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Sample records for mixed dna chromatograms

  1. DNA sequence chromatogram browsing using JAVA and CORBA.

    PubMed

    Parsons, J D; Buehler, E; Hillier, L

    1999-03-01

    DNA sequence chromatograms (traces) are the primary data source for all large-scale genomic and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing projects. Access to the sequencing trace assists many later analyses, for example contig assembly and polymorphism detection, but obtaining and using traces is problematic. Traces are not collected and published centrally, they are much larger than the base calls derived from them, and viewing them requires the interactivity of a local graphical client with local data. To provide efficient global access to DNA traces, we developed a client/server system based on flexible Java components integrated into other applications including an applet for use in a WWW browser and a stand-alone trace viewer. Client/server interaction is facilitated by CORBA middleware which provides a well-defined interface, a naming service, and location independence. [The software is packaged as a Jar file available from the following URL: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/jparsons. Links to working examples of the trace viewers can be found at http://corba.ebi.ac.uk/EST. All the Washington University mouse EST traces are available for browsing at the same URL.

  2. Base-Calling Algorithm with Vocabulary (BCV) Method for Analyzing Population Sequencing Chromatograms

    PubMed Central

    Fantin, Yuri S.; Neverov, Alexey D.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Alvarez-Figueroa, Maria V.; Braslavskaya, Svetlana I.; Gordukova, Maria A.; Karandashova, Inga V.; Kuleshov, Konstantin V.; Myznikova, Anna I.; Polishchuk, Maya S.; Reshetov, Denis A.; Voiciehovskaya, Yana A.; Mironov, Andrei A.; Chulanov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Sanger sequencing is a common method of reading DNA sequences. It is less expensive than high-throughput methods, and it is appropriate for numerous applications including molecular diagnostics. However, sequencing mixtures of similar DNA of pathogens with this method is challenging. This is important because most clinical samples contain such mixtures, rather than pure single strains. The traditional solution is to sequence selected clones of PCR products, a complicated, time-consuming, and expensive procedure. Here, we propose the base-calling with vocabulary (BCV) method that computationally deciphers Sanger chromatograms obtained from mixed DNA samples. The inputs to the BCV algorithm are a chromatogram and a dictionary of sequences that are similar to those we expect to obtain. We apply the base-calling function on a test dataset of chromatograms without ambiguous positions, as well as one with 3–14% sequence degeneracy. Furthermore, we use BCV to assemble a consensus sequence for an HIV genome fragment in a sample containing a mixture of viral DNA variants and to determine the positions of the indels. Finally, we detect drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains carrying frameshift mutations mixed with wild-type bacteria in the pncA gene, and roughly characterize bacterial communities in clinical samples by direct 16S rRNA sequencing. PMID:23382983

  3. Mixed sequence reader: a program for analyzing DNA sequences with heterozygous base calling.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Tien; Tsai, Chi-Neu; Tang, Chuan Yi; Chen, Chun-Houh; Lian, Jang-Hau; Hu, Chi-Yu; Tsai, Chia-Lung; Chao, Angel; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Lee, Yun-Shien

    2012-01-01

    The direct sequencing of PCR products generates heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatograms that are useful for identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion-deletions (indels), short tandem repeats (STRs), and paralogous genes. Indels and STRs can be easily detected using the currently available Indelligent or ShiftDetector programs, which do not search reference sequences. However, the detection of other genomic variants remains a challenge due to the lack of appropriate tools for heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatogram data analysis. In this study, we developed a free web-based program, Mixed Sequence Reader (MSR), which can directly analyze heterozygous base-calling fluorescence chromatogram data in .abi file format using comparisons with reference sequences. The heterozygous sequences are identified as two distinct sequences and aligned with reference sequences. Our results showed that MSR may be used to (i) physically locate indel and STR sequences and determine STR copy number by searching NCBI reference sequences; (ii) predict combinations of microsatellite patterns using the Federal Bureau of Investigation Combined DNA Index System (CODIS); (iii) determine human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes by searching current viral databases in cases of double infections; (iv) estimate the copy number of paralogous genes, such as β-defensin 4 (DEFB4) and its paralog HSPDP3.

  4. Current developments in forensic interpretation of mixed DNA samples (Review)

    PubMed Central

    HU, NA; CONG, BIN; LI, SHUJIN; MA, CHUNLING; FU, LIHONG; ZHANG, XIAOJING

    2014-01-01

    A number of recent improvements have provided contemporary forensic investigations with a variety of tools to improve the analysis of mixed DNA samples in criminal investigations, producing notable improvements in the analysis of complex trace samples in cases of sexual assult and homicide. Mixed DNA contains DNA from two or more contributors, compounding DNA analysis by combining DNA from one or more major contributors with small amounts of DNA from potentially numerous minor contributors. These samples are characterized by a high probability of drop-out or drop-in combined with elevated stutter, significantly increasing analysis complexity. At some loci, minor contributor alleles may be completely obscured due to amplification bias or over-amplification, creating the illusion of additional contributors. Thus, estimating the number of contributors and separating contributor genotypes at a given locus is significantly more difficult in mixed DNA samples, requiring the application of specialized protocols that have only recently been widely commercialized and standardized. Over the last decade, the accuracy and repeatability of mixed DNA analyses available to conventional forensic laboratories has greatly advanced in terms of laboratory technology, mathematical models and biostatistical software, generating more accurate, rapid and readily available data for legal proceedings and criminal cases. PMID:24748965

  5. The Denaturation Transition of DNA in Mixed Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Hammouda, Boualem; Worcester, David

    2006-01-01

    The helix-to-coil denaturation transition in DNA has been investigated in mixed solvents at high concentration using ultraviolet light absorption spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering. Two solvents have been used: water and ethylene glycol. The “melting” transition temperature was found to be 94°C for 4% mass fraction DNA/d-water and 38°C for 4% mass fraction DNA/d-ethylene glycol. The DNA melting transition temperature was found to vary linearly with the solvent fraction in the mixed solvents case. Deuterated solvents (d-water and d-ethylene glycol) were used to enhance the small-angle neutron scattering signal and 0.1M NaCl (or 0.0058 g/g mass fraction) salt concentration was added to screen charge interactions in all cases. DNA structural information was obtained by small-angle neutron scattering, including a correlation length characteristic of the inter-distance between the hydrogen-containing (desoxyribose sugar-amine base) groups. This correlation length was found to increase from 8.5 to 12.3 Å across the melting transition. Ethylene glycol and water mixed solvents were found to mix randomly in the solvation region in the helix phase, but nonideal solvent mixing was found in the melted coil phase. In the coil phase, solvent mixtures are more effective solvating agents than either of the individual solvents. Once melted, DNA coils behave like swollen water-soluble synthetic polymer chains. PMID:16815902

  6. Polyphenols and DNA Damage: A Mixed Blessing

    PubMed Central

    Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are a very broad group of chemicals, widely distributed in plant foods, and endowed with antioxidant activity by virtue of their numerous phenol groups. They are widely studied as putative cancer-protective agents, potentially contributing to the cancer preventive properties of fruits and vegetables. We review recent publications relating to human trials, animal experiments and cell culture, grouping them according to whether polyphenols are investigated in whole foods and drinks, in plant extracts, or as individual compounds. A variety of assays are in use to study genetic damage endpoints. Human trials, of which there are rather few, tend to show decreases in endogenous DNA damage and protection against DNA damage induced ex vivo in blood cells. Most animal experiments have investigated the effects of polyphenols (often at high doses) in combination with known DNA-damaging agents, and generally they show protection. High concentrations can themselves induce DNA damage, as demonstrated in numerous cell culture experiments; low concentrations, on the other hand, tend to decrease DNA damage. PMID:27918471

  7. Polyphenols and DNA Damage: A Mixed Blessing.

    PubMed

    Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew

    2016-12-03

    Polyphenols are a very broad group of chemicals, widely distributed in plant foods, and endowed with antioxidant activity by virtue of their numerous phenol groups. They are widely studied as putative cancer-protective agents, potentially contributing to the cancer preventive properties of fruits and vegetables. We review recent publications relating to human trials, animal experiments and cell culture, grouping them according to whether polyphenols are investigated in whole foods and drinks, in plant extracts, or as individual compounds. A variety of assays are in use to study genetic damage endpoints. Human trials, of which there are rather few, tend to show decreases in endogenous DNA damage and protection against DNA damage induced ex vivo in blood cells. Most animal experiments have investigated the effects of polyphenols (often at high doses) in combination with known DNA-damaging agents, and generally they show protection. High concentrations can themselves induce DNA damage, as demonstrated in numerous cell culture experiments; low concentrations, on the other hand, tend to decrease DNA damage.

  8. Mixed DNA/Oligo(ethylene glycol) Functionalized Gold Surface Improve DNA Hybridization in Complex Media

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Gamble, L.; Grainger, D.; Castner, D.

    2006-01-01

    Reliable, direct 'sample-to-answer' capture of nucleic acid targets from complex media would greatly improve existing capabilities of DNA microarrays and biosensors. This goal has proven elusive for many current nucleic acid detection technologies attempting to produce assay results directly from complex real-world samples, including food, tissue, and environmental materials. In this study, we have investigated mixed self-assembled thiolated single-strand DNA (ssDNA) monolayers containing a short thiolated oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) surface diluent on gold surfaces to improve the specific capture of DNA targets from complex media. Both surface composition and orientation of these mixed DNA monolayers were characterized with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). XPS results from sequentially adsorbed ssDNA/OEG monolayers on gold indicate that thiolated OEG diluent molecules first incorporate into the thiolated ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer OEG exposures, competitively displace adsorbed ssDNA molecules from the gold surface. NEXAFS polarization dependence results (followed by monitoring the N 1s{yields}{pi}* transition) indicate that adsorbed thiolated ssDNA nucleotide base-ring structures in the mixed ssDNA monolayers are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure ssDNA monolayers. This supports ssDNA oligomer reorientation towards a more upright position upon OEG mixed adlayer incorporation. DNA target hybridization on mixed ssDNA probe/OEG monolayers was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Improvements in specific target capture for these ssDNA probe surfaces due to incorporation of the OEG diluent were demonstrated using two model biosensing assays, DNA target capture from complete bovine serum and from salmon genomic DNA mixtures. SPR results demonstrate that OEG incorporation into the ssDNA adlayer improves surface resistance to both nonspecific DNA and protein

  9. Insights of Mixing on the Assembly of DNA Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Manda S.

    Size is a crucial parameter in the delivery of nanoparticle therapeutics, affecting mechanisms such as tissue delivery, clearance, and cellular uptake. The morphology of nanoparticles is dependent both upon chemistry and the physical process of assembly. Polyplexes, a major class of non-viral gene delivery vectors, are conventionally prepared by vortex mixing, resulting in non-uniform nanoparticles and poor reproducibility. Better understanding and control of the physical process of assembly, and mixing in particular, will produce polyplexes of a more uniform and reliable size, optimizing their efficiency for laboratory and clinical use. "Mixing" is the reduction of length scale of a system to accelerate diffusion until a uniform concentration is achieved. Vortex mixing is poorly characterized and sensitive to protocols. Microfluidic systems are notable for predictable fluid behavior, and are ideal for analyzing and controlling the physical interaction of reagents on the microscale, realm where mixing occurs. Several microdevices for the preparation of DNA polyplexes are explored here. Firstly, the staggered herringbone mixer, a chaotic advection micromixer, is used to observe the effects of mixing time on nanoparticle size. Next, a novel device to surround the reagent flows with a sheath of buffer, preventing interaction with the walls and confining the complexation to a zone of lower, less variable shear and residence time, is used to demonstrate the role of shear in nanoparticle assembly. Lastly, uneven diffusion between ion pairs produces a small separation of charge at fluid interfaces; this short-lived electric field has a significant impact on the transport of DNA over the time scales of mixing and complexation. The effects of common buffers on the transport of DNA are examined for possible applications to mixing and complexation. These three investigations demonstrate the importance of the physical process in polyplex assembly, and indicate several

  10. [Study on HPLC fingerprint chromatograms of Arisaematis Rhizoma].

    PubMed

    Luo, Fen; Lu, Dan; Chi, Yumei; Wu, Hao; Yu, Hongli

    2011-12-01

    The fingerprint chromatograms of Arisaematis Rhizoma were established by HPLC. The analysis was performed on a Lichrospher C18 (4.6 mm x 200 mm, 5 microm) column with acetonitrile-water (containing 0.1% acetic acid) as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL x min(-1). The detection wavelength was set at 270 nm, and the column temperature was 30 degrees C. The similarities of the fingerprint chromatograms were calculated over 0.9 between 11 batches of Arisaematis Rhizoma samples by analyzing 14 common peaks with adenosine as reference substance. However, their fingerprint chromatograms were significantly different from those of Pinellia pedatisecta and P. ternate. Adenine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, uridine, guanosine, adenosine, schaftoside, and isoschaftoside were identified by comparing the retention times and their ultraviolet spectra. The method is repeatable, exclusive and can be used for identification and evaluation of Arisaematis Rhizoma.

  11. [HPLC fingerprint chromatogram analysis of some Taraxacum in Henan province].

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Feng; Shi, Hui-Min; Xu, Min; Meng, Lu

    2008-10-01

    To analyze the HPLC fingerprint chromatogram of some Taraxacum in Henan. Samples of different species, producing areas, harvest seasons and medicinal parts were determined by RP-HPLC. The chromatogram was evaluated by software of evaluating similarity. The components of different species in Taraxacum were the same and could be substituted for each other. The contents of coffeic acid and chlorogenic acid in different producing areas were very different,which in fecund soil was better. The period of flowering and fruiting in Spring was the best gather period, and the components in different parts were different. The quality of medicinal materal within Taraxacum should be controlled better by this method.

  12. A new mathematical procedure to evaluate peaks in complex chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Steffen, B; Müller, K P; Komenda, M; Koppmann, R; Schaub, A

    2005-04-15

    Automatic peak evaluation in chromatograms and subsequent quantification of compound concentrations is still a challenge in the analysis of complex samples containing hundreds or thousands of compounds. Although a number of software packages for peak evaluation exist, baseline definition and overlapping peaks of different shapes are the main reasons which prevent reliable automatic analysis of complex chromatograms. A new mathematical procedure is presented which uses peak shapes extracted from the chromatogram itself and modified by nonlinear (in fact, hyperbolic) stretching of the peak head and tail. With this approach, the peak parameters are position, height, scale of front, scale of tail, and smoothness of transition from front to tail scaling. This approach is found to give a substantially better fit than traditional analytically defined peak shapes. Together with a good peak finding heuristic and nonlinear optimization of parameters this allows a reliable automatic analysis of chromatograms with a large number of peaks, even with large groups of overlapping peaks. The analysis matches the quality of standard interactive methods, but still permits interactive refinement. This approach has been implemented and tested on a large set of data from chromatography of hydrocarbons in ambient air samples.

  13. The interpretation of single source and mixed DNA profiles.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Duncan; Bright, Jo-Anne; Buckleton, John

    2013-09-01

    A method for interpreting autosomal mixed DNA profiles based on continuous modelling of peak heights is described. MCMC is applied with a model for allelic and stutter heights to produce a probability for the data given a specified genotype combination. The theory extends to handle any number of contributors and replicates, although practical implementation limits analyses to four contributors. The probability of the peak data given a genotype combination has proven to be a highly intuitive probability that may be assessed subjectively by experienced caseworkers. Whilst caseworkers will not assess the probabilities per se, they can broadly judge genotypes that fit the observed data well, and those that fit relatively less well. These probabilities are used when calculating a subsequent likelihood ratio. The method has been trialled on a number of mixed DNA profiles constructed from known contributors. The results have been assessed against a binary approach and also compared with the subjective judgement of an analyst. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Two-dimensional semi-parametric alignment of chromatograms.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Wim P H; Lankelma, Jan

    2014-06-06

    We present a comprehensive alignment algorithm that extends the semi-parametric approach to two dimensions. The algorithm is based on modeling shifts with a two-dimensional "warp function" such that the sample chromatogram - its shifts corrected with the warp function - is adjusted to the reference chromatogram by minimizing the squared intensity difference. A warp function approach has the advantage that overlapping peaks are easily dealt with compared to other proposed two-dimensional algorithms. Another advantage is that missing peaks are allowed if the absence of these peaks has little numerical effect on the warp function computation and if these peaks occur between existing peaks. Performance of the algorithm is demonstrated using GC×GC data from three batches of three diesel oil samples and LC-MS data from a mouse breast cancer data set.

  15. [GPC Fingerprint Chromatograms of Aloe vera Leaf Gel Polysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiao-e; Xie, Dan; Qian, Jie; Dong, Yin-mao

    2015-10-01

    To establish the gel permeation chromatography (GPC) fingerprint chromatograms of polysaccharides in Aloe vera leaf gel from the same habitat (Beijing) and different habitats for evaluating the quality of Aloe vera leaf gel products commercially available and testing common adulterated substances. The samples were prepared by water-extraction and alcohol-precipitation method. GPC separation was performed on a Shodex SUGAR KS-805 (300 mm x 8.0 mm, 7 μm) column and a Shodex SUGAR KS-803 (300 mm x 8.0 mm, 6 μm) column at the temperature of 60 degrees C by eluting with 0.1 mol/L NaNO3 (containing 0.2 per thousand NaN) at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, the chromatographic effluent was detected by refractive index detector (RID) at the temperature of 50 degrees C. The common pattern of GPC fingerprint chromatograms was established and four common peaks were demarcated. The similarities of samples from the same habitat (Beijing) and different habitats were over 0.9. Taking the GPC fingerprint chromatograms for the qualified model, three commercially available aloe products were evaluated to be made of Aloe vera by the different manufacturing processes and four common adulterated substances of aloe polysaccharides were identified effectively. The method is simple and accurate with a good reproducibility, and it can be used for the identification and quality evaluation of Aloe vera leaf gel products.

  16. [Extraction of DNA from environmental samples and construction of mixed genomic DNA libraries].

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Tang, Y; Wang, J; Huang, Y; Chen, R; Huang, L

    2001-04-01

    A method has been developed for extracting and purifying genomic DNA from environmental samples. In this method, an environmental sample is treated first by grinding and freezing/thawing and subsequently by SDS/proteinase K-based DNA extraction. The yields of purified DNA from three samples used in this study ranged from 2 to 16 micrograms per gram of dry sample. Mixed genomic DNA libraries for two of the environmental samples were constructed by inserting restriction fragments (3-8 kb) of the purified DNAs into plasmid pUC18 and transforming E. coli DH5 alpha with the resultant plasmids. Approximately 10(3) to 10(4) insert-containing clones were obtained from 1 g of each sample. Clone libraries were analyzed by DNA sequencing and gene annotation. Among 20 randomly-selected clones, 14 contained an insert whose sequence had not been reported while the rest had an insert of either E. coli or vector origin. A search of sequence databases using the end sequences of each of the foreign inserts showed that each sequence was part of a gene encoding, in most cases, a predictable function. Our results are of significance to the collection, investigation and exploitation of the genes of uncultured microorganisms.

  17. ChromatoGate: A Tool for Detecting Base Mis-Calls in Multiple Sequence Alignments by Semi-Automatic Chromatogram Inspection.

    PubMed

    Alachiotis, Nikolaos; Vogiatzi, Emmanouella; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Stamatakis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Automated DNA sequencers generate chromatograms that contain raw sequencing data. They also generate data that translates the chromatograms into molecular sequences of A, C, G, T, or N (undetermined) characters. Since chromatogram translation programs frequently introduce errors, a manual inspection of the generated sequence data is required. As sequence numbers and lengths increase, visual inspection and manual correction of chromatograms and corresponding sequences on a per-peak and per-nucleotide basis becomes an error-prone, time-consuming, and tedious process. Here, we introduce ChromatoGate (CG), an open-source software that accelerates and partially automates the inspection of chromatograms and the detection of sequencing errors for bidirectional sequencing runs. To provide users full control over the error correction process, a fully automated error correction algorithm has not been implemented. Initially, the program scans a given multiple sequence alignment (MSA) for potential sequencing errors, assuming that each polymorphic site in the alignment may be attributed to a sequencing error with a certain probability. The guided MSA assembly procedure in ChromatoGate detects chromatogram peaks of all characters in an alignment that lead to polymorphic sites, given a user-defined threshold. The threshold value represents the sensitivity of the sequencing error detection mechanism. After this pre-filtering, the user only needs to inspect a small number of peaks in every chromatogram to correct sequencing errors. Finally, we show that correcting sequencing errors is important, because population genetic and phylogenetic inferences can be misled by MSAs with uncorrected mis-calls. Our experiments indicate that estimates of population mutation rates can be affected two- to three-fold by uncorrected errors.

  18. Enthused research on DNA-binding and DNA-cleavage aptitude of mixed ligand metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalakshmi, Rajkumar; Raman, Natarajan

    2013-08-01

    Five new Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized using a Schiff base precursor (obtained by the condensation of N-(4-aminophenyl)acetamide and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde) as main ligand and 1,10-phenanthroline as co-ligand. They have been characterized by microanalytical data, IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment values, conductivity and electrochemical measurements. The spectral data reveal that all the complexes exhibit octahedral geometry. The high electrical conductance of the complexes supports their electrolytic nature. The monomeric nature of the complexes has been assessed from their magnetic susceptibility values. These complexes are better antimicrobial active agents than the free ligands. DNA (CT) binding properties of these complexes have been explored by UV-Vis., viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetry, and differential pulse voltammetry measurements. The oxidative cleavage activity of the complexes has been studied using supercoiled pUC19 DNA by gel electrophoresis. The experimental results show that the complexes are good intercalators.

  19. Enthused research on DNA-binding and DNA-cleavage aptitude of mixed ligand metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Mahalakshmi, Rajkumar; Raman, Natarajan

    2013-08-01

    Five new Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized using a Schiff base precursor (obtained by the condensation of N-(4-aminophenyl)acetamide and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde) as main ligand and 1,10-phenanthroline as co-ligand. They have been characterized by microanalytical data, IR, UV-Vis, magnetic moment values, conductivity and electrochemical measurements. The spectral data reveal that all the complexes exhibit octahedral geometry. The high electrical conductance of the complexes supports their electrolytic nature. The monomeric nature of the complexes has been assessed from their magnetic susceptibility values. These complexes are better antimicrobial active agents than the free ligands. DNA (CT) binding properties of these complexes have been explored by UV-Vis., viscosity measurements, cyclic voltammetry, and differential pulse voltammetry measurements. The oxidative cleavage activity of the complexes has been studied using supercoiled pUC19 DNA by gel electrophoresis. The experimental results show that the complexes are good intercalators.

  20. Controlling the surface‐mediated release of DNA using ‘mixed multilayers’

    PubMed Central

    Appadoo, Visham; Carter, Matthew C. D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We report the design of erodible ‘mixed multilayer’ coatings fabricated using plasmid DNA and combinations of both hydrolytically degradable and charge‐shifting cationic polymer building blocks. Films fabricated layer‐by‐layer using combinations of a model poly(β‐amino ester) (polymer 1) and a model charge‐shifting polymer (polymer 2) exhibited DNA release profiles that were substantially different than those assembled using DNA and either polymer 1 or polymer 2 alone. In addition, the order in which layers of these two cationic polymers were deposited during assembly had a profound impact on DNA release profiles when these materials were incubated in physiological buffer. Mixed multilayers ∼225 nm thick fabricated by depositing layers of polymer 1/DNA onto films composed of polymer 2/DNA released DNA into solution over ∼60 days, with multi‐phase release profiles intermediate to and exhibiting some general features of polymer 1/DNA or polymer 2/DNA films (e.g., a period of rapid release, followed by a more extended phase). In sharp contrast, ‘inverted’ mixed multilayers fabricated by depositing layers of polymer 2/DNA onto films composed of polymer 1/DNA exhibited release profiles that were almost completely linear over ∼60‐80 days. These and other results are consistent with substantial interdiffusion and commingling (or mixing) among the individual components of these compound materials. Our results reveal this mixing to lead to new, unanticipated, and useful release profiles and provide guidance for the design of polymer‐based coatings for the local, surface‐mediated delivery of DNA from the surfaces of topologically complex interventional devices, such as intravascular stents, with predictable long‐term release profiles. PMID:27981243

  1. Reciprocal symmetry plots as a representation of countercurrent chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Friesen, J Brent; Pauli, Guido F

    2007-03-15

    Traditionally, chromatograms in countercurrent chromatography (CCC) have been plotted with retention volume or time on the x-axis. However, the distribution constant (K) is a more appropriate, reproducible value for the x-axis, because it is a physicochemical property of a particular analyte in a particular solvent system. Therefore, K is independent of both the total column volume and the stationary-phase volume ratio (SF) of the column. Going one step beyond simple K plots, the reciprocal symmetry (ReS) plot, with K and 1/K positioned on either side of a line of symmetry on the x-axis, represents all K values, zero to infinity. Based on experimental evidence, using a mixture of CCC reference standards, the ReS plot demonstrates both the invertible and "symmetric" nature of CCC, a consequence of the exchange of the mobile and stationary phases by reversing the direction of the flow and the symmetry of the liquid-liquid partitioning process between two immiscible phases, respectively. Moreover, the interval of optimal resolution can be centered on the ReS plot to focus on K values of interest, establishing the reciprocal shifted symmetry (ReSS) plots in CCC. Improved representation of peak shape across the whole CCC polarity range is an added advantage of ReSS plots over both K and classical retention volume plots.

  2. Biofilm extracellular DNA enhances mixed species biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polymicrobial infections are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in adults and children. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans are the most frequent combination of organisms isolated from polymicrobial infections. Vascular indwelling catheters are sites for mixed species biofilm formation and pose a significant risk for polymicrobial infections. We hypothesized that enhancement of biofilms in a mixed species environment increases patient mortality and morbidity. Results Mixed species biofilms of S. epidermidis and C. albicans were evaluated in vitro and in a subcutaneous catheter infection model in vivo. Mixed species biofilms were enhanced compared to single species biofilms of either S. epidermidis or C. albicans. A mixed species environment increased catheter infection and increased dissemination of S. epidermidis in mice. Microarrays were used to explore differential gene expression of S. epidermidis in the mixed species biofilms. In mixed species biofilms, compared to single species S. epidermidis biofilms, 2.7% of S. epidermidis genes were upregulated and 6% were down regulated. Staphylococcal autolysis repressors lrgA and lrgB were down regulated 36-fold and 27-fold respectively. The role of biofilm extracellular DNA was investigated by quantitation and by evaluating the effects of DNAse in a concentration and time dependent manner. S. epidermidis specific eDNA was increased in mixed species biofilms and further confirmed by degradation with DNAse. Conclusions Mixed-species biofilms are enhanced and associated with increased S. epidermidis-specific eDNA in vitro and greater systemic dissemination of S. epidermidis in vivo. Down regulation of the lrg operon, a repressor of autolysis, associated with increased eDNA suggests a possible role for bacterial autolysis in mixed species biofilms. Enhancement and systemic dissemination of S. epidermidis may explain adverse outcomes after clinical polymicrobial infections of S

  3. Biofilm extracellular DNA enhances mixed species biofilms of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Pammi, Mohan; Liang, Rong; Hicks, John; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Versalovic, James

    2013-11-14

    Polymicrobial infections are responsible for significant mortality and morbidity in adults and children. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Candida albicans are the most frequent combination of organisms isolated from polymicrobial infections. Vascular indwelling catheters are sites for mixed species biofilm formation and pose a significant risk for polymicrobial infections. We hypothesized that enhancement of biofilms in a mixed species environment increases patient mortality and morbidity. Mixed species biofilms of S. epidermidis and C. albicans were evaluated in vitro and in a subcutaneous catheter infection model in vivo. Mixed species biofilms were enhanced compared to single species biofilms of either S. epidermidis or C. albicans. A mixed species environment increased catheter infection and increased dissemination of S. epidermidis in mice. Microarrays were used to explore differential gene expression of S. epidermidis in the mixed species biofilms. In mixed species biofilms, compared to single species S. epidermidis biofilms, 2.7% of S. epidermidis genes were upregulated and 6% were down regulated. Staphylococcal autolysis repressors lrgA and lrgB were down regulated 36-fold and 27-fold respectively. The role of biofilm extracellular DNA was investigated by quantitation and by evaluating the effects of DNAse in a concentration and time dependent manner. S. epidermidis specific eDNA was increased in mixed species biofilms and further confirmed by degradation with DNAse. Mixed-species biofilms are enhanced and associated with increased S. epidermidis-specific eDNA in vitro and greater systemic dissemination of S. epidermidis in vivo. Down regulation of the lrg operon, a repressor of autolysis, associated with increased eDNA suggests a possible role for bacterial autolysis in mixed species biofilms. Enhancement and systemic dissemination of S. epidermidis may explain adverse outcomes after clinical polymicrobial infections of S. epidermidis and C. albicans.

  4. Evaluation of parameters in mixed male DNA profiles for the Identifiler® multiplex system

    PubMed Central

    HU, NA; CONG, BIN; GAO, TAO; HU, RONG; CHEN, YI; TANG, HUI; XUE, LUYAN; LI, SHUJIN; MA, CHUNLING

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of complex DNA mixtures is challenging for forensic DNA testing. Accurate and sensitive methods for profiling these samples are urgently required. In this study, we developed 11 groups of mixed male DNA samples (n=297) with scientific validation of D-value [>95% of D-values ≤0.1 with average peak height (APH) of the active alleles ≤2,500 rfu]. A strong linear correlation was detected between the peak height (PH) and peak area (PA) in the curve fit using the least squares method (P<2e-16). The Kruskal-Wallis rank-sum test revealed significant differences in the heterozygote balance ratio (Hb) at 16 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (P=0.0063) and 9 mixed gradients (P=0.02257). Locally weighted regression fitting of APH and Hb (inflection point at APH = 1,250 rfu) showed 92.74% of Hb >0.6 with the APH ≥1,250. The variation of Hb distribution in the different STR loci suggested the different forensic efficiencies of these loci. Allelic drop-out (ADO) correlated with the APH and mixed gradient. All ADOs had an APH of <1,000 rfu, and the number of ADO increased when the APH of mixed DNA profiles gradually decreased. These results strongly suggest that calibration parameters should be introduced to correct the deviation in the APH at each STR locus during the analysis of mixed DNA samples. PMID:24821391

  5. Extracellular DNA is abundant and important for microcolony strength in mixed microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Dominiak, Dominik Marek; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2011-03-01

    A new approach for quantification of extracellular DNA (eDNA) in mixed biofilms at microscale resolution was developed and combined with other staining techniques to assess the origin, abundance and role of eDNA in activated sludge biofilms. Most eDNA was found in close proximity to living cells in microcolonies, suggesting that most of it originated from an active secretion or alternatively, by lysis of a sub-population of cells. When the staining was combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization for identification of the microorganisms, it was found that the eDNA content varied among the different probe-defined species. The highest amount of eDNA was found in and around the microcolonies of denitrifiers belonging to the genera Curvibacter and Thauera, the ammonium-oxidizing Nitrosomonas and the nitrite-oxidizing Nitrospira. Other floc-formers also produced eDNA, although in lower amounts. The total eDNA content in activated sludge varied from 4 to 52 mg per gram volatile suspended solids in different wastewater treatment plants. Very high local concentrations within some microcolonies were found with up to approximately 300 mg of eDNA per g of organic matter. DNase digestion of activated sludge led to general floc disintegration and disruption of the microcolonies with high eDNA content, implying that eDNA was an important structural component in activated sludge biofilms.

  6. Differentiation of mixed biological traces in sexual assaults using DNA fragment analysis

    PubMed Central

    Apostolov, Аleksandar

    2014-01-01

    During the investigation of sexual abuse, it is not rare that mixed genetic material from two or more persons is detected. In such cases, successful profiling can be achieved using DNA fragment analysis, resulting in individual genetic profiles of offenders and their victims. This has led to an increase in the percentage of identified perpetrators of sexual offenses. The classic and modified genetic models used, allowed us to refine and implement appropriate extraction, polymerase chain reaction and electrophoretic procedures with individual assessment and approach to conducting research. Testing mixed biological traces using DNA fragment analysis appears to be the only opportunity for identifying perpetrators in gang rapes. PMID:26019514

  7. [Influence of combination on the specific chromatogram of Glycyrrhiza in sini decoctions by HPLC].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huai-Bin; Hong, Yan-Long; Wang, You-Jie; Shen, Lan; Wu, Fei; Feng, Yi; Ruan, Ke-Feng

    2012-04-01

    The paper is to report the establishment of an HPLC specific chromatogram of Glycyrrhiza in Sini decoctions and the influence of combination on the specific chromatogram. The RP-HPLC method was used with a Phenomenex Gemini C18 column (250 mm x 4.6 mm ID, 5 microm), and acetonitrile-0.05% trifluoroacetic acid (gradient elution) as mobile phase. Flow rate was 0.8 mL x min(-1) and the detection wavelength was set at 232 nm. The temperature of column was 30 degrees C. The method is stable and reliable with a good reproducibility, it can be used to determine the specific chromatogram of Glycyrrhiza in Sini Decoctions. Twenty peaks were selected as specific peaks in Sini Decoction with liquiritin peak as the reference peak. Six of them were from Glycyrrhiza and the other 6 peaks were from both Glycyrrhiza and Ganjiangfuzi Decoction. The areas of specific peaks of Sini Decoctions were smaller than those in the chromatogram of Glycyrrhiza. The specific chromatogram of Glycyrrhiza in Sini Decoctions is markedly influenced by Radix Aconiti Carmichaeli and Rhizoma Zingiberis. The areas of the specific peaks in Sini Decoctions were reduced obviously. The method is stable and reliable with a good reproducibility, it can be used to determine the specific chromatogram of Glycyrrhiza in Sini Decoctions.

  8. Nonlinear alignment of chromatograms by means of moving window fast Fourier transfrom cross-correlation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Wang, Jia-Jun; Huang, Jing; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Lu, Hong-Mei; Zheng, Yi-Bao; Zhan, De-Jian; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2013-05-01

    The preprocessing of chromatograms is essential to modern chromatography for further qualitative and quantitative analysis, especially when chromatographic instruments are used for herb products analysis involving large number of samples. To accurately compare and analyze the obtained chromatograms, it is necessary to preprocess, especially align retention time shifts. Here moving window fast Fourier transform (FFT) cross-correlation is introduced to perform nonlinear alignment of high-throughput chromatograms. Since elution characteristics of chromatograms will produce local similarity in retention time shifts, moving window procedure seems to be a better substitute of segmentation steps. The retention time shifts can be calculated and accelerated by FFT cross-correlation. The artifacts can be detected and eliminated from the retention time shifts profile since the continuity of moving window procedure. The proposed method is demonstrated in comparison with recursive alignment by FFT on chromatographic datasets from herb products analysis. It is shown that the proposed method can address nonlinear retention time shift problem in chromatograms with the simple moving window procedure, which will not introduce segments size optimization problem. In additional, the parameters are intuitive and easy to adjust, which makes it off-the-shelf toolbox for alignment of chromatograms.

  9. Application of mixsep software package: Performance verification of male-mixed DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Na; Cong, Bin; Gao, Tao; Chen, Yu; Shen, Junyi; Li, Shujin; Ma, Chunling

    2015-08-01

    An experimental model of male-mixed DNA (n=297) was constructed according to the mixed DNA construction principle. This comprised the use of the Applied Biosystems (ABI) 7500 quantitative polymerase chain reaction system, with scientific validation of mixture proportion (Mx; root-mean-square error ≤ 0.02). Statistical analysis was performed on locus separation accuracy using mixsep, a DNA mixture separation R-package, and the analytical performance of mixsep was assessed by examining the data distribution pattern of different mixed gradients, short tandem repeat (STR) loci and mixed DNA types. The results showed that locus separation accuracy had a negative linear correlation with the mixed gradient (R(2)=-0.7121). With increasing mixed gradient imbalance, locus separation accuracy first increased and then decreased, with the highest value detected at a gradient of 1:3 (≥ 90%). The mixed gradient, which is the theoretical Mx, was one of the primary factors that influenced the success of mixed DNA analysis. Among the 16 STR loci detected by Identifiler®, the separation accuracy was relatively high (>88%) for loci D5S818, D8S1179 and FGA, whereas the median separation accuracy value was lowest for the D7S820 locus. STR loci with relatively large numbers of allelic drop-out (ADO; >15) were all located in the yellow and red channels, including loci D18S51, D19S433, FGA, TPOX and vWA. These five loci featured low allele peak heights, which was consistent with the low sensitivity of the ABI 3130xl Genetic Analyzer to yellow and red fluorescence. The locus separation accuracy of the mixsep package was substantially different with and without the inclusion of ADO loci; inclusion of ADO significantly reduced the analytical performance of the mixsep package, which was consistent with the lack of an ADO functional module in this software. The present study demonstrated that the mixsep software had a number of advantages and was recommended for analysis of mixed DNA. This

  10. Application of mixsep software package: Performance verification of male-mixed DNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    HU, NA; CONG, BIN; GAO, TAO; CHEN, YU; SHEN, JUNYI; LI, SHUJIN; MA, CHUNLING

    2015-01-01

    An experimental model of male-mixed DNA (n=297) was constructed according to the mixed DNA construction principle. This comprised the use of the Applied Biosystems (ABI) 7500 quantitative polymerase chain reaction system, with scientific validation of mixture proportion (Mx; root-mean-square error ≤0.02). Statistical analysis was performed on locus separation accuracy using mixsep, a DNA mixture separation R-package, and the analytical performance of mixsep was assessed by examining the data distribution pattern of different mixed gradients, short tandem repeat (STR) loci and mixed DNA types. The results showed that locus separation accuracy had a negative linear correlation with the mixed gradient (R2=−0.7121). With increasing mixed gradient imbalance, locus separation accuracy first increased and then decreased, with the highest value detected at a gradient of 1:3 (≥90%). The mixed gradient, which is the theoretical Mx, was one of the primary factors that influenced the success of mixed DNA analysis. Among the 16 STR loci detected by Identifiler®, the separation accuracy was relatively high (>88%) for loci D5S818, D8S1179 and FGA, whereas the median separation accuracy value was lowest for the D7S820 locus. STR loci with relatively large numbers of allelic drop-out (ADO; >15) were all located in the yellow and red channels, including loci D18S51, D19S433, FGA, TPOX and vWA. These five loci featured low allele peak heights, which was consistent with the low sensitivity of the ABI 3130xl Genetic Analyzer to yellow and red fluorescence. The locus separation accuracy of the mixsep package was substantially different with and without the inclusion of ADO loci; inclusion of ADO significantly reduced the analytical performance of the mixsep package, which was consistent with the lack of an ADO functional module in this software. The present study demonstrated that the mixsep software had a number of advantages and was recommended for analysis of mixed DNA. This

  11. Selective removal of DNA from dead cells of mixed bacterial communities by use of ethidium monoazide.

    PubMed

    Nocker, Andreas; Camper, Anne K

    2006-03-01

    The distinction between viable and dead bacterial cells poses a major challenge in microbial diagnostics. Due to the persistence of DNA in the environment after cells have lost viability, DNA-based quantification methods overestimate the number of viable cells in mixed populations or even lead to false-positive results in the absence of viable cells. On the other hand, RNA-based diagnostic methods, which circumvent this problem, are technically demanding and suffer from some drawbacks. A promising and easy-to-use alternative utilizing the DNA-intercalating dye ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA) was published recently. This chemical is known to penetrate only into "dead" cells with compromised cell membrane integrity. Subsequent photoinduced cross-linking was reported to inhibit PCR amplification of DNA from dead cells. We provide evidence here that in addition to inhibition of amplification, most of the DNA from dead cells is actually lost during the DNA extraction procedure, probably together with cell debris which goes into the pellet fraction. Exposure of bacteria to increasing stress and higher proportions of dead cells in defined populations led to increasing loss of genomic DNA. Experiments were performed using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as model pathogens and using real-time PCR for their quantification. Results showed that EMA treatment of mixed populations of these two species provides a valuable tool for selective removal of DNA of nonviable cells by using conventional extraction protocols. Furthermore, we provide evidence that prior to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, EMA treatment of a mature mixed-population drinking-water biofilm containing a substantial proportion of dead cells can result in community fingerprints dramatically different from those for an untreated biofilm. The interpretation of such fingerprints can have important implications in the field of microbial ecology.

  12. Electrical detection and quantification of single and mixed DNA nucleotides in suspension

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Panicker, Neena G.; Rizvi, Tahir A.; Mustafa, Farah

    2016-01-01

    High speed sequential identification of the building blocks of DNA, (deoxyribonucleotides or nucleotides for short) without labeling or processing in long reads of DNA is the need of the hour. This can be accomplished through exploiting their unique electrical properties. In this study, the four different types of nucleotides that constitute a DNA molecule were suspended in a buffer followed by performing several types of electrical measurements. These electrical parameters were then used to quantify the suspended DNA nucleotides. Thus, we present a purely electrical counting scheme based on the semiconductor theory that allows one to determine the number of nucleotides in a solution by measuring their capacitance-voltage dependency. The nucleotide count was observed to be similar to the multiplication of the corresponding dopant concentration and debye volume after de-embedding the buffer contribution. The presented approach allows for a fast and label-free quantification of single and mixed nucleotides in a solution. PMID:27677329

  13. Electrical detection and quantification of single and mixed DNA nucleotides in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Panicker, Neena G.; Rizvi, Tahir A.; Mustafa, Farah

    2016-09-01

    High speed sequential identification of the building blocks of DNA, (deoxyribonucleotides or nucleotides for short) without labeling or processing in long reads of DNA is the need of the hour. This can be accomplished through exploiting their unique electrical properties. In this study, the four different types of nucleotides that constitute a DNA molecule were suspended in a buffer followed by performing several types of electrical measurements. These electrical parameters were then used to quantify the suspended DNA nucleotides. Thus, we present a purely electrical counting scheme based on the semiconductor theory that allows one to determine the number of nucleotides in a solution by measuring their capacitance-voltage dependency. The nucleotide count was observed to be similar to the multiplication of the corresponding dopant concentration and debye volume after de-embedding the buffer contribution. The presented approach allows for a fast and label-free quantification of single and mixed nucleotides in a solution.

  14. [Identification of chromosomal aberration in esophageal cancer cells by mixed BAC DNA probes of chromosome arms and regions].

    PubMed

    Jiajie, Hao; Chunli, Wang; Wenyue, Gu; Xiaoyu, Cheng; Yu, Zhang; Xin, Xu; Yan, Cai; Mingrong, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal aberration is an important genetic feature of malignant tumor cells. This study aimed to clarify whether BAC DNA could be used to identify chromosome region and arm alterations. For each chromosome region, five to ten 1 Mb BAC DNA clones were selected to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the particular region. All of the mixed clones from regions which could cover the whole chromosome arm were then mixed to construct mixed BAC DNA clones for the arms. Mixed BAC DNA probes of arms and regions were labeled by degenerate oligonucleotide primed PCR (DOP-PCR) and Nick translation techniques, respectively. The specificities of these probes were validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) on the metaphase chromosomes of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes. FISH with arm-specific mixed BAC DNA probes showed that chromosomal rearrangements and involved chromosome arms were confirmed in several esophageal cancer cells. By using region-specific mixed probes, the breakpoint on 1q from the derivative chromosome t(1q;7q) was identified in 1q32-q41 in esophageal KYSE140 cells. In conclusion, we established an effective labeling method for 1 Mb BAC DNA mixed clone probes, and chromosome arm and region rearrangements could be identified in several esophageal cancer cells by using these probes. Our study provides a more precise method for identification of chromosomal aberration by M-FISH, and the established method may also be applied to the karyotype analysis of hematological malignancies and prenatal diagnosis.

  15. Natural DNA mixed with trehalose persists in B-form double-stranding even in the dry state.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Furuki, Takao; Okuda, Takashi; Sakurai, Minoru

    2007-05-24

    Desiccated calf-thymus DNA has been found to persist in the B-form double-stranding when mixed with trehalose. The stabilization effect on natural DNA depends on the trehalose content, and should basically arise from its ability to tightly hydrogen bond to phosphate groups of DNA, which leads to screening of the large phosphate-phosphate repulsion.

  16. An improved transmutation method for quantitative determination of the components in multicomponent overlapping chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xueguang; Yu, Zhengliang; Ma, Chaoxiong

    2004-06-01

    An improved method is proposed for the quantitative determination of multicomponent overlapping chromatograms based on a known transmutation method. To overcome the main limitation of the transmutation method caused by the oscillation generated in the transmutation process, two techniques--wavelet transform smoothing and the cubic spline interpolation for reducing data points--were adopted, and a new criterion was also developed. By using the proposed algorithm, the oscillation can be suppressed effectively, and quantitative determination of the components in both the simulated and experimental overlapping chromatograms is successfully obtained.

  17. Surface Coverage and Structure of Mixed DNA/Alkylthiol Monolayers on Gold: Characterization by XPS, NEXAFS, and Fluorescence Intensity Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Ying; Gong, Ping; Harbers, Gregory M.; Grainger, David W.; Castner, David G.; Gamble, Lara J.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly of thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA (HS-ssDNA) on gold has served as an important model system for DNA immobilization at surfaces. Here, we report a detailed study of the surface composition and structure of mixed self-assembled DNA monolayers containing a short alkylthiol surface diluent [11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU)] on gold supports. These mixed DNA monolayers were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and fluorescence intensity measurements. XPS results on sequentially adsorbed DNA/MCU monolayers on gold indicated that adsorbed MCU molecules first incorporate into the HS-ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer MCU exposures, displace adsorbed HS-ssDNA molecules from the surface. Thus, HS-ssDNA surface coverage steadily decreased with MCU exposure time. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS and fluorescence results both show changes in signals consistent with changes in DNA orientation after only 30 min of MCU exposure. NEXAFS polarization dependence (followed by monitoring the N 1s → π* transition) of the mixed DNA monolayers indicated that the DNA nucleotide base ring structures are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure HS-ssDNA monolayers. This indicates that HS-ssDNA oligomers reorient toward a more-upright position upon MCU incorporation. Fluorescence intensity results using end-labeled DNA probes on gold show little observable fluorescence on pure HS-ssDNA monolayers, likely due to substrate quenching effects between the fluorophore and the gold. MCU diluent incorporation into HS-ssDNA monolayers initially increases DNA fluorescence signal by densifying the chemisorbed monolayer, prompting an upright orientation of the DNA, and moving the terminal fluorophore away from the substrate. Immobilized DNA probe density and DNA target hybridization in these mixed DNA monolayers, as well as effects of MCU diluent on DNA hybridization in complex

  18. Surface Coverage and Structure of Mixed DNA/Alkylthiol Monolayers on Gold: Characterization by XPS, NEXAFS, and Fluorescence Intensity Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,C.; Gong, P.; Harbers, G.; Grainger, D.; Castner, D.; Gamble, L.

    2006-01-01

    Self-assembly of thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA (HS-ssDNA) on gold has served as an important model system for DNA immobilization at surfaces. Here, we report a detailed study of the surface composition and structure of mixed self-assembled DNA monolayers containing a short alkylthiol surface diluent [11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MCU)] on gold supports. These mixed DNA monolayers were studied with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and fluorescence intensity measurements. XPS results on sequentially adsorbed DNA/MCU monolayers on gold indicated that adsorbed MCU molecules first incorporate into the HS-ssDNA monolayer and, upon longer MCU exposures, displace adsorbed HS-ssDNA molecules from the surface. Thus, HS-ssDNA surface coverage steadily decreased with MCU exposure time. Polarization-dependent NEXAFS and fluorescence results both show changes in signals consistent with changes in DNA orientation after only 30 min of MCU exposure. NEXAFS polarization dependence (followed by monitoring the N 1s{yields}{pi}* transition) of the mixed DNA monolayers indicated that the DNA nucleotide base ring structures are oriented more parallel to the gold surface compared to DNA bases in pure HS-ssDNA monolayers. This indicates that HS-ssDNA oligomers reorient toward a more-upright position upon MCU incorporation. Fluorescence intensity results using end-labeled DNA probes on gold show little observable fluorescence on pure HS-ssDNA monolayers, likely due to substrate quenching effects between the fluorophore and the gold. MCU diluent incorporation into HS-ssDNA monolayers initially increases DNA fluorescence signal by densifying the chemisorbed monolayer, prompting an upright orientation of the DNA, and moving the terminal fluorophore away from the substrate. Immobilized DNA probe density and DNA target hybridization in these mixed DNA monolayers, as well as effects of MCU diluent on DNA hybridization in

  19. Identification of refined petroleum products in contaminated soils using an identification index for GC chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dongwook; Ko, Myoung-Soo; Yang, Jung-Seok; Kwon, Man Jae; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Seunghak

    2015-08-01

    Hydrocarbons found in the environment are typically characterized by gas chromatography (GC). The shape of the GC chromatogram has been used to identify the source of petroleum contamination. However, the conventional practice of simply comparing the peak patterns of source products to those of environmental samples is dependent on the subjective decisions of individual analysts. We have developed and verified a quantitative analytical method for interpreting GC chromatograms to distinguish refined petroleum products in contaminated soils. We found that chromatograms for gasoline, kerosene, and diesel could be divided into three ranges with boundaries at C6, C8, C16, and C26. In addition, the relative peak area (RPA(GC)) of each range, a dimensionless ratio of the peak area within each range to that of the total range (C6-C26), had a unique value for each petroleum product. An identification index for GC chromatograms (ID(GC)), defined as the ratio of RPA(GC) of C8-C16 to that of C16-C26, was able to identify diesel and kerosene sources in samples extracted from artificially contaminated soils even after weathering. Thus, the ID(GC) can be used to effectively distinguish between refined petroleum products in contaminated soils.

  20. Gas Cromatography In Solar System Exploration:decoding Complex Chromatograms Recovered From Space Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrogrande, M. C.; Tellini, I.; Dondi, F.; Felinger, A.; Sternberg, R.; Szopa, C.; Vidal-Madjar, C.

    GC plays a predominant role in solar system explorations: it has been applied to space research related to exobiology: i.e., Cassini-Huygens mission devoted to characterize chemical composition of TitanSs atmosphere [2], Rosetta mission to investigate the nucleus of comet p/Wirtamen (COSAC experiments) [1]. GC analysis of planetary atmosphere is a difficult analytical task because of the unknown and low level of an- alytes present in the sample, the high degree of automatization required, the strong constraints due to the flight (short analysis time, low power consumption, high accu- racy and reliability under extreme space conditions). In these circumstances the use of a signal processing procedure is practically mandatory to efficiently extract useful in- formation from the raw chromatogram ­ i.e. to decode the complex chromatogram to determine the number of components, the separation efficiency and the retention pat- tern. In this work a chemometric approach based on the Fourier analysis is applied to complex chromatograms related to space research: from the autocovariance function (ACVF) computed on the digitized chromatogram, the chromatographic parameters ­ number of components, peak shape parameters, retention pattern ­ can be estimated [3-7]. The procedure, originally developed for constant peak width [3], was extended to variable peak width [4], in order to describe chromatograms obtained in isother- mal conditions, i.e., analysis condition compatible with space flight constraints. The chemometric procedure was applied to chromatograms of standard mixtures repre- sentative of planetary atmospheres ­ hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds with carbon atom number ranging from 2 to 8 ­ obtained in flight simulating conditions ­ isothermal or pseudo-isothermal conditions. Both the simplified graphic procedure, based on the assumption of constant peak width [3], and the complete approach de- veloped for variable peak width [4], were applied and the results

  1. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity studies on DNA adsorption on mixed DPPC/DC-Cholesterol monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Jeng, U.-Ser; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Gutberlet, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    We have studied DNA adsorption on mixed DPPC/DC-Chol monolayers. Solid supported mixed monolayers on silicon wafers were prepared using Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) dipping technique. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity measurements were used to characterize these LB monofilms. For LB monofilms with DNA adsorption, the reflectivity data of the DPPC/DNA film are very close to that from the DPPC film, which indicates only minor DNA adsorption on the pure DPPC monolayer. Increasing the percentage of DC-Chol, film thickness increases. The DC-Chol/DNA film is thicker than the pure DC-Chol film (film thickness 18 Å) by about 9 Å due to the presence of adsorbed DNA. A model is presented to explain the structure of the lipid/DNA film.

  2. Bulged Invader probes: activated duplexes for mixed-sequence dsDNA recognition with improved thermodynamic and kinetic profiles.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Dale C; Karmakar, Saswata; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2015-10-18

    Double-stranded oligonucleotides with +1 interstrand zipper arrangements of intercalator-functionalized nucleotides are energetically activated for recognition of mixed-sequence double-stranded DNA. Incorporation of nonyl (C9) bulges at specific positions of these probes, results in more highly affine (>5-fold), faster (>4-fold) and more persistent dsDNA recognition relative to conventional Invader probes.

  3. Confidence interval of the likelihood ratio associated with mixed stain DNA evidence.

    PubMed

    Beecham, Gary W; Weir, Bruce S

    2011-01-01

    Likelihood ratios are necessary to properly interpret mixed stain DNA evidence. They can flexibly consider alternate hypotheses and can account for population substructure. The likelihood ratio should be seen as an estimate and not a fixed value, because the calculations are functions of allelic frequency estimates that were estimated from a small portion of the population. Current methods do not account for uncertainty in the likelihood ratio estimates and are therefore an incomplete picture of the strength of the evidence. We propose the use of a confidence interval to report the consequent variation of likelihood ratios. The confidence interval is calculated using the standard forensic likelihood ratio formulae and a variance estimate derived using the Taylor expansion. The formula is explained, and a computer program has been made available. Numeric work shows that the evidential strength of DNA profiles decreases as the variation among populations increases.

  4. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation in Mixed Ancestry Individuals with Diabetes and Prediabetes from South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Pheiffer, Carmen; Humphries, Stephen E.; Gamieldien, Junaid; Erasmus, Rajiv T.

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To conduct a genome-wide DNA methylation in individuals with type 2 diabetes, individuals with prediabetes, and control mixed ancestry individuals from South Africa. Methods. We used peripheral blood to perform genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in 3 individuals with screen detected diabetes, 3 individuals with prediabetes, and 3 individuals with normoglycaemia from the Bellville South Community, Cape Town, South Africa, who were age-, gender-, body mass index-, and duration of residency-matched. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) was performed by Arraystar Inc. (Rockville, MD, USA). Results. Hypermethylated DMRs were 1160 (81.97%) and 124 (43.20%), respectively, in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes when both were compared to subjects with normoglycaemia. Our data shows that genes related to the immune system, signal transduction, glucose transport, and pancreas development have altered DNA methylation in subjects with prediabetes and diabetes. Pathway analysis based on the functional analysis mapping of genes to KEGG pathways suggested that the linoleic acid metabolism and arachidonic acid metabolism pathways are hypomethylated in prediabetes and diabetes. Conclusions. Our study suggests that epigenetic changes are likely to be an early process that occurs before the onset of overt diabetes. Detailed analysis of DMRs that shows gradual methylation differences from control versus prediabetes to prediabetes versus diabetes in a larger sample size is required to confirm these findings. PMID:27555869

  5. DNA interaction studies of tridentate bridged Ru(II)-Pt(II) mixed-metal supramolecules.

    PubMed

    Prussin, Aaron J; Zhao, Shengliang; Jain, Avijita; Winkel, Brenda S J; Brewer, Karen J

    2009-03-01

    Reported herein are studies of the concentration and temperature dependent interactions with DNA of the stereochemically defined mixed-metal supramolecular complexes, [(tpy)Ru(tppz)PtCl](PF(6))(3) and [ClPt(tppz)Ru(tppz)PtCl](PF(6))(4) (tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and tppz=2,3,5,6-tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine). These metal complexes couple a ruthenium based light absorber (LA) to the bioactive platinum sites (BAS) using a tridentate bridging ligand (BL). The complexes exhibit intense Ru-->tppz(pi*) metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transitions in the visible region and adopt a square planar geometry around the Pt(II) center. The effect of incubating these metal complexes with DNA on the subsequent migration of DNA through an agarose gel was found to be more dramatic than that observed for the well known anticancer drug, cis-[Pt(NH(3))(2)Cl(2)] (cisplatin). This effect was enhanced with increased incubation temperature. Unwinding of supercoiled plasmid DNA was found to be more pronounced for the trimetallic complex, [ClPt(tppz)Ru(tppz)PtCl](PF(6))(4), than for the bimetallic complex, [(tpy)Ru(tppz)PtCl](PF(6))(3).

  6. Genetic differences at four DNA typing loci in Finnish, Italian, and mixed Caucasian populations.

    PubMed Central

    Krane, D E; Allen, R W; Sawyer, S A; Petrov, D A; Hartl, D L

    1992-01-01

    Highly polymorphic segments of the human genome containing variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTRs) have been widely used to establish DNA profiles of individuals for use in forensics. Methods of estimating the probability of occurrence of matching DNA profiles between two randomly selected individuals have been subject to extensive debate regarding the possibility of significant substructure occurring within the major races. We have sampled two Caucasian subpopulations, Finns and Italians, at four commonly used VNTR loci to determine the extent to which the subgroups differ from each other and from a mixed Caucasian database. The data were also analyzed for the occurrence of linkage disequilibrium among the loci. The allele frequency distributions of some loci were found to differ significantly among the subpopulations in a manner consistent with population substructure. Major differences were also found in the probability of occurrence of matching DNA profiles between two individuals chosen at random from the same subpopulation. With respect to the Finnish and Italian subpopulations, the conventional product rule for estimating the probability of a multilocus VNTR match using a mixed Caucasian database consistently yields estimates that are artificially small. Systematic errors of this type were not found using the interim ceiling principle recently advocated in the National Research Council's report [National Research Council (1992) DNA Technology in Forensic Science (Natl. Acad. Sci., Washington)]. The interim ceiling principle is based on currently available racial or ethnic databases and sets an arbitrary lower limit on each VNTR allele frequency. In the future the ceiling frequencies are expected to be established from more adequate data acquired for relevant VNTR loci from multiple subpopulations. Images PMID:1438254

  7. Internal validation of STRmix™ for the interpretation of single source and mixed DNA profiles.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Tamyra R; Just, Rebecca S; Kehl, Susannah C; Willis, Leah E; Buckleton, John S; Bright, Jo-Anne; Taylor, Duncan A; Onorato, Anthony J

    2017-07-01

    The interpretation of DNA evidence can entail analysis of challenging STR typing results. Genotypes inferred from low quality or quantity specimens, or mixed DNA samples originating from multiple contributors, can result in weak or inconclusive match probabilities when a binary interpretation method and necessary thresholds (such as a stochastic threshold) are employed. Probabilistic genotyping approaches, such as fully continuous methods that incorporate empirically determined biological parameter models, enable usage of more of the profile information and reduce subjectivity in interpretation. As a result, software-based probabilistic analyses tend to produce more consistent and more informative results regarding potential contributors to DNA evidence. Studies to assess and internally validate the probabilistic genotyping software STRmix™ for casework usage at the Federal Bureau of Investigation Laboratory were conducted using lab-specific parameters and more than 300 single-source and mixed contributor profiles. Simulated forensic specimens, including constructed mixtures that included DNA from two to five donors across a broad range of template amounts and contributor proportions, were used to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the system via more than 60,000 tests comparing hundreds of known contributors and non-contributors to the specimens. Conditioned analyses, concurrent interpretation of amplification replicates, and application of an incorrect contributor number were also performed to further investigate software performance and probe the limitations of the system. In addition, the results from manual and probabilistic interpretation of both prepared and evidentiary mixtures were compared. The findings support that STRmix™ is sufficiently robust for implementation in forensic laboratories, offering numerous advantages over historical methods of DNA profile analysis and greater statistical power for the estimation of evidentiary weight, and

  8. Multifunctional DNA interactions of Ru-Pt mixed metal supramolecular complexes with substituted terpyridine ligands.

    PubMed

    Jain, Avijita; Wang, Jing; Mashack, Emily R; Winkel, Brenda S J; Brewer, Karen J

    2009-10-05

    The coupling of a light absorbing unit to a bioactive site allows for the development of supramolecules with multifunctional interactions with DNA. A series of mixed metal supramolecular complexes that couple a DNA-binding cis-Pt(II)Cl(2) center to a ruthenium chromophore via a polyazine bridging ligand have been prepared, and their DNA interactions have been studied, [(TL)RuCl(dpp)PtCl(2)](PF(6)) (TL = tpy (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine), MePhtpy (4'-(4-methylphenyl)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine), or (t)Bu(3)tpy (4,4',4''-tri-tert-butyl-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and dpp = 2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine). This series provides for unique tridentate coordinated Ru(II) systems to photocleave DNA with preassociation with the DNA target via coordination of the Pt(II) center. Electronic absorption spectroscopy of the complexes displays intense ligand-based pi-->pi* transitions in the UV region and metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transitions in the visible region. The Ru(dpi)-->dpp(pi*) MLCT transitions occur at 545 nm, red-shifted relative to the 520 nm maxima for the monometallic synthons, [(TL)RuCl(dpp)](PF(6)). The title RuPt complexes display reversible Ru(II/III) oxidative couples at 1.10, 1.10, and 1.01 V vs Ag/AgCl for TL = tpy, MePhtpy, and (t)Bu(3)tpy, respectively. The TL(0/-) reduction occurred at -1.43, -1.44, and -1.59 V vs Ag/AgCl for TL = tpy, MePhtpy, and (t)Bu(3)tpy, respectively. These complexes display a dpp(0/-) couple (-0.50 -0.55, and -0.59 V) significantly shifted to positive potential relative to their monometallic synthons (-1.15, -1.16, and -1.22 V), consistent with the bridging coordination of the dpp ligand. Coupling of (TL)Ru(II)Cl(BL) subunit to a cis-Pt(II)Cl(2) site provides for the application of photochemically inactive Ru(II)(tpy)-based chromophores in DNA photocleavage applications. The [(TL)RuCl(dpp)PtCl(2)](+) complexes display covalent binding to DNA and photocleavage upon irradiation with visible light modulated by TL identity. The redox

  9. Decoding of complex isothermal chromatograms recovered from space missions. Identification of molecular structure.

    PubMed

    Pietrogrande, Maria Chiara; Tellini, Ilaria; Pasti, Luisa; Dondi, Francesco; Szopa, Cyril; Sternberg, Robert; Vidal-Madjar, Claire

    2003-06-20

    A chemometric approach, based on the study of the autocovariance function, is described to study isothermal GC chromatograms of multicomponent mixtures: isothermal GC analysis is the method of choice in space missions since it is, to date, the only method compatible with flight constraints. Isothermal GC chromatograms look inhomogeneous and disordered with peak density decreasing at higher retention times: a time axis transformation is proposed to make retention an homogeneous process so that CH2 addition in terms of an homologous series yields a constant retention increment. The time axis is transformed into a new scale based on the retention times of n-alkanes, as they are the basis of the universal Kovats indices procedure. The order introduced into the chromatogram by retention time linearization can be simply singled out by the experimental autocorrelation function (EACF) plot: if constant inter-distances are repeated in different regions of the chromatogram, well-shaped peaks are evident in the EACF plot. By comparison, with a standard mixture it is possible to identify peaks diagnostic of specific molecular structures: study of the EACF plot provides information on sample chemical composition. The procedure was applied to standard mixtures containing compounds representative of the planetary atmospheres that will be investigated in the near future: in particular, those related to Titan's atmosphere (Cassini-Huygens mission) and cometary's nucleus (Rosetta mission). The employed experimental conditions simulated those applied to GC instruments installed on space probes and landers in space missions. The method was applied to two specific investigations related to space research, i.e., a comparison of retention selectivity of different GC columns and identification of the chemical composition of an unknown mixture.

  10. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples.

    PubMed

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U; Mustafa, S; Man, Y B Che; Yusop, M H M; Bari, M F; Islam, Kh N; Hasan, M F

    2011-05-13

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml(-1) swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  11. Nanoparticle sensor for label free detection of swine DNA in mixed biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, M. E.; Hashim, U.; Mustafa, S.; Che Man, Y. B.; Yusop, M. H. M.; Bari, M. F.; Islam, Kh N.; Hasan, M. F.

    2011-05-01

    We used 40 ± 5 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as colorimetric sensor to visually detect swine-specific conserved sequence and nucleotide mismatch in PCR-amplified and non-amplified mitochondrial DNA mixtures to authenticate species. Colloidal GNPs changed color from pinkish-red to gray-purple in 2 mM PBS. Visually observed results were clearly reflected by the dramatic reduction of surface plasmon resonance peak at 530 nm and the appearance of new features in the 620-800 nm regions in their absorption spectra. The particles were stabilized against salt-induced aggregation upon the adsorption of single-stranded DNA. The PCR products, without any additional processing, were hybridized with a 17-base probe prior to exposure to GNPs. At a critical annealing temperature (55 °C) that differentiated matched and mismatched base pairing, the probe was hybridized to pig PCR product and dehybridized from the deer product. The dehybridized probe stuck to GNPs to prevent them from salt-induced aggregation and retained their characteristic red color. Hybridization of a 27-nucleotide probe to swine mitochondrial DNA identified them in pork-venison, pork-shad and venison-shad binary admixtures, eliminating the need of PCR amplification. Thus the assay was applied to authenticate species both in PCR-amplified and non-amplified heterogeneous biological samples. The results were determined visually and validated by absorption spectroscopy. The entire assay (hybridization plus visual detection) was performed in less than 10 min. The LOD (for genomic DNA) of the assay was 6 µg ml - 1 swine DNA in mixed meat samples. We believe the assay can be applied for species assignment in food analysis, mismatch detection in genetic screening and homology studies between closely related species.

  12. A Flexible, Efficient Binomial Mixed Model for Identifying Differential DNA Methylation in Bisulfite Sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Lea, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying sources of variation in DNA methylation levels is important for understanding gene regulation. Recently, bisulfite sequencing has become a popular tool for investigating DNA methylation levels. However, modeling bisulfite sequencing data is complicated by dramatic variation in coverage across sites and individual samples, and because of the computational challenges of controlling for genetic covariance in count data. To address these challenges, we present a binomial mixed model and an efficient, sampling-based algorithm (MACAU: Mixed model association for count data via data augmentation) for approximate parameter estimation and p-value computation. This framework allows us to simultaneously account for both the over-dispersed, count-based nature of bisulfite sequencing data, as well as genetic relatedness among individuals. Using simulations and two real data sets (whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) data from Arabidopsis thaliana and reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) data from baboons), we show that our method provides well-calibrated test statistics in the presence of population structure. Further, it improves power to detect differentially methylated sites: in the RRBS data set, MACAU detected 1.6-fold more age-associated CpG sites than a beta-binomial model (the next best approach). Changes in these sites are consistent with known age-related shifts in DNA methylation levels, and are enriched near genes that are differentially expressed with age in the same population. Taken together, our results indicate that MACAU is an efficient, effective tool for analyzing bisulfite sequencing data, with particular salience to analyses of structured populations. MACAU is freely available at www.xzlab.org/software.html. PMID:26599596

  13. [Extraction of sperm DNA from mixed stain by the modified differential lysis method combined with silicon bead method].

    PubMed

    Han, Hai-Jun; Zhang, Yu-Hong; Yang, Min; Yi, Hai; Yang, Geng-Ye; Jia, Dong-Tao; Lu, Da-Ru

    2014-02-01

    To extract sperm DNA from mixed stain by the modified differential lysis method combined with silicon bead method and to evaluate its application value. Fifty-two mixed stains containing female STR genotypes detected by differential lysis method were collected. The sperm DNA was extracted by the modified method combined with silicon bead method, then genotyped with the Identifiler Kit, and compared with the results of genotyping by the conventional differential lysis method as control. Of the 52 samples, 38 samples with sole male STR genotypes in all loci were detected. The detection rate of male STR genotypes was 98.08% through the modified method combined with silicon bead method. The modified differential lysis method combined with silicon bead method can be used in extraction of sperm DNA from mixed stain.

  14. An improved independent component analysis model for 3D chromatogram separation and its solution by multi-areas genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The 3D chromatogram generated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) has been researched widely in the field of herbal medicine, grape wine, agriculture, petroleum and so on. Currently, most of the methods used for separating a 3D chromatogram need to know the compounds' number in advance, which could be impossible especially when the compounds are complex or white noise exist. New method which extracts compounds from 3D chromatogram directly is needed. Methods In this paper, a new separation model named parallel Independent Component Analysis constrained by Reference Curve (pICARC) was proposed to transform the separation problem to a multi-parameter optimization issue. It was not necessary to know the number of compounds in the optimization. In order to find all the solutions, an algorithm named multi-areas Genetic Algorithm (mGA) was proposed, where multiple areas of candidate solutions were constructed according to the fitness and distances among the chromosomes. Results Simulations and experiments on a real life HPLC-DAD data set were used to demonstrate our method and its effectiveness. Through simulations, it can be seen that our method can separate 3D chromatogram to chromatogram peaks and spectra successfully even when they severely overlapped. It is also shown by the experiments that our method is effective to solve real HPLC-DAD data set. Conclusions Our method can separate 3D chromatogram successfully without knowing the compounds' number in advance, which is fast and effective. PMID:25474487

  15. Results of the 2003-2004 GEP-ISFG collaborative study on mitochondrial DNA: focus on the mtDNA profile of a mixed semen-saliva stain.

    PubMed

    Crespillo, Manuel; Paredes, Miguel R; Prieto, Lourdes; Montesino, Marta; Salas, Antonio; Albarran, Cristina; Alvarez-Iglesias, V; Amorin, Antonio; Berniell-Lee, Gemma; Brehm, Antonio; Carril, Juan C; Corach, Daniel; Cuevas, Nerea; Di Lonardo, Ana M; Doutremepuich, Christian; Espinheira, Rosa M; Espinoza, Marta; Gómez, Felix; González, Alberto; Hernández, Alexis; Hidalgo, M; Jimenez, Magda; Leite, Fabio P N; López, Ana M; López-Soto, Manuel; Lorente, Jose A; Pagano, Shintia; Palacio, Ana M; Pestano, José J; Pinheiro, Maria F; Raimondi, Eduardo; Ramón, M M; Tovar, Florangel; Vidal-Rioja, Lidia; Vide, Maria C; Whittle, Martín R; Yunis, Juan J; Garcia-Hirschfel, Julia

    2006-07-13

    We report here a review of the seventh mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) exercise undertaken by the Spanish and Portuguese working group (GEP) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) corresponding to the period 2003-2004. Five reference bloodstains from five donors (M1-M5), a mixed stain of saliva and semen (M6), and a hair sample (M7) were submitted to each participating laboratory for nuclear DNA (nDNA; autosomal STR and Y-STR) and mtDNA analysis. Laboratories were asked to investigate the contributors of samples M6 and M7 among the reference donors (M1-M5). A total of 34 laboratories reported total or partial mtDNA sequence data from both, the reference bloodstains (M1-M5) and the hair sample (M7) concluding a match between mtDNA profiles of M5 and M7. Autosomal STR and Y-STR profiling was the preferred strategy to investigate the contributors of the semen/saliva mixture (M6). Nuclear DNA profiles were consistent with a mixture of saliva from the donor (female) of M4 and semen from donor M5, being the semen (XY) profile the dominant component of the mixture. Strikingly, and in contradiction to the nuclear DNA analysis, mtDNA sequencing results yield a more simple result: only the saliva contribution (M4) was detected, either after preferential lysis or after complete DNA digestion. Some labs provided with several explanations for this finding and carried out additional experiments to explain this apparent contradictory result. The results pointed to the existence of different relative amounts of nuclear and mtDNAs in saliva and semen. We conclude that this circumstance could strongly influence the interpretation of the mtDNA evidence in unbalanced mixtures and in consequence lead to false exclusions. During the GEP-ISFG annual conference a validation study was planned to progress in the interpretation of mtDNA from different mixtures.

  16. Signal processing using sparse derivatives with applications to chromatograms and ECG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xiaoran

    In this thesis, we investigate the sparsity exist in the derivative domain. Particularly, we focus on the type of signals which posses up to Mth (M > 0) order sparse derivatives. Efforts are put on formulating proper penalty functions and optimization problems to capture properties related to sparse derivatives, searching for fast, computationally efficient solvers. Also the effectiveness of these algorithms are applied to two real world applications. In the first application, we provide an algorithm which jointly addresses the problems of chromatogram baseline correction and noise reduction. The series of chromatogram peaks are modeled as sparse with sparse derivatives, and the baseline is modeled as a low-pass signal. A convex optimization problem is formulated so as to encapsulate these non-parametric models. To account for the positivity of chromatogram peaks, an asymmetric penalty function is also utilized with symmetric penalty functions. A robust, computationally efficient, iterative algorithm is developed that is guaranteed to converge to the unique optimal solution. The approach, termed Baseline Estimation And Denoising with Sparsity (BEADS), is evaluated and compared with two state-of-the-art methods using both simulated and real chromatogram data. Promising result is obtained. In the second application, a novel Electrocardiography (ECG) enhancement algorithm is designed also based on sparse derivatives. In the real medical environment, ECG signals are often contaminated by various kinds of noise or artifacts, for example, morphological changes due to motion artifact, non-stationary noise due to muscular contraction (EMG), etc. Some of these contaminations severely affect the usefulness of ECG signals, especially when computer aided algorithms are utilized. By solving the proposed convex l1 optimization problem, artifacts are reduced by modeling the clean ECG signal as a sum of two signals whose second and third-order derivatives (differences) are sparse

  17. [Simultaneous determination of five main index components and specific chromatograms analysis in Xiaochaihu granules].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yan-Shuang; Cai, Hao; Liu, Xiao; Cai, Bao-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector was employed for simultaneous determination of five main index components and specific chromatograms analysis in Xiaochaihu granules with a linear gradient elution of acetonitrile-water (containing 0.1% phosphoric acid) as mobile phase. The results showed that five main index components (baicalin, baicalein, wogonoside, wogonin, enoxolone) were separated well under the analytical condition. The linear ranges of five components were 0.518 - 16.576, 0.069 - 2.197, 0.167 - 5.333, 0.009 - 0.297 and 0.006 - 0.270 mg x g(-1), respectively. The correlation coefficients were 0.999 9, and the average recoveries ranged from 95% to 105%. Twelve common peaks were selected as the specific chromatograms of Xiaochaihu granules with baicalin as the reference peak. There were good similarities between the reference and the ten batches of samples. The similarity coefficients were no less than 0.9. The analytical method established is highly sensitive with strong specificity and it can be used efficiently in the quality control of Xiaochaihu granules.

  18. OpenSlice: Quantitative data sharing from HyperPeaks to global ion chromatograms (GICs).

    PubMed

    Askenazi, Manor; Fenyö, David

    2016-09-01

    Data sharing in the field of MS has advanced greatly thanks to innovations such as the standardized formats, data repositories, and publications guidelines. However, there is currently no data sharing mechanism that enables real-time data browsing and deep linking on a large scale: unrestricted data access (particularly at the quantitative level) ultimately requires the user to download a local copy of the relevant data files (e.g., in order to generate extracted ion chromatograms [XICs]). In this technical resource, we present a set of technologies (collectively termed OpenSlice) that enable the user to quantitatively query hundreds of hours of proteomics discovery data (i.e., nontargeted acquisition) in real time: the user is able to effectively generate XICs for arbitrary masses on the fly and across the entire dataset (so-called global ion chromatograms), interacting with the results through a very intuitive browser-based interface. A key design consideration underlying the OpenSlice approach is the notion that every aspect of the acquired data must be accessible through a RESTful uniform resource locator based application programming interface, up to and including individual chromatographic peaks (hence HyperPeaks). A publicly accessible demonstration of this technology based on the Clinical Proteomics Tumor Analysis Consortium CompRef dataset is made available at http://compref.fenyolab.org. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Identification and quantification of volatile organic compounds using systematic single-ion chromatograms

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Yoshio; Kanabus-Kaminska, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    In order to determine the background level of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Canadian indoor air, a method of identification and quantification at a level of 0.3 {micro}g/m{sup 3} using systematic single-ion chromatograms (SICs) has been developed. The compounds selected for measurement included several halogenated compounds, oxygen compounds, terpenes, and C8 to C16 n-alkanes. Air samples were taken in 3-layered sorbent tubes and trapped compounds were thermally desorbed into the helium stream of a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) analytical system. Total quantities of volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) were measured using a flame ionization detector (FID). Individual compounds were analyzed by a GC/MS. For the identification of compounds in the main stream GC effluent, both the specific GC retention and mass spectra were used. About 50 selected SICs were routinely extracted from a total ion chromatogram (TIC) to detect and quantify compounds. For each compound, a single representative ion was selected. The specific retention was calculated from the elution time on the SIC. For quantification, ion counts under a peak in the SIC were measured. The single-ion MS response factor for some of the compounds was experimentally determined using a dynamic reference procedure.

  20. Design and synthesis of heterocyclic cations for specific DNA recognition: from AT-rich to mixed-base-pair DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yun; Paul, Ananya; Rettig, Michael; Wilson, W David; Boykin, David W

    2014-02-07

    The compounds synthesized in this research were designed with the goal of establishing a new paradigm for mixed-base-pair DNA sequence-specific recognition. The design scheme starts with a cell-permeable heterocyclic cation that binds to AT base pair sites in the DNA minor groove. Modifications were introduced in the original compound to include an H-bond accepting group to specifically recognize the G-NH that projects into the minor groove. Therefore, a series of heterocyclic cations substituted with an azabenzimidazole ring has been designed and synthesized for mixed-base-pair DNA recognition. The most successful compound, 12a, had an azabenzimidazole to recognize G and additional modifications for general minor groove interactions. It binds to the DNA site -AAAGTTT- more strongly than the -AAATTT- site without GC and indicates the design success. Structural modifications of 12a generally weakened binding. The interactions of the new compound with a variety of DNA sequences with and without GC base pairs were evaluated by thermal melting analysis, circular dichroism, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance, and molecular modeling.

  1. Differential reporting of mixed DNA profiles and its impact on jurists' evaluation of evidence. An international analysis.

    PubMed

    de Keijser, Jan W; Malsch, Marijke; Luining, Egge T; Weulen Kranenbarg, Marleen; Lenssen, Dominique J H M

    2016-07-01

    While DNA analysis is considered by many the gold standard in forensic science, there is ample room for variation in interpretation and reporting. This seems especially the case when working with (complex) mixed DNA profiles. Two consecutive studies on differential DNA reporting were conducted. In Study 1, we first examined type and magnitude of differences when forensic DNA experts across institutes and jurisdictions are handed an identical forensic case with mixed profiles. In Study 2, we explore the impact of the observed differential reporting on jurists' evaluation of the DNA evidence. 19 DNA expert reports from forensic institutes across Western jurisdictions were obtained. Differences between the reports were many and include extensiveness of the reports, explanations of technical issues, use of explanatory appendices, level of reporting, use of context information, and, most markedly, type and substantive content of the conclusions. In Study 2, a group of criminal law students judged a selection of these reports in a quasi experimental study design. Findings show that these differing reports have quite different evidentiary value for jurists, depending on which expert authored the report. It is argued that the impact of differential reporting on jurists' evaluation was so fundamental and substantive that it is seems reasonable to claim that in an actual court case it could make the difference between acquittal and conviction.

  2. DNA extraction for short tandem repeat typing from mixed samples using anti-human leukocyte CD45 and ABO blood group antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shizue; Honda, Katsuya; Kaminiwa, Junko; Nishi, Takeki; Iwabuchi, Yayoi; Sugano, Yukiko; Kurosu, Akira; Suzuki, Yasuhito

    2014-05-01

    DNA testing from mixed cell samples can be difficult to use successfully in criminal investigations. Here, we present a method for the extraction of DNA from mixed bloodstains involving plural contributors, after antibody-microbead captured cell separation. This method, together with the multiplex short tandem repeat typing presented, has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA profiles corresponding to the ABO blood type. Methodological steps include magnetic separation using leukocyte specific CD45 antibody-coated microbeads and centrifugal separation of leukocyte agglutination by ABO antibody. The detection results of variable mixed ratio showed that the target DNA was detected accurately as low as 1:512 mixed ratio, regardless of the large amount of the background DNA present. The method presented here is applicable to PCR-based identification for various kinds of mixed samples.

  3. Use of DNA quantification to measure growth and autolysis of Lactococcus and Propionibacterium spp. in mixed populations.

    PubMed

    Treimo, Janneke; Vegarud, Gerd; Langsrud, Thor; Rudi, Knut

    2006-09-01

    Autolysis is self-degradation of the bacterial cell wall that results in the release of enzymes and DNA. Autolysis of starter bacteria, such as lactococci and propionibacteria, is essential for cheese ripening, but our understanding of this important process is limited. This is mainly because the current tools for measuring autolysis cannot readily be used for analysis of bacteria in mixed populations. We have now addressed this problem by species-specific detection and quantification of free DNA released during autolysis. This was done by use of 16S rRNA gene single-nucleotide extension probes in combination with competitive PCR. We analyzed pure and mixed populations of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and three different species of Propionibacterium. Results showed that L. lactis subsp. lactis INF L2 autolyzed first, followed by Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 4965, Propionibacterium freudenreichii ISU P59, and then Propionibacterium jensenii INF P303. We also investigated the autolytic effect of rennet (commonly used in cheese production). We found that the effect was highly strain specific, with all the strains responding differently. Finally, autolysis of L. lactis subsp. lactis INF L2 and P. freudenreichii ISU P59 was analyzed in a liquid cheese model. Autolysis was detected later in this cheese model system than in broth media. A challenge with DNA, however, is DNA degradation. We addressed this challenge by using a DNA degradation marker. We obtained a good correlation between the degradation of the marker and the target in a model experiment. We conclude that our DNA approach will be a valuable tool for use in future analyses and for understanding autolysis in mixed bacterial populations.

  4. Use of DNA Quantification To Measure Growth and Autolysis of Lactococcus and Propionibacterium spp. in Mixed Populations

    PubMed Central

    Treimo, Janneke; Vegarud, Gerd; Langsrud, Thor; Rudi, Knut

    2006-01-01

    Autolysis is self-degradation of the bacterial cell wall that results in the release of enzymes and DNA. Autolysis of starter bacteria, such as lactococci and propionibacteria, is essential for cheese ripening, but our understanding of this important process is limited. This is mainly because the current tools for measuring autolysis cannot readily be used for analysis of bacteria in mixed populations. We have now addressed this problem by species-specific detection and quantification of free DNA released during autolysis. This was done by use of 16S rRNA gene single-nucleotide extension probes in combination with competitive PCR. We analyzed pure and mixed populations of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and three different species of Propionibacterium. Results showed that L. lactis subsp. lactis INF L2 autolyzed first, followed by Propionibacterium acidipropionici ATCC 4965, Propionibacterium freudenreichii ISU P59, and then Propionibacterium jensenii INF P303. We also investigated the autolytic effect of rennet (commonly used in cheese production). We found that the effect was highly strain specific, with all the strains responding differently. Finally, autolysis of L. lactis subsp. lactis INF L2 and P. freudenreichii ISU P59 was analyzed in a liquid cheese model. Autolysis was detected later in this cheese model system than in broth media. A challenge with DNA, however, is DNA degradation. We addressed this challenge by using a DNA degradation marker. We obtained a good correlation between the degradation of the marker and the target in a model experiment. We conclude that our DNA approach will be a valuable tool for use in future analyses and for understanding autolysis in mixed bacterial populations. PMID:16957244

  5. [Changes of specific chromatograms and contents of five components in Yinqiao powder decoctions during decocting process].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yun; Zhao, Guo-Wei; Liang, Xin-Li; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zheng, Qin; Yang, Ming; Liao, Zheng-Gen

    2016-01-01

    To establish a method for the determination of chemical specific chromatograms and five components in Yinqiao powder decoction, and provide basis for elucidating the scientific connotation of ″taking in when the fragrance volatilized fiercely″. Yinqiao powder decoctions with different decocting times were prepared to study the changes of chemical components during decocting process. Specific chromatograms and contents of chlorogenic acid, phillyrin, arctiin, liquiritin and glycyrrhizin were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. According to the results, the similarities of Yinqiao powder decoctions with different decocting times were high, which indicated that their chemical compositions were similar. The dissolutions of the five components in Yinqiao powder reached more than 39.7% of 2 hour maximum dissolution amounts (MDA) after 20 minutes of soaking, more than 69.5% of MDA when boiling, more than 79.1% of MDA at the 5th minute after boiling, and more than 85.7% of MDA at the 10th minute after boiling. The concentrations of five components were not increasing obviously after 15 minutes of boiling (RSD<4.3%). The fragrance volatilized fiercely at about the 5th minute after boiling, which indicated that the contents of volatile components in Yinqiao powder decoctions were high, but it became weak after boiling for 15 minutes, which indicated that the contents of volatile components in Yinqiao powder decoctions were low. The results showed that the contents of five components in Yinqiao powder decoctions were heavily influenced by the decocting time. When boiling for about 5 minutes, the fragrance volatilized fiercely, both the contents of volatile components and non-volatile components were high. It is suggested that the traditional decocting method has a certain scientific basis. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  6. Structure and DNA Hybridization Properties of Mixed Nucleic Acid/Maleimide-ethylene glycol Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Ying; Nguyen, Phuong-Cac T.; Grainger, David W.; Gamble, Lara J.; Castner, David G.

    2008-01-01

    The surface structure and DNA hybridization performance of thiolated single-strand DNA (HS-ssDNA) covalently attached to a maleimide-ethylene glycol disulfide (MEG) monolayer on gold have been investigated. Monolayer immobilization chemistry and surface coverage of reactive ssDNA probes were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Orientation of the ssDNA probes was determined by near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Target DNA hybridization on the DNA-MEG probe surfaces was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to demonstrate the utility of these probe surfaces for detection of DNA targets from both purified target DNA samples and complex biological mixtures such as blood serum. Data from complementary techniques showed that immobilized ssDNA density is strongly dependent on the spotted bulk DNA concentration and buffer ionic strength. Variation of the immobilized ssDNA density had a profound influence on the DNA probe orientation at the surface and subsequent target hybridization efficiency. With increasing surface probe density, NEXAFS polarization dependence results (followed by monitoring the N 1s → π* transition) indicate that the immobilized ssDNA molecules reorient towards a more upright position on the MEG monolayer. SPR assays of DNA targets from buffer and serum showed that DNA hybridization efficiency increased with decreasing surface probe density. However, target detection in serum was better on the “high density” probe surface than on the “high efficiency” probe surface. The amount of target detected for both ssDNA surfaces were several orders of magnitude poorer in serum than in purified DNA samples due to non-specific serum protein adsorption onto the sensing surface. PMID:17492838

  7. Absence of Y-specific DNA sequences in human 46,XX true hermaphrodites and in 45,X mixed gonadal dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Waibel, F; Scherer, G; Fraccaro, M; Hustinx, T W; Weissenbach, J; Wieland, J; Mayerová, A; Back, E; Wolf, U

    1987-08-01

    A search for Y-specific DNA sequences has been performed in a sample of seven 46,XX true hermaphrodites and one 45,X mixed gonadal dysgenesis case and compared with a sample of 11 XX males. Using six Y-specific DNA probes no hybridization signal was obtained in the hermaphrodite group; in contrast, all XX males gave a positive signal with at least one probe. This difference is statistically highly significant. We conclude that the aetiology of true hermaphroditism is different from that of the XX male syndrome. As all cases of the hermaphrodite group are positive for the serological sex-specific antigen (Sxs) it is concluded that this antigen can be present even in the absence of Y-specific DNA.

  8. DNA and protein binding, double-strand DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of the antibacterial drug nalidixic acid.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Muruganantham, Amsaveni; Ghosh, Swapan K; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2017-09-01

    The water soluble mixed ligand complexes [Cu(nal)(diimine)(H2O)](ClO4) 1-4, where H(nal) is nalidixic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (1), 1,10-phenanthroline (2), 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3), and 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (4), have been isolated. The coordination geometry around Cu(II) in 1 and that in the Density Functional Theory optimized structures of 1-4 has been assessed as square pyramidal. The trend in DNA binding constants (Kb) determined using absorption spectral titration (Kb: 1, 0.79±0.1<2, 1.06±0.1<3, 1.79±0.2<4, 1.84±0.2×10(5)M(-1)) is in line with that (Kapp) determined by competitive ethidium bromide binding studies. The large red-shift (10nm) observed for 2 suggests that the phen co-ligand is stacked with a frayed DNA base pair. In contrast, 3 and 4 are involved in intimate hydrophobic interaction with DNA through the methyl substituents on phen ring, which is supported by viscosity and protein binding studies. DNA docking studies imply that 4 is involved preferentially in DNA major groove binding while 1-3 in minor groove binding and that all the complexes, upon removing the axially coordinated water molecule, bind in the major groove. Interestingly, 3 and 4 display prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while 1 and 2 effect only single-strand DNA cleavage in the absence of an activator. The complexes 3 and 4 show cytotoxicity higher than 1 and 2 against human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7). The complex 4 induces apoptotic mode of cell death in cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality evaluation of Yin Chen Hao Tang extract based on fingerprint chromatogram and simultaneous determination of five bioactive constituents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Lv, Haitao; Sun, Hui; Jiang, Xingang; Wu, Zeming; Sun, Wenjun; Wang, Ping; Liu, Lian; Bi, Kaishun

    2008-01-01

    A completely validated method based on HPLC coupled with photodiode array detector (HPLC-UV) was described for evaluating and controlling quality of Yin Chen Hao Tang extract (YCHTE). First, HPLC-UV fingerprint chromatogram of YCHTE was established for preliminarily elucidating amount and chromatographic trajectory of chemical constituents in YCHTE. Second, for the first time, five mainly bioactive constituents in YCHTE were simultaneously determined based on fingerprint chromatogram for furthermore controlling the quality of YCHTE quantitatively. The developed method was applied to analyze 12 batches of YCHTE samples which consisted of herbal drugs from different places of production, showed acceptable linearity, intraday (RSD <5%), interday precision (RSD <4.80%), and accuracy (RSD <2.80%). As a result, fingerprint chromatogram determined 15 representative general fingerprint peaks, and the fingerprint chromatogram resemblances are all better than 0.9996. The contents of five analytes in different batches of YCHTE samples do not indicate significant difference. So, it is concluded that the developed HPLC-UV method is a more fully validated and complete method for evaluating and controlling the quality of YCHTE.

  10. Forgotten evidence: A mixed methods study of why sexual assault kits (SAKs) are not submitted for DNA forensic testing.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Rebecca; Fehler-Cabral, Giannina; Bybee, Deborah; Shaw, Jessica

    2017-10-01

    Throughout the United States, hundreds of thousands of sexual assault kits (SAKs) (also termed "rape kits") have not been submitted by the police for forensic DNA testing. DNA evidence can help sexual assault investigations and prosecutions by identifying offenders, revealing serial offenders through DNA matches across cases, and exonerating those who have been wrongly accused. In this article, we describe a 5-year action research project conducted with 1 city that had large numbers of untested SAKs-Detroit, Michigan-and our examination into why thousands of rape kits in this city were never submitted for forensic DNA testing. This mixed methods study combined ethnographic observations and qualitative interviews to identify stakeholders' perspectives as to why rape kits were not routinely submitted for testing. Then, we quantitatively examined whether these factors may have affected police practices regarding SAK testing, as evidenced by predictable changes in SAK submission rates over time. Chronic resource scarcity only partially explained why the organizations that serve rape victims-the police, crime lab, prosecution, and victim advocacy-could not test all rape kits, investigate all reported sexual assaults, and support all rape survivors. SAK submission rates significantly increased once criminal justice professionals in this city had full access to the FBI DNA forensic database Combined DNA Index System (CODIS), but even then, most SAKs were still not submitted for DNA testing. Building crime laboratories' capacities for DNA testing and training police on the utility of forensic evidence and best practices in sexual assault investigations can help remedy, and possibly prevent, the problem of untested rape kits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Mixture interpretation: defining the relevant features for guidelines for the assessment of mixed DNA profiles in forensic casework.

    PubMed

    Budowle, Bruce; Onorato, Anthony J; Callaghan, Thomas F; Della Manna, Angelo; Gross, Ann M; Guerrieri, Richard A; Luttman, Jennifer C; McClure, David Lee

    2009-07-01

    Currently in the United States there is little direction for what constitutes sufficient guidelines for DNA mixture interpretation. While a standardized approach is not possible or desirable, more definition is necessary to ensure reliable interpretation of results is carried out. In addition, qualified DNA examiners should be able to review reports and understand the assumptions made by the analyst who performed the interpretation. Interpretation of DNA mixture profiles requires consideration of a number of aspects of a mixed profile, many of which need to be established by on-site, internal validation studies conducted by a laboratory's technical staff, prior to performing casework analysis. The relevant features include: criteria for identification of mixed specimens, establishing detection and interpretation threshold values, defining allele peaks, defining nonallele peaks, identifying artifacts, consideration of tri-allelic patterns, estimating the minimum number of contributors, resolving components of a mixture, determining when a portion of the mixed profile can be treated as a single source profile, consideration of potential additive effects of allele sharing, impact of stutter peaks on interpretation in the presence of a minor contributor, comparison with reference specimens, and some issues related to the application of mixture calculation statistics. Equally important is using sensible judgment based on sound and documented principles of DNA analyses. Assumptions should be documented so that reliable descriptive information is conveyed adequately concerning that mixture and what were the bases for the interpretations that were carried out. Examples are provided to guide the community. Interpretation guidelines also should incorporate strategies to minimize potential bias that could occur by making inferences based on a reference sample. The intent of this paper is to promote more thought, provide assistance on many aspects for consideration, and to

  12. Analysis of mixed DNA-bisnaphthalimide interactions involving groove association and intercalation with surface-based and solution methodologies.

    PubMed

    González-Bulnes, Luis; Gallego, José

    2012-12-01

    The bisnaphthalimide cytotoxic agent elinafide exhibits a mixed DNA binding mode including groove-association and intercalation. We have compared the interaction of elinafide and two bisnaphthalimide analogues with various natural and modified DNA sequences using solution NMR and UV-melting methods and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) experiments at different pH conditions. The combined data obtained with these techniques established a high-affinity binding mode comprising intercalation and strong electrostatic contacts with guanine bases in the major groove, and a weaker interaction with A·T pairs likely involving groove association. However, the SPR binding constants and the NMR and UV-melting binding parameters responded differently to variations in DNA bases and ligand intercalating moieties. The rates and equilibrium constants determined by SPR clearly responded to changes in pH and DNA groove composition, but were rather insensitive to alterations in drug rings and DNA bases affecting the intercalation process. Conversely, the intermolecular stacking interactions detected by NMR and the ligand-induced thermal stabilizations measured by UV depended on both sets of factors and were controlled by the sequence-dependent properties of the DNA helices, indicating that these data were modulated by naphthalimide stacking in addition to groove association. A two-step binding process where a groove-bound state is required prior to intercalation is proposed as an explanation for these observations. These findings may be useful for studying other classes of DNA- and RNA-binding drugs, which frequently combine groove-binding and stacking moieties.

  13. A chromatographic objective function to characterise chromatograms with unknown compounds or without standards available.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Segura, T; Gómez-Díaz, A; Ortiz-Bolsico, C; Torres-Lapasió, J R; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C

    2015-08-28

    Getting useful chemical information from samples containing many compounds is still a challenge to analysts in liquid chromatography. The highest complexity corresponds to samples for which there is no prior knowledge about their chemical composition. Computer-based methodologies are currently considered as the most efficient tools to optimise the chromatographic resolution, and further finding the optimal separation conditions. However, most chromatographic objective functions (COFs) described in the literature to measure the resolution are based on mathematical models fitted with the information obtained from standards, and cannot be applied to samples with unknown compounds. In this work, a new COF based on the automatic measurement of the protruding part of the chromatographic peaks (or peak prominences) that indicates the number of perceptible peaks and global resolution, without the need of standards, is developed. The proposed COF was found satisfactory with regard to the peak purity criterion when applied to artificial peaks and simulated chromatograms of mixtures built using the information of standards. The approach was applied to mixtures of drugs containing unknown impurities and degradation products and to extracts of medicinal herbs, eluted with acetonitrile-water mixtures using isocratic and gradient elution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Synchronized Analysis of FTIR Spectra and GCMS Chromatograms for Evaluation of the Thermally Degraded Vegetable Oils

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Irwan Lu, Nurul Aida Lu; Samling, Benedict

    2014-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS) are two common instruments used for analysis of edible oils. The output signal is often analysed on the software attached to the workstations. The processing software is usually individualised for a specific source. The output of GCMS cannot be analysed on the FTIR hence analysts often need to juggle between instruments when multiple techniques are employed. This could become exhaustive when a large dataset is involved. This paper reports a synchronised approach for analysis of signal from FTIR and GCMS. The algorithm is demonstrated on a dataset of edible oils to investigate the thermal degradation of seven types of edible oils treated at 100°C and 150°C. The synchronised routines identify peaks present in FTIR and GCMS spectra/chromatograms where the information is subsequently extracted onto peak tables for further analysis. In this study, it is found that palm based products and corn oils were relatively more stable with higher content of antioxidants tocopherols and squalene. As a conclusion, this approach allows simultaneous analysis of signal from multiple sources and samples enhancing the efficiency of the signal processing process. PMID:24563804

  15. Cumulative area of peaks in a multidimensional high performance liquid chromatogram.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Paul G; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-09-20

    An algorithm was developed to recognize peaks in a multidimensional separation and calculate their cumulative peak area. To find the retention times of peaks in a one dimensional chromatogram, the Savitzky-Golay smoothing filter was used to smooth and find the first through third derivatives of the experimental profiles. Close examination of the shape of these curves informs on the number of peaks that are present and provides starting values for fitting theoretical profiles. Due to the nature of comprehensive multidimensional HPLC, adjacent cut fractions may contain compounds common to more than one cut fraction. The algorithm determines which components were common in adjacent cuts and subsequently calculates the area of a two-dimensional peak profile by interpolating the surface of the 2D peaks between adjacent peaks. This algorithm was tested by calculating the cumulative peak area of a series of 2D-HPLC separations of alkylbenzenes, phenol and caffeine with varied concentrations. A good relationship was found between the concentration and the cumulative peak area. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Determination of 13C enrichment in soil amino acid enantiomers by gas chromatogram/mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Wei; Ding, Xue-Li; Bai, Zhen; Liu, Ning; Zhang, Xu-Dong

    2008-06-01

    The transformation and renewal of amino acid enantiomers is of significance in indicating the turnover mechanism of soil organic matter. In this paper, a method of gas chromatogram/mass spectrometry combined with U-13 C-glucose incubation was developed to determine the 13C enrichment in soil amino acid enantiomers, which could effectively differentiate the original and the newly synthesized amino acids in soil matrix. The added U-13 C-glucose was utilized rapidly to structure the amino acid carbon skeleton, and the change of relative abundance of isotope ions could be determined by mass spectrometry. The direct incorporation of U-13 C glucose was estimated by the intensity increase of m/z (F + n) to F (F was parent fragment, and n was the carbon number in the fragment), while the total isotope incorporation from the added 13C could be calculated according to the abundance ratio increment summation from m/z (Fa + 1) through (Fa + T) (Fa was the fragment containing all original skeleton carbons, and T was the carbon number in the amino acid molecule). The 13C enrichment in the target compound was expressed as atom percentage excess (APE), and that of D-amino acid needed to be corrected by the coefficient of hydrolysis-induced racemization. The 13C enrichment reflected the carbon turnover velocity of individual amino acid enantiomers, and was powerful to investigate the dynamics of soil amino acids.

  17. LoCIM-tool: An expert's assistant for inferring the major contributor's alleles in mixed consensus DNA profiles.

    PubMed

    Benschop, Corina C G; Sijen, Titia

    2014-07-01

    When dealing with mixed DNA profiles where contributors have donated DNA in unequal amounts, it is often useful to deduce the genotype of the major contributor. Inference of a major contributor's genotype empowers storage of the DNA profile in a DNA database (DDB), which is especially of interest in cases without a suspect. When a major contributor's genotype cannot be inferred straightforwardly, for instance because low level components are present, replicate analyses can be prepared and combined into a consensus profile. Here we describe an automated and freely available tool to deduce the major component's alleles in mixed consensus DNA profiles. In these consensus profiles, theoretical peak heights (PHs) are assigned to the alleles using the sum of the PHs in the individual amplifications. The LoCIM-tool (Locus Classification & Inference of the Major-tool) uses these PHs plus parameters on the stochastic threshold, heterozygote balance (HB) and major to minor(s) ratio to classify every locus as a type 1, type 2 or type 3 locus, which represent classes of increasing complexity. Based on the type of locus, the LoCIM-tool applies an inclusion percentage to deduce the alleles for the major contributor. Using the LoCIM-tool, 99.9% of all type 1 loci and 96.7% of all type 2 loci were inferred correctly from a large set of consensus DNA profiles that were generated from mixtures varying for the mixture ratio, amount of DNA per contributor, number of contributors, quality of DNA, and allele sharing among the contributors. For type 3 loci, we aimed at inferring the major contributor's alleles and possibly extra alleles, which occurred for 87.2% of all type 3 loci analysed using the LoCIM-tool. When compared to the overall results of manual inference by a group of forensic scientists, the LoCIM-tool obtains a higher percentage of correctly inferred loci. From our results, we conclude that the LoCIM-tool presents an objective, uniform and fast method to reliably deduce

  18. Relative stability of transgene DNA fragments from GM rapeseed in mixed ruminal cultures.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ranjana; Alexander, Trevor W; John, S Jacob; Forster, Robert J; McAllister, Tim A

    2004-05-01

    The use of transgenic crops as feeds for ruminant animals has prompted study of the possible uptake of transgene fragments by ruminal micro-organisms and/or intestinal absorption of fragments surviving passage through the rumen. The persistence in buffered ruminal contents of seven different recombinant DNA fragments from GM rapeseed expressing the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS) transgene was tracked using PCR. Parental and transgenic (i.e. glyphosphate-tolerant; Roundup Ready, Monsanto Company, St Louis, MO, USA) rapeseed were incubated for 0, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h as whole seeds, cracked seeds, rapeseed meal, and as pelleted, barley-based diets containing 65 g rapeseed meal/kg. The seven transgene fragments ranged from 179 to 527 bp and spanned the entire 1363 bp EPSPS transgene. A 180 bp ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) small subunit fragment and a 466 bp 16S rDNA fragment were used as controls for endogenous rapeseed DNA and bacterial DNA respectively. The limit of detection of the PCR assay, established using negative controls spiked with known quantities of DNA, was 12.5 pg. Production of gas and NH3 was monitored throughout the incubation and confirmed active in vitro fermentation. Bacterial DNA was detected in all sample types at all time points. Persistence patterns of endogenous (Rubisco) and recombinant (EPSPS) rapeseed DNA were inversely related to substrate digestibility (amplifiable for 48, 8 and 4 h in whole or cracked seeds, meal and diets respectively), but did not differ between parental and GM rapeseed, nor among fragments. Detection of fragments was representative of persistence of the whole transgene. No EPSPS fragments were amplifiable in microbial DNA, suggesting that transformation had not occurred during the 48 h incubation. Uptake of transgenic DNA fragments by ruminal bacteria is probably precluded or time-limited by rapid degradation of plant DNA upon plant cell lysis.

  19. Preferential interaction between DNA and small ions in mixed-size counterion systems: Monte Carlo simulation and density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ke; Yu, Yang-Xin; Gao, Guang-Hua; Luo, Guang-Sheng

    2007-04-01

    Competitive binding between counterions around DNA molecule is characterized using the preferential interaction coefficient of individual ion in single and mixed electrolyte solutions. The canonical Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation, and density functional theory (DFT) proposed in our previous work [Wang, Yu, Gao, and Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 123, 234904 (2005)] are utilized to calculate the preferential interaction coefficients. The MC simulations and theoretical results show that for single electrolyte around DNA, the preferential interaction coefficient of electrolyte decreases as the cation size is increased, indicating that the larger cation has less accumulation ability in the vicinity of DNA. For the mixed electrolyte solution, it is found that cation diameter has a significant effect on the competitive ability while anion diameter has a negligible effect. It proves that the preferential interaction coefficients of all ions decrease as the total ionic concentration is increased. The DFT generally has better performance than the PB equation does when compared to the MC simulation data. The DFT behaves quite well for the real ionic solutions such as the KCl -NaCl-H2O, NaCl -CaCl2-H2O, and CaCl2-MgCl2-H2O systems.

  20. Volume based vs. time based chromatograms: reproducibility of data for gradient separations under high and low pressure conditions.

    PubMed

    Stankovich, Joseph J; Gritti, Fabrice; Stevenson, Paul G; Vajda, Péter; Beaver, Lois Ann; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-05-23

    A critical aspect in fast gradient separations carried out under constant pressure, in the very high pressure liquid chromatography (VHPLC) mode is that time-based chromatograms may not yield highly reproducible separations. A proposed solution to improve the reproducibility of these separations involves plotting the chromatograms as functions of the volume eluted vs. UV absorbance instead of time vs. UV. To study the consequences of using the volume-based rather than the time-based chromatograms, separations were first performed under low pressures that do not generate significant amounts of heat and for which the variations of the eluent density along the columns are negligible. Secondly, they were performed under very high pressures that do generate heat and measurable variations of the local retention factor and eluent density along the column. Comparison of the results provides estimates of the improvements obtained when volume based chromatograms are used in gradient analyses. Using a column packed with fully porous particles, four different types of methods and several sets for each method were used to perform the gradient elution runs: two sets of constant flow rate operations, four sets of constant pressure operations, two sets of constant pressure operations with programmed flow rate, and one set using the constant heat loss approach. The differences between time-based and volume-based chromatograms are demonstrated by using eight replicates of early, middle, and last eluting peaks. The results show that volume-based chromatograms improve the retention time reproducibility of the four constant pressure methods by a factor of 3.7 on average. If the column is not thermally conditioned prior to performing a long series of separations, flow controlled methods (constant flow rate, programmed constant pressure, and constant wall heat approaches) are more precise. If one gradient run is used to bring the column to a relatively stable temperature, constant

  1. DNA interactions of cobalt(III) mixed-polypyridyl complexes containing asymmetric ligands.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang-Li; Chao, Hui; Li, Hong; Hong, Xian-Lan; Liu, Yun-Jun; Tan, Li-Feng; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2004-06-01

    Three novel asymmetric ligands, 3-(pyridine-2-yl)-5,6-diphenyl-as-triazine (pdtb), 3-(pyridine-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]acenaphthylene (pdta) and 3-(pyridine-2-yl)-as-triazino[5,6-f]phenanthroline (pdtp) and their cobalt(III) complexes have been synthesized and characterized. Binding of the three complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated by spectroscopic methods, viscosity, cyclic voltammetry, and electrophoresis measurements. The experimental results indicate that the size and shape of the intercalated ligand have a marked effect on the binding affinity of complexes to CT-DNA. Complexes 2 and 3 have also been found to promote cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA from the supercoiled form I to the open circular form II upon irradiation.

  2. Synthesis and DNA interaction of a mixed proflavine-phenanthroline Tröger base.

    PubMed

    Baldeyrou, Brigitte; Tardy, Christelle; Bailly, Christian; Colson, Pierre; Houssier, Claude; Charmantray, Franck; Demeunynck, Martine

    2002-04-01

    We report the synthesis of an asymmetric Tröger base containing the two well characterised DNA binding chromophores, proflavine and phenanthroline. The mode of interaction of the hybrid molecule was investigated by circular and linear dichroism experiments and a biochemical assay using DNA topoisomerase I. The data are compatible with a model in which the proflavine moiety intercalates between DNA base pairs and the phenanthroline ring occupies the DNA groove. DNase I cleavage experiments were carried out to investigate the sequence preference of the hybrid ligand and a well resolved footprint was detected at a site encompassing two adjacent 5'-GTC.5-GAC triplets. The sequence preference of the asymmetric molecule is compared to that of the symmetric analogues.

  3. Studies on Photocleavage, DNA Binding, Cytotoxicity, and Docking Studies of Ruthenium(II) Mixed Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yata Praveen; Devi, C Shobha; Srishailam, A; Deepika, N; Kumar, V Ravi; Reddy, P Venkat; Nagasuryaprasad, K; Singh, Surya S; Nagababu, Penumaka; Satyanarayana, S

    2016-11-01

    This article describes the synthesis and characterization of three new Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes including [Ru(phen)2(dpphz)](2+) (1), [Ru(bpy)2(dpphz)](2+) (2) and [Ru(dmb)2(dpphz)](2+) (3) where dpphz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c] phenazine-11-hydrazide, phen =1,10-phenanthroline, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and dmb = 4,4'-dimethyl2,2'-bipyridine. The binding behaviors of these complexes to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were explored by spectroscopic titrations, viscosity measurements. Results suggest that these complexes can bind to CT-DNA through intercalation. However, their binding strength differs from each other; this may be attributed to difference in the ancillary ligand. The cytotoxicity of 1-3 was evaluated by MTT assay; results indicated that all complexes have significant dose dependent cytotoxicity with HeLa tumor cell line. All complexes exhibited efficient photocleavage of pBR322 DNA upon irradiation. The DNA binding ability of 1-3 was also studied by docking the complexes into B-DNA using docking program.

  4. Peak alignment and robust principal component analysis of gas chromatograms of fatty acid methyl esters and volatiles.

    PubMed

    Møller, Stina Frosch; Jørgensen, Bo M

    2007-04-01

    Gas chromatograms of fatty acid methyl esters and of volatile lipid oxidation products from fish lipid extracts are analyzed by multivariate data analysis [principal component analysis (PCA)]. Peak alignment is necessary in order to include all sampled points of the chromatograms in the data set. The ability of robust algorithms to deal with outlier problems, including both sample-wise and element-wise outliers, and the advantages and drawbacks of two robust PCA methods, robust PCA (ROBPCA) and robust singular value decomposition when analysing these GC data were investigated. The results show that the usage of ROPCA is advantageous, compared with traditional PCA, when analysing the entire profile of chromatographic data in cases of sub-optimally aligned data. It also demonstrates how choosing the most robust PCA (sample or element-wise) depends on the type of outliers present in the data set.

  5. RNA cell typing and DNA profiling of mixed samples: can cell types and donors be associated?

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Joyce; Lindenbergh, Alexander; Sijen, Titia

    2013-09-01

    Forensic samples regularly involve mixtures, which are readily recognised in forensic analyses. Combined DNA and mRNA profiling is an upcoming forensic practice to examine donors and cell types from the exact same sample. From DNA profiles individual genotypes may be deconvoluted, but to date no studies have established whether the cell types identified in corresponding RNA profiles can be associated with individual donors. Although RNA expression levels hold many variables from which an association may not be expected, proof of concept is important to forensic experts who may be cross examined about this possible correlation in court settings. Clearly, the gender-specificity of certain body fluids (semen, vaginal mucosa, menstrual secretion) can be instructive. However, when donors of the same gender or gender-neutral cell types are involved, alternatives are needed. Here we analyse basic two-component mixtures (two cell types provided by different donors) composed of six different cell types, and assess whether the heights of DNA and RNA peaks may guide association of donor and cell type. Divergent results were obtained; for some mixtures RNA peak heights followed the DNA results, but for others the major DNA component did not present higher RNA peaks. Also, variation in mixture ratios was observed for RNA profiling replicates and when different donor couples gave the same two body fluids. As sample degradation may affect the two nucleic acids and/or distinct cell types differently (and thus influence donor and cell type association), mixtures were subjected to elevated temperature or UV-light. Variation in DNA and RNA stability was observed both between and within cell types and depended on the method inducing degradation. Taken together, we discourage to associate cell types and donors from peak heights when performing RNA and DNA profiling.

  6. Evaluation of mixed-source, low-template DNA profiles in forensic science.

    PubMed

    Balding, David J

    2013-07-23

    Enhancements in sensitivity now allow DNA profiles to be obtained from only tens of picograms of DNA, corresponding to a few cells, even for samples subject to degradation from environmental exposure. However, low-template DNA (LTDNA) profiles are subject to stochastic effects, such as "dropout" and "dropin" of alleles, and highly variable stutter peak heights. Although the sensitivity of the newly developed methods is highly appealing to crime investigators, courts are concerned about the reliability of the underlying science. High-profile cases relying on LTDNA evidence have collapsed amid controversy, including the case of Hoey in the United Kingdom and the case of Knox and Sollecito in Italy. I argue that rather than the reliability of the science, courts and commentators should focus on the validity of the statistical methods of evaluation of the evidence. Even noisy DNA evidence can be more powerful than many traditional types of evidence, and it can be helpful to a court as long as its strength is not overstated. There have been serious shortcomings in statistical methods for the evaluation of LTDNA profile evidence, however. Here, I propose a method that allows for multiple replicates with different rates of dropout, sporadic dropins, different amounts of DNA from different contributors, relatedness of suspected and alternate contributors, "uncertain" allele designations, and degradation. R code implementing the method is open source, facilitating wide scrutiny. I illustrate its good performance using real cases and simulated crime scene profiles.

  7. Solvent fluctuations drive the hole transfer in DNA: a mixed quantum-classical study.

    PubMed

    Kubar, Tomás; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Elstner, Marcus

    2009-10-01

    We studied the hole transfer across adenine bridges in double-stranded DNA by means of a multiscale approach, propagating the hole in the framework of time-dependent DFT coupled to classical molecular dynamics simulation using a QM/MM scheme. The hole transfer in DNA is codetermined by the large fluctuations of site energies on the order of 0.4 eV, induced by the solvent degrees of freedom. These fluctuations lead to charge-transfer active conformations with large transfer efficiency, which are characterized by a favorable alignment of site energies along the DNA strand. This reduces the barrier for the hole transfer dramatically. Consequently, we find that a charge hopping mechanism is operative already for short bridges with fewer than four adenines, in contrast to the charge-transfer models assuming static DNA structures, where only tunneling occurs. The solvent fluctuations introduce a significant correlation between neighboring sites, enhancing the charge-transfer rate, while the fluctuation of electronic couplings has only a minor impact on the charge-transfer characteristics. Our results emphasize the importance of an accurate description of solvent effects as well as proper sampling, and it is suggested that charge transfer in DNA is gated by the dynamics of solvent.

  8. Prevalence and persistence of male DNA identified in mixed saliva samples after intense kissing.

    PubMed

    Kamodyová, Natália; Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Celec, Peter; Sedláčková, Tatiana; Repiská, Gabriela; Sviežená, Barbara; Minárik, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Identification of foreign biological material by genetic profiling is widely used in forensic DNA testing in different cases of sexual violence, sexual abuse or sexual harassment. In all these kinds of sexual assaults, the perpetrator could constrain the victim to kissing. The value of the victim's saliva taken after such an assault has not been investigated in the past with currently widely used molecular methods of extremely high sensitivity (e.g. qPCR) and specificity (e.g. multiplex Y-STR PCR). In our study, 12 voluntary pairs were tested at various intervals after intense kissing and saliva samples were taken from the women to assess the presence of male DNA. Sensitivity-focused assays based on the SRY (single-copy gene) and DYS (multi-copy gene) sequence motifs confirmed the presence of male DNA in female saliva after 10 and even 60min after kissing, respectively. For specificity, standard multiplex Y-STR PCR profiling was performed and male DNA was found in female saliva samples, as the entire Y-STR profile, even after 30min in one sample. Our study confirms that foreign DNA tends to persist for a restricted period of time in the victim's mouth, can be isolated from saliva after prompt collection and can be used as a valuable source of evidence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of mixed-source, low-template DNA profiles in forensic science

    PubMed Central

    Balding, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Enhancements in sensitivity now allow DNA profiles to be obtained from only tens of picograms of DNA, corresponding to a few cells, even for samples subject to degradation from environmental exposure. However, low-template DNA (LTDNA) profiles are subject to stochastic effects, such as “dropout” and “dropin” of alleles, and highly variable stutter peak heights. Although the sensitivity of the newly developed methods is highly appealing to crime investigators, courts are concerned about the reliability of the underlying science. High-profile cases relying on LTDNA evidence have collapsed amid controversy, including the case of Hoey in the United Kingdom and the case of Knox and Sollecito in Italy. I argue that rather than the reliability of the science, courts and commentators should focus on the validity of the statistical methods of evaluation of the evidence. Even noisy DNA evidence can be more powerful than many traditional types of evidence, and it can be helpful to a court as long as its strength is not overstated. There have been serious shortcomings in statistical methods for the evaluation of LTDNA profile evidence, however. Here, I propose a method that allows for multiple replicates with different rates of dropout, sporadic dropins, different amounts of DNA from different contributors, relatedness of suspected and alternate contributors, “uncertain” allele designations, and degradation. R code implementing the method is open source, facilitating wide scrutiny. I illustrate its good performance using real cases and simulated crime scene profiles. PMID:23818643

  10. Recovery of genomic DNA from archived PCR product mixes for subsequent multiplex amplification and typing of additional loci: forensic significance for older unsolved criminal cases.

    PubMed

    Patchett, Kylie L; Cox, Ken J; Burns, Dennis M

    2002-07-01

    A method for genomic DNA recovery from different types of PCR product mixes suitable for multiplex amplification and typing using the Profiler Plus STR typing system has been investigated. The application of this method is of significance in cases where the original DNA samples have been exhausted due to repeated typing analyses in an effort to maximize their evidentiary value. Such cases typically involve samples analyzed using the available DNA typing systems of the time which gave a markedly lower power of discrimination, either alone or in combination, compared to that of modern multiplex STR typing systems. It was found that an effective method for recovering genomic DNA from HLA-DQA1 +PM and CTT triplex amplification mixes, suitable for reproducible achievement of the complete Profiler Plus profile, involved the use of Amicon Microcon-100 microconcentrators. Interestingly, this method was not required to achieve the complete nine STR profile using D1S80 amplification mixes.

  11. Toward a DNA taxonomy of Alpine Rhithrogena (Ephemeroptera: Heptageniidae) using a mixed Yule-coalescent analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

    PubMed

    Vuataz, Laurent; Sartori, Michel; Wagner, André; Monaghan, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic larvae of many Rhithrogena mayflies (Ephemeroptera) inhabit sensitive Alpine environments. A number of species are on the IUCN Red List and many recognized species have restricted distributions and are of conservation interest. Despite their ecological and conservation importance, ambiguous morphological differences among closely related species suggest that the current taxonomy may not accurately reflect the evolutionary diversity of the group. Here we examined the species status of nearly 50% of European Rhithrogena diversity using a widespread sampling scheme of Alpine species that included 22 type localities, general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model analysis of one standard mtDNA marker and one newly developed nDNA marker, and morphological identification where possible. Using sequences from 533 individuals from 144 sampling localities, we observed significant clustering of the mitochondrial (cox1) marker into 31 GMYC species. Twenty-one of these could be identified based on the presence of topotypes (expertly identified specimens from the species' type locality) or unambiguous morphology. These results strongly suggest the presence of both cryptic diversity and taxonomic oversplitting in Rhithrogena. Significant clustering was not detected with protein-coding nuclear PEPCK, although nine GMYC species were congruent with well supported terminal clusters of nDNA. Lack of greater congruence in the two data sets may be the result of incomplete sorting of ancestral polymorphism. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of both gene regions recovered four of the six recognized Rhithrogena species groups in our samples as monophyletic. Future development of more nuclear markers would facilitate multi-locus analysis of unresolved, closely related species pairs. The DNA taxonomy developed here lays the groundwork for a future revision of the important but cryptic Rhithrogena genus in Europe.

  12. Toward a DNA Taxonomy of Alpine Rhithrogena (Ephemeroptera: Heptageniidae) Using a Mixed Yule-Coalescent Analysis of Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vuataz, Laurent; Sartori, Michel; Wagner, André; Monaghan, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic larvae of many Rhithrogena mayflies (Ephemeroptera) inhabit sensitive Alpine environments. A number of species are on the IUCN Red List and many recognized species have restricted distributions and are of conservation interest. Despite their ecological and conservation importance, ambiguous morphological differences among closely related species suggest that the current taxonomy may not accurately reflect the evolutionary diversity of the group. Here we examined the species status of nearly 50% of European Rhithrogena diversity using a widespread sampling scheme of Alpine species that included 22 type localities, general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model analysis of one standard mtDNA marker and one newly developed nDNA marker, and morphological identification where possible. Using sequences from 533 individuals from 144 sampling localities, we observed significant clustering of the mitochondrial (cox1) marker into 31 GMYC species. Twenty-one of these could be identified based on the presence of topotypes (expertly identified specimens from the species' type locality) or unambiguous morphology. These results strongly suggest the presence of both cryptic diversity and taxonomic oversplitting in Rhithrogena. Significant clustering was not detected with protein-coding nuclear PEPCK, although nine GMYC species were congruent with well supported terminal clusters of nDNA. Lack of greater congruence in the two data sets may be the result of incomplete sorting of ancestral polymorphism. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of both gene regions recovered four of the six recognized Rhithrogena species groups in our samples as monophyletic. Future development of more nuclear markers would facilitate multi-locus analysis of unresolved, closely related species pairs. The DNA taxonomy developed here lays the groundwork for a future revision of the important but cryptic Rhithrogena genus in Europe. PMID:21611178

  13. Mixed infection of Sida jamaicensis in Jamaica reveals the presence of three recombinant begomovirus DNA A components.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Cheryl; Kon, Tatsuya; Rojas, Maria; Graham, André; Martin, Darren; Gilbertson, Robert; Roye, Marcia

    2014-09-01

    Begomoviruses impose serious constraints on agriculture throughout the temperate, tropical and subtropical regions. Previously, we characterised a sida golden yellow vein virus isolate, SiGYVV-[JM:Lig2:08] (HQ009519-20) from a symptomatic Sida jamaicensis plant. With the aim of establishing whether it was hosting a mixed infection that could facilitate recombination, PCR-RFLP was done on DNA extracted from this plant, and the results suggested the presence of two additional genetically distinct DNA-A molecules. Sequence analysis of these two DNA-A molecules (relying on BLAST searches and the CLUSTAL V algorithm within the DNASTAR MegAlign module) revealed that they belonged to novel species, and we have tentatively named these viruses sida golden mosaic Braco virus-[Jamaica:Liguanea:2008] and sida golden mosaic Liguanea virus-[Jamaica:1:2008]. Using RDP4 (recombination detection program), we determined that all three viruses were recombinant, with bases ~10 to ~440 of both SiGMLigV-[JM:Lig:08] and SiGYVV-[JM:Lig2:08] having been derived from a relative of SiGMBV-[JM:Lig:08] (P<2.070×10(-7) for all seven of the recombination detection methods). SiGMBV-[JM:Lig:08] was itself a product of recombination, deriving bases ~490-1195 from a virus that was ~92% similar to malvastrum yellow mosaic Helshire virus. Phylogenetically, these DNA-A components are most closely related to those of malvaceous weed-infecting begomoviruses from Jamaica, Cuba, Florida and Mexico. The SiGMBV DNA-A was able to elicit symptomatic infection in N. benthamiana.

  14. Microfluidic devices for fluidic circulation and mixing improve hybridization signal intensity on DNA arrays.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Po Ki; Li, Guangshan; Bao, Yijia; Muller, Uwe R

    2003-02-01

    Reactions of biomolecules with surface mounted materials on microscope slides are often limited by slow diffusion kinetics, especially in low volumes where diffusion is the only means of mixing. This is a particular problem for reactions where only small amounts of analyte are available and the required reaction volume limits the analyte concentration. A low volume microfluidic device consisting of two interconnected 9 mm x 37.5 mm reaction chambers was developed to allow mixing and closed loop fluidic circulation over most of the surface of a microscope slide. Fluid samples are moved from one reaction chamber to the other by the rotation of a magnetic stirring bar that is driven by a standard magnetic stirrer. We demonstrate that circulation and mixing of different reagents can be efficiently accomplished by this closed loop device with solutions varying in viscosity from 1 to 16.2 centipoise. We also show by example of a microarray hybridization that the reaction efficiency can be enhanced 2-5 fold through fluid mixing under conditions where diffusion is rate limiting. For comparison, similar results were achieved with a disposable commercial device that covers only half of the reaction area of the closed loop device.

  15. Forensic science, genetics and wildlife biology: getting the right mix for a wildlife DNA forensics lab.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Rob

    2010-09-01

    Wildlife DNA forensics is receiving increasing coverage in the popular press and has begun to appear in the scientific literature in relation to several different fields. Recognized as an applied subject, it rests on top of very diverse scientific pillars ranging from biochemistry through to evolutionary genetics, all embedded within the context of modern forensic science. This breadth of scope, combined with typically limited resources, has often left wildlife DNA forensics hanging precariously between human DNA forensics and academics keen to seek novel applications for biological research. How best to bridge this gap is a matter for regular debate among the relatively few full-time practitioners in the field. The decisions involved in establishing forensic genetic services to investigate wildlife crime can be complex, particularly where crimes involve a wide range of species and evidential questions. This paper examines some of the issues relevant to setting up a wildlife DNA forensics laboratory based on experiences of working in this area over the past 7 years. It includes a discussion of various models for operating individual laboratories as well as options for organizing forensic testing at higher national and international levels.

  16. Synthesis, DNA/HSA Interaction Spectroscopic Studies and In Vitro Cytotoxicity of a New Mixed Ligand Cu(II) Complex.

    PubMed

    Gan, Qian; Fu, Xiabing; Chen, Weijiang; Xiong, Yahong; Fu, Yinlian; Chen, Shi; Le, Xueyi

    2016-05-01

    A new mixed ligand copper(II)-dipeptide complex with 2-(2'-pyridyl)benzothiazole (pbt), [Cu(Gly-L-leu)(pbt)(H2O)]·ClO4 (Gly-L-leu = Glycyl-L-leucine anion) was synthesized and characterized by various physico-chemical means. The DNA binding and cleavage properties of the complex investigated by viscosity, agarose gel electrophoresis and multi-spectroscopic techniques (UV, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence) showed that the complex was bound to CT-DNA through intercalation mode with moderate binding constant (K b = 3.132 × 10(4) M(-1)), and cleaved pBR322 DNA efficiently (~ 5 μM) in the presence of Vc, probably via an oxidative mechanism induced by •OH. Additionally, the interaction of the complex with human serum albumin (HSA) was explored by UV-visible, CD, fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and 3D fluorescence spectroscopy. The complex exhibits desired affinity to HSA through hydrophobic interaction. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of the complex against three human carcinoma cell lines (HeLa, HepG2 and A549) was evaluated by MTT assay, which showed that the complex had effective cytotoxicity and higher inhibition toward A549 cell lines with IC50 of 38.0 ± 3.2 μM.

  17. Relative biological effects of neutron mixed-beam irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy on cell survival and DNA double-strand breaks in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Kakuji; Kinashi, Yuko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Kitajima, Erika; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biological effects of neutron mixed-beam irradiation used for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is important in order to improve the efficacy of the therapy and to reduce side effects. In the present study, cell viability and DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and their radiosensitive mutant cells (xrs5, Ku80-deficient), following neutron mixed-beam irradiation for BNCT. Cell viability was significantly impaired in the neutron irradiation groups compared to the reference gamma-ray irradiation group. The relative biological effectiveness for 10% cell survival was 3.3 and 1.2 for CHO-K1 and xrs5 cells, respectively. There were a similar number of 53BP1 foci, indicators of DNA-DSBs, in the neutron mixed-beam and the gamma-ray groups. In addition, the size of the foci did not differ between groups. However, neutron mixed-beam irradiation resulted in foci with different spatial distributions. The foci were more proximal to each other in the neutron mixed-beam groups than the gamma-ray irradiation groups. These findings suggest that neutron beams may induce another type of DNA damage, such as clustered DNA-DSBs, as has been indicated for other high-LET irradiation.

  18. Relative biological effects of neutron mixed-beam irradiation for boron neutron capture therapy on cell survival and DNA double-strand breaks in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Kakuji; Kinashi, Yuko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Kitajima, Erika; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Ono, Koji; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biological effects of neutron mixed-beam irradiation used for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is important in order to improve the efficacy of the therapy and to reduce side effects. In the present study, cell viability and DNA double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) were examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1) and their radiosensitive mutant cells (xrs5, Ku80-deficient), following neutron mixed-beam irradiation for BNCT. Cell viability was significantly impaired in the neutron irradiation groups compared to the reference gamma-ray irradiation group. The relative biological effectiveness for 10% cell survival was 3.3 and 1.2 for CHO-K1 and xrs5 cells, respectively. There were a similar number of 53BP1 foci, indicators of DNA-DSBs, in the neutron mixed-beam and the gamma-ray groups. In addition, the size of the foci did not differ between groups. However, neutron mixed-beam irradiation resulted in foci with different spatial distributions. The foci were more proximal to each other in the neutron mixed-beam groups than the gamma-ray irradiation groups. These findings suggest that neutron beams may induce another type of DNA damage, such as clustered DNA-DSBs, as has been indicated for other high-LET irradiation. PMID:22966174

  19. Can a mixed damage interfere with DNA-protein cross-links repair?

    PubMed

    Marzano, C; Severin, E; Bordin, F

    2001-01-01

    Some photochemical and photobiological properties of 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen (TMP) have been studied in comparison with 1,4,6,8-tetramethyl-2H-furo[2,3-h]quinolin-2 one (FQ) and 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP). TMP and FQ can photobind to mammalian cell DNA in vivo, by UVA irradiation, forming DNA-protein cross-links (DPC), but only TMP shows a strong capacity of inducing interstrand cross-links (ISC). The mechanism of DPC formation was studied using the double irradiation method in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and DPC were detected by alkaline elution. Both TMP and FQ induce covalent diadducts linking together DNA and proteins. Studying the formation of double strand breaks (DSB) in CHO cells we observed that TMP induced a low amount of DSB, similar to 8-MOP. TMP and 8-MOP induced chromosomal aberrations in CHO cells to the same extent, while FQ appeared to be more active. Our data suggest that the ISC induced by TMP could trap enzymes involved in DPC repair.

  20. DNA methylation of cord blood cell types: Applications for mixed cell birth studies.

    PubMed

    Bakulski, Kelly M; Feinberg, Jason I; Andrews, Shan V; Yang, Jack; Brown, Shannon; L McKenney, Stephanie; Witter, Frank; Walston, Jeremy; Feinberg, Andrew P; Fallin, M Daniele

    2016-05-03

    Epigenome-wide association studies of disease widely use DNA methylation measured in blood as a surrogate tissue. Cell proportions can vary between people and confound associations of exposure or outcome. An adequate reference panel for estimating cell proportions from adult whole blood for DNA methylation studies is available, but an analogous cord blood cell reference panel is not yet available. Cord blood has unique cell types and the epigenetic signatures of standard cell types may not be consistent throughout the life course. Using magnetic bead sorting, we isolated cord blood cell types (nucleated red blood cells, granulocytes, monocytes, natural killer cells, B cells, CD4(+)T cells, and CD8(+)T cells) from 17 live births at Johns Hopkins Hospital. We confirmed enrichment of the cell types using fluorescence assisted cell sorting and ran DNA from the separated cell types on the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. After filtering, the final analysis was on 104 samples at 429,794 probes. We compared cell type specific signatures in cord to each other and methylation at 49.2% of CpG sites on the array differed by cell type (F-test P < 10(-8)). Differences between nucleated red blood cells and the remainder of the cell types were most pronounced (36.9% of CpG sites at P < 10(-8)) and 99.5% of these sites were hypomethylated relative to the other cell types. We also compared the mean-centered sorted cord profiles to the available adult reference panel and observed high correlation between the overlapping cell types for granulocytes and monocytes (both r=0.74), and poor correlation for CD8(+)T cells and NK cells (both r=0.08). We further provide an algorithm for estimating cell proportions in cord blood using the newly developed cord reference panel, which estimates biologically plausible cell proportions in whole cord blood samples.

  1. DNA methylation of cord blood cell types: Applications for mixed cell birth studies

    PubMed Central

    Bakulski, Kelly M.; Feinberg, Jason I.; Andrews, Shan V.; Yang, Jack; Brown, Shannon; L. McKenney, Stephanie; Witter, Frank; Walston, Jeremy; Feinberg, Andrew P.; Fallin, M. Daniele

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epigenome-wide association studies of disease widely use DNA methylation measured in blood as a surrogate tissue. Cell proportions can vary between people and confound associations of exposure or outcome. An adequate reference panel for estimating cell proportions from adult whole blood for DNA methylation studies is available, but an analogous cord blood cell reference panel is not yet available. Cord blood has unique cell types and the epigenetic signatures of standard cell types may not be consistent throughout the life course. Using magnetic bead sorting, we isolated cord blood cell types (nucleated red blood cells, granulocytes, monocytes, natural killer cells, B cells, CD4+T cells, and CD8+T cells) from 17 live births at Johns Hopkins Hospital. We confirmed enrichment of the cell types using fluorescence assisted cell sorting and ran DNA from the separated cell types on the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array. After filtering, the final analysis was on 104 samples at 429,794 probes. We compared cell type specific signatures in cord to each other and methylation at 49.2% of CpG sites on the array differed by cell type (F-test P < 10−8). Differences between nucleated red blood cells and the remainder of the cell types were most pronounced (36.9% of CpG sites at P < 10−8) and 99.5% of these sites were hypomethylated relative to the other cell types. We also compared the mean-centered sorted cord profiles to the available adult reference panel and observed high correlation between the overlapping cell types for granulocytes and monocytes (both r=0.74), and poor correlation for CD8+T cells and NK cells (both r=0.08). We further provide an algorithm for estimating cell proportions in cord blood using the newly developed cord reference panel, which estimates biologically plausible cell proportions in whole cord blood samples. PMID:27019159

  2. Lanthanide mixed ligand chelates for DNA profiling and latent fingerprint detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, E. R.; Allred, Clay

    1997-02-01

    It is our aim to develop a universally applicable latent fingerprint detection method using lanthanide (rare-earth) complexes as a source of luminescence. Use of these lanthanide complexes offers advantages on several fronts, including benefits from large Stokes shifts, long luminescence lifetimes, narrow emissions, ability of sequential assembly of complexes, and chemical variability of the ligands. Proper exploitation of these advantages would lead to a latent fingerprint detection method superior to any currently available. These same characteristics also lend themselves to many of the problems associated with DNA processing in the forensic science context.

  3. Considering relatives when assessing the evidential strength of mixed DNA profiles.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Duncan; Bright, Jo-Anne; Buckleton, John

    2014-11-01

    Sophisticated methods of DNA profile interpretation have enabled scientists to calculate weights for genotype sets proposed to explain some observed data. Using standard formulae these weights can be incorporated into an LR calculation that considers two competing propositions. We demonstrate here how consideration of relatedness to the person of interest can be incorporated into a LR calculation and how the same calculation can be used for familial searches of complex mixtures. We provide a general formula that can be used in semi or fully automated methods of calculation and demonstrate their use by working through an example.

  4. Mixed-stock analysis in green turtles Chelonia mydas: mtDNA decipher current connections among west Atlantic populations.

    PubMed

    Costa Jordao, Juliana; Bondioli, Ana Cristina Vigliar; Almeida-Toledo, Lurdes Foresti de; Bilo, Karin; Berzins, Rachel; Le Maho, Yvon; Chevallier, Damien; de Thoisy, Benoit

    2017-03-01

    The green turtle Chelonia mydas undertakes wide-ranging migrations between feeding and nesting sites, resulting in mixing and isolation of genetic stocks. We used mtDNA control region to characterize the genetic composition, population structure, and natal origins of C. mydas in the West Atlantic Ocean, at one feeding ground (State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), and three Caribbean nesting grounds (French Guiana, Guadeloupe, and Suriname). The feeding ground presented considerable frequency of common haplotypes from the South Atlantic, whereas the nesting sites presented a major contribution of the most common haplotype from the Caribbean. MSA revealed multiple origins of individuals at the feeding ground, notably from Ascension Island, Guinea Bissau, and French Guiana. This study enables a better understanding of the dispersion patterns and highlights the importance of connecting both nesting and feeding areas. Effective conservation initiatives need to encompass these ecologically and geographically distinct sites as well as those corridors connecting them.

  5. The Shimadzu CS 920 densitometer: illumination of thin layer chromatograms with a parallel light beam and its effects on quantification.

    PubMed

    Huf, F A

    1984-02-24

    The Shimadzu CS 920 has shown to be an easy to handle flying-spot densitometer that enables rapid quantification of thin layer chromatograms. Linear calibration curves with a relative standard deviation of 3 to 4% in the slope can be obtained for Sudan Yellow on Merck H60 plates. However, contrary to the statements in the instrument manual, the 'linearizer' performance is not in agreement with the Kubelka and Munk theory. Consequently, the CS 920 can only be used after empirically determined adjustment of the 'linearizer'. Furthermore, errors in analysis can increase up to 30% by using TLC-plates with fluctuating layer thickness.

  6. Structural varieties of selectively mixed G- and C-rich short DNA sequences studied with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanwei; Gao, Shang; Li, Caijin; Yan, Yuting; Wang, Bing; Guo, Xinhua

    2016-10-01

    Short guanine(G)-repeat and cytosine(C)-repeat DNA strands can self-assemble to form four-stranded G-quadruplexes and i-motifs, respectively. Herein, G-rich and C-rich strands with non-G or non-C terminal bases and different lengths of G- or C-repeats are mixed selectively in pH 4.5 and 6.7 ammonium acetate buffer solutions and studied by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Various strand associations corresponding to bi-, tri- and tetramolecular ions are observed in mass spectra, indicating that the formation of quadruplex structures is a random strand by strand association process. However, with increasing incubation time for the mixtures, initially associated hybrid tetramers will transform into self-assembled conformations, which is mainly driven by the structural stability. The melting temperature values of self-assembled quadruplexes suggest that the length of G-repeats or C-repeats shows more significant effect on the stability of quadruplex structures than that of terminal residues. Accordingly, we can obtain the self-associated tetrameric species generated from the mixtures of various homologous G- or C-strands efficiently by altering the length of G- or C-repeats. Our studies demonstrate that ESI-MS is a very direct, fast and sensitive tool to provide significant information on DNA strand associations and stoichiometric transitions, particularly for complex mixtures. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Cloning of Mix-related homeodomain proteins using fast retrieval of gel shift activities, (FROGS), a technique for the isolation of DNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Paul E.; Zhou, Yi; Lustig, Kevin D.; Huber, Tara L.; Kirschner, Marc W.; Zon, Leonard I.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a technique, fast retrieval of gel shift activities (FROGS), that allows for the rapid isolation of proteins that interact with DNA. Using this technique, we have isolated two proteins that are structurally similar to Mix.1, a PAX class homeodomain protein with ventralizing activity in Xenopus. The Mix family of proteins are expressed during late blastula and gastrula stages of Xenopus development. During gastrulation, these genes are expressed at high levels in distinct, yet overlapping regions in mesoderm and endoderm. The members of the Mix family heterodimerize with each other and overexpression of each results in severe axial abnormalities. Mix.3 and Mix.4 can directly induce primitive ectoderm to become endoderm whereas Mix.1 cannot. Injection of Mix.3 or Mix.4 RNA in the whole embryo results in extensive ectopic endodermin mRNA expression. The expression of the Mix family homeoproteins is differentially regulated by activin, Vg1, BMP-4, and fibroblast growth factor, supporting a model in which the Mix homeoproteins are downstream effectors of growth factor signaling during endoderm and ventral mesoderm formation. PMID:9736722

  8. The Unusual Monomer Recognition of Guanine-Containing Mixed Sequence DNA by a Dithiophene Heterocyclic Diamidine

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DB1255 is a symmetrical diamidinophenyl-dithiophene that exhibits cellular activity by binding to DNA and inhibiting binding of ERG, an ETS family transcription factor that is commonly overexpressed or translocated in leukemia and prostate cancer [Nhili, R., Peixoto, P., Depauw, S., Flajollet, S., Dezitter, X., Munde, M. M., Ismail, M. A., Kumar, A., Farahat, A. A., Stephens, C. E., Duterque-Coquillaud, M., Wilson, W. D., Boykin, D. W., and David-Cordonnier, M. H. (2013) Nucleic Acids Res. 41, 125–138]. Because transcription factor inhibition is complex but is an attractive area for anticancer and antiparasitic drug development, we have evaluated the DNA interactions of additional derivatives of DB1255 to gain an improved understanding of the biophysical chemistry of complex function and inhibition. DNase I footprinting, biosensor surface plasmon resonance, and circular dichroism experiments show that DB1255 has an unusual and strong monomer binding mode in minor groove sites that contain a single GC base pair flanked by AT base pairs, for example, 5′-ATGAT-3′. Closely related derivatives, such as compounds with the thiophene replaced with furan or selenophane, bind very weakly to GC-containing sequences and do not have biological activity. DB1255 is selective for the ATGAT site; however, a similar sequence, 5′-ATGAC-3′, binds DB1255 more weakly and does not produce a footprint. Molecular docking studies show that the two thiophene sulfur atoms form strong, bifurcated hydrogen bond-type interactions with the G-N-H sequence that extends into the minor groove while the amidines form hydrogen bonds to the flanking AT base pairs. The central dithiophene unit of DB1255 thus forms an excellent, but unexpected, single-GC base pair recognition module in a monomer minor groove complex. PMID:24495039

  9. Mixed-ligand copper(II) phenolate complexes: Synthesis, spectral characterization, phosphate-hydrolysis, antioxidant, DNA interaction and cytotoxic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurumoorthy, Perumal; Mahendiran, Dharmasivam; Prabhu, Durai; Arulvasu, Chinnasamy; Rahiman, Aziz Kalilur

    2015-01-01

    A series of phenol-based mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes of the type [CuL1-4(diimine)] (1-8), where L1-4 = N1,N2-bis(5-substituted-2-hydroxybenzylidene)-1,2-ethylene/phenylenediimine and diimine = 2,2‧-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), have been isolated and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. Electronic spectra of complexes suggest Cu(II) cation has a d9 electronic configuration, adopting distorted octahedral geometry with axial elongation, due to Jahn-Teller effect. Electrochemical studies of complexes evidenced one-electron irreversible reduction wave in the cathodic region. The observed rate constant (k) values for the hydrolysis of 4-nitrophenylphosphate (4-NPP) are in the range of 0.25-3.82 × 10-2 min-1. The obtained room temperature magnetic moment values (1.79-1.90 BM) lies within the range observed for octahedral copper(II) complexes. Antioxidant studies revealed that these complexes possess considerable radical scavenging potency against DPPH. The binding studies of complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) revealed intercalation with minor-groove binding, and the complex 4 exhibits highest binding activity than the other complexes. The cleavage activity on supercoiled pBR322 DNA revealed the involvement of hydroxyl radical and singlet-oxygen as reactive oxygen species, and complexes encourage binding to minor-groove. Further, the cytotoxicity of complex 4 on human hepatocellular liver carcinoma HepG2 cell line implies the cell death through apoptosis.

  10. DNA-interaction and in vitro antimicrobial studies of some mixed-ligand complexes of cobalt(II) with fluoroquinolone antibacterial agent ciprofloxacin and some neutral bidentate ligands.

    PubMed

    Patel, M N; Chhasatia, M R; Gandhi, D S

    2009-05-15

    Six new mixed-ligand complexes of Co(II) with ciprofloxacin (Cip) and neutral bidentate ligands have been synthesized and characterized. Binding and cleavage of DNA with the complex were investigated using spectroscopic method, viscosity measurements and gel electrophoresis techniques. Antibacterial activity has been assayed against two Gram((-ve)) and three Gram((+ve)) microorganisms using the doubling dilution technique.

  11. Sandwich assay for mixed-sequence recognition of double-stranded DNA: invader-based detection of targets specific to foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Denn, Benjamin; Karmakar, Saswata; Guenther, Dale C; Hrdlicka, Patrick J

    2013-10-28

    A 96-well plate sandwich assay based on Invader capture/signalling probes is used to recognize 28-mer mixed-sequence dsDNA targets specific to Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli. Targets are detected down to 20-55 pM concentration with excellent binding specificity.

  12. Interaction of DNA with Simple and Mixed Ligand Copper(II) Complexes of 1,10-Phenanthrolines as Studied by DNA-Fiber EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chikira, Makoto; Ng, Chew Hee; Palaniandavar, Mallayan

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of simple and ternary Cu(II) complexes of 1,10-phenanthrolines with DNA has been studied extensively because of their various interesting and important functions such as DNA cleavage activity, cytotoxicity towards cancer cells, and DNA based asymmetric catalysis. Such functions are closely related to the DNA binding modes of the complexes such as intercalation, groove binding, and electrostatic surface binding. A variety of spectroscopic methods have been used to study the DNA binding mode of the Cu(II) complexes. Of all these methods, DNA-fiber electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy affords unique information on the DNA binding structures of the complexes. In this review we summarize the results of our DNA-fiber EPR studies on the DNA binding structure of the complexes and discuss them together with the data accumulated by using other measurements. PMID:26402668

  13. Strain-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, K; Batt, C A

    1997-01-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony hybridization assay was developed that allows strain-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential strain-specific markers. Southern hybridization analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for strains 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These strain-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony hybridization assay. Colony lysis, hybridization, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target strains in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal hybridization temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target strain CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other strains. The probes for strains 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two strains. PMID:9212417

  14. Strain-specific differentiation of lactococci in mixed starter culture populations using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA-derived probes.

    PubMed

    Erlandson, K; Batt, C A

    1997-07-01

    A hydrophobic grid membrane filtration (HGMF) colony hybridization assay was developed that allows strain-specific differentiation of defined bacterial populations. The randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique was used to identify potential signature nucleic acid sequences unique to each member of a commercial cheese starter culture blend. The blend consisted of two closely related Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains, 160 and 331, and one L. lactis subsp. lactis strain, 210. Three RAPD primers (OPX 1, OPX 12, and OPX 15) generated a total of 32 products from these isolates, 20 of which were potential strain-specific markers. Southern hybridization analyses revealed, that the RAPD-generated signature sequences OPX15-0.95 and a 0.36-kb HaeIII fragment of OPX1-1.0b were specific for strains 331 and 210, respectively, within the context of the test starter culture blend. These strain-specific probes were used in a HGMF colony hybridization assay. Colony lysis, hybridization, and nonradioactive detection parameters were optimized to allow specific differentiation and quantitation of the target strains in the mixed starter culture population. When the 210 and 331 probes were tested at their optimal hybridization temperatures against single cultures, they detected 100% of the target strain CFUs, without cross-reactivity to the other strains. The probes for strains 210 and 331 also successfully detected their targets in blended cultures even with a high background of the other two strains.

  15. An automated Pearson's correlation change classification (APC3) approach for GC/MS metabonomic data using total ion chromatograms (TICs).

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bhaskaran David; Esuvaranathan, Kesavan; Ho, Paul C; Pasikanti, Kishore Kumar; Chan, Eric Chun Yong; Yap, Chun Wei

    2013-05-21

    A fully automated and computationally efficient Pearson's correlation change classification (APC3) approach is proposed and shown to have overall comparable performance with both an average accuracy and an average AUC of 0.89 ± 0.08 but is 3.9 to 7 times faster, easier to use and have low outlier susceptibility in contrast to other dimensional reduction and classification combinations using only the total ion chromatogram (TIC) intensities of GC/MS data. The use of only the TIC permits the possible application of APC3 to other metabonomic data such as LC/MS TICs or NMR spectra. A RapidMiner implementation is available for download at http://padel.nus.edu.sg/software/padelapc3.

  16. DNA measurement and immunohistochemical characterization of epithelial and mesenchymal cells in canine mixed mammary tumours: putative evidence for a common histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, F; Geraldes, M; Cassali, G; Rema, A; Schmitt, F

    1999-07-01

    DNA measurement by image cytometry, and a detailed immunohistochemical study using monoclonal antibodies directed against different human cytokeratin types, muscle-specific actin, vimentin and S100 protein were carried out on normal canine mammary tissue (n =4), benign canine mammary mixed tumours (n =20) and malignant canine mammary mixed tumours (n =13). The results showed that ductal and alveolar luminal cells in normal and neoplastic tissue were immunoreactive with CAM5.2 and AE1/AE3 antibodies recognizing human keratins.Basal/myoepithelial cells were clearly differentiated from ductal and alveolar epithelial cells, since the latter only expressed cytokeratins, whereas the former also expressed vimentin and muscle-specific actin. This immunohistochemical study showed that there is loss of expression of muscle-specific actin and cytokeratins in areas of myoepithelial proliferation, and enhanced expression of vimentin and S100 protein in proliferative areas with osseous and/or chondroid metaplasia. The ploidy studies revealed that 20% (4/20) of benign and 54% (7/13) of malignant mixed tumours of canine mammary gland were aneuploid and that the epithelial and myoepithelial components of the mixed tumours had identical DNA content. Our results reinforce the role of myoepithelial cells in mesenchymal metaplasia in mixed mammary tumours and suggest the possibility of a common origin of both components from a totipotential stem cell with capacity for divergent differentiation.

  17. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  18. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  19. The interaction between the outer layer of a mixed ion pair amphiphile/double-chained cationic surfactant vesicle and DNA: a Langmuir monolayer study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung; Chang, Chien-Hsiang

    2014-03-21

    The charge density of vesicular bilayers plays an important role in the structure characteristic of the vesicle-DNA complex for gene delivery. In this work, the charge density effect of catanionic vesicle surfaces on the association behavior of the vesicle with DNA was explored with the model Langmuir monolayer approach. The interaction of negatively charged DNA with positively charged Langmuir monolayers composed of catanionic vesicle-forming materials, hexadecyltrimethylammonium-dodecylsulfate (HTMA-DS) and dihexadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DHDAB), was investigated with surface pressure-area isotherms, area-time relaxation curves and Brewster angle microscope images. The results showed that the adsorption of DNA molecules onto the monolayers was enhanced with an increased DHDAB molar fraction (XDHDAB), which was apparently related to the increased charge density of the monolayers. With XDHDAB being increased up to 0.5, the mixed monolayers with a higher XDHDAB, or higher charge density, possessed a more stable characteristic at high surface pressures, at which the molecular status was close to that in a corresponding vesicular bilayer, due to the DHDAB-improved molecular packing/interaction. It was found that the composition of the mixed HTMA-DS-DHDAB monolayers at high surface pressures would be affected by the adsorbed DNA with the extent depending on XDHDAB. For the formation of stable HTMA-DS-DHDAB monolayer-DNA complexes, a strong electrostatic interaction of DNA with a monolayer of high charge density and a high monolayer stability characteristic resulting from DHDAB-improved molecular packing/interaction were thus required. The finding has an implication for the formulation of catanionic vesicles composed of an ion pair amphiphile, HTMA-DS, with DHDAB in gene delivery applications.

  20. Glucose Tolerance, MTHFR C677T and NOS3 G894T Polymorphisms, and Global DNA Methylation in Mixed Ancestry African Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Mutize, Tinashe; Erasmus, Rajiv T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify global DNA methylation and investigate the relationship with diabetes status and polymorphisms in MTHFR C677T and NOS3 G894T genes in mixed ancestry subjects from South Africa. Global DNA methylation was measured, and MTHFR rs1801133 and NOS3 rs1799983 polymorphisms were genotyped using high throughput real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing. Of the 564 participants, 158 (28%) individuals had T2DM of which 97 (17.2%) were screen-detected cases. Another 119 (21.1%) had prediabetes, that is, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or the combination of both, and the remainder 287 (50.9%) had normal glucose tolerance. Global DNA methylation was significantly higher in prediabetes and screen-detected diabetes than in normal glucose tolerance (both p ≤ 0.033) and in screen-detected diabetes compared to known diabetes on treatment (p = 0.019). There was no difference in global DNA methylation between known diabetes on treatment and normal glucose tolerance (p > 0.999). In multivariable linear regression analysis, only NOS3 was associated with increasing global DNA methylation (β = 0.943; 95% CI: 0.286 to 1.560). The association of global DNA methylation with screen-detected diabetes but not treated diabetes suggests that glucose control agents to some extent may be reversing DNA methylation. The association between NOS3 rs1799983 polymorphisms and DNA methylation suggests gene-epigenetic mechanisms through which vascular diabetes complications develop despite adequate metabolic control. PMID:27990443

  1. Glucose Tolerance, MTHFR C677T and NOS3 G894T Polymorphisms, and Global DNA Methylation in Mixed Ancestry African Individuals.

    PubMed

    Matsha, Tandi E; Pheiffer, Carmen; Mutize, Tinashe; Erasmus, Rajiv T; Kengne, Andre P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to quantify global DNA methylation and investigate the relationship with diabetes status and polymorphisms in MTHFR C677T and NOS3 G894T genes in mixed ancestry subjects from South Africa. Global DNA methylation was measured, and MTHFR rs1801133 and NOS3 rs1799983 polymorphisms were genotyped using high throughput real-time polymerase chain reaction and direct DNA sequencing. Of the 564 participants, 158 (28%) individuals had T2DM of which 97 (17.2%) were screen-detected cases. Another 119 (21.1%) had prediabetes, that is, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, or the combination of both, and the remainder 287 (50.9%) had normal glucose tolerance. Global DNA methylation was significantly higher in prediabetes and screen-detected diabetes than in normal glucose tolerance (both p ≤ 0.033) and in screen-detected diabetes compared to known diabetes on treatment (p = 0.019). There was no difference in global DNA methylation between known diabetes on treatment and normal glucose tolerance (p > 0.999). In multivariable linear regression analysis, only NOS3 was associated with increasing global DNA methylation (β = 0.943; 95% CI: 0.286 to 1.560). The association of global DNA methylation with screen-detected diabetes but not treated diabetes suggests that glucose control agents to some extent may be reversing DNA methylation. The association between NOS3 rs1799983 polymorphisms and DNA methylation suggests gene-epigenetic mechanisms through which vascular diabetes complications develop despite adequate metabolic control.

  2. Determination of bile acids in pig liver, pig kidney and bovine liver by gas chromatography-chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry with total ion chromatograms and extraction ion chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Suh-Jen Jane; Zhong, Yao-Shen; Weng, Jen-Feng; Huang, Hsiu-Hua; Hsieh, Pei-Yin

    2011-01-21

    An effective method has been developed for quantitative determination of six bile acids including lithocholic acid (LCA), deoxycholic acid (DCA), chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), hydodeoxycholic acid (HDCA), cholic acid (CA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) in biological tissues including pig liver, pig kidney and bovine liver by gas chromatography-chemical ionization/tandem mass spectrometry (GC-CI/MS/MS). Camphor-10-sulphonic acid (CSA) was proposed as effective catalyst for bile acid derivatization. Reactions were accelerated ultrasonically. The effects of different catalysts and reaction times on derivatization efficiency were evaluated and optimized. Bile acids were determined as methyl ester-trimethylsilyl ether and methyl ester-acetate derivatives. The efficiency of trimethylsilylation and acetylation was evaluated. Trimethylsilylation was done with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) as the trimethylsilyl donating reagent in a ultrasonic bath for 20 min. Acetylation was done in pyridine with acetic anhydride at 40-45°C for 4 h. The former reaction was faster than the latter. Thus, trimethylsilylation was employed for the quantitative analysis. Negligible interferences from sterols in biological matrices were observed when the biological samples were treated with solid phase extraction before GC-CI/MS/MS. The linearity, reproducibility, detection limit and recovery were evaluated under the optimized conditions. Satisfactory results were obtained when bile acid derivatives of LCA, CDCA, HDCA, and UDCA were determined with total ion chromatograms (TIC) while DCA and CA were determined with extracted ion chromatograms (EIC), respectively. The detection limits (S/N=3) for six bile acids in biological tissues were ranging from 0.40 to 1.6 ng/mL and the recoveries indicated that the proposed method was feasible for the determination of trace bile acids in the biological samples studied. The experimental results for the animal tissues purchased from five

  3. Quinoxaline based bio-active mixed ligand transition metal complexes: Synthesis, characterization, electrochemical, antimicrobial, DNA binding, cleavage, antioxidant and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Dhanaraj, C Justin; Johnson, Jijo

    2015-10-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized from N(2), N(3)-bis(4-nitrophenyl)quinoxaline-2,3-diamine and 1,10-phenanthroline. The compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR, UV-Vis., (1)H NMR, mass and ESR spectra. Octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes and distorted octahedral geometry for Cu(II) complex. Electrochemical behavior of the synthesized complexes was studied using cyclic voltammetry. Grain size and surface morphologies of the complexes were determined by powder XRD and SEM analyses. The mixed ligand metal complexes were screened for antimicrobial activity against bacterial species Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus; fungal species Aspergillus niger, and Candida albicans by disc diffusion method. The DNA binding and DNA cleavage activities of the compounds were determined using electronic absorption titration and agarose gel electrophoresis respectively. The superoxide radical scavenging and free radical scavenging activities of the Cu(II) complex was also evaluated. Molecular docking studies of the synthesized mixed ligand metal complexes were carried out against B-DNA dodecamer and the protein Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (pf DHFR).

  4. Removal of a PCR inhibitor and resolution of DNA STR types in mixed human-canine stains from a five year old case.

    PubMed

    Shutler, G G; Gagnon, P; Verret, G; Kalyn, H; Korkosh, S; Johnston, E; Halverson, J

    1999-05-01

    The analysis of biological trace evidence from a reopened investigation into a 1991 murder from Vernon, B.C. revealed mixed human and dog bloodstains on blue jean pants that contained a PCR inhibitory substance. The presence of the inhibitory substance was detected by the inhibition caused from adding a small aliquot of the test DNA extract into a PCR reaction designed to produce a known standard product. The removal of the PCR inhibitory substance was accomplished by treating the extracted DNA with Thiopropyl Sepharose 6B beads. DNA profiles from two human contributors and a canine were obtained using species specific polymorphic STR markers. The two human DNA profiles obtained from blue jean pants were resolved, one matched the suspect and the other matched the victim. The DNA profile from the canine component matched that obtained from the known sample of the victim's dog who was also slain during the assault. This evidence along with other DNA typing evidence was critical in obtaining a resolution of the case.

  5. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Heravi, Mitra; Kumala, Slawomir; Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J; Radzioch, Danuta; Muanza, Thierry M

    2015-06-01

    ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Acceptability of self-collection sampling for HPV-DNA testing in low-resource settings: a mixed methods approach.

    PubMed

    Bansil, Pooja; Wittet, Scott; Lim, Jeanette L; Winkler, Jennifer L; Paul, Proma; Jeronimo, Jose

    2014-06-12

    Vaginal self-sampling with HPV-DNA tests is a promising primary screening method for cervical cancer. However, women's experiences, concerns and the acceptability of such tests in low-resource settings remain unknown. In India, Nicaragua, and Uganda, a mixed-method design was used to collect data from surveys (N = 3,863), qualitative interviews (N = 72; 20 providers and 52 women) and focus groups (N = 30 women) on women's and providers' experiences with self-sampling, women's opinions of sampling at home, and their future needs. Among surveyed women, 90% provided a self- collected sample. Of these, 75% reported it was easy, although 52% were initially concerned about hurting themselves and 24% were worried about not getting a good sample. Most surveyed women preferred self-sampling (78%). However it was not clear if they responded to the privacy of self-sampling or the convenience of avoiding a pelvic examination, or both. In follow-up interviews, most women reported that they didn't mind self-sampling, but many preferred to have a provider collect the vaginal sample. Most women also preferred clinic-based screening (as opposed to home-based self-sampling), because the sample could be collected by a provider, women could receive treatment if needed, and the clinic was sanitary and provided privacy. Self-sampling acceptability was higher when providers prepared women through education, allowed women to examine the collection brush, and were present during the self-collection process. Among survey respondents, aids that would facilitate self-sampling in the future were: staff help (53%), additional images in the illustrated instructions (31%), and a chance to practice beforehand with a doll/model (26%). Self-and vaginal-sampling are widely acceptable among women in low-resource settings. Providers have a unique opportunity to educate and prepare women for self-sampling and be flexible in accommodating women's preference for self-sampling.

  7. Acceptability of self-collection sampling for HPV-DNA testing in low-resource settings: a mixed methods approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaginal self-sampling with HPV-DNA tests is a promising primary screening method for cervical cancer. However, women’s experiences, concerns and the acceptability of such tests in low-resource settings remain unknown. Methods In India, Nicaragua, and Uganda, a mixed-method design was used to collect data from surveys (N = 3,863), qualitative interviews (N = 72; 20 providers and 52 women) and focus groups (N = 30 women) on women’s and providers’ experiences with self-sampling, women’s opinions of sampling at home, and their future needs. Results Among surveyed women, 90% provided a self- collected sample. Of these, 75% reported it was easy, although 52% were initially concerned about hurting themselves and 24% were worried about not getting a good sample. Most surveyed women preferred self-sampling (78%). However it was not clear if they responded to the privacy of self-sampling or the convenience of avoiding a pelvic examination, or both. In follow-up interviews, most women reported that they didn’t mind self-sampling, but many preferred to have a provider collect the vaginal sample. Most women also preferred clinic-based screening (as opposed to home-based self-sampling), because the sample could be collected by a provider, women could receive treatment if needed, and the clinic was sanitary and provided privacy. Self-sampling acceptability was higher when providers prepared women through education, allowed women to examine the collection brush, and were present during the self-collection process. Among survey respondents, aids that would facilitate self-sampling in the future were: staff help (53%), additional images in the illustrated instructions (31%), and a chance to practice beforehand with a doll/model (26%). Conclusion Self-and vaginal-sampling are widely acceptable among women in low-resource settings. Providers have a unique opportunity to educate and prepare women for self-sampling and be flexible in accommodating women

  8. Structural dynamics and cation interactions of DNA quadruplex molecules containing mixed guanine/cytosine quartets revealed by large-scale MD simulations.

    PubMed

    Spacková, N; Berger, I; Sponer, J

    2001-04-11

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been utilized to study G-DNA quadruplex molecules containing mixed GCGC and all-guanine GGGG quartet layers. Incorporation of mixed GCGC quartets into G-DNA stems substantially enhances their sequence variability. The mixed quadruplexes form rigid assemblies that require integral monovalent cations for their stabilization. The interaction of cations with the all-guanine quartets is the leading contribution for the stability of the four-stranded assemblies, while the mixed quartets are rather tolerated within the structure. The simulations predict that two cations are preferred to stabilize a four-layer quadruplex stem composed of two GCGC and two all-guanine quartets. The distribution of cations in the structure is influenced by the position of the GCGC quartets within the quadruplex, the presence and arrangement of thymidine loops connecting the guanine/cytosine stretches forming the stems, and the cation type present (Na(+) or K(+)). The simulations identify multiple nanosecond-scale stable arrangements of the thymidine loops present in the molecules investigated. In these thymidine loops, several structured pockets are identified capable of temporarily coordinating cations. However, no stable association of cations to a loop has been observed. The simulations reveal several paths through the thymidine loop regions that can be followed by the cations when exchanging between the central ion channel in the quadruplex stem and the surrounding solvent. We have carried out 20 independent simulations while the length of simulations reaches a total of 90 ns, rendering this study one of the most extensive MD investigations carried out on nucleic acids so far. The trajectories provide a largely converged characterization of the structural dynamics of these four-stranded G-DNA molecules.

  9. Robust alignment of chromatograms by statistically analyzing the shifts matrix generated by moving window fast Fourier transform cross-correlation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingjing; Wen, Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Min; Lu, Hongmei; Liang, Yizeng; Zhan, Dejian

    2015-03-01

    Retention time shift is one of the most challenging problems during the preprocessing of massive chromatographic datasets. Here, an improved version of the moving window fast Fourier transform cross-correlation algorithm is presented to perform nonlinear and robust alignment of chromatograms by analyzing the shifts matrix generated by moving window procedure. The shifts matrix in retention time can be estimated by fast Fourier transform cross-correlation with a moving window procedure. The refined shift of each scan point can be obtained by calculating the mode of corresponding column of the shifts matrix. This version is simple, but more effective and robust than the previously published moving window fast Fourier transform cross-correlation method. It can handle nonlinear retention time shift robustly if proper window size has been selected. The window size is the only one parameter needed to adjust and optimize. The properties of the proposed method are investigated by comparison with the previous moving window fast Fourier transform cross-correlation and recursive alignment by fast Fourier transform using chromatographic datasets. The pattern recognition results of a gas chromatography mass spectrometry dataset of metabolic syndrome can be improved significantly after preprocessing by this method. Furthermore, the proposed method is available as an open source package at https://github.com/zmzhang/MWFFT2.

  10. [Study on HPLC chromatograms of different processed Euphorbia ebracteolata products and content change of three chemical components].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Guo; Li, Jun-Song; Cai, Bao-Chang

    2013-05-01

    To prepare processed products with different methods, in order to study the impact of auxiliary materials and temperature on chemical components of Euphorbia ebracteolata, and establish specific chromatograms of different processed products. Wel-chorm-C18 column (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 microm) was used and eluted with a gradient program, with acetonitrile (A)-water(B). The column temperature was 25 degrees C, and the detection wave length was set at 226 nm. The aim was to determine the content of effective components in different processed products--ebracteolata cpd B, ebracteolata cpd C and jolkinolide B and establish respective characteristic fingerprints to compare with similarity. The results showed that the content of ebracteolata cpd B, ebracteolata cpd C first increased and then decreased with the rise in temperature. Different processed products showed significant difference in HPLC spectrograms, with a low similarity. This study showed great impacts of auxiliary materials and temperature on chemical components of E. ebracteolata. As the vinegar processing method had higher attenuation and and synergistic effects than other methods, the auxiliary material vinegar cannot be replaced by chemical reagent acetic acid.

  11. Elution behavior of lambda-DNA with ternary mixed carrier solvents in an open-tubular capillary under laminar flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Takahiro; Fujinaga, Satoshi; Jinno, Naoya; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    An open-tubular capillary chromatography was developed based on the tube radial distribution of the ternary mixed carrier solvents that generated the inner and outer phases under laminar flow conditions. This is called "tube radial distribution chromatography" (TRDC). In this report, the elution behavior of lambda-DNA (48502 bp) as a biopolymer was examined by the TRDC system. The ternary mixture of water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate, 15:3:2 or 3:8:4 volume ratio, as a carrier solution was fed into the capillary tube made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or fused-silica. The mixture of hydrophobic 1-naphthol and hydrophilic lambda-DNA was subjected to the TRDC system using the water-rich carrier solution. Lambda-DNA and 1-naphthol were distributed between the inner and outer phases due to their hydrophilic and hydrophobic nature, and then eluted in this order, undergoing chromatographic separation. The mixture of hydrophilic 2,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid and hydrophobic lambda-DNA that was treated with surfactants was also examined with the organic solvent-rich carrier solution. The modified hydrophobic DNA and 2,6-naphthalenedisulfonic acid were distributed and eluted in this order due to their nature.

  12. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  13. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  14. Towards intelligent bioreactor systems: triggering the release and mixing of compounds based on DNA-functionalized hybrid hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Chen, Cuie; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-09-14

    We have designed and synthesized an intelligent mesoporous silica nanoparticle-DNA hydrogel bioreactor system that can be controlled by external stimuli. The system allowed the simultaneous incorporation of multiple components, and the separation between the components can be destroyed by a structural change of the DNA to initiate a reaction.

  15. ZRBA1, a Mixed EGFR/DNA Targeting Molecule, Potentiates Radiation Response Through Delayed DNA Damage Repair Process in a Triple Negative Breast Cancer Model

    SciTech Connect

    Heravi, Mitra; Kumala, Slawomir; Rachid, Zakaria; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J.; Radzioch, Danuta; Muanza, Thierry M.

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: ZRBA1 is a combi-molecule designed to induce DNA alkylating lesions and to block epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) TK domain. Inasmuch as ZRBA1 downregulates the EGFR TK-mediated antisurvival signaling and induces DNA damage, we postulated that it might be a radiosensitizer. The aim of this study was to further investigate the potentiating effect of ZRBA1 in combination with radiation and to elucidate the possible mechanisms of interaction between these 2 treatment modalities. Methods and Materials: The triple negative human breast MDA-MB-468 cancer cell line and mouse mammary cancer 4T1 cell line were used in this study. Clonogenic assay, Western blot analysis, and DNA damage analysis were performed at multiple time points after treatment. To confirm our in vitro findings, in vivo tumor growth delay assay was performed. Results: Our results show that a combination of ZRBA1 and radiation increases the radiation sensitivity of both cell lines significantly with a dose enhancement factor of 1.56, induces significant numbers of DNA strand breaks, prolongs higher DNA damage up to 24 hours after treatment, and significantly increases tumor growth delay in a syngeneic mouse model. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the higher efficacy of this combination could be partially due to increased DNA damage and delayed DNA repair process and to the inhibition of EGFR. The encouraging results of this combination demonstrated a significant improvement in treatment efficiency and therefore could be applicable in early clinical trial settings.

  16. Nonisotopic detection of human papillomavirus DNA in clinical specimens using a consensus PCR and a generic probe mix in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay format.

    PubMed

    Kornegay, J R; Shepard, A P; Hankins, C; Franco, E; Lapointe, N; Richardson, H; Coutleé, F

    2001-10-01

    We assessed the value of a new digoxigenin (DIG)-labeled generic probe mix in a PCR-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay format to screen for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA amplified from clinical specimens. After screening with this new generic assay is performed, HPV DNA-positive samples can be directly genotyped using a reverse blotting method with product from the same PCR amplification. DNA from 287 genital specimens was amplified via PCR using biotin-labeled consensus primers directed to the L1 gene. HPV amplicons were captured on a streptavidin-coated microwell plate (MWP) and detected with a DIG-labeled HPV generic probe mix consisting of nested L1 fragments from types 11, 16, 18, and 51. Coamplification and detection of human DNA with biotinylated beta-globin primers served as a control for both sample adequacy and PCR amplification. All specimens were genotyped using a reverse line blot assay (13). Results for the generic assay using MWPs and a DIG-labeled HPV generic probe mix (DIG-MWP generic probe assay) were compared with results from a previous analysis using dot blots with a radiolabeled nested generic probe mix and type-specific probes for genotyping. The DIG-MWP generic probe assay resulted in high intralaboratory concordance in genotyping results (88% versus 73% agreement using traditional methods). There were 207 HPV-positive results using the DIG-MWP method and 196 positives using the radiolabeled generic probe technique, suggesting slightly improved sensitivity. Only one sample failed to test positive with the DIG-MWP generic probe assay in spite of a positive genotyping result. Concordance between the two laboratories was nearly 87%. Approximately 6% of samples that were positive or borderline when tested with the DIG-MWP generic probe assay were not detected with the HPV type-specific panel, perhaps representing very rare or novel HPV types. This new method is easier to perform than traditional generic probe techniques and uses

  17. Massive processing of pyro-chromatogram mass spectra (py-GCMS) of soil samples using the PARAFAC2 algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cécillon, Lauric; Quénéa, Katell; Anquetil, Christelle; Barré, Pierre

    2015-04-01

    Due to its large heterogeneity at all scales (from soil core to the globe), several measurements are often mandatory to get a meaningful value of a measured soil property. A large number of measurements can therefore be needed to study a soil property whatever the scale of the study. Moreover, several soil investigation techniques produce large and complex datasets, such as pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC-MS) which produces complex 3-way data. In this context, straightforward methods designed to speed up data treatments are needed to deal with large datasets. GC-MS pyrolysis (py-GCMS) is a powerful and frequently used tool to characterize soil organic matter (SOM). However, the treatment of the results of a py-GCMS analysis of soil sample is time consuming (number of peaks, co-elution, etc.) and the treatment of large data set of py-GCMS results is rather laborious. Moreover, peak position shifts and baseline drifts between analyses make the automation of GCMS programs data treatment difficult. These problems can be fixed using the Parallel Factor Analysis 2 (PARAFAC 2, Kiers et al., 1999; Bro et al., 1999). This algorithm has been applied frequently on chromatography data but has never been applied to analyses of SOM. We developed a Matlab routine based on existing Matlab packages dedicated to the simultaneous treatment of dozens of pyro-chromatograms mass spectra. We applied this routine on 40 soil samples. The benefits and expected improvements of our method will be discussed in our poster. References Kiers et al. (1999) PARAFAC2 - PartI. A direct fitting algorithm for the PARAFAC2 model. Journal of Chemometrics, 13: 275-294. Bro et al. (1999) PARAFAC2 - PartII. Modeling chromatographic data with retention time shifts. Journal of Chemometrics, 13: 295-309.

  18. Platform-independent and Label-free Quantitation of Proteomic Data Using MS1 Extracted Ion Chromatograms in Skyline

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Birgit; Rardin, Matthew J.; MacLean, Brendan X.; Zawadzka, Anna M.; Frewen, Barbara E.; Cusack, Michael P.; Sorensen, Dylan J.; Bereman, Michael S.; Jing, Enxuan; Wu, Christine C.; Verdin, Eric; Kahn, C. Ronald; MacCoss, Michael J.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances in metabolic and postmetabolic labeling methods for quantitative proteomics, there remains a need for improved label-free approaches. This need is particularly pressing for workflows that incorporate affinity enrichment at the peptide level, where isobaric chemical labels such as isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation and tandem mass tags may prove problematic or where stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture labeling cannot be readily applied. Skyline is a freely available, open source software tool for quantitative data processing and proteomic analysis. We expanded the capabilities of Skyline to process ion intensity chromatograms of peptide analytes from full scan mass spectral data (MS1) acquired during HPLC MS/MS proteomic experiments. Moreover, unlike existing programs, Skyline MS1 filtering can be used with mass spectrometers from four major vendors, which allows results to be compared directly across laboratories. The new quantitative and graphical tools now available in Skyline specifically support interrogation of multiple acquisitions for MS1 filtering, including visual inspection of peak picking and both automated and manual integration, key features often lacking in existing software. In addition, Skyline MS1 filtering displays retention time indicators from underlying MS/MS data contained within the spectral library to ensure proper peak selection. The modular structure of Skyline also provides well defined, customizable data reports and thus allows users to directly connect to existing statistical programs for post hoc data analysis. To demonstrate the utility of the MS1 filtering approach, we have carried out experiments on several MS platforms and have specifically examined the performance of this method to quantify two important post-translational modifications: acetylation and phosphorylation, in peptide-centric affinity workflows of increasing complexity using mouse and human models. PMID:22454539

  19. Evaluation of environmental polychlorobiphenyls and DDE in terms of mixtures of commercial preparations from peak heights of packed-column gas chromatograms using a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Eder, G

    1976-06-23

    A method is proposed for evaluating gas chromatograms of multi-component PCB mixtures and superposed single components simultaneously. Apparent concentrations relative to a calibration mixture are assigned to a number of suitable peaks, and the apparent concentrations are related to the true concentrations by a set of linear equations, which are solved by least-squares approximation. The results are provided with an estimate of their confidence intervals.

  20. Proof-of-Principle of rTLC, an Open-Source Software Developed for Image Evaluation and Multivariate Analysis of Planar Chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Fichou, Dimitri; Ristivojević, Petar; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2016-12-20

    High-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) is an advantageous analytical technique for analysis of complex samples. Combined with multivariate data analysis, it turns out to be a powerful tool for profiling of many samples in parallel. So far, chromatogram analysis has been time-consuming and required the application of at least two software packages to convert HPTLC chromatograms into a numerical data matrix. Hence, this study aimed to develop a powerful, all in one open-source software for user-friendly image processing and multivariate analysis of HPTLC chromatograms. Using the caret package for machine learning, the software was set up in the R programming language with an HTML-user interface created by the shiny package. The newly developed software, called rTLC, is deployed online, and instructions for direct use as a web application and for local installation, if required, are available on GitHub. rTLC was created especially for routine use in planar chromatography. It provides the necessary tools to guide the user in a fast protocol to the statistical data output (e.g., data extraction, preprocessing techniques, variable selection, and data analysis). rTLC offers a standardized procedure and informative visualization tools that allow the user to explore the data in a reproducible and comprehensive way. As proof-of-principle of rTLC, German propolis samples were analyzed using pattern recognition techniques, principal component analysis, hierarchic cluster analysis, and predictive techniques, such as random forest and support vector machines.

  1. Combination of HPLC chromatogram and hypoglycemic effect identifies isoflavones as the principal active fraction of Belamcanda chinensis leaf extract in diabetes treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Wu, Chong-Ming; Dai, Rong-Ji; Li, Liang; Yu, Yu-Hong; Li, Yan; Meng, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Yongqian; Deng, Yu-Lin

    2011-02-15

    In previous study, we demonstrated the hypoglycemic effect of aqueous extract of Belamcanda chinensis leaves in rats. Here, we separated the aqueous extract of B. chinensis leaves and investigated the spectrum-effect relationships between HPLC chromatograms and hypoglycemic activities of different isolates from B. chinensis leaf extract. Sequential solvent extraction with petroleum ether, chloroform, acetic ester and n-butanol provided several isolates showing similar hypoglycemic activities, making it difficult to discriminate the active fractions. Stepwise elution through HP20 macroporous resin by water, 40% and 95% ethanol provided isolates with distinct hypoglycemic activities, representing a simple, rapid and efficient preparative separation method. Combination of HPLC chromatogram and pharmacological effect targeted a hypoglycemic activity-related region in HPLC chromatogram. Each peak in this region was analyzed by UV spectrum scan. Most of them were flavonoids in which tectoridin and swertisin were known flavonoids with anti-diabetic activities. In together, this work provides a general model of combination of HPLC chromatography and pharmacological effect to study the spectrum-effect relationships of aqueous extract from B. chinensis leaves, which can be used to find principle components of B. chinensis on pharmacological activity.

  2. EuroForMix: An open source software based on a continuous model to evaluate STR DNA profiles from a mixture of contributors with artefacts.

    PubMed

    Bleka, Øyvind; Storvik, Geir; Gill, Peter

    2016-03-01

    We have released a software named EuroForMix to analyze STR DNA profiles in a user-friendly graphical user interface. The software implements a model to explain the allelic peak height on a continuous scale in order to carry out weight-of-evidence calculations for profiles which could be from a mixture of contributors. Through a properly parameterized model we are able to do inference on mixture proportions, the peak height properties, stutter proportion and degradation. In addition, EuroForMix includes models for allele drop-out, allele drop-in and sub-population structure. EuroForMix supports two inference approaches for likelihood ratio calculations. The first approach uses maximum likelihood estimation of the unknown parameters. The second approach is Bayesian based which requires prior distributions to be specified for the parameters involved. The user may specify any number of known and unknown contributors in the model, however we find that there is a practical computing time limit which restricts the model to a maximum of four unknown contributors. EuroForMix is the first freely open source, continuous model (accommodating peak height, stutter, drop-in, drop-out, population substructure and degradation), to be reported in the literature. It therefore serves an important purpose to act as an unrestricted platform to compare different solutions that are available. The implementation of the continuous model used in the software showed close to identical results to the R-package DNAmixtures, which requires a HUGIN Expert license to be used. An additional feature in EuroForMix is the ability for the user to adapt the Bayesian inference framework by incorporating their own prior information.

  3. Diazido mixed-amine platinum(IV) anticancer complexes activatable by visible-light form novel DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yao; Woods, Julie A; Farrer, Nicola J; Robinson, Kim S; Pracharova, Jitka; Kasparkova, Jana; Novakova, Olga; Li, Huilin; Salassa, Luca; Pizarro, Ana M; Clarkson, Guy J; Song, Lijiang; Brabec, Viktor; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-07-15

    Platinum diam(m)ine complexes, such as cisplatin, are successful anticancer drugs, but suffer from problems of resistance and side-effects. Photoactivatable Pt(IV) prodrugs offer the potential of targeted drug release and new mechanisms of action. We report the synthesis, X-ray crystallographic and spectroscopic properties of photoactivatable diazido complexes trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3)2(OH)2(MA)(Py)] (1; MA=methylamine, Py=pyridine) and trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3)2(OH)2(MA)(Tz)] (2; Tz=thiazole), and interpret their photophysical properties by TD-DFT modelling. The orientation of the azido groups is highly dependent on H bonding and crystal packing, as shown by polymorphs 1p and 1q. Complexes 1 and 2 are stable in the dark towards hydrolysis and glutathione reduction, but undergo rapid photoreduction with UVA or blue light with minimal amine photodissociation. They are over an order of magnitude more potent towards HaCaT keratinocytes, A2780 ovarian, and OE19 oesophageal carcinoma cells than cisplatin and show particular potency towards cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells (A2780cis). Analysis of binding to calf-thymus (CT), plasmids, oligonucleotide DNA and individual nucleotides reveals that photoactivated 1 and 2 form both mono- and bifunctional DNA lesions, with preference for G and C, similar to transplatin, but with significantly larger unwinding angles and a higher percentage of interstrand cross-links, with evidence for DNA strand cross-linking further supported by a comet assay. DNA lesions of 1 and 2 on a 50 bp duplex were not recognised by HMGB1 protein, in contrast to cisplatin-type lesions. The photo-induced platination reactions of DNA by 1 and 2 show similarities with the products of the dark reactions of the Pt(II) compounds trans-[PtCl2(MA)(Py)] (5) and trans-[PtCl2(MA)(Tz)] (6). Following photoactivation, complex 2 reacted most rapidly with CT DNA, followed by 1, whereas the dark reactions of 5 and 6 with DNA were comparatively slow

  4. Diazido Mixed-Amine Platinum(IV) Anticancer Complexes Activatable by Visible-Light Form Novel DNA Adducts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yao; Woods, Julie A; Farrer, Nicola J; Robinson, Kim S; Pracharova, Jitka; Kasparkova, Jana; Novakova, Olga; Li, Huilin; Salassa, Luca; Pizarro, Ana M; Clarkson, Guy J; Song, Lijiang; Brabec, Viktor; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Platinum diam(m)ine complexes, such as cisplatin, are successful anticancer drugs, but suffer from problems of resistance and side-effects. Photoactivatable PtIV prodrugs offer the potential of targeted drug release and new mechanisms of action. We report the synthesis, X-ray crystallographic and spectroscopic properties of photoactivatable diazido complexes trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3)2(OH)2(MA)(Py)] (1; MA=methylamine, Py=pyridine) and trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3)2(OH)2(MA)(Tz)] (2; Tz=thiazole), and interpret their photophysical properties by TD-DFT modelling. The orientation of the azido groups is highly dependent on H bonding and crystal packing, as shown by polymorphs 1 p and 1 q. Complexes 1 and 2 are stable in the dark towards hydrolysis and glutathione reduction, but undergo rapid photoreduction with UVA or blue light with minimal amine photodissociation. They are over an order of magnitude more potent towards HaCaT keratinocytes, A2780 ovarian, and OE19 oesophageal carcinoma cells than cisplatin and show particular potency towards cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells (A2780cis). Analysis of binding to calf-thymus (CT), plasmids, oligonucleotide DNA and individual nucleotides reveals that photoactivated 1 and 2 form both mono- and bifunctional DNA lesions, with preference for G and C, similar to transplatin, but with significantly larger unwinding angles and a higher percentage of interstrand cross-links, with evidence for DNA strand cross-linking further supported by a comet assay. DNA lesions of 1 and 2 on a 50 bp duplex were not recognised by HMGB1 protein, in contrast to cisplatin-type lesions. The photo-induced platination reactions of DNA by 1 and 2 show similarities with the products of the dark reactions of the PtII compounds trans-[PtCl2(MA)(Py)] (5) and trans-[PtCl2(MA)(Tz)] (6). Following photoactivation, complex 2 reacted most rapidly with CT DNA, followed by 1, whereas the dark reactions of 5 and 6 with DNA were comparatively slow

  5. Fluorescent mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of anthracene-appended Schiff bases: studies on DNA binding, nuclease activity and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jaividhya, Paramasivam; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Dhivya, Rajkumar; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkadher; Palaniandavar, Mallayan

    2015-07-14

    A series of mixed ligand copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(L)(phen)(ACN)](ClO4)21-5, where L is a bidentate Schiff base ligand (N(1)-(anthracen-10-ylmethylene)-N(2)-methylethane-1,2-diamine (L1), N(1)-(anthracen-10-ylmethylene)-N(2),N(2)-dimethylethane-1,2-diamine (L2), N(1)-(anthracen-10-yl-methylene)-N(2)-ethylethane-1,2-diamine (L3), N(1)-(anthracen-10-ylmethylene)-N(2),N(2)-diethylethane-1,2-diamine (L4) and N(1)-(anthracen-10-ylmethylene)-N(3)-methylpropane-1,3-diamine (L5)) and phen is 1,10-phenanthroline, have been synthesized and characterized by spectral and analytical methods. The X-ray crystal structure of 5 reveals that the coordination geometry around Cu(ii) is square pyramidal distorted trigonal bipyramidal (τ, 0.76). The corners of the trigonal plane of the geometry are occupied by the N2 nitrogen atom of phen, the N4 nitrogen atom of L5 and the N5 nitrogen of acetonitrile while the N1 nitrogen of phen and the N3 nitrogen of L5 occupy the axial positions with an N1-Cu1-N3 bond angle of 176.0(3)°. All the complexes display a ligand field band (600-705 nm) and three less intense anthracene-based bands (345-395 nm) in solution. The Kb values calculated from absorption spectral titration of the complexes (π→π*, 250-265 nm) with Calf Thymus (CT) DNA vary in the order 5 > 4 > 3 > 2 > 1. The fluorescence intensity of the complexes (520-525 nm) decreases upon incremental addition of CT DNA, which reveals the involvement of phen rather than the appended anthracene ring in partial DNA intercalation with the DNA base stack. The extent of quenching is in agreement with the DNA binding affinities and the relative increase in the viscosity of DNA upon binding to the complexes as well. Thus 5 interacts with DNA more strongly than 4 on account of the stronger involvement in hydrophobic DNA interaction of the anthracenyl moiety, which is facilitated by the propylene ligand backbone with chair conformation. The ability of complexes (100 μM) to cleave DNA (p

  6. Mixing of M Segment DNA Vaccines to Hantaan Virus and Puumala Virus Reduces Their Immunogenicity in Hamsters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    with renal syndrome (HFRS). In merica, several other hantaviruses cause hantavirus pulmonary yndrome (HPS) [1]. There are currently no U.S. licensed vac...online 25 April 2008 eywords: a b s t r a c t To determine if DNA vaccines for two hantaviruses causing hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, Hantaan...twoantaviruses emorrhagic fever with renal syndrome NA vaccines hantaviruses could be detected. In contrast, if the DNAs were given as separate vaccinations to

  7. Studies of the B-Z transition of DNA: The temperature dependence of the free-energy difference, the composition of the counterion sheath in mixed salt, and the preparation of a sample of the 5'-d[T-(m(5) C-G)12 -T] duplex in pure B-DNA or Z-DNA form.

    PubMed

    Guéron, Maurice; Plateau, Pierre; Filoche, Marcel

    2016-07-01

    It is often envisioned that cations might coordinate at specific sites of nucleic acids and play an important structural role, for instance in the transition between B-DNA and Z-DNA. However, nucleic acid models explicitly devoid of specific sites may also exhibit features previously considered as evidence for specific binding. Such is the case of the "composite cylinder" (or CC) model which spreads out localized features of DNA structure and charge by cylindrical averaging, while sustaining the main difference between the B and Z structures, namely the better immersion of the B-DNA phosphodiester charges in the solution. Here, we analyze the non-electrostatic component of the free-energy difference between B-DNA and Z-DNA. We also compute the composition of the counterion sheath in a wide range of mixed-salt solutions and of temperatures: in contrast with the large difference of composition between the B-DNA and Z-DNA forms, the temperature dependence of sheath composition, previously unknown, is very weak. In order to validate the model, the mixed-salt predictions should be compared to experiment. We design a procedure for future measurements of the sheath composition based on Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and complemented by (31) P NMR. With due consideration for the kinetics of the B-Z transition and for the capacity of generating at will the B or Z form in a single sample, the 5'-d[T-(m(5) C-G)12 -T] 26-mer emerges as a most suitable oligonucleotide for this study. Finally, the application of the finite element method to the resolution of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation is described in detail. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 369-384, 2016.

  8. Mixed ligand complexation of some transition metal ions in solution and solid state: Spectral characterization, antimicrobial, antioxidant, DNA cleavage activities and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobana, Sutha; Dharmaraja, Jeyaprakash; Selvaraj, Shanmugaperumal

    2013-04-01

    Equilibrium studies of Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes involving a primary ligand 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; A) and imidazoles viz., imidazole (him), benzimidazole (bim), histamine (hist) and L-histidine (his) as co-ligands(B) were carried out pH-metrically in aqueous medium at 310 ± 0.1 K with I = 0.15 M (NaClO4). In solution state, the stoichiometry of MABH, MAB and MAB2 species have been detected. The primary ligand(A) binds the central M(II) ions in a monodentate manner whereas him, bim, hist and his co-ligands(B) bind in mono, mono, bi and tridentate modes respectively. The calculated Δ log K, log X and log X' values indicate higher stability of the mixed ligand complexes in comparison to binary species. Stability of the mixed ligand complex equilibria follows the Irving-Williams order of stability. In vitro biological evaluations of the free ligand(A) and their metal complexes by well diffusion technique show moderate activities against common bacterial and fungal strains. Oxidative cleavage interaction of ligand(A) and their copper complexes with CT DNA is also studied by gel electrophoresis method in the presence of oxidant. In vitro antioxidant evaluations of the primary ligand(A), CuA and CuAB complexes by DPPH free radical scavenging model were carried out. In solid, the MAB type of M(II)sbnd 5-FU(A)sbnd his(B) complexes were isolated and characterized by various physico-chemical and spectral techniques. Both the magnetic susceptibility and electronic spectral analysis suggest distorted octahedral geometry. Thermal studies on the synthesized mixed ligand complexes show loss of coordinated water molecule in the first step followed by decomposition of the organic residues subsequently. XRD and SEM analysis suggest that the microcrystalline nature and homogeneous morphology of MAB complexes. Further, the 3D molecular modeling and analysis for the mixed ligand MAB complexes have also been carried out.

  9. Molecular mechanism of promoter selection in gene transcription. I. Development of a rapid mixing-photocrosslinking technique to study the kinetics of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase binding to T7 DNA.

    PubMed

    Park, C S; Hillel, Z; Wu, C W

    1982-06-25

    A combined rapid mixing-photocrosslinking technique has been developed to investigate the kinetics of the interaction between Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and T7 DNA. The reactants were rapidly mixed in a modified Durrum stopped-flow apparatus, and the intermediates formed at different stages of the binding process were "frozen" by photocrosslinking with a UV light pulse of 10-mus duration at various times after mixing. The results indicate that the initial binding between RNA polymerase and T7 DNA is a diffusion-controlled reaction. Furthermore, the extents of initial contracts with DNA made with the beta, beta', and sigma subunits of RNA polymerase are roughly proportional to the sizes of these subunits, suggesting that complex formation occurs through random collision between the two reactants. After the initial complex formation, the rate of transfer of polymerase between individual DNA molecules is slow, implying that the polymerase molecules are undergoing predominantly intramolecular transfer during the promoter search. From the kinetic studies of subunit-DNA contacts during RNA polymerase binding to T7 DNA, it can be inferred that the beta, beta', and sigma subunits are directly participating in the promoter search process.

  10. Spectral and redox studies on mixed ligand complexes of cobalt(III) phenanthroline/bipyridyl and benzoylhydrazones, their DNA binding and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, S; Annaraj, J; Athappan, Pr

    2005-03-01

    Cobalt(III) complexes of the type [Co(N-N)2L](ClO4)2.H2O [where L=anionic form of para-substituted benzaldehyde-benzoylhydrazone (BHBX-); X=H, Me, OMe, OH, Cl or NO2; N-N=2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen)] have been synthesized and characterized through UV-Vis, IR, NMR and electrochemical studies. The IR spectral frequencies support the mode of coordination of BHBX to the metal through the imino nitrogen and enolic oxygen atoms. The electronic absorption spectra exhibit metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transition around 450 nm together with intraligand (IL) bands that are comparable to that of [Co(phen/bpy)3]3+. In acetonitrile solution these complexes show two well defined redox couples corresponding to Co(III/II) and Co(II/I) processes. Binding of these complexes with herring sperm DNA have been investigated by spectroscopic and voltammetric methods. The lower binding constant values of these complexes with respect to the [Co(phen/bpy)3]3+ are ascribed to the polar interaction of the substituted benzoylhydrazone moiety with the sugar-phosphate backbone of the DNA. The UV spectrum shows reasonable hypochromism with slight (2-4 nm) red shift, while the cyclic voltammogram shows decrease in current intensity along with a very small shift in the formal potential of the Co(III/II) redox couple. These experimental results indicate that phen mixed ligand complexes bind to DNA through an intercalative mode more effectively than their bpy counterparts. These complexes are also found to have good antimicrobial activity.

  11. Development of a ginkgo biloba fingerprint chromatogram with UV and evaporative light scattering detection and optimization of the evaporative light scattering detector operating conditions.

    PubMed

    van Nederkassel, A M; Vijverman, V; Massart, D L; Vander Heyden, Y

    2005-09-02

    A fingerprint chromatogram of a standardized Ginkgo biloba extract is developed on a monolithic silica column using a ternary gradient containing water, iso-propanol and tetrahydrofuran. For the detection, UV and evaporative light scattering (ELS) detectors are used, the latter allowing detection of the poor UV absorbing compounds as ginkgolides (A-C and J) and bilobalide in the extract. The complementary information between the UV and ELS fingerprint is evaluated. The ELS detector used in this study can operate in an impactor 'on' or 'off' mode. For each mode, the operating conditions such as the nebulizing gas flow rate, the drift tube temperature and the gain are optimized by use of three-level screening designs to obtain the best signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio in the final ELS fingerprint chromatogram. In both impactor modes, very similar S/N ratios are obtained for the nominal levels of the design. However, optimization of the operating conditions resulted, for both impactor modes, in a significant increase in S/N ratios compared to the initial evaluated conditions, obtained from the detector software.

  12. Deep Sequencing of Mixed Total DNA without Barcodes Allows Efficient Assembly of Highly Plastic Ascidian Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Nimrod D.; Feldstein, Tamar; Shenkar, Noa; Botero-Castro, Fidel; Griggio, Francesca; Mastrototaro, Francesco; Delsuc, Frédéric; Douzery, Emmanuel J.P.; Gissi, Carmela; Huchon, Dorothée

    2013-01-01

    Ascidians or sea squirts form a diverse group within chordates, which includes a few thousand members of marine sessile filter-feeding animals. Their mitochondrial genomes are characterized by particularly high evolutionary rates and rampant gene rearrangements. This extreme variability complicates standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based techniques for molecular characterization studies, and consequently only a few complete Ascidian mitochondrial genome sequences are available. Using the standard PCR and Sanger sequencing approach, we produced the mitochondrial genome of Ascidiella aspersa only after a great effort. In contrast, we produced five additional mitogenomes (Botrylloides aff. leachii, Halocynthia spinosa, Polycarpa mytiligera, Pyura gangelion, and Rhodosoma turcicum) with a novel strategy, consisting in sequencing the pooled total DNA samples of these five species using one Illumina HiSeq 2000 flow cell lane. Each mitogenome was efficiently assembled in a single contig using de novo transcriptome assembly, as de novo genome assembly generally performed poorly for this task. Each of the new six mitogenomes presents a different and novel gene order, showing that no syntenic block has been conserved at the ordinal level (in Stolidobranchia and in Phlebobranchia). Phylogenetic analyses support the paraphyly of both Ascidiacea and Phlebobranchia, with Thaliacea nested inside Phlebobranchia, although the deepest nodes of the Phlebobranchia–Thaliacea clade are not well resolved. The strategy described here thus provides a cost-effective approach to obtain complete mitogenomes characterized by a highly plastic gene order and a fast nucleotide/amino acid substitution rate. PMID:23709623

  13. Deep sequencing of mixed total DNA without barcodes allows efficient assembly of highly plastic ascidian mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Nimrod D; Feldstein, Tamar; Shenkar, Noa; Botero-Castro, Fidel; Griggio, Francesca; Mastrototaro, Francesco; Delsuc, Frédéric; Douzery, Emmanuel J P; Gissi, Carmela; Huchon, Dorothée

    2013-01-01

    Ascidians or sea squirts form a diverse group within chordates, which includes a few thousand members of marine sessile filter-feeding animals. Their mitochondrial genomes are characterized by particularly high evolutionary rates and rampant gene rearrangements. This extreme variability complicates standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based techniques for molecular characterization studies, and consequently only a few complete Ascidian mitochondrial genome sequences are available. Using the standard PCR and Sanger sequencing approach, we produced the mitochondrial genome of Ascidiella aspersa only after a great effort. In contrast, we produced five additional mitogenomes (Botrylloides aff. leachii, Halocynthia spinosa, Polycarpa mytiligera, Pyura gangelion, and Rhodosoma turcicum) with a novel strategy, consisting in sequencing the pooled total DNA samples of these five species using one Illumina HiSeq 2000 flow cell lane. Each mitogenome was efficiently assembled in a single contig using de novo transcriptome assembly, as de novo genome assembly generally performed poorly for this task. Each of the new six mitogenomes presents a different and novel gene order, showing that no syntenic block has been conserved at the ordinal level (in Stolidobranchia and in Phlebobranchia). Phylogenetic analyses support the paraphyly of both Ascidiacea and Phlebobranchia, with Thaliacea nested inside Phlebobranchia, although the deepest nodes of the Phlebobranchia-Thaliacea clade are not well resolved. The strategy described here thus provides a cost-effective approach to obtain complete mitogenomes characterized by a highly plastic gene order and a fast nucleotide/amino acid substitution rate.

  14. Comparing self- and provider-collected swabbing for HPV DNA testing in female-to-male transgender adult patients: a mixed-methods biobehavioral study protocol.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Sari L; Deutsch, Madeline B; Peitzmeier, Sarah M; White Hughto, Jaclyn M; Cavanaugh, Timothy; Pardee, Dana J; McLean, Sarah; Marrow, Elliot J; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Panther, Lori; Gelman, Marcy; Green, Jamison; Potter, Jennifer

    2017-06-23

    Cervical cancer, nearly all cases of which are caused by one of several high-risk strains of the human papillomavirus (hr-HPV), leads to significant morbidity and mortality in individuals with a cervix. Trans masculine (TM) individuals were born with female reproductive organs and identify as male, man, transgender man, or another diverse gender identity different from their female assigned sex at birth. Routine preventive sexual health screening of TM patients is recommended, including screening for cervical cancer and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs); however, as many as one in three TM patients are not up-to-date per recommended U.S. Among cisgender (non-transgender) women, self-swab hr.-HPV DNA testing as a primary cervical cancer screening method and self-swab specimen collection for other STIs have high levels of acceptability. No study has yet been conducted to compare the performance and acceptability of self- and provider-collected swabs for hr.-HPV DNA testing and other STIs in TM patients. This article describes the study protocol for a mixed-methods biobehavioral investigation enrolling 150 sexually active TM to (1) assess the clinical performance and acceptability of a vaginal self-swab for hr.-HPV DNA testing compared to provider cervical swab and cervical cytology, and (2) gather acceptability data on self-collected specimens for other STIs. Study participation entails a one-time clinical visit at Fenway Health in Boston, MA comprised of informed consent, quantitative assessment, venipuncture for syphilis testing and HIV (Rapid OraQuick) testing, randomization, collection of biological specimens/biomarkers, participant and provider satisfaction survey, and qualitative exit interview. Participants are compensated $100. The primary study outcomes are concordance (kappa statistic) and performance (sensitivity and specificity) of self-collected vaginal HPV DNA specimens vs provider-collected cervical HPV swabs as a gold standard. This study

  15. On-line coupled high performance liquid chromatography-gas chromatography for the analysis of contamination by mineral oil. Part 2: migration from paperboard into dry foods: interpretation of chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Maurus; Grob, Koni

    2012-09-14

    Mineral oil hydrocarbons are complex as well as varying mixtures and produce correspondingly complex chromatograms (on-line HPLC-GC-FID as described in Part 1): mostly humps of unresolved components are obtained, sometimes with sharp peaks on top. Chromatograms may also contain peaks of hydrocarbons from other sources which need to be subtracted from the mineral oil components. The review focuses on the interpretation and integration of chromatograms related to food contamination by mineral oil from paperboard boxes (off-set printing inks and recycled fibers), if possible distinguishing between various sources of mineral oil. Typical chromatograms are shown for relevant components and interferences as well as food samples encountered on the market. Details are pointed out which may provide relevant information. Integration is shown for examples of paperboard packaging materials as well as various foods. Finally the uncertainty of the analysis and limit of quantitation are discussed for specific examples. They primarily result from the interpretation of the chromatogram, manually placing the baseline and cuts for taking off extraneous components. Without previous enrichment, the limit of quantitation is between around 0.1 mg/kg for foods with a low fat content and 2.5 mg/kg for fats and oils. The measurement uncertainty can be kept clearly below 20% for most samples.

  16. Theoretical calculations, DNA interaction, topoisomerase I and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase studies of water soluble mixed-ligand nickel(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Gurumoorthy, Perumal; Mahendiran, Dharmasivam; Kalilur Rahiman, Aziz

    2016-03-25

    Eight water soluble mixed-ligand nickel(II) complexes of the type [NiL(1-4)(diimine)H2O]·(ClO4)2, (1-8) where L(1-4) = 2-((2-(piperazin-1-yl)ethylimino)methyl)-4-substituted phenols, and diimine = 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The uncoordinated perchlorate anions was ascertained form IR spectra of the complexes, and the absorption spectra reveal the octahedron geometry around nickel(II) ion with tridentate Schiff base ligand, diimine and a coordinated water molecule. Cyclic voltammograms of the complexes indicate the one-electron irreversible processes in the cathodic and anodic region. In vitro antioxidant activity proved the significant radical scavenging activity of the complexes against DPPH radical. The groove/electrostatic binding nature of complexes with CT-DNA (calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid) were affirmed by absorption, hydrodynamic and voltammetric titration experiments and docking analysis. All the complexes exhibit significant cleavage activity on plasmid DNA via hydrolytic and oxidatively, in which the oxidative mechanism involves hydroxyl radicals and supports the possibility of minor-groove binding. The complex 4 shows significant topoisomerase I (Topo-I) inhibitory activity. The molecular modeling analysis of complexes with phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) receptor indicate the hydrogen bonding with Met1039, Asp837 and Leu1027, and hydrophobic interactions with Ser488, Asn498, Asp500, Gln662, Lys668, Ile844, Ile847, Ile850, Val941, Leu942, Leu1020, Met1034, Leu1035, Thr1037, Met1039, Gln1041 and Ile1051 of subdomain IIA of BSA. The complexes show σ-π interaction between diimines and amino groups of Leu1030 and Arg839. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. One Step Forward for Reducing False Positive and False Negative Compound Identifications from Mass Spectrometry Metabolomics Data: New Algorithms for Constructing Extracted Ion Chromatograms and Detecting Chromatographic Peaks.

    PubMed

    Myers, Owen D; Sumner, Susan J; Li, Shuzhao; Barnes, Stephen; Du, Xiuxia

    2017-09-05

    False positive and false negative peaks detected from extracted ion chromatograms (EIC) are an urgent problem with existing software packages that preprocess untargeted liquid or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry metabolomics data because they can translate downstream into spurious or missing compound identifications. We have developed new algorithms that carry out the sequential construction of EICs and detection of EIC peaks. We compare the new algorithms to two popular software packages XCMS and MZmine 2 and present evidence that these new algorithms detect significantly fewer false positives. Regarding the detection of compounds known to be present in the data, the new algorithms perform at least as well as XCMS and MZmine 2. Furthermore, we present evidence that mass tolerance in m/z should be favored rather than mass tolerance in ppm in the process of constructing EICs. The mass tolerance parameter plays a critical role in the EIC construction process and can have immense impact on the detection of EIC peaks.

  18. Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) foraging at Arvoredo Island in Southern Brazil: Genetic characterization and mixed stock analysis through mtDNA control region haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Maíra Carneiro; Lara-Ruiz, Paula; Reisser, Júlia Wiener; da Silva Pinto, Luciano; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2009-07-01

    We analyzed mtDNA control region sequences of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Arvoredo Island, a foraging ground in southern Brazil, and identified eight haplotypes. Of these, CM-A8 (64%) and CM-A5 (22%) were dominant, the remainder presenting low frequencies (< 5%). Haplotype (h) and nucleotide (π) diversities were 0.5570 ± 0.0697 and 0.0021 ± 0.0016, respectively. Exact tests of differentiation and AMOVA Φ(ST) pairwise values between the study area and eight other Atlantic foraging grounds revealed significant differences in most areas, except Ubatuba and Rocas/Noronha, in Brazil (p > 0.05). Mixed Stock Analysis, incorporating eleven Atlantic and one Mediterranean rookery as possible sources of individuals, indicated Ascension and Aves islands as the main contributing stocks to the Arvoredo aggregation (68.01% and 22.96%, respectively). These results demonstrate the extensive relationships between Arvoredo Island and other Atlantic foraging and breeding areas. Such an understanding provides a framework for establishing adequate management and conservation strategies for this endangered species.

  19. Green turtles (Chelonia mydas) foraging at Arvoredo Island in Southern Brazil: Genetic characterization and mixed stock analysis through mtDNA control region haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed mtDNA control region sequences of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Arvoredo Island, a foraging ground in southern Brazil, and identified eight haplotypes. Of these, CM-A8 (64%) and CM-A5 (22%) were dominant, the remainder presenting low frequencies (< 5%). Haplotype (h) and nucleotide (π) diversities were 0.5570 ± 0.0697 and 0.0021 ± 0.0016, respectively. Exact tests of differentiation and AMOVA ΦST pairwise values between the study area and eight other Atlantic foraging grounds revealed significant differences in most areas, except Ubatuba and Rocas/Noronha, in Brazil (p > 0.05). Mixed Stock Analysis, incorporating eleven Atlantic and one Mediterranean rookery as possible sources of individuals, indicated Ascension and Aves islands as the main contributing stocks to the Arvoredo aggregation (68.01% and 22.96%, respectively). These results demonstrate the extensive relationships between Arvoredo Island and other Atlantic foraging and breeding areas. Such an understanding provides a framework for establishing adequate management and conservation strategies for this endangered species. PMID:21637527

  20. Correlation between mixed-function oxidase enzyme induction and aflatoxin B/sub 1/-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in the chick embryo, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.W.; Bloom, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    The unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) technique has been adapted for use in the chick embryo, in vivo, to determine the relationship between induction of the mixed-function oxidase (MFO) enzyme system and genetic damage from an indirect-acting mutagen-carcinogen. Embryos were injected at 6 days of incubation (DI) with either phenobarbital (PB), a specific inducer of P-450-associated enzyme activities, or 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (TCB), a specific inducer of P/sub 1/-450-associated enzyme activities. Aflatoxin B/sub 1/ (AFB1) was injected 24 hr later (7 DI), followed by a 5-hr continuous /sup 3/H-thymidine exposure. The livers were removed, prepared for autoradiography, and hepatocytes were scored for an increase in grains/nucleus, indicative of UDS. Aflatoxin B/sub 1/ caused a dose-related increase in UDS in all control and induction groups. Phenobarbital-induced embryos had an increased UDS response while TCB-induced embryos had a decreased UDS response, relative to noninduced embryos, for each dosage of AFB1. This suggests that the genotoxicity of an indirect-acting mutagen-carcinogen can be either increased or decreased, in vivo, depending on the inducer used. The chick embryo provides an excellent system for studying the effect of MFO induction on the genotoxicity of promutagen-carcinogens in a developing system.

  1. Characterization of the herb-derived components in rats following oral administration of Carthamus tinctorius extract by extracting diagnostic fragment ions (DFIs) in the MS(n) chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Feng; Song, Yue-Lin; Guo, Xiao-Yu; Tu, Peng-Fei; Jiang, Yong

    2014-12-21

    In this study, a new strategy named extracting diagnostic fragment ions (DFIs) in the MS(n) chromatograms [E(DFI)MS(n)Cs] was proposed to rapidly detect and identify the in vivo components derived from the extract of Carthamus tinctorius (ECT), using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with hybrid ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry. In order to comprehensively summarize the DFIs for the global identification of in vivo constituents of ECT, chemical profiling was carried out, and then the typical metabolic pathways of the primary components were proposed according to their chemical categories, by orally administering representative reference compounds. Based on the proposed metabolic pathways and the fragmentation rules, a list of DFIs was constructed and adopted to differentiate and identify the metabolites from the endogenous substances in the MS(n) chromatograms of ECT-treated biological samples, in combination with the neutral loss scan mode as a supplement. As a result, a total of 156 compounds were tentatively assigned in vivo, including 63, 73, 50, and 17 components from rat plasma, urine, bile, and feces, respectively, following oral administration of ECT. Deglycosylation, oxidation, methylation, sulfonation, and glucuronidation were observed as the major metabolic pathways for the chemical constituents of ECT, and dehydroxylation was detected at the A-ring of flavones for the first time. The findings suggested that the E(DFI)MS(n)Cs-based strategy which integrated ideas from single compounds to herbal extracts and from extract chemical profiling to in vivo metabolite profiling, could be used as a reliable tool for rapidly discovering and identifying herb-related constituents in vivo.

  2. Oxidative DNA damage of mixed copper(II) complexes with sulfonamides and 1,10-phenanthroline. Crystal structure of [Cu(N-quinolin-8-yl-p-toluenesulfonamidate)2(1,10-phenanthroline)].

    PubMed

    Macías, Benigno; García, Isabel; Villa, María V; Borrás, Joaquín; González-Alvarez, Marta; Castiñeiras, Alfonso

    2003-08-01

    Mixed coordination compounds of Cu(II) with sulfonamides and 1,10-phenanthroline as ligands have been prepared and characterised. Single crystal structural determination of the complex [Cu(N-quinolin-8-yl-p-toluenesulfonamidate)(2)(phen)] shows Cu(II) ions are located in a highly distorted octahedral environment, probably as a consequence of the Jahn-Teller effect. The FT-IR and electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra are also discussed. The mixed complexes prepared undergo an extensive DNA cleavage in the presence of ascorbate and hydrogen peroxide. Two of the complexes have higher nucleolytic efficiency than the bis(o-phenanthroline)copper(II) complex.

  3. Identification of leachables observed in the size exclusion chromatograms of a low concentration product stored in prefilled syringes.

    PubMed

    Valente, Joseph J; Peddicord, Michael B; Rinaldi, Frank A; Kelly, Kathleen A; Bolgar, Mark S

    2017-05-30

    Requisite leachables testing of pharmaceutical products is commonly conducted with pre-defined analytical methods on a subset of materials intended to be representative of the marketed product. Throughout product development, leachables may occasionally be detected in other methods not specifically intended for monitoring such impurities. We have identified two leachables, ethyl 4-ethoxybenzoate (E4E) and 2,6-di(t-butyl)-4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadien-1-one (BHT-OH) in a low concentration product stored in prefilled syringes (PFS). The leachables were initially detected by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) as late-eluting impurity peaks. Syringe component extraction studies indicated that the impurities were related to the syringe stoppers. Positive identification of E4E was accomplished by reversed phase liquid chromatography- tandem mass spectrometry (RPLC-MS/MS). Positive identification of BHT-OH required RPLC-solid phase extraction-cryoflow NMR (RPLC-SPE-NMR), as initial RPLC-MS/MS investigations were unsuccessful in elucidating the structure. We focus specifically on the efforts required to identify the leachables, and the fortuitous mixed mode separation mechanism and low concentration nature of the product, which were the main factors contributing to the unlikely detection of the leachables by SEC. We note that our investigations were conducted independently of formal leachables and extractables (L&E) studies and we discuss challenges with designing and conducting such studies in a manner that captures the comprehensive L&E profile of a product.

  4. PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI micelles and PEG-b-PPS/PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI mixed micelles as non-viral vectors for plasmid DNA: tumor immunotoxicity in B16F10 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Velluto, Diana; Thomas, Susan N; Simeoni, Eleonora; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbell, Jeffrey A

    2011-12-01

    Cationic micelles formed from poly(ethylene glycol)-bl-poly(propylene sulfide)-bl-poly(ethylene imine) (PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI) and from mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol)-bl-poly(propylene sulfide) (PEG-b-PPS) with PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI were explored as non-viral vectors for plasmid DNA (pDNA) transfection in a tumor immunotoxicity model. Complexes with pDNA were found to be templated exclusively by the size of the pDNA-free micelles and ranged from 240 nm (for PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI) to 30 nm (for mixed micelles of PEG-b-PPS/PEG-b-PPS-b-PEI). Both formulations transfected melanoma cells well in vitro. As a model with a functional read-out of tumor cell death, one with likely only small bystander effects, tumors were transfected with an antigen transgene, using an antigen to which the recipient animals had been previously vaccinated with a Th1-biasing adjuvant. Reduction in tumor growth, increase in intratumoral infiltration of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and accumulation of Th1-biasing cytokines indicated that both micelle formulations transfected efficiently compared with naked pDNA and with low cytotoxicity.

  5. Synthesis, structure information, DNA/BSA binding affinity and in vitro cytotoxic studies of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes containing a phenylalanine derivative and diimine co-ligands.

    PubMed

    Annaraj, B; Balakrishnan, C; Neelakantan, M A

    2016-07-01

    Binary [Cu(PAIC)(H2O)2]·H2O (1) and mixed ligand [Cu(PAIC)(L)]·2H2O complexes, where PAIC=phenylalanine imidazole carboxylic acid, L=diimine coligands [2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (2) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3)] have been synthesized and fully characterized by analytical and spectral techniques. The X-ray structure of [Cu(PAIC)(phen)]·2H2O (3) shows a N4O coordination with square pyramidal geometry around the copper (II) atom. The spin Hamiltonian parameters calculated for the complexes account for the distorted square planar structure and rules out the possibility of a trigonal bipyramidal structure. Interaction of the complexes (1-3) with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) was studied by using different techniques (absorption titration, fluorescence quenching and thermal melting) and the studies suggest that these complexes bind to CT DNA through intercalation. The DNA-binding affinity of the complexes has further been explained by DFT computational results. Binding activity of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) reveals that the complexes can strongly quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching mechanism. DNA cleavage experiments using plasmid DNA pUC 19 show that the complexes exhibit efficient chemical nuclease activity even in the absence of any external additives. The cytotoxicity of the complexes against human normal cell line (HBL 100) and human breast cancer cell line (MCF-7) shows that metal complexation of the ligands results in a significant enhancement in the cell death of MCF-7. Finally, docking studies on DNA and protein binding interactions were performed.

  6. DNA binding of iron(II) mixed-ligand complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Mudasir; Yoshioka, N; Inoue, H

    1999-01-01

    Absorption spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) have been used to characterize the DNA binding of [Fe(phen)3]2+, [Fe(phen)2(DIP)]2+ and [Fe(phen)(DIP)2]2+ where phen and DIP stand for 1,10-phenanthroline and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, respectively. Both [Fe(phen)3]2+ and [Fe(phen)2(DIP)]2+ bind weakly to calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) in an electrostatic mode, while [Fe(phen)(DIP)2]2+ binds more strongly to CT-DNA, possibly in an intercalation mode. The hypochromicity, red shift and Kb increase in the order [Fe(phen)3]2+ < [Fe(phen)2(DIP)]2+ < [Fe(phen)(DIP)2]2+ in accordance with the increase in size and hydrophobicity of the iron(II) complexes. The thermodynamic parameters obtained suggest that the DNA binding of both [Fe(phen)3]2+ and [Fe(phen)2(DIP)]2+ is entropically driven, while that of [Fe(phen)(DIP)2]2+ is enthalpically driven. A strong CD spectrum in the UV and visible region develops upon addition of CT-DNA into the racemate solution of each iron(II) complex (Pfeiffer effect). This has revealed that a shift in diastereomeric inversion equilibrium takes place in the solution to yield an excess of one of the DNA-complex diastereomers. The striking resemblance of the CD spectral profiles to those of the pure delta-enantiomer indicates that the delta-enantiomer of the iron(II) complexes is preferentially bound to CT-DNA. The mechanism of the development of Pfeiffer CD is proposed on the basis of kinetic studies on the DNA binding of the racemic iron(II) complexes.

  7. Blocking primers to enhance PCR amplification of rare sequences in mixed samples - a case study on prey DNA in Antarctic krill stomachs.

    PubMed

    Vestheim, Hege; Jarman, Simon N

    2008-07-20

    Identification of DNA sequence diversity is a powerful means for assessing the species present in environmental samples. The most common molecular strategies for estimating taxonomic composition depend upon PCR with universal primers that amplify an orthologous DNA region from a range of species. The diversity of sequences within a sample that can be detected by universal primers is often compromised by high concentrations of some DNA templates. If the DNA within the sample contains a small number of sequences in relatively high concentrations, then less concentrated sequences are often not amplified because the PCR favours the dominant DNA types. This is a particular problem in molecular diet studies, where predator DNA is often present in great excess of food-derived DNA. We have developed a strategy where a universal PCR simultaneously amplifies DNA from food items present in DNA purified from stomach samples, while the predator's own DNA is blocked from amplification by the addition of a modified predator-specific blocking primer. Three different types of modified primers were tested out; one annealing inhibiting primer overlapping with the 3' end of one of the universal primers, another annealing inhibiting primer also having an internal modification of five dI molecules making it a dual priming oligo, and a third elongation arrest primer located between the two universal primers. All blocking primers were modified with a C3 spacer. In artificial PCR mixtures, annealing inhibiting primers proved to be the most efficient ones and this method reduced predator amplicons to undetectable levels even when predator template was present in 1000 fold excess of the prey template. The prey template then showed strong PCR amplification where none was detectable without the addition of blocking primer. Our method was applied to identifying the winter food of one of the most abundant animals in the world, the Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba. Dietary item DNA was PCR

  8. Concept for facilitating analyst-mediated interpretation of qualitative chromatographic-mass spectral data: an alternative to manual examination of extracted ion chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Borges, Chad R

    2007-07-01

    A chemometrics-based data analysis concept has been developed as a substitute for manual inspection of extracted ion chromatograms (XICs), which facilitates rapid, analyst-mediated interpretation of GC- and LC/MS(n) data sets from samples undergoing qualitative batchwise screening for prespecified sets of analytes. Automatic preparation of data into two-dimensional row space-derived scatter plots (row space plots) eliminates the need to manually interpret hundreds to thousands of XICs per batch of samples while keeping all interpretation of raw data directly in the hands of the analyst-saving great quantities of human time without loss of integrity in the data analysis process. For a given analyte, two analyte-specific variables are automatically collected by a computer algorithm and placed into a data matrix (i.e., placed into row space): the first variable is the ion abundance corresponding to scan number x and analyte-specific m/z value y, and the second variable is the ion abundance corresponding to scan number x and analyte-specific m/z value z (a second ion). These two variables serve as the two axes of the aforementioned row space plots. In order to collect appropriate scan number (retention time) information, it is necessary to analyze, as part of every batch, a sample containing a mixture of all analytes to be tested. When pure standard materials of tested analytes are unavailable, but representative ion m/z values are known and retention time can be approximated, data are evaluated based on two-dimensional scores plots from principal component analysis of small time range(s) of mass spectral data. The time-saving efficiency of this concept is directly proportional to the percentage of negative samples and to the total number of samples processed simultaneously.

  9. Comparison of dna-copying fidelity during repair and semiconservative synthesis by radioactive precursor distribution analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nemirovskii, L.E.; Vasil'ev, V.K.

    1986-04-01

    The authors compare the fidelity of DNA copying during semiconservative and reparative synthesis under normal conditions and during cortisol-induced activation of free-radical processes, by examining the distribution of radioactivity among DNA pyrimidine isopliths. Radioactivity of nucleotide material in the isopliths was measured by counting in appropriate zones of the chromatograms in toluene scintillator. The investigation shows that injury to DNA of different organs, both directly and as a result of faulty repair, leads to shortening of the pyrimidine isopliths, i.e., to changes in the primary structure of DNA. These data help to explain the simultaneously cytostatic, carcinostatic, and mutagenic action of irradiation, cortisol and hydroxyurea.

  10. Microwave-assisted synthesis of mixed ligands organotin(IV) complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline and l-proline: Physicochemical characterization, DFT calculations, chemotherapeutic potential validation by in vitro DNA binding and nuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Nath, Mala; Mridula; Kumari, Ranjana

    2017-09-01

    Diorganotin(IV) and triphenyltin(IV) derivatives of L-proline (HPro) having general formula R2Sn(Pro)2 (R=n-Bu (1), Ph (2)) and Ph3Sn(Pro) (3), respectively, and the mixed ligands di-/triorganotin(IV) derivatives of L-proline and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) with general formula [R2Sn(Pro)(Phen)Cl] and [R3Sn(Pro)(Phen)] (where R=Me (4 and 7), n-Bu (5 and 8), Ph (6 and 9)), respectively, have been synthesized by microwave-assisted method and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR ((1)H, (13)C and (119)Sn) and DART-mass spectral studies. The results suggest bicapped tetrahedron or a skew trapezoidal-bipyramid geometry for R2Sn(Pro)2, a distorted tetrahedral geometry for Ph3Sn(Pro) and a distorted octahedral geometry for [R2Sn(Pro)(Phen)Cl] and [Ph3Sn(Pro)(Phen)] around the Sn atom, and the same has been validated by density functional theory calculations (DFT). In vitro DNA binding studies of 1-9 have been investigated by UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism titrations, viscosity and DNA melting experiments. The observed hypochromic shift in UV-Vis and fluorescence studies evidenced a partial intercalative mode of binding of complexes to CT-DNA. The binding affinity and quenching ability have been quantified in terms of intrinsic binding constant (Kb) and Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv). The determined values suggest that di- and triorganotin(IV) derivatives of L-proline possess lesser affinity to bind with CT-DNA in comparison to the mixed ligands di-/triorganotin(IV) derivatives of L-proline and 1,10-phenanthroline. The partial intercalative mode of binding of these complexes with CT DNA has also been supported by a change in the viscosity and melting point of DNA as well as a change in the intensity of positive and negative bands in circular dichroism spectra. The cleavage studies by agarose gel electrophoresis indicate effective cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA into its nicked form by all the complexes and even to its linear form in presence

  11. Determining the efficacy of microsatellite DNA-based mixed-stock analysis of Lake Michigan’s lake whitefish commercial fishery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    VanDeHey, Justin A.; Sloss, Brian L.; Peeters, Paul J.; Sutton, Trent M.

    2009-01-01

    Management of commercially exploited fish should be conducted at the stock level. If a mixed stock fishery exists, a comprehensive mixed stock analysis is required for stock-based management. The lake whitefish Coregonus clupeaformis comprises the primary commercial fishery across the Great Lakes. Recent research resolved that six genetic stocks of lake whitefish were present in Lake Michigan, and long-term tagging data indicate that Lake Michigan's lake whitefish commercial fishery is a mixed stock fishery. The objective of this research was to determine the usefulness of microsatellite data for conducting comprehensive mixed stock analyses of the Lake Michigan lake whitefish commercial fishery. We used the individual assignment method as implemented in the program ONCOR to determine the accuracy level at which microsatellite data can reliably identify component populations or stocks. Self-assignment of lake whitefish to their population and stock of origin ranged from > 96% to 100%. Evaluation of genetic stock discreteness indicated a moderately high degree of correct assignment (average = 75%); simulations indicated supplementing baseline data by ∼ 50 to 100 individuals could increase accuracy by up to 4.5%. Simulated mixed stock commercial harvests with known stock composition showed a high degree of correct proportional assignment between observed and predicted harvest values. These data suggest that a comprehensive mixed stock analysis of Lake Michigan's lake whitefish commercial fishery is viable and would provide valuable information for improving management.

  12. Multiplex RT-PCR assays for the simultaneous detection of both RNA and DNA viruses infecting cassava and the common occurrence of mixed infections by two cassava brown streak viruses in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Abarshi, M M; Mohammed, I U; Jeremiah, S C; Legg, J P; Kumar, P Lava; Hillocks, R J; Maruthi, M N

    2012-01-01

    Uniplex and multiplex reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocols were developed for the detection of cassava brown streak viruses (CBSVs) in single and mixed infections with cassava mosaic begomoviruses (CMBs) in a tropical crop plant, cassava (Manihot esculenta). CMBs contain ssDNA as their genome (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) while CBSVs are made up of positive sense ssRNA (genus Ipomovirus, family Potyviridae), and they cause the economically important cassava mosaic and cassava brown streak diseases, respectively, in sub-Saharan Africa. Diagnostic methodologies have long been available for CMBs but they are limited for CBSVs especially in mixed infections. In this study, the two CBSVs, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Cassava brown streak Uganda virus (CBSUV) occurring singly or in mixed infection with CMBs, African cassava mosaic virus and East African cassava mosaic virus were detected in a single RT-PCR using both previously described and newly designed virus-specific primers. These protocols were highly efficient for detecting CBSVs compared to the existing methods and have great potential to minimize sample handling and contamination. As well as improving the diagnosis of cassava viruses, the development of multiplex RT-PCR protocols have revealed the common occurrence of mixed infections by CBSV and CBSUV in cassava fields of Tanzania and Kenya, which was contrary to the common belief until recently that these two viruses have existed separately. These protocols have implications for diagnosis and epidemiological studies on cassava virus diseases in Eastern Africa.

  13. Enhancement of the cytotoxic potential of the mixed EGFR and DNA-targeting 'combi-molecule' ZRBA1 against human solid tumour cells by a bis-quinazoline-based drug design approach.

    PubMed

    Al-Safadi, Sherin; Domarkas, Juozas; Han, YingShan; Brahimi, Fouad; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J

    2012-06-01

    ZRBA1 is a quinazoline-based molecule termed 'combi-molecule' designed to block the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and further degrade to FD105, an EGFR inhibitor plus a DNA-alkylating agent. To augment the potency of ZRBA1, we designed JDE52, a bistriazene that, following degradation, was 'programmed' to yield higher concentrations of the free inhibitor FD105 and a more cytotoxic bifunctional DNA-damaging species. The results indicated that JDE52 was capable of inducing significant blockade of EGFR phosphorylation, DNA strand breaks and interstrand cross-links in human cells. The fluorescent property of FD105, the secondary inhibitor that both JDE52 and ZRBA1 are capable of releasing, has permitted the analysis of its levels in tumour cells by ultraviolet flow cytometry. It was found that JDE52 was indeed capable of significantly releasing higher levels of fluorescence (P<0.05) in human tumour cells when compared with ZRBA1. Apoptosis was triggered by JDE52 at a faster rate than ZRBA1 and led to higher levels of cell killing. The results in toto suggest that the superior potency of JDE52, when compared with ZRBA1, may be imputed to mechanisms associated with the generation of higher intracellular concentrations of FD105 and to the induction of DNA cross-links. These combined mechanisms (blockade of EGFR-tyrosine kinase and induction of cross-links) contributed to an accelerated rate of apoptosis by JDE52. This study conclusively demonstrated that designing molecules as prodrugs of high levels of quinazoline inhibitors of EGFR and bifunctional DNA cross-linking species is a valid strategy to enhance the potency of mixed EGFR-DNA-targeting combi-molecules.

  14. Salt-dependent binding of iron(II) mixed-ligand complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine to calf thymus DNA.

    PubMed

    Mudasir; Wijaya, Karna; Tri Wahyuni, Endang; Yoshioka, Naoki; Inoue, Hidenari

    2006-04-20

    The salt-dependent binding of racemic iron(II) mixed-ligand complex containing 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz), [Fe(phen)2(dppz)]2+ to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) has been characterized by UV-VIS spectrophotometric titration. The equilibrium binding constant (Kb) of the iron(II) complex to ct-DNA decreases with the salt concentration in the solution. The slope, SK=(deltalog Kb/deltalog [Na2+]) has been found to be 0.49, suggesting that, in addition to intercalation, considerable electrostatic interaction is also involved in the ct-DNA binding of [Fe(phen)2(dppz)]2+. The calculation of non-electrostatic binding constant (Kt(o)) based on polyelectrolyte theory has revealed that the non-electrostatic contribution to the total binding constant (Kb) increases significantly with the increase in [Na+] and reaches 36% at 0.1 M NaCl. On the other hand, the contribution of the non-electrostatic binding free energy (DeltaGt(o)) to the total binding free energy change (DeltaGo) is considerably large, i.e. 87% at [Na+]=0.1 M, suggesting that the stabilization of the DNA binding is mostly due to the contribution of non-electrostatic process. Moreover, the effect of specific ligand substitutions on DeltaGo has been rigorously evaluated using the quantity DeltaDeltaGt(o), i.e. the difference in DeltaGt(o) relative to that of the parent iron(II) complex, [Fe(phen)3]2+, indicating that each substitution of phen by dip and dppz contributes 7.5 and 17.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively to more favorable ct-DNA binding.

  15. Synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and cleavage, and in vitro cytotoxicity of copper(II) mixed-ligand complexes with 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone.

    PubMed

    Buchtík, Roman; Trávníček, Zdeněk; Vančo, Ján; Herchel, Radovan; Dvořák, Zdeněk

    2011-10-07

    A series of mixed-ligand complexes [Cu(qui)(L)]NO(3)·xH(2)O (1-6), where Hqui = 2-phenyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolinone, L = 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) (1), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (2), bis(2-pyridyl)amine (ambpy) (3), 5-methyl-1,10-phenanthroline (mphen) (4), 5-nitro-1,10-phenanthroline (nphen) (5) and bathophenanthroline (bphen) (6), have been synthesized and fully characterized. The X-ray structures of [Cu(qui)(phen)]NO(3)·H(2)O (2) and [Cu(qui)(ambpy)]NO(3) (3a) show a slightly distorted square-planar geometry in the vicinity of the central copper(II) atom. An in vitro cytotoxicity study of the complexes found significant activity against human osteosarcoma (HOS) and human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF7) cell lines, with the best results for complex 6, where IC(50) equals to 2.1 ± 0.2 μM, and 2.2 ± 0.4 μM, respectively. The strong interactions of the complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) and high ability to cleave pUC19 DNA plasmid were found. A correlation has been found between the in vitro cytotoxicity and DNA cleavage studies of the complexes.

  16. Vaccination with toxofilin DNA in combination with an alum-monophosphoryl lipid A mixed adjuvant induces significant protective immunity against Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Song, Pengxia; He, Shenyi; Zhou, Aihua; Lv, Gang; Guo, Jingjing; Zhou, Jian; Han, Yali; Zhou, Huaiyu; Hao, Zhen; Cong, Hua

    2017-01-05

    A widely prevalent disease, toxoplasmosis poses serious health threats to both humans and animals; therefore, development of an ideal DNA vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii is needed eagerly. The purpose of the present study is to assess the protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding the T. gondii toxofilin gene (pEGFP-toxofilin). In addition, toxofilin DNA vaccine combined with the individual adjuvants, alum or monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), or a mixture of alum-MPLA adjuvant were screened for their ability to enhance antibody responses. Using bioinformatics, we analyzed the gene and amino acid sequences of the toxofilin protein, recognizing and identifying several potential linear B and T helper (Th)-1 cell epitopes. BALB/c mice were immunized three times with either toxofilin DNA vaccine alone or in combination with the adjuvants such as alum, MPLA or an alum-MPLA mixture. The systemic immune response was evaluated by cytokine, the percentage of CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T cells and specific antibody measurement. Two weeks after the last immunization, protective efficacy was evaluated by challenging intraperitoneally with 1 × 10(4) tachyzoites of T. gondii or intragastrically with 20 cysts of T. gondii PRU strain. All experimentally immunized mice developed strong humoral and cellular immune responses compared with the control groups. Moreover, by comparison with the non-adjuvant toxofilin DNA vaccine group, adding alum adjuvant to toxofilin DNA vaccine resulted in an increase in humoral response and a skewed Th2 response. However, the MPLA adjuvant with toxofilin DNA vaccine induced significantly enhanced humoral and Th1-biased immune responses. Importantly, the co-administration of alum-MPLA adjuvant in combination with the toxofilin DNA vaccine shifted the Th2 immune response to a Th1 response compared with the alum-toxofilin group, and elicited the strongest humoral and Th1 responses among all the groups. At the same time, a longer survival time and less

  17. Quantitative determination of transformed cells in a mixed population by stimultaneous fluorescence analysis of cell surface and DNA an individual cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, S P; Bartholomew, J C

    1977-01-01

    Cell-surface labeling with fluorescamine indicates that the fluorescence of Balb 3T3 A31 cells in considerably decreased after both viral and chemical transformation. This phenomenon, coupled with the technique of flow microfluorometry, enabled nontransformed and transformed cells to be distinguished. A second fluroescent probe, propidium iodide, which intercalates into DNA, was used in combination with fluorescamine in order to obtain a ratio of cell-surface labeling to DNA content. This manipulation allowed enhanced resolution of two populations and the detection of small numbers of transformants in a predominantly normal population. PMID:193110

  18. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Studies on the Multilamellae Formed by Mixing Lamella-Forming Cationic Diblock Copolymers with Lipids and Their Interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Po-Wei; Lin, Tsang-Lang; Liu, I-Ting; Hu, Yuan; Jeng, U-Ser; Gilbert, Elliot Paul

    2016-02-23

    We demonstrate that the lamella-forming polystyrene-block-poly(N-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium iodine) (PS-b-P4VPQ), with similar sizes of the PS and P4VPQ blocks, can be dispersed in the aqueous solutions by forming lipid/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae. Using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (d62-DPPC) in D2O, a broad correlation peak is found in the scattering profile that signifies the formation of the loosely ordered d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae. The thicknesses of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic layers of the d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae are close to the PS layer and the condensed brush layer thicknesses as determined from previous neutron reflectometry studies on the PS-b-P4VPQ monolayer at the air-water interface. Such well-dispersed d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae are capable of forming multilamellae with DNA in aqueous solution. It is found that the encapsulation of DNA in the hydrophilic layer of the d62-DPPC/PS-b-P4VPQ multilamellae slightly increases the thickness of the hydrophilic layer. Adding CaCl2 can enhance the DNA adsorption in the hydrophilic brush layer, and it is similar to that observed in the neutron reflectometry study of the DNA adsorption by the PS-b-P4VPQ monolayer.

  19. Ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) mixed chelates based on pyrenyl-pyridylimidazole and 2,2'-bipyridine ligands as efficient DNA intercalators and anion sensors.

    PubMed

    Mardanya, Sourav; Karmakar, Srikanta; Maity, Dinesh; Baitalik, Sujoy

    2015-01-20

    We report herein the synthesis and characterization of two monometallic ruthenium(II) and osmium(II) complexes of composition [(bpy)2M(HImzPPy)] (ClO4)2 derived from pyrenylimidazole-10-pyridin-2-yl-9H-9,11-diazacyclopenta[e]pyrene (HImzPPy) and 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands. X-ray crystallographic study shows that both crystals belong to the triclinic system having space group P1̅. The photophysical properties of 1 and 2 in acetonitrile indicate that the metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excited state is mainly centered in the [M(bpy)2](2+) moiety of the complexes and slightly affected by the extended conjugation of the pyrenylimidazole moiety. Both complexes display one-electron reversible metal-centered oxidative processes and a number of quasi-reversible reductive processes. The binding affinities of the complexes toward calf-thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were thoroughly studied through different methods such as absorption, emission, excited-state lifetime, circular dichroism, and thermal denaturation of DNA and a relative DNA binding study using ethidium bromide. All of these experiments account for the intercalative nature of both 1 and 2 toward CT-DNA as well as their light-switch behavior. The anion recognition study through different spectroscopic techniques reveals that both complexes act as "turn-on" luminescence sensors for H2PO4(-) and "turn-off" sensors toward F(-) and AcO(-). The imidazole N-H proton of the receptors gets deprotonated with the excessive addition of F(-) and AcO(-), while it interacts with H2PO4(-) through hydrogen-bonding interaction. Theoretical calculations (DFT and TD-DFT) were also performed to understand the photophysical properties of the metalloreceptors.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure, DFT calculation, DNA binding, and antimicrobial assays of two new mixed-ligand copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimipour, S. Yousef; Sheikhshoaie, Iran; Mohamadi, Maryam; Suarez, Sebastian; Baggio, Ricardo; Khaleghi, Moj; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud; Mostafavi, Ali

    2015-05-01

    Two new Cu(II) complexes, [Cu(L)(phen)] (1), [Cu(L)(bipy)] (2), where L2- = (3-methoxy-2oxidobenzylidene)benzohydrazidato, phen = 1,10 phenanthroline, and bipy = 2,2‧ bipyridine, were prepared and fully characterized using elemental analyses, FT-IR, molar conductivity, and electronic spectra. The structures of both complexes were also determined by X-ray diffraction. It was found that, both complexes possessed square pyramidal coordination environment in which, Cu(II) ions were coordinated by donor atoms of HL and two nitrogens of heterocyclic bases. Computational studies were performed using DFT calculations at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory. DNA binding activities of these complexes were also investigated using electronic absorption, competitive fluorescence titration and cyclic voltammetry studies. The obtained results indicated that binding of the complexes to DNA was of intercalative mode. Furthermore, antimicrobial activities of these compounds were screened against microorganisms.

  1. In vitro DNA and BSA-binding, cell imaging and anticancer activity against human carcinoma cell lines of mixed ligand copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Anjomshoa, Marzieh; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Binding studies of two water soluble copper(II) complexes of the type [Cu(phen-dion)(diimine)Cl]Cl, where phen-dione is 1,10-phenanthroline-5,6-dione and diimine is 1,10-phenanthroline (1) and 2,2'-bipyridine (2), with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been examined under physiological conditions by a series of experimental methods (UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence, viscosity, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic techniques). The experimental results indicate that the complexes interact with FS-DNA by electrostatic and partial insertion of pyridyl rings between the base stacks of double-stranded DNA. The complexes could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA with the binding constants (Kbin) of 32×10(5) M(-1) (1) and 1.7×10(5) M(-1) (2) at 290 K. The quenching mechanism, thermodynamic parameters, the number of binding sites and the effect of the Cu(II) complexes on the secondary structure of BSA have been explored. The in vitro anticancer chemotherapeutic potential of two copper(II) complexes against the three human carcinoma cell lines (MCF-7, A-549, and HT-29) and one normal cell line (DPSC) were evaluated by MTT assay. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity indicate that the complex (1) has greater cytotoxicity activity against all of the cell lines, especially HT-29 with IC50 values of 1.8 μM. Based on the IC50 values, these complexes did not display an apparent cyto-selective profile, because it would appear that two complexes are toxic to all four model cell lines. The microscopic analyses of the cancer cells confirm results of cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 5,7-Disubstituted analogues of the mixed topoisomerase I/II poison N-[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl]acridine-4-carboxamide (DACA): DNA binding and patterns of cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Spicer, J A; Finlay, G J; Baguley, B C; Velea, L; Graves, D E; Denny, W A

    1999-02-01

    DACA is a DNA-intercalating agent and dual topoisomerase (topo) I/II inhibitor currently in clinical trial as an anticancer drug. Substitutions in the acridine ring of DACA have significant effects on biological activity, with 5-substituted analogues being more potent but relatively less active against cell lines that underexpress topo II, and the converse for 7-substituted analogues. A small series of 5,7-disubstituted analogues was therefore prepared and evaluated. The compounds were prepared by CDI-assisted coupling of the appropriate acridine acids. When these contained no or only one halogen atom, they could be prepared by Al/Hg amalgam reduction of the corresponding acridine acids. However, this method could not be used to prepare dihalogen-substituted acridine acids due to substantial dehalogenation, and these intermediates were synthesized via cyclization of the appropriate aldehydes to give the acridines directly. These compounds showed enhanced DNA binding compared with the parent DACA, indicating that the known favourable influence of 5-substituents on DNA binding is retained. Cell line studies showed that the 5,7-disubstituted compounds retained both the broad-spectrum effectiveness of the 7-monosubstituted analogues and the higher cytotoxic potency of the 5-monosubstituted analogues. The 7-chloro-5-methyl and 5-chloro-7-methyl analogues showed comparable in vivo antitumour activity to DACA in the subcutaneous colon 38 model, but were substantially more potent (optimal doses of 60 mg/kg compared with 200 mg/kg for DACA).

  3. Cationized gelatin hydrogels mixed with plasmid DNA induce stronger and more sustained gene expression than atelocollagen at calvarial bone defects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, K; Shibata, T; Shimada, A; Ideno, H; Nakashima, K; Tabata, Y; Nifuji, A

    2016-01-01

    Gene transduction of exogenous factors at local sites in vivo is a promising approach to promote regeneration of tissue defects owing to its simplicity and capacity for expression of a variety of genes. Gene transduction by viral vectors is highly efficient; however, there are safety concerns associated with viruses. As a method for nonviral gene transduction, plasmid DNA delivery is safer and simpler, but requires an efficient carrier substance. Here, we aimed to develop a simple, efficient method for bone regeneration by gene transduction and to identify optimal conditions for plasmid DNA delivery at bone defect sites. We focused on carrier substances and compared the efficiencies of two collagen derivatives, atelocollagen, and gelatin hydrogel, as substrates for plasmid DNA delivery in vivo. To assess the efficiencies of these substrates, we examined exogenous expression of green fluorescence protein (GFP) by fluorescence microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. GFP expression at the bone defect site was higher when gelatin hydrogel was used as a substrate to deliver plasmids than when atelocollagen was used. Moreover, the gelatin hydrogel was almost completely absorbed at the defect site, whereas some atelocollagen remained. When a plasmid harboring bone morphogenic protein 2 was delivered with the substrate to bony defect sites, more new bone formation was observed in the gelatin group than in the atelocollagen group. These results suggested that the gelatin hydrogel was more efficient than atelocollagen as a substrate for local gene delivery and may be a superior material for induction of bone regeneration.

  4. An electrochemical DNA biosensor for evaluating the effect of mix anion in cellular fluid on the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yanwu; Zhang, Yan; Qin, Fei; Yao, Xin

    2015-08-15

    CeO2 nanoparticles are of particular interest as a novel antioxidant for scavenging free radicals. However, some studies showed that they could cause cell damage or death by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Up to now, it is not well understood about these paradoxical phenomena. Therefore, many attentions have been paid to the factors that could affect the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles. CeO2 nanoparticles would inevitably encounter body fluid environment for its potential medical application. In this work the antioxidant activity behavior of CeO2 nanoparticles is studied in simulated cellular fluid, which contains main body anions (HPO4(2-), HCO3(-), Cl(-) and SO4(2-)), by a method of electrochemical DNA biosensor. We found that in the solution of Cl(-) and SO4(2-), CeO2 nanoparticles can protect DNA from damage by hydroxyl radicals, while in the presence of HPO4(2-) and HCO3(-), CeO2 nanoparticles lose the antioxidant activity. This can be explained by the cerium phosphate and cerium carbonate formed on the surface of the nanoparticles, which interfere with the redox cycling between Ce(3+) and Ce(4+). These results not only add basic knowledge to the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles under different situations, but also pave the way for practical applications of nanoceria. Moreover, it also shows electrochemical DNA biosensor is an effective method to explore the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles.

  5. DNA binding, cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction activity of a mixed-ligand copper(II) complex with taurine Schiff base and imidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mei; kong, Lin Lin; Gou, Yi; Yang, Feng; Liang, Hong

    2014-07-01

    A novel binuclear copper(II) complex (complex 1) with taurine Schiff base and imidazole has been synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, ESI-MS spectrometry, UV-vis and IR spectroscopy. Single-crystal analysis revealed that 1 displays the sulfonate-bridged dinuclear copper(II) centers. Both copper atoms are five-coordinated and exhibit slightly distorted square pyramidal geometries. Each of copper atom is surrounded by three oxygen atoms and one nitrogen atom from different taurine Schiff base ligands, and one nitrogen atom from one imidazole ligand. The interaction between 1 and calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by UV-vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The experimental results indicated that 1 could bind to CT-DNA via an intercalative mode and show efficient cleavage activity. In addition, 1 showed an antitumor effect on cell cycle and apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that MGC-803 cells were arrested in the S phase after treatment with 1. Fluorescence microscopic observation indicated that 1 could induce apoptosis of MGC-803 cells.

  6. Synthesis and Evaluation of In Vitro DNA/Protein Binding Affinity, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant and Antitumor Activity of Mononuclear Ru(II) Mixed Polypyridyl Complexes.

    PubMed

    Putta, Venkat Reddy; Chintakuntla, Nagamani; Mallepally, Rajender Reddy; Avudoddi, Srishailam; K, Nagasuryaprasad; Nancherla, Deepika; V V N, Yaswanth; R S, Prakasham; Surya, Satyanarayana Singh; Sirasani, Satyanarayana

    2016-01-01

    The four novel Ru(II) complexes [Ru(phen)2MAFIP](2+) (1) [MAFIP = 2-(5-(methylacetate)furan-2-yl)-1 H-imidazo[4,5-f] [1, 10]phenanthroline, phen = 1,10-Phenanthroline], [Ru(bpy)2MAFIP](2+) (2) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(dmb)2MAFIP](2+) (3) (dmb = 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) and [Ru(hdpa)2MAFIP](2+) (4) (hdpa = 2,2-dipyridylamine) have been synthesized and fully characterized via elemental analysis, NMR spectroscopy, EI-MS and FT-IR spectroscopy. In addition, the DNA-binding behaviors of the complexes 1-4 with calf thymus DNA were investigated by UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence studies and viscosity measurement. The DNA-binding experiments showed that the complexes 1-4 interact with CT-DNA through an intercalative mode. BSA protein binding affinity of synthesized complexes was determined by UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence emission titrations. The binding affinity of ruthenium complexes was supported by molecular docking. The photoactivated cleavage of plasmid pBR322 DNA by ruthenium complexes 1-4 was investigated. All the synthesized compounds were tested for antimicrobial activity by using three Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and three Gram-positive (Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus megaterium) organisms, these results indicated that complex 3 was more activity compared to other complexes against all tested microbial strains while moderate antimicrobial activity profile was noticed for complex 4. The antioxidant activity experiments show that the complexes exhibit moderate antioxidant activity. The cytotoxicity of synthesized complexes on HeLa cell lines has been examined by MTT assay. The apoptosis assay was carried out with Acridine Orange (AO) staining methods and the results indicate that complexes can induce the apoptosis of HeLa cells. The cell cycle arrest investigated by flow cytometry and these results indicate that complexes 1-4 induce the cell cycle arrest at G0/G1

  7. Multiplexed Sequence Encoding: A Framework for DNA Communication

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Bijan; Carr, Peter A.; Lu, Timothy K.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic DNA has great propensity for efficiently and stably storing non-biological information. With DNA writing and reading technologies rapidly advancing, new applications for synthetic DNA are emerging in data storage and communication. Traditionally, DNA communication has focused on the encoding and transfer of complete sets of information. Here, we explore the use of DNA for the communication of short messages that are fragmented across multiple distinct DNA molecules. We identified three pivotal points in a communication—data encoding, data transfer & data extraction—and developed novel tools to enable communication via molecules of DNA. To address data encoding, we designed DNA-based individualized keyboards (iKeys) to convert plaintext into DNA, while reducing the occurrence of DNA homopolymers to improve synthesis and sequencing processes. To address data transfer, we implemented a secret-sharing system—Multiplexed Sequence Encoding (MuSE)—that conceals messages between multiple distinct DNA molecules, requiring a combination key to reveal messages. To address data extraction, we achieved the first instance of chromatogram patterning through multiplexed sequencing, thereby enabling a new method for data extraction. We envision these approaches will enable more widespread communication of information via DNA. PMID:27050646

  8. Mixed ligand copper(II) complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline with tridentate phenolate/pyridyl/(benz)imidazolyl Schiff base ligands: covalent vs non-covalent DNA binding, DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rajarajeswari, Chandrasekaran; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkadher

    2014-11-01

    A series of copper(II) complexes of the types [Cu(L)(phen)](ClO4) 1-2, where HL is a tridentate ligand with two nitrogen and one oxygen donor atoms (2NO) such as 2-(2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyliminomethyl)phenol (HL1) and 2-(2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl-imino)methyl)-4-methylphenol (HL2), phen is 1,10-phenanthroline and [Cu(L)(phen)](ClO4)23-6, where L is a tridentate ligand with three nitrogen donor atoms (3N) such as (2-pyridin-2-ylethyl)pyridin-2-ylmethyleneamine (L3), 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl)-pyridin-2-yl-methyleneamine (L4), 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl)(1H-imidazol-2-ylmethylene)-amine (L5) and 2-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)ethyl)(4,4a-dihydroquinolin-2-ylmethylene)amine (L6), has been isolated and characterized by different spectral techniques. In single crystal X-ray structures, 1 possesses square pyramidal distorted trigonal bipyramidal (SPDTBP), geometry whereas 3 and 4 possess trigonal bipyramidal distorted square pyramidal (TBDSP) geometry. UV-Vis and fluorescence spectral studies reveal that the complexes 1-6 bind non-covalently to calf thymus DNA more strongly than the corresponding covalently bound chlorido complexes [Cu(2NO)Cl] 1a-2a and [Cu(3N)Cl2] 3a-6a. On prolonged incubation, all the complexes 1-6 exhibit double strand cleavage of supercoiled (SC) plasmid DNA in the absence of an activator. Also, they exhibit cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cell lines (HBL-100) more potent than their corresponding chlorido complexes 1a-6a, and have the potential to act as efficient cytotoxic drugs.

  9. Development of a ligase detection reaction/CGE method using a LIF dual-channel detection system for direct identification of allelic composition of mutated DNA in a mixed population of excess wild-type DNA.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Mariko; Shimase, Koji; Noda, Keiichi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2013-05-01

    We developed an inexpensive LIF dual-channel detection system and applied it to a ligase detection reaction (LDR)/CGE method to identify the allelic composition of low-abundance point mutations in a large excess of wild-type DNA in a single reaction with a high degree of certainty. Ligation was performed in a tube with a nonlabeled common primer and multiplex discriminating primers, each labeled with a different standard fluorophore. The discriminating primers were directed against three mutant variations in codon 12 of the K-ras oncogene that have a high diagnostic value for colorectal cancer. LDR products generated from a particular K-ras mutation through successful ligation events were separated from remaining discriminating primers by CGE, followed by LIF detection using the new system, which consists of two photomultiplier tubes, each with a unique optical filter. Each fluorophore label conjugated to the corresponding LDR product produced a distinct fluorescence signal intensity ratio from the two detection channels, allowing spectral discrimination of the three labels. The ability of this system to detect point mutations in a wild-type sequence-dominated population, and to disclose their allelic composition, was thus demonstrated successfully.

  10. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... community Use our Virtual Library Treatment and outcomes back to top Because most people with mixed dementia are diagnosed with a single type of dementia, physicians often base their prescribing decisions on the type of dementia ...

  11. GenoMass - a computer software for automated identification of oligonucleotide DNA adducts from LC-MS analysis of DNA digests

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qing; Shen, Chang; Vouros, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In the investigation of oligonucleotides, DNA and their adducts by LC-MS, a myriad of data are generated that make manual data processing quite difficult. This paper describes a ‘reversed pseudo-combinatorial’ approach for fragment identification and the software implementation of this approach. Combinatorial isomer libraries are generated in silico to represent the digestion products of oligonucleotides, DNA or DNA adducts of various sizes. The software automatically calculates ion masses of each isomeric segment of the library, searches for them in complicated LC-MS data, lists their intensities and plots extracted ion chromatograms (EIC). This customized new data analysis tool has enabled a study of the enzymatic behavior of a nuclease system in the digestion of normal and adducted DNA, and in the recognition of oligomers containing a carcinogen bound to a nucleobase. The software program potentially can be further expanded to postulate unknown DNA sequences and recognize the adduction sites. PMID:19053159

  12. Age dependency of base modification in rabbit liver DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, O.; Fuji, I.; Yoshida, T.; Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Age-related modifications of DNA bases have been observed in the liver of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a lagomorph with a median life span in captivity of 5-7 yr. The ages of the animals studied ranged from 6 wk to 9 yr. After the DNA had been extracted from the liver cell nuclei and hydrolyzed with acid, the bases were analyzed by column chromatography with Cellulofine gels (GC-15-m). Two peaks in the chromatogram, which eluted before the four DNA bases, contained modified bases. Those materials, which were obtained in relatively large amounts from old animals, were highly fluorescent, and were shown to be crosslinked base products by mass spectrometry. The yield of crosslinked products versus rabbit age (greater than 0.5 yr) can be fitted by an exponential function (correlation coefficient: 0.76 +/- 0.09).

  13. Age dependency of base modification in rabbit liver DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, O.; Fuji, I.; Yoshida, T.; Cox, A. B.; Lett, J. T.

    1988-01-01

    Age-related modifications of DNA bases have been observed in the liver of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a lagomorph with a median life span in captivity of 5-7 yr. The ages of the animals studied ranged from 6 wk to 9 yr. After the DNA had been extracted from the liver cell nuclei and hydrolyzed with acid, the bases were analyzed by column chromatography with Cellulofine gels (GC-15-m). Two peaks in the chromatogram, which eluted before the four DNA bases, contained modified bases. Those materials, which were obtained in relatively large amounts from old animals, were highly fluorescent, and were shown to be crosslinked base products by mass spectrometry. The yield of crosslinked products versus rabbit age (greater than 0.5 yr) can be fitted by an exponential function (correlation coefficient: 0.76 +/- 0.09).

  14. Determination of dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls in 1 mL whole blood using programmable temperature vaporization large volume injection coupled to gas chromatogram and high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haitao; Guan, Rongfa; Li, Jingguang; Zhang, Lei; Ren, Yiping; Xu, Xiaomin; Song, Yang; Zhao, Yunfeng; Han, Jianlong; Wu, Yongning

    2013-03-12

    A sensitive method based on programmable temperature vaporization large volume injection coupled to gas chromatogram and high-resolution mass spectrometry (PTV-GC-HRMS) has been developed for the determination of ultra trace levels of dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL PCBs) in small amounts of human blood. Blood samples (1mL) were first extracted by column extraction and then purified with column chromatorgraphies. Final extracts (20μL) were introduced to the PTV injector under the solvent vent mode and detected by GC-HRMS (SIM mode). PTV parameters were observed by changing one factor at a time (practical conditions: vent flow: 50mLmin(-1), vent pressure: 0kPa and vent time: 0.1min), recoveries of most PCB congeners ranged from 55.1% to 108%, and method detection limits were in the range of 0.11-1.63pgg(-1).

  15. Average mass scan of the total ion chromatograms: a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry derived variable for fast and reliable multivariate statistical treatment of essential oil compositional data.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Niko S; Blagojević, Polina D

    2013-08-02

    Plant volatiles have been repeatedly shown to provide valuable insight into the evolutionary relationships among plant taxa on various taxonomical levels. The number of variables available from GC-MS analyses of these plant metabolites usually represents a large data set. The comparison of such data sets requires the use of multivariate statistical analyses (MSA) but with several serious shortcomings. In order to make multivariate statistical comparison of essential oils more applicable, reliable and faster, this work was set to explore the suitability of a complementary use of relative abundances of m/z values of the average mass scan of the total GC chromatograms instead of the traditionally used variables-percentages (peak areas) of individual oil constituents. To achieve this, essential oils extracted from 12 different Artemisia species were analyzed using GC-FID and GC-MS. Almost 500 different constituents were successfully identified. Average mass scans of the total GC chromatograms (AMS) and chemical compositions (relative percentages) of the analyzed oils were separately compared using two MSA methods: agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis. This approach was applied to an additional set of essential oil compositional data (representatives of a number of different genera/families; data from the literature) using both types of variables. The obtained results strongly suggest that MSA of complex volatile mixtures, using the corresponding directly obtainable AMS, could be considered as a promising time saving tool for easy and reliable comparison purposes. The AMS approach gives comparable or even better results than the traditional method - it reflected the natural relationships between observations within both studied groups of oils.

  16. Ion mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, S.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental studies of the ion-mixing phenomenon are summarized. Ion mixing is differentiated from ion implantation and shown to be a useful technique for overcoming the sputter-dependent limitations of implantation processes. The fundamental physical principles of ion/solid interactions are explored. The basic experimental configurations currently in use are characterized: bilayered samples, multilayered samples, and samples with a thin marker layer. A table listing the binary systems (metal-semiconductor or metal-metal) which have been investigated using each configuration is presented. Results are discussed, and some sample data are plotted. The prospects for future application of ion mixing to the alteration of solid surface properties are considered. Practical applications are seen as restricted by economic considerations to the production of small, expensive components or to fields (such as the semiconductor industry) which already have facilities for ion implantation.

  17. Successful isolation and PCR amplification of DNA from National Institute of Standards and Technology herbal dietary supplement standard reference material powders and extracts.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Matthew T

    2010-03-01

    Twenty-four herbal dietary supplement powder and extract reference standards provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were investigated using three different commercially available DNA extraction kits to evaluate DNA availability for downstream nucleotide-based applications. The material included samples of Camellia, Citrus, Ephedra, Ginkgo, Hypericum, Serenoa, And Vaccinium. Protocols from Qiagen, MoBio, and Phytopure were used to isolate and purify DNA from the NIST standards. The resulting DNA concentration was quantified using SYBR Green fluorometry. Each of the 24 samples yielded DNA, though the concentration of DNA from each approach was notably different. The Phytopure method consistently yielded more DNA. The average yield ratio was 22 : 3 : 1 (ng/microL; Phytopure : Qiagen : MoBio). Amplification of the internal transcribed spacer II region using PCR was ultimately successful in 22 of the 24 samples. Direct sequencing chromatograms of the amplified material suggested that most of the samples were comprised of mixtures. However, the sequencing chromatograms of 12 of the 24 samples were sufficient to confirm the identity of the target material. The successful extraction, amplification, and sequencing of DNA from these herbal dietary supplement extracts and powders supports a continued effort to explore nucleotide sequence-based tools for the authentication and identification of plants in dietary supplements. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  18. Experiments in DNA extraction and PCR amplification from bighorn sheep feces: the importance of DNA extraction method.

    PubMed

    Wehausen, J D; Ramey, R R; Epps, C W

    2004-01-01

    Reliability of genotyping is an issue for studies using non-invasive sources of DNA. We emphasize the importance of refining DNA extraction methods to maximize reliability and efficiency of genotyping for such DNA sources. We present a simple and general method to quantitatively compare genotyping reliability of various DNA extraction techniques and sample materials used. For bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) fecal samples we compare different fecal pellet materials, different amounts of fecal pellet material, and the effects of eliminating two DNA extraction steps for four microsatellite loci and four samples heterozygous at each locus. We evaluated 192 PCR outcomes for each treatment using indices of PCR success and peak height (signal strength) developed from analysis output of sequencer chromatograms. Outermost pellet material produced PCR results almost equivalent to DNA extracted from blood. Where any inner pellet material was used for DNA extraction, PCR results were poorer and inconsistent among samples. PCR success was not sensitive to amount of pellet material used until it was decreased to 15 mg from 60 mg. Our PCR index provides considerably more information relative to potential genotyping errors than simply comparing genotypes derived from paired fecal and blood or tissue samples. Our DNA extraction method probably has wide applicability to herbivores that produce pelleted feces where samples dry rapidly after deposition.

  19. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    ocean as it responds to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . My approach for...therefore requires integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal...also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the center of

  20. Results of External Quality Assessment for Proviral DNA Testing of HIV Tropism in the Maraviroc Switch Collaborative Study

    PubMed Central

    Land, Sally; Pett, Sarah; Emery, Sean; Marks, Kat; Kelleher, Anthony D.; Kaye, Steve; Kaiser, Rolf; Schuelter, Eugene; Harrigan, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Maraviroc Switch collaborative study (MARCH) is a study in aviremic patients on stable antiretroviral therapy and utilizes population-based sequencing of proviral DNA to determine HIV tropism and susceptibility to maraviroc. An external quality assessment (EQA) program was implemented to ensure competency in assessing the tropism of clinical samples conducted by MARCH laboratories (n = 14). The MARCH EQA has three prestudy phases assessing V3 loop sequencing and tropism determination using the bioinformatic algorithm geno2pheno, which generates a false-positive rate (FPR). DNA sequences with low FPRs are more likely to be from CXCR4-using (X4) viruses. Phase 1 of the EQA involved chromatogram interpretation. Phases 2, 2/3, and 3 involved patient and clonal samples. Clinical samples used in these phases were from treatment-experienced HIV-infected volunteers; 18/20 had viral loads of <50 copies/ml, and 10/15 were CXCR4-tropic on prior phenotyping. All samples were tested in triplicate, and any replicate with a geno2pheno FPR of <10% was designated X4. Performance was deemed adequate if ≤2 R5 and ≤1 X4 specimens were miscalled. For several clinical samples in the EQA, triplicate testing revealed marked DNA variability (FPR range, 0 to 96.7%). Therefore, a consensus-based approach was employed for each sample, i.e., a median FPR across laboratories was used to define sample tropism. Further sequencing analysis showed mixed viral populations in the clinical samples, explaining the differences in tropism predictions. All laboratories passed the EQA after achieving predefined competence thresholds in either of the phase 2 rounds. The use of clinical samples from patients resembling those who were likely to be screened in the MARCH, coupled with triplicate testing, revealed inherent DNA variability that might have been missed if single or duplicate testing and/or clonal samples alone were used. These data highlight the importance of intensive EQA of tropism

  1. Results of external quality assessment for proviral DNA testing of HIV tropism in the Maraviroc Switch collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Tu, Elise; Swenson, Luke C; Land, Sally; Pett, Sarah; Emery, Sean; Marks, Kat; Kelleher, Anthony D; Kaye, Steve; Kaiser, Rolf; Schuelter, Eugene; Harrigan, Richard

    2013-07-01

    The Maraviroc Switch collaborative study (MARCH) is a study in aviremic patients on stable antiretroviral therapy and utilizes population-based sequencing of proviral DNA to determine HIV tropism and susceptibility to maraviroc. An external quality assessment (EQA) program was implemented to ensure competency in assessing the tropism of clinical samples conducted by MARCH laboratories (n = 14). The MARCH EQA has three prestudy phases assessing V3 loop sequencing and tropism determination using the bioinformatic algorithm geno2pheno, which generates a false-positive rate (FPR). DNA sequences with low FPRs are more likely to be from CXCR4-using (X4) viruses. Phase 1 of the EQA involved chromatogram interpretation. Phases 2, 2/3, and 3 involved patient and clonal samples. Clinical samples used in these phases were from treatment-experienced HIV-infected volunteers; 18/20 had viral loads of <50 copies/ml, and 10/15 were CXCR4-tropic on prior phenotyping. All samples were tested in triplicate, and any replicate with a geno2pheno FPR of <10% was designated X4. Performance was deemed adequate if ≤2 R5 and ≤1 X4 specimens were miscalled. For several clinical samples in the EQA, triplicate testing revealed marked DNA variability (FPR range, 0 to 96.7%). Therefore, a consensus-based approach was employed for each sample, i.e., a median FPR across laboratories was used to define sample tropism. Further sequencing analysis showed mixed viral populations in the clinical samples, explaining the differences in tropism predictions. All laboratories passed the EQA after achieving predefined competence thresholds in either of the phase 2 rounds. The use of clinical samples from patients resembling those who were likely to be screened in the MARCH, coupled with triplicate testing, revealed inherent DNA variability that might have been missed if single or duplicate testing and/or clonal samples alone were used. These data highlight the importance of intensive EQA of tropism

  2. Source identification of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil and sediments from Iguaçu River Watershed, Paraná, Brazil using the CHEMSIC method (CHEMometric analysis of Selected Ion Chromatograms).

    PubMed

    Gallotta, Fabiana D C; Christensen, Jan H

    2012-04-27

    A chemometric method based on principal component analysis (PCA) of pre-processed and combined sections of selected ion chromatograms (SICs) is used to characterise the hydrocarbon profiles in soil and sediment from Araucária, Guajuvira, General Lúcio and Balsa Nova Municipalities (Iguaçu River Watershed, Paraná, Brazil) and to indicate the main sources of hydrocarbon pollution. The study includes 38 SICs of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) and four of petroleum biomarkers in two separate analyses. The most contaminated samples are inside the Presidente Getúlio Vargas Refinery area. These samples represent a petrogenic pattern and different weathering degrees. Samples from outside the refinery area are either less or not contaminated, or contain mixtures of diagenetic, pyrogenic and petrogenic inputs where different proportions predominate. The locations farthest away from industrial activity (Balsa Nova) contains the lowest levels of PAC contamination. There are no evidences to conclude positive matches between the samples from outside the refinery area and the Cusiana spilled oil.

  3. A comparison between the vacuum ultraviolet photoionization time-of-flight mass spectra and the GC/MS total ion chromatograms of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contained in coal soot and multi-component PAH particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shaokai; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yao; Meng, Junwang; He, Hong; Shu, Jinian

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports a comparison between the vacuum ultraviolet photoionization time-of-flight mass spectra and the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry total ion chromatograms of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) contained in soot particles and multi-component PAH particles. The soot particles are produced by burning a small amount of screened bituminous coal powder in a tubular oven under synthesized air. The soot particles generated are analyzed on-line with a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-AMS) and off-line with a gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC/MS). 55 PAHs are observed with the GC/MS, while parent ions of 54 PAHs are observed with the VUV-AMS. The multi-component PAH particles are generated by atomizing 16 PAHs in isopropyl alcohol. The PAHs are defined as 16 primary pollutants by the Environmental Protection Agency of the United States. GC/MS identifies the 16 PAHs while VUV-AMS observes 15 PAHs with missing the mass peak of naphthalene. The relationship of the PAH sensitivity of VUV-AMS and GC/MS vs. the molecular weights of the PAHs are obtained.

  4. DNA profiling of trace DNA recovered from bedding.

    PubMed

    Petricevic, Susan F; Bright, Jo-Anne; Cockerton, Sarah L

    2006-05-25

    Trace DNA is often detected on handled items and worn clothing examined in forensic laboratories. In this study, the potential transfer of trace DNA to bedding by normal contact, when an individual sleeps in a bed, is examined. Volunteers slept one night on a new, lower bed sheet in their own bed and one night in a bed foreign to them. Samples from the sheets were collected and analysed by DNA profiling. The results indicate that the DNA profile of an individual can be obtained from bedding after one night of sleeping in a bed. The DNA profile of the owner of the bed could also be detected in the foreign bed experiments. Since mixed DNA profiles can be obtained from trace DNA on bedding, caution should be exercised when drawing conclusions from DNA profiling results obtained from such samples. This transfer may have important repercussions in sexual assault investigations.

  5. Rigorous buoyancy driven bubble mixing for centrifugal microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Burger, S; Schulz, M; von Stetten, F; Zengerle, R; Paust, N

    2016-01-21

    We present batch-mode mixing for centrifugal microfluidics operated at fixed rotational frequency. Gas is generated by the disk integrated decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to liquid water (H2O) and gaseous oxygen (O2) and inserted into a mixing chamber. There, bubbles are formed that ascent through the liquid in the artificial gravity field and lead to drag flow. Additionaly, strong buoyancy causes deformation and rupture of the gas bubbles and induces strong mixing flows in the liquids. Buoyancy driven bubble mixing is quantitatively compared to shake mode mixing, mixing by reciprocation and vortex mixing. To determine mixing efficiencies in a meaningful way, the different mixers are employed for mixing of a lysis reagent and human whole blood. Subsequently, DNA is extracted from the lysate and the amount of DNA recovered is taken as a measure for mixing efficiency. Relative to standard vortex mixing, DNA extraction based on buoyancy driven bubble mixing resulted in yields of 92 ± 8% (100 s mixing time) and 100 ± 8% (600 s) at 130g centrifugal acceleration. Shake mode mixing yields 96 ± 11% and is thus equal to buoyancy driven bubble mixing. An advantage of buoyancy driven bubble mixing is that it can be operated at fixed rotational frequency, however. The additional costs of implementing buoyancy driven bubble mixing are low since both the activation liquid and the catalyst are very low cost and no external means are required in the processing device. Furthermore, buoyancy driven bubble mixing can easily be integrated in a monolithic manner and is compatible to scalable manufacturing technologies such as injection moulding or thermoforming. We consider buoyancy driven bubble mixing an excellent alternative to shake mode mixing, in particular if the processing device is not capable of providing fast changes of rotational frequency or if the low average rotational frequency is challenging for the other integrated fluidic operations.

  6. Mixed cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Clodoveo

    2008-01-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC), type II and type III, refers to the presence of circulating cryoprecipitable immune complexes in the serum and manifests clinically by a classical triad of purpura, weakness and arthralgias. It is considered to be a rare disorder, but its true prevalence remains unknown. The disease is more common in Southern Europe than in Northern Europe or Northern America. The prevalence of 'essential' MC is reported as approximately 1:100,000 (with a female-to-male ratio 3:1), but this term is now used to refer to a minority of MC patients only. MC is characterized by variable organ involvement including skin lesions (orthostatic purpura, ulcers), chronic hepatitis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, peripheral neuropathy, diffuse vasculitis, and, less frequently, interstitial lung involvement and endocrine disorders. Some patients may develop lymphatic and hepatic malignancies, usually as a late complication. MC may be associated with numerous infectious or immunological diseases. When isolated, MC may represent a distinct disease, the so-called 'essential' MC. The etiopathogenesis of MC is not completely understood. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is suggested to play a causative role, with the contribution of genetic and/or environmental factors. Moreover, MC may be associated with other infectious agents or immunological disorders, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or primary Sjögren's syndrome. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory findings. Circulating mixed cryoglobulins, low C4 levels and orthostatic skin purpura are the hallmarks of the disease. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis involving medium- and, more often, small-sized blood vessels is the typical pathological finding, easily detectable by means of skin biopsy of recent vasculitic lesions. Differential diagnoses include a wide range of systemic, infectious and neoplastic disorders, mainly autoimmune hepatitis, Sjögren's syndrome, polyarthritis, and B

  7. Mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Clodoveo

    2008-09-16

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC), type II and type III, refers to the presence of circulating cryoprecipitable immune complexes in the serum and manifests clinically by a classical triad of purpura, weakness and arthralgias. It is considered to be a rare disorder, but its true prevalence remains unknown. The disease is more common in Southern Europe than in Northern Europe or Northern America. The prevalence of 'essential' MC is reported as approximately 1:100,000 (with a female-to-male ratio 3:1), but this term is now used to refer to a minority of MC patients only. MC is characterized by variable organ involvement including skin lesions (orthostatic purpura, ulcers), chronic hepatitis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, peripheral neuropathy, diffuse vasculitis, and, less frequently, interstitial lung involvement and endocrine disorders. Some patients may develop lymphatic and hepatic malignancies, usually as a late complication. MC may be associated with numerous infectious or immunological diseases. When isolated, MC may represent a distinct disease, the so-called 'essential' MC. The etiopathogenesis of MC is not completely understood. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is suggested to play a causative role, with the contribution of genetic and/or environmental factors. Moreover, MC may be associated with other infectious agents or immunological disorders, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or primary Sjögren's syndrome. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory findings. Circulating mixed cryoglobulins, low C4 levels and orthostatic skin purpura are the hallmarks of the disease. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis involving medium- and, more often, small-sized blood vessels is the typical pathological finding, easily detectable by means of skin biopsy of recent vasculitic lesions. Differential diagnoses include a wide range of systemic, infectious and neoplastic disorders, mainly autoimmune hepatitis, Sjögren's syndrome, polyarthritis, and B

  8. Mixed infection by Legionella pneumophila in outbreak patients.

    PubMed

    Coscollá, Mireia; Fernández, Carmen; Colomina, Javier; Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    During the molecular epidemiological study of a legionellosis outbreak, we obtained sequence based typing (SBT) profiles from uncultured respiratory samples of 15 affected patients. We detected several distinct allelic profiles some of which were a mixture of alleles present in the more common profiles. Chromatograms from the sequences of one patient with mixed profile showed polymorphisms in several positions, which could result from the simultaneous presence of different Legionella variants in the sample. In order to test this possibility, we cloned PCR amplification products from six loci for two patients with a mixed profile and a patient with a pure profile. After obtaining around 20 sequences for each locus of three patients, we detected several variants in two of them and two variants in the third one. In summary, the three analyzed patients showed evidence of more than one Legionella variant during the acute infection. These results indicate that probably some patients were infected by more than one strain, which could be due to co-infection from the same environmental source or, alternatively, to independent infections in a very short period of time. Although our data cannot discriminate between these hypotheses, these results suggest that Legionella infection patterns can be more complex than previously assumed. None of the environmental samples analyzed during this outbreak was even similar to any of the clinical ones.

  9. Reliable screening and confirmation of 156 multi-class illegal adulterants in dietary supplements based on extracted common ion chromatograms by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole/time of flight-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Hye; Seo, Hee Seung; Ki, Nam Yong; Park, Na-Hyun; Lee, Wonwoong; Do, Jung Ah; Park, Sungkwan; Baek, Sun Young; Moon, Bongjin; Oh, Han Bin; Hong, Jongki

    2017-03-31

    An analytical method for the reliable screening and confirmation of 156 illegal drugs (58 erectile dysfunction drugs, 49 synthetic steroids, 26 anabolic steroids, and 23 anti-histamine drugs) in supplementary diets using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-Q/TOF-MS) was developed. Various types of supplements (liquid, capsule, powder, pill and tablet) with complicated matrices were pretreated by simple liquid-liquid extraction. The wide scope of 156 target compounds was effectively determined within 15min in the positive ion mode, detecting the compounds at a sub-ppb level. Their MS/MS spectra were preferentially investigated to find diagnostic common ions according to the structural similarity of diverse adulterants. For the rapid screening of multiple classes of the target adulterants, extracted common ion chromatograms (ECICs) based on specific fragments of similar molecular moieties were attempted. A database including the elemental compositions, retention times, and MS/MS spectra was built for the confirmation of adulterants. The established method was validated in terms of the linearity, limits of detection (LOD), precision, and accuracy. The linear correlation coefficient and limit of detection ranged from 0.9880 to 1 and from 0.02 to 16.04ng/mL, respectively. The precision and accuracy of intra- and inter-day experiments for the spiked samples at the range of 0.2 and 16.0ng/mL were from 0.16 to 13.50% and 0.19-11.48%, respectively, with relative standard deviation. Mean recoveries ranged from 81.6 to 124.7%, and relative standard deviation was less than 9.20%. The screening and confirmation method demonstrated the usefulness of UHPLC-Q/TOF-MS combined with ECICs as a promising approach for the analysis of multi-class adulterants. Finally, the established method was successfully applied for the monitoring of several types of dietary supplements in routine analysis.

  10. Base-specific and enantioselective studies for the DNA binding of iron(II) mixed-ligand complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline and dipyrido[3,2- a:2',3'- c]phenazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudasir; Wijaya, Karna; Wahyuni, Endang Tri; Inoue, Hidenari; Yoshioka, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Base specificity and enantioselectivity for the DNA binding of [Fe(phen) 2(dppz)] 2+ (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline and dppz = dipyrido[3,2- a:2',3'- c]phenazine) have been studied by determining the equilibrium binding constant ( Kb) of the iron(II) complex to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA), poly[(dA-dT) 2], poly[(dG-dC) 2] and poly[(dI-dC) 2] using spectrophotometric titration and by monitoring the CD spectral profile of the iron(II) complex in the presence and absence of different types of DNA using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, respectively. It has been shown that [Fe(phen) 2(dppz)] 2+ prefers to intercalate into the A-T and I-C sequences of poly[(dA-dT) 2] and poly[(dI-dC) 2] rather than into the G-C sequences of poly[(dG-dC) 2] or into the base pairs of ct-DNA. In contrast to previous reports, it is a surprising observation that the enantioselectivity of the DNA binding for [Fe(phen) 2(dppz)] 2+ is base-dependent in nature. The Δ-enantiomer of [Fe(phen) 2(dppz)] 2+ is preferentially intercalated into the base pairs of poly[(dG-dC) 2] or ct-DNA as indicated by its CD spectral profiles. On the other hand, the Λ-enantiomer of [Fe(phen) 2(dppz)] 2+ is favorably intercalated into poly[(dA-dT) 2] or poly[(dI-dC) 2] as suggested by the opposite CD spectral profile. This preferential binding of Λ-[Fe(phen) 2(dppz)] 2+ for the A-T sequence may be attributed to the fact that the binding site for the A-T sequence is relatively facile and thus the steric effect caused by the ancillary (non-intercalated) phen ligands is alleviated. The degree of enantioselectivity represented by inversion constants ( Kinv) decreases as the salt concentration in the solution increases, indicating that electrostatic interaction is also operating in the ct-DNA-binding events of the iron (II) complex.

  11. Base-specific and enantioselective studies for the DNA binding of iron(II) mixed-ligand complexes containing 1,10-phenanthroline and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine.

    PubMed

    Mudasir; Wijaya, Karna; Wahyuni, Endang Tri; Inoue, Hidenari; Yoshioka, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    Base specificity and enantioselectivity for the DNA binding of [Fe(phen)2(dppz)]2+ (phen=1,10-phenanthroline and dppz=dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine) have been studied by determining the equilibrium binding constant (Kb) of the iron(II) complex to calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA), poly[(dA-dT)2], poly[(dG-dC)2] and poly[(dI-dC)2] using spectrophotometric titration and by monitoring the CD spectral profile of the iron(II) complex in the presence and absence of different types of DNA using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, respectively. It has been shown that [Fe(phen)2(dppz)]2+ prefers to intercalate into the A-T and I-C sequences of poly[(dA-dT)2] and poly[(dI-dC)2] rather than into the G-C sequences of poly[(dG-dC)2] or into the base pairs of ct-DNA. In contrast to previous reports, it is a surprising observation that the enantioselectivity of the DNA binding for [Fe(phen)2(dppz)]2+ is base-dependent in nature. The Delta-enantiomer of [Fe(phen)2(dppz)]2+ is preferentially intercalated into the base pairs of poly[(dG-dC)2] or ct-DNA as indicated by its CD spectral profiles. On the other hand, the Lambda-enantiomer of [Fe(phen)2(dppz)]2+ is favorably intercalated into poly[(dA-dT)2] or poly[(dI-dC)2] as suggested by the opposite CD spectral profile. This preferential binding of Lambda-[Fe(phen)2(dppz)]2+)for the A-T sequence may be attributed to the fact that the binding site for the A-T sequence is relatively facile and thus the steric effect caused by the ancillary (non-intercalated) phen ligands is alleviated. The degree of enantioselectivity represented by inversion constants (Kinv) decreases as the salt concentration in the solution increases, indicating that electrostatic interaction is also operating in the ct-DNA-binding events of the iron (II) complex.

  12. DNA Nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  14. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  15. Detection of Parasite-Specific DNA in Urine Sediment Obtained by Filtration Differentiates between Single and Mixed Infections of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium from Endemic Areas in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Nilanjan; Naples, Jean M.; Bosompem, Kwabena M.; Quartey, Joseph; Shiff, Clive J.

    2014-01-01

    Differential diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni and S. haematobium, which often occur sympatrically in Africa, requires both urine and stool and the procedures are low in sensitivity. The standard diagnostic tests, such as Kato-Katz (KK) for S. mansoni eggs and presence of haematuria for S. haematobium both lack sensitivity, produce false-negative results and show reduced accuracy with decreasing intensity of infection. The need for a single diagnostic test with high sensitivity and specificity for both parasites is important as many African countries are implementing Mass Drug Administration (MDA) following recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO). Eighty-six samples of urine sediment obtained by filtration were collected from a group of 5–23 years old people from an endemic area of southern Ghana. DNA was extracted from the urine sediment on filter paper from which a species-specific repeat fragment was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with specific primers for S. mansoni and for S. haematobium. Additionally, all participants were tested by KK (stool) and dipstick for haematuria. Diagnostic parameters for all three tests were analyzed statistically. Amplification of species-specific DNA by PCR showed much higher sensitivity (99%–100%) and specificity (100%) compared to KK and haematuria (sensitivity: 76% and 30% respectively) for both schistosome species. The same pattern was observed when the data were stratified for age group and sex specific analysis. In addition PCR amplification detected DNA from 11 individuals infected with both parasites who were negative by KK and haematuria. This approach of detecting parasite specific DNA from either or both species in a single urine specimen is a practical advantage that avoids the need for two specimens and is more effective than standard tests including those based on serology. This promises to improve the effectiveness of surveillance of MDA control programs of schistosomiasis. PMID

  16. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  17. Programmable Quantitative DNA Nanothermometers.

    PubMed

    Gareau, David; Desrosiers, Arnaud; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2016-07-13

    Developing molecules, switches, probes or nanomaterials that are able to respond to specific temperature changes should prove of utility for several applications in nanotechnology. Here, we describe bioinspired strategies to design DNA thermoswitches with programmable linear response ranges that can provide either a precise ultrasensitive response over a desired, small temperature interval (±0.05 °C) or an extended linear response over a wide temperature range (e.g., from 25 to 90 °C). Using structural modifications or inexpensive DNA stabilizers, we show that we can tune the transition midpoints of DNA thermometers from 30 to 85 °C. Using multimeric switch architectures, we are able to create ultrasensitive thermometers that display large quantitative fluorescence gains within small temperature variation (e.g., > 700% over 10 °C). Using a combination of thermoswitches of different stabilities or a mix of stabilizers of various strengths, we can create extended thermometers that respond linearly up to 50 °C in temperature range. Here, we demonstrate the reversibility, robustness, and efficiency of these programmable DNA thermometers by monitoring temperature change inside individual wells during polymerase chain reactions. We discuss the potential applications of these programmable DNA thermoswitches in various nanotechnology fields including cell imaging, nanofluidics, nanomedecine, nanoelectronics, nanomaterial, and synthetic biology.

  18. DNA Flexibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widom, Jonathan

    2005-03-01

    Classic experimental and theoretical analyses led to a unified view of DNA as a semiflexible polymer, characterized by a bending persistence length, P, ˜50 nm (˜150 bp). In this view, DNA lengths that are greater than P are, on average, spontaneously gently bent, and require relatively little force to bend significantly, while DNA lengths that are shorter than P are nearly straight, and require great force to bend significantly. Nevertheless, sharply bent DNA plays important roles in biology. We used the method of ligase catalyzed DNA cyclization to investigate the spontaneous looping of short DNAs. Remarkably, DNAs as short as 84 bp spontaneously bend into circles, and 94 bp DNA sequences cyclize up to 10^5 times more easily than predicted from classic theories of DNA bending. In subsequent studies we find that the twistability of sharply looped DNAs exceeds the prediction of classic theories by up to 400-fold. These results can only be understood by greatly enhanced DNA flexibility, not by permanent bends. Our results provide striking support for two new theories of DNA mechanics based on local melted or kinked regions, and they establish DNA as an active participant in the formation and function of looped regulatory complexes in vivo.

  19. New mixed ligand palladium(II) complexes based on the antiepileptic drug sodium valproate and bioactive nitrogen-donor ligands: Synthesis, structural characterization, binding interactions with DNA and BSA, in vitro cytotoxicity studies and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabrizi, Leila; Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Tavakol, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    The complexes [Pd(valp)2(imidazole)2] (1), [Pd(valp)2(pyrazine)2] (2) (valp is sodium valproate) have been synthesized and characterized using IR, 1H NMR, 13C{1H} NMR and UV-Vis spectrometry. The interaction of complexes with CT-DNA has been investigated using spectroscopic tools and viscosity measurement. In each case, the association constant (Kb) was deduced from the absorption spectral study and the number of binding sites (n) and the binding constant (K) were calculated from relevant fluorescence quenching data. As a result, a non-covalent interaction between the metal complex and DNA was suggested, which could be assigned to an intercalative binding. In addition, the interaction of 1 and 2 was ventured with bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the help of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Through these techniques, the apparent association constant (Kapp) and the binding constant (K) could be calculated for each complex. Evaluation of cytotoxic activity of the complexes against four different cancer cell lines proved that the complexes exhibited cytotoxic specificity and significant cancer cell inhibitory rate. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to provide more evidence about the observed data. The majority of trans isomers were supported not only by energies, but also by the similarity of its calculated IR frequencies, UV adsorptions and NMR chemical shifts to the experimental values.

  20. Mixing in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  1. Mixing in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee

    2011-01-07

    Turbulent mixing plays a vital role in many fields in astronomy. Here I review a few of these sites, discuss the importance of this turbulent mixing and the techniques used by astrophysicists to solve these problems.

  2. Improvements in Mixing Time and Mixing Uniformity in Devices Designed for Studies of Protein Folding Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Shuhuai; Bakajin, Olgica

    2007-08-01

    Using a microfluidic laminar flow mixer designed for studies of protein folding kinetics, we demonstrate a mixing time of 1 +/- 1 micros with sample consumption on the order of femtomoles. We recognize two limitations of previously proposed designs: (1) size and shape of the mixing region, which limits mixing uniformity and (2) the formation of Dean vortices at high flow rates, which limits the mixing time. We address these limitations by using a narrow shape-optimized nozzle and by reducing the bend of the side channel streamlines. The final design, which combines both of these features, achieves the best performance. We quantified the mixing performance of the different designs by numerical simulation of coupled Navier-Stokes and convection-diffusion equations and experiments using fluorescence resonance energy-transfer (FRET)-labeled DNA.

  3. STATIC AND KINETIC SITE-SPECIFIC PROTEIN-DNA PHOTOCROSSLINKING: ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL TRANSCRIPTION INITIATION COMPLEXES

    PubMed Central

    Naryshkin, Nikolai; Druzhinin, Sergei; Revyakin, Andrei; Kim, Younggyu; Mekler, Vladimir; Ebright, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Static site-specific protein-DNA photocrosslinking permits identification of protein-DNA interactions within multiprotein-DNA complexes. Kinetic site-specific protein-DNA photocrosslinking--involving rapid-quench-flow mixing and pulsed-laser irradiation--permits elucidation of pathways and kinetics of formation of protein-DNA interactions within multiprotein-DNA complexes. We present detailed protocols for application of static and kinetic site-specific protein-DNA photocrosslinking to bacterial transcription initiation complexes. PMID:19378179

  4. DNA Camouflage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-08

    1 DNA Camouflage Supplementary Information Bijan Zakeri1,2*, Timothy K. Lu1,2*, Peter A. Carr2,3* 1Department of Electrical Engineering and...ll.mit.edu). Distribution A: Public Release   2 Supplementary Figure 1 DNA camouflage with the 2-state device. (a) In the presence of Cre, DSD-2[α...Supplementary Figure 2 DNA shuffling does not comprise sequencing outside of DSDs. (a) Sequencing of 1 kb downstream of DSD-2[α] produces high quality

  5. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  6. Mixed methods research.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Hickman, Louise

    2015-04-08

    Mixed methods research involves the use of qualitative and quantitative data in a single research project. It represents an alternative methodological approach, combining qualitative and quantitative research approaches, which enables nurse researchers to explore complex phenomena in detail. This article provides a practical overview of mixed methods research and its application in nursing, to guide the novice researcher considering a mixed methods research project.

  7. DNA microarray-based mutation discovery and genotyping.

    PubMed

    Gresham, David

    2011-01-01

    DNA microarrays provide an efficient means of identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA samples and characterizing their frequencies in individual and mixed samples. We have studied the parameters that determine the sensitivity of DNA probes to SNPs and found that the melting temperature (T (m)) of the probe is the primary determinant of probe sensitivity. An isothermal-melting temperature DNA microarray design, in which the T (m) of all probes is tightly distributed, can be implemented by varying the length of DNA probes within a single DNA microarray. I describe guidelines for designing isothermal-melting temperature DNA microarrays and protocols for labeling and hybridizing DNA samples to DNA microarrays for SNP discovery, genotyping, and quantitative determination of allele frequencies in mixed samples.

  8. Molecular Cloning of the Bovine Liver ADPRT cDNA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-13

    of the DNA was - 0.5 micrograms. The 209 bp fragment from SV40 was mixed with pUC19 DNA in equal amounts and ligated ovenight at 12*C using T4 DNA ... ligase . The ligation mixture was used to transform Ecoli JM109 (1). Transformanrs were selected on LB plates cont- aining X-gal + FF0 + ampicillin (1

  9. /sup 32/P-postlabeling analysis of DNA adducts in liver of wild English sole (Parophrys vetulus) and winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus)

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, U.; Reichert, W.L.; Stein, J.E.

    1989-03-01

    The 1-butanol adduct enhancement version of the 32P-postlabeling assay was used to measure the levels of hepatic DNA adducts in the marine flatfish, English sole (Parophrys vetulus), sampled from the Duwamish Waterway and Eagle Harbor, Puget Sound, WA, where they are exposed to high concentrations of sediment-associated chemical contaminants and exhibit an elevated prevalence of hepatic neoplasms. Hepatic DNA was also analyzed from English sole from a reference area (Useless Bay, WA) and from reference English sole treated with organic-solvent extracts of sediments from the two contaminated sites. Autoradiograms of thin-layer chromatograms of 32P-labeled hepatic DNA digests from English sole from the contaminated sites exhibited up to three diagonal radioactive zones, which were not present in autoradiograms of thin-layer chromatogram maps of 32P-labeled DNA digests from English sole from the reference site. These diagonal radioactive zones contained several distinct spots as well as what appeared to be multiple overlapping adduct spots. The levels (nmol of adducts/mol of nucleotides) of total DNA adducts for English sole from Duwamish Waterway and Eagle Harbor were 26 +/- 28 (DS) and 17 +/- 9.6, respectively. All autoradiograms of DNA from fish from the contaminated sites exhibited a diagonal radioactive zone where DNA adducts of chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, and dibenz(a,h)anthracene, formed in vitro using English sole hepatic microsomes, were shown to chromatograph. English sole treated with extracts of the contaminated sediments had adduct profiles generally similar to those for English sole from the respective contaminated sites.

  10. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  11. DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S

    2001-05-01

    DNA ligases catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between juxtaposed 5' phosphate and a 3'-hydroxyl terminus in duplex DNA. This activity can repair single-stranded nicks in duplex DNA and join duplex DNA restriction fragments having either blunt ends or homologous cohesive ends. Two ligases are used for nucleic acid research and their reaction conditions and applications are described in this unit: E. coli ligase and T4 ligase. These enzymes differ in two important properties. One is the source of energy: T4 ligase uses ATP, while E. coli ligase uses NAD. Another important difference is their ability to ligate blunt ends; under normal reaction conditions, only T4 DNA ligase will ligate blunt ends.

  12. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  13. Patenting DNA.

    PubMed

    Bobrow, Martin; Thomas, Sandy

    2002-12-01

    The protection of inventions based on human DNA sequences has been achieved mainly through application of the patent system. Over the past decade, there has been continuing debate about whether this use of intellectual property rights is acceptable. Companies and universities have been active during this period in filing thousands of patent applications. Although many have argued that to claim a DNA sequence in a patent is to claim a discovery, patent law allows discoveries that are useful to be claimed as part of an invention. As the technology to isolate DNA sequences has advanced, the criterion for inventiveness, necessary for any invention to be eligible for filing, has become more difficult to justify in the case of claims to DNA sequences. Moreover, the discovery that a gene is associated with a particular disease is, it is argued, to discover a fact about the world and undeserving of the status of an invention. Careful examination of the grounds for allowing the patenting of DNA sequences as research tools suggests such rewards will rarely be justified. The patenting of DNA sequences as chemical intermediates necessary for the manufacture of therapeutic proteins is, however, reasonable given that the information within the sequence is applied to produce a tangible substance which has application as a medicine. Despite the legal, technical and political complexities of applying the flexibilities with the current law, it is argued that much could be achieved in the area of patenting DNA by raising the thresholds for patentability.

  14. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    Błasiak, Janusz; Krasiński, Tadeusz; Popławski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science.

  15. Stabbing simulations and DNA transfer.

    PubMed

    Samie, Lydie; Hicks, Tacha; Castella, Vincent; Taroni, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Technical developments have made it possible to analyze very low amounts of DNA. This has many advantages, but the drawback of this technological progress is that interpretation of the results becomes increasingly complex: the number of mixed DNA profiles increased relatively to single source DNA profiles and stochastic effects in the DNA profile, such as drop-in and drop-out, are more frequently observed. Moreover, the relevance of low template DNA material regarding the activities alleged is not as straightforward as it was a few years ago, when for example large quantities of blood were recovered. The possibility of secondary and tertiary transfer is now becoming an issue. The purpose of this research is twofold: first, to study the transfer of DNA from the handler and secondly, to observe if handlers would transfer DNA from persons closely connected to them. We chose to mimic cases where the offender would attack a person with a knife. As a first approach, we envisaged that the defense would not give an alternative explanation for the origin of the DNA. In our transfer experiments (4 donors, 16 experiments each, 64 traces), 3% of the traces were single DNA profiles. Most of the time, the DNA profile of the person handling the knife was present as the major profile: in 83% of the traces the major contributor profile corresponded to the stabber's DNA profile (in single stains and mixtures). Mixture with no clear major/minor fraction (12%) were observed. 5% of the traces were considered of insufficient quality (more than 3 contributors, presence of a few minor peaks). In that case, we considered that the stabber's DNA was absent. In our experiments, no traces allowed excluding the stabber, however it must be noted that precautions were taken to minimize background DNA as knives were cleaned before the experiments. DNA profiles of the stabber's colleagues were not observed. We hope that this study will allow for a better understanding of the transfer mechanism and

  16. DNA Labeling Using DNA Methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Tomkuvienė, Miglė; Kriukienė, Edita; Klimašauskas, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    DNA methyltransferases (MTases) uniquely combine the ability to recognize and covalently modify specific target sequences in DNA using the ubiquitous cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). Although DNA methylation plays important roles in biological signaling, the transferred methyl group is a poor reporter and is highly inert to further biocompatible derivatization. To unlock the biotechnological power of these enzymes, two major types of cofactor AdoMet analogs were developed that permit targeted MTase-directed attachment of larger moieties containing functional or reporter groups onto DNA. One such approach (named sequence-specific methyltransferase-induced labeling, SMILing) uses reactive aziridine or N-mustard mimics of the cofactor AdoMet, which render targeted coupling of a whole cofactor molecule to the target DNA. The second approach (methyltransferase-directed transfer of activated groups, mTAG) uses AdoMet analogs with a sulfonium-bound extended side chain replacing the methyl group, which permits MTase-directed covalent transfer of the activated side chain alone. As the enlarged cofactors are not always compatible with the active sites of native MTases, steric engineering of the active site has been employed to optimize their alkyltransferase activity. In addition to the described cofactor analogs, recently discovered atypical reactions of DNA cytosine-5 MTases involving non-cofactor-like compounds can also be exploited for targeted derivatization and labeling of DNA. Altogether, these approaches offer new powerful tools for sequence-specific covalent DNA labeling, which not only pave the way to developing a variety of useful techniques in DNA research, diagnostics, and nanotechnologies but have already proven practical utility for optical DNA mapping and epigenome studies.

  17. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  18. Cement mixing with vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.E.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a method of cementing a casing string in a bore hole of a well. It comprises introducing water and dry cement material into a mixing vessel; mixing the water and dry cement material in the mixing vessel to form a cement slurry, the slurry including lumps of the dry cement material, the mixing including steps of: agitating the slurry; and while agitating the slurry, transmitting vibrational energy into the slurry and thereby aiding disintegration and subsequent wetting of the lumps of the dry cement material in the slurry; and pumping the slurry into an annulus between the casing string and the bore hole.

  19. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  20. DNA Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Michael D.

    1997-01-01

    Explains a method to enable students to understand DNA and protein synthesis using model-building and role-playing. Acquaints students with the triplet code and transcription. Includes copies of the charts used in this technique. (DDR)

  1. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  2. Screening of hydrophobic DNA adducts in flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Malmström, C; Konn, M; Bogovski, S; Lang, T; Lönnström, L-G; Bylund, G

    2009-12-01

    Neoplasia and other histopathological lesions in flounder (Platichthys flesus) liver have been investigated in several European sea areas, including the Baltic Sea. Several studies have been able to link neoplasm epizootics in fish with the exposure to genotoxins such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The level of hydrophobic DNA adducts in tissue DNA reflects the exposure of the organism to PAHs. Using hydrophobic DNA adduct levels as biomarkers, possible PAH exposure was assessed in flounder from 10 different sites in the Baltic Sea, collected during the years 1995-1997. The results show that the overall levels of hepatic DNA adducts were low and, in general, the chromatograms appeared clean. The highest levels of DNA adducts were found at two sites in the southern Baltic Sea. There were no statistically significant differences in adduct levels between the sites. Our results indicate that flounder from studied off shore sites of the Baltic Sea had not been exposed to a greater extent to large polycyclic hydrophobic hydrocarbons in their environment.

  3. Metabolite Profiling and Classification of DNA-Authenticated Licorice Botanicals

    PubMed Central

    Simmler, Charlotte; Anderson, Jeffrey R.; Gauthier, Laura; Lankin, David C.; McAlpine, James B.; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F.

    2015-01-01

    Raw licorice roots represent heterogeneous materials obtained from mainly three Glycyrrhiza species. G. glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata exhibit marked metabolite differences in terms of flavanones (Fs), chalcones (Cs), and other phenolic constituents. The principal objective of this work was to develop complementary chemometric models for the metabolite profiling, classification, and quality control of authenticated licorice. A total of 51 commercial and macroscopically verified samples were DNA authenticated. Principal component analysis and canonical discriminant analysis were performed on 1H NMR spectra and area under the curve values obtained from UHPLC-UV chromatograms, respectively. The developed chemometric models enable the identification and classification of Glycyrrhiza species according to their composition in major Fs, Cs, and species specific phenolic compounds. Further key outcomes demonstrated that DNA authentication combined with chemometric analyses enabled the characterization of mixtures, hybrids, and species outliers. This study provides a new foundation for the botanical and chemical authentication, classification, and metabolomic characterization of crude licorice botanicals and derived materials. Collectively, the proposed methods offer a comprehensive approach for the quality control of licorice as one of the most widely used botanical dietary supplements. PMID:26244884

  4. Metabolite Profiling and Classification of DNA-Authenticated Licorice Botanicals.

    PubMed

    Simmler, Charlotte; Anderson, Jeffrey R; Gauthier, Laura; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Chen, Shao-Nong; Pauli, Guido F

    2015-08-28

    Raw licorice roots represent heterogeneous materials obtained from mainly three Glycyrrhiza species. G. glabra, G. uralensis, and G. inflata exhibit marked metabolite differences in terms of flavanones (Fs), chalcones (Cs), and other phenolic constituents. The principal objective of this work was to develop complementary chemometric models for the metabolite profiling, classification, and quality control of authenticated licorice. A total of 51 commercial and macroscopically verified samples were DNA authenticated. Principal component analysis and canonical discriminant analysis were performed on (1)H NMR spectra and area under the curve values obtained from UHPLC-UV chromatograms, respectively. The developed chemometric models enable the identification and classification of Glycyrrhiza species according to their composition in major Fs, Cs, and species specific phenolic compounds. Further key outcomes demonstrated that DNA authentication combined with chemometric analyses enabled the characterization of mixtures, hybrids, and species outliers. This study provides a new foundation for the botanical and chemical authentication, classification, and metabolomic characterization of crude licorice botanicals and derived materials. Collectively, the proposed methods offer a comprehensive approach for the quality control of licorice as one of the most widely used botanical dietary supplements.

  5. Mixed waste minimization/mixed waste avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    Todisco, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation describes methods for the minimization and volume reduction of low-level radioactive and mixed wastes. Many methods are presented including: source reduction, better waste monitoring activities, waste segregation, recycling, administrative controls, and optimization of waste-generating processes.

  6. Unravelling DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Rs; Danilowicz, C.

    2004-04-01

    The forces involved in the biology of life are carefully balanced between stopping thermal fluctuations ripping our DNA apart and having bonds weak enough to allow enzymes to function. The application of recently developed techniques for measuring piconewton forces and imaging at the nanometre scale on a molecule-by-molecule basis has dramatically increased the impact of single-molecule biophysics. This article describes the most commonly used techniques for imaging and manipulating single biomolecules. Using these techniques, the mechanical properties of DNA can be investigated, for example through measurements of the forces required to stretch and unzip the DNA double helix. These properties determine the ease with which DNA can be folded into the cell nucleus and the size and complexity of the accompanying cellular machinery. Part of this cellular machinery is enzymes, which manipulate, repair and transcribe the DNA helix. Enzymatic function is increasingly being investigated at the single molecule level to give better understanding of the forces and processes involved in the genetic cycle. One of the challenges is to transfer this understanding of single molecules into living systems. Already there have been some notable successes, such as the development of techniques for gene expression through the application of mechanical forces to cells, and the imaging and control of viral infection of a cell. This understanding and control of DNA has also been used to design molecules, which can self-assemble into a range of structures.

  7. DNA adductomics.

    PubMed

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  8. Interference of Co-amplified nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences on the determination of human mtDNA heteroplasmy by Using the SURVEYOR nuclease and the WAVE HS system.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Li, Shiue-Li; Hsu, Wei-Chien; Tang, Petrus

    2014-01-01

    High-sensitivity and high-throughput mutation detection techniques are useful for screening the homoplasmy or heteroplasmy status of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but might be susceptible to interference from nuclear mitochondrial DNA sequences (NUMTs) co-amplified during polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, we first evaluated the platform of SURVEYOR Nuclease digestion of heteroduplexed DNA followed by the detection of cleaved DNA by using the WAVE HS System (SN/WAVE-HS) for detecting human mtDNA variants and found that its performance was slightly better than that of denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). The potential interference from co-amplified NUMTs on screening mtDNA heteroplasmy when using these 2 highly sensitive techniques was further examined by using 2 published primer sets containing a total of 65 primer pairs, which were originally designed to be used with one of the 2 techniques. We confirmed that 24 primer pairs could amplify NUMTs by conducting bioinformatic analysis and PCR with the DNA from 143B-ρ0 cells. Using mtDNA extracted from the mitochondria of human 143B cells and a cybrid line with the nuclear background of 143B-ρ0 cells, we demonstrated that NUMTs could affect the patterns of chromatograms for cell DNA during SN-WAVE/HS analysis of mtDNA, leading to incorrect judgment of mtDNA homoplasmy or heteroplasmy status. However, we observed such interference only in 2 of 24 primer pairs selected, and did not observe such effects during DHPLC analysis. These results indicate that NUMTs can affect the screening of low-level mtDNA variants, but it might not be predicted by bioinformatic analysis or the amplification of DNA from 143B-ρ0 cells. Therefore, using purified mtDNA from cultured cells with proven purity to evaluate the effects of NUMTs from a primer pair on mtDNA detection by using PCR-based high-sensitivity methods prior to the use of a primer pair in real studies would be a more practical strategy.

  9. Bubble-bound state of triple-stranded DNA: Efimov physics in DNA with repulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, Jaya; Seno, Flavio; Trovato, Antonio; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2017-07-01

    The presence of a thermodynamic phase of a three-stranded DNA, namely, a mixed phase of bubbles of two bound strands and a single one, is established for large dimensions (d≥slant 5 ) by using exact real space renormalization group transformations and exact computations of specific heat for finite length chains. Similar exact computations for the fractal Sierpinski gasket of dimension d  <  2 establish the stability of the phase in the presence of a repulsive three chain interaction. Although, for d  <  2, cooperativity factors for bubbles or noncrossing conditions are needed for the melting transition, the mixed phase may exist even in absence of those. In contrast to the Efimov DNA, where three strands are bound though no two are bound, the mixed phase appears at temperatures less than the two chain melting temperature. Both the Efimov-DNA and the mixed phase are formed essentially due to the strand exchange mechanism.

  10. Admission mixing duct assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, Robert J. (Inventor); Dunbar, Lawrence W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A variable cycle jet engine is provided with a mixing duct assembly which mixes core engine exhaust gas with bypass air when the engine is operating in a turbofan mode and which blocks flow from the core engine and isolates the core engine from the bypass flow when the engine is operating as a ramjet.

  11. Dilution Zone Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Studies to characterize dilution zone mixing; experiments on the effects of free-stream turbulence on a jet in crossflow; and the development of an interactive computer code for the analysis of the mixing of jets with a confined crossflow are reviewed.

  12. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  13. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  14. Theory for Neutrino Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations, for which Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald were awarded the 2015 Nobel prize in physics, tremendous progresses have been made in measuring the mixing angles which determine the oscillation pattern. A lot of theoretical efforts have been made to understand how neutrinos mix with each other. Present data show that in the standard parameterization of the mixing matrix, θ23 is close to π/4 and the CP violating phase is close to - π/2. In this talk I report results obtained in arXiv:1505.01932 (Phys. Lett. B750(2015)620) and arXive:1404.01560 (Chin. J. Phys.53(2015)100101) and discuss some implications for theoretical model buildings for such mixing pattern. Specific examples for neutrino mixing based on A4 family symmetry are given.

  15. High-mix insulins

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Farooqi, Mohammad Hamed; El-Houni, Ali E.

    2015-01-01

    Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use. PMID:26425485

  16. MHD turbulent mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.; Benjamin, R.A.; Cho, J.; Leitner, S.N.

    2005-09-28

    Turbulent mixing layers have been proposed to explain observations of line ratios of highly ionized elements in the interstellar medium. We present preliminary results of numerical simulations of turbulent mixing layers in a magnetized medium. We developed a MHD code with radiative cooling. The magnetic field is expected to be a controlling factor by suppressing instabilities that lead to the turbulent mixing. Our results suggest that the difference in turbulent mixing in the unmagnetized case as compared to the case of a weak magnetic field, {beta} = Pgas/Pmag {approx} 10, is insignificant. With a more thorough exploration of parameter space, this work will provide more reliable diagnostics of turbulent mixing layers than those available today.

  17. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R; David Tamburello, D

    2008-11-13

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four dual-nozzle jet mixers located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The work described in this report establishes the basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, the benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations, and the application of those indicators to SRS waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in height from zero to 10 ft. The sludge has been characterized and modeled as micron-sized solids, typically 1 to 5 microns, at weight fractions as high as 20 to 30 wt%, specific gravities to 1.4, and viscosities up to 64 cp during motion. The sludge is suspended and mixed through the use of submersible slurry jet pumps. To suspend settled sludge, water is added to the tank as a slurry medium and stirred with the jet pump. Although there is considerable technical literature on mixing and solid suspension in agitated tanks, very little literature has been published on jet mixing in a large-scale tank. If shorter mixing times can be shown to support Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) or other feed requirements, longer pump lifetimes can be achieved with associated operational cost and

  18. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  19. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  20. Plasmonic Metallurgy Enabled by DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Lee, Byeongdu; Mirkin, Chad A.; Schatz, George C.

    2016-02-05

    In this study, mixed silver and gold plasmonic nanoparticle architectures are synthesized using DNA-programmable assembly, unveiling exquisitely tunable optical properties that are predicted and explained both by effective thin-film models and explicit electrodynamic simulations. These data demonstrate that the manner and ratio with which multiple metallic components are arranged can greatly alter optical properties, including tunable color and asymmetric reflectivity behavior of relevance for thin-film applications.

  1. Plasmonic Metallurgy Enabled by DNA.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael B; Ku, Jessie C; Lee, Byeongdu; Mirkin, Chad A; Schatz, George C

    2016-04-13

    Mixed silver and gold plasmonic nanoparticle architectures are synthesized using DNA-programmable assembly, unveiling exquisitely tunable optical properties that are predicted and explained both by effective thin-film models and explicit electrodynamic simulations. These data demonstrate that the manner and ratio with which multiple metallic components are arranged can greatly alter optical properties, including tunable color and asymmetric reflectivity behavior of relevance for thin-film applications.

  2. Plasmonic Metallurgy Enabled by DNA

    DOE PAGES

    Ross, Michael B.; Ku, Jessie C.; Lee, Byeongdu; ...

    2016-02-05

    In this study, mixed silver and gold plasmonic nanoparticle architectures are synthesized using DNA-programmable assembly, unveiling exquisitely tunable optical properties that are predicted and explained both by effective thin-film models and explicit electrodynamic simulations. These data demonstrate that the manner and ratio with which multiple metallic components are arranged can greatly alter optical properties, including tunable color and asymmetric reflectivity behavior of relevance for thin-film applications.

  3. ADVANCED MIXING MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Dimenna, R; Tamburello, D

    2011-02-14

    The process of recovering and processing High Level Waste (HLW) the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank with one to four mixers (pumps) located within the tank. The typical criteria to establish a mixed condition in a tank are based on the number of pumps in operation and the time duration of operation. To ensure that a mixed condition is achieved, operating times are typically set conservatively long. This approach results in high operational costs because of the long mixing times and high maintenance and repair costs for the same reason. A significant reduction in both of these costs might be realized by reducing the required mixing time based on calculating a reliable indicator of mixing with a suitably validated computer code. The focus of the present work is to establish mixing criteria applicable to miscible fluids, with an ultimate goal of addressing waste processing in HLW tanks at SRS and quantifying the mixing time required to suspend sludge particles with the submersible jet pump. A single-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach was taken for the analysis of jet flow patterns with an emphasis on the velocity decay and the turbulent flow evolution for the farfield region from the pump. Literature results for a turbulent jet flow are reviewed, since the decay of the axial jet velocity and the evolution of the jet flow patterns are important phenomena affecting sludge suspension and mixing operations. The work described in this report suggests a basis for further development of the theory leading to the identified mixing indicators, with benchmark analyses demonstrating their consistency with widely accepted correlations. Although the indicators are somewhat generic in nature, they are applied to Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks to provide a better, physically based estimate of the required mixing time. Waste storage tanks at SRS contain settled sludge which varies in

  4. Antifungal activity of DNA-lipid complexes and DNA-lipid films against Candida species.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Y; Fukushima, T; Hayakawa, T; Ogura, R; Kaminishi, H; Miyazaki, K; Okahata, Y

    2006-01-01

    In this study amphiphilic lipids, DNA-lipid complexes, and DNA-lipid films were prepared, and their antifungal activity against Candida species was examined. The amphiphilic lipids were synthesized from a reaction of glycine or L-alanine with n-alkyl alcohol in the presence of p-toluene sulfonic acid. DNA-lipid complexes, which were prepared by the simple mixing of DNA and amphiphilic lipids, were insoluble in water. Self-standing, water-insoluble DNA-lipid films were prepared by casting the DNA-lipid complexes from a chloroform/ethanol solution. The antifungal activities of the lipids and DNA-lipid complexes against the Candida species were evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs); those of DNA-lipid films were evaluated by the disk diffusion method. The seven kinds of lipids, DNA-lipid complexes, and DNA-lipid films showed antifungal activity, and no differences were seen in the antifungal activities between glycine and L-alanine derivatives. The lipids, DNA-lipid complexes, and DNA-lipid films, which have shorter alkyl chain length in lipids, showed antifungal activity against all Candida species. However, the effect of antifungal activity against Candida species decreased with increased alkyl chain length in lipids. In this study, it was found that lipids, DNA-lipid complexes, and films with a decyl or dodecyl group exhibit more favorable antifungal activity. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  5. Bacterial identification and subtyping using DNA microarray and DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Al-Khaldi, Sufian F; Mossoba, Magdi M; Allard, Marc M; Lienau, E Kurt; Brown, Eric D

    2012-01-01

    The era of fast and accurate discovery of biological sequence motifs in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is here. The co-evolution of direct genome sequencing and DNA microarray strategies not only will identify, isotype, and serotype pathogenic bacteria, but also it will aid in the discovery of new gene functions by detecting gene expressions in different diseases and environmental conditions. Microarray bacterial identification has made great advances in working with pure and mixed bacterial samples. The technological advances have moved beyond bacterial gene expression to include bacterial identification and isotyping. Application of new tools such as mid-infrared chemical imaging improves detection of hybridization in DNA microarrays. The research in this field is promising and future work will reveal the potential of infrared technology in bacterial identification. On the other hand, DNA sequencing by using 454 pyrosequencing is so cost effective that the promise of $1,000 per bacterial genome sequence is becoming a reality. Pyrosequencing technology is a simple to use technique that can produce accurate and quantitative analysis of DNA sequences with a great speed. The deposition of massive amounts of bacterial genomic information in databanks is creating fingerprint phylogenetic analysis that will ultimately replace several technologies such as Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis. In this chapter, we will review (1) the use of DNA microarray using fluorescence and infrared imaging detection for identification of pathogenic bacteria, and (2) use of pyrosequencing in DNA cluster analysis to fingerprint bacterial phylogenetic trees.

  6. Mixing in Microfluidic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskok, A.

    Flow and species transport in micro-scales experience laminar, even Stokes flow conditions. In absence of turbulence, species mixing becomes diffusion dominated, and requires very long mixing length scales (l m ). This creates significant challenges in the design of Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, where mixing of macromolecules and biological species with very low mass diffusivities are often desired. The objectives of this chapter are to introduce concepts relevant to mixing enhancement in microfluidic systems, and guide readers in the design of new mixers via numerical simulations. A distinguishing feature is the identification of flow kinematics that enhance mixing, followed with systematic characterization of mixing as a function of the Schmidt number at fixed kinematic conditions. In this chapter, we briefly review the routes to achieve chaotic advection in Stokes flow, and then illustrate the characteri-zation of a continuous flow chaotic stirrer via appropriate numerical tools, including the Poincaré section, finite time Lyapunov exponent, and mixing index.

  7. Lipid phase control of DNA delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Koynova, Rumiana; Wang, Li; Tarahovsky, Yury; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2010-01-18

    Cationic lipids form nanoscale complexes (lipoplexes) with polyanionic DNA and can be utilized to deliver DNA to cells for transfection. Here we report the correlation between delivery efficiency of these DNA carriers and the mesomorphic phases they form when interacting with anionic membrane lipids. Specifically, formulations that are particularly effective DNA carriers form phases of highest negative interfacial curvature when mixed with anionic lipids, whereas less effective formulations form phases of lower curvature. Structural evolution of the carrier lipid/DNA complexes upon interaction with cellular lipids is hence suggested as a controlling factor in lipid-mediated DNA delivery. A strategy for optimizing lipofection is deduced. The behavior of a highly effective lipoplex formulation, DOTAP/DOPE, is found to conform to this 'efficiency formula'.

  8. Detection of Quadruplex DNA by Gold Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Crouse, Heather F.; Doudt, Alex; Zerbe, Cassie; Basu, Swarna

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been used as a probe to detect low (<10 ppb) concentrations of quadruplex DNA. These nanoparticles display a tendency to form aggregates in the presence of certain quadruplex forms, as observed via enhanced plasmon resonance light scattering (PRLS) signals. These nanoparticles showed differing degrees of interactions with different types of quadruplex and mixed sequences but no interaction with duplex DNA. Enhancement of PRLS signals greater than 50% was observed at nanomolar DNA concentration, and a lower limit of detection of 2.1 nM was established for three different quadruplex DNA sequences, including the thrombin-inhibiting single-stranded 15 mer aptamer DNA, d(GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG), and the double-stranded 12 mer DNA, d(G4T4G4). Two different sample preparation protocols were used for the PRLS experiments, and they yielded similar results. PMID:22567555

  9. Applications of DNA fingerprinting in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    McCabe, E R

    1992-04-01

    Pediatric cases have played historic and precedent-setting roles in DNA forensics. DNA fingerprinting is a powerful tool for the pediatrician in cases of physical and sexual abuse and when issues arise regarding identification and familial relationships. If this technology is to be utilized effectively, the physician must know how to collect and document specimens. The pediatrician needs to be cautious in making referrals for commercial DNA banking. Whereas well-maintained and protected DNA repositories can be extremely valuable when there are medical and other appropriate indications, there are very real concerns about commercial DNA banking solely for purposes of identification. Pediatricians should recognize that this technology can be applied in novel but important new ways in their practices. For example, at the first indication of a possible mix-up of babies in the nursery, this should be acknowledged and rapidly resolved through DNA profiling of the parents and the neonates.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and thermal studies of binary and/or mixed ligand complexes of Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(III) based on 2-(Hydroxybenzylidene) thiosemicarbazone: DNA binding affinity of binary Cu(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Saif, M; Mashaly, Mahmoud M; Eid, Mohamed F; Fouad, R

    2012-06-15

    A new series of metal complexes of Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(III) with Schiff base ligand, H(2)L, 2-(Hydroxybenzylidene) thiosemicarbazone were synthesized. The mixed ligand complexes were prepared by using glycine (Gly), 2-aminopyridine (2-Ampy) and 1,10-phenanthroline (Phen) as secondary ligands. The structure of these complexes was identified and confirmed by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, UV-Vis, FT-IR and (1)H NMR spectroscopy and magnetic moment measurements as well as TG-DSC technique. The discussions of the prepared complexes indicate that the ligand behaves as a monoanionic tridentate ligand through ONS donor sites. Thermal studies suggested a mechanism for the degradation of the metal complexes as a function of temperature supporting the chelation modes and showed the possibility of obtaining new complexes pyrolytically in the solid state which cannot be synthesized from the solution. The absorption studies support that the binary Cu(II) complex exhibits a significant binding affinity to HS-DNA through intercalative mode. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The mixing of fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ottino, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    What do the eruption of Krakatau, the manufacture of puff pastry and the brightness of stars have in common Each involves some aspect of mixing. Mixing also plays a critical role in modern technology. Chemical engineers rely on mixing to ensure that substances react properly, to produce polymer blends that exhibit unique properties and to disperse drag-reducing agents in pipelines. Yet in spite of its of its ubiquity in nature and industry, mixing is only imperfectly under-stood. Indeed, investigators cannot even settle on a common terminology: mixing is often referred to as stirring by oceanographers and geophysicists, as blending by polymer engineers and as agitation by process engineers. Regardless of what the process is called, there is little doubt that it is exceedingly complex and is found in a great variety of systems. In constructing a theory of fluid mixing, for example, one has to take into account fluids that can be miscible or partially miscible and reactive or inert, and flows that are slow and orderly or very fast and turbulent. It is therefore not surprising that no single theory can explain all aspect of mixing in fluids and that straightforward computations usually fail to capture all the important details. Still, both physical experiments and computer simulations can provide insight into the mixing process. Over the past several years the authors and his colleague have taken both approaches in an effort to increase understanding of various aspect of the process-particularly of mixing involving slow flows and viscous fluids such as oils.

  12. Very Short Mitochondrial DNA Fragments and Heteroplasmy in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruoyu; Nakahira, Kiichi; Guo, Xiaoxian; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Gu, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    Cell free DNA (cfDNA) has received increasing attention and has been studied in a broad range of clinical conditions. However, few studies have focused on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in the cell free form. We optimized DNA isolation and sequencing library preparation protocols to better retain short DNA fragments from plasma, and applied these optimized methods to plasma samples from patients with sepsis. Our methods can retain substantially shorter DNA, resulting in an average of 11.5 fold increase in short DNA fragments yield (DNA <100bp). We report that cf-mtDNA in plasma is highly enriched in short-size cfDNA (30~60 bp). Motivated by this unique size distribution, we size-selected short cfDNA, which further increased the mtDNA recovery rate by an average of 10.4 fold. We then detected mtDNA heteroplasmy in plasma from 3 patients. In one patient who previously received bone marrow transplantation, different minor allele frequencies were observed between plasma and leukocytes at heteroplasmic sites, consistent with mixed-tissue origin for cfDNA. For the other two patients, the heteroplasmy pattern is also different between plasma and leukocyte. Our study shed new lights into the architecture of the cfDNA, and mtDNA heteroplasmy identified in plasma provides new potential for biomarker discovery. PMID:27811968

  13. Nearly discontinuous chaotic mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, David Howland; Lim, Hyun K; Yu, Yan; Glimm, James G

    2009-01-01

    A new scientific approach is presented for a broad class of chaotic problems involving a high degree of mixing over rapid time scales. Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows are typical of such problems. Microscopic mixing properties such as chemical reaction rates for turbulent mixtures can be obtained with feasible grid resolution. The essential dependence of (some) fluid mixing observables on transport phenomena is observed. This dependence includes numerical as well as physical transport and it includes laminar as well as turbulent transport. A new approach to the mathematical theory for the underlying equations is suggested.

  14. Liquid air mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Robert B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A device for mixing liquid nitrogen and liquid oxygen to form liquid air. The mixing device consists of a tube for transferring liquid oxygen positioned within a tube for transferring liquid nitrogen. Supply vessels for liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen are equally pressurized and connected to the appropriate tubes. Liquid oxygen and nitrogen flow from the supply vessels through the respective tubes and are mixed to form liquid air upon exiting the outlets of the tube. The resulting liquid air is transferred to a holding vessel.

  15. Mixing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Green, Norman W.

    1982-06-15

    Method of mixing particulate materials comprising contacting a primary source and a secondary source thereof whereby resulting mixture ensues; preferably at least one of the two sources has enough motion to insure good mixing and the particulate materials may be heat treated if desired. Apparatus for such mixing comprising an inlet for a primary source, a reactor communicating therewith, a feeding means for supplying a secondary source to the reactor, and an inlet for the secondary source. Feeding means is preferably adapted to supply fluidized materials.

  16. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, R. R. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to a remotely controllable mixing system in which a plurality of mixing assemblies are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly employs a central chamber and two outer, upper and lower chambers. Valves are positioned between chambers, and these valves for a given mixing assembly are operated by upper and lower control rotors, which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors. Additionally, a hoop is compressed around upper control rotors and a hoop is compressed around lower control rotors to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors and drive rotors. The drive rollers are driven by a motor.

  17. How to make DNA count: DNA-based diagnostic tools in veterinary parasitology.

    PubMed

    Hunt, P W; Lello, J

    2012-05-04

    Traditional methods for the diagnosis of parasitic helminth infections of livestock have a number of limitations, such as the inability to distinguish mixed-species infections, a heavy reliance on technical experience and also sub-sampling errors. Some of these limitations may be overcome through the development of rapid and accurate DNA-based tests. For example, DNA-based tests can specifically detect individual species in a mixed infection at either the larval or egg stages, in the absence of morphological differences among species. Even so, some diagnostic problems remain the same, irrespective of whether a DNA-based or traditional method is used. For example, sub-sampling errors from an aggregated distribution are likely to persist. It is proposed, however, that DNA-based diagnostic technologies offer an opportunity to expand diagnostic capabilities, and are discussed in the current review. The future introduction of DNA-based diagnostic technologies into routine diagnostic settings will also be discussed.

  18. DNA codes

    SciTech Connect

    Torney, D. C.

    2001-01-01

    We have begun to characterize a variety of codes, motivated by potential implementation as (quaternary) DNA n-sequences, with letters denoted A, C The first codes we studied are the most reminiscent of conventional group codes. For these codes, Hamming similarity was generalized so that the score for matched letters takes more than one value, depending upon which letters are matched [2]. These codes consist of n-sequences satisfying an upper bound on the similarities, summed over the letter positions, of distinct codewords. We chose similarity 2 for matches of letters A and T and 3 for matches of the letters C and G, providing a rough approximation to double-strand bond energies in DNA. An inherent novelty of DNA codes is 'reverse complementation'. The latter may be defined, as follows, not only for alphabets of size four, but, more generally, for any even-size alphabet. All that is required is a matching of the letters of the alphabet: a partition into pairs. Then, the reverse complement of a codeword is obtained by reversing the order of its letters and replacing each letter by its match. For DNA, the matching is AT/CG because these are the Watson-Crick bonding pairs. Reversal arises because two DNA sequences form a double strand with opposite relative orientations. Thus, as will be described in detail, because in vitro decoding involves the formation of double-stranded DNA from two codewords, it is reasonable to assume - for universal applicability - that the reverse complement of any codeword is also a codeword. In particular, self-reverse complementary codewords are expressly forbidden in reverse-complement codes. Thus, an appropriate distance between all pairs of codewords must, when large, effectively prohibit binding between the respective codewords: to form a double strand. Only reverse-complement pairs of codewords should be able to bind. For most applications, a DNA code is to be bi-partitioned, such that the reverse-complementary pairs are separated

  19. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  20. DNA origami nanopores for controlling DNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Göpfrich, Kerstin; Misiunas, Karolis; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-07-23

    We combine DNA origami structures with glass nanocapillaries to reversibly form hybrid DNA origami nanopores. Trapping of the DNA origami onto the nanocapillary is proven by imaging fluorescently labeled DNA origami structures and simultaneous ionic current measurements of the trapping events. We then show two applications highlighting the versatility of these DNA origami nanopores. First, by tuning the pore size we can control the folding of dsDNA molecules ("physical control"). Second, we show that the specific introduction of binding sites in the DNA origami nanopore allows selective detection of ssDNA as a function of the DNA sequence ("chemical control").

  1. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  2. Mixed-Media Owls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    The fun of creating collages is there are unlimited possibilities for the different kinds of materials one can use. In this article, the author describes how her eighth-grade students created an owl using mixed media.

  3. Artificial upwelling and mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The authors present results related to artificial upwelling and coastal mariculture using deep ocean water and mixing in coastal waters. They discuss the application of research results for marine waste disposal.

  4. Asymmetric antiproton debuncher: No bad mixing, more good mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Visnjic, V.

    1994-07-01

    An asymmetric lattice for the Fermilab Antiproton Debuncher is designed. The lattice has zero mixing between the pickups and the kickers (bad mixing) while the mixing in the rest of the machine (good mixing) can be varied (even during the operation of the machine) in order to optimize the stochastic cooling. As an example, a lattice with zero bad mixing and twice the good mixing is presented. The betatron cooling rate in this lattice is twice its present value.

  5. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  6. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  7. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  8. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  9. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Løbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  10. BioBarcode: a general DNA barcoding database and server platform for Asian biodiversity resources.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeongheui; Kim, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Sungmin; Eo, Hae-Seok; Kim, Chang-Bae; Paek, Woon Kee; Kim, Won; Bhak, Jong

    2009-12-03

    DNA barcoding provides a rapid, accurate, and standardized method for species-level identification using short DNA sequences. Such a standardized identification method is useful for mapping all the species on Earth, particularly when DNA sequencing technology is cheaply available. There are many nations in Asia with many biodiversity resources that need to be mapped and registered in databases. We have built a general DNA barcode data processing system, BioBarcode, with open source software - which is a general purpose database and server. It uses mySQL RDBMS 5.0, BLAST2, and Apache httpd server. An exemplary database of BioBarcode has around 11,300 specimen entries (including GenBank data) and registers the biological species to map their genetic relationships. The BioBarcode database contains a chromatogram viewer which improves the performance in DNA sequence analyses. Asia has a very high degree of biodiversity and the BioBarcode database server system aims to provide an efficient bioinformatics protocol that can be freely used by Asian researchers and research organizations interested in DNA barcoding. The BioBarcode promotes the rapid acquisition of biological species DNA sequence data that meet global standards by providing specialized services, and provides useful tools that will make barcoding cheaper and faster in the biodiversity community such as standardization, depository, management, and analysis of DNA barcode data. The system can be downloaded upon request, and an exemplary server has been constructed with which to build an Asian biodiversity system http://www.asianbarcode.org.

  11. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 10 rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  12. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 19 equivalent rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  13. Mixing of Supersonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, C. W.; Landrum, D. B.; Muller, S.; Turner, M.; Parkinson, D.

    1998-01-01

    The Strutjet approach to Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) propulsion depends upon fuel-rich flows from the rocket nozzles and turbine exhaust products mixing with the ingested air for successful operation in the ramjet and scramjet modes. It is desirable to delay this mixing process in the air-augmented mode of operation present during low speed flight. A model of the Strutjet device has been built and is undergoing test to investigate the mixing of the streams as a function of distance from the Strutjet exit plane during simulated low speed flight conditions. Cold flow testing of a 1/6 scale Strutjet model is underway and nearing completion. Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostic methods are being employed to observe the mixing of the turbine exhaust gas with the gases from both the primary rockets and the ingested air simulating low speed, air augmented operation of the RBCC. The ratio of the pressure in the turbine exhaust duct to that in the rocket nozzle wall at the point of their intersection is the independent variable in these experiments. Tests were accomplished at values of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 for this parameter. Qualitative results illustrate the development of the mixing zone from the exit plane of the model to a distance of about 19 equivalent rocket nozzle exit diameters downstream. These data show the mixing to be confined in the vertical plane for all cases, The lateral expansion is more pronounced at a pressure ratio of 1.0 and suggests that mixing with the ingested flow would be likely beginning at a distance of 7 nozzle exit diameters downstream of the nozzle exit plane.

  14. Topological impact of noncanonical DNA structures on Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shuntaro; Brazier, John A; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2017-09-05

    Noncanonical DNA structures that stall DNA replication can cause errors in genomic DNA. Here, we investigated how the noncanonical structures formed by sequences in genes associated with a number of diseases impacted DNA polymerization by the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase. Replication of a DNA sequence forming an i-motif from a telomere, hypoxia-induced transcription factor, and an insulin-linked polymorphic region was effectively inhibited. On the other hand, replication of a mixed-type G-quadruplex (G4) from a telomere was less inhibited than that of the antiparallel type or parallel type. Interestingly, the i-motif was a better inhibitor of replication than were mixed-type G4s or hairpin structures, even though all had similar thermodynamic stabilities. These results indicate that both the stability and topology of structures formed in DNA templates impact the processivity of a DNA polymerase. This suggests that i-motif formation may trigger genomic instability by stalling the replication of DNA, causing intractable diseases.

  15. Enhanced solubilization of curcumin in mixed surfactant vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kansal, S K; Chaudhary, Ganga Ram; Mehta, S K

    2016-05-15

    Self-assemblies of equimolar double and single chain mixed ionic surfactants, with increasing numbers of carbon atoms of double chain surfactant, were analyzed on the basis of fluorescence and conductivity results. Attempts were also made to enhance the solubilization of curcumin in aqueous equimolar mixed surfactant systems. Mixed surfactant assembly was successful in retarding the degradation of curcumin in alkaline media (only 25-28 40% degraded in 10h at pH 13). Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence quenching methods were employed to predict the binding position and mechanism of curcumin with self-assemblies. Results indicate that the interactions take place according to both dynamic and static quenching mechanisms and curcumin was distributed in a palisade layer of mixed aggregates. Antioxidant activity (using DPPH radical) and biocompatibility (using calf-thymus DNA) of curcumin-loaded mixed surfactant formulations were also evaluated. The prepared systems improved the stability, solubility and antioxidant activity of curcumin and additionally are biocompatible.

  16. Mixed waste management options

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.B.; Kirner, N.P.

    1991-12-31

    Disposal fees for mixed waste at proposed commercial disposal sites have been estimated to be $15,000 to $40,000 per cubit foot. If such high disposal fees are imposed, generators may be willing to apply extraordinary treatment or regulatory approaches to properly dispose of their mixed waste. This paper explores the feasibility of several waste management scenarios and attempts to answer the question: Can mixed waste be managed out of existence? Existing data on commercially generated mixed waste streams are used to identify the realm of mixed waste known to be generated. Each waste stream is evaluated from both a regulatory and technical perspective in order to convert the waste into a strictly low-level radioactive or a hazardous waste. Alternative regulatory approaches evaluated in this paper include a delisting petition, no migration petition, and a treatability variance. For each waste stream, potentially available treatment options are identified that could lead to these variances. Waste minimization methodology and storage for decay are also considered. Economic feasibility of each option is discussed broadly.

  17. [Mixed states and schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Fakra, E; Belzeaux, R; Pringuey, D; Cermolacce, M; Corréard, N; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Azorin, J-M

    2013-12-01

    Because of their compilation of contrasted symptoms and their variable clinical presentation, mixed episodes have been withdrawn from the DSM. However, mixed states question not only the bonds between depression and mania, but also the distinction between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia. Indeed, doubts about the dichotomy introduced by Kraepelin between bipolar disorders and schizophrenia is as old as the nosolgy itself, as attest the later works of this author revealing his hesitations on his own classification. But findings here reviewed issued from recent technical advances, particularly in the imaging and genetic fields, offer a better understanding of the boundaries between these two disorders. Yet, when confronted to an acute episode, clinicians may find it challenging to distinguish a mixed state from a schizophrenic relapse. Indeed, there is no pathognomonic manifestation allowing to retain a diagnosis with confidence. The physician will therefore have to identify a pattern of signs, which will orient his assessment with no certainty. Thus, negative rather than affective or psychotic symptomatology appears to be useful in discriminating schizophrenia (or schizoaffective) disorders from mixed mania. However, a conclusion during this acute stage appears in definitive a formal exercise, first because the final diagnosis will only be ascertained once the symptoms are amended, and second because, according to our classifications, a mood episode, including mania and mixed mania, can be observed without ruling out the diagnosis of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  18. Prokaryotic DNA ligases unwind superhelical DNA.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, M; van Holde, K; Zlatanova, J

    1996-09-13

    We have studied the effect on DNA topology of binding of prokaryotic DNA ligases (T4 and E. coli) to superhelical or nicked circular DNA. Performing topoisomerase I-mediated relaxation in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase led to a shift in the topoisomer distribution to increasingly more negative values. This result suggested that T4 ligase unwound the DNA and was further substantiated by ligation of nicked circular molecules by E. coli DNA ligase in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase. Such an experiment was possible since the two DNA ligases require different cofactors for enzymatic activity. Performing a similar experiment with reverse partners, using E. coli DNA ligase as ligand, and T4 ligase as sealing agent, we observed that the E. coli enzyme also unwound the DNA. Thus, prokaryotic DNA ligases can be added to an ever-growing list of DNA-binding proteins that unwind the DNA upon binding.

  19. Natural convective mixing flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Eduardo; de La Cruz, Luis; del Castillo, Luis

    1998-11-01

    Natural convective mixing flows. Eduardo Ramos and Luis M. de La Cruz, National University of Mexico and Luis Del Castillo San Luis Potosi University. The possibility of mixing a fluid with a natural convective flow is analysed by solving numerically the mass, momentum and energy equations in a cubic container. Two opposite vertical walls of the container are assumed to have temperatures that oscillate as functions of time. The phase of the oscillations is chosen in such a way that alternating corrotating vortices are formed in the cavity. The mixing efficiency of this kind of flow is examined with a Lagrangian tracking technique. This work was partially financed by CONACyT-Mexico project number GE0044

  20. Remotely controllable mixing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belew, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controllable mixing system (210) in which a plurality of mixing assemblies (10a-10e) are arranged in an annular configuration, and wherein each assembly (10) employs a central chamber (16) and two outer, upper and lower, chambers (12, 14). Valves (18, 20) are positioned between chambers, and these valves (18, 20) for a given mixing assembly (10) are operated by upper and lower control rotors (29), which in turn are driven by upper and lower drive rotors (270, 270b). Additionally, a hoop (278) is compressed around upper control rotors (29) and a hoop (278b) is compressed around lower control rotors (29) to thus insure constant frictional engagement between all control rotors (29) and drive rotors (270, 270b). The drive rollers (270, 270b) are driven by a motor (213).

  1. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  2. Mixed waste: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Moghissi, A.A.; Blauvelt, R.K.; Benda, G.A.; Rothermich, N.E.

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the peer-reviewed and edited versions of papers submitted for presentation a the Second International Mixed Waste Symposium. Following the tradition of the First International Mixed Waste Symposium, these proceedings were prepared in advance of the meeting for distribution to participants. The symposium was organized by the Mixed Waste Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The topics discussed at the symposium include: stabilization technologies, alternative treatment technologies, regulatory issues, vitrification technologies, characterization of wastes, thermal technologies, laboratory and analytical issues, waste storage and disposal, organic treatment technologies, waste minimization, packaging and transportation, treatment of mercury contaminated wastes and bioprocessing, and environmental restoration. Individual abstracts are catalogued separately for the data base.

  3. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  4. Mixing navigation on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao

    2008-05-01

    In this article, we propose a mixing navigation mechanism, which interpolates between random-walk and shortest-path protocol. The navigation efficiency can be remarkably enhanced via a few routers. Some advanced strategies are also designed: For non-geographical scale-free networks, the targeted strategy with a tiny fraction of routers can guarantee an efficient navigation with low and stable delivery time almost independent of network size. For geographical localized networks, the clustering strategy can simultaneously increase efficiency and reduce the communication cost. The present mixing navigation mechanism is of significance especially for information organization of wireless sensor networks and distributed autonomous robotic systems.

  5. Turbulence and Interfacial Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, James; Li, Xiaolin

    2005-03-15

    The authors study mix from analytical and numerical points of view. These investigations are linked. The analytical studies (in addition to laboratory experiments) provide bench marks for the direct simulation of mix. However, direct simulation is too detailed to be useful and to expensive to be practical. They also consider averaged equations. Here the major issue is the validation of the closure assumptions. They appeal to the direct simulation methods for this step. They have collaborated with several NNSA teams; moreover, Stony Brook alumni (former students, faculty and research collaborators) presently hold staff positions in NNSA laboratories.

  6. Atomization and Mixing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Hunt, K.; Duesberg, J.

    1985-01-01

    The primary objective was the obtainment of atomization and mixing performance data for a variety of typical liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon injector element designs. Such data are required to establish injector design criteria and to provide critical inputs to liquid rocket engine combustor performance and stability analysis, and computational codes and methods. Deficiencies and problems with the atomization test equipment were identified, and action initiated to resolve them. Test results of the gas/liquid mixing tests indicated that an assessment of test methods was required. A series of 71 liquid/liquid tests were performed.

  7. Atomization and mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrenberg, A.; Jaqua, V. W.

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art in atomization and mixing for triplet, pentad, and coaxial injectors is described. Injectors that are applicable for LOX/hydrocarbon propellants and main chamber and fuel rich preburner/gas generator mixture ratios are of special interest. Various applicable correlating equations and parameters as well as test data found in the literature are presented. The validity, utility, and important aspects of these data and correlations are discussed and the measurement techniques used are evaluated. Propellant mixing tests performed are described and summarized, results are reported, and tentative conclusions are included.

  8. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOEpatents

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  9. Sylgard® Mixing Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bello, Mollie; Welch, Cynthia F.; Goodwin, Lynne Alese; Keller, Jennie

    2014-08-22

    Sylgard® 184 and Sylgard® 186 silicone elastomers form Dow Corning® are used as potting agents across the Nuclear Weapons Complex. A standardized mixing procedure is required for filled versions of these products. The present study is a follow-up to a mixing study performed by MST-7 which established the best mixing procedure to use when adding filler to either 184 or 186 base resins. The most effective and consistent method of mixing resin and curing agent for three modified silicone elastomer recipes is outlined in this report. For each recipe, sample size, mixing type, and mixing time was varied over 10 separate runs. The results show that the THINKY™ Mixer gives reliable mixing over varying batch sizes and mixing times. Hand Mixing can give improved mixing, as indicated by reduced initial viscosity; however, this method is not consistent.

  10. Radial Mixing in Turbomachines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-31

    Belgium March 31, 1991 Final Scientific Report June 1, 1989 - July 31, 1990 VUB -STR -17 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. - Prepared ...secondary flows and turbulence as sources of mixing was investigated by conducting experiments using hot-wire anemometry and ehtylene tracer gas

  11. Stabilizer for mixed fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, M.; Igarashi, T.; Ukigai, T.

    1984-03-13

    A stabilizer for mixed fuels containing a reaction product obtained by reacting (1) a polyol having at least 3 hydroxyl groups in the molecule and a molecular weight of 400-10,000 with (2) an epihalohydrin, as the principal component.

  12. Mixing and Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditmars, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of longitudinal dispersion, mixing and transport in streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, and oceans. This review covers also: (1) fluid-solid mixtures and (2) oil spill behavior. A list of 189 references published in 1976 and 1977 is presented. (HM)

  13. True Anonymity Without Mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Jimenez, C.; Marshall, L.

    2002-04-01

    Anonymizers based on mix computers interposed between the sender and the receiver of an e-mail message have been used in the Internet for several years by senders of e-mail messages who do not wish to disclose their identity. Unfortunately, the degree of anonymity provided by this paradigm is limited and fragile. First, the messages sent are not truly anonymous but pseudo-anonymous since one of the mixes, at least, always knows the sender's identity. Secondly, the strength of the system to protect the sender's identity depends on the ability and the willingness of the mixes to keep the secret. If the mixes fail, the sender/'s anonymity is reduced to pieces. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for sending truly anonymous messages over the Internet where the anonymous message is sent from a PDA which uses dynamically assigned temporary, non-personal, random IP and MAC addresses. Anonymous E-cash is used to pay for the service.

  14. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  15. Mixed-Initiative Clustering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yifen

    2010-01-01

    Mixed-initiative clustering is a task where a user and a machine work collaboratively to analyze a large set of documents. We hypothesize that a user and a machine can both learn better clustering models through enriched communication and interactive learning from each other. The first contribution or this thesis is providing a framework of…

  16. Mixing and Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditmars, John D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of longitudinal dispersion, mixing and transport in streams, rivers, lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, and oceans. This review covers also: (1) fluid-solid mixtures and (2) oil spill behavior. A list of 189 references published in 1976 and 1977 is presented. (HM)

  17. Mixed valent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riseborough, P. S.; Lawrence, J. M.

    2016-08-01

    We review the theory of mixed-valent metals and make comparison with experiments. A single-impurity description of the mixed-valent state is discussed alongside the description of the nearly-integer valent or Kondo limit. The degeneracy N of the f-shell plays an important role in the description of the low-temperature Fermi-liquid state. In particular, for large N, there is a rapid cross-over between the mixed-valent and the Kondo limit when the number of f electrons is changed. We discuss the limitations on the application of the single-impurity description to concentrated compounds such as those caused by the saturation of the Kondo effect and those due to the presence of magnetic interactions between the impurities. This discussion is followed by a description of a periodic lattice of mixed-valent ions, including the role of the degeneracy N. The article concludes with a comparison of theory and experiment. Topics covered include the single-impurity Anderson model, Luttinger’s theorem, the Friedel sum rule, the Schrieffer-Wolff transformation, the single-impurity Kondo model, Kondo screening, the Wilson ratio, local Fermi-liquids, Fermi-liquid sum rules, the Noziéres exhaustion principle, Doniach’s diagram, the Anderson lattice model, the Slave-Boson method, etc.

  18. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be considered as COAs. As manufacturing of such media produces inevitable errors, we use the locations and count of these errors as a “fingerprint” for each optical disc: its optical DNA. The “fingerprint” is signed using publisher’s private-key and the resulting signature is stored onto the optical medium using a post-production process. Standard DVD players with altered firmware that includes publisher’s public-key, should be able to verify the authenticity of DVDs protected with optical DNA. Our key finding is that for the proposed protocol, only DVDs with exceptional wear-and-tear characteristics would result in an inexpensive and viable anti-counterfeiting technology.

  19. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  20. More evidence for non-maternal inheritance of mitochondrial DNA?

    PubMed

    Bandelt, H-J; Kong, Q-P; Parson, W; Salas, A

    2005-12-01

    A single case of paternal co-transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in humans has been reported so far. To find potential instances of non-maternal inheritance of mtDNA. Published medical case studies (of single patients) were searched for irregular mtDNA patterns by comparing the given haplotype information for different clones or tissues with the worldwide mtDNA database as known to date-a method that has proved robust and reliable for the detection of flawed mtDNA sequence data. More than 20 studies were found reporting clear cut instances with mtDNAs of different ancestries in single individuals. As examples, cases are reviewed from recent published reports which, at face value, may be taken as evidence for paternal inheritance of mtDNA or recombination. Multiple types (or recombinant types) of quite dissimilar mitochondrial DNA from different parts of the known mtDNA phylogeny are often reported in single individuals. From re-analyses and corrigenda of forensic mtDNA data, it is apparent that the phenomenon of mixed or mosaic mtDNA can be ascribed solely to contamination and sample mix up.

  1. Rapid and Sensitive PCR-Dipstick DNA Chromatography for Multiplex Analysis of the Oral Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Niwa, Kousuke; Kawase, Mitsuo; Tanner, Anne C. R.; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    A complex of species has been associated with dental caries under the ecological hypothesis. This study aimed to develop a rapid, sensitive PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography assay that could be read by eye for multiplex and semiquantitative analysis of plaque bacteria. Parallel oligonucleotides were immobilized on a dipstick strip for multiplex analysis of target DNA sequences of the caries-associated bacteria, Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Scardovia wiggsiae, Actinomyces species, and Veillonella parvula. Streptavidin-coated blue-colored latex microspheres were to generate signal. Target DNA amplicons with an oligonucleotide-tagged terminus and a biotinylated terminus were coupled with latex beads through a streptavidin-biotin interaction and then hybridized with complementary oligonucleotides on the strip. The accumulation of captured latex beads on the test and control lines produced blue bands, enabling visual detection with the naked eye. The PCR-dipstick DNA chromatography detected quantities as low as 100 pg of DNA amplicons and demonstrated 10- to 1000-fold higher sensitivity than PCR-agarose gel electrophoresis, depending on the target bacterial species. Semiquantification of bacteria was performed by obtaining a series of chromatograms using serial 10-fold dilution of PCR-amplified DNA extracted from dental plaque samples. The assay time was less than 3 h. The semiquantification procedure revealed the relative amounts of each test species in dental plaque samples, indicating that this disposable device has great potential in analysis of microbial composition in the oral cavity and intestinal tract, as well as in point-of-care diagnosis of microbiota-associated diseases. PMID:25485279

  2. In vitro selection and characterization of catalytic DNA in model biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slimmer, Scott Collins

    This work reports the in vitro selection and characterization of a metal cofactor independent DNAzyme with RNA phosphoesterase activity. The majority of DNAzymes with catalytic RNA phosphoesterase activity are dependent upon divalent metal ion cofactors. The family of DNAzymes described in this research is functional in the absence of divalent cations. The most prevalent sequence in the selection population was chosen for further study. In contrast to previous studies which have reported divalent cation independent DNAzyme activity between pH 5.0 and pH 9.0, the catalytic activity of the DNAzyme reported here is extremely pH-dependent with maximum activity between pH 4.0 and pH 5.0. The catalytic activity of this DNAzyme appears to be dependent on the presence of organic anion cofactors including acetic acid, formic acid, citric acid, and MES. This research also details the first attempt to obtain useful information from heterogeneous DNA sequencing data. A sample of the selection population from each of the twelve rounds of in vitro selection was heterogeneously sequenced without any prior separation or purification. The observed concurrence of qualitative changes in the heterogeneous sequencing chromatograms with observed changes in the catalytic activity of the population is evidence of the ability of heterogeneous DNA sequencing to successfully monitor the evolution of DNA populations during in vitro selection. The ability to successfully analyze heterogeneous DNA samples containing multiple DNA sequences using a single sequencing experiment may play an important role in driving the development of new DNA sequencing technologies and shaping the future of genomic research.

  3. Experiments in mixed reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krum, David M.; Sadek, Ramy; Kohli, Luv; Olson, Logan; Bolas, Mark

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Institute for Creative Technologies and the School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California, the Mixed Reality lab develops technologies and techniques for presenting realistic immersive training experiences. Such experiences typically place users within a complex ecology of social actors, physical objects, and collections of intents, motivations, relationships, and other psychological constructs. Currently, it remains infeasible to completely synthesize the interactivity and sensory signatures of such ecologies. For this reason, the lab advocates mixed reality methods for training and conducts experiments exploring such methods. Currently, the lab focuses on understanding and exploiting the elasticity of human perception with respect to representational differences between real and virtual environments. This paper presents an overview of three projects: techniques for redirected walking, displays for the representation of virtual humans, and audio processing to increase stress.

  4. Mixing by individual swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkin, Dmitri; Shum, Henry; Yeomans, Julia

    2012-11-01

    Despite their evolutionary and technological importance, different biomixing mechanisms, their effectiveness and universality remain poorly understood. In this talk we focus on the Lagrangian transport of the surrounding fluid by swimmers. Low Re passive tracers advected by swimmers move in loops that are, in general, almost closed. We analyze the reasons for this behavior and, as non-closedness of the loops is a natural requirement for an efficient mixing, propose a classification of possible mechanisms for biogenic mixing. Next, we discuss the universal (common to all swimmers) and the swimmer-dependent features of the resulting tracer displacements and analyze the Darwin drift, the total fluid volume displaced by a swimmer passing from and to infinity. We show that the Darwin drift is finite for force-free swimmers and can be decomposed into a universal and a swimmer-dependent part. We illustrate our consideration with examples for model swimmers and biological data.

  5. Nozzle mixing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mensink, D.L.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a nozzle device for causing two fluids to mix together. In particular, a spray nozzle comprise two hollow, concentric housings, an inner housing and an outer housing. The inner housing has a channel formed therethrough for a first fluid. Its outer surface cooperates with the interior surface of the outer housing to define the second channel for a second fluid. The outer surface of the inner housing and the inner surface of the outer housing each carry a plurality of vanes that interleave but do not touch, each vane of one housing being between two vanes of the other housing. The vanes are curved and the inner surface of the outer housing and the outer surface of the inner housing converge to narrow the second channel. The shape of second channel results in a swirling, accelerating second fluid that will impact the first fluid just past the end of the nozzle where mixing will take place.

  6. Neutrino-Modulino Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Benakli, K.; Smirnov, A.Y.

    1997-12-01

    We suggest an existence of light singlet fermion, S, which interacts with observable matter only via Planck mass suppressed interaction: {approximately}m{sub 3/2}/M{sub P}, where m{sub 3/2} is the supergravity gravitino mass. If the mass of the singlet equals {approximately}m{sup 2}{sub 3/2}/M{sub P}, then {nu}{sub e}{r_arrow}S resonance conversion solves the solar neutrino problem or leads to observable effects. The {nu}S mixing changes supernova neutrino fluxes and has an impact on the primordial nucleosynthesis. The singlet S can originate as the supersymmetric partner of the moduli fields in supergravity or low energy effective theory stemming from superstrings. The {nu}S mixing may be accompanied by observable R-parity breaking effects. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  7. Heteroplasmy of chloroplast DNA in Medicago.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L B; Palmer, J D

    1989-01-01

    Two chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) regions exhibiting a high frequency of intra- or inter-species variation were identified in 12 accessions of the genus Medicago. Restriction maps of both regions were prepared for alfalfa, and the probable nature of the events causing the DNA differences was identified. Specific DNA fragments were then cloned for use in identification of variants in each region. Two each of M. sativa ssp. varia and ssp. caerulea and one of six M. sativa ssp. sativa single plants examined possessed cpDNA heterogeneity as identified by screening extracts for fragments generated by the presence and absence of a specific Xba I restriction site. Three plants of M. sativa ssp. sativa, two of each of sspp. varia and caerulea, and three M. scutellata were also examined for single-plant cpDNA heterogeneity at a hypervariable region where differences resulted from small insertion-deletion events. A single M. scutellata plant with mixed cpDNAs was identified. Sorting out was seen when one spp. sativa plant with mixed plastid types identifiable by the Xba I restriction site difference was vegetatively propagated. This indicated that the initial stock plant was heteroplastidic. Controlled crosses will be required in order to test whether heteroplasmy results from chloroplast transmission in the pollen and to examine the dynamic of sorting out. However, heteroplasmy is apparently not a rare situation in Medicago.

  8. Magnetically driven surface mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belkin, M.; Snezhko, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Kwok, W.-K.

    2009-07-01

    Magnetic microparticles suspended on the surface of liquid and energized by vertical alternating magnetic field exhibit complex collective behavior. Various immobile and self-propelled self-assembled structures have been observed. Here, we report on experimental studies of mixing and surface diffusion processes in this system. We show that the pattern-induced surface flows have properties of quasi-two-dimensional turbulence. Correspondingly, the surface advection of tracer particle exhibits properties of Brownian diffusion.

  9. Stochastic neutrino mixing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzo, M. M.; de Holanda, P. C.; Peres, O. L. G.; Zavanin, E. M.

    2013-05-01

    We propose a mechanism which provides an explanation of the Gallium and antineutrino reactor anomalies. Differently from original Pontecorvo’s hypothesis, this mechanism is based on the phenomenological assumption in which the admixture of neutrino mass eigenstates in the moments of neutrino creation and detection can assume different configurations around the admixture parametrized by the usual values of the mixing angles θ12, θ23, and θ13. For simplicity, we assume a Gaussian distribution for the mixing angles in such a way that the average value of this distribution is given by the usual values of the mixing angles, and the width of the Gaussian is denoted by α. We show that the proposed mechanism provides a possible explanation for very short-baseline neutrino disappearance, necessary to accommodate Gallium and antineutrino reactor anomalies, which is not allowed in usual neutrino oscillations based on Pontecorvo’s original hypotheses. We also can describe high-energy oscillation experiments, like LSND, Fermi, and NuTeV, assuming a weakly energy dependent width parameter, α(E), that nicely fits all experimental results.

  10. Flows, Turbulence, and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, Alex

    2003-07-01

    HST and FUSE spectra of distant UV-bright sources reveal interstellar absorption lines of high stages of ionization {O VI, C IV, N V, Si IV} arising in many different astrophysical environments such as superbubbles, interstellar chimneys, high-velocity clouds, galaxy halos and cosmic filaments. Turbulence, always present in the magnetized ISM, must mix the hot { 10^6 K} gas with cooler gas within "turbulent mixing layers". Present theory, based on 1D steady-state flows, suggest the line ratios in these layers differ significantly from photoionized gas, radiative shocks, cooling zones, or conduction fronts. These models are use to infer mass and energy fluxes important to understanding the ISM. We propose to develop a suite of 3D time-dependent models that properly calculate turbulent mixing. We will produce synthetic UV absorption lines and optical emission lines directly relevant to HST observations that use GHRS, STIS, and eventually, COS. These models will allow us to explore the sensitivity of the spectral diagnostics to magnetic field strength, turbulence intensity, and relative velocity of the hot and cold gas. We will publish the resulting grid of spectral diagnostics and make them available through the Web.

  11. Mixing kaons with mixed action chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, Christopher

    2006-12-01

    We calculate the neutral kaon mixing parameter, BK , to next-to-leading order in mixed action (domain-wall valence with staggered sea quarks) chiral perturbation theory. We find the expres- sion for BK in this mixed-action case only differs from the continuum partially quenched expres- sion by an additional analytic term. Additionally, in preparation for a lattice calculation of BK with a mixed action, we discuss quantitatively the effects of the taste violations as well as finite volume effects.

  12. Supramolecular gel electrophoresis of large DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Oyoshi, Takanori; Yamanaka, Masamichi

    2017-07-06

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a frequent technique used to separate exceptionally large DNA fragments. In a typical continuous field electrophoresis, it is challenging to separate DNA fragments larger than 20 kbp because they migrate at a comparable rate. To overcome this challenge, it is necessary to develop a novel matrix for the electrophoresis. Here, we describe the electrophoresis of large DNA fragments up to 166 kbp using a supramolecular gel matrix and a typical continuous field electrophoresis system. C3 -symmetric tris-urea self-assembled into a supramolecular hydrogel in tris-boric acid-EDTA buffer, a typical buffer for DNA electrophoresis, and the supramolecular hydrogel was used as a matrix for electrophoresis to separate large DNA fragments. Three types of DNA marker, the λ-Hind III digest (2 to 23 kbp), Lambda DNA-Mono Cut Mix (10 to 49 kbp), and Marker 7 GT (10 to 165 kbp), were analyzed in this study. Large DNA fragments of greater than 100 kbp showed distinct mobility using a typical continuous field electrophoresis system. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. MixSIAR: advanced stable isotope mixing models in R

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods The development of stable isotope mixing models has coincided with modeling products (e.g. IsoSource, MixSIR, SIAR), where methodological advances are published in parity with software packages. However, while mixing model theory has recently been ex...

  14. MixSIAR: advanced stable isotope mixing models in R

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods The development of stable isotope mixing models has coincided with modeling products (e.g. IsoSource, MixSIR, SIAR), where methodological advances are published in parity with software packages. However, while mixing model theory has recently been ex...

  15. The Value of Mixed Methods Research: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKim, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this explanatory mixed methods study was to examine the perceived value of mixed methods research for graduate students. The quantitative phase was an experiment examining the effect of a passage's methodology on students' perceived value. Results indicated students scored the mixed methods passage as more valuable than those who…

  16. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  17. Mixed marriages. Some key questions.

    PubMed

    Barbara, A

    1994-01-01

    The author discusses various aspects of intercultural or mixed marriage. Factors considered include trends in different countries; determinants of mixed marriage; cultural and social class differences; and mate selection. (SUMMARY IN FRE AND SPA)

  18. Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides an overview Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System water quality modeling and decision support system designed for environmental impact assessment of mixing zones resulting from wastewater discharge from point sources

  19. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  20. Filtration recovery of extracellular DNA from environmental ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    qPCR methods are able to analyze DNA from microbes within hours of collecting water samples, providing the promptest notification and public awareness possible when unsafe pathogenic levels are reached. Health risk, however, may be overestimated by the presence of extracellular DNA (eDNA) that is co-recovered by the filtration procedure which is the most commonly used method to concentrate target microbes from environmental waters. Using C. parvum 18S rRNA gene fragment as a representative of eDNA, we examined the impact of filters (types and pore sizes) and physiochemical properties of surface water samples on the recovery of spiked DNA. Our results indicated that binding affinities of various filter membranes were quantifiably different for eDNA fragments with the polycarbonate (PC) binding the least and mixed cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate (MCE) binding the most as evidenced by up to 16% recovery of the spiked plasmid DNA with a pore size of 0.2µm. Water quality parameters also had a distinct influence on the recovery of eDNA which was enhanced by the presence of high total suspended solid (TSS) concentrations and reduced pH. At pH 5.5, with 150mg/L of clay, DNA recovery was increased to as much as 18%. By shielding the negative charge, thus increasing the interaction of DNA and colloids, the increase of Na+ and Ca+2 concentrations resulted in more DNA binding and consequently more recovery from environmental water samples. Therefore, in addition

  1. Minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS) and minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS) specifications.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Pelin; Kottmann, Renzo; Field, Dawn; Knight, Rob; Cole, James R; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Gilbert, Jack A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Johnston, Anjanette; Cochrane, Guy; Vaughan, Robert; Hunter, Christopher; Park, Joonhong; Morrison, Norman; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sterk, Peter; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Bailey, Mark; Baumgartner, Laura; Birren, Bruce W; Blaser, Martin J; Bonazzi, Vivien; Booth, Tim; Bork, Peer; Bushman, Frederic D; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Chain, Patrick S G; Charlson, Emily; Costello, Elizabeth K; Huot-Creasy, Heather; Dawyndt, Peter; DeSantis, Todd; Fierer, Noah; Fuhrman, Jed A; Gallery, Rachel E; Gevers, Dirk; Gibbs, Richard A; San Gil, Inigo; Gonzalez, Antonio; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Guralnick, Robert; Hankeln, Wolfgang; Highlander, Sarah; Hugenholtz, Philip; Jansson, Janet; Kau, Andrew L; Kelley, Scott T; Kennedy, Jerry; Knights, Dan; Koren, Omry; Kuczynski, Justin; Kyrpides, Nikos; Larsen, Robert; Lauber, Christian L; Legg, Teresa; Ley, Ruth E; Lozupone, Catherine A; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Lyons, Donna; Maguire, Eamonn; Methé, Barbara A; Meyer, Folker; Muegge, Brian; Nakielny, Sara; Nelson, Karen E; Nemergut, Diana; Neufeld, Josh D; Newbold, Lindsay K; Oliver, Anna E; Pace, Norman R; Palanisamy, Giriprakash; Peplies, Jörg; Petrosino, Joseph; Proctor, Lita; Pruesse, Elmar; Quast, Christian; Raes, Jeroen; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Ravel, Jacques; Relman, David A; Assunta-Sansone, Susanna; Schloss, Patrick D; Schriml, Lynn; Sinha, Rohini; Smith, Michelle I; Sodergren, Erica; Spo, Aymé; Stombaugh, Jesse; Tiedje, James M; Ward, Doyle V; Weinstock, George M; Wendel, Doug; White, Owen; Whiteley, Andrew; Wilke, Andreas; Wortman, Jennifer R; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2011-05-01

    Here we present a standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting marker gene sequences--the minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS). We also introduce a system for describing the environment from which a biological sample originates. The 'environmental packages' apply to any genome sequence of known origin and can be used in combination with MIMARKS and other GSC checklists. Finally, to establish a unified standard for describing sequence data and to provide a single point of entry for the scientific community to access and learn about GSC checklists, we present the minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS). Adoption of MIxS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  2. Minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS) and minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS) specifications

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Pelin; Kottmann, Renzo; Field, Dawn; Knight, Rob; Cole, James R; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Gilbert, Jack A; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Johnston, Anjanette; Cochrane, Guy; Vaughan, Robert; Hunter, Christopher; Park, Joonhong; Morrison, Norman; Rocca-Serra, Philippe; Sterk, Peter; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Bailey, Mark; Baumgartner, Laura; Birren, Bruce W; Blaser, Martin J; Bonazzi, Vivien; Booth, Tim; Bork, Peer; Bushman, Frederic D; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Chain, Patrick S G; Charlson, Emily; Costello, Elizabeth K; Huot-Creasy, Heather; Dawyndt, Peter; DeSantis, Todd; Fierer, Noah; Fuhrman, Jed A; Gallery, Rachel E; Gevers, Dirk; Gibbs, Richard A; Gil, Inigo San; Gonzalez, Antonio; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Guralnick, Robert; Hankeln, Wolfgang; Highlander, Sarah; Hugenholtz, Philip; Jansson, Janet; Kau, Andrew L; Kelley, Scott T; Kennedy, Jerry; Knights, Dan; Koren, Omry; Kuczynski, Justin; Kyrpides, Nikos; Larsen, Robert; Lauber, Christian L; Legg, Teresa; Ley, Ruth E; Lozupone, Catherine A; Ludwig, Wolfgang; Lyons, Donna; Maguire, Eamonn; Methé, Barbara A; Meyer, Folker; Muegge, Brian; Nakielny, Sara; Nelson, Karen E; Nemergut, Diana; Neufeld, Josh D; Newbold, Lindsay K; Oliver, Anna E; Pace, Norman R; Palanisamy, Giriprakash; Peplies, Jörg; Petrosino, Joseph; Proctor, Lita; Pruesse, Elmar; Quast, Christian; Raes, Jeroen; Ratnasingham, Sujeevan; Ravel, Jacques; Relman, David A; Assunta-Sansone, Susanna; Schloss, Patrick D; Schriml, Lynn; Sinha, Rohini; Smith, Michelle I; Sodergren, Erica; Spor, Aymé; Stombaugh, Jesse; Tiedje, James M; Ward, Doyle V; Weinstock, George M; Wendel, Doug; White, Owen; Whiteley, Andrew; Wilke, Andreas; Wortman, Jennifer R; Yatsunenko, Tanya; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Here we present a standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting marker gene sequences—the minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS). We also introduce a system for describing the environment from which a biological sample originates. The ‘environmental packages’ apply to any genome sequence of known origin and can be used in combination with MIMARKS and other GSC checklists. Finally, to establish a unified standard for describing sequence data and to provide a single point of entry for the scientific community to access and learn about GSC checklists, we present the minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS). Adoption of MIxS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere. PMID:21552244

  3. Minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS) and minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS) specifications.

    SciTech Connect

    Yilmaz, P.; Kottmann, R.; Field, D.; Knight, R.; Cole, J. R.; Amaral-Zettler, L.; Gilbert, J. A.

    2011-05-01

    Here we present a standard developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting marker gene sequences - the minimum information about a marker gene sequence (MIMARKS). We also introduce a system for describing the environment from which a biological sample originates. The 'environmental packages' apply to any genome sequence of known origin and can be used in combination with MIMARKS and other GSC checklists. Finally, to establish a unified standard for describing sequence data and to provide a single point of entry for the scientific community to access and learn about GSC checklists, we present the minimum information about any (x) sequence (MIxS). Adoption of MIxS will enhance our ability to analyze natural genetic diversity documented by massive DNA sequencing efforts from myriad ecosystems in our ever-changing biosphere.

  4. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  5. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    DOEpatents

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  6. Magnetically coupled system for mixing

    DOEpatents

    Miller, III, Harlan; Meichel, George; Legere, Edward; Malkiel, Edwin; Woods, Robert Paul; Ashley, Oliver; Katz, Joseph; Ward, Jason; Petersen, Paul

    2015-09-22

    The invention provides a mixing system comprising a magnetically coupled drive system and a foil for cultivating algae, or cyanobacteria, in an open or enclosed vessel. The invention provides effective mixing, low energy usage, low capital expenditure, and ease of drive system component maintenance while maintaining the integrity of a sealed mixing vessel.

  7. Mix/Cast Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallentine, M.

    2005-01-01

    Presented is a training handbook for Mix/Cast Contamination Control; a part of a series of training courses to qualify access to Mix/Cast facilities. Contents: List Contamination Control Requirements; Identify foreign objects debris (FOD), Control Areas and their guidelines; Describe environmental monitoring; List Contamination Control Initiatives; Describe concern for Controlled Materials; Identify FOD Controlled Areas in Mix/Cast.

  8. Error Estimates for Mixed Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    This paper presents abstract error estimates for mixed methods for the approximate solution of elliptic boundary value problems. These estimates are...then applied to obtain quasi-optimal error estimates in the usual Sobolev norms for four examples: three mixed methods for the biharmonic problem and a mixed method for 2nd order elliptic problems. (Author)

  9. [Application of fingerprint chromatogram in quality assessment of apple cider].

    PubMed

    Xu, Kangzhen; Song, Jirong; Ren, Yinghui; Ma, Haixia; Huang, Jie; Du, Xiaodan

    2007-01-01

    Fingerprints of 14 apple cider samples from different manufacturers were studied using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an electrochemical detector (ECD). The analysis was carried out on a Zorbax SB-C18 column at 30 degrees C with 2% (v/v) methanol aqueous solution-4% (v/v) acetic acid aqueous solution as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.8 mL/min. The electrochemical detector was set at 0.7 V. By calculating the relative retention times of certain peaks with chlorogenic acid as the reference standard, 8 common peaks in the samples were analyzed. Relative retention times for the common peaks of various samples were calculated, and the similarities of all the samples were figured out through each peak area with the vectorial angle cosine method and correlative coefficient method. The results indicated that apple cider products of the same manufacturer have good similarity, with the similarities greater than 92.7%. According to this experiment, effectual microcosmic information for apple cider analysis was gained through HPLC and ECD. Moreover, this test method will help the analysis and the control of product quality, the development of new products and the establishment of trade standard.

  10. Synthesis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  11. The mixed chemistry problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Ramirez, L.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Gesicki, K.; Lagadec, E.; Jones, D.; Millar, T. J.; Woods, P. M.; Chuimin, R. N.

    2014-04-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) represent the last stage of evolution of intermediate mass stars (0.8 to 8M⊙) and, hence, by their very nature are fundamental to galactic evolution. The massive envelopes ejected during their earlier evolution (AGB phase) are an important source of recycled material in the form of dust and molecular gas into the interstellar medium. A small fraction of PNe show both O- and C-rich features and are therefore classified as mixed-chemistry objects. The origin of their mixed-chemistry is still uncertain. Our chemical models show that the PAHs may form in irradiated dense tori, and HST images confirm the presence of such tori in some of the objects. Using the VISIR/VLT, we spatially resolved the precise location of the PAHs. We find a dense dusty structures in all of the objects observed. The ionised [SIV] material is located inside the dusty tori, while the PAHs are present at the outer edges of these tori. This confirms that the PAHs formation is due to the photodissociation of CO. In the Galactic Disk, very few PNe have shown to harbour these mixed-chemistry phenomenon. We propose to observe the tori of a sample of bipolar PNe from the Galactic Disk that harbour a close binary system inside them. The chemical models show that the formation of long C-chain molecules is possible to occur in O-rich environments, but the formation of these C-rich molecules require a very dense region (Av˜4). To test this theory we propose to observe the very dense tori of these Galactic Disk PNe and compare these sample with the already observed sample of PNe in the Galactic Bulge (Guzman-Ramirez, et al., 2011;Guzman-Ramirez, et al., 2013, submitted).

  12. Detection and mapping of homologous, repeated and amplified DNA sequences by DNA renaturation in agarose gels.

    PubMed Central

    Roninson, I B

    1983-01-01

    A new molecular hybridization approach to the analysis of complex genomes has been developed. Tracer and driver DNAs were digested with the same restriction enzyme(s), and tracer DNA was labeled with 32P using T4 DNA polymerase. Tracer DNA was mixed with an excess amount of driver, and the mixture was electrophoresed in an agarose gel. Following electrophoresis, DNA was alkali-denatured in situ and allowed to reanneal in the gel, so that tracer DNA fragments could hybridize to the driver only when homologous driver DNA sequences were present at the same place in the gel, i.e. within a restriction fragment of the same size. After reannealing, unhybridized single-stranded DNA was digested in situ with S1 nuclease. The hybridized tracer DNA was detected by autoradiography. The general applicability of this technique was demonstrated in the following experiments. The common EcoRI restriction fragments were identified in the genomes of E. coli and four other species of bacteria. Two of these fragments are conserved in all Enterobacteriaceae. In other experiments, repeated EcoRI fragments of eukaryotic DNA were visualized as bands of various intensity after reassociation of a total genomic restriction digest in the gel. The situation of gene amplification was modeled by the addition of varying amounts of lambda phage DNA to eukaryotic DNA prior to restriction enzyme digestion. Restriction fragments of lambda DNA were detectable at a ratio of 15 copies per chicken genome and 30 copies per human genome. This approach was used to detect amplified DNA fragments in methotrexate (MTX)-resistant mouse cells and to identify commonly amplified fragments in two independently derived MTX-resistant lines. Images PMID:6310499

  13. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  14. The boundary is mixed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Eugenio; Haggard, Hal M.; Rovelli, Carlo

    2017-08-01

    We show that in Oeckl's boundary formalism the boundary vectors that do not have a tensor form represent, in a precise sense, statistical states. Therefore the formalism incorporates quantum statistical mechanics naturally. We formulate general-covariant quantum statistical mechanics in this language. We illustrate the formalism by showing how it accounts for the Unruh effect. We observe that the distinction between pure and mixed states weakens in the general covariant context, suggesting that local gravitational processes are naturally statistical without a sharp quantal versus probabilistic distinction.

  15. B Lifetimes and Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Harold G.; /Indiana U.

    2009-05-01

    The Tevatron experiments, CDF and D0, have produced a wealth of new B-physics results since the start of Run II in 2001. We've observed new B-hadrons, seen new effects, and increased many-fold the precision with which we know the properties of b-quark systems. In these proceedings, we will discuss two of the most fruitful areas in the Tevatron B-physics program: lifetimes and mixing. We'll examine the experimental issues driving these analyses, present a summary of the latest results, and discuss prospects for the future.

  16. Radial Mixing in Turbomachines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    entrainment rate F force defect thickness f blade force, wake model function (eq 9.3) g wake model function (eq 9.4) H shape factor , H Head’s shape factor h...and wake predictions . A new mixing procedure based on the explicit computation of the full transport equation is proposed. This full computation...8217 caused by an overall non-uniform inlet flow as predicted by a through-flow computation, and an ’end-wall boundary layer passage vortex’. 2.2

  17. DNA systematics. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: PLANTS: PLANT DNA: Contents and Systematics. Repeated DNA Sequences and Polyploidy in Cereal Crops. Homology of Nonrepeated DNA Sequences in Phylogeny of Fungal Species. Chloropast DNA and Phylogenetic Relationships. rDNA: Evolution Over a Billion Years. 23S rRNA-derived Small Ribosomal RNAs: Their Structure and Evolution with Reference to Plant Phylogeny. Molecular Analysis of Plant DNA Genomes: Conserved and Diverged DNA Sequences. A Critical Review of Some Terminologies Used for Additional DNA in Plant Chromosomes and Index.

  18. Solute-solvent interactions in micellar electrokinetic chromatography. 6. Optimization of the selectivity of lithium dodecyl sulfate-lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate mixed micellar buffers.

    PubMed

    Fuguet, Elisabet; Ràfols, Clara; Torres-Lapasió, José Ramón; García-Alvarez-Coque, María Celia; Bosch, Elisabeth; Rosés, Martí

    2002-09-01

    The optimization of the composition of mixed surfactants used as micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) pseudostationary phases is proposed as an effective method for the separation of complex mixtures of analytes. The solvation parameter model is used to select two surfactants (lithium dodecyl sulfate, LDS, and lithium perfluorooctanesulfonate, LPFOS) with contrasting solvation properties. Combination of these two surfactants allows variations of the solvation properties of MEKC pseudostationary phase along a wide range. Thus, the convenient variation of the proportion of both surfactants allows an effective control of the selectivity in such systems. An algorithm that predicts the overall resolution of a given mixture of compounds is described and applied to optimize the composition of the mixed surfactant for the separation of the mixture. The algorithm is based on the calculation of peak purities on simulated chromatograms as a function of the composition of the mixed LDS/LPFOS micellar buffer from data at several micellar buffer compositions. Successful separations were achieved for mixtures containing up to 20 compounds, in less than 12 min.

  19. Intrinsically mixed states: an appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruetsche, Laura

    An "intrinsically mixed" state is a mixed state of a system that is (in a sense to be elaborated) 'orthogonal' to every pure state of that system. Although the presence of such states in the quantum theories of infinite systems is well known to those who work with such theories, intrinsically mixed states are virtually unheralded in the philosophical literature. Rob Clifton was thoroughly familiar with intrinsically mixed states. I aim here to introduce them to a wider audience-and to encourage that audience to cultivate their acquaintance by suggesting that intrinsically mixed states undermine assumptions framing standard discussions of the quantum measurement problem.

  20. Mixing incompatibilities and toxic exposures.

    PubMed

    Olson, K R; Shusterman, D J

    1993-01-01

    A number of consumer and commercial products may react, upon inappropriate mixing, to produce substances of greater toxicity than the starting materials. Consumer product mixing incompatibilities have been well documented and warning labels appear on high-risk products. In industry, a wider array of potential mixing incompatibilities exists and includes potential accidents in chemical storage and hazardous material handling. Emergency response personnel are a group who often deal with inadvertent mixing related to transportation and other hazardous materials incidents. This article assembles some better-known examples of toxicologically significant exposures resulting from inadvertent or deliberate mixing of incompatible materials.

  1. Transition mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, C.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model capable of analyzing the flow field in the transition liner of small gas turbine engines is developed. A FORTRAN code has been assembled from existing codes and physical submodels and used to predict the flow in several test geometries which contain characteristics similar to transition liners, and for which experimental data was available. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements indicate that the code produces qualitative results but that the turbulence models, both K-E and algebraic Reynolds Stress, underestimate the cross-stream diffusion. The code has also been used to perform a numerical experiment to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the mixing process in transition liners. Comparisons illustrate that geometries with significant curvature show a drift of the jet trajectory toward the convex wall and weaker wake region vortices and decreased penetration for jets located on the convex wall of the liner, when compared to jets located on concave walls. Also shown were the approximate equivalency of angled slots and round holes and a technique by which jet mixing correlations developed for rectangular channels can be used for can geometries.

  2. [Mixed states and neuroimaging].

    PubMed

    Kaladjian, A; Belzeaux, R; Micoulaud-Franchi, J A; Cermolacce, M; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2013-12-01

    Despite the growing number of neuroimaging studies in bipolar disorder over the past years, the brain regions involved in mood dysregulation in this disease are still poorly understood. If some neurofunctional abnormalities seem to be independent of mood state, others were preferentially associated with mania or depression, involving the amygdala and other limbic regions as well as ventral frontal regions, with a likely hemispheric lateralization of these abnormalities according to the thymic state that was examined. Very few imaging studies became interested in bipolar patients in a mixed state, making it harder to connect brain malfunction to a given mood state. However, data obtained so far support the hypothesis of a lateralization of brain abnormalities in relation to bipolar symptomatology, suggesting that neurofonctional abnormalities preferentially located in the right ventral frontal and limbic areas may underlie the depressive component, associated with abnormalities of the left similar regions for the manic component. Identification of brain dysfunctions that may explain the emergence of mixed symptoms will likely provide useful information to better understand the respective roles of each hemisphere in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Farmacognosia. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  3. Collisional atomic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biersack, Jochen P.

    The collisional mixing of thin metal markers in silicon is investigated with the computer program TRIM-DYNAMIC (T-DYN). This code assumes that at high dose irradiation, the substrate Si or Ge, will get fully amorphized, and the recoil atom can stop in any position after slowing down below a certain final energy Ef (taken here as 3 eV). In order to avoid chemical effects, the system Au marker in a silicon matrix was chosen for the TRIM simulation. The results are in good agreement with the experimental findings, as compiled in the review article by Paine and Averback. Similar collisional mixing effects occur in the process of SIMS or Auger electron depth profiling, and cannot be avoided. An example is given here for a thin layer of arsenic vapor deposited on Si and covered by amorphous silicon. The analysing ion beam in this case was 14.5 keV Cs+ incident at 37° towards the surface normal. In comparison with the SIMS measurements by modern depth profiling equipment, again good agreement was found between the T-DYN results and the experiment.

  4. Wave mixing spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Several new aspects of nonlinear or wave mixing spectroscopy were investigated utilizing the polarization properties of the nonlinear output field and the dependence of this field upon the occurrence of multiple resonances in the nonlinear susceptibility. First, it is shown theoretically that polarization-sensitive detection may be used to either eliminate or controllably reduce the nonresonant background in coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy, allowing weaker Raman resonances to be studied. The features of multi-resonant four-wave mixing are examined in the case of an inhomogeneously broadened medium. It is found that the linewidth of the nonlinear output narrows considerably (approaching the homogeneous width) when the quantum mechanical expressions for the doubly- and triply-resonant susceptibilities are averaged over a Doppler or strain broadened profile. Experimental studies of nonlinear processes in Pr/sup +3/:LaF/sub 3/ verify this linewidth narrowing, but indicate that this strain broadened system cannot be treated with a single broadening parameter as in the case of Doppler broadening in a gas. Several susceptibilities are measured from which are deduced dipole matrix elements and Raman polarizabilities related to the /sup 3/H/sub 4/, /sup 3/H/sub 6/, and /sup 3/P/sub 0/ levels of the praseodymium ions.

  5. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  6. DNA vaccines: a simple DNA sensing matter?

    PubMed

    Coban, Cevayir; Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Tozuka, Miyuki; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-10-01

    Since the introduction of DNA vaccines two decades ago, this attractive strategy has been hampered by its low immunogenicity in humans. Studies conducted to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines have shown that understanding the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines might be the key to successfully improving their immunogenicity. Our current understanding is that DNA vaccines induce innate and adaptive immune responses in two ways: (1) encoded protein (or polypeptide) antigen(s) by the DNA plasmid can be expressed in stromal cells (i.e., muscle cells) as well as DCs, where these antigens are processed and presented to naïve CD4 or CD8 T cells either by direct or cross presentation, respectively; and (2) the transfected DNA plasmid itself may bind to an un-identified cytosolic DNA sensor and activate the TBK1-STING pathway and the production of type I interferons (IFNs) which function as an adjuvant. Recent studies investigating double-stranded cytosolic DNA sensor(s) have highlighted new mechanisms in which cytosolic DNA may release secondary metabolites, which are in turn recognized by a novel DNA sensing machinery. Here, we discuss these new metabolites and the possibilities of translating this knowledge into improved immunogenicity for DNA vaccines.

  7. DNA Repair by Reversal of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors constantly challenge cellular DNA, generating cytotoxic and/or mutagenic DNA adducts. As a result, organisms have evolved different mechanisms to defend against the deleterious effects of DNA damage. Among these diverse repair pathways, direct DNA-repair systems provide cells with simple yet efficient solutions to reverse covalent DNA adducts. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the field of direct DNA repair, namely, photolyase-, alkyltransferase-, and dioxygenase-mediated repair processes. We present specific examples to describe new findings of known enzymes and appealing discoveries of new proteins. At the end of this article, we also briefly discuss the influence of direct DNA repair on other fields of biology and its implication on the discovery of new biology. PMID:23284047

  8. Separation of Short Single- and Double-Stranded DNA Based on Their Adsorption Kinetics Difference on Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung Jimmy; Liu, Juewen

    2013-01-01

    Separation of short single- and double-stranded DNA typically requires gel electrophoresis followed by DNA extraction, which is a time consuming process. Graphene oxide adsorbs single-stranded DNA more quickly than double-stranded ones, allowing for selective removal of the former with a simple mixing and centrifugation operation. The effect of DNA length and salt on adsorption selectivity has been characterized and its application in DNA melting curve measurement has been demonstrated.

  9. Mixed methods, mixed methodology health services research in practice.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, P Lynne

    2004-02-01

    Mixed methods, mixed methodology research is a little documented but increasingly accepted approach employed to investigate organizational phenomena. The author presents a synthesis of literature that informed the decision to adopt a mixed methods, mixed methodology, dominantly naturalistic study approach to health services research in which she explored the process and organizational consequences of new artifact adoption in surgery. She describes the way whereby a collective case study involving five Australian hospitals yielded quantitative and qualitative data that were analyzed using inductive and/or deductive reasoning. She goes beyond the theoretical rational for employing a mixed methods, mixed methodology approach to present a summative conceptual model of the research process and describe the structural aspects of the dissertation in which the research was reported that should benefit researchers contemplating the value of such an approach.

  10. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the DNA mapping and sequencing technologies. In particular, the present invention provides enhanced methods and compositions for the physical mapping and positional cloning of genomic DNA. The present invention also provides a useful analytical technique to directly map cloned DNA sequences onto individual stretched DNA molecules.

  11. Radioactive mixed waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.; Erpenbeck, E.G.

    1993-02-01

    Various types of waste have been generated during the 50-year history of the Hanford Site. Regulatory changes in the last 20 years have provided the emphasis for better management of these wastes. Interpretations of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA), and the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) have led to the definition of radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The radioactive and hazardous properties of these wastes have resulted in the initiation of special projects for the management of these wastes. Other solid wastes at the Hanford Site include low-level wastes, transuranic (TRU), and nonradioactive hazardous wastes. This paper describes a system for the treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) of solid radioactive waste.

  12. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  13. Nation's water picture mixed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The nation's water picture for April showed mixed trends: More than half of the index gaging stations reported normal streamflow conditions during the month, while the spring snowmelt boosted streamflow in the Northeast and Northwest to well above normal levels. Parts of the Southeast, however, from West Virginia south to the Carolinas, reported well-below normal streamflow conditions, according to a month-end check on water resources conditions by the U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior.After nearly 2 years of drought conditions the three major reservoirs supplying New York City reached full storage capacity and were spilling during April. Combined contents of the three reservoirs on May 1, 1982, was 272 billion gallons, 101% of their full usable capacity. The full reservoirs and the generally good surface and groundwater conditions throughout the Delaware River basin allowed the Delaware River Basin Commission to lift its drought emergency warning on April 27.

  14. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Burgers, P M; Kornberg, A; Sakakibara, Y

    1981-09-01

    An Escherichia coli mutant, dnaN59, stops DNA synthesis promptly upon a shift to a high temperature; the wild-type dnaN gene carried in a transducing phage encodes a polypeptide of about 41,000 daltons [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553; Yuasa, S. & Sakakibara, Y. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 180, 267-273]. We now find that the product of dnaN gene is the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, the principal DNA synthetic multipolypeptide complex in E. coli. The conclusion is based on the following observations: (i) Extracts from dnaN59 cells were defective in phage phi X174 and G4 DNA synthesis after the mutant cells had been exposed to the increased temperature. (ii) The enzymatic defect was overcome by addition of purified beta subunit but not by other subunits of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme or by other replication proteins required for phi X174 DNA synthesis. (iii) Partially purified beta subunit from the dnaN mutant, unlike that from the wild type, was inactive in reconstituting the holoenzyme when mixed with the other purified subunits. (iv) Increased dosage of the dnaN gene provided by a plasmid carrying the gene raised cellular levels of the beta subunit 5- to 6-fold.

  15. The dnaN gene codes for the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme of escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Burgers, P M; Kornberg, A; Sakakibara, Y

    1981-01-01

    An Escherichia coli mutant, dnaN59, stops DNA synthesis promptly upon a shift to a high temperature; the wild-type dnaN gene carried in a transducing phage encodes a polypeptide of about 41,000 daltons [Sakakibara, Y. & Mizukami, T. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 178, 541-553; Yuasa, S. & Sakakibara, Y. (1980) Mol. Gen. Genet. 180, 267-273]. We now find that the product of dnaN gene is the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, the principal DNA synthetic multipolypeptide complex in E. coli. The conclusion is based on the following observations: (i) Extracts from dnaN59 cells were defective in phage phi X174 and G4 DNA synthesis after the mutant cells had been exposed to the increased temperature. (ii) The enzymatic defect was overcome by addition of purified beta subunit but not by other subunits of DNA polymerase III holoenzyme or by other replication proteins required for phi X174 DNA synthesis. (iii) Partially purified beta subunit from the dnaN mutant, unlike that from the wild type, was inactive in reconstituting the holoenzyme when mixed with the other purified subunits. (iv) Increased dosage of the dnaN gene provided by a plasmid carrying the gene raised cellular levels of the beta subunit 5- to 6-fold. PMID:6458041

  16. Biogenic inputs to ocean mixing.

    PubMed

    Katija, Kakani

    2012-03-15

    Recent studies have evoked heated debate about whether biologically generated (or biogenic) fluid disturbances affect mixing in the ocean. Estimates of biogenic inputs have shown that their contribution to ocean mixing is of the same order as winds and tides. Although these estimates are intriguing, further study using theoretical, numerical and experimental techniques is required to obtain conclusive evidence of biogenic mixing in the ocean. Biogenic ocean mixing is a complex problem that requires detailed understanding of: (1) marine organism behavior and characteristics (i.e. swimming dynamics, abundance and migratory behavior), (2) mechanisms utilized by swimming animals that have the ability to mix stratified fluids (i.e. turbulence and fluid drift) and (3) knowledge of the physical environment to isolate contributions of marine organisms from other sources of mixing. In addition to summarizing prior work addressing the points above, observations on the effect of animal swimming mode and body morphology on biogenic fluid transport will also be presented. It is argued that to inform the debate on whether biogenic mixing can contribute to ocean mixing, our studies should focus on diel vertical migrators that traverse stratified waters of the upper pycnocline. Based on our understanding of mixing mechanisms, body morphologies, swimming modes and body orientation, combined with our knowledge of vertically migrating populations of animals, it is likely that copepods, krill and some species of gelatinous zooplankton and fish have the potential to be strong sources of biogenic mixing.

  17. On the correlation between phase evolution of lipoplexes/anionic lipid mixtures and DNA release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Pozzi, Daniela; Caminiti, Ruggero; Marchini, Cristina; Montani, Maura; Amici, Augusto; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the structural evolution of three lipoplex formulations when interacting with anionic lipids by synchrotron small angle x-ray diffraction, while the extent of DNA release from lipoplexes by anionic lipids was evaluated by gel electrophoresis. Lipoplexes formed lamellar phases when mixed with anionic dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG), while promoting the formation of nonbilayer structures when mixed with anionic dioleoylphosphatidic acid (DOPA). However, lipoplexes exhibited a virtually identical extent of DNA release when mixed with DOPG or DOPA. Thus, the recently proposed correlation between the formation of nonlamellar phases in lipoplex/anionic lipid mixtures and the increase of DNA release does not seem to exist.

  18. Poxvirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses are large, enveloped viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm and encode proteins for DNA replication and gene expression. Hairpin ends link the two strands of the linear, double-stranded DNA genome. Viral proteins involved in DNA synthesis include a 117-kDa polymerase, a helicase–primase, a uracil DNA glycosylase, a processivity factor, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein, a protein kinase, and a DNA ligase. A viral FEN1 family protein participates in double-strand break repair. The DNA is replicated as long concatemers that are resolved by a viral Holliday junction endonuclease. PMID:23838441

  19. Fluid mixing in stratified gravity currents: the Prandtl mixing length.

    PubMed

    Odier, P; Chen, J; Rivera, M K; Ecke, R E

    2009-04-03

    Shear-induced vertical mixing in a stratified flow is a key ingredient of thermohaline circulation. We experimentally determine the vertical flux of momentum and density of a forced gravity current using high-resolution velocity and density measurements. A constant eddy-viscosity model provides a poor description of the physics of mixing, but a Prandtl mixing length model relating momentum and density fluxes to mean velocity and density gradients works well. For the average gradient Richardson number Ri(g) approximately 0.08 and a Taylor Reynolds number Re(lambda) approximately 100, the mixing lengths are fairly constant, about the same magnitude, comparable to the turbulent shear length.

  20. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwijit, K.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Pitakrattananukool, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 1012 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  1. Computational method and system for modeling, analyzing, and optimizing DNA amplification and synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Vandersall, Jennifer A.; Gardner, Shea N.; Clague, David S.

    2010-05-04

    A computational method and computer-based system of modeling DNA synthesis for the design and interpretation of PCR amplification, parallel DNA synthesis, and microarray chip analysis. The method and system include modules that address the bioinformatics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of DNA amplification and synthesis. Specifically, the steps of DNA selection, as well as the kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA hybridization and extensions, are addressed, which enable the optimization of the processing and the prediction of the products as a function of DNA sequence, mixing protocol, time, temperature and concentration of species.

  2. Investigation of thermic transition and renaturation of high polymerized DNA extracted from thyroid nodule.

    PubMed

    Bistriceanu, M; Roşca, T; Dumitriu, I; Bistriceanu, I; Voinea, F; Burdescu, C

    1985-01-01

    The study was carried out on 16 cases of mixed thyroid hypertrophy in which total or partial thyroidectomy was performed. Fragments collected intraoperatively from the thyroid nodule were used for extraction of high polymerized DNA. At the same time with quantitative evaluation of DNA, RNA and proteins were also assayed. The thermic transition mean temperature of the DNA extracted from the thyroid nodule is compared to other standards (DNA-HP-standard, calf thymus DNA, normal leukocytic DNA) and the thermic transition curves are presented. Hyperchromicity after thermic denaturation and renaturation is analysed and expressed in per cent values.

  3. Affective and schizoaffective mixed states.

    PubMed

    Marneros, Andreas; Röttig, Stephan; Wenzel, Andreas; Blöink, Raffaela; Brieger, Peter

    2004-04-01

    Although both DSM-IV and ICD-10 define schizoaffective mixed states, they have not received much attention-neither in the clinical nor in research context. We present preliminary results of a prospective study of bipolar affective (n = 100) and bipolar schizoaffective (n = 177) patients. 25% of the bipolar affective and 32% of the bipolar schizoaffective patients had at least one (schizo)mixed episode during the illness course. Nevertheless, (schizo)mixed episodes were rare-only 5.6% of all episodes. There was a trend that patients with (schizo)mixed episodes were more often women and exhibited more disability (reflected by higher rates of disability payments). Nevertheless, these differences failed to reach significance. Overall, schizo-mixed episodes are as frequent as "pure" affective mixed episodes. They might be linked to a less favourable course. Nevertheless, while their diagnostic criteria are problematic, they are systematically underdiagnosed.

  4. Authoring Immersive Mixed Reality Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misker, Jan M. V.; van der Ster, Jelle

    Creating a mixed reality experience is a complicated endeavour. From our practice as a media lab in the artistic domain we found that engineering is “only” a first step in creating a mixed reality experience. Designing the appearance and directing the user experience are equally important for creating an engaging, immersive experience. We found that mixed reality artworks provide a very good test bed for studying these topics. This chapter details three steps required for authoring mixed reality experiences: engineering, designing and directing. We will describe a platform (VGE) for creating mixed reality environments that incorporates these steps. A case study (EI4) is presented in which this platform was used to not only engineer the system, but in which an artist was given the freedom to explore the artistic merits of mixed reality as an artistic medium, which involved areas such as the look and feel, multimodal experience and interaction, immersion as a subjective emotion and game play scenarios.

  5. Fluoroquinolones inhibit preferentially Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA topoisomerase IV than DNA gyrase native proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Moreira, E; Balas, D; Gonzalez, I; de la Campa, A G

    2000-01-01

    The genes encoding the subunits of DNA topoisomerase IV (parC and parE) and DNA gyrase (gyrA and gyrB) of Streptococcus pneumoniae were cloned and overproduced in Escherichia coli by using the T7promoter-T7 RNA polymerase system. The four subunits were separately purified to near homogeneity by column chromatography. Protein purification was achieved by DEAE-sepharose, heparin-agarose, and hydroxylapatite chromatography. DNA topoisomerase IV was reconstituted when ParC and ParE were combined at a 3.8-fold excess of ParE. The reconstituted topoisomerase IV showed to generate efficient ATP-dependent DNA decatenation activity. The DNA gyrase ATP-dependent supercoiling activity was reconstituted by mixing equimolar amounts of the two gyrase subunits. The inhibitory effects of four representative fluoroquinolones on the DNA decatenation activity of topoisomerase IV and DNA supercoiling of gyrase have been examined and compared. All four compounds were more active in inhibiting topoisomerase IV than gyrase. Moreover, there was a positive correlation between the inhibitory activity against topoisomerase IV decatenation and DNA gyrase supercoiling. The classification of the four fluoroquinolones, considering their inhibitory activities in decatenation, supercoiling and growth was the following: clinafloxacin > trovafloxacin > sparfloxacin > ciprofloxacin. These results suggest these drugs primarily target topoisomerase IV of S. pneumoniae, and gyrase secondarily, in agreement with genetic data.

  6. Estimating beta-mixing coefficients

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Daniel J.; Shalizi, Cosma Rohilla; Schervish, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The literature on statistical learning for time series assumes the asymptotic independence or “mixing” of the data-generating process. These mixing assumptions are never tested, and there are no methods for estimating mixing rates from data. We give an estimator for the beta-mixing rate based on a single stationary sample path and show it is L1-risk consistent. PMID:26279742

  7. Optimal broadcasting of mixed states

    SciTech Connect

    Dang Guifang; Fan Heng

    2007-08-15

    The N to M (M{>=}N) universal quantum broadcasting of mixed states {rho}{sup xN} is proposed for a qubit system. The broadcasting of mixed states is universal and optimal in the sense that the shrinking factor is independent of the input state and achieves the upper bound. The quantum broadcasting of mixed qubits is a generalization of the universal quantum cloning machine for identical pure input states. A pure state decomposition of the identical mixed qubits {rho}{sup xN} is obtained.

  8. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-09-18

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span.

  9. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2015-01-01

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span. PMID:26385091

  10. Classification of Plant Associated Bacteria Using RIF, a Computationally Derived DNA Marker

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Kevin L.; Marrero, Glorimar; Alvarez, Anne M.; Presting, Gernot G.

    2011-01-01

    A DNA marker that distinguishes plant associated bacteria at the species level and below was derived by comparing six sequenced genomes of Xanthomonas, a genus that contains many important phytopathogens. This DNA marker comprises a portion of the dnaA replication initiation factor (RIF). Unlike the rRNA genes, dnaA is a single copy gene in the vast majority of sequenced bacterial genomes, and amplification of RIF requires genus-specific primers. In silico analysis revealed that RIF has equal or greater ability to differentiate closely related species of Xanthomonas than the widely used ribosomal intergenic spacer region (ITS). Furthermore, in a set of 263 Xanthomonas, Ralstonia and Clavibacter strains, the RIF marker was directly sequenced in both directions with a success rate approximately 16% higher than that for ITS. RIF frameworks for Xanthomonas, Ralstonia and Clavibacter were constructed using 682 reference strains representing different species, subspecies, pathovars, races, hosts and geographic regions, and contain a total of 109 different RIF sequences. RIF sequences showed subspecific groupings but did not place strains of X. campestris or X. axonopodis into currently named pathovars nor R. solanacearum strains into their respective races, confirming previous conclusions that pathovar and race designations do not necessarily reflect genetic relationships. The RIF marker also was sequenced for 24 reference strains from three genera in the Enterobacteriaceae: Pectobacterium, Pantoea and Dickeya. RIF sequences of 70 previously uncharacterized strains of Ralstonia, Clavibacter, Pectobacterium and Dickeya matched, or were similar to, those of known reference strains, illustrating the utility of the frameworks to classify bacteria below the species level and rapidly match unknown isolates to reference strains. The RIF sequence frameworks are available at the online RIF database, RIFdb, and can be queried for diagnostic purposes with RIF sequences obtained

  11. Overview of Neutrino Mixing Models and Their Mixing Angle Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Albright, Carl H.

    2009-11-01

    An overview of neutrino-mixing models is presented with emphasis on the types of horizontal flavor and vertical family symmetries that have been invoked. Distributions for the mixing angles of many models are displayed. Ways to differentiate among the models and to narrow the list of viable models are discussed.

  12. DNA analysis of fingernail clippings: an unusual case report.

    PubMed

    Song, Fangming; Liu, Yanjun; He, Qun; Hou, Wenmin; Wei, Feng; Liu, Liang

    2014-06-01

    The case of an unusual DNA analysis of fingernail clippings is described. A 20-year-old woman died of strangulation, and her former boyfriend entered the police's sight as suspect through rapid investigation and inspection. Genomic DNA from debris scraped underneath the suspect's fingernail was extracted 2 days after the incident using the modified DNA pretreatment method. Finally, mixed DNA profiles were observed from the suspect's fingernail clippings, one of them originating from the victim, which is consistent with the result of criminal investigation. With the support of strong evidence, the suspect soon confessed. In this case, it was really unusual in practice that fingernail debris extracted from the suspect was used to accuse the suspect himself. This case demonstrates the usefulness of the modified DNA pretreatment method and the possibility of getting DNA profiles from fingernail clippings with 2 days' lapse between the incident and recovery of the evidential material.

  13. Flavonoid-DNA binding studies and thermodynamic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janjua, Naveed Kausar; Shaheen, Amber; Yaqub, Azra; Perveen, Fouzia; Sabahat, Sana; Mumtaz, Misbah; Jacob, Claus; Ba, Lalla Aicha; Mohammed, Hamdoon A.

    2011-09-01

    Interactional studies of new flavonoid derivatives (Fl) with chicken blood ds.DNA were investigated spectrophotometrically in DMSO-H 2O (9:1 v/v) at various temperatures. Spectral parameters suggest considerable binding between the flavonoid derivatives studied and ds.DNA. The binding constant values lie in the enhanced-binding range. Thermodynamic parameters obtained from UV studies also point to strong spontaneous binding of Fl with ds.DNA. Viscometric studies complimented the UV results where a small linear increase in relative viscosity of the DNA solution was observed with added optimal flavonoid concentration. An overall mixed mode of interaction (intercalative plus groove binding) is proposed between DNA and flavonoids. Conclusively, investigated flavonoid derivatives are found to be strong DNA binders and seem to be promising drug candidates like their natural analogues.

  14. In vitro transfection of plasmid DNA by cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tomoshige, Ryuji; Iwanaga, Kazunori; Kakemi, Masawo; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the in vitro transfection efficiency of a luciferase plasmid DNA using cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds. The compounds used here were ethylenediamine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine, chemically introduced to the carboxyl group of gelatin for the cationization. Complexation of the cationized gelatin with the plasmid DNA was performed by simply mixing the two materials at various N+/P- mixing ratios (the molar number ratio of amino groups of gelatin to the phosphate groups of DNA) in aqueous solution. Gel retardation studies revealed that the formation of cationized-gelatin-plasmid DNA complexes depended on the N+/P- mixing ratio. The stronger interaction of plasmid DNA with the cationized gelatin of spermine compared to the other cationized gelatins was observed by an ethidium bromide intercalation assay and Scatchard binding analysis. When the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA complexed with the various cationized gelatins at different N+/P- mixing ratios was evaluated for mouse L929 fibroblasts, the highest transfection efficiency was observed for the complex prepared from the cationized gelatin of spermine at a N+/P- mixing ratio of 2. The present study indicates that there is an optimal N+/P- mixing ratio and a type of amine compound or cationization extent of cationized gelatin to enhance the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA.

  15. DNA degradation with ozone.

    PubMed

    Cataldo, Franco

    2006-05-30

    DNA was ozonized in solution and the reaction was followed with polarimetry and with iodimetry. Polarimetry was used to determine the molar ratio DNA/O(3) when the DNA optical activity vanishes completely. At a molar ratio DNA/O(3)=2.3 the supramolecular structure of DNA collapses completely. Instead, iodimetry shows that the ozonolysis proceeds until all the nucleobases have been destroyed, an event which occurs at a molar ratio DNA/O(3)=1.1. The ozonolysis of DNA was also followed spectrophotometrically. DNA is reactive with ozone also in the solid state, as fixed bed. Clear indication about its oxidation derives from the FT-IR spectra from polarimetric measurements and from thermal analysis performed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential thermogravimetric analysis (DTG) and from differential thermal analysis (DTA). Particular remarkable is the fact that RNA has been found much less reactive toward ozone in the solid state than DNA.

  16. Mixed voltage VLSI design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panwar, Ramesh; Rennels, David; Alkalaj, Leon

    1993-01-01

    A technique for minimizing the power dissipated in a Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) chip by lowering the operating voltage without any significant penalty in the chip throughput even though low voltage operation results in slower circuits. Since the overall throughput of a VLSI chip depends on the speed of the critical path(s) in the chip, it may be possible to sustain the throughput rates attained at higher voltages by operating the circuits in the critical path(s) with a high voltage while operating the other circuits with a lower voltage to minimize the power dissipation. The interface between the gates which operate at different voltages is crucial for low power dissipation since the interface may possibly have high static current dissipation thus negating the gains of the low voltage operation. The design of a voltage level translator which does the interface between the low voltage and high voltage circuits without any significant static dissipation is presented. Then, the results of the mixed voltage design using a greedy algorithm on three chips for various operating voltages are presented.

  17. Mixed cryoglobulinemia: new concepts.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Casals, M; Trejo, O; García-Carrasco, M; Cervera, R; Font, J

    2000-01-01

    The most documented extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC). MC is characterised by the presence of temperature-sensitive protein complexes: in type II MC, cryoglobulins are composed of a monoclonal rheumatoid factor (usually, IgMkappa) against polyclonal IgG. In type III MC, all components are polyclonal. The presence of microheterogeneity and other new types of cryoglobulins is a novel and recent observation. The production of different autoantibodies and circulating immune complexes, including the cryoglobulins, are responsible for systemic vasculitis and various organ damage. In a limited number of MC patients, a malignancy, that is B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or hepatocellular carcinoma, may also develop. Finally, results of interferon and/or ribavirin treatments in MC patients represent an indirect proof for the pathogenetic link between MC and HVC infection. The discovery of the relation between HCV infection and MC shows the striking association between a viral infection and an autoimmune disease and, thus, a potential link between the systemic autoimmune and lymphoproliferative disorders.

  18. Measures on mixing angles

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, Gary W.; Gielen, Steffen; Pope, C. N.; Turok, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We address the problem of the apparently very small magnitude of CP violation in the standard model, measured by the Jarlskog invariant J. In order to make statements about probabilities for certain values of J, we seek to find a natural measure on the space of Kobayashi-Maskawa matrices, the double quotient U(1){sup 2}/SU(3)/U(1){sup 2}. We review several possible, geometrically motivated choices of the measure, and compute expectation values for powers of J for these measures. We find that different choices of the measure generically make the observed magnitude of CP violation appear finely tuned. Since the quark masses and the mixing angles are determined by the same set of Yukawa couplings, we then do a second calculation in which we take the known quark mass hierarchy into account. We construct the simplest measure on the space of 3x3 Hermitian matrices which reproduces this known hierarchy. Calculating expectation values for powers of J in this second approach, we find that values of J close to the observed value are now rather likely, and there does not seem to be any fine-tuning. Our results suggest that the choice of Kobayashi-Maskawa angles is closely linked to the observed mass hierarchy. We close by discussing the corresponding case of neutrinos.

  19. Neutrino Masses and Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, K.; Tobita, Y.

    2008-05-21

    We report (1) the current status of neutrino parameters and (2) our recent work on implications of particle's coherence, which are weakly related each others. In the first part, current status of the neutrino parameters obtained from oscillation experiments and their prospects are briefly reviewed. From various oscillation experiments, existence of three mass scales have been confirmed. One value of the difference of mass squared is around 10{sup -3}eV{sup 2} and another is around 10{sup -5}eV{sup 2}. Although mixing angles are partly found, one important angle, {theta}{sub 13} is left unknown.In the second part, implications of coherence length of particles in the scattering of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHCR) with cosmic background radiations (CBR) is discussed. Although coherence length is regarded usually irrelevant to observations, its role is important in several situations of recent experiments which include that of the ultra-high energy charged particles. Here we discuss the scattering of UHCR with CBR.

  20. Postictal mixed transcortical aphasia.

    PubMed

    Yankovsky, A E; Treves, T A

    2002-06-01

    Postictal aphasia has been described in left temporal lobe seizures. It may be of fluent, non-fluent or global type. We present here a patient who displayed signs of mixed transcortical aphasia (MTCA). The patient was a 67 year old man who underwent excision of a left frontal parasagittal meningioma in 1987. Since then he has been treated with phenytoin for generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). He was admitted in status epilepticus. On awakening, the patient was non-fluent with palilalia and echolalia. His repetition was relatively preserved but all the other language functions were impaired. This picture faded away within a few hours. Brain CT, performed during this postictal state, was normal except for signs related to frontal craniotomy. SPECT, which was performed after language functions returned to normal, displayed left frontal, cingular and insular hypoperfusion. The postictal language dysfunction of the patient corresponded to MTCA. Although our case has frontal, he had no other structural lesion that could explain either diffuse ischemia of the left hemisphere or watershed areas secondary to the generalized seizures. The uniqueness of this case is the combination of postictal MTCA with good prognosis. Copyright 2002 BEA Trading Ltd. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mixed oxide fuel development

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.D.; Omberg, R.P.

    1987-05-08

    This paper describes the success of the ongoing mixed-oxide fuel development program in the United States aimed at qualifying an economical fuel system for liquid metal cooled reactors. This development has been the cornerstone of the US program for the past 20 years and has proceeded in a deliberate and highly disciplined fashion with high emphasis on fuel reliability and operational safety as major features of an economical fuel system. The program progresses from feature testing in EBR-II to qualifying full size components in FFTF under fully prototypic conditions to establish a basis for extending allowable lifetimes. The development program started with the one year (300 EFPD) core, which is the FFTF driver fuel, continued with the demonstration of a two year (600 EFPD) core and is presently evaluating a three year (900 EFPD) fuel system. All three of these systems, consistent with other LMR fuel programs around the world, use fuel pellets gas bonded to a cladding tube that is assembled into a bundle and fitted into a wrapper tube or duct for ease of insertion into a core. The materials of construction progressed from austenitic CW 316 SS to lower swelling austenitic D9 to non swelling ferritic/martensitic HT9. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Mammalian DNA helicase.

    PubMed Central

    Hübscher, U; Stalder, H P

    1985-01-01

    A forked DNA was constructed to serve as a substrate for DNA helicases. It contains features closely resembling a natural replication fork. The DNA was prepared in large amounts and was used to assay displacement activity during isolation from calf thymus DNA polymerases alpha holoenzyme. One form of DNA polymerase alpha holoenzyme is possibly involved leading strand replication at the replication fork and possesses DNA dependent ATPase activity (Ottiger, H.-P. and Hübscher, U. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 81, 3993-3997). The enzyme can be separated from DNA polymerase alpha by velocity sedimentation in conditions of very low ionic strength and then be purified by chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 and ATP-agarose. At all stages of purification, DNA dependent ATPase and displacement activity profiles were virtually superimposable. The DNA dependent ATPase can displace a hybridized DNA fragment with a short single-stranded tail at its 3'hydroxyl end only in the presence of ATP, and this displacement relies on ATP hydrolysis. Furthermore, homogeneous single-stranded binding proteins from calf thymus as well as from other tissues cannot perform this displacement reaction. By all this token the DNA dependent ATPase appears to be a DNA helicase. It is suggested that this DNA helicase might act in concert with DNA polymerase alpha at the leading strand, possibly pushing the replication fork ahead of the polymerase. Images PMID:3162158

  3. New branched DNA constructs.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Madhavaiah; Keller, Sascha; Gloeckner, Christian; Bornemann, Benjamin; Marx, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The Watson-Crick base pairing of DNA is an advantageous phenomenon that can be exploited when using DNA as a scaffold for directed self-organization of nanometer-sized objects. Several reports have appeared in the literature that describe the generation of branched DNA (bDNA) with variable numbers of arms that self-assembles into predesigned architectures. These bDNA units are generated by using cleverly designed rigid crossover DNA molecules. Alternatively, bDNA can be generated by using synthetic branch points derived from either nucleoside or non-nucleoside building blocks. Branched DNA has scarcely been explored for use in nanotechnology or from self-assembling perspectives. Herein, we wish to report our results for the synthesis, characterization, and assembling properties of asymmetrical bDNA molecules that are able to generate linear and circular bDNA constructs. Our strategy for the generation of bDNA is based on a branching point that makes use of a novel protecting-group strategy. The bDNA units were generated by means of automated DNA synthesis methods and were used to generate novel objects by employing chemical and biological techniques. The entities generated might be useful building blocks for DNA-based nanobiotechnology.

  4. Toward Contactless Biology: Acoustophoretic DNA Transfection

    PubMed Central

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Foresti, Daniele; Bayram, Adem; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Acoustophoresis revolutionized the field of container-less manipulation of liquids and solids by enabling mixing procedures which avoid contamination and loss of reagents due to the contact with the support. While its applications to chemistry and engineering are straightforward, additional developments are needed to obtain reliable biological protocols in a contactless environment. Here, we provide a first, fundamental step towards biological reactions in air by demonstrating the acoustophoretic DNA transfection of mammalian cells. We developed an original acoustophoretic design capable of levitating, moving and mixing biological suspensions of living mammalians cells and of DNA plasmids. The precise and sequential delivery of the mixed solutions into tissue culture plates is actuated by a novel mechanism based on the controlled actuation of the acoustophoretic force. The viability of the contactless procedure is tested using a cellular model sensitive to small perturbation of neuronal differentiation pathways. Additionally, the efficiency of the transfection procedure is compared to standard, container-based methods for both single and double DNA transfection and for different cell types including adherent growing HeLa cancer cells, and low adhesion neuron-like PC12 cells. In all, this work provides a proof of principle which paves the way to the development of high-throughput acoustophoretic biological reactors. PMID:26828312

  5. Familial searching on DNA mixtures with dropout.

    PubMed

    Slooten, K

    2016-05-01

    Familial searching, the act of searching a database for a relative of an unknown individual whose DNA profile has been obtained, is usually restricted to cases where the DNA profile of that person has been unambiguously determined. Therefore, it is normally applied only with a good quality single source profile as starting point. In this article we investigate the performance of the method if applied to mixtures with and without allelic dropout, when likelihood ratios are computed with a semi-continuous (binary) model. We show that mixtures with dropout do not necessarily perform worse than mixtures without, especially if some separation between the donors is possible due to their different dropout probabilities. The familial searching true and false positive rates of mixed profiles on 15 loci are in some cases better than those of single source profiles on 10 loci. Thus, the information loss due to the fact that the person of interest's DNA has been mixed with that of other, and is affected by dropout, can be less than the loss of information corresponding to having 5 fewer loci available for a single source trace. Profiles typed on 10 autosomal loci are often involved in familial searching casework since many databases, including the Dutch one, in part consist of such profiles. Therefore, from this point of view, there seems to be no objection to extend familial searching to mixed or degraded profiles.

  6. Toward Contactless Biology: Acoustophoretic DNA Transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Thomas; Foresti, Daniele; Bayram, Adem; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-02-01

    Acoustophoresis revolutionized the field of container-less manipulation of liquids and solids by enabling mixing procedures which avoid contamination and loss of reagents due to the contact with the support. While its applications to chemistry and engineering are straightforward, additional developments are needed to obtain reliable biological protocols in a contactless environment. Here, we provide a first, fundamental step towards biological reactions in air by demonstrating the acoustophoretic DNA transfection of mammalian cells. We developed an original acoustophoretic design capable of levitating, moving and mixing biological suspensions of living mammalians cells and of DNA plasmids. The precise and sequential delivery of the mixed solutions into tissue culture plates is actuated by a novel mechanism based on the controlled actuation of the acoustophoretic force. The viability of the contactless procedure is tested using a cellular model sensitive to small perturbation of neuronal differentiation pathways. Additionally, the efficiency of the transfection procedure is compared to standard, container-based methods for both single and double DNA transfection and for different cell types including adherent growing HeLa cancer cells, and low adhesion neuron-like PC12 cells. In all, this work provides a proof of principle which paves the way to the development of high-throughput acoustophoretic biological reactors.

  7. Mixing in polymeric microfluidic devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Davis, Robert H.; Brotherton, Christopher M. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO)

    2006-04-01

    This SAND report describes progress made during a Sandia National Laboratories sponsored graduate fellowship. The fellowship was funded through an LDRD proposal. The goal of this project is development and characterization of mixing strategies for polymeric microfluidic devices. The mixing strategies under investigation include electroosmotic flow focusing, hydrodynamic focusing, physical constrictions and porous polymer monoliths. For electroosmotic flow focusing, simulations were performed to determine the effect of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with heterogeneous surface potential. The heterogeneous surface potential caused recirculations to form within the microchannel. These recirculations could then be used to restrict two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the mixing region surface potential to the average channel surface potential was made large in magnitude and negative in sign, and when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the characteristic diffusion time was minimized. Based on these results, experiments were performed to evaluate the manipulation of surface potential using living-radical photopolymerization. The material chosen to manipulate typically exhibits a negative surface potential. Using living-radical surface grafting, a positive surface potential was produced using 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and a neutral surface was produced using a poly(ethylene glycol) surface graft. Simulations investigating hydrodynamic focusing were also performed. For this technique, mixing is enhanced by using a tertiary fluid stream to constrict the two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the tertiary flow stream flow-rate to the mixing streams flow-rate was maximized. Also, like the electroosmotic focusing mixer, mixing was also maximized when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the

  8. Anomalous Sediment Mixing by Bioturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, K. R.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Xie, M.; Packman, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Bioturbation, the reworking of sediments by animals and plants, is the dominant mode of sediment mixing in low-energy environments, and plays an important role in sedimentary biogeochemical processes. Mixing resulting from bioturbation has historically been modeled as a diffusive process. However, diffusion models often do not provide a sufficient description of sediment mixing due to bioturbation. Stochastic models, such as the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, provide more general descriptions of mixing behavior that are applicable even when regular diffusion assumptions are not met. Here we present results from an experimental investigation of anomalous sediment mixing by bioturbation in freshwater sediments. Clean and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments were collected from Lake DePue, a backwater lake of the Illinois River. The burrowing worm species Lumbriculus variegatus was introduced to homogenized Lake DePue sediments in aerated aquaria. We then introduced inert fine fluorescent particles to the sediment-water interface. Using time-lapse photography, we observed the mixing of the fluorescent particles into the sediment bed over a two-week period. We developed image analysis software to characterize the concentration distribution of the fluorescent particles as a function of sediment depth, and applied this to the time-series of images to evaluate sediment mixing. We fit a one-dimensional CTRW model to the depth profiles to evaluate the underlying statistical properties of the mixing behavior. This analysis suggests that the sediment mixing caused by L. variegatus burrowing is subdiffusive in time and superdiffusive in space. We also found that heavy metal contamination significantly reduces L. variegatus burrowing, causing increasingly anomalous sediment mixing. This result implies that there can be important feedbacks between sediment chemistry, organism behavior, and sediment mixing that are not considered in current environmental models.

  9. Characterization of IS6110 insertions in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Turcios, L; Casart, Y; Florez, I; de Waard, J; Salazar, L

    2009-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with identical IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns are considered to be clonally related. The presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region, one preferential locus for the integration of IS6110, was evaluated in 125 M. tuberculosis isolates. Five isolates had IS6110 inserted in this region, and two consisted of a mix of isogenic strains that putatively have evolved during a single infection. Strains from the same isolate had identical spoligo and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable-number tandem repeat profiles, but had slight variations in IS6110 RFLP patterns, due to the presence of IS6110 in the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region. Duplication of the dnaA-dnaN intergenic region was found in one isogenic strain.

  10. Fern spore extracts can damage DNA

    PubMed Central

    Simán, S E; Povey, A C; Ward, T H; Margison, G P; Sheffield, E

    2000-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of the vegetative tissues of bracken fern (Pteridium) has long been established. More recently, the carcinogenic effects of the spores of bracken have also been recognized. Both vegetative tissues and spores of bracken can induce adducts in DNA in animal tissues, but the possible genotoxic or carcinogenic effects of spores from fern species other than bracken are unknown. The single-cell gel electrophoresis (‘comet’) assay was used to investigate whether fern spores can cause DNA damage in vitro. Extracts of spores from six fern species were administered to cultured human premyeloid leukaemia (K562) cells. Spore extracts of five fern species: Anemia phyllitidis, Dicksonia antarctica, Pteridium aquilinum, Pteris vittata and Sadleria pallida, induced significantly more DNA strand breaks than those in the control groups. Only in one species, Osmunda regalis, was the effect no different from that in the control groups. Using extracts from A. phyllitidis and P. vittata, the extent of DNA damage was increased by increasing the original dose 10 times, whereas an experiment in which exposure times were varied suggested that the highest levels of strand breaks appear after 2 h exposure. Simultaneous incubation with human S9 liver enzyme mix ablated the damaging effect of the extracts. Our data show that fern spore extracts can cause DNA damage in human cells in vitro. Considering the strong correlation between DNA damage and carcinogenic events, the observations made in this report may well have some implications for human health. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883670

  11. Insight into the Helix-to-Coil Transition in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammouda, Boualem

    2006-03-01

    Dissolved DNA is known to undergo a helix-to-coil transition when temperature is increased. For a solution of 4% DNA in water, the transition temperature is around 94^oC. UV absorption spectroscopy was performed to characterize such a transition. The 260 nm absorption line is a good monitor of the un-stacking of the DNA amine bases. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering was also performed to investigate structural changes that accompany the transition. A characteristic DNA cross section correlation length was found to increase from 9A to 15A and the Porod exponent was found to decrease from close to 4 to around 2 across the transition. The average sugar-sugar inter-distance is larger in the open molecule coil phase. The helix phase is characterized by a cylindrical structure with well-defined interface whereas melted DNA macromolecules behave like Gaussian coils. Jump in the scattered (solvation) intensity was also observed across the transition. A hysteresis cycle was observed upon a subsequent temperature decrease. Once DNA melts, it does not reform the helix phase easily. DNA solvation (interaction of DNA and solvent molecules) has also been investigated. When solvent mixtures (for example water/alcohol mixtures) are used, ideal solvent mixing is observed for the helix phase but a highly non-ideal mixing behavior is observed for the coil phase.

  12. Microfluidic mixing using contactless dielectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Salmanzadeh, Alireza; Shafiee, Hadi; Davalos, Rafael V; Stremler, Mark A

    2011-09-01

    The first experimental evidence of mixing enhancement in a microfluidic system using contactless dielectrophoresis (cDEP) is presented in this work. Pressure-driven flow of deionized water containing 0.5 μm beads was mixed in various chamber geometries by imposing a dielectrophoresis (DEP) force on the beads. In cDEP the electrodes are not in direct contact with the fluid sample but are instead capacitively coupled to the mixing chamber through thin dielectric barriers, which eliminates many of the problems encountered with standard DEP. Four system designs with rectangular and circular mixing chambers were fabricated in PDMS. Mixing tests were conducted for flow rates from 0.005 to 1 mL/h subject to an alternating current signal range of 0-300 V at 100-600 kHz. When the time scales of the bulk fluid motion and the DEP motion were commensurate, rapid mixing was observed. The rectangular mixing chambers were found to be more efficient than the circular chambers. This approach shows potential for mixing low diffusivity biological samples, which is a very challenging problem in laminar flows at small scales.

  13. Iowa City Ready Mix, Inc.

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Iowa City Ready Mix, Inc., for alleged violations at a facility located at 1854 South Riverside, Iowa City, IA (“facility”). The facility produces and transports ready mixe

  14. Mixed Waste Working Group report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-09

    The treatment of mixed waste remains one of this country`s most vexing environmental problems. Mixed waste is the combination of radioactive waste and hazardous waste, as defined by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Department of Energy (DOE), as the country`s largest mixed waste generator, responsible for 95 percent of the Nation`s mixed waste volume, is now required to address a strict set of milestones under the Federal Facility Compliance Act of 1992. DOE`s earlier failure to adequately address the storage and treatment issues associated with mixed waste has led to a significant backlog of temporarily stored waste, significant quantities of buried waste, limited permanent disposal options, and inadequate treatment solutions. Between May and November of 1993, the Mixed Waste Working Group brought together stakeholders from around the Nation. Scientists, citizens, entrepreneurs, and bureaucrats convened in a series of forums to chart a course for accelerated testing of innovative mixed waste technologies. For the first time, a wide range of stakeholders were asked to examine new technologies that, if given the chance to be tested and evaluated, offer the prospect for better, safer, cheaper, and faster solutions to the mixed waste problem. In a matter of months, the Working Group has managed to bridge a gap between science and perception, engineer and citizen, and has developed a shared program for testing new technologies.

  15. Mixed-Methods Research Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terrell, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-Method studies have emerged from the paradigm wars between qualitative and quantitative research approaches to become a widely used mode of inquiry. Depending on choices made across four dimensions, mixed-methods can provide an investigator with many design choices which involve a range of sequential and concurrent strategies. Defining…

  16. Coupled amplification and sequencing of genomic DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Ruano, G; Kidd, K K

    1991-01-01

    Addition of dideoxyribonucleotides during the exponential phase of the PCR should result in the synthesis of two complementary sequence ladders. We have explored this hypothesis to develop coupled amplification and sequencing of genomic DNA. Coupled amplification and sequencing is a biphasic method for sequencing both strands of template as they are amplified. Stage I selects and amplifies a single target from the genomic DNA sample. Stage II accomplishes the sequencing as well as additional amplification of the target using aliquots from the stage I reaction mixed with end-labeled primer and dideoxynucleotides. We have successfully applied coupled amplification and sequencing to a 300-base-pair fragment 4 kilobases upstream from HOX2B directly from human whole genomic DNA. Images PMID:1672768

  17. Mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Ragnar; Hetlevik, Siri Opsahl; Lilleby, Vibke; Molberg, Øyvind

    2016-02-01

    The concept of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) as a separate connective tissue disease (CTD) has persisted for more than four decades. High titers of antibodies targeting the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (U1 snRNP) in peripheral blood are a sine qua non for the diagnosis of MCTD, in addition to distinct clinical features including Raynaud's phenomenon (RP), "puffy hands," arthritis, myositis, pleuritis, pericarditis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Recently, population-based epidemiology data from Norway estimated the point prevalence of adult-onset MCTD to be 3.8 per 100,000 and the mean annual incidence to be 2.1 per million per year, supporting the notion that MCTD is the least common CTD. Little is known about the etiology of MCTD, but recent genetic studies have confirmed that MCTD is a strongly HLA (​human leukocyte antigen)-linked disease, as the HLA profiles of MCTD differ distinctly from the corresponding profiles of ethnically matched healthy controls and other CTDs. In the first section of this review, we provide an update on the clinical, immunological, and genetic features of MCTD and discuss the relationship between MCTD and the other CTDs. Then we proceed to discuss the recent advances in therapy and our current understanding of prognosis and prognostic factors, especially those that are associated with the more serious pulmonary and cardiovascular complications of the disease. In the final section, we discuss some of the key, unresolved questions related to anti-RNP-associated diseases and indicate how these questions may be approached in future studies.

  18. Amplified DNA Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, Itamar; Shlyahovsky, Bella; Willner, Bilha; Zayats, Maya

    Amplified detection of DNA is a central research topic in modern bioanalytical science. Electronic or optical transduction of DNA recognition events provides readout signals for DNA biosensors. Amplification of the DNA analysis is accomplished by the coupling of nucleic acid-functionalized enzymes or nucleic acid-functionalized nanoparticles (NP) as labels for the DNA duplex formation. This chapter discusses the amplified amperometric analysis of DNA by redox enzymes, the amplified optical sensing of DNA by enzymes or DNAzymes, and the amplified voltammetric, optical, or microgravimetric analysis of DNA using metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. Further approaches to amplify DNA detection involve the use of micro-carriers of redox compounds as labels for DNA complex formation on electrodes, or the use of micro-objects such as liposomes, that label the resulting DNA complexes on electrodes and alter the interfacial properties of the electrodes. Finally, DNA machines are used for the optical detection of DNA, and the systems are suggested as future analytical procedures that could substitute the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process.

  19. Biomass conversion to mixed alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzapple, M.T.; Loescher, M.; Ross, M.

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses the MixAlco Process which converts a wide variety of biomass materials (e.g. municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, agricultural residues) to mixed alcohols. First, the biomass is treated with lime to enhance its digestibility. Then, a mixed culture of acid-forming microorganisms converts the lime-treated biomass to volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids. To maintain fermentor pH, a neutralizing agent (e.g. calcium carbonate or lime) is added, so the fermentation actually produces VFA salts such as calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The VFA salts are recovered and thermally converted to ketones (e.g. acetone, methylethyl ketone, diethyl ketone) which are subsequently hydrogenated to mixed alcohols (e.g. isopropanol, isobutanol, isopentanol). Processing costs are estimated at $0.72/gallon of mixed alcohols making it potentially attractive for transportation fuels.

  20. CHARACTERIZING PULSATING MIXING OF SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.

    2007-12-01

    This paper describes the physical properties for defining the operation of a pulse jet mixing system. Pulse jet mixing operates with no moving parts located in the vessel to be mixed. Pulse tubes submerged in the vessel provide a pulsating flow due to a controlled combination of applied pressure to expel the fluid from the pulse tube nozzle followed by suction to refill the pulse tube through the same nozzle. For mixing slurries nondimensional parameters to define mixing operation include slurry properties, geometric properties and operational parameters. Primary parameters include jet Reynolds number and Froude number; alternate parameters may include particle Galileo number, particle Reynolds number, settling velocity ratio, and hindered settling velocity ratio. Rating metrics for system performance include just suspended velocity, concentration distribution as a function of elevation, and blend time.

  1. Mixing in confined stratified aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolster, Diogo; Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; LeBorgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Carrera, Jesus

    2011-03-01

    Spatial variability in a flow field leads to spreading of a tracer plume. The effect of microdispersion is to smooth concentration gradients that exist in the system. The combined effect of these two phenomena leads to an 'effective' enhanced mixing that can be asymptotically quantified by an effective dispersion coefficient (i.e. Taylor dispersion). Mixing plays a fundamental role in driving chemical reactions. However, at pre-asymptotic times it is considerably more difficult to accurately quantify these effects by an effective dispersion coefficient as spreading and mixing are not the same (but intricately related). In this work we use a volume averaging approach to calculate the concentration distribution of an inert solute release at pre-asymptotic times in a stratified formation. Mixing here is characterized by the scalar dissipation rate, which measures the destruction of concentration variance. As such it is an indicator for the degree of mixing of a system. We study pre-asymptotic solute mixing in terms of explicit analytical expressions for the scalar dissipation rate and numerical random walk simulations. In particular, we divide the concentration field into a mean and deviation component and use dominant balance arguments to write approximate governing equations for each, which we then solve analytically. This allows us to explicitly evaluate the separate contributions to mixing from the mean and the deviation behavior. We find an approximate, but accurate expression (when compared to numerical simulations) to evaluate mixing. Our results shed some new light on the mechanisms that lead to large scale mixing and allow for a distinction between solute spreading, represented by the mean concentration, and mixing, which comes from both the mean and deviation concentrations, at pre-asymptotic times.

  2. Baroclinic mixing in HE fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.; Ferguson, R.E.; Priolo, F.; Chien, K.Y.; Collins, J.P.

    1993-08-01

    Numerical simulations of the turbulent mixing in the fireball of an HE blast wave were performed with a second-order Godunov code. Adaptive mesh refinement was used to capture the convective mixing processes on the computational grid. The calculations revealed that the interface between the shock-compressed air and the dense detonation products was unstable. Vorticity was generated in that region by baroclinic effects. This caused the interface to roll-up into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were identified: a strong blast wave phase, where the mixing region was swept outward by the shockinduced flow; an implosion phase, that stretched the inner boundary of the mixing region back toward the origin; a re-shocking phase, where the imploding shock expands back outward from the origin and re-energizes the mixing later by RichtmyerMeshkov effects; and an asymptotic mixing phase, where line-scale structures are continually recreated by folding effects but the overall vorticity decays through a cascade process. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean-flow profiles and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The mean kinetic energy rapidly approached zero as the blast wave decayed, but the fluctuating kinetic energy asymptotically approached a small constant value. This represents the rotational kinetic energy driven by the vorticity field, that continued to mix the fluid at late times. It was shown that the vorticity field corresponds to a function that fluctuates between plus and minus values-with a volume-averaged mean of zero.

  3. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  4. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  5. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  6. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  7. Unusual DNA structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, R.D.; Harvey, S.C.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Unusual DNS Structures and the Probes Used for Their Detection; The Specificity of Single Strand Specific Endonucleases; Chromatin STructure and DNA Structure at the hsp 26 Locus of Drosophilia; Cruciform Extrusion in Supercoiled DNA-Mechanisms and Contextual Influence; Torsional Stress, Unusual DNA Structures, and Eukaryotic Gene Expression; DNA Sequence and Structure: Bending to Biology. Cruciform Transitions Assayed Using a Psoralen Cross-linking Method: Applications to Measurements of DNA Torisonal Tension; NMR-Distance Geometry Studies of Helical Errors and Sequence Dependent Conformations of DNA in Solution; Hyperreactivity of the B-Z Junctions Probed by Two Aromatic Chemical Carcinogens; Inherently Curved DNA and Its Structural Elements; and DNA Flexibility Under Control: The Juma Algorithm and its Application to BZ Junctions.

  8. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  9. DNA Spools under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulić, I. M.; Schiessel, H.

    2004-06-01

    DNA spools, structures in which DNA is wrapped and helically coiled onto itself or onto a protein core, are ubiquitous in nature. We develop a general theory describing the nonequilibrium behavior of DNA spools under linear tension. Two puzzling and seemingly unrelated recent experimental findings, the sudden quantized unwrapping of nucleosomes and that of DNA toroidal condensates under tension, are theoretically explained and shown to be of the same origin. The study provides new insights into nucleosome and chromatin fiber stability and dynamics.

  10. Turbidity Current Head Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, David; Sanchez, Miguel Angel; Medina, Pablo

    2010-05-01

    coastal diffusion using image analysis. Applied Scientific Research 59,.191-204. 1998. [5] J.M. Redondo. Turbulent mixing in the Atmosphere and Ocean. Fluid Physics. 584-597. World Scientific. New York. 1994

  11. Computational design of co-assembling protein-DNA nanowires.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yun; Yu, Jiun-Yann; Wannier, Timothy M; Guo, Chin-Lin; Mayo, Stephen L

    2015-09-10

    Biomolecular self-assemblies are of great interest to nanotechnologists because of their functional versatility and their biocompatibility. Over the past decade, sophisticated single-component nanostructures composed exclusively of nucleic acids, peptides and proteins have been reported, and these nanostructures have been used in a wide range of applications, from drug delivery to molecular computing. Despite these successes, the development of hybrid co-assemblies of nucleic acids and proteins has remained elusive. Here we use computational protein design to create a protein-DNA co-assembling nanomaterial whose assembly is driven via non-covalent interactions. To achieve this, a homodimerization interface is engineered onto the Drosophila Engrailed homeodomain (ENH), allowing the dimerized protein complex to bind to two double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules. By varying the arrangement of protein-binding sites on the dsDNA, an irregular bulk nanoparticle or a nanowire with single-molecule width can be spontaneously formed by mixing the protein and dsDNA building blocks. We characterize the protein-DNA nanowire using fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray crystallography, confirming that the nanowire is formed via the proposed mechanism. This work lays the foundation for the development of new classes of protein-DNA hybrid materials. Further applications can be explored by incorporating DNA origami, DNA aptamers and/or peptide epitopes into the protein-DNA framework presented here.

  12. Computational design of co-assembling protein-DNA nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Yun; Yu, Jiun-Yann; Wannier, Timothy M.; Guo, Chin-Lin; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular self-assemblies are of great interest to nanotechnologists because of their functional versatility and their biocompatibility. Over the past decade, sophisticated single-component nanostructures composed exclusively of nucleic acids, peptides and proteins have been reported, and these nanostructures have been used in a wide range of applications, from drug delivery to molecular computing. Despite these successes, the development of hybrid co-assemblies of nucleic acids and proteins has remained elusive. Here we use computational protein design to create a protein-DNA co-assembling nanomaterial whose assembly is driven via non-covalent interactions. To achieve this, a homodimerization interface is engineered onto the Drosophila Engrailed homeodomain (ENH), allowing the dimerized protein complex to bind to two double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules. By varying the arrangement of protein-binding sites on the dsDNA, an irregular bulk nanoparticle or a nanowire with single-molecule width can be spontaneously formed by mixing the protein and dsDNA building blocks. We characterize the protein-DNA nanowire using fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray crystallography, confirming that the nanowire is formed via the proposed mechanism. This work lays the foundation for the development of new classes of protein-DNA hybrid materials. Further applications can be explored by incorporating DNA origami, DNA aptamers and/or peptide epitopes into the protein-DNA framework presented here.

  13. Nanopores: Flossing with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasianowicz, John J.

    2004-06-01

    Passing a DNA strand many times back-and-forth through a protein nanopore would enable the interaction between them to be studied more closely. This may now be possible, using a dumbbell-shaped DNA-polymer complex, which may lead to a more reliable analysis of DNA sequences using nanopores.

  14. Compressibility effects on turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panickacheril John, John; Donzis, Diego

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of compressibility on passive scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence with a focus on the fundamental mechanisms that are responsible for such effects using a large Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database. The database includes simulations with Taylor Reynolds number (Rλ) up to 100, turbulent Mach number (Mt) between 0.1 and 0.6 and Schmidt number (Sc) from 0.5 to 1.0. We present several measures of mixing efficiency on different canonical flows to robustly identify compressibility effects. We found that, like shear layers, mixing is reduced as Mach number increases. However, data also reveal a non-monotonic trend with Mt. To assess directly the effect of dilatational motions we also present results with both dilatational and soleniodal forcing. Analysis suggests that a small fraction of dilatational forcing decreases mixing time at higher Mt. Scalar spectra collapse when normalized by Batchelor variables which suggests that a compressive mechanism similar to Batchelor mixing in incompressible flows might be responsible for better mixing at high Mt and with dilatational forcing compared to pure solenoidal mixing. We also present results on scalar budgets, in particular on production and dissipation. Support from NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Langmuir Mixing Affects Global Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Webb, A.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Arbetter, T. E.; Craig, A.; Danabasoglu, G.; Large, W.; Vertenstein, M.

    2016-02-01

    The effects of Langmuir turbulence on the surface ocean mixing and thereby the global climate are assessed in the CESM earth system model by adding a parameterization of Langmuir mixing to the K-Profile Parameterization (KPP). A global wave field is needed by this Langmuir mixing parameterization to provide the Stokes drift that drives Langmuir mixing. Both a prognostic wave model, WAVEWATCH III, and a climatological data wave model have been coupled with CESM and tested. Nearly identical and substantial improvements in the simulated mixed layer depth and intermediate water ventilation are found in both cases when Langmuir mixing is included. The greatest improvement occurs in the Southern Ocean. A climatological data wave model, which responds to simulated winds, but with fixed wind-wave relationships, can therefore reproduce the primary improvements of Langmuir mixing, but with much less computational cost than even a coarse-resolution prognostic wave model. Progress toward an improved wave-induced entrainment through the bottom of ocean surface boundary layer will also be discussed.

  16. Mixed features in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Solé, Eva; Garriga, Marina; Valentí, Marc; Vieta, Eduard

    2016-12-29

    Mixed affective states, defined as the coexistence of depressive and manic symptoms, are complex presentations of manic-depressive illness that represent a challenge for clinicians at the levels of diagnosis, classification, and pharmacological treatment. The evidence shows that patients with bipolar disorder who have manic/hypomanic or depressive episodes with mixed features tend to have a more severe form of bipolar disorder along with a worse course of illness and higher rates of comorbid conditions than those with non-mixed presentations. In the updated Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5), the definition of "mixed episode" has been removed, and subthreshold nonoverlapping symptoms of the opposite pole are captured using a "with mixed features" specifier applied to manic, hypomanic, and major depressive episodes. However, the list of symptoms proposed in the DSM-5 specifier has been widely criticized, because it includes typical manic symptoms (such as elevated mood and grandiosity) that are rare among patients with mixed depression, while excluding symptoms (such as irritability, psychomotor agitation, and distractibility) that are frequently reported in these patients. With the new classification, mixed depressive episodes are three times more common in bipolar II compared with unipolar depression, which partly contributes to the increased risk of suicide observed in bipolar depression compared to unipolar depression. Therefore, a specific diagnostic category would imply an increased diagnostic sensitivity, would help to foster early identification of symptoms and ensure specific treatment, as well as play a role in suicide prevention in this population.

  17. Mapping the Mixed Methods–Mixed Research Synthesis Terrain

    PubMed Central

    Sandelowski, Margarete; Voils, Corrine I.; Leeman, Jennifer; Crandell, Jamie L.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed methods–mixed research synthesis is a form of systematic review in which the findings of qualitative and quantitative studies are integrated via qualitative and/or quantitative methods. Although methodological advances have been made, efforts to differentiate research synthesis methods have been too focused on methods and not focused enough on the defining logics of research synthesis—each of which may be operationalized in different ways—or on the research findings themselves that are targeted for synthesis. The conduct of mixed methods–mixed research synthesis studies may more usefully be understood in terms of the logics of aggregation and configuration. Neither logic is preferable to the other nor tied exclusively to any one method or to any one side of the qualitative/quantitative binary. PMID:23066379

  18. DNAzymes in DNA Nanomachines and DNA Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yu; Tian, Ye; Chen, Yi; Mao, Chengde

    This chapter discusses our efforts in using DNAzymes in DNA nano-machines and DNA analysis systems. 10-23 DNAzymes can cleave specific phos-phodiester bonds in RNA. We use them to construct an autonomous DNA-RNA chimera nanomotor, which constantly extracts chemical energy from RNA substrates and transduces the energy into a mechanical motion: cycles of contraction and extension. The motor's motion can be reversibly turned on and off by a DNA analogue (brake) of the RNA substrate. Addition and removal of the brake stops and restarts, respectively, the motor's motion. Furthermore, when the RNA substrates are preorganized into a one-dimensional track, a DNAzyme can continuously move along the track so long as there are substrates available ahead. Based on a similar mechanism, a novel DNA detection system has been developed. A target DNA activates a DNAzyme to cleave RNA-containing molecular beacons (MB), which generates an enhanced fluorescence signal. A following work integrates two steps of signal amplifications: a rolling-circle amplification (RCA) to synthesize multiple copies of DNAzymes, and the DNAzymes catalyze a chemical reaction to generate a colorimetric signal. This method allows detection of DNA analytes whose concentration is as low as 1 pM.

  19. A Critical Role for Extracellular DNA in Dental Plaque Formation.

    PubMed

    Rostami, N; Shields, R C; Yassin, S A; Hawkins, A R; Bowen, L; Luo, T L; Rickard, A H; Holliday, R; Preshaw, P M; Jakubovics, N S

    2017-02-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) has been identified in the matrix of many different monospecies biofilms in vitro, including some of those produced by oral bacteria. In many cases, eDNA stabilizes the structure of monospecies biofilms. Here, the authors aimed to determine whether eDNA is an important component of natural, mixed-species oral biofilms, such as plaque on natural teeth or dental implants. To visualize eDNA in oral biofilms, approaches for fluorescently stained eDNA with either anti-DNA antibodies or an ultrasensitive cell-impermeant dye, YOYO-1, were first developed using Enterococcus faecalis, an organism that has previously been shown to produce extensive eDNA structures within biofilms. Oral biofilms were modelled as in vitro "microcosms" on glass coverslips inoculated with the natural microbial population of human saliva and cultured statically in artificial saliva medium. Using antibodies and YOYO-1, eDNA was found to be distributed throughout microcosm biofilms, and was particularly abundant in the immediate vicinity of cells. Similar arrangements of eDNA were detected in biofilms on crowns and overdenture abutments of dental implants that had been recovered from patients during the restorative phase of treatment, and in subgingival dental plaque of periodontitis patients, indicating that eDNA is a common component of natural oral biofilms. In model oral biofilms, treatment with a DNA-degrading enzyme, NucB from Bacillus licheniformis, strongly inhibited the accumulation of biofilms. The bacterial species diversity was significantly reduced by treatment with NucB and particularly strong reductions were observed in the abundance of anaerobic, proteolytic bacteria such as Peptostreptococcus, Porphyromonas and Prevotella. Preformed biofilms were not significantly reduced by NucB treatment, indicating that eDNA is more important or more exposed during the early stages of biofilm formation. Overall, these data demonstrate that dental plaque eDNA is

  20. Three-Dimensional DNA Nanostructures Assembled from DNA Star Motifs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Tile-based DNA self-assembly is a promising method in DNA nanotechnology and has produced a wide range of nanostructures by using a small set of unique DNA strands. DNA star motif, as one of DNA tiles, has been employed to assemble varieties of symmetric one-, two-, three-dimensional (1, 2, 3D) DNA nanostructures. Herein, we describe the design principles, assembly methods, and characterization methods of 3D DNA nanostructures assembled from the DNA star motifs.

  1. [Marketing mix in health service].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The marketing mix is the combination of the marketing variables that a firm employs with the purpose to achieve the expected volume of business within its market. In the sale of goods, four variables compose the marketing mix (4 Ps): Product, Price, Point of sale and Promotion. In the case of providing services, three further elements play a role: Personnel, Physical Evidence and Processes (7 Ps). The marketing mix must be addressed to the consumers as well as to the employees of the providing firm. Furthermore, it must be interpreted as employees ability to satisfy customers (interactive marketing).

  2. Waveguide Four-Wave Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    PL-TR--91-1045 /’--"PL-TR-- AD-A243 555 91-1045 WAVEGUIDE FOUR -WAVE MIXING Thomas B. Simpson Jia-ming Liu JAYCOR San Diego, CA 92186-5154 October...Final Report; May 88 - Mar 91 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS WAVEGUIDE FOUR -WAVE MIXING C: F29601-88-C-0023 PE: 62601F PR: 3326 6. AUTHOR(S...for public release; distribution unlimited. 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words) This program has investigated four -wave mixing (4-win) in non- linear

  3. Mixed deterministic and probabilistic networks

    PubMed Central

    Dechter, Rina

    2010-01-01

    The paper introduces mixed networks, a new graphical model framework for expressing and reasoning with probabilistic and deterministic information. The motivation to develop mixed networks stems from the desire to fully exploit the deterministic information (constraints) that is often present in graphical models. Several concepts and algorithms specific to belief networks and constraint networks are combined, achieving computational efficiency, semantic coherence and user-interface convenience. We define the semantics and graphical representation of mixed networks, and discuss the two main types of algorithms for processing them: inference-based and search-based. A preliminary experimental evaluation shows the benefits of the new model. PMID:20981243

  4. Biodegradation of mixed pesticides by mixed pesticide enriched cultures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, K Rama; Philip, Ligy

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the degradation kinetics of mixed (lindane, methyl parathion and carbofuran) pesticides by mixed pesticide enriched cultures (MEC) under various environmental conditions. The bacterial strains isolated from the mixed microbial consortium were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MTCC 9236), Bacillus sp. (MTCC 9235) and Chryseobacterium joostei (MTCC 9237). Batch studies were conducted to estimate the biokinetic parameters like the maximum specific growth rate (mu(max)), Yield Coefficient (Y(T)), half saturation concentration (K(s)) and inhibition concentration (Ki) for individual and mixed pesticide enriched cultures. The cultures enriched in a particular pollutant always showed high growth rate and low inhibition in that particular pollutant compared to MEC. After seven weeks of incubation, mixed pesticide enriched cultures were able to degrade 72% lindane, 95% carbofuran and 100% of methyl parathion in facultative co-metabolic conditions. In aerobic systems, degradation efficiencies of lindane methyl parathion and carbofuran were increased by the addition of 2g L(- 1) of dextrose. Though many metabolic compounds of mixed pesticides were observed at different time intervals, none of the metabolites were persistent. Based on the observed metabolites, a degradation pathway was postulated for different pesticides under various environmental conditions.

  5. The Many Sides of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the meaning of DNA. Discusses histories of DNA, literature on DNA, the contributions of Max Delbruck and Barbara McClintock, life, views of control, current research, and the language of DNA. Contains 24 references. (JRH)

  6. The Many Sides of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the meaning of DNA. Discusses histories of DNA, literature on DNA, the contributions of Max Delbruck and Barbara McClintock, life, views of control, current research, and the language of DNA. Contains 24 references. (JRH)

  7. Thermodynamic studies on PNA and PNA/DNA dendrimer formation.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Maria; Musumeci, Domenica; Valente, Margherita; Roviello, Giovanni N; Sapio, Roberto; Pedone, Carlo; Bucci, Enrico M

    2007-01-01

    In this work we report a kinetic and thermodynamic study relative to the formation of gel systems based on PNA and PNA/DNA dendrimers, useful for drug delivery or diagnostic applications. We realized two kinds of systems: a PNA-based monomolecular system formed by an autoassembling PNA tridendron (A) and a PNA/DNA bimolecular system based on a PNA tridendron with a mixed sequence and a DNA crosslinker (B). Both systems have the ability to form a three-dimensional network by means of specific W-C base pairing.

  8. Archaeal DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  9. DNA-Mediated Electrochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Gorodetsky, Alon A.; Buzzeo, Marisa C.

    2009-01-01

    The base pair stack of DNA has been demonstrated as a medium for long range charge transport chemistry both in solution and at DNA-modified surfaces. This chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to structural perturbations in the base pair stack as occur with lesions, single base mismatches, and protein binding. We have exploited this sensitivity for the development of reliable electrochemical assays based on DNA charge transport at self-assembled DNA monolayers. Here we discuss the characteristic features, applications, and advantages of DNA-mediated electrochemistry. PMID:18980370

  10. DNA Sequencing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    An automated DNA sequencing apparatus having a reactor for providing at least two series of DNA products formed from a single primer and a DNA strand, each DNA product of a series differing in molecular weight and having a chain terminating agent at one end; separating means for separating the DNA products to form a series bands, the intensity of substantially all nearby bands in a different series being different, band reading means for determining the position an This invention was made with government support including a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, contract number AI-06045. The U.S. government has certain rights in the invention.

  11. DNA Functionalization of Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Fang; Gang, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    DNA-nanoparticle conjugates are hybrid nanoscale objects that integrate different types of DNA molecules and inorganic nanoparticles with a typical architecture of a DNA shell around an inorganic core. Such incorporation provides particles with unique properties of DNA, addressability and recognition, but, at the same time, allows exploiting the properties of the particle's inorganic core. Thus, these hybrid nano-objects are advantageous for rational fabrication of functional materials and for biomedical applications. Here, we describe several established DNA functionalization procedures for different types of surface ligands and nanoparticle core materials.

  12. Validation and scale-up of plasmid DNA purification by phenyl-boronic acid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A Gabriela; Azevedo, Ana M; Aires-Barros, M Raquel; Prazeres, D Miguel F

    2012-11-01

    This study addresses the feasibility of scaling-up the removal of host cell impurities from plasmid DNA (pDNA)-containing Escherichia coli lysates by phenyl-boronic (PB) acid chromatography using columns packed with 7.6 and 15.2 cm(3) of controlled porous glass beads (CPG) derivatized with PB ligands. Equilibration was performed with water at 10 cm(3) /min and no conditioning of the lysate feed was required. At a ratio of lysate feed to adsorbent volume of 1.3, 93-96% of pDNA was recovered in the flow through while 66-71% of impurities remained bound (~2.5-fold purification). The entire sequence of loading, washing, elution, and re-equilibration was completed in 20 min. Run-to-run consistency was observed in terms of chromatogram features and performance (yield, purification factor, agarose electrophoresis) across the different amounts of adsorbent (0.75-15.2 cm(3) ) by performing successive injections of lysates prepared independently and containing 3.7 or 6.1 kbp plasmids. The column productivity at large scale was 4 dm(3) of alkaline lysate per hour per dm(3) of PB-CPG resin. The method is rapid, reproducible, simple, and straightforward to scale-up. Furthermore, it is capable of handling heavily contaminated samples, constituting a good alternative to purification techniques such as isopropanol precipitation, aqueous two-phase systems, and tangential flow filtration. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Internet-Accessible DNA Sequence Database for Identifying Fusaria from Human and Animal Infections ▿

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sutton, Deanna A.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Sarver, Brice A. J.; Balajee, S. Arunmozhi; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Summerbell, Richard C.; Robert, Vincent A. R. G.; Crous, Pedro W.; Zhang, Ning; Aoki, Takayuki; Jung, Kyongyong; Park, Jongsun; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Seogchan; Park, Bongsoo; Geiser, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Because less than one-third of clinically relevant fusaria can be accurately identified to species level using phenotypic data (i.e., morphological species recognition), we constructed a three-locus DNA sequence database to facilitate molecular identification of the 69 Fusarium species associated with human or animal mycoses encountered in clinical microbiology laboratories. The database comprises partial sequences from three nuclear genes: translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase (RPB1), and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase (RPB2). These three gene fragments can be amplified by PCR and sequenced using primers that are conserved across the phylogenetic breadth of Fusarium. Phylogenetic analyses of the combined data set reveal that, with the exception of two monotypic lineages, all clinically relevant fusaria are nested in one of eight variously sized and strongly supported species complexes. The monophyletic lineages have been named informally to facilitate communication of an isolate's clade membership and genetic diversity. To identify isolates to the species included within the database, partial DNA sequence data from one or more of the three genes can be used as a BLAST query against the database which is Web accessible at FUSARIUM-ID (http://isolate.fusariumdb.org) and the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS-KNAW) Fungal Biodiversity Center (http://www.cbs.knaw.nl/fusarium). Alternatively, isolates can be identified via phylogenetic analysis by adding sequences of unknowns to the DNA sequence alignment, which can be downloaded from the two aforementioned websites. The utility of this database should increase significantly as members of the clinical microbiology community deposit in internationally accessible culture collections (e.g., CBS-KNAW or the Fusarium Research Center) cultures of novel mycosis-associated fusaria, along with associated, corrected sequence chromatograms and data, so that the

  14. Internet-accessible DNA sequence database for identifying fusaria from human and animal infections.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Kerry; Sutton, Deanna A; Rinaldi, Michael G; Sarver, Brice A J; Balajee, S Arunmozhi; Schroers, Hans-Josef; Summerbell, Richard C; Robert, Vincent A R G; Crous, Pedro W; Zhang, Ning; Aoki, Takayuki; Jung, Kyongyong; Park, Jongsun; Lee, Yong-Hwan; Kang, Seogchan; Park, Bongsoo; Geiser, David M

    2010-10-01

    Because less than one-third of clinically relevant fusaria can be accurately identified to species level using phenotypic data (i.e., morphological species recognition), we constructed a three-locus DNA sequence database to facilitate molecular identification of the 69 Fusarium species associated with human or animal mycoses encountered in clinical microbiology laboratories. The database comprises partial sequences from three nuclear genes: translation elongation factor 1α (EF-1α), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase (RPB1), and the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase (RPB2). These three gene fragments can be amplified by PCR and sequenced using primers that are conserved across the phylogenetic breadth of Fusarium. Phylogenetic analyses of the combined data set reveal that, with the exception of two monotypic lineages, all clinically relevant fusaria are nested in one of eight variously sized and strongly supported species complexes. The monophyletic lineages have been named informally to facilitate communication of an isolate's clade membership and genetic diversity. To identify isolates to the species included within the database, partial DNA sequence data from one or more of the three genes can be used as a BLAST query against the database which is Web accessible at FUSARIUM-ID (http://isolate.fusariumdb.org) and the Centraalbureau voor Schimmelcultures (CBS-KNAW) Fungal Biodiversity Center (http://www.cbs.knaw.nl/fusarium). Alternatively, isolates can be identified via phylogenetic analysis by adding sequences of unknowns to the DNA sequence alignment, which can be downloaded from the two aforementioned websites. The utility of this database should increase significantly as members of the clinical microbiology community deposit in internationally accessible culture collections (e.g., CBS-KNAW or the Fusarium Research Center) cultures of novel mycosis-associated fusaria, along with associated, corrected sequence chromatograms and data, so that the

  15. DNA structure and function.

    PubMed

    Travers, Andrew; Muskhelishvili, Georgi

    2015-06-01

    The proposal of a double-helical structure for DNA over 60 years ago provided an eminently satisfying explanation for the heritability of genetic information. But why is DNA, and not RNA, now the dominant biological information store? We argue that, in addition to its coding function, the ability of DNA, unlike RNA, to adopt a B-DNA structure confers advantages both for information accessibility and for packaging. The information encoded by DNA is both digital - the precise base specifying, for example, amino acid sequences - and analogue. The latter determines the sequence-dependent physicochemical properties of DNA, for example, its stiffness and susceptibility to strand separation. Most importantly, DNA chirality enables the formation of supercoiling under torsional stress. We review recent evidence suggesting that DNA supercoiling, particularly that generated by DNA translocases, is a major driver of gene regulation and patterns of chromosomal gene organization, and in its guise as a promoter of DNA packaging enables DNA to act as an energy store to facilitate the passage of translocating enzymes such as RNA polymerase.

  16. Supramolecular DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Christopher K; Hamblin, Graham D; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2011-12-01

    The powerful self-assembly features of DNA make it a unique template to finely organize and control matter on the nanometre scale. While DNA alone offers a high degree of fidelity in its self-assembly, a new area of research termed 'supramolecular DNA assembly' has recently emerged. This field combines DNA building blocks with synthetic organic, inorganic and polymeric structures. It thus brings together the toolbox of supramolecular chemistry with the predictable and programmable nature of DNA. The result of this molecular partnership is a variety of hybrid architectures, that expand DNA assembly beyond the boundaries of Watson-Crick base pairing into new structural and functional properties. In this tutorial review we outline this emerging field of study, and describe recent research aiming to synergistically combine the properties inherent to DNA with those of a number of supramolecular scaffolds. This ultimately creates structures with numerous potential applications in materials science, catalysis and medicine.

  17. Drying of DNA droplets.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiaohua; Li, Bingquan; Petersen, Eric; Seo, Young-Soo; Samuilov, Vladimir A; Chen, Yong; Sokolov, Jonathan C; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2006-07-04

    The evaporation kinetics of droplets containing DNA was studied, as a function of DNA concentration. Drops containing very low DNA concentrations dried by maintaining a constant base, whereas those with high concentration dried with a constant contact angle. To understand this phenomenon, the distribution of the DNA inside the droplet was measured using confocal microscopy. The results indicated that the DNA was condensed mostly on the surface of the droplets. In the case of high concentration droplets, it formed a shell, whereas isolated islands were found for droplets of low DNA concentrations. Rheologic results indicate the formation of a hydro gel in the low concentration drops, whereas phase separation between the self-assembled DNA structures and the water phase occurred at higher concentration.

  18. Modeling Mix in ICF Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Clark, D. S.; Chang, B.; Eder, D. C.; Haan, S. W.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Peterson, J. L.; Robey, H. F.

    2014-10-01

    The observation of ablator material mixing into the hot spot of ICF implosions correlates with reduced yield in National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments. Higher Z ablator material radiatively cools the central hot spot, inhibiting thermonuclear burn. This talk focuses on modeling a ``high-mix'' implosion from the NIC, where greater than 1000 ng of ablator material was inferred to have mixed into the hot spot. Standard post-shot modeling of this implosion does not predict the large amounts of ablator mix necessary to explain the data. Other issues are explored in this talk and sensitivity to the method of radiation transport is found. Compared with radiation diffusion, Sn transport can increase ablation front growth and alter the blow-off dynamics of capsule dust. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  20. Is the tribimaximal mixing accidental?

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas, Mohammed; Smirnov, A. Yu.

    2010-07-01

    The tribimaximal (TBM) mixing is not accidental if structures of the corresponding leptonic mass matrices follow immediately from certain (residual or broken) flavor symmetry. We develop a simple formalism which allows one to analyze effects of deviations of the lepton mixing from TBM on the structure of the neutrino mass matrix and on the underlying flavor symmetry. We show that possible deviations from the TBM mixing can lead to strong modifications of the mass matrix and strong violation of the TBM-mass relations. As a result, the mass matrix may have an 'anarchical' structure with random values of elements or it may have some symmetry that differs from the TBM symmetry. Interesting examples include matrices with texture zeros, matrices with certain 'flavor alignment' as well as hierarchical matrices with a two-component structure, where the dominant and subdominant contributions have different symmetries. This opens up new approaches to understanding the lepton mixing.

  1. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOEpatents

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  2. Cutaneous mixed infections in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Piérard, G E; Piérard-Franchimont, C; Estrada, J A; Rurangirwa, A; Dosal, F L

    1990-02-01

    We report a new case of mixed infection occurring at the same site of the skin in a human immune deficiency virus-positive patient. Hyperkeratotic and crusted erosions contained fusospirochetal organisms, Cryptococcus neoformans, and another unidentified fungus.

  3. Barium Stars and Thermohaline Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Husti, Laura

    2008-01-24

    Barium stars are formed in binary systems through mass transfer from the carbon and s-element rich primary in the AGB phase, to the secondary star which is in a less evolved evolutionary stage. The mixing of the accreted material from the AGB donor with the envelope of the secondary results in a dilution of the s-element abundances. Dilution in red giants is explained by the occurence of the first dredge up, while in case of dwarfs thermohaline mixing would determine it. A comparison between the theoretical predictions of the AGB stellar models and the spectroscopical observations of a large sample of barium stars has been made. Dilution due to thermohaline mixing was taken into account when searching for best fits of the observational data. The importance of thermohaline mixing in barium dwarfs is discussed.

  4. Improved sustained release of antigen from immunostimulatory DNA hydrogel by electrostatic interaction with chitosan.

    PubMed

    Ishii-Mizuno, Yumiko; Umeki, Yuka; Onuki, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yuki; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Nishikawa, Makiya

    2017-01-10

    Immunostimulatory DNA hydrogel (sDNA hydrogel) containing unmethylated cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sequences has been demonstrated to be a useful antigen delivery system, which can effectively induce an antigen-specific immune response through stimulation of the innate immune system. However, relatively rapid release of antigens from the sDNA hydrogel limits its potential. To enhance the potency of the sDNA hydrogel via improvement of its sustained release property, we selected chitosan, a biocompatible cationic polymer which electrostatically interacts with DNA, and mixed it with the sDNA hydrogel. Compared to unmixed sDNA hydrogel, sDNA hydrogel mixed with chitosan (Chitosan-sDNA hydrogel) was more stable, tougher, had more bound water, released a model antigen ovalbumin (OVA) more slowly in vitro, and provided longer retention of OVA at the injection site after intradermal injection into mice. Intradermal immunization of mice with the OVA-loaded Chitosan-sDNA hydrogel resulted in the induction of a higher level of OVA-specific IgG in serum compared with OVA-loaded sDNA hydrogel with no chitosan. These results indicate that the Chitosan-sDNA hydrogel is an improved sustained release formulation for efficient induction of antigen-specific immune responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurements of the binding of a large protein using a substrate density-controlled DNA chip.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shu-ichi; Kanzaki, Takayuki; Nakano, Mariko; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2011-08-15

    The DNA chip that immobilizes DNA oligonucleotides on a solid plate surface is used for many diagnostic applications. For maximizing the detection sensitivity and accuracy, it is important to control the DNA density on a chip surface and establish a convenient method for optimizing the density. Here, the binding of DNA mismatch-binding protein MutS to the DNA substrate on the chip was investigated, which can be applied for high-throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism analysis in a genome. We prepared the DNA chips where the DNA substrate density was changed simply by using a mixed DNA solution. The binding of MutS was significantly influenced by the amount of DNA substrate on the chip as a consequence of steric crowding, and the moderate density that gave the distance between the DNA substrates greater than the size of the protein was appropriate to obtain accurate kinetic parameters. The substrate density-controlled DNA chip prepared using the mixed DNA solution has distinctive advantages for maximizing the detection capability and kinetic analysis of the binding of MutS and probably also other large proteins.

  6. Enhancement of Pathologist's Routine Practice: Reuse of DNA Extracted from Immunostained Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Slides in Downstream Molecular Analysis of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    AL-ATTAS*, ASMAA; ASSIDI*, MOURAD; AL-MAGHRABI, JAUDAH; DALLOL, ASHRAF; SCHULTEN, HANS-JUERGEN; ABU-ELMAGD, MUHAMMAD; CHAUDHARY, ADEEL; ABUZENADAH, ADEL; BUDOWLE, BRUCE; BUHMEIDA, ABDELBASET; AL-QAHTANI, MOHAMMED

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: To date, the conventional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) technique is the gold-standard for preserving histomorphology. Once FFPE tissues are stained, slides are routinely archived along with their blocks at biobanks/hospitals. However, the reuse of fixed and stained biospecimens as DNA source is not a common routine practice worldwide and, thus, indicates the need of studies to investigate the feasibility of extracting DNA from already immunohistochemistry (IHC) FFPE-stained slides and its possible reuse in subsequent downstream molecular analyses. Materials and Methods: FFPE IHC slides from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients were prepared and stored in the CEGMR Biobank. The workflow consists of digitalization of IHC stained slide’s image, removing the slide cover-slip, crude dissection and DNA extraction. Following DNA quality assessment, mutation analysis of CTNNB1 and methylation profile of CDH1 were performed. Results: High-quality DNA was obtained allowing 60% concordance between CDH1 methylation and membranous E-cadherin expression pattern. Clean CTNNB1 DNA chromatograms with evenly-spaced peaks were observed. Conclusion: This study is a proof of concept to recycle and reuse DNA from IHC stained slides with suitable concentration and integrity for further downstream molecular applications. These findings will enhance the pathologists’ knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) towards the use of these biospecimens and support the implementation of this approach in clinical pathology practice. Therefore, the scientific community will benefit from the largest comprehensive database of human fully annotated FFPE biospecimens already available at their disposal in order to demystify the complexity and the heterogeneity of many challenging diseases and foster the transition towards precision medicine. *These Authors contributed equally to this manuscript. PMID:27566658

  7. Enhancement of Pathologist's Routine Practice: Reuse of DNA Extracted from Immunostained Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Slides in Downstream Molecular Analysis of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Al-Attas, Asmaa; Assidi, Mourad; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah; Dallol, Ashraf; Schulten, Hans-Juergen; Abu-Elmagd, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Adeel; Abuzenadah, Adel; Budowle, Bruce; Buhmeida, Abdelbaset; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed

    To date, the conventional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) technique is the gold-standard for preserving histomorphology. Once FFPE tissues are stained, slides are routinely archived along with their blocks at biobanks/hospitals. However, the reuse of fixed and stained biospecimens as DNA source is not a common routine practice worldwide and, thus, indicates the need of studies to investigate the feasibility of extracting DNA from already immunohistochemistry (IHC) FFPE-stained slides and its possible reuse in subsequent downstream molecular analyses. FFPE IHC slides from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients were prepared and stored in the CEGMR Biobank. The workflow consists of digitalization of IHC stained slide's image, removing the slide cover-slip, crude dissection and DNA extraction. Following DNA quality assessment, mutation analysis of CTNNB1 and methylation profile of CDH1 were performed. High-quality DNA was obtained allowing 60% concordance between CDH1 methylation and membranous E-cadherin expression pattern. Clean CTNNB1 DNA chromatograms with evenly-spaced peaks were observed. This study is a proof of concept to recycle and reuse DNA from IHC stained slides with suitable concentration and integrity for further downstream molecular applications. These findings will enhance the pathologists' knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) towards the use of these biospecimens and support the implementation of this approach in clinical pathology practice. Therefore, the scientific community will benefit from the largest comprehensive database of human fully annotated FFPE biospecimens already available at their disposal in order to demystify the complexity and the heterogeneity of many challenging diseases and foster the transition towards precision medicine. Copyright© 2016, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Mixed jamming method for SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-feng; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Yong-sheng

    2007-11-01

    The mixed jamming method of synthetic aperture radar is analyzed and discussed. The methods of active noise and deception jamming and the signal model of transmitting is described. The raw echo signal of SAR and the model of jammed echo signal are expatiated, the characteristic of SAR and the evaluating method of jamming effect are established. Finally, the mixed jamming imaging of SAR is simulated.

  9. Perspectives on dilution jet mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    A microcomputer code which displays 3-D oblique and 2-D plots of the temperature distribution downstream of jets mixing with a confined crossflow has been used to investigate the effects of varying the several independent flow and geometric parameters on the mixing. Temperature profiles calculated with this empirical model are presented to show the effects of orifice size and spacing, momentum flux ratio, density ratio, variable temperature mainstream, flow area convergence, orifice aspect ratio, and opposed and axially staged rows of jets.

  10. [DNA methylation and epigenetics].

    PubMed

    Vaniushin, B F

    2006-09-01

    In eukaryotic cells, nuclear DNA is subject to enzymatic methylation with the formation of 5-methylcytosine residues, mostly within the CG and CNG sequences. In plants and animals this DNA methylation is species-, tissue-, and organelle-specific. It changes (decreases) with age and is regulated by hormones. On the other hand, genome methylation can control hormonal signal. Replicative and post-replicative DNA methylation types are distinguished. They are mediated by multiple DNA methyltransferases with different site-specificity. Replication is accompanied by the appearance of hemimethylated DNA sites. Pronounced asymmetry of the DNA strand methylation disappears to the end of the cell cycle. A model of methylation-regulated DNA replication is proposed. DNA methylation controls all genetic processes in the cell (replication, transcription, DNA repair, recombination, and gene transposition). It is the mechanism of cell differentiation, gene discrimination and silencing. In animals, suppression of DNA methylation stops development (embryogenesis), switches on apoptosis, and is usually lethal. Disruption of DNA methylation pattern results in the malignant cell transformation and serves as one of the early diagnostic features of carcinogenesis. In malignant cell the pattern of DNA methylation, as well as the set of DNA methyltransferase activities, differs from that in normal cell. In plants inhibition of DNA methylation is accompanied by the induction of seed storage and florescence genes. In eukaryotes one and the same gene can be simultaneously methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues. It can be thus suggested, that the plant cell contains at least two different, and probably, interdependent systems of DNA methylation. The first eukaryotic adenine DNA methyltransferase was isolated from plants. This enzyme methylates DNA with the formation of N6-methyladenine residues in the sequence TGATCA (TGATCA-->TGm6ATCA). Plants possess AdoMet-dependent endonucleases

  11. Mixing of discontinuously deforming media.

    PubMed

    Smith, L D; Rudman, M; Lester, D R; Metcalfe, G

    2016-02-01

    Mixing of materials is fundamental to many natural phenomena and engineering applications. The presence of discontinuous deformations-such as shear banding or wall slip-creates new mechanisms for mixing and transport beyond those predicted by classical dynamical systems theory. Here, we show how a novel mixing mechanism combining stretching with cutting and shuffling yields exponential mixing rates, quantified by a positive Lyapunov exponent, an impossibility for systems with cutting and shuffling alone or bounded systems with stretching alone, and demonstrate it in a fluid flow. While dynamical systems theory provides a framework for understanding mixing in smoothly deforming media, a theory of discontinuous mixing is yet to be fully developed. New methods are needed to systematize, explain, and extrapolate measurements on systems with discontinuous deformations. Here, we investigate "webs" of Lagrangian discontinuities and show that they provide a template for the overall transport dynamics. Considering slip deformations as the asymptotic limit of increasingly localised smooth shear, we also demonstrate exactly how some of the new structures introduced by discontinuous deformations are analogous to structures in smoothly deforming systems.

  12. Quantifying mixing using equilibrium reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheat, Philip M.; Posner, Jonathan D.

    2009-03-01

    A method of quantifying equilibrium reactions in a microchannel using a fluorometric reaction of Fluo-4 and Ca2+ ions is presented. Under the proper conditions, equilibrium reactions can be used to quantify fluid mixing without the challenges associated with constituent mixing measures such as limited imaging spatial resolution and viewing angle coupled with three-dimensional structure. Quantitative measurements of CaCl and calcium-indicating fluorescent dye Fluo-4 mixing are measured in Y-shaped microchannels. Reactant and product concentration distributions are modeled using Green's function solutions and a numerical solution to the advection-diffusion equation. Equilibrium reactions provide for an unambiguous, quantitative measure of mixing when the reactant concentrations are greater than 100 times their dissociation constant and the diffusivities are equal. At lower concentrations and for dissimilar diffusivities, the area averaged fluorescence signal reaches a maximum before the species have interdiffused, suggesting that reactant concentrations and diffusivities must be carefully selected to provide unambiguous, quantitative mixing measures. Fluorometric equilibrium reactions work over a wide range of pH and background concentrations such that they can be used for a wide variety of fluid mixing measures including industrial or microscale flows.

  13. Spermine Condenses DNA, but Not RNA Duplexes

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Andrea M.; Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Baker, Nathan; Onufriev, Alexey V.; Pollack, Lois

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between the polyamine spermine and nucleic acids drive important cellular processes. Spermine condenses DNA, and some RNAs such as poly(rA):poly(rU). A large fraction of the spermine present in cells is bound to RNA, but apparently does not condense it. Here, we study the effect of spermine binding to short duplex RNA and DNA and compare our findings with predictions of molecular dynamics simulations. When small numbers of spermine are introduced, RNA with a designed sequence, containing a mixture of 14 GC pairs and 11 AU pairs, resists condensation relative to DNA of an equivalent sequence or to 25 base pair poly(rA):poly(rU) RNA. Comparison of wide-angle x-ray scattering profiles with simulation suggests that spermine is sequestered deep within the major groove of mixed sequence RNA, preventing condensation by limiting opportunities to bridge to other molecules as well as stabilizing the RNA by locking it into a particular conformation. In contrast, for DNA, simulations suggest that spermine binds external to the duplex, offering opportunities for intermolecular interaction. The goal of this study is to explain how RNA can remain soluble, and available for interaction with other molecules in the cell, despite the presence of spermine at concentrations high enough to precipitate DNA.

  14. The unusual and dynamic character of PX-DNA

    DOE PAGES

    Niu, Dong; Jiang, Hualin; Sha, Ruojie; ...

    2015-07-15

    PX-DNA is a four-stranded DNA structure that has been implicated in the recognition of homology, either continuously, or in an every-other-half-turn fashion. Some of the structural features of the molecule have been noted previously, but the structure requires further characterization. Here, we report atomic force microscopic characterization of PX molecules that contain periodically placed biotin groups, enabling the molecule to be labeled by streptavidin molecules at these sites. In comparison with conventional double stranded DNA and with antiparallel DNA double crossover molecules, it is clear that PX-DNA is a more dynamic structure. Moreover, the spacing between the nucleotide pairs alongmore » the helix axis is shorter, suggesting a mixed B/A structure. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicates unusual features in the PX molecule that are absent in both the molecules to which it is compared.« less

  15. The unusual and dynamic character of PX-DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Dong; Jiang, Hualin; Sha, Ruojie; Canary, James W.; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2015-07-15

    PX-DNA is a four-stranded DNA structure that has been implicated in the recognition of homology, either continuously, or in an every-other-half-turn fashion. Some of the structural features of the molecule have been noted previously, but the structure requires further characterization. Here, we report atomic force microscopic characterization of PX molecules that contain periodically placed biotin groups, enabling the molecule to be labeled by streptavidin molecules at these sites. In comparison with conventional double stranded DNA and with antiparallel DNA double crossover molecules, it is clear that PX-DNA is a more dynamic structure. Moreover, the spacing between the nucleotide pairs along the helix axis is shorter, suggesting a mixed B/A structure. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicates unusual features in the PX molecule that are absent in both the molecules to which it is compared.

  16. The unusual and dynamic character of PX-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dong; Jiang, Hualin; Sha, Ruojie; Canary, James W.; Seeman, Nadrian C.

    2015-01-01

    PX-DNA is a four-stranded DNA structure that has been implicated in the recognition of homology, either continuously, or in an every-other-half-turn fashion. Some of the structural features of the molecule have been noted previously, but the structure requires further characterization. Here, we report atomic force microscopic characterization of PX molecules that contain periodically placed biotin groups, enabling the molecule to be labeled by streptavidin molecules at these sites. In comparison with conventional double stranded DNA and with antiparallel DNA double crossover molecules, it is clear that PX-DNA is a more dynamic structure. Furthermore, the spacing between the nucleotide pairs along the helix axis is shorter, suggesting a mixed B/A structure. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicates unusual features in the PX molecule that are absent in both the molecules to which it is compared. PMID:26184876

  17. DNA fingerprinting of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex culture isolates collected in Brazil and spotted onto filter paper.

    PubMed

    Burger, M; Raskin, S; Brockelt, S R; Amthor, B; Geiss, H K; Haas, W H

    1998-02-01

    The usefulness of filter paper for preservation of bacterial cells was shown by mixed-linker DNA fingerprint analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from 77 Brazilian patients. DNA fingerprints of samples spotted onto filter paper and conventional culture material were identical. Thus, filter paper specimens analyzed by an amplification-based typing method provide a new resource for epidemiological studies of infectious diseases.

  18. DNA barcoding as a tool for Great Lakes biological assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enumerating organisms found in water samples in support of biodiversity and biological condition assessment is a mainstay of aquatic ecology, yet can require considerable resources and expertise. DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly ...

  19. DNA barcoding as a tool for Great Lakes biological assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Enumerating organisms found in water samples in support of biodiversity and biological condition assessment is a mainstay of aquatic ecology, yet can require considerable resources and expertise. DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly ...

  20. Forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Jessica; Lehman, Donald C

    2012-01-01

    Before the routine use of DNA profiling, blood typing was an important forensic tool. However, blood typing was not very discriminating. For example, roughly 30% of the United States population has type A-positive blood. Therefore, if A-positive blood were found at a crime scene, it could have come from 30% of the population. DNA profiling has a much better ability for discrimination. Forensic laboratories no longer routinely determine blood type. If blood is found at a crime scene, DNA profiling is performed. From Jeffrey's discovery of DNA fingerprinting to the development of PCR of STRs to the formation of DNA databases, our knowledge of DNA and DNA profiling have expanded greatly. Also, the applications for which we use DNA profiling have increased. DNA profiling is not just used for criminal case work, but it has expanded to encompass paternity testing, disaster victim identification, monitoring bone marrow transplants, detecting fetal cells in a mother's blood, tracing human history, and a multitude of other areas. The future of DNA profiling looks expansive with the development of newer instrumentation and techniques.

  1. Enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Plevani, P; Chang, L M

    1977-01-01

    Partially purified yeast RNA polymerases (RNA nucleotidyltransferases) initiate DNA synthesis by yeast DNA polymerase (DNA nucleotidyltransferase) I and to a lesser extent yeast DNA polymerase II in the replication of single-stranded DNA. The enzymatic initiation of DNA synthesis on phage fd DNA template occurs with dNTPs alone and is further stimulated by the presence of rNTPs in DNA polymerase I reactions. The presence of rNTPs has no effect on the RNA polymerase initiation of the DNA polymerase II reaction. RNA polymerases I and III are more efficient in initiation of DNA synthesis than RNA polymerase II. Analyses of the products of fd DNA replication show noncovalent linkage between the newly synthesized DNA and the template DNA, and covalent linkage between the newly synthesized RNA and DNA. PMID:325562

  2. Functional DNA Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao

    The discovery of DNA helical structure opened the door of modern molecular biology. Ned Seeman utilized DNA as building block to construct different nanoscale materials, and introduced a new field, know as DNA nanotechnology. After several decades of development, different DNA structures had been created, with different dimension, different morphology and even with complex curvatures. In addition, after construction of enough amounts DNA structure candidates, DNA structure template, with excellent spatial addressability, had been used to direct the assembly of different nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and proteins, to produce different functional nanomaterials. However there are still many challenges to fabricate functional DNA nanostructures. The first difficulty is that the present finite sized template dimension is still very small, usually smaller than 100nm, which will limit the application for large amount of nanomaterials assembly or large sized nanomaterials assembly. Here we tried to solve this problem through developing a new method, superorigami, to construct finite sized DNA structure with much larger dimension, which can be as large as 500nm. The second problem will be explored the ability of DNA structure to assemble inorganic nanomaterials for novel photonic or electronic properties. Here we tried to utilize DNA Origami method to assemble AuNPs with controlled 3D spacial position for possible chiral photonic complex. We also tried to assemble SWNT with discrete length for possible field effect transistor device. In addition, we tried to mimic in vivo compartment with DNA structure to study internalized enzyme behavior. From our results, constructed DNA cage origami can protect encapsulated enzyme from degradation, and internalized enzyme activity can be boosted for up to 10 folds. In summary, DNA structure can serve as an ideal template for construction of functional nanomaterials with lots of possibilities to be explored.

  3. DNA methylation profiles at birth and child ADHD symptoms.

    PubMed

    van Mil, Nina H; Steegers-Theunissen, Régine P M; Bouwland-Both, Marieke I; Verbiest, Michael M P J; Rijlaarsdam, Jolien; Hofman, Albert; Steegers, Eric A P; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Stolk, Lisette; Eilers, Paul H C; Uitterlinden, André G; Tiemeier, Henning

    2014-02-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and highly heritable psychiatric disorder. In addition, early life environmental factors contribute to the occurrence of ADHD. Recently, DNA methylation has emerged as a mechanism potentially mediating genetic and environmental effects. Here, we investigated whether newborn DNA methylation patterns of selected candidate genes involved in psychiatric disorders or fetal growth are associated with ADHD symptoms in childhood. Participants were 426 children from a large population based cohort of Dutch national origin. Behavioral data were obtained at age 6 years with the Child Behavior Checklist. For the current study, 11 regions at 7 different genes were selected. DNA methylation levels of cord blood DNA were measured for the 11 regions combined and for each region separately. We examined the association between DNA methylation levels at different regions and ADHD symptoms with linear mixed models. DNA methylation levels were negatively associated with ADHD symptom score in the overall analysis of all 11 regions. This association was largely explained by associations of DRD4 and 5-HTT regions. Other candidate genes showed no association between DNA methylation levels and ADHD symptom score. Associations between DNA methylation levels and ADHD symptom score were attenuated by co-occurring Oppositional defiant disorder and total symptoms. Lower DNA methylation levels of the 7 genes assessed at birth, were associated with more ADHD symptoms of the child at 6 years of age. Further studies are needed to confirm our results and to investigate the possible underlying mechanism.

  4. A DNA-Based Encryption Method Based on Two Biological Axioms of DNA Chip and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Amplification Techniques.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunpeng; Wang, Zhiwen; Wang, Zhenzhen; Liu, Xin; Yuan, Xiaojing

    2017-09-27

    Researchers have gained a deeper understanding of DNA-based encryption and its effectiveness in enhancing information security in recent years. However, there are many theoretical and technical issues about DNA-based encryption that need to be addressed before it can be effectively used in the field of security. Currently, the most popular DNA-based encryption schemes are based on traditional cryptography and the integration of existing DNA technology. These schemes are not completely based on DNA computing and biotechnology. Herein, as inspired by nature, encryption based on DNA has been developed, which is, in turn, based on two fundamental biological axioms about DNA sequencing: 1) DNA sequencing is difficult under the conditions of not knowing the correct sequencing primers and probes, and 2) without knowing the correct probe, it is difficult to decipher precisely and sequence the information of unknown and mixed DNA/peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes, which only differ in nucleotide sequence, arranged on DNA chips (microarrays). In essence, when creating DNA-based encryption by means of biological technologies, such as DNA chips and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification, the encryption method discussed herein cannot be decrypted, unless the DNA/PNA probe or PCR amplification is known. The biological analysis, mathematical analysis, and simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of the method, which provides much stronger security and reliability than that of traditional encryption methods. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Investigating the Potential Use of Environmental DNA (eDNA) for Genetic Monitoring of Marine Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Sveegaard, Signe; Wahlberg, Magnus; Kielgast, Jos; Kyhn, Line A.; Salling, Andreas B.; Galatius, Anders; Orlando, Ludovic; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.

    2012-01-01

    The exploitation of non-invasive samples has been widely used in genetic monitoring of terrestrial species. In aquatic ecosystems, non-invasive samples such as feces, shed hair or skin, are less accessible. However, the use of environmental DNA (eDNA) has recently been shown to be an effective tool for genetic monitoring of species presence in freshwater ecosystems. Detecting species in the marine environment using eDNA potentially offers a greater challenge due to the greater dilution, amount of mixing and salinity compared with most freshwater ecosystems. To determine the potential use of eDNA for genetic monitoring we used specific primers that amplify short mitochondrial DNA sequences to detect the presence of a marine mammal, the harbor porpoise, Phocoena phocoena, in a controlled environment and in natural marine locations. The reliability of the genetic detections was investigated by comparing with detections of harbor porpoise echolocation clicks by static acoustic monitoring devices. While we were able to consistently genetically detect the target species under controlled conditions, the results from natural locations were less consistent and detection by eDNA was less successful than acoustic detections. However, at one site we detected long-finned pilot whale, Globicephala melas, a species rarely sighted in the Baltic. Therefore, with optimization aimed towards processing larger volumes of seawater this method has the potential to compliment current visual and acoustic methods of species detection of marine mammals. PMID:22952587

  6. DNA nanotech: Expanding the repertoire of DNA for the assembly of nanoscale objects and electrical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlman, Richard Peter

    Much recent interest has focused on DNA as a material for the construction of objects and the templating of other materials on the nanometer to micrometer scale. Such constructions have made use of the recognition of "complementary" nucleotide sequence by single-stranded stretches of DNA in the formation of double helices. The ability of DNA double helices to act as a semi-conductor for electron transfer has opened more opportunities for using DNA in nanoscale devices. This work describes several advancements involving structural and functional aspect of DNA based nanotechnologies. We have developed a new approach to assemble DNA nanostructures in a cation dependent manner. Association is via the formation of guanine quartets from two G-G mismatch domains within a duplex DNA framework. Association can be regulated by the addition or removal of cation species that promote guanine quartet formation (i.e. K+ or Sr2+). We have also demonstrated that these domains can be 'programmed' to be self-specific in mixed solutions by patterning the G·G mismatches into distinct domains. We have evaluated the process of charge transfer through immobile DNA junctions. This work compares anthraquinone- and rhodium-based methods to induce charge transfer through DNA and identifies some pitfalls in one of the prominently used systems. We have also demonstrated that the conformational transitions of folded DNA structures, more complex than simple double helical DNA, can be utilized in regulating charge transfer. We have successfully constructed 'electrical on/off switches' composed of DNA, which are modulated by the presence or absence of particular compounds in solution. Switches that are modulated by the small molecule adenosine and as well as ones modulated by short oligonucleotides have been assembled. The construction and demonstration of their operation now opens a new window of opportunity for the development of DNA detector systems, which could be directly coupled to

  7. The DNA-polymerase-X family: controllers of DNA quality?

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Kristijan; Shevelev, Igor; Hübscher, Ulrich

    2004-12-01

    Synthesis of the genetic material of the cell is achieved by a large number of DNA polymerases. Besides replicating the genome, they are involved in DNA-repair processes. Recent studies have indicated that certain DNA-polymerase-X-family members can synthesize unusual DNA structures, and we propose that these DNA structures might serve as 'flag wavers' for the induction of DNA-repair and/or DNA-damage-checkpoint pathways.

  8. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: Match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to biotic condition assessment and non-native species early-detection monitoring. However, the abi...

  9. Potential for DNA-based identification of Great Lakes fauna: Match and mismatch between taxa inventories and DNA barcode libraries

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers the potential to greatly reduce the need for resource-intensive morphological identification, which would be of value both to biotic condition assessment and non-native species early-detection monitoring. However, the abi...

  10. DNA damage induced by low-energy electrons: conversion of thymine to 5,6-dihydrothymine in the oligonucleotide trimer TpTpT.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeunsoo; Li, Zejun; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon; Wagner, J Richard

    2011-02-01

    Low-energy electrons (LEE) induce single- and double-strand breaks in DNA. To investigate the mechanism of LEE-induced DNA damage, nucleotides and short oligonucleotide were irradiated with monoenergetic electrons in the solid state and the modifications were observed by chemical analyses. With 10 eV electrons and TpTpT as the target, approximately one-third of the total damage of TpTpT involves cleavage of the phosphodiester-sugar bond (C-O) and the N-glycosidic bond (C-N). Here we focus on the remaining two-thirds of the damage. The major products were observed to elute between TpT and TpTpT on the HPLC chromatogram. Of these products, three modifications were identified as XpTpT, TpXpT and TpTpX, where X  =  5,6-dihydrothymine, on the basis of comparison with standard compounds using HPLC and mass spectrometry. These results suggest that 5,6-dihydrothymine is a major product of the reaction of LEE with DNA.

  11. Mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II)/Zn(II) ions containing (m-)/(p-) carboxylato phenyl azo pentane 2,4-dione and 2,2'-bipyridine/1,10 phenanthroline: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, nuclease and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Md Amin; Kumari, Niraj; Singh, Kanhaiya; Singh, Kiran; Mishra, Lallan

    2016-01-05

    Metal complexes of type [Cu(L1H)2(bpy)] (1), [Zn(L1H)2(bpy)] (2), [Cu(L2H)2(bpy)] (3) and [Cu(L2H)2(Phen)] (4) (L1H2=3-[N'-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, L2H2=4-[N'-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, Phen=1,10 phenanthroline) are synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, electronic absorption and emission) and elemental analysis data. The assembly of the complexes involving intramolecular H-bonding is displayed using corresponding crystal structure. Binding of the complexes separately with Calf Thymus DNA is monitored using UV-vis spectral titrations. The displacement of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to DNA by the complexes, in phosphate buffer solution (pH∼7.2) is monitored using fluorescence spectral titrations. Nuclease activity of the complexes follow the order 4>3>1>2. The gel electrophoretic mobility assay measurement in presence of minor groove binder 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), suggests that complexes preferably bind with the minor groove of DNA. Topoisomerase I inhibitory activity of the complexes 3 and 4 inhibit topoisomerase I activity with IC50 values of 112 and 87μM respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Mixed ligand complexes of Cu(II)/Zn(II) ions containing (m-)/(p-) carboxylato phenyl azo pentane 2,4-dione and 2,2‧-bipyridine/1,10 phenanthroline: Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, nuclease and topoisomerase I inhibitory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Amin; Kumari, Niraj; Singh, Kanhaiya; Singh, Kiran; Mishra, Lallan

    2016-01-01

    Metal complexes of type [Cu(L1H)2(bpy)] (1), [Zn(L1H)2(bpy)] (2), [Cu(L2H)2(bpy)] (3) and [Cu(L2H)2(Phen)] (4) (L1H2 = 3-[N‧-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, L2H2 = 4-[N‧-(1-acetyl-2-oxo-propylidene)-hydrazino]-benzoic acid, bpy = 2,2‧-bipyridine, Phen = 1,10 phenanthroline) are synthesized and characterized using spectroscopic techniques (FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, electronic absorption and emission) and elemental analysis data. The assembly of the complexes involving intramolecular H-bonding is displayed using corresponding crystal structure. Binding of the complexes separately with Calf Thymus DNA is monitored using UV-vis spectral titrations. The displacement of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to DNA by the complexes, in phosphate buffer solution (pH ∼ 7.2) is monitored using fluorescence spectral titrations. Nuclease activity of the complexes follow the order 4 > 3 > 1 > 2. The gel electrophoretic mobility assay measurement in presence of minor groove binder 4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), suggests that complexes preferably bind with the minor groove of DNA. Topoisomerase I inhibitory activity of the complexes 3 and 4 inhibit topoisomerase I activity with IC50 values of 112 and 87 μM respectively.

  13. Formation of DNA adducts in the skin of psoriasis patients, in human skin in organ culture, and in mouse skin and lung following topical application of coal-tar and juniper tar.

    PubMed

    Schoket, B; Horkay, I; Kósa, A; Páldeák, L; Hewer, A; Grover, P L; Phillips, D H

    1990-02-01

    Preparations of coal-tar and juniper tar (cade oil) that are used in the treatment of psoriasis are known to contain numerous potentially carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). Evidence of covalent binding to DNA by components of these mixtures was sought in a) human skin biopsy samples from 12 psoriasis patients receiving therapy with these agents, b) human skin explants maintained in organ culture and treated topically with the tars, and c) the skin and lungs of mice treated with repeated doses of the formulations following the regimen used in the clinic. DNA was isolated from the human and mouse tissues and digested enzymically to mononucleotides. 32P-Post-labeling analysis revealed the presence of aromatic DNA adducts in the biopsy samples at levels of up to 0.4 fmol total adducts/microgram DNA. Treatment of human skin in organ culture produced similar levels of adducts, while treatment with dithranol, a non-mutagenic therapeutic agent, resulted in chromatograms indistinguishable from those from untreated controls. In mouse skin, coal-tar ointment and juniper tar gave similar DNA adduct levels, with a similar time-course of removal: maximum levels (0.5 fmol/microgram DNA) at 24 h after the final treatment declined rapidly to 0.05 fmol/microgram at 7 d, thereafter declining slowly over the succeeding 25 d. However, while coal-tar ointment produced only very low levels of adducts in mouse lung (less than 0.03 fmol/microgram DNA), juniper tar produced adducts at a high level (0.7 fmol/microgram DNA) that were persistent in this tissue. These results provide direct evidence for the formation of potentially carcinogenic DNA damage in human and mouse tissue by components of these therapeutic tar preparations.

  14. GHEP-ISFG collaborative exercise on mixture profiles of autosomal STRs (GHEP-MIX01, GHEP-MIX02 and GHEP-MIX03): results and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Crespillo, M; Barrio, P A; Luque, J A; Alves, C; Aler, M; Alessandrini, F; Andrade, L; Barretto, R M; Bofarull, A; Costa, S; García, M A; García, O; Gaviria, A; Gladys, A; Gorostiza, A; Hernández, A; Herrera, M; Hombreiro, L; Ibarra, A A; Jiménez, M J; Luque, G M; Madero, P; Martínez-Jarreta, B; Masciovecchio, M V; Modesti, N M; Moreno, F; Pagano, S; Pedrosa, S; Plaza, G; Prat, E; Puente, J; Rendo, F; Ribeiro, T; Sala, A; Santamaría, E; Saragoni, V G; Whittle, M R

    2014-05-01

    One of the main objectives of the Spanish and Portuguese-Speaking Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (GHEP-ISFG) is to promote and contribute to the development and dissemination of scientific knowledge in the area of forensic genetics. Due to this fact, GHEP-ISFG holds different working commissions that are set up to develop activities in scientific aspects of general interest. One of them, the Mixture Commission of GHEP-ISFG, has organized annually, since 2009, a collaborative exercise on analysis and interpretation of autosomal short tandem repeat (STR) mixture profiles. Until now, three exercises have been organized (GHEP-MIX01, GHEP-MIX02 and GHEP-MIX03), with 32, 24 and 17 participant laboratories respectively. The exercise aims to give a general vision by addressing, through the proposal of mock cases, aspects related to the edition of mixture profiles and the statistical treatment. The main conclusions obtained from these exercises may be summarized as follows. Firstly, the data show an increased tendency of the laboratories toward validation of DNA mixture profiles analysis following international recommendations (ISO/IEC 17025:2005). Secondly, the majority of discrepancies are mainly encountered in stutters positions (53.4%, 96.0% and 74.9%, respectively for the three editions). On the other hand, the results submitted reveal the importance of performing duplicate analysis by using different kits in order to reduce errors as much as possible. Regarding the statistical aspect (GHEP-MIX02 and 03), all participants employed the likelihood ratio (LR) parameter to evaluate the statistical compatibility and the formulas employed were quite similar. When the hypotheses to evaluate the LR value were locked by the coordinators (GHEP-MIX02) the results revealed a minor number of discrepancies that were mainly due to clerical reasons. However, the GHEP-MIX03 exercise allowed the participants to freely come up with their own hypotheses to

  15. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success.

  16. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  17. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    PubMed

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  18. DNA topology and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  19. DNA supercoiling during transcription.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D

    2016-11-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  20. Rifampin and vaccinia DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, M

    1977-01-01

    The effect of rifampin on the replication of vaccinia DNA was studied in mouse L cells by a cytochemical techinque and by alkaline sucrose sedimentation analysis of newly synthesized viral DNA molecules. By the use of a fluorescent DNA-binding compound (Hoechst 33258), the sequential appearance, size, and location of the viral "factories" in rifampin-treated, virus-infected cells were found to be indistinguishable from those observed in untreated, infected cells. Sedimentation analysis in alkaline scurose gradients of the viral DNA molecules labeled in pulse-chase experiments showed that formation of small fragments, elongation into "intermediate"-sized molecules, and maturation into full-length viral DNA and, finally, into cross-linked viral DNA molecules occurred in the absence or presence of rifampin. The results support the view that the primary effect of the drug is related to assembly or morphogenesis. Images PMID:833950