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Sample records for mixed epithelial stromal

  1. Mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Adsay, N V; Eble, J N; Srigley, J R; Jones, E C; Grignon, D J

    2000-07-01

    receptors in three. The distinctive clinicopathologic characteristics of these lesions warrant their classification as a separate category of kidney tumor. We suggest the descriptive term "mixed epithelial and stromal tumor" for this group until its nature and relationship to other kidney lesions are further clarified. Its preponderance in females with a history of long-term estrogen replacement and the history of long-term sex-steroid use in the only male patient, combined with the frequent content of estrogen and progesterone receptors in the spindle cells, suggest that the hormonal milieu plays a role in the evolution of these tumors. The clinical and pathologic parallels with mucinous cystic tumors of pancreas and liver raise the possibility of a common pathogenetic mechanism that may be linked to the periductal fetal mesenchyme. We think this entity is a benign composite neoplasm in which stroma and epithelium are both integral neoplastic components.

  2. A mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney in a ringtail lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Muller, S; Oevermann, A; Wenker, C; Altermatt, H J; Robert, N

    2007-03-01

    Primary renal tumors are rare neoplasms in nonhuman primates. This report describes a mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney (MESTK) in a 14.5-year-old female ringtail lemur. The well-demarcated, solid, and cystic mass was located in the pelvis of the left kidney and consisted histologically of both epithelial and mesenchymal components. The mesenchymal cells were arranged in fascicles around cysts lined by a well-differentiated epithelium. Neither the mesenchymal nor the epithelial parts showed significant nuclear atypia or mitotic figures. To our knowledge, only 1 similar case, classified as adenoleiomyofibromatous hamartoma, has been reported in a ringtail lemur. In humans this tumor affects predominantly perimenopausal women and can express estrogen and progesterone receptors. However, neither estrogen nor progesterone receptors could be identified by immunohistochemistry in the tumor of the present ringtail lemur. Therefore, a hormonal mechanism could not be demonstrated in this case.

  3. Cystic nephroma/mixed epithelial stromal tumor: a benign neoplasm with potential for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Belinda L; Abern, Michael; Garzon, Steven; Setty, Suman

    2015-05-01

    Cystic nephroma (CN) is a rare, benign, renal neoplasm composed of epithelial and stromal elements. Only about 200 cases have been reported since 1892 and recurrence has rarely been observed. We report a 32-year-old Hispanic woman, with a history of a right, complex cystic, renal mass treated by robotic decortication 2 years ago, who presented with flank pain, hematuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection. A magnetic resonance imaging study showed a 3.4-cm multicystic lesion with thickened septa and enhancement at the right kidney. The partial nephrectomy specimen revealed a well-circumscribed, multicystic tumor abutting the renal pelvis, with thick septa and smooth walls, filled with clear fluid. Microscopic examination showed variably sized cysts lined by cuboidal epithelium with focal hobnailing, without significant cytologic atypia and mitosis. The epithelial lining was positive for CK19, high molecular weight cytokeratin, and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase suggesting a primitive tubular epithelial phenotype. Primitive glomeruli-like structures were also present. The ovarian-like stroma was condensed around the cysts and was variably cellular with areas of muscle differentiation and thick-walled vessels. The stroma was positive for desmin, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and CD10. We suggest that CN represents a variable mixture of epithelial and stromal elements, immature glomerular, tubular, muscle, and vascular elements, which may be present in variable proportions creating a spectrum of lesions previously described as CN and mixed epithelial and stromal tumors (MEST). This case emphasizes that CN/MEST clinically/radiologically mimics other cystic renal neoplasms, especially cystic renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma, necessitating histopathological examination and immunohistochemial studies for definitive diagnosis. Additionally, CN has the tendency to recur when not completely excised initially.

  4. Mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney (MEST) simulating an upper tract TCC.

    PubMed

    Sountoulides, Petros; Koptsis, Michail; Metaxa, Linda; Theodosiou, Alexandros; Kikidakis, Dimitrios; Filintatzi, Chrysa; Paschalidis, Konstantinos

    2012-02-01

    We present a rare and interesting case of a mixed epithelial and stromal tumour (MEST) of the kidney. The case is unique as it involves a male patient with no history of hormonal therapy presenting with a filling defect in the renal collecting system and positive urine cytology. The patient was diagnosed with transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis and subjected to nephroureterectomy, which revealed a solid tumour arising from the lower calyces and extending into the renal pelvis and upper ureter. Pathology revealed a MEST. The patient was disease-free at the 6-month follow-up.

  5. Engineering epithelial-stromal interactions in vitro for toxicology assessment.

    PubMed

    Belair, David G; Abbott, Barbara D

    2017-03-08

    Crosstalk between epithelial and stromal cells drives the morphogenesis of ectodermal organs during development and promotes normal mature adult epithelial tissue homeostasis. Epithelial-stromal interactions (ESIs) have historically been examined using mammalian models and ex vivo tissue recombination. Although these approaches have elucidated signaling mechanisms underlying embryonic morphogenesis processes and adult mammalian epithelial tissue function, they are limited by the availability of tissue, low throughput, and human developmental or physiological relevance. In this review, we describe how bioengineered ESIs, using either human stem cells or co-cultures of human primary epithelial and stromal cells, have enabled the development of human in vitro epithelial tissue models that recapitulate the architecture, phenotype, and function of adult human epithelial tissues. We discuss how the strategies used to engineer mature epithelial tissue models in vitro could be extrapolated to instruct the design of organotypic culture models that can recapitulate the structure of embryonic ectodermal tissues and enable the in vitro assessment of events critical to organ/tissue morphogenesis. Given the importance of ESIs towards normal epithelial tissue development and function, such models present a unique opportunity for toxicological screening assays to incorporate ESIs to assess the impact of chemicals on mature and developing epidermal tissues.

  6. Depth-cumulated epithelial redox ratio and stromal collagen quantity as quantitative intrinsic indicators for differentiating normal, inflammatory, and dysplastic epithelial tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2010-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy was used to isolate the intrinsic emission contribution of epithelial cellular origins and stromal collagen in normal, inflammatory, and dysplastic epithelial tissues, and quantify the depth-cumulated epithelial redox ratio and stromal collagen quantity. It was found that both inflammatory and dysplastic epithelial tissues display a large decrease in stromal collagen quantity but have very different epithelial redox ratio. These results suggest that probing differences in epithelial redox ratio in addition to stromal collagen quantity can serve as quantitative intrinsic indicators for differentiating normal, inflammatory, and dysplastic epithelial tissues.

  7. An improved method for isolation of epithelial and stromal cells from the human endometrium

    PubMed Central

    MASUDA, Ayako; KATOH, Noriko; NAKABAYASHI, Kazuhiko; KATO, Kiyoko; SONODA, Kenzo; KITADE, Mari; TAKEDA, Satoru; HATA, Kenichiro; TOMIKAWA, Junko

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to improve the efficiency of isolating endometrial epithelial and stromal cells (EMECs and EMSCs) from the human endometrium. We revealed by immunohistochemical staining that the large tissue fragments remaining after collagenase treatment, which are usually discarded after the first filtration in the conventional protocol, consisted of glandular epithelial and stromal cells. Therefore, we established protease treatment and cell suspension conditions to dissociate single cells from the tissue fragments and isolated epithelial (EPCAM-positive) and stromal (CD13-positive) cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Four independent experiments showed that, on average, 1.2 × 106 of EMECs and 2.8 × 106 EMSCs were isolated from one hysterectomy specimen. We confirmed that the isolated cells presented transcriptomic features highly similar to those of epithelial and stromal cells obtained by the conventional method. Our improved protocol facilitates future studies to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the dynamic changes of the endometrium during the menstrual cycle. PMID:26853786

  8. Stromal-epithelial interaction study: The effect of corneal epithelial cells on growth factor expression in stromal cells using organotypic culture model.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takeshi; Shiraishi, Atsushi; Hara, Yuko; Kadota, Yuko; Yang, Lujun; Inoue, Tomoyuki; Shirakata, Yuji; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    Interactions between stromal and epithelial cells play important roles in the development, homeostasis, and pathological conditions of the cornea. Soluble cytokines are critical factors in stromal-epithelial interactions, and growth factors secreted from corneal stromal cells contribute to the regulation of proliferation and differentiation of corneal epithelial cells (CECs). However, the manner in which the expression of growth factors is regulated in stromal cells has not been completely determined. To study stromal-epithelial cell interactions, we used an organotypic culture model. Human or rabbit CECs (HCECs or RCECs) were cultured on amniotic membranes placed on human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) embedded in a collagen gel. The properties of the organotypic culture were examined by hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunofluorescence. In the organotypic culture, HCECs or RCECs were stratified into two-three layers after five days and five-seven layers after nine days. However, stratification was not observed when the HCECs were seeded on a collagen gel without fibroblasts. K3/K12 were expressed on day 9. The HCF-embedded collagen gels were collected on days 3, 5, or 9 after seeding the RCECs, and mRNA expression of growth factors FGF7, HGF, NGF, EGF, TGF-α, SCF, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and TGF-β3 were quantified by real-time PCR. mRNA expression of the growth factors in HCFs cultured with RCECs were compared with those cultured without RCECs, as well as in monolayer cultures. mRNA expression of TGF-α was markedly increased in HCFs cultured with RCECs. However, mRNA expression of the TGF-β family was suppressed in HCFs cultured with RCECs. Principal component analysis revealed that mRNA expression of the growth factors in HCFs were generally similar when they were cultured with RCECs. In organotypic cultures, the morphological changes in the CECs and the expression patterns of the growth factors in the stromal cells clearly demonstrated stromal-epithelial cell

  9. Transcriptome analysis of epithelial and stromal contributions to mammogenesis in three week prepartum cows.

    PubMed

    Casey, Theresa; Dover, Heather; Liesman, James; DeVries, Lindsey; Kiupel, Matti; Vandehaar, Michael; Plaut, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of bovine mammary development has provided insight into regulation of mammogenesis. However, previous studies primarily examined expression of epithelial and stromal tissues combined, and consequently did not account for tissue specific contribution to mammary development. Our objective was to identify differences in gene expression in epithelial and intralobular stromal compartments. Tissue was biopsied from non-lactating dairy cows 3 weeks prepartum, cut into explants and incubated for 2 hr with insulin and hydrocortisone. Epithelial and intralobular stromal tissues were isolated with laser capture microdissection. Global gene expression was measured with Bovine Affymetrix GeneChips, and data were preprocessed using RMA method. Moderated t-tests from gene-specific linear model analysis with cell type as a fixed effect showed more than 3,000 genes were differentially expressed between tissues (P<0.05; FDR<0.17). Analysis of epithelial and stromal transcriptomes using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) showed that epithelial and stromal cells contributed distinct molecular signatures. Epithelial signatures were enriched with gene sets for protein synthesis, metabolism and secretion. Stromal signatures were enriched with genes that encoded molecules important to signaling, extracellular matrix composition and remodeling. Transcriptome differences also showed evidence for paracrine interactions between tissues in stimulation of IGF1 signaling pathway, stromal reaction, angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and immune response. Molecular signatures point to the dynamic role the stroma plays in prepartum mammogenesis and highlight the importance of examining the roles of cell types within the mammary gland when targeting therapies and studying mechanisms that affect milk production.

  10. Transcriptome Analysis of Epithelial and Stromal Contributions to Mammogenesis in Three Week Prepartum Cows

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Theresa; Dover, Heather; Liesman, James; DeVries, Lindsey; Kiupel, Matti; VandeHaar, Michael; Plaut, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of bovine mammary development has provided insight into regulation of mammogenesis. However, previous studies primarily examined expression of epithelial and stromal tissues combined, and consequently did not account for tissue specific contribution to mammary development. Our objective was to identify differences in gene expression in epithelial and intralobular stromal compartments. Tissue was biopsied from non-lactating dairy cows 3 weeks prepartum, cut into explants and incubated for 2 hr with insulin and hydrocortisone. Epithelial and intralobular stromal tissues were isolated with laser capture microdissection. Global gene expression was measured with Bovine Affymetrix GeneChips, and data were preprocessed using RMA method. Moderated t-tests from gene-specific linear model analysis with cell type as a fixed effect showed more than 3,000 genes were differentially expressed between tissues (P<0.05; FDR<0.17). Analysis of epithelial and stromal transcriptomes using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) showed that epithelial and stromal cells contributed distinct molecular signatures. Epithelial signatures were enriched with gene sets for protein synthesis, metabolism and secretion. Stromal signatures were enriched with genes that encoded molecules important to signaling, extracellular matrix composition and remodeling. Transcriptome differences also showed evidence for paracrine interactions between tissues in stimulation of IGF1 signaling pathway, stromal reaction, angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and immune response. Molecular signatures point to the dynamic role the stroma plays in prepartum mammogenesis and highlight the importance of examining the roles of cell types within the mammary gland when targeting therapies and studying mechanisms that affect milk production. PMID:21829467

  11. Modulation of Mammary Stromal Cell Lactate Dynamics by Ambient Glucose and Epithelial Factors.

    PubMed

    Tobar, Nicolas; Porras, Omar; Smith, Patricio C; Barros, L Felipe; Martínez, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a risk factor for a variety of human cancers. Increased access to glucose and that tumor metabolize glucose by a glycolytic process even in the presence of oxygen (Warburg effect), provide a framework to analyze a particular set of metabolic adaptation mechanisms that may explain this phenomenon. In the present work, using a mammary stromal cell line derived from healthy tissue that was subjected to a long-term culture in low (5 mM) or high (25 mM) glucose, we analyzed kinetic parameters of lactate transport using a FRET biosensor. Our results indicate that the glucose pre-culture and soluble epithelial factors constitute a stimulus for lactate stromal production, factors that also modify the kinetic parameters and the monocarboxylate transporters expression in stromal cells. We also observed a vectorial flux of lactate from stroma to epithelial cells in a co-culture setting and found that the uptake of lactate by epithelial cells correlates with the degree of malignancy. Glucose preconditioning of the stromal cell stimulated epithelial motility. Our findings suggest that lactate generated by stromal cells in the high glucose condition stimulate epithelial migration. Overall, our results support the notion that glucose not only provides a substrate for tumor nutrition but also behaves as a signal promoting malignancy. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 136-144, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Epithelial and Stromal Spectral Imaging for Rapid Surgical Margin Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    for key diagnostic classes. The optical system samples mesoscopic tissue volumes; therefore, microscopic segmentation of glandular , stromal and...heterogeneous, but imaging-pathology correlates revealed that this variation had a spatial pattern that reflected the organization of glandular structures...characterized by marked expansion of glandular units by neo-plastic cells, compressing (but not invading) the surrounding stromal environment

  13. Stromal-epithelial dynamics in response to fractionated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, Muqeem Abdul

    effective at treating the reactive stroma. We can kill the cancer cells at the standard rate (180 cGy/fraction), but we have found the larger fractions specifically inhibit wound healing mechanisms by inactivating stromal fibroblasts. The long term goal would be to reduce recurrence rates for early stage breast cancer by treating postsurgical regions most likely to harbor residual tumor cells. Ionizing radiation stress and its effect on ECM mediated cellular functions continues to be an evolving area of research. This study is an initial step in my career plans to study stromal modulation of epithelial tumors. It is also my career goal to integrate basic science experiments and engineering tools into clinical practice.

  14. Stromal-epithelial paracrine interactions in the neoplastic rat and human prostate.

    PubMed

    Djakiew, D; Pflug, B; Onoda, M

    1993-01-01

    Homotypic paracrine interactions in the rat and human prostate have been investigated using prostatic stromal cells and neoplastic epithelial cells (PA-III, rat; TSU-pr1, human). Secretory proteins prepared from each cell type were used to determine the dose dependent regulation of growth (DNA synthesis) of the corresponding homotypic responder cell, as determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation. PA-III secretory protein stimulated rat stromal cell proliferation by 1.8-fold. This stimulatory activity of PA-III protein on stromal cell proliferation was partially reduced (approximately 35%) by treatment with nerve growth factor (NGF) antibody, whereas neither acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) antibody nor basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) antibody immunoneutralized the stimulatory activity of PA-III cell protein. In the corresponding opposite interaction, rat stromal cell protein modulated PA-III growth in a biphasic manner. At lower concentrations of stromal cell protein (1.25 micrograms/ml) PA-III cell growth was stimulated by 1.6-fold, whereas at higher concentrations of protein (100 micrograms/ml) PA-III cell growth was inhibited to 60%. Treatment of the stromal cell protein (1.25 micrograms/ml and 100 micrograms/ml) with NGF antibody reduced PA-III cell relative growth to approximately 30% and 5%, respectively. bFGF antibody treatment of stromal cell protein at 1.25 micrograms/ml did not influence relative growth, whereas bFGF antibody treatment of 100 micrograms/ml stromal cell protein reduced relative growth by an additional 40%. Treatment of the stromal cell protein (1.25 micrograms/ml and 100 micrograms/ml) with aFGF antibodies reduced relative growth from that observed at these two protein concentrations by approximately 50% in both cases. Human epithelial TSU-pr1 protein stimulated human stromal cell proliferation approximately 1.7-fold. Treatment of TSU-pr1 protein with NGF antibody resulted in stimulation of human stromal cell proliferation (4

  15. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Intercellular Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Kalabis, Jiri; Rustgi, Anil K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Its development is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. An association with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. It is also seen as a secondary malignancy in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely curable. The stromal microenvironment plays an essential role in the maintenance and modulation of normal epithelial cell growth and differentiation and cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibroblasts (Okawa et al., Genes & Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how radiation treatment of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. Chemotactic and haptotactic migration of epithelial cells stimulated by conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts was measured using assays conducted in Transwell cell culture chambers. Our results using

  16. Consequences of epithelial or stromal TGFβ1 depletion in the mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, David H; Martinez-Ruiz, Haydeliz; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2011-06-01

    Transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ) affects stroma and epithelial composition and interactions that mediate mammary development and determine the course of cancer. The reduction of TGFβ in Tgfβ1 heterozygote mice, which are healthy and long-lived, provides an important model to dissect the contribution of TGFβ in mammary gland biology and cancer. We used both intact mice and mammary chimeras in conjunction with Tgfβ1 genetic depletion and TGFβ neutralizing antibodies to evaluate how stromal or epithelial TGFβ depletion affect mammary development and response to physiological stimuli. Our studies of radiation carcinogenesis have revealed new aspects of TGFβ biology and suggest that the paradoxical TGFβ switch from tumor suppressor to tumor promoter can be resolved by assessing distinct stromal versus epithelial actions.

  17. Tenascin is a Stromal Marker for Epithelial Malignancy in the Mammary Gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Eleanor J.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Adams Pearson, Carolyn; Inaguma, Yutaka; Taya, Koji; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Sakakura, Teruyo

    1987-07-01

    Tenascin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is not present in the normal mature rat mammary gland. The distribution of tenascin was examined by immunohistochemistry in mammary tumors from carcinogen-treated and untreated rats, in virus-induced mammary tumors from mice, and in a variety of mammary gland lesions from humans. Tenascin was detectable in the stroma of the malignant but not of the benign tumors from all species. An inhibition ELISA, testing homogenates of rat tumors, confirmed that tenascin was present in malignant but not in benign tumors. Thus, tenascin was consistently found to be a stromal marker for epithelial malignancy in the mammary gland. It is concluded that tenascin may be involved in the interactions between the epithelial and mesenchyme-derived (stromal) components of the mammary gland, which are known to influence epithelial carcinogenesis in this organ.

  18. Stromal-epithelial measurements of prostate cancer in native Japanese and Japanese-American men.

    PubMed

    Veltri, R W; Park, J; Miller, M C; Marks, L; Kojima, M; van Rootselaar, C; Khan, M A; Partin, A W

    2004-01-01

    We measured the histologic stromal and epithelial tissue components of the benign (normal) and malignant tissue compartments of Japanese-Americans (J-A) and native Japanese (NJ) men living in Japan. The patient cohort included 25 NJ men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) in Nagoya, Japan and 25 J-A (second or third generation US born). We conducted tissue image quantitation (in-house image software) of the stromal and epithelial compartments in malignant and adjacent normal tissue areas from a tissue microarray (TMA) selected from radical prostatectomy (RP) blocks. Stromal-epithelial (S-E) areas were determined using immunohistochemical stains for CAM-5.2 epithelial cytokeratin marker and the Masson trichrome stain to measure the stroma component. We observed differences in the volumes of normal and cancer epithelium and stroma within both the J-A and NJ study populations (P<0.01). Only the individual average cancer epithelium (CE) volume (JA=24.1 vs NJ=29.9) differed significantly between the NJ and J-A study populations (P=0.03). Consequently, the S-E ratio in NJ group was significantly different from that of J-A population (P=0.05). The decrease in S-E ratio noted in the malignant tissues of NJ prostate tissue may provide a biological marker for differentiation of the two groups and suggests a need for further investigations into the molecular basis for these histologic differences.

  19. Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumours and nested stromal epithelial tumours of the liver.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sunayana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2016-04-01

    Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumour of liver (DNSTL), nested stromal-epithelial tumour (NSET) and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumour (CNSET) are recently described entities with similar morphology, immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics. These are rare entities with only three large case series described till date. These tumours commonly present in the paediatric age group. NSETs, in addition have been described to be associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production and Cushingoid features. It is important to discuss this rare group of tumours with a low malignant potential as the most common radiological differential diagnosis is hepatoblastoma, which has a relatively poorer prognosis. Thus, a pathologist needs to keep this entity in mind, so as to offer a correct histological diagnosis.

  20. Apoptosis induction of human endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells by noscapine

    PubMed Central

    Khazaei, Mohammad Rasoul; Rashidi, Zahra; Chobsaz, Farzaneh; Khazaei, Mozafar

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Endometriosis is a complex gynecologic disease with unknown etiology. Noscapine has been introduced as a cancer cell suppressor. Endometriosis was considered as a cancer like disorder, The aim of present study was to investigate noscapine apoptotic effect on human endometriotic epithelial and stromal cells in vitro. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, endometrial biopsies from endometriosis patients (n=9) were prepared and digested by an enzymatic method (collagenase I, 2 mg/ml). Stromal and epithelial cells were separated by sequential filtration through a cell strainer and ficoll layering. The cells of each sample were divided into five groups: control (0), 10, 25, 50 and 100 micromole/liter (µM) concentration of noscapine and were cultured for three different periods of times; 24, 48 and 72 hr. Cell viability was assessed by colorimetric assay. Nitric oxide (NO) concentration was measured by Griess reagent. Cell death was analyzed by Acridine Orange (AO)–Ethidium Bromide (EB) double staining and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) assay. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. Results: Viability of endometrial epithelial and stromal cells significantly decreased in 10, 25, 50 and 100 µM noscapine concentration in 24, 48, 72 hr (P<0.05) and apoptotic index increased in 25, 50 and 100 µM noscapine concentrations in 48 hr significantly (P<0.05). Concentrations of NO didn’t show a significant decrease. Conclusion: Noscapine increased endometriotic epithelial and stromal cell death and can be suggested as a treatment for endometriosis. PMID:27803780

  1. Influence of Ionizing Radiation on Stromal-Epithelial Communication in Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, Janice; Patel, Zarana; Grugan, Katharine; Rustgi, Anil; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    Esophageal cancer is the 6th leading cause of cancer death worldwide and is associated with a variety of risk factors including tobacco use, heavy alcohol consumption, human papilloma virus infection, and certain dietary factors such as trace mineral and vitamin deficiencies. A connection with ionizing radiation exposure is revealed by the high excess relative risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma observed in the survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan. Esophageal carcinomas are also seen as secondary malignancies in patients who received radiotherapy for breast and thoracic cancers; additionally, patients with head/neck and oral squamous cell cancers are at increased risk for metachronous esophageal squamous cell cancers. This malignancy is rapidly fatal, mainly because it remains asymptomatic until late, advanced stages when the disease is rarely responsive to treatment. In normal epithelium, the stromal microenvironment is essential for the maintenance and modulation of cell growth and differentiation. Cross talk between the epithelial and stromal compartments can influence many aspects of malignant progression, including tumor cell proliferation, migration, invasion and recruitment of new blood vessels. To test the hypothesis that radiation exposure plays a role in esophageal carcinogenesis via non-targeted mechanisms involving stromal-epithelial cell communication, we are studying radiation effects on hTERT-immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells and genetic variants grown in co-culture with human esophageal stromal fibrob-lasts (Okawa et al., Genes Dev. 2007. 21: 2788-2803). We examined how irradiation of stromal fibroblasts affected epithelial migration and invasion, behaviors associated with cancer promotion and progression. These assays were conducted in modified Boyden chambers using conditioned media from irradiated fibroblasts. Our results using low LET gamma radiation showed a dose-dependent increase in migration of epithelial

  2. On-demand dissolution of modular, synthetic extracellular matrix reveals local epithelial-stromal communication networks.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Jorge; Cook, Christi D; Ahrens, Caroline Chopko; Wang, Alex J; Brown, Alexander; Kumar, Manu; Stockdale, Linda; Rothenberg, Daniel; Renggli, Kasper; Gordon, Elizabeth; Lauffenburger, Douglas; White, Forest; Griffith, Linda

    2017-06-01

    Methods to parse paracrine epithelial-stromal communication networks are a vital need in drug development, as disruption of these networks underlies diseases ranging from cancer to endometriosis. Here, we describe a modular, synthetic, and dissolvable extracellular matrix (MSD-ECM) hydrogel that fosters functional 3D epithelial-stromal co-culture, and that can be dissolved on-demand to recover cells and paracrine signaling proteins intact for subsequent analysis. Specifically, synthetic polymer hydrogels, modified with cell-interacting adhesion motifs and crosslinked with peptides that include a substrate for cell-mediated proteolytic remodeling, can be rapidly dissolved by an engineered version of the microbial transpeptidase Sortase A (SrtA) if the crosslinking peptide includes a SrtA substrate motif and a soluble second substrate. SrtA-mediated dissolution affected only 1 of 31 cytokines and growth factors assayed, whereas standard protease degradation methods destroyed about half of these same molecules. Using co-encapsulated endometrial epithelial and stromal cells as one model system, we show that the dynamic cytokine and growth factor response of co-cultures to an inflammatory cue is richer and more nuanced when measured from SrtA-dissolved gel microenvironments than from the culture supernate. This system employs accessible, reproducible reagents and facile protocols; hence, has potential as a tool in identifying and validating therapeutic targets in complex diseases.

  3. Estrogen mediated epithelial proliferation in the uterus is directed by stromal Fgf10 and Bmp8a.

    PubMed

    Chung, Daesuk; Gao, Fei; Jegga, Anil G; Das, Sanjoy K

    2015-01-15

    To define endometrial stromal-derived paracrine mediators that participate in estradiol-17β (E2)-induced epithelial proliferation, microarray analysis of gene expression was carried out in mouse uterine epithelial-stromal co-culture systems under the condition of E2 or vehicle (control). Our results demonstrated gene alteration by E2: in epithelial cells, we found up-regulation of 119 genes and down-regulation of 28 genes, while in stroma cells we found up-regulation of 144 genes and down-regulation of 184 genes. A functional enrichment analysis of the upregulated epithelial genes implicated them for proliferation, while upregulated stromal genes were associated with extracellular functions. Quantitative RT-PCR and in situ hybridization results confirmed differential gene expression in both cell cultures and ovariectomized uteri after the above treatments. Based on our identification of stromal secretory factors, we found evidence that suppression by siRNA specifically for Bmp8a and/or Fgf10 in the stromal layer caused significant inhibition of proliferation by E2 in the co-culture system, suggesting Bmp8a and Fgf10 act as paracrine mediators during E2-dependent control of uterine proliferation. The localization of receptors and receptor activation signaling in epithelial cells in both the co-culture system and uteri was consistent with their involvement in ligand-receptor signaling. Interestingly, loss of Bmp8a or Fgf10 also caused abrogation of E2-regulated epithelial receptor signaling in co-culture systems, suggesting that stroma-derived Fgf10 and Bmp8a are responsible for epithelial communication. Overall, stromal Fgf10 and Bmp8a serve as potential paracrine factors for E2-dependent regulation of epithelial proliferation in the uterus.

  4. Empirical comparison of color normalization methods for epithelial-stromal classification in H and E images

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Amit; Sha, Lingdao; Vahadane, Abhishek Ramnath; Deaton, Ryan J.; Kumar, Neeraj; Macias, Virgilia; Gann, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Color normalization techniques for histology have not been empirically tested for their utility for computational pathology pipelines. Aims: We compared two contemporary techniques for achieving a common intermediate goal – epithelial-stromal classification. Settings and Design: Expert-annotated regions of epithelium and stroma were treated as ground truth for comparing classifiers on original and color-normalized images. Materials and Methods: Epithelial and stromal regions were annotated on thirty diverse-appearing H and E stained prostate cancer tissue microarray cores. Corresponding sets of thirty images each were generated using the two color normalization techniques. Color metrics were compared for original and color-normalized images. Separate epithelial-stromal classifiers were trained and compared on test images. Main analyses were conducted using a multiresolution segmentation (MRS) approach; comparative analyses using two other classification approaches (convolutional neural network [CNN], Wndchrm) were also performed. Statistical Analysis: For the main MRS method, which relied on classification of super-pixels, the number of variables used was reduced using backward elimination without compromising accuracy, and test - area under the curves (AUCs) were compared for original and normalized images. For CNN and Wndchrm, pixel classification test-AUCs were compared. Results: Khan method reduced color saturation while Vahadane reduced hue variance. Super-pixel-level test-AUC for MRS was 0.010–0.025 (95% confidence interval limits ± 0.004) higher for the two normalized image sets compared to the original in the 10–80 variable range. Improvement in pixel classification accuracy was also observed for CNN and Wndchrm for color-normalized images. Conclusions: Color normalization can give a small incremental benefit when a super-pixel-based classification method is used with features that perform implicit color normalization while the gain is

  5. Malignant mixed sex cord-stromal tumour in a stallion.

    PubMed

    Zanghì, A; Catone, G; Marino, G; De Vico, G; Nicòtina, P A

    2004-10-01

    A 30-year-old Standardbred stallion was examined for unilateral scrotal swelling. Physical and ultrasound examinations revealed a painless enlarged left testis with a non-homogeneous echogenicity, when compared with the controlateral testis. The stallion underwent left unilateral orchiectomy. Grossly, the excised testis was irregularly enlarged (12 x 9 x 9 cm; weight: 530 g) and firm. The sections showed that testicular parenchyma was replaced by a lobulated, greyish-white mass, which involved the epididymal head. At microscopy, a dual Leydig and Sertoli cell tumour component could be seen. Neoplastic Sertoli cells were prevalent and presented pleomorphic cells, mitotic figures and occasional vascular invasion. Tumour patterns showed tubular and solid areas, cord-like or diffuse in appearance, among which newly formed Leydig cell nests and low-density fibrillar bundles were interposed. Immunohistochemically, a weak to moderate immunostaining for vimentin, AE(1)/AE(3) cytokeratin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and CD99 antigens was found in the growing Sertoli cells, whose nuclear MIB-1 labelling index scored 13 +/- 2%. The Leydig tumour cells, on the other hand, displayed a moderate to strong positivity for alpha-inhibin, vimentin, AE(1)/AE(3) cytokeratin, neurone-specific enolase and CD99. On the basis of these findings, a diagnosis of malignant mixed sex cord-stromal tumour was made.

  6. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  7. Human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cell sheets with bellows graft for rapid tracheal epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Hun; Park, Ju Young; Nam, Inn-Chul; Hwang, Se-Hwan; Kim, Choung-Soo; Jung, Jin Woo; Jang, Jinah; Lee, Hyungseok; Choi, Yeongjin; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-10-01

    Rapid functional epithelial regeneration on the luminal surface is essential when using artificial tracheal grafts to repair tracheal defects. In this study, we imposed human turbinate mesenchymal stromal cell (hTMSC) sheets for tracheal epithelial regeneration, and then assessed their potential as a new clinical cell source. In vitro, hTMSCs sheets showed high capacity to differentiate into tracheal epithelium. We fabricated a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) tracheal graft by indirect three-dimensional (3D) printing technique and created a composite construct by transplanting the hTMSC sheets to its luminal surface of the tracheal graft, then applied this tissue-engineered tracheal graft to non-circumferential tracheal reconstruction in a rabbit model. 4 weeks after implantation, the luminal surface of tissue-engineered tracheal graft was covered by a mature and highly-ciliated epithelium, whereas tracheal grafts without hTMSC sheets were covered by only a thin, immature epithelium. Therefore, hTMSC sheets on the luminal surface of a tissue-engineered tracheal graft can accelerate the tracheal epithelial regeneration, and the tissue-engineered tracheal graft with hTMSC sheets provides a useful clinical alternative for tracheal epithelial regeneration.

  8. Epithelial-stromal interaction via Notch signaling is essential for the full maturation of gut-associated lymphoid tissues.

    PubMed

    Obata, Yuuki; Kimura, Shunsuke; Nakato, Gaku; Iizuka, Keito; Miyagawa, Yurika; Nakamura, Yutaka; Furusawa, Yukihiro; Sugiyama, Machiko; Suzuki, Keiichiro; Ebisawa, Masashi; Fujimura, Yumiko; Yoshida, Hisahiro; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Hase, Koji; Ohno, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Intrinsic Notch signaling in intestinal epithelial cells restricts secretory cell differentiation. In gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), stromal cells located beneath the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) abundantly express the Notch ligand delta-like 1 (Dll1). Here, we show that mice lacking Rbpj-a gene encoding a transcription factor implicated in Notch signaling-in intestinal epithelial cells have defective GALT maturation. This defect can be attributed to the expansion of goblet cells, which leads to the down-regulation of CCL20 in FAE. These data demonstrate that epithelial Notch signaling maintained by stromal cells contributes to the full maturation of GALT by restricting secretory cell differentiation in FAE.

  9. Genetic Evidence for Differential Regulation of Corneal Epithelial and Stromal Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Koehn, Demelza R.; Meyer, Kacie J.; Anderson, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Central corneal thickness (CCT) is a quantitative trait associated with keratoconus and primary open-angle glaucoma. Although CCT is highly heritable, known genetic variations explain only a fraction of the phenotypic variability. The purpose of this study was to identify additional CCT-influencing loci using inbred strains of mice. Methods Cohorts of 82 backcrossed (N2) and 99 intercrossed (F2) mice were generated from crosses between recombinant inbred BXD24/TyJ and wild-derived CAST/EiJ mice. Using anterior chamber optical coherence tomography, mice were phenotyped at 10 to 12 weeks of age, genotyped based on 96 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and subjected to quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Results In an analysis of total CCT among all mice, two loci passed the significance threshold of P = 0.05. These were on Chr 3 and Chr 11 (Cctq4 and Cctq5, respectively). A third locus of interest was identified in a two-dimensional pairwise analysis; this locus on Chr 14 (Cctq6) exhibited a significant additive effect with Cctq5. Independent analyses of the dataset for epithelial and stromal thickness revealed that Cctq4 is specific to the epithelial layer and that Cctq5 and Cctq6 are specific to the stromal layer. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate a quantitative multigenic pattern of CCT inheritance in mice and identify three previously unrecognized CCT-influencing loci: Cctq4, Cctq5, and Cctq6. This is the first demonstration that distinct layers of the cornea are under differential genetic control and highlights the need to refine the design of future genome-wide association studies of CCT. PMID:26305532

  10. The keratoconus corneal proteome: loss of epithelial integrity and stromal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chaerkady, Raghothama; Shao, Hanjuan; Scott, Sherri-Gae; Pandey, Akhilesh; Jun, Albert S.; Chakravarti, Shukti

    2013-01-01

    Keratoconus is a thinning corneal dystrophy that begins in the early teenage years and ultimately requires cornea transplantation to restore vision. Here we conducted a highly sensitive mass spectrometric analysis of the epithelium and the stroma from keratoconus and normal donor corneas. We identified a total of 932 and 1,157 proteins in the consolidated data of the epithelium and stroma, respectively. Technical replicates showed strong correlations (≥ 0.88) in levels of all common proteins, indicating very low technical variations in the data. Analysis of the most increased (≥ 1.5 fold) and decreased (≤ 0.8 fold) proteins in the keratoconus corneal epithelial protein extracts identified proteins related to dermal diseases, inflammation, epithelial stratification and mesenchymal changes. Increased proteins included keratins 6A, 16 and vimentin, while the iron transporter lactotransferrin was decreased. The keratoconus stromal proteome suggest endoplasmic reticular stress, oxidative stress and widespread decreases in many extracellular matrix proteoglycan core proteins, lumican and keratocan, collagen types I, III, V and XII. Marked increase in apoptosis and endocytosis-related proteins suggest degenerative changes in keratocytes, the resident cells of the stroma. This is the most comprehensive proteome analysis of the cornea that highlights similarities of keratoconus with other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23727491

  11. SU-E-J-105: Stromal-Epithelial Responses to Fractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Qayyum, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The stromal-epithelial-cell interactions that are responsible for directing normal breast-tissue development and maintenance play a central role in the progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we developed three-dimensional (3-D) cell co-cultures used to study cancerous mammary cell responses to fractionated radiotherapy. In particular, we focused on the role of the reactive stroma in determining the therapeutic ratio for postsurgical treatment. Methods: Cancerous human mammary epithelial cells were cultured in a 3-D collagen matrix with human fibroblasts stimulated by various concentrations of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1). These culture samples were designed to model the post-lumpectomy mammary stroma in the presence of residual cancer cells. We tracked over time the changes in medium stiffness, fibroblast-cell activation (conversion to cancer activated fibroblasts (CAF)), and proliferation of both cell types under a variety of fractionated radiotherapy protocols. Samples were exposed to 6 MV X-rays from a linear accelerator in daily fraction sizes of 90, 180 and 360 cGy over five days in a manner consistent with irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. Results: We found in fractionation studies with fibroblasts and CAF that higher doses per fraction may be more effective early on in deactivating cancer-harboring cellular environments. Higher-dose fraction schemes inhibit contractility in CAF and prevent differentiation of fibroblasts, thereby metabolically uncoupling tumor cells from their surrounding stroma. Yet, over a longer time period, the higher dose fractions may slow wound healing and increase ECM stiffening that could stimulate proliferation of surviving cancer cells. Conclusion: The findings suggest that dose escalation to the region with residual disease can deactivate the reactive stroma, thus minimizing the cancer promoting features of the cellular environment. Large-fraction irradiation may be used to sterilize

  12. Evidence for a stromal-epithelial “lactate shuttle” in human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhao; Ertel, Adam; Flomenberg, Neal; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Birbe, Ruth C; Howell, Anthony; Pavlides, Stephanos; Gandara, Ricardo; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we proposed a new mechanism for understanding the Warburg effect in cancer metabolism. In this new paradigm, cancer-associated fibroblasts undergo aerobic glycolysis, and extrude lactate to “feed” adjacent cancer cells, which then drives mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells. Thus, there is vectorial transport of energy-rich substrates from the fibroblastic tumor stroma to anabolic cancer cells. A prediction of this hypothesis is that cancer-associated fibroblasts should express MCT4, a mono-carboxylate transporter that has been implicated in lactate efflux from glycolytic muscle fibers and astrocytes in the brain. To address this issue, we co-cultured MCF7 breast cancer cells with normal fibroblasts. Interestingly, our results directly show that breast cancer cells specifically induce the expression of MCT4 in cancer-associated fibroblasts; MCF7 cells alone and fibroblasts alone, both failed to express MCT4. We also show that the expression of MCT4 in cancer-associated fibroblasts is due to oxidative stress, and can be prevented by pre-treatment with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. In contrast to our results with MCT4, we see that MCT1, a transporter involved in lactate uptake, is specifically upregulated in MCF7 breast cancer cells when co-cultured with fibroblasts. Virtually identical results were also obtained with primary human breast cancer samples. In human breast cancers, MCT4 selectively labels the tumor stroma, e.g., the cancer-associated fibroblast compartment. Conversely, MCT1 was selectively expressed in the epithelial cancer cells within the same tumors. Functionally, we show that overexpression of MCT4 in fibroblasts protects both MCF7 cancer cells and fibroblasts against cell death, under co-culture conditions. Thus, we provide the first evidence for the existence of a stromal-epithelial lactate shuttle in human tumors, analogous to the lactate shuttles that are essential for the normal

  13. Increased COX-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells of high mammographic density tissues and in a xenograft model of mammographic density.

    PubMed

    Chew, G L; Huo, C W; Huang, D; Hill, P; Cawson, J; Frazer, H; Hopper, J L; Haviv, I; Henderson, M A; Britt, K; Thompson, E W

    2015-08-01

    Mammographic density (MD) adjusted for age and body mass index is one of the strongest known risk factors for breast cancer. Given the high attributable risk of MD for breast cancer, chemoprevention with a safe and available agent that reduces MD and breast cancer risk would be beneficial. Cox-2 has been implicated in MD-related breast cancer risk, and was increased in stromal cells in high MD tissues in one study. Our study assessed differential Cox-2 expression in epithelial and stromal cells in paired samples of high and low MD human breast tissue, and in a validated xenograft biochamber model of MD. We also examined the effects of endocrine treatment upon Cox-2 expression in high and low MD tissues in the MD xenograft model. Paired high and low MD human breast tissue samples were immunostained for Cox-2, then assessed for differential expression and staining intensity in epithelial and stromal cells. High and low MD human breast tissues were separately maintained in biochambers in mice treated with Tamoxifen, oestrogen or placebo implants, then assessed for percentage Cox-2 staining in epithelial and stromal cells. Percentage Cox-2 staining was greater for both epithelial (p = 0.01) and stromal cells (p < 0.0001) of high compared with low MD breast tissues. In high MD biochamber tissues, percentage Cox-2 staining was greater in stromal cells of oestrogen-treated versus placebo-treated tissues (p = 0.05).

  14. Morphological and Molecular Characteristics of Mixed Epithelial Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Robertson; Talhouk, Aline; Eshragh, Sima; Lau, Sherman; Cheung, Daphne; Chow, Christine; Le, Nhu; Cook, Linda S; Wilkinson, Nafisa; McDermott, Jacqueline; Singh, Naveena; Kommoss, Friedrich; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Huntsman, David G; Köbel, Martin; Kommoss, Stefan; Gilks, C Blake; Anglesio, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer consists of 5 major histotypes: high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC), endometrioid carcinoma (EC), clear cell carcinoma (CCC), mucinous carcinoma (MC) and low-grade serous (LGSC). Each can have a broad spectrum of morphological appearances, and one histotype can closely mimic histopathological features more typical of another. Historically, there has been a relatively high frequency of mixed, defined by 2 or more distinct histotypes present based on routine histopathological assessment, histotype carcinoma diagnoses (3–11%), however recent immunohistochemical studies identifying histotype specific markers and allowing more refined histotype diagnoses suggests a much lower incidence. We reviewed hematoxylin and eosin stained slides from 871 cases of epithelial ovarian cancer and found the frequency of mixed carcinomas to be 1.7% when modern diagnostic criteria are applied. Through international collaboration, we established a cohort totaling 22 mixed epithelial ovarian cancers, consisting of 9 EC/CCC, 4 EC/LGSC, 3 HGSC/CCC, 2 CCC/MC and 4 other combinations. We interrogated the molecular differences between the different components of each case using immunohistochemistry, gene expression and hotspot sequencing analyses. Immunohistochemical data alone suggested 9 of the 22 cases were not mixed tumors as they presented a uniform immuno-phenotype throughout, and these cases most probably represent morphological mimicry and variation within tumors of a single histotype. Synthesis of molecular data further reduces the incidence of mixed carcinomas. Based on these results, true mixed carcinomas with both morphological and molecular support for the presence of more than one histotype within a given tumor represent less than 1% of epithelial ovarian cancers. PMID:26099008

  15. Epithelial to Stromal Re-Distribution of Primary Cilia during Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schimmack, Simon; Kneller, Sarah; Dadabaeva, Nigora; Bergmann, Frank; Taylor, Andrew; Hackert, Thilo; Werner, Jens; Strobel, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background The Hedgehog (HH) pathway is a mediator in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Surprisingly, previous studies suggested that primary cilia (PC), the essential organelles for HH signal transduction, were lost in PDAC. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of PC in human normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, and during carcinogenesis to PDAC with focus on both epithelia and stroma. Methods PC were analyzed in paraffin sections from normal pancreas, chronic pancreatitis, intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasia, and PDAC, as well as in primary human pancreatic stellate cells (PSC) and pancreatic cancer cell lines by double immunofluorescence staining for acetylated α-tubuline and γ-tubuline. Co-staining for the HH receptors PTCH1, PTCH2 and SMO was also performed. Results PC are gradually lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis in the epithelium: the fraction of cells with PC gradually and significantly decreased from 32% in ducts of normal pancreas, to 21% in ducts of chronic pancreatitis, to 18% in PanIN1a, 6% in PanIN2, 3% in PanIN3 and to 1.2% in invasive PDAC. However, this loss of PC in the neoplastic epithelium is accompanied by a gain of PC in the surrounding stroma. The fraction of stromal cells with PC significantly increased from 13% around normal ducts to about 30% around PanIN and PDAC. HH-receptors were detected in tumor stroma but not in epithelial cells. PC are also present in PSC and pancreatic cancer cell lines. Conclusion PC are not lost during pancreatic carcinogenesis but re-distributed from the epithelium to the stroma. This redistribution may explain the re-direction of HH signaling towards the stroma during pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:27783689

  16. A Deep Convolutional Neural Network for segmenting and classifying epithelial and stromal regions in histopathological images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Luo, Xiaofei; Wang, Guanhao; Gilmore, Hannah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-05-26

    Epithelial (EP) and stromal (ST) are two types of tissues in histological images. Automated segmentation or classification of EP and ST tissues is important when developing computerized system for analyzing the tumor microenvironment. In this paper, a Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (DCNN) based feature learning is presented to automatically segment or classify EP and ST regions from digitized tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs). Current approaches are based on handcraft feature representation, such as color, texture, and Local Binary Patterns (LBP) in classifying two regions. Compared to handcrafted feature based approaches, which involve task dependent representation, DCNN is an end-to-end feature extractor that may be directly learned from the raw pixel intensity value of EP and ST tissues in a data driven fashion. These high-level features contribute to the construction of a supervised classifier for discriminating the two types of tissues. In this work we compare DCNN based models with three handcraft feature extraction based approaches on two different datasets which consist of 157 Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained images of breast cancer and 1376 immunohistological (IHC) stained images of colorectal cancer, respectively. The DCNN based feature learning approach was shown to have a F1 classification score of 85%, 89%, and 100%, accuracy (ACC) of 84%, 88%, and 100%, and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 86%, 77%, and 100% on two H&E stained (NKI and VGH) and IHC stained data, respectively. Our DNN based approach was shown to outperform three handcraft feature extraction based approaches in terms of the classification of EP and ST regions.

  17. A Deep Convolutional Neural Network for segmenting and classifying epithelial and stromal regions in histopathological images

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Luo, Xiaofei; Wang, Guanhao; Gilmore, Hannah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial (EP) and stromal (ST) are two types of tissues in histological images. Automated segmentation or classification of EP and ST tissues is important when developing computerized system for analyzing the tumor microenvironment. In this paper, a Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (DCNN) based feature learning is presented to automatically segment or classify EP and ST regions from digitized tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs). Current approaches are based on handcraft feature representation, such as color, texture, and Local Binary Patterns (LBP) in classifying two regions. Compared to handcrafted feature based approaches, which involve task dependent representation, DCNN is an end-to-end feature extractor that may be directly learned from the raw pixel intensity value of EP and ST tissues in a data driven fashion. These high-level features contribute to the construction of a supervised classifier for discriminating the two types of tissues. In this work we compare DCNN based models with three handcraft feature extraction based approaches on two different datasets which consist of 157 Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained images of breast cancer and 1376 immunohistological (IHC) stained images of colorectal cancer, respectively. The DCNN based feature learning approach was shown to have a F1 classification score of 85%, 89%, and 100%, accuracy (ACC) of 84%, 88%, and 100%, and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 86%, 77%, and 100% on two H&E stained (NKI and VGH) and IHC stained data, respectively. Our DNN based approach was shown to outperform three handcraft feature extraction based approaches in terms of the classification of EP and ST regions. PMID:28154470

  18. A molecular signature of normal breast epithelial and stromal cells from Li-Fraumeni syndrome mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Brittney-Shea; Chanoux, Rebecca A.; Liu, Yunlong; Baenziger, Peter H.; Goswami, Chirayu P.; McClintick, Jeanette N.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Pennington, Robert E.; Lipkin, Steven M.; Kopelovich, Levy

    2010-01-01

    Specific changes in gene expression during cancer initiation should enable discovery of biomarkers for risk assessment, early detection and targets for chemoprevention. It has been previously demonstrated that altered mRNA and proteome signatures of morphologically normal cells bearing a single inherited “hit” in a tumor suppressor gene parallel many changes observed in the corresponding sporadic cancer. Here, we report on the global gene expression profile of morphologically normal, cultured primary breast epithelial and stromal cells from Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) TP53 mutation carriers. Our analyses identified multiple changes in gene expression in both morphologically normal breast epithelial and stromal cells associated with TP53 haploinsufficiency, as well as interlocking pathways. Notably, a dysregulated p53 signaling pathway was readily detectable. Pharmacological intervention with the p53 rescue compounds CP-31398 and PRIMA-1 provided further evidence in support of the central role of p53 in affecting these changes in LFS cells and treatment for this cancer. Because loss of signaling mediated by TP53 is associated with the development and survival of many human tumors, identification of gene expression profiles in morphologically normal cells that carry “one-hit” p53 mutations may reveal novel biomarkers, enabling the discovery of potential targets for chemoprevention of sporadic tumors as well. PMID:21311097

  19. Immunohistochemical expression of epithelial and stromal immunomodulatory signalling molecules is a prognostic indicator in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The immune system has paradoxical roles during cancer development and the prognostic significance of immune modulating factors is controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF- beta), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and their prognostic significance in breast cancers. Ki67 was included as a measure of growth fraction of tumor cells. Methods On immunohistochemical stained slides from 38 breast cancer patients, we performed digital video analysis of tumor cell areas and adjacent tumor stromal areas from the primary tumors and their corresponding lymph node metastases. COX-2 was recorded as graded staining intensity. Results The expression of TGF-beta, IL-10 and Ki67 were recorded in tumor cell areas and adjacent tumor stromal areas. In both primary tumors and metastases, the expression of COX-2 was higher in the tumor stromal areas than in the tumor cell areas (both P < 0.001). High stromal staining intensity in the primary tumors was associated with a 3.9 (95% CI 1.1-14.2) times higher risk of death compared to the low staining group (P = 0.036). The expression of TGF-beta was highest in the tumor cell areas of both primary tumors and metastases (both P < 0.001). High stromal expression of TGF-beta was associated with increased mortality. For IL-10, the stromal expression was highest in the primary tumors (P < 0.001), whereas in the metastases the expression was highest in tumor cell areas (P < 0.001). High IL-10 expression in tumor- and stromal cell areas of primary tumors predicted mortality. Ki67 was higher expressed in tumor stromal areas of the metastases, and in tumor cell areas of the primary tumors (P < 0.001). Ki67 expression in tumor cell areas and stromal areas of the metastases was independently associated with breast cancer mortality. Conclusions Stromal expression of COX-2, TGF-beta and Ki67 may facilitate tumor progression in breast cancer. PMID:22353218

  20. Development of an Autonomous, Dual Chamber Bioreactor for the Growth of 3-Dimensional Epithelial-Stromal Tissues in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Wettergreen, Matthew A.; Huff, Janice L.

    2014-01-01

    We are developing a novel, autonomous bioreactor that can provide for the growth and maintenance in microgravity of 3-D organotypic epithelial-stromal cultures that require an air-liquid interface. These complex 3-D tissue models accurately represent the morphological features, differentiation markers, and growth characteristics observed in normal human epithelial tissues, including the skin, esophagus, lung, breast, pancreas, and colon. However, because of their precise and complex culture requirements, including that of an air-liquid interface, these 3-D models have yet to be utilized for life sciences research aboard the International Space Station. The development of a bioreactor for these cultures will provide the capability to perform biological research on the ISS using these realistic, tissue-like human epithelial-stromal cell models and will contribute significantly to advances in fundamental space biology research on questions regarding microgravity effects on normal tissue development, aging, cancer, and other disease processes. It will also allow for the study of how combined stressors, such as microgravity with radiation and nutritional deficiencies, affect multiple biological processes and will provide a platform for conducting countermeasure investigations on the ISS without the use of animal models. The technology will be autonomous and consist of a cell culture chamber that provides for air-liquid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-air exchanges within the chambers while maintaining the growth and development of the biological samples. The bioreactor will support multiple tissue types and its modular design will provide for incorporation of add-on capabilities such as microfluidics drug delivery, media sampling, and in situ biomarker analysis. Preliminary flight testing of the hardware will be conducted on a parabolic platform through NASA's Flight Opportunities Program.

  1. Isolation of mammary epithelial cells from three-dimensional mixed-cell spheroid co-culture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Buchsbaum, Rachel J

    2012-04-30

    While enormous efforts have gone into identifying signaling pathways and molecules involved in normal and malignant cell behaviors(1-2), much of this work has been done using classical two-dimensional cell culture models, which allow for easy cell manipulation. It has become clear that intracellular signaling pathways are affected by extracellular forces, including dimensionality and cell surface tension(3-4). Multiple approaches have been taken to develop three-dimensional models that more accurately represent biologic tissue architecture(3). While these models incorporate multi-dimensionality and architectural stresses, study of the consequent effects on cells is less facile than in two-dimensional tissue culture due to the limitations of the models and the difficulty in extracting cells for subsequent analysis. The important role of the microenvironment around tumors in tumorigenesis and tumor behavior is becoming increasingly recognized(4). Tumor stroma is composed of multiple cell types and extracellular molecules. During tumor development there are bidirectional signals between tumor cells and stromal cells(5). Although some factors participating in tumor-stroma co-evolution have been identified, there is still a need to develop simple techniques to systematically identify and study the full array of these signals(6). Fibroblasts are the most abundant cell type in normal or tumor-associated stromal tissues, and contribute to deposition and maintenance of basement membrane and paracrine growth factors(7). Many groups have used three dimensional culture systems to study the role of fibroblasts on various cellular functions, including tumor response to therapies, recruitment of immune cells, signaling molecules, proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and invasion(8-15). We have optimized a simple method for assessing the effects of mammary fibroblasts on mammary epithelial cells using a commercially available extracellular matrix model to create three

  2. COX2 (PTGS2) gene methylation in epithelial, subepithelial lymphocyte and stromal tissue compartments in a spectrum of esophageal squamous neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dawsey, Sonja P.; Roth, Mark J.; Adams, Lisa; Hu, Nan; Wang, Quan-Hong; Taylor, Philip R.; Woodson, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown important effects of stromal elements in carcinogenesis. To explore the tumor-stromal relationship in esophageal neoplasia, we examined methylation of COX-2 (PTGS2), a gene etiologically associated with the development of gastrointestinal cancers, in adjacent foci of epithelium, subepithelial lymphocytes and non-lymphocytic stromal cells found in sections of normal squamous epithelium, squamous dysplasia and invasive esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Methods Adjacent foci of epithelium, subepithelial lymphocytic aggregates and non-lymphocytic stromal tissues were laser microdissected from six fully embedded, ethanol fixed, esophagectomy samples from Shanxi, China, a high-risk region for esophageal cancer. Promoter CpG site-specific hypermethylation status of COX-2 was determined using real-time methylation specific PCR (qMS-PCR) based on Taqman Chemistry. The methylation status of a subset of samples was confirmed by pyrosequencing. Results Forty-nine microdissected foci were analyzed. COX-2 gene methylation was significantly more common in subepithelial lymphocytes (12/16 (75% of all foci)) than in epithelial foci (3/16 (19%)) or foci of non-lymphocytic stromal tissues (3/17 (18%)) (Fisher’s Exact p=0.05). Two of three epithelial samples and all three stromal samples that showed COX-2 methylation were adjacent to foci of methylated subepithelial lymphocytes. Pyrosequencing confirmed the methylation status in a subset of samples. Conclusions In these esopohageal cancer patients, COX-2 gene methylation was more common in subepithelial lymphocytes than in adjacent epithelial or stromal cells in both grades of dysplasia and in foci of invasive cancer. These findings raise the possibility that methylation of subepithelial lymphocytes may be important for tumorigenesis. Future studies of gene methylation should consider separate evaluation of epithelial and non-epithelial cell populations. Condensed abstract COX2 (PTGS2) gene

  3. Fibulin-5 localisation in human endometrial cancer shifts from epithelial to stromal with increasing tumour grade, and silencing promotes endometrial epithelial cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    WINSHIP, AMY LOUISE; RAINCZUK, KATE; TON, AMANDA; DIMITRIADIS, EVA

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynaecological malignancy. While endocrine, genetic and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to its pathogenesis, its precise etiology and molecular regulators remain poorly understood. Fibulin-5 is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that inhibits cell growth and invasion in several cancer cell types and is downregulated in a number of types of human cancer. However, it is unknown whether fibulin-5 plays a role in endometrial tumourigenesis. In the current report, the expression and localisation of fibulin-5 in type I endometrioid human endometrial cancers of grades (G) 1–3 was investigated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Fibulin-5 mRNA was found to be significantly reduced in whole tumour tissues from women across G1-3 compared with benign endometrium (P<0.0001). Consistently, fibulin-5 protein was also reduced in the tumour epithelial compartment across increasing tumour grades. By contrast, increased protein localisation to the tumour stroma was observed with increasing grade. Knockdown by small interfering RNA in Ishikawa endometrial epithelial cancer cells expressing fibulin-5 stimulated cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro. Fibulin-5 mRNA expression in Ishikawa cells was induced by transforming growth factor-β and fibulin-5 in turn activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), suggesting that it may act via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In summary, the present study identified fibulin-5 as a downregulated ECM gene in human endometrial cancer and observed a shift from epithelial to stromal protein localisation with increasing tumour grade in women. These data suggest that loss of fibulin-5 function may promote endometrial cancer progression by enhancing epithelial cell adhesion and proliferation. PMID:27347195

  4. Coculturing human endometrial epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts alters cell-specific gene expression and cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Joseph C.; Erikson, David W.; Piltonen, Terhi T.; Meyer, Michelle R.; Barragan, Fatima; McIntire, Ramsey H.; Tamaresis, John S.; Vo, Kim Chi; Giudice, Linda C.; Irwin, Juan C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of coculturing endometrial epithelial cells (eEC) with paired endometrial stromal fibroblasts (eSF) on cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion patterns. Design In vitro study. Setting University research laboratory. Patient(s) Endometrial biopsies were obtained from premenopausal women. Intervention(s) Polarized eEC and subject-paired eSF were cultured for 12.5 hours alone (monoculture) or combined in a two-chamber coculture system without cell-cell contact. Cells and conditioned media were analyzed for global gene expression and cytokine secretion, respectively. Purified, endometrial tissue-derived eEC and eSF isolated by fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS) were used as noncultured controls. Main Outcome Measure(s) Cell-specific global gene expression profiling and analysis of secreted cytokines in eEC/eSF cocultures and respective monocultures. Result(s) Transepithelial resistance, diffusible tracer exclusion, expression of tight junction proteins, and apical/basolateral vectorial secretion confirmed eEC structural and functional polarization. Distinct transcriptomes of eEC and eSF were consistent with their respective lineages and their endometrial origin. Coculture of eEC with eSF resulted in altered cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion. Conclusion(s) This coculture model provides evidence that interactions between endometrial functionally polarized epithelium and stromal fibroblasts affect cell-specific gene expression and cytokine secretion underscoring their relevance when modeling endometrium in vitro. PMID:23849844

  5. Preferential Secretion of Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) by Terminally Differentiated Esophageal Epithelial Cells: Relevance to Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    PubMed Central

    Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M.; Shen, Dawen; Lee, Anna J.; Benitez, Alain; Dods, Kara; Gambanga, Fiona; Wilkins, Benjamin J.; Merves, Jamie; Noah, Yuliana; Toltzis, Sarit; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Spergel, Jonathan M.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Malefyt, Rene deWaal; Muir, Amanda B.; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic Th2 and food antigen-mediated disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilic infiltration. Thymic stromal lymphopoetin (TSLP), an epithelial derived cytokine which bridges innate and Th2-type adaptive immune responses in other allergic conditions, is overexpressed in esophageal biopsies of EoE subjects. However, the triggers of TSLP expression in the esophageal epithelium are unknown. The objective of the current study was to characterize TSLP expression in human esophageal epithelium in EoE in vivo and to determine the role of food antigens upon epithelial TSLP expression in vitro. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we localized TSLP in esophageal biopsies of active EoE (≥15 eos/hpf), inactive EoE (<15 eos/hpf) and non-EoE control subjects, and found that TSLP expression was restricted to the differentiated suprabasal layer of the epithelium in actively inflamed EoE biopsies. Consistent with these results in vivo, inducible TSLP protein secretion was higher in CaCl2 differentiated telomerase-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2-hTERT) compared to undifferentiated cells of the basal phenotype, following stimulation with the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C). To determine whether food antigens could directly induce epithelial TSLP secretion, differentiated and undifferentiated primary esophageal epithelial cells from EoE and non-EoE subjects were challenged with food antigens clinically relevant to EoE: Chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA), wheat, and milk proteins beta-lactoglobulin (blg) and beta-casein. Food antigens failed to induce TSLP secretion by undifferentiated cells; in contrast, only OVA induced TSLP secretion in differentiated epithelial cells from both EoE and control cell lines, an effect abolished by budesonide and NF-κb inhibition. Together, our study shows that specific food antigens can trigger innate immune mediated esophageal TSLP secretion, suggesting that esophageal epithelial cells at the barrier surface

  6. Preferential Secretion of Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) by Terminally Differentiated Esophageal Epithelial Cells: Relevance to Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE).

    PubMed

    Chandramouleeswaran, Prasanna M; Shen, Dawen; Lee, Anna J; Benitez, Alain; Dods, Kara; Gambanga, Fiona; Wilkins, Benjamin J; Merves, Jamie; Noah, Yuliana; Toltzis, Sarit; Yearley, Jennifer H; Spergel, Jonathan M; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Malefyt, Rene deWaal; Muir, Amanda B; Wang, Mei-Lun

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic Th2 and food antigen-mediated disease characterized by esophageal eosinophilic infiltration. Thymic stromal lymphopoetin (TSLP), an epithelial derived cytokine which bridges innate and Th2-type adaptive immune responses in other allergic conditions, is overexpressed in esophageal biopsies of EoE subjects. However, the triggers of TSLP expression in the esophageal epithelium are unknown. The objective of the current study was to characterize TSLP expression in human esophageal epithelium in EoE in vivo and to determine the role of food antigens upon epithelial TSLP expression in vitro. Using immunohistochemistry (IHC), we localized TSLP in esophageal biopsies of active EoE (≥15 eos/hpf), inactive EoE (<15 eos/hpf) and non-EoE control subjects, and found that TSLP expression was restricted to the differentiated suprabasal layer of the epithelium in actively inflamed EoE biopsies. Consistent with these results in vivo, inducible TSLP protein secretion was higher in CaCl2 differentiated telomerase-immortalized esophageal epithelial cells (EPC2-hTERT) compared to undifferentiated cells of the basal phenotype, following stimulation with the TLR3 ligand poly(I:C). To determine whether food antigens could directly induce epithelial TSLP secretion, differentiated and undifferentiated primary esophageal epithelial cells from EoE and non-EoE subjects were challenged with food antigens clinically relevant to EoE: Chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA), wheat, and milk proteins beta-lactoglobulin (blg) and beta-casein. Food antigens failed to induce TSLP secretion by undifferentiated cells; in contrast, only OVA induced TSLP secretion in differentiated epithelial cells from both EoE and control cell lines, an effect abolished by budesonide and NF-κb inhibition. Together, our study shows that specific food antigens can trigger innate immune mediated esophageal TSLP secretion, suggesting that esophageal epithelial cells at the barrier surface

  7. Epithelialization and stromalization of porcine follicular granulosa cells during real-time proliferation - a primary cell culture approach.

    PubMed

    Ciesiółka, S; Bryja, A; Budna, J; Kranc, W; Chachuła, A; Bukowska, D; Piotrowska, H; Porowski, L; Antosik, P; Bruska, M; Brüssow, K P; Nowicki, M; Zabel, M; Kempisty, B

    2016-01-01

    The process of oocyte growth and development takes place during long stages of folliculogenesis and oogenesis. This is accompanied by biochemical and morphological changes, occurring from the preantral to antral stages during ovarian follicle differentiation. It is well known that the process of follicle growth is associated with morphological modifications of theca (TCs) and granulosa cells (GCs). However, the relationship between proliferation and/or differentiation of porcine GCs during long-term in vitro culture requires further investigation. Moreover, the expression of cytokeratins and vimentin in porcine GCs, in relation to real-time cell proliferation, has yet to be explored. Utilizing confocal microscopy, we analyzed cytokeratin 18 (CK18), cytokeratin 8 + 18 + 19 (panCK), and vimentin (Vim) expression, as well as their protein distribution, within GCs isolated from slaughtered ovarian follicles. The cells were cultured for 168 h with protein expression and cell proliferation index analyzed at 24-h intervals. We found the highest expression of CK18, panCK, and Vim occurred at 120 h of in vitro culture (IVC) as compared with other experimental time intervals. All of the investigated proteins displayed cytoplasmic distribution. Analysis of real-time cell proliferation revealed an increased cell index after the first 24 h of IVC. Additionally, during each period between 24-168 h of IVC, a significant difference in the proliferation profile, expressed as the cell index, was also observed. We concluded that higher expression of vimentin at 120 h of in vitro proliferation might explain the culmination of the stromalization process associated with growth and domination of stromal cells in GC culture. Cytokeratin expression within GC cytoplasm confirms the presence of epithelial cells as well as epithelial-related GC development during IVC. Moreover, expression of both cytokeratins and vimentin during short-term culture suggests that the process of GC proliferation

  8. Polymorphisms in Stromal Genes and Susceptibility to Serous Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: A Report from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Amankwah, Ernest K.; Wang, Qinggang; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Ramus, Susan J.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Beesley, Jonathan; Johnatty, Sharon E.; Webb, Penelope M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dale, Laura C.; Lambrechts, Diether; Amant, Frederic; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Gayther, Simon A.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Dörk, Thilo; Dürst, Matthias; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brown, Robert; Flanagan, James M.; Kaye, Stanley B.; Paul, James; Bützow, Ralf; Nevanlinna, Heli; Campbell, Ian; Eccles, Diana M.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Walsh, Christine; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Song, Honglin; Krüger Kjær, Susanne; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus; Lundvall, Lene; Nedergaard, Lotte; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; van Altena, Anne M.; Vermeulen, Sita H. H. M.; Le, Nhu D.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Cook, Linda S.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Vachon, Celine M.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Berchuck, Andrew; Goode, Ellen L.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Kelemen, Linda E.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in stromal tissue components can inhibit or promote epithelial tumorigenesis. Decorin (DCN) and lumican (LUM) show reduced stromal expression in serous epithelial ovarian cancer (sEOC). We hypothesized that common variants in these genes associate with risk. Associations with sEOC among Caucasians were estimated with odds ratios (OR) among 397 cases and 920 controls in two U.S.-based studies (discovery set), 436 cases and 1,098 controls in Australia (replication set 1) and a consortium of 15 studies comprising 1,668 cases and 4,249 controls (replication set 2). The discovery set and replication set 1 (833 cases and 2,013 controls) showed statistically homogeneous (Pheterogeneity≥0.48) decreased risks of sEOC at four variants: DCN rs3138165, rs13312816 and rs516115, and LUM rs17018765 (OR = 0.6 to 0.9; Ptrend = 0.001 to 0.03). Results from replication set 2 were statistically homogeneous (Pheterogeneity≥0.13) and associated with increased risks at DCN rs3138165 and rs13312816, and LUM rs17018765: all ORs = 1.2; Ptrend≤0.02. The ORs at the four variants were statistically heterogeneous across all 18 studies (Pheterogeneity≤0.03), which precluded combining. In post-hoc analyses, interactions were observed between each variant and recruitment period (Pinteraction≤0.003), age at diagnosis (Pinteraction = 0.04), and year of diagnosis (Pinteraction = 0.05) in the five studies with available information (1,044 cases, 2,469 controls). We conclude that variants in DCN and LUM are not directly associated with sEOC, and that confirmation of possible effect modification of the variants by non-genetic factors is required. PMID:21637745

  9. Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Sex Cord-Stromal Tumors of the Ovary

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-03

    Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Granulosa Cell Tumor; Ovarian Gynandroblastoma; Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sex Cord Tumor With Annular Tubules; Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor of Mixed or Unclassified Cell Types; Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor

  10. Anti-proliferative activities of finasteride in benign prostate epithelial cells require stromal fibroblasts and c-Jun gene

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Dongdong; Wang, Mingshuai; Xing, Nianzeng; Niu, Yinong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the role of mouse fibroblast-mediated c-Jun and IGF-1 signaling in the therapeutic effect of finasteride on benign prostatic epithelial cells. BPH-1 cells, alone or with fibroblasts (c-Jun+/+ or c-Jun-/-), were implanted subcutaneously in male nude mice who were then treated with finasteride. The degrees of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and sizes of the xenografts were determined. BPH-1 cells were grown alone or co-cultured with mouse fibroblasts in the presence of finasteride and the level of IGF-1 secreted into the medium by the fibroblasts was determined. The proliferation-associated signaling pathway in BPH-1 cells was also evaluated. Fibroblasts and c-Jun promoted xenograft growth, stimulated Ki-67 expression, and inhibited BPH-1 apoptosis. Finasteride did not induce the shrinkage of xenografts in the combined-grafted groups despite repressing Ki-67 expression and inducing cell apoptosis. The addition of c-Jun-/- fibroblasts did not promote xenograft growth. In the absence of c-Jun and fibroblasts, finasteride did not alter xenograft growth, Ki-67 expression, or cell apoptosis. The in vitro results demonstrated that when BPH-1 cells were grown in monoculture, treatment with finasteride did not induce cell death and stimulated the expression of pro-proliferative signaling molecules, while in the presence of fibroblasts containing c-Jun, finasteride treatment repressed epithelial cell proliferation, the level of IGF-1 in the medium, and the activation of downstream pro-proliferative signaling pathways. Taken together, our results suggest that fibroblasts, c-Jun, and IGF-1 play key roles in mediating stromal-epithelial interactions that are required for the therapeutic effects of finasteride in benign prostate epithelial cells. PMID:28196103

  11. Anti-proliferative activities of finasteride in benign prostate epithelial cells require stromal fibroblasts and c-Jun gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Jin, Song; Fan, Dongdong; Wang, Mingshuai; Xing, Nianzeng; Niu, Yinong

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the role of mouse fibroblast-mediated c-Jun and IGF-1 signaling in the therapeutic effect of finasteride on benign prostatic epithelial cells. BPH-1 cells, alone or with fibroblasts (c-Jun+/+ or c-Jun-/-), were implanted subcutaneously in male nude mice who were then treated with finasteride. The degrees of cell proliferation, apoptosis, and sizes of the xenografts were determined. BPH-1 cells were grown alone or co-cultured with mouse fibroblasts in the presence of finasteride and the level of IGF-1 secreted into the medium by the fibroblasts was determined. The proliferation-associated signaling pathway in BPH-1 cells was also evaluated. Fibroblasts and c-Jun promoted xenograft growth, stimulated Ki-67 expression, and inhibited BPH-1 apoptosis. Finasteride did not induce the shrinkage of xenografts in the combined-grafted groups despite repressing Ki-67 expression and inducing cell apoptosis. The addition of c-Jun-/- fibroblasts did not promote xenograft growth. In the absence of c-Jun and fibroblasts, finasteride did not alter xenograft growth, Ki-67 expression, or cell apoptosis. The in vitro results demonstrated that when BPH-1 cells were grown in monoculture, treatment with finasteride did not induce cell death and stimulated the expression of pro-proliferative signaling molecules, while in the presence of fibroblasts containing c-Jun, finasteride treatment repressed epithelial cell proliferation, the level of IGF-1 in the medium, and the activation of downstream pro-proliferative signaling pathways. Taken together, our results suggest that fibroblasts, c-Jun, and IGF-1 play key roles in mediating stromal-epithelial interactions that are required for the therapeutic effects of finasteride in benign prostate epithelial cells.

  12. The Role of Cyclin D1 in Altering Stromal-Epithelial Interactions in Prostate Carcinogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    adenocarcinomas. One study of cyclin D1 expression in esophageal carcinomas indicated that cyclin D1 is strongly expressed in stromal fibroblasts. In this study...proliferate faster than controls in vivo in our tissue recombination model. Although cyclin D1 can increase BPH-1 cell motility and promote cell...Alarid ET, Turner T, Donjacour AA, Boutin EL, Foster BA. Normal and abnormal development of the male urogenital tract: role of androgens, mesenchymal

  13. Limbal Stromal Tissue Specific Stem Cells and Their Differentiation Potential to Corneal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Katikireddy, Kishore Reddy; Jurkunas, Ula V

    2016-01-01

    From the derivation of the first human embryonic stem (hES) cell line to the development of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells; it has become evident that tissue specific stem cells are able to differentiate into a specific somatic cell types. The understanding of key processes such as the signaling pathways and the role of the microenvironment in epidermal/epithelial development has provided important clues for the derivation of specific epithelial cell types.Various differentiation protocols/methods were used to attain specific epithelial cell types. Here, we describe in detail the procedure to follow for isolation of tissue specific stem cells, mimicking their microenvironment to attain stem cell characteristics, and their potential differentiation to corneal epithelial cells.

  14. The administration of multipotent stromal cells at precancerous stage precludes tumor growth and epithelial dedifferentiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bruna, Flavia; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha; Plaza, Anita; Espinoza, Iris; Conget, Paulette

    2017-01-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) are envisioned as a powerful therapeutic tool. As they home into tumors, secrete trophic and vasculogenic factors, and suppress immune response their role in carcinogenesis is a matter of controversy. Worldwide oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the fifth most common epithelial cancer. Our aim was to determine whether MSC administration at precancerous stage modifies the natural progression of OSCC. OSCC was induced in Syrian hamsters by topical application of DMBA in the buccal pouch. At papilloma stage, the vehicle or 3×10(6) allogenic bone marrow-derived MSCs were locally administered. Four weeks later, the lesions were studied according to: volume, stratification (histology), proliferation (Ki-67), apoptosis (Caspase 3 cleaved), vasculature (ASMA), inflammation (Leukocyte infiltrate), differentiation (CK1 and CK4) and gene expression profile (mRNA). Tumors found in individuals that received MSCs were smaller than those presented in the vehicle group (87±80 versus 54±62mm(3), p<0.05). The rate of proliferation was two times lower and the apoptosis was 2.5 times higher in lesions treated with MSCs than in untreated ones. While the laters presented dedifferentiated cells, the former maintained differentiated cells (cytokeratin and gene expression profile similar to normal tissue). Thus, MSC administration at papilloma stage precludes tumor growth and epithelial dedifferentiation of OSCC.

  15. Epithelial but not stromal expression of collagen alpha-1(III) is a diagnostic and prognostic indicator of colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Qing; Tang, Zu-Xiong; Yu, Dong; Cui, Shu-Jian; Jiang, Ying-Hua; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jie; Yang, Peng-Yuan; Liu, Feng

    2016-02-23

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in males and the second in females worldwide with very poor prognosis. Collagen alpha-1(III) (COL3A1) gene, encoding an extracellular matrix protein, is upregulated in human cancers. Here, we revealed that COL3A1 was increased in CRC by analysis of five Oncomine gene expression datasets (n = 496). Immunohistochemistry analysis of a tissue microarray (n = 90) demonstrated that cancer epithelial but not stromal COL3A1 was significantly upregulated comparing with the normal counterparts. High COL3A1 mRNA and/or protein expression was accompanied with high stage, T stage, Dukes stage, grade and older age, as well as smoking and recurrence status. Upregulated COL3A1 predicted poor overall (p = 0.003) and disease-free (p = 0.025) survival. Increased epithelial but not stromal COL3A1 protein predicted worse outcome (p = 0.03). Older patients (age>65) with high COL3A1 had worse survival than younger (age≤65) with high COL3A1. Plasma COL3A1 was increased in CRC patients (n = 86) by 5.4 fold comparing with healthy individuals, enteritis and polyps patients. Plasma COL3A1 had an area under curve (AUC) of 0.92 and the best sensitivity/specificity of 98.8%/69.1%. While plasma CEA had a poorer prediction power (AUC = 0.791, sensitivity/selectivity = 70.2%/73.0%). Older patients (age≥60) had higher plasma COL3A1 than younger patients. The epithelial COL3A1 protein had an AUC of 0.975 and the best sensitivity/specificity of 95.2%/91.1%. Silencing of COL3A1 suppressed CRC cell proliferation in in vitro MTT assay and in in vivo Zebra fish xenograft model by downregulation of PI3K/AKT and WNT signaling. COL3A1 was a novel diagnosis and prognosis marker of CRC.

  16. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on epithelial light-scattering and stromal deturgescence

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, G. )

    1990-01-01

    The anterior epithelium of the cornea is particularly sensitive to toxic solutions. A zone of increased light-scattering in the anterior epithelium, the anterior bright band (ABB), increases in thickness when exposed to toxic substances, but is not affected by benign solutions. With some solutions the thickness of the stroma also increases. The endothelial surfaces of rabbit corneas were perfused in vitro at 35 degrees C with various solutions, and the ABB and stromal thickness determined by specular microscopy. With glutathione-bicarbonate Ringer as control, the epithelium was bathed with concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at 72, 153, and 235 ppm with either a 10-minute pulse dose or a sustained dose of 150 minutes. In the 10-minute pulse-dose experiment, the H2O2 concentrations caused no significant changes in the ABB or stroma when compared with the control. In the 150-minute sustained-dose experiment, significant changes in both the ABB and stroma thickness were noted at the 153 and 235 ppm concentrations, but the 72 ppm dose caused no significant change. Exposure to benzalkonium chloride for 150 minutes produces a greater increase in both ABB and stromal thickness than does exposure to 235 ppm hydrogen peroxide.

  17. The Impact of Epithelial-Stromal Interactions on Human Breast Tumor Heterogeneity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Tables 1‐3, Appendix 3), we generated a correlation network of  gene  modules (Figure 6, Appendix 2).   This  correlation  map   revealed  two main...and stromal  gene  modules combined  with  an  evaluation  of  their  correlation  allowed  us  to  generate  a module  interaction  map   (Figure  6,  8...generated an interaction/correlation  map  of these  gene  modules.   These are critical steps towards  accomplishing  our major  objectives  and

  18. HIF-1alpha regulates epithelial inflammation by cell autonomous NFkappaB activation and paracrine stromal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Scortegagna, Marzia; Cataisson, Christophe; Martin, Rebecca J; Hicklin, Daniel J; Schreiber, Robert D; Yuspa, Stuart H; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2008-04-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a master regulatory transcription factor controlling multiple cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous processes, such as metabolism, angiogenesis, matrix invasion, and cancer metastasis. Here we used a new line of transgenic mice with constitutive gain of HIF-1 function in basal keratinocytes and demonstrated a signaling pathway from HIF-1 to nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) activation to enhanced epithelial chemokine and cytokine elaboration. This pathway was responsible for a phenotypically silent accumulation of stromal inflammatory cells and a marked inflammatory hypersensitivity to a single 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) challenge. HIF-1-induced NFkappaB activation was composed of 2 elements, IkappaB hyperphosphorylation and phosphorylation of Ser276 on p65, enhancing p65 nuclear localization and transcriptional activity, respectively. NFkappaB transcriptional targets macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2/CXCL2/3), keratinocyte chemokine (KC/CXCL1), and tumor necrosis factor [alfa] (TNFalpha) were constitutively up-regulated and further increased after TPA challenge both in cultured keratinocytes and in transgenic mice. Whole animal KC, MIP-2, or TNFalpha immunodepletion each abrogated TPA-induced inflammation, whereas blockade of either VEGF or placenta growth factor (PlGF) signaling did not affect transgenic inflammatory hyper-responsiveness. Thus, epithelial HIF-1 gain of function remodels the local environment by cell-autonomous NFkappaB-mediated chemokine and cytokine secretion, which may be another mechanism by which HIF-1 facilitates either inflammatory diseases or malignant progression.

  19. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma is correlated with COX-2 expression but not with the presence of stromal macrophages or CD10-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Jung

    2012-05-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an intricate process by which epithelial cells loose epithelial characteristics and acquire a mesenchymal-like phenotype. EMT and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression are related to tumor invasion and metastasis. The tumor microenvironment plays a major role in tumor progression and the induction of EMT. Here, we investigated the relationship between EMT and COX-2 expression as well as tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and CD10-positive stromal cells during the development of cutaneous squamous neoplastic lesion. We performed immunohistochemical staining for vimentin, E-cadherin, β-catenin, COX-2, CD68, and CD10 in 41 cases of squamous cell cancers (SCC), 20 of Bowen's disease, 30 of actinic keratosis, and 30 samples of normal skin. SCC cells showed significantly increased vimentin expression and reduced expression of membranous E-cadherin and β-catenin compared with cells in precursor lesions and in normal skin. COX-2 expression was also markedly increased in SCC cells. E-cadherin expression was positively correlated with β-catenin expression and inversely correlated with COX-2 expression in SCC cells. The number of TAM and CD10-positive stromal cells increased from the normal skin to precursor lesions and SCC cells. The number of TAM and of CD10-positive stromal cells did not correlate with the expression of E-cadherin, β-catenin, COX-2, and vimentin in SCC cells. We suggest that cutaneous SCC cells show EMT, which appears to be correlated with COX-2 expression but not with stromal CD10 expression and TAM.

  20. Suppression of interleukin 1α and interleukin 1β in human limbal epithelial cells cultured on the amniotic membrane stromal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, A.; Rosenblatt, M.; Monroy, D.; Ji, Z.; Pflugfelder, S.; Tseng, S.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS—Amniotic membrane (AM) transplantation reduces inflammation in a variety of ocular surface disorders. The aim of this study was to determine if AM stroma suppresses the expression of the IL-1 gene family in cultured human corneal limbal epithelial cells.
METHODS—Human corneal limbal epithelial cells were cultured from limbocorneal explants of donor eyes on plastic or on the AM stroma. Transcript expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (RA), and GAPDH was compared with or without addition of lipopolysaccharide to their serum-free media for 24 hours using RNAse protection assay (RPA). Their protein production in the supernatant was analysed by ELISA.
RESULTS—Expression of IL-1α and IL-1β transcripts and proteins was significantly reduced by cells cultured on the AM stromal matrix compared with plastic cultures whether lipopolysaccharide was added or not. Moreover, expression of IL-1 RA by cells cultured in the lipopolysaccharide-free medium was upregulated by AM stromal matrix. The ratio between IL-1 RA and IL-1α protein levels in AM cultures was higher than in plastic cultures.
CONCLUSIONS—AM stromal matrix markedly suppresses lipopolysaccharide induced upregulation of both IL-1α and IL-1β. These data may explain in part the effect of AM transplantation in reducing ocular surface inflammation, underscoring the unique feature of the AM as a substrate for tissue engineering.

 PMID:11264135

  1. Acute corneal epithelial debridement unmasks the corneal stromal nerve responses to ocular stimulation in rats: Implications for abnormal sensations of the eye.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Harumitsu; Mizerska, Kamila K; Dallacasagrande, Valentina A; Guaiquil, Victor H; Rosenblatt, Mark I

    2017-03-01

    It is widely accepted that the mechanisms for transducing sensory information reside in the nerve terminals. Occasionally, however, studies have appeared demonstrating that similar mechanisms may exist in the axon to which these terminals are connected. We examined this issue using the cornea where nerve terminals in the epithelial cell layers are easily accessible for debridement, leaving the underlying stromal (axonal) nerves undisturbed. In isoflurane-anesthetized rats, we recorded extracellularly from single trigeminal ganglion neurons innervating the cornea that are excited by ocular dryness and cooling: low threshold (<2 oC cooling) and high threshold (>2 oC) cold-sensitive plus dry sensitive (LT-CS+DS and HT-CS+DS) neurons, playing possible roles in tearing and ocular pain. We found that the responses in both types of neurons to dryness, wetness, and menthol stimuli were effectively abolished by the debridement, indicating that their transduction mechanisms lie in the nerve terminals. However, some responses to the cold, heat and hyperosmolar stimuli in LT-CS+DS neurons still remained. Surprisingly, the responses to heat in ~ half of the neurons were augmented after the debridement. We were also able to evoke these residual responses and follow the trajectory of the stromal nerves, which we subsequently confirmed histologically. The residual responses always disappeared when the stromal nerves were cut at the limbus, suggesting that the additional transduction mechanisms for these sensory modalities originated mostly likely in stromal nerves. The functional significance of these residual and enhanced responses from stromal nerves may be related to the abnormal sensations observed in ocular disease.

  2. Mitochondria "fuel" breast cancer metabolism: fifteen markers of mitochondrial biogenesis label epithelial cancer cells, but are excluded from adjacent stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sotgia, Federica; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Salem, Ahmed F; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Lamb, Rebecca; Sneddon, Sharon; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-12-01

    Here, we present new genetic and morphological evidence that human tumors consist of two distinct metabolic compartments. First, re-analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiling data revealed that > 95 gene transcripts associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation were significantly elevated in human breast cancer cells, as compared with adjacent stromal tissue. Remarkably, nearly 40 of these upregulated gene transcripts were mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs), functionally associated with mitochondrial translation of protein components of the OXPHOS complex. Second, during validation by immunohistochemistry, we observed that antibodies directed against 15 markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation (AKAP1, GOLPH3, GOLPH3L, MCT1, MRPL40, MRPS7, MRPS15, MRPS22, NRF1, NRF2, PGC1-α, POLRMT, TFAM, TIMM9 and TOMM70A) selectively labeled epithelial breast cancer cells. These same mitochondrial markers were largely absent or excluded from adjacent tumor stromal cells. Finally, markers of mitochondrial lipid synthesis (GOLPH3) and mitochondrial translation (POLRMT) were associated with poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that human breast cancers contain two distinct metabolic compartments-a glycolytic tumor stroma, which surrounds oxidative epithelial cancer cells-that are mitochondria-rich. The co-existence of these two compartments is indicative of metabolic symbiosis between epithelial cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. As such, epithelial breast cancer cells should be viewed as predatory metabolic "parasites," which undergo anabolic reprogramming to amplify their mitochondrial "power." This notion is consistent with the observation that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine may be an effective anticancer agent. New anticancer therapies should be developed to target mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation in human cancer cells.

  3. Mitochondria “fuel” breast cancer metabolism: Fifteen markers of mitochondrial biogenesis label epithelial cancer cells, but are excluded from adjacent stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Sotgia, Federica; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Salem, Ahmed F.; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Lamb, Rebecca; Sneddon, Sharon; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we present new genetic and morphological evidence that human tumors consist of two distinct metabolic compartments. First, re-analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiling data revealed that > 95 gene transcripts associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation were significantly elevated in human breast cancer cells, as compared with adjacent stromal tissue. Remarkably, nearly 40 of these upregulated gene transcripts were mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs), functionally associated with mitochondrial translation of protein components of the OXPHOS complex. Second, during validation by immunohistochemistry, we observed that antibodies directed against 15 markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation (AKAP1, GOLPH3, GOLPH3L, MCT1, MRPL40, MRPS7, MRPS15, MRPS22, NRF1, NRF2, PGC1-α, POLRMT, TFAM, TIMM9 and TOMM70A) selectively labeled epithelial breast cancer cells. These same mitochondrial markers were largely absent or excluded from adjacent tumor stromal cells. Finally, markers of mitochondrial lipid synthesis (GOLPH3) and mitochondrial translation (POLRMT) were associated with poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. Thus, we conclude that human breast cancers contain two distinct metabolic compartments—a glycolytic tumor stroma, which surrounds oxidative epithelial cancer cells—that are mitochondria-rich. The co-existence of these two compartments is indicative of metabolic symbiosis between epithelial cancer cells and their surrounding stroma. As such, epithelial breast cancer cells should be viewed as predatory metabolic “parasites,” which undergo anabolic reprogramming to amplify their mitochondrial “power.” This notion is consistent with the observation that the anti-malarial agent chloroquine may be an effective anticancer agent. New anticancer therapies should be developed to target mitochondrial biogenesis and/or mitochondrial translation in human cancer cells. PMID

  4. Analysis of thymic stromal cell subpopulations grown in vitro on extracellular matrix in defined medium. II. Cytokine activities in murine thymic epithelial and mesenchymal cell culture supernatants.

    PubMed

    Eshel, I; Savion, N; Shoham, J

    1990-03-01

    Two morphologically distinct primary cultures of murine thymic stroma were established and found to be of epithelial (MTEC) and mesenchymal (MTMC) origin. These cultures were generated by selective conditions of tissue disruption and were maintained on extracellular matrix in defined medium. Culture supernatants (CS) from these cultures (EC-CS and MC-CS respectively), were tested for cytokine production and for effects on thymocyte maturation. Both supernatants displayed the activities of IL-3 and of granulocyte/macrophage-CSF and not of IL-1, -2, -4, or IFN. In addition they were found to be mitogenic to murine thymocytes in a "spontaneous" [3H]TdR incorporation assay. The two supernatants differed, however, in their effect on Con A stimulation. EC-CS had a strong enhancing effect, both when used for preincubation (18 h) before Con A stimulation or when present simultaneously with it. MC-CS had a small inconsistent effect under these conditions. Also EC-CS enhanced IL-2 and IL-3 production by thymocytes. The responsive thymocyte subpopulation was the one that does not bind peanut agglutinin. CS of an established thymic epithelial cell line displayed only part of these activities at a considerably lower level. CS from primary kidney cell culture was completely devoid of activity. The results suggest that primary thymic stromal cell cultures, cultivated under the defined conditions described here, may better preserve physiologic secretory activities, and probably also other cell functions, compared with established cell lines. Furthermore, the results are compatible with the hypothesis that the soluble factors, secreted by thymic stromal cells, are active on either very early or late stages of thymic differentiation, whereas the main intrathymic stages of differentiation are conceivable dependent primarily on direct contact with stromal cells.

  5. Distinct roles of short and long thymic stromal lymphopoietin isoforms in house dust mite-induced asthmatic airway epithelial barrier disruption

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hangming; Hu, Yahui; Liu, Laiyu; Zou, Mengchen; Huang, Chaowen; Luo, Lishan; Yu, Changhui; Wan, Xuan; Zhao, Haijin; Chen, JiaLong; Xie, Zhefan; Le, Yanqing; Zou, Fei; Cai, Shaoxi

    2016-01-01

    Loss of airway epithelial integrity contributes significantly to asthma pathogenesis. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) may have dual immunoregulatory roles. In inflammatory disorders of the bowel, the long isoform of TSLP (lfTSLP) promotes inflammation while the short isoform (sfTSLP) inhibits inflammation. We hypothesize that lfTSLP contributes to house dust mite (HDM)-induced airway epithelial barrier dysfunction and that synthetic sfTSLP can prevent these effects. In vitro, airway epithelial barrier function was assessed by monitoring transepithelial electrical resistance, fluorescent-dextran permeability, and distribution of E-cadherin and β-catenin. In vivo, BALB/c mice were exposed to HDM by nasal inhalation for 5 consecutive days per week to establish an asthma model. sfTSLP and 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) were administered 1 h before HDM exposure. After 8 weeks, animal lung function tests and pathological staining were performed to evaluate asthma progression. We found that HDM and lfTSLP impaired barrier function. Treatment with sfTSLP and 1,25D3 prevented HDM-induced airway epithelial barrier disruption. Moreover, sfTSLP and 1,25D3 treatment ameliorated HDM-induced asthma in mice. Our data emphasize the importance of the different expression patterns and biological properties of sfTSLP and lfTSLP. Moreover, our results indicate that sfTSLP and 1,25D3 may serve as novel therapeutic agents for individualized treatment of asthma. PMID:27996052

  6. Human amnion contains a novel laminin variant, laminin 7, which like laminin 6, covalently associates with laminin 5 to promote stable epithelial-stromal attachment

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Stable attachment of external epithelia to the basement membrane and underlying stroma is mediated by transmembrane proteins such as the integrin alpha6beta4 and bullous pemphigoid antigen 2 within the hemidesmosomes along the basolateral surface of the epithelial cell and their ligands that include a specialized subfamily of laminins. The laminin 5 molecule (previously termed kalinin/nicein/epiligrin) is a member of this epithelial-specific subfamily. Laminin 5 chains are not only considerably truncated within domains III-VI, but are also extensively proteolytically processed in vitro and in vivo. As a result, the domains expected to be required for the association of laminins with other basement membrane components are lacking in the mature laminin 5 molecule. Therefore, the tight binding of laminin 5 to the basement membrane may occur by a unique mechanism. To examine laminin 5 in tissue, we chose human amnion as the source, because of its availability and the similarity of the amniotic epithelial basement membrane with that of skin. We isolated the laminin 5 contained within the basement membrane of human amnion. In addition to monomeric laminin 5, we find that much of the laminin 5 isolated is covalently adducted with laminin 6 (alpha3beta1gamma1) and a novel laminin isotype we have termed laminin 7 (alpha3beta2gamma1). We propose that the association between laminin 5 and laminins 6 and 7 is a mechanism used in amnion to allow stable association of laminin 5 with the basement membrane. The beta2 chain is seen at the human amniotic epithelial-stromal interface and at the dermal-epidermal junction of fetal and adult bovine skin by immunofluorescence, but is not present, or only weakly present, in neonatal human skin. PMID:8601594

  7. Conditioned media from mesenchymal stromal cells restore sodium transport and preserve epithelial permeability in an in vitro model of acute alveolar injury.

    PubMed

    Goolaerts, Arnaud; Pellan-Randrianarison, Nadia; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie; Uzunhan, Yurdagül; Gille, Thomas; Dard, Nicolas; Planès, Carole; Matthay, Michael A; Clerici, Christine

    2014-06-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) or their media (MSC-M) were reported to reverse acute lung injury (ALI)-induced decrease of alveolar fluid clearance. To determine the mechanisms by which MSC-M exert their beneficial effects, an in vitro model of alveolar epithelial injury was created by exposing primary rat alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) to hypoxia (3% O2) plus cytomix, a combination of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. MSC-M were collected from human MSCs exposed for 12 h to either normoxia (MSC-M) or to hypoxia plus cytomix (HCYT-MSC-M). This latter condition was used to model the effect of alveolar inflammation and hypoxia on paracrine secretion of MSCs in the injured lung. Comparison of paracrine soluble factors in MSC media showed that the IL-1 receptor antagonist and prostaglandin E2 were markedly increased while keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) was twofold lower in HCYT-MSC-M compared with MSC-M. In AECs, hypoxia plus cytomix increased protein permeability, reduced amiloride-sensitive short-circuit current (AS-Isc), and also decreased the number of α-epithelial sodium channel (α-ENaC) subunits in the apical membrane. To test the effects of MSC media, MSC-M and HCYT-MSC-M were added for an additional 12 h to AECs exposed to hypoxia plus cytomix. MSC-M and HCYT-MSC-M completely restored epithelial permeability to normal. MSC-M, but not HCYT-MSC-M, significantly prevented the hypoxia plus cytomix-induced decrease of ENaC activity and restored apical α-ENaC channels. Interestingly, KGF-deprived MSC-M were unable to restore amiloride-sensitive sodium transport, indicating a possible role for KGF in the beneficial effect of MSC-M. These results indicate that MSC-M may be a preferable therapeutic option for ALI.

  8. Glycolytic cancer associated fibroblasts promote breast cancer tumor growth, without a measurable increase in angiogenesis: evidence for stromal-epithelial metabolic coupling.

    PubMed

    Migneco, Gemma; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Chiavarina, Barbara; Castello-Cros, Remedios; Pavlides, Stephanos; Pestell, Richard G; Fatatis, Alessandro; Flomenberg, Neal; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Howell, Anthony; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2010-06-15

    Previously, we proposed a new model for understanding the Warburg effect in tumorigenesis and metastasis. In this model, the stromal fibroblasts would undergo aerobic glycolysis (a.k.a., the Warburg effect)--producing and secreting increased pyruvate/lactate that could then be used by adjacent epithelial cancer cells as "fuel" for the mitochondrial TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and ATP production. To test this model more directly, here we used a matched set of metabolically well-characterized immortalized fibroblasts that differ in a single gene. CL3 fibroblasts show a shift towards oxidative metabolism, and have an increased mitochondrial mass. In contrast, CL4 fibroblasts show a shift towards aerobic glycolysis, and have a reduced mitochondrial mass. We validated these differences in CL3 and CL4 fibroblasts by performing an unbiased proteomics analysis, showing the functional upregulation of 4 glycolytic enzymes, namely ENO1, ALDOA, LDHA and TPI1, in CL4 fibroblasts. Many of the proteins that were upregulated in CL4 fibroblasts, as seen by unbiased proteomics, were also transcriptionally upregulated in the stroma of human breast cancers, especially in the patients that were prone to metastasis. Importantly, when CL4 fibroblasts were co-injected with human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) in a xenograft model, tumor growth was dramatically enhanced. CL4 fibroblasts induced a > 4-fold increase in tumor mass, and a near 8-fold increase in tumor volume, without any measurable increases in tumor angiogenesis. In parallel, CL3 and CL4 fibroblasts both failed to form tumors when they were injected alone, without epithelial cancer cells. Mechanistically, under co-culture conditions, CL4 glycolytic fibroblasts increased mitochondrial activity in adjacent breast cancer cells (relative to CL3 cells), consistent with the "Reverse Warburg Effect". Notably, Western blot analysis of CL4 fibroblasts revealed a significant reduction in caveolin-1 (Cav-1) protein levels

  9. A composite neoplastic lesion of the vulva with mixed features of fibroadenoma and hidradenoma papilliferum combined with pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia containing multinucleated giant cells.

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, Anastasia M; Kacerovska, Denisa; Michal, Michal; Kazakov, Dmitry V

    2014-10-01

    Anogenital mammary-like glands (AGMLG) are nowadays considered a normal component of the anogenital area. Lesions affecting AGMLG are similar to those seen in breast. We present a case of a complex neoplastic lesion of the AGMLG with mixed features of fibroadenoma and hidradenoma papilliferum combined with pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia. Multinucleated cells were detected in the pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia areas as seen in some patients with neurofibromatosis type 1. The neoplasm is similar to rare mammary composite neoplasms that feature simultaneously patterns of a fibroepithelial neoplasms and intraductal papilloma.

  10. From Normalcy to Neoplasia. The Role of Epithelial-Stromal Interactions in Regulating Mammary Growth and Differentiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    the gland invades the fat pad and forms a small bud of epithelial cells. This epithelial cell bud will grow into a tree-like structure after puberty ...al., 1988). Ligands of the epidermal growth hormonally regulated ductal development during puberty and factor receptor (EGFR) are believed to be...A few exceptional Image programn (developed at the US National Institutes of Health and Eg/-Ir- mice survived until the age of puberty , when

  11. Collagen based film with well epithelial and stromal regeneration as corneal repair materials: Improving mechanical property by crosslinking with citric acid.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Li, Weichang; Long, Kai; Wang, Lin; Liu, Sa; Wang, Yingjun; Ren, Li

    2015-10-01

    Corneal disease can lead to vision loss. It has become the second greatest cause of blindness in the world, and keratoplasty is considered as an effective treatment method. This paper presents the crosslinked collagen (Col)-citric acid (CA) films developed by making use of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). The results showed that the Col-CA films had necessary optical performance, water content. The collagenase resistance of CA crosslinked films was superior to that of EDC crosslinked films. And CA5 film (Col:CA:EDC:NHS=60:3:10:10) had the best mechanical properties. Cell experiments showed that CA5 film was non-cytotoxic and human corneal epithelial cells could proliferate well on the films. Lamellar keratoplasty showed that the CA5 film could be sutured in the rabbit eyes and was epithelialized completely in about 10 days, and the transparency was restored quickly in 30±5 days. No inflammation and corneal neovascularization were observed at 6 months. Corneal stroma had been repaired; stromal cells and neo-stroma could be seen in the area of operation from the hematoxylin-eosin stained histologic sections and anterior segment optical coherence tomography images. These results indicated that Col-CA films were highly promising biomaterials that could be used in corneal tissue engineering and a variety of other tissue engineering applications.

  12. IL1{beta}-mediated Stromal COX-2 signaling mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-11-15

    COX-2 is a major inflammatory mediator implicated in colorectal inflammation and cancer. However, the exact origin and role of COX-2 on colorectal inflammation and carcinogenesis are still not well defined. Recently, we reported that COX-2 and iNOS signalings interact in colonic CCD18Co fibroblasts. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by IL1{beta} in primary colonic fibroblasts obtained from normal and cancer patients play a critical role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated that COX-2 level was significantly higher in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}, a powerful stimulator of COX-2. Using in vitro assays for estimating proliferative and invasive potential, we discovered that the proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts than with normal fibroblasts, with or without stimulation of IL1{beta}. Further analysis indicated that the major COX-2 product, prostaglandin E{sub 2}, directly enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells in the absence of fibroblasts. Moreover, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, blocked the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts on the epithelial cancer cells, with or without stimulation of IL-1{beta}. Those results indicate that activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts plays a major role in promoting proliferation and invasiveness of the epithelial cancer cells. In this process, PKC is involved in the activation of COX-2 signaling induced by IL-1{beta} in the fibroblasts.

  13. Mesenchymal stromal cells induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human colorectal cancer cells through the expression of surface-bound TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Mele, Valentina; Muraro, Manuele G; Calabrese, Diego; Pfaff, Dennis; Amatruda, Nunzia; Amicarella, Francesca; Kvinlaug, Brynn; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Martin, Ivan; Resink, Therese J; Heberer, Michael; Oertli, Daniel; Terracciano, Luigi; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent precursors endowed with the ability to home to primary and metastatic tumor sites, where they can integrate into the tumor-associated stroma. However, molecular mechanisms and outcome of their interaction with cancer cells have not been fully clarified. In this study, we investigated the effects mediated by bone marrow-derived MSC on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that MSC triggered epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor cells in vitro, as indicated by upregulation of EMT-related genes, downregulation of E-cadherin and acquisition of mesenchymal morphology. These effects required cell-to-cell contact and were mediated by surface-bound TGF-β newly expressed on MSC upon coculture with tumor cells. In vivo tumor masses formed by MSC-conditioned CRC cells were larger and characterized by higher vessel density, decreased E-cadherin expression and increased expression of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, MSC-conditioned tumor cells displayed increased invasiveness in vitro and enhanced capacity to invade peripheral tissues in vivo. Thus, by promoting EMT-related phenomena, MSC appear to favor the acquisition of an aggressive phenotype by CRC cells. PMID:24214914

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in human colorectal cancer cells through the expression of surface-bound TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Mele, Valentina; Muraro, Manuele G; Calabrese, Diego; Pfaff, Dennis; Amatruda, Nunzia; Amicarella, Francesca; Kvinlaug, Brynn; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Martin, Ivan; Resink, Therese J; Heberer, Michael; Oertli, Daniel; Terracciano, Luigi; Spagnoli, Giulio C; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2014-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent precursors endowed with the ability to home to primary and metastatic tumor sites, where they can integrate into the tumor-associated stroma. However, molecular mechanisms and outcome of their interaction with cancer cells have not been fully clarified. In this study, we investigated the effects mediated by bone marrow-derived MSC on human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in vitro and in vivo. We found that MSC triggered epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor cells in vitro, as indicated by upregulation of EMT-related genes, downregulation of E-cadherin and acquisition of mesenchymal morphology. These effects required cell-to-cell contact and were mediated by surface-bound TGF-β newly expressed on MSC upon coculture with tumor cells. In vivo tumor masses formed by MSC-conditioned CRC cells were larger and characterized by higher vessel density, decreased E-cadherin expression and increased expression of mesenchymal markers. Furthermore, MSC-conditioned tumor cells displayed increased invasiveness in vitro and enhanced capacity to invade peripheral tissues in vivo. Thus, by promoting EMT-related phenomena, MSC appear to favor the acquisition of an aggressive phenotype by CRC cells.

  15. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human colonic cancer associated fibroblasts are major sources of COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fibroblasts interact with human colonic epithelial cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of COX-2 signaling in the fibroblasts affects behavior of the epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein Kinase C controls the activation of COX-2 signaling. -- Abstract: COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide Attenuates Induction of Proallergic Cytokines, Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin, and Interleukin 33 in Respiratory Epithelial Cells Stimulated with PolyI:C and Human Parechovirus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsang-Hsiung; Cheng, Chih-Chi; Su, Hsing-Hao; Huang, Nan-Chieh; Chen, Jih-Jung; Kang, Hong-Yo; Chang, Tsung-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies based on the “hygiene hypothesis” declare that the level of childhood exposure to environmental microbial products is inversely related to the incidence of allergic diseases in later life. Multiple types of immune cell-mediated immune regulation networks support the hygiene hypothesis. Epithelial cells are the first line of response to microbial products in the environment and bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems; however, their role in the hygiene hypothesis is unknown. To demonstrate the hygiene hypothesis in airway epithelial cells, we examined the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; toll-like receptor 4 ligand) on the expression of the proallergic cytokines thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and interleukin 33 (IL33) in H292 cells (pulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells). Stimulation with the TLR ligand polyI:C and human parechovirus type 1 (HPeV1) but not LPS-induced TSLP and IL33 through interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and NF-κB activity, which was further validated by using inhibitors (dexamethasone and Bay 11-7082) and short hairpin RNA-mediated gene knockdown. Importantly, polyI:C and HPeV1-stimulated TSLP and IL33 induction was reduced by LPS treatment by attenuating TANK-binding kinase 1, IRF3, and NF-κB activation. Interestingly, the basal mRNA levels of TLR signaling proteins were downregulated with long-term LPS treatment of H292 cells, which suggests that such long-term exposure modulates the expression of innate immunity signaling molecules in airway epithelial cells to mitigate the allergic response. In contrast to the effects of LPS treatment, the alarmin high-mobility group protein B1 acts in synergy with polyI:C to promote TSLP and IL33 expression. Our data support part of the hygiene hypothesis in airway epithelia cells in vitro. In addition to therapeutic targeting of TSLP and IL33, local application of non-pathogenic LPS may be a rational strategy to prevent allergies. PMID:27826297

  17. Evidence for a stromal-epithelial "lactate shuttle" in human tumors: MCT4 is a marker of oxidative stress in cancer-associated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Lin, Zhao; Ertel, Adam; Flomenberg, Neal; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Birbe, Ruth C; Howell, Anthony; Pavlides, Stephanos; Gandara, Ricardo; Pestell, Richard G; Sotgia, Federica; Philp, Nancy J; Lisanti, Michael P

    2011-06-01

    Recently, we proposed a new mechanism for understanding the Warburg effect in cancer metabolism. In this new paradigm, cancer-associated fibroblasts undergo aerobic glycolysis, and extrude lactate to "feed" adjacent cancer cells, which then drives mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells. Thus, there is vectorial transport of energy-rich substrates from the fibroblastic tumor stroma to anabolic cancer cells. A prediction of this hypothesis is that cancer-associated fibroblasts should express MCT4, a mono-carboxylate transporter that has been implicated in lactate efflux from glycolytic muscle fibers and astrocytes in the brain. To address this issue, we co-cultured MCF7 breast cancer cells with normal fibroblasts. Interestingly, our results directly show that breast cancer cells specifically induce the expression of MCT4 in cancer-associated fibroblasts; MCF7 cells alone and fibroblasts alone, both failed to express MCT4. We also show that the expression of MCT4 in cancer-associated fibroblasts is due to oxidative stress, and can be prevented by pre-treatment with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. In contrast to our results with MCT4, we see that MCT1, a transporter involved in lactate uptake, is specifically upregulated in MCF7 breast cancer cells when co-cultured with fibroblasts. Virtually identical results were also obtained with primary human breast cancer samples. In human breast cancers, MCT4 selectively labels the tumor stroma, e.g., the cancer-associated fibroblast compartment. Conversely, MCT1 was selectively expressed in the epithelial cancer cells within the same tumors. Functionally, we show that overexpression of MCT4 in fibroblasts protects both MCF7 cancer cells and fibroblasts against cell death, under co-culture conditions. Thus, we provide the first evidence for the existence of a stromal-epithelial lactate shuttle in human tumors, analogous to the lactate shuttles that are essential for the normal

  18. Stromal COX-2 signaling activated by deoxycholic acid mediates proliferation and invasiveness of colorectal epithelial cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingting; Zhu, Min; Lance, Peter

    2012-08-31

    COX-2 is a major regulator implicated in colonic cancer. However, how COX-2 signaling affects colonic carcinogenesis at cellular level is not clear. In this article, we investigated whether activation of COX-2 signaling by deoxycholic acid (DCA) in primary human normal and cancer associated fibroblasts play a significant role in regulation of proliferation and invasiveness of colonic epithelial cancer cells. Our results demonstrated while COX-2 signaling can be activated by DCA in both normal and cancer associated fibroblasts, the level of activation of COX-2 signaling is significantly greater in cancer associated fibroblasts than that in normal fibroblasts. In addition, we discovered that the proliferative and invasive potential of colonic epithelial cancer cells were much greater when the cells were co-cultured with cancer associated fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA than with normal fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA. Moreover, COX-2 siRNA attenuated the proliferative and invasive effect of both normal and cancer associate fibroblasts pre-treated with DCA on the colonic cancer cells. Further studies indicated that the activation of COX-2 signaling by DCA is through protein kinase C signaling. We speculate that activation of COX-2 signaling especially in cancer associated fibroblasts promotes progression of colonic cancer.

  19. Epithelial and stromal developmental patterns in a novel substitute of the human skin generated with fibrin-agarose biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Carriel, Víctor; Garzón, Ingrid; Jiménez, Jose-María; Oliveira, Ana-Celeste-Ximenes; Arias-Santiago, Salvador; Campos, Antonio; Sánchez-Quevedo, Maria-Carmen; Alaminos, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Development of human skin substitutes by tissue engineering may offer new therapeutic alternatives to the use of autologous tissue grafts. For that reason, it is necessary to investigate and develop new biocompatible biomaterials that support the generation of a proper human skin construct. In this study, we generated a novel model of bioengineered human skin substitute using human cells obtained from skin biopsies and fibrin-agarose biomaterials and we evaluated this model both at the ex vivo and the in vivo levels. Once the dermal fibroblasts and the epithelial keratinocytes were isolated and expanded in culture, we used fibrin-agarose scaffolds for the development of a full-thickness human skin construct, which was evaluated after 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks of development ex vivo. The skin substitutes were then grafted onto immune-deficient nude mice and analyzed at days 10, 20, 30 and 40 postimplantation using transmission electron microscopy, histochemistry and immunofluorescence. The results demonstrated that the fibrin-agarose artificial skin had adequate biocompatibility and proper biomechanical properties. A proper development of both the bioengineered dermis and epidermis was found after 30 days in vivo, although the tissues kept ex vivo and those implanted in the animal model for 10 or 20 days showed lower levels of differentiation. In summary, our model of fibrin-agarose skin equivalent was able to reproduce the structure and histological architecture of the native human skin, especially after long-term in vivo implantation, suggesting that these tissues could reproduce the native skin.

  20. Epithelial and Stromal Cell Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor Expression Differentially Correlates with Survival in Rectal Cancer Stages B and C Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seong Beom; Chan, Charles; Dent, Owen F.; Mohamedali, Abidali; Kwun, Sun Young; Clarke, Candice; Fletcher, Julie; Chapuis, Pierre H.; Nice, Edouard C.; Baker, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) has been proposed as a potential prognostic factor for colorectal cancer (CRC) patient survival. However, CRC uPAR expression remains controversial, especially regarding cell types where uPAR is overexpressed (e.g., epithelium (uPARE) or stroma-associated cells (uPARS)) and associated prognostic relevance. In this study, two epitope-specific anti-uPAR monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) could discriminate expression of uPARE from uPARS and were used to examine this association with survival of stages B and C rectal cancer (RC) patients. Using immunohistochemistry, MAbs #3937 and R4 were used to discriminate uPARE from uPARS respectively in the central and invasive frontal regions of 170 stage B and 179 stage C RC specimens. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses were used to determine association with survival. uPAR expression occurred in both epithelial and stromal compartments with differential expression observed in many cases, indicating uPARE and uPARS have different cellular roles. In the central and invasive frontal regions, uPARE was adversely associated with overall stage B survival (HR = 1.9; p = 0.014 and HR = 1.5; p = 0.031, respectively) reproducing results from previous studies. uPARS at the invasive front was associated with longer stage C survival (HR = 0.6; p = 0.007), reflecting studies demonstrating that macrophage peritumoural accumulation is associated with longer survival. This study demonstrates that different uPAR epitopes should be considered as being expressed on different cell types during tumour progression and at different stages in RC. Understanding how uPARE and uPARS expression affects survival is anticipated to be a useful clinical prognostic marker of stages B and C RC. PMID:25692297

  1. The functional interplay between EGFR overexpression, hTERT activation, and p53 mutation in esophageal epithelial cells with activation of stromal fibroblasts induces tumor development, invasion, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Takaomi; Michaylira, Carmen Z; Kalabis, Jiri; Stairs, Douglas B; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Andl, Claudia D; Johnstone, Cameron N; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Cukierman, Edna; Herlyn, Meenhard; Rustgi, Anil K

    2007-11-01

    Esophageal cancer is a prototypic squamous cell cancer that carries a poor prognosis, primarily due to presentation at advanced stages. We used human esophageal epithelial cells as a platform to recapitulate esophageal squamous cell cancer, thereby providing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of squamous cell cancers in general. This was achieved through the retroviral-mediated transduction into normal, primary human esophageal epithelial cells of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT), and p53(R175H), genes that are frequently altered in human esophageal squamous cell cancer. These cells demonstrated increased migration and invasion when compared with control cells. When these genetically altered cells were placed within the in vivo-like context of an organotypic three-dimensional (3D) culture system, the cells formed a high-grade dysplastic epithelium with malignant cells invading into the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM). The invasive phenotype was in part modulated by the activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Using pharmacological and genetic approaches to decrease MMP-9, invasion into the underlying ECM could be suppressed partially. In addition, tumor differentiation was influenced by the type of fibroblasts within the stromal ECM. To that end, fetal esophageal fibroblasts fostered a microenvironment conducive to poorly differentiated invading tumor cells, whereas fetal skin fibroblasts supported a well-differentiated tumor as illustrated by keratin "pearl" formation, a hallmark feature of well-differentiated squamous cell cancers. When inducible AKT was introduced into fetal skin esophageal fibroblasts, a more invasive, less-differentiated esophageal cancer phenotype was achieved. Invasion into the stromal ECM was attenuated by genetic knockdown of AKT1 as well as AKT2. Taken together, alterations in key oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in esophageal epithelial cells, the composition

  2. Epithelial and Stromal Cells of Bovine Endometrium Have Roles in Innate Immunity and Initiate Inflammatory Responses to Bacterial Lipopeptides In Vitro via Toll-Like Receptors TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Matthew L.; Cronin, James G.; Healey, Gareth D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria often infect the endometrium of cattle to cause endometritis, uterine disease, and infertility. Lipopeptides are commonly found among bacteria and are detected by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) cell surface receptor TLR2 on immune cells. Heterodimers of TLR2 with TLR1 or TLR6 activate MAPK and nuclear factor-κB intracellular signaling pathways to stimulate inflammatory responses. In the endometrium, epithelial and stromal cells are the first to encounter invading bacteria, so the present study explored whether endometrial cells can also mount inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopeptides via TLRs. The supernatants of pure populations of primary bovine endometrial epithelial and stromal cells accumulated the cytokine IL-6 and the chemokine IL-8 in response to triacylated or diacylated bacterial lipopeptides. The accumulation of IL-6 and IL-8 in response to triacylated lipopeptides was reduced by small interfering RNA targeting TLR2 or TLR1 but not TLR6, whereas cellular responses to diacylated lipopeptide were reduced by small interfering RNA targeting TLR2, TLR1, or TLR6. Both lipopeptides induced rapid phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and nuclear factor-κB in endometrial cells, and inhibitors of ERK1/2 or p38 limited the accumulation of IL-6. The ovarian steroids estradiol and progesterone had little impact on inflammatory responses to lipopeptides. The endometrial epithelial and stromal cell responses to lipopeptides via TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6 provide a mechanism linking a wide range of bacterial infections to inflammation of the endometrium. PMID:24437488

  3. Epithelial and stromal cells of bovine endometrium have roles in innate immunity and initiate inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopeptides in vitro via Toll-like receptors TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6.

    PubMed

    Turner, Matthew L; Cronin, James G; Healey, Gareth D; Sheldon, Iain Martin

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria often infect the endometrium of cattle to cause endometritis, uterine disease, and infertility. Lipopeptides are commonly found among bacteria and are detected by the Toll-like receptor (TLR) cell surface receptor TLR2 on immune cells. Heterodimers of TLR2 with TLR1 or TLR6 activate MAPK and nuclear factor-κB intracellular signaling pathways to stimulate inflammatory responses. In the endometrium, epithelial and stromal cells are the first to encounter invading bacteria, so the present study explored whether endometrial cells can also mount inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopeptides via TLRs. The supernatants of pure populations of primary bovine endometrial epithelial and stromal cells accumulated the cytokine IL-6 and the chemokine IL-8 in response to triacylated or diacylated bacterial lipopeptides. The accumulation of IL-6 and IL-8 in response to triacylated lipopeptides was reduced by small interfering RNA targeting TLR2 or TLR1 but not TLR6, whereas cellular responses to diacylated lipopeptide were reduced by small interfering RNA targeting TLR2, TLR1, or TLR6. Both lipopeptides induced rapid phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and nuclear factor-κB in endometrial cells, and inhibitors of ERK1/2 or p38 limited the accumulation of IL-6. The ovarian steroids estradiol and progesterone had little impact on inflammatory responses to lipopeptides. The endometrial epithelial and stromal cell responses to lipopeptides via TLR2, TLR1, and TLR6 provide a mechanism linking a wide range of bacterial infections to inflammation of the endometrium.

  4. Effects of steroid hormones on differentiated glandular epithelial and stromal cells in a three dimensional cell culture model of the canine endometrium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oestrogens and progesterone have a significant impact on the endometrium during the canine oestrous cycle. Their receptors mediate plasma steroid hormone levels and are expressed in several endometrial cell types. Altered steroid receptor expression patterns are involved in serious uterine diseases; however the mechanisms of hormone action during pathogenesis in these tissues remain unclear. The development of 3D culture systems of canine endometrial cells provides an opportunity for the effects of steroid hormones to be quantitatively assessed in a more in vivo-like setting. The present study aimed to determine the effects of the steroid hormones 17β-estradiol (E) and progesterone (P) on the expression of the oestrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR), and on proliferative activity, in a 3D co-culture system of canine uterine origin, comprising differentiated endometrial glands, and stromal cells (SCs). Results Morphology, differentiation, and apical-basolateral polarity of cultured glandular epithelial cells (GECs) were comparable to those in native uterine tissue as assessed by immunohistochemistry using differentiation markers (β-catenin, laminin), lectin histochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. Supplementation of our 3D-culture system with E (at 15, 30 and 100 pg/mL) resulted in constant levels of ER expression in GECs, but reduced expression levels in SCs. PR expression was reduced in both GECs and SCs following treatment with E. 3 ng/mL P resulted in increased ER expression in GECs, but a decrease in SCs. PR expression in GECs increased in all P-treated groups, whereas PRs in SCs decreased with the lowest and highest doses, but increased with the middle dose of treatment. Proliferative activity, assessed by Ki67 staining, remained below 1% in all assays and cell types. Conclusions The present study demonstrates the applicability of our 3D organotypic canine endometrium-derived culture system for cellular-level studies. 3D

  5. Regulation of growth by a nerve growth factor-like protein which modulates paracrine interactions between a neoplastic epithelial cell line and stromal cells of the human prostate.

    PubMed

    Djakiew, D; Delsite, R; Pflug, B; Wrathall, J; Lynch, J H; Onoda, M

    1991-06-15

    Nerve growth factor-like substance(s) were identified in both conditioned media of a human prostatic tumor epithelial cell line (TSU-pr1) and a human prostatic stromal cell line (HPS) by Western blot analysis and bioassay of neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells. Nerve growth factor-beta (NGF) immunofluorescence was also localized to secretory vesicles in the cytoplasm of both the TSU-pr1 and HPS cells. Western blot of the TSU-pr1 and HPS cell-secreted protein identified an Mr 65,000 major protein which immunoreacted with murine NGF antibody. NGF Western blot of HPS cell-secreted protein also identified an Mr 42,000 minor band under reduced and nonreduced conditions and an Mr 61,000 minor band under reduced conditions. The secreted protein from the TSU-pr1 cells (50 micrograms/ml) and HPS (50 micrograms/ml), as well as murine NGF (50 ng/ml) or human recombinant NGF (50 ng/ml), stimulated neurite outgrowth from PC12 cells. This neurite outgrowth activity was partially inhibited by treatment with NGF antibody. Neither the serum containing growth medium nor bovine serum albumin (50 micrograms/ml) stimulated neurite outgrowth. The NGF-like secretory protein appeared to play a role in the paracrine regulation of prostatic growth between TSU-pr1 cells and HPS cells. The relative growth of TSU-pr1 cells, as indicated by [3H]thymidine incorporation, in response to HPS secretory protein was stimulated 2.8-fold in a dose-dependent manner. In the converse interaction, the relative growth of HPS cells in response to TSU-pr1 secretory protein was stimulated 1.8-fold in a dose-dependent manner. Immunoneutralization of TSU-pr1 and HPS secretory protein was performed with antibody against NGF, acidic fibroblast growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Removal of the NGF-like protein from the maximal stimulatory dose of TSU-pr1 secretory protein (100 micrograms/ml) with NGF antibody reduced HPS proliferation to 52% of maximal levels, and immunoneutralization of the NGF

  6. Stromal Effects on Mammary Gland Development and Breast Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Werb, Zena

    2002-05-01

    Breast cancer manifests itself in the mammary epithelium, yet there is a growing recognition that mammary stromal cells also play an important role in tumorigenesis. During its developmental cycle, the mammary gland displays many of the properties associated with breast cancer, and many of the stromal factors necessary for mammary development also promote or protect against breast cancer. Here we review our present knowledge of the specific factors and cell types that contribute to epithelial-stromal crosstalk during mammary development. To find cures for diseases like breast cancer that rely on epithelial-stromal crosstalk, we must understand how these different cell types communicate with each other.

  7. Angiotensin II enhances epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition through the interaction between activated hepatic stellate cells and the stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXCR4 axis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Koichi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Nakanuma, Shinichi; Sakai, Seisho; Makino, Isamu; Kinoshita, Jun; Hayashi, Hironori; Nakamura, Keishi; Oyama, Katsunobu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Fujita, Hideto; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Harada, Shinichi; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Iseki, Shoichi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    We previously reported that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activated by angiotensin II (AngII) facilitate stromal fibrosis and tumor progression in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). AngII has been known as a growth factor which can promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in renal epithelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells and peritoneal mesothelial cells. However, in the past, the relationship between AngII and stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) in the microenvironment around cancer and the role of AngII on EMT of cancer cells has not been reported in detail. SDF-1 and its specific receptor, CXCR4, are now receiving attention as a mechanism of cell progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined whether activated HSCs promote tumor fibrogenesis, tumor progression and distant metastasis by mediating EMT via the AngII/AngII type 1 receptor (AT-1) and the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. Two human ICC cell lines and a human HSC line, LI-90, express CXCR4. Significantly higher concentration of SDF-1α was released into the supernatant of LI-90 cells to which AngII had been added. SDF-1α increased the proliferative activity of HSCs and enhanced the activation of HSCs as a growth factor. Furthermore, addition of SDF-1α and AngII enhanced the increase of the migratory capability and vimentin expression, reduced E-cadherin expression, and translocated the expression of β-catenin into the nucleus and cytoplasm in ICC cells. Co-culture with HSCs also enhanced the migratory capability of ICC cells. These findings suggest that SDF-1α, released from activated HSCs and AngII, play important roles in cancer progression, tumor fibrogenesis, and migration in autocrine and paracrine fashion by mediating EMT. Our mechanistic findings may provide pivotal insights into the molecular mechanism of the AngII and SDF-1α-initiated signaling pathway that regulates fibrogenesis in cancerous stroma, tumor progression and meta-stasis of tumor cells expressing AT-1 and CXCR4.

  8. Analysis of thymic stromal cell subpopulations grown in vitro on extracellular matrix in defined medium. III. Growth conditions of human thymic epithelial cells and immunomodulatory activities in their culture supernatant.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, L; Eshel, I; Meilin, A; Sharabi, Y; Shoham, J

    1991-01-01

    We report here on a new approach to the cultivation of human thymic epithelial (HTE) cells, which apparently allows more faithful preservation of cell function. This approach, previously developed by us for mouse thymic epithelial (MTE) cells, is based on the use of culture plates coated with extracellular matrix (ECM), and on the use of serum-free, growth factor-supplemented medium. The nutritional requirements of HTE and MTE are somewhat different. Although both are critically dependent on ECM and insulin, they differ in their dependency on other growth factors: selenium and transferrin are much more important for HTE cells, whereas epidermal growth factor and hydrocortisone play a more essential role in MTE cultures. The epithelial nature of the cultured cells is indicated by positive staining with anti-keratin antibodies and by the presence of desmosomes and tonofilaments. The ultrastructural appearance of the cells further suggests high metabolic and secretory activities, not usually found in corresponding cell lines. The culture supernatant (CS) of HTE cells exhibited a strong enhancing effect on thymocyte response to Con A stimulation, as measured by cell proliferation and lymphokine production. The effect was observed on both human and mouse thymocytes, but was much stronger in the homologous combination. Thymic factors tested in parallel did not have such a differential effect. The dose-effect relationships were in the form of a bell-shaped curve, with fivefold enhancement of response at the peak and a measurable effect even with 1:1000 dilution, when human thymocytes were used. The responding thymocytes were those which do not bind peanut agglutinin and are resistant to hydrocortisone. The culture system described here may have advantages for the in vitro study of thymic stromal cell function. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1783421

  9. Increased breast density correlates with the proliferation-seeking radiotracer (99m)Tc(V)-DMSA uptake in florid epithelial hyperplasia and in mixed ductal carcinoma in situ with invasive ductal carcinoma but not in pure invasive ductal carcinoma or in mild epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Papantoniou, Vassilios; Valsamaki, Pipitsa; Sotiropoulou, Evangelia; Tsaroucha, Angeliki; Tsiouris, Spyridon; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Marinopoulos, Spyridon; Kounadi, Evangelia; Karianos, Theodore; Fothiadaki, Athina; Archontaki, Aikaterini; Syrgiannis, Konstantinos; Ptohis, Nikolaos; Makris, Nikolaos; Limouris, Georgios; Antsaklis, Aris

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of mammographic breast density (BD) and cell proliferation/focal adhesion kinase activation-seeking radiotracer technetium 99m pentavalent dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc(V)-DMSA) uptake in women with different breast histologies, that is, mild epithelial hyperplasia (MEH), florid epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), mixed ductal carcinoma in situ with invasive ductal carcinoma (DCIS + IDC), and pure IDC. Fifty-five women with histologically confirmed mammary pathologies were submitted preoperatively to mammography and 99mTc(V)-DMSA scintimammography. The percentage and intensity of 99mTc(V)-DMSA uptake and the percentage of BD were calculated by computer-assisted methods and compared (t-test) between the breast pathologies. In breasts with increased BD, FEH and DCIS + IDC were found. On the contrary, pure IDC and MEH were identified in breasts with significantly lower BD values. In breasts with increased 99mTc(V)-DMSA area and intensity of uptake, FEH was the main lesion found compared to all other histologies. Linear regression analysis between BD and 99mTc(V)-DMSA uptake area and intensity revealed significant coefficients of correlation (r  =  .689, p < .001 and r  =  .582, p < .001, respectively). Increased BD correlates with the presence of FEH and mixed DCIS + IDC but not with pure IDC or MEH. Its close relationship to 99mTc(V)-DMSA, which also showed an affinity to FEH, indicates that stromal microenvironment may constitute a specific substrate leading to progression to different subtypes of cancerous lesions originating from different pathways.

  10. Analysis of thymic stromal cell subpopulations grown in vitro on extracellular matrix in defined medium. I. Growth conditions and morphology of murine thymic epithelial and mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Eshel, I; Savion, N; Shoham, J

    1990-03-01

    We report here the successful selective cultivation of murine thymic mesenchymal reticular cells (MTMC) and murine thymic epithelial cells (MTEC) grown on extracellular matrix in the presence of defined medium. The selective growth of these two cell types was based on 1) conditions of tissue disruption and 2) differential growth requirements. Both cell types were dependent on transferrin, high density lipoproteins, insulin, hydrocortisone, and epidermal growth factor, whereas MTMC was dependent also on selenium and 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine. The elimination of single factors or extracellular matrix resulted in specific and different changes in the growth pattern of each cell subpopulation. Cells of both types exhibited the ultrastructural features of high metabolic activity. The epithelial nature of MTEC cultures was defined by bundles of tonofilaments and desmosomes and by positive staining to keratins and negative to vimentin. In addition MTEC were positively stained with mAb to thymic medullary epithelial cells and by Ulex europeus agglutinin, and were able to form Hassall's corpuscles, suggesting their medullary origin. MTEC were also H-2 and Ia positive. In contrast MTMC were positive for vimentin and periodic acid-Schiff, low positive for H-2, and negative for keratin and Ia. Both cells did not contain nonspecific esterase, nor did they phagocytize latex beads. With the use of all these criteria we classified MTEC as epithelial cells from the medullary compartment of the thymus and MTMC as reticular cells of mesenchymal origin.

  11. Sonic hedgehog signals to multiple prostate stromal stem cells that replenish distinct stromal subtypes during regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Ching; Levine, Charles M.; Zahid, Sarwar; Wilson, E. Lynette; Joyner, Alexandra L.

    2013-01-01

    The adult mouse prostate has a seemingly endless capacity for regeneration, and sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling has been implicated in this stem cell-driven process. However, it is not clear whether SHH acts on the epithelium or stromal cells that secrete factors required for epithelial expansion. Because little is known about stromal stem cells compared with their epithelial counterparts, we used in vivo mouse genetics tools to characterize four prostate stromal subtypes and their stem cells. Using knockin reporter alleles, we uncovered that SHH signals from prostate basal epithelial cells to adjacent stromal cells. Furthermore, the SHH target gene Gli1 is preferentially expressed in subepithelial fibroblast-like cells, one of four prostate stromal subtypes and the subtype closest to the epithelial source of SHH. Using Genetic Inducible Fate Mapping to mark adult Gli1- or Smooth muscle actin-expressing cells and follow their fate during regeneration, we uncovered that Gli1-expressing cells exhibit long-term self-renewal capacity during multiple rounds of androgen-mediated regeneration after castration-induced involution, and depleted smooth muscle cells are mainly replenished by preexisting smooth muscle cells. Based on our Genetic Inducible Fate Mapping studies, we propose a model where SHH signals to multiple stromal stem cells, which are largely unipotent in vivo. PMID:24218555

  12. Interactions between stromal cell--derived keratinocyte growth factor and epithelial transforming growth factor in immune-mediated crypt cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj-Elliott, M; Poulsom, R; Pender, S L; Wathen, N C; MacDonald, T T

    1998-01-01

    Immune reactions in the gut are associated with increased epithelial cell proliferation. Here we have studied the role of keratinocyte growth factor (KGF; FGF7) and transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) in the epithelial cell hyperplasia seen in explants of fetal human small intestine after activation of lamina propria T cells with the superantigen Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B (SEB). After the addition of SEB to the explants there is a 10-fold increase in KGF mRNA by 72 h of culture. KGF transcripts were abundant in the lamina propria using in situ hybridization and the culture supernatants contained elevated amounts of KGF protein. SEB had no direct effect on KGF mRNA and protein production by cultured lamina propria mesenchymal cells, but both were upregulated by TNF-alpha. Accompanying the increase in KGF there was also an increase in TGF-alpha precursor proteins in the culture supernatants and the phosphorylated form of the EGFR receptor was also detected in the tissue. Increased TGF-alpha precursor proteins were also detected in the supernatants of control explants stimulated with KGF alone. The direct addition of KGF and TGF-alpha enhanced epithelial cell proliferation and antibodies against KGF and TGF-alpha partially inhibited SEB-induced crypt hyperplasia. These results suggest molecular cross-talk between the KGF/KGFR and the TGF-alpha/EGFR in immune-mediated crypt cell hyperplasia. PMID:9788959

  13. Replenishment of type VII collagen and re-epithelialization of chronically ulcerated skin after intradermal administration of allogeneic mesenchymal stromal cells in two patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Conget, Paulette; Rodriguez, Fernando; Kramer, Susanne; Allers, Carolina; Simon, Valeska; Palisson, Francis; Gonzalez, Sergio; Yubero, Maria J

    2010-05-01

    In animal models it has been shown that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) contribute to skin regeneration and accelerate wound healing. We evaluated whether allogeneic MSC administration resulted in an improvement in the skin of two patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB; OMIM 226600). Patients had absent type VII collagen immunohistofluorescence and since birth had suffered severe blistering and wounds that heal with scarring. Vehicle or 0.5 x 10(6) MSC were infused intradermally in intact and chronic ulcerated sites. One week after intervention, in MSC-treated skin type VII collagen was detected along the basement membrane zone and the dermal-epidermal junction was continuous. Re-epithelialization of chronic ulcerated skin was observed only near MSC administration sites. In both patients the observed clinical benefit lasted for 4 months. Thus intradermal administration of allogeneic MSC associates with type VII collagen replenishment at the dermal-epidermal junction, prevents blistering and improves wound healing in unconditioned patients with RDEB.

  14. Parameters of Stromal Activation and Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition as Predictive Biomarkers for Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geweiler, Jana; Inhestern, Johanna; Berndt, Alexander; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Induction chemotherapy (IC) is likely to be effective for biologically distinct subgroups of oral cancer and biomarker development may lead to identification of those patients. Methods We evaluated immune cell infiltration, stroma formation and structure of the invasive front as well as the immunohistochemical expression of alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA), CD163, E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and the laminin gamma 2 chain in pretreatment biopsy specimens and surgical resections after IC in 20 patients with locally advanced oral cancer who were treated in a prospective, ongoing, phase II trial on IC using docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (TPF). Results Significant negative prognostic factors for incomplete pathological tumor response to IC were alcohol abuse (P=0.032), cN+ (P=0.042), and <30% tumor reduction after first cycle of IC (P=0.034). Of the investigated histological parameters and biomarkers only a low membrane-bound expression of E-cadherin showed a trend to be associated with incomplete response to IC (P=0.061). Low expression of ASMA in stromal vessels and a strong tumor invasion front were significantly associated to tumor recurrence (P=0.024 and P=0.004, respectively). The median follow-up of all patients was 35 months. Alcohol abuse (P<0.001), <30% tumor reduction after first cycle of IC (P=0.005), and a strong tumor invasion front (P=0.019) were negative prognostic factors for overall survival. Conclusion A strong predictive biomarker among the investigated parameters for benefitting from TPF IC could not be found. The extent of the tumor invasion front was a negative prognostic marker for recurrence and survival in oral cancer treated by TPF IC followed by surgery and postoperative radiochemotherapy. PMID:27416733

  15. Stromal Fibroblasts from the Interface Zone of Triple Negative Breast Carcinomas Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and its Inhibition by Emodin.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiang-Chi; Liu, Liang-Chih; Wang, Hao-Yu; Hung, Chao-Ming; Lin, Ying-Chao; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2017-01-01

    "Triple negative breast cancer" (TNBC) is associated with a higher rate and earlier time of recurrence and worse prognosis after recurrence. In this study, we aimed to examine the crosstalk between fibroblasts and TNBC cells. The fibroblasts were isolated from TNBC patients' tissue in tumor burden zones, distal normal zones and interface zones. The fibroblasts were indicated as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), normal zone fibroblasts (NFs) and interface zone fibroblasts (INFs). Our study found that INFs grew significantly faster than NFs and CAFs in vitro. The epithelial BT20 cells cultured with the conditioned medium of INFs (INFs-CM) and CAFs (CAFs-CM) showed more spindle-like shape and cell scattering than cultured with the conditioned medium of NFs (NFs-CM). These results indicated that factors secreted by INFs-CM or CAFs-CM could induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in BT20 cells. Using an in vitro co-culture model, INFs or CAFs induced EMT and promoted cancer cell migration in BT20 cells. Interestingly, we found that emodin inhibited INFs-CM or CAFs-CM-induced EMT programming and phenotype in BT20 cells. Previous studies reported that CAFs and INFs-secreted TGF-β promoted human breast cancer cell proliferation, here; our results indicated that TGF-β initiated EMT in BT20 cells. Pretreatment with emodin significantly suppressed the TGF-β-induced EMT and cell migration in BT20 cells. These results suggest that emodin may be used as a novel agent for the treatment of TNBC.

  16. Stromal Fibroblasts from the Interface Zone of Triple Negative Breast Carcinomas Induced Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and its Inhibition by Emodin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao-Yu; Hung, Chao-Ming; Lin, Ying-Chao; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2017-01-01

    “Triple negative breast cancer” (TNBC) is associated with a higher rate and earlier time of recurrence and worse prognosis after recurrence. In this study, we aimed to examine the crosstalk between fibroblasts and TNBC cells. The fibroblasts were isolated from TNBC patients’ tissue in tumor burden zones, distal normal zones and interface zones. The fibroblasts were indicated as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), normal zone fibroblasts (NFs) and interface zone fibroblasts (INFs). Our study found that INFs grew significantly faster than NFs and CAFs in vitro. The epithelial BT20 cells cultured with the conditioned medium of INFs (INFs-CM) and CAFs (CAFs-CM) showed more spindle-like shape and cell scattering than cultured with the conditioned medium of NFs (NFs-CM). These results indicated that factors secreted by INFs-CM or CAFs-CM could induce the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype in BT20 cells. Using an in vitro co-culture model, INFs or CAFs induced EMT and promoted cancer cell migration in BT20 cells. Interestingly, we found that emodin inhibited INFs-CM or CAFs-CM-induced EMT programming and phenotype in BT20 cells. Previous studies reported that CAFs and INFs-secreted TGF-β promoted human breast cancer cell proliferation, here; our results indicated that TGF-β initiated EMT in BT20 cells. Pretreatment with emodin significantly suppressed the TGF-β-induced EMT and cell migration in BT20 cells. These results suggest that emodin may be used as a novel agent for the treatment of TNBC. PMID:28060811

  17. Transplantation of a mammary stromal cell line into a mammary fat pad: development of the site-specific in vivo analysis system for mammary stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Hajime; Aoki, Naohito; Nadano, Daita; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between mammary epithelial and stromal tissue is considered to be important in breast tissue development. In this study, we developed a transplantation procedure for the mammary stromal fibroblastic cell line (MSF) to examine its life in vivo. First we established MSF cells which stably expressed lacZ (lacZ/MSF) and had characteristics of mammary stromal cells. The lacZ/MSF cells were then transplanted into a cleared mammary fat pad of syngenic mice with and without mammary primary epithelial organoids. Whole mount X-gal and carmine staining of the transplants revealed that a number of undifferentiated lacZ/MSF cells survived around the mammary epithelial tissue when transplanted with organoids. These results indicate that transplantation of MSF cells into mammary fat pad was accomplished by co-transplantation with primary mammary organoids. Finally, we discuss the application of transplantation procedure for in vivo studies of the mammary stromal tissue development and stromal-epithelial interactions.

  18. Cytochemical localisation and characterisation of proteoglycans (glycosaminoglycans) in the epithelial-stromal interface of the seminal vesicle of the guinea pig.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, L; Wong, Y C

    1992-01-01

    The proteoglycans (PGs) in the guinea pig seminal vesicle were demonstrated ultrastructurally by both cuprolinic blue (CB) and ruthenium red (RR) staining. The PGs appeared as electron-dense granules with RR, but were filamentous following CB staining using the critical electrolyte concentration method. Three major types of PGs (T1, T2, T3) have been described according to their different locations and sizes. T1 filaments were short and were found mostly on both sides of the lamina densa of the basal lamina of the glandular epithelium (40-60 nm long) and also on the basal laminae of smooth muscle cells and capillary endothelial cells (20-30 nm long). In the epithelial basal lamina they were regularly spaced at an interval of 40-60 nm. T1 filaments in the lamina densa were smaller and more randomly distributed. Cytochemical characterisation of these PGs by various GAG degrading enzymes showed that T1 PGs are rich in heparan sulphate. T2 filaments were 30-40 nm long and closely associated with the collagen fibrils. They were arranged perpendicular to the long axis of collagen fibrils, also at intervals of about 60 nm. T2 filaments were removed by chondroitinase (Ch)-ABC, Ch-ABC plus Streptomyces (S)-hyaluronidase and pronase, but resistant to nitrous acid, heparitinase, heparinase, neuraminidase and S-hyaluronidase. These show that T2 filaments are rich in dermatan sulphate. T3 filaments (60-100 nm) were widely distributed in the stroma at sites such as the interstitial spaces of the lamina propria, the reticular layer below the basal lamina, around individual collagen fibrils or bundles of such fibres, and on the cell surfaces of fibroblasts. The T3 filaments were removed by Ch-ABC, Ch-AC and pronase but were resistant to heparitinase, heparinase, S-hyaluronidase, neuraminidase and nitrous acid. They are therefore rich in chondroitin sulphate. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig

  19. Gastric stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Ovali, Gülgün Yilmaz; Tarhan, Serdar; Serter, Selim; Pabuşçu, Yüksel

    2005-06-01

    Gastric stromal tumors are rare neoplasms of the stomach. In this report we present a gastric stromal tumor with an exophytic growth pattern, and describe magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasonography findings.

  20. DNA measurement and immunohistochemical characterization of epithelial and mesenchymal cells in canine mixed mammary tumours: putative evidence for a common histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gärtner, F; Geraldes, M; Cassali, G; Rema, A; Schmitt, F

    1999-07-01

    DNA measurement by image cytometry, and a detailed immunohistochemical study using monoclonal antibodies directed against different human cytokeratin types, muscle-specific actin, vimentin and S100 protein were carried out on normal canine mammary tissue (n =4), benign canine mammary mixed tumours (n =20) and malignant canine mammary mixed tumours (n =13). The results showed that ductal and alveolar luminal cells in normal and neoplastic tissue were immunoreactive with CAM5.2 and AE1/AE3 antibodies recognizing human keratins.Basal/myoepithelial cells were clearly differentiated from ductal and alveolar epithelial cells, since the latter only expressed cytokeratins, whereas the former also expressed vimentin and muscle-specific actin. This immunohistochemical study showed that there is loss of expression of muscle-specific actin and cytokeratins in areas of myoepithelial proliferation, and enhanced expression of vimentin and S100 protein in proliferative areas with osseous and/or chondroid metaplasia. The ploidy studies revealed that 20% (4/20) of benign and 54% (7/13) of malignant mixed tumours of canine mammary gland were aneuploid and that the epithelial and myoepithelial components of the mixed tumours had identical DNA content. Our results reinforce the role of myoepithelial cells in mesenchymal metaplasia in mixed mammary tumours and suggest the possibility of a common origin of both components from a totipotential stem cell with capacity for divergent differentiation.

  1. Targeting stromal androgen receptor suppresses prolactin-driven benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    PubMed

    Lai, Kuo-Pao; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Fang, Lei-Ya; Izumi, Kouji; Lo, Chi-Wen; Wood, Ronald; Kindblom, Jon; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-10-01

    Stromal-epithelial interaction plays a pivotal role to mediate the normal prostate growth, the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer development. Until now, the stromal androgen receptor (AR) functions in the BPH development, and the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we used a genetic knockout approach to ablate stromal fibromuscular (fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells) AR in a probasin promoter-driven prolactin transgenic mouse model (Pb-PRL tg mice) that could spontaneously develop prostate hyperplasia to partially mimic human BPH development. We found Pb-PRL tg mice lacking stromal fibromuscular AR developed smaller prostates, with more marked changes in the dorsolateral prostate lobes with less proliferation index. Mechanistically, prolactin mediated hyperplastic prostate growth involved epithelial-stromal interaction through epithelial prolactin/prolactin receptor signals to regulate granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor expression to facilitate stromal cell growth via sustaining signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 activity. Importantly, the stromal fibromuscular AR could modulate such epithelial-stromal interacting signals. Targeting stromal fibromuscular AR with the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), led to the reduction of prostate size, which could be used in future therapy.

  2. Assessment of the stromal contribution to Sonic Hedgehog-dependent pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Damhofer, Helene; Medema, Jan Paul; Veenstra, Veronique L; Badea, Liviu; Popescu, Irinel; Roelink, Henk; Bijlsma, Maarten F

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. It is typically detected at an advanced stage, at which the therapeutic options are very limited. One remarkable feature of PDAC that contributes to its resilience to treatment is the extreme stromal activation seen in these tumors. Often, the vast majority of tumor bulk consists of non-tumor cells that together provide a tumor-promoting environment. One of the signals that maintains and activates the stroma is the developmental protein Sonic Hedgehog (SHH). As the disease progresses, tumor cells produce increasing amounts of SHH, which activates the surrounding stroma to aid in tumor progression. To better understand this response and identify targets for inhibition, we aimed to elucidate the proteins that mediate the SHH-driven stromal response in PDAC. For this a novel mixed-species coculture model was set up in which the cancer cells are human, and the stroma is modeled by mouse fibroblasts. In conjunction with next-generation sequencing we were able to use the sequence difference between these species to genetically distinguish between the epithelial and stromal responses to SHH. The stromal SHH-dependent genes from this analysis were validated and their relevance for human disease was subsequently determined in two independent patient cohorts. In non-microdissected tissue from PDAC patients, in which a large amount of stroma is present, the targets were confirmed to associate with tumor stroma versus normal pancreatic tissue. Patient survival analysis and immunohistochemistry identified CDA, EDIL3, ITGB4, PLAUR and SPOCK1 as SHH-dependent stromal factors that are associated with poor prognosis in PDAC patients. Summarizing, the presented data provide insight into the role of the activated stroma in PDAC, and how SHH acts to mediate this response. In addition, the study has yielded several candidates that are interesting therapeutic targets for a disease for which treatment

  3. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Hein, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    Although the stroma within carcinogenic lesions is known to be supportive and responsive to tumors, new data increasingly show that the stroma also has a more active, oncogenic role in tumorigenesis. Stromal cells and their products can transform adjacent tissues in the absence of pre-existing tumor cells by inciting phenotypic and genomic changes in the epithelial cells. The oncogenic action of distinctive stromal components has been demonstrated through a variety of approaches, which provide clues about the cellular pathways involved.

  4. Inflammatory responses of a macrophage/epithelial cell co-culture model to mono and mixed infections with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia.

    PubMed

    Bodet, Charles; Chandad, Fatiha; Grenier, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Accumulated evidence points to Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia as three major etiologic agents of chronic periodontitis. Epithelial cells and macrophages play a major role in the host response to periodontopathogens, and the secretion of inflammatory mediators and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by these host cells is believed to contribute to periodontal tissue destruction. The aim of this study was to investigate the inflammatory response of a macrophage/epithelial cell co-culture model following mono or mixed infections with the above three periodontopathogens. An in vitro co-culture model composed of epithelial-like transformed cells (HeLa cell line) and macrophage-like cells (phorbol myristic acid-differentiated U937 monocytic cell line) was challenged with whole cells or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia, individually and in combination. Following stimulation, the production of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and MMP-9 were quantified by enzyme-linked immunoassays. We observed that mono or mixed infections of the co-culture model induced the secretion of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, PGE2, and MMP-9. P. gingivalis and T. forsythia induced an increase in RANTES secretion, whereas T. denticola alone or in combination resulted in a significant decrease in RANTES levels. All LPS challenges induced an increase in chemokine, MMP-9, and PGE2 production. No synergistic effect on the production of cytokines, chemokines, PGE2, and MMP-9 was observed for any of the bacterial or LPS mixtures tested. This study supports the view that P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia may induce high levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and MMP-9 in periodontal lesions, thus contributing to the progression of periodontitis.

  5. Crosstalk between stromal cells and cancer cells in pancreatic cancer: New insights into stromal biology.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Han-Xiang; Zhou, Bin; Cheng, Yu-Gang; Xu, Jian-Wei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Guang-Yong; Hu, San-Yuan

    2017-04-28

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. Increasing evidence has confirmed the pivotal role of stromal components in the regulation of carcinogenesis, invasion, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance in PC. Interaction between neoplastic cells and stromal cells builds a specific microenvironment, which further modulates the malignant properties of cancer cells. Instead of being a "passive bystander", stroma may play a role as a "partner in crime" in PC. However, the role of stromal components in PC is complex and requires further investigation. In this article, we review recent advances regarding the regulatory roles and mechanisms of stroma biology, especially the cellular components such as pancreatic stellate cells, macrophages, neutrophils, adipocytes, epithelial cells, pericytes, mast cells, and lymphocytes, in PC. Crosstalk between stromal cells and cancer cells is thoroughly investigated. We also review the prognostic value and molecular therapeutic targets of stroma in PC. This review may help us further understand the molecular mechanisms of stromal biology and its role in PC development and therapeutic resistance. Moreover, targeting stroma components may provide new therapeutic strategies for this stubborn disease.

  6. Stromal response to Hedgehog signaling restrains pancreatic cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Lee, John J; Perera, Rushika M; Wang, Huaijun; Wu, Dai-Chen; Liu, X Shawn; Han, Shiwei; Fitamant, Julien; Jones, Phillip D; Ghanta, Krishna S; Kawano, Sally; Nagle, Julia M; Deshpande, Vikram; Boucher, Yves; Kato, Tomoyo; Chen, James K; Willmann, Jürgen K; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Beachy, Philip A

    2014-07-29

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the most lethal of common human malignancies, with no truly effective therapies for advanced disease. Preclinical studies have suggested a therapeutic benefit of targeting the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway, which is activated throughout the course of PDA progression by expression of Hh ligands in the neoplastic epithelium and paracrine response in the stromal fibroblasts. Clinical trials to test this possibility, however, have yielded disappointing results. To further investigate the role of Hh signaling in the formation of PDA and its precursor lesion, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN), we examined the effects of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of Hh pathway activity in three distinct genetically engineered mouse models and found that Hh pathway inhibition accelerates rather than delays progression of oncogenic Kras-driven disease. Notably, pharmacologic inhibition of Hh pathway activity affected the balance between epithelial and stromal elements, suppressing stromal desmoplasia but also causing accelerated growth of the PanIN epithelium. In striking contrast, pathway activation using a small molecule agonist caused stromal hyperplasia and reduced epithelial proliferation. These results indicate that stromal response to Hh signaling is protective against PDA and that pharmacologic activation of pathway response can slow tumorigenesis. Our results provide evidence for a restraining role of stroma in PDA progression, suggesting an explanation for the failure of Hh inhibitors in clinical trials and pointing to the possibility of a novel type of therapeutic intervention.

  7. Stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of studies of neoplastic transformation have focused attention on events that occur within transformed cells. These cell autonomous events result in the disruption of molecular pathways that regulate basic activities of the cells such as proliferation, death, movement and genomic integrity. Other studies have addressed the microenvironment of tumor cells and documented its importance in supporting tumor progression. Recent work has begun to expand on these initial studies of tumor microenvironment and now provide novel insights into the possible initiation and progression of malignant cells. This review will address the transforming effect of stromal cells on epithelial components. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. Cellular and molecular phenotypes of proliferating stromal cells from human carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kopantzev, E P; Vayshlya, N A; Kopantseva, M R; Egorov, V I; Pikunov, M; Zinovyeva, M V; Vinogradova, T V; Zborovskaya, I B; Sverdlov, E D

    2010-01-01

    Background: Stromal cells are a functionally important component of human carcinomas. The aim of this study was to obtain and characterise primary cultures of stromal cells from human carcinomas and the corresponding surrounding normal tissue. Methods: Primary stromal cell cultures from tumours of lung, oesophagus and pancreas were obtained using a mild tissue dissociation method and a medium for culturing mesenchymal cells. Immunofluorescence staining and western blotting were used to analyse the expression of differentiation markers and selected known oncoproteins in the cell cultures obtained. Results: A panel of stromal primary cultures was prepared from different human tumours and from matched normal cancer-free tissues. The in vitro proliferative potential of tumour-associated fibroblasts was shown to be higher than that of matched normal stromal cells. A mutational analysis of the TP53 and KRAS2 genes in a number of stromal cultures did not reveal known mutations in most cells of the cultures studied. Western blot analysis showed that stromal cells of lung tumours were characterised by a statistically significantly lower expression level of the p16 protein as compared with that in normal lung stromal cells. An important finding of our study was that, according to immunofluorescence assay, a fraction of fibroblast-like vimentin-positive cells in some tumour and normal stromal cell cultures expressed an epithelial marker – cytokeratins. Conclusions: Proliferating stromal cells from the carcinomas studied proved to be genetically normal cells with altered expression profiles of some genes involved in carcinogenesis, as compared with normal stromal cells. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition may lead to the emergence of transdifferentiated fibroblast-like cells in tumour stroma and in the tumour-surrounding tissue. PMID:20407446

  9. Regeneration of Bovine Mammary Gland in Immunodeficient Mice by Transplantation of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells Mixed with Matrigel

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jung; Lee, Won Young; Jeong, Ha Yeon; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives With the global demand for dairy protein for consumption growing annually, there has been increasing activity in the research field of dairy protein synthesis and production. From a manipulation perspective, it is more difficult to use live cattle for laboratory studies on the production of milk as well as of dairy protein such as casein, as compared with using laboratory animals like rodents. Therefore, we aimed to develop a mouse model of bovine mammary alveolar ducts for laboratory-scale studies. We studied the formation of the bovine mammary gland ductal structure by transplanting the MAC-T bovine alveolar cell line into mice. Methods and Results MAC-T cells (1×107) were suspended in Matrigel and injected into the dorsal tissue of 8-week-old male BALB/C nude mice. Histological analysis of tissue dissected from the MAC-T cell-transplanted mice after 6 weeks showed the typical morphology of the tubuloalveolar female gland, as well as glands made up of branching ducts that were surrounded by smooth muscle with small alveoli budding off the ducts. In addition, the epithelial markers CK14 and CK18 were expressed within the duct-like structure. Prolactin was detected in the duct interior in these CK14+ and CK18+ cells but not in the non-transplanted MAC-T cells. Conclusions These results showed that duct-like tissue had been successfully formed after 6 weeks of transplantation of the CK14+ and CK18+ MAC-T cells into mice dorsal tissue. This mouse model will be a useful tool for further research on the bovine mammary gland. PMID:27788570

  10. An unusual infiltrative basal cell carcinoma with osteoclastic stromal changes mimicking carcinosarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gamsizkan, Mehmet; Naujokas, Agne; Simsek, Hasan Aktug; McCalmont, Timothy H

    2015-01-01

    A 91-year-old man presented with an ulcerated nodule on his left lower eyelid. The tumor showed an epithelial component composed of basaloid and clear cells and a stroma that contained many osteoclastic giant cells. Strong, diffuse expression for cytokeratin 17 and p63 was noted in the epithelial component, whereas no staining was present in the sarcomatoid stroma, suggesting that the osteoclast-rich stromal component represented an unusual benign stromal reaction to the carcinoma rather than a manifestation of carcinosarcoma. Further supporting this interpretation was the absence of mitotic figures and low Ki-67 proliferation index (of approximately 1%) in the stromal cells. We herein reported a case of unusual infiltrative basal cell carcinoma, accompanied by a clear cell carcinomatous features and concurrent benign osteoclastic stromal changes.

  11. Benign phyllodes tumor with tubular adenoma-like epithelial component in FNAC: A diagnostic pitfall

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Kishori M

    2016-01-01

    Benign phyllodes tumor (BPT) is a biphasic neoplasm composed of bland stromal and epithelial elements. Cytologic diagnostic criteria of BPT, though documented in the literature, diagnostic pitfalls in fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) may occur due to sampling error, high cellularity, ductal hyperplasia, paucity of stromal component, and occasional dissociation of epithelial cells. Here, we describe a case of BPT diagnosed by histology in a 19-year-old female, where FNAC features were inconclusive due to paucity of stromal component, predominance of tubular adenoma-like epithelial component, and due to the presence of other overlapping features with fibroadenoma. PMID:28028339

  12. Benign phyllodes tumor with tubular adenoma-like epithelial component in FNAC: A diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Panda, Kishori M

    2016-01-01

    Benign phyllodes tumor (BPT) is a biphasic neoplasm composed of bland stromal and epithelial elements. Cytologic diagnostic criteria of BPT, though documented in the literature, diagnostic pitfalls in fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) may occur due to sampling error, high cellularity, ductal hyperplasia, paucity of stromal component, and occasional dissociation of epithelial cells. Here, we describe a case of BPT diagnosed by histology in a 19-year-old female, where FNAC features were inconclusive due to paucity of stromal component, predominance of tubular adenoma-like epithelial component, and due to the presence of other overlapping features with fibroadenoma.

  13. Protective Effects of Human iPS-Derived Retinal Pigmented Epithelial Cells in Comparison with Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells and Human Neural Stem Cells on the Degenerating Retina in rd1 mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianan; Mandai, Michiko; Kamao, Hiroyuki; Hashiguchi, Tomoyo; Shikamura, Masayuki; Kawamata, Shin; Sugita, Sunao; Takahashi, Masayo

    2015-05-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of visual impairments characterized by progressive rod photoreceptor cell loss due to a genetic background. Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) predominantly secreted by the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) has been reported to protect photoreceptors in retinal degeneration models, including rd1. In addition, clinical trials are currently underway outside Japan using human mesenchymal stromal cells and human neural stem cells to protect photoreceptors in RP and dry age-related macular degeneration, respectively. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the rescue effects of induced pluripotent stem (iPS)-RPE cells in comparison with those types of cells used in clinical trials on photoreceptor degeneration in rd1 mice. Cells were injected into the subretinal space of immune-suppressed 2-week-old rd1 mice. The results demonstrated that human iPS-RPE cells significantly attenuated photoreceptor degeneration on postoperative days (PODs) 14 and 21 and survived longer up to at least 12 weeks after operation than the other two types of graft cells with less immune responses and apoptosis. The mean PEDF concentration in the intraocular fluid in RPE-transplanted eyes was more than 1 µg/ml at PODs 14 and 21, and this may have contributed to the protective effect of RPE transplantation. Our findings suggest that iPS-RPE cells serve as a competent source to delay photoreceptor degeneration through stable survival in degenerating ocular environment and by releasing neuroprotective factors such as PEDF.

  14. What's New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stromal Tumor (GIST) About Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor What’s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment? There ... the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors? What’s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment? More ...

  15. Denileukin Diftitox Used in Treating Patients With Advanced Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma, or Epithelial Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  16. Marginal reticular cells: a stromal subset directly descended from the lymphoid tissue organizer

    PubMed Central

    Katakai, Tomoya

    2012-01-01

    The architecture of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) is supported by several non-hematopoietic stromal cells. Currently it is established that two distinct stromal subsets, follicular dendritic cells and fibroblastic reticular cells, play crucial roles in the formation of tissue compartments within SLOs, i.e., the follicle and T zone, respectively. Although stromal cells in the anlagen are essential for SLO development, the relationship between these primordial cells and the subsets in adulthood remains poorly understood. In addition, the roles of stromal cells in the entry of antigens into the compartments through some tissue structures peculiar to SLOs remain unclear. A recently identified stromal subset, marginal reticular cells (MRCs), covers the margin of SLOs that are primarily located in the outer edge of follicles and construct a unique reticulum. MRCs are closely associated with specialized endothelial or epithelial structures for antigen transport. The similarities in marker expression profiles and successive localization during development suggest that MRCs directly descend from organizer stromal cells in the anlagen. Therefore, MRCs are thought to be a crucial stromal component for the organization and function of SLOs. PMID:22807928

  17. Stromal influences on breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    van Roozendaal, C. E.; van Ooijen, B.; Klijn, J. G.; Claassen, C.; Eggermont, A. M.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Foekens, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Paracrine influences from fibroblasts derived from different sources of breast tissue on epithelial breast cancer cell growth in vitro were investigated. Medium conditioned (CM) by fibroblasts derived from tumours, adjacent normal breast tissue, and normal breast tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty or from skin tissue significantly stimulated the growth of the steroid-receptor positive cell lines MCF-7 and ZR 75.1. The proliferation index (PI) on MCF-7 cells with CM from fibroblasts derived from breast tumour tissue was significantly higher than that obtained with fibroblasts derived from adjacent normal breast tissue (2p less than 0.05, n = 8). The PI obtained with CM from normal fibroblast cultures from reduction mammoplasty tissue, like normal tissue adjacent to the tumour, fell in the lower range of values. Skin fibroblast, like tumour tissue derived fibroblast, CM caused a high range PI. MDA-MB-231 and Evsa-T, two steroid-receptor negative cell lines, showed only a minor growth stimulatory responses with some of the fibroblast CM's. Evsa-T was occasionally inhibited by CM's. In conclusion, stromal factors play a role in the growth regulation of human breast cancer cells. The effects on cancer cell growth are, however, varying depending on the source of the stroma and the characteristics of the epithelial tumour cells. PMID:1733444

  18. The contribution of thymic stromal abnormalities to autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Anne L; Calder, Adrienne; Hince, Melanie N; Boyd, Richard L; Chidgey, Ann P

    2011-01-01

    In essence, normal thymus function involves the production of a broad repertoire of αβT cells capable of responding to foreign antigens with low risk of autoreactivity. Thymic epithelial cells are an essential component of the thymic stromal microenvironment, promoting the growth and export of self-tolerant thymocytes. Autoimmune disease, resulting from a loss of self-tolerance, is clinically and genetically complex, and accordingly has many potential etiological origins. However, it is commonly linked to defects in the thymic epithelial microenvironment. The study of autoimmune-linked thymic stromal dysfunction has indisputably advanced our understanding of T cell tolerance; notably, a field-wide paradigm shift occurred when autoimmune regulator (Aire) was found to drive expression of a multitude of peripheral tissue-restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells. Many other associations with polygenically controlled autoimmune diseases have been reported but are more difficult to definitively dissect. Paradoxically, immunodeficiency and age-related immunosenescence are also linked with increased autoimmunity. Here we discuss the theoretical basis and the evidence gathered thus far to support these associations.

  19. Amount of stroma is associated with mammographic density and stromal expression of oestrogen receptor in normal breast tissues.

    PubMed

    Gabrielson, Marike; Chiesa, Flaminia; Paulsson, Janna; Strell, Carina; Behmer, Catharina; Rönnow, Katarina; Czene, Kamila; Östman, Arne; Hall, Per

    2016-07-01

    Following female sex and age, mammographic density is considered one of the strongest risk factors for breast cancer. Despite the association between mammographic density and breast cancer risk, little is known about the underlying histology and biological basis of breast density. To better understand the mechanisms behind mammographic density we assessed morphology, proliferation and hormone receptor status in relation to mammographic density in breast tissues from healthy women. Tissues were obtained from 2012-2013 by ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy from 160 women as part of the Karma (Karolinska mammography project for risk prediction for breast cancer) project. Mammograms were collected through routine mammography screening and mammographic density was calculated using STRATUS. The histological composition, epithelial and stromal proliferation status and hormone receptor status were assessed through immunohistochemical staining. Higher mammographic density was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stromal and epithelial tissue and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial expression levels of Ki-67, oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) were not associated with mammographic density. Epithelial Ki-67 was associated with a greater proportion of epithelial tissue, and epithelial PR was associated with a greater proportion of stromal and a lower proportion of adipose tissue. Epithelial ER was not associated with any tissues. In contrast, expression of ER in the stroma was significantly associated with a greater proportion of stroma, and negatively associated with the amount of adipose tissue. High mammographic density is associated with higher amount of stroma and epithelium and less amount of fat, but is not associated with a change in epithelial proliferation or receptor status. Increased expressions of both epithelial PR and stromal ER are associated with a greater proportion of stroma, suggesting hormonal involvement

  20. Phenotypic plasticity in normal breast derived epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Normal, healthy human breast tissue from a variety of volunteer donors has become available for research thanks to the establishment of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure® Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center (KTB). Multiple epithelial (K-HME) and stromal cells (K-HMS) were established from the donated tissue. Explant culture was utilized to isolate the cells from pieces of breast tissue. Selective media and trypsinization were employed to select either epithelial cells or stromal cells. The primary, non-transformed epithelial cells, the focus of this study, were characterized by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and in vitro cell culture. Results All of the primary, non-transformed epithelial cells tested have the ability to differentiate in vitro into a variety of cell types when plated in or on biologic matrices. Cells identified include stratified squamous epithelial, osteoclasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, neural progenitors/neurons, immature muscle and melanocytes. The cells also express markers of embryonic stem cells. Conclusions The cell culture conditions employed select an epithelial cell that is pluri/multipotent. The plasticity of the epithelial cells developed mimics that seen in metaplastic carcinoma of the breast (MCB), a subtype of triple negative breast cancer; and may provide clues to the origin of this particularly aggressive type of breast cancer. The KTB is a unique biorepository, and the normal breast epithelial cells isolated from donated tissue have significant potential as new research tools. PMID:24915897

  1. Modulation of corneal and stromal matrix metalloproteinase by the mannose-induced Acanthamoeba cytolytic protein

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Hassan; Li, Haochuan; Neelam, Sudha; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2008-01-01

    The involvement of the mannose-induced Acanthamoeba cytopathic protein (MIP-133) in tissue injury and activation of metalloproteinase of corneal and stromal cells was examined in vitro. Activation of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 induced by MIP-133 on human corneal epithelial and stromal cell cultures was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and ELISA. MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 mRNA were expressed in both cultured human corneal epithelial and stromal cells. When the epithelial cells were exposed to MIP-133 protein, the mRNA expression for MMP-1 and MMP-9 was unchanged. However, the transcript for MMP-2 and MMP-3 was decreased by two fold. By contrast, the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-3 was significantly up-regulated (2–4 fold) in the corneal stromal cells 1, 4, and 8 hours after MIP-133 stimulation. At the protein level, there was no significant difference in the level of MMPs between the corneal epithelial cells before and after stimulation with MIP-133. By contrast, the levels of MMP-2 and MMP-3 were significantly higher in the corneal stromal cells stimulated with MIP-133. The supernatants from corneal stromal cells stimulated with MIP-133 were incubated with PMSF and MIP-133 antibody and the level of MMP-2 was measured by ELISA. Activation of MMP-2 by MIP-133 was inhibited in the supernatants pretreated with the serine protease inhibitor, PMSF, and anti-MIP-133. Supernatants pretreated with the cysteine protease inhibitor E6 or control antibody produced the same amount of MMP-2 as the untreated supernatants. To verify the possible of homology between MMPs and A. castellanii proteases, the mRNA from A. castellanii was prepared and analyzed for the expression of MMP genes by PT-PCR. The results showed that A. castellanii did not express mRNA for MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, or MMP-9. Thus, A. castellanii mRNA does not cross react with human MMPs. Furthermore, ELISA was used to determine the cross reactivity of MMP antibodies with

  2. Mammary Tumor Development: Stromal-Epithelial Interactions in Oncogenesis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    address experimentally the strong association of p53 mutations with human breast cancers, and to test whether this association holds for experimental...may develop secretory tumors (32,45,46). MG tumors are reported in transgenic mice expressing c-myc, c- erbB2 /neu, int-1, int-3 and Ha-ras, and in F1...Yasui, W, Takekura, N, Kameda, T, Oda, N, Ito, M, Ito, H, Tahara, E: Effect of epider- mal growth factor on rat stomach carcinogenesis induced by N

  3. Epithelial and Stromal Spectral Imaging for Rapid Surgical Margin Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    cancer (orange). (f) Corresponding immunohistochemical measures of percent stroma, epithelium and fat, and CD31- positive, CD105-positive vascular...density and area. A b [HbT] % O2 % H2O % Epithelium -0.06 -0.37 0.27 -0.11 -0.21 % Stroma 0.06 0.33 -0.28 0.09 0.25 % Fat -0.02 -0.01 0.21 0.02...scattering slope was observed to better localize suspicious fibro- glandular lesions. The scattering slope was likely under-valued by the limitations

  4. Epithelial and Stromal Spectral Imaging for Rapid Surgical Margin Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, beta carotene and blood break-down products in a tissue, while simultaneously extracting scattering features in...fluorescence), so that the most diagnostically discriminating and robust parameters could be identified and optimized during data collection. Note that beta ... carotene is a member of the carotenoids and gives fat its highly pigmented, yellow color; we hope that its absorption spectra will improve

  5. Stromal-epithelial dynamics in response to fractionated radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Panying

    The speech of individuals with velopharyngeal incompetency (VPI) is characterized by hypernasality, a speech quality related to excessive emission of acoustic energy through the nose, as caused by failure of velopharyngeal closure. As an attempt to reduce hypernasality and, in turn, improve the quality of VPI-related hypernasal speech, this study is dedicated to developing an approach that uses speech-dependent articulatory adjustments to reduce hypernasality caused by excessive velopharyngeal opening. A preliminary study has been done to derive such articulatory adjustments for hypernasal /i/ vowels based on the simulation of an articulatorymodel (Speech Processing and Synthesis Toolboxes, Childers (2000)). Both nasal /i/ vowels with and without articulatory adjustments were synthesized by the model. Spectral analysis found that nasal acoustic features were attenuated and oral formant structures were restored after articulatory adjustments. In addition, comparisons of perceptual ratings of nasality between the two types of nasal vowels showed the articulatory adjustments generated by the model significantly reduced the perception of nasality for nasal /i/ vowels. Such articulatory adjustments for nasal /i/ have two patterns: 1) a consistent adjustment pattern, which corresponds an expansion at the velopharynx, and 2) some speech-dependent fine-tuning adjustment patterns, including adjustments in the lip area and the upper pharynx. The long-term goal of this study is to apply this approach of articulatory adjustment as a therapeutic tool in clinical speech treatment to detect and correct the maladaptive articulatory behaviors developed spontaneously by speakers with VPI on individual bases. This study constructed a speaker-adaptive articulatory model on the basis of the framework of Childers's vocal tract model to simulate articulatory adjustments aiming at compensating for the acoustic outcome caused by velopharyngeal opening and reducing nasality. To construct such a speaker-adaptive articulatory model, (1) an articulatory-acoustic-aerodynamic database was recorded using the articulography and aerodynamic instruments to provide point-wise articulatory data to be fitted into the framework of Childers's standard vocal tract model; (2) the length and transverse dimension of the vocal tract were adjusted to fit individual speaker by minimizing the acoustic discrepancy between the model simulation and the target derived from acoustic signal in the database using the simulated annealing algorithm; (3) the articulatory space of the model was adjusted to fit individual articulatory features by adapting the movement ranges of all articulators. With the speaker-adaptive articulatory model, the articulatory configurations of the oral and nasal vowels in the database were simulated and synthesized. Given the acoustic targets derived from the oral vowels in the database, speech-dependent articulatory adjustments were simulated to compensate for the acoustic outcome caused by VPO. The resultant articulatory configurations corresponds to nasal vowels with articulatory adjustment, which were synthesized to serve as the perceptual stimuli for a listening task of nasality rating. The oral and nasal vowels synthesized based on the oral and nasal vowel targets in the database also served as the perceptual stimuli. The results suggest both acoustic and perceptual effects of the mode-generated articulatory adjustment on the nasal vowels /a/, /i/ and /u/. In terms of acoustics, the articulatory adjustment (1) restores the altered formant structures due to nasal coupling, including shifted formant frequency, attenuated formant intensity and expanded formant bandwidth and (2) attenuates the peaks and zeros caused by nasal resonances. Perceptually, the articulatory adjustment generated by the speaker-adaptive model significantly reduces the perceived nasality for all three vowels (/a/, /i/, /u/). The acoustic and perceptual effects of articulatory adjustment suggest achievement of the acoustic goal of compensating for the acoustic discrepancy caused by VPO and the auditory goal of reducing the perception of nasality. Such a finding is consistent with motor equivalence (Hughes and Abbs, 1976; Maeda, 1990), which enables inter-articulator coordination to compensate for the deviation from the acoustic/auditory goal caused by the shifted position of an articulator. The articulatory adjustment responsible for the acoustic and perceptual effects as described above was decomposed into a set of empirical orthogonal modes (Story and Titze, 1998). Both gross articulatory patterns and fine-tuning adjustments were found in the principal orthogonal modes, which lead to the acoustic compensation and reduction of nasality. For /a/ and /i/, a direct relationship was found among the acoustic features, nasality, and articulatory adjustment patterns. Specifically, the articulatory adjustments indicated by the principal orthogonal modes of the adjusted nasal /a/ and /i/ were directly correlated with the attenuation of the acoustic cues of nasality (i.e., shifting of F1 and F2 frequencies) and the reduction of nasality rating. For /u/, such a direct relationship among the acoustic features, nasality and articulatory adjustment was not as prominent, suggesting the possibility of additional acoustic correlates of nasality other than F1 and F2. The findings of this study demonstrate the possibility of using articulatory adjustment to reduce the perception of nasality through model simulation. A speaker-adaptive articulatory model is able to simulate individual-based articulatory adjustment strategies that can be applied in clinical settings to serve as the articulatory targets for correction of the maladaptive articulatory behaviors developed spontaneously by speakers with hypernasal speech. Such a speaker-adaptive articulatory model provides an intuitive way of articulatory learning and self-training for speakers with VPI to learn appropriate articulatory strategies through model-speaker interaction.

  6. Potential role of corneal epithelial cell-derived exosomes in corneal wound healing and neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu-Yeon; Tran, Jennifer A.; Chang, Jin-Hong; Azar, Dimitri T.; Zieske, James D.

    2017-01-01

    Specific factors from the corneal epithelium underlying the stimulation of stromal fibrosis and myofibroblast formation in corneal wound healing have not been fully elucidated. Given that exosomes are known to transfer bioactive molecules among cells and play crucial roles in wound healing, angiogenesis, and cancer, we hypothesized that corneal epithelial cell-derived exosomes may gain access to the underlying stromal fibroblasts upon disruption of the epithelial basement membrane and that they induce signaling events essential for corneal wound healing. In the present study, exosome-like vesicles were observed between corneal epithelial cells and the stroma during wound healing after corneal epithelial debridement. These vesicles were also found in the stroma following anterior stromal keratectomy, in which surgical removal of the epithelium, basement membrane, and anterior stroma was performed. Exosomes secreted by mouse corneal epithelial cells were found to fuse to keratocytes in vitro and to induce myofibroblast transformation. In addition, epithelial cell-derived exosomes induced endothelial cell proliferation and ex vivo aortic ring sprouting. Our results indicate that epithelial cell-derived exosomes mediate communication between corneal epithelial cells and corneal keratocytes as well as vascular endothelial cells. These findings demonstrate that epithelial-derived exosomes may be involved in corneal wound healing and neovascularization, and thus, may serve as targets for potential therapeutic interventions. PMID:28165027

  7. Mesenchymal stromal cell cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Renzi, Sabrina; Lombardo, Tina; Dotti, Silvia; Dessì, Sara S; De Blasio, Pasquale; Ferrari, Maura

    2012-06-01

    The advent of stem cells and stem cell-based therapies for specific diseases requires particular knowledge of laboratory procedures, which not only guarantee the continuous production of cells, but also provide them an identity and integrity as close as possible to their origin. Their cryopreservation at temperatures below -80°C and typically below -140°C is of paramount importance. This target can be achieved by incorporating high molar concentrations of cryoprotectant mixtures that preserve cells from deleterious ice crystal formation. Usually, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and animal proteins are used as protectant reagents, but unexpected changes in stem cell fate and downstream toxicity effects have been reported, limiting their wide use in clinical settings. In scientific reviews, there are not much data regarding viability of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) after the freezing/thawing process. During our routine analysis, a poor resistance to cryopreservation of these cells was observed, as well as their weak ability to replicate. This is an important point in the study of MSCs; moreover, it represents a limit for preservation and long-term storage. For this reason, MSCs isolated from equine, ovine, and rodent bone marrow and equine adipose tissue were compared using different cryopreservation solutions for this study of vitality. Our findings showed the best results regarding cell viability using a solution of fetal bovine serum with addition of 10% DMSO. In particular, we noted an increase in survival of equine bone marrow MSCs. This parameter has been evaluated by Trypan blue staining at fixed times (0, 24, and 48 hours post-thaw). This result highlights the fact that equine bone marrow MSCs are the frailest we analyzed. Therefore, it could be useful to delve further into this topic in order to improve the storage possibility for these cells and their potential use in cell-based therapies.

  8. Spontaneous formation of tumorigenic hybrids between breast cancer and multipotent stromal cells is a source of tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer progression involves cancer cell heterogeneity, with generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells within populations of nonmetastatic cells of the primary tumor. Sequential genetic mutations, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interaction with local stroma, and formation of hybrids between cancer cells and normal bone marrow-derived cells have been advocated as tumor progression mechanisms. We report herein the spontaneous in vitro formation of heterotypic hybrids between human bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and two different breast carcinoma cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (MDA) and MA11. Hybrids showed predominantly mesenchymal morphological characteristics, mixed gene expression profiles, and increased DNA ploidy. Both MA11 and MDA hybrids were tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice, and some MDA hybrids had an increased metastatic capacity. Both in culture and as xenografts, hybrids underwent DNA ploidy reduction and morphological reversal to breast carcinoma-like morphological characteristics, while maintaining a mixed breast cancer-mesenchymal expression profile. Analysis of coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms by RNA sequencing revealed genetic contributions from both parental partners to hybrid tumors and metastasis. Because MSCs migrate and localize to breast carcinoma, our findings indicate that formation of MSC-breast cancer cell hybrids is a potential mechanism of the generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells. Our findings reconcile the fusion theory of cancer progression with the common observation that breast cancer metastases are generally aneuploid, but not tetraploid, and are histopathologically similar to the primary neoplasm.

  9. Stromal hedgehog signaling maintains smooth muscle and hampers micro-invasive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhaohui; Peng, Yu-Ching; Gopalan, Anuradha; Gao, Dong; Chen, Yu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is widely appreciated that reactive stroma or carcinoma-associated fibroblasts can influence epithelial tumor progression. In prostate cancer (PCa), the second most common male malignancy worldwide, the amount of reactive stroma is variable and has predictive value for tumor recurrence. By analyzing human PCa protein and RNA expression databases, we found smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are decreased in advanced tumors, whereas fibroblasts are maintained. In three mouse models of PCa, PB-MYC, ERG/PTEN and TRAMP, we found the composition of the stroma is distinct. SMCs are greatly depleted in advanced PB-MYC tumors and locally reduced in ERG/PTEN prostates, whereas in TRAMP tumors the SMC layers are increased. In addition, interductal fibroblast-like cells expand in PB-MYC and ERG/PTEN tumors, whereas in TRAMP PCa they expand little and stromal cells invade into intraductal adenomas. Fate mapping of SMCs showed that in PB-MYC tumors the cells are depleted, whereas they expand in TRAMP tumors and interestingly contribute to the stromal cells in intraductal adenomas. Hedgehog (HH) ligands secreted by epithelial cells are known to regulate prostate mesenchyme expansion differentially during development and regeneration. Any possible role of HH signaling in stromal cells during PCa progression is poorly understood. We found that HH signaling is high in SMCs and fibroblasts near tumor cells in all models, and epithelial Shh expression is decreased whereas Ihh and Dhh are increased. In human primary PCa, expression of IHH is the highest of the three HH genes, and elevated HH signaling correlates with high stromal gene expression. Moreover, increasing HH signaling in the stroma of PB-MYC PCa resulted in more intact SMC layers and decreased tumor progression (micro-invasive carcinoma). Thus, we propose HH signaling restrains tumor progression by maintaining the smooth muscle and preventing invasion by tumor cells. Our studies highlight the importance of understanding

  10. Three-dimensional collagen matrix induces a mechanosensitive invasive epithelial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Shawn P.; Martin, Karen E.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2017-01-01

    A critical step in breast cancer progression is local tissue invasion, during which cells pass from the epithelial compartment to the stromal compartment. We recently showed that malignant leader cells can promote the invasion of otherwise non-invasive epithelial follower cells, but the effects of this induced-invasion phenomenon on follower cell phenotype remain unclear. Notably, this process can expose epithelial cells to the stromal extracellular matrix (ECM), which is distinct from the ECM within the normal epithelial microenvironment. Here, we used a 3D epithelial morphogenesis model in which cells were cultured in biochemically and mechanically defined matrices to examine matrix-mediated gene expression and the associated phenotypic response. We found that 3D collagen matrix promoted expression of mesenchymal genes including MT1-MMP, which was required for collagen-stimulated invasive behavior. Epithelial invasion required matrix anchorage as well as signaling through Src, PI3K, and Rac1, and increasingly stiff collagen promoted dispersive epithelial cell invasion. These results suggest that leader cell-facilitated access to the stromal ECM may trigger an invasive phenotype in follower epithelial cells that could enable them to actively participate in local tissue invasion. PMID:28186196

  11. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  12. Gut Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Valeria; Buccione, Carla; Marotta, Giulia; Ziccheddu, Giovanna; Signore, Michele; Mattia, Gianfranco; Puglisi, Rossella; Sacchetti, Benedetto; Biancone, Livia

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), first found in bone marrow (BM), are the structural architects of all organs, participating in most biological functions. MSCs possess tissue-specific signatures that allow their discrimination according to their origin and location. Among their multiple functions, MSCs closely interact with immune cells, orchestrating their activity to maintain overall homeostasis. The phenotype of tissue MSCs residing in the bowel overlaps with myofibroblasts, lining the bottom walls of intestinal crypts (pericryptal) or interspersed within intestinal submucosa (intercryptal). In Crohn's disease, intestinal MSCs are tightly stacked in a chronic inflammatory milieu, which causes their enforced expression of Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The absence of Class II MHC is a hallmark for immune-modulator and tolerogenic properties of normal MSCs and, vice versa, the expression of HLA-DR is peculiar to antigen presenting cells, that is, immune-activator cells. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is responsible for induction of Class II MHC expression on intestinal MSCs. The reversal of myofibroblasts/MSCs from an immune-modulator to an activator phenotype in Crohn's disease results in the formation of a fibrotic tube subverting the intestinal structure. Epithelial metaplastic areas in this context can progress to dysplasia and cancer. PMID:28337224

  13. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin or Bleomycin Sulfate, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Sex Cord-Ovarian Stromal Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Ovarian Granulosa Cell Tumor; Ovarian Gynandroblastoma; Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sex Cord Tumor With Annular Tubules; Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor of Mixed or Unclassified Cell Types; Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor

  14. Construction of a Corneal Stromal Equivalent with SMILE-Derived Lenticules and Fibrin Glue

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Houfa; Qiu, Peijin; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Teng, Wenqi; Qin, Zhenwei; Li, Chao; Zhou, Jiaojie; Fang, Zhi; Tang, Qiaomei; Fu, Qiuli; Ma, Jian; Yang, Yabo

    2016-01-01

    The scarcity of corneal tissue to treat deep corneal defects and corneal perforations remains a challenge. Currently, small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE)-derived lenticules appear to be a promising alternative for the treatment of these conditions. However, the thickness and toughness of a single piece of lenticule are limited. To overcome these limitations, we constructed a corneal stromal equivalent with SMILE-derived lenticules and fibrin glue. In vitro cell culture revealed that the corneal stromal equivalent could provide a suitable scaffold for the survival and proliferation of corneal epithelial cells, which formed a continuous pluristratified epithelium with the expression of characteristic markers. Finally, anterior lamellar keratoplasty in rabbits demonstrated that the corneal stromal equivalent with decellularized lenticules and fibrin glue could repair the anterior region of the stroma, leading to re-epithelialization and recovery of both transparency and ultrastructural organization. Corneal neovascularization, graft degradation, and corneal rejection were not observed within 3 months. Taken together, the corneal stromal equivalent with SMILE-derived lenticules and fibrin glue appears to be a safe and effective alternative for the repair of damage to the anterior cornea, which may provide new avenues in the treatment of deep corneal defects or corneal perforations. PMID:27651001

  15. Analysis of stromal cells in osteofibrous dysplasia and adamantinoma of long bones.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Richard M; Kashima, Takeshi G; Ferguson, David J; Szuhai, Károly; Hogendoorn, Pancras C; Athanasou, Nicholas A

    2012-01-01

    Adamantinoma of long bones and osteofibrous dysplasia are rare, osteolytic primary bone tumours of uncertain origin containing areas of fibrous and fibro-osseous proliferation. We investigated the nature of the stromal cells in adamantinoma of long bones and osteofibrous dysplasia, and determined cellular and molecular mechanisms of osteolysis in these tumours. Cell culture, molecular (RT-PCR, western blot) and immunohistochemical studies on cases of adamantinoma of long bones and of osteofibrous dysplasia were undertaken to determine the expression of epithelial, osteoblast and osteoclast markers. Ultrastructural and immunophenotypic studies on cultured adamantinoma and osteofibrous dysplasia stromal cells showed that these cells were mainly fibroblast-like with few cells expressing epithelial markers. Osteofibrous dysplasia but not adamantinoma cells expressed alkaline phosphatase. Both osteofibrous dysplasia and adamantinoma cells expressed the ostoclastogenic factors M-CSF and RANKL. Adamantinoma and osteofibrous dysplasia cells also expressed messenger RNA for osteocalcin, osteonectin, osteopontin, osterix and collagen type 1. Adamantinoma and osteofibrous dysplasia cells cultured alone on dentine slices were not capable of lacunar resorption, but in co-cultures with monocytes induced formation of osteoclast-like cells was observered. Cultured osteofibrous dysplasia and adamantinoma stromal cells show similar ultrastructural and immunophenotypic characteristics, and differentially express osteoblast markers. Promotion of osteoclastogenesis by stromal cells may contribute to osteolysis in adamantinoma of long bones and osteofibrous dysplasia.

  16. Confocal microscopic analysis of a rabbit eye model of high incidence recurrent herpes stromal keratitis (HSK)

    PubMed Central

    Jester, James V.; Morishige, Naoyuki; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Brown, Donald J.; Osorio, Nelson; Hsiang, Chinhui; Perng, Guey Chuen; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Using CJLAT, a chimeric herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) that produces a high incidence of herpes stromal keratitis (HSK) in latently infected rabbits, we characterized, by in vivo confocal microscopy (CM), the cellular events that precede development of HSK. Methods Thirty days post infection, in vivo CM was performed daily for 10 days and then weekly for up to 80 days post infection. Results We detected three types of subclinical corneal lesions prior to clinically apparent HSK: i)Small epithelial erosions; ii)Regenerating epithelium overlying small, cell infiltrates within the basal epithelial cell layer; and iii)Dendritic-like cells within the basal epithelial layer overlying stromal foci containing infiltrating cells. Sequential in vivo CM observations suggested that subclinical foci resolved over time, but were larger and more abundant with CJLAT than wild type HSV-1 McKrae. Active HSK was observed only with CJLAT and was initially associated with a large epithelial lesion overlying stromal immune cell infiltrates. Conclusions These results suggest that replication in the cornea of reactivated virus from trigeminal ganglia produces epithelial lesions which recruit immune cell infiltrates into the basal epithelial layer and anterior stroma. The virus is usually cleared rapidly eliminating viral antigens (Ags) prior to the arrival of the immune cells, which disperse. However, if the virus is not cleared rapidly, or if an additional reactivation results in an additional round of virus at the same site before the immune cells disperse, then the immune cells are stimulated and may induce an immunopathological response leading to the development of HSK. PMID:26555580

  17. Identification of Sonic Hedgehog-Induced Stromal Factors That Stimulate Prostate Tumor Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    features of the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions of development may play a critical role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia and in the...proceeds (Hayward et al., 1996). Myofibroblasts are present in the adult prostate at sites of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in prostate...Wang, S.Y., Vazquez, D.V., C, C.X., Zhang, S., and Tang, L. (2007) Prostatic stromal cells derived from benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens possess

  18. Total lymphoid irradiation leads to transient depletion of the mouse thymic medulla and persistent abnormalities among medullary stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, B.; Gandour, D.; Strober, S.; Weissman, I.

    1988-05-15

    Mice given multiple doses of sublethal irradiation to both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid tissues showed major transient, and some persistent disruptions in general thymic architecture and in thymic stromal components. At 2 wk after total lymphoid irradiation (TLI), the thymus lacked identifiable medullary regions by immunohistochemical analyses. Medullary stromal cells expression MHC Ag or a medullary epithelial cell Ag, as well as medullary macrophages, were undetectable. Instead, the processes of cortical epithelial cells were observed throughout the entire thymus. Strikingly, thymocyte subsets with mature phenotypes (CD4+CD8- and CD4-CD8+) were present in the apparent absence of a medulla. This early, gross effect was rapidly reversed such that by 1 to 2 mo after TLI, medullary areas with MHC Ag-positive cells were evident. However, abnormalities in a subset of medullary stromal cells appeared to be more persistent. Medullary epithelial cells, identified by the MD1 mAb, were greatly reduced in number and abnormally organized for at least 4 mo after TLI. In addition, macrophages containing endogenous peroxidase activity, normally abundant in medullary regions, were undetectable at all times examined after TLI. Therefore, this irradiation regimen induced both transient and long term effects in the thymus, primarily in medullary regions. These results suggest that TLI may be used as an experimental tool for studying the impact of selective depletion of medullary stromal cells on the development of specific T cell functions.

  19. What Are the Risk Factors for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Be Prevented? Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention What Are the ... few known risk factors for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Being older These tumors can occur in people ...

  20. What Are the Key Statistics about Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor What Are the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors? Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) ... They are slightly more common in men. Survival statistics for GIST are discussed in “ Survival rates for ...

  1. Immunohistological study of the endometrial stromal fibroblasts in the opossum, Monodelphis domestica: evidence for homology with eutherian stromal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kin, Koryu; Maziarz, Jamie; Wagner, Günter P

    2014-05-01

    Molecular phylogenetic studies suggest that the hemochorial placentation and decidualization are ancestral traits of eutherian mammals. While the origin of the placental tissue is well understood, the origin of the decidual cells is unclear. Here we address the origin of decidual cells by examining the expression patterns of six transcription factors (TFs) as well as four structural proteins in the endometrium of a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica, and compared them with the patterns known from eutherian species. We found a mesenchymal cell population in the subepithelial compartment of the opossum endometrium. These cells express a set of TFs, such as homeobox A11 (HOXA11), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB), and progesterone receptor (PGR), that are important for eutherian endometrial stromal cells. On the other hand, we did not find the expression of a decidual cell marker desmin (DES) or of TFs that are important for decidual cell differentiation, such as forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), in those cells. Based on these results, we propose that opossum has cells homologous to eutherian endometrial fibroblasts but no decidual cells. In addition, we describe cellular changes associated with the progression of pregnancy: nuclear localization of CEBPB in luminal epithelial cells as early as 8 days postcoitum, expansion of endometrial glands, nuclear localization of FOXO1 in glandular epithelial cells, and expression of smooth muscle actin in luminal epithelial cells. These data show that the luminal and glandular epithelium react to the presence of the preplacentation conceptus and suggest a limited form of pregnancy recognition.

  2. Nuclear receptor co-regulator Kruppel-like factor 9 and prohibitin 2 expression in estrogen-induced epithelial cell proliferation in the mouse uterus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen, acting through its cognate receptor estrogen receptor-' (ESR1), is a critical regulator of uterine endometrial epithelial proliferation. Although the dynamic communication between endometrial stromal (ST) and epithelial cells is considered to be an important component in this process, key ...

  3. Expression of smooth muscle-specific proteins in myoepithelium and stromal myofibroblasts of normal and malignant human breast tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Lazard, D; Sastre, X; Frid, M G; Glukhova, M A; Thiery, J P; Koteliansky, V E

    1993-01-01

    The expression of several differentiation markers in normal human mammary gland myoepithelium and in certain stromal fibroblasts ("myofibroblasts") associated with breast carcinomas was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy of frozen sections. Several antibodies to smooth muscle-specific proteins (smooth muscle alpha-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chains, calponin, alpha 1-integrin, and high molecular weight caldesmon) and to epithelial-specific proteins (cytokeratins, E-cadherin, and desmoplakin) were used to show that myoepithelial cells concomitantly express epithelial and smooth muscle markers whereas adjacent luminal cells express only epithelial markers. The same antibodies were used to establish that stromal myofibroblasts exhibit smooth muscle phenotypic properties characterized by the expression of all the smooth muscle markers examined except for high molecular weight caldesmon. In addition, both myoepithelium and myofibroblasts show a significant degree of heterogeneity in smooth muscle protein expression. Thus, myoepithelial cells and stromal myofibroblasts are epithelial and mesenchymal cells, respectively, which coordinately express a set of smooth muscle markers while maintaining their specific original features. The dual nature of myoepithelial cells and the phenotypic transition of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts are examples of the plasticity of the differentiated cell phenotype. Images PMID:8430113

  4. Paclitaxel, Cisplatin, and Topotecan With or Without Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III or Stage IV Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  5. Nerve regeneration by human corneal stromal keratocytes and stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Williams, Geraint P.; Setiawan, Melina; Yusoff, Nur Zahirah Binte M.; Lee, Xiao-wen; Htoon, Hla Myint; Zhou, Lei; Fuest, Matthias; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2017-01-01

    Laser refractive surgeries reshape corneal stroma to correct refractive errors, but unavoidably affect corneal nerves. Slow nerve regeneration and atypical neurite morphology cause desensitization and neuro-epitheliopathy. Following injury, surviving corneal stromal keratocytes (CSKs) are activated to stromal fibroblasts (SFs). How these two different cell types influence nerve regeneration is elusive. Our study evaluated the neuro-regulatory effects of human SFs versus CSKs derived from the same corneal stroma using an in vitro chick dorsal root ganglion model. The neurite growth was assessed by a validated concentric circle intersection count method. Serum-free conditioned media (CM) from SFs promoted neurite growth dose-dependently, compared to that from CSKs. We detected neurotrophic and pro-inflammatory factors (interleukin-8, interleukin-15, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, eotaxin, RANTES) in SFCM by Bio-Plex Human Cytokine assay. More than 130 proteins in SFCM and 49 in CSKCM were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS. Proteins uniquely present in SFCM had reported neuro-regulatory activities and were predicted to regulate neurogenesis, focal adhesion and wound healing. Conclusively, this was the first study showing a physiological relationship between nerve growth and the metabolically active SFs versus quiescent CSKs from the same cornea source. The dose-dependent effect on neurite growth indicated that nerve regeneration could be influenced by SF density. PMID:28349952

  6. Stromal Cell Subsets Directing Neonatal Spleen Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jonathan K. H.; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Development of lymphoid tissue is determined by interactions between stromal lymphoid tissue organiser (LTo) and hematopoietic lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. A failure for LTo to receive appropriate activating signals during embryogenesis through lymphotoxin engagement leads to a complete cessation of lymph node (LN) and Peyer’s patch development, identifying LTo as a key stromal population for lymphoid tissue organogenesis. However, little is known about the equivalent stromal cells that induce spleen development. Here, by dissociating neonatal murine spleen stromal tissue for re-aggregation and transplant into adult mouse recipients, we have identified a MAdCAM-1+CD31+CD201+ spleen stromal organizer cell-type critical for new tissue formation. This finding provides an insight into the regulation of post-natal spleen tissue organogenesis, and could be exploited in the development of spleen regenerative therapies. PMID:28067323

  7. A complex 3D human tissue culture system based on mammary stromal cells and silk scaffolds for modeling breast morphogenesis and function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuli; Sun, Lin; Maffini, Maricel V; Soto, Ana; Sonnenschein, Carlos; Kaplan, David L

    2010-05-01

    Epithelial-stromal interactions play a crucial role in normal embryonic development and carcinogenesis of the human breast while the underlying mechanisms of these events remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we constructed a physiologically relevant, three-dimensional (3D) culture surrogate of complex human breast tissue that included a tri-culture system made up of human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A), human fibroblasts and adipocytes, i.e., the two dominant breast stromal cell types, in a Matrigel/collagen mixture on porous silk protein scaffolds. The presence of stromal cells inhibited MCF10A cell proliferation and induced both alveolar and ductal morphogenesis and enhanced casein expression. In contrast to the immature polarity exhibited by co-cultures with either fibroblasts or adipocytes, the alveolar structures formed by the tri-cultures exhibited proper polarity similar to that observed in breast tissue in vivo. Only alveolar structures with reverted polarity were observed in MCF10A monocultures. Consistent with their phenotypic appearance, more functional differentiation of epithelial cells was also observed in the tri-cultures, where casein alpha- and -beta mRNA expression was significantly increased. This in vitro tri-culture breast tissue system sustained on silk scaffold effectively represents a more physiologically relevant 3D microenvironment for mammary epithelial cells and stromal cells than either co-cultures or monocultures. This experimental model provides an important first step for bioengineering an informative human breast tissue system, with which to study normal breast morphogenesis and neoplastic transformation.

  8. Platelet recruitment promotes keratocyte repopulation following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corneal abrasion not only damages the epithelium but also induces stromal keratocyte death at the site of injury. While a coordinated cascade of inflammatory cell recruitment facilitates epithelial restoration, it is unclear if this cascade is necessary for keratocyte recovery. Since platelet and ne...

  9. ICAM-1 mediates surface contact between neutrophils and keratocytes following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corneal epithelial abrasion elicits an inflammatory response involving neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the limbal vessels into the corneal stroma. These migrating PMNs make surface contact with collagen and stromal keratocytes. Using mice deficient in PMN integrin CD18, we previously showed that P...

  10. Distinctive Responsiveness to Stromal Signaling Accompanies Histologic Grade Programming of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sayeed, Aejaz; Champion, Stacey; Goodson, William H.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Xiao, Wenzhong; Mindrinos, Michael; Davis, Ronald W.; Dairkee, Shanaz H.

    2011-01-01

    Whether stromal components facilitate growth, invasion, and dissemination of cancer cells or suppress neoplastic lesions from further malignant progression is a continuing conundrum in tumor biology. Conceptualizing a dynamic picture of tumorigenesis is complicated by inter-individual heterogeneity. In the post genomic era, unraveling such complexity remains a challenge for the cancer biologist. Towards establishing a functional association between cellular crosstalk and differential cancer aggressiveness, we identified a signature of malignant breast epithelial response to stromal signaling. Proximity to fibroblasts resulted in gene transcript alterations of >2-fold for 107 probes, collectively designated as Fibroblast Triggered Gene Expression in Tumor (FTExT). The hazard ratio predicted by the FTExT classifier for distant relapse in patients with intermediate and high grade breast tumors was significant compared to routine clinical variables (dataset 1, n = 258, HR – 2.11, 95% CI 1.17–3.80, p-value 0.01; dataset 2, n = 171, HR - 3.07, 95% CI 1.21–7.83, p-value 0.01). Biofunctions represented by FTExT included inflammatory signaling, free radical scavenging, cell death, and cell proliferation. Unlike genes of the ‘proliferation cluster’, which are overexpressed in aggressive primary tumors, FTExT genes were uniquely repressed in such cases. As proof of concept for our correlative findings, which link stromal-epithelial crosstalk and tumor behavior, we show a distinctive differential in stromal impact on prognosis-defining functional endpoints of cell cycle progression, and resistance to therapy-induced growth arrest and apoptosis in low vs. high grade cancer cells. Our experimental data thus reveal aspects of ‘paracrine cooperativity’ that are exclusively contingent upon the histopathologically defined grade of interacting tumor epithelium, and demonstrate that epithelial responsiveness to the tumor microenvironment is a deterministic factor

  11. Identification of Meflin as a Potential Marker for Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Keiko; Enomoto, Atsushi; Hara, Akitoshi; Asai, Naoya; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Horinouchi, Asuka; Maruyama, Shoichi; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Nishiyama, Takahiro; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Kato, Takuya; Ando, Kenju; Weng, Liang; Mii, Shinji; Asai, Masato; Mizutani, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in culture are derived from BM stromal cells or skeletal stem cells. Whereas MSCs have been exploited in clinical medicine, the identification of MSC-specific markers has been limited. Here, we report that a cell surface and secreted protein, Meflin, is expressed in cultured MSCs, fibroblasts and pericytes, but not other types of cells including epithelial, endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In vivo, Meflin is expressed by immature osteoblasts and chondroblasts. In addition, Meflin is found on stromal cells distributed throughout the BM, and on pericytes and perivascular cells in multiple organs. Meflin maintains the undifferentiated state of cultured MSCs and is downregulated upon their differentiation, consistent with the observation that Meflin-deficient mice exhibit increased number of osteoblasts and accelerated bone development. In the bone and BM, Meflin is more highly expressed in primitive stromal cells that express platelet-derived growth factor receptor α and Sca-1 than the Sca-1-negative adipo-osteogenic progenitors, which create a niche for hematopoiesis. Those results are consistent with a decrease in the number of clonogenic colony-forming unit-fibroblasts within the BM of Meflin-deficient mice. These preliminary data suggest that Meflin is a potential marker for cultured MSCs and their source cells in vivo. PMID:26924503

  12. Epithelialization of mouse ovarian tumor cells originating in the fallopian tube stroma

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yuanyuan; Choi, Pui-Wah; Trachtenberg, Alexander J.; Ng, Allen C.; Kuo, Winston P.; Ng, Shu-Kay; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Ng, Shu-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma accounts for 90% of all ovarian cancer and is the most deadly gynecologic malignancy. Recent studies have suggested that fallopian tube fimbriae can be the origin of cells for high-grade serous subtype of epithelial ovarian carcinoma (HGSOC). A mouse HGSOC model with conditional Dicer-Pten double knockout (Dicer-Pten DKO) developed primary tumors, intriguingly, from the fallopian tube stroma. We examined the growth and epithelial phenotypes of the Dicer-Pten DKO mouse tumor cells contributable by each gene knockout. Unlike human ovarian epithelial cancer cells that expressed full-length E-cadherin, the Dicer-Pten DKO stromal tumor cells expressed cleaved E-cadherin fragments and metalloproteinase 2, a mixture of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Although the Dicer-Pten DKO tumor cells lost the expression of mature microRNAs as expected, they showed high levels of tRNA fragment expression and enhanced AKT activation due to the loss of PTEN function. Introduction of a Dicer1-expressing construct into the DKO mouse tumor cells significantly reduced DNA synthesis and the cell growth rate, with concurrent diminished adhesion and ZO1 epithelial staining. Hence, it is likely that the loss of Dicer promoted mesenchymal-epithelial transition in fallopian tube stromal cells, and in conjunction with Pten loss, further promoted cell proliferation and epithelial-like tumorigenesis. PMID:27602775

  13. Epithelial-mesenchymal, mesenchymal-epithelial, and endothelial-mesenchymal transitions in malignant tumors: An update

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Turdean, Sabin; Kovecsi, Attila; Contac, Anca Otilia; Jung, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) represents conversion of an epithelial cell in an elongated cell with mesenchymal phenotype, which can occur in physiologic and pathologic processes such as embryogenesis (type 1 EMT), wound healing and/or fibrosis (type 2 EMT) and malignant tumors (type 3 EMT). The proliferation rate, metastasizing and recurrence capacity, as also the individualized response at chemotherapics, in both epithelial and mesenchymal malignant tumors is known to be influenced by reversible switch between EMT and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). Although much research work has already been done in these fields, the specific molecular pathways of EMT, relating to the tumor type and tumor localization, are yet to be elucidated. In this paper, based on the literature and personal experience of the authors, an update in the field of EMT vs MET in epithelial and mesenchymal tumors is presented. The authors tried to present the latest data about the particularities of these processes, and also of the so-called endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on tumor location. The EMT-angiogenesis link is discussed as a possible valuable parameter for clinical follow-up and targeted therapeutic oncologic management. The paper begins with presentation of the basic aspects of EMT, its classification and assessment possibilities, and concludes with prognostic and therapeutic perspectives. The particularities of EMT and MET in gastric and colorectal carcinomas, pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular and cholangiocarcinomas, and lung, breast and prostate cancers, respectively in sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors are presented in detail. PMID:25984514

  14. Inflammatory stromal keratopathies: medical management of stromal keratomalacia, stromal abscesses, eosinophilic keratitis, and band keratopathy in the horse.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Dennis E

    2004-08-01

    This article discusses the diagnosis and medical treatment of stromal keratomalacia or "melting ulcers," stromal abscesses, eosinophilic keratitis (EK), and calcific band keratopathy. These are common and important inflammatory keratopathies of the equine corneal stroma. Keratomalacia and stromal abscesses are associated with infection, leukocytic invasion of the stroma, and loss of tissue and tear film proteinase homeostasis. Eosinophils infiltrate the stroma in response to unknown stimuli in EK. Calcium is deposited in the stroma and epithelium secondary to chronic equine recurrent uveitis in calcific band keratopathy. They are all associated with varying degrees of iridocyclitis.

  15. A spinal tumor showing mixed features of ependymoma and hemangioblastoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hai-Xia; Chu, Shu-Guang; Xu, Qi-Wu; Wang, Yin

    2015-04-01

    We report an intramedullary spinal tumor consisting of an ependymoma and a hemangioblastoma (HB). A 37-year-old woman presented with progressive bilateral lower limb sensory and motor deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a single intramedullary mass in the thoracic cord (T4-T6 level). Clinically, the patient had no von Hippel-Lindau disease and neurofibromatosis type 2. Metastatic carcinomas including renal cell carcinoma were altogether negative. Complete surgical resection was performed. Histologically, the tumor consisted of a mixed ependymoma and HB. Tumor cells of ependymoma displayed a rather uniform appearance with round to oval nuclei having salt-and-pepper-like chromatin, forming perivascular pseudorosette structures with radially arranged, tapering cell processes extending to intratumoral blood vessels. Stromal cells of HB had vacuolated or homogeneously eosinophilic cytoplasm and variable sized hyperchromatic nuclei within a background of capillaries. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells of ependymoma were strongly positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), focally positive for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) and D2-40 in a dot-like or ring-like pattern. Stromal cells of HB showed immunoreactivity for S100, vimentin, inhibin-α, D2-40, EMA and cytokeratins (CK: AE1/AE3, CK19). A review of the literature, in conjunction with the present case, shows that ependymomas and HBs may have a close relationship with each other.

  16. Enhancement of terminal B lymphocyte differentiation in vitro by fibroblast-like stromal cells from human spleen.

    PubMed

    Skibinski, G; Skibinska, A; Stewart, G D; James, K

    1998-12-01

    Stromal elements are major components of lymphoid tissues contributing to both tissue architecture and function. In this study we report on the phenotype and function of fibroblast-like stromal cells obtained from human spleen. These cells express high levels of CD44 and ICAM-1 and moderate levels of VLA-4, VCAM, CD40 and CD21. They fail to express endothelial, epithelial, lymphocyte and monocyte/macrophage markers. We show that these cells interact with B cell blasts induced in vitro by anti-CD40 and anti-mu stimulation. As a result of these interactions both IL-6 and IgG secretion into culture medium is increased. The enhanced secretion of IgG is partly inhibited by abolishing B cell blaststromal cell contact or by anti-IL-6, anti-VCAM or anti-CD49d antibodies. Our studies also suggest that the ability of stromal cells to promote B cell survival is most likely the underlying mechanism of the enhanced immunoglobulin secretion. Comparison of stromal cells from different lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs revealed that bone marrow- and spleen-derived stromal cells are the most effective in promoting B cell blast differentiation.

  17. Highly aligned stromal collagen is a negative prognostic factor following pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Drifka, Cole R.; Loeffler, Agnes G.; Mathewson, Kara; Keikhosravi, Adib; Eickhoff, Jens C.; Liu, Yuming; Weber, Sharon M.

    2016-01-01

    Risk factors for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) progression after surgery are unclear, and additional prognostic factors are needed to inform treatment regimens and therapeutic targets. PDAC is characterized by advanced sclerosis of the extracellular matrix, and interactions between cancer cells, fibrillar collagen, and other stromal components play an integral role in progression. Changes in stromal collagen alignment have been shown to modulate cancer cell behavior and have important clinical value in other cancer types, but little is known about its role in PDAC and prognostic value. We hypothesized that the alignment of collagen is associated with PDAC patient survival. To address this, pathology-confirmed tissues from 114 PDAC patients that underwent curative-intent surgery were retrospectively imaged with Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy, quantified with fiber segmentation algorithms, and correlated to patient survival. The same tissue regions were analyzed for epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT), α-SMA, and syndecan-1 using complimentary immunohistostaining and visualization techniques. Significant inter-tumoral variation in collagen alignment was found, and notably high collagen alignment was observed in 12% of the patient cohort. Stratification of patients according to collagen alignment revealed that high alignment is an independent negative factor following PDAC resection (p = 0.0153, multivariate). We also found that epithelial expression of EMT and the stromal expression of α-SMA and syndecan-1 were positively correlated with collagen alignment. In summary, stromal collagen alignment may provide additional, clinically-relevant information about PDAC tumors and underscores the importance of stroma-cancer interactions. PMID:27776346

  18. Glucose Promotes a Pro-Oxidant and Pro-Inflammatory Stromal Microenvironment Which Favors Motile Properties in Breast Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kallens, Violeta; Tobar, Nicolás; Molina, Jessica; Bidegain, Arantzazú; Smith, Patricio C; Porras, Omar; Martínez, Jorge

    2017-05-01

    Chronic inflammation and metabolic reprogramming have been proposed as hallmarks of cancer development. Currently, many of the functional clues between these two phenomena are studied under the integrative view of functional stroma-epithelia interaction. It has been proposed that stromal cells, due to their abundance and avidity for glucose, are able to modify the metabolic behavior of an entire solid tumor. In the present study, using a mammary stromal cell line derived from healthy tissue subjected to long-term culture in low (5 mM) or high (25 mM) glucose, we found that the hyperglycemic condition favors the establishment of a pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant environment characterized by the induction of the COX-2/PGE2 axis. In this condition, epithelial migration was stimulated. Moreover, we also found that stromal-derived PGE2, acting as a stimulator of IL-1 epithelial expression was one of the factors that promote the acquisition of motile properties by epithelial cells and the maintenance of a COX-2/PGE2-dependent inflammatory condition. Overall, our work provides experimental evidence that glucose stimulates a tumor inflammatory environment that, as a result of a functional cross-talk between stroma and epithelia, may be responsible for tumor progression. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 994-1002, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Epigenetic Alterations Affecting Transcription Factors and Signaling Pathways in Stromal Cells of Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Yotova, Iveta; Hsu, Emily; Do, Catherine; Gaba, Aulona; Sczabolcs, Matthias; Dekan, Sabine; Kenner, Lukas; Wenzl, Rene; Tycko, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by growth of endometrial-like tissue outside the uterine cavity. Since its pathogenesis may involve epigenetic changes, we used Illumina 450K Methylation Beadchips to profile CpG methylation in endometriosis stromal cells compared to stromal cells from normal endometrium. We validated and extended the Beadchip data using bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq), and analyzed differential methylation (DM) at the CpG-level and by an element-level classification for groups of CpGs in chromatin domains. Genes found to have DM included examples encoding transporters (SLC22A23), signaling components (BDNF, DAPK1, ROR1, and WNT5A) and transcription factors (GATA family, HAND2, HOXA cluster, NR5A1, OSR2, TBX3). Intriguingly, among the TF genes with DM we also found JAZF1, a proto-oncogene affected by chromosomal translocations in endometrial stromal tumors. Using RNA-Seq we identified a subset of the DM genes showing differential expression (DE), with the likelihood of DE increasing with the extent of the DM and its location in enhancer elements. Supporting functional relevance, treatment of stromal cells with the hypomethylating drug 5aza-dC led to activation of DAPK1 and SLC22A23 and repression of HAND2, JAZF1, OSR2, and ROR1 mRNA expression. We found that global 5hmC is decreased in endometriotic versus normal epithelial but not stroma cells, and for JAZF1 and BDNF examined by oxidative bis-seq, found that when 5hmC is detected, patterns of 5hmC paralleled those of 5mC. Together with prior studies, these results define a consistent epigenetic signature in endometriosis stromal cells and nominate specific transcriptional and signaling pathways as therapeutic targets. PMID:28125717

  20. Stromal matrix metalloproteinase-11 is involved in the mammary gland postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Tan, J; Buache, E; Alpy, F; Daguenet, E; Tomasetto, C-L; Ren, G-S; Rio, M-C

    2014-07-31

    MMP-11 is a bad prognosis paracrine factor in invasive breast cancers. However, its mammary physiological function remains largely unknown. In the present study we have investigated MMP-11 function during postnatal mammary gland development and function using MMP-11-deficient (MMP-11-/-) mice. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses as well as whole-mount mammary gland staining show alteration of the mammary gland in the absence of MMP-11, where ductal tree, alveolar structures and milk production are reduced. Moreover, a series of transplantation experiments allowed us to demonstrate that MMP-11 exerts an essential local paracrine function that favors mammary gland branching and epithelial cell outgrowth and invasion through adjacent connective tissues. Indeed, MMP-11-/- cleared fat pads are not permissive for wild-type epithelium development, whereas MMP-11-/- epithelium transplants grow normally when implanted in wild-type cleared fat pads. In addition, using primary mammary epithelial organoids, we show in vitro that this MMP-11 pro-branching effect is not direct, suggesting that MMP-11 acts via production/release of stroma-associated soluble factor(s). Finally, the lack of MMP-11 leads to decreased periductal collagen content, suggesting that MMP-11 has a role in collagen homeostasis. Thus, local stromal MMP-11 might also regulate mammary epithelial cell behavior mechanically by promoting extracellular matrix stiffness. Collectively, the present data indicate that MMP-11 is a paracrine factor involved during postnatal mammary gland morphogenesis, and support the concept that the stroma strongly impact epithelial cell behavior. Interestingly, stromal MMP-11 has previously been reported to favor malignant epithelial cell survival and promote cancer aggressiveness. Thus, MMP-11 has a paracrine function during mammary gland development that might be harnessed to promote tumor progression, exposing a new link between development and malignancy.

  1. ICAM-1 mediates surface contact between neutrophils and keratocytes following corneal epithelial abrasion in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Gagen, Debjani; Laubinger, Sara; Li, Zhijie; Petrescu, Matei S.; Brown, Evelyn S.; Smith, C. Wayne; Burns, Alan R.

    2010-01-01

    Corneal epithelial abrasion elicits an inflammatory response involving neutrophil (PMN) recruitment from the limbal vessels into the corneal stroma. These migrating PMNs make surface contact with collagen and stromal keratocytes. Using mice deficient in PMN integrin CD18, we previously showed that PMN contact with stromal keratocytes is CD18-dependent, while contact with collagen is CD18-independent. In the present study, we wished to extend these observations and determine if ICAM-1, a known ligand for CD18, mediates PMN contact with keratocytes during corneal wound healing. Uninjured and injured right corneas from C57Bl/6 wild type (WT) mice and ICAM-1−/− mice were processed for transmission electron microscopy and imaged for morphometric analysis. PMN migration, stromal thickness, and ICAM-1 staining were evaluated using light microscopy. Twelve hours after epithelial abrasion, PMN surface contact with paralimbal keratocytes in ICAM-1−/− corneas was reduced to ~50% of that observed in WT corneas; PMN surface contact with collagen was not affected. Stromal thickness (edema), keratocyte network surface area and keratocyte shape were similar in ICAM-1−/− and WT corneas. WT keratocyte ICAM-1 expression was detected at baseline and ICAM-1 staining intensity increased following injury. Since ICAM-1 is readily detected on mouse keratocytes and PMN-keratocyte surface contact in ICAM-1−/− mice is markedly reduced, the data suggest PMN adhesive interactions with keratocyte stromal networks is in part regulated by keratocyte ICAM-1 expression. PMID:20713042

  2. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts and Their Putative Role in Potentiating the Initiation and Development of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Isaiah G; Sood, Anil K; Mok, Samuel; Liu, Jinsong

    2011-01-01

    The progression of ovarian cancer, from cell transformation through invasion of normal tissue, relies on communication between tumor cells and their adjacent stromal microenvironment. Through a natural selection process, an autocrine-paracrine communication loop establishes reciprocal reinforcement of growth and migration signals. Thus, the cancer-activated stromal response is similar to an off-switch-defective form of the normal, universal response needed to survive insult or injury. It is becoming clearer within the cancer literature base that tumor stroma plays a bimodal role in cancer development: it impedes neoplastic growth in normal tissue while encouraging migration and tumor growth in a co-opted desmoplastic response during tumor progression. In this review, we discuss this reciprocal influence that ovarian cancer epithelial cells may have on ovarian stromal cell-reactive phenotype, stromal cell behavior, disrupted signaling networks, and tumor suppressor status in the stroma, within the context of cancer fibroblast studies from alternate cancer tissue settings. We focus on the exchange of secreted factors, in particular interleukin 1β and SDF-1α, between activated fibroblasts and cancer cells as a key area for future investigation and therapeutic development. A better understanding of the bidirectional reliance of early epithelial cancer cells on activated stromal cells could lead to the identification of novel diagnostic stromal markers and targets for therapy. PMID:21532880

  3. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumours: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Somerhausen, Nicolas De Saint Aubain

    1998-01-01

    Purpose. To study the evolution of concepts concerning gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) over 30 years. Discussion. GISTs have been, for more than 30 years, the subject of considerable controversy regarding their line of differentiation as well as the prediction of their behaviour. Furthermore, once they spread within the peritoneal cavity, they are extremely hard to control. The recent findings of c-Kit mutations and the immunohistochemical detection of the product of this gene, KIT or CD117, in the mainly non-myogenic subset of this family of tumours, has led to a reappraisal of this group of lesions, which, with some exceptions, is now thought to be derived from the interstitial cells of Cajal, and this has facilitated a clearer definition of their pathological spectrum. In this article, we review chronologically the evolution of the concept of GIST with the gradual application of electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, DNA ploidy analysis. We discuss the impact of these techniques on the pathological assessment and clinical management of GISTs. PMID:18521245

  4. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs. PMID:28348480

  5. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-03-14

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs.

  6. What Happens After Treatment for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumor Is No Longer Working Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Gastrointestinal ... For some people with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), treatment may remove or destroy the cancer. Completing ...

  7. Cigarette smoke metabolically promotes cancer, via autophagy and premature aging in the host stromal microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Ahmed F.; Al-Zoubi, Mazhar Salim; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Lamb, Rebecca; Hulit, James; Howell, Anthony; Gandara, Ricardo; Sartini, Marina; Galbiati, Ferruccio; Bevilacqua, Generoso; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoke has been directly implicated in the disease pathogenesis of a plethora of different human cancer subtypes, including breast cancers. The prevailing view is that cigarette smoke acts as a mutagen and DNA damaging agent in normal epithelial cells, driving tumor initiation. However, its potential negative metabolic effects on the normal stromal microenvironment have been largely ignored. Here, we propose a new mechanism by which carcinogen-rich cigarette smoke may promote cancer growth, by metabolically “fertilizing” the host microenvironment. More specifically, we show that cigarette smoke exposure is indeed sufficient to drive the onset of the cancer-associated fibroblast phenotype via the induction of DNA damage, autophagy and mitophagy in the tumor stroma. In turn, cigarette smoke exposure induces premature aging and mitochondrial dysfunction in stromal fibroblasts, leading to the secretion of high-energy mitochondrial fuels, such as L-lactate and ketone bodies. Hence, cigarette smoke induces catabolism in the local microenvironment, directly fueling oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) in neighboring epithelial cancer cells, actively promoting anabolic tumor growth. Remarkably, these autophagic-senescent fibroblasts increased breast cancer tumor growth in vivo by up to 4-fold. Importantly, we show that cigarette smoke-induced metabolic reprogramming of the fibroblastic stroma occurs independently of tumor neo-angiogenesis. We discuss the possible implications of our current findings for the prevention of aging-associated human diseases and, especially, common epithelial cancers, as we show that cigarette smoke can systemically accelerate aging in the host microenvironment. Finally, our current findings are consistent with the idea that cigarette smoke induces the “reverse Warburg effect,” thereby fueling “two-compartment tumor metabolism” and oxidative mitochondrial metabolism in epithelial cancer cells. PMID:23388463

  8. Targeting Stromal-Cancer Cell Crosstalk Networks in Ovarian Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Tsz-Lun; Leung, Cecilia S.; Li, Fuhai; Wong, Stephen T. C.; Mok, Samuel C.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a histologically, clinically, and molecularly diverse disease with a five-year survival rate of less than 30%. It has been estimated that approximately 21,980 new cases of epithelial ovarian cancer will be diagnosed and 14,270 deaths will occur in the United States in 2015, making it the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Ovarian tumor tissue is composed of cancer cells and a collection of different stromal cells. There is increasing evidence that demonstrates that stromal involvement is important in ovarian cancer pathogenesis. Therefore, stroma-specific signaling pathways, stroma-derived factors, and genetic changes in the tumor stroma present unique opportunities for improving the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are one of the major components of the tumor stroma that have demonstrated supportive roles in tumor progression. In this review, we highlight various types of signaling crosstalk between ovarian cancer cells and stromal cells, particularly with CAFs. In addition to evaluating the importance of signaling crosstalk in ovarian cancer progression, we discuss approaches that can be used to target tumor-promoting signaling crosstalk and how these approaches can be translated into potential ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26751490

  9. Understanding tumor-stroma interplays for targeted therapies by armed mesenchymal stromal progenitors: the Mesenkillers

    PubMed Central

    Grisendi, Giulia; Bussolari, Rita; Veronesi, Elena; Piccinno, Serena; Burns, Jorge S; De Santis, Giorgio; Loschi, Pietro; Pignatti, Marco; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Ballarin, Roberto; Di Gregorio, Carmela; Guarneri, Valentina; Piccinini, Lino; Horwitz, Edwin M; Paolucci, Paolo; Conte, PierFranco; Dominici, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A tumor represents a complex structure containing malignant cells strictly coupled with a large variety of surrounding cells constituting the tumor stroma (TS). In recent years, the importance of TS for cancer initiation, development, local invasion and metastases has become increasingly clear allowing the identification of TS as one of the possible ways to indirectly target tumors. Inside the heterogeneous stromal cell population, tumor associated fibroblasts (TAF) play a crucial role providing both functional and supportive environments. During both tumor and stroma development, several findings suggest that TAF could be recruited from different sources such as locally derived host fibroblasts, via epithelial/endothelial mesenchymal transitions or from circulating pools of fibroblasts deriving form mesenchymal progenitors, namely mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). These insights prompted scientists to identify multimodal approaches to target TS by biomolecules, monoclonal antibodies, and more recently via cell based strategies. These latter strategies appear extremely promising, although still associated with debated and unclear findings. This review discusses crosstalk between cancers and their stroma, dissecting specific tumor types, such as sarcoma, pancreatic and breast carcinoma, where stroma plays distinct paradigmatic roles. The recognition of these distinct stromal functions may help in planning effective and safer approaches aimed either to eradicate or to substitute TS by novel compounds and/or MSC having specific killing activities. PMID:22016827

  10. Umbilical cord blood serum therapy for the management of persistent corneal epithelial defects

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Elif; Yagmur, Meltem; Harbiyeli, Inan; Taylan-Sekeroglu, Hande; Ersoz, Reha

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of umbilical cord blood serum (CBS) therapy in cases with persistent corneal epithelial defects (PED). METHODS Sixteen eyes of 14 patients with PED who were resistant to conventional treatment were treated with 20% umbilical cord serum eye drops. Patients were followed-up weekly until epithelization was complete. The collected data included the grade of corneal lesion (Grade I: epithelial defect+superficial vascularization, Grade II: epithelial defect+stromal edema, Grade III: corneal ulcer+stromal melting), the size of epithelial defect (pretreatment, 7th, 14th and 21st days of treatment), and follow-up time was evaluated retrospectively. RESULTS The mean size of epithelial defect on two perpendicular axes was 5.2×4.6-mm2 (range: 2.5-8×2.2-9 mm2). Mean duration of treatment was 8.3±5wk. CBS therapy was effective in 12 eyes (75%) and ineffective in 4 eyes (25%). The epithelial defects in 4 ineffective eyes were healed with amniotic membrane transplantation and tarsorrhaphy. The rate of complete healing was 12.5% by 7d, 25% by 14d, and 75% by 21d. The healing time was prolonged in Grade III eyes in comparison to eyes in Grade I or Grade II. CONCLUSION The results of the current study indicated the safety effectiveness of CBS drops in the management of PED. The grade of disease seems have a role on the healing time. PMID:25349797

  11. Feasibility of obtaining breast epithelial cells from healthy women for studies of cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Miller, N A; Thomas, M; Martin, L J; Hedley, D W; Michal, S; Boyd, N F

    1997-05-01

    Increased dietary fat intake and rate of breast epithelial cell proliferation have each been associated with the development of breast cancer. The goal of this study was to measure the effect of a low fat, high carbohydrate diet on the rate of breast epithelial cell proliferation in women at high risk for breast cancer. Women were recruited from the intervention and control groups of a randomized low fat dietary intervention trial, breast epithelial cells were obtained by fine needle aspiration, and cell proliferation was assessed in these samples using immunofluorescent detection of Ki-67 and PCNA. The effects of needle size and study group on cell yield and cytologic features of the cells were also examined. Fifty three women (20 in the intervention group and 33 in the control group) underwent the biopsy procedure. Slides from 38 subjects were stained for Ki-67 and from 14 subjects for PCNA. No cell proliferation (fluorescence) was detected for either Ki-67 or PCNA in any of the slides. Epithelial cell yield and number of stromal fragments were greater with a larger needle size. Numbers of stromal fragments and bipolar naked nuclei were greater in the low fat as compared to the control group but no differences in epithelial cell yield were observed between the two groups. This study confirms that fine needle aspiration biopsy is a feasible method of obtaining epithelial cells from women without discrete breast masses, but suggests that cell proliferation cannot be assessed using Ki-67 and PCNA in such samples.

  12. Hepatic immune regulation by stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Schildberg, Frank A; Sharpe, Arlene H; Turley, Shannon J

    2015-02-01

    A metabolic organ, the liver also has a central role in tolerance induction. Stromal cells lining the hepatic sinusoids, such as liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), are the first liver cells to encounter gut-derived and systemic antigens, thereby shaping local and systemic tolerance. Recent studies have demonstrated that stromal cells can modulate immune responses by antigen-dependent and independent mechanisms. Stromal cells interfere with the function of other antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and induce non-responsive T cells as well as regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The immunosuppressive microenvironment thus created provides a means to protect the liver from tissue damage. Such tolerized surroundings, however, can be exploited by certain pathogens, promoting persistent liver infections.

  13. [Frequent allelic losses in tumor-associated stromal cells and tumor epitelium of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kekeeva, T V; Popova, O P; Shegaĭ, P V; Zavalishina, L E; Andreeva, Iu Iu; Zaletaev, D V; Nemtsova, M V

    2008-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Accumulation of genetic alterations is typical not only for cancer epithelial cells but tumor-associated fibroblasts as well. Tumor epithelia, tumor-associated stroma from prostatectomy specimens of patients with prostate cancer and cells from prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and adjacent stroma from males with PIN were isolated by using laser capture microdissection. Microsatellite allelotyping was evaluated using 4 highly polymorphic markers for chromosomal regions 8p22, 16q23-24 and 13q14. Incidences of alterations (loss of heterozygosity or allelic imbalance) were 48% for region 8p22, 72% for 16q23 and 37% for 13q14. The LOH frequencies in tumor-associated stroma cells were very similar. Alterations at chromosome 13q were significantly associated with advanced tumor stage, whereas AI at 16q was also associated with high Gleason score and lymph node metastasis. We find some incidences of allelic imbalance in premalignant lesions in epithelial (16-27%) and stromal (7-22%) components. Our results show that the frequencies of genetic aberrations are as high in stromal cells as in tumor cells.

  14. Stromal cell expression of caveolin-1 predicts outcome in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Erica K; Ciocca, Daniel R; Pouliot, Normand; Natoli, Anthony; Restall, Christina; Henderson, Michael A; Fanelli, Mariel A; Cuello-Carrión, Fernando D; Gago, Francisco E; Anderson, Robin L

    2009-06-01

    Caveolin-1 has been linked to tumor progression and clinical outcome in breast cancer, but a clear resolution of its role as a prognostic marker is lacking. We assessed caveolin-1 levels in normal breast tissue and two breast cancer cohorts for which outcome data were available. We found that caveolin-1 was not expressed in normal breast luminal epithelium but was present in the epithelial compartment of some tumors. We found no association between caveolin-1 expression in the epithelial compartment and clinical outcome. However, high levels of caveolin-1 in the stromal tissue surrounding the tumor, rather than within tumor cells, associated strongly with reduced metastasis and improved survival (P < 0.0001). The onset of mammary tumors driven by Her2/neu overexpression was accelerated in mice lacking caveolin-1, thereby supporting the observation that the presence of caveolin-1 in the tumor microenvironment modulates tumor development. These studies suggest that stromal caveolin-1 expression may be a potential therapeutic target and a valuable prognostic indicator of breast cancer progression.

  15. Stromal Cell Expression of Caveolin-1 Predicts Outcome in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Erica K.; Ciocca, Daniel R.; Pouliot, Normand; Natoli, Anthony; Restall, Christina; Henderson, Michael A.; Fanelli, Mariel A.; Cuello-Carrión, Fernando D.; Gago, Francisco E.; Anderson, Robin L.

    2009-01-01

    Caveolin-1 has been linked to tumor progression and clinical outcome in breast cancer, but a clear resolution of its role as a prognostic marker is lacking. We assessed caveolin-1 levels in normal breast tissue and two breast cancer cohorts for which outcome data were available. We found that caveolin-1 was not expressed in normal breast luminal epithelium but was present in the epithelial compartment of some tumors. We found no association between caveolin-1 expression in the epithelial compartment and clinical outcome. However, high levels of caveolin-1 in the stromal tissue surrounding the tumor, rather than within tumor cells, associated strongly with reduced metastasis and improved survival (P < 0.0001). The onset of mammary tumors driven by Her2/neu overexpression was accelerated in mice lacking caveolin-1, thereby supporting the observation that the presence of caveolin-1 in the tumor microenvironment modulates tumor development. These studies suggest that stromal caveolin-1 expression may be a potential therapeutic target and a valuable prognostic indicator of breast cancer progression. PMID:19411449

  16. The Action of Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in Basal Tumor Cells and Stromal Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts Is Critical for Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Corsa, Callie A S; Brenot, Audrey; Grither, Whitney R; Van Hove, Samantha; Loza, Andrew J; Zhang, Kun; Ponik, Suzanne M; Liu, Yuming; DeNardo, David G; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Longmore, Gregory D

    2016-06-14

    High levels of collagen deposition in human and mouse breast tumors are associated with poor outcome due to increased local invasion and distant metastases. Using a genetic approach, we show that, in mice, the action of the fibrillar collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) in both tumor and tumor-stromal cells is critical for breast cancer metastasis yet does not affect primary tumor growth. In tumor cells, DDR2 in basal epithelial cells regulates the collective invasion of tumor organoids. In stromal cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), DDR2 is critical for extracellular matrix production and the organization of collagen fibers. The action of DDR2 in CAFs also enhances tumor cell collective invasion through a pathway distinct from the tumor-cell-intrinsic function of DDR2. This work identifies DDR2 as a potential therapeutic target that controls breast cancer metastases through its action in both tumor cells and tumor-stromal cells at the primary tumor site.

  17. Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and tumor stromal cells by tissue on chip based mass spectrometry (toc-MS)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In carcinoma tissues, genetic and metabolic changes not only occur at the tumor cell level, but also in the surrounding stroma. This carcinoma-reactive stromal tissue is heterogeneous and consists e.g. of non-epithelial cells such as fibroblasts or fibrocytes, inflammatory cells and vasculature-related cells, which promote carcinoma growth and progression of carcinomas. Nevertheless, there is just little knowledge about the proteomic changes from normal connective tissue to tumor stroma. In the present study, we acquired and analysed specific protein patterns of small stromal sections surrounding head and neck cell complexes in comparison to normal subepithelial connective tissue. To gain defined stromal areas we used laser-based tissue microdissection. Because these stromal areas are limited in size we established the highly sensitive 'tissue on chip based mass spectrometry' (toc-MS). Therefore, the dissected areas were directly transferred to chromatographic arrays and the proteomic profiles were subsequently analysed with mass spectrometry. At least 100 cells were needed for an adequate spectrum. The locating of differentially expressed proteins enables a precise separation of normal and tumor stroma. The newly described toc-MS technology allows an initial insight into proteomic differences between small numbers of exactly defined cells from normal and tumor stroma. PMID:20205871

  18. Very Late Antigen-5 Facilitates Stromal Progenitor Cell Differentiation Into Myofibroblast

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Namita; Weingarten, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Fibrotic disease is associated with abrogated stromal cell proliferation and activity. The precise identity of the cells that drive fibrosis remains obscure, in part because of a lack of information on their lineage development. To investigate the role of an early stromal progenitor cell (SPC) on the fibrotic process, we selected for, and monitored the stages of, fibroblast development from a previously reported free-floating anchorage-independent cell (AIC) progenitor population. Our findings demonstrate that organotypic pulmonary, cardiac, and renal fibroblast commitment follows a two-step process of attachment and remodeling in culture. Cell differentiation was confirmed by the inability of SPCs to revert to the free-floating state and functional mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) differentiation into osteoblast, adipocyte, chondrocyte, and fibroblastic lineages. The myofibroblastic phenotype was reflected by actin stress-fiber formation, α-smooth muscle production, and a greater than threefold increase in proliferative activity compared with that of the progenitors. SPC-derived pulmonary myofibroblasts demonstrated a more than 300-fold increase in fibronectin-1 (Fn1), collagen, type 1, α1, integrin α-5 (Itga5), and integrin β-1 (Itgb1) transcript levels. Very late antigen-5 (ITGA5/ITGB1) protein cluster formations were also prevalent on the differentiated cells. Normalized SPC-derived myofibroblast expression patterns reflected those of primary cultured lung myofibroblasts. Intratracheal implantation of pulmonary AICs into recipient mouse lungs resulted in donor cell FN1 production and evidence of epithelial derivation. SPC derivation into stromal tissue in vitro and in vivo and the observation that MSC and fibroblast lineages share a common ancestor could potentially lead to personalized antifibrotic therapies. PMID:25273539

  19. Matrix remodeling stimulates stromal autophagy, “fueling” cancer cell mitochondrial metabolism and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Bonuccelli, Gloria; Molchansky, Alex; Capozza, Franco; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Birbe, Ruth C; Howell, Anthony; Pestell, Richard G; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Sotgia, Federica

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that loss of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in cancer-associated fibroblasts is a strong and independent predictor of poor clinical outcome in human breast cancer patients. However, the signaling mechanism(s) by which Cav-1 downregulation leads to this tumor-promoting microenvironment are not well understood. To address this issue, we performed an unbiased comparative proteomic analysis of wild-type (WT) and Cav-1-/- null mammary stromal fibroblasts (MSFs). Our results show that plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and type 2 (PAI-1 and PAI-2) expression is significantly increased in Cav-1-/- MSFs. To establish a direct cause-effect relationship, we next generated immortalized human fibroblast lines stably overexpressing either PAI-1 or PAI-2. Importantly, PAI-1/2(+) fibroblasts promote the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumors (a human breast cancer cell line) in a murine xenograft model, without any increases in angiogenesis. Similarly, PAI-1/2(+) fibroblasts stimulate experimental metastasis of MDA-MB-231 cells using an in vivo lung colonization assay. Further mechanistic studies revealed that fibroblasts overexpressing PAI-1 or PAI-2 display increased autophagy (“self-eating”) and are sufficient to induce mitochondrial biogenesis/activity in adjacent cancer cells, in co-culture experiments. In xenografts, PAI-1/2(+) fibroblasts significantly reduce the apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 tumor cells. The current study provides further support for the “Autophagic Tumor Stroma Model of Cancer” and identifies a novel “extracellular matrix”-based signaling mechanism, by which a loss of stromal Cav-1 generates a metastatic phenotype. Thus, the secretion and remodeling of extracellular matrix components (such as PAI-1/2) can directly regulate both (1) autophagy in stromal fibroblasts and (2) epithelial tumor cell mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:21646868

  20. TGF-β in jaw tumor fluids induces RANKL expression in stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Chiaki; Aikawa, Tomonao; Okuno, Emi; Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Amano, Katsuhiko; Takahata, Sosuke; Kimata, Masaaki; Okura, Masaya; Iida, Seiji; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors and cysts, arising in the jawbones, grow by resorption and destruction of the jawbones. However, mechanisms underlying bone resorption by odontogenic tumors/cysts remain unclear. Odontogenic tumors/cysts comprise odontogenic epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts, which originate from the developing tooth germ. It has been demonstrated that odontogenic epithelial cells of the developing tooth germ induce osteoclastogenesis to prevent the tooth germ from invading the developing bone to maintain its structure in developing bones. Thus, we hypothesized that odontogenic epithelial cells of odontogenic tumors/cysts induce osteoclast formation, which plays potential roles in tumor/cyst outgrowth into the jawbone. The purpose of this study was to examine osteoclastogenesis by cytokines, focusing on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), produced by odontogenic epithelial cells. We observed two pathways for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) induction by keratocystic odontogenic tumor fluid: the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway through interleukin-1α (IL-1α) signaling and non-COX-2/PGE2 pathway through TGF-β receptor signaling. TGF-β1 and IL-1α produced by odontogenic tumors/cysts induced osteoclastogenesis directly in the osteoclast precursor cells and indirectly via increased RANKL induction in the stroma. PMID:27279422

  1. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites on Extracellular Corneal Epithelial Cell Maspin

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Malathi; Mirza, Shama P.; Twining, Sally S.

    2011-01-01

    Maspin, a 42-kDa non classical serine protease inhibitor (serpin) is expressed by epithelial cells of various tissues including the cornea. The protein localizes to the nucleus and cytosol, and is present in the extracellular space. While extracellular maspin regulates corneal stromal fibroblast adhesion and inhibits angiogenesis during wound healing in the cornea, the molecular mechanism of its extracellular functions is unclear. We hypothesized that identifying post-translational modifications of maspin, such as phosphorylation, may help decipher its mode of action. The focus of this study was on the identification of phosphorylation sites on extracellular maspin, since the extracellular form of the molecule is implicated in several functions. Multi-stage fragmentation mass spectrometry was used to identify sites of phosphorylation on extracellular corneal epithelial cell maspin. A total of eight serine and threonine phosphorylation sites (Thr50, Ser97, Thr118, Thr157, Ser240, Ser298, Thr310, Ser316) were identified on the extracellular forms of the molecule. Phosphorylation of tyrosine residues on extracellular maspin was not detected on extracellular maspin from corneal epithelial cell, in contrast to breast epithelial cells. This study provides the basis for further investigation into the functional role of phosphorylation of corneal epithelial maspin. PMID:21365746

  2. Starved epithelial cells uptake extracellular matrix for survival

    PubMed Central

    Muranen, Taru; Iwanicki, Marcin P.; Curry, Natasha L.; Hwang, Julie; DuBois, Cory D.; Coloff, Jonathan L.; Hitchcock, Daniel S.; Clish, Clary B.; Brugge, Joan S.; Kalaany, Nada Y.

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular matrix adhesion is required for normal epithelial cell survival, nutrient uptake and metabolism. This requirement can be overcome by oncogene activation. Interestingly, inhibition of PI3K/mTOR leads to apoptosis of matrix-detached, but not matrix-attached cancer cells, suggesting that matrix-attached cells use alternate mechanisms to maintain nutrient supplies. Here we demonstrate that under conditions of dietary restriction or growth factor starvation, where PI3K/mTOR signalling is decreased, matrix-attached human mammary epithelial cells upregulate and internalize β4-integrin along with its matrix substrate, laminin. Endocytosed laminin localizes to lysosomes, results in increased intracellular levels of essential amino acids and enhanced mTORC1 signalling, preventing cell death. Moreover, we show that starved human fibroblasts secrete matrix proteins that maintain the growth of starved mammary epithelial cells contingent upon epithelial cell β4-integrin expression. Our study identifies a crosstalk between stromal fibroblasts and epithelial cells under starvation that could be exploited therapeutically to target tumours resistant to PI3K/mTOR inhibition. PMID:28071763

  3. Metformin inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rongbin; Li, Jijun; Johnson, Cameron W.; Rassoulian, Cyrus; Olumi, Aria F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the most common proliferative abnormality of the prostate affecting elderly men throughout the world. Epidemiologic studies have shown that diabetes significantly increases the risk of developing BPH, although whether anti-diabetic medications preventing the development of BPH remains to be defined. We have previously found that stromally expressed insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) promotes benign prostatic epithelial cell proliferation through paracrine mechanisms. Here, we seek to understand if metformin, a first line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, inhibits the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells through reducing the expression of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and regulating cell cycle. Methods BPE cell lines BPH-1 and P69, murine fibroblasts3T3 and primary human prostatic fibroblasts were cultured and tested in this study. Cell proliferation and the cell cycle were analyzed by MTS assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The expression of IGF-1R was determined by western-blot and immunocytochemistry. The level of IGF-1 secretion in culture medium was measured by ELISA. Results Metformin (0.5-10mM, 6-48h) significantly inhibited the proliferation of BPH-1 and P69 cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Treatment with metformin for 24 hours lowered the G2/M cell population by 43.24% in P69 cells and 24.22% in BPH-1 cells. On the other hand, IGF-1 (100ng/mL, 24h) stimulated the cell proliferation (increased by 28.81% in P69 cells and 20.95% in BPH-1 cells) and significantly enhanced the expression of IGF-1R in benign prostatic epithelial cells. Metformin (5mM) abrogated the proliferation of benign prostatic epithelial cells induced by IGF-1. In 3T3 cells, the secretion of IGF-1 was significantly inhibited by metformin from 574.31pg/ml to 197.61pg/ml. The conditioned media of 3T3 cells and human prostatic fibroblasts promoted the proliferation of epithelial cells and the

  4. Origin of hemopoietic stromal progenitor cells in chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, J.L.; Drize, N.J.; Gurevitch, O.A.; Samoylova, R.S.

    1985-12-01

    Intravenously injected bone marrow cells do not participate in the regeneration of hemopoietic stromal progenitors in irradiated mice, nor in the curetted parts of the recipient's marrow. The hemopoietic stromal progenitors in allogeneic chimeras are of recipient origin. The adherent cell layer (ACL) of long-term cultures of allogeneic chimera bone marrow contains only recipient hemopoietic stromal progenitors. However, in ectopic hemopoietic foci produced by marrow implantation under the renal capsule and repopulated by the recipient hemopoietic cells after irradiation and reconstitution by syngeneic hemopoietic cells, the stromal progenitors were of implant donor origin, as were stromal progenitors of the ACL in long-term cultures of hemopoietic cells from ectopic foci. Our results confirm that the stromal and hemopoietic progenitors differ in origin and that hemopoietic stromal progenitors are not transplantable by the intravenous route in mice.

  5. Skull metastasis from rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Gil-Arnaiz, Irene; Martínez-Trufero, Javier; Pazo-Cid, Roberto Antonio; Felipo, Francesc; Lecumberri, María José; Calderero, Verónica

    2009-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Rectum localisation is infrequent for these neoplasms, accounting for about 5% of all cases. Distant metastases of GIST are also rare. We present a patient with special features: the tumour is localised in rectum and it has an uncommon metastatic site, the skull, implying a complex differential diagnosis approach.

  6. Pyruvate kinase expression (PKM1 and PKM2) in cancer-associated fibroblasts drives stromal nutrient production and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Chiavarina, Barbara; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K; Birbe, Ruth; Howell, Anthony; Pestell, Richard G; Smith, Johanna; Daniel, Rene; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2011-12-15

    We have previously demonstrated that enhanced aerobic glycolysis and/or autophagy in the tumor stroma supports epithelial cancer cell growth and aggressive behavior, via the secretion of high-energy metabolites. These nutrients include lactate and ketones, as well as chemical building blocks, such as amino acids (glutamine) and nucleotides. Lactate and ketones serve as fuel for cancer cell oxidative metabolism, and building blocks sustain the anabolic needs of rapidly proliferating cancer cells. We have termed these novel concepts the "Reverse Warburg Effect," and the "Autophagic Tumor Stroma Model of Cancer Metabolism." We have also identified a loss of stromal caveolin-1 (Cav-1) as a marker of stromal glycolysis and autophagy. The aim of the current study was to provide genetic evidence that enhanced glycolysis in stromal cells favors tumorigenesis. To this end, normal human fibroblasts were genetically-engineered to express the two isoforms of pyruvate kinase M (PKM1 and PKM2), a key enzyme in the glycolytic pathway. In a xenograft model, fibroblasts expressing PKM1 or PKM2 greatly promoted the growth of co-injected MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, without an increase in tumor angiogenesis. Interestingly, PKM1 and PKM2 promoted tumorigenesis by different mechanism(s). Expression of PKM1 enhanced the glycolytic power of stromal cells, with increased output of lactate. Analysis of tumor xenografts demonstrated that PKM1 fibroblasts greatly induced tumor inflammation, as judged by CD45 staining. In contrast, PKM2 did not lead to lactate accumulation, but triggered a "pseudo-starvation" response in stromal cells, with induction of an NFκB-dependent autophagic program, and increased output of the ketone body 3-hydroxy-buryrate. Strikingly, in situ evaluation of Complex IV activity in the tumor xenografts demonstrated that stromal PKM2 expression drives mitochondrial respiration specifically in tumor cells. Finally, immuno-histochemistry analysis of human breast

  7. Inorganic Arsenic–Related Changes in the Stromal Tumor Microenvironment in a Prostate Cancer Cell–Conditioned Media Model

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Joseph J.; Wold, Eric A.; Umbaugh, Charles S.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Nilsson, Carol L.; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the progression of cancer by mediating stromal–epithelial paracrine signaling, which can aberrantly modulate cellular proliferation and tumorigenesis. Exposure to environmental toxicants, such as inorganic arsenic (iAs), has also been implicated in the progression of prostate cancer. Objective: The role of iAs exposure in stromal signaling in the tumor microenvironment has been largely unexplored. Our objective was to elucidate molecular mechanisms of iAs-induced changes to stromal signaling by an enriched prostate tumor microenvironment cell population, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (ASCs). Results: ASC-conditioned media (CM) collected after 1 week of iAs exposure increased prostate cancer cell viability, whereas CM from ASCs that received no iAs exposure decreased cell viability. Cytokine array analysis suggested changes to cytokine signaling associated with iAs exposure. Subsequent proteomic analysis suggested a concentration-dependent alteration to the HMOX1/THBS1/TGFβ signaling pathway by iAs. These results were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, confirming a concentration-dependent increase in HMOX1 and a decrease in THBS1 expression in ASC following iAs exposure. Subsequently, we used a TGFβ pathway reporter construct to confirm a decrease in stromal TGFβ signaling in ASC following iAs exposure. Conclusions: Our results suggest a concentration-dependent alteration of stromal signaling: specifically, attenuation of stromal-mediated TGFβ signaling following exposure to iAs. Our results indicate iAs may enhance prostate cancer cell viability through a previously unreported stromal-based mechanism. These findings indicate that the stroma may mediate the effects of iAs in tumor progression, which may have future therapeutic implications. Citation: Shearer JJ, Wold EA, Umbaugh CS, Lichti CF, Nilsson CL

  8. Progression-related loss of stromal Caveolin 1 levels fosters the growth of human PC3 xenografts and mediates radiation resistance

    PubMed Central

    Panic, Andrej; Ketteler, Julia; Reis, Henning; Sak, Ali; Herskind, Carsten; Maier, Patrick; Rübben, Herbert; Jendrossek, Verena; Klein, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Despite good treatment results in localized prostate tumors, advanced disease stages usually have a pronounced resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The membrane protein caveolin-1 (Cav1) functions here as an important oncogene. Therefore we examined the impact of stromal Cav1 expression for tumor growth and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR). Silencing of Cav1 expression in PC3 cells resulted in increased tumor growth and a reduced growth delay after IR when compared to tumors generated by Cav1-expressing PC3 cells. The increased radiation resistance was associated with increasing amounts of reactive tumor stroma and a Cav1 re-expression in the malignant epithelial cells. Mimicking the human situation these results were confirmed using co-implantation of Cav1-silenced PC3 cells with Cav1-silenced or Cav1-expressing fibroblasts. Immunohistochemically analysis of irradiated tumors as well as human prostate tissue specimen confirmed that alterations in stromal-epithelial Cav1 expressions were accompanied by a more reactive Cav1-reduced tumor stroma after radiation and within advanced prostate cancer tissues which potentially mediates the resistance to radiation treatment. Conclusively, the radiation response of human prostate tumors is critically regulated by Cav1 expression in stromal fibroblasts. Loss of stromal Cav1 expression in advanced tumor stages may thus contribute to resistance of these tumors to radiotherapy. PMID:28112237

  9. The human thymus microenvironment: heterogeneity detected by monoclonal anti-epithelial cell antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    de Maagd, R A; MacKenzie, W A; Schuurman, H J; Ritter, M A; Price, K M; Broekhuizen, R; Kater, L

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against human thymus stromal cells and their specificity for the epithelial component of thymus stroma assessed by double immunofluorescence using anti-keratin antibodies to identify epithelium. Our monoclonal antibodies identify six distinct patterns of epithelial cell antigen expression within the thymus: pan epithelial (antibody IP1); cortex (MR3 and MR6); cortical/medullary junction (IP2); subcapsule and subpopulation of medulla (MR10/MR14); Hassall's corpuscles and adjacent subpopulation of medulla (IP3); Hassall's corpuscles only (MR13/IP4). This heterogeneity of antigen expression suggests that many different epithelial microenvironments exist within the human thymus. Images Figure 1 Figure 1 Cont Figure 2 PMID:3884494

  10. Role of Allergen Source-Derived Proteases in Sensitization via Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Protease activity is a characteristic common to many allergens. Allergen source-derived proteases interact with lung epithelial cells, which are now thought to play vital roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Allergen source-derived proteases act on airway epithelial cells to induce disruption of the tight junctions between epithelial cells, activation of protease-activated receptor-2, and the production of thymic stromal lymphopoietin. These facilitate allergen delivery across epithelial layers and enhance allergenicity or directly activate the immune system through a nonallergic mechanism. Furthermore, they cleave regulatory cell surface molecules involved in allergic reactions. Thus, allergen source-derived proteases are a potentially critical factor in the development of allergic sensitization and appear to be strongly associated with heightened allergenicity. PMID:22523502

  11. Attenuated proliferation and trans-differentiation of prostatic stromal cells indicate suitability of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors for prevention and treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zenzmaier, Christoph; Sampson, Natalie; Pernkopf, Dominik; Plas, Eugen; Untergasser, Gerold; Berger, Peter

    2010-08-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is characterized by tissue overgrowth and stromal reorganization primarily due to cellular proliferation and fibroblast-to-myofibroblast trans-differentiation. To evaluate the potential of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors like tadalafil for prevention and treatment of BPH, we analyzed the role of the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP (cGMP)/PDE5 pathway for cellular proliferation and TGFbeta1-induced fibroblast-to-myofibroblast trans-differentiation in primary prostate stromal cells. Inhibition by tadalafil of PDE5, which is mainly expressed in the stromal compartment of the prostate, reduced proliferation of primary prostate stromal cells and to a lesser extent of primary prostate basal epithelial cells. Attenuated proliferation due to elevated intracellular cGMP levels was confirmed by inhibition of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase G by its inhibitor KT2358. Moreover, tadalafil strongly attenuated TGFbeta1-induced fibroblast-to-myofibroblast trans-differentiation. The inhibitory effect on trans-differentiation was also observed after small interfering RNA-mediated PDE5 knockdown. As confirmed by the MAPK kinase 1 inhibitor PD98059, this effect was mediated via MAPK kinase 1 signaling. We conclude that BPH patients might benefit from adjuvant therapies with PDE5 inhibitors that inhibit stromal enlargement due to cell proliferation, as well as TGFbeta1-induced trans-differentiation processes.

  12. Epimorphin Functions as a Key Morphoregulator for Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, H.; Lochter, A.; Galosy, S.; Koshida, S.; Niwa, S.; Bissell, M.J.

    1997-10-13

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and EGF have been reported to promote branching morphogenesis of mammary epithelial cells. We now show that it is epimorphin that is primarily responsible for this phenomenon. In vivo, epimorphin was detected in the stromal compartment but not in lumenal epithelial cells of the mammary gland; in culture, however, a subpopulation of mammary epithelial cells produced significant amounts of epimorphin. When epimorphin-expressing epithelial cell clones were cultured in collagen gels they displayed branching morphogenesis in the presence of HGF, EGF, keratinocyte growth factor, or fibroblast growth factor, a process that was inhibited by anti-epimorphin but not anti-HGF antibodies. The branch length, however, was roughly proportional to the ability of the factors to induce growth. Accordingly, epimorphin-negative epithelial cells simply grew in a cluster in response to the growth factors and failed to branch. When recombinant epimorphin was added to these collagen gels, epimorphin-negative cells underwent branching morphogenesis. The mode of action of epimorphin on morphogenesis of the gland, however, was dependent on how it was presented to the mammary cells. If epimorphin was overexpressed in epimorphin-negative epithelial cells under regulation of an inducible promoter or was allowed to coat the surface of each epithelial cell in a nonpolar fashion, the cells formed globular, alveoli-like structures with a large central lumen instead of branching ducts. This process was enhanced also by addition of HGF, EGF, or other growth factors and was inhibited by epimorphin antibodies. These results suggest that epimorphin is the primary morphogen in the mammary gland but that growth factors are necessary to achieve the appropriate cell numbers for the resulting morphogenesis to be visualized.

  13. Uterine epithelial cell proliferation and endometrial hyperplasia: evidence from a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Li, Shu; Li, Qinglei

    2014-08-01

    In the uterus, epithelial cell proliferation changes during the estrous cycle and pregnancy. Uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation results in implantation failure and/or cancer development. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is a fundamental regulator of diverse biological processes and is indispensable for multiple reproductive functions. However, the in vivo role of TGF-β signaling in uterine epithelial cells remains poorly defined. We have shown that in the uterus, conditional deletion of the Type 1 receptor for TGF-β (Tgfbr1) using anti-Müllerian hormone receptor type 2 (Amhr2) Cre leads to myometrial defects. Here, we describe enhanced epithelial cell proliferation by immunostaining of Ki67 in the uteri of these mice. The aberration culminated in endometrial hyperplasia in aged females. To exclude the potential influence of ovarian steroid hormones, the proliferative status of uterine epithelial cells was assessed following ovariectomy. Increased uterine epithelial cell proliferation was also revealed in ovariectomized Tgfbr1 Amhr2-Cre conditional knockout mice. We further demonstrated that transcript levels for fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf10) were markedly up-regulated in Tgfbr1 Amhr2-Cre conditional knockout uteri. Consistently, treatment of primary uterine stromal cells with TGF-β1 significantly reduced Fgf10 mRNA expression. Thus, our findings suggest a potential involvement of TGFBR1-mediated signaling in the regulation of uterine epithelial cell proliferation, and provide genetic evidence supporting the role of uterine epithelial cell proliferation in the pathogenesis of endometrial hyperplasia.

  14. Hmgn1 acts downstream of C/EBPβ to regulate the decidualization of uterine stromal cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Dang-Dang; Yang, Zhan-Qing; Guo, Chuan-Hui; Yue, Liang; Duan, Cui-Cui; Cao, Hang; Guo, Bin; Yue, Zhan-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Although Hmgn1 is involved in the regulation of gene expression and cellular differentiation, its physiological roles on the differentiation of uterine stromal cells during decidualization still remain unknown. Here we showed that Hmgn1 mRNA was highly expressed in the decidua on days 6-8 of pregnancy. Simultaneously, increased expression of Hmgn1 was also observed in the artificial and in vitro induced decidualization models. Hmgn1 induced the proliferation of uterine stromal cells and expression of Ccna1, Ccnb1, Ccnb2 and Cdk1 in the absence of estrogen and progesterone. Overexpression of Hmgn1 could enhance the expression of Prl8a2 and Prl3c1 which were 2 well-known differentiation markers for decidualization, whereas inhibition of Hmgn1 with specific siRNA could reduce their expression. Further studies found that Hmgn1 could mediate the effects of C/EBPβ on the expression of Prl8a2 and Prl3c1 during in vitro decidualization. In the uterine stromal cells, cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP could stimulate the expression of Hmgn1 via C/EBPβ. Moreover, siRNA-mediated down-regulation of Hmgn1 could attenuate the effects of cAMP on the differentiation of uterine stromal cells. During in vitro decidualization, Hmgn1 might act downstream of C/EBPβ to regulate the expression of Cox-2, mPGES-1 and Vegf. Progesterone could up-regulate the expression of Hmgn1 in the ovariectomized mouse uterus, uterine epithelial cells and stromal cells. Knockdown of C/EBPβ with siRNA alleviated the up-regulation of progesterone on Hmgn1 expression. Collectively, Hmgn1 may play an important role during mouse decidualization.

  15. Paracrine-acting adiponectin promotes mammary epithelial differentiation and synergizes with genistein to enhance transcriptional response to estrogen receptor beta signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mammary stromal adipocytes constitute an active site for the synthesis of the adipokine adiponectin (APN) that may influence the mammary epithelial microenvironment. The relationship between 'local', mammary tissue-derived APN and breast cancer risk is poorly understood. Herein, we identify a novel ...

  16. BRAF exon 15 mutations in pediatric renal stromal tumors: prevalence in metanephric stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Lily; Jennings, Lawrence J; Gadd, Samantha; Yu, Min; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Cajaiba, Mariana M

    2017-02-01

    Metanephric stromal tumors (MSTs) are rare renal stromal tumors that predominantly affect children. They belong to the metanephric family of tumors, along with metanephric adenofibroma and metanephric adenoma. The previous documentation of BRAF exon 15 mutations in 88% of metanephric adenomas and in isolated cases of metanephric adenofibroma prompted us to investigate the prevalence of these mutations in MSTs and in other pediatric renal stromal tumors. In this study, 17 MSTs, 22 congenital mesoblastic nephromas, and 6 ossifying renal tumors of infancy were selected for BRAF exon 15 testing. Tumor genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification and Sanger dideoxy sequencing with primers flanking the BRAF exon 15 gene. BRAF exon 15 mutations were found in 11 (65%) of the 17 cases of MST, all corresponding to a thymidine-to-adenine substitution at codon 600 (BRAF V600E). All other renal stromal tumors tested were negative for BRAF exon 15 mutations. In conclusion, BRAF V600E mutations are encountered in most MSTs, supporting a link with other metanephric tumors and suggesting a clonal event possibly affecting primordial renal cells. In addition, BRAF V600E mutations have been associated with oncogene-induced senescence in other benign tumors, providing clues to the pathogenesis of metanephric neoplasms in keeping with their overall benign behavior. Our results also suggest a potential diagnostic use for BRAF exon 15 mutations in differentiating MSTs from other pediatric renal stromal tumors, particularly in limited samples.

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cells for treatment of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Swart, J F; Wulffraat, N M

    2014-08-01

    Patients with refractory inflammatory arthritis can still respond favourable to autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, this treatment has a high morbidity and even 5% mortality. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), a subset of the non-haematopoietic stromal cells obtained from bone marrow, were found to have a strong immunosuppressive effect. MSC treatment is explored in many diseases like diabetes, SLE, MS and RA. This review covers all relevant literature regarding MSC treatment of inflammatory arthritis (RA and JIA). This review contains data of in vitro studies, animal studies and clinical studies. The following subjects will be discussed in detail: properties of MSC, presence of MSC in the joint, intra-articular versus intravenous route, autologous versus allogeneic, ideal source of MSC, distribution, transdifferentiation, engraftment, rejection, efficacy and toxicology. After reading this review the reader will be totally updated in this quickly evolving field of MSC therapy.

  18. EGEN-001 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-11

    Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

  19. Belinostat and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer That Did Not Respond to Carboplatin or Cisplatin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  20. Maintenance of Taste Organs Is Strictly Dependent on Epithelial Hedgehog/GLI Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mistretta, Charlotte M.

    2016-01-01

    For homeostasis, lingual taste papilla organs require regulation of epithelial cell survival and renewal, with sustained innervation and stromal interactions. To investigate a role for Hedgehog/GLI signaling in adult taste organs we used a panel of conditional mouse models to manipulate GLI activity within epithelial cells of the fungiform and circumvallate papillae. Hedgehog signaling suppression rapidly led to taste bud loss, papilla disruption, and decreased proliferation in domains of papilla epithelium that contribute to taste cells. Hedgehog responding cells were eliminated from the epithelium but retained in the papilla stromal core. Despite papilla disruption and loss of taste buds that are a major source of Hedgehog ligand, innervation to taste papillae was maintained, and not misdirected, even after prolonged GLI blockade. Further, vimentin-positive fibroblasts remained in the papilla core. However, retained innervation and stromal cells were not sufficient to maintain taste bud cells in the context of compromised epithelial Hedgehog signaling. Importantly taste organ disruption after GLI blockade was reversible in papillae that retained some taste bud cell remnants where reactivation of Hedgehog signaling led to regeneration of papilla epithelium and taste buds. Therefore, taste bud progenitors were either retained during epithelial GLI blockade or readily repopulated during recovery, and were poised to regenerate taste buds once Hedgehog signaling was restored, with innervation and papilla connective tissue elements in place. Our data argue that Hedgehog signaling is essential for adult tongue tissue maintenance and that taste papilla epithelial cells represent the key targets for physiologic Hedgehog-dependent regulation of taste organ homeostasis. Because disruption of GLI transcriptional activity in taste papilla epithelium is sufficient to drive taste organ loss, similar to pharmacologic Hedgehog pathway inhibition, the findings suggest that taste

  1. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Vera-Iglesias, E; García-Arpa, M; Sánchez-Caminero, P; Romero-Aguilera, G; Cortina de la Calle, P

    2007-11-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare disease of the oral mucosa caused by the human papilloma virus (HPV). It appears as a benign epithelial growth, usually in the mucosa of the lower lip. It is mainly associated with HPV serotypes 13 and 32 and there is a clear racial predilection for the disease in Native Americans and Eskimos. We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl from Ecuador with multiple papular lesions in both lips that were clinically and histologically consistent with focal epithelial hyperplasia. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction detected HPV serotype 13.

  2. Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary in a premenarchal female.

    PubMed

    Fefferman, Nancy R; Pinkney, Lynne P; Rivera, Rafael; Popiolek, Dorota; Hummel-Levine, Pascale; Cosme, Jaqueline

    2003-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumor (SST) is a rare benign ovarian neoplasm of stromal origin with less than 100 cases reported in the literature. Unlike the other stromal tumors, thecomas and fibromas, which tend to occur in the fifth and sixth decades, sclerosing stromal tumors predominantly affect females in the second and third decades. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound findings have been described, but have not been reported previously in the pediatric literature. We present a case of SST of the ovary in a 10-year-old premenarchal female, the youngest patient to our knowledge reported in the literature, and describe the ultrasound and CT findings with pathologic correlation.

  3. Characterization of Murine Thymic Stromal-Cell Lines Immortalized by Temperature-Sensitive Simian Virus 40 Large T or Adenovirus 5 E1a

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Lena; Timms, Emma; Blight, Kenneth; Restall, Deborah E.; Jat, Parmjit S.; Fisher, Amanda G.

    1991-01-01

    The heterogeneity of thymic stromal cells is probably related to their role in providing different microenvironments where T cells can develop. We have immortalized thymic stromal elements using recombinant retroviral constructs containing a temperature-sensitive simian virus 40 (SV40tsA58) large-T antigen gene or the adenovirus 5 E1a region linked to the gene coding for resistance to G418. Cell lines containing the thermolabile large T antigen encoded by SV40 proliferate at the permissive temperature of 33°C and arrest growth when transferred to the nonpermissive temperature of 39°C. At the nonpermissive temperature, ts-derived cell lines are shown to alter their phenotype but remain metabolically active, as indicated by the inducible expression of class I and class II MHC antigens. Here we describe the generation of a total of 84 thymic stromal-cell lines, many of which show distinct morphologic, phenotypic, and functional properties consistent with fibroblastoid, epithelial, or monocytoid origins. Several E1a and SV40tsA58-derived cell lines generated exhibit the epithelial characteristic of desmosome formation and, in addition, two of these lines (15.5 and 15.18) form multicellular complexes (rosettes) when incubated with unfractionated thymocytes from syngeneic mice. A single line (14.5) displays very strong nonspecific esterase activity, suggesting it may represent a macrophagelike cell type. We describe the generation of stromal cell lines with different properties, which is consistent with the heterogeneity found in the thymic microenvironment. In addition to documenting this diversity, these cell lines may be useful tools for studying T-cell development in vitro and give access to model systems in which stromal-thymocyte interactions can be examined. PMID:1668372

  4. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun-Xin; Wang, Lin-Nong; Zhou, Ru-Xia; Yu, Yang; Du, Tong-Xin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design, optimize and validate a rapid, internally controlled real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) test for herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. METHODS Tears alone or together with corneal epithelium scrapings from 30 patients (30 eyes) suspected of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis were tested for HSV DNA by RT-PCR. The samples were collected during the first visit and then on the subsequent 7, 14, 28, 42, and 56d. The symptoms of the patients were scored before treatment to determine the correlation between HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores. RESULTS The positive rate (46.4%) in the corneal epithelium group before the therapy was significantly higher than that (13.3%) in the tears group (P=0.006). There were 13 positive HSV patients before the therapy, the concentration of HSV DNA in corneal epithelium scrapings group was significantly higher than that in the tears group (paired t-test, P=0.0397). Multilevel mixed-effects model analysis showed that the difference between the corneal epithelium scrapings group and the tears group was statistically significant (P=0.0049). The Spearman rank correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between the HSV concentration in the corneal epithelium scrapings and clinical scores before the treatment (r=0.844, P<0.0001). CONCLUSION RT-PCR appears to be a powerful molecular tool for the diagnosis of necrotizing herpes stromal keratitis. PMID:27275421

  5. Anterior stromal puncture for treatment of contact lens-intolerant keratoconus patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Su Yeon; Park, Young Kee; Song, Jong-Suk

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To report the results and effectiveness of anterior stromal puncture for contact lens-intolerant keratoconus patients with subepithelial fibrotic nodules. Methods Nine eyes of nine keratoconus patients who were rigid gas-permeable contact lenses (RGP)-intolerant due to subepithelial nodular scars were included in this study. The nine patients were enrolled in the study between March 2008 and December 2008. After confirming nodular elevation from slit-lamp biomicroscopy, the area where the epithelium of nodular scars had sloughed was punctured by anterior stromal puncture using a 26-gauge needle attached to a 1-ml syringe under slit-lamp biomicroscopy. The RGPs of all patients were refitted around 4 weeks after the puncture. Results Five of the nine patients were male, and the average patient age was 29.6 years (SD ± 5.22 years). Mean follow-up time was 13.7 months (SD ± 4.8 months), and the epithelial defect healed in 1.4 days on average. After the puncture, four of nine patients presented with a recurrent erosion of the nodule during follow-up and needed a second puncture. All the patients showed good contact lens tolerance and satisfactory contact lens fit. No complications such as corneal perforation or keratitis developed. Conclusions Anterior stromal puncture using a 26-gauge needle can be a successful and effective method to induce corneal epithelium and Bowman’s layer reattachment. It can be used as an outpatient procedure to improve RGP tolerance in patients with keratoconus with elevated subepithelial nodules. PMID:20625761

  6. Hedgehog signaling plays roles in epithelial cell proliferation in neonatal mouse uterus and vagina.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadaaki; Iguchi, Taisen; Sato, Tomomi

    2012-04-01

    Both the uterus and vagina develop from the Müllerian duct but are quite distinct in morphology and function. To investigate factors controlling epithelial differentiation and cell proliferation in neonatal uterus and vagina, we focused on Hedgehog (HH) signaling. In neonatal mice, Sonic hh (Shh) was localized in the vaginal epithelium and Indian hh (Ihh) was slightly expressed in the uterus and vagina, whereas all Glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) genes were mainly expressed in the stroma. The expression of target genes of HH signaling was high in the neonatal vagina and in the uterus, it increased with growth. Thus, in neonatal mice, Shh in the vaginal epithelium and Ihh in the uterus and vagina activated HH signaling in the stroma. Tissue recombinants showed that vaginal Shh expression was inhibited by the vaginal stroma and uterine Ihh expression was stimulated by the uterine stroma. Addition of a HH signaling inhibitor decreased epithelial cell proliferation in organ-cultured uterus and vagina and increased stromal cell proliferation in organ-cultured uterus. However, it did not affect epithelial differentiation or the expression of growth factors in organ-cultured uterus and vagina. Thus, activated HH signaling stimulates epithelial cell proliferation in neonatal uterus and vagina but inhibits stromal cell proliferation in neonatal uterus.

  7. [Two cases of endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) in which survival was prolonged by administration of MPA].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Masako; Nakayama, Kentaro; Shamima, Yeasmin; Katagiri, Atsuko; Iida, Kohji; Nakayama, Naomi; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2008-05-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) is very rare. It accounts for 0.5% of all uterine corpus malignant tumors and 10% of all malignant non-epithelial tumors. MPA is one effective hormonal treatment for ESS. We describe two cases in which patients with metastatic low-grade ESS lesions had prolonged survival with MPA therapy. Case 1 was a 50-year-old woman with a low-grade uterine endometrial stromal tumor who had been operated on at another hospital. She had been followed for three years. She had pelvis metastases with infiltration into the bladder, and pulmonary metastases. She had an incomplete response to chemotherapy. We initiated MPA therapy, which resulted in significant improvement in her metastatic lesions. Case 2 was a 58-year-old woman with stage Ic low-grade ESS who presented with abnormal uterine bleeding. Following surgery (TAH+BSO), MPA therapy was initiated and she had no recurrence. After 1 year and 7 months, she discontinued the MPA because it worsened her articular rheumatism. Her cancer recurred with pelvic and paraaortic lymph node metastasis. She was treated with chemotherapy, MPA and radiotherapy. Her metastases improved, and the patient has continued to survive on MPA therapy alone. These cases suggest that MPA might be an effective hormonal therapy for patients with low-grade ESS.

  8. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells’ growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells’ behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity. PMID:27834810

  9. Mucosal stromal fibroblasts markedly enhance HIV infection of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kohgadai, Nargis; Müller, Janis A.; Laustsen, Anders; Thavachelvam, Karthiga; Stürzel, Christina M.; Jones, Jennifer J.; Somsouk, Ma; Garcia, Maurice M.; Smith, James F.; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Münch, Jan; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Giudice, Linda C.; Greene, Warner C.; Roan, Nadia R.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding early events of HIV transmission within mucosal tissues is vital for developing effective prevention strategies. Here, we report that primary stromal fibroblasts isolated from endometrium, cervix, foreskin, male urethra, and intestines significantly increase HIV infection of CD4+ T cells–by up to 37-fold for R5-tropic HIV and 100-fold for X4-tropic HIV–without themselves becoming infected. Fibroblasts were more efficient than dendritic cells at trans-infection and mediate this response in the absence of the DC-SIGN and Siglec-1 receptors. In comparison, mucosal epithelial cells secrete antivirals and inhibit HIV infection. These data suggest that breaches in the epithelium allow external or luminal HIV to escape an antiviral environment to access the infection-favorable environment of the stromal fibroblasts, and suggest that resident fibroblasts have a central, but previously unrecognized, role in HIV acquisition at mucosal sites. Inhibiting fibroblast-mediated enhancement of HIV infection should be considered as a novel prevention strategy. PMID:28207890

  10. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Alessandro; Giuliani, Massimo

    2016-11-08

    The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells' growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells' behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity.

  11. Suboptimal cytoreduction in ovarian carcinoma is associated with molecular pathways characteristic of increased stromal activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenqiu; Beach, Jessica A.; Agadjanian, Hasmik; Jia, Dongyu; Aspuria, Paul-Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y.; Orsulic, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective Suboptimal cytoreductive surgery in advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is associated with poor survival but it is unknown if poor outcome is due to the intrinsic biology of unresectable tumors or insufficient surgical effort resulting in residual tumor-sustaining clones. Our objective was to identify the potential molecular pathway(s) and cell type(s) that may be responsible for suboptimal surgical resection. Methods By comparing gene expression in optimally and suboptimally cytoreduced patients, we identified a gene network associated with suboptimal cytoreduction and explored the biological processes and cell types associated with this gene network. Results We show that primary tumors from suboptimally cytoreduced patients express molecular signatures that are typically present in a distinct molecular subtype of EOC characterized by increased stromal activation and lymphovascular invasion. Similar molecular pathways are present in EOC metastases, suggesting that primary tumors in suboptimally cytoreduced patients are biologically similar to metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that the suboptimal cytoreduction network genes are enriched in reactive tumor stroma cells rather than malignant tumor cells. Conclusion Our data suggest that the success of cytoreductive surgery is dictated by tumor biology, such as extensive stromal reaction and increased invasiveness, which may hinder surgical resection and ultimately lead to poor survival. PMID:26348314

  12. ADAM17 Inhibitors Attenuate Corneal Epithelial Detachment Induced by Mustard Exposure

    PubMed Central

    DeSantis-Rodrigues, Andrea; Chang, Yoke-Chen; A. Hahn, Rita; P. Po, Iris; Zhou, Peihong; Lacey, C. Jeffrey; Pillai, Abhilash; C. Young, Sherri; A. Flowers II, Robert; A. Gallo, Michael; D. Laskin, Jeffrey; R. Gerecke, Donald; K. H. Svoboda, Kathy; D. Heindel, Ned; Gordon, Marion K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Sulfur mustard, nitrogen mustard (NM), and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide all cause corneal injury with epithelial–stromal separation, differing only by degree. Injury can resolve in a few weeks or develop into chronic corneal problems. These vesicants induce microbullae at the epithelial–stromal junction, which is partially caused by cleavage of transmembranous hemidesmosomal collagen XVII, a component anchoring the epithelium to the stroma. ADAM17 is an enzyme involved in wound healing and is able to cleave collagen XVII. The activity of ADAM17 was inhibited in vesicant-exposed corneas by four different hydroxamates, to evaluate their therapeutic potential when applied 2 hours after exposure, thereby allowing ADAM17 to perform its early steps in wound healing. Methods Rabbit corneal organ cultures exposed to NM for 2 hours were washed, then incubated at 37°C for 22 hours, with or without one of the four hydroxamates (dose range, 0.3–100 nmol in 20 μL, applied four times). Corneas were analyzed by light and immunofluorescence microscopy, and ADAM17 activity assays. Results Nitrogen mustard–induced corneal injury showed significant activation of ADAM17 levels accompanying epithelial–stromal detachment. Corneas treated with hydroxamates starting 2 hours post exposure showed a dose-dependent ADAM17 activity inhibition up to concentrations of 3 nmol. Of the four hydroxamates, NDH4417 (N-octyl-N-hydroxy-2-[4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl] acetamide) was most effective for inhibiting ADAM17 and retaining epithelial–stromal attachment. Conclusions Mustard exposure leads to corneal epithelial sloughing caused, in part, by the activation of ADAM17 at the epithelial–stromal junction. Select hydroxamate compounds applied 2 hours after NM exposure mitigated epithelial–stromal separation. PMID:27058125

  13. The resistance of activated T-cells from SLE patients to apoptosis induced by human thymic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Budagyan, V M; Bulanova, E G; Sharova, N I; Nikonova, M F; Stanislav, M L; Yarylin, A A

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we show the differential sensitivity of phytohemagglutinine (PHA) activated T-cells from healthy donors or patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) to apoptosis induced by human thymic stromal cell line of epithelial origin. T-cells from SLE patients were mainly resistant to the apoptotic action of the stromal cells, while normal T-lymphocytes readily died via apoptosis. Gel electrophoresis revealed a DNA fragmentation pattern characteristic of apoptosis after 18 h of coculture. The simultaneous measurement of [3H]-thymidine uptake showed that the proliferative response of T-cells from SLE patients was significantly decreased compared to their normal counterparts. Such difference may account for the distinct result of interactions between the stromal and lymphoid cells, leading to the subsequent survival of T-lymphocytes from SLE patients. Nevertheless pretreatment of normal activated T-lymphocytes with anti-Fas mAbs, which have the capacity to substantially inhibit signaling through this receptor resulted in abolition of this form of programmed cell death. Thus, the precise role of Fas receptor and its ligand in this in vitro test system needs further investigation.

  14. Radiation-induced DNA damage in canine hemopoietic cells and stromal cells as measured by the comet assay

    SciTech Connect

    Kreja, L.; Selig, C.; Plappert, U.; Nothdurft, W.

    1996-12-31

    Stromal cell progenitors (fibroblastoid colony-forming unit; CFU-Fs) are representative of the progenitor cell population of the hemopoietic microenvironment in bone marrow (BM). Previous studies of the radiation dose-effect relationships for colony formation have shown that canine CFU-Fs are relatively radioresistant as characterized by a D{sub 0} value of about 2.4 Gy. In contrast, hemopoietic progenitors are particularly radiosensitive (D{sub 0} values = 0.12-0.60 Gy). In the present study, the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis technique for the in situ quantitation of DNA strand breaks and alkalilabile site was employed. Canine buffy coat cells from BM aspirates and cells harvested from CFU-F colonies or from mixed populations of adherent BM stromal cell (SC) layers were exposed to increasing doses of X-rays, embedded in agarose gel on slides, lysed with detergents, and placed in an electric field. DNA migrating from single cells in the gel was made visible as {open_quotes}comets{close_quotes} by ethidium bromide staining. Immediate DNA damage was much less in cultured stromal cells than in hemopoietic cells in BM aspirates. These results suggest that the observed differences in clonogenic survival could be partly due to differences in the type of the initial DNA damage between stromal cells and hemopoietic cells. 37 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Schwann cells induce neuronal differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Mercedes; Vaquero, Jesús; Oya, Santiago; Miguel, Miriam

    2005-04-04

    Bone marrow stromal cells are multipotent stem cells that have the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle. Recently, bone marrow stromal cells have been shown to have the capacity to differentiate into neurons under specific experimental conditions, using chemical factors. We now describe how bone marrow stromal cells can be induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells when they are co-cultured with Schwann cells. When compared with chemical differentiation, expression of neuronal differentiation markers begins later, but one week after beginning co-culture, most bone marrow stromal cells showed a typical neuronal morphology. Our present findings support the transdifferentiation of bone marrow stromal cells, and the potential utility of these cells for the treatment of degenerative and acquired disorders of the nervous system.

  16. Stromal networking: cellular connections in the germinal centre.

    PubMed

    Denton, Alice E; Linterman, Michelle A

    2017-03-17

    Secondary lymphoid organs are organized into distinct zones, governed by different types of mesenchymal stromal cells. These stromal cell subsets are critical for the generation of protective humoral immunity because they direct the migration of, and interaction between, multiple immune cell types to form the germinal centre. The germinal centre response generates long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells which can provide long-term protection against re-infection. Stromal cell subsets mediate this response through control of immune cell trafficking, activation, localization and antigen access within the secondary lymphoid organ. Further, distinct populations of stromal cells underpin the delicate spatial organization of immune cells within the germinal centre. Because of this, the interactions between immune cells and stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs are fundamental to the germinal centre response. Herein we review how this unique relationship leads to effective germinal centre responses.

  17. The Interaction Between Human Papillomaviruses and the Stromal Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Woodby, B; Scott, M; Bodily, J

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, double-stranded DNA viruses that replicate in stratified squamous epithelia and cause a variety of malignancies. Current efforts in HPV biology are focused on understanding the virus-host interactions that enable HPV to persist for years or decades in the tissue. The importance of interactions between tumor cells and the stromal microenvironment has become increasingly apparent in recent years, but how stromal interactions impact the normal, benign life cycle of HPVs, or progression of lesions to cancer is less understood. Furthermore, how productively replicating HPV impacts cells in the stromal environment is also unclear. Here we bring together some of the relevant literature on keratinocyte-stromal interactions and their impacts on HPV biology, focusing on stromal fibroblasts, immune cells, and endothelial cells. We discuss how HPV oncogenes in infected cells manipulate other cells in their environment, and, conversely, how neighboring cells may impact the efficiency or course of HPV infection.

  18. Giant fibroepithelial stromal polyp of the vulva: largest case reported

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibroepithelial stromal polyps are site-specific mesenchymal lesions that are commonly found in the vulvovaginal region in premenopausal females. These polyps usually are less than 5 cm in diameter and are most commonly identified during routine gynecological examination. Although the stromal polyp is benign, its differential diagnosis includes some malignant vulva lesions making it critical to ensure that an accurate pathologic diagnosis is made. Case We present a case of a 21 year old female with a giant fibroepithelial stromal polyp of the vulva. Upon review of the literature this is the largest reported fibroepithelial stromal polyp to date. Conclusion Fibroepithelial stromal polyps can grow as large as 390 grams and can be 18.5-cm in diameter. Microscopic evaluation of the polyp is critical in the exclusion of malignancy with this diagnosis. PMID:23842282

  19. Paclitaxel, Bevacizumab And Adjuvant Intraperitoneal Carboplatin in Treating Patients Who Had Initial Debulking Surgery for Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  20. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab Compared to Docetaxel, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cavity Carcinoma (Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-18

    Brenner Tumor; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Carcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Undifferentiated Adenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

  1. Oncogenes and inflammation rewire host energy metabolism in the tumor microenvironment: RAS and NFκB target stromal MCT4.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Curry, Joseph M; Ko, Ying-Hui; Lin, Zhao; Tuluc, Madalina; Cognetti, David; Birbe, Ruth C; Pribitkin, Edmund; Bombonati, Alessandro; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-08-15

    Here, we developed a model system to evaluate the metabolic effects of oncogene(s) on the host microenvironment. A matched set of "normal" and oncogenically transformed epithelial cell lines were co-cultured with human fibroblasts, to determine the "bystander" effects of oncogenes on stromal cells. ROS production and glucose uptake were measured by FACS analysis. In addition, expression of a panel of metabolic protein biomarkers (Caveolin-1, MCT1, and MCT4) was analyzed in parallel. Interestingly, oncogene activation in cancer cells was sufficient to induce the metabolic reprogramming of cancer-associated fibroblasts toward glycolysis, via oxidative stress. Evidence for "metabolic symbiosis" between oxidative cancer cells and glycolytic fibroblasts was provided by MCT1/4 immunostaining. As such, oncogenes drive the establishment of a stromal-epithelial "lactate-shuttle", to fuel the anabolic growth of cancer cells. Similar results were obtained with two divergent oncogenes (RAS and NFκB), indicating that ROS production and inflammation metabolically converge on the tumor stroma, driving glycolysis and upregulation of MCT4. These findings make stromal MCT4 an attractive target for new drug discovery, as MCT4 is a shared endpoint for the metabolic effects of many oncogenic stimuli. Thus, diverse oncogenes stimulate a common metabolic response in the tumor stroma. Conversely, we also show that fibroblasts protect cancer cells against oncogenic stress and senescence by reducing ROS production in tumor cells. Ras-transformed cells were also able to metabolically reprogram normal adjacent epithelia, indicating that cancer cells can use either fibroblasts or epithelial cells as "partners" for metabolic symbiosis. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) selectively halted mitochondrial biogenesis in Ras-transformed cells, but not in normal epithelia. NAC also blocked stromal induction of MCT4, indicating that NAC effectively functions as an "MCT4 inhibitor". Taken

  2. A Role for Androgens in Epithelial Proliferation and Formation of Glands in the Mouse Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Gibson, Douglas A.; Cousins, Fiona L.; Esnal-Zufiaurre, Arantza

    2016-01-01

    The endometrium consists of stromal and epithelial compartments (luminal and glandular) with distinct functions in the regulation of uterine homeostasis. Ovarian sex steroids, namely 17β-estradiol and progesterone, play essential roles in modulating uterine cell proliferation, stromal-epithelial cross-talk and differentiation in preparation for pregnancy. The effect of androgens on uterine function remains poorly understood. The current study investigated the effect of the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on mouse endometrial function. Ovx female mice were given a single sc injection (short treatment) or 7 daily injections (long treatment) of vehicle alone (5% ethanol, 0.4% methylcellulose) or vehicle with the addition of 0.2 mg DHT (n=8/group) and a single injection of bromodeoxyuridine 2 hours prior to tissue recovery. Treatment with DHT increased uterine weight, the area of the endometrial compartment and immunoexpression of the androgen receptor in the luminal and glandular epithelium. Treatment-dependent proliferation of epithelial cells was identified by immunostaining for MKi67 and bromodeoxyuridine. Real-time PCR identified significant DHT-dependent changes in the concentrations of mRNAs encoded by genes implicated in the regulation of the cell cycle (Wee1, Ccnd1, Rb1) and stromal-epithelial interactions (Wnt4, Wnt5a, Wnt7a, Cdh1, Vcl, Igf1, Prl8, Prlr) as well as a striking effect on the number of endometrial glands. This study has revealed a novel role for androgens in regulating uterine function with an effect on the glandular compartment of the endometrium. This previously unrecognized role for androgens has implications for our understanding of the role of androgens in regulation of endometrial function and fertility in women. PMID:26963473

  3. Periostin expression in intra-tumoral stromal cells is prognostic and predictive for colorectal carcinoma via creating a cancer-supportive niche

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaojie; Ding, Yibo; Luo, Yanxin; Cai, Hui; Liu, Yan; Gao, Xianhua; Liu, Qizhi; Yu, Yongwei; Du, Yan; Wang, Hao; Ma, Liye; Wang, Jianping; Chen, Kun; Ding, Yanqing; Fu, Chuangang; Cao, Guangwen

    2016-01-01

    Periostin (POSTN) expression in cancer cells and circulation has been related to poor prognosis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, the role of POSTN expressed in intra-tumoral stroma on CRC progression remains largely unknown. This study enrolled 1098 CRC patients who received surgical treatment in Shanghai and Guangzhou, Mainland China. In Shanghai cohort, immunohistochemistry score of stromal POSTN expression increased consecutively from adjacent mucosa, primary CRC tissues, to metastatic CRC tissues (P < 0.001), while medium- and high-stromal POSTN expression, rather than epithelial POSTN expression, independently predicted unfavorable prognoses of CRC, adjusted for covariates including TNM stage and postoperative chemotherapy in multivariate Cox models. The results in Shanghai cohort were faithfully replicated in Guangzhou cohort. Stromal POSTN expression dose-dependently predicted an unfavorable prognosis of stage III CRC patients with postoperative chemotherapy in both cohorts. POSTN derived from colonic fibroblasts or recombinant POSTN significantly promoted proliferation, anchorage independent growth, invasion, and chemo-resistance of CRC cells; whereas these effects were counteracted via targeting to PI3K/Akt or Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. CRC cell RKO-derived factor(s) significantly induced POSTN production in colonic fibroblasts and autocrine POSTN promoted proliferation, migration, and anchorage independent growth of fibroblasts. Conclusively, stromal POSTN is prognostic and predictive for CRC via creating a niche to facilitate cancer progression. Targeting POSTN-induced signaling pathways may be therapeutic options for metastatic or chemoresistant CRC. PMID:26556874

  4. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, James R.; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J.; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment. In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  5. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery.

  6. The plasticity of human breast carcinoma cells is more than epithelial to mesenchymal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Ole William; Nielsen, Helga Lind; Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Villadsen, René; Ronnov-Jessen, Lone; Bissell, Mina J.

    2001-05-12

    The human breast comprises three lineages: the luminal epithelial lineage, the myoepithelial lineage, and the mesenchymal lineage. It has been widely accepted that human breast neoplasia pertains only to the luminal epithelial lineage. In recent years, however, evidence has accumulated that neoplastic breast epithelial cells may be substantially more plastic in their differentiation repertoire than previously anticipated. Thus, along with an increasing availability of markers for the myoepithelial lineage, at least a partial differentiation towards this lineage is being revealed frequently. It has also become clear that conversions towards the mesenchymal lineage actually occur, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Indeed, some of the so-called myofibroblasts surrounding the tumor may indeed have an epithelial origin rather than a mesenchymal origin. Because myoepithelial cells, epithelial to mesenchymal transition-derived cells, genuine stromal cells and myofibroblasts share common markers, we now need to define a more ambitious set of markers to distinguish these cell types in the microenvironment of the tumors. This is necessary because the different microenvironments may confer different clinical outcomes. The aim of this commentary is to describe some of the inherent complexities in defining cellular phenotypes in the microenvironment of breast cancer and to expand wherever possible on the implications for tumor suppression and progression.

  7. Strategies to enhance epithelial-mesenchymal interactions for human hair follicle bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Manabu; Veraitch, Ophelia

    2013-05-01

    Hair follicle morphogenesis and regeneration depend on intensive but well-orchestrated interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal components. Accordingly, the enhancement of this crosstalk represents a promising approach to achieve successful bioengineering of human hair follicles. The present article summarizes the techniques, both currently available and potentially feasible, to promote epithelial-mesenchymal interactions (EMIs) necessary for human hair follicle regeneration. The strategies include the preparation of epithelial components with high receptivity to trichogenic dermal signals and/or mesenchymal cell populations with potent hair inductive capacity. In this regard, bulge epithelial stem cells, keratinocytes predisposed to hair follicle fate or keratinocyte precursor cells with plasticity may provide favorable epithelial cell populations. Dermal papilla cells sustaining intrinsic hair inductive capacity, putative dermal papilla precursor cells in the dermal sheath/neonatal dermis or trichogenic dermal cells derived from undifferentiated stem/progenitor cells are promising candidates as hair inductive dermal cells. The most established protocol for in vivo hair follicle reconstitution is co-grafting of epithelial and mesenchymal components into immunodeficient mice. In theory, combination of individually optimized cellular components of respective lineages should elicit most intensive EMIs to form hair follicles. Still, EMIs can be further ameliorated by the modulation of non-cell autonomous conditions, including cell compartmentalization to replicate the positional relationship in vivo and humanization of host environment by preparing human stromal bed. These approaches may not always synergistically intensify EMIs, however, step-by-step investigation probing optimal combinations should maximally enhance EMIs to achieve successful human hair follicle bioengineering.

  8. The influence of substrate topography on the migration of corneal epithelial wound borders.

    PubMed

    Yanez-Soto, Bernardo; Liliensiek, Sara J; Gasiorowski, Joshua Z; Murphy, Christopher J; Nealey, Paul F

    2013-12-01

    Currently available artificial corneas can develop post-implant complications including epithelial downgrowth, infection, and stromal melting. The likelihood of developing these disastrous complications could be minimized through improved formation and maintenance of a healthy epithelium covering the implant. We hypothesize that this epithelial formation may be enhanced through the incorporation of native corneal basement membrane biomimetic chemical and physical cues onto the surface of the keratoprosthesis. We fabricated hydrogel substrates molded with topographic features containing specific bio-ligands and developed an in vitro wound healing assay. In our experiments, the rate of corneal epithelial wound healing was significantly increased by 50% in hydrogel surfaces containing topographic features, compared to flat surfaces with the same chemical attributes. We determined that this increased healing is not due to enhanced proliferation or increased spreading of the epithelial cells, but to an increased active migration of the epithelial cells. These results show the potential benefit of restructuring and improving the surface of artificial corneas to enhance epithelial coverage and more rapidly restore the formation of a functional epithelium.

  9. Distinct functions and regulation of epithelial progesterone receptor in the mouse cervix, vagina, and uterus.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Fabiola F; Son, Jieun; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Jang, Eunjung; Lydon, John P; Korach, Kenneth S; Chung, Sang-Hyuk

    2016-04-05

    While the function of progesterone receptor (PR) has been studied in the mouse vagina and uterus, its regulation and function in the cervix has not been described. We selectively deleted epithelial PR in the female reproductive tracts using the Cre/LoxP recombination system. We found that epithelial PR was required for induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation by progesterone (P4) in the cervical and vaginal epithelium. We also found that epithelial PR was dispensable for P4 to suppress apoptosis and proliferation in the uterine epithelium. PR is encoded by the Pgr gene, which is regulated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) in the female reproductive tracts. Using knock-in mouse models expressing ERα mutants, we determined that the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and AF2 domain of ERα were required for upregulation of Pgr in the cervix and vagina as well as the uterine stroma. The ERα AF1 domain was required for upregulation of Pgr in the vaginal stroma and epithelium and cervical epithelium, but not in the uterine and cervical stroma. ERα DBD, AF1, and AF2 were required for suppression of Pgr in the uterine epithelium, which was mediated by stromal ERα. Epithelial ERα was responsible for upregulation of epithelial Pgr in the cervix and vagina. Our results indicate that regulation and functions of epithelial PR are different in the cervix, vagina, and uterus.

  10. Decellularization of human stromal refractive lenticules for corneal tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Yusoff, Nur Zahirah Binte M.; Goh, Tze-Wei; Setiawan, Melina; Lee, Xiao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Chi; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2016-01-01

    Small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) becomes a procedure to correct myopia. The extracted lenticule can be used for other clinical scenarios. To prepare for allogeneic implantation, lenticule decellularization with preserved optical property, stromal architecture and chemistry would be necessary. We evaluated different methods to decellularize thin human corneal stromal lenticules created by femtosecond laser. Treatment with 0.1% sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) followed by extensive washes was the most efficient protocol to remove cellular and nuclear materials. Empty cell space was found inside the stroma, which displayed aligned collagen fibril architecture similar to native stroma. The SDS-based method was superior to other treatments with hyperosmotic 1.5 M sodium chloride, 0.1% Triton X-100 and nucleases (from 2 to 10 U/ml DNase and RNase) in preserving extracellular matrix content (collagens, glycoproteins and glycosaminoglycans). The stromal transparency and light transmittance was indifferent to untreated lenticules. In vitro recellularization showed that the SDS-treated lenticules supported corneal stromal fibroblast growth. In vivo re-implantation into a rabbit stromal pocket further revealed the safety and biocompatibility of SDS-decellularized lenticules without short- and long-term rejection risk. Our results concluded that femtosecond laser-derived human stromal lenticules decellularized by 0.1% SDS could generate a transplantable bioscaffold with native-like stromal architecture and chemistry. PMID:27210519

  11. Polyglutamate Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial, Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-07

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  12. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bassioukas, K; Danielides, V; Georgiou, I; Photos, E; Zagorianakou, P; Skevas, A

    2000-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) or Heck disease, is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by HPV 13 or HPV 32. In Caucasians there have been only a few cases reported. We present the first case in Greece in a young Caucasian girl in which HPV 13 was detected with PCR analysis. The patient was successfully treated with CO2 laser.

  13. Normal morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and progression of epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Chao; Jamal, Leen; Janes, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial cells organize into various tissue architectures that largely maintain their structure throughout the life of an organism. For decades, the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues has fascinated scientists at the interface of cell, developmental, and molecular biology. Systems biology offers ways to combine knowledge from these disciplines by building integrative models that are quantitative and predictive. Can such models be useful for gaining a deeper understanding of epithelial morphogenesis? Here, we take inventory of some recurring themes in epithelial morphogenesis that systems approaches could strive to capture. Predictive understanding of morphogenesis at the systems level would prove especially valuable for diseases such as cancer, where epithelial tissue architecture is profoundly disrupted. PMID:21898857

  14. Normal morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and progression of epithelial tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Chao; Jamal, Leen; Janes, Kevin A

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cells organize into various tissue architectures that largely maintain their structure throughout the life of an organism. For decades, the morphogenesis of epithelial tissues has fascinated scientists at the interface of cell, developmental, and molecular biology. Systems biology offers ways to combine knowledge from these disciplines by building integrative models that are quantitative and predictive. Can such models be useful for gaining a deeper understanding of epithelial morphogenesis? Here, we take inventory of some recurring themes in epithelial morphogenesis that systems approaches could strive to capture. Predictive understanding of morphogenesis at the systems level would prove especially valuable for diseases such as cancer, where epithelial tissue architecture is profoundly disrupted.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus Blepharitis Associated with Multiple Corneal Stromal Microabscess, Stromal Edema, and Uveitis.

    PubMed

    Boto-de-los-Bueis, Ana; del Hierro Zarzuelo, Almudena; García Perea, Adela; de Pablos, Manuela; Pastora, Natalia; Noval, Susana

    2015-04-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent woman with atypical marginal keratitis. She presented with recurrent episodes of multiples microabscess distributed in a triangular pattern associated with stromal oedema and anterior chamber uveitis, affecting both eyes, but not simultaneously. The episodes responded to steroid drops, corneal inflammation was coincidental with a worsening of her blepharitis in the affected eye and S. aureus was isolated from the lids.

  16. Immunological hallmarks of stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Turley, Shannon J; Cremasco, Viviana; Astarita, Jillian L

    2015-11-01

    A dynamic and mutualistic interaction between tumour cells and the surrounding stroma promotes the initiation, progression, metastasis and chemoresistance of solid tumours. Far less understood is the relationship between the stroma and tumour-infiltrating leukocytes; however, emerging evidence suggests that the stromal compartment can shape antitumour immunity and responsiveness to immunotherapy. Thus, there is growing interest in elucidating the immunomodulatory roles of the stroma that evolve within the tumour microenvironment. In this Review, we discuss the evidence that stromal determinants interact with leukocytes and influence antitumour immunity, with emphasis on the immunological attributes of stromal cells that may foster their protumorigenic function.

  17. Sex cord-gonadal stromal tumor of the rete testis.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Dalton, Rory R; Brown, James A

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm.

  18. Bilateral Sclerosing Stromal Ovarian Tumor in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Naidu, Anjani; Chung, Betty; Simon, Mitchell; Marshall, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumor of the ovary is a rare, benign, sex cord stromal tumor occurring predominantly in younger women in the 2nd and 3rd decades of life. It typically presents unilaterally with only 2 previously reported cases of bilateral presentation. Common clinical presentations include pelvic or abdominal pain, a mass, or menstrual changes. Although occasionally presenting with hormonal manifestations, virilization as a result of androgen production by the tumor is rare. Here we present an extremely rare case of a sclerosing stromal ovarian tumor in a 14-year-old patient with bilateral presentation and with clinical and biochemical evidence of hyperandrogenemia. PMID:26064755

  19. Identification of Ovarian Cancer Susceptibility Genes Involved in Stromal-Epithelial Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    Hispanic White women. Discussion FGF2 is a potent angiogenic molecule that has been shown to promote tumour cell mitosis and has been...participating studies. Reference 1. Parkin DM, Bray F, Ferlay J, Pisani P. Global cancer statistics, 2002. CA Cancer J Clin 2005;55:74-108. 2

  20. Stromal-Epithelial Interactions and Tamoxifen-Sensitivity: A Bench-to-Beside Model of Chemoprevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    uniformity of the cohort. Women were considered to be peri- menopausal, as defined by < 6 menstrual periods/year in the absence of pregnancy, polycystic ...ovarian syndrome , or thyroid disorder or post-menopausal as defined as no menses for >12 months in the absence of pregnancy and/or status post...surgical removal of both ovaries , respectively. Socio-demographic variables (age, race), hormone- replacement (HRT)-use, and family history of breast

  1. Stromal-Epithelial Interactions and Tamoxifen-Sensitivity: A Bench-to-Bedside Model of Chemoprevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Immunohistochemistry. ERa protein expression was tested in RPFNA cytology specimens by immuno - histochemistry (IHC) by a modification of published methods (32...6870 – 5. 3. Holst CR, Nuovo GJ, Esteller M, et al. Methylation of p16 (INK4a) promoters occurs in vivo in histologically normal human mammary epithelia

  2. The Impact of Epithelial-Stromal Interactions on Human Breast Tumor Heterogeneity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    available at the  Innovation Centre (McGill University).   As a result of technical difficulties, we  chose an alternate platform,  i.e.  TaqMan  LDA plate...Technologies).  Total RNA (150‐200 ng) is subjected to a pre‐amplification step using  the  TaqMan  MegaPlex PreAmp primer pool and the pre‐amplified...products are assayed using  TaqMan   LDA 384‐well plates (Pools A and B) on an ABI 7900HT Fast Real‐Time system.  Currently, the miR analysis  is ongoing and

  3. Studies on T cell maturation on defined thymic stromal cell populations in vitro

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We describe an in vitro system in which positive selection of developing T cells takes place on defined stromal cell preparations, which include major histocompatibility complex class II+ epithelial cells but exclude cells of bone marrow origin. In this system, maturation of double-positive T cell receptor negative (TCR-), CD4+8+ thymocytes into single-positive TCR+, CD4+ and CD8+ cells takes place together with the development of functional competence. As in vivo, this maturation is associated with the upregulation of TCR levels as cells progress from double-positive to single-positive status. We also show that class II+ epithelial cells in these cultures are less efficient than dendritic cells in mediating the deletion (negative selection) of V beta 8+ cells by the superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B. For the first time, this approach provides a model in which the cellular interactions involved in both positive and negative selection can be studied under controlled in vitro conditions. PMID:1512547

  4. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Dei Tos, Angelo P; Laurino, Licia; Bearzi, Italo; Messerini, Luca; Farinati, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent a mesenchymal neoplasm occurring primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, and showing differentiation toward the interstitial cell of Cajal. Its incidence is approximately 15 case/100,000/year. Stomach and small bowel are the most frequently affected anatomic sites. GIST represents a morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular distinct entity, the recognition of which has profound therapeutic implications. In fact, they have shown an exquisite sensitivity to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. Diagnosis relies upon morphology along with immunodetection of KIT and/or DOG1. When dealing with KIT negative cases, molecular analysis of KIT/PDGFRA genes may help in confirming diagnosis. Molecular evaluation of both genes are in any case recommended as mutational status provides key predictive information. Pathologists also play a key role in providing an estimation of the risk of biological aggressiveness, which is currently based on anatomic location of the tumor, size, and mitotic activity.

  5. Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia causing massive breast enlargement.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Anita Geraldine; Tiang, Stephen; Harvey, Nathan; McClure, Robert

    2015-10-16

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) of the breast is a benign mesenchymal proliferative process, initially described by Vuitch et al. We report an unusual case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with a 6-week history of bilateral massive, asymmetrical, painful enlargement of her breasts, without a history of trauma. On clinical examination, both breasts were markedly enlarged and oedematous, but there were no discrete palpable masses. Preoperative image-guided core biopsies and surgery showed PASH. PASH is increasingly recognised as an incidental finding on image-guided core biopsy performed for screen detected lesions. There are a few reported cases of PASH presenting as rapid breast enlargement. In our case, the patient presented with painful, asymmetrical, massive breast enlargement. Awareness needs to be raised of this entity as a differential diagnosis in massive, painful breast enlargement.

  6. Update on Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors for Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Baheti, Akshay D.; Tirumani, Harika; O'Neill, Ailbhe; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.

    2017-01-01

    The management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) has evolved significantly in the last two decades due to better understanding of their biologic behavior as well as development of molecular targeted therapies. GISTs with exon 11 mutation respond to imatinib whereas GISTs with exon 9 or succinate dehydrogenase subunit mutations do not. Risk stratification models have enabled stratifying GISTs according to risk of recurrence and choosing patients who may benefit from adjuvant therapy. Assessing response to targeted therapies in GIST using conventional response criteria has several potential pitfalls leading to search for alternate response criteria based on changes in tumor attenuation, volume, metabolic and functional parameters. Surveillance of patients with GIST in the adjuvant setting is important for timely detection of recurrences. PMID:28096720

  7. Laparoscopic resection of duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Zioni, Tammy; Dizengof, Vitaliy; Kirshtein, Boris

    2017-01-01

    Only a few studies have revealed using laparoscopic technique with limited resection of gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) of the duodenum. A 68-year-old man was admitted to the hospital due to upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Evaluation revealed an ulcerated, bleeding GI tumour in the second part of the duodenum. After control of bleeding during gastroduodenoscopy, he underwent a laparoscopic wedge resection of the area. During 1.5 years of follow-up, the patient is disease free, eats drinks well, and has regained weight. Surgical resection of duodenal GIST with free margins is the main treatment of this tumour. Various surgical treatment options have been reported. Laparoscopic resection of duodenal GIST is an advanced and challenging procedure requiring experience and good surgical technique. The laparoscopic limited resection of duodenal GIST is feasible and safe, reducing postoperative morbidity without compromising oncologic results. PMID:28281485

  8. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Linnemann, Jelena R.; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K.; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J.; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S.; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J.; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H.

    2015-01-01

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49fhi/EpCAM− population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis. PMID:26071498

  9. Quantification of regenerative potential in primary human mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Jelena R; Miura, Haruko; Meixner, Lisa K; Irmler, Martin; Kloos, Uwe J; Hirschi, Benjamin; Bartsch, Harald S; Sass, Steffen; Beckers, Johannes; Theis, Fabian J; Gabka, Christian; Sotlar, Karl; Scheel, Christina H

    2015-09-15

    We present an organoid regeneration assay in which freshly isolated human mammary epithelial cells are cultured in adherent or floating collagen gels, corresponding to a rigid or compliant matrix environment. In both conditions, luminal progenitors form spheres, whereas basal cells generate branched ductal structures. In compliant but not rigid collagen gels, branching ducts form alveoli at their tips, express basal and luminal markers at correct positions, and display contractility, which is required for alveologenesis. Thereby, branched structures generated in compliant collagen gels resemble terminal ductal-lobular units (TDLUs), the functional units of the mammary gland. Using the membrane metallo-endopeptidase CD10 as a surface marker enriches for TDLU formation and reveals the presence of stromal cells within the CD49f(hi)/EpCAM(-) population. In summary, we describe a defined in vitro assay system to quantify cells with regenerative potential and systematically investigate their interaction with the physical environment at distinct steps of morphogenesis.

  10. Three-dimensional epithelial tissues generated from human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Kyle J; Shamis, Yulia; Carlson, Mark W; Aberdam, Edith; Aberdam, Daniel; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2009-11-01

    The use of pluripotent human embryonic stem (hES) cells for tissue engineering may provide advantages over traditional sources of progenitor cells because of their ability to give rise to multiple cell types and their unlimited expansion potential. We derived cell populations with properties of ectodermal and mesenchymal cells in two-dimensional culture and incorporated these divergent cell populations into three-dimensional (3D) epithelial tissues. When grown in specific media and substrate conditions, two-dimensional cultures were enriched in cells (EDK1) with mesenchymal morphology and surface markers. Cells with a distinct epithelial morphology (HDE1) that expressed cytokeratin 12 and beta-catenin at cell junctions became the predominant cell type when EDK1 were grown on surfaces enriched in keratinocyte-derived extracellular matrix proteins. When these cells were incorporated into the stromal and epithelial tissue compartments of 3D tissues, they generated multilayer epithelia similar to those generated with foreskin-derived epithelium and fibroblasts. Three-dimensional tissues demonstrated stromal cells with morphologic features of mature fibroblasts, type IV collagen deposition in the basement membrane, and a stratified epithelium that expressed cytokeratin 12. By deriving two distinct cell lineages from a common hES cell source to fabricate complex tissues, it is possible to explore environmental cues that will direct hES-derived cells toward optimal tissue form and function.

  11. Tissue Digestion for Stromal Cell and Leukocyte Isolation.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Saba; Campos, Joana; Steinthal, Nathalie; Barone, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Tissue mechanical disruption is often not sufficient to disrupt cell-to-cell interactions; this is particularly relevant for stromal cells that are embedded within the extracellular matrix. For this reason, different enzyme combinations have been described to enable the isolation of single-cell populations, particularly stromal cells. This chapter aims to describe different methods used for enzymatic digestion of stromal cell and leukocyte populations from secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs. Collagenase D and P and collagenase D and dispase protocols provide a good yield of stromal cells, while a collagenase dispase-only protocol should be used if the main aim of the technique is to retrieve leukocyte populations. However, for isolation of both stroma and leukocyte populations the collagenase D and P protocol would provide the best results. Protocols for these techniques and illustrative results from flow cytometry analysis can be found in this chapter.

  12. Effect of hydrocortisone on multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Shipunova, N N; Petinati, N A; Drize, N I

    2013-05-01

    We studied the effect of natural glucocorticosteroid hydrocortisone on total cell production, cloning efficiency, and expression of genes important for the function of mesenchymal stromal cells. Addition of hydrocortisone to the culture medium reduces the total cell yield by 2 times and significantly increased cloning efficiency by 2-3 times; this effect was more pronounced in multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells obtained from female donors. Hydrocortisone had no effect on the expression of immunomodulatory factors produced by multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. Hydrocortisone inhibits the expression of bone differentiation markers, increases the expression of the early adipocyte differentiation marker at the beginning of culturing, and dramatically stimulates the expression of the late adipocyte differentiation marker throughout the culturing period. The findings suggest that hydrocortisone activates multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

  13. Stromal infrastructure of the lymph node and coordination of immunity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jonathan E; Turley, Shannon J

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of adaptive immune responses depends upon the careful maneuvering of lymphocytes and antigen into and within strategically placed lymph nodes (LNs). Non-hematopoietic stromal cells form the cellular infrastructure that directs this process. Once regarded as merely structural features of lymphoid tissues, these cells are now appreciated as essential regulators of immune cell trafficking, fluid flow, and LN homeostasis. Recent advances in the identification and in vivo targeting of specific stromal populations have resulted in striking new insights to the function of stromal cells and reveal a level of complexity previously unrealized. We discuss here recent discoveries that highlight the pivotal role that stromal cells play in orchestrating immune cell homeostasis and adaptive immunity.

  14. Stromal-Based Signatures for the Classification of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Liu, Jiangang; Falcon, Beverly L; Iyer, Seema; Stewart, Julie; Celikkaya, Hilal; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Sevinsky, Christopher; Lowes, Christina; Douglass, Larry; Jeffries, Cynthia; Bodenmiller, Diane; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Fischl, Anthony; Gerald, Damien; Xue, Qi; Lee, Jee-Yun; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Sui, Yunxia; Desai, Keyur; Doman, Thompson; Aggarwal, Amit; Carter, Julia H; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Ginty, Fiona; Nasir, Aejaz; Nagy, Janice A; Dvorak, Harold F; Benjamin, Laura E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric cancer typically involves chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 (ERBB2) and VEGFR2 (KDR). However, reliable methods to identify patients who would benefit most from a combination of treatment modalities targeting the tumor stroma, including new immunotherapy approaches, are still lacking. Therefore, we integrated a mouse model of stromal activation and gastric cancer genomic information to identify gene expression signatures that may inform treatment strategies. We generated a mouse model in which VEGF-A is expressed via adenovirus, enabling a stromal response marked by immune infiltration and angiogenesis at the injection site, and identified distinct stromal gene expression signatures. With these data, we designed multiplexed IHC assays that were applied to human primary gastric tumors and classified each tumor to a dominant stromal phenotype representative of the vascular and immune diversity found in gastric cancer. We also refined the stromal gene signatures and explored their relation to the dominant patient phenotypes identified by recent large-scale studies of gastric cancer genomics (The Cancer Genome Atlas and Asian Cancer Research Group), revealing four distinct stromal phenotypes. Collectively, these findings suggest that a genomics-based systems approach focused on the tumor stroma can be used to discover putative predictive biomarkers of treatment response, especially to antiangiogenesis agents and immunotherapy, thus offering an opportunity to improve patient stratification. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2573-86. ©2016 AACR.

  15. Stromal p16 expression is significantly increased in endometrial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Gun; Koh, Chang Won; Yoon, Nara; Kim, Ji-Ye; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2017-01-17

    p16 is a negative regulator of cell proliferation and is considered a tumor suppressor protein. Alterations in p16 protein expression are associated with tumor development and progression. However, the p16 expression status in the peritumoral stroma has not been investigated in the endometrium. Therefore, we evaluated stromal p16 expression in different types of endometrial lesions using immunohistochemistry. Differences in the p16 expression status according to the degree of malignancy and histological type were analyzed. This study included 62, 26, and 36 cases of benign, precancerous, and malignant endometrial lesions, respectively. Most benign lesions showed negative or weak expression, whereas precancerous lesions showed a variable degree of staining proportion and intensity. Atypical hyperplasia/endometrial intraepithelial neoplasia (AH/EIN) and serous endometrial intraepithelial carcinoma (SEIC) had significantly higher stromal p16 expression levels than benign lesions. Endometrioid carcinoma (EC), serous carcinoma (SC), and carcinosarcoma showed significantly elevated stromal p16 expression levels compared with benign and precancerous lesions. In addition, there were significant differences in stromal p16 expression between AH/EIN and SEIC and between EC and SC. In contrast, differences in stromal p16 expression among nonpathological endometrium, atrophic endometrium, endometrial polyp, and hyperplasia without atypia were not statistically significant. Our observations suggest that stromal p16 expression is involved in the development and progression of endometrial carcinoma, and raise the possibility that p16 overexpression in the peritumoral stroma is associated with aggressive oncogenic behavior of endometrial SC.

  16. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    López-Jornet, Pía; Camacho-Alonso, Fabio; Berdugo, Lucero

    2010-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a benign, asymptomatic disease. It appears as papules, principally on the lower lip, although it can also be found on the retro-commissural mucosa and tongue and, less frequently, on the upper lip, gingiva and palate. FEH is caused by human papillomavirus subtype 13 or 32. The condition occurs in many populations and ethnic groups. We present the clinical case of a 31-year-old male with lesions that clinically and histologically corresponded to FEH.

  17. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  18. Direct reprogramming of human bone marrow stromal cells into functional renal cells using cell-free extracts.

    PubMed

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-04-14

    The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes-formation of "domes" and tubule-like structures-and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy.

  19. Direct Reprogramming of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells into Functional Renal Cells Using Cell-free Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Papadimou, Evangelia; Morigi, Marina; Iatropoulos, Paraskevas; Xinaris, Christodoulos; Tomasoni, Susanna; Benedetti, Valentina; Longaretti, Lorena; Rota, Cinzia; Todeschini, Marta; Rizzo, Paola; Introna, Martino; Grazia de Simoni, Maria; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Benigni, Ariela

    2015-01-01

    Summary The application of cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine is gaining recognition. Here, we show that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), also known as bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal cells, can be reprogrammed into renal proximal tubular-like epithelial cells using cell-free extracts. Streptolysin-O-permeabilized BMSCs exposed to HK2-cell extracts underwent morphological changes—formation of “domes” and tubule-like structures—and acquired epithelial functional properties such as transepithelial-resistance, albumin-binding, and uptake and specific markers E-cadherin and aquaporin-1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of brush border microvilli and tight intercellular contacts. RNA sequencing showed tubular epithelial transcript abundance and revealed the upregulation of components of the EGFR pathway. Reprogrammed BMSCs integrated into self-forming kidney tissue and formed tubular structures. Reprogrammed BMSCs infused in immunodeficient mice with cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury engrafted into proximal tubuli, reduced renal injury and improved function. Thus, reprogrammed BMSCs are a promising cell resource for future cell therapy. PMID:25754206

  20. Role of the epithelial cell rests of Malassez in the development, maintenance and regeneration of periodontal ligament tissues.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jimin; Gronthos, Stan; Bartold, P Mark

    2013-10-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent inflammatory disease that results in damage to the tooth-supporting tissues, potentially leading to tooth loss. Periodontal tissue regeneration is a complex process that involves the collaboration of two hard tissues (cementum and alveolar bone) and two soft tissues (gingiva and periodontal ligament). To date, no periodontal-regenerative procedures provide predictable clinical outcomes. To understand the rational basis of regenerative procedures, a better understanding of the events associated with the formation of periodontal components will help to establish reliable strategies for clinical practice. An important aspect of this is the role of the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath in periodontal development and that of its descendants, the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, in the maintenance of the periodontium. An important structure during tooth root development, the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath is not only a barrier between the dental follicle and dental papilla cells but is also involved in determining the shape, size and number of roots and in the development of dentin and cementum, and may act as a source of mesenchymal progenitor cells for cementoblasts. In adulthood, the epithelial cell rests of Malassez are the only odontogenic epithelial population in the periodontal ligament. Although there is no general agreement on the functions of the epithelial cell rests of Malassez, accumulating evidence suggests that the putative roles of the epithelial cell rests of Malassez in adult periodontal ligament include maintaining periodontal ligament homeostasis to prevent ankylosis and maintain periodontal ligament space, to prevent root resorption, to serve as a target during periodontal ligament innervation and to contribute to cementum repair. Recently, ovine epithelial cell rests of Malassez cells have been shown to harbor clonogenic epithelial stem-cell populations that demonstrate similar properties to mesenchymal stromal

  1. Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.C.; Lichtenstein, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Oertel, J.E.; Dachman, A.H.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1985-02-01

    Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas is an uncommon low grade malignant tumor histologically distinct from the usual ductal adenocarcinoma and amenable to cure by surgical excision. It tends to occur in black women in their second or third decade of life and has often been misclassified as nonfunctional islet cell tumor or as cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma. Twelve cases were reviewed. Sonography and CT of solid and pipillary epithelial neoplasms depict a well-demarcated mass that can be solid, mixed cystic and solid, or largely cystic. The radiologic appearance is dependent on the maintenance of the integrity of the neoplasm versus the extent of retrogressive changes that have occurred.

  2. ADAMTS-1 metalloproteinase promotes tumor development through the induction of a stromal reaction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rocks, Natacha; Paulissen, Geneviève; Quesada-Calvo, Florence; Munaut, Carine; Gonzalez, Maria-Luz Alvarez; Gueders, Maud; Hacha, Jonathan; Gilles, Christine; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Noel, Agnès; Cataldo, Didier D

    2008-11-15

    ADAMTS-1 (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs), the first described member of the ADAMTS family, is differentially expressed in various tumors. However, its exact role in tumor development and progression is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of ADAMTS-1 transfection in a bronchial epithelial tumor cell line (BZR) and its potential to modulate tumor development. ADAMTS-1 overexpression did not affect in vitro cell properties such as (a) proliferation in two-dimensional culture, (b) proliferation in three-dimensional culture, (c) anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, (d) cell migration and invasion in modified Boyden chamber assay, (e) angiogenesis in the aortic ring assay, and (f) cell apoptosis. In contrast, ADAMTS-1 stable transfection in BZR cells accelerated the in vivo tumor growth after s.c. injection into severe combined immunodeficient mice. It also promoted a stromal reaction characterized by myofibroblast infiltration and excessive matrix deposition. These features are, however, not observed in tumors derived from cells overexpressing a catalytically inactive mutant of ADAMTS-1. Conditioned media from ADAMTS-1-overexpressing cells display a potent chemotactic activity toward fibroblasts. ADAMTS-1 overexpression in tumors was associated with increased production of matrix metalloproteinase-13, fibronectin, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). Neutralizing antibodies against TGF-beta and IL-1beta blocked the chemotactic effect of medium conditioned by ADAMTS-1-expressing cells on fibroblasts, showing the contribution of these factors in ADAMTS-1-induced stromal reaction. In conclusion, we propose a new paradigm for catalytically active ADAMTS-1 contribution to tumor development, which consists of the recruitment of fibroblasts involved in tumor growth and tumor-associated stroma remodeling.

  3. Mesenchymal stromal cells in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Geyh, Stefanie; Germing, Ulrich; Haas, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are clonal myeloid disorders characterized by hematopoietic insufficiency. As MDS and AML are considered to originate from genetic and molecular defects of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), the main focus of research in this field has focused on the characterization of these cells. Recently, the contribution of BM microenvironment to the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies, in particular MDS and AML has gained more interest. This is based on a better understanding of its physiological role in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Additionally, it was demonstrated as a ‘proof of principle’ that genetic disruption of cells of the mesenchymal or osteoblastic lineage can induce MDS, MPS or AML in mice. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the contribution of the BM microenvironment, in particular mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to the pathogenesis of AML and MDS. Furthermore, potential models integrating the BM microenvironment into the pathophysiology of these myeloid disorders are discussed. Finally, strategies to therapeutically exploit this knowledge and to interfere with the crosstalk between clonal hematopoietic cells and altered stem cell niches are introduced. PMID:28090484

  4. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Sever; Barbu, Emil; Ionescu, Călin; Costache, Adrian; Bălăşoiu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal malignancies of the digestive tract. Gastric localization is the most frequent. The aim of this study is to evaluate the importance of immunohistochemical factors (CD117, CD34, α-SMA, vimentin, p53, Ki67) in diagnostic and size tumor and mitotic activity as prognostic factors for these tumors. We present the case of a 66-year-old male patient with a giant gastric GIST. Like in the vast majority, the symptomatology in this patient has long been faint, despite the large tumor size, and when it became manifest, it was nonspecific. Imagery wise, the computer tomography (CT) scan was the most efficient, showing the origin of the tumor from the greater curvature of the stomach, its dimensions, as well as the relations with the other abdominal viscera. Surgery in this patient was en-bloc, according to the principles of GIST. The histological aspect is characterized by a proliferation of spindle cells positive for CD117 and CD34. Despite complete microscopic resection, the size of the tumor (25×20×27 cm) and the mitotic activity (21÷5 mm2) remains important relapse factor.

  5. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  6. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins.

  7. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins. PMID:19968734

  8. Intestinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor in a cat

    PubMed Central

    SUWA, Akihisa; SHIMODA, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    A 12-year-old, 3.6-kg, spayed female domestic shorthaired cat had a 2-month history of anorexia and weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed an exophytic mass originating from the jejunum with very poor central and poor peripheral contrast enhancement. On day 14, surgical resection of the jejunum and mass with 5-cm margins and an end-to-end anastomosis were performed. Histopathological examination revealed the mass was a transmural, invasive cancer showing exophytic growth and originating from the small intestinal muscle layer. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor cells revealed diffuse positivity for KIT protein and negativity for desmin and S-100. The mass was diagnosed as a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Ultrasonographic findings indicated the tumor probably metastasized to the liver and omentum, as seen in humans and dogs. The owner rejected further treatment at the last visit on day 192. To our knowledge, this is the first report of intestinal tumor and metastasis in feline GIST and its imaging features. PMID:28163271

  9. Epigenetic Classification of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Danilo Candido; Ferreira, Marcelo R.P.; Franzen, Julia; Weidner, Carola I.; Frobel, Joana; Zenke, Martin; Costa, Ivan G.; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Standardization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is hampered by the lack of a precise definition for these cell preparations; for example, there are no molecular markers to discern MSCs and fibroblasts. In this study, we followed the hypothesis that specific DNA methylation (DNAm) patterns can assist classification of MSCs. We utilized 190 DNAm profiles to address the impact of tissue of origin, donor age, replicative senescence, and serum supplements on the epigenetic makeup. Based on this, we elaborated a simple epigenetic signature based on two CpG sites to classify MSCs and fibroblasts, referred to as the Epi-MSC-Score. Another two-CpG signature can distinguish between MSCs from bone marrow and adipose tissue, referred to as the Epi-Tissue-Score. These assays were validated by site-specific pyrosequencing analysis in 34 primary cell preparations. Furthermore, even individual subclones of MSCs were correctly classified by our epigenetic signatures. In summary, we propose an alternative concept to use DNAm patterns for molecular definition of cell preparations, and our epigenetic scores facilitate robust and cost-effective quality control of MSC cultures. PMID:26862701

  10. Kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells and supportive activities of stromal cells in a three-dimensional bone marrow culture system.

    PubMed

    Harada, Tomonori; Hirabayashi, Yukio; Hatta, Yoshihiro; Tsuboi, Isao; Glomm, Wilhelm Robert; Yasuda, Masahiro; Aizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    In the bone marrow, hematopoietic cells proliferate and differentiate in close association with a three-dimensional (3D) hematopoietic microenvironment. Previously, we established a 3D bone marrow culture system. In this study, we analyzed the kinetics of hematopoietic cells, and more than 50% of hematopoietic progenitor cells, including CFU-Mix, CFU-GM and BFU-E in 3D culture were in a resting (non-S) phase. Furthermore, we examined the hematopoietic supportive ability of stromal cells by measuring the expression of various mRNAs relevant to hematopoietic regulation. Over the 4 weeks of culture, the stromal cells in the 3D culture are not needlessly activated and "quietly" regulate hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation during the culture, resulting in the presence of resting hematopoietic stem cells in the 3D culture for a long time. Thus, the 3D culture system may be a new tool for investigating hematopoietic stem cell-stromal cell interactions in vitro.

  11. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Delgado, Yolanda; Torrelo, Antonio; Colmenero, Isabel; Zambrano, Antonio

    2005-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a benign proliferation of the oral mucosa with well defined clinical and histological characteristics. It has been associated with infection of the oral mucosa by types 13 and 32 of the human papillomavirus (HPV), and to a lesser extent, with other types. Its clinical course is variable, although it usually persists for months or years; cases with spontaneous resolution have been described, as have others with prolonged persistence. We present the case of an Ecuadorian boy whose visit was motivated by lesions in the oral mucosa consistent with a diagnosis of FEH, which were confirmed in the histological study, and in which HPV type 13 DNA was identified.

  12. Insufficient stromal support in MDS results from molecular and functional deficits of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Geyh, S; Oz, S; Cadeddu, R-P; Fröbel, J; Brückner, B; Kündgen, A; Fenk, R; Bruns, I; Zilkens, C; Hermsen, D; Gattermann, N; Kobbe, G; Germing, U; Lyko, F; Haas, R; Schroeder, T

    2013-09-01

    Ineffective hematopoiesis is a major characteristic of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) causing relevant morbidity and mortality. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been shown to physiologically support hematopoiesis, but their contribution to the pathogenesis of MDS remains elusive. We show that MSC from patients across all MDS subtypes (n=106) exhibit significantly reduced growth and proliferative capacities accompanied by premature replicative senescence. Osteogenic differentiation was significantly reduced in MDS-derived MSC, indicated by cytochemical stainings and reduced expressions of Osterix and Osteocalcin. This was associated with specific methylation patterns that clearly separated MDS-MSC from healthy controls and showed a strong enrichment for biological processes associated with cellular phenotypes and transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, in MDS-MSC, we detected altered expression of key molecules involved in the interaction with hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), in particular Osteopontin, Jagged1, Kit-ligand and Angiopoietin as well as several chemokines. Functionally, this translated into a significantly diminished ability of MDS-derived MSC to support CD34+ HSPC in long-term culture-initiating cell assays associated with a reduced cell cycle activity. Taken together, our comprehensive analysis shows that MSC from all MDS subtypes are structurally, epigenetically and functionally altered, which leads to impaired stromal support and seems to contribute to deficient hematopoiesis in MDS.

  13. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin is expressed in the intact central nervous system and upregulated in the myelin-degenerative central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Kitic, Maja; Wimmer, Isabella; Adzemovic, Milena; Kögl, Nikolaus; Rudel, Antonia; Lassmann, Hans; Bradl, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is an epithelial cytokine expressed at barrier surfaces of the skin, gut, nose, lung, and the maternal/fetal interphase. At these sites, it is important for the generation and maintenance of non-inflammatory, tissue-resident dendritic cell responses. We show here that TSLP is also expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) where it is produced by choroid plexus epithelial cells and astrocytes in the spinal cord. Under conditions of low-grade myelin degeneration, the numbers of TSLP-expressing astrocytes increase, and microglia express transcripts for the functional TSLP receptor dimer indicating that these cells are targets for TSLP in the myelin-degenerative CNS. PMID:24668732

  14. Peritoneal inflammation – A microenvironment for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Ralph S; Deavers, Michael; Liu, Jinsong; Wang, Ena

    2004-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a significant cause of cancer related morbidity and mortality in women. Preferential involvement of peritoneal structures contributes to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients. Advances in biotechnology, such as cDNA microarray, are a product of the Human Genome Project and are beginning to provide fresh opportunities to understand the biology of EOC. In particular, it is now possible to examine in depth, at the molecular level, the complex relationship between the tumor itself and its surrounding microenvironment. This review focuses on the anatomy, physiology, and current immunobiologic research of peritoneal structures, and addresses certain potentially useful animal models. Changes in both the inflammatory and non-inflammatory cell compartments, as well as alterations to the extracellular matrix, appear to be signal events that contribute to the remodeling effects of the peritoneal stroma and surface epithelial cells on tumor growth and spread. These alterations may involve a number of proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, either membrane or non-membrane bound, and integrins. Interactions between these molecules and molecular structures within the extracellular matrix, such as collagens and the proteoglycans, may contribute to a peritoneal mesothelial surface and stromal environment that is conducive to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. These alterations need to be examined and defined as possible prosnosticators and as therapeutic or diagnostic targets. PMID:15219235

  15. Functional imaging and assessment of the glucose diffusion rate in epithelial tissues in optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, K V; Tuchin, V V

    2008-06-30

    Functional imaging, monitoring and quantitative description of glucose diffusion in epithelial and underlying stromal tissues in vivo and controlling of the optical properties of tissues are extremely important for many biomedical applications including the development of noninvasive or minimally invasive glucose sensors as well as for therapy and diagnostics of various diseases, such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Recent progress in the development of a noninvasive molecular diffusion biosensor based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. The diffusion of glucose was studied in several epithelial tissues both in vitro and in vivo. Because OCT provides depth-resolved imaging of tissues with high in-depth resolution, the glucose diffusion is described not only as a function of time but also as a function of depth. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  16. Epithelial derived CTGF promotes breast tumor progression via inducing EMT and collagen I fibers deposition

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhen; Sheng, Jianting; Wang, Jiang; Liu, Jiyong; Cui, Kemi; Chang, Jenny; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Interactions among tumor cells, stromal cells, and extracellular matrix compositions are mediated through cytokines during tumor progression. Our analysis of 132 known cytokines and growth factors in published clinical breast cohorts and our 84 patient-derived xenograft models revealed that the elevated connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in tumor epithelial cells significantly correlated with poor clinical prognosis and outcomes. CTGF was able to induce tumor cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and promote stroma deposition of collagen I fibers to stimulate tumor growth and metastasis. This process was mediated through CTGF-tumor necrosis factor receptor I (TNFR1)-IκB autocrine signaling. Drug treatments targeting CTGF, TNFR1, and IκB signaling each prohibited the EMT and tumor progression. PMID:26318291

  17. The Ets Transcription Factor EHF as a Regulator of Cornea Epithelial Cell Identity*

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Denise N.; Klein, Rachel Herndon; Salmans, Michael L.; Gordon, William; Ho, Hsiang; Andersen, Bogi

    2013-01-01

    The cornea is the clear, outermost portion of the eye composed of three layers: an epithelium that provides a protective barrier while allowing transmission of light into the eye, a collagen-rich stroma, and an endothelium monolayer. How cornea development and aging is controlled is poorly understood. Here we characterize the mouse cornea transcriptome from early embryogenesis through aging and compare it with transcriptomes of other epithelial tissues, identifying cornea-enriched genes, pathways, and transcriptional regulators. Additionally, we profiled cornea epithelium and stroma, defining genes enriched in these layers. Over 10,000 genes are differentially regulated in the mouse cornea across the time course, showing dynamic expression during development and modest expression changes in fewer genes during aging. A striking transition time point for gene expression between postnatal days 14 and 28 corresponds with completion of cornea development at the transcriptional level. Clustering classifies co-expressed, and potentially co-regulated, genes into biologically informative categories, including groups that exhibit epithelial or stromal enriched expression. Based on these findings, and through loss of function studies and ChIP-seq, we show that the Ets transcription factor EHF promotes cornea epithelial fate through complementary gene activating and repressing activities. Furthermore, we identify potential interactions between EHF, KLF4, and KLF5 in promoting cornea epithelial differentiation. These data provide insights into the mechanisms underlying epithelial development and aging, identifying EHF as a regulator of cornea epithelial identity and pointing to interactions between Ets and KLF factors in promoting epithelial fate. Furthermore, this comprehensive gene expression data set for the cornea is a powerful tool for discovery of novel cornea regulators and pathways. PMID:24142692

  18. Epithelial Conduction in Hydromedusae

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, G. O.; Passano, L. M.

    1968-01-01

    Sarsia, Euphysa, and other hydromedusae have been studied by electrophysiological techniques and are found to have nonnervous conducting epithelia resembling those described earlier for siphonophores. Simple, non-muscular epithelia fire singly or repetitively following brief electrical stimuli. The pulses recorded with suction electrodes are biphasic, initially positive, and show amplitudes of 0.75–2.0 mv, durations of 5–15 msec, and velocities of 15–35 cm/sec with short refractory periods. In the swimming muscle (myoepithelium) 2.0–4.0 mv composite events lasting 150–300 msec are associated with contraction waves. Propagation in nonnervous epithelia is typically all-or-none, nondecremental, and unpolarized. The subumbrellar endoderm lamella conducts independently of the adjacent ectoderm. The lower regions of the tentacles do not show propagated epithelial events. The spread of excitation in conducting epithelia and associated effector responses are described. Examples are given of interaction between events seemingly conducted in the nervous system and those in nonnervous epithelia. Either system may excite the other. Spontaneous activity, however, appears to originate in the nervous system. Conduction in nonnervous tissues is unaffected by excess Mg++ in concentrations suppressing presumed nervous activity, although this may not be a wholly adequate criterion for distinguishing components of the two systems. Evidence from old work by Romanes is considered in the light of these findings and the general significance of epithelial conduction is discussed. PMID:4386662

  19. Stromal accumulation of chondroitin sulphate in mammary tumours of dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichs, U; Rutteman, G R; Nederbragt, H

    1999-01-01

    To contribute to the investigation of the composition of the extracellular matrix in epithelial tumours, mammary gland tissues of dogs (including tumours, hyperplasias and normal tissue as well as metastatic lesions in lymph nodes and lung) were studied histochemically and immunohistochemically for distribution of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (s-GAGs). The formaline-fixed tissue was stained by alcian blue at pH 5.8, using the ‘critical electrolyte concentration’ to study the degree of sulphation of s-GAGs. s-GAGs were characterized by degradation with enzymes and nitrous acid and by immunohistochemistry with two anti-chondroitin sulphate monoclonal antibodies. The light microscopic investigation of s-GAG deposits revealed a limited number of patterns of their distribution. The main s-GAGs found in the mammary gland tumours of dogs and in metastatic lesions were chondroitin sulphate (CS) and heparin/heparan sulphate (HEP/HS). CS accumulated in diffuse structures between epithelial cells as well as around clusters of tumour cells. The latter pattern, possibly representing a mesenchymal reaction to the tumour, was present in 74% of the tumours, and in 67% of these, highly sulphated CS was present. A diffuse accumulation of CS was present almost exclusively in complex and mixed tumours; because of the expression of the 3B3 epitope for CS in immature cartilage the spindle cells of complex tumours are argued to be the precursors of the cartilage in mixed tumours. HEP/HS was stored mainly in mast cells that were found in increased numbers in hyperplasias and tumours. By pretreatment of microscopic slides with chondroitinase AC or ABC immunostaining of fibronectin could be made possible in areas in which CS was abundantly present, suggesting that CS may mask fibronectin epitopes. It is concluded that CS with different degrees of sulphation is the most important s-GAG in the extracellular matrix of mammary tumours of dogs. CS and other s-GAGs accumulate at different

  20. Complement and Humoral Adaptive Immunity in the Human Choroid Plexus: Roles for Stromal Concretions, Basement Membranes, and Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Laule, Cornelia; Leung, Esther; Pavlova, Vladimira; Morgan, B. Paul; Esiri, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) provides a barrier to entry of toxic molecules from the blood into the brain and transports vital molecules into the cerebrospinal fluid. While a great deal is known about CP physiology, relatively little is known about its immunology. Here, we show immunohistochemical data that help define the role of the CP in innate and adaptive humoral immunity. The results show that complement, in the form of C1q, C3d, C9, or C9neo, is preferentially deposited in stromal concretions. In contrast, immunoglobulin (Ig) G (IgG) and IgA are more often found in CP epithelial cells, and IgM is found in either locale. C4d, IgD, and IgE are rarely, if ever, seen in the CP. In multiple sclerosis CP, basement membrane C9 or stromal IgA patterns were common but were not specific for the disease. These findings indicate that the CP may orchestrate the clearance of complement, particularly by deposition in its concretions, IgA and IgG preferentially via its epithelium, and IgM by either mechanism. PMID:26994633

  1. Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Differentiate Into Corneal Tissue and Prevent Ocular Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Hernández-Galilea, Emiliano; Lorenzo, Rebeca; Herrero, Carmen; Velasco, Almudena; Carrancio, Soraya; Caballero-Velázquez, Teresa; Rodríguez-Barbosa, José Ignacio; Parrilla, Marta; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; San Miguel, Jesús; Aijón, José; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials have assessed the use of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) for the treatment of immune-related disorders such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In the current study, we show that GFP(+)-transduced hBMSCs generated from bone marrow migrate and differentiate into corneal tissue after subconjunctival injection in mice. Interestingly, these hBMSCs display morphological features of epithelial, stromal, and endothelial cells and appear at different layers and with different morphologies depending on their position within the epithelium. Furthermore, these cells display ultrastructural properties, such as bundles of intermediate filaments, interdigitations, and desmosomes with GFP(-) cells, which confirms their differentiation into corneal tissues. GFP(+)-transduced hBMSCs were injected at different time points into the right eye of lethally irradiated mice undergoing bone marrow transplantation, which developed ocular GVHD (oGVHD). Remarkably, hBMSCs massively migrate to corneal tissues after subconjunctival injection. Both macroscopic and histopathological examination showed minimal or no evidence of GVHD in the right eye, while the left eye, where no hBMSCs were injected, displayed features of GVHD. Thus, in the current study, we confirm that hBMSCs may induce their therapeutic effect at least in part by differentiation and regeneration of damaged tissues in the host. Our results provide experimental evidence that hBMSCs represent a potential cellular therapy to attenuate oGVHD.

  2. Endometriosis-associated serous borderline tumor and endometrial stromal sarcoma of the ovary: a report of a rare lesion in an infant.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ronnie S L; Chan, Godfrey C F; Ha, Shau Yin; Ip, Philip P C

    2012-01-01

    Endometriosis in infancy is most unusual, and associated tumors in this age group are exceptionally rare. We report a case of a serous borderline tumor and endometrial stromal sarcoma arising in an ovarian endometriotic cyst. The patient was an infant of 18 months of age who presented with an incidental abdominal mass. The serum sex hormones were at prepubertal levels. There was no evidence of precocious puberty or any obvious genital anomaly. Intraoperative findings included a solitary solid and multicystic right ovarian mass without evidence of any extraovarian disease. On microscopic examination, the tumor was composed of an intimate mixture of florid papillary and stromal cell proliferation in the wall of an endometriotic cyst. The papillae showed hierarchical branching and had hyalinized and edematous cores with scattered psammoma bodies. The epithelial cells were mildly atypical and mitotically inactive. The underlying endometrial stromal cells were arranged in irregular tongues that permeated the thickened fibrous cyst wall. They were mitotically active and immunoreactive for CD10. There was no evidence of any primitive germ cell tumor. The patient received no adjuvant treatment and had an uneventful postoperative follow-up period of 30 months. To the best of our knowledge, endometriosis associated with this most unusual combination of ovarian tumors has never been reported in an infant.

  3. Bone morphogenetic protein antagonist gremlin 1 is widely expressed by cancer-associated stromal cells and can promote tumor cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneddon, Julie B.; Zhen, Hanson H.; Montgomery, Kelli; van de Rijn, Matt; Tward, Aaron D.; West, Robert; Gladstone, Hayes; Chang, Howard Y.; Morganroth, Greg S.; Oro, Anthony E.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2006-10-01

    Although tissue microenvironments play critical roles in epithelial development and tumorigenesis, the factors mediating these effects are poorly understood. In this work, we used a genomic approach to identify factors produced by cells in the microenvironment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin, one of the most common human cancers. The global gene expression programs of stromal cell cultures derived from human BCCs showed consistent, systematic differences from those derived from nontumor skin. The gene most consistently expressed at a higher level in BCC tumor stromal cells compared with those from nontumor skin was GREMLIN 1, which encodes a secreted antagonist of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. BMPs and their antagonists are known to play a crucial role in stem and progenitor cell biology as regulators of the balance between expansion and differentiation. Consistent with the hypothesis that BMP antagonists might have a similar role in cancer, we found GREMLIN 1 expression in the stroma of human BCC tumors but not in normal skin in vivo. Furthermore, BMP 2 and 4 are expressed by BCC cells. Ex vivo, BMP inhibits, and Gremlin 1 promotes, proliferation of cultured BCC cells. We further found that GREMLIN 1 is expressed by stromal cells in many carcinomas but not in the corresponding normal tissue counterparts that we examined. Our data suggest that BMP antagonists may be important constituents of tumor stroma, providing a favorable microenvironment for cancer cell survival and expansion in many cancers. cancer biology | stem cell regulation | tissue microenvironment | tumor stroma

  4. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells are Readily Recoverable from Lung Tissue, but not the Alveolar Space, in Healthy Humans.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, K A; Yerkovich, S T; Chen, T; McQualter, J L; Hopkins, P M-A; Wells, C A; Chambers, D C

    2016-10-01

    Stromal support is critical for lung homeostasis and the maintenance of an effective epithelial barrier. Despite this, previous studies have found a positive association between the number of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from the alveolar compartment and human lung diseases associated with epithelial dysfunction. We hypothesised that bronchoalveolar lavage derived MSCs (BAL-MSCs) are dysfunctional and distinct from resident lung tissue MSCs (LT-MSCs). In this study, we comprehensively interrogated the phenotype and transcriptome of human BAL-MSCs and LT-MSCs. We found that MSCs were rarely recoverable from the alveolar space in healthy humans, but could be readily isolated from lung transplant recipients by bronchoalveolar lavage. BAL-MSCs exhibited a CD90(Hi) , CD73(Hi) , CD45(Neg) , CD105(Lo) immunophenotype and were bipotent, lacking adipogenic potential. In contrast, MSCs were readily recoverable from healthy human lung tissue and were CD90(Hi or Lo) , CD73(Hi) , CD45(Neg) , CD105(Int) and had full tri-lineage potential. Transcriptional profiling of the two populations confirmed their status as bona fide MSCs and revealed a high degree of similarity between each other and the archetypal bone-marrow MSC. 105 genes were differentially expressed; 76 of which were increased in BAL-MSCs including genes involved in fibroblast activation, extracellular matrix deposition and tissue remodelling. Finally, we found the fibroblast markers collagen 1A1 and α-smooth muscle actin were increased in BAL-MSCs. Our data suggests that in healthy humans, lung MSCs reside within the tissue, but in disease can differentiate to acquire a profibrotic phenotype and migrate from their in-tissue niche into the alveolar space. Stem Cells 2016;34:2548-2558.

  5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and second malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodriquenz, Maria Grazia; Rossi, Sabrina; Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Larocca, Mario; Dipasquale, Angelo; Quirino, Michela; Schinzari, Giovanni; Basso, Michele; D’Argento, Ettore; Strippoli, Antonia; Barone, Carlo; Cassano, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several evidences showed that patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) develop additional malignancies. However, thorough incidence of second tumors remains uncertain as the possibility of a common molecular pathogenesis. A retrospective series of 128 patients with histologically proven GIST treated at our institution was evaluated. Molecular analysis of KIT and PDGFR-α genes was performed in all patients. Following the involvement of KRAS mutation in many tumors’ pathogenesis, analysis of KRAS was performed in patients with also second neoplasms. Forty-six out of 128 GIST patients (35.9%) had a second neoplasm. Most second tumors (52%) raised from gastrointestinal tract and 19.6% from genitourinary tract. Benign neoplasms were also included (21.7%). Molecular analysis was available for 29/46 patients with a second tumor: wild-type GISTs (n. 5), exon 11 (n. 16), exon 13 (n. 1), exon 9 (n. 1) KIT mutations, exon 14 PDGFR-α mutation (n. 2) and exon 18 PDGFR-α mutation (n. 4). KIT exon 11 mutations were more frequent between patients who developed a second tumor (P = 0.0003). Mutational analysis of KRAS showed a wild-type sequence in all cases. In metachronous cases, the median time interval between GIST and second tumor was 21.5 months. The high frequency of second tumors suggests that an unknown common molecular mechanism might play a role, but it is not likely that KRAS is involved in this common pathogenesis. The short interval between GIST diagnosis and the onset of second neoplasms asks for a careful follow-up, particularly in the first 3 years after diagnosis. PMID:27661019

  6. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    PubMed Central

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression maneuvers. After pressure equilibration cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics. PMID:25664452

  7. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  8. Stromal cells in chronic inflammation and tertiary lymphoid organ formation.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Christopher D; Barone, Francesca; Nayar, Saba; Bénézech, Cecile; Caamaño, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is an unstable state. It either resolves or persists. Why inflammation persists and the factors that define tissue tropism remain obscure. Increasing evidence suggests that tissue-resident stromal cells not only provide positional memory but also actively regulate the differential accumulation of inflammatory cells within inflamed tissues. Furthermore, at many sites of chronic inflammation, structures that mimic secondary lymphoid tissues are observed, suggesting that chronic inflammation and lymphoid tissue formation share common activation programs. Similarly, blood and lymphatic endothelial cells contribute to tissue homeostasis and disease persistence in chronic inflammation. This review highlights our increasing understanding of the role of stromal cells in inflammation and summarizes the novel immunological role that stromal cells exert in the persistence of inflammatory diseases.

  9. A6 in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-27

    Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  10. Altered expression profile of micrornas in gastric stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun; Wang, Qi-xian; Zhu, You-qing

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in carcinogenesis, but the global miRNA expression profile in gastric stromal tumor tissues remains unclear. This study was to examine the miRNA expression profile in gastric stromal tumor tissues and explore the function of dysregulated miRNAs by performing gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis. Total RNA was extracted and purified from 3 pairs of frozen gastric stromal tumor tissues and the adjacent non-tumor tissues by using mirVana™ miRNA isolation kit. The miRNA expression was analyzed with Affymetrix microarrays (version 4.0) containing 2578 human mature microRNA probes. The dysregulated microRNAs were validated by quantitative RT-PCR in 30 pairs of gastric stromal tumor tissues. The target gene of the dysregulated microRNAs was predicted by miRanda, TargetScan and PicTar. GO and pathway enrichment analysis was conducted to examine the potential function of miR-3178 and miR-193a-5p. The results showed that there were 12 differently expressed microRNAs in gastric stromal tumor tissues, among which 10 miRNAs were down-regulated, and 2 were up-regulated (P<0.05). The validation results by RT-PCR were in accordance with those by microRNA microarry. GO analysis found that the target genes of miR-3178 were involved in 5 GO terms and those of miR-193a-5p in 7 GO terms in level 2. Pathway enrichment analysis suggested that miR-3178 and miR-193a-5p were related to 57 and 122 signaling pathways, respectively. It was concluded that gastric stromal tumor displays a unique miRNA signature. This specific expression may become a new diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for gastric stromal tumor. miR-3178 and miR-193a-5p function as suppressive microRNAs, and they may also become diagnosis and treatment targets for gastric stromal tumor.

  11. Tumeur stromale rectale: à propos d'une observation

    PubMed Central

    Rejab, Haitham; Kridis, Wala Ben; Ben Ameur, Hazem; Feki, Jihene; Frikha, Mounir; Beyrouti, Mohamed Issam

    2014-01-01

    Les tumeurs stromales gastro-intestinales sont des tumeurs mésenchymateuses peu fréquentes. Elles sont localisées préférentiellement eu niveau de l'estomac. La localisation rectale reste rare. A un nouveau cas de tumeur stromale du rectum ainsi qu'une bref revue de la littérature, on se propose d’étudier les particularités cliniques, radiologiques et thérapeutiques de cette entité rare. PMID:25120863

  12. Implications of the Hybrid Epithelial/Mesenchymal Phenotype in Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Boareto, Marcelo; Huang, Bin; Jia, Dongya; Lu, Mingyang; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Onuchic, José N.; Levine, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes – the epithelial to ­mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its reverse the mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET) – are hallmarks of cancer metastasis. While transitioning between the epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes, cells can also attain a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M) (i.e., partial or intermediate EMT) phenotype. Cells in this phenotype have mixed epithelial (e.g., adhesion) and mesenchymal (e.g., migration) properties, thereby allowing them to move collectively as clusters. If these clusters reach the bloodstream intact, they can give rise to clusters of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), as have often been seen experimentally. Here, we review the operating principles of the core regulatory network for EMT/MET that acts as a “three-way” switch giving rise to three distinct phenotypes – E, M and hybrid E/M – and present a theoretical framework that can elucidate the role of many other players in regulating epithelial plasticity. Furthermore, we highlight recent studies on partial EMT and its association with drug resistance and tumor-initiating potential; and discuss how cell–cell communication between cells in a partial EMT phenotype can enable the formation of clusters of CTCs. These clusters can be more apoptosis-resistant and have more tumor-initiating potential than singly moving CTCs with a wholly mesenchymal (complete EMT) phenotype. Also, more such clusters can be formed under inflammatory conditions that are often generated by various therapies. Finally, we discuss the multiple advantages that the partial EMT or hybrid E/M phenotype have as compared to a complete EMT phenotype and argue that these collectively migrating cells are the primary “bad actors” of metastasis. PMID:26258068

  13. Extensive focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hashemipour, Maryam Alsadat; Shoryabi, Ali; Adhami, Shahrzad; Mehrabizadeh Honarmand, Hoda

    2010-01-01

    Heck's disease or focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign contagious disease caused by human papillomavirus types 13 or 32. It occurs with low frequency in the Iranian population. This condition is characterized by the occurrence of multiple, small papules or nodules in the oral cavity, especially on the labial and buccal mucosa and tongue. In some populations, up to 39% of children are affected. Conservative surgical excision of lesions may be performed for diagnostic or aesthetic purposes. The risk of recurrence after this therapy is minimal, and there seems to be no malignant transformation potential. In the present work, we presented the clinical case of a 12-year-old Iranian girl with oral lesions that clinically and histologically correspond to Heck's disease.

  14. Thymic epithelial cell expansion through matricellular protein CYR61 boosts progenitor homing and T-cell output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emre, Yalin; Irla, Magali; Dunand-Sauthier, Isabelle; Ballet, Romain; Meguenani, Mehdi; Jemelin, Stephane; Vesin, Christian; Reith, Walter; Imhof, Beat A.

    2013-11-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TEC) are heterogeneous stromal cells that generate microenvironments required for the formation of T cells within the thymus. Defects in TEC lead to immunodeficiency or autoimmunity. Here we identify TEC as the major source of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61), a matricellular protein implicated in cell proliferation and migration. Binding of CYR61 to LFA-1, ICAM-1 and integrin α6 supports the adhesion of TEC and thymocytes as well as their interaction. Treatment of thymic lobes with recombinant CYR61 expands the stromal compartment by inducing the proliferation of TEC and activates Akt signalling. Engraftment of CYR61-overexpressing thymic lobes into athymic nude mice drastically boosts the yield of thymic output via expansion of TEC. This increases the space for the recruitment of circulating hematopoietic progenitors and the development of T cells. Our discovery paves the way for therapeutic interventions designed to restore thymus stroma and T-cell generation.

  15. Heterogeneity of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells: from stromal cells to stem cells and vice versa.

    PubMed

    Dominici, Massimo; Paolucci, Paolo; Conte, Pierfranco; Horwitz, Edwin M

    2009-05-15

    Discovered more than 40 years ago, the biological features of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) were progressively compared first with hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and, more recently, with embryonic stem cells (ESC). Although these comparisons have been crucial in helping to clarify their nature, there is now a robust amount of data indicating that MSC in vitro represent an independent and heterogeneous group of progenitors with distinct self-renewal properties and established differentiation potentials. However, research developments both in humans and animals have progressively revealed the limits that MSC may face in vivo. To recognize these issues and challenge MSC stemness may seem to be a step backward. Nevertheless, it might also represent the beginning of a phase in which the introduction of novel preclinical approaches could provide better characterization and standardization of the in vivo factors influencing cell engraftment and survival, allowing a more successful impact of mesenchymal progenitors in several clinical settings.

  16. Functional characterisation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, Helene; Zarcone, Maria C.; Taube, Christian; Stolk, Jan; Hiemstra, Pieter S.

    2016-01-01

    Autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) are evaluated for clinical use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but it is unclear whether COPD affects BM-MSCs. To investigate this, BM-MSCs from nine COPD patients and nine non-COPD age-matched controls were compared with regard to immunophenotype, growth and differentiation potential, and migration capacity. Other functional assays included the response to pro-inflammatory stimuli and inducers of the nuclear factor (erythroid derived 2)-like 2 antioxidant response element (Nrf2-ARE) pathway, and effects on NCI-H292 airway epithelial cells. No significant differences were observed in terms of morphology, proliferation and migration, except for increased adipocyte differentiation potential in the COPD group. Both groups were comparable regarding mRNA expression of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, and in their potential to induce mRNA expression of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands in NCI-H292 airway epithelial cells. MSCs from COPD patients secreted more interleukin-6 in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli. Activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway resulted in a comparable induction of mRNA expression of four target genes, but the expression of the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene NQO1 was lower in MSCs from COPD patients. The observation that MSCs from COPD patients are phenotypically and functionally comparable to those from non-COPD controls implies that autologous MSCs can be considered for use in the setting of clinical trials as a treatment for COPD. PMID:27730190

  17. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-07

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  18. TSCOT+ thymic epithelial cell-mediated sensitive CD4 tolerance by direct presentation.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sejin; Lee, Gwanghee; Yang, Soo Jung; Lee, Deokjae; Lee, Seunghyuk; Shin, Hyo Sun; Kim, Min Cheol; Lee, Kee Nyung; Palmer, Douglas C; Theoret, Marc R; Jenkinson, Eric J; Anderson, Graham; Restifo, Nicholas P; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2008-08-05

    Although much effort has been directed at dissecting the mechanisms of central tolerance, the role of thymic stromal cells remains elusive. In order to further characterize this event, we developed a mouse model restricting LacZ to thymic stromal cotransporter (TSCOT)-expressing thymic stromal cells (TDLacZ). The thymus of this mouse contains approximately 4,300 TSCOT+ cells, each expressing several thousand molecules of the LacZ antigen. TSCOT+ cells express the cortical marker CDR1, CD40, CD80, CD54, and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII). When examining endogenous responses directed against LacZ, we observed significant tolerance. This was evidenced in a diverse T cell repertoire as measured by both a CD4 T cell proliferation assay and an antigen-specific antibody isotype analysis. This tolerance process was at least partially independent of Autoimmune Regulatory Element gene expression. When TDLacZ mice were crossed to a novel CD4 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic reactive against LacZ (BgII), there was a complete deletion of double-positive thymocytes. Fetal thymic reaggregate culture of CD45- and UEA-depleted thymic stromal cells from TDLacZ and sorted TCR-bearing thymocytes excluded the possibility of cross presentation by thymic dendritic cells and medullary epithelial cells for the deletion. Overall, these results demonstrate that the introduction of a neoantigen into TSCOT-expressing cells can efficiently establish complete tolerance and suggest a possible application for the deletion of antigen-specific T cells by antigen introduction into TSCOT+ cells.

  19. Expression Analyses Revealed Thymic Stromal Co-Transporter/Slc46A2 Is in Stem Cell Populations and Is a Putative Tumor Suppressor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Yeon; Lee, Gwanghee; Yoon, Minsang; Cho, Eun Hye; Park, Chan-Sik; Kim, Moon Gyo

    2015-06-01

    By combining conventional single cell analysis with flow cytometry and public database searches with bioinformatics tools, we extended the expression profiling of thymic stromal cotransporter (TSCOT), Slc46A2/Ly110, that was shown to be expressed in bipotent precursor and cortical thymic epithelial cells. Genome scale analysis verified TSCOT expression in thymic tissue- and cell type- specific fashion and is also expressed in some other epithelial tissues including skin and lung. Coexpression profiling with genes, Foxn1 and Hoxa3, revealed the role of TSCOT during the organogenesis. TSCOT expression was detected in all thymic epithelial cells (TECs), but not in the CD31(+) endothelial cell lineage in fetal thymus. In addition, ABC transporter-dependent side population and Sca-1(+) fetal TEC populations both contain TSCOT-expressing cells, indicating TEC stem cells express TSCOT. TSCOT expression was identified as early as in differentiating embryonic stem cells. TSCOT expression is not under the control of Foxn1 since TSCOT is present in the thymic rudiment of nude mice. By searching variations in the expression levels, TSCOT is positively associated with Grhl3 and Irf6. Cytokines such as IL1b, IL22 and IL24 are the potential regulators of the TSCOT expression. Surprisingly, we found TSCOT expression in the lung is diminished in lung cancers, suggesting TSCOT may be involved in the suppression of lung tumor development. Based on these results, a model for TEC differentiation from the stem cells was proposed in context of multiple epithelial organ formation.

  20. High-Resolution Optical Coherence Tomography Findings of Lisch Epithelial Corneal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Pole, Cameron; Sise, Adam; Joag, Madhura; Galor, Anat; Bermudez-Magner, Jose Antonio; Dubovy, Sander; Karp, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe a case of Lisch epithelial corneal dystrophy (LECD) and present its unique characteristics on high-resolution optical coherence tomography (HR-OCT). Methods A 78-year-old man with whorled corneal epithelial opacities in the right eye was referred for evaluation of ocular surface squamous neoplasia. Clinical evaluation, photos, and HR-OCT images of involved cornea were obtained and scrapings of the affected cornea were sent for histopathologic analysis. Results Clinically the patient presented with a opalescent whirling epithelium in a linear pattern encroaching on the visual axis. HR-OCT showed normal thickness epithelial hyperreflectivity of involved cornea without stromal involvement, along with sharply demarcated borders of unaffected tissue. Histopathologic findings demonstrated vacuolated PAS-positive cells throughout the epithelial layers consistent with LECD. Conclusions HR-OCT was able to provide useful information to rule out ocular surface squamous neoplasia, and confirm the clinical impression of LECD at the time of clinical examination. HR-OCT shows promise as an adjunctive diagnostic tool for ocular surface lesions and pathologies. PMID:26764880

  1. Stress signaling from human mammary epithelial cells contributes to phenotypes of mammographic density.

    PubMed

    DeFilippis, Rosa Anna; Fordyce, Colleen; Patten, Kelley; Chang, Hang; Zhao, Jianxin; Fontenay, Gerald V; Kerlikowske, Karla; Parvin, Bahram; Tlsty, Thea D

    2014-09-15

    Telomere malfunction and other types of DNA damage induce an activin A-dependent stress response in mortal nontumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells that subsequently induces desmoplastic-like phenotypes in neighboring fibroblasts. Some characteristics of this fibroblast/stromal response, such as reduced adipocytes and increased extracellular matrix content, are observed not only in tumor tissues but also in disease-free breast tissues at high risk for developing cancer, especially high mammographic density tissues. We found that these phenotypes are induced by repression of the fatty acid translocase CD36, which is seen in desmoplastic and disease-free high mammographic density tissues. In this study, we show that epithelial cells from high mammographic density tissues have more DNA damage signaling, shorter telomeres, increased activin A secretion and an altered DNA damage response compared with epithelial cells from low mammographic density tissues. Strikingly, both telomere malfunction and activin A expression in epithelial cells can repress CD36 expression in adjacent fibroblasts. These results provide new insights into how high mammographic density arises and why it is associated with breast cancer risk, with implications for the definition of novel invention targets (e.g., activin A and CD36) to prevent breast cancer.

  2. STAT3 accelerates uterine epithelial regeneration in a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Takehiro; Saito-Fujita, Tomoko; Matsuo, Mitsunori; Egashira, Mahiro; Matsumoto, Leona; Haraguchi, Hirofumi; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Furukawa, Katsuko S.; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Although a close connection between uterine regeneration and successful pregnancy in both humans and mice has been consistently observed, its molecular basis remains unclear. We here established a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix (DUM) transplantation. Resected mouse uteri were processed with SDS to make DUMs without any intact cells. DUMs were transplanted into the mouse uteri with artificially induced defects, and all the uterine layers were recovered at the DUM transplantation sites within a month. In the regenerated uteri, normal hormone responsiveness in early pregnancy was observed, suggesting the regeneration of functional uteri. Uterine epithelial cells rapidly migrated and formed a normal uterine epithelial layer within a week, indicating a robust epithelial-regenerating capacity. Stromal and myometrial regeneration occurred following epithelial regeneration. In ovariectomized mice, uterine regeneration of the DUM transplantation was similarly observed, suggesting that ovarian hormones are not essential for this regeneration process. Importantly, the regenerating epithelium around the DUM demonstrated heightened STAT3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation, which was suppressed in uteri of Stat3 conditional knockout mice. These data suggest a key role of STAT3 in the initial step of the uterine regeneration process. The DUM transplantation model is a powerful tool for uterine regeneration research. PMID:27358915

  3. Epithelial proliferation in small ducts of salivary cystadenoma resembling atypical ductal hyperplasia of breast.

    PubMed

    Fahim, Lisa; Weinreb, Ilan; Alexander, Cherupushpam; Perez Ordoñez, Bayardo

    2008-09-01

    Salivary gland cystadenomas are cystic neoplasms with diverse architecture and cytology. Cystadenomas may have a considerable intracystic epithelial component, but an epithelial proliferation in small ducts and cysts resembling atypical ductal hyperplasia of breast has not been documented. The patient was a 68-year-old man with a slow growing right submandibular mass. He has no recurrence 13 months after resection. The tumor was polycystic and measured 3.0 x 2.5 x 2.5 cm. The epithelium of the larger cysts was composed of flat, cuboidal, columnar, and apocrine-like cells. Many of the larger cysts showed "Roman bridges", epithelial tufting, and papillae. The smaller cysts and ducts had apocrine-like cells forming secondary glandular lumens. The ductal cells were surrounded by clear myoepithelial cells. Nuclear pleomorphism and hyperchromasia was seen in the apocrine-like cells. Adjacent to the larger cysts, there was an adenomatoid proliferation of small ducts surrounded by myoepithelial cells. No mitotic activity, necrosis, or stromal invasion was identified. The ductal cells were diffusely positive for keratin 7 and androgen receptors with focal expression of keratin 19 and high-molecular weight keratin. S-100, estrogen and progesterone receptors, and BRST-2 were negative in the ductal cells. Recognition of a prominent intraductal epithelial component in cystadenomas is important to avoid a misdiagnosis of cystadenocarcinoma or low-grade salivary duct carcinoma. Cystadenomas join the list of salivary gland lesions with microscopic similarities to primary lesions of the breast.

  4. Stress Signaling from Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Contributes to Phenotypes of Mammographic Density

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Kelley; Chang, Hang; Zhao, Jianxin; Fontenay, Gerald V.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Parvin, Bahram; Tlsty, Thea D.

    2014-01-01

    Telomere malfunction and other types of DNA damage induce an activin A-dependent stress response in mortal non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells that subsequently induces desmoplastic-like phenotypes in neighboring fibroblasts. Some characteristics of this fibroblast/stromal response, such as reduced adipocytes and increased extracellular matrix content, are observed not only in tumor tissues but also in disease-free breast tissues at high risk for developing cancer, especially high mammographic density tissues. We found that these phenotypes are induced by repression of the fatty acid translocase CD36, which is seen in desmoplastic and disease-free high mammographic density tissues. In this study, we show that epithelial cells from high mammographic density tissues have more DNA damage signaling, shorter telomeres, increased activin A secretion and an altered DNA damage response compared to epithelial cells from low mammographic density tissues. Strikingly, both telomere malfunction and activin A expression in epithelial cells can repress CD36 expression in adjacent fibroblasts. These results provide new insights into how high mammographic density arises and why it is associated with breast cancer risk, with implications for the definition of novel invention targets (e.g. activin A, CD36) to prevent breast cancer. PMID:25172842

  5. Cytokine networks that mediate epithelial cell-macrophage crosstalk in the mammary gland: implications for development and cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuan; Ingman, Wendy V

    2014-07-01

    Dynamic interactions between the hormone responsive mammary gland epithelium and surrounding stromal macrophage populations are critical for normal development and function of the mammary gland. Macrophages are versatile cells capable of diverse roles in mammary gland development and maintenance of homeostasis, and their function is highly dependent on signals within the local cytokine microenvironment. The mammary epithelium secretes a number of cytokines, including colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1), and chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) that affect the abundance, phenotype and function of macrophages. However, aberrations in these interactions have been found to increase the risk of tumour formation, and utilisation of stromal macrophage support by tumours can increase the invasive and metastatic potential of the cancer. Studies utilising genetically modified mouse models have shed light on the significance of epithelial cell-macrophage crosstalk, and the cytokines that mediate this communication, in mammary gland development and tumourigenesis. This article reviews the current status of our understanding of the roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines in mammary gland development and cancer, with a focus on the crosstalk between epithelial cells and the local macrophage population.

  6. Osteoblasts and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Migration and Proliferation in 3D In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    de Barros, Ana Paula D. N.; Takiya, Christina M.; Garzoni, Luciana R.; Leal-Ferreira, Mona Lisa; Dutra, Hélio S.; Chiarini, Luciana B.; Meirelles, Maria Nazareth; Borojevic, Radovan; Rossi, Maria Isabel D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D) bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC) and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. Methodology/Principal Findings A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34+ cells was decreased. Conclusions/Significance Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation. PMID:20161704

  7. Mechanisms of tumor escape from immune system: role of mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Alessandro; Musso, Alessandra; Dapino, Irene; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment represents the site where the tumor tries to survive and escape from immune system-mediated recognition. Indeed, to proliferate tumor cells can divert the immune response inducing the generation of myeloid derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells which can limit the efficiency of effector antitumor lymphocytes in eliminating neoplastic cells. Many components of the tumor microenvironment can serve as a double sword for the tumor and the host. Several types of fibroblast-like cells, which herein we define mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), secrete extracellular matrix components and surrounding the tumor mass can limit the expansion of the tumor. On the other hand, MSC can interfere with the immune recognition of tumor cells producing immunoregulatory cytokines as transforming growth factor (TGF)ß, releasing soluble ligands of the activating receptors expressed on cytolytic effector cells as decoy molecules, affecting the correct interaction among lymphocytes and tumor cells. MSC can also serve as target for the same anti-tumor effector lymphocytes or simply impede the interaction between these lymphocytes and neoplastic cells. Thus, several evidences point out the role of MSC, both in epithelial solid tumors and hematological malignancies, in regulating tumor cell growth and immune response. Herein, we review these evidences and suggest that MSC can be a suitable target for a more efficient anti-tumor therapy.

  8. Antioxidant function of corneal ALDH3A1 in cultured stromal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lassen, Natalie; Pappa, Aglaia; Black, William J; Jester, James V; Day, Brian J; Min, Elysia; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2006-11-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 3A1 (ALDH3A1) is highly expressed in epithelial cells and stromal keratocytes of mammalian cornea and is believed to play an important role in cellular defense. To explore a potential protective role against oxidative damage, a rabbit corneal fibroblastic cell line (TRK43) was stably transfected with the human ALDH3A1 and subjected to oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2), mitomycin C (MMC), or etoposide (VP-16). ALDH3A1-transfected cells were more resistant to H(2)O(2,) MMC, and VP-16 compared to the vector-transfected cells. All treatments induced apoptosis only in vector-transfected cells, which was associated with increased levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE)-adducted proteins. Treatment with H(2)O(2) resulted in a rise in reduced glutathione (GSH) levels in all groups but was more pronounced in the ALDH3A1-expressing cells. Treatment with the DNA-damaging agents led to GSH depletion in control groups, although the depletion was significantly less in ALDH3A1-expressing cells. Increased carbonylation of ALDH3A1 but not significant decline in enzymatic activity was observed after all treatments. In conclusion, our results suggest that ALDH3A1 may act to protect corneal cells against cellular oxidative damage by metabolizing toxic lipid peroxidation products (e.g., 4-HNE), maintaining cellular GSH levels and redox balance, and operating as an antioxidant.

  9. Autologous transplantation of adipose tissue-derived stromal cells ameliorates pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, N; Okumura, M; Mizuno, S; Imanishi, Y; Nakamura, T; Sawa, Y

    2006-11-01

    Adipose tissue is a useful tool for management of most complex cardiothoracic problems, including the reinforcement of damaged lungs, and adipose tissue-derived stromal cells (ASCs) have been suggested to secrete hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a multipotent regenerative factor that contributes to the repair process after lung injury. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the therapeutic impact of autologous transplantation of ASCs through HGF supplementation for the enhancement of alveolar repair in a rat model of emphysema. ASCs were isolated from inguinal subcutaneous fat pads and characterized by flow cytometry. Cultured ASC were found to secrete significantly larger amounts of HGF (15 112 +/- 1628 pg per 10(6) cells) than other angiogenic factors. Transplantation of ASCs into elastase-treated emphysema models induced a significant increase in endogenous HGF expression in lung tissues with a small amount of increase in other organs, with the high levels lasting for up to 4 weeks after transplantation. Further, alveolar and vascular regeneration were significantly enhanced via inhibition of alveolar cell apoptosis, enhancement of epithelial cell proliferation and promotion of angiogenesis in pulmonary vasculature, leading to restoration of pulmonary function affected by emphysema. These data suggest that autologous ASC cell therapy may have a therapeutic potential for pulmonary emphysema, through inducing HGF expression selectively in injured lung tissues.

  10. Multiple Functions of the New Cytokine-Based Antimicrobial Peptide Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP)

    PubMed Central

    Bjerkan, Louise; Sonesson, Andreas; Schenck, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a pleiotropic cytokine, hitherto mostly known to be involved in inflammatory responses and immunoregulation. The human tslp gene gives rise to two transcription and translation variants: a long form (lfTSLP) that is induced by inflammation, and a short, constitutively-expressed form (sfTSLP), that appears to be downregulated by inflammation. The TSLP forms can be produced by a number of cell types, including epithelial and dendritic cells (DCs). lfTSLP can activate mast cells, DCs, and T cells through binding to the lfTSLP receptor (TSLPR) and has a pro-inflammatory function. In contrast, sfTSLP inhibits cytokine secretion of DCs, but the receptor mediating this effect is unknown. Our recent studies have demonstrated that both forms of TSLP display potent antimicrobial activity, exceeding that of many other known antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), with sfTSLP having the strongest effect. The AMP activity is primarily mediated by the C-terminal region of the protein and is localized within a 34-mer peptide (MKK34) that spans the C-terminal α-helical region in TSLP. Fluorescent studies of peptide-treated bacteria, electron microscopy, and liposome leakage models showed that MKK34 exerted membrane-disrupting effects comparable to those of LL-37. Expression of TSLP in skin, oral mucosa, salivary glands, and intestine is part of the defense barrier that aids in the control of both commensal and pathogenic microbes. PMID:27399723

  11. Proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells under hypoxic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Hongying; Cai Huiguo; Han Zhongchao; Yang Renchi; Zhao, Qinjun; Cao Ying; Li Jing; Zhou Cixiang; Liao Lianming; Jia Mingyue; Zhao Qian; Chen Guoqiang . E-mail: chengq@shsmu.edu.cn; Zhao, R.C. |. E-mail: chunhuaz@public.tpt.tj.cn

    2006-08-18

    Low oxygen tension is a potent differentiation inducer of numerous cell types and an effective stimulus of many gene expressions. Here, we described that under 8% O{sub 2}, bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) exhibited proliferative and morphologic changes. The level of differentiated antigen H-2Dd and the number of G{sub 2}/S/M phase cells increased evidently under 8% O{sub 2} condition. Also, the proportion of wide, flattened, and epithelial-like cells (which were alkaline phosphatase staining positive) in MSCs increased significantly. When cultured in adipogenic medium, there was a 5- to 6-fold increase in the number of lipid droplets under hypoxic conditions compared with that in normoxic culture. We also demonstrated the existence of MSC differentiation under hypoxic conditions by electron microscopy. Expression of Oct4 was inhibited under 8% O{sub 2} condition, but after adipocyte differentiation in normoxic culture and hypoxia-mimicking agents cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) and deferoxamine mesylate (DFX) treatments, Oct4 was still expressed in MSCs. These results indicate hypoxia accelerates MSC differentiation and hypoxia and hypoxia-mimicking agents exert different effects on MSC differentiation.

  12. Beyond Standard Therapy: Drugs Under Investigation for The Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Alturkmani, Hani J; Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Godwin, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common non-epithelial malignancy of the GI tract. With the discovery of KIT and later PDGFRA gain-of-function mutations as factors in the pathogenesis of the disease, GIST was the quintessential model for targeted therapy. Despite the successful clinical use of imatinib mesylate, a selective receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor that targets KIT, PDGFRA and BCR-ABL, we still do not have treatment for the long-term control of advanced GIST. Areas covered This review summarizes the drugs that are under investigation or have been assessed in trials for GIST treatment. The article focuses on their mechanisms of actions, the preclinical evidence of efficacy, and the clinical trials concerning safety and efficacy in humans. Expert opinion It is known that KIT and PDGFRA mutations in GIST patients influence the response to treatment. This observation should be taken into consideration when investigating new drugs. RECIST was developed to help uniformly report efficacy trials in oncology. Despite the usefulness of this system, many questions are being addressed about its validity in evaluating the true efficacy of drugs knowing that new targeted therapies do not affect the tumor size as much as they halt progression and prolong survival. PMID:26098203

  13. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-09-24

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  14. Induction of T Cell Development In Vitro by Delta-Like (Dll)-Expressing Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Mohtashami, Mahmood; Zarin, Payam; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Recreating the thymic microenvironment in vitro poses a great challenge to immunologists. Until recently, the only approach was to utilize the thymic tissue in its three-dimensional form and to transfer the hematopoietic progenitors into this tissue to generate de novo T cells. With the advent of OP9-DL cells (bone marrow-derived cells that are transduced to express Notch ligand, Delta-like), hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) could be induced to differentiate into T cells in culture for the first time outside of the thymic tissue on a monolayer. We, as well as others, asked whether the ability to support T cell development in vitro in a monolayer is unique to BM-derived OP9 cells, and showed that provision of Delta-like expression to thymic epithelial cells and fibroblasts also allowed for T cell development. This provides the opportunity to design an autologous coculture system where the supportive stromal and the hematopoietic components are both derived from the same individual, which has obvious clinical implications. In this chapter, we describe methods for establishing a primary murine dermal fibroblast cell population that is transduced to express Delta-like 4, and describe the conditions for its coculture with HSCs to support T cell lineage initiation and expansion, while comparing it to the now classic OP9-DL coculture.

  15. Characterization of CD34+ thymic stromal cells located in the subcapsular cortex of the human thymus.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cáceres, E; Jaleco, A C; Res, P; Noteboom, E; Weijer, K; Spits, H

    1998-07-01

    In this paper we report that suspensions of human fetal thymocytes contain cells that express high levels of CD34 and Thy-1. These cells were characterized with regard to location within the thymus, phenotype, and function. Confocal laser scan analysis of frozen sections of fetal thymus with anti-CD34 and Thy-1 antibodies revealed that the double-labeled cells were located in the pericortical area. In addition, it was found that the CD34+Thy-1+ cells lacked CD45 and CD50, indicating that these cells are not of hematopoietic origin; this was confirmed by the finding that these cells could be cultured as adherent cells in a medium with cholera toxin and dexamethasone, but failed to grow in mixtures of hematopoietic growth factors. Further analysis indicated that most cultured CD34+Thy-1+ cells expressed cytokeratin (CK) 14 but lacked CK 13, suggesting that these cells are immature epithelial cells. Cultured CD34+Thy-1+ cells were able to induce differentiation of CD1-CD34+CD3-CD4-CD8- thymic precursors into CD4+CD8+ cells in a reaggregate culture in the absence of exogenous cytokines. The CD4+CD8+ cells that developed in these cultures did not express CD3, indicating that CD34+Thy-1+ thymic stromal cells are not capable of completing full T cell differentiation of thymic hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  16. CXCL1 mediates obesity-associated adipose stromal cell trafficking and function in the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Sirin, Olga; Corn, Paul G.; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Davis, John; Pettaway, Curtis; Ward, John; Frazier, Marsha L.; Logothetis, Christopher; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) overgrowth in obesity is linked with increased aggressiveness of certain cancers. Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) can become mobilized from WAT, recruited by tumours and promote cancer progression. Mechanisms underlying ASC trafficking are unclear. Here we demonstrate that chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8 chemoattract ASC by signalling through their receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, in cell culture models. We further show that obese patients with prostate cancer have increased epithelial CXCL1 expression. Concomitantly, we observe that cells with ASC phenotype are mobilized and infiltrate tumours in obese patients. Using mouse models, we show that the CXCL1 chemokine gradient is required for the obesity-dependent tumour ASC recruitment, vascularization and tumour growth promotion. We demonstrate that αSMA expression in ASCs is induced by chemokine signalling and mediates the stimulatory effects of ASCs on endothelial cells. Our data suggest that ASC recruitment to tumours, driven by CXCL1 and CXCL8, promotes prostate cancer progression. PMID:27241286

  17. Graded activation of the MEK1/MT1-MMP axis determines renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mahimkar, Rajeev; Alfonso-Jaume, Maria Alejandra; Cape, Leslie M; Dahiya, Rajvir; Lovett, David H

    2011-12-01

    Activation of Raf/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and elevated expression of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) are associated with von Hippel-Lindau gene alterations in renal cell carcinoma. We postulated that the degree of MEK activation was related to graded expression of MT1-MMP and the resultant phenotype of renal epithelial tumors. Madin Darby canine kidney epithelial cells transfected with a MEK1 expression plasmid yielded populations with morphologic phenotypes ranging from epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal to mesenchymal. Clones were analyzed for MEK1 activity, MT1-MMP expression and extent of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Phenotypes of the MDCK-MEK1 clones were evaluated in vivo with nu/nu mice. Tissue microarray of renal cell cancers was quantitatively assessed for expression of phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP proteins and correlations drawn to Fuhrman nuclear grade. Graded increases in the MEK signaling module were associated with graded induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition of the MDCK cells and induction of MT1-MMP transcription and synthesis. Inhibition of MEK1 and MT1-MMP activity reversed the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Tumors generated by epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal and mesenchymal MDCK clones demonstrated a gradient of phenotypes extending from well-differentiated, fully encapsulated non-invasive tumors to tumors with an anaplastic morphology, high Fuhrman nuclear score, neoangiogenesis and invasion. Tumor microarray demonstrated a statistically significant association between the extent of phosphorylated MEK1, MT1-MMP expression and nuclear grade. We conclude that graded increases in the MEK1 signaling module are correlated with M1-MMP expression, renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype, invasive activity and nuclear grade. Phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP may represent novel, and mechanistic, biomarkers for the assessment of renal cell

  18. Eosinophils promote epithelial to mesenchymal transition of bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Atsushi; Hosoki, Koa; Toda, Masaaki; Miyake, Yasushi; Matsushima, Yuki; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Boveda-Ruiz, Daniel; Gil-Bernabe, Paloma; Nagao, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Mayumi; Hiraguchi, Yukiko; Tokuda, Reiko; Naito, Masahiro; Takagi, Takehiro; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Suga, Shigeru; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Fujisawa, Takao; Taguchi, Osamu; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic inflammation and remodeling of the airways including subepithelial fibrosis and myofibroblast hyperplasia are characteristic pathological findings of bronchial asthma. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays a critical role in airway remodelling. In this study, we hypothesized that infiltrating eosinophils promote airway remodelling in bronchial asthma. To demonstrate this hypothesis we evaluated the effect of eosinophils on EMT by in vitro and in vivo studies. EMT was assessed in mice that received intra-tracheal instillation of mouse bone marrow derived eosinophils and in human bronchial epithelial cells co-cultured with eosinophils freshly purified from healthy individuals or with eosinophilic leukemia cell lines. Intra-tracheal instillation of eosinophils was associated with enhanced bronchial inflammation and fibrosis and increased lung concentration of growth factors. Mice instilled with eosinophils pre-treated with transforming growth factor(TGF)-β1 siRNA had decreased bronchial wall fibrosis compared to controls. EMT was induced in bronchial epithelial cells co-cultured with human eosinophils and it was associated with increased expression of TGF-β1 and Smad3 phosphorylation in the bronchial epithelial cells. Treatment with anti-TGF-β1 antibody blocked EMT in bronchial epithelial cells. Eosinophils induced EMT in bronchial epithelial cells, suggesting their contribution to the pathogenesis of airway remodelling.

  19. Stromal cues regulate the pancreatic cancer epigenome and metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Mara H.; Yu, Ruth T.; Tseng, Tiffany W.; Sousa, Cristovao M.; Liu, Sihao; Truitt, Morgan L.; He, Nanhai; Ding, Ning; Liddle, Christopher; Atkins, Annette R.; Leblanc, Mathias; Collisson, Eric A.; Asara, John M.; Kimmelman, Alec C.; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2017-01-01

    A fibroinflammatory stromal reaction cooperates with oncogenic signaling to influence pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) initiation, progression, and therapeutic outcome, yet the mechanistic underpinning of this crosstalk remains poorly understood. Here we show that stromal cues elicit an adaptive response in the cancer cell including the rapid mobilization of a transcriptional network implicated in accelerated growth, along with anabolic changes of an altered metabolome. The close overlap of stroma-induced changes in vitro with those previously shown to be regulated by oncogenic Kras in vivo suggests that oncogenic Kras signaling—a hallmark and key driver of PDAC—is contingent on stromal inputs. Mechanistically, stroma-activated cancer cells show widespread increases in histone acetylation at transcriptionally enhanced genes, implicating the PDAC epigenome as a presumptive point of convergence between these pathways and a potential therapeutic target. Notably, inhibition of the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family of epigenetic readers, and of Bromodomain-containing protein 2 (BRD2) in particular, blocks stroma-inducible transcriptional regulation in vitro and tumor progression in vivo. Our work suggests the existence of a molecular “AND-gate” such that tumor activation is the consequence of mutant Kras and stromal cues, providing insight into the role of the tumor microenvironment in the origin and treatment of Ras-driven tumors. PMID:28096419

  20. Integrins and epithelial cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jessica L; Streuli, Charles H

    2014-08-01

    Cell polarity is characterised by differences in structure, composition and function between at least two poles of a cell. In epithelial cells, these spatial differences allow for the formation of defined apical and basal membranes. It has been increasingly recognised that cell-matrix interactions and integrins play an essential role in creating epithelial cell polarity, although key gaps in our knowledge remain. This Commentary will discuss the mounting evidence for the role of integrins in polarising epithelial cells. We build a model in which both inside-out signals to polarise basement membrane assembly at the basal surface, and outside-in signals to control microtubule apical-basal orientation and vesicular trafficking are required for establishing and maintaining the orientation of epithelial cell polarity. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the basal integrin polarity axis to cancer. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity.

  1. Theory of epithelial elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnc, Matej; Ziherl, Primož

    2015-11-01

    We propose an elastic theory of epithelial monolayers based on a two-dimensional discrete model of dropletlike cells characterized by differential surface tensions of their apical, basal, and lateral sides. We show that the effective tissue bending modulus depends on the apicobasal differential tension and changes sign at the transition from the flat to the fold morphology. We discuss three mechanisms that stabilize the finite-wavelength fold structures: Physical constraint on cell geometry, hard-core interaction between non-neighboring cells, and bending elasticity of the basement membrane. We show that the thickness of the monolayer changes along the waveform and thus needs to be considered as a variable rather than a parameter. Next we show that the coupling between the curvature and the thickness is governed by the apicobasal polarity and that the amplitude of thickness modulation along the waveform is proportional to the apicobasal differential tension. This suggests that intracellular stresses can be measured indirectly by observing easily measurable morphometric parameters. We also study the mechanics of three-dimensional structures with cylindrical symmetry.

  2. Analysis of stromal cell secretomes reveals a critical role for stromal cell-derived HGF and fibronectin in angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Andrew C.; Chou, Wayne; Welch-Reardon, Katrina M.; Fong, Ashley H.; Popson, Stephanie A.; Phan, Duc Thien; Sandoval, Daniel R.; Nguyen, Dananh P.; Gershon, Paul D.; Hughes, Christopher C. W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Angiogenesis requires tightly coordinated cross-talk between endothelial cells and stromal cells such as fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. The specific molecular mechanisms moderating this process are still poorly understood. Method and Results Stromal cell-derived factors are essential for endothelial cell sprouting and lumen formation. We therefore compared the abilities of two primary fibroblast isolates and a primary smooth muscle cell isolate to promote in vitro angiogenesis and analyzed their secretomes using a combination of nanoLC-MS/MS, qPCR and ELISA. Each isolate exhibited a different level of angiogenic ability. Using quantitative MS, we then compared the secretomes of a fibroblast isolate exhibiting low angiogenic activity, a fibroblast isolate exhibiting high angiogenic activity and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. High angiogenic fibroblast supernatants exhibited an over-abundance of proteins associated with extracellular matrix constituents compared to low angiogenic fibroblasts or endothelial cells. Finally, siRNA technology and purified protein were used to confirm a role for stromal cell-derived hepatocyte growth factor and fibronectin in inducing endothelial cell sprouting. Conclusion Differences in stromal cell ability to induce angiogenesis are due to differences in the secreted proteomes of both extracellular matrix proteins and pro-angiogenic growth factors. PMID:23288153

  3. Human blood BDCA-1 dendritic cells differentiate into Langerhans-like cells with thymic stromal lymphopoietin and TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cingolani, Carolina; Grandclaudon, Maximilien; Jeanmougin, Marine; Jouve, Mabel; Zollinger, Raphaël; Soumelis, Vassili

    2014-10-09

    The ontogeny of human Langerhans cells (LCs) remains poorly characterized, in particular the nature of LC precursors and the factors that may drive LC differentiation. Here we report that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a keratinocyte-derived cytokine involved in epithelial inflammation, cooperates with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β for the generation of LCs. We show that primary human blood BDCA-1(+), but not BDCA-3(+), dendritic cells (DCs) stimulated with TSLP and TGF-β harbor a typical CD1a(+)Langerin(+) LC phenotype. Electron microscopy established the presence of Birbeck granules, an intracellular organelle specific to LCs. LC differentiation was not observed from tonsil BDCA-1(+) and BDCA-3(+) subsets. TSLP + TGF-β LCs had a mature phenotype with high surface levels of CD80, CD86, and CD40. They induced a potent CD4(+) T-helper (Th) cell expansion and differentiation into Th2 cells with increased production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 compared with CD34-derived LCs. Our findings establish a novel LC differentiation pathway from BDCA-1(+) blood DCs with potential implications in epithelial inflammation. Therapeutic targeting of TSLP may interfere with tissue LC repopulation from circulating precursors.

  4. Stromal expression of 72 kda type IV collagenase (MMP-2) and TIMP-2 mRNAs in colorectal neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Poulsom, R.; Pignatelli, M.; Stetler-Stevenson, W. G.; Liotta, L. A.; Wright, P. A.; Jeffery, R. E.; Longcroft, J. M.; Rogers, L.; Stamp, G. W.

    1992-01-01

    We undertook an in situ hybridization study to localize the mRNAs for the 72 kda type IV collagenase (MMP-2) and its specific inhibitor (TIMP-2) in 12 colorectal carcinomas, 3 adenomas, and 4 uninvolved resection margins to see how their distributions correlated with that of the reported distribution of MMP-2 protein. Labeling for MMP-2 and TIMP-2 mRNAs was detectable in 10 of 12 carcinomas and in 2 of 3 adenomas. Unexpectedly, we found much stronger signals for MMP-2 and TIMP-2 mRNAs within the mesenchymal cells in the desmoplastic stroma, of endothelial and/or (myo)fibroblastic nature, rather than in tumor epithelial cells in which localization of MMP-2 was anticipated. Our data indicate that stromal cells may have the ability to synthesize a metalloproteinase that degrades basement membrane, and may together with the neoplastic epithelial cells participate actively in the tissue remodeling and disruption of the basement membrane integrity which is characteristic of invasive tumors. Images Figure 1 to 6 PMID:1323219

  5. Selection of antibodies to cell surface determinants on mouse thymic epithelial cells using a phage display library.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, D B; George, A J; Ritter, M A

    1997-01-01

    The network of thymic epithelium contributes significantly to the thymic stromal cell environment, which plays a vital role in the generation and maturation of thymocytes. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have revealed considerable heterogeneity within this epithelial component of the mouse thymic microenvironment, but many of these antibodies recognize epitopes that are located inside the cell and so cannot be used in functional studies. As an alternative approach to isolate antibodies specific to thymic epithelium, we used a phage display library expressing single chain Fv antibodies. For selection, a thymic cell suspension was incubated with the phage display library, and major histocompatibility complex class II positive cells, the majority of which are epithelial, were then specifically selected. Phage bound to these cells were eluted and the selection procedure was repeated for a further five rounds. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that these phage antibodies show differential staining of thymic epithelial subsets. Flow cytometric analysis of a thymic epithelial cell line using a panel of these antibodies demonstrated that they recognize epitopes on the cell surface. Furthermore, some of these antibodies also labelled human thymic epithelium, suggesting that the epitopes recognized by these antibodies are conserved between human and rodent thymus. Our approach therefore provides a rapid method to select antibodies specific for thymic epithelial cell surface determinants in their native configuration. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9301539

  6. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Lewy bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from ... commonly with Alzheimer's disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive ...

  7. Small Molecule Mesengenic Induction of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Generate Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen Shun; Ellis, Rebecca L.; Horne, Rachel; Wolvetang, Ernst J.; Fisk, Nicholas M.

    2012-01-01

    The translational potential of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) is limited by their rarity in somatic organs, heterogeneity, and need for harvest by invasive procedures. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) could be an advantageous source of MSCs, but attempts to derive MSCs from pluripotent cells have required cumbersome or untranslatable techniques, such as coculture, physical manipulation, sorting, or viral transduction. We devised a single-step method to direct mesengenic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and iPSCs using a small molecule inhibitor. First, epithelial-like monolayer cells were generated by culturing ESCs/iPSCs in serum-free medium containing the transforming growth factor-β pathway inhibitor SB431542. After 10 days, iPSCs showed upregulation of mesodermal genes (MSX2, NCAM, HOXA2) and downregulation of pluripotency genes (OCT4, LEFTY1/2). Differentiation was then completed by transferring cells into conventional MSC medium. The resultant development of MSC-like morphology was associated with increased expression of genes, reflecting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Both ESC- and iPSC-derived MSCs exhibited a typical MSC immunophenotype, expressed high levels of vimentin and N-cadherin, and lacked expression of pluripotency markers at the protein level. Robust osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation was induced in vitro in ES-MSCs and iPS-MSCs, whereas adipogenic differentiation was limited, as reported for primitive fetal MSCs and ES-MSCs derived by other methods. We conclude that treatment with SB431542 in two-dimensional cultures followed by culture-induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition leads to rapid and uniform MSC conversion of human pluripotent cells without the need for embryoid body formation or feeder cell coculture, providing a robust, clinically applicable, and efficient system for generating MSCs from human iPSCs. PMID:23197756

  8. Integrins and epithelial cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jessica L.; Streuli, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell polarity is characterised by differences in structure, composition and function between at least two poles of a cell. In epithelial cells, these spatial differences allow for the formation of defined apical and basal membranes. It has been increasingly recognised that cell–matrix interactions and integrins play an essential role in creating epithelial cell polarity, although key gaps in our knowledge remain. This Commentary will discuss the mounting evidence for the role of integrins in polarising epithelial cells. We build a model in which both inside-out signals to polarise basement membrane assembly at the basal surface, and outside-in signals to control microtubule apical–basal orientation and vesicular trafficking are required for establishing and maintaining the orientation of epithelial cell polarity. Finally, we discuss the relevance of the basal integrin polarity axis to cancer. This article is part of a Minifocus on Establishing polarity. For further reading, please see related articles: ‘ERM proteins at a glance’ by Andrea McClatchey (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3199–3204). ‘Establishment of epithelial polarity – GEF who's minding the GAP?’ by Siu Ngok et al. (J. Cell Sci. 127, 3205–3215). PMID:24994933

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs): SEAP-SEOM consensus on pathologic and molecular diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Martin-Broto, J; Martinez-Marín, V; Serrano, C; Hindi, N; López-Guerrero, J A; Ramos-Asensio, R; Vallejo-Benítez, A; Marcilla-Plaza, D; González-Cámpora, R

    2016-12-09

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract, with an incidence of 1.1 cases/100,000 inhabitants/year. A group of experts from the Spanish Society of Pathology and the Spanish Society of Oncology met to discuss a brief update on GISTs and agree on aspects relating to the pathological and molecular diagnosis of these tumors. GISTs are generally solitary, well-circumscribed lesions of variable size (<10 mm-35 cm) that may present with intra- or extra-luminal parietal growth or a mixed-type (hourglass) growth pattern. Histologically, they are unencapsulated neoplasms displaying expansive growth and spindle-shaped (70%), epithelioid (20%), or mixed cellularity (10%). Mitotic activity is generally moderate or low and should be evaluated only in areas with high cellularity or higher mitotic frequency. The great majority of GISTs harbour mutually exclusive activating mutations in genes coding for the type III receptor tyrosine kinases KIT and PDGFRA; less commonly, GISTs have also been reported to display mutations elsewhere, including BRAF and NF1 and SDH-complex genes. The method most widely used to detect KIT and PDGFRA mutations is amplification of the exons involved by polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing (Sanger method) of these amplification products. Molecular analyses should always specify the type of analysis performed, the region or mutations evaluated, and the sensitivity of the detection method employed.

  10. Stromal Modulators of TGF-β in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Costanza, Brunella; Umelo, Ijeoma Adaku; Bellier, Justine; Castronovo, Vincent; Turtoi, Andrei

    2017-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is an intriguing cytokine exhibiting dual activities in malignant disease. It is an important mediator of cancer invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis, on the one hand, while it exhibits anti-tumor functions on the other hand. Elucidating the precise role of TGF-β in malignant development and progression requires a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in its tumor suppressor to tumor promoter switch. One important aspect of TGF-β function is its interaction with proteins within the tumor microenvironment. Several stromal proteins have the natural ability to interact and modulate TGF-β function. Understanding the complex interplay between the TGF-β signaling network and these stromal proteins may provide greater insight into the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target the TGF-β axis. The present review highlights our present understanding of how stroma modulates TGF-β activity in human cancers. PMID:28067804

  11. Stromal Modulators of TGF-β in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Costanza, Brunella; Umelo, Ijeoma Adaku; Bellier, Justine; Castronovo, Vincent; Turtoi, Andrei

    2017-01-06

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is an intriguing cytokine exhibiting dual activities in malignant disease. It is an important mediator of cancer invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis, on the one hand, while it exhibits anti-tumor functions on the other hand. Elucidating the precise role of TGF-β in malignant development and progression requires a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in its tumor suppressor to tumor promoter switch. One important aspect of TGF-β function is its interaction with proteins within the tumor microenvironment. Several stromal proteins have the natural ability to interact and modulate TGF-β function. Understanding the complex interplay between the TGF-β signaling network and these stromal proteins may provide greater insight into the development of novel therapeutic strategies that target the TGF-β axis. The present review highlights our present understanding of how stroma modulates TGF-β activity in human cancers.

  12. Molecular diagnostics in soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen M; Coleman, Joshua; Bridge, Julia A; Iwenofu, O Hans

    2015-04-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are rare malignant heterogenous tumors of mesenchymal origin with over fifty subtypes. The use of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections (and immunohistochemistry) in the morphologic assessment of these tumors has been the bane of clinical diagnosis until recently. The last decade has witnessed considerable progress in the understanding and application of molecular techniques in refining the current understanding of soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors beyond the limits of traditional approaches. Indeed, the identification of reciprocal chromosomal translocations and fusion genes in some subsets of sarcomas with potential implications in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment has been revolutionary. The era of molecular targeted therapy presents a platform that continues to drive biomarker discovery and personalized medicine in soft tissue sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. In this review, we highlight how the different molecular techniques have enhanced the diagnosis of these tumors with prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  13. Cancer stem cells, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and drug resistance in high-grade ovarian serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoxiang; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Zhihong; Li, Hongxia; Cheng, Wenjun; Liu, Jinsong

    2013-11-01

    Although epithelial ovarian cancer cells are eliminated by debulking surgery and chemotherapy during initial treatment, it is believed that only a subset of cancer cells, that is, cancer stem cells, may be an important source of tumor recurrence and drug resistance. This review highlights our current understanding of high-grade serous carcinoma, ovarian cancer stem cells, common methods for enrichment of ovarian cancer stem cells, mechanisms involved in drug resistance, and potential strategies for overcoming drug resistance, with associated potential controversies and pitfalls. We also review the potential relationship between epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cells and how we can induce cancer cells to differentiate into benign stromal fibroblasts in response to certain chemotherapy drugs.

  14. Keratin gene expression in non-epithelial tissues. Detection with polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Traweek, S. T.; Liu, J.; Battifora, H.

    1993-01-01

    Keratin filament are characteristically present in epithelial cells and tumors, but have also been detected in many normal and neoplastic non-epithelial cell types using immunohistochemical techniques. To investigate the validity of this seemingly aberrant protein expression, we applied the highly sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique to study keratin gene expression in a variety of non-epithelial tissues. Total RNA was extracted from nine samples of leiomyosarcoma, four non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, seven normal bone marrows, normal lymph node, normal peripheral blood cells, freshly isolated and cultured endothelial cells, cultured skin fibroblasts, and the myeloid leukemia cell line HL-60. Amplification primers and probes for the three most primitive keratin types (8, 18, and 19) were synthesized using published gene sequences. RNA from the breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7, known to be rich in all three keratins, was used as positive control. Concurrently run actin primers were used to confirm RNA integrity. After an initial cycle with reverse transcriptase, PCR amplification was performed for 30 cycles. Southern blots of the PCR products showed variably intense bands corresponding to keratin 8 and 18 gene products in all samples, offering conclusive evidence of keratin gene expression in cells of both stromal and hematopoietic derivation. However, keratin 19 gene transcription was not nearly so ubiquitous, being detected in normal fibroblasts and endothelial cells, two of four non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and four of nine leiomyosarcoma, but not in normal lymph node, peripheral blood cells, HL-60 cells, or any of the seven normal bone marrows examined. Dilutional experiments showed PCR to be highly sensitive in the detection of keratin 19 gene expression, capable of registering one MCF-7 cell in 10(6) HL-60 cells. These studies show that variable levels of keratin 8 and 18 gene expression may be detected by PCR in a wide variety of non-epithelial tissues

  15. Effect of Stromal Adipokines on Breast Cancer Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    menopausal women. The degree of risk increases proportionally with an increase in adiposity. There is mounting evidence that stromal cells in the tumor...the risk of breast cancer in post- menopausal women. The degree of risk increases proportionally with an increase in adiposity. There is mounting...cells has not been resolved. It is apparent that concomitant changes at the organismic level (e.g. degree of adiposity and/or menopausal status) and

  16. Giant rectal gastrointestinal stromal tumours: a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Alder, L.S.; Elver, G.; Foo, F.J.; Dobson, M.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST are the most common mesenchymal tumours; however, rectal GISTs account for <5%. In the pelvis they represent a diagnostic challenge with giant GISTs likely to be malignant. They may present with urological, gynaecological or rectal symptoms. Sphincter-preserving surgery can be aided by neoadjuvant therapy. We present an uncommon case of giant rectal GIST masquerading as acute urinary retention. PMID:24968434

  17. Atypical presentation of gastrointestinal stromal tumours-a case report.

    PubMed

    Raja, Kalpana; Dev, Bhawna; Santosham, Roy; Santhosh, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are benign mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Their clinical presentations are variable. We report a case of a 31-year-old man who presented with pain in the abdomen and vomiting. CT abdomen revealed a large exophytic mass in the epigastrium with enhancement pattern similar to hemangioma. No relationship of the mass could be made out with the adjacent structures on CT, histopathology proved it to be a GIST.

  18. Abnormal epithelial homeostasis in the cornea of mice with a destrin deletion

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, J.; Chen, L.; Urbanowicz, M. M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Dstncorn1 mice lack normal destrin expression and develop corneal abnormality shortly after birth such as epithelial hyperplasia and total vascularization. Thus, the mice serve as a model for ocular surface disorders. To determine the nature of epithelial defects, we examined whether epithelial homeostasis is altered in these corneas. Methods Dstncorn1 mice were crossed with ubiquitous GFP mice to generate a double homozygous line, GFP-Dstncorn1, and cell movements were determined by whole-mount histology and in vivo time-lapse microscopy, tracking the change of epithelial GFP patterns. Rates of cell division and the presence of label-retaining cells (LRCs) were determined by systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Epithelial expression of keratins 8, 12, and 15, and MUC5AC were determined by whole-mount immunofluorescence. Results Epithelial cells in an adult GFP-Dstncorn1 cornea were generally immobile with no sign of directed movement for the entire life of the animal. These cells were not senescent because more than 70% of basal epithelial cells incorporated BrdU over a 24 h period. LRCs were widely distributed throughout a GFP-Dstncorn1 cornea. The epithelium of a GFP-Dstncorn1 cornea contained a mixed population of cells with a corneal and a conjunctival phenotype as judged by the expression of keratins and MUC5AC. Conclusions Epithelial cells of an adult GFP-Dstncorn1 cornea are generally stationary, mitotically active, and contain LRCs, indicating that the epithelium is self-sustained, which in turn suggests that epithelial stem cells are present within the cornea. Epithelial homeostasis of adult GFP-Dstncorn1 corneas is abnormal, mimicking that of a normal conjunctiva or a pathological, conjunctivalized cornea. PMID:18958303

  19. Ion mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, S.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental studies of the ion-mixing phenomenon are summarized. Ion mixing is differentiated from ion implantation and shown to be a useful technique for overcoming the sputter-dependent limitations of implantation processes. The fundamental physical principles of ion/solid interactions are explored. The basic experimental configurations currently in use are characterized: bilayered samples, multilayered samples, and samples with a thin marker layer. A table listing the binary systems (metal-semiconductor or metal-metal) which have been investigated using each configuration is presented. Results are discussed, and some sample data are plotted. The prospects for future application of ion mixing to the alteration of solid surface properties are considered. Practical applications are seen as restricted by economic considerations to the production of small, expensive components or to fields (such as the semiconductor industry) which already have facilities for ion implantation.

  20. Therapeutic effect of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells on memory in animals with Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bobkova, N V; Poltavtseva, R A; Samokhin, A N; Sukhikh, G T

    2013-11-01

    Transplantation of human mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells improved spatial memory in bulbectomized mice with Alzheimer-type neurodegeneration. The positive effect was observed in 1 month after intracerebral transplantation and in 3 months after systemic injection of mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells. No cases of malignant transformation were noted. These findings indicate prospects of using mesenchymal multipotent stromal cells for the therapy of Alzheimer disease and the possibility of their systemic administration for attaining the therapeutic effect.

  1. Interstitial stromal progenitors during kidney development: here, there and everywhere.

    PubMed

    Fanni, Daniela; Gerosa, Clara; Vinci, Laura; Ambu, Rossano; Dessì, Angelica; Eyken, Peter Van; Fanos, Vassilios; Faa, Gavino

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, the renal interstitium has been identified as the site of multiple cell types, giving rise to multiple contiguous cellular networks with multiple fundamental structural and functional roles. Few studies have been carried out on the morphological and functional properties of the stromal/interstitial renal cells during the intrauterine life. This work was aimed at reviewing the peculiar features of renal interstitial stem/progenitor cells involved in kidney development. The origin of the renal interstitial progenitor cells remains unknown. During kidney development, besides the Six2 + cells of the cap mesenchyme, a self-renewing progenitor population, characterized by the expression of Foxd1, represents the first actor of the non-nephrogenic lineage. Foxd1 + interstitial progenitors originate the cortical and the renal medullary interstitial progenitors. Here, the most important stromal/interstitial compartments present in the developing human kidney will be analyzed: capsular stromal cells, cortical interstitial cells, medullary interstitial cells, the interstitium inside the renal stem cell niche, Hilar interstitial cells and Ureteric interstitial cells. Data reported here indicate that the different interstitial compartments of the developing kidney are formed by different cell types that characterize the different renal areas. Further studies are needed to better characterize the different pools of renal interstitial progenitors and their role in human nephrogenesis.

  2. Stromal Targets for Fluorescent-Guided Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Martin C.; Prakash, Jai; Van De Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Mesker, Wilma E.; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Sier, Cornelis F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-operative imaging techniques are essential for tumor detection and diagnosis, but offer limited help during surgery. Recently, the applicability of imaging during oncologic surgery has been recognized, using near-infrared fluorescent dyes conjugated to targeting antibodies, peptides, or other vehicles. Image-guided oncologic surgery (IGOS) assists the surgeFon to distinguish tumor from normal tissue during operation, and can aid in recognizing vital structures. IGOS relies on an optimized combination of a dedicated fluorescent camera system and specific probes for targeting. IGOS probes for clinical use are not widely available yet, but numerous pre-clinical studies have been published and clinical trials are being established or prepared. Most of the investigated probes are based on antibodies or peptides against proteins on the membranes of malignant cells, whereas others are directed against stromal cells. Targeting stroma cells for IGOS has several advantages. Besides the high stromal content in more aggressive tumor types, the stroma is often primarily located at the periphery/invasive front of the tumor, which makes stromal targets particularly suited for imaging purposes. Moreover, because stroma up-regulation is a physiological reaction, most proteins to be targeted on these cells are “universal” and not derived from a specific genetic variation, as is the case with many upregulated proteins on malignant cancer cells. PMID:26636036

  3. [Extragastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST)--a case review].

    PubMed

    Kolarík, J; Drápela, J

    2012-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. Due to the presence of thyrosine kinase receptors within the tumor tissue, GIST is thought to originate from gastrointestinal pacemaker cells, the intersticial cells of Cajal. Tumors with the same morphological and imunohistochemical characteristics detected outside the gastrointestinal tract, are called extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGIST). Biological characteristics of these tumors is uncertain and the malignancy rates are difficult to predict. Surgical R0 resection in resecable tumors is the only option with the potential for complete cure. Nevertheless, the recurrence rates are high. Adjuvant biological treatment with imatinib, a thyrosine kinase inhibitor, reduces the risk of relapses. Imatinib administration is also the principal treatment method in metastatic GIST disorders. The article offers a short and complex overview of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) problematics and presents a case report of a patient suffering from EGIST of mesocolon transversum treated by R0 resection which was performed under multidisciplinary cooperation, with a specialist follow up.

  4. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumour of The Abdominal Wall - A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, A. Sathish Selva; Padmini, R; Veena, G; Murugesan, N

    2013-01-01

    Stromal tumours occurring in areas other than the GastroIntestinal Tract (GIT) are known as Extra GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumours (EGISTs). They usually arise in the mesentery, omentum or retroperitoneum, while EGISTs which occur in the abdominal wall are very rare. Both gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) and EGISTs are histologically and immunophenotypically similar. We are reporting a case of EGIST, which occurred in the anterior abdominal wall in a twenty five-year-old female patient. The tumour was present in the right loin and imaging studies suggested that it was a desmoid tumour. It was surgically excised by doing an abdominal wall mesh repair. The histological examinations revealed a tumour with spindle cell morphology, with <2 mitoses per 50 High Power Field (HPF) and no necrosis, with tumour free margins. Immunohistochemistry was strongly positive for CD117 and Smooth Muscle Actin (SMA), while it was negative for β-catenin and S100. The patient is well post operatively and is on close follow up. EGISTs should be considered in the differential diagnosis of mesenchymal tumours which occur in the abdominal wall, inspite of their rarity, as the high risk patients may need Imatinib chemotherapy. PMID:24551695

  5. Characterization of bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells in aplastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Hamzic, Edita; Whiting, Karen; Gordon Smith, Edward; Pettengell, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    In aplastic anaemia (AA), haemopoietic activity is significantly reduced and generally attributed to failure of haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) within the bone marrow (BM). The regulation of haemopoiesis depends on the interaction between HSC and various cells of the BM microenvironment, including mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). MSC involvement in the functional restriction of HSC in AA is largely unknown and therefore, the physical and functional properties of AA MSC were studied in vitro. MSC were characterized by their phenotype and ability to form adherent stromal layers. The functional properties of AA MSC were assessed through proliferative, clonogenic and cross-over culture assays. Results indicate that although AA MSC presented typical morphology and distinctive mesenchymal markers, stromal formation was reduced, with 50% of BM samples failing to produce adherent layers. Furthermore, their proliferative and clonogenic capacity was markedly decreased (P = 0·03 and P = 0·04 respectively) and the ability to sustain haemopoiesis was significantly reduced, as assessed by total cell proliferation (P = 0·032 and P = 0·019 at Week 5 and 6, respectively) and clonogenic potential of HSC (P = 0·02 at Week 6). It was concluded that the biological characteristics of AA MSC are different from those of control MSC and their in vitro haemopoiesis-supporting ability is significantly reduced.

  6. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  7. Focal epithelial hyperplasia: Case report.

    PubMed

    Puriene, Alina; Rimkevicius, Arunas; Gaigalas, Mindaugas

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present article is to present a 15 year-old patient with focal epithelial hyperplasia and to review the references on the subject-related etiological, pathological, diagnostic and treatment aspects. Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare human papilloma virus (HPV) related to oral lesion with very low frequency within our population. Surgical treatment with a biopsy was performed, acanthosis and parakeratosis are consistent histopathological features, since the patient had no history of sexual contact and HIV infection, the virus was probably acquired from environmental sources.

  8. Ion Channels in Epithelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Lawrence G.

    Ion channels in epithelial cells serve to move ions, and in some cases fluid, between compartments of the body. This function of the transfer of material is fundamentally different from that of the transfer of information, which is the main job of most channels in excitable cells. Nevertheless the basic construction of the channels is similar in many respects in the two tissue types. This chapter reviews the nature of channels in epithelia and discusses how their functions have evolved to accomplish the basic tasks for which they are responsible. I will focus on three channel types: epithelial Na+ channels, inward-rectifier K+ channels, and CFTR Cl- channels.

  9. Expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4 transcript variants and CXCR7 in epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaszczynska-Nowinka, Karolina; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Markowska, Anna; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2014-05-01

    Chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, have been implicated in epithelial ovarian cancer progression and metastasis. However, limited data are available on the expression levels of SDF-1 and CXCR4 variants and CXCR7 in human epithelial ovarian cancer. The present study aimed to characterize the expression pattern and levels of SDF-1, CXCR4 and CXCR7 in normal human ovaries and epithelial ovarian cancer. The expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4 transcript variants and CXCR7 was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Plasma SDF-1α levels were determined by commercially available EIA kits and cancer antigen 125 (CA 125) levels were quantified by automated microparticle enzyme immunosorbent assay. High expression levels of SDF-1 transcript variant 1 were identified in ovarian cancer and control ovaries. By contrast, in both groups the expression levels of SDF-1 transcript variants 3 and 4 were extremely low. Furthermore, SDF-1 variant 1 levels were notably higher in epithelial ovarian cancer than in control ovaries, while data for the remaining transcripts were similar in both groups. CXCR4 transcript variant 2 and CXCR7 expression levels in normal and neoplastic ovaries were similar. In both groups, CXCR4 transcript variant 2 was not detected. Plasma SDF-1α levels were notably higher in females with epithelial ovarian cancer than in the control ovaries. Elevated levels of blood SDF-1α were found prior to surgery, 6 days after surgery and following completion of the first chemotherapy course. These increases were independent of the type of epithelial ovarian cancer. Our results suggest that the expression of SDF-1 and the genes controlling alternative splicing are elevated in epithelial ovarian cancer, leading to an increased formation of SDF-1 variant 1. Elevated plasma SDF-1α levels in epithelial ovarian cancer patients are not associated with the presence of tumors and/or metastases, however reflect a

  10. Suppression of epithelial ovarian cancer invasion into the omentum by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and its receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lungchukiet, Panida; Sun, Yuefeng; Kasiappan, Ravi; Quarni, Waise; Nicosia, Santo V.; Zhang, Xiaohong; Bai, Wenlong

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the leading cause of gynecological cancer death in women, mainly because it has spread to intraperitoneal tissues such as the omentum in the peritoneal cavity by the time of diagnosis. In the present study, we established in vitro assays, ex vivo omental organ culture system and syngeneic animal tumor models using wild type (WT) and vitamin D receptor (VDR) null mice to investigate the effects of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3) and VDR on EOC invasion. Treatment of human EOC cells with 1,25D3 suppressed their migration and invasion in monolayer scratch and transwell assays and ability to colonize the omentum in the ex vivo system, supporting a role for epithelial VDR in interfering with EOC invasion. Furthermore, VDR knockdown in OVCAR3 cells increased their ability to colonize the omentum in the ex vivo system in the absence of 1,25D3, showing a potential ligand-independent suppression of EOC invasion by epithelial VDR. In syngeneic models, ID8 tumors exhibited an increased ability to colonize omenta of VDR null over that of WT mice; pre-treatment of WT, not VDR null, mice with EB1089 reduced ID8 colonization, revealing a role for stromal VDR in suppressing EOC invasion. These studies are the first to demonstrate a role for epithelial and stromal VDR in mediating the activity of 1,25D3 as well as a 1,25D3-independent action of the VDR in suppressing EOC invasion. The data suggest that VDR-based drug discovery may lead to the development of new intervention strategies to improve the survival of patients with EOC at advanced stages. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled “Vitamin D Workshop”. PMID:25448740

  11. Stromal and hematopoietic cells in secondary lymphoid organs: partners in immunity.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Deepali; Fletcher, Anne L; Turley, Shannon J

    2013-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), including lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and the spleen, have evolved to bring cells of the immune system together. In these collaborative environments, lymphocytes scan the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells for cognate antigens, while moving along stromal networks. The cell-cell interactions between stromal and hematopoietic cells in SLOs are therefore integral to the normal functioning of these tissues. Not only do stromal cells physically construct SLO architecture but they are essential for regulating hematopoietic populations within these domains. Stromal cells interact closely with lymphocytes and dendritic cells, providing scaffolds on which these cells migrate, and recruiting them into niches by secreting chemokines. Within lymph nodes, stromal cell-ensheathed conduit networks transport small antigens deep into the SLO parenchyma. More recently, stromal cells have been found to induce peripheral CD8(+) T-cell tolerance and control the extent to which newly activated T cells proliferate within lymph nodes. Thus, stromal-hematopoietic crosstalk has important consequences for regulating immune cell function within SLOs. In addition, stromal cell interactions with hematopoietic cells, other stroma, and the inflammatory milieu have profound effects on key stromal functions. Here, we examine ways in which these interactions within the lymph node environment influence the adaptive immune response.

  12. Stromal and hematopoietic cells in secondary lymphoid organs: partners in immunity

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Deepali; Fletcher, Anne L.; Turley, Shannon J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), including lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and the spleen, have evolved to bring cells of the immune system together. In these collaborative environments, lymphocytes scan the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells for cognate antigens, while moving along stromal networks. The cell-cell interactions between stromal and hematopoietic cells in SLOs are therefore integral to the normal functioning of these tissues. Not only do stromal cells physically construct SLO architecture, but they are essential for regulating hematopoietic populations within these domains. Stromal cells interact closely with lymphocytes and dendritic cells, providing scaffolds on which these cells migrate, and recruiting them into niches by secreting chemokines. Within lymph nodes, stromal cell-ensheathed conduit networks transport small antigens deep into the SLO parenchyma. More recently, stromal cells have been found to induce peripheral CD8+ T-cell tolerance and control the extent to which newly activated T cells proliferate within lymph nodes. Thus, stromal-hematopoietic crosstalk has important consequences for regulating immune cell function within SLOs. In addition, stromal cell interactions with hematopoietic cells, other stroma, and the inflammatory milieu have profound effects on key stromal functions. Here, we examine ways in which these interactions within the lymph node environment influence the adaptive immune response. PMID:23278748

  13. Prenatal metanephrogenesis of the camel: morphological evidence of epithelial-mesenchymal interaction.

    PubMed

    Osman, A-H K; Farouk, S M; Eidaroos, H; Abbott, L C; Ahmed, A A

    2014-04-01

    The present investigation examined histogenesis of epithelial, stromal and angiogenic elements of the prenatal camel permanent or metanephric kidney. The primitive metanephros was first observed at the 13-mm crown vertebral rump length (CVRL) stage as an ovoid structure composed of a centrally located epithelial ureteric bud and peripheral circumscribed masses of undifferentiated mesenchymal cells. The first morphological evidence of glomerulogenesis was observed at the 28-mm CVRL stage. Developing renal corpuscles became obvious at the 35-mm CVRL stage. At the 60-mm CVRL stage, the epithelial renal pelvis gave rise to tubular branches that extended towards the cortical zone. These branches represented the presumptive collecting ducts. Differentiation of renal tubules into the proximal and distal convoluted tubules was observed at the 95-mm CVRL stage. At the 130-mm CVRL stage, the renal medulla was clearly delineated into medullary pyramids, which in association with the corresponding cortical caps formed the morphological basis of the renal lobar formation. A gradual nephrogenic decline was noticed from the 940-mm CVRL on; however, the process of nephrogenesis persisted throughout all the studied foetal stages.

  14. ED-B fibronectin expression is a marker of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in translational oncology.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Iacopo; Barachini, Serena; Carnicelli, Vittoria; Galimberti, Sara; Modeo, Letizia; Boni, Roberto; Sollini, Martina; Erba, Paola Anna

    2017-01-17

    Fibronectin is a component of the extracellular matrix that links collagen fibers to integrins on the cell's surface. The splicing isoforms, containing the ED-B domain, are not expressed in adult tissues but only in tumor stroma or during embryonic development. Fibroblasts and endothelial cells express ED-B fibronectin during angiogenesis. Also cancer cells can synthetize ED-B fibronectin, but its function in tumor growth needs to be further elucidated.We evaluated the expression of ED-B fibronectin in prostate cancer cell lines: PC3 and DU145. Using TGF-β, we induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition in culture and observed an increase of ED-B fibronectin expression. Thereafter, we evaluated the expression of ED-B fibronectin in multipotent mesangiogenic progenitor cells, and in mesenchymal stromal cells. The expression of ED-B fibronectin was much higher in mesenchymal than prostate cancer cells even after the epithelial to mesenchymal transition.Epithelial to mesenchymal transition is a key step for tumor progression contributing to the metastatic spread. Therefore, circulating cancer cells could seed into the metastatic niche taking advantage from the ED-B fibronectin that secrete their own.

  15. PREPARATION OF EPITHELIAL AND MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS FROM MURINE MAMMARY GLAND

    PubMed Central

    Guest, I.; Ilic, Z.; Ma, J.

    2011-01-01

    The mammary gland is a complex organ consisting of multiple cell types that undergo extensive remodeling during pregnancy and involution, cyclical changes that suggest the existence of a resident stem cell population that is responsible for this remarkable tissue regeneration. The basic functional unit of the mammary gland is the terminal duct lobular unit, which invades the stromal tissue (fat, connective tissue, blood vessels, etc.). Luminal epithelial cells line the ducts while outer myoepithelial cells secrete the basal lamina that separates the mammary gland parenchyma from the mesenchymal cells of the stroma. Within the epithelial cell population of the ducts resides the mammary gland stem cells and it is believed that this population is the origin of the mammary gland cancer stem cells as well. In the mouse, epithelial stem cells can be separated from mesenchymal cells on the basis of CD24, CD44 and CD49f expression. This allows for the determination of both normal and cancer stem cell potential of these two populations and permits investigation into their interaction in tumour development. PMID:22058055

  16. Cultivate Primary Nasal Epithelial Cells from Children and Reprogram into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ulm, Ashley; Mayhew, Christopher N.; Debley, Jason; Khurana Hershey, Gurjit K.; Ji, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Nasal epithelial cells (NECs) are the part of the airways that respond to air pollutants and are the first cells infected with respiratory viruses. They are also involved in many airway diseases through their innate immune response and interaction with immune and airway stromal cells. NECs are of particular interest for studies in children due to their accessibility during clinical visits. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been generated from multiple cell types and are a powerful tool for modeling human development and disease, as well as for their potential applications in regenerative medicine. This is the first protocol to lay out methods for successful generation of iPSCs from NECs derived from pediatric participants for research purposes. It describes how to obtain nasal epithelial cells from children, how to generate primary NEC cultures from these samples, and how to reprogram primary NECs into well-characterized iPSCs. Nasal mucosa samples are useful in epidemiological studies related to the effects of air pollution in children, and provide an important tool for studying airway disease. Primary nasal cells and iPSCs derived from them can be a tool for providing unlimited material for patient-specific research in diverse areas of airway epithelial biology, including asthma and COPD research. PMID:27022951

  17. Active Pedicle Epithelial Flap Transposition Combined with Amniotic Membrane Transplantation for Treatment of Nonhealing Corneal Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Wang, Yuexin; Jia, Yanni; Liu, Dongle; Li, Suxia; Shi, Weiyun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of active pedicle epithelial flap transposition combined with amniotic membrane transplantation (AMT) in treating nonhealing corneal ulcers. Material and Methods. Eleven patients (11 eyes) with nonhealing corneal ulcer who underwent the combined surgery were included. Postoperatively, ulcer healing time was detected by corneal fluorescein staining. Visual acuity, intraocular pressure, surgical complications, and recurrence were recorded. Corneal status was inspected by the laser scanning confocal microscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). Results. The primary diseases were herpes simplex keratitis (8 eyes), corneal graft ulcer (2 eyes), and Stevens-Johnson syndrome (1 eye). All epithelial flaps were intact following surgery, without shedding or displacement. Mean ulcer healing time was 10.8 ± 3.1 days, with a healing rate of 91%. Vision significantly improved from 1.70 to 0.82 log MAR (P = 0.001). A significant decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and corneal stromal edema was revealed 2 months postoperatively by confocal microscopy and AS-OCT. Corneal ulcer recurred in 1 eye. None of the patients developed major complications. Conclusion. Active pedicle epithelial flap transposition combined with AMT is a simple and effective treatment for nonhealing corneal ulcers. PMID:27830086

  18. Butyrate and bioactive proteolytic form of Wnt-5a regulate colonic epithelial proliferation and spatial development

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Sakiyama, Toshio; Hasebe, Takumu; Musch, Mark W.; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Yasushi; He, Tong-Chuan; Lichtenstein, Lev; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Jabri, Bana; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus; Chang, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation and spatial development of colonic epithelial cells are highly regulated along the crypt vertical axis, which, when perturbed, can result in aberrant growth and carcinogenesis. In this study, two key factors were identified that have important and counterbalancing roles regulating these processes: pericrypt myofibroblast-derived Wnt-5a and the microbial metabolite butyrate. Cultured YAMC cell proliferation and heat shock protein induction were analzyed after butryate, conditioned medium with Wnt5a activity, and FrzB containing conditioned medium. In vivo studies to modulate Hsp25 employed intra-colonic wall Hsp25 encoding lentivirus. To silence Wnt-5a in vivo, intra-colonic wall Wnt-5a silencing RNA was used. Wnt-5a, secreted by stromal myofibroblasts of the lower crypt, promotes proliferation through canonical β-catenin activation. Essential to this are two key requirements: (1) proteolytic conversion of the highly insoluble ~40 kD Wnt-5a protein to a soluble 36 mer amino acid peptide that activates epithelial β-catenin and cellular proliferation, and (2) the simultaneous inhibition of butyrate-induced Hsp25 by Wnt-5a which is necessary to arrest the proliferative process in the upper colonic crypt. The interplay and spatial gradients of these factors insures that crypt epithelial cell proliferation and development proceed in an orderly fashion, but with sufficient plasticity to adapt to physiological perturbations including inflammation. PMID:27561676

  19. Epithelial Xbp1 Is Required for Cellular Proliferation and Differentiation during Mammary Gland Development

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Calvo, Veronica; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Lade, Abigale; Chou, Hsin-I; Lee, Youngmin A.; Farias, Eduardo F.; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A.

    2015-01-01

    Xbp1, a key mediator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated by IRE1α-mediated splicing, which results in a frameshift to encode a protein with transcriptional activity. However, the direct function of Xbp1 in epithelial cells during mammary gland development is unknown. Here we report that the loss of Xbp1 in the mammary epithelium through targeted deletion leads to poor branching morphogenesis, impaired terminal end bud formation, and spontaneous stromal fibrosis during the adult virgin period. Additionally, epithelial Xbp1 deletion induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the epithelium and dramatically inhibits epithelial proliferation and differentiation during lactation. The synthesis of milk and its major components, α/β-casein and whey acidic protein (WAP), is significantly reduced due to decreased prolactin receptor (Prlr) and ErbB4 expression in Xbp1-deficient mammary epithelium. Reduction of Prlr and ErbB4 expression and their diminished availability at the cell surface lead to reduced phosphorylated Stat5, an essential regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation during lactation. As a result, lactating mammary glands in these mice produce less milk protein, leading to poor pup growth and postnatal death. These findings suggest that the loss of Xbp1 induces a terminal UPR which blocks proliferation and differentiation during mammary gland development. PMID:25713103

  20. Barrier Epithelial Cells and the Control of Type 2 Immunity.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Hamida; Lambrecht, Bart N

    2015-07-21

    Type-2-cell-mediated immunity, rich in eosinophils, basophils, mast cells, CD4(+) T helper 2 (Th2) cells, and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), protects the host from helminth infection but also drives chronic allergic diseases like asthma and atopic dermatitis. Barrier epithelial cells (ECs) represent the very first line of defense and express pattern recognition receptors to recognize type-2-cell-mediated immune insults like proteolytic allergens or helminths. These ECs mount a prototypical response made up of chemokines, innate cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-25, IL-33, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), as well as the alarmins uric acid, ATP, HMGB1, and S100 proteins. These signals program dendritic cells (DCs) to mount Th2-cell-mediated immunity and in so doing boost ILC2, basophil, and mast cell function. Here we review the general mechanisms of how different stimuli trigger type-2-cell-mediated immunity at mucosal barriers and how this leads to protection or disease.

  1. Clinical-Grade Isolated Human Kidney Perivascular Stromal Cells as an Organotypic Cell Source for Kidney Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Leuning, Daniëlle G; Reinders, Marlies E J; Li, Joan; Peired, Anna J; Lievers, Ellen; de Boer, Hetty C; Fibbe, Willem E; Romagnani, Paola; van Kooten, Cees; Little, Melissa H; Engelse, Marten A; Rabelink, Ton J

    2017-02-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are immunomodulatory and tissue homeostatic cells that have shown beneficial effects in kidney diseases and transplantation. Perivascular stromal cells (PSCs) identified within several different organs share characteristics of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs). These PSCs may also possess tissue-specific properties and play a role in local tissue homeostasis. We hypothesized that human kidney-derived PSCs (hkPSCs) would elicit improved kidney repair in comparison with BM-MSCs. Here we introduce a novel, clinical-grade isolation method of hkPSCs from cadaveric kidneys by enriching for the perivascular marker, NG2. hkPSCs show strong transcriptional similarities to BM-MSCs but also show organotypic expression signatures, including the HoxD10 and HoxD11 nephrogenic transcription factors. Comparable to BM-MSCs, hkPSCs showed immunosuppressive potential and, when cocultured with endothelial cells, vascular plexus formation was supported, which was specifically in the hkPSCs accompanied by an increased NG2 expression. hkPSCs did not undergo myofibroblast transformation after exposure to transforming growth factor-β, further corroborating their potential regulatory role in tissue homeostasis. This was further supported by the observation that hkPSCs induced accelerated repair in a tubular epithelial wound scratch assay, which was mediated through hepatocyte growth factor release. In vivo, in a neonatal kidney injection model, hkPSCs reintegrated and survived in the interstitial compartment, whereas BM-MSCs did not show this potential. Moreover, hkPSCs gave protection against the development of acute kidney injury in vivo in a model of rhabdomyolysis-mediated nephrotoxicity. Overall, this suggests a superior therapeutic potential for the use of hkPSCs and their secretome in the treatment of kidney diseases. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:405-418.

  2. High Stromal Carbonic Anhydrase IX Expression Is Associated With Decreased Survival in p16-Negative Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Brockton, Nigel; Dort, Joseph; Lau, Harold; Hao, Desiree; Brar, Sony; Klimowicz, Alexander; Petrillo, Stephanie; Diaz, Roman; Doll, Corinne; Magliocco, Anthony

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the fifth most common malignancy worldwide. Alcohol use and tobacco use are the most established risk factors; however, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is a major risk factor for a subset of HNSCCs. Although HPV-positive tumors typically present at a more advanced stage at diagnosis, they are associated with a better prognosis. Tumor hypoxia confers poor prognosis and treatment failure, but direct tumor oxygen measurement is challenging. Endogenous markers of hypoxia (EMHs) have been proposed but have not replicated the prognostic utility of direct oxygen measurement. The expression of endogenous markers of hypoxia may be influenced by oxygen-independent factors, such as the HPV status of the tumor. Methods and Materials: Consecutive cases of locally advanced HNSCC, treated with a uniform regimen of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, were identified. Tissue microarrays were assembled from triplicate 0.6-mm cores of archived tumor tissue. HPV status was inferred from semiquantitative p16 immunostaining and directly measured by use of HPV-specific chromogenic in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. Automated quantitative fluorescent immunohistochemistry was conducted to measure epithelial and stromal expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Results: High stromal CAIX expression was associated with significantly reduced overall survival (p = 0.03) in patients with p16-negative tumors. Conclusions: This is the first study to use quantitative immunohistochemistry to examine endogenous markers of hypoxia stratified by tumor p16/HPV status. Assessment of CAIX expression in p16-negative HNSCC could identify patients with the least favorable prognosis and inform therapeutic strategies.

  3. EBM regeneration and changes in EBM component mRNA expression in stromal cells after corneal injury

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Abirami; Marino, Gustavo K.; Torricelli, Andre A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the production of the epithelial basement membrane (EBM) component mRNAs at time points before lamina lucida and lamina densa regeneration in anterior stromal cells after corneal injury that would heal with and without fibrosis. Methods Rabbit corneas were removed from 2 to 19 days after −4.5D or −9.0D photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) with the VISX S4 IR laser. Corneas were evaluated with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for full regeneration of the lamina lucida and the lamina densa. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) based quantitative real-time (RT)–PCR was used to quantitate the expression of mRNAs for laminin α-3 (LAMA3), perlecan, nidogen-1, and nidogen-2 in the anterior stroma. Results After −4.5D PRK, EBM was found to be fully regenerated at 8 to 10 days after surgery. At 4 days after PRK, the nidogen-2 and LAMA3 mRNAs levels were detected at statistically significantly lower levels in the anterior stroma of the −9.0D PRK corneas (where the EBM would not fully regenerate) compared to the −4.5D PRK corneas (where the EBM was destined to fully regenerate). At 7 days after PRK, nidogen-2 and LAMA3 mRNAs continued to be statistically significantly lower in the anterior stroma of the −9.0D PRK corneas compared to their expression in the anterior stroma of the −4.5D PRK corneas. Conclusions Key EBM components LAMA3 and nidogen-2 mRNAs are expressed at higher levels in the anterior stroma during EBM regeneration in the −4.5D PRK corneas where the EBM is destined to fully regenerate and no haze developed compared to the −9.0D PRK corneas where the EBM will not fully regenerate and myofibroblast-related stromal fibrosis (haze) will develop. PMID:28275314

  4. A physical method for separating spermatozoa from epithelial cells in sexual assault evidence.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Kobilinsky, L; Wolosin, D; Shaler, R; Baum, H

    1998-01-01

    The analysis of genetic markers for the purpose of individualization of semen specimens is extremely important in cases of sexual abuse and assault. The serological analysis of sexual assault evidence can sometimes be complicated because stains are often composed of a mixture of spermatozoa, vaginal epithelial cells and white and red blood cells. A filtration method has been developed to cleanly separate spermatozoa from epithelial cells based upon differences in size and shape. Nylon mesh filters of the appropriate pore size can be used to separate the smaller oval shaped spermatozoal cells from the larger and flatter epithelial cells. The former pass freely through the membrane while the latter are retained on the filter. In this study, cell separation was demonstrated by (a) microscopic observation of stained cells, (b) amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis of DNA obtained from separated cells. The results of these analyses indicate that: (1) Approximately 70% of spermatozoa in the mixed cell sample will penetrate the 10 microns pore size filter, (2) Only about 1-2% of intact epithelial cells will do so, and (3) A small number of nuclei from spontaneously lysed epithelial cells will cross the filter. Experimental results using mixtures of spermatozoa and vaginal epithelial cells prepared in different ratios support the conclusion that the filtration process is an efficient and reliable method to separate spermatozoa from epithelial cells in casework specimens for subsequent DNA analysis.

  5. Bivariate flow cytometric analysis of murine intestinal epithelial cells for cytokinetic studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pallavicini, M.G.; Ng, C.R.; Gray, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The heterogeneous nature of the small intestine and the lack of methods to obtain pure crypt populations has, in the past, limited the application of standard flow cytometric analysis for cytokinetic studies of the proliferating crypts. The authors describe a flow cytometric technique to discriminate crypt and villus cells in an epithelial cell suspension on the basis of cell length, and to measure the DNA content of the discriminated subpopulations. These data indicate that bivariate analysis of a mixed epithelial cell suspension can be used to distinguish mature villus cells, G/sub 1/ crypt cells, and S-phase crypt cells. In addition, continuous labeling studies suggest that the position of a cell on the cell length axis reflects epithelial cell maturity. The authors applied this flow cytometric technique to determine the cytokinetic nature of epithelial cells obtained by sequential digestion of the small intestine. 22 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Acetyl-L-Carnitine Hydrochloride in Preventing Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Fatigue; Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Neuropathy; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Pain; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma

  7. Elesclomol Sodium and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  8. TLR8 Agonist VTX-2337 and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride or Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial, Fallopian Tube, or Peritoneal Cavity Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Malignant Ovarian Mixed Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  9. Increased infiltrated macrophages in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): role of stromal androgen receptor in macrophage-induced prostate stromal cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohai; Lin, Wen-Jye; Izumi, Kouji; Jiang, Qi; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Xu, Defeng; Fang, Lei-Ya; Lu, Tianjing; Li, Lei; Xia, Shujie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-05-25

    Infiltrated macrophages may play important roles in the development and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We found increased macrophages infiltration in human and mouse BPH tissues. By establishing a co-culture transwell system, we found increased migration of macrophages and proliferation of prostate stromal cells during co-culture. Importantly, stromal androgen receptor (AR) could enhance the migration of macrophages and macrophage-mediated stromal cell proliferation. We identified CCL3 as an AR downstream player, and found CCL3 levels were notably increased in human and mouse BPH prostates. Ablation of prostate stromal AR in a mouse BPH model significantly reduced CCL3 expression levels in prostates. Consistently, targeting AR via an AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9®, or neutralization of CCL3 with an antibody, resulted in suppression of macrophage migration and prostate stromal cell growth. Our study provides mechanistic insights on the regulation of prostate stromal cells by macrophages via stromal AR/CCL3 signaling pathways, which could potentially allow the development of therapeutic approaches for battling BPH with persistent inflammation.

  10. Computational modeling of epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Smallwood, Rod

    2009-01-01

    There is an extensive literature on the computational modeling of epithelial tissues at all levels from subcellular to whole tissue. This review concentrates on behavior at the individual cell to whole tissue level, and particularly on organizational aspects, and provides an indication of where information from other areas, such as the modeling of angiogenesis, is relevant. The skin, and the lining of all of the body cavities (lung, gut, cervix, bladder etc) are epithelial tissues, which in a topological sense are the boundary between inside and outside the body. They are thin sheets of cells (usually of the order of 0.5 mm thick) without extracellular matrix, have a relatively simple structure, and contain few types of cells. They have important barrier, secretory and transport functions, which are essential for the maintenance of life, so homeostasis and wound healing are important aspects of the behavior of epithelial tissues. Carcinomas originate in epithelial tissues.There are essentially two approaches to modeling tissues--to start at the level of the tissue (i.e., a length scale of the order of 1 mm) and develop generalized equations for behavior (a continuum approach); or to start at the level of the cell (i.e., a length scale of the order of 10 µm) and develop tissue behavior as an emergent property of cellular behavior (an individual-based approach). As will be seen, these are not mutually exclusive approaches, and they come in a variety of flavors.

  11. Encapsulation of Adipose Stromal Vascular Fraction Cells in Alginate Hydrogel Spheroids Using a Direct-Write Three-Dimensional Printing System

    PubMed Central

    Touroo, Jeremy S.; Church, Kenneth H.; Hoying, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The study of tissue function in vitro has been aided by the development of three-dimensional culture systems that more accurately duplicate the complex cell components of tissues and organs. Bioprinting of cells provides a rapid tissue fabrication technique that can be used to evaluate normal and pathologic conditions in vitro as well as to construct complex three-dimensional tissue structures for implantation in regenerative medicine therapies. Studies were performed using a direct write three-dimensional bioprinting system to fabricate adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cell spheroids. Human fat–derived stromal vascular fraction cells were mixed in 1.5% (w/v) alginate solutions, and fabrication conditions were varied to produce an array of spheroids. The spheroids were placed in spinner culture, and spheroid integrity and encapsulated cell viability were assessed for 16 days. Results establish the ability to tightly control adipose SVF spheroids in the range of 800–1500 μm. Fabrication conditions were used to control spheroid size, and the results illustrate the ability to construct spheroids of precise size and shape. The adipose SVF cell population remains viable and the spheroid integrity was maintained for 16 days in suspension culture. The direct-write printing of adipose stromal vascular fraction cell containing spheroids provides a rapid fabrication technology to support in vitro microphysiologic system studies. PMID:24380055

  12. Human Thymus Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Augment Force Production in Self-Organized Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sondergaard, Claus S.; Hodonsky, Chani J.; Khait, Luda; Shaw, John; Sarkar, Bedabrata; Birla, Ravi; Bove, Edward; Nolta, Jan; Si, Ming-Sing

    2011-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells have been recently isolated from thymus gland tissue discarded after surgical procedures. The role of this novel cell type in heart regeneration has yet to be defined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells using self-organized cardiac tissue as an in vitro platform for quantitative assessment. Methods Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from discarded thymus tissue from neonates undergoing heart surgery and were incubated in differentiation media to demonstrate multipotency. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes self-organized into cardiac tissue fibers in a custom culture dish either alone or in combination with varying numbers of mesenchymal stromal cells. A transducer measured force generated by spontaneously contracting self-organized cardiac tissue fibers. Work and power outputs were calculated from force tracings. Immunofluorescence was performed to determine the fate of the thymus-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Results Mesenchymal stromal cells were successfully isolated from discarded thymus tissue. After incubation in differentiation media, mesenchymal stromal cells attained the expected phenotypes. Although mesenchymal stromal cells did not differentiate into mature cardiomyocytes, addition of these cells increased the rate of fiber formation, force production, and work and power outputs. Self-organized cardiac tissue containing mesenchymal stromal cells acquired a defined microscopic architecture. Conclusions Discarded thymus tissue contains mesenchymal stromal cells, which can augment force production and work and power outputs of self-organized cardiac tissue fibers by several-fold. These findings indicate the potential utility of mesenchymal stromal cells in treating heart failure. PMID:20732499

  13. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    apl.uw.edu/dasaro LONG-TERM GOALS I seek to understand the processes controlling lateral mixing in the ocean, particularly at the submesoscale ...APPROACH During AESOP, Lee and D’Asaro pioneered an innovative approach to measuring submesoscale structure in strong fronts. An adaptive measurement...injection of potential vorticity and scalars is predicted to create an intense ‘ submesoscale soup’ of high small-scale variance. The combination of small

  14. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-08

    to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . 1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for...integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal opportunity to...2011 I also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the

  15. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    ocean as it responds to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . My approach for...therefore requires integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal...also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the center of

  16. A role for fibroblasts in mediating the effects of tobacco-induced epithelial cell growth and invasion.

    PubMed

    Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Boysen, Megan; Sun, Chung Ho; Wong, Brian J F; Kang, Mo K; Park, No-Hee; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Krtolica, Ana

    2008-07-01

    Cigarette smoke and smokeless tobacco extracts contain multiple carcinogenic compounds, but little is known about the mechanisms by which tumors develop and progress upon chronic exposure to carcinogens such as those present in tobacco products. Here, we examine the effects of smokeless tobacco extracts on human oral fibroblasts. We show that smokeless tobacco extracts elevated the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen, oxidative DNA damage, and DNA double-strand breaks in a dose-dependent manner. Extended exposure to extracts induced fibroblasts to undergo a senescence-like growth arrest, with striking accompanying changes in the secretory phenotype. Using cocultures of smokeless tobacco extracts-exposed fibroblasts and immortalized but nontumorigenic keratinocytes, we further show that factors secreted by extracts-modified fibroblasts increase the proliferation and invasiveness of partially transformed epithelial cells, but not their normal counterparts. In addition, smokeless tobacco extracts-exposed fibroblasts caused partially transformed keratinocytes to lose the expression of E-cadherin and ZO-1, as well as involucrin, changes that are indicative of compromised epithelial function and commonly associated with malignant progression. Together, our results suggest that fibroblasts may contribute to tumorigenesis indirectly by increasing epithelial cell aggressiveness. Thus, tobacco may not only initiate mutagenic changes in epithelial cells but also promote the growth and invasion of mutant cells by creating a procarcinogenic stromal environment.

  17. The interplay of matrix metalloproteinases, morphogens and growth factors is necessary for branching of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Simian, Marina; Hirai, Yohei; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J.

    2002-03-06

    The mammary gland develops its adult form by a process referred to as branching morphogenesis. Many factors have been reported to affect this process. We have used cultured primary mammary epithelial organoids and mammary epithelial cell lines in three-dimensional collagen gels to elucidate which growth factors, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and mammary morphogens interact in branching morphogenesis. Branching stimulated by stromal fibroblasts, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 7, fibroblast growth factor 2 and hepatocyte growth factor was strongly reduced by inhibitors of MMPs, indicating the requirement of MMPs for three-dimensional growth involved in morphogenesis. Recombinant stromelysin 1/MMP-3 alone was sufficient to drive branching in the absence of growth factors in the organoids. Plasmin also stimulated branching; however, plasmin-dependent branching was abolished by both inhibitors of plasmin and MMPs, suggesting that plasmin activates MMPs. To differentiate between signals for proliferation and morphogenesis, we used a cloned mammary epithelial cell line that lacks epimorphin, an essential mammary morphogen. Both epimorphin and MMPs were required for morphogenesis, but neither was required for epithelial cell proliferation. These results provide direct evidence for a critical role of MMPs in branching in mammary epithelium and suggest that, in addition to epimorphin, MMP activity is a minimum requirement for branching morphogenesis in the mammary gland.

  18. Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin in stromal cells are possible biomarkers for metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported a case of giant basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in a 75-year-old Japanese man, who subsequently developed a pulmonary metastasis. With regard to the pathogenesis of metastasis of BCC, recently, it has been reported that high levels of expression of Twist1 and N-cadherin in primary and metastatic tumor cells, suggesting that Twist1 expression and an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells are important for the promotion of tumor invasion and subsequent metastasis. In this report, we identified the expressions of Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in stromal cells in the primary and metastatic sites of giant BCC. These results suggest that Twist1-induced EMT of tumor cells might have been associated with distant organ metastasis in our case, and the presence of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts surrounding a BCC nest can be one of hallmarks of the aggressiveness of BCC.

  19. MET-dependent cancer invasion may be preprogrammed by early alterations of p53-regulated feedforward loop and triggered by stromal cell-derived HGF.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Choi, Jinhyang; Zhou, Zongxiang; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Nikitin, Alexander Yu

    2011-11-15

    MET, a receptor protein tyrosine kinase activated by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), is a crucial determinant of metastatic progression. Recently, we have identified p53 as an important regulator of MET-dependent cell motility and invasion. This regulation occurs via feedforward loop suppressing MET expression by miR-34-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Here, by using Dicer conditional knockout, we provide further evidence for microRNA-independent MET regulation by p53. Furthermore, we show that while MET levels increase immediately after p53 inactivation, mutant cells do not contain active phosphorylated MET and remain non-invasive for a long latency period at contrary to cell culture observations. Evaluation of mouse models of ovarian and prostate carcinogenesis indicates that formation of desmoplastic stroma, associated production of HGF by stromal cells and coinciding MET phosphorylation precede cancer invasion. Thus, initiation mutation of p53 is sufficient for preprogramming motile and invasive properties of epithelial cells, but the stromal reaction may represent a critical step for their manifestation during cancer progression.

  20. Cell and Molecular Biology of Ataxia Telangiectasia Heterozygous Human Mammary Epithelial Cells Irradiated in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richmond, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Autologous isolates of cell types from obligate heterozygotes with the autosomal disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)were used to begin a tissue culture model for assessing pathways of radiation-induced cancer formation in this target tissue. This was done by establishing cultures of stromal fibroblasts and long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) in standard 2-dimensional tissue culture in order to establish expression of markers detailing early steps of carcinogenesis. The presumptive breast cancer susceptibility of A-T heterozygotes as a sequel to damage caused by ionizing radiation provided reason to study expression of markers in irradiated HMEC. Findings from our study with HMEC have included determination of differences in specific protein expression amongst growth phase (e.g., log vs stationary) and growth progression (e.g., pass 7 vs pass 9), as well as differences in morphologic markers within populations of irradiated HMEC (e.g., development of multinucleated cells).

  1. Progress Towards Drosophila Epithelial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila epithelial research is at the forefront of the field; however, there are no well-characterized epithelial cell lines that could provide a complementary in vitro model for studies conducted in vivo. Here, a protocol is described that produces epithelial cell lines. The method uses genetic manipulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressors to induce embryonic primary culture cells to rapidly progress to permanent cell lines. It is, however, a general method and the type of cells that comprise a given line is not controlled experimentally. Indeed, only a small fraction of the lines produced are epithelial in character. For this reason, additional work needs to be done to develop a more robust epithelial cell-specific protocol. It is expected that Drosophila epithelial cell lines will have great utility for in vitro analysis of epithelial biology, particularly high-throughput analyses such as RNAi screens. PMID:23097097

  2. The Role of Stromally Produced Cathepsin D in Promoting Prostate Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    beta (TGF-β) and stromal cell derived factor-1 ( SDF -1) as being overexpressed in CAF cells. These factors were 11 Figure 7. Stromal specific...expressed in cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) (including cyclin D1 [CD1], TGFß and SDF -1) induce tumorigenesis and malignant transformation in tissue

  3. Stromal vascular cells and adipogenesis: Cells within adipose depots regulate adipogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A collection of investigations indicate the importance of adipose tissue stromal/stem cells to vasculogenesis and angiogenesis during adipogenesis. Early in development the stromal-vascular (S-V) elements control and dictate the extent of adipogenesis in a depot dependent manner. For instance, the...

  4. Adenovirus mediated homozygous endometrial epithelial Pten deletion results in aggressive endometrial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Ayesha; Ellenson, Lora Hedrick

    2011-07-01

    Pten is the most frequently mutated gene in uterine endometriod carcinoma (UEC) and its precursor complex atypical hyperplasia (CAH). Because the mutation frequency is similar in CAH and UEC, Pten mutations are thought to occur relatively early in endometrial tumorigenesis. Previous work from our laboratory using the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model has demonstrated somatic inactivation of the wild type allele of Pten in both CAH and UEC. In the present study, we injected adenoviruses expressing Cre into the uterine lumen of adult Pten floxed mice in an attempt to somatically delete both alleles of Pten specifically in the endometrium. Our results demonstrate that biallelic inactivation of Pten results in an increased incidence of carcinoma as compared to the Pten{sup +/-} mouse model. In addition, the carcinomas were more aggressive with extension beyond the uterus into adjacent tissues and were associated with decreased expression of nuclear ER{alpha} as compared to associated CAH. Primary cultures of epithelial and stromal cells were prepared from uteri of Pten floxed mice and Pten was deleted in vitro using Cre expressing adenovirus. Pten deletion was evident in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the treatment of the primary cultures with estrogen had different effects on Akt activation as well as Cyclin D3 expression in the two purified components. This study demonstrates that somatic biallelic inactivation of Pten in endometrial epithelium in vivo results in an increased incidence and aggressiveness of endometrial carcinoma compared to mice carrying a germline deletion of one allele and provides an important in vivo and in vitro model system for understanding the genetic underpinnings of endometrial carcinoma.

  5. The oligomeric stromal proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Jean-Benoit; Cai, Yang; Sun, Qi; Zabrouskov, Vladimir; Giacomelli, Lisa; Rudella, Andrea; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Rutschow, Heidi; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2006-01-01

    This study presents an analysis of the stromal proteome in its oligomeric state extracted from highly purified chloroplasts of Arabidopsis thaliana. 241 proteins (88% with predicted cTP), mostly assembled in oligomeric complexes, were identified by mass spectrometry with emphasis on distinguishing between paralogues. This is critical because different paralogues in a gene family often have different subcellular localizations and/or different expression patterns and functions. The native protein masses were determined for all identified proteins. Comparison with the few well characterized stromal complexes from A. thaliana confirmed the accuracy of the native mass determination, and by extension, the usefulness of the native mass data for future in-depth protein interaction studies. Resolved protein interactions are discussed and compared with an extensive collection of native mass data of orthologues in other plants and bacteria. Relative protein expression levels were estimated from spot intensities and also provided estimates of relative concentrations of individual proteins. No such quantification has been reported so far. Surprisingly proteins dedicated to chloroplast protein synthesis, biogenesis, and fate represented nearly 10% of the total stroma protein mass. Oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, glycolysis, and Calvin cycle represented together about 75%, nitrogen assimilation represented 5-7%, and all other pathways such as biosynthesis of e.g. fatty acids, amino acids, nucleotides, tetrapyrroles, and vitamins B(1) and B(2) each represented less than 1% of total protein mass. Several proteins with diverse functions outside primary carbon metabolism, such as the isomerase ROC4, lipoxygenase 2 involved in jasmonic acid biosynthesis, and a carbonic anhydrase (CA1), were surprisingly abundant in the range of 0.75-1.5% of the total stromal mass. Native images with associated information are available via the Plastid Proteome Database.

  6. Bone marrow stromal stem cells: nature, biology, and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Bianco, P; Riminucci, M; Gronthos, S; Robey, P G

    2001-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are progenitors of skeletal tissue components such as bone, cartilage, the hematopoiesis-supporting stroma, and adipocytes. In addition, they may be experimentally induced to undergo unorthodox differentiation, possibly forming neural and myogenic cells. As such, they represent an important paradigm of post-natal nonhematopoietic stem cells, and an easy source for potential therapeutic use. Along with an overview of the basics of their biology, we discuss here their potential nature as components of the vascular wall, and the prospects for their use in local and systemic transplantation and gene therapy.

  7. The Role of Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin (TSLP) in Allergic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Steven F.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The importance of the epithelium in initiating and controlling immune responses is becoming more appreciated. For example, allergens contact first occurs at mucosal sites in exposed to the external environment such as the skin, airways and gastrointestinal tract. This exposure leads to the production of a variety of cytokines and chemokines that are involved in driving allergic inflammatory responses. One such product is thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). Recent studies, in both humans and mouse models, have implicated TSLP in the development and progression of atopy and atopic diseases. This review will discuss this work and place TSLP in the inflammatory cascade that leads to allergic disease. PMID:21109412

  8. Targeting stromal microenvironment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: controversies and promises

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Du, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease. Conventional therapeutics targeting pancreas cancer cell compartment using cytotoxics improved patient survival but at the expense of significant toxicity. Microscopically, the tumor is characterized by thick desmoplastic stroma that surrounds islands of pancreatic cancer cells. The tumor microenvironment has been found to play important roles in carcinogenesis, the development of drug resistance, and mediating immunosuppression. The understanding the tumor-stromal interaction has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we review the strategies that are currently in (or, near to) clinical evaluation and the underlying preclinical rationales. PMID:27284483

  9. Meckel Diverticulum Harboring a Rare Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Andrew C.; Nakshabendi, Rahman; Kanar, Ozdemir; Hamer, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tumors within a Meckel diverticulum are a rare complication observed in only 0.5%-3.2% of symptomatic cases. The majority of tumors are benign, but some malignant tumors, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) can occur. Case Report: We report the case of a 48-year-old female who presented with severe abdominal pain and nausea and was found to have a GIST arising from a Meckel diverticulum. Conclusion: The differential diagnosis of a pelvic mass in a middle-aged female presenting with gastrointestinal symptoms must remain broad. With an atypical presentation site, distinguishing benign tumors from malignant tumors such as GISTs is of paramount importance. PMID:28331460

  10. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Arising From a Gastric Duplication Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Machicado, Jorge; Davogustto, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts (GDC) are rarely diagnosed in adults, but previous cases have been associated with malignancy. We present a case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) arising from a GDC in a 71-year-old woman who presented with 3 years of early satiety, anorexia, abdominal distention, and weight loss. Abdominal CT showed a 9.3 x 5.2 x 9.5-cm well-circumscribed cystic mass arising 3 cm above the gastroduodenal junction. The cyst was resected, and histopathology was consistent with GDC. Future studies are needed to clarify the malignant potential of GDC and the molecular pathways for its development. PMID:27144196

  11. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Li; Liu, Dan; Yang, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Min-Wen; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the liver. A 17-year-old man with a solid mass in the anterior segment of the right liver was asymptomatic with negative laboratory examinations with the exception of positive HBV. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) revealed a hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase and hypoechoic features during the portal and late phases. However, enhanced spiral computed tomography (CT) showed hypoattenuation in all three phases. Following biopsy, immunohistochemical evaluation demonstrated positive CD117. Different imaging features of primary GISTs of the liver are due to pathological properties and different working systems between CEUS and enhanced spiral CT. PMID:19653356

  12. [VEGF gene expression in transfected human multipotent stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Smirnikhina, S A; Lavrov, A V; Bochkov, N P

    2011-01-01

    Dynamics of VEGF gene expression in transfected multipotent stromal cells from adipose tissue was examined using electroporation and lipofection. Differences in the potency and dynamics of plasmid elimination (up to day 9) between cell cultures were observed. All cultures were divided into fast and slow plasmid-eliminating ones. Interculture differences in VEGF expression were detected. The possibility of a 5-6-fold increase of VEGF expression was shown. There were no differences in transfection potency, plasmid elimination dynamics, and VEGF expression after transfection by both nonviral methods.

  13. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: case reports and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bronzino, P; Colombini, M; Ferro, A; Gambetta, G; Gennaro, M; Ivaldi, L; Revetria, P

    2008-01-01

    The Authors describe four cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) two of them were localized in the stomach, the others in the ileum. GIST are neoplasms of mesenchymal origin which develop inside the wall of the digestive tract. The most frequent site is the stomach, followed by the small bowel; less commonly these tumors can affect the oesophagus, the colon and the rectum. GIST originate from precursors of the interstitial cells of Cajal, which are localized in the gastro-intestinal wall and are involved in the regulation of the peristalsis. The treatment is surgical resection. For advanced disease there is a new interesting treatment based on the imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

  14. Heterotopic Pancreatic Pseudocyst Radiologically Mimicking Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sarsenov, Dauren; Tırnaksız, Mehmet Bülent; Doğrul, Ahmet Bülent; Tanas, Özlem; Gedikoglu, Gökhan; Abbasoğlu, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Heterotopic pancreas is a relatively common variant of foregut embryologic dystopia that can be described as pancreatic tissue found outside the normal anatomic location, being independent from vascular supply of normal pancreas. Having all features of pancreatic tissue except for the major duct structures, this ectopic tissue may be clinically recognized when pathologic changes take place. Inflammation, hemorrhagic or obstructive states, and eventually malignancy-related problems may become a diagnostic challenge for clinician and finally lead to consequences of misdiagnosis. In this article we will discuss a case of heterotopic pancreatic tissue located in gastric cardia, which was diagnosed preoperatively as gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:25785332

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor extending to prostate

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huan; Liu, Chong; Chen, Yanbo; Gu, Meng; Cai, Zhikang; Chen, Qi; Wang, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the neoplasm of gastrointestinal tract. Patient concerns: The patient complained about the retention of urinary. Diagnoses: GIST. Interventions: radical prostatectomy and the imatinib therapy. Outcomes: No recurrence and metastasis have been found during a 14-month follow-up. Lessons: comprehensive treatment is necessary for the GIST treatment. Furthermore, we summarize a review of the literature of GIST occurring in the prostate gland treated by different methods and 4 kinds of rare diseases in prostate. PMID:27861390

  16. Mesenchymal stromal cells and the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Le Blanc, Katarina; Davies, Lindsay C

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have been exploited for their immunomodulatory properties in the treatment of a number of immune-based disorders, including Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) and type 1 diabetes. The mechanisms for inducing therapeutic effect still remain largely unknown however, with research focused on understanding how MSCs interact with individual immune cell subsets. Within this review we address what is known about the interactions of MSCs with cells of the innate immune system, how they respond to their microenvironment and how this relates to therapeutic effects we see both within in vivo animal models and in clinical trials.

  17. Osterix marks distinct waves of primitive and definitive stromal progenitors during bone marrow development.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, Toshihide; Pinho, Sandra; Ahmed, Jalal; Kunisaki, Yuya; Hanoun, Maher; Mendelson, Avital; Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M; Frenette, Paul S

    2014-05-12

    Mesenchymal stem and progenitor cells (MSPCs) contribute to bone marrow (BM) homeostasis by generating multiple types of stromal cells. MSPCs can be labeled in the adult BM by Nestin-GFP, whereas committed osteoblast progenitors are marked by Osterix expression. However, the developmental origin and hierarchical relationship of stromal cells remain largely unknown. Here, by using a lineage-tracing system, we describe three distinct waves of contributions of Osterix(+) cells in the BM. First, Osterix(+) progenitors in the fetal BM contribute to nascent bone tissues and transient stromal cells that are replaced in the adult marrow. Second, Osterix-expressing cells perinatally contribute to osteolineages and long-lived BM stroma, which have characteristics of Nestin-GFP(+) MSPCs. Third, Osterix labeling in the adult marrow is osteolineage-restricted, devoid of stromal contribution. These results uncover a broad expression profile of Osterix and raise the intriguing possibility that distinct waves of stromal cells, primitive and definitive, may organize the developing BM.

  18. Identification of the 64 kilodalton chloroplast stromal phosphoprotein as phosphoglucomutase. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Salvucci, M.E.; Drake, R.R.; Broadbent, K.P.; Haley, B.E. ); Hanson, K.R.; McHale, N.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Phosphorylation of the 64 kilodalton stromal phosphoprotein by incubation of pea (Pisum sativum) chloroplast extracts with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP decreased in the presence of Glc-6-P and Glc-1,6-P{sub 2}, but was stimulated by glucose. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis following incubation of intact chloroplasts and stromal extracts with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP, or incubation of stromal extracts and partially purified phosphoglucomutase (EC 2.7.5.1) with ({sup 32}P)Glc-1-P showed that the identical 64 kilodalton polypeptide was labeled. A 62 kilodalton polypeptide was phosphorylated by incubation of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) stromal extracts with either ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP or ({sup 32}P)Glc-1-P. In contrast, an analogous polypeptide was not phosphorylated in extracts from a tobacco mutant deficient in plastid phosphoglucomutase activity. The results indicate that the 64 (or 62) kilodalton chloroplast stromal phosphoprotein is phosphoglucomutase.

  19. Quantitative Morphology of Epithelial Folds

    PubMed Central

    Štorgel, Nick; Krajnc, Matej; Mrak, Polona; Štrus, Jasna; Ziherl, Primož

    2016-01-01

    The shape of spatially modulated epithelial morphologies such as villi and crypts is usually associated with the epithelium-stroma area mismatch leading to buckling. We propose an alternative mechanical model based on intraepithelial stresses generated by differential tensions of apical, lateral, and basal sides of cells as well as on the elasticity of the basement membrane. We use it to theoretically study longitudinal folds in simple epithelia and we identify four types of corrugated morphologies: compact, invaginated, evaginated, and wavy. The obtained tissue contours and thickness profiles are compared to epithelial folds observed in invertebrates and vertebrates, and for most samples, the agreement is within the estimated experimental error. Our model establishes the groove-crest modulation of tissue thickness as a morphometric parameter that can, together with the curvature profile, be used to estimate the relative differential apicobasal tension in the epithelium. PMID:26745429

  20. Cellular systems for epithelial invagination

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial invagination is a fundamental module of morphogenesis that iteratively occurs to generate the architecture of many parts of a developing organism. By changing the physical properties such as the shape and/or position of a population of cells, invagination drives processes ranging from reconfiguring the entire body axis during gastrulation, to forming the primordia of the eyes, ears and multiple ducts and glands, during organogenesis. The epithelial bending required for invagination is achieved through a variety of mechanisms involving systems of cells. Here we provide an overview of the different mechanisms, some of which can work in combination, and outline the circumstances in which they apply. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Systems morphodynamics: understanding the development of tissue hardware’. PMID:28348256

  1. Clinicopathological Study of Surface Epithelial Tumours of the Ovary: An Institutional Study

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Suguna Belur

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is an established fact that tumours of ovary inherit a spectrum of histogenetic background, the variety being more than any other organ. Surface epithelial stromal tumours of ovary being the most common type of ovarian tumours form a complicating and baffling subject in the history of oncology and hence, are an interesting topic for study. Aim The aim of this study was to categorize the surface epithelial tumours of ovary into benign, borderline and malignant, to study their clinical and histopathological pattern and to compare their incidences with other studies. Materials and Methods This is a 5 year (3years of retrospective + 2 years of prospective) study conducted during the period of June 2006 to May 2011. It consisted of 139 cases (141 tumours/ lesions). The relevant clinical details about the patient were retrieved from hospital data. Results The 141 surface epithelial tumours from 139 cases accounted for 66.2% of all the ovarian tumours encountered during the study period. The mean age of diagnosis in our study was 42.4 years. The most common clinical presentation was mass in abdomen. 90.6% of tumours were unilateral and 9.4% cases were bilateral. Right sided tumours (59.8%) were more common than left sided tumours (40.14%). 82.3% were benign tumours, 12.1% were malignant and 5.7% tumours belonged to the borderline category. Conclusion Surface epithelial tumours present a great challenge to the gynecologic oncologist because non-neoplastic ovarian lesions can form a pelvic mass and potentially mimic a neoplasm. Their proper recognition and histopathologic classification is essential for appropriate management as malignant tumours are usually picked up at an advanced stage owing to their asymptomatic nature and inaccessible site for aspiration cytology and biopsy. Histopathological examination still remains the mainstay in diagnosis of these neoplasms. PMID:27891341

  2. Ectopic Epithelial Deaminase in IBD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic intestinal disorder that is caused by...mice (carrying non-functional AID) before and after induction of colitis by oral administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). 1c will...epithelial cells in colitis (months 1-18) 2a will develop and expand the mouse colony of RAG1-deficient KI/KI mice (months 1-6). In order to test the

  3. Bystander effect in glioma suicide gene therapy using bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shaoyi; Gu, Chunyu; Gao, Yun; Amano, Shinji; Koizumi, Shinichiro; Tokuyama, Tsutomu; Namba, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    An established rat intracranial glioma was successfully treated through the tumoricidal bystander effect generated by intratumoral injection of rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) transduced with the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase gene (BMSCtk cells) followed by systemic ganciclovir administration. In the present study, we tested the bystander effect of this treatment strategy when using human BMSCs as the vector cells. Human BMSCtk cells were mixed with various kinds of brain tumor cell lines (human and rat glioma cells) and examined in vitro and in vivo tumoricidal bystander effects, by co-culture study and co-implantation study in the nude mouse, respectively. A significant in vitro bystander effect was observed between human BMSCtk cells and any of the tumor cells examined in the ganciclovir-containing medium. A potent in vivo bystander effect against human and rat glioma cells was also demonstrated when ganciclovir was administered. Migratory activity of the human BMSCs toward the tumor cells was enhanced by the conditioned media obtained from both human and rat glioma cells compared to the fresh media. The results of this study have demonstrated that the bystander effect generated by BMSCtk cells and ganciclovir is not cell type-specific, suggesting that the strategy would be quite feasible for clinical use.

  4. Native multipotential stromal cell colonization and graft expander potential of a bovine natural bone scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kouroupis, Dimitrios; Baboolal, Thomas G; Jones, Elena; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2013-12-01

    Graft expanders are bone scaffolds used, in combination with autografts, to fill large bone defects in trauma surgery. This study investigates the graft expander potential of a natural bone substitute Orthoss by studying its ability to support attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation of neighboring multipotential stromal cells (MSCs). Material consisting of bone marrow (BM) aspirate and reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA)-harvested autograft bone was co-cultured with commercially available Orthoss granules. Native MSCs attached to Orthoss were expanded and phenotypically characterized. MSCs egress from neighboring cancelous bone was assessed in 3D Matrigel co-cultures. MSC differentiation was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy and measuring alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity per cell. CD45(+) hematopoietic lineage cells and highly proliferative CD90(+) CD73(+) CD105(+) MSCs preferentially colonized Orthoss granules, over RIA bone chips. MSC colonization was followed by their intrinsic osteogenic differentiation, assessed as mineral deposition and gradual rise in ALP activity, even in the absence of osteogenic stimuli. When in contact with mixed cell populations and RIA chips, Orthoss granules support the attachment, growth and osteogenic differentiation of neighboring MSCs. Therefore, natural bone substitutes similar to Orthoss can be used as void fillers and graft expanders for repairing large bone defects in conjunction with autologous BM aspirates and autografts.

  5. Mouse adipose tissue stromal cells give rise to skeletal and cardiomyogenic cell sub-populations

    PubMed Central

    Dromard, Cécile; Barreau, Corinne; André, Mireille; Berger-Müller, Sandra; Casteilla, Louis; Planat-Benard, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that adipose tissue could generate cardiomyocyte-like cells from crude stromal vascular fraction (SVF) in vitro that improved cardiac function in a myocardial infarction context. However, it is not clear whether these adipose-derived cardiomyogenic cells (AD-CMG) constitute a homogenous population and if AD-CMG progenitors could be isolated as a pure population from the SVF of adipose tissue. This study aims to characterize the different cell types that constitute myogenic clusters and identify the earliest AD-CMG progenitors in vitro for establishing a complete phenotype and use it to sort AD-CMG progenitors from crude SVF. Here, we report cell heterogeneity among adipose-derived clusters during their course of maturation and highlighted sub-populations that exhibit original mixed cardiac/skeletal muscle phenotypes with a progressive loss of cardiac phenotype with time in liquid culture conditions. Moreover, we completed the phenotype of AD-CMG progenitors but we failed to sort them from the SVF. We demonstrated that micro-environment is required for the maturation of myogenic phenotype by co-culture experiments. These findings bring complementary data on AD-CMG and suggest that their emergence results from in vitro events. PMID:25364749

  6. Human mesenchymal stromal cells suppress T-cell proliferation independent of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Patel, Seema R; Copland, Ian B; Garcia, Marco A; Metz, Richard; Galipeau, Jacques

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells deploy immune suppressive properties amenable for use as cell therapy for inflammatory disorders. It is now recognized that mesenchymal stromal cells necessitate priming with an inflammatory milieu, in particular interferon-γ, to exert augmented immunosuppressive effects. It has been recently suggested that the heme-catabolizing enzyme heme oxygenase-1 is an essential component of the mesenchymal stromal cell-driven immune suppressive response. Because mesenchymal stromal cells upregulate indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression on interferon-γ priming and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase requires heme as a cofactor for optimal catabolic function, we investigated the potential antagonism of heme oxygenase-1 activity on indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase and the impact on mesenchymal stromal cell immune plasticity. We herein sought to evaluate the molecular genetic effect of cytokine priming on human mesenchymal stromal cell heme oxygenase-1 expression and its functional role in differentially primed mesenchymal stromal cells. Contrary to previous reports, messenger RNA and protein analyses demonstrated that mesenchymal stromal cells derived from normal subjects (n = 6) do not express heme oxygenase-1 at steady state or after interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, and/or transforming growth factor-β priming. Pharmacological inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 with the use of tin protoporphyrin did not significantly abrogate the ability of mesenchymal stromal cells to suppress T-cell proliferation in vitro. Overall, these results unequivocally demonstrate that under steady state and after cytokine priming, human mesenchymal stromal cells immunoregulate T-cell proliferation independent of heme oxygenase-1.

  7. Vertex Models of Epithelial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Alexander G.; Osterfield, Miriam; Baker, Ruth E.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of epithelial cell sheets plays a central role during numerous developmental processes. Genetic and imaging studies of epithelial morphogenesis in a wide range of organisms have led to increasingly detailed mechanisms of cell sheet dynamics. Computational models offer a useful means by which to investigate and test these mechanisms, and have played a key role in the study of cell-cell interactions. A variety of modeling approaches can be used to simulate the balance of forces within an epithelial sheet. Vertex models are a class of such models that consider cells as individual objects, approximated by two-dimensional polygons representing cellular interfaces, in which each vertex moves in response to forces due to growth, interfacial tension, and pressure within each cell. Vertex models are used to study cellular processes within epithelia, including cell motility, adhesion, mitosis, and delamination. This review summarizes how vertex models have been used to provide insight into developmental processes and highlights current challenges in this area, including progressing these models from two to three dimensions and developing new tools for model validation. PMID:24896108

  8. Can notochordal cells promote bone marrow stromal cell potential for nucleus pulposus enrichment? A simplified in vitro system.

    PubMed

    Potier, Esther; Ito, Keita

    2014-12-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have shown promising potential to stop intervertebral disc degeneration in several animal models. In order to restore a healthy state, though, this potential should be further stimulated. Notochordal cells (NCs), influential in disc development, have been shown to stimulate BMSC differentiation, but it is unclear how this effect will translate in an environment where resident disc cells (nucleus pulposus cells [NPCs]) could also influence BMSCs. The goal of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the effects of NCs on BMSCs when cocultured with NPCs, in a simplified 3D in vitro system. Bovine BMSCs and NPCs were mixed (Mix) and seeded into alginate beads. Using culture inserts, the Mix was then cocultured with porcine NCs (alginate beads) and compared to coculture with empty beads or porcine skin fibroblasts (SFs, alginate beads). NPCs alone were also cocultured with NCs, and BMSCs alone cultured under chondrogenic conditions. The effects of coculture conditions on cell viability, matrix production (proteoglycan and collagen), and gene expression of disc markers (aggrecan, type II collagen, and SOX9) were assessed after 4 weeks of culture. The NC phenotype and gene expression profile were also analyzed. Coculture with NCs did not significantly influence cell viability, proteoglycan production, or disc marker gene expression of the Mix. When compared to NPCs, the Mix produced the same amount of proteoglycan and displayed a higher expression of disc marker, indicating a stimulation of the BMSCs (and/or NPCs) in the Mix. Additionally, during the 4 weeks of culture, the NC phenotype changed drastically (morphology, gene expression profile). These results show that NCs might not be as stimulatory for BMSCs in an NPC-rich environment, as believed from individual cultures. This absence of effects could be explained by a mild stimulation provided by (de)differentiating NCs and the costimulation of BMSCs and NPCs by each other.

  9. Roles of epithelial cell-derived periostin in TGF-beta activation, collagen production, and collagen gel elasticity in asthma.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Sukhvinder S; Yuan, Shaopeng; Innes, Anh L; Kerr, Sheena; Woodruff, Prescott G; Hou, Lydia; Muller, Susan J; Fahy, John V

    2010-08-10

    Periostin is considered to be a matricellular protein with expression typically confined to cells of mesenchymal origin. Here, by using in situ hybridization, we show that periostin is specifically up-regulated in bronchial epithelial cells of asthmatic subjects, and in vitro, we show that periostin protein is basally secreted by airway epithelial cells in response to IL-13 to influence epithelial cell function, epithelial-mesenchymal interactions, and extracellular matrix organization. In primary human bronchial epithelial cells stimulated with periostin and epithelial cells overexpressing periostin, we reveal a function for periostin in stimulating the TGF-beta signaling pathway in a mechanism involving matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. Furthermore, conditioned medium from the epithelial cells overexpressing periostin caused TGF-beta-dependent secretion of type 1 collagen by airway fibroblasts. In addition, mixing recombinant periostin with type 1 collagen in solution caused a dramatic increase in the elastic modulus of the collagen gel, indicating that periostin alters collagen fibrillogenesis or cross-linking and leads to stiffening of the matrix. Epithelial cell-derived periostin in asthma has roles in TGF-beta activation and collagen gel elasticity in asthma.

  10. Graded activation of the MEK1/MT1-MMP axis determines renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Mahimkar, Rajeev; Alfonso-Jaume, Maria Alejandra; Cape, Leslie M.; Dahiya, Rajvir; Lovett, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Activation of Raf/Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and elevated expression of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) are associated with von Hippel–Lindau gene alterations in renal cell carcinoma. We postulated that the degree of MEK activation was related to graded expression of MT1-MMP and the resultant phenotype of renal epithelial tumors. Madin Darby canine kidney epithelial cells transfected with a MEK1 expression plasmid yielded populations with morphologic phenotypes ranging from epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal to mesenchymal. Clones were analyzed for MEK1 activity, MT1-MMP expression and extent of epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Phenotypes of the MDCK-MEK1 clones were evaluated in vivo with nu/nu mice. Tissue microarray of renal cell cancers was quantitatively assessed for expression of phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP proteins and correlations drawn to Fuhrman nuclear grade. Graded increases in the MEK signaling module were associated with graded induction of epithelial–mesenchymal transition of the MDCK cells and induction of MT1-MMP transcription and synthesis. Inhibition of MEK1 and MT1-MMP activity reversed the epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Tumors generated by epithelial, mixed epithelial/mesenchymal and mesenchymal MDCK clones demonstrated a gradient of phenotypes extending from well-differentiated, fully encapsulated non-invasive tumors to tumors with an anaplastic morphology, high Fuhrman nuclear score, neoangiogenesis and invasion. Tumor microarray demonstrated a statistically significant association between the extent of phosphorylated MEK1, MT1-MMP expression and nuclear grade. We conclude that graded increases in the MEK1 signaling module are correlated with M1-MMP expression, renal epithelial cell tumor phenotype, invasive activity and nuclear grade. Phosphorylated MEK1 and MT1-MMP may represent novel, and mechanistic, biomarkers for the assessment of renal

  11. The Interplay between Entamoeba and Enteropathogenic Bacteria Modulates Epithelial Cell Damage

    PubMed Central

    Galván-Moroyoqui, José Manuel; del Carmen Domínguez-Robles, M.; Franco, Elizabeth; Meza, Isaura

    2008-01-01

    Background Mixed intestinal infections with Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and bacteria with exacerbated manifestations of disease are common in regions where amoebiasis is endemic. However, amoeba–bacteria interactions remain largely unexamined. Methodology Trophozoites of E. histolytica and E. dispar were co-cultured with enteropathogenic bacteria strains Escherichia coli (EPEC), Shigella dysenteriae and a commensal Escherichia coli. Amoebae that phagocytosed bacteria were tested for a cytopathic effect on epithelial cell monolayers. Cysteine proteinase activity, adhesion and cell surface concentration of Gal/GalNAc lectin were analyzed in amoebae showing increased virulence. Structural and functional changes and induction of IL-8 expression were determined in epithelial cells before and after exposure to bacteria. Chemotaxis of amoebae and neutrophils to human IL-8 and conditioned culture media from epithelial cells exposed to bacteria was quantified. Principal Findings E. histolytica digested phagocytosed bacteria, although S. dysenteriae retained 70% viability after ingestion. Phagocytosis of pathogenic bacteria augmented the cytopathic effect of E. histolytica and increased expression of Gal/GalNAc lectin on the amoebic surface and increased cysteine proteinase activity. E. dispar remained avirulent. Adhesion of amoebae and damage to cells exposed to bacteria were increased. Additional increases were observed if amoebae had phagocytosed bacteria. Co-culture of epithelial cells with enteropathogenic bacteria disrupted monolayer permeability and induced expression of IL-8. Media from these co-cultures and human recombinant IL-8 were similarly chemotactic for neutrophils and E. histolytica. Conclusions Epithelial monolayers exposed to enteropathogenic bacteria become more susceptible to E. histolytica damage. At the same time, phagocytosis of pathogenic bacteria by amoebae further increased epithelial cell damage. Significance The in vitro system

  12. Senescent stromal-derived osteopontin promotes preneoplastic cell growth.

    PubMed

    Pazolli, Ermira; Luo, Xianmin; Brehm, Sarah; Carbery, Kelly; Chung, Jun-Jae; Prior, Julie L; Doherty, Jason; Demehri, Shadmehr; Salavaggione, Lorena; Piwnica-Worms, David; Stewart, Sheila A

    2009-02-01

    Alterations in the tissue microenvironment collaborate with cell autonomous genetic changes to contribute to neoplastic progression. The importance of the microenvironment in neoplastic progression is underscored by studies showing that fibroblasts isolated from a tumor stimulate the growth of preneoplastic and neoplastic cells in xenograft models. Similarly, senescent fibroblasts promote preneoplastic cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Because senescent cells accumulate with age, their presence is hypothesized to facilitate preneoplastic cell growth and tumor formation in older individuals. To identify senescent stromal factors directly responsible for stimulating preneoplastic cell growth, we carried out whole-genome transcriptional profiling and compared senescent fibroblasts with their younger counterparts. We identified osteopontin (OPN) as one of the most highly elevated transcripts in senescent fibroblasts. Importantly, reduction of OPN protein levels by RNA interference did not affect senescence induction in fibroblasts; however, it dramatically reduced the growth-promoting activities of senescent fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo, showing that OPN is necessary for paracrine stimulation of preneoplastic cell growth. In addition, we found that recombinant OPN was sufficient to stimulate preneoplastic cell growth. Finally, we show that OPN is expressed in senescent stroma within preneoplastic lesions that arise following 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment of mice, suggesting that stromal-derived OPN-mediated signaling events affect neoplastic progression.

  13. Senescent Stromal-Derived Osteopontin Promotes Preneoplastic Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Pazolli, Ermira; Luo, Xianmin; Brehm, Sarah; Carbery, Kelly; Chung, Jun-Jae; Prior, Julie L.; Doherty, Jason; Demehri, Shadmehr; Salavaggione, Lorena; Piwnica-Worms, David; Stewart, Sheila A.

    2008-01-01

    Alterations in the tissue microenvironment collaborate with cell autonomous genetic changes to contribute to neoplastic progression. The importance of the microenvironment in neoplastic progression is underscored by studies demonstrating that fibroblasts isolated from a tumor stimulate the growth of preneoplastic and neoplastic cells in xenograft models. Similarly, senescent fibroblasts promote preneoplastic cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Because senescent cells accumulate with age, their presence is hypothesized to facilitate preneoplastic cell growth and tumor formation in older individuals. To identify senescent stromal factors directly responsible for stimulating preneoplastic cell growth, we carried out whole genome transcriptional profiling and compared senescent fibroblasts to their younger counterparts. We identified osteopontin (OPN) as one of the most highly elevated transcripts in senescent fibroblasts. Importantly, reduction of OPN protein levels by RNAi did not impact senescence induction in fibroblasts; however, it dramatically reduced the growth-promoting activities of senescent fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating that OPN is necessary for paracrine stimulation of preneoplastic cell growth. In addition, we found that recombinant OPN was sufficient to stimulate preneoplastic cell growth. Finally, we demonstrate that OPN is expressed in senescent stroma within preneoplastic lesions that arise following DMBA/TPA treatment of mice, suggesting that stromal-derived OPN-mediated signaling events impact neoplastic progression. PMID:19155301

  14. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  15. Bone Marrow Cells in Murine Colitis: Multi-Signal Analysis Confirms Pericryptal Myofibroblast Engraftment without Epithelial Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chung-Yin; Jeffery, Rosemary; Hutchinson, Gillian; Alison, Malcolm R.; Poulsom, Richard; Wright, Nicholas A.; Otto, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to epithelial tissues in the inflamed gut remains controversial. Recent reports have suggested that cell fusion between bone marrow-derived cells and the intestinal epithelium takes place in inflammatory conditions. Methods In attempts to confirm this, we have undertaken gender mis-matched bone marrow (BM) transplants from male Swiss Webster (SWR) mice to B and T cell-deficient female Rag2 KO mice which, 4 weeks later, were given 5% dextran sodium sulphate in drinking water to induce acute colitis. A further BM-treated group of animals with a graft versus host-like condition was also studied. We developed a new method to combine up to three brightfield or fluorescent lectin- or immuno-histochemical signals with fluorescent in situ hybridisation for the Y and X chromosomes to enable us unequivocally to identify BM-derived male cells which presented as different cell types in the gastrointestinal tract. Principal Findings In rolled preparations of whole intestines we scanned around 1.5 million crypts at many tissue levels. In no instance did we see a Y chromosome-positive cell in the epithelial compartment, which was not also CD45-positive. We saw no evidence of cell fusion, based on combined X and Y chromosome analysis. Levels of CD45-positive stromal and lymphoid cells and pericryptal myfibroblasts (positive for α-smooth muscle actin) increased with time up to a plateau, which resembled the level seen in untreated control grafted animals. We saw very few Y chromosome-positive endothelial cells in intestinal stromal vessels. Conclusions We conclude that whole BM transplantation does not result in intestinal epithelial engraftment in this model. Our new methods can usefully assist in multi-signal analyses of cell phenotypes following BM transplant and in models of chimaerism and regenerative medicine. PMID:22022515

  16. Increased MicroRNA-34b and -34c Predominantly Expressed in Stromal Tissues Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Human Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Okayama, Hirokazu; Inamura, Kentaro; Anami, Katsuhiro; Nguyen, Giang H.; Horikawa, Izumi; Hawkes, Jason E.; Bowman, Elise D.; Leung, Suet Yi; Harris, Curtis C.

    2015-01-01

    The microRNA-34 family (miR-34a, -34b and -34c) have been reported to be tumor suppressor microRNAs (miRNAs) that are regulated by the TP53 and DNA hypermethylation. However, the expression, regulation, and prognostic value of the miR-34 family have not been systematically studied in colon cancer. To elucidate the roles of miR-34 family in colon carcinogenesis, miR-34a/b/c were measured in tumors and adjacent noncancerous tissues from 159 American and 113 Chinese colon cancer patients using quantitative RT-PCR, and we examined associations between miR-34a/b/c expression with TNM staging, cancer-specific mortality, TP53 mutation status and Affymetrix microarray data. All miR-34 family members were significantly increased in colon tumors, counter to the proposed tumor suppressor role for these miRNAs. Increased miR-34b/c were observed in more advanced tumors in two independent cohorts and increased expression of miR-34b/c was associated with poor cancer-specific mortality. While the expression of miR-34 family was not associated with TP53 mutation status, TP53 transcriptional activity was associated with miR-34a/b/c expression that is consistent with the proposed regulation of miR-34a/b/c by TP53. To examine where the miR-34 family is expressed, the expression of miR-34 family was compared between epitheliums and stromal tissues using laser microdissection technique. The expression of miR-34b/c was increased significantly in stromal tissues, especially in cancer stroma, compared with epithelial tissue. In conclusion, increased miR-34b/c predominantly expressed in stromal tissues is associated with poor prognosis in colon cancer. MiR-34 may contribute to cancer-stromal interaction associated with colon cancer progression. PMID:25894979

  17. Myeloid dendritic cells stimulated by thymic stromal lymphopoietin promote Th2 immune responses and the pathogenesis of oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Hayashida, Jun-Nosuke; Maehara, Takashi; Ishiguro, Noriko; Kubota, Keigo; Furukawa, Sachiko; Ohta, Miho; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Tanaka, Akihiko; Nakamura, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by subepithelial T-cell infiltration. Recent studies reported that specific T helper (Th) subsets, especially Th2 cells, are involved in the pathogenesis of OLP. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is mainly secreted by epithelial cells and potently activates myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) to induce Th2-mediated inflammation. Here, we investigated the expression of TSLP and related molecules in OLP. Buccal mucosa specimens from patients with OLP, hyperkeratosis, and ulcer were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for expression of TSLP, its receptor (TSLPR), and inflammatory cells. TSLP was detected in/around the epithelium of patients with OLP and hyperkeratosis, whereas TSLPR, CD11c (mDC), and GATA3 (Th2) were strongly expressed in the subepithelial layer only in OLP patients. Double immunofluorescence staining showed that TSLPR expression mainly co-localized with CD11c. Moreover, the number of CD11c- and GATA-3 positive cells was correlated in OLP patients. In lesions selectively extracted by laser microdissection, the mRNA expression of Th2 (IL-4, MDC, TARC, GATA3)- and Th17 (IL-17, RORγt)-related molecules in OLP patients was significantly higher than in other groups. These results suggest that CD11c+ mDCs expressing TSLPR contribute to aberrant Th2 immune responses and the pathogenesis of OLP via TSLP stimulation. PMID:28278185

  18. Scaffold-free and scaffold-assisted 3D culture enhances differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Vidyasekar, Prasanna; Shyamsunder, Pavithra; Sahoo, Sanjeeb Kumar; Verma, Rama Shanker

    2016-02-01

    3D cultures of stem cells can preserve differentiation potential or increase the efficiency of methods that induce differentiation. Mouse bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) were cultured in 3D as scaffold-free spheroids or "mesoid bodies" (MBs) and as aggregates on poly(lactic) acid microspheres (MB/MS). 3D cultures demonstrated viable cells, interaction on multiple planes, altered cell morphology, and the formation of structures similar to epithelial cell bridges. Cell proliferation was limited in suspension cultures of MB and MB/MS; however, cells regained proliferative capacity when transferred to flat substrates of tissue culture plates (TCPs). Expanded as monolayer, cells retained expression of Sca-1 and CD44 stem cell markers. 3D cultures demonstrated enhanced potential for adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation showing higher triglyceride accumulation and robust mineralization in comparison with TCP cultures. Enhanced and efficient adipogenesis was also observed in 3D cultures generated in a rotating cell culture system. Preservation of multilineage potential of BMSC was demonstrated in 5-azacytidine treatment of 3D cultures and TCP by expression of cardiac markers GATA4 and ACTA1 although functioning cardiomyocytes were not derived.

  19. Lipopolysaccharide-Activated Leukocytes Enhance Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Production in a Mouse Air-Pouch-Type Inflammation Model.

    PubMed

    Segawa, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Natsumi; Hatayama, Takahiro; Jiangxu, Dong; Hiratsuka, Masahiro; Endo, Yasuo; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2016-08-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a key cytokine that exacerbates allergic and fibrotic reactions. Several microbes and virus components have been shown to induce TSLP production, mainly in epithelial cells. TLR4 activators, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), induce TSLP production in vivo, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the contribution of LPS-activated leukocytes to the production of TSLP in a mouse air-pouch-type inflammation model. LPS induced the production of TSLP in this model but not in the mouse keratinocyte cell line PAM212. Transfer of the infiltrated leukocytes collected from an LPS-injected air pouch to the air pouch of another mouse enhanced TSLP production. Further, the LPS-activated leukocytes produced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β); a deficiency in these cytokines attenuated the LPS-induced production of TSLP. TSLP production was induced by TNF-α and enhanced by IL-1β and LPS in the PAM212 cells. These results demonstrated that TNF-α and IL-1β, which are partly produced by LPS-activated leukocytes, contribute to TSLP production via TLR4 activation in vivo.

  20. From The Cover: Induction of antiviral immunity requires Toll-like receptor signaling in both stromal and dendritic cell compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ayuko; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2004-11-01

    Pattern recognition by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) is known to be important for the induction of dendritic cell (DC) maturation. DCs, in turn, are critically important in the initiation of T cell responses. However, most viruses do not infect DCs. This recognition system poses a biological problem in ensuring that most viral infections be detected by pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, it is unknown what, if any, is the contribution of TLRs expressed by cells that are infected by a virus, versus TLRs expressed by DCs, in the initiation of antiviral adaptive immunity. Here we address these issues using a physiologically relevant model of mucosal infection with herpes simplex virus type 2. We demonstrate that innate immune recognition of viral infection occurs in two distinct stages, one at the level of the infected epithelial cells and the other at the level of the noninfected DCs. Importantly, both TLR-mediated recognition events are required for the induction of effector T cells. Our results demonstrate that virally infected tissues instruct DCs to initiate the appropriate class of effector T cell responses and reveal the critical importance of the stromal cells in detecting infectious agents through their own pattern recognition receptors. mucosal immunity | pattern recognition | viral infection

  1. Patient factors influencing the concentration of stromal vascular fraction (SVF) for adipose-derived stromal cell (ASC) therapy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Astor, Donniel E; Hoelzler, Michael G; Harman, Robert; Bastian, Richard P

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether patient factors influence the concentration of the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) in fat for adipose-derived stromal cell (ASC) therapy in dogs. A total of 1265 dogs underwent adipose collection surgeries by veterinarians for processing by the Vet-Stem laboratory and data on cell counts and patient factors were collected. Body condition score (BCS) and breed size did not significantly affect the viable cells per gram (VCPG) of adipose tissue that represents the viable SVF. Age significantly affected the VCPG, with dogs in age quartile 1 having a significantly higher VCPG than those in quartile 2 (P = 0.003) and quartile 4 (P = 0.002). Adipose tissue collected at the falciform location had significantly fewer VCPG than tissue collected at the thoracic wall and inguinal locations (P < 0.001). When the interaction of gender and location was evaluated, there were significantly fewer VCPG in tissue collected at the falciform location than at the thoracic wall and inguinal locations in female spayed dogs (P < 0.001) and male neutered dogs (P < 0.001), but not in female intact dogs (P = 0.743) or male intact dogs (P = 0.208). It was concluded that specific patient factors should be taken into consideration in order to obtain the maximal yield of VCPG from an adipose collection procedure.

  2. Mixed cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Clodoveo

    2008-01-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC), type II and type III, refers to the presence of circulating cryoprecipitable immune complexes in the serum and manifests clinically by a classical triad of purpura, weakness and arthralgias. It is considered to be a rare disorder, but its true prevalence remains unknown. The disease is more common in Southern Europe than in Northern Europe or Northern America. The prevalence of 'essential' MC is reported as approximately 1:100,000 (with a female-to-male ratio 3:1), but this term is now used to refer to a minority of MC patients only. MC is characterized by variable organ involvement including skin lesions (orthostatic purpura, ulcers), chronic hepatitis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, peripheral neuropathy, diffuse vasculitis, and, less frequently, interstitial lung involvement and endocrine disorders. Some patients may develop lymphatic and hepatic malignancies, usually as a late complication. MC may be associated with numerous infectious or immunological diseases. When isolated, MC may represent a distinct disease, the so-called 'essential' MC. The etiopathogenesis of MC is not completely understood. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is suggested to play a causative role, with the contribution of genetic and/or environmental factors. Moreover, MC may be associated with other infectious agents or immunological disorders, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or primary Sjögren's syndrome. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory findings. Circulating mixed cryoglobulins, low C4 levels and orthostatic skin purpura are the hallmarks of the disease. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis involving medium- and, more often, small-sized blood vessels is the typical pathological finding, easily detectable by means of skin biopsy of recent vasculitic lesions. Differential diagnoses include a wide range of systemic, infectious and neoplastic disorders, mainly autoimmune hepatitis, Sjögren's syndrome, polyarthritis, and B

  3. Focal epithelial hyperplasia: Heck disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, P R; Hebert, A A; Adler-Storthz, K

    1993-09-01

    Two sisters of Mexican ancestry had focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). The lesions on the oral mucosa of the older child were initially misinterpreted as representing sexual abuse. Microscopic evaluation of a hematoxylin and eosin-stained section from a lower lip papule demonstrated the histologic features of FEH. Although human papillomavirus (HPV) type 13 and HPV32 have been most consistently present in FEH lesions, types 6, 11, 13, and 32 were not detected in the paraffin-embedded tissue specimen of our patient using an in situ hybridization technique. The lesions persisted or recurred during management using destructive modalities; subsequently, they completely resolved spontaneously.

  4. Force transmission in epithelial tissues.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Claudia G; Martin, Adam C

    2016-03-01

    In epithelial tissues, cells constantly generate and transmit forces between each other. Forces generated by the actomyosin cytoskeleton regulate tissue shape and structure and also provide signals that influence cells' decisions to divide, die, or differentiate. Forces are transmitted across epithelia because cells are mechanically linked through junctional complexes, and forces can propagate through the cell cytoplasm. Here, we review some of the molecular mechanisms responsible for force generation, with a specific focus on the actomyosin cortex and adherens junctions. We then discuss evidence for how these mechanisms promote cell shape changes and force transmission in tissues.

  5. A rare ovarian tumor, leydig stromal cell tumor, presenting with virilization: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Hashemi, Forough

    2012-01-01

    Leydig stromal cell tumor is a rare ovarian tumor that belongs to the group of sex-cord stromal tumors. They produce testosterone leading to hyperandrogenism. We present a 41yr old woman with symptoms of virilization and a mass of right adenex via ultra Sonography, and a rise of total and free serum testosterone. An ovarian source of androgen was suspected and a surgery performed. A diagnosis of leydig-stromal cell tumor was confirmed. Our report is a reminder that although idiopathic hirsutism and other benign androgen excess disorder like Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOs) are common, ovarian mass should be considered in differential diagnosis. PMID:23482693

  6. Isolation of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Cryopreserved Human Umbilical Cord Tissue.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2016-02-01

    Umbilical cord stroma is an easily available, convenient, and promising source of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for regenerative medicine. Cryogenic storage of umbilical cord tissue provides more possibilities for further isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for autologous transplantation or scientific purposes. Here we developed a protocol for preparation of the whole umbilical cord tissue for cryogenic storage that in combination with the previously described modified method of isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells allowed us to isolate cells with high proliferative potential, typical phenotype, and preserved differentiation potencies.

  7. Confocal microscopy reveals persisting stromal changes after myopic photorefractive keratectomy in zero haze corneas

    PubMed Central

    Bohnke, M.; Thaer, A.; Schipper, I.

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—Micromorphological examination of the central cornea in myopic patients 8-43 months after excimer laser photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), using the slit scanning confocal microscope.
METHODS—Patients were selected from a larger cohort of individuals on the basis of full corneal clarity (haze grading 0 to +1; mean 0.3) and their willingness to participate in the study. 15 eyes of 10 patients with myopic PRK (−4 to −11 D; mean 6.7) and an uneventful postoperative interval of 8-43 months (mean 26) were examined. Contact lenses had been worn by eight of the 10 patients for 4-11 years (mean 6.7) before surgery. Controls included the five untreated fellow eyes of PRK patients, 10 healthy, age matched volunteers without a history of ocular inflammation or contact lens wear, and 20 patients who had worn rigid gas permeable (n=10) or soft contact lenses (n=10) for 2-11 years. Subjects were examined with a real time flying slit, scanning confocal microscope using ×25 and ×50 objectives.
RESULTS—In PRK treated patients and contact lens wearers, basal layer epithelial cells sporadically displayed enhanced reflectivity. The subepithelial nerve plexus was observed in all individuals, but was usually less well contrasted in the PRK group, owing to the presence of a very discrete layer of subepithelial scar tissue, which patchily enhanced background reflectivity. Within all layers of the stroma, two distinct types of abnormal reflective bodies were observed in all PRK treated eyes, but in none of the controls. One had the appearance of long (>= 50 µm), slender (2-8 µm in diameter) dimly reflective rods, which sometimes contained bright, punctate, crystal-like inclusions, arranged linearly and at irregular intervals. The other was shorter (<25 µm), more slender in form (<1 µm in diameter), and highly reflective; these so called needles were composed of crystal-like granules in linear array, with an individual appearance similar to the bright

  8. Zfp423 promotes adipogenic differentiation of bovine stromal vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Das, Arun Kr; Yang, Qi-Yuan; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Du, Min

    2012-01-01

    Intramuscular fat or marbling is critical for the palatability of beef. In mice, very recent studies show that adipocytes and fibroblasts share a common pool of progenitor cells, with Zinc finger protein 423 (Zfp423) as a key initiator of adipogenic differentiation. To evaluate the role of Zfp423 in intramuscular adipogenesis and marbling in beef cattle, we sampled beef muscle for separation of stromal vascular cells. These cells were immortalized with pCI neo-hEST2 and individual clones were selected by G418. A total of 288 clones (3×96 well plates) were isolated and induced to adipogenesis. The presence of adipocytes was assessed by Oil-Red-O staining. Three clones with high and low adipogenic potential respectively were selected for further analyses. In addition, fibro/adipogenic progenitor cells were selected using a surface marker, platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) α. The expression of Zfp423 was much higher (307.4±61.9%, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells, while transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was higher (156.1±48.7%, P<0.05) in low adipogenic cells. Following adipogenic differentiation, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) were much higher (239.4±84.1% and 310.7±138.4%, respectively, P<0.05) in high adipogenic cells. Over-expression of Zfp423 in stromal vascular cells and cloned low adipogenic cells dramatically increased their adipogenic differentiation, accompanied with the inhibition of TGF-β expression. Zfp423 knockdown by shRNA in high adipogenic cells largely prevented their adipogenic differentiation. The differential regulation of Zfp423 and TGF-β between low and high adipogenic cells is associated with the DNA methylation in their promoters. In conclusion, data show that Zfp423 is a critical regulator of adipogenesis in stromal vascular cells of bovine muscle, and Zfp423 may provide a molecular target for enhancing intramuscular adipogenesis

  9. A molecular classification of human mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Rohart, Florian; Mason, Elizabeth A.; Matigian, Nicholas; Mosbergen, Rowland; Korn, Othmar; Chen, Tyrone; Butcher, Suzanne; Patel, Jatin; Atkinson, Kerry; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash; Fisk, Nicholas M.; Lê Cao, Kim-Anh

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are widely used for the study of mesenchymal tissue repair, and increasingly adopted for cell therapy, despite the lack of consensus on the identity of these cells. In part this is due to the lack of specificity of MSC markers. Distinguishing MSC from other stromal cells such as fibroblasts is particularly difficult using standard analysis of surface proteins, and there is an urgent need for improved classification approaches. Transcriptome profiling is commonly used to describe and compare different cell types; however, efforts to identify specific markers of rare cellular subsets may be confounded by the small sample sizes of most studies. Consequently, it is difficult to derive reproducible, and therefore useful markers. We addressed the question of MSC classification with a large integrative analysis of many public MSC datasets. We derived a sparse classifier (The Rohart MSC test) that accurately distinguished MSC from non-MSC samples with >97% accuracy on an internal training set of 635 samples from 41 studies derived on 10 different microarray platforms. The classifier was validated on an external test set of 1,291 samples from 65 studies derived on 15 different platforms, with >95% accuracy. The genes that contribute to the MSC classifier formed a protein-interaction network that included known MSC markers. Further evidence of the relevance of this new MSC panel came from the high number of Mendelian disorders associated with mutations in more than 65% of the network. These result in mesenchymal defects, particularly impacting on skeletal growth and function. The Rohart MSC test is a simple in silico test that accurately discriminates MSC from fibroblasts, other adult stem/progenitor cell types or differentiated stromal cells. It has been implemented in the www.stemformatics.org resource, to assist researchers wishing to benchmark their own MSC datasets or data from the public domain. The code is available from the CRAN

  10. Chronic caffeine intake increases androgenic stimuli, epithelial cell proliferation and hyperplasia in rat ventral prostate

    PubMed Central

    Sarobo, Carolina; Lacorte, Lívia M; Martins, Marcela; Rinaldi, Jaqueline C; Moroz, Andrei; Scarano, Wellerson R; Delella, Flavia K; Felisbino, Sérgio L

    2012-01-01

    Coffee intake has been associated with a low risk of developing cancer, including prostate cancer, which is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. However, few studies have evaluated the chronic effects of caffeine, which is the most abundant methylxanthine in coffee, on prostate morphology and physiology. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic, low-dose caffeine intake on rat prostate morphology from puberty to adulthood. Five-week-old male Wistar rats were randomized into two experimental groups: caffeine-treated (20 ppm in drinking water, n = 12) and control (n = 12). The ventral and dorsolateral prostates were dissected, weighted and submitted to morphological, morphometrical and immunohistochemical analysis of cellular proliferation, apoptosis and androgen receptor (AR) tissue expression. The testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentrations were measured in the plasma. Our results show that caffeine intake increased the concentrations of T and DHT, organ weight, epithelial cell proliferation and AR tissue expression in the ventral prostatic lobe. All the ventral prostates from the caffeine-treated animals presented various degrees of epithelial and stromal hyperplasia. Our results suggest that chronic caffeine intake from puberty increases androgenic signalling and cell proliferation in the rat prostate gland and can be related to the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:23136995

  11. Hormonal regulation of H19 gene expression in prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Berteaux, N; Lottin, S; Adriaenssens, E; Van Coppenolle, F; Van Coppennolle, F; Leroy, X; Coll, J; Dugimont, T; Curgy, J-J

    2004-10-01

    The H19 gene is transcribed in an mRNA-like noncoding RNA. When tumors of various organs or cell types are considered, H19 oncogene or tumor-suppressor status remains controversial. To address the potential regulation of H19 gene expression by an androgen steroid hormone (DHT: dihydrotestosterone) or by a peptidic hormone (PRL: prolactin), we performed experiments in rats systemically treated with chemical mediators. This range of in vivo experiments demonstrated that chronic hyperprolactinemia upregulated the H19 expression in epithelial and stromal cells whereas DHT downregulated the gene. PRL and DHT appeared to be opposite mediators in the H19 RNA synthesis. We investigated these hormonal effects in three human prostate epithelial cell lines. In LNCaP cancer cells, the opposite effect of PRL and DHT was corroborated. However, in normal cells (PNT1A), H19 remained insensitive to the hormones in fetal calf serum (FCS) medium but became responsive in a serum-stripped medium. In the DU-145 cancer cell line, tested for its androgen-independence and aggressiveness, the hormones had no effect on H19 expression whatever the culture conditions. Finally, we demonstrated that PRL upregulated the H19 expression in LNCaP cells by the JAK2-STAT5 transduction pathway. We conclude that H19 expression is regulated by both a peptidic and a male steroid hormone.

  12. Reflectance spectroscopy for diagnosis of epithelial precancer: model-based analysis of fiber-optic probe designs to resolve spectral information from epithelium and stroma

    PubMed Central

    Arifler, Dizem; Schwarz, Richard A.; Chang, Sung K.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy is a promising technology for detection of epithelial precancer. Fiber-optic probes that selectively collect scattered light from both the epithelium and the underlying stroma are likely to improve diagnostic performance of in vivo reflectance spectroscopy by revealing diagnostic features unique to each layer. We present Monte Carlo models with which to evaluate fiber-optic probe geometries with respect to sampling depth and depth resolution. We propose a probe design that utilizes half-ball lens coupled source and detector fibers to isolate epithelial scattering from stromal scattering and hence to resolve spectral information from the two layers. The probe is extremely compact and can provide easy access to different organ sites. PMID:16045217

  13. Carcinosarcoma of parotid gland (malignant mixed tumor).

    PubMed

    Feng, Duan; Fidele, Nyimi Bushabu; Agustin, Mansthumba Milolo; Jian, Guan; Bourleyi, Sekele Isouradi; Augustin, Lamwe; Olivier, Ngueji Kakubu

    2015-01-01

    Salivary gland carcinosarcoma is a rare neoplasm; with a poor prognosis. The most common epithelial components are adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma, whereas the most common mesenchymal components are chondrosarcoma. It should not be confused with the most common carcinoma ex-pleomorphic adenoma, in which the epithelial component alone is malignant. This condition might exhibit with a wide variety of presentation and symptoms along with associated conditions. We present a case of an old patient who presented with a very unusual type clinically with confusing presentation which was eventually diagnosed as carsinosarcoma. In addition, the literature is reviewed, and the possible clinical signs and management of malignant mixed tumor of the salivary gland are briefly discussed.

  14. Macrophage-derived LIF and IL1B regulate alpha(1,2)fucosyltransferase 2 (Fut2) expression in mouse uterine epithelial cells during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Melinda J; Care, Alison S; Sullivan, Brad; Ingman, Wendy V; Aplin, John D; Robertson, Sarah A

    2011-01-01

    Macrophages accumulate within stromal tissue subjacent to the luminal epithelium in the mouse uterus during early pregnancy after seminal fluid exposure at coitus. To investigate their role in regulating epithelial cell expression of fucosylated structures required for embryo attachment and implantation, fucosyltransferase enzymes Fut1, Fut2 (Enzyme Commission number [EC] 2.4.1.69), and Fut4 (EC 2.4.1.214) and Muc1 and Muc4 mRNAs were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR in uterine epithelial cells after laser capture microdissection in situ or after epithelial cell coculture with macrophages or macrophage-secreted factors. When uterine macrophage recruitment was impaired by mating with seminal plasma-deficient males, epithelial cell Fut2 expression on Day 3.5 postcoitus (pc) was reduced compared to intact-mated controls. Epithelial cell Fut2 was upregulated in vitro by coculture with macrophages or macrophage-conditioned medium (MCM). Macrophage-derived cytokines LIF, IL1B, and IL12 replicated the effect of MCM on Fut2 mRNA expression, and MCM-stimulated expression was inhibited by anti-LIF and anti-IL1B neutralizing antibodies. The effects of acute macrophage depletion on fucosylated structures detected with lectins Ulex europaeus 1 (UEA-1) and Lotus tetragonolobus purpureas (LTP), or LewisX immunoreactivity, were quantified in vivo in Cd11b-dtr transgenic mice. Depletion of macrophages caused a 30% reduction in luminal epithelial UEA-1 staining and a 67% reduction in LewisX staining in uterine tissues of mice hormonally treated to mimic early pregnancy. Together, these data demonstrate that uterine epithelial Fut2 mRNA expression and terminal fucosylation of embryo attachment ligands is regulated in preparation for implantation by factors including LIF and IL1B secreted from macrophages recruited during the inflammatory response to insemination.

  15. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor in an XYY/XY male.

    PubMed

    Limacher, Jean-Marc; Girard-Lemaire, Françoise; Jeandidier, Eric; Chenard-Neu, Marie-Pierre; Kassem, Maysoun; Flori, Elisabeth; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre

    2002-03-01

    A 32-year-old patient was diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small bowel. The pathologic diagnosis was confirmed by positive immunochemistry against CD34, and against CD117, the tyrosine-kinase c-kit. We performed a karyotypic analysis on the basis of the patient's tall stature and speech difficulties. One hundred thirty-two metaphases were obtained on PHA-stimulated peripheral blood; 123 of them presented an extra chromosome Y. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a Y satellite III probe showed the presence of a sole copy of chromosome Y in the tumor cells precluding a direct relationship between the extra chromosome Y and the initiation of the tumor. This is, to our knowledge, the second occurrence of a nonhematologic malignancy reported in this genetic disorder. A review of the malignancies observed in men with the XYY constitution is presented.

  16. Mesenteric gastrointestinal stromal tumour presenting as intracranial space occupying lesion

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Tarun; Gunabushanam, Gowthaman; Malik, Monica; Goyal, Shikha; Das, Anup K; Julka, Pramod K; Rath, Goura K

    2006-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) usually present with non-specific gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal mass, pain, anorexia and bowel obstruction. Methods We report a case of a 42 year old male who presented with a solitary intracranial space occupying lesion which was established as a metastasis from a mesenteric tumour. Results The patient was initially treated as a metastatic sarcoma, but a lack of response to chemotherapy prompted testing for CD117 which returned positive. A diagnosis of mesenteric GIST presenting as solitary brain metastasis was made, and the patient was treated with imatinib. Conclusion We recommend that all sarcomas with either an intraabdominal or unknown origin be routinely tested for CD117 to rule out GIST. PMID:17105654

  17. Low Grade Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Reena; Batra, Swaraj; Ahmad, Ayesha; Elahi, Arifa Anwar; Gupta, Monika; Saith, Poonam

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcoma (ESS) is a rare malignant tumor of the endometrium, occurring in the age group of 40–50 years. We report a case of low-grade ESS in a 39-year-old woman, presenting as rapid enlargement of a uterine fibroid polyp associated with irregular and excessive vaginal bleeding. Polypectomy followed by pan hysterectomy was performed. Histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry confirmed LGESS. As the tumor is rarely encountered, management protocols are still questionable. In our case, we tried a different post-surgical protocol and the patient is being closely followed up. Although rare, ESS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of all women who present with a rapid enlargement of a uterine leiomyoma. PMID:25648534

  18. Stromal Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Damien A.; Buchanan, Grant

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer development and progression is the result of complex interactions between epithelia cells and fibroblasts/myofibroblasts, in a series of dynamic process amenable to regulation by hormones. Whilst androgen action through the androgen receptor (AR) is a well-established component of prostate cancer biology, it has been becoming increasingly apparent that changes in AR signalling in the surrounding stroma can dramatically influence tumour cell behavior. This is reflected in the consistent finding of a strong association between stromal AR expression and patient outcomes. In this review, we explore the relationship between AR signalling in fibroblasts/myofibroblasts and prostate cancer cells in the primary site, and detail the known functions, actions, and mechanisms of fibroblast AR signaling. We conclude with an evidence-based summary of how androgen action in stroma dramatically influences disease progression. PMID:28117763

  19. Paraneoplastic Hypoglycaemia: A Rare Manifestation of Pelvic Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Rahat; Mehrotra, Kiranpreet; Rastogi, Shivani; Masood, Shakeel

    2017-01-01

    Non-Islet Cell Tumour Induced Hypoglycaemia (NICTH), presenting with recurrent fasting hypoglycaemia is a very rare paraneoplastic syndrome. It usually presents with large metastatic mesenchymal tumours. NICTH secondary to Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) is even rarer. Diagnosis of NICTH is based on the low serum insulin level, low serum concentrations of Insulin Like Growth Factor (IGF-I) and IGF binding protein- III (IGFBP-III) in combination with elevated concentrations of pro-IGF-II. Various Immunohistochemical (IHC) markers are integral to diagnosis of GIST namely 2-deoxyglucose-6-phosphate phosphatase -1(DOG-1), Cluster Differentiation 34 (CD 34), Cluster Differentiation 117 (CD117). The management requires prompt intravenous hydration and glucose infusions followed by surgical resection. We hereby, report a rare case of a 65-year-old female with intractable fasting hypoglycaemia due to overproduction of "big" insulin-like growth factor II diagnosed to have pelvic GIST and managed by Steroids and Imatinib.

  20. Stromal-dependent tumor promotion by MIF family members

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Robert A.; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha

    2014-01-01

    Solid tumors are composed of a heterogeneous population of cells that interact with each other and with soluble and insoluble factors that, when combined, strongly influence the relative proliferation, differentiation, motility, matrix remodeling, metabolism and microvessel density of malignant lesions. One family of soluble factors that is becoming increasingly associated with pro-tumoral phenotypes within tumor microenvironments is that of the migration inhibitory factor family which includes its namesake, MIF, and its only known family member, D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT). This review seeks to highlight our current understanding of the relative contributions of a variety of immune and non-immune tumor stromal cell populations and, within those contexts, will summarize the literature associated with MIF and/or D-DT. PMID:25277536

  1. In vitro differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into endometrial epithelial cells in mouse: a proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Qing; Li, Bin; Wang, Yisheng; Zhang, Wenbi; Cheng, Mingjun; Wu, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Congjian

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) have been demonstrated to differentiate into female endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) in vivo. Our previous studies demonstrated that BMSCs can differentiate in the direction of EECs when co-cultured with endometrial stromal cells in vitro. Here, we obtain and analyse differential proteins and their relevant pathways in the process of BMSCs differentiating into EECs by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) proteomic analysis. Methods: A 0.4-μm pore size indirect co-culture system was established with female mice endometrial stromal cells (EStCs) restricted in the upper Transwell chamber and BMSCs in the lower well plate. After indirect co-culture for several days, the BMSCs were revealed to progressively differentiate towards EECs in vitro. Then, four groups were divided according to different co-culture days with single culture groups of BMSCs as controls. Proteins were detected using iTRAQ based on 2DLC-ESI-MS/MS and data were analysed by bioinformatics. Results: A total number of 311 proteins were detected, of which 210 proteins were identified with relative quantitation. Among them, 107 proteins were differentially expressed with a 1.2-fold change as the benchmark, with 61 up-regulated and 46 down-regulated proteins. Differential proteins CK19 and CK8 were epithelial markers and upregulated. Stromal marker vimentin were downregulated. Top canonical pathways was “remodeling of epithelial adhesions junctions” and “actin cytoskeleton signaling”. Top networks was “cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, tissue development and cellular movement” regulated by ERK/MAPK and α-catenin. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first preliminary study of differential protein expression in the differentiation process of BMSCs into EECs in vitro. We further elucidated BMSCs differentiated in the direction of EECs. In addition, ERK/MAPK and α-catenin played

  2. Isolating stromal stem cells from periodontal granulation tissues.

    PubMed

    Hung, Tzu-Yuan; Lin, Hsiang-Chun; Chan, Ying-Jen; Yuan, Kuo

    2012-08-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising area in regenerative medicine. Periodontal granulation tissues are often discarded during conventional surgery. If stromal stem cells can be isolated from these tissues, they can be used for subsequent surgery on the same patient. Fifteen human periodontal granulation tissue samples were obtained from intrabony defects during surgery. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was carried out on five of the samples to identify STRO-1, a marker of mesenchymal stem cells. Five samples underwent flow cytometry analysis for the same marker. The remaining five samples were characterized by "colony formation unit-fibroblast" (CFU-f) assay and selected for proliferation assay, flow cytometry of stem cell markers, immunocytochemistry (ICC), multipotent differentiation assays, and repairing critical-size defects in mice. The ratio of STRO-1(+) cells detected by IHC was 5.91 ± 1.50%. The analysis of flow cytometry for STRO-1 was 6.70 ± 0.81%. Approximately two thirds of the CFU-f colonies had a strong reaction to STRO-1 in ICC staining. The cells were multipotent both in vitro and in vivo. Mice given bone grafts and stem cells showed significantly better bone healing than those without stem cells. Multipotent stromal stem cells can be isolated from human periodontal granulation tissues. These cells improve new bone formation when transplanted in mouse calvarial defects. Isolating stem cells from relatively accessible sites without extra procedures is clinically advantageous. This study demonstrated that human periodontal granulation tissues contain isolatable multipotent stem cells. The cells may be a good source for autotransplantation in subsequent treatment.

  3. Inverse-power-law behavior of cellular motility reveals stromal–epithelial cell interactions in 3D co-culture by OCT fluctuation spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Amy L.; Yu, Xiao; Gilliss, Thomas; Alabi, Oluwafemi; Taylor, Russell M.; Troester, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    The progression of breast cancer is known to be affected by stromal cells within the local microenvironment. Here we study the effect of stromal fibroblasts on the in-place motions (motility) of mammary epithelial cells within organoids in 3D co-culture, inferred from the speckle fluctuation spectrum using optical coherence tomography (OCT). In contrast to Brownian motion, mammary cell motions exhibit an inverse power-law fluctuation spectrum. We introduce two complementary metrics for quantifying fluctuation spectra: the power-law exponent and a novel definition of the motility amplitude, both of which are signal- and position-independent. We find that the power-law exponent and motility amplitude are positively (p<0.001) and negatively (p<0.01) correlated with the density of stromal cells in 3D co-culture, respectively. We also show how the hyperspectral data can be visualized using these metrics to observe heterogeneity within organoids. This constitutes a simple and powerful tool for detecting and imaging cellular functional changes with OCT. PMID:26973862

  4. Epithelialization in Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie C.; Ramirez, Horacio; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Sawaya, Andrew; Patel, Shailee B.; Khalid, Laiqua; Isseroff, Rivkah R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Keratinocytes, a major cellular component of the epidermis, are responsible for restoring the epidermis after injury through a process termed epithelialization. This review will focus on the pivotal role of keratinocytes in epithelialization, including cellular processes and mechanisms of their regulation during re-epithelialization, and their cross talk with other cell types participating in wound healing. Recent Advances: Discoveries in epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte immune function, and the role of the epidermis as an independent neuroendocrine organ will be reviewed. Novel mechanisms of gene expression regulation important for re-epithelialization, including microRNAs and histone modifications, will also be discussed. Critical Issues: Epithelialization is an essential component of wound healing used as a defining parameter of a successful wound closure. A wound cannot be considered healed in the absence of re-epithelialization. The epithelialization process is impaired in all types of chronic wounds. Future Directions: A comprehensive understanding of the epithelialization process will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to promote wound closure. PMID:25032064

  5. Epithelialization in Wound Healing: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Pastar, Irena; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Yin, Natalie C; Ramirez, Horacio; Nusbaum, Aron G; Sawaya, Andrew; Patel, Shailee B; Khalid, Laiqua; Isseroff, Rivkah R; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-07-01

    Significance: Keratinocytes, a major cellular component of the epidermis, are responsible for restoring the epidermis after injury through a process termed epithelialization. This review will focus on the pivotal role of keratinocytes in epithelialization, including cellular processes and mechanisms of their regulation during re-epithelialization, and their cross talk with other cell types participating in wound healing. Recent Advances: Discoveries in epidermal stem cells, keratinocyte immune function, and the role of the epidermis as an independent neuroendocrine organ will be reviewed. Novel mechanisms of gene expression regulation important for re-epithelialization, including microRNAs and histone modifications, will also be discussed. Critical Issues: Epithelialization is an essential component of wound healing used as a defining parameter of a successful wound closure. A wound cannot be considered healed in the absence of re-epithelialization. The epithelialization process is impaired in all types of chronic wounds. Future Directions: A comprehensive understanding of the epithelialization process will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches to promote wound closure.

  6. Architectural Analysis of Picrosirius Red Stained Collagen in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma using Polarization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rashi; Rehani, Shweta; Mehendiratta, Monica; Kumra, Madhumani; Mathias, Yulia; Yadav, Jyoti; Sahay, Khushboo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Collagen degradation is important both for carcinogenesis and in its progression. Research regarding the co-relation of collagen with Oral Epithelial Dysplasia (OED) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) is less explored. Aim To elucidate the nature of collagen in Oral Epithelial Dysplasia (OED) and Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) using Picrosirius Red Stain (PSR) under polarizing microscopy. Materials and Methods The study consisted of a total 40 samples which were divided into three groups. Group I included buccal mucosa as negative and irritation fibroma as positive control, group II consisted of OED and group III consisted of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). A histochemical analysis was conducted using PSR-polarization method by two independent observers. Results The control group shows predominantly reddish–orange birefringence. In OED with the advancement of grades, the colour changed from yellowish-orange colour to yellow-greenish with progressive increase in greenish hue. As OSCC regresses from well to poorly differentiated, the colour changed from reddish-orange to yellowish orange to greenish-yellow suggesting a transition from mature to immature collagen. Conclusion An observable gradual change in collagen of both OED and OSCC was noted as they were proceeding from benign to critical step. Thus, PSR is a useful tool for studying stromal changes as supporting collagen shows the transition in the form besides the alterations in epithelial cells. PMID:26816897

  7. Expression of epithelial cell-derived cytokine genes in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with chronic enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    OSADA, Hironari; OGAWA, Misato; HASEGAWA, Ayana; NAGAI, Makoto; SHIRAI, Junsuke; SASAKI, Kazuaki; SHIMODA, Minoru; ITOH, Hiroshi; KONDO, Hirotaka; OHMORI, Keitaro

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear whether epithelial cell-derived cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), contribute to development of canine chronic enteropathy (CE), which includes antibiotic-responsive enteropathy (ARE), food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, we examined mRNA expression of il-25, il-33 and tslp in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with ARE, FRE and IBD. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of il-33 was significantly lower in the duodenum in dogs with FRE than in healthy dogs. The results suggest that epithelial cell-derived cytokines may not be an inducer of Th2-type immunity in the gut of dogs with CE, and decreased expression of IL-33 may be involved in induction of FRE. Further studies are required to clarify roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines, especially IL-33, in the pathogenesis of canine CE. PMID:28049868

  8. Expression of epithelial cell-derived cytokine genes in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with chronic enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hironari; Ogawa, Misato; Hasegawa, Ayana; Nagai, Makoto; Shirai, Junsuke; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Minoru; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kondo, Hirotaka; Ohmori, Keitaro

    2017-02-28

    It remains unclear whether epithelial cell-derived cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-25, IL-33 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), contribute to development of canine chronic enteropathy (CE), which includes antibiotic-responsive enteropathy (ARE), food-responsive enteropathy (FRE) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the present study, we examined mRNA expression of il-25, il-33 and tslp in the duodenal and colonic mucosae of dogs with ARE, FRE and IBD. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that mRNA expression of il-33 was significantly lower in the duodenum in dogs with FRE than in healthy dogs. The results suggest that epithelial cell-derived cytokines may not be an inducer of Th2-type immunity in the gut of dogs with CE, and decreased expression of IL-33 may be involved in induction of FRE. Further studies are required to clarify roles of epithelial cell-derived cytokines, especially IL-33, in the pathogenesis of canine CE.

  9. CCN1 induces a reversible epithelial-mesenchymal transition in gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chai, Jianyuan; Norng, Manith; Modak, Cristina; Reavis, Kevin M; Mouazzen, Wasim; Pham, Jennifer

    2010-08-01

    CCN1 is a matricellular protein that activates many genes related to wound healing and tissue remodeling in fibroblasts, but its effect on epithelial cells remains unclear. This study examined the role of CCN1 in epithelial wound healing using rat gastric epithelial cells and rat stomach ulcer as in vitro and in vivo models, respectively. We found that CCN1 expression is highly upregulated in the epithelial cells adjacent to a wound and remains high until the wound is healed. Upregulation of CCN1 activates a transient epithelial-mesenchymal transition in the epithelial cells at the migrating front and drives wound closure. Once the wound is healed, these epithelial cells and their progeny can resume their original epithelial phenotype. We also found that CCN1-induced E-cadherin loss is not due to transcriptional regulation but rather protein degradation due to the collapse of adherens junctions, which is contributed by beta-catenin translocation. CCN1-activated integrin-linked kinase mediates this process. Finally, our in vivo study showed that locally neutralizing CCN1 drastically impairs wound closure, whereas local injection of recombinant CCN1 protein induces expression of vimentin and smooth muscle alpha-actin in normal gastric mucosal epithelial cells and accelerates re-epithelialization during ulcer healing. In conclusion, our study indicates that CCN1 can induce reversible epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and this feature may have great value for clinical wound healing.

  10. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma or Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma

  11. Optimized Protocol for Isolation of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Human Umbilical Cord.

    PubMed

    Romanov, Yu A; Balashova, E E; Volgina, N E; Kabaeva, N V; Dugina, T N; Sukhikh, G T

    2015-11-01

    Extraembryonic tissues, in particular, umbilical cord stroma are promising sources of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells for regenerative medicine. In recent years, methods for isolation of mesenchymal stromal cells from different compartments of the umbilical cords based on enzymatic disaggregation of the tissue or on tissue explants have been proposed. Here we propose a protocol of isolation of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells from the whole umbilical cord that combines the advantages of each approach and ensures sufficient cell yield for further experimental and clinical applications. A combination of short-term incubation of tissue fragments on cold collagenase solution followed by their culturing in the form of explants significantly increased the yield of cells with high proliferative activity, typical pluripotent mesenchymal stromal cell phenotype, and preserved differentiation capacity.

  12. Infection Programs Sustained Lymphoid Stromal Cell Responses and Shapes Lymph Node Remodeling upon Secondary Challenge.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Julia L; Walter, Anne; Alexandre, Yannick O; Hor, Jyh Liang; Liu, Ruijie; Ma, Joel Z; Devi, Sapna; Tokuda, Nobuko; Owada, Yuji; Mackay, Laura K; Smyth, Gordon K; Heath, William R; Mueller, Scott N

    2017-01-10

    Lymph nodes (LNs) are constructed of intricate networks of endothelial and mesenchymal stromal cells. How these lymphoid stromal cells (LSCs) regulate lymphoid tissue remodeling and contribute to immune responses remains poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive functional and transcriptional analysis of LSC responses to skin viral infection and found that LSC subsets responded robustly, with different kinetics for distinct pathogens. Recruitment of cells to inflamed LNs induced LSC expansion, while B cells sustained stromal responses in an antigen-independent manner. Infection induced rapid transcriptional responses in LSCs. This transcriptional program was transient, returning to homeostasis within 1 month of infection, yet expanded fibroblastic reticular cell networks persisted for more than 3 months after infection, and this altered LN composition reduced the magnitude of LSC responses to subsequent heterologous infection. Our results reveal the complexity of LSC responses during infection and suggest that amplified networks of LN stromal cells support successive immune responses.

  13. Stromal-cell and cancer-cell exosomes leading the metastatic exodus for the promised niche.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-06-18

    Exosomes are thought to play an important role in metastasis. Luga and colleagues have described the production of exosomes by stromal cells such as cancer-associated fibroblasts that are taken up by breast cancer cells and are then loaded with Wnt 11, which is associated with stimulation of the invasiveness and metastasis of the breast cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that exosomes produced by breast cancer cells are taken up by stromal fibroblasts and other stromal cells, suggesting that exosomes are agents of cross-talk between cancer and stromal cells to stimulate metastasis. Imaging of exosomes by labeling with fluorescent proteins will enlighten the process by which exosomes enhance metastasis, including premetastatic niche formation.

  14. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells

    PubMed Central

    Coffelt, Seth B.; Marini, Frank C.; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; LaMarca, Heather L.; Tomchuck, Suzanne L.; zu Bentrup, Kerstin Honer; Danka, Elizabeth S.; Henkle, Sarah L.; Scandurro, Aline B.

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells. PMID:19234121

  15. The pro-inflammatory peptide LL-37 promotes ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Seth B; Marini, Frank C; Watson, Keri; Zwezdaryk, Kevin J; Dembinski, Jennifer L; LaMarca, Heather L; Tomchuck, Suzanne L; Honer zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Danka, Elizabeth S; Henkle, Sarah L; Scandurro, Aline B

    2009-03-10

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been shown to engraft into the stroma of several tumor types, where they contribute to tumor progression and metastasis. However, the chemotactic signals mediating MSC migration to tumors remain poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that LL-37 (leucine, leucine-37), the C-terminal peptide of human cationic antimicrobial protein 18, stimulates the migration of various cell types and is overexpressed in ovarian, breast, and lung cancers. Although there is evidence to support a pro-tumorigenic role for LL-37, the function of the peptide in tumors remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that neutralization of LL-37 in vivo significantly reduces the engraftment of MSCs into ovarian tumor xenografts, resulting in inhibition of tumor growth as well as disruption of the fibrovascular network. Migration and invasion experiments conducted in vitro indicated that the LL-37-mediated migration of MSCs to tumors likely occurs through formyl peptide receptor like-1. To assess the response of MSCs to the LL-37-rich tumor microenvironment, conditioned medium from LL-37-treated MSCs was assessed and found to contain increased levels of several cytokines and pro-angiogenic factors compared with controls, including IL-1 receptor antagonist, IL-6, IL-10, CCL5, VEGF, and matrix metalloproteinase-2. Similarly, Matrigel mixed with LL-37, MSCs, or the combination of the two resulted in a significant number of vascular channels in nude mice. These data indicate that LL-37 facilitates ovarian tumor progression through recruitment of progenitor cell populations to serve as pro-angiogenic factor-expressing tumor stromal cells.

  16. Clinicopathologic study of 275 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the experience at 3 large medical centers in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Vázquez, Gonzálo; Sierra Santiesteban, Francisca I; Hernández-Hernández, Dulce Ma; Pompa, Angel Zavala

    2007-02-01

    It is important to distinguish gastrointestinal (GI) stromal tumors (GISTs) from other GI mesenchymal tumors (GIMTs) because of the availability of molecular-targeted therapy for GISTs. The aim of the study was to reclassify GIMTs and to determine the clinicopathologic features of GISTs in Mexico. Cases of GIMT identified from the database of 3 large diagnostic centers in Mexico between 1995 and 2004 were reclassified according to current criteria. Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections and clinical histories were reviewed, and immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-CD117, CD34, smooth muscle actin, and S-100 protein. A total of 275 GISTs were identified. The tumors were located in the stomach (40%), small intestine (35%), colorectum (12%), abdominal cavity (11%), and esophagus (2%). There were equal numbers of men and women with a mean age at diagnosis of 61 years. The tumors ranged in size from 3.5 to 34 cm (mean, 9.1 cm); 95 tumors (34%) were larger than 10 cm. Colorectal and omental tumors were the largest. The cell types included pure spindle (68%), pure epithelioid (16%), and mixed epithelioid/spindle (14%). Whereas 17.8% of tumors were regarded as low risk, 43% of tumors were in the high-risk category. CD117 positivity was detected in most of the tumors (96%). In addition to CD117, 255 cases (92%) were positive for CD34, 82 cases (32%) were positive for smooth muscle actin, and 13 cases (4.7%) were positive for desmin. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors in Mexico have the same clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical features as those reported in other countries. It is not always easy to distinguish GISTs from other soft tissue lesions. The diagnosis can be difficult even for experienced pathologists.

  17. Characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumours, diagnostic procedure and therapeutic management and main directions of nursing practice in gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Głuszek, Stanisław; Kozieł, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) constitute a separate group of mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. They have been commonly recognized for a few years, they have created a new problem in medical practice. GIST are more often centred in the stomach. They equally affect female and male patients and occur mainly in patients older than 50 years of age. The clinical picture of the tumour is non-specific. Radical surgical treatment and molecularly targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors are used in GIST treatment. Nursing practice with reference to GIST danger is connected with biopsychosocial interventions of perioperative, oncological and palliative procedures and involves the area of health education mainly oriented towards shaping preventive procedures which favour early disease detection and support therapy and recovery. PMID:25784835

  18. Bioenergetics of Stromal Cells As a Predictor of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    1 AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0255 TITLE: BIOENERGETICS OF STROMAL CELLS AS A PREDICTOR OF AGGRESSIVE PROSTATE CANCER...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Bioenergetics Of Stromal Cells As A Predictor Of Aggressive Prostate Cancer” 5b. GRANT NUMBER...form and rapidly falls below the normal as they become aggressive in prostate tumorigenesis. We have validated this in five prostate cancer cell

  19. [A rare case of bone metastasis from gastro-intestinal stromal tumour: place of radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Heymann, S; Imperiale, A; Schlund-Schoettel, E; Sauer, B; Dourthe, L-M

    2014-01-01

    Gastro-intestinal stromal tumours are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Their usual metastatic sites are the liver and the peritoneum, but gastro-intestinal stromal tumours rarely metastasize to the bones. We report the case of a 56-year-old male presenting with bone lesions six years after initial surgical resection. We discuss through this paper the possibilities of management of these lesions and the place of radiotherapy.

  20. The effect of autologous bone marrow stromal cells differentiated on scaffolds for canine tibial bone reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Özdal-Kurt, F; Tuğlu, I; Vatansever, H S; Tong, S; Deliloğlu-Gürhan, S I

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow contains mesenchymal stem cells that form many tissues. Various scaffolds are available for bone reconstruction by tissue engineering. Osteoblastic differentiated bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) promote osteogenesis on scaffolds and stimulate bone regeneration. We investigated the use of cultured autologous BMSC on different scaffolds for healing defects in tibias of adult male canines. BMSC were isolated from canine humerus bone marrow, differentiated into osteoblasts in culture and loaded onto porous ceramic scaffolds including hydroxyapatite 1, hydroxyapatite gel and calcium phosphate. Osteoblast differentiation was verified by osteonectine and osteocalcine immunocytochemistry. The scaffolds with stromal cells were implanted in the tibial defect. Scaffolds without stromal cells were used as controls. Sections from the defects were processed for histological, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical and histomorphometric analyses to analyze the healing of the defects. BMSC were spread, allowed to proliferate and differentiate to osteoblasts as shown by alizarin red histochemistry, and osteocalcine and osteonectine immunostaining. Scanning electron microscopy showed that BMSC on the scaffolds were more active and adhesive to the calcium phosphate scaffold compared to the others. Macroscopic bone formation was observed in all groups, but scaffolds with stromal cells produced significantly better results. Bone healing occurred earlier and faster with stromal cells on the calcium phosphate scaffold and produced more callus compared to other scaffolds. Tissue healing and osteoblastic marker expression also were better with stromal cells on the scaffolds. Increased trabecula formation, cell density and decreased fibrosis were observed in the calcium phosphate scaffold with stromal cells. Autologous cultured stromal cells on the scaffolds were useful for healing of canine tibial bone defects. The calcium phosphate scaffold was the best for both cell

  1. Stromal prostatic sarcoma: a rare tumor with rare clinical and imaging presentation

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Jiménez, Anamaría; Otero-Garcia, Milagros; Mateos-Martin, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Adult prostatic stromal sarcoma is a rare malignant tumor. The main presenting symptom is urinary retention secondary to bladder outlet obstruction. Prostatic Specific Antigen level can be normal. Imaging features show a prostate mass with or without pelvic organ invasion depending on the aggressiveness of the tumor. We present a patient with prostatic stromal sarcoma who debuted with urinary obstruction, leukocytosis and neutrophilia, prostate enlargement, and hypodense prostate areas on CT images, simulating prostatitis with abscess formation. PMID:24421945

  2. Glandular epithelial AR inactivation enhances PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaesung Peter; Zheng, Yu; Handelsman, David J; Simanainen, Ulla

    2016-05-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletion induces uterine pathology, whereas androgen actions via androgen receptor (AR) support uterine growth and therefore may modify uterine cancer risk. We hypothesized that the androgen actions mediated via uterine glandular epithelial AR could modify PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology. To test our hypothesis, we developed uterine glandular epithelium-specific PTEN and/or AR knockout mouse models comparing the uterine pathology among wild-type (WT), glandular epithelium-specific AR inactivation (ugeARKO), PTEN deletion (ugePTENKO), and the combined PTEN and AR knockout (ugePTENARKO) female mice. The double knockout restricted to glandular epithelium showed that AR inactivation enhanced PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology with development of intraepithelial neoplasia by 20 weeks of age. In ugePTENARKO, 6/10 (60%) developed intraepithelial neoplasia, whereas 3/10 (30%) developed only glandular hyperplasia in ugePTENKO uterus. No uterine pathology was observed in WT (n=8) and ugeARKO (n=7) uteri. Uterine weight was significantly (P=0.002) increased in ugePTENARKO (374±97 mg (mean±s.e.)) compared with WT (97±6 mg), ugeARKO (94±12 mg), and ugePTENKO (205±33 mg). Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and P-AKT expression was modified by uterine pathology but did not differ between ugePTENKO and ugePTENARKO, suggesting that its expressions are not directly affected by androgens. However, progesterone receptor (PR) expression was reduced in ugePTENARKO compared to ugePTENKO uterus, suggesting that PR expression could be regulated by glandular epithelial AR inactivation. In conclusion, glandular epithelial AR inactivation (with persistent stromal AR action) enhanced PTEN deletion-induced uterine pathology possibly by downregulating PR expression in the uterus.

  3. Stromal cell migration precedes hemopoietic repopulation of the bone marrow after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Werts, E.D.; Gibson, D.P.; Knapp, S.A.; DeGowin, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Circulation of hemopoietic stem cells into an irradiated site has been thoroughly documented, but migration of stromal cells to repair radiation damage has not. We determined the radiosensitivity of mouse bone marrow stroma and evaluated stromal and hemopoietic repopulation in x-irradiated marrow. The D/sub 0/ for growth of colonies of marrow stromal cells (MSC) was 215 to 230 rad. Total-body irradiation (TB) obliterated marrow stromal and hemopoietic cells within 3 days. In contrast, 1 day after 1000 rad leg irradiation (LI), MSC rose to 80% of normal, but fell to 34% by 3 days and recovered to 72% by 30 days. However, femoral nucleated cells diminished to 20% by 3 days and recovered to 74% of normal by 30 days. Likewise, differentiated marrow cells and hemopoietic stem cells were initially depleted. With 1000 rad LI followed 3 h later by 1000 rad to the body while shielding the leg, MSC and femoral nucleated cells recovered to values intermediate between 1000 rad TB and 1000 rad LI. We concluded that: (1) the D/sub 0/ for MSC was 215 to 230 rad, (2) stromal repopulation preceded hemopoietic recovery, and (3) immigration of stromal cells from an unirradiated sanctuary facilitated hemopoietic repopulation of a heavily irradiated site.

  4. Controlling herpetic stromal keratitis by modulating lymphotoxin-alpha-mediated inflammatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Veiga-Parga, Tamara; Giménez, Fernanda; Mulik, Sachin; Chiang, Eugene Y; Grogan, Jane L; Rouse, Barry T

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 infection of the eye can result in stromal keratitis, a chronic immunoinflammatory lesion that is a significant cause of human blindness. A key to controlling the severity of lesions is to identify cellular and molecular events responsible for tissue damage. This report evaluates the role of lymphotoxin-α, a proinflammatory cytokine that could be involved during stromal keratitis. We demonstrate that after infection, both lymphotoxin-α and lymphotoxin-β transcripts are detectable at high levels 48 h postinfection, suggesting roles for the secreted homotrimer lymphotoxin-α3 and the membrane-bound lymphotoxin-α1β2 heterotrimer in stromal keratitis. Using a corneal stromal fibroblast cell line, lymphotoxin-α3 and lymphotoxin-α1β2 were found to have proinflammatory roles by stimulating production of chemokines. Treatment of mice with a depleting anti-lymphotoxin-α mAb during the clinical phase of the disease significantly attenuated stromal keratitis lesions. In treated mice, expression of proinflammatory molecules and chemokines was reduced, as were numbers of cornea-infiltrating proinflammatory cells, particularly Th1 cells. The protective effect of anti-lymphotoxin-α mAb was highly reduced with a mutant version of the mAb that lacks Fc receptor binding activity, indicating that depletion of lymphotoxin-expressing cells was mainly responsible for efficacy, with LT-α3 contributing minimally to inflammation. These data demonstrate that lymphotoxin-expressing cells, such as Th1 cells, mediate stromal keratitis.

  5. Inflammation, Innate Immunity, and the Intestinal Stromal Cell Niche: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Benjamin M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Stromal cells of multiple tissues contribute to immune-mediated protective responses and, conversely, the pathological tissue changes associated with chronic inflammatory disease. However, unlike hematopoietic immune cells, tissue stromal cell populations remain poorly characterized with respect to specific surface marker expression, their ontogeny, self-renewal, and proliferative capacity within tissues and the extent to which they undergo phenotypic immunological changes during the course of an infectious or inflammatory insult. Extending our knowledge of the immunological features of stromal cells provides an exciting opportunity to further dissect the underlying biology of many important immune-mediated diseases, although several challenges remain in bringing the emerging field of stromal immunology to equivalence with the study of the hematopoietic immune cell compartment. This review highlights recent studies that have begun unraveling the complexity of tissue stromal cell function in immune responses, with a focus on the intestine, and proposes strategies for the development of the field to uncover the great potential for stromal immunology to contribute to our understanding of the fundamental pathophysiology of disease, and the opening of new therapeutic avenues in multiple chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:26150817

  6. CollagenVI-Cre mice: A new tool to target stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs

    PubMed Central

    Prados, Alejandro; Kollias, George; Koliaraki, Vasiliki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells in secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are non-hematopoietic cells involved in the regulation of adaptive immune responses. Three major stromal populations have been identified in adult SLOs: fibroblastic reticular cells (FRCs), follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and marginal reticular cells (MRCs). The properties of these individual populations are not clearly defined, mainly due to the lack of appropriate genetic tools, especially for MRCs. Here, we analyzed stromal cell targeting in SLOs from a transgenic mouse strain that expresses Cre recombinase under the CollagenVI promoter, using lineage tracing approaches. We show that these mice target specifically MRCs and FDCs, but not FRCs in Peyer’s patches and isolated lymphoid follicles in the intestine. In contrast, stromal cells in lymph nodes and the spleen do not express the transgene, which renders ColVI-cre mice ideal for the specific targeting of stromal cells in the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT). This funding further supports the hypothesis of organ-specific stromal precursors in SLOs. Interestingly, in all tissues analyzed, there was also high specificity for perivascular cells, which have been proposed to act as FDC precursors. Taken together, ColVI-Cre mice are a useful new tool for the dissection of MRC- and FDC-specific functions and plasticity in the GALT. PMID:27604178

  7. Stromal p16 expression is significantly increased in malignant ovarian neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Nara; Yoon, Gun; Park, Cheol Keun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in p16 protein expression have been reported to be associated with tumor development and progression. However, p16 expression status in the peritumoral stroma has been rarely investigated. We investigated the stromal p16 expression in ovarian neoplasms using immunohistochemistry, and differences in the expression status depending on the degree of malignancy and histological type were analyzed. This study included 24, 21, and 46 cases of benign, borderline, and malignant ovarian lesions, respectively, of which 29, 25, and 32 cases were serous, mucinous, and endometriosis-associated lesions. Most benign lesions showed negative or weak expression, whereas borderline lesions showed focal, moderate expression. Malignant lesions showed markedly elevated stromal p16 expression compared with benign or borderline lesions. There were significant differences in stromal p16 expression between benign and borderline lesions (P < 0.001) and between borderline and malignant lesions (P < 0.001). These significances remained when analysis was performed based on lesion classification as serous, mucinous, and endometriosis-associated. In contrast, differences in stromal p16 expression among the histological types were not significant. Stromal p16 expression in ovarian neoplasms was absent or weak in benign and focal, moderate in borderline lesions, whereas malignant lesions exhibited diffuse, moderate-to-strong p16 immunoreactivity. Our observations suggest that stromal p16 expression is involved in the development of ovarian carcinoma. Further studies are necessary to confirm our preliminary results. PMID:27572321

  8. Paracrine effects of uterine leucocytes on gene expression of human uterine stromal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Germeyer, Ariane; Sharkey, Andrew Mark; Prasadajudio, Mirari; Sherwin, Robert; Moffett, Ashley; Bieback, Karen; Clausmeyer, Susanne; Masters, Leanne; Popovici, Roxana Maria; Hess, Alexandra Petra; Strowitzki, Thomas; von Wolff, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The endometrium contains a distinct population of immune cells that undergo cyclic changes during the menstrual cycle and implantation. The majority of these leucocytes are uterine NK (uNK) cells, however how these cells interact with uterine stromal fibroblasts remains unclear. We therefore investigated the paracrine effect of medium conditioned by uterine decidual leucocytes (which are enriched for uNK cells) on the gene expression profile of endometrial stromal fibroblasts in vitro using a cDNA microarray. Our results, verified by real-time PCR, ELISA and FACS analysis, reveal that soluble factors from uterine leucocytes substantially alter endometrial stromal fibroblast gene expression. The largest group of up-regulated genes found was chemokines and cytokines. These include IL-8, CCL8 and CXCL1, which have also been shown to be stimulated by contact of stromal fibroblasts with trophoblast, suggesting that uNK cells work synergistically to support trophoblast migration during implantation. The decidual leucocytes also up-regulated IL-15 and IL-15Ralpha in stromal fibroblasts which could produce a niche for uNK cells allowing proliferation within and recruitment into the uterus, as seen in bone marrow. Overall this study demonstrates, for the first time, the paracrine communication between uterine leucocytes and uterine stromal fibroblasts, and adds to the understanding of how the uterine immune system contributes to the changes seen within the cycling endometrium.

  9. Stromal p16 expression is significantly increased in malignant ovarian neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Nara; Yoon, Gun; Park, Cheol Keun; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-10-04

    Alterations in p16 protein expression have been reported to be associated with tumor development and progression. However, p16 expression status in the peritumoral stroma has been rarely investigated. We investigated the stromal p16 expression in ovarian neoplasms using immunohistochemistry, and differences in the expression status depending on the degree of malignancy and histological type were analyzed. This study included 24, 21, and 46 cases of benign, borderline, and malignant ovarian lesions, respectively, of which 29, 25, and 32 cases were serous, mucinous, and endometriosis-associated lesions. Most benign lesions showed negative or weak expression, whereas borderline lesions showed focal, moderate expression. Malignant lesions showed markedly elevated stromal p16 expression compared with benign or borderline lesions. There were signific