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Sample records for mixed lipid layers

  1. Debye-Hückel theory of mixed charged-zwitterionic lipid layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengistu, D. H.; May, S.

    2008-07-01

    Modeling electrostatic properties of macroions such as charged lipid membranes is especially simple within linear Debye-Hückel theory where analytical solutions are often available. Charged lipid layers typically also contain zwitterionic lipids that possess a large headgroup dipole. We incorporate the presence of zwitterionic lipids into the Debye-Hückel description and derive analytical expressions for the free energies of isolated and interacting lipid layers. Our approach accounts for two major characteristic features of zwitterionic lipids, the firm linkage of the dipole's negatively charged phosphate end to the lipid chain and the comparatively large conformational freedom of the opposite, positively charged, dipole end. This leads to differences in structural properties of mixed anionic and cationic lipid layers that are known from experiment and that the Debye-Hückel description qualitatively recovers. Most notably, this includes the different dependencies of the average cross-sectional area per lipid on the composition of mixed anionic and cationic membranes. In addition, we study the predictions of Debye-Hückel theory regarding the electrostatic influence of zwitterionic lipids on the stability of non-ideally mixed membranes as well as on the adsorption energy of oppositely charged macroions.

  2. Stability and phase separation in mixed monopolar lipid/bolalipid layers.

    PubMed

    Longo, Gabriel S; Thompson, David H; Szleifer, I

    2007-10-15

    The phase stability of a fluid lipid layer that is a mixture of conventional monopolar lipids and C20 bipolar bolalipids was studied using a mean field theory that explicitly includes molecular details and configurational properties of the lipid molecules. The effect of changing the fraction of bolalipids, as well as the length of the hydrocarbon chain of the monopolar lipids, was probed. A phase separation between two liquid lipid phases was found when a mismatch exists in the optimal hydrophobic thicknesses of the pure bolalipid and monopolar lipid layers. The lipid mixture phase separates into a thin bolalipid-rich layer and a thicker monopolar-rich layer. The thin membrane phase is mainly composed of transmembrane bolalipid molecules whose polar heads are positioned at opposite membrane-water interfaces. In the monopolar lipid-rich phase, bolalipids are the minor component and most of them assume a looping configuration where both headgroups are present at the same membrane-water interface. For mixed layers that form a single lipid phase across all bolalipid concentrations, the hairpin-transmembrane ratio strongly depends on the hydrocarbon chain length of the monopolar lipid and the bolalipid concentration. The C-D bond order parameters of the different species have been calculated. Our findings suggest that the concentration-dependent phase transition should be experimentally observable by measuring of the order parameters through quadrupolar splitting experiments. The driving force for the phase separation in the monopolar lipid/bolalipid mixture is the packing mismatch between hydrophobic regions of the monopolar lipid hydrocarbon chains and the membrane-spanning bolalipid chains. The results from the molecular theory may be useful in the design of stable lipid layers for integral membrane protein sensing.

  3. Composite S-layer lipid structures

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2010-01-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state of the art survey how S-layer proteins, lipids, and polysaccharides may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas for application of composite S-layer membrane systems concern sensor systems involving specific membrane functions. PMID:19303933

  4. Mixed Layers and Satellite Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, R.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the process to determine whether it is possible to retrieve boundary layer structure with the current sounding techniques, temperature retievals were performed for radiosonde profiles that showed temperature inversions. It was found that when temperature inversions exceed 8 to 10 C a retrieval will indeed show a temperature increase with height over a limited vertical distance. For weaker inversions retrieved temperatures are generally smoothly decreasing with height. It is, however, impossible to determine the actual mixed layer height from the retrievals. Whether the water vapor channels could be used in observing mixed layer structure was investigated. Temperature inversions are accompanied by significant drops in relative humidity. While this effect is very pronounced in parts of the trade wind regimes with relative humidity drops of up to 60%, it is widespread in other areas of the ocean as well. A simulation experiment was performed in which brightness temperatures were computed for smooth temperature and humidity profiles and compared with those computed from inversion profiles.

  5. Martian Mixed Layer during Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, G. M.; Valero, F.; Vazquez, L.

    2008-09-01

    In situ measurements of the Martian Planetary Boundary Layer (MPBL) encompass only the sur- face layer. Therefore, in order to fully address the MPBL, it becomes necessary to simulate somehow the behaviour of the martian mixed layer. The small-scale processes that happen in the MPBL cause GCM's ([1], [2]) to describe only partially the turbulent statistics, height, convective scales, etc, of the surface layer and the mixed layer. For this reason, 2D and 3D martian mesoscale models ([4], [5]), and large eddy simulations ([4], [6], [7], [8]) have been designed in the last years. Although they are expected to simulate more accurately the MPBL, they take an extremely expensive compu- tational time. Alternatively, we have derived the main turbu- lent characteristics of the martian mixed layer by using surface layer and mixed layer similarity ([9], [10]). From in situ temperature and wind speed measurements, together with quality-tested simu- lated ground temperature [11], we have character- ized the martian mixed layer during the convective hours of Pathfinder mission Sol 25. Mean mixed layer turbulent statistics like tem- perature variance < σ? >, horizontal wind speed variance < σu,v >, vertical wind speed variance < σw >, viscous dissipation rate < ǫ >, and turbu- lent kinetic energy < e > have been calculated, as well as the mixed layer height zi, and the convective scales of wind w? and temperature θ?. Our values, obtained with negligible time cost, match quite well with some previously obtained results via LES's ([4] and [8]). A comparisson between the above obtained mar- tian values and the typical Earth values are shown in Table 1. Convective velocity scale w doubles its counterpart terrestrial typical value, as it does the mean wind speed variances < σu,v > and < σw >. On the other hand, the temperature scale θ? and the mean temperature variance < σ > are virtually around one order higher on Mars. The limitations of these results concern the va- lidity

  6. Lidar observation of marine mixed layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamagishi, Susumu; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Masayuki

    1992-01-01

    Marine mixed layer is known to play an important role in the transportation of pollution exiting ship funnels. The application of a diffusion model is critically dependent upon a reliable estimate of a lid. However, the processes that form lids are not well understood, though considerable progress toward marine boundary layer has been achieved. This report describes observations of the marine mixed layer from the course Ise-wan to Nii-jima with the intention of gaining a better understanding of their structure by a shipboard lidar. These observations were made in the summer of 1991. One interesting feature of the observations was that the multiple layers of aerosols, which is rarely numerically modeled, was encountered. No attempt is yet made to present a systematic analysis of all the data collected. Instead we focus on observations that seem to be directly relevant to the structure of the mixed layer.

  7. Lidar observations of mixed layer dynamics - Tests of parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.; Coulter, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric mixed layer depth, the entrainment zone depth and the wind speed and wind direction were used to test various parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under clear air convective conditions over flat terrain in central Illinois are presented. It is shown that surface heating alone accounts for a major portion of the rise of the mixed layer on all days. A new set of entrainment model constants was determined which optimized height predictions for the dataset. Under convective conditions, the shape of the mixed layer height prediction curves closely resembled the observed shapes. Under conditions when significant wind shear was present, the shape of the height prediction curve departed from the data suggesting deficiencies in the parameterization of shear production. Development of small cumulus clouds on top of the layer is shown to affect mixed layer depths in the afternoon growth phase.

  8. A random distribution reacting mixing layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for simulation of molecular mixing and the resulting velocity and temperature fields has been developed. The ideas are applied to the flow conditions present in the NASA Lewis Planar Reacting Shear Layer (PRSL) facility, and results compared to experimental data. A gaussian transverse turbulent velocity distribution is used in conjunction with a linearly increasing time scale to describe the mixing of different regions of the flow. Equilibrium reaction calculations are then performed on the mix to arrive at a new species composition and temperature. Velocities are determined through summation of momentum contributions. The analysis indicates a combustion efficiency of the order of 80 percent for the reacting mixing layer, and a turbulent Schmidt number of 2/3. The success of the model is attributed to the simulation of large-scale transport of fluid. The favorable comparison shows that a relatively quick and simple PC calculation is capable of simulating the basic flow structure in the reacting and non-reacting shear layer present in the facility given basic assumptions about turbulence properties.

  9. A random distribution reacting mixing layer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Richard A.; Marek, C. John; Myrabo, Leik N.; Nagamatsu, Henry T.

    1994-01-01

    A methodology for simulation of molecular mixing, and the resulting velocity and temperature fields has been developed. The ideas are applied to the flow conditions present in the NASA Lewis Research Center Planar Reacting Shear Layer (PRSL) facility, and results compared to experimental data. A gaussian transverse turbulent velocity distribution is used in conjunction with a linearly increasing time scale to describe the mixing of different regions of the flow. Equilibrium reaction calculations are then performed on the mix to arrive at a new species composition and temperature. Velocities are determined through summation of momentum contributions. The analysis indicates a combustion efficiency of the order of 80 percent for the reacting mixing layer, and a turbulent Schmidt number of 2/3. The success of the model is attributed to the simulation of large-scale transport of fluid. The favorable comparison shows that a relatively quick and simple PC calculation is capable of simulating the basic flow structure in the reacting and nonreacting shear layer present in the facility given basic assumptions about turbulence properties.

  10. Anelastic Rayleigh–Taylor mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Gauthier, S.

    2016-07-01

    Anelastic Rayleigh–Taylor mixing layers for miscible fluids are investigated with a recently built model (Schneider and Gauthier 2015 J. Eng. Math. 92 55–71). Four Chebyshev–Fourier–Fourier direct numerical simulations are analyzed. They use different values for the compressibility parameters: Atwood number (the dimensionless difference of the heavy and light fluid densities) and stratification (accounts for the vertical variation of density due to gravity). For intermediate Atwood numbers and finite stratification, compressibility effects quickly occurs. As a result only nonlinear behaviours are reached. The influence of the compressibility parameters on the growth speed of the RTI is discussed. The 0.1—Atwood number/0.4—stratification configuration reaches a turbulent regime. This turbulent mixing layer is analyzed with statistical tools such as moments, PDFs, anisotropy indicators and spectra.

  11. Plane mixing layer vortical structure kinematics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the current project was to experimentally investigate the structure and dynamics of the streamwise vorticity in a plane mixing layer. The first part of this research program was intended to clarify whether the observed decrease in mean streamwise vorticity in the far-field of mixing layers is due primarily to the 'smearing' caused by vortex meander or to diffusion. Two-point velocity correlation measurements have been used to show that there is little spanwise meander of the large-scale streamwise vortical structure. The correlation measurements also indicate a large degree of transverse meander of the streamwise vorticity which is not surprising since the streamwise vorticity exists in the inclined braid region between the spanwise vortex core regions. The streamwise convection of the braid region thereby introduces an apparent transverse meander into measurements using stationary probes. These results corroborated with estimated secondary velocity profiles in which the streamwise vorticity produces a signature which was tracked in time.

  12. Anelastic Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Gauthier, S.

    2016-07-01

    Anelastic Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layers for miscible fluids are investigated with a recently built model (Schneider and Gauthier 2015 J. Eng. Math. 92 55-71). Four Chebyshev-Fourier-Fourier direct numerical simulations are analyzed. They use different values for the compressibility parameters: Atwood number (the dimensionless difference of the heavy and light fluid densities) and stratification (accounts for the vertical variation of density due to gravity). For intermediate Atwood numbers and finite stratification, compressibility effects quickly occurs. As a result only nonlinear behaviours are reached. The influence of the compressibility parameters on the growth speed of the RTI is discussed. The 0.1—Atwood number/0.4—stratification configuration reaches a turbulent regime. This turbulent mixing layer is analyzed with statistical tools such as moments, PDFs, anisotropy indicators and spectra.

  13. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  14. Stabilization of concentration fluctuations in mixed membranes by hybrid lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Safran, Samuel

    2012-02-01

    Finite-size domains have been observed at the surface of cells. These lipids ``rafts'' are stable nanodomains enriched in saturated lipids and cholesterol. While line tension favors macrodomains, one explanation for raft stabilization suggests that the membrane composition is tuned close to a spinodal temperature. From this point of view, rafts are long-lived concentration fluctuations in the mixed phase. We propose a ternary mixture model for the cell membrane that includes hybrid lipids which have one saturated and one unsaturated hydrocarbon chain. Finite amount of hybrid lipids reduces the packing incompatibility at the saturated/unsaturated lipid interface and stabilizes the concentration fluctuations. Hybrid-Hybrid interactions are included in the model and further increase the life-time of the rafts and decrease their length-scales. Moreover, the hybrid has extra orientational degrees of freedom that may lead to modulated phases.

  15. Physical properties of the hybrid lipid POPC on micrometer-sized domains in mixed lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Naofumi; Nagata, Mariko; Takagi, Masahiro

    2015-08-28

    Macro-phase separation in mixed lipid membranes containing the hybrid lipid palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) was observed by fluorescent and confocal laser scanning microscopy. In a binary system consisting of the saturated lipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and the hybrid lipid POPC, the hybrid lipid forms a liquid-disordered (Ld) phase. In a ternary system consisting of this binary system and an unsaturated lipid dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), three-phase coexistence is observed. The POPC-rich phase appears around DPPC-rich domains, and the hybrid lipid is expected to behave like a line-active agent (linactant). Finally, phase separation in a four-component system, composed of this ternary system and cholesterol, was examined. Domains with a size that is smaller than 1 μm are found, and domain-induced budding is also observed. To explain small domain formation and domain-induced budding, chain ordering was evaluated based on Laurdan generalized polarization measurements. Our observations revealed that the hybrid lipid acted like a linactant to solid domains and disturbed chain ordering in liquid-ordered (Lo) domains. In both cases, the hybrid lipid reduced line tension at the domain boundary.

  16. Efficiency of shear induced entrainment in convectively mixed layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, Reinout

    1988-01-01

    Lidar data of mixed layer height are used to compare the model of process partitioning to that of Eulerian partitioning. It is found that the Eulerian partitioning model more closely follows the data and that the process partitioning model underpredicts the mixed layer depth. The results suggest that shear production and consumption of turbulent kinetic energy at the mixed layer top are local processes.

  17. Role of neutral lipids in tear fluid lipid layer: coarse-grained simulation study.

    PubMed

    Telenius, Jelena; Koivuniemi, Artturi; Kulovesi, Pipsa; Holopainen, Juha M; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2012-12-11

    Tear fluid lipid layer (TFLL) residing at the air-water interface of tears has been recognized to play an important role in the development of dry eye syndrome. Yet, the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of TFLL are only partly known. Here, we report results of coarse-grained simulations of a lipid layer comprising phospholipids, free fatty acids, cholesteryl esters, and triglycerides at the air-water interface to shed light on the properties of TFLL. We consider structural as well as dynamical properties of the lipid layer as a function of surface pressure. Simulations revealed that neutral lipids reside heterogeneously between phospholipids at relatively low pressures but form a separate hydrophobic phase with increasing surface pressure, transforming the initial lipid monolayer to a two-layered structure. When the model of TFLL was compared to a one-component phospholipid monolayer system, we found drastic differences in both structural and dynamical properties that explain the prominent role of neutral lipids as stabilizers of the TFLL. Based on our results, we suggest that neutral lipids are able to increase the stability of the TFLL by modulating its dynamical and structural behavior, which is important for the proper function of tear film. PMID:23151187

  18. Mixed Layer Drift Revealed by Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Antony K.; Zhao, Yun-He; Esaias, Wayne E.; Campbell, Janet W.; Moore, Timothy; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For the first time we are able to derive ocean currents using the wavelet algorithm for feature tracking from two different sensors (MODIS and SeaWiFS) on different satellites. Satellite ocean color data provide an important insight to the marine biosphere because of their capability to quantify certain fundamental properties (such as phytoplankton pigment concentration, marine primary production, etc.) on a global basis. The mixed layer drift can be derived because the ocean color signal bears information from a much larger depth (10 to 30 meters) as compared with the sea surface temperature data. Although the drifter data are very limited in the study area, the comparison shows a general agreement between drifter data and satellite tracking results, especially for the cases near the Gulf Stream boundary.

  19. Mixed Layer Heat Budget During Pomme Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordani, H.; Caniaux, G.; Prieur, L.; Gavart, M.; Reverdin, G.

    A simplified 3D oceanic model derived from 1D turbulent mixing model was built in order to evaluate separately the impacts of the different processes of the mixed layer. This model is run from the hydrological networks collected during the POMME ex- periment (NE Atlantic, February to April 2001). Five simulations were performed be- tween Pomme1 (13/02) and Pomme2 (04/04), each one deduced from the previous one by adding one new physical process. The performance of the model to retrieve the final analysed fields increases with the number of the processes. A significant improvement is reached when the ageostrophic circulation (associated with the geostrophic adjust- ment of the large scale structures) is activated. In this case, the vertical heat transport has a clear signature in fronts and in some eddies present in the domain. Therefore, these local strong intensities seems well to be associated to the synoptic structures in permanent geostrophic adjustment. Thus subduction seems to be linked to the evolu- tion of the fronts and eddies.

  20. Stabilization of composition fluctuations in mixed membranes by hybrid lipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, Samuel; Palmieri, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    A ternary mixture model is proposed to describe composition fluctuations in mixed membranes composed of saturated, unsaturated and hybrid lipids. The asymmetric hybrid lipid has one saturated and one unsaturated hydrocarbon chain and it can reduce the packing incompatibility between saturated and unsaturated lipids. A methodology to recast the free-energy of the lattice in terms of a continuous isotropic field theory is proposed and used to analyze composition fluctuations above the critical temperature. The effect of hybrid lipids on fluctuations domains rich in saturated/unsaturated lipids is predicted. The correlation length of such fluctuations decreases significantly with increasing amounts of hybrids even if the temperature is maintained close to the critical temperature. This provides an upper bound for the domain sizes expected in rafts stabilized by hybrids, above the critical temperature. When the hybrid composition of the membrane is increased further, a crossover value is found above which ``stripe-like'' fluctuations are observed. The wavelength of these fluctuations decreases with increasing hybrid fraction and tends toward a molecular size in a membrane that contains only hybrids.

  1. Lipid Layers on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers: Understanding Lipid-Polyelectrolyte Interactions and Applications on the Surface Engineering of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Eleftheria; Gregurec, Danijela; Gabriela, Romero; Cuellar, J L; Donath, E; Moya, S E

    2016-06-01

    In this manuscript we review work of our group on the assembly of lipid layers on top of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). The assembly of lipid layers with zwitterionic and charged lipids on PEMs is studied as a function of lipid and polyelectrolyte composition by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance. Polyelectrolyte lipid interactions are studied by means of Atomic Force Spectroscopy. We also show the coating of lipid layers for engineering different nanomaterials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) nanoparticles and how these can be used to decrease in vitro toxicity and to direct the intracellular localization of nanomaterials.

  2. Lipid Layers on Polyelectrolyte Multilayers: Understanding Lipid-Polyelectrolyte Interactions and Applications on the Surface Engineering of Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Eleftheria; Gregurec, Danijela; Gabriela, Romero; Cuellar, J L; Donath, E; Moya, S E

    2016-06-01

    In this manuscript we review work of our group on the assembly of lipid layers on top of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). The assembly of lipid layers with zwitterionic and charged lipids on PEMs is studied as a function of lipid and polyelectrolyte composition by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance. Polyelectrolyte lipid interactions are studied by means of Atomic Force Spectroscopy. We also show the coating of lipid layers for engineering different nanomaterials, i.e., carbon nanotubes and poly(lactic-co-glycolic) nanoparticles and how these can be used to decrease in vitro toxicity and to direct the intracellular localization of nanomaterials. PMID:27427617

  3. Lagrangian mixed layer modeling of the western equatorial Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinoda, Toshiaki; Lukas, Roger

    1995-01-01

    Processes that control the upper ocean thermohaline structure in the western equatorial Pacific are examined using a Lagrangian mixed layer model. The one-dimensional bulk mixed layer model of Garwood (1977) is integrated along the trajectories derived from a nonlinear 1 1/2 layer reduced gravity model forced with actual wind fields. The Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data are used to estimate surface freshwater fluxes for the mixed layer model. The wind stress data which forced the 1 1/2 layer model are used for the mixed layer model. The model was run for the period 1987-1988. This simple model is able to simulate the isothermal layer below the mixed layer in the western Pacific warm pool and its variation. The subduction mechanism hypothesized by Lukas and Lindstrom (1991) is evident in the model results. During periods of strong South Equatorial Current, the warm and salty mixed layer waters in the central Pacific are subducted below the fresh shallow mixed layer in the western Pacific. However, this subduction mechanism is not evident when upwelling Rossby waves reach the western equatorial Pacific or when a prominent deepening of the mixed layer occurs in the western equatorial Pacific or when a prominent deepening of the mixed layer occurs in the western equatorial Pacific due to episodes of strong wind and light precipitation associated with the El Nino-Southern Oscillation. Comparison of the results between the Lagrangian mixed layer model and a locally forced Eulerian mixed layer model indicated that horizontal advection of salty waters from the central Pacific strongly affects the upper ocean salinity variation in the western Pacific, and that this advection is necessary to maintain the upper ocean thermohaline structure in this region.

  4. Investigation on flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer induced by forced vibration of cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Tan, Jianguo; Lv, Liang

    2015-12-01

    The mixing process has been an important issue for the design of supersonic combustion ramjet engine, and the mixing efficiency plays a crucial role in the improvement of the combustion efficiency. In the present study, nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering (NPLS), particle image velocimetry (PIV) and large eddy simulation (LES) are employed to investigate the flow and mixing characteristics of supersonic mixing layer under different forced vibration conditions. The indexes of fractal dimension, mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are applied to describe the mixing process. Results show that different from the development and evolution of supersonic mixing layer without vibration, the flow under forced vibration is more likely to present the characteristics of three-dimensionality. The laminar flow region of mixing layer under forced vibration is greatly shortened and the scales of rolled up Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices become larger, which promote the mixing process remarkably. The fractal dimension distribution reveals that comparing with the flow without vibration, the turbulent fluctuation of supersonic mixing layer under forced vibration is more intense. Besides, the distribution of mixing layer thickness, momentum thickness and scalar mixing level are strongly influenced by forced vibration. Especially, when the forcing frequency is 4000 Hz, the mixing layer thickness and momentum thickness are 0.0391 m and 0.0222 m at the far field of 0.16 m, 83% and 131% higher than that without vibration at the same position, respectively.

  5. Effect of meibomian lipid layer on evaporation of tears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miano, F.; Calcara, M.; Giuliano, F.; Millar, T. J.; Enea, V.

    2004-07-01

    The outer interface of a tear film was studied with the aid of a model system able to investigate the interfacial phenomena derived from the spreading of an insoluble lipid multilayer onto a tear-like aqueous fluid. The interactions of such a layer with proteins dissolved in the aqueous phase beneath were also investigated. Emphasis was given to evaporation phenomena because the increased rate of tear evaporation in humans is often related to a number of ocular dysfunctions. The model tear was studied as a pendant drop that permitted a functional evaluation of the effect of lipids and proteins upon the evaporation of water from the tear film.

  6. Tear film lipid layer: A molecular level view.

    PubMed

    Cwiklik, Lukasz

    2016-10-01

    Human cornea is covered by an aqueous tear film, and the outermost layer of the tear film is coated by lipids. This so-called tear film lipid layer (TFLL) reduces surface tension of the tear film and helps with the film re-spreading after blinks. Alterations of tear lipids composition and properties are related to dry eye syndrome. Therefore, unveiling structural and functional properties of TFLL is necessary for understanding tear film function under both normal and pathological conditions. Key properties of TFLL, such as resistance against high lateral pressures and ability to spread at the tear film surface, are directly related to the chemical identity of TFLL lipids. Hence, a molecular-level description is required to get better insight into TFLL properties. Molecular dynamics simulations are particularly well suited for this task and they were recently used for investigating TFLL. The present review discusses molecular level organization and properties of TFLL as seen by these simulation studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg.

  7. [Abnormal of tear lipid layer and recent advances in clinical study of dry eye].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xin-Ye; Liu, Zu-Guo

    2012-03-01

    Dry eye is a common disease in the ophthalmological clinic, which is related to the dysfunction of tear film. The tear film is composed of lipid layer, aqueous layer and mucin layer (or lipid layer, aqueous/mucin layer). The lipid of the outmost layer derived from Meibomian gland and distributed on the tear film after blinking can decrease the evaporation and stabilize the tear film. The thickness, quality, and distribution of lipid layer are impaired in many dry eye patients, hence restoring the physiological function of lipid layer may be crucial for the treatment of this kind of dry eye. The lipid artificial tears manifest great effects on increasing lipid layer thickness, stabilizing tear film, improving Meibomian gland dysfunction, and promoting tear film distribution.

  8. Turbulent mixing layers in the interstellar medium of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Shull, J. M.; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1993-01-01

    It is proposed that turbulent mixing layers are common in the ISM of the Milky Way and selected external galaxies, with many layers per kiloparsec along typical lines of sight. All of the diffuse C I 1550-A background emission and a significant fraction of the diffuse H-alpha background at high latitude can be explained by mixing layers cooling at pressure of about 3000/cu cm K. These models also produce the correct ratio of semiforbidden C IV 15500 III 1663-A emission. Only 10 percent of the disk H-alpha is likely to arise from mixing layers. The observed Galactic absorption-line column densities of C IV, N V, Si IV, and O VI are roughly consistent with mixing-layer models with an intermediate temperature of about 10 exp 5.3 K and depleted abundances.

  9. Observations of mixed layer deepening during an Antarctic gale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane-Serff, G. F.; Stansfield, K. L.

    2013-03-01

    of mixed layer deepening made during a gale in February 2005 near an ice shelf, Fimbulisen, Antarctica, are reported. The observations were made from the RRS James Clark Ross in the lee of the ice shelf, using repeated downcasts ("yo-yo") of a conductivity-temperature-depth package, together with shipboard meteorological and other measurements. The mixed layer deepened from less than 40 m to over 120 m over the course of 27 h, with a very rapid deepening from 80 m to 120 m over a period of under 11 h. The mixed layer became both colder and fresher, with the change in salinity and heat content likely to be caused by melting ice. Oxygen isotope results suggest the source of the fresh water was melting sea ice rather than precipitation or ice shelf melt. The input of melt water at the surface stabilizes the mixed layer, so extra energy is required to deepen the mixed layer. The observations suggest that approximately 1.8% of the available "wind-work" energy was used to mix the upper water column, while the stabilizing surface buoyancy flux inhibits the turbulence in the mixed layer, limiting the mixing length to 1.6 m. The eventual depth of the mixed layer is in line with estimates based on the planetary length scale u*/f. The rate of mixed layer deepening is given by Ue/u* = 0.035. The apparent peak ice melting rate was approximately 60 mm hr-1, although this is likely to be exaggerated by convergence and downwelling.

  10. Analysis of Compressible Mixing Layers Using Dilatational Covariances Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thangam, S.; Zhou, Y.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    1996-01-01

    Compressible mixing layers are analyzed using a dilatational covariances model based on a pseudo-sound constitutive relation. The calculations are used to evaluate the different physical phenomena affecting compressible mixing layers. The rate of growth of the mixing layer is retarded by both the compressible dissipation and the pressure-dilatational covariances. The pressure-dilatational, essentially a nonequilibrium effect, reduces the amount of excess production over dissipation available for the turbulence energy growth. The pseudo-sound model also includes a history dependent portion: this is also investigated. All constants in the model and used in these computations are predicted by the theory.

  11. Crowding-Induced Mixing Behavior of Lipid Bilayers: Examination of Mixing Energy, Phase, Packing Geometry, and Reversibility.

    PubMed

    Zeno, Wade F; Rystov, Alice; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Risbud, Subhash H; Longo, Marjorie L

    2016-05-10

    In an effort to develop a general thermodynamic model from first-principles to describe the mixing behavior of lipid membranes, we examined lipid mixing induced by targeted binding of small (Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)) and large (nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs)) structures to specific phases of phase-separated lipid bilayers. Phases were targeted by incorporation of phase-partitioning iminodiacetic acid (IDA)-functionalized lipids into ternary lipid mixtures consisting of DPPC, DOPC, and cholesterol. GFP and NLPs, containing histidine tags, bound the IDA portion of these lipids via a metal, Cu(2+), chelating mechanism. In giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), GFP and NLPs bound to the Lo domains of bilayers containing DPIDA, and bound to the Ld region of bilayers containing DOIDA. At sufficiently large concentrations of DPIDA or DOIDA, lipid mixing was induced by bound GFP and NLPs. The validity of the thermodynamic model was confirmed when it was found that the statistical mixing distribution as a function of crowding energy for smaller GFP and larger NLPs collapsed to the same trend line for each GUV composition. Moreover, results of this analysis show that the free energy of mixing for a ternary lipid bilayer consisting of DOPC, DPPC, and cholesterol varied from 7.9 × 10(-22) to 1.5 × 10(-20) J/lipid at the compositions observed, decreasing as the relative cholesterol concentration was increased. It was discovered that there appears to be a maximum packing density, and associated maximum crowding pressure, of the NLPs, suggestive of circular packing. A similarity in mixing induced by NLP1 and NLP3 despite large difference in projected areas was analytically consistent with monovalent (one histidine tag) versus divalent (two histidine tags) surface interactions, respectively. In addition to GUVs, binding and induced mixing behavior of NLPs was also observed on planar, supported lipid multibilayers. The mixing process was reversible, with Lo domains

  12. Crowding-induced mixing behavior of lipid bilayers: Examination of mixing energy, phase, packing geometry, and reversibility

    DOE PAGES

    Zeno, Wade F.; Rystov, Alice; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Risbud, Subhash H.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2016-04-20

    In an effort to develop a general thermodynamic model from first-principles to describe the mixing behavior of lipid membranes, we examined lipid mixing induced by targeted binding of small (Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)) and large (nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs)) structures to specific phases of phase-separated lipid bilayers. Phases were targeted by incorporation of phase-partitioning iminodiacetic acid (IDA)-functionalized lipids into ternary lipid mixtures consisting of DPPC, DOPC, and cholesterol. GFP and NLPs, containing histidine tags, bound the IDA portion of these lipids via a metal, Cu2+, chelating mechanism. In giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), GFP and NLPs bound to the Lo domains ofmore » bilayers containing DPIDA, and bound to the Ld region of bilayers containing DOIDA. At sufficiently large concentrations of DPIDA or DOIDA, lipid mixing was induced by bound GFP and NLPs. The validity of the thermodynamic model was confirmed when it was found that the statistical mixing distribution as a function of crowding energy for smaller GFP and larger NLPs collapsed to the same trend line for each GUV composition. Moreover, results of this analysis show that the free energy of mixing for a ternary lipid bilayer consisting of DOPC, DPPC, and cholesterol varied from 7.9 × 10–22 to 1.5 × 10–20 J/lipid at the compositions observed, decreasing as the relative cholesterol concentration was increased. It was discovered that there appears to be a maximum packing density, and associated maximum crowding pressure, of the NLPs, suggestive of circular packing. A similarity in mixing induced by NLP1 and NLP3 despite large difference in projected areas was analytically consistent with monovalent (one histidine tag) versus divalent (two histidine tags) surface interactions, respectively. In addition to GUVs, binding and induced mixing behavior of NLPs was also observed on planar, supported lipid multibilayers. Furthermore, the mixing process was reversible, with

  13. Lipid and protein maps defining arterial layers in atherosclerotic aorta.

    PubMed

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Balluff, Benjamin; Maroto, Aroa S; Carreira, Ricardo J; van Zeijl, Rene J M; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; McDonnell, Liam A; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2015-09-01

    Subclinical atherosclerosis cannot be predicted and novel therapeutic targets are needed. The molecular anatomy of healthy and atherosclerotic tissue is pursued to identify ongoing molecular changes in atherosclerosis development. Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) accounts with the unique advantage of analyzing proteins and metabolites (lipids) while preserving their original localization; thus two dimensional maps can be obtained. Main molecular alterations were investigated in a rabbit model in response to early development of atherosclerosis. Aortic arterial layers (intima and media) and calcified regions were investigated in detail by MALDI-MSI and proteins and lipids specifically defining those areas of interest were identified. These data further complement main findings previously published in J Proteomics (M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics. (In press); M. Martin-Lorenzo et al., J. Proteomics 108 (2014) 465-468.) [1,2]. PMID:26217810

  14. Single-step assembly of homogenous lipid-polymeric and lipid-quantum dot nanoparticles enabled by microfluidic rapid mixing.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Pedro M; Basto, Pamela A; Zhang, Liangfang; Rhee, Minsoung; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C; Karnik, Rohit

    2010-03-23

    A key challenge in the synthesis of multicomponent nanoparticles (NPs) for therapy or diagnosis is obtaining reproducible monodisperse NPs with a minimum number of preparation steps. Here we report the use of microfluidic rapid mixing using hydrodynamic flow focusing in combination with passive mixing structures to realize the self-assembly of monodisperse lipid-polymer and lipid-quantum dot (QD) NPs in a single mixing step. These NPs are composed of a polymeric core for drug encapsulation or a QD core for imaging purposes, a hydrophilic polymeric shell, and a lipid monolayer at the interface of the core and the shell. In contrast to slow mixing of lipid and polymeric solutions, rapid mixing directly results in formation of homogeneous NPs with relatively narrow size distribution that obviates the need for subsequent thermal or mechanical agitation for homogenization. We identify rapid mixing conditions that result in formation of homogeneous NPs and show that self-assembly of polymeric core occurs independent of the lipid component, which only provides stability against aggregation over time and in the presence of high salt concentrations. Physicochemical properties of the NPs including size (35-180 nm) and zeta potential (-10 to +20 mV in PBS) are controlled by simply varying the composition and concentration of precursors. This method for preparation of hybrid NPs in a single mixing step may be useful for combinatorial synthesis of NPs with different properties for imaging and drug delivery applications. PMID:20166699

  15. Evolution of a forced stratified mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, J.; Fernando, H. J. S.; Kit, E.

    2007-06-01

    Laboratory measurements were carried out in a spatially developing stably stratified shear layer generated downstream of a splitter plate. The instabilities were controlled using a flapper spanning the entire shear layer, with the flapper forced at the fastest growing frequency of the primary [Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH)] instability. The measurements were taken as the KH instabilities roll up, break down, and degenerate into stratified turbulence. Both stratified and homogeneous shear layers were considered, the latter acting as the "baseline" case. The measurements included the streamwise and vertical velocities (made using X-wire hot film probes), which allowed calculation of the mean and rms velocities, turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation, and TKE production. The density and its gradients were measured using miniature conductivity probes. The measurements and flow visualization elicited interesting features of KH evolution, namely that KH billows may be turbulent from the onset, the TKE dissipation is largest at early stages of evolution, the production of TKE is a maximum at the breakdown of billows, the decay of turbulence to fossilized motions and concomitant formation of fine (layered) structure occur rapidly after the breakdown of billows, and episodic rebirth of (zombie) turbulence develops before a final permanently fossilized state is achieved.

  16. Gradient layer entrainment in a thermohaline system with mixed layer circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Incropera, F.P.; Lents, C.E.; Viskanta, R.

    1986-11-01

    Entrainment of salt-stratified fluid into a bottom mixed layer is investigated under conditions for which mixing is driven by bottom heating and/or an imposed horizontal flow. Entrainment rate measurements and mixed layer flow visualization suggest that entrainment is strongly influenced by a shear mechanism involving both horizontal and vertical fluid velocity components. Under certain conditions, imposition of the horizontal flow inhibits the buoyancy flow and entrainment rates for combined mixing are less than those for pure buoyant mixing. Attempts to correlate entrainment rates in terms of conventional dimensionless parameters were unsuccessful.

  17. Geometric Frustration in the Mixed Layer Pnictide Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Enjalran, M.; Scalettar, R.T.; Kauzlarich, S.M.

    2000-06-06

    The authors present results from a Monte Carlo investigation of a simple bilayer model with geometrically frustrated interactions similar to those found in the mixed layer pnictide oxides (Sr{sub 2}Mn{sub 3}Pn{sub 2}O{sub 2}, Pn = As, Sb). The model is composed of two inequivalent square lattices with nearest-neighbor intra- and interlayer interactions. They find a ground state composed of two independent Neel ordered layers when the interlayer exchange is an order of magnitude weaker than the intralayer exchange, as suggested by experiment. Evidence for local orthogonal order between the layers is found, but it occurs in regions of parameter space which are not experimentally realized. Qualitatively similar results were observed in models with a larger number of layers. They conclude that frustration caused by nearest-neighbor interactions in the mixed layer pnictide oxides is not sufficient to explain the long-range orthogonal order that is observed experimentally.

  18. Numerical simulation of the non-Newtonian mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azaiez, Jalel; Homsy, G. M.

    1993-01-01

    This work is a continuing effort to advance our understanding of the effects of polymer additives on the structures of the mixing layer. In anticipation of full nonlinear simulations of the non-Newtonian mixing layer, we examined in a first stage the linear stability of the non-Newtonian mixing layer. The results of this study show that, for a fluid described by the Oldroyd-B model, viscoelasticity reduces the instability of the inviscid mixing layer in a special limit where the ratio (We/Re) is of order 1 where We is the Weissenberg number, a measure of the elasticity of the flow, and Re is the Reynolds number. In the present study, we pursue this project with numerical simulations of the non-Newtonian mixing layer. Our primary objective is to determine the effects of viscoelasticity on the roll-up structure. We also examine the origin of the numerical instabilities usually encountered in the simulations of non-Newtonian fluids.

  19. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph W.; Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Jou, Wen-Huei; Riley, James J.; Givi, Peyman

    1988-01-01

    The results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers are presented. This is an extension of earlier work to a more detailed study of previous three dimensional simulations of cold reacting flows plus the development, validation, and use of codes to simulate chemically reacting shear layers with heat release. Additional analysis of earlier simulations showed good agreement with self similarity theory and laboratory data. Simulations with a two dimensional code including the effects of heat release showed that the rate of chemical product formation, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release. Subsequent three dimensional simulations showed similar behavior, in agreement with laboratory observations. Baroclinic torques and thermal expansion in the mixing layer were found to produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to diffuse the pairing vortices, resulting in a net reduction in vorticity. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers were shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques.

  20. Mixing layer resonance under high-speed stream forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomassin, Jean; Mureithi, Njuki; Vo, Huu Duc

    2014-12-01

    In the majority of fluid-structure interaction problems, the biggest challenge lies in the fundamental understanding of the flow physics. Forced mixing layers is an important phenomenon found in many cases of flow-induced vibrations and acoustics. The response of a mixing layer to high-speed stream acoustic forcing is investigated with a theoretical and experimental approach. Two different experiments demonstrating the fluid mechanic phenomenon are presented. The first experiment consists of a circular jet impinging on a vibrating plate. The second experiment demonstrates the mixing layer resonance in the context of a fluidelastic instability causing high-amplitude vibrations in gas turbine high-pressure compressor rotor blades. Both the plate and the adjacent blade vibration induce an acoustic feedback that propagates within the jet and blade tip clearance flow, respectively. The resonance was found to occur when the feedback wavelength matched either the jet-to-plate or the inter-blade distance. In both experimental cases, the resonance condition has been simply modeled by the coincidence of a 1D feedback wave, which propagates upstream at reduced velocity by the high-speed flow. The coupling between the jet induced mixing layer and the feedback wave is assumed to naturally occur when one of the wave crests reaches the separation edge. The objective of this study is to improve the understanding of the coupling mechanism between an emanating shear layer and the acoustic forcing originating within a fast flow stream. The study is based on a simplified analytical model in order to enlarge the current understanding of the mixing layer receptivity to the more specific case of its response to high-speed stream forcing. To identify the mixing layer resonant modes, an analytical resonance condition is proposed. It is found that the mixing layer response becomes spatially resonant for specific source locations downstream in the high-speed flow. The study also provides an

  1. Transition and mixing in layered stratified shear flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Victoria; Caulfield, C. P.

    2001-11-01

    Flows with step-wise density distributions, i.e. well-mixed layers of fluid separated by narrow regions of high density gradient, are common in geophysics. We investigate numerically and theoretically the nonlinear evolution of a parallel shear flow at a moderate Reynolds number which has embedded within it a mixed layer of intermediate fluid. Linear stability theory predicts that the flow may be unstable to stationary vortical disturbances which are a generalization of an inviscid instability first considered by G. I. Taylor. We investigate the behaviour of these "Taylor waves" at finite amplitude through 3D nonlinear numerical simulations. We follow the development of primary and secondary instabilities which contribute to the eventual breakdown of the layered flow. In particular, we are interested in the mixing properties of the flow as it undergoes transition to small-scale disorder.

  2. Prediction of dynamic and mixing characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers using DNS and LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) have been conducted of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, in order to assess the ability of LES to reproduce dynamic and mixing aspects of the DNS which affect combustion, independently of combustion models.

  3. LIF measurements of scalar mixing in turbulent shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasso, Paris S.; Mungal, M. G.

    1993-01-01

    The structure of shear layer flows at high Reynolds numbers remains a very interesting problem. Straight mixing layers have been studied and yielded information on the probability density function (pdf) of a passive scalar across the layer. Konrad and Koochesfahani & Dimotakis measured the pdf of the mixture fraction for mixing layers of moderate Reynolds numbers, each about 25,000 (Re based on velocity difference and visual thickness). Their measurements showed a 'non-marching' pdf (central hump which is invariant from edge to edge across the layer), a result which is linked to the visualizations of the spanwise Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability mode, which is the primary instability for plane shear layer flows. A secondary instability mode, the Taylor-Gortler (T-G) instability, which is associated with streamwise vortical structures, has also been observed in shear layers. Image reconstruction by Jimenez et al. and volume renderings by Karasso & Mungal at low Re numbers have demonstrated that the K-H and the T-G instability modes occur simultaneously in a non-mutually destructive way, evidence that supports the quasi two-dimensional aspect of these flows and the non-marching character of the pdf at low Reynolds numbers. At higher Re numbers though, the interaction of these two instability modes is still unclear and may affect the mixing process. In this study, we perform measurements of the concentration pdf of plane mixing layers for different operating conditions. At a speed ratio of r = U(sub 1)/U(sub 2) = 4:1, we examine three Reynolds number cases: Re = 14,000, Re = 31,000, and Re = 62,000. Some other Re number cases' results, not presented in detail, are invoked to explain the behavior of the pdf of the concentration field. A case of r = 2.6:1 at Re = 20,000 is also considered. The planar laser-induced fluorescence technique is used to yield quantitative measurements. The different Re are obtained by changing the velocity magnitudes of the two streams. The

  4. Double-diffusive layering and mixing in Patagonian fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Santos, Iván; Garcés-Vargas, José; Schneider, Wolfgang; Ross, Lauren; Parra, Sabrina; Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo

    2014-12-01

    Double-diffusive layering was quantified for the first time in the Chilean Patagonian fjords region (41.5-56°S). Approximately 600 temperature and salinity profiles collected during 1995-2012 were used to study water masses, quantify diffusive layering and compute the vertical diffusivity of heat. Development of 'diffusive-layering' or simply 'layering' was favored by relatively fresh-cold waters overlying salty-warm waters. Fresh waters are frequently derived from glacial melting that influences the fjord either directly or through rivers. Salty waters are associated with Modified Subantarctic (MSAAW) and Subantarctic Water (SAAW). Double-diffusive convection occurred as layering in 40% of the year-round data and as salt fingering in <1% of the time. The most vigorous layering, was found at depths between 20 and 70 m, as quantified by (a) Turner angles, (b) density ratios, and (c) heat diffusivity (with maximum values of 5 × 10-5 m2 s-1). Diffusive-layering events presented a meridional gradient with less layering within the 41-47°S northern region, relative to the southern region between 47° and 56°S. Layering occupied, on average, 27% and 56% of the water column in the northern and southern regions, respectively. Thermohaline staircases were detected with microprofile measurements in Martinez and Baker channels (48°S), showing homogeneous layers (2-4 m thick) below the pycnocline (10-40 m). Also in this area, increased vertical mixing coincided with the increased layering events. High values of Thorpe scale (LT ∼ 7 m), dissipation rate of TKE (ε = 10-5-10-3 W kg-1) and diapycnal eddy diffusivity (Kρ = 10-6-10-3 m-2 s-1) were associated with diffusive layering. Implications of these results are that diffusive layering should be taken into account, together with other mixing processes such as shear instabilities and wind-driven flows, in biological and geochemical studies.

  5. Internal wave energy radiated from a turbulent mixed layer

    SciTech Connect

    Munroe, James R.; Sutherland, Bruce R.

    2014-09-15

    We examine mixed-layer deepening and the generation of internal waves in stratified fluid resulting from turbulence that develops in response to an applied surface stress. In laboratory experiments the stress is applied over the breadth of a finite-length tank by a moving roughened conveyor belt. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy density. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine their amplitudes, frequencies, and energy density. We also perform fully nonlinear numerical simulations restricted to two dimensions but in a horizontally periodic domain. These clearly demonstrate that internal waves are generated by transient eddies at the integral length scale of turbulence and which translate with the background shear along the base of the mixed layer. In both experiments and simulations we find that the energy density of the generated waves is 1%–3% of the turbulent kinetic energy density of the turbulent layer.

  6. Mixing layers and coherent structures in vegetated aquatic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisalberti, Marco; Nepf, Heidi M.

    2002-02-01

    To date, flow through submerged aquatic vegetation has largely been viewed as perturbed boundary layer flow, with vegetative drag treated as an extension of bed drag. However, recent studies of terrestrial canopies demonstrate that the flow structure within and just above an unconfined canopy more strongly resembles a mixing layer than a boundary layer. This paper presents laboratory measurements, obtained from a scaled seagrass model, that demonstrate the applicability of the mixing layer analogy to aquatic systems. Specifically, all vertical profiles of mean velocity contained an inflection point, which makes the flow susceptible to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. This instability leads to the generation of large, coherent vortices within the mixing layer (observed in the model at frequencies between 0.01 and 0.11 Hz), which dominate the vertical transport of momentum through the layer. The downstream advection of these vortices is shown to cause the progressive, coherent waving of aquatic vegetation, known as the monami. When the monami is present, the turbulent vertical transport of momentum is enhanced, with turbulent stresses penetrating an additional 30% of the plant height into the canopy.

  7. Hybrid lipids increase nanoscale fluctuation lifetimes in mixed membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmieri, Benoit; Safran, Samuel A.

    2013-09-01

    A recently proposed ternary mixture model is used to predict fluctuation domain lifetimes in the one phase region. The membrane is made of saturated, unsaturated, and hybrid lipids that have one saturated and one unsaturated hydrocarbon chain. The hybrid lipid is a natural linactant which can reduce the packing incompatibility between saturated and unsaturated lipids. The fluctuation lifetimes are predicted as a function of the hybrid lipid fraction and the fluctuation domain size. These lifetimes can be increased by up to three orders of magnitude compared to the case of no hybrids. With hybrid, small length scale fluctuations have sizable amplitudes even close to the critical temperature and, hence, benefit from enhanced critical slowing down. The increase in lifetime is particularly important for nanometer scale fluctuation domains where the hybrid orientation and the other lipids composition are highly coupled.

  8. Mixing Layer Excitation by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Richard; Little, Jesse

    2012-11-01

    The response of a mixing layer with velocity ratio 0.28 to perturbations near the high-speed side (U2=11 m/s, ReL = 0.26 × 106) of its origin from dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators is studied experimentally. Both alternating current (ac) and nanosecond (ns) pulse driven plasma are investigated in an effort to clarify the mechanisms associated with each technique as well as the more general physics associated with flow control via momentum-based versus thermal actuation. Ac-DBD plasma actuators, which function through electrohydrodynamic effects, are found to generate an increase in mixing layer momentum thickness that is strongly dependent on forcing frequency. Results are qualitatively similar to previous archival literature on the topic employing oscillating flaps. Ns-DBD plasma, which is believed to function through thermal effects, has no measureable influence on the mixing layer profile at similar forcing conditions. In the context of previous archival literature, these results suggest different physical mechanisms govern active control via ac- and ns-DBD plasma actuation and more generally, momentum versus thermal perturbations. Further investigation of these phenomena will be provided through variation of the boundary/mixing layer properties and forcing parameters in the context of spatially and temporally resolved experimental data. Supported by: AFOSR and Raytheon Missile Systems.

  9. Disintegration of fluids under supercritical conditions from mixing layer studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2003-01-01

    Databases of transitional states obtained from Direct Numerical simulations (DNS) of temporal, supercritical mixing layers for two species systems, O2/H2 and C7H16/N2, are analyzed to elucidate species-specific turbulence aspects and features of fluid disintegration.

  10. Turbulent mixing layers in the interstellar medium of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. D.; Shull, J. M.; Begelman, M. C.

    1993-01-01

    We propose that turbulent mixing layers are common in the interstellar medium (ISM). Injection of kinetic energy into the ISM by supernovae and stellar winds, in combination with density and temperature inhomogeneities, results in shear flows. Such flows will become turbulent due to the high Reynolds number (low viscosity) of the ISM plasma. These turbulent boundary layers will be particularly interesting where the shear flow occurs at boundaries of hot (approximately 10(exp 6) K) and cold or warm (10(exp 2) - 10(exp 4) K) gas. Mixing will occur in such layers producing intermediate-temperature gas at T is approximately equal to 10(exp 5.0) - 10(exp 5.5) that radiates strongly in the optical, ultraviolet, and EUV. We have modeled these layers under the assumptions of rapid mixing down to the atomic level and steady flow. By including the effects of non-equilibrium ionization and self-photoionization of the gas as it cools after mixing, we predict the intensities of numerous optical, infrared, and ultraviolet emission lines, as well as absorption column densities of C 4, N 5, Si 4, and O 6.

  11. Initial development of a hypersonic free mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.; Bolton, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    A preliminary experimental investigation to establish some of the characteristics and further the understanding of the initial development of a turbulent free mixing layer for hypersonic speeds has been conducted. Mean profile data at about 6 inches downstream of the exit of a hypersonic nozzle have been obtained in nitrogen for a nominal Mach number of 19.5, total temperature of about 1670 K and Reynolds number range from about 50,000 to 110,000 per foot and have been compared with profiles upstream of the nozzle exit. Static pressure varied across the shear layer for the present tests. The outer 80 percent of the high-velocity portion of the free shear layer can be calculated by a rotational method of characteristics. However, turbulent mixing is evidently important in the low-velocity region, and effects of eddy viscosity and eddy conductivity should be included in a theoretical analysis.

  12. Keratin-lipid structural organization in the corneous layer of snake.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Alberto; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Falini, Giuseppe; Fermani, Simona; Gazzano, Massimo

    2009-12-01

    The shed epidermis (molt) of snakes comprises four distinct layers. The upper two layers, here considered as beta-layer, contain essentially beta-keratin. The following layer, known as mesos-layer, is similar to the human stratum corneum, and is formed by thin cells surrounded by intercellular lipids. The latter layer mainly contains alpha-keratin. In this study, the molecular assemblies of proteins and lipids contained in these layers have been analyzed in the scale of two species of snakes, the elapid Tiger snake (TS, Notechis scutatus) and the viperid Gabon viper (GV, Bitis gabonica). Scanning X-ray micro-diffraction, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies, thermal analysis, and scanning electron microscopy experiments confirm the presence of the three layers in the GV skin scale. Conversely, in the TS molt a typical alpha-keratin layer appears to be absent. In the latter, experimental data suggest the presence of two domains similar to those found in the lipid intercellular matrix of stratum corneum. X-ray diffraction data also allow to determine the relative orientation of keratins and lipids. The keratin fibrils are randomly oriented inside the layers parallel to the surface of scales while the lipids are organized in lamellar structures having aliphatic chains normal to the scale surface. The high ordered lipid organization in the mature mesos layer probably increases its effectiveness in limiting water-loss. PMID:19280640

  13. Measurements of Molecular Mixing in a High Schmidt Number Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O; Youngs, D L; Andrews, M

    2007-12-03

    Molecular mixing measurements are performed for a high Schmidt number (Sc {approx} 10{sup 3}), small Atwood number (A {approx} 7.5 x 10{sup -4}) buoyancy-driven turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer in a water channel facility. Salt was added to the top stream to create the desired density difference. The degree of molecular mixing was measured as a function of time by monitoring a diffusion-limited chemical reaction between the two fluid streams. The pH of each stream was modified by the addition of acid or alkali such that a local neutralization reaction occurred as the two fluids molecularly mixed. The progress of this neutralization reaction was tracked by the addition of phenolphthalein - a pH-sensitive chemical indicator - to the acidic stream. Accurately calibrated backlit optical techniques were used to measure the average concentration of the colored chemical indicator. Comparisons of chemical product formation for pre-transitional buoyancy- and shear-driven mixing layers are given. It is also shown that experiments performed at different equivalence ratios (acid/alkali concentration) can be combined to obtain a mathematical relationship between the colored product formed and the density variance. This relationship was used to obtain high-fidelity, quantitative measures of the degree of molecular mixing which are independent of probe resolution constraints. The dependence of such mixing parameters on the Schmidt and Reynolds numbers is examined by comparing the current Sc {approx} 10{sup 3} measurements with Sc = 0.7 gas-phase and Pr = 7 liquid-phase measurements. This comparison indicates that the Schmidt number has a large effect on the bulk quantity of mixed fluid at small Reynolds numbers Re{sub h} < 10{sup 3}. At late times, all mixing parameters indicated a greater degree of molecular mixing and a decreased Schmidt number dependence. Implications for the development and quantitative assessment of turbulent transport and mixing models appropriate for

  14. Tear lipid layer deficiency associated with incomplete blinking: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Meibomian gland obstruction induces hyposecretion of tear film lipids, which results in lipid layer deficiency and evaporative dry eye. Unfortunately, the importance of blinking in meibomian gland dysfunction has been largely overlooked, and it is not known whether incomplete blinking causes tear lipid deficiency, even in the unobstructed meibomian glands. Case presentation A 38-year-old woman suffering from foreign body sensations in her eyes was examined. The cornea was clear and tear secretion was normal. Lid margin abnormalities were not observed and the meibum was clear. However, the lipid layer was very thin, and the patient was given a diagnosis of incomplete blinking. The patient was made aware of her condition and asked to blink consciously and completely. After that, an immediate increase in lipid flow was observed. Conclusion Tear lipid layer deficiency can occur with incomplete blinking, even though meibomian gland structures are intact. This case highlights the importance of complete blinking. PMID:23855887

  15. Kubo-Anderson Mixing in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Brink, A. Maassen Van Den

    A novel ab initio analysis of the Reynolds stress is presented in order to model non-local turbulence transport. The theory involves a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. A scaling relation maps the path space onto the boundary layer. Analytical sampling rates are shown to model mixing by exchange. Nonlocal mixing involves a scaling exponent ɛ≈0.58 (ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit). The resulting transport equation represents a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process.

  16. Streamwise vortex meander in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboeuf, Richard L.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1993-01-01

    The present experimental study was conducted in order to determine the existence of streamwise vortex meander in a mixing layer, and if present, its significance on the measured properties. The dependence of the velocity cross-correlation on the fixed probe location was shown to be a good indicator of the stationarity of the streamwise vortex location. The cross-correlation measurements obtained here indicate that spanwise meander is negligible, although transverse apparent meander (normal to the plane of the mixing layer) was indicated. The transverse meander, exemplified by the elliptical shape of the mean streamwise vorticity contours, was expected, since the streamwise vorticity in the braid region is essentially inclined, with respect to the streamwise direction. These conclusions were supported by results of estimated spanwise profiles of the transverse velocity component. The balance of evidence suggests that the measured mean streamwise vorticity decay is representative of the decay of the vorticity rather than an artifact of meander.

  17. Dynamics of coherent structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, Fazle; Moser, R. D.; Colonius, T.; Moin, P.; Rogers, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    An incompressible, time developing 3-D mixing layer with idealized initial conditions was simulated numerically. Consistent with the suggestions from experimental measurements, the braid region between the dominant spanwise vortices or rolls develops longitudinal vortices or ribs, which are aligned upstream and downstream of a roll and produce spanwise distortion of the rolls. The process by which this distortion occurs is explained by studying a variety of quantities of dynamic importance (e.g., production of enstrophy, vortex stretching). Other quantities of interest (dissipation, helicity density) are also computed and discussed. The currently available simulation only allows the study of the early evolution (before pairing) of the mixing layer. New simulations in progress will relieve this restriction.

  18. Application of large eddy interaction model to a mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. N. B.

    1989-01-01

    The large eddy interaction model (LEIM) is a statistical model of turbulence based on the interaction of selected eddies with the mean flow and all of the eddies in a turbulent shear flow. It can be utilized as the starting point for obtaining physical structures in the flow. The possible application of the LEIM to a mixing layer formed between two parallel, incompressible flows with a small temperature difference is developed by invoking a detailed similarity between the spectra of velocity and temperature.

  19. PDF calculation of scalar mixing layer with simple chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaki, Takao; Pope, Stephen B.

    1999-11-01

    A joint velocity-composition-turbulent frequency PDF(JPDF) model is used to simulate reactive mixing layer in a grid-generated turbulence with the influence of second-order irreversible chemical reactions. To investigate the effects of molecular mixing, a gas flow and a liquid flow are simulated. For a gas flow, the oxidation reaction (NO+ O3 arrow NO2 +O2 ) between nitricoxide (NO) and ozone (O3 ) is used. For a liquid flow, the saponification reaction(NaOH+HCOOCH3 arrow HCOONa+CH_3OH) between sodiumhydroxide(NaOH) and methylformate(HCOOCH_3) is used. The both cases are moderately fast reactions. Therefore, reactive scalar statistics are affected by turbulent mixing. The results of caliculation are compared with experimental data of Komori et al.(1994) and Bilger et al.(1991)

  20. Irreversible Entropy Production in Two-Phase Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okongo, Nora

    2003-01-01

    This report presents a study of dissipation (irreversible production of entropy) in three-dimensional, temporal mixing layers laden with evaporating liquid drops. The purpose of the study is to examine the effects of evaporating drops on the development of turbulent features in flows. Direct numerical simulations were performed to analyze transitional states of three mixing layers: one without drops, and two that included drops at different initial mass loadings. Without drops, the dissipation is essentially due to viscous effects. It was found that in the presence of drops, the largest contribution to dissipation was made by heating and evaporation of the drops, and that at large length scales, this contribution is positive (signifying that the drops reduce turbulence), while at small scales, this contribution is negative (the drops increase turbulence). The second largest contribution to dissipation was found to be associated with the chemical potential, which leads to an increase in turbulence at large scales and a decrease in turbulence at small scales. The next smaller contribution was found to be that of viscosity. The fact that viscosity effects are only third in order of magnitude in the dissipation is in sharp contrast to the situation for the mixing layer without the drops. The next smaller contribution - that of the drag and momentum of the vapor from the drops - was found to be negative at lower mass loading but to become positive at higher mass loading.

  1. Numerical investigation of algebraic oceanic turbulent mixing-layer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón-Rebollo, T.; Gómez-Mármol, M.; Rubino, S.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the finite-time and asymptotic behaviour of algebraic turbulent mixing-layer models by numerical simulation. We compare the performances given by three different settings of the eddy viscosity. We consider Richardson number-based vertical eddy viscosity models. Two of these are classical algebraic turbulence models usually used in numerical simulations of global oceanic circulation, i.e. the Pacanowski-Philander and the Gent models, while the other one is a more recent model (Bennis et al., 2010) proposed to prevent numerical instabilities generated by physically unstable configurations. The numerical schemes are based on the standard finite element method. We perform some numerical tests for relatively large deviations of realistic initial conditions provided by the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO) array. These initial conditions correspond to states close to mixing-layer profiles, measured on the Equatorial Pacific region called the West-Pacific Warm Pool. We conclude that mixing-layer profiles could be considered as kinds of "absorbing configurations" in finite time that asymptotically evolve to steady states under the application of negative surface energy fluxes.

  2. The stability of compressible mixing layers in binary gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozusko, F.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the inviscid two-dimensional spatial stability of a parallel compressible mixing layer in a binary gas. The parameters of this study are the Mach number of the fast stream, the ratio of the velocity of the slow stream to that of the fast stream, the ratio of the temperatures, the composition of the gas in the slow stream and in the fast stream, and the frequency of the disturbance wave. The ratio of the molecular weight of the slow stream to that of the fast stream is found to be an important quantity and is used as an independent variable in presenting the stability characteristics of the flow. It is shown that differing molecular weights have a significant effect on the neutral-mode phase speeds, the phase speeds of the unstable modes, the maximum growth rates and the unstable frequency range of the disturbances. The molecular weight ratio is a reasonable predictor of the stability trends. We have further demonstrated that the normalized growth rate as a function of the convective Mach number is relatively insensitive (Approx. 25%) to changes in the composition of the mixing layer. Thus, the normalized growth rate is a key element when considering the stability of compressible mixing layers, since once the basic stability characteristics for a particular combination of gases is known at zero Mach number, the decrease in growth rates due to compressibility effects at the larger convective Mach numbers is somewhat predictable.

  3. Optical transfer function of the supersonic mixing layer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiong; Yi, Shihe; Jiang, Zongfu; He, Lin; Wang, Xiaohu

    2012-12-01

    The optical path difference (OPD) of the supersonic mixing layer with convective Mach number 0.5 is measured using the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering technique, and its short-exposure optical transfer function (OTF) is computed with the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The OPD is analyzed from the viewpoint of structure function, and remarkable power law behavior is found. The power exponent is computed and analyzed. Taking the advantage of POD in capturing the energy of a signal, we present a model for the temporal evolution of OPD, which combines the deterministic and random factors together. With this model, the short-exposure OTF of the mixing layer is computed and analyzed. The amplitude modulation is evident at low frequencies, and it is almost negligible at high frequencies. The imaginary part of OTF for the mixing layer with developed vortex structures is of considerable amplitude, and the phase modulation becomes important for image degradation. We compare this phenomenon with the early result in aero-optics and explain it with the non-Gaussian statistics of OPD. PMID:23455913

  4. Modeling and diagnosing interface mix in layered ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C. R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Clark, D. S.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D. D.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    Mixing at the fuel-ablator interface of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion can arise from an unfavorable in-flight Atwood number between the cryogenic DT fuel and the ablator. High-Z dopant is typically added to the ablator to control the Atwood number, but recent high-density carbon (HDC) capsules have been shot at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) without this added dopant. Highly resolved post-shot modeling of these implosions shows that there was significant mixing of ablator material into the dense DT fuel. This mix lowers the fuel density and results in less overall compression, helping to explain the measured ratio of down scattered-to-primary neutrons. Future experimental designs will seek to improve this issue through adding dopant and changing the x-ray spectra with a different hohlraum wall material. To test these changes, we are designing an experimental platform to look at the growth of this mixing layer. This technique uses side-on radiography to measure the spatial extent of an embedded high-Z tracer layer near the interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. D.O.E. by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Lipids from the nacreous and prismatic layers of two Pteriomorpha mollusc shells.

    PubMed

    Farre, B; Dauphin, Y

    2009-02-01

    Mollusc shells are acellular biominerals, in which macromolecular structures are intimately associated with mineral phases. Most studies are devoted to proteins, despite sugars have been described. Lipids were extracted from the calcite prismatic and aragonite nacreous layer of two mollusc shells. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry shows that lipids are present in both samples, but they are not similar. Thin layer chromatography confirms that lipids are different in the two studied layers, so that it may be suggested they are species-dependant. Although not yet deciphered, their role in biomineralization and fossilisation processes is probably important.

  6. Direct simulation of high-speed mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukunda, H. S.; Sekar, B.; Carpenter, M. H.; Drummond, J. Philip; Kumar, Ajay

    1992-01-01

    A computational study of a nonreacting high-speed mixing layer is performed. A higher order algorithm with sufficient grid points is used to resolve all relevant scales. In all cases, a temporal free-stream disturbance is introduced. The resulting flow is time-sampled to generate a statistical cross section of the flow properties. The studies are conducted at two convective Mach numbers, three free-stream turbulence intensities, three Reynolds numbers, and two types of initial profiles-hyperbolic tangent (tanh) and boundary layer. The boundary-layer profile leads to more realistic predictions of the transition processes. The predicted transition Reynolds number of 0.18 x 10(exp 6) compares well with experimental data. Normalized vortex spacings for the boundary-layer case are about 3.5 and compare favorably with the 1.5 to 2.5 found in experimental measurements. The tanh profile produces spacings of about 10. The growth rate of the layer is shown to be moderately affected by the initial disturbance field, but comparison with experimental data shows moderate agreement. For the boundary-layer case, it is shown that noise at the Strouhal number of 0.007 is selectively amplified and shows little Reynolds number dependence.

  7. DNS and LES of a Shear-Free Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knaepen, B.; Debliquy, O.; Carati, D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this work is twofold. First, given the computational resources available today, it is possible to reach, using DNS, higher Reynolds numbers than in Briggs et al.. In the present study, the microscale Reynolds numbers reached in the low- and high-energy homogeneous regions are, respectively, 32 and 69. The results reported earlier can thus be complemented and their robustness in the presence of increased turbulence studied. The second aim of this work is to perform a detailed and documented LES of the shear-free mixing layer. In that respect, the creation of a DNS database at higher Reynolds number is necessary in order to make meaningful LES assessments. From the point of view of LES, the shear-free mixing-layer is interesting since it allows one to test how traditional LES models perform in the presence of an inhomogeneity without having to deal with difficult numerical issues. Indeed, as argued in Briggs et al., it is possible to use a spectral code to study the shear-free mixing layer and one can thus focus on the accuracy of the modelling while avoiding contamination of the results by commutation errors etc. This paper is organized as follows. First we detail the initialization procedure used in the simulation. Since the flow is not statistically stationary, this initialization procedure has a fairly strong influence on the evolution. Although we will focus here on the shear-free mixing layer, the method proposed in the present work can easily be used for other flows with one inhomogeneous direction. The next section of the article is devoted to the description of the DNS. All the relevant parameters are listed and comparison with the Veeravalli & Warhaft experiment is performed. The section on the LES of the shear-free mixing layer follows. A detailed comparison between the filtered DNS data and the LES predictions is presented. It is shown that simple eddy viscosity models perform very well for the present test case, most probably because the

  8. Design and calibration of the mixing layer and wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed account of the design, assembly and calibration of a wind tunnel specifically designed for free-shear layer research is contained. The construction of this new facility was motivated by a strong interest in the study of plane mixing layers with varying initial and operating conditions. The Mixing Layer Wind tunnel is located in the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center. The tunnel consists of two separate legs which are driven independently by centrifugal blowers connected to variable speed motors. The blower/motor combinations are sized such that one is smaller than the other, giving maximum flow speeds of about 20 and 40 m/s, respectively. The blower speeds can either be set manually or via the Microvax II computer. The two streams are allowed to merge in the test section at the sharp trailing edge of a slowly tapering splitter plate. The test section is 36 cm in the cross-stream direction, 91 cm in the spanwise direction and 366 cm in length. One test section side-wall is slotted for probe access and adjustable so that the streamwise pressure gradient may be controlled. The wind tunnel is also equipped with a computer controlled, three-dimensional traversing system which is used to investigate the flow fields with pressure and hot-wire instrumentation. The wind tunnel calibration results show that the mean flow in the test section is uniform to within plus or minus 0.25 pct and the flow angularity is less than 0.25 deg. The total streamwise free-stream turbulence intensity level is approximately 0.15 pct. Currently the wind tunnel is being used in experiments designed to study the three-dimensional structure of plane mixing layers and wakes.

  9. Solid lipid nanodispersions containing mixed lipid core and a polar heterolipid: characterization.

    PubMed

    Attama, A A; Schicke, B C; Paepenmüller, T; Müller-Goymann, C C

    2007-08-01

    This paper describes the characterization of solid lipid nanodispersions (SLN) prepared with a 1:1 mixture of theobroma oil and goat fat as the main lipid matrix and Phospholipon 90G (P90G) as a stabilizer heterolipid, using polysorbate 80 as the mobile surfactant, with a view to applying the SLN in drug delivery. The 1:1 lipid mixture and P90G constituting the lipid matrix was first homogeneously prepared by fusion. Thereafter, the SLN were formulated with a gradient of polysorbate 80 and constant lipid matrix concentration by melt-high pressure homogenisation. The SLN were characterized by time-resolved particle size analysis, zeta potential and osmotic pressure measurements, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and isothermal heat conduction microcalorimetry (IMC) which monitors the in situ crystallization were also carried out on the SLN containing P90G and 1.0 % w/w of polysorbate 80. The results obtained in these studies were compared with SLN prepared with theobroma oil with and without phospholipid. Particle size analysis of SLN indicated reduction in size with increase in concentration of mobile surfactant and was in the lower nanometer range after 3 months except SLN prepared without P90G or polysorbate 80. The lipid nanoparticles had negative potentials after 3 months. WAXD and DSC studies revealed low crystalline SLN after 3 months of storage except in WAXD of SLN formulated with 1.0 % w/w polysorbate 80. TEM micrograph of the SLN containing 1.0 % w/w polysorbate 80 revealed discrete particles whose sizes were in consonance with the static light scattering measurement. In situ crystallization studies in IMC revealed delayed crystallization of the SLN with 1.0 % w/w polysorbate 80. Results indicate lipid mixtures produced SLN with lower crystallinity and higher particle sizes compared with SLN prepared with theobroma oil alone with or without P90G, and would lead to higher

  10. Configuration of PKCα-C2 Domain Bound to Mixed SOPC/SOPS Lipid Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Hao; Málková, Šárka; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Long, Fei; Garde, Shekhar; Cho, Wonhwa; Schlossman, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract X-ray reflectivity measurements are used to determine the configuration of the C2 domain of protein kinase Cα (PKCα-C2) bound to a lipid monolayer of a 7:3 mixture of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoserine supported on a buffered aqueous solution. The reflectivity is analyzed in terms of the known crystallographic structure of PKCα-C2 and a slab model representation of the lipid layer. The configuration of lipid-bound PKCα-C2 is described by two angles that define its orientation, θ = 35° ± 10° and ϕ =210° ± 30°, and a penetration depth (=7.5 ± 2 Å) into the lipid layer. In this structure, the β-sheets of PKCα-C2 are nearly perpendicular to the lipid layer and the domain penetrates into the headgroup region of the lipid layer, but not into the tailgroup region. This configuration of PKCα-C2 determined by our x-ray reflectivity is consistent with many previous findings, particularly mutational studies, and also provides what we believe is new molecular insight into the mechanism of PKCα enzyme activation. Our analysis method, which allows us to test all possible protein orientations, shows that our data cannot be explained by a protein that is orientated parallel to the membrane, as suggested by earlier work. PMID:19917234

  11. Effects of viscosity variations in temporal mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguelmimt, N.; Danaila, L.; Hadjadj, A.

    2014-08-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to assess the effects of viscosity variations in low-speed temporally-evolving turbulent mixing layer. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are performed for several viscosity ratios, Rv = vhigh/vlow, varying between 1 and 9, whereas the upper and lower streams are of equal density. The space-time evolution of Variable-Viscosity Flow (VVF) is compared with the Constant-Viscosity Flow (CVF), for which Rv = 1. The initial Reynolds number, based on the initial momentum thickness, δθ,0, is Reδθ,0 = 160 for the considered cases. The study focuses on the first stages of the temporal evolution of the mixing-layer. It is shown that in VVF (with respect to CVF): (i) the birth of turbulent fluctuations is accelerated; (ii) large-scale quantities, i.e. mean longitudinal velocity and momentum thickness, are affected by the viscosity variations, thus dispelling the myth that viscosity is a 'small-scale quantity that does not affect the large scales'; (iii) the velocity fluctuations are enhanced for VVF. In particular, the turbulent kinetic energy peaks earlier and is three times larger for VVF than CVF at the earliest stage of the mixing, and (iv) the transport equation for the turbulent kinetic energy is derived and favourably compared with simulations data.

  12. A comparison of hydrographically and optically derived mixed layer depths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, D.G.; Zaneveld, J.R.V.; Boss, E.; Gardner, W.D.; Richardson, M.J.; Mishonov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Efforts to understand and model the dynamics of the upper ocean would be significantly advanced given the ability to rapidly determine mixed layer depths (MLDs) over large regions. Remote sensing technologies are an ideal choice for achieving this goal. This study addresses the feasibility of estimating MLDs from optical properties. These properties are strongly influenced by suspended particle concentrations, which generally reach a maximum at pycnoclines. The premise therefore is to use a gradient in beam attenuation at 660 nm (c660) as a proxy for the depth of a particle-scattering layer. Using a global data set collected during World Ocean Circulation Experiment cruises from 1988-1997, six algorithms were employed to compute MLDs from either density or temperature profiles. Given the absence of published optically based MLD algorithms, two new methods were developed that use c660 profiles to estimate the MLD. Intercomparison of the six hydrographically based algorithms revealed some significant disparities among the resulting MLD values. Comparisons between the hydrographical and optical approaches indicated a first-order agreement between the MLDs based on the depths of gradient maxima for density and c660. When comparing various hydrographically based algorithms, other investigators reported that inherent fluctuations of the mixed layer depth limit the accuracy of its determination to 20 m. Using this benchmark, we found a ???70% agreement between the best hydrographical-optical algorithm pairings. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Atomic View of Calcium-Induced Clustering of Phosphatidylserine in Mixed Lipid Bilayers†

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, John M.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Clay, Mary C.; Nieuwkoop, Andrew J.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Morrissey, James H.; Rienstra, Chad M.

    2011-01-01

    Membranes play key regulatory roles in biological processes, with bilayer composition exerting marked effects on binding affinities and catalytic activities of a number of membrane-associated proteins. In particular, proteins involved in diverse processes such as vesicle fusion, intracellular signaling cascades, and blood coagulation interact specifically with anionic lipids such as phosphatidylserine (PS) in the presence of Ca2+ ions. While Ca2+ is suspected to induce PS clustering in mixed phospholipid bilayers, the detailed structural effects of this ion on anionic lipids are not established. In this study, combining magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR (SSNMR) measurements of isotopically labeled serine headgroups in mixed lipid bilayers with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of PS lipid bilayers in the presence of different counterions, we provide site-resolved insights into the effects of Ca2+ on the structure and dynamics of lipid bilayers. Ca2+-induced conformational changes of PS in mixed bilayers are observed in both liposomes and Nanodiscs, a nanoscale membrane-mimetic of bilayer patches. Site-resolved multidimensional correlation SSNMR spectra of bilayers containing 13C, 15N-labeled PS demonstrate that Ca2+ ions promote two major PS headgroup conformations, which are well resolved in two-dimensional 13C-13C, 15N-13C and 31P-13C spectra. The results of MD simulations performed on PS lipid bilayers in the presence or absence of Ca2+ provide an atomic view of the conformational effects underlying the observed spectra. PMID:21294564

  14. Turbulence in the upper-ocean mixed layer.

    PubMed

    D'Asaro, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Nearly all operational models of upper-ocean mixing assume that the turbulence responsible for this mixing is driven by the atmospheric fluxes of momentum, heat, and moisture and the shear imposed by the ocean circulation. This idealization is supported by historical measurements of dissipation rate within the boundary layer. Detailed measurements made recently by many investigators and supported by theoretical and numerical results have found significant deviations from this classical view attributable to the influence of surface waves. Although a review of these measurements finds strong support for the influence of waves-and, in particular, for the predictions of large-eddy simulations, including the Craik-Leibovich vortex force-there are insufficient data to give definitive support to a new paradigm.

  15. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  16. Vertical and horizontal mixing in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glanville, Anne Alexandra

    Nearly all air enters the stratosphere through a single layer in the tropics. The tropical tropopause layer (TTL) is a transition region between the troposphere and stratosphere and its roles include regulating stratospheric chemistry and surface climate. Multiscale dynamics existing in the TTL range from transient convection to the hemispheric wave-driven circulation and the relative influences of these processes still remain unclear. This study pays special attention to vertical and horizontal mixing which are associated with breaking gravity waves and Rossby waves, respectively. Our study quantifies the roles of these dynamics by taking advantage of the conservative nature of water vapor in the lower stratosphere. Unable to change concentration in the lowermost stratosphere after passing through the cold point, water vapor becomes a tracer for total transport and its signal is known as the tape recorder. This tape recorder is studied using observations, reanalysis data, a chemistry-climate model (CCM), and simple idealized modeling. Modifying past methods, we are able to capture the seasonal cycle of effective transport in the TTL and we introduce seasonally-dependent dynamics to a one-dimensional model and perform a parameter-sweep to test all possible dynamical combinations. Simulating with unrealistic annual mean transports results in bimodality where either vertical advection or vertical mixing dominate. The solutions that depend on amplified vertical advection disappear when seasonally-dependent transports are used. Overall, all datasets show that vertical mixing is as important to TTL transport as vertical advection itself even during boreal winter when advection peaks. The reanalysis and CCM have increased effective transport compared to observations, however, they rely on different dynamics. The reanalysis has amplified vertical mixing while the CCM has amplified vertical advection. This hints at the possible influence of spurious diffusion from data

  17. Mixed Layers of Nonionic Dendritic Amphiphiles and DPPC at the Water Surface.

    PubMed

    Degen, Patrick; Wieland, D C Florian; Strötges, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Nonionic dendritic amphiphiles that self-assemble into defined supramolecular aggregates are useful for the efficient solubilization of active agents, for example, in drug delivery. We investigated a new class of dendritic amphiphiles based on a hydrophilic polyol dendron head connected to a two-chain hydrophobic block. In analogy to phospholipids, these molecules form well-organized layers in bulk (vesicles) or at the water surface (Langmuir monolayer). The actual study focuses on the phase behavior and microscopic structure of mixed Langmuir layers of theses dendritic amphiphiles with the well-known phospholipid DPPC. The combination of surface pressure area isotherms with X-ray grazing incident diffraction and Brewster angle microscopy gives us information on the phase behavior of the mixed monolayers and the orientation of the amphiphiles inside the condensed domains with molecular resolution. We could prove that the dendritic generation and, by this, the headgroup size of the amphiphilic molecules have a significant influence on their interaction with DPPC at the air-water interface. Thus, our findings are important for the understanding of mixed lipid membranes in general as well as for the preparation of artificial membranes and vesicles with adjustable properties, e.g., their drug delivery potential. PMID:26447650

  18. Prediction of heat release effects on a mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farshchi, M.

    1986-01-01

    A fully second-order closure model for turbulent reacting flows is suggested based on Favre statistics. For diffusion flames the local thermodynamic state is related to single conserved scalar. The properties of pressure fluctuations are analyzed for turbulent flows with fluctuating density. Closure models for pressure correlations are discussed and modeled transport equations for Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation, density-velocity correlations, scalar moments and dissipation are presented and solved, together with the mean equations for momentum and mixture fraction. Solutions of these equations are compared with the experimental data for high heat release free mixing layers of fluorine and hydrogen in a nitrogen diluent.

  19. A mixing layer theory for flow resistance in shallow streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katul, Gabriel; Wiberg, Patricia; Albertson, John; Hornberger, George

    2002-11-01

    A variety of surface roughness characterizations have emerged from nineteenth and twentieth century studies of channel hydraulics. When the water depth h is much larger than the characteristic roughness height ks, roughness formulations such as Manning's n and the friction factor f can be explicitly related to the momentum roughness height zo in the log-law formulation for turbulent boundary layers, thereby unifying roughness definitions for a given surface. However, when h is comparable to (or even smaller than) ks, the log-law need not be valid. Using a newly proposed mixing layer analogy for the inflectional velocity profile within and just above the roughness layer, a model for the flow resistance in shallow flows is developed. The key model parameter is the characteristic length scale describing the depth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz wave instability. It is shown that the new theory, originally developed for canopy turbulence, recovers much of the earlier roughness results for flume experiments and shallow gravel streams. This study is the first to provide such a unifying framework between canopy atmospheric turbulence and shallow gravel stream roughness characterization. The broader implication of this study is to support the merger of a wealth of surface roughness characterizations independently developed in nineteenth and twentieth century hydraulics and atmospheric sciences and to establish a connection between roughness formulations across traditionally distinct boundary layer types.

  20. Effect of mixed layer crystallinity on the performance of mixed heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Byeongseop; Rolin, Cedric; Zimmerman, Jeramy D; Forrest, Stephen R

    2014-05-01

    Organic vapor-phase deposition (OVPD) is used to grow tetraphenyldibenzoperiflanthen (DBP):C70 mixed heterojunction photovoltaic devices. Compared with vacuum thermal evaporation (VTE), the OVPD-grown film develops nanocrystalline domains of C70. Optimized OVPD-grown OPVs have a 61% fill factor for a 100 nm active layer thickness, whereas VTE-grown devices have a 47% fill factor at the same thickness.

  1. Lipid production by a mixed culture of oleaginous yeast and microalga from distillery and domestic mixed wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ling, Jiayin; Nip, Saiwa; Cheok, Wai Leong; de Toledo, Renata Alves; Shim, Hojae

    2014-12-01

    Lipid productivity by mixed culture of Rhodosporidium toruloides and Chlorella pyrenoidosa was studied using 1:1 mixed real wastewater from distillery and local municipal wastewater treatment plant with initial soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) around 25,000 mg/L, initial cell density of 2×10(7) cells/mL (yeast) and 5×10(6) cells/mL (microalga), at 30 °C and 2.93 W/m2 (2000 lux, 12:12 h light and dark cycles). Lipid content and lipid yield achieved were 63.45±2.58% and 4.60±0.36 g/L with the associated removal efficiencies for SCOD, total nitrogen (TN), and total phosphorus (TP) at 95.34±0.07%, 51.18±2.17%, and 89.29±4.91%, respectively, after 5 days of cultivation without the pH adjustment. Inoculation of microalgae at 40 h of the initial yeast cultivation and harvesting part of inactive biomass at 72 h by sedimentation could improve both lipid production and wastewater treatment efficiency under non-sterile conditions.

  2. The lipid layer of tears: dependent on meibomian gland function.

    PubMed

    McCulley, James P; Shine, Ward E

    2004-03-01

    There is growing laboratory and clinical evidence implicating the meibomian glands of the eyelid as playing a critical role in the pathogenesis of various ocular surface disorders such as chronic blepharitis and dry eye. Meibomian glands produce a lipid material whose synthesis is dependent on factors such as stem cells, neurological stimulants and hormones. This lipid material is fluid, spreads easily, is a surfactant as well as an aqueous barrier, and must remain functional after a blink. Before delivery it can be modified by factors such as hormone abnormalities and even after delivery it may be modified by lipases produced by ocular bacteria.

  3. Calcium-mediated binding of DNA to 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-containing mixed lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P; Barlow, David J; Clifton, Luke A; Hughes, Arwel V; Webster, John R P; Green, Rebecca J; Quinn, Peter J; Lawrence, M Jayne

    2014-03-21

    The calcium-mediated interaction of DNA with monolayers of the non-toxic, zwitterionic phospholipid, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine when mixed with 50 mol% of a second lipid, either the zwitteronic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine or neutral cholesterol was investigated using a combination of surface pressure-area isotherms, Brewster angle microscopy, external reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and specular neutron reflectivity in combination with contrast variation. When calcium and DNA were both present in the aqueous subphase, changes were observed in the compression isotherms as well as the surface morphologies of the mixed lipid monolayers. In the presence of calcium and DNA, specular neutron reflectivity showed that directly underneath the head groups of the lipids comprising the monolayers, DNA occupied a layer comprising approximately 13 and 18% v/v DNA for the 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine and cholesterol-containing monolayers, respectively. The volume of the corresponding layer for 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine only containing monolayers was ∼15% v/v DNA. Furthermore regardless of the presence and nature of the second lipid and the surface pressure of the monolayer, the specular neutron reflectivity experiments showed that the DNA-containing layer was 20-27 Å thick, suggesting the presence of a well-hydrated layer of double-stranded DNA. External reflectance Fourier transform infrared studies confirmed the presence of double stranded DNA, and indicated that the strands are in the B-form conformation. The results shed light on the interaction between lipids and nucleic acid cargo as well as the role of a second lipid in lipid-based carriers for drug delivery. PMID:24652078

  4. Direct simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The report presents the results of direct numerical simulations of chemically reacting turbulent mixing layers. The work consists of two parts: (1) the development and testing of a spectral numerical computer code that treats the diffusion reaction equations; and (2) the simulation of a series of cases of chemical reactions occurring on mixing layers. The reaction considered is a binary, irreversible reaction with no heat release. The reacting species are nonpremixed. The results of the numerical tests indicate that the high accuracy of the spectral methods observed for rigid body rotation are also obtained when diffusion, reaction, and more complex flows are considered. In the simulations, the effects of vortex rollup and smaller scale turbulence on the overall reaction rates are investigated. The simulation results are found to be in approximate agreement with similarity theory. Comparisons of simulation results with certain modeling hypotheses indicate limitations in these hypotheses. The nondimensional product thickness computed from the simulations is compared with laboratory values and is found to be in reasonable agreement, especially since there are no adjustable constants in the method.

  5. Statistics of High Atwood Number Turbulent Mixing Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltzer, Jon; Livescu, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    The statistical properties of incompressible shear-driven planar mixing layers between two miscible streams of fluids with different densities are investigated by means of Direct Numerical Simulations. The simulations begin from a thin interface perturbed by a thin broadband random disturbance, and the mixing layers are allowed to develop to self-similar states. The temporal simulations are performed in unprecedented domain sizes, with grid sizes up to 6144 x 2048 x 1536, which allows turbulent structures to grow and merge naturally. This allows the flow to reach states far-removed from the initial disturbances, thereby enabling high-quality statistics to be obtained for higher moments, pdfs, and other quantities critical to developing closure models. A wide range of Atwood numbers are explored, ranging from nearly constant density to At=0.87. The consequences of increasing the density contrast are investigated for global quantities, such as growth rates, and asymmetries that form in statistical profiles. Additional simulations in smaller domains are performed to study the effects of domain size.

  6. High-productivity lipid production using mixed trophic state cultivation of Auxenochlorella (Chlorella) protothecoides.

    PubMed

    Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Hampel, Kristin H; Lane, Christopher D; Kessler, Ben A; White, Nicholas M; Moats, Kenneth M; Thomas Allnutt, F C

    2015-04-01

    A mixed trophic state production process for algal lipids for use as feedstock for renewable biofuel production was developed and deployed at subpilot scale using a green microalga, Auxenochlorella (Chlorella) protothecoides. The process is composed of two separate stages: (1) the photoautotrophic stage, focused on biomass production in open ponds, and (2) the heterotrophic stage focused on lipid production and accumulation in aerobic bioreactors using fixed carbon substrates (e.g., sugar). The process achieved biomass and lipid productivities of 0.5 and 0.27 g/L/h that were, respectively, over 250 and 670 times higher than those obtained from the photoautotrophic cultivation stage. The biomass oil content (over 60% w/DCW) following the two-stage process was predominantly monounsaturated fatty acids (~82%) and largely free of contaminating pigments that is more suitable for biodiesel production than photosynthetically generated lipid. Similar process performances were obtained using cassava hydrolysate as an alternative feedstock to glucose.

  7. Charged particles interacting with a mixed supported lipid bilayer as a biomimetic pulmonary surfactant.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, B; Harb, F; Rieu, J P; Berthier, Y; Tinland, B; Trunfio-Sfarghiu, A-M

    2014-08-01

    This study shows the interactions of charged particles with mixed supported lipid bilayers (SLB) as biomimetic pulmonary surfactants. We tested two types of charged particles: positively charged and negatively charged particles. Two parameters were measured: adsorption density of particles on the SLB and the diffusion coefficient of lipids by FRAPP techniques as a measure of interaction strength between particles and lipids. We found that positively charged particles do not adsorb on the bilayer, probably due to the electrostatic repulsion between positively charged parts of the lipid head and the positive groups on the particle surface, therefore no variation in diffusion coefficient of lipid molecules was observed. On the contrary, the negatively charged particles, driven by electrostatic interactions are adsorbed onto the supported bilayer. The adsorption of negatively charged particles increases with the zeta-potential of the particle. Consecutively, the diffusion coefficient of lipids is reduced probably due to binding onto the lipid heads which slows down their Brownian motion. The results are directly relevant for understanding the interactions of particulate matter with pulmonary structures which could lead to pulmonary surfactant inhibition or deficiency causing severe respiratory distress or pathologies.

  8. Bending elasticity of charged surfactant layers: the effect of mixing.

    PubMed

    Bergström, L Magnus

    2006-08-01

    Expressions have been derived from which the spontaneous curvature (H(0)), bending rigidity (k(c)), and saddle-splay constant (k(c)) of mixed monolayers and bilayers may be calculated from molecular and solution properties as well as experimentally available quantities such as the macroscopic hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfacial tension. Three different cases of binary surfactant mixtures have been treated in detail: (i) mixtures of an ionic and a nonionic surfactant, (ii) mixtures of two oppositely charged surfactants, and (iii) mixtures of two ionic surfactants with identical headgroups but different tail volumes. It is demonstrated that k(c)H(0), k(c), and k(c) for mixtures of surfactants with flexible tails may be subdivided into one contribution that is due to bending properties of an infinitely thin surface as calculated from the Poisson-Boltzmann mean field theory and one contribution appearing as a result of the surfactant film having a finite thickness with the surface of charge located somewhat outside the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface. As a matter of fact, the picture becomes completely different as finite layer thickness effects are taken into account, and as a result, the spontaneous curvature is extensively lowered whereas the bending rigidity is raised. Furthermore, an additional contribution to k(c) is present for surfactant mixtures but is absent for k(c)H(0) and k(c). This contribution appears as a consequence of the minimization of the free energy with respect to the composition of a surfactant layer that is open in the thermodynamic sense and must always be negative (i.e., k(c) is generally found to be brought down by the process of mixing two or more surfactants). The magnitude of the reduction of k(c) increases with increasing asymmetry between two surfactants with respect to headgroup charge number and tail volume. As a consequence, the bending rigidity assumes the lowest values for layers formed in mixtures of two oppositely charged

  9. Model of Mixing Layer With Multicomponent Evaporating Drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Le Clercq, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model of a three-dimensional mixing layer laden with evaporating fuel drops composed of many chemical species has been derived. The study is motivated by the fact that typical real petroleum fuels contain hundreds of chemical species. Previously, for the sake of computational efficiency, spray studies were performed using either models based on a single representative species or models based on surrogate fuels of at most 15 species. The present multicomponent model makes it possible to perform more realistic simulations by accounting for hundreds of chemical species in a computationally efficient manner. The model is used to perform Direct Numerical Simulations in continuing studies directed toward understanding the behavior of liquid petroleum fuel sprays. The model includes governing equations formulated in an Eulerian and a Lagrangian reference frame for the gas and the drops, respectively. This representation is consistent with the expected volumetrically small loading of the drops in gas (of the order of 10 3), although the mass loading can be substantial because of the high ratio (of the order of 103) between the densities of liquid and gas. The drops are treated as point sources of mass, momentum, and energy; this representation is consistent with the drop size being smaller than the Kolmogorov scale. Unsteady drag, added-mass effects, Basset history forces, and collisions between the drops are neglected, and the gas is assumed calorically perfect. The model incorporates the concept of continuous thermodynamics, according to which the chemical composition of a fuel is described probabilistically, by use of a distribution function. Distribution functions generally depend on many parameters. However, for mixtures of homologous species, the distribution can be approximated with acceptable accuracy as a sole function of the molecular weight. The mixing layer is initially laden with drops in its lower stream, and the drops are colder than the gas

  10. Four characteristics and a model of an effective tear film lipid layer (TFLL).

    PubMed

    King-Smith, P Ewen; Bailey, Melissa D; Braun, Richard J

    2013-10-01

    It is proposed that a normal, effective tear film lipid layer (TFLL) should have the following four characteristics: 1) high evaporation resistance to prevent water loss and consequent hyperosmolarity; 2) respreadability, so it will return to its original state after the compression-expansion cycle of the blink; 3) fluidity sufficient to avoid blocking secretion from meibomian glands; 4) gel-like and incompressible structure that can resist forces that may tend to disrupt it. These characteristics tend to be incompatible; for example, lipids that form good evaporation barriers tend to be disrupted by compression-expansion cycles. It is noted that clues about the function and organization of the TFLL can be obtained by comparison with other biological lipid layers, such as lung surfactant and the lipid evaporation barrier of the skin. In an attempt to satisfy the conflicting characteristics, a "multilamellar sandwich model" of the TFLL is proposed, having features in common with the skin evaporation barrier.

  11. Four Characteristics and a Model of an Effective Tear Film Lipid Layer (TFLL)

    PubMed Central

    King-Smith, P. Ewen; Bailey, Melissa D.; Braun, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    It is proposed that a normal, effective tear film lipid layer (TFLL) should have the following four characteristics: 1) high evaporation resistance to prevent water loss and consequent hyperosmolarity; 2) respreadability, so it will return to its original state after the compression-expansion cycle of the blink; 3) fluidity sufficient to avoid blocking secretion from meibomian glands; 4) gel-like and incompressible structure that can resist forces that may tend to disrupt it. These characteristics tend to be incompatible; for example, lipids that form good evaporation barriers tend to be disrupted by compression-expansion cycles. It is noted that clues about the function and organization of the TFLL can be obtained by comparison with other biological lipid layers, such as lung surfactant and the lipid evaporation barrier of the skin. In an attempt to satisfy the conflicting characteristics, a “multilamellar sandwich model” of the TFLL is proposed, having features in common with the skin evaporation barrier. PMID:24112227

  12. Direct numerical simulations of a reacting turbulent mixing layer by a pseudospectral-spectral element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, Patrick A.; Givi, Peyman

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the implementation of the spectral-element technique for simulating a chemically reacting, spatially developing turbulent mixing layer. Attention is given to experimental and numerical studies that have investigated the development, evolution, and mixing characteristics of shear flows. A mathematical formulation is presented of the physical configuration of the spatially developing reacting mixing layer, in conjunction with a detailed representation of the spectral-element method's application to the numerical simulation of mixing layers. Results from 2D and 3D calculations of chemically reacting mixing layers are given.

  13. Computation of three-dimensional mixed convective boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadepalli, Prashandt; Rahman, Muhammad M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the numerical solution of heat and mass transfer during cross-flow (orthogonal) mixed convection. In this class of flow, a buoyancy-driven transport in the vertical direction and a forced convective flow in the horizontal direction results in a three-dimensional boundary layer structure adjacent to the plate. The rates of heat and mass transfer are determined by a combined influence of the two transport processes. The equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration were solved along with appropriate boundary conditions to determine the distributions of velocity components, temperature, and concentration across the thickness of the boundary layer at different locations on the plate. Results were expressed in dimensionless form using Reynolds number, Richardson number for heat transfer, Richardson number for mass transfer, Prandtl number, and Schmidt number as parameters. It was found that the transport is dominated by buoyancy at smaller vertical locations and at larger distances away from the forced convection leading edge. Effects of forced convection appeared to be very strong at smaller horizontal distances from the leading edge. The cross stream forced convection enhanced the rate of heat and mass transfer by a very significant amount.

  14. Online Detection of Mixed Layer Depth for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, S.; Estlin, T.; Castano, R.; Woodward, G.; Gierach, M. M.; Thompson, A. F.; Schaffer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The accurate determination of the mixed layer depth (MLD) plays a crucial role in studying ocean dynamics and climate change. Various methods to estimate MLD have been proposed [1, 2]. However there is no current consensus on the best model, which leads to large uncertainty in the estimation. The variability, coupled with the complexity of physical, chemical and biological processes involved and the uncertainty and instabilities of the upper ocean surface, makes estimating MLD a challenging task. MLD varies significantly, even across a small spatial area (< 10km), and this depth is fluctuating, even over a short period of time (< 24 hrs), depending on the season. This abstract describes our proposed online algorithm for detecting mixed layer depth that would operate onboard an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). Using an online method permits a more adaptive approach to estimating MLD. Our proposed algorithm is based on an ensemble approach, which includes data mining techniques for real-time peak and change detection, learned seasonal variability profile, combined with MLD estimation criteria in [1]. In this study, we analyze measurements using glider data collected from the OSMOSIS (Ocean Surface Mixing, Ocean Submesoscale Interaction Study) project, concatenated into a year-long time series [3]. The glider data consists of nine full-depth moorings, which were deployed in a 15 km by 15 km box at the Porcupine Abyssal Plain in the northeast Atlantic, centered at 16.2°W, 48.7°N. Our algorithm utilizes direct measurements of salinity, temperature, depth and time and the design is based on the spatial and temporal variability of MLD learned. We will present our initial work on tracking the MLD based on real-time simulations using the OSMOSIS glider data and discussed for the case of deploying on a single AUV. Using an online algorithm for estimating MLD in-situ enables the system to rapidly adapt to the variability in a real-world environment and also allows for

  15. Biomimetic interfaces based on S-layer proteins, lipid membranes and functional biomolecules

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B.

    2014-01-01

    Designing and utilization of biomimetic membrane systems generated by bottom-up processes is a rapidly growing scientific and engineering field. Elucidation of the supramolecular construction principle of archaeal cell envelopes composed of S-layer stabilized lipid membranes led to new strategies for generating highly stable functional lipid membranes at meso- and macroscopic scale. In this review, we provide a state-of-the-art survey of how S-layer proteins, lipids and polymers may be used as basic building blocks for the assembly of S-layer-supported lipid membranes. These biomimetic membrane systems are distinguished by a nanopatterned fluidity, enhanced stability and longevity and, thus, provide a dedicated reconstitution matrix for membrane-active peptides and transmembrane proteins. Exciting areas in the (lab-on-a-) biochip technology are combining composite S-layer membrane systems involving specific membrane functions with the silicon world. Thus, it might become possible to create artificial noses or tongues, where many receptor proteins have to be exposed and read out simultaneously. Moreover, S-layer-coated liposomes and emulsomes copying virus envelopes constitute promising nanoformulations for the production of novel targeting, delivery, encapsulation and imaging systems. PMID:24812051

  16. Phase changes in mixed lipid/polymer membranes by multivalent nanoparticle recognition.

    PubMed

    Olubummo, Adekunle; Schulz, Matthias; Schöps, Regina; Kressler, Jörg; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2014-01-14

    Selective addressing of membrane components in complex membrane mixtures is important for many biological processes. The present paper investigates the recognition between multivalent surface functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) and amphiphilic block copolymers (BCPs), which are successfully incorporated into lipid membranes. The concept involves the supramolecular recognition between hybrid membranes (composed of a mixture of a lipid (DPPC or DOPC), an amphiphilic triazine-functionalized block copolymer TRI-PEO13-b-PIB83 (BCP 2), and nonfunctionalized BCPs (PEO17-b-PIB87 BCP 1)) with multivalent (water-soluble) nanoparticles able to recognize the triazine end group of the BCP 2 at the membrane surface via supramolecular hydrogen bonds. CdSe-NPs bearing long PEO47-thymine (THY) polymer chains on their surface specifically interacted with the 2,4-diaminotriazine (TRI) moiety of BCP 2 embedded within hybrid lipid/BCP mono- or bilayers. Experiments with GUVs from a mixture of DPPC/BCP 2 confirm selective supramolecular recognition between the THY-functionalized NPs and the TRI-functionalized polymers, finally resulting in the selective removal of BCP 2 from the hybrid vesicle membrane as proven via facetation of the originally round and smooth vesicles. GUVs (composed of DOPC/BCP 2) show that a selective removal of the polymer component from the fluid hybrid membrane results in destruction of hybrid vesicles via membrane rupture. Adsorption experiments with mixed monolayers from lipids with either BCP 2 or BCP 1 (nonfunctionalized) reveal that the THY-functionalized NPs specifically recognize BCP 2 at the air/water interface by inducing significantly higher changes in the surface pressure when compared to monolayers from nonspecifically interacting lipid/BCP 1 mixtures. Thus, recognition of multivalent NPs with specific membrane components of hybrid lipid/BCP mono- and bilayers proves the selective removal of BCPs from mixed membranes, in turn inducing membrane rupture

  17. Wind induced mixing processes in the coastal surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraunie, Philippe; Schaeffer, Amandine; Molcard, Anne; Forget, Philippe; Garreau, Pierre; Poitevin, Joel

    2010-05-01

    Mesoscale and submescale patterns participate in mixing processes in the coastal surface layer. A process oriented numerical investigation using MARS 3D code and high resolution atmospheric forcing using AROME is presented by comparison with HF radar measurements in the Gulf of Lions, Western Mediterranean Sea. As a result, wind reversal conditions have been observed to be responsible for inertial motion and anticyclonic eddy formation when vertical mixing due to internal waves is expected to erode the halocline. Acknowledgements : MeteoFrance and Ifremer support Amandine Schaeffer's PhD. This work is part of the GIRAC project in the framework of the Pole Mer http://polemerpaca.tvt.fr/ References : André G., Garreau P., Garnier V., Fraunie P., 2005. Modelled variability of the sea surface circulation in the North-western Mediterranean Sea and in the Gulf of Lions. Ocean Dynamics, 55: 294-308 André G., Garreau P., Fraunié P., (2009) Mesoscale slope current variability in the Gulf of Lions. Interpretation of in-situ measurements using a three-dimensional model, Cont. Shelf Res.29, 407-423 Bouttier F., 2007, "AROME, avenir de la prévision régionale", La Météorologie, 58, 12-20 Langlais C., Barnier B., Fraunié P. and Schiller A. 2009b: Resolving the diurnal variability of atmospheric forcing in a coastal ocean circulation model of the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean): impact on the thermodynamical state of the upper ocean. Submitted. Schaeffer A. Molcard A. Forget P. Fraunié P. Gareau P. Generation mechanism of sub-mesoscale eddy in the Gulf of Lions : radar observation and modelling. Submitted Xing J., A.M. Davies, P. Fraunié, Model studies of near-inertial motion on the continental shelf off northeast Spain : a 3D/2D model comparison study, 24p, J. Geophys. Res., 109, C01017, doi:10.1029/2003JC001822, 2004.

  18. Parameterization of large-scale turbulent diffusion in the presence of both well-mixed and weakly mixed patchy layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osman, M. K.; Hocking, W. K.; Tarasick, D. W.

    2016-06-01

    Vertical diffusion and mixing of tracers in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) are not uniform, but primarily occur due to patches of turbulence that are intermittent in time and space. The effective diffusivity of regions of patchy turbulence is related to statistical parameters describing the morphology of turbulent events, such as lifetime, number, width, depth and local diffusivity (i.e., diffusivity within the turbulent patch) of the patches. While this has been recognized in the literature, the primary focus has been on well-mixed layers, with few exceptions. In such cases the local diffusivity is irrelevant, but this is not true for weakly and partially mixed layers. Here, we use both theory and numerical simulations to consider the impact of intermediate and weakly mixed layers, in addition to well-mixed layers. Previous approaches have considered only one dimension (vertical), and only a small number of layers (often one at each time step), and have examined mixing of constituents. We consider a two-dimensional case, with multiple layers (10 and more, up to hundreds and even thousands), having well-defined, non-infinite, lengths and depths. We then provide new formulas to describe cases involving well-mixed layers which supersede earlier expressions. In addition, we look in detail at layers that are not well mixed, and, as an interesting variation on previous models, our procedure is based on tracking the dispersion of individual particles, which is quite different to the earlier approaches which looked at mixing of constituents. We develop an expression which allows determination of the degree of mixing, and show that layers used in some previous models were in fact not well mixed and so produced erroneous results. We then develop a generalized model based on two dimensional random-walk theory employing Rayleigh distributions which allows us to develop a universal formula for diffusion rates for multiple two-dimensional layers with

  19. Biophysical investigations of the structure and function of the tear fluid lipid layers and the effect of ectoine. Part B: artificial lipid films.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula; Brinkkötter, Marc; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The tear fluid lipid layer is present at the outermost part of the tear film which lines the ocular surface and functions to maintain the corneal surface moist by retarding evaporation. Instability in the structure of the tear fluid lipid layer can cause an increased rate of evaporation and thus dry eye syndrome. Ectoine has been previously shown to fluidize lipid monolayers and alter the phase behavior. In the current study we have investigated the effect of ectoine on the artificial tear fluid lipid layer composed of binary and ternary lipid mixtures of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), cholesteryl esters and tri-acyl-glycerols. The focus of our study was mainly the structural and the biophysical aspects of the artificial tear fluid lipid layer using surface activity studies and topology analysis. The presence of ectoine consistently causes an expansion of the pressure-area isotherm indicating increased intermolecular spacing. The topology studies showed the formation of droplet-like structures due to the addition of ectoine only when tri-acyl-glycerol is present in the mixture of DPPC and chol-palmitate, similar to the natural meibomian lipids. Consequently, the hypothesis of an exclusion of tri/di-acyl-glycerol from the meibomian lipid film in the presence of ectoine in the subphase is confirmed. A model describing the effect of ectoine on meibomian lipid films is further presented which may have an application for the use of ectoines in eye drops as a treatment for the dry eye syndrome.

  20. [The lipid layer of the lacrimal tear film: physiology and pathology].

    PubMed

    Lozato, P A; Pisella, P J; Baudouin, C

    2001-06-01

    The preocular tear film (POTF) is composed of a deep aqueous-mucin phase that supports a thin superficial lipid phase. The tear lipid layer (TLL), although thin, stabilizes the POTF providing a 25% surface-tension decrease and a 90-95% aqueous evaporation reduction. TLL is formed from lipids secreted by tarsal meibomian glands and spread onto the ocular surface by blinking. The TLL itself is composed of two phases. A thin and deep polar phase, adjacent to the aqueous-mucin layer, has a surfactant role. A thicker and superficial nonpolar phase has antievaporative properties. At the same time, tear lipocalins help the TLL spread and stabilize the lipid-aqueous interface. For clinical examination, TLL is directly observed with the Tearscope. POTF stability and the evaporation rate depend on the lipid layer pattern. When chronic, POTF qualitative trouble (evaporative syndrome) due to a TLL anomaly, leads to secondary ocular surface impairment with increased tear instability and self-propagation of ocular dryness. Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) results from local pathology, dermatologic disease (ocular rosacea) or iatrogenic etiology. Cosmetic use is the other principal cause of TLL destabilization. Lid hygiene is the mainstay of MGD treatment. Systemic antibiotics (cyclins) can be associated in cases of severe symptoms. Topical treatment is useful if there is marginal lid inflammation or infection.

  1. Lipids from the nacreous and prismatic layers of two Pteriomorpha Mollusc shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farre, B.; Dauphin, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Mollusc shells are the best-known Ca-carbonate biominerals. They are commonly described as a mineralized two layered structure: an outer layer composed of calcite prismatic units, and an internal layer composed of tablets of aragonite: the nacreous layer. An external organic layer (periostracum) is present in most taxa. However, the most common structure in the Mollusc shell is the aragonite crossed lamellar layer, but aragonite prisms, calcite foliated layers and homogeneous layers have been also described by Boggild (1930) in all the Mollusc orders. Since, more detailed descriptions of Bivalve shells have been done (Taylor et al., 1969, 1973). Despite the nacroprismatic arrangement is rare, calcite prismatic and aragonite nacreous layers are the best studied because of their simple 3D structure and large units. Among these Molluscs, some Bivalve species composed of these two layers are of commercial interest, such as the pearl oyster, Pinctada margaritifera, cultivated in French Polynesia to produce black pearls. It is well established that Mollusc shells are composite structures of organic and inorganic components (Hatchett, 1799; Grégoire et al., 1955; Beedham, 1958; Simkiss, 1965; Mutvei, 1969; Cuif et al., 1980; Berman et al., 1993; Kobayashi and Samata, 2006). Numerous studies are concerned with the organic matrix of the shell. Organic components are commonly obtained after a strong or mild decalcification process. They are said to consist of both a soluble and insoluble fraction. The main part of studies is dedicated to the soluble components, and among them, proteins (Grégoire et al., 1955; Grégoire, 1961; Krampitz et al., 1976; Samata et al., 1980, 2004; Weiner, 1983; Miyamoto et al., 2006). Despite the pioneering work of Wada (1980) sugars are usually neglected despite their role in biomineralization. The third component of the organic matrix of calcareous biominerals is lipids. To date, there is a paucity of information concerning the presence

  2. Chaos in a spatially-developing plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broze, J. G.; Hussain, Fazle; Buell, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    A spatially-developing plane mixing layer was analyzed for chaotic behavior. A direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations in a 2-D domain infinite in y and having inflow-outflow boundary conditions in x was used for data. Spectra, correlation dimension and the largest Lyapunov exponent were computed as functions of downstream distance x. When forced at a single (fundamental) frequency with maximum amplitude, the flow is periodic at the inflow but becomes aperiodic with increasing x. The aperiodic behavior is caused by the presence of a noisy subharmonic caused by the feedback between the necessarily nonphysical inflow and outflow boundary conditions. In order to overshadow this noise the flow was also studied with the same fundamental forcing and added random forcing of amplitude upsilon prime sub R/delta U = 0.01 at the inlet. Results were qualitatively the same in both cases: for small x, spectral peaks were sharp and dimension was nearly 1, but as x increased a narrowband spectral peak grew, spectra decayed exponentially at high frequencies and dimension increased to greater than 3. Based on these results, the flow appears to exhibit deterministic chaos. However, at no location was the largest Lyapunov exponent found to be significantly greater than zero.

  3. On the viscosity stratification in temporal mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danaila, Luminita; Taguelmimt, Noureddine; Hadjadj, Abdellah; Turbulence Team

    2015-11-01

    We assess the effects of viscosity variations in low-speed temporally-evolving turbulent mixing layer. The two streams are density-matched, but the slow fluid is Rv times more viscous than the rapid stream. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are performed for several viscosity ratios, Rv varying between 1 and 9. The space-time evolution of Variable-Viscosity Flow (VVF) is compared with that of the Constant-Viscosity Flow (CVF). The velocity fluctuations occur earlier and are more enhanced for VVF. In particular, the kinetic energy peaks earlier and is up to three times larger for VVF than for CVF at the earliest stages of the flow. Over the first stages of the flow, the temporal growth rate of the fluctuations kinetic energy is exponential, in full agreement with linear stability theory. The transport equation for the fluctuations kinetic energy is favourably compared with simulations data. The enhanced kinetic energy for VVF is mainly due to an increased production at the interface between the two fluids, in tight correlation with enlarged values of mean velocity gradient at the inflection point of the mean velocity profile. The transport equations of the one-and two-point kinetic energy show that self-preservation cannot be complete in variable-viscosity flows. ANR is acknowledged for financial support.

  4. In situ laser sensing of mixed layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgleish, Fraser; Hou, Weilin; Vuorenkoski, Anni; Nootz, Gero; Ouyang, Bing

    2013-06-01

    This paper will discuss and compare some recent oceanic test results from the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Exercise (BOTEX) cruise, where vertical profiling was conducted with both time-resolved laser backscatter measurements being acquired via a subsurface light detection and ranging (lidar) profiling instrument, and laser beam forward deflection measurements were acquired from a matrix of continuous wave (cw) laser beams (i.e. structured lighting) being imaged in the forward direction with a high speed camera over a one-way path, with both transmitter and camera firmly fixed on a rigid frame. From the latter, it was observed that when within a natural turbulent layer, the laser beams were being deflected from their still water location at the image plane, which was 8.8 meters distance from the laser dot matrix transmitter. As well as suggesting that the turbulent structures being encountered were predominately larger than the beam diameter, the magnitude of the deflection has been confirmed to correlate with the temperature dissipation rate. The profiling lidar measurements which were conducted in similar conditions, also used a narrow collimated laser beam in order to resolve small-scale spatial structure, but with the added attribute that sub-nanosecond short pulse temporal profile could potentially resolve small-scale vertical structure. In the clear waters of the Tongue of the Ocean in the Bahamas, it was hypothesized that the backscatter anomalies due to the effect of refractive index discontinuities (i.e. mixed layer turbulence) would be observable. The processed lidar data presented herein indicates that higher backscatter levels were observed in the regions of the water column which corresponded to higher turbulent mixing which occurs at the first and second themoclines. At the same test stations that the laser beam matrix and lidar measurements were conducted, turbulence measurements were made with two non-optical instruments, the Vertical Microstructure

  5. Thermal phase transition behavior of lipid layers on a single human corneocyte cell.

    PubMed

    Imai, Tomohiro; Nakazawa, Hiromitsu; Kato, Satoru

    2013-09-01

    We have improved the selected area electron diffraction method to analyze the dynamic structural change in a single corneocyte cell non-invasively stripped off from human skin surface. The improved method made it possible to obtain reliable diffraction images to trace the structural change in the intercellular lipid layers on a single corneocyte cell during heating from 24°C to 100°C. Comparison of the results with those of synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments on human stratum corneum sheets revealed that the intercellular lipid layers on a corneocyte cell exhibit essentially the same thermal phase transitions as those in a stratum corneum sheet. These results suggest that the structural features of the lipid layers are well preserved after the mechanical stripping of the corneocyte cell. Moreover, electron diffraction analyses of the thermal phase transition behaviors of the corneocyte cells that had the lipid layers with different distributions of orthorhombic and hexagonal domains at 24°C suggested that small orthorhombic domains interconnected with surrounding hexagonal domains transforms in a continuous manner into new hexagonal domains.

  6. The effects of the laminar/turbulent boundary layer states on the development of a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. F.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of the laminar/turbulent boundary layer state on the mean and rms velocities of a developing plane mixing layer was investigated. The use of commonly accepted nondimensional representations of the data confirm (at least) an approximately self-preserving condition. It is suggested that the effects of the laminar/turbulent initial condition persist in the self-preserving region.

  7. Mixed-layer simulation of buoy observations taken during Hurricane Eloise

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.J.

    1982-01-20

    A one-dimensional mixed-layer model is used to simulate observations made by a NOAA buoy in the Gulf of Mexico during Hurricane Eloise. The model-predicted SST, mixed-layer depth, and inertial current agree favorably with the observations. In addition, model experiments demonstrate the importance of the veering of the wind vector during the passage of the eye to the amplitude of the inertial current generated by the wind and the extent of vertical mixing.

  8. Lipids from the nacreous and prismatic layers of two Pteriomorpha Mollusc shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farre, B.; Dauphin, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Mollusc shells are the best-known Ca-carbonate biominerals. They are commonly described as a mineralized two layered structure: an outer layer composed of calcite prismatic units, and an internal layer composed of tablets of aragonite: the nacreous layer. An external organic layer (periostracum) is present in most taxa. However, the most common structure in the Mollusc shell is the aragonite crossed lamellar layer, but aragonite prisms, calcite foliated layers and homogeneous layers have been also described by Boggild (1930) in all the Mollusc orders. Since, more detailed descriptions of Bivalve shells have been done (Taylor et al., 1969, 1973). Despite the nacroprismatic arrangement is rare, calcite prismatic and aragonite nacreous layers are the best studied because of their simple 3D structure and large units. Among these Molluscs, some Bivalve species composed of these two layers are of commercial interest, such as the pearl oyster, Pinctada margaritifera, cultivated in French Polynesia to produce black pearls. It is well established that Mollusc shells are composite structures of organic and inorganic components (Hatchett, 1799; Grégoire et al., 1955; Beedham, 1958; Simkiss, 1965; Mutvei, 1969; Cuif et al., 1980; Berman et al., 1993; Kobayashi and Samata, 2006). Numerous studies are concerned with the organic matrix of the shell. Organic components are commonly obtained after a strong or mild decalcification process. They are said to consist of both a soluble and insoluble fraction. The main part of studies is dedicated to the soluble components, and among them, proteins (Grégoire et al., 1955; Grégoire, 1961; Krampitz et al., 1976; Samata et al., 1980, 2004; Weiner, 1983; Miyamoto et al., 2006). Despite the pioneering work of Wada (1980) sugars are usually neglected despite their role in biomineralization. The third component of the organic matrix of calcareous biominerals is lipids. To date, there is a paucity of information concerning the presence

  9. Lipid modification gives rise to two distinct Haloferax volcanii S-layer glycoprotein populations.

    PubMed

    Kandiba, Lina; Guan, Ziqiang; Eichler, Jerry

    2013-03-01

    The S-layer glycoprotein is the sole component of the protein shell surrounding Haloferax volcanii cells. The deduced amino acid sequence of the S-layer glycoprotein predicts the presence of a C-terminal membrane-spanning domain. However, several earlier observations, including the ability of EDTA to selectively solubilize the protein, are inconsistent with the presence of a trans-membrane sequence. In the present report, sequential solubilization of the S-layer glycoprotein by EDTA and then with detergent revealed the existence of two distinct populations of the S-layer glycoprotein. Whereas both S-layer glycoprotein populations underwent signal peptide cleavage and N-glycosylation, base hydrolysis followed by mass spectrometry revealed that a lipid, likely archaetidic acid, modified only the EDTA-solubilized version of the protein. These observations are consistent with the S-layer glycoprotein being initially synthesized as an integral membrane protein and subsequently undergoing a processing event in which the extracellular portion of the protein is separated from the membrane-spanning domain and transferred to a waiting lipid moiety.

  10. Characterization of Floating Surface Layers of Lipids and Lipopolymers by Surface-Sensitive Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Peter; Lösche, Mathias

    Nanotechnology and molecular (bio-)engineering are making ever deepening inroads into everybodys daily life. Physicochemical and biotechnological achievements in the design of physiologically active supramolecular assemblies have brought about the quest for their submolecular-level characterization. We employ surface-sensitive scattering techniques for the investigation of planar lipid membranes - floating monolayers on aqueous surfaces - to correlate structural, functional and dynamic aspects of biomembrane models. This chapter surveys recent work on the submolecular structure of floating phospholipid monolayers - where the advent of third-generation synchrotron X-ray sources has driven the development of realistic, submolecular-scale quasi-chemical models - as well as of more complex systems: cation binding to anionic lipid surfaces; conformational changes of lipopolymers undergoing phase transitions; the conformational organization of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylinositides, as examples of physiologically important lipids; and the adsorption of peptides (neuropeptide Y, NPY) or solvents (dimethylsulfoxide, DMSO) onto phospholipid surface layers.

  11. Probing Peptide and Protein Insertion in a Biomimetic S-Layer Supported Lipid Membrane Platform

    PubMed Central

    Damiati, Samar; Schrems, Angelika; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The most important aspect of synthetic lipid membrane architectures is their ability to study functional membrane-active peptides and membrane proteins in an environment close to nature. Here, we report on the generation and performance of a biomimetic platform, the S-layer supported lipid membrane (SsLM), to investigate the structural and electrical characteristics of the membrane-active peptide gramicidin and the transmembrane protein α-hemolysin in real-time using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A shift in membrane resistance is caused by the interaction of α-hemolysin and gramicidin with SsLMs, even if only an attachment onto, or functional channels through the lipid membrane, respectively, are formed. Moreover, the obtained results did not indicate the formation of functional α-hemolysin pores, but evidence for functional incorporation of gramicidin into this biomimetic architecture is provided. PMID:25633104

  12. A Simplified Direct Lipid Mixing Lipoplex Preparation: Comparison of Liposomal-, Dimethylsulfoxide-, and Ethanol-Based Methods

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Joseph W.; Gokel, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Established transfection methodology often uses commercial reagents, which must be formed into liposomes in a sequence of about half a dozen steps. The simplified method reported here is a direct lipid mixing approach that requires fewer steps, less manipulation, and is less time-consuming. Results are comparable to those obtained with more commonly used methods, as judged by a variety of analytical techniques and by comparisons of transfection results. The method reported here may be applied to non-liposome-forming compounds, thereby greatly expanding the range of structures that can be tested for transfection ability. PMID:27323668

  13. A Simplified Direct Lipid Mixing Lipoplex Preparation: Comparison of Liposomal-, Dimethylsulfoxide-, and Ethanol-Based Methods.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Joseph W; Gokel, George W

    2016-01-01

    Established transfection methodology often uses commercial reagents, which must be formed into liposomes in a sequence of about half a dozen steps. The simplified method reported here is a direct lipid mixing approach that requires fewer steps, less manipulation, and is less time-consuming. Results are comparable to those obtained with more commonly used methods, as judged by a variety of analytical techniques and by comparisons of transfection results. The method reported here may be applied to non-liposome-forming compounds, thereby greatly expanding the range of structures that can be tested for transfection ability. PMID:27323668

  14. Wind, mixed-layer depth and Chl-a variability in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, S. T.; Carranza, M. M.; Franks, P. J. S.; Girton, J. B.; Johnson, K. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Southern Ocean, contains some of the ocean's deepest mixed layers and is under the constant influence of strong winds and buoyancy forcing. Phytoplankton growth is hypothesized to be co-limited by iron and light. Because deep mixed layers can transport phytoplankton below the depth of the euphotic zone, light levels depend on mixed-layer depth. We use satellite winds from multiple wind sensors, combined with Argo data, to show that deep mixed layers are generally correlated with strong winds over the Southern Ocean. These deep mixed layers correspond to cold sea surface temperatures. This might also be expected to lead to nutrient upwelling and high chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), as measured by satellite ocean color sensors. However, Chl-a is less strongly correlated with wind speed than SST is, particularly at the mesoscale, and in summer Chl-a is not well correlated with mixed-layer depth. Using new in situ observations of subsurface Chl-a from sensors on southern elephant seals, EM-APEX floats, and bio-optical Argo floats, we find that Chl-a typically has a subsurface maximum in spring, summer, and fall. As a result satellite-sensed Chl-a is an inadequate measure of total biomass within the mixed layer. Satellite Chl-a and integrated Chl-a over the euphotic zone are negatively correlated with MLD from fall through spring, and uncorrelated during the summer. However, integrated Chl-a within the mixed layer shows significant positive correlations with MLD in all seasons. The fact that the deep Chl-a maximum sits at the base of the MLD, closer to the nutrient (or iron) maximum than the light maximum, suggests nutrient limitation plays a greater role than light limitation in governing productivity, and that wind and buoyancy forcing likely govern the mixing processes at the base of the mixed layer that control phytoplankton growth.

  15. Development of "all natural" layer-by-layer redispersible solid lipid nanoparticles by nano spray drying technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taoran; Hu, Qiaobin; Zhou, Mingyong; Xia, Yan; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have gained tremendous attraction as carriers for controlled drug delivery. Despite numerous advances in the field, one long-standing historical challenge for their practical applications remains unmet: redispersibility after drying. In this work, a novel design of SLNs using a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique was developed and the formulations were optimized by surface response methodology (Box-Behnken design). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the fabrication of SLNs from all natural ingredients in the absence of any synthetic surfactants or coatings. The SLNs were prepared by a combined solvent-diffusion and hot homogenization method, with soy lecithin as natural emulsifier (first layer), followed by the subsequent coating with sodium caseinate (second layer) and pectin (third layer), both of which are natural food biopolymers. The adsorption of pectin coating onto caseinate was reinforced by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions induced by a pH-driven process along with thermal treatment. The innovative nano spray drying technology was further explored to obtain ultra-fine powders of SLNs. Compared to uncoated or single-layer coated SLNs powders, which showed severe aggregation after spray drying, the well-separated particles with spherical shape and smooth surface were obtained for layer-by-layer (LbL) SLNs, which were redispersible into water without variation of dimension, shape and morphology. The SLNs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared and high-performance differential scanning calorimetry for their physical properties. The LbL-coated SLNs based on all natural ingredients have promising features for future applications as drug delivery systems, overcoming the major obstacles in conventional spray drying and redispersing SLNs-based formulations. PMID:27470922

  16. Development of "all natural" layer-by-layer redispersible solid lipid nanoparticles by nano spray drying technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Taoran; Hu, Qiaobin; Zhou, Mingyong; Xia, Yan; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-10-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have gained tremendous attraction as carriers for controlled drug delivery. Despite numerous advances in the field, one long-standing historical challenge for their practical applications remains unmet: redispersibility after drying. In this work, a novel design of SLNs using a layer-by-layer (LbL) technique was developed and the formulations were optimized by surface response methodology (Box-Behnken design). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the fabrication of SLNs from all natural ingredients in the absence of any synthetic surfactants or coatings. The SLNs were prepared by a combined solvent-diffusion and hot homogenization method, with soy lecithin as natural emulsifier (first layer), followed by the subsequent coating with sodium caseinate (second layer) and pectin (third layer), both of which are natural food biopolymers. The adsorption of pectin coating onto caseinate was reinforced by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions induced by a pH-driven process along with thermal treatment. The innovative nano spray drying technology was further explored to obtain ultra-fine powders of SLNs. Compared to uncoated or single-layer coated SLNs powders, which showed severe aggregation after spray drying, the well-separated particles with spherical shape and smooth surface were obtained for layer-by-layer (LbL) SLNs, which were redispersible into water without variation of dimension, shape and morphology. The SLNs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared and high-performance differential scanning calorimetry for their physical properties. The LbL-coated SLNs based on all natural ingredients have promising features for future applications as drug delivery systems, overcoming the major obstacles in conventional spray drying and redispersing SLNs-based formulations.

  17. The Closure of the Ocean Mixed Layer Temperature Budget using Level-Coordinate Model Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Seung-Bum; Fukumori, Ichiro; Lee, Tong

    2005-01-01

    Entrainment is an important element of the mixed layer mass, heat, and temperature budgets. Conventional procedures to estimate entrainment heat advection often do not permit the closure of heat and temperature budgets because of inaccuracies in its formulation. In this study a rigorous approach to evaluate the effect of entrainment using the output of a general circulation model (GCM) that does not have an explicit prognostic mixed layer model is described. The integral elements of the evaluation are 1) the rigorous estimates of the temperature difference between mixed layer water and entrained water at each horizontal grid point, 2) the formulation of the temperature difference such that the budget closes over a volume greater than one horizontal grid point, and 3) the apparent warming of the mixed layer during the mixed layer shoaling to account for the weak vertical temperature gradient within the mixed layer. This evaluation of entrainment heat advection is compared with the estimates by other commonly used ad hoc formulations by applying them in three regions: the north-central Pacific, the Kuroshio Extension, and the Nino-3 areas in the tropical Pacific. In all three areas the imbalance in the mixed layer temperature budget by the ad hoc estimates is significant, reaching a maximum of about 4 K yr(exp -1).

  18. Problem of the thermodynamic status of the mixed-layer minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zen, E.-A.

    1962-01-01

    Minerals that show mixed layering, particularly with the component layers in random sequence, pose problems because they may behave thermodynamically as single phases or as polyphase aggregates. Two operational criteria are proposed for their distinction. The first scheme requires two samples of mixed-layer material which differ only in the proportions of the layers. If each of these two samples are allowed to equilibrate with the same suitably chosen monitoring solution, then the intensive parameters of the solution will be invariant if the mixed-layer sample is a polyphase aggregate, but not otherwise. The second scheme makes use of the fact that portions of many titration curves of clay minerals show constancy of the chemical activities of the components in the equilibrating solutions, suggesting phase separation. If such phase separation occurs for a mixed-layer material, then, knowing the number of independent components in the system, it should be possible to decide on the number of phases the mixed-layer material represents. Knowledge of the phase status of mixed-layer material is essential to the study of the equilibrium relations of mineral assemblages involving such material, because a given mixed-layer mineral will be plotted and treated differently on a phase diagram, depending on whether it is a single phase or a polyphase aggregate. Extension of the titration technique to minerals other than the mixed-layer type is possible. In particular, this method may be used to determine if cryptoperthites and peristerites are polyphase aggregates. In general, for any high-order phase separation, the method may be used to decide just at what point in this continuous process the system must be regarded operationally as a polyphase aggregate. ?? 1962.

  19. Determination of the Mixing Layer Height Over two Sites, Using Pilot Balloons During the MILAGRO Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohrnschimmel, H.; Alonso, A. L.; Ángeles, F.; Sosa, G.; Varela, J.; Cárdenas, B.

    2007-12-01

    Among the mechanisms that affect air quality there is a variety of meteorological processes. An important process in this context are the changes in the mixing layer height during a day and over the year. The mixing layer height is the portion of the atmosphere close to the surface layer where air pollutants get diluted, without leaving this layer. Therefore, it is important to describe the variations in the height of the mixing layer, i.e. the vertical dilution of air pollution, since this is a process mitigating naturally the impact of emissions. There exist different methods to obtain information on the mixing layer height, among them radio soundings, the application of vertical wind profilers, and launching pilot balloons. In this study, pilot balloons have been used simultaneously over two sites of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO campaign in March 2006. The objective was to determine the vertical wind profiles and derive information on the mixing layer height. Daily, four pilot balloons were launched, at 9:00, 12:00, 15:00, and 18:00 hours, over Tenango del Aire (a rural area in the Southeast of Mexico City), and over Ciudad Universitaria, in the Southern metropolitan area. At some occasions, night time measurements have been carried out at 21:00 and 24:00. A variability of the diurnal evolution of the mixing layer was observed along March, which could be related to surface temperature. The diurnal evolution showed a sudden growth of the mixing layer between 9:00 and 12:00 hours. Data intercomparisons were carried out for pilot balloons versus radio soundings during a few days at a third site, Tula, in the North of Mexico City. Both intercomparisons showed that pilot balloons are an effective method to obtain information about the development of the mixing layer.

  20. [Particle dispersion by order motion in mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Troutt, T.R.

    1993-09-01

    Multiphase mixing in turbulent flows is a key element in many energy conversion and chemical processes. There is considerable need for improving the design and control of these processes. Free turbulent shear flows are the primary agents for particle mixing in these systems. Previous studies by this research group have shown that, if particle coupling effects are neglected, the organized vortex structures generated by these shear flows control the character of the particle mixing process. A coordinated experimental and numerical study is proposed to investigate the coupled effects of droplet mass and energy transfer on the turbulent multiphase mixing process in free shear flows. This study has important implications concerning the design of reacting flow systems. Experimental visualizations of the multiphase flow will be carried out using laser-sheet lighting and high speed photography. Local measurements of droplet size, velocity and concentration diagnostics, will be made with laser anemometry and phase Doppler diagnostics. Complementary analytical and numerical analyses will be carried out to assess the effect of coupling on vortex structure, stability and growth. The results of the proposed research will provide basic understanding concerning the coupled effects of particle concentration on the rate of multiphase mixing in turbulent flows. Information of this nature is essential to the improved designs of engineering systems with particulate or droplet flows.

  1. Low Velocity Difference Thermal Shear Layer Mixing Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Robert H.; Culver, Harry C. M.; Weissbein, Dave; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Current CFD modeling techniques are known to do a poor job of predicting the mixing rate and persistence of slot film flow in co-annular flowing ducts with relatively small velocity differences but large thermal gradients. A co-annular test was devised to empirically determine the mixing rate of slot film flow in a constant area circular duct (D approx. 1ft, L approx. 10ft). The axial rate of wall heat-up is a sensitive measure of the mixing rate of the two flows. The inflow conditions were varied to simulate a variety of conditions characteristic of moderate by-pass ratio engines. A series of air temperature measurements near the duct wall provided a straightforward means to measure the axial temperature distribution and thus infer the mixing rate. This data provides a characterization of the slot film mixing rates encountered in typical jet engine environments. The experimental geometry and entrance conditions, along with the sensitivity of the results as the entrance conditions vary, make this a good test for turbulence models in a regime important to modern air-breathing propulsion research and development.

  2. Large mixed Ekman Hartmann boundary layers in magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousset, F.

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we study the nonlinear stability of Ekman-Hartmann type boundary layers in a rotating magnetohydrodynamics flow under a sharp spectral assumption. This generalizes the result of Desjardins et al (1999 Nonlinearity 12 181-99) obtained under a smallness assumption on a Reynolds number and the result of Rousset (2003 Arch. Rat. Mech. Anal. in press) about the stability of Ekman layers.

  3. An experimental study of aero-optical aberration and dithering of supersonic mixing layer via BOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yuxin; Yi, Shihe; Tian, Lifeng; He, Lin; Cheng, Zhongyu

    2010-01-01

    The optical performance of supersonic mixing layer is heavily deteriorated by the aero-optical aberration and dithering of coherent structures, but current measuring methods limit the spatiotemporal resolution in relevant studies. A high resolution whole-field aero-optical aberration and dithering measuring method based on the Background Orient Schlieren (BOS) technique was studied. The systematic structure, sensitivity and resolution of BOS are analyzed in this paper. The aero-optical aberration and dithering of streamwise structures in supersonic mixing layers were quantificationally studied with BOS. The aberration field of spanwise structures revealed the ribbon-like aberration structures, which heavily restrict the optical performance of a mixing layer. The quantifications of aero-optical aberration and dithering are very important in studying aero-optical performance of supersonic mixing layer.

  4. Detailed characteristics of drop-laden mixing layers: LES predictions compared to DNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, N.; Leboissetier, A.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    Results have been compared from Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a temporal mixing layer laden with evaporating drops, to assess the ability of LES to reproduce detailed characteristics of DNS.

  5. Coherent structures in a turbulent mixing layer - A comparison between direct numerical simulations and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalfe, R. W.; Menon, S.; Hussain, A. K. M. F.

    1985-01-01

    An eduction scheme has been developed in an attempt to determine the characteristics of large-scale vortical structures in a turbulent mixing layer. This analysis scheme has been applied to a set of experimental data taken in a new, larger mixing layer facility designed to minimize boundary and resonance effects. A similar scheme has been developed to apply to the results of a direct numerical simulation of a temporally growing mixing layer. A comparison of the two approaches shows important similarities in the coherent structures. The numerical simulations indicate that low levels of coherent forcing can dramatically change the evolution of the mixing layer. In the absence of such forcing, the numerical simulations and experiments show a lack of regularity in the transverse position, spacing, amplitude, shape and spanwise coherence of the large-scale vortical structures.

  6. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Compressible Mixing Layer Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modem day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS/LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. The hybrid RANS/LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two-dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, indicated an initial vortex shedding followed by rapid transition to turbulence, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  7. Numerical investigation of sensitivity of the Black Sea mixed layer to vertical turbulent diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvaratskhelia, Diana; Demetrashvili, Demuri

    2015-04-01

    The upper mixed-layer of seas and oceans is one of the important water areas, the thermodynamic state of which defines many important physical, chemical or biological processes in the sea- atmosphere environment. The same can be note concerning the Black Sea turbulent mixed layer, which represents the object of our investigation. It is well known that the depth of the mixed layer is generaly determined by measurements of water properties: temperature and sigma-t (density) but here the depth of the mixed layer and its variability are investigated by using of the basin-scale numerical model of the Black Sea dynamics of M. Nodia Institute of Geophysics (BSM-IG, Tbilisi, Georgia). The main object of this study is to investigate the Black Sea upper mixed-layer generation and its evolution in connection with the nonstationarity atmospheric circulation and thermohaline action in the inner-annual time scale. Besides, how the temperature and salinity fields of the Black Sea upper layer are substantially reacted by the vertical diffusion coefficient are the centre of our attention. Therefore, the coefficient of vertical turbulent diffusion for heat and salt are tested as constant equal to 10 cm2s-1 and it was parameterized by modified Oboukhov's formula. The results of the numerical investigations show that: in wintertime for any choosing of this vertical diffusion coefficient the intense wind-driven turbulence promotes mixing aproximetly till 16-26 m in deep layers of the Black Sea. Except for that, cold fluxes through the surface and precipitation-evapuration system play aditionally role on the mixed layer forming as well. During the transitive spring season (in difference from the cold season), when the depth of the mixed layer is aproxometly 2-4 m., the role of vertical turbulent viscosity insignificantly grows. In the warm season (summer), when the mixed layer does not observe in the upper layer of the Black Sea, the role of the vertical diffusion coefficient is more

  8. Lidar Characterization of Boundary Layer Transport and Mixing for Estimating Urban-Scale Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardesty, R. Michael; Brewer, W. Alan; Sandberg, Scott P.; Weickmann, Ann M.; Shepson, Paul B.; Cambaliza, Maria; Heimburger, Alexie; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Miles, Natasha L.; Sarmiento, Daniel P.; Deng, A. J.; Gaudet, Brian; Karion, Anna; Sweeney, Colm; Whetstone, James

    2016-06-01

    A compact commercial Doppler lidar has been deployed in Indianapolis for two years to measure wind profiles and mixing layer properties as part of project to improve greenhouse measurements from large area sources. The lidar uses vertical velocity variance and aerosol structure to measure mixing layer depth. Comparisons with aircraft and the NOAA HRDL lidar generally indicate good performance, although sensitivity might be an issue under low aerosol conditions.

  9. On the turbulence-generated sound and control of compressible mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinman, Randall Ray

    A mixing layer is a common model used to study the noise generation and mixing characteristics of the near-nozzle region of jets. This work presents three separate but related studies that investigate sound generation and active control for noise mitigation and mixing enhancement of such mixing layers. High-fidelity direct numerical simulations of temporal and spatial mixing layers are used for this in two and three dimensions. The first study investigates the role of turbulence scales in generating the radiated far-field sound from temporally-developing, Mach 0.9 mixing layers. To do this, four mixing layers were simulated, starting from the same initial conditions but with Reynolds numbers that varied by a factor of twelve. Above a momentum thickness Reynolds number of 300, all the mixing layers radiate over 85 percent of the acoustic energy of the apparently asymptotically high-Reynolds-number value we are able to compute. Wavenumber spectra of turbulence energy and pressure show the expected Reynolds number dependence: the two highest Reynolds number simulations show evidence of an inertial range and Kolmogorov scaling at the highest wavenumbers. Farfield pressure spectra all decay much more rapidly with wavenumber than the corresponding near-field spectra and show significantly less sensitivity to Reynolds number. Low wavenumbers account for nearly all of the radiated acoustic energy. Implications of these results for jet noise large-eddy simulations are discussed. The second study uses direct numerical simulations of Mach 1.3 mixing layers to characterize the physical mechanisms of flow actuation by localized arc-filament plasma actuators. A validated numerical model of the actuator is devised and placed, as in corresponding experiments, in a cavity in the nozzle near its exit. A rapid Joule heating caused by the plasma is thought to be the root mechanism of flow actuation based upon experimental observation. Simulations show that in the confined space of the

  10. Oceanic upper mixed layer depth determination by the use of satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Xiao-Hai; Schubel, J. R.; Pritchard, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed to determine the oceanic daily mean mixed layer depth from satellite observations and a mixed layer thermal inertia (MLTI) model. The algorithms were developed to use remotely-sensed values of sea surface temperature, albedo, and surface wind speeds to calculate the thermal inertia and to predict changes in subsurface diurnal mixed layer depth. The MLTI model, based on a mixed layer model of the upper ocean, has been used to simulate the diurnal mixing process and thermal inertia distribution in the Sargasso Sea around 34 deg N, 70 deg W. Sea surface temperature and albedo have been obtained from the NOAA7-AVHRR images. Surface wind speeds have been derived from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) aboard Nimbus 7. Image processing was performed for images gathered between June and July 1982. The daily mean mixed layer depths predicted by the MLTI model agree well with data gathered at the LOTUS mooring located in the Sargasso Sea. This suggests that vertical mixing is the dominant physical process that controls the thermal inertia distribution in the midocean, far from major current systems, and that remote sensing is a promising tool to study such upper ocean processes.

  11. Modeled mixed-layer salinity balance in the Gulf of Guinea: seasonal and interannual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da-Allada, Casimir Y.; du Penhoat, Yves; Jouanno, Julien; Alory, Gael; Hounkonnou, Norbert Mahouton

    2014-12-01

    A regional numerical simulation and observations were used to investigate the various processes controlling mixed-layer salinity balance on seasonal and interannual time scales in the Gulf of Guinea. Processes were quantified using a mixed-layer salt budget. Model results correctly reproduced the mean, phase, and amplitude of observed seasonal near-surface salinity. The results indicated that on seasonal time scales, the mixed-layer salinity balance differed from one region to another. The surface salinity seasonal cycle was characterized by strong salinization during May for coastal areas north and south of the equator. Model results suggested that vertical mixing controls the mixed-layer salinity increase at the equator during May, while both vertical mixing and vertical advection contribute to the salinity increase in coastal regions. We also determined that freshening from horizontal advection and freshwater flux tended to balance the salinization effects of vertical diffusion and vertical advection during the seasonal cycle. On interannual time scales, based on the mixed-layer salinity balance and sensitivity experiments, we determined that for the northern and equatorial Gulf of Guinea, changes in near-surface salinity were largely due to changes in precipitation and winds. For the southern Gulf of Guinea, only wind changes were determined to be important for explaining near-surface salinity changes.

  12. Implicit large eddy simulation of a scalar mixing layer in fractal grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tomoaki; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Nagata, Kouji; Ito, Yasumasa; Hayase, Toshiyuki

    2016-07-01

    A scalar mixing layer in fractal grid turbulence is simulated by the implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) using low-pass filtering as an implicit subgrid-scale model. The square-type fractal grid with three fractal iterations is used for generating turbulence. The streamwise evolutions of the streamwise velocity statistics obtained in the ILES are in good agreement with the experimental results. The ILES results are used for investigating the development of the scalar mixing layer behind the fractal grid. The results show that the vertical development of the scalar mixing layer strongly depends on the spanwise location. Near the fractal grid, the scalar mixing layer rapidly develops just behind the largest grid bars owing to the vertical turbulent transport. The scalar mixing layer near the fractal grid also develops outside the largest grid bars because the scalar is transported between the outside and back of the largest grid bars by the spanwise turbulent transport. In the downstream region, the scalar mixing layer develops more rapidly near the grid centerline by the vertical turbulent transport and by the spanwise one which transports the scalar between the back of the largest grid bars and both the centerline and outer edge of the fractal grid. Then, the mean scalar profile becomes close to be homogeneous in the spanwise direction.

  13. Spectroscopic study of 3-Hydroxyflavone - protein interaction in lipidic bi-layers immobilized on silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Voicescu, Mariana; Ionescu, Sorana; Nistor, Cristina L

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of 3-Hydroxyflavone with serum proteins (BSA and HSA) in lecithin lipidic bi-layers (PC) immobilized on silver nanoparticles (SNPs), was studied by fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. BSA secondary structure was quantified with a deconvolution algorithm, showing a decrease in α-helix structure when lipids were added to the solution. The effect of temperature on the rate of the excited-state intra-molecular proton transfer and on the dual fluorescence emission of 3-HF in the HSA/PC/SNPs systems was discussed. Evaluation of the antioxidant activity of 3-HF in HSA/PC/SNPs systems was also studied. The antioxidant activity of 3-HF decreased in the presence of SNPs. The results are discussed with relevance to the secondary structure of proteins and of the 3-HF based nano-systems to a topical formulation useful in the oxidative stress process. PMID:27380623

  14. Mixing-Height Time Series from Operational Ceilometer Aerosol-Layer Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotteraner, Christoph; Piringer, Martin

    2016-07-01

    A new method is described to derive mixing-height time series directly from aerosol-layer height data available from a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. As complete as possible mixing-height time series are calculated by avoiding outliers, filling data gaps by linear interpolation, and smoothing. In addition, large aerosol-layer heights at night that can be interpreted as residual layers are not assigned as mixing heights. The resulting mixing-height time series, converted to an appropriate data format, can be used as input for dispersion calculations. Two case examples demonstrate in detail how the method works. The mixing heights calculated using ceilometer data are compared with values determined from radiosounding data at Vienna by applying the parcel, Heffter, and Richardson methods. The results of the parcel method, obtained from radiosonde profiles at noon, show the best fit to the ceilometer-derived mixing heights. For midnight radiosoundings, larger deviations between mixing heights from the ceilometer and those deduced from the potential temperature profiles of the soundings are found. We use data from two Vaisala CL51 ceilometers, operating in the Vienna area at an urban and rural site, respectively, during an overlapping period of about 1 year. In addition to the case studies, the calculated mixing-height time series are also statistically evaluated and compared, demonstrating that the ceilometer-based mixing height follows an expected daily and seasonal course.

  15. Mixing-Height Time Series from Operational Ceilometer Aerosol-Layer Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotteraner, Christoph; Piringer, Martin

    2016-11-01

    A new method is described to derive mixing-height time series directly from aerosol-layer height data available from a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. As complete as possible mixing-height time series are calculated by avoiding outliers, filling data gaps by linear interpolation, and smoothing. In addition, large aerosol-layer heights at night that can be interpreted as residual layers are not assigned as mixing heights. The resulting mixing-height time series, converted to an appropriate data format, can be used as input for dispersion calculations. Two case examples demonstrate in detail how the method works. The mixing heights calculated using ceilometer data are compared with values determined from radiosounding data at Vienna by applying the parcel, Heffter, and Richardson methods. The results of the parcel method, obtained from radiosonde profiles at noon, show the best fit to the ceilometer-derived mixing heights. For midnight radiosoundings, larger deviations between mixing heights from the ceilometer and those deduced from the potential temperature profiles of the soundings are found. We use data from two Vaisala CL51 ceilometers, operating in the Vienna area at an urban and rural site, respectively, during an overlapping period of about 1 year. In addition to the case studies, the calculated mixing-height time series are also statistically evaluated and compared, demonstrating that the ceilometer-based mixing height follows an expected daily and seasonal course.

  16. Discrete element simulation of charging and mixed layer formation in the ironmaking blast furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Saxén, Henrik

    2015-11-01

    The burden distribution in the ironmaking blast furnace plays an important role for the operation as it affects the gas flow distribution, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions in the shaft. This work studies certain aspects of burden distribution by small-scale experiments and numerical simulation by the discrete element method (DEM). Particular attention is focused on the complex layer-formation process and the problems associated with estimating the burden layer distribution by burden profile measurements. The formation of mixed layers is studied, and a computational method for estimating the extent of the mixed layer, as well as its voidage, is proposed and applied on the results of the DEM simulations. In studying a charging program and its resulting burden distribution, the mixed layers of coke and pellets were found to show lower voidage than the individual burden layers. The dynamic evolution of the mixed layer during the charging process is also analyzed. The results of the study can be used to gain deeper insight into the complex charging process of the blast furnace, which is useful in the design of new charging programs and for mathematical models that do not consider the full behavior of the particles in the burden layers.

  17. Turbulent mixing and transport in a thermally stratified interfacial layer in decaying grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayesh, Yoon, Kyunghwan; Warhaft, Z.

    1991-05-01

    A stably stratified mixing layer, sandwiched in between regions of neutral turbulence, was studied in decaying grid turbulence. The layer, which was shearless, was formed by heating the upper half of the flow by means of elements placed at the entrance to the plenum of a large, open circuit low speed wind tunnel 0.91×0.91 m2 in cross section and 9.14 m in length. The hot air above mixed with the cold below forming the stratified layer in between. As the flow evolved and the turbulence decayed, the buoyancy forces increased relative to the inertial forces (i.e., the Richardson number increased) causing the heat flux to collapse. This resulted in a thinning of the mixing layer with downstream distance (rather than growth which occurs for the passive case). Inside the layer the vertical velocity variance diminished and the vertical heat flux correlation coefficient was reduced to zero. Smoke wire photographs showed a wavylike damped region inside the layer, surrounded by the normal, more energetic turbulence outside. Second-order turbulence quantities scaled in the same way with the local Richardson number both along the layer and across it. The two stably stratified cases studied had centerline Froude numbers of 95 and 65 at 40 mesh lengths from the grid. The results are compared to a passive thermal mixing layer and are contrasted with recent experiments concerning a constant temperature gradient in grid turbulence.

  18. Turbulent mixing and transport in a thermally stratified interfacial layer in decaying grid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Jayesh; Yoon, K.; Warhaft, Z. )

    1991-05-01

    A stably stratified mixing layer, sandwiched in between regions of neutral turbulence, was studied in decaying grid turbulence. The layer, which was shearless, was formed by heating the upper half of the flow by means of elements placed at the entrance to the plenum of a large, open circuit low speed wind tunnel 0.91{times}0.91 m{sup 2} in cross section and 9.14 m in length. The hot air above mixed with the cold below forming the stratified layer in between. As the flow evolved and the turbulence decayed, the buoyancy forces increased relative to the inertial forces (i.e., the Richardson number increased) causing the heat flux to collapse. This resulted in a thinning of the mixing layer with downstream distance (rather than growth which occurs for the passive case). Inside the layer the vertical velocity variance diminished and the vertical heat flux correlation coefficient was reduced to zero. Smoke wire photographs showed a wavylike damped region inside the layer, surrounded by the normal, more energetic turbulence outside. Second-order turbulence quantities scaled in the same way with the local Richardson number both along the layer and across it. The two stably stratified cases studied had centerline Froude numbers of 95 and 65 at 40 mesh lengths from the grid. The results are compared to a passive thermal mixing layer and are contrasted with recent experiments concerning a constant temperature gradient in grid turbulence.

  19. Discrete element simulation of charging and mixed layer formation in the ironmaking blast furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Saxén, Henrik

    2016-11-01

    The burden distribution in the ironmaking blast furnace plays an important role for the operation as it affects the gas flow distribution, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions in the shaft. This work studies certain aspects of burden distribution by small-scale experiments and numerical simulation by the discrete element method (DEM). Particular attention is focused on the complex layer-formation process and the problems associated with estimating the burden layer distribution by burden profile measurements. The formation of mixed layers is studied, and a computational method for estimating the extent of the mixed layer, as well as its voidage, is proposed and applied on the results of the DEM simulations. In studying a charging program and its resulting burden distribution, the mixed layers of coke and pellets were found to show lower voidage than the individual burden layers. The dynamic evolution of the mixed layer during the charging process is also analyzed. The results of the study can be used to gain deeper insight into the complex charging process of the blast furnace, which is useful in the design of new charging programs and for mathematical models that do not consider the full behavior of the particles in the burden layers.

  20. Acceleration of Lateral Equilibration in Mixed Lipid Bilayers Using Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The lateral heterogeneity of cellular membranes plays an important role in many biological functions such as signaling and regulating membrane proteins. This heterogeneity can result from preferential interactions between membrane components or interactions with membrane proteins. One major difficulty in molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying the membrane heterogeneity is that lipids diffuse slowly and collectively in bilayers, and therefore, it is difficult to reach equilibrium in lateral organization in bilayer mixtures. Here, we propose the use of the replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) approach to accelerate lateral relaxation in heterogeneous bilayers. REST is based on the replica exchange method but tempers only the solute, leaving the temperature of the solvent fixed. Since the number of replicas in REST scales approximately only with the degrees of freedom in the solute, REST enables us to enhance the configuration sampling of lipid bilayers with fewer replicas, in comparison with the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD) where the number of replicas scales with the degrees of freedom of the entire system. We apply the REST method to a cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer mixture and find that the lateral distribution functions of all molecular pair types converge much faster than in the standard MD simulation. The relative diffusion rate between molecules in REST is, on average, an order of magnitude faster than in the standard MD simulation. Although REST was initially proposed to study protein folding and its efficiency in protein folding is still under debate, we find a unique application of REST to accelerate lateral equilibration in mixed lipid membranes and suggest a promising way to probe membrane lateral heterogeneity through molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:25328493

  1. Disposition and crystallization of saturated fatty acid in mixed micelles of relevance to lipid digestion.

    PubMed

    Phan, Stephanie; Salentinig, Stefan; Gilbert, Elliot; Darwish, Tamim A; Hawley, Adrian; Nixon-Luke, Reece; Bryant, Gary; Boyd, Ben J

    2015-07-01

    During lipolysis of triglyceride by lipase, monoglyceride and fatty acids are produced which combine with gastrointestinal fluids to form self-assembled structures. These solubilize hydrophobic food components to promote their absorption. The aim of this study was a detailed understanding of structure formation from triglyceride digestion products with saturated short-, medium- and long chain fatty acids. Complementary characterization methods have been applied comprising small angle X-ray and neutron scattering – the latter involving the contrast matching technique using fully deuterated fatty acids – polarized and depolarized dynamic light scattering and cryogenic-transmission electron microscopy. Shape, size and solubilization capacity of the self-assembled structures was dependent on composition and lipid chain length. Crystallization of fatty acid was observed when the solubility limit in the mixed bile salt micelles was exceeded; however, increasing pH and temperature increased the fatty acid solubility. The results provide insight into structure formation and crystallization of incorporated lipolysis products; this is important for a detailed understanding of food structure and nutrition, as well as the rational design of lipid based drug delivery systems.

  2. Intraspecific Differences in Lipid Content of Calanoid Copepods across Fine-Scale Depth Ranges within the Photic Layer

    PubMed Central

    Zarubin, Margarita; Farstey, Viviana; Wold, Anette; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Genin, Amatzia

    2014-01-01

    Copepods are among the most abundant and diverse groups of mesozooplankton in the world's oceans. Each species has a certain depth range within which different individuals (of the same life stage and sex) are found. Lipids are accumulated in many calanoid copepods for energy storage and reproduction. Lipid content in some species increases with depth, however studies so far focused mostly on temperate and high-latitude seasonal vertically migrating copepods and compared lipid contents among individuals either from coarse layers or between diapausing, deep-dwelling copepods and individuals found in the photic, near-surface layer. Here we examined whether lipid contents of individual calanoid copepods of the same species, life stage/sex differ between finer depth layers within the upper water column of subtropical and Arctic seas. A total of 6 calanoid species were collected from samples taken at precise depths within the photic layer in both cold eutrophic and warm oligotrophic environments using SCUBA diving, MOCNESS and Multinet. Measurements of lipid content were obtained from digitized photographs of the collected individuals. The results revealed significant differences in lipid content across depth differences as small as 12–15 meters for Mecynocera clausi C5 and Ctenocalanus vanus C5 (Red Sea), Clausocalanus furcatus males and two clausocalanid C5s (Mediterranean Sea), and Calanus glacialis C5 (Arctic). We suggest two possible explanations for the differences in lipid content with depth on such a fine scale: predator avoidance and buoyancy. PMID:24667529

  3. Intraspecific differences in lipid content of calanoid copepods across fine-scale depth ranges within the photic layer.

    PubMed

    Zarubin, Margarita; Farstey, Viviana; Wold, Anette; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Genin, Amatzia

    2014-01-01

    Copepods are among the most abundant and diverse groups of mesozooplankton in the world's oceans. Each species has a certain depth range within which different individuals (of the same life stage and sex) are found. Lipids are accumulated in many calanoid copepods for energy storage and reproduction. Lipid content in some species increases with depth, however studies so far focused mostly on temperate and high-latitude seasonal vertically migrating copepods and compared lipid contents among individuals either from coarse layers or between diapausing, deep-dwelling copepods and individuals found in the photic, near-surface layer. Here we examined whether lipid contents of individual calanoid copepods of the same species, life stage/sex differ between finer depth layers within the upper water column of subtropical and Arctic seas. A total of 6 calanoid species were collected from samples taken at precise depths within the photic layer in both cold eutrophic and warm oligotrophic environments using SCUBA diving, MOCNESS and Multinet. Measurements of lipid content were obtained from digitized photographs of the collected individuals. The results revealed significant differences in lipid content across depth differences as small as 12-15 meters for Mecynocera clausi C5 and Ctenocalanus vanus C5 (Red Sea), Clausocalanus furcatus males and two clausocalanid C5s (Mediterranean Sea), and Calanus glacialis C5 (Arctic). We suggest two possible explanations for the differences in lipid content with depth on such a fine scale: predator avoidance and buoyancy. PMID:24667529

  4. Intraspecific differences in lipid content of calanoid copepods across fine-scale depth ranges within the photic layer.

    PubMed

    Zarubin, Margarita; Farstey, Viviana; Wold, Anette; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Genin, Amatzia

    2014-01-01

    Copepods are among the most abundant and diverse groups of mesozooplankton in the world's oceans. Each species has a certain depth range within which different individuals (of the same life stage and sex) are found. Lipids are accumulated in many calanoid copepods for energy storage and reproduction. Lipid content in some species increases with depth, however studies so far focused mostly on temperate and high-latitude seasonal vertically migrating copepods and compared lipid contents among individuals either from coarse layers or between diapausing, deep-dwelling copepods and individuals found in the photic, near-surface layer. Here we examined whether lipid contents of individual calanoid copepods of the same species, life stage/sex differ between finer depth layers within the upper water column of subtropical and Arctic seas. A total of 6 calanoid species were collected from samples taken at precise depths within the photic layer in both cold eutrophic and warm oligotrophic environments using SCUBA diving, MOCNESS and Multinet. Measurements of lipid content were obtained from digitized photographs of the collected individuals. The results revealed significant differences in lipid content across depth differences as small as 12-15 meters for Mecynocera clausi C5 and Ctenocalanus vanus C5 (Red Sea), Clausocalanus furcatus males and two clausocalanid C5s (Mediterranean Sea), and Calanus glacialis C5 (Arctic). We suggest two possible explanations for the differences in lipid content with depth on such a fine scale: predator avoidance and buoyancy.

  5. An asymptotic analysis of supersonic reacting mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an asymptotic analysis of the laminar mixing of the simultaneous chemical reaction between parallel supersonic streams of two reacting species. The study is based on a one-step irreversible Arrhenius reaction and on large activation energy asymptotics. Essentially it extends the work of Linan and Crespo to include the effect of free shear and Mach number on the ignition regime, the deflagration regime and the diffusion flame regime. It is found that the effective parameter is the product of the characteristic Mach number and a shear parameter.

  6. Mixing and non-equilibrium chemical reaction in a compressible mixing layer. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberger, Craig J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of compressibility, chemical reaction exothermicity, and non-equilibrium chemical modeling in a reacting plane mixing layer were investigated by means of two dimensional direct numerical simulations. The chemical reaction was irreversible and second order of the type A + B yields Products + Heat. The general governing fluid equations of a compressible reacting flow field were solved by means of high order finite difference methods. Physical effects were then determined by examining the response of the mixing layer to variation of the relevant non-dimensionalized parameters. The simulations show that increased compressibility generally results in a suppressed mixing, and consequently a reduced chemical reaction conversion rate. Reaction heat release was found to enhance mixing at the initial stages of the layer growth, but had a stabilizing effect at later times. The increased stability manifested itself in the suppression or delay of the formation of large coherent structures within the flow. Calculations were performed for a constant rate chemical kinetics model and an Arrhenius type kinetic prototype. The choice of the model was shown to have an effect on the development of the flow. The Arrhenius model caused a greater temperature increase due to reaction than the constant kinetic model. This had the same effect as increasing the exothermicity of the reaction. Localized flame quenching was also observed when the Zeldovich number was relatively large.

  7. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-08-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  8. The effect of boundary-layer turbulence on mixing in heated jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strykowski, P. J.; Russ, S.

    1992-05-01

    The mixing properties of a heated axisymmetric jet at a density ratio of 0.55 were examined for initially laminar and turbulent separated boundary layers. Initially laminar jets displayed large intermittent spread rates with half-angles up to 45° and a corresponding rapid decay of the streamwise velocity and temperature on the jet axis. When the boundary layer was disturbed upstream of the nozzle exit, creating an initially turbulent separated layer, the jet mixing was significantly reduced. Flow visualization revealed that the turbulent conditions eliminated the intermittent nature of the jet spreading, producing constant spreading rates at half-angles near 10°.

  9. The effect of boundary-layer turbulence on mixing in heated jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strykowski, P. J.; Russ, S.

    1992-05-01

    The mixing properties of a heated axisymmetric jet at a density ratio of 0.55 were examined for initially laminar and turbulent separated boundary layers. Initially laminar jets displayed large intermittent spread rates with half-angles up to 45 deg and a corresponding rapid decay af the streamwise velocity and temperature on the jet axis. When the boundary layer was disturbed upstream of the nozzle exit, creating an initially turbulent separated layer, the jet mixing was significantly reduced. Flow visualization revealed that the turbulent conditions eliminated the intermittent nature of the jet spreading, producing constant spreading rates at half-angles near 10 deg.

  10. Protected Sulfur Cathode with Mixed Conductive Coating Layer for Lithium Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jun; Wen, Zhaoyin; Wang, Qingsong; Gu, Sui; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Chunhua

    2016-10-01

    A mixed conductive coating layer composed of lithium ion conductive ceramic powder, carbon and binder was introduced on the surface of a sulfur electrode. This coating layer is designed to suppress the migration of lithium polysulfides from the sulfur electrode, and improve the cycling capacity of a lithium sulfur battery. The protected sulfur cathode with a mixed conductive coating layer delivered an initial specific capacity of 1236 mAh g-1 at 0.5C and maintained a capacity of 842 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles. In particular, a soft package battery with protected cathode exhibits improved cycling capacity and excellent rate performance.

  11. Estimating diffusivity from the mixed layer heat and salt balances in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, M. F.; Pelland, N.; Emerson, S. R.; Crawford, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Data from two National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) surface moorings in the North Pacific, in combination with data from satellite, Argo floats and glider (when available), are used to evaluate the residual diffusive flux of heat across the base of the mixed layer from the surface mixed layer heat budget. The diffusion coefficient (i.e., diffusivity) is then computed by dividing the diffusive flux by the temperature gradient in the 20-m transition layer just below the base of the mixed layer. At Station Papa in the NE Pacific subpolar gyre, this diffusivity is 1×10-4 m2/s during summer, increasing to ~3×10-4 m2/s during fall. During late winter and early spring, diffusivity has large errors. At other times, diffusivity computed from the mixed layer salt budget at Papa correlate with those from the heat budget, giving confidence that the results are robust for all seasons except late winter-early spring and can be used for other tracers. In comparison, at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) in the NW Pacific subtropical recirculation gyre, somewhat larger diffusivity are found based upon the mixed layer heat budget: ~ 3×10-4 m2/s during the warm season and more than an order of magnitude larger during the winter, although again, wintertime errors are large. These larger values at KEO appear to be due to the increased turbulence associated with the summertime typhoons, and weaker wintertime stratification.

  12. Estimating diffusivity from the mixed layer heat and salt balances in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Meghan F.; Pelland, Noel A.; Emerson, Steven R.; Crawford, William R.

    2015-11-01

    Data from two National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) surface moorings in the North Pacific, in combination with data from satellite, Argo floats and glider (when available), are used to evaluate the residual diffusive flux of heat across the base of the mixed layer from the surface mixed layer heat budget. The diffusion coefficient (i.e., diffusivity) is then computed by dividing the diffusive flux by the temperature gradient in the 20 m transition layer just below the base of the mixed layer. At Station Papa in the NE Pacific subpolar gyre, this diffusivity is 1 × 10-4 m2/s during summer, increasing to ˜3 × 10-4 m2/s during fall. During late winter and early spring, diffusivity has large errors. At other times, diffusivity computed from the mixed layer salt budget at Papa correlate with those from the heat budget, giving confidence that the results are robust for all seasons except late winter-early spring and can be used for other tracers. In comparison, at the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) in the NW Pacific subtropical recirculation gyre, somewhat larger diffusivities are found based upon the mixed layer heat budget: ˜ 3 × 10-4 m2/s during the warm season and more than an order of magnitude larger during the winter, although again, wintertime errors are large. These larger values at KEO appear to be due to the increased turbulence associated with the summertime typhoons, and weaker wintertime stratification.

  13. MAPLE preparation and characterization of mixed arylenevinylene based oligomers:C60 layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanculescu, A.; Socol, G.; Vacareanu, L.; Socol, M.; Rasoga, O.; Breazu, C.; Girtan, M.; Stanculescu, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents some studies about the preparation by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of mixed layers based on two arylenevinylene oligomers, 1,4-bis [4-(N,N‧-diphenylamino)phenylvinyl] benzene (L78) and 3,3‧-bis(N-hexylcarbazole)vinylbenzene (L13) as donor and buckminsterfullerene (C60) as acceptor, blended in three different weight ratios: 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3. The optical, morphological, structural and electrical properties of these mixed layers have been investigated emphasizing the effect of the layer composition and of the significant degree of disorder. I-V characteristics have revealed typically solar cell behaviour for the heterostructures prepared with mixed layers containing L78 (L13) and fullerene blended in a weight ratio of 1:2. The solar cell structure glass/ITO/L13:C60/Al has shown the best parameters.

  14. Measurements of the streamwise vortical structures in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James H.; Mehta, Rabindra D.

    1992-01-01

    The 3D structure of a plane two-stream mixing layer of velocity ratio 0.6 and originating from laminar initial boundary layers was investigated through direct measurements made in a specially constructed mixing-layer wind tunnel. The main objective of the study was to establish quantitatively the presence and the role of the secondary streamwise vortex structure (of the kind that has been shown in past flow visualization investigations to ride among the primary spanwise vortices) in the development of a plane turbulent mixing layer at relatively high Reynolds numbers. Results indicate that the instability leading to the formation of streamwise vortices is initially amplified just downstream of the first spanwise roll-up. The streamwise vortices, which first appear in clusters containing vorticity of both signs, realign further downstream to form counterrotating pairs. Due to the amalgamation of like-sign vortices, the streamwise vortex spacing increases in a stepwise fashion.

  15. Sea ice and the ocean mixed layer over the Antarctic shelf seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petty, A.; Holland, P.; Feltham, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    An ocean mixed layer model has been incorporated into the Los Alamos sea ice model CICE, to investigate regional variations in the surface-driven formation of Antarctic shelf sea waters. The model captures well the expected sea ice thickness distribution and produces deep (>500 m) mixed layers in the Weddell and Ross shelf seas each winter. By deconstructing the surface power input to the mixed layer, we have shown that the salt/fresh water flux from sea ice growth/melt dominates the evolution of the mixed layer in all shelf sea regions, with a smaller contribution from the mixed layer-surface heat flux. The Weddell and Ross shelf seas have the highest annual ice growth, with a large fraction exported northwards each year, whereas the Bellingshausen shelf sea experiences the highest annual ice melt, driven by the advection of ice from the northeast. Forcing the model with ERA-Interim (1980-2011) and hadGEM2-ES (1980-2099) atmospheric data allows us to look at the impact of atmospheric trends on the sea ice and ocean mixed layer. Both simulations show a shallowing of the wintertime mixed layer in the Amundsen & Bellingshausen seas, potentially increasing the access of warm CDW to ice shelves in both regions. The ERA-I hindcast simulation shows a significant freshening in the Ross and salinification in the Weddell due to surface driven trends (primarily through changes in the sea ice). The Ross freshening is smaller than observed however, highlighting the important role of ice shelf melt in the Amundsen Sea.

  16. The roll-up and merging of coherent structures in shallow mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, M. Y.; Ghidaoui, M. S.; Kolyshkin, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    The current study seeks a fundamental explanation to the development of two-dimensional coherent structures (2DCSs) in shallow mixing layers. A nonlinear numerical model based on the depth-averaged shallow water equations is used to investigate the temporal evolution of shallow mixing layers, where the mapping from temporal to spatial results is made using the velocity at the center of the mixing layers. The flow is periodic in the streamwise direction. Transmissive boundary conditions are used in the cross-stream boundaries to prevent reflections. Numerical results are compared to linear stability analysis, mean-field theory, and secondary stability analysis. Results suggest that the onset and development of 2DCS in shallow mixing layers are the result of a sequence of instabilities governed by linear theory, mean-field theory, and secondary stability theory. The linear instability of the shearing velocity gradient gives the onset of 2DCS. When the perturbations reach a certain amplitude, the flow field of the perturbations changes from a wavy shape to a vortical (2DCS) structure because of nonlinearity. The development of the vertical 2DCS does not appear to follow weakly nonlinear theory; instead, it follows mean-field theory. After the formation of 2DCS, separate 2DCSs merge to form larger 2DCS. In this way, 2DCSs grow and shallow mixing layers develop and grow in scale. The merging of 2DCS in shallow mixing layers is shown to be caused by the secondary instability of the 2DCS. Eventually 2DCSs are dissipated by bed friction. The sequence of instabilities can cause the upscaling of the turbulent kinetic energy in shallow mixing layers.

  17. Analysis of mixed-layer clay mineral structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, W.F.

    1953-01-01

    Among the enormously abundant natural occurrences of clay minerals, many examples are encountered in which no single specific crystallization scheme extends through a single ultimate grain. The characterization of such assemblages becomes an analysis of the distribution of matter within such grains, rather than the simple identification of mineral species. It having become established that the particular coordination complex typified by mica is a common component of many natural subcrystalline assemblages, the opportunity is afforded to analyze scattering from random associations of these complexes with other structural units. Successful analyses have been made of mixed hydration states of montmorillonite, of montmorillonite with mica, of vermiculite with mica, and of montmorillonite with chlorite, all of which are variants of the mica complex, and of halloysite with hydrated halloysite.

  18. Lipid-Based Immuno-Magnetic Separation of Archaea from a Mixed Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frickle, C. M.; Bailey, J.; Lloyd, K. G.; Shumaker, A.; Flood, B.

    2014-12-01

    Despite advancing techniques in microbiology, an estimated 98% of all microbial species on Earth have yet to be isolated in pure culture. Natural samples, once transferred to the lab, are commonly overgrown by "weed" species whose metabolic advantages enable them to monopolize available resources. Developing new methods for the isolation of thus-far uncultivable microorganisms would allow us to better understand their ecology, physiology and genetic potential. Physically separating target organisms from a mixed community is one approach that may allow enrichment and growth of the desired strain. Here we report on a novel method that uses known physiological variations between taxa, in this case membrane lipids, to segregate the desired organisms while keeping them alive and viable for reproduction. Magnetic antibodies bound to the molecule squalene, which is found in the cell membranes of certain archaea, but not bacteria, enable separation of archaea from bacteria in mixed samples. Viability of cells was tested by growing the separated fractions in batch culture. Efficacy and optimization of the antibody separation technique are being evaluated using qPCR and cell counts. Future work will apply this new separation technique to natural samples.

  19. Studying calcium triggered vesicle fusion in a single vesicle-vesicle content/lipid mixing system

    PubMed Central

    Kyoung, Minjoung; Zhang, Yunxiang; Diao, Jiajie; Chu, Steven; Brunger, Axel T.

    2013-01-01

    This Protocol describes a single vesicle-vesicle microscopy system to study Ca2+-triggered vesicle fusion. Donor vesicles contain reconstituted synaptobrevin and synaptotagmin-1. Acceptor vesicles contain reconstituted syntaxin and SNAP-25, and are tethered to a PEG-coated glass surface. Donor vesicles are mixed with the tethered acceptor vesicles and incubated for several minutes at zero Ca2+-concentration, resulting in a collection of single interacting vesicle pairs. The donor vesicles also contain two spectrally distinct fluorophores that allow simultaneous monitoring of temporal changes of the content and membrane. Upon Ca2+-injection into the sample chamber, our system therefore differentiates between hemifusion and complete fusion of interacting vesicle pairs and determines the temporal sequence of these events on a sub-hundred millisecond timescale. Other factors, such as complexin, can be easily added. Our system is unique by monitoring both content and lipid mixing, and by starting from a metastable state of interacting vesicle pairs prior to Ca2+-injection. PMID:23222454

  20. Lipid mixing and content release in single-vesicle, SNARE-driven fusion assay with 1-5 ms resolution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tingting; Smith, Elizabeth A; Chapman, Edwin R; Weisshaar, James C

    2009-05-20

    A single-vesicle, fluorescence-based, SNARE-driven fusion assay enables simultaneous measurement of lipid mixing and content release with 5 ms/frame, or even 1 ms/frame, time resolution. The v-SNARE vesicles, labeled with lipid and content markers of different color, dock and fuse with a planar t-SNARE bilayer supported on glass. A narrow (<5 ms duration), intense spike of calcein fluorescence due to content release and dequenching coincides with inner-leaflet lipid mixing within 10 ms. The spike provides more sensitive detection of productive hemifusion events than do lipid labels alone. Consequently, many fast events previously thought to be prompt, full fusion events are now reclassified as productive hemifusion. Both full fusion and hemifusion occur with a time constant of 5-10 ms. At 60% phosphatidylethanolamine lipid composition, productive and dead-end hemifusion account for 65% of all fusion events. However, quantitative analysis shows that calcein is released into the space above the bilayer (vesicle bursting), rather than the thin aqueous space between the bilayer and glass. Evidently, at the instant of inner-leaflet mixing, flattening of the vesicle increases the internal pressure beyond the bursting point. This may be related to in vivo observations suggesting that membrane lysis often competes with membrane fusion.

  1. Lipid metabolism of commercial layers fed diets containing aflatoxin, fumonisin, and a binder.

    PubMed

    Siloto, E V; Oliveira, E F A; Sartori, J R; Fascina, V B; Martins, B A B; Ledoux, D R; Rottinghaus, G E; Sartori, D R S

    2013-08-01

    Aflatoxins (AF) and fumonisins (FU) are a major problem faced by poultry farmers, leading to huge economic losses. This experiment was conducted to determine the effects of AF (1 mg/kg of feed) and FU (25 mg/kg of feed), singly or in combination, on the lipid metabolism in commercial layers and investigate the efficacy of a commercial binder (2 kg/t of feed) on reducing the toxic effects of these mycotoxins. A total of 168 Hisex Brown layer hens, 37 wk of age, were randomized into a 3 × 2 + 1 factorial arrangement (3 diets with no binder containing AF, FU, and AF+FU; 3 diets with binder containing AF, FU, and AF+FU; and a control diet with no mycotoxins and binders), totaling 7 treatments. The hens contaminated with AF showed the characteristic effects of aflatoxicosis, such as a yellow liver, resulting from the accumulation of liver fat, lower values of plasma very low-density lipoprotein and triglycerides, and higher relative weight of the kidneys and liver. Hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic effects of FU were not observed in this study. On the other hand, the FU caused a reduction in small intestine length and an increase in abdominal fat deposition. The glucan-based binder prevented some of the deleterious effects of these mycotoxins, particularly the effects of AF on hepatic lipid metabolism, kidney relative weight, and FU in the small intestine.

  2. A model study of seasonal mixed-layer primary production in the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, John; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor

    1994-06-01

    We combined a surface irradiance model with a non-spectral photosynthesisirradiance model to estimate the daily, average rate of mixed-layer primary production in the Arabian Sea for the 15th day of months at the end of the northeast monsoon, the southwest monsoon, and the fall and spring inter-monsoons. Our model experiment uses climatologies of cloud cover, mixed-layer thickness, and satellite ocean-color observations of phytoplankton biomass. Modelled surface radiation is at an annual maximum in May beneath nearly cloud-free skies just prior to the summer solstice. The model estimate of surface radiation diminishes through the southwest monsoon over most of the northern Arabian Sea to an annual minimum in August due to intense cloudiness. In agreement with previous ship-based measurements, the photosynthesis-irradiance model predicts that the mixed-layer primary production in the Arabian Sea is extremely seasonal, and peaks annually during the southwest monsoon to the north-west of the atmospheric Findlater Jet and along the coast of Somalia. Northern Arabian Sea maxima predicted for both the summer and winter monsoons are separated by periods of low mixed-layer primary production, the fall and spring inter-monsoons. The annual cycles of modelled mixed-layer primary production differ by region in the Arabian Sea due to varying monsoon influence and circulation dynamics.

  3. Microalgal biomass and lipid production in mixed municipal, dairy, pulp and paper wastewater together with added flue gases.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Francesco G

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to grow microalgae on mixed municipal and industrial wastewater to simultaneously treat the wastewater and produce biomass and lipids. All algal strains grew in all wastewater mixtures; however, Selenastrum minutum had the highest biomass and lipids yields, up to 37% of the dry matter. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal were high and followed a similar trend in all three strains. Ammonium was reduced from 96% to 99%; this reduction was due to algal growth and not to stripping to the atmosphere, as confirmed by the amount of nitrogen in the dry algal biomass. Phosphate was reduced from 91% to 99%. In all strains used the lipid content was negatively correlated to the nitrogen concentration in the algal biomass. Mixtures of pulp and paper wastewater with municipal and dairy wastewater have great potential to grow algae for biomass and lipid production together with effective wastewater treatment. PMID:25016463

  4. Microalgal biomass and lipid production in mixed municipal, dairy, pulp and paper wastewater together with added flue gases.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Francesco G

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the study was to grow microalgae on mixed municipal and industrial wastewater to simultaneously treat the wastewater and produce biomass and lipids. All algal strains grew in all wastewater mixtures; however, Selenastrum minutum had the highest biomass and lipids yields, up to 37% of the dry matter. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal were high and followed a similar trend in all three strains. Ammonium was reduced from 96% to 99%; this reduction was due to algal growth and not to stripping to the atmosphere, as confirmed by the amount of nitrogen in the dry algal biomass. Phosphate was reduced from 91% to 99%. In all strains used the lipid content was negatively correlated to the nitrogen concentration in the algal biomass. Mixtures of pulp and paper wastewater with municipal and dairy wastewater have great potential to grow algae for biomass and lipid production together with effective wastewater treatment.

  5. Coherent structures and turbulent molecular mixing in gaseous planar shear layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, T. R.; Dutton, J. C.; Lucht, R. P.

    2006-07-01

    Quantitative planar visualization of molecular mixing dynamics in large- and intermediate-scale coherent structures is reported for the first time in the developing and far-field regions of gaseous planar shear layers. A dual-tracer (nitric oxide and acetone) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) technique is implemented as the gaseous analogue to acid/base chemical reactions that have previously been used to study molecular mixing in liquid shear layers. Data on low-speed, high-speed, and total molecularly mixed fluid fractions are collected for low- to high-speed velocity ratios from 0.25 to 0.44 and Reynolds numbers, Re_{delta}, from 18 600 to 103 000. Within this range of conditions, mixed-fluid probability density functions and ensemble-averaged statistics are highly influenced by the homogenizing effect of large-scale Kelvin Helmholtz rollers and the competing action of intermediate-scale secondary instabilities. Small-scale turbulence leads to near-unity mixing efficiencies and mixed-fluid probabilities within the shear layer, with subresolution stirring being detected primarily along the interface with free-stream fluid. Current molecular-mixing data compare favourably with previous time-averaged probe-based measurements while providing new insight on the effects of coherent structures, velocity ratio, downstream distance, and differences between low- and high-speed fluid entrainment.

  6. Evaluation of the parameterization for cloud top-down mixing in the boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Hong, Song-You; Dudhia, Jimy

    2015-04-01

    An enhanced turbulent mixing due to radiative cooling at cloud or fog top located in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is parameterized by adopting the top-down diffusivity profile and the cloud top entrainment. The algorithm is first implemented to YSU PBL scheme to be evaluated for idealized cases and then applied for the regional and global real case simulations. Since the modified algorithm consider the mixing height as near surface cloud top, its enhanced mixing effect appears more distinctly especially for the stabilized nocturnal boundary layer. As a result, in the idealized radiation fog case study, it is found that near-surface air temperature decreases due to both radiative cooling at fog top and boundary layer mixing of the new algorithm. Also, the moisture is diffused more effectively to the above the boundary layer, which leads to the rapid dispersion of the fog in the modified algorithm. As a result, the new algorithm simulates the warm and dried near-surface and the cool and moistened boundary layer top in the following daytime. It is also found that the modified algorithm affects the cloud structure frequently occurring at the ocean boundary layer top in the regional and global simulation results.

  7. Parameterization of mixed layer eddies. III: Implementation and impact in global ocean climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox-Kemper, B.; Danabasoglu, G.; Ferrari, R.; Griffies, S. M.; Hallberg, R. W.; Holland, M. M.; Maltrud, M. E.; Peacock, S.; Samuels, B. L.

    A parameterization for the restratification by finite-amplitude, submesoscale, mixed layer eddies, formulated as an overturning streamfunction, has been recently proposed to approximate eddy fluxes of density and other tracers. Here, the technicalities of implementing the parameterization in the coarse-resolution ocean component of global climate models are made explicit, and the primary impacts on model solutions of implementing the parameterization are discussed. Three global ocean general circulation models including this parameterization are contrasted with control simulations lacking the parameterization. The MLE parameterization behaves as expected and fairly consistently in models differing in discretization, boundary layer mixing, resolution, and other parameterizations. The primary impact of the parameterization is a shoaling of the mixed layer, with the largest effect in polar winter regions. Secondary impacts include strengthening the Atlantic meridional overturning while reducing its variability, reducing CFC and tracer ventilation, modest changes to sea surface temperature and air-sea fluxes, and an apparent reduction of sea ice basal melting.

  8. Computation of turbulent high speed mixing layers using a two-equation turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, J. R.; Sekar, B.

    1991-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence model was extended to be applicable for compressible flows. A compressibility correction based on modelling the dilational terms in the Reynolds stress equations were included in the model. The model is used in conjunction with the SPARK code for the computation of high speed mixing layers. The observed trend of decreasing growth rate with increasing convective Mach number in compressible mixing layers is well predicted by the model. The predictions agree well with the experimental data and the results from a compressible Reynolds stress model. The present model appears to be well suited for the study of compressible free shear flows. Preliminary results obtained for the reacting mixing layers are included.

  9. Seasonal evolution of the mixed layer in the Subantarctic Zone south of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rintoul, Stephen R.; Trull, Thomas W.

    2001-12-01

    The circumpolar Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) is a globally significant region of water mass formation and carbon dioxide uptake from the atmosphere. Here we synthesize the results of nine voyages over 8 years to describe the seasonal variation in mixed layer properties in the SAZ south of Australia for comparison with biogeochemical process studies carried out in late summer (March 1998) as part of the SAZ Project. Winter mixing extends to depths >400 m, resulting in the formation of Subantarctic Mode Water. In summer the mixed layer shoals to 75-100 m, depths which are still sufficiently deep that phytoplankton growth may be light limited. Nitrate and phosphate concentrations are reduced in summer (e.g., nitrate decreases from >15 to <5 μmol kg-1) but remain well above limiting levels. Silicate, in contrast, is low throughout the year (4 μmol kg-1 in winter and <2 μmol kg-1 in summer). Water mass properties along a north-south hydrographic section in March 1998 suggest that near-surface waters spread from south to north across the Subantarctic Front (SAF), supplying cool, fresh, nutrient-rich water to the SAZ. As a consequence, the properties of the southern SAZ differ from those farther north: the mixed layer in the south is cooler, fresher, deeper, higher in nutrients, and bounded below by a halocline (rather than by a seasonal thermocline, as in the northern SAZ). The contrast between the northern and southern SAZ persists throughout the year, suggesting the cross-front exchange occurs year-round and likely contributes to the differences in seasonal thermal amplitude and algal biomass accumulation seen in satellite images. Density-compensated horizontal gradients of temperature and salinity are common in the mixed layer of the SAZ and the northern SAF, consistent with the hypothesis that the vigor of lateral mixing in the mixed layer is a strong function of the magnitude of the lateral density gradient.

  10. Application of continuous remote sensing of mixing layer height for assessment of airport air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Helmis, Costas; Emeis, Stefan; Sgouros, George; Kurtenbach, Ralf; Wiesen, Peter; Münkel, Christoph; Jahn, Carsten; Hoffmann, Maria; Anamaterou, Evi; O'Connor, Michael

    2010-10-01

    The assessment of airport air quality requires not only the knowledge of the emissions and the temporal and spatial distribution of meteorological parameters like wind direction and wind speed but also of the mixing layer height, because this variable controls the vertical space for rapid mixing of near-surface pollutants. It was demonstrated that the lowest stable layer or temperature inversion limits the vertical exchange of primary pollutants emitted at or near the surface and thus controls the near-surface pollutant concentrations. Remote sensing is a suitable tool to determine mixing layer height continuously as was demonstrated in urban and sub-urban areas (Hannover, Munich, Budapest, Augsburg) as well as at airports (Zurich, Paris CDG, Mexico City International Airport, Athens International Airport). The Vaisala ceilometer LD40 was used which is an eye-safe commercial lidar and designed originally to detect cloud base heights and vertical visibility for aviation safety purposes. These measurements of the vertical aerosol distribution are routinely retrieved for mixing layer height estimation by using software which was improved continuously and compared with radiosonde data. Further, mixing layer height was determined by remote sensing with a combination of a Doppler- SODAR (Sound Detection and Ranging), a RASS (Radio Acustic Sounding System) and in-situ measurements. Vertical wind, temperature and turbulence parameter profiles up to 1500 m maximum were measured by this method too. Some results of interpretation of measured data at Athens International Airport will be discussed as the influence of mixing layer height upon airport air quality and estimation of the airport emission source strengths.

  11. Biophysical investigations of the structure and function of the tear fluid lipid layer and the effect of ectoine. Part A: natural meibomian lipid films.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Mridula; Backers, Hannes; Harishchandra, Rakesh Kumar; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-10-01

    The tear fluid lipid layer is the outermost part of the tear film on the ocular surface which protects the eye from inflammations and injuries. We investigated the influence of ectoine on the structural organization of natural meibomian lipid films using surface activity analysis and topographical studies. These films exhibit a continuous pressure-area isotherm without any phase transition. With the addition of ectoine, the isotherm is expanded towards higher area per molecule values suggesting an increased area occupied by the interfacial lipid molecules. The AFM topology scans of natural meibomian lipid films reveal a presence of fiber-like structures. The addition of ectoine causes an appearance of droplet-like structures which are hypothesized to be tri-acyl-glycerols and other hydrophobic components excluded from the lipid film. Further the material properties of the droplet-like structure with respect to the surrounding were determined by using the quantitative imaging mode of the AFM technique. The droplet-like structures were found to be comparatively softer than the surrounding. Based on the observations a preliminary hypothesis is proposed explaining the mechanism of action of ectoine leading to the fluidization of meibomian lipid films. This suggests the possibility of ectoine as a treatment for the dry eye syndrome.

  12. Profiling the Triacylglyceride Contents in Bat Integumentary Lipids by Preparative Thin Layer Chromatography and MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pannkuk, Evan L.; Risch, Thomas S.; Savary, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian integument includes sebaceous glands that secrete an oily material onto the skin surface. Sebum production is part of the innate immune system that is protective against pathogenic microbes. Abnormal sebum production and chemical composition are also a clinical symptom of specific skin diseases. Sebum contains a complex mixture of lipids, including triacylglycerides, which is species-specific. The broad chemical properties exhibited by diverse lipid classes hinder the specific determination of sebum composition. Analytical techniques for lipids typically require chemical derivatizations that are labor-intensive and increase sample preparation costs. This paper describes how to extract lipids from mammalian integument, separate broad lipid classes by thin-layer chromatography, and profile the triacylglyceride contents using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. This robust method enables a direct determination of the triacylglyceride profiles among species and individuals, and it can be readily applied to any taxonomic group of mammals. PMID:24056580

  13. One-dimensional mixing layer model for a shear Hele-Shaw flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovtunenko, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    A shear flow of a viscosity-stratified fluid in a Hele-Shaw cell is considered. The long-wave approximation is applied to the governing equations. To describe the evolution of the mixing layer, a special flow with a three-layered structure is considered. A one-dimensional model is derived by averaging the motion equations over the cell width, taking into account the flow structure. For a stationary flow, solutions of motion equations are constructed. The influence of viscosity on the mixing layer evolution is investigated by performing a numerical experiment for a flow with different viscosities in the layers and for a flow with always zero viscosity. It is shown that viscosity has a significant influence on the flow evolution.

  14. Mixing layer growth and background air-quality measurements over the Colorado oil-shale area

    SciTech Connect

    Laulainen, N.S.; Whiteman, C.D.; Davis, W.E.; Thorp, J.M.

    1981-06-01

    The daily growth of convective boundary layers over the complex terrain of the oil shale areas of Colorado is a prominent feature of the meteorology of the region. The development of these layers was investigated using airsondes, rawinsondes, and aircraft. The deep growth of the layers in August, to heights in excess of 5500-m MSL on clear or partly cloudy days, is expected to have important implications for the dispersal of pollutants released in the region as the oil shale resource undergoes future development. Aircraft observations show that the present background air quality is good over the region and that pollutants, when present, become well mixed throughout the depth of the convective boundary layer. The layer therefore represents an important natural means of dilution for pollutants introduced into the atmosphere. Work is proceeding to incorporate the time-dependent convective boundary layer growth into air pollution models for the region.

  15. Treating mixed hyperlipidemia and the atherogenic lipid phenotype for prevention of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D; Rosenson, Robert S

    2010-10-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular events and cardiovascular and total mortality in persons at risk for and with coronary disease, but there remains a significant residual event rate, particularly in those with the atherogenic lipid phenotype that is characterized by a low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and increase in non-HDL cholesterol. Large outcome trials designed to assess the value of combining statins with other agents to target HDL cholesterol and non-HDL cholesterol will not be completed for a few years, but there is ample evidence for the clinician to consider combination therapy. The choices for therapies to supplement statins include niacin, fibrates, and omega-3 fatty acids. We present the argument that after therapeutic lifestyle changes, the first priority should be the maximally tolerated effective dose of a potent statin. Evidence supports the addition of niacin as the second agent. In some situations, high-dose omega-3 fatty acid therapy could be the first agent added to statins. Although fibrate monotherapy alone or in combination with non-statin low-density lipoprotein cholesterol-lowering agents can be effective in mixed hyperlipidemia when statins are not tolerated, the combination of statin+fibrate should be considered second-line therapy until the efficacy and safety are established. PMID:20920687

  16. Turbulent mixing and transport in a thermally stratified interfacial layer in decaying grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kyunghwan; Warhaft, Z.; Jayesh

    1991-05-01

    A stably stratified mixing layer, sandwiched in between regions of neutral turbulence, was studied in decaying grid turbulence. The layer, which was shearless, was formed by heating the upper half of the flow by means of elements placed at the entrance to the plenum of a large, open circuit low speed wind tunnel 0.91 x 0.91 sq m in cross section and 9.14 m in length. The hot air above mixed with the cold below forming the stratified layer in between. Smoke wire photographs showed a wavelike damped region inside the layer, surrounded by the normal, more energetic turbulence outside. Second-order turbulence quantities scaled in the same way with the local Richardson number both along the layer and across it. The two stably stratified cases studied had centerline Froude numbers of 95 and 65 at 40 mesh lengths from the grid. The results are compared to a passive thermal mixing layer and are contrasted with recent experiments concerning a constant temperature gradient in grid turbulence.

  17. Non-local closure model for vertical mixing in the convective boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Pleim, J.E.; Chang, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    A simple non-local closure model for vertical mixing in Convective Boundary Layers (CBL) has been developed specifically for application in regional or meso-scale atmospheric chemistry models. The model, named the Asymmetrical Convective Model (ACM), is based on the concept that vertical transport within the CBL is inherently asymmetrical. Upward transport by buoyant plumes originating in the surface layer is simulated by mixing from the lowest model layer directly to all other layers in the CBL. Downward transport, however, proceeds only to the next lower layer in order to emulate gradual compensatory subsidence. The realism of the ACM is tested through comparisons to large-eddy simulations of several idealized test cases. The ACM is also tested in the context of the Regional Acid Deposition Model (RADM) both to determine sensitivity to different CBL mixing schemes and to compare to vertically resolved aircraft measurements. These tests demonstrate quicker upward transport of ground level emissions by the ACM as compared to the eddy diffusion scheme currently used in RADM. The ACM also affects ozone photochemistry in the boundary layer resulting in lower ozone concentrations in areas of high NOx emissions.

  18. HST STIS Observations of the Mixing Layer in the Cat’s Eye Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xuan; Guerrero, Martín A.; Toalá, Jesús A.; Chu, You-Hua; Gruendl, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) are expected to have a ˜105 K interface layer between the ≥slant 106 K inner hot bubble and the ˜104 K optical nebular shell. The PN structure and evolution, and the X-ray emission, depend critically on the efficiency of the mixing of material at this interface layer. However, neither its location nor its spatial extent have ever been determined. Using high-spatial resolution HST STIS spectroscopic observations of the N v λ λ 1239,1243 lines in the Cat’s Eye Nebula (NGC 6543), we have detected this interface layer and determined its location, extent, and physical properties for the first time in a PN. We confirm that this interface layer, as revealed by the spatial distribution of the N v λ1239 line emission, is located between the hot bubble and the optical nebular shell. We estimate a thickness of 1.5× {10}16 cm and an electron density of ˜200 cm-3 for the mixing layer. With a thermal pressure of ˜2 × 10-8 dyn cm-2, the mixing layer is in pressure equilibrium with the hot bubble and ionized nebular rim of NGC 6543. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. The observations are associated with program #12509.

  19. Ion-beam mixing of Fe/B layers for tribological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, G.R.; Hu, R.; Baldo, P.M.; Erck, R.A.; Erdemir, A.; Lee, R.H.; Busch, D.E.; Nichols, F.A.; Rehn, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Ion-beam mixing of iron and boron deposited layers was investigated as a technique to produce improved tribological coatings on steel substrates. Analysis of the kinetics of the ion-mixing process indicated that processing temperatures between 300 and 450{degree}C were required to achieve mixing of iron and boron multilayered coatings. During film deposition, it is critical to avoid deposition processes such as rf sputtering that trap large quantities of inert gases in the growing films and form blisters during subsequent ion mixing at elevated temperatures. Tribological evaluation of annealed and ion-mixed coatings indicated that the major effect of the ion mixing is formation of hard, wear-resistant, polycrystalline Fe{sub 2}B and Fe{sub 3}B phases at 450{degree}C and amorphous layers at 300{degree}C. Under partially lubricated conditions, the hard phases increase the duration of a low-friction (coefficient of friction <0.2) regime by reducing wear, thereby maintaining a low surface roughness. Under boundary-lubrication conditions, reduced wear was observed in tests on ion-mixed samples and was found to be dependent on the humidity in the test environment. 16 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Mixed layer warming-deepening in the Mediterranean Sea and its effect on the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivetti, Irene; Boero, Ferdinando; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Zambianchi, Enrico; Lionello, Piero

    2015-04-01

    This work aims at investigating the evolution of the ocean mixed layer in the Mediterranean Sea and linking it to the occurrence of mass mortalities of benthic invertebrates. The temporal evolution of selected parameters describing the mixed layer and the seasonal thermocline is provided for the whole Mediterranean Sea for spring, summer and autumn and for the period 1945-2011. For this analysis all temperature profiles collected in the basin with bottles, Mechanical Bathy-Thermographs (MBT), eXpendable Bathy-Thermographs (XBT), and Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) have been used (166,990). These data have been extracted from three public sources: the MEDAR-MEDATLAS, the World Ocean Database 2013 and the MFS-VOS program. Five different methods for estimating the mixed layer depth are compared using temperature profiles collected at the DYFAMED station in the Ligurian Sea and one method, the so-called three-segment method, has been selected for a systematic analysis of the evolution of the uppermost part of the whole Mediterranean Sea. This method approximates the upper water column with three segments representing mixed layer, thermocline and deep layer and has shown to be the most suitable method for capturing the mixed layer depth for most shapes of temperature profiles. Mass mortalities events of benthic invertebrates have been identified by an extensive search of all data bases in ISI Web of Knowledge considering studies published from 1945 to 2011. Studies reporting the geographical coordinates, the timing of the events, the species involved and the depth at which signs of stress occurred have been considered. Results show a general increase of thickness and temperature of the mixed layer, deepening and cooling of the thermocline base in summer and autumn. Possible impacts of these changes are mass mortalities events of benthic invertebrates that have been documented since 1983 mainly in summer and autumn. It is also shown that most mass mortalities

  1. A Hybrid Numerical Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers. Degree awarded by Case Western Reserve Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2001-01-01

    A hybrid method has been developed for simulations of compressible turbulent mixing layers. Such mixing layers dominate the flows in exhaust systems of modern day aircraft and also those of hypersonic vehicles currently under development. The method configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. The hybrid method uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall bounded regions entering a mixing section, and a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) procedure to calculate the mixing dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. Closure for the RANS equations was obtained using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The wall-function approach enabled a continuous computational grid from the RANS regions to the LES region. The LES equations were closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. The hybrid RANS-LES method is applied to a benchmark compressible mixing layer experiment. Preliminary two dimensional calculations are used to investigate the effects of axial grid density and boundary conditions. Vortex shedding from the base region of a splitter plate separating the upstream flows was observed to eventually transition to turbulence. The location of the transition, however, was much further downstream than indicated by experiments. Actual LES calculations, performed in three spatial directions, also indicated vortex shedding, but the transition to turbulence was found to occur much closer to the beginning of the mixing section. which is in agreement with experimental observations. These calculations demonstrated that LES simulations must be performed in three dimensions. Comparisons of time-averaged axial velocities and turbulence intensities indicated reasonable agreement with experimental

  2. Purification and lipid-layer crystallization of yeast RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A M; Darst, S A; Feaver, W J; Thompson, N E; Burgess, R R; Kornberg, R D

    1990-01-01

    Yeast RNA polymerase II was purified to homogeneity by a rapid procedure involving immunoaffinity chromatography. The purified enzyme contained 10 subunits, as reported for conventional preparations, but with no detectable proteolysis of the largest subunit. In assays of initiation of transcription at the yeast CYC1 promoter, the enzyme complemented the deficiency of an extract from a strain that produces a temperature-sensitive polymerase II. Mammalian RNA polymerase II was inactive in this initiation assay. The purified yeast enzyme formed two-dimensional crystals on positively charged lipid layers, as previously found for Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme. Image analysis of electron micrographs of crystals in negative stain, which diffracted to about 30-A resolution, showed protein densities of dimensions consistent with those of single polymerase molecules. Images PMID:2179949

  3. Multiscale Variability of the Atmospheric Mixed Layer over the Western Pacific Warm Pool.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Richard H.; Ciesielski, Paul E.; Cotturone, Jennifer A.

    2001-09-01

    Sounding data from Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) have provided a first opportunity to document the variability of the atmospheric mixed layer over the western Pacific warm pool on timescales ranging from diurnal to intraseasonal. Six-hourly sounding data from four sites-the atoll Kapingamarangi and R/Vs Moana Wave, Shiyan 3, and Xiangyanghong 5-are used to determine the mixed layer depth and its thermodynamic properties. Almost three-quarters of the soundings at these four sites exhibited well-mixed structures: nearly constant profiles of potential temperature and specific humidity capped by a 150-m-deep entrainment zone. The majority of the remaining soundings were modified by precipitation and their associated downdrafts. It is estimated that approximately 40%-50% of the total soundings in COARE were influenced by precipitation downdrafts.The mean mixed layer depth at the four sites was 512 m with large variations on multiple timescales. Mean depths decreased across the warm pool from west to east, consistent with the west-to-east increase in precipitation averaged over the 4-month Intensive Observing Period. Significant modulation of the mixed layer occurred on the timescale of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO): the mean depth was 562 m during the undisturbed, light-wind period prior to the strong westerly wind burst (WWB) associated with the December MJO; it decreased to 466 m during the heavy-rain period of the WWB, reflecting numerous, recovering precipitation downdraft wakes; and then increased to 629 m during the late stages of the WWB when precipitation had ended. Dry intrusions over the warm pool caused the mixed layer to deepen at times to 800 m and more. Since the surface buoyancy flux typically did not increase at these times, the deepening is linked to a suppression of shallow cumulus clouds by the dry air (reduced between-cloud subsidence) as well as a general reduction in the overall

  4. Method of and apparatus for dynamically stabilizing the wind-mixed layer of a solar-water pond

    SciTech Connect

    Assaf, G.

    1986-03-25

    A method is described for dynamically stabilizing the convective wind-mixed layer of a salt-water solar pond, which covers a nonconvective halocline, the method comprising providing a source of brine whose salinity differs from the salinity of the water in the wind-mixed layer, and exchanging brine between the source and the wind-mixed layer for creating a two-layer flow regime in the wind-mixed layer due to differences in salinity whereby lighter less dense water flows adjacent the surface of the pond into the source, and heavier, more dense water, flows beneath the lighter water out of the source. A solar pond is described which consists of: (a) a convective wind-mixed layer of water on the surface of the pond; (b) a nonconvective halocline covered by the wind-mixed layer having a density that increases with depth; (c) a heat storage layer under the halocline for storing heat created in the pond by the absorption of solar radiation; and (d) a reservoir associated with the wind-mixed layer and containing water whose salinity is different from the average salinity of water in the wind-mixed layer, and means to exchange water between the reservoir and the wind-mixed layer for establishing a two-layer flow regime in the wind-mixed layer due to a difference in salinity between the layers whereby lighter less dense water flows adjacent the surface of the pond into the reservoir, and heavier, more dense water, flows beneath the lighter water out of the reservoir.

  5. Estimation of the mixing layer height over a high altitude site in Central Himalayan region by using Doppler lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Newsom, Rob K.; Kumar, Niranjan; Ratnam, Venkat; Naja, M.; Singh, Narendra

    2014-03-01

    A Doppler lidar was installed at Manora Peak, Nainital (29.4 N; 79.2 E, 1958 amsl) to estimate mixing layer height for the first time by using vertical velocity variance as basic measurement parameter for the period September-November 2011. Mixing layer height is found to be located ~0.57 +/- 0.1and 0.45 +/- 0.05km AGL during day and nighttime, respectively. The estimation of mixing layer height shows good correlation (R>0.8) between different instruments and with different methods. Our results show that wavelet co-variance transform is a robust method for mixing layer height estimation.

  6. Formation of amorphous Ti alloy layers by excimer laser mixing of Ti on AISI 304 stainless-steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jervis, T. R.; Nastasi, M.; Zocco, T. G.; Martin, J. A.

    1988-07-01

    We used excimer laser radiation at 308 nm to mix thin layers of Ti into AISI 304 stainless steel. Different numbers of shots at a fluence about twice the threshold for melting varied the amount of mixing. When mixing is sufficiently complete, an amorphous surface layer is formed with Ti substituting for Fe on a one-to-one basis in the alloy. The laser mixing process, unlike Ti ion implantation, does not result in high incorporation of C in the processed layer, although some C from surface and interface contamination is incorporated into the surface layer.

  7. Lidar Descriptions of Mixing-Layer Thickness Characteristics in a Complex Terrain/Coastal Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElroy, James L.; Smith, Ted B.

    1991-05-01

    Airborne lidar and supplementary measurements made during a major study of air chemistry in southern California (SCCCAMP 1985) provided a rare opportunity to examine atmospheric boundary-layer structure in a coastal area with complex terrain. This structure results from a combination of daytime heating or convection in the boundary layer (CBL), the intrusion of a marine layer into the inland areas, the thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) formed within the marine onshore flow, inland growth of the TIBL, interactions of the CBL and the TIBL, and airflow interactions with terrain features.Measurements showed offshore mixing-layer thicknesses during SCCCAMP to be quite uniform spatially and day to day at 100-200 m. Movement of this layer onshore occurred readily with terrain that sloped gradually upward (e.g., to 300 m MSL at 50 km inland), but was effectively blocked by a 400-500 m high coastal ridge. In the higher terrain beyond the coastal ridge, aerosol layers aloft were often created as a result of deep convection and of a combination of onshore flow and heated, upslope airflow activity. Such aerosol layers can extend far offshore when embedded in reverse circulations aloft.The forward boundary of the marine layer was quite sharp, resembling a miniature cold front. Within the marine layer the onshore flow initiates a TIBL at the coastline, which increases in depth with distance inland due to roughness and convective influences. A coherent marine layer with imbedded TIBL was maintained for inland distances of 20-50 km, depending on terrain. Intense heating occurred inland prior to the arrival and undercutting by the marine front. The resulting, effective mixing layer increased in thickness from a few hundred meters to nearly two kilometers in a very short distance.Comparisons of a representative, physically based TIBL and convective mixing-layer models with observed data indicate that they generally do a credible job of estimating the depth of the marine layer

  8. Transient effects in unstable ablation fronts and mixing layers in HEDP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarisse, J.-M.; Gauthier, S.; Dastugue, L.; Vallet, A.; Schneider, N.

    2016-07-01

    We report results obtained for two elementary unstable flow configurations relevant to high energy density physics: the ablation front instability and the Rayleigh–Taylor -instability induced mixing layer. These two flows are characterized by a transience of their perturbation dynamics. In the ablative flow case, this perturbation dynamics transience takes the form of finite-durations of successive linear-perturbation evolution phases until reaching regimes of decaying oscillations. This behaviour is observed in various regimes: weakly or strongly accelerated ablation fronts, irradiation asymmetries or initial external-surface defects, and is a result of the mean-flow unsteadiness and stretching. In the case of the Rayleigh–Taylor-instability induced mixing layer, perturbation dynamics transience manifests itself through the extinction of turbulence and mixing as the flow reaches a stable state made of two stably stratified layers of pure fluids separated by an unstratified mixing layer. A second feature, also due to compressibility, takes the form of an intense acoustic wave production, mainly localized in the heavy fluid. Finally, we point out that a systematic short-term linear-perturbation dynamics analysis should be undertaken within the framework of non-normal stability theory.

  9. Significant mixed layer nitrification in a natural iron-fertilized bloom of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fripiat, F.; Elskens, M.; Trull, T. W.; Blain, S.; Cavagna, A.-J.; Fernandez, C.; Fonseca-Batista, D.; Planchon, F.; Raimbault, P.; Roukaerts, A.; Dehairs, F.

    2015-11-01

    Nitrification, the microbially mediated oxidation of ammonium into nitrate, is generally expected to be low in the Southern Ocean mixed layer. This paradigm assumes that nitrate is mainly provided through vertical mixing and assimilated during the vegetative season, supporting the concept that nitrate uptake is equivalent to the new primary production (i.e., primary production which is potentially available for export). Here we show that nitrification is significant (~40-80% of the seasonal nitrate uptake) in the naturally iron-fertilized bloom over the southeast Kerguelen Plateau. Hence, a large fraction of the nitrate-based primary production is regenerated, instead of being exported. It appears that nitrate assimilation (light dependent) and nitrification (partly light inhibited) are spatially separated between the upper and lower parts, respectively, of the deep surface mixed layers. These deep mixed layers, extending well below the euphotic layer, allow nitrifiers to compete with phytoplankton for the assimilation of ammonium. The high contributions of nitrification to nitrate uptake are in agreement with both low export efficiency (i.e., the percentage of primary production that is exported) and low seasonal nitrate drawdown despite high nitrate assimilation.

  10. [Mineralogy and genesis of mixed-layer clay minerals in the Jiujiang net-like red soil].

    PubMed

    Yin, Ke; Hong, Han-Lie; Li, Rong-Biao; Han, Wen; Wu, Yu; Gao, Wen-Peng; Jia, Jin-Sheng

    2012-10-01

    Mineralogy and genesis were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to understand the mineralogy and its genesis significance of mixed-layer clay minerals in Jiujiang red soil section. XRD and FTIR results show that the net-like red soil sediments are composed of illite, kaolinite, minor smectite and mixed-layer illite-smectite and minor mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite. HRTEM observation indicates that some smectite layers have transformed into kaolinite layers in net-like red soil. Mixed-layer illite-smectite is a transition phase of illite transforming into smectite, and mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite is a transitional product relative to kaolinite and smectite. The occurrence of two mixed-layer clay species suggests that the weathering sequence of clay minerals in net-like red soil traversed from illite to mixed-layer illite-smectite to smectite to mixed-layer kaolinite-smectite to kaolinite, which indicates that net-like red soil formed under a warm and humid climate with strengthening of weathering.

  11. Centrifugal instability of the wake-dominated curved compressible mixing-layers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Stephen, Sharon

    2007-11-01

    The mixing layer is an interfacial region between two moving homogeneous fluids of different density, compressibility, velocity and temperature. G"ortler instability is a type of centrifugal instability which could arise from the mixing layer system owing to the dynamical effect of centreline curvature. The linear development of G"ortler vortices at high Reynolds number within both stably and unstably curved compressible mixing layers is investigated. The purpose behind this investigation is to determine if the presence of a G"ortler mode could enhance the mixing of two fluids in certain physical situations such as the mixing between fuel and oxidizer within a scramjet engine for the propulsion of hypersonic aircraft. The investigation is made by examining the growth rate and the location of the G"ortler modes in the limit of larger G"ortler number. An analytical Gaussian wake model is first used to predict the development of the G"ortler modes. A more accurate basic wake model has also been obtained numerically to compare with the earlier prediction.

  12. Computer analysis of a high-speed film of the plane turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernan, M. A.; Jimenez, J.

    1982-06-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of digital image analysis in extracting quantitative information from flow pictures we have studied a 16 mm cine film of a turbulent mixing layer. A sequence of 373 frames is digitized and analyzed to isolate and measure the concentration eddies that constitute the large structure and to follow their individual evolution in time. As a result, statistics are given on the life history of the eddies, the structure of the amalgamation process and the amount of entrainment, as measured by area change, due to amalgamation as compared to the total. It is found that most of the entrainment occurs during the normal life of eddies and not during pairing. Mixing intermittency is computed from the observed shape of the eddies and seen to compare well with previous measurements. The significance of these results in modelling the mixing layer is discussed briefly and some comments are given on the general usefulness of the techniques presented.

  13. Parametric investigation on mixing in a micromixer with two-layer crossing channels.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Shakhawat; Kim, Kwang-Yong

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a parametric investigation on flow and mixing in a chaotic micromixer consisting of two-layer crossing channels proposed by Xia et al. (Lab Chip 5: 748-755, 2005). The flow and mixing performance were numerically analyzed using commercially available software ANSYS CFX-15.0, which solves the Navier-Stokes and mass conservation equations with a diffusion-convection model in a Reynolds number range from 0.2 to 40. A mixing index based on the variance of the mass fraction of the mixture was employed to evaluate the mixing performance of the micromixer. The flow structure in the channel was also investigated to identify the relationship with mixing performance. The mixing performance and pressure-drop were evaluated with two dimensionless geometric parameters, i.e., ratios of the sub-channel width to the main channel width and the channels depth to the main channel width. The results revealed that the mixing index at the exit of the micromixer increases with increase in the channel depth-to-width ratio, but decreases with increase in the sub-channel width to main channel width ratio. And, it was found that the mixing index could be increased up to 0.90 with variations of the geometric parameters at Re = 0.2, and the pressure drop was very sensitive to the geometric parameters. PMID:27390635

  14. Summertime mixed layer development in the marginal sea ice zone off the Mawson coast, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, G. D.; Nicol, S.; Raymond, B.; Meiners, K.

    2008-02-01

    Two small-scale Antarctic marine ecosystem surveys were conducted offshore from the Mawson coast (61-66∘E), in the austral summers of January 2001 and 2003. Striking differences were observed in the state of the marine ecosystem between the surveys; in particular krill abundance and penguin breeding success were significantly lower in 2003. In this paper we examine the variability in the physical oceanography between the two surveys, and identify the development of the summer mixed layer (SML) as the key physical process influencing the differences in ecological conditions. The mixed layer in 2003 was warmer, fresher and reduced in both dissolved oxygen content and fluorescence relative to 2001. In 2001 the mean mixed-layer depth was 68.5±12.4m. In 2003, the mean mixed-layer depth was 33.8±11.2m, and increased through the remaining 14 days of the survey. The SML in 2003 was underdeveloped by over a month relative to the 2001 hydrography and we relate this to the seasonal variability in the pattern and timing of sea-ice melt. AVHRR satellite images show a region of fast ice against the Mawson coast that had greater spatial and temporal extent in 2003. We conclude that delayed mixed layer development due to persistent sea ice is likely to have a negative impact on the marine ecosystem of the Antarctic shelf. This may have important implications for predicting the impact of future variability in the sea-ice growth/melt transition due to climate change.

  15. Buoyant production and consumption of turbulence kinetic energy in cloud-topped mixed layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    It is pointed out that studies of the entraining planetary boundary layer (PBL) have generally emphasized the role of buoyancy fluxes in driving entrainment. The buoyancy flux is proportional to the rate of conversion of the potential energy of the mean flow into the kinetic energy of the turbulence. It is not unusual for conversion to proceed in both directions simultaneously. This occurs, for instance, in both clear and cloudy convective mixed layers which are capped by inversions. A partitioning of the net conversion into positive parts, generating turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and negative parts (TKE-consuming), would make it possible to include the positive part in the gross production rate, and closure would be achieved. Three different approaches to partitioning have been proposed. The present investigation is concerned with a comparison of the three partitioning theories. Particular attention is given to the cloud-topped mixed layer because in this case the differences between two partitioning approaches are most apparent.

  16. Direct numerical simulations of a reacting mixing layer with chemical heat release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, P. A.; Jou, W.-H.; Metcalfe, R. W.; Riley, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the coupling between chemical heat release and fluid dynamics, direct numerical simulations of a chemically reacting mixing layer with heat release are performed. The fully compressible equations as well as an approximate set of equations that is asymptotically valid for low-Mach-number flows are treated. These latter equations have the computational advantage that high-frequency acoustic waves have been filtered out, allowing much larger time steps to be taken in the numerical solution procedure. A detailed derivation of these equations along with an outline of the numerical solution technique is given. Simulation results indicate that the rate of chemical product formed, the thickness of the mixing layer, and the amount of mass entrained into the layer all decrease with increasing rates of heat release.

  17. Trace-Gas Mixing in Isolated Urban Boundary Layers: Results from the 2001 Phoenix Sunrise Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, Carl M.; Doran, J C.; Shaw, William J.; Springston, Stephen R.; Spicer, Chet W.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements made from surface sites, from the 50-m and 140-m levels (the 16th and 39th floors) of a skyscraper and from an instrumented aircraft are used to characterize early morning profiles of CO, NOy and O3 within the mid-morning summertime convective atmospheric boundary layer (CABL) over Phoenix, Arizona. Although mixing was anticipated to produce uniform values of these species throughout the CABL, this was found not to be the case. Background air advected into the upper levels of the boundary layer and entrained air from above appears to be the most likely cause for the lack of well-mixed trace gases. The results show that surface measurements may provide only limited information on concentrations of trace gas species higher in the boundary layer.

  18. The real reason for having a meibomian lipid layer covering the outer surface of the tear film - A review.

    PubMed

    Millar, Thomas J; Schuett, Burkhardt S

    2015-08-01

    This review critically evaluates a broad range of literature in order to show the relationship between meibum, tear lipids and the tear film lipid layer (TFLL). The relationship of meibum composition to dry eye syndrome is briefly discussed. The review also explores the interactions between aqueous and the TFLL by examining the correlations between meibomian lipids and lipids extracted from whole tears, and by considering protein adsorption to the TFLL from the aqueous. Although it is clear to the authors that a normal tear film resists evaporation, an emerging idea from the literature is that the main purpose of the TFLL is to allow the spread of the tear film and to prevent its collapse onto the ocular surface, rather than to be an evaporative blanket. Current models on the possible structure of the TFLL are also examined.

  19. The real reason for having a meibomian lipid layer covering the outer surface of the tear film - A review.

    PubMed

    Millar, Thomas J; Schuett, Burkhardt S

    2015-08-01

    This review critically evaluates a broad range of literature in order to show the relationship between meibum, tear lipids and the tear film lipid layer (TFLL). The relationship of meibum composition to dry eye syndrome is briefly discussed. The review also explores the interactions between aqueous and the TFLL by examining the correlations between meibomian lipids and lipids extracted from whole tears, and by considering protein adsorption to the TFLL from the aqueous. Although it is clear to the authors that a normal tear film resists evaporation, an emerging idea from the literature is that the main purpose of the TFLL is to allow the spread of the tear film and to prevent its collapse onto the ocular surface, rather than to be an evaporative blanket. Current models on the possible structure of the TFLL are also examined. PMID:25981748

  20. Band gap and refractive index tunability in thallium based layered mixed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasanly, N. M.

    2015-07-01

    Compositional variation of the band gap energy and refractive index of TlMeX2-type (Me = Ga or In and X = S or Se) layered mixed crystals have been studied by the transmission and reflection measurements in the wavelength range of 400-1100 nm. The analysis of absorption data of TlGa1-xInxSe2, TlGa(S1-xSex)2, TlGa1-xInxS2, and TlIn(Se1-xSx)2 mixed crystals revealed the presence of both optical indirect and direct transitions. It was found that the energy band gaps of mixed crystals decrease at the replacing of gallium atoms by indium and of sulfur atoms by selenium ones. Through the similar replacing of atoms (smaller atoms by larger ones) in the studied mixed crystals, the refractive index shows the quite opposite behavior.

  1. Growth rate of a shocked mixing layer with known initial perturbations [Mixing at shocked interfaces with known perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Christopher R.; Cook, Andrew W.; Bonazza, Riccardo

    2013-05-14

    Here we derive a growth-rate model for the Richtmyer–Meshkov mixing layer, given arbitrary but known initial conditions. The initial growth rate is determined by the net mass flux through the centre plane of the perturbed interface immediately after shock passage. The net mass flux is determined by the correlation between the post-shock density and streamwise velocity. The post-shock density field is computed from the known initial perturbations and the shock jump conditions. The streamwise velocity is computed via Biot–Savart integration of the vorticity field. The vorticity deposited by the shock is obtained from the baroclinic torque with an impulsive acceleration. Using the initial growth rate and characteristic perturbation wavelength as scaling factors, the model collapses the growth-rate curves and, in most cases, predicts the peak growth rate over a range of Mach numbers (1.1 ≤Mi≤1.9), Atwood numbers (₋0.73 ≤ A ≤ ₋0.35 and 0.22 ≤ A ≤ 0.73), adiabatic indices (1.40/1.67≤γ12≤1.67/1.09) and narrow-band perturbation spectra. Lastly, the mixing layer at late times exhibits a power-law growth with an average exponent of θ=0.24.

  2. The influence of the mixed host emitting layer based on the TCTA and TPBi in blue phosphorescent OLED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhong-Lin; Tian, Wei; Kou, Zhi-Qi; Cheng, Shuang; Li, Yi-Hang

    2016-08-01

    The performance of the blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) can be improved by changing the proportion and structure of the host materials in the emitting layer. A series of devices with the mixed host (TCTAx: TPBi1-x) single emitting layer is fabricated and the best performance appears when x is 1/2. Then, the highest luminance and power efficiency reach 7189 (cd/m2) at 10.5 V and 41.7 lm/W at 2.75 V respectively after changing the position of the single host (TCTA or TPBi) emitting layer and the mixed host (TCTA1/2: TPBi1/2) emitting layer in the multiple emitting layers device. The power efficiency is almost 37% improved in device with the optimized mixed host multiple emitting layers than that of device with the mixed host single emitting layer, the former device shows great potential to realize the high efficiency blue PHOLEDs.

  3. Shear, Stability and Mixing within the Ice-Shelf-Ocean Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Ocean-forced basal melting has been implicated in the widespread thinning of Antarctic ice shelves that has been causally linked with acceleration in the outflow of grounded ice. What determines the distribution and rates of basal melting and freezing beneath an ice shelf and how these respond to changes in the ocean temperature or circulation are therefore key questions. Recent years have seen major progress in our ability to observe basal melting and the ocean conditions that drive it, but data on the latter remain sparse, limiting our understanding of the key processes of ice-ocean heat transfer. In particular, we have no observations of current profiles through the buoyancy- and frictionally-controlled flows along the ice shelf base that drive mixing through the ice-ocean boundary layer. This presentation represents an attempt to address this gap in our knowledge through application of a very simple model of such boundary flows that considers only the spatial dimension perpendicular to the boundary. Initial results obtained with an unrealistic assumuption of constant eddy viscosity/diffusivity are nevertheless informative. For the buoyancy-driven flow two possible regimes exist: a weakly-stratified, geostrophic cross-slope current with an embedded Ekman layer, somewhat analogous to a conventional density current on a slope; or a strongly-stratified upslope jet with weak cross-slope flow, more analogous to an inverted katabatic wind. The latter is most appropriate when the ice-ocean interface is very steep, while for the gentle slopes typical of ice shelves the buoyant Ekman regime prevails. Introduction of a variable eddy viscosity/diffusivity derived from a local turbulence closure scheme modifies the current structure and stratification. There is a sharp step in properties across the surface layer, where the viscosity/diffusivity is low, weak gradients across the outer part of the boundary layer, where shear-driven mixing is strong, and a relatively strong

  4. Stratus: An interactive steady state mixed layer model for personal computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, Thomas A.; Schubert, Wayne H.

    1990-01-01

    A steady-state, horizontally homogeneous, cloud-topped marine boundary layer model based primarily on the work of Lilly (1968) and Schubert et al., (1979) is presented. The conservative thermodynamic variables are equivalent potential temperature, theta(sub e), and total water mixing ratio, q + l. Some of the differences between this and Lilly's (1968) model are: radiation is allowed to penetrate into the boundary layer; cloud top values of longwave radiation, equivalent potential temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio are linear functions of height derived from climatological data at California coastal stations; and the closure assumption assumes a weighted average of Lilly's (1968) maximum and minimum entrainment theories. This model was programmed in FORTRAN and will run interactively on an IBM-compatible personal computer. The program allows the user to specify the geographical location, the wind speed, the sea-surface temperature, the large scale horizontal divergence, and the initial guess for cloud top height. Output includes the steady state values of cloud top and cloud base height, mixed layer equivalent potential temperature and total water mixing ratio, and the associated convective and radiative fluxes.

  5. Methylmercury production below the mixed layer in the North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Joel D.; Popp, Brian N.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Anela Choy, C.; Johnson, Marcus W.

    2013-10-01

    Mercury enters marine food webs in the form of microbially generated monomethylmercury. Microbial methylation of inorganic mercury, generating monomethylmercury, is widespread in low-oxygen coastal sediments. The degree to which microbes also methylate mercury in the open ocean has remained uncertain, however. Here, we present measurements of the stable isotopic composition of mercury in nine species of marine fish that feed at different depths in the central North Pacific Subtropical Gyre. We document a systematic decline in δ202Hg, Δ199Hg and Δ201Hg values with the depth at which fish feed. We show that these mercury isotope trends can be explained only if monomethylmercury is produced below the surface mixed layer, including in the underlying oxygen minimum zone, that is, between 50 and more than 400m depth. Specifically, we estimate that about 20-40% of the monomethylmercury detected below the surface mixed layer originates from the surface and enters deeper waters either attached to sinking particles, or in zooplankton and micronekton that migrate to depth. We suggest that the remaining monomethylmercury found at depth is produced below the surface mixed layer by methylating microbes that live on sinking particles. We suggest that microbial production of monomethylmercury below the surface mixed later contributes significantly to anthropogenic mercury uptake into marine food webs.

  6. Mixing and Reaction in the Subsonic Two-Dimensional Turbulent Free Shear Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieler, Clifford Eugene

    1992-09-01

    The amount of mixed fluid is estimated by performing "flip" experiments and sensing the heat released due to reactions between H_2, F _2 and NO carried in inert diluent gases. The effects of density ratio, chemical kinetics and Reynolds number were investigated using this approach which avoids the usual resolution limitations. Experiments covering a factor of 30 range in density ratio are presented. Several aspects of the mixing process, such as the distribution of mixed fluid, appear insensitive to density ratio. The integral amount of mixed fluid varies less than 6%. This insensitivity contrasts with that of the profiles of mixed fluid composition. While having similar shapes, the composition profile offset depends strongly upon the density ratio. Power spectral densities of the temperature fluctuations are presented and are found to collapse upon normalization with the adiabatic flame temperature and large-structure passage frequency. Probability density functions of composition are presented and indicate that for all density ratios, a predominant composition of the mixed fluid exists within the turbulence. The initial work of Mungal and Frieler on the effects of chemical kinetics on the formation of product in the 2-D mixing layer has been greatly expanded. Measurements have been extended to include a wider range of NO concentrations and have been performed for two other stoichiometries. Results indicate that the simple model used to explain the effects of reaction kinetics in Mungal and Frieler may only be suited for cases with extreme stoichiometry (very high or very low). It has also been found that more product is formed when F_2 is the rich reactant than when H_2 is the rich reactant. This dependence upon molecular character questions both the experimental technique and theory and modeling of this reacting flow, and stems from a coupling of the effects of differing diffusivity and chemical kinetics. Numerical calculations based on simplified flow models

  7. Vorticity-production mechanisms in shock/mixing-layer interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tritarelli, R. C.; Kleiser, L.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigate analytically the importance of different vorticity-production mechanisms contributing to the shock-induced vorticity caused by the interaction of a steady oblique shock wave with a steady, planar, supersonic, laminar mixing layer. The inviscid analysis is performed under the condition of a supersonic post-shock flow, which guarantees that the shock refraction remains regular. Special attention is paid to the vorticity production induced by a change in shock strength along the shock. Our analysis subdivides the total vorticity production into its contributions due to bulk or volumetric compression, pre-shock density gradients and variable shock strength. The latter is the only contribution dependent on the shock-wave curvature. The magnitudes of these contributions are analysed for two limiting cases, i.e., the interaction of an oblique shock wave with a constant-density shear layer and the interaction with a constant-velocity mixing layer with density gradients only. Possible implications for shock/mixing-layer interactions occurring in scramjet combustors are briefly discussed.

  8. The structure of variable property, compressible mixing layers in binary gas mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozusko, F.; Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.; Kennedy, Christipher A.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the structure of a parallel compressible mixing layer in a binary mixture of gases. The gases included in this study are hydrogen (H2), helium (He), nitrogen (N2), oxygen (02), neon (Ne) and argon (Ar). Profiles of the variation of the Lewis and Prandtl numbers across the mixing layer for all thirty combinations of gases are given. It is shown that the Lewis number can vary by as much as a factor of eight and the Prandtl number by a factor of two across the mixing layer. Thus assuming constant values for the Lewis and Prandtl numbers of a binary gas mixture in the shear layer, as is done in many theoretical studies, is a poor approximation. We also present profiles of the velocity, mass fraction, temperature and density for representative binary gas mixtures at zero and supersonic Mach numbers. We show that the shape of these profiles is strongly dependent on which gases are in the mixture as well as on whether the denser gas is in the fast stream or the slow stream.

  9. Instabilities of the tidally induced bottom boundary layer in the rotating frame and their mixing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K.; Akitomo, K.

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the stability of the bottom boundary layer induced by tidal flow (oscillating flow) in a rotating frame, numerical experiments have been carried out with a two-dimensional non-hydrostatic model. Under homogeneous conditions three types of instability are found depending on the temporal Rossby number Rot, the ratio of the inertial and tidal periods. When Rot < 0.9 (subinertial range), the Ekman type I instability occurs because the effect of rotation is dominant though the flow becomes more stable than the steady Ekman flow with increasing Rot. When Rot > 1.1 (superinertial range), the Stokes layer instability is excited as in the absence of rotation. When 0.9 < Rot < 1.1 (near-inertial range), the Ekman type I or type II instability appears as in the steady Ekman layer. Being much thickened (˜100 m), the boundary layer becomes unstable even if tidal flow is weak (˜5 cm/s). The large vertical scale enhances the contribution of the Coriolis effect to destabilization, so that the type II instability tends to appear when Rot > 1.0. However, when Rot < 1.0, the type I instability rather than the type II instability appears because the downward phase change of tidal flow acts to suppress the latter. To evaluate the mixing effect of these instabilities, some experiments have been executed under a weak stratification peculiar to polar oceans (the buoyancy frequency N2 ˜ 10 -6 s -2). Strong mixing occurs in the subinertial and near-inertial ranges such that tracer is well mixed in the boundary layer and an apparent diffusivity there is evaluated at 150-300 cm 2/s. This suggests that effective mixing due to these instabilities may play an important role in determining the properties of dense shelf water in the polar regions.

  10. Fixed-point observation of mixed layer evolution in seasonally ice-free Chukchi Sea: Turbulent mixing due to gale winds and internal gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Inoue, J.; Nishino, S.

    2015-12-01

    A fixed-point observation using the R/V Mirai was conducted in the ice-free northern Chukchi Sea of the Arctic Ocean during September of 2013. During the program the authors performed repeated microstructure measurements to reveal the temporal evolution of the surface mixed layer and mixing processes in the upper water column. The shelf region was initially characterized by a distinct two-layer system comprising a warmer/ fresher top layer and a colder/saltier bottom layer. During the two-week observation period, the top-layer water showed two types of mixing processes: near-surface turbulence due to strong wind forcing and subsurface mixing due to internal gravity waves. In the first week, when the top layer was stratified with fresh sea ice meltwater, turbulent energy related to internal waves propagated through the subsurface stratification, resulting in a mechanical overturning near the pycnocline, followed by enhanced mixing there. In the second week, gale winds directly stirred up the upper water and then established a deeper homogenous layer. The combination of internal wave mixing and wind-driven turbulence may contribute to releasing the oceanic heat into the atmosphere, consequently promoting the preconditioning of surface water freezing.

  11. Precipitation Properties of Arctic Single-Layer Mixed-Phase Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohigashi, T.; Kollias, P.; Szyrmer, W.

    2015-12-01

    In the Arctic, single-layer mixed-phase clouds rooted in the boundary layer with cloud top heights between several hundred meters and 2 km are frequently observed. Ice particles grow fast in these mixed-phase clouds and thus produce solid precipitation. Understanding the water cycle in the Arctic region requires an extensive study of the precipitation properties of the Arctic single-layer mixed-phase clouds. The US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at Barrow, North Slope of Alaska conducts long-term measurements of mixed-phase clouds using a combination of active and passive sensors. Using the data of 35-GHz (Ka-band) zenith pointing radar (KAZR), ceilometer, and microwave radiometer, 1-hour averaged estimates of mixed-phase clouds are produced. A total of 553 hours of single-layer mixed-phase clouds were visually identified between October 2011 and December 2014. Using the KAZR radar reflectivity measured just one radar range gate (30 m) below the liquid base of the mixed-phase, ice water content (IWC) estimates are derived. The correlation between the hourly-mean liquid water path (LWP) and IWC below the base is not high. On the other hand, the KAZR mean Doppler velocity (Vd) at the same level exhibits high correlation with the LWP. In the LWP regime above 220 g m-2, Vd is larger than 1.0 m s-1. Vd approached to 1.8 m s-1 at even higher LWP values. We assumed that the 1-hour averaged Vd values are representative of the reflectivity-weighted mean terminal velocity of the ice particles. The large terminal velocities cannot be explained if the ice particles grow only via the deposition process. It is suggested that the riming process contributed to the growth of the particles when large terminal velocities are observed. The correlation between LWP and the KAZR Vd near the surface is similarly high. From high correlations between LWP and Vd near the cloud base and near the surface, it is clear that the LWP exhibits some control

  12. Fabrication of fracture-free nanoglassified substrates by layer-by-layer deposition with a paint gun technique for real-time monitoring of protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Linman, Matthew J; Culver, Sean P; Cheng, Quan

    2009-03-01

    New sensing materials that are robust, biocompatible, and amenable to array fabrication are vital to the development of novel bioassays. Herein we report the fabrication of ultrathin (ca. 5-8 nm) glass (silicate) layers on top of a gold surface for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensing applications. The nanoglass layers are fabricated by layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH) and sodium silicate (SiO(x)), followed by calcination at high temperature. To deposit these layers in a uniform and reproducible manner, we employed a high-volume, low-pressure (HVLP) paint gun technique that offers high precision and better control through pressurized nitrogen gas. The new substrates are stable in solution for a long period of time, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images confirm that these films are nearly fracture-free. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) indicates that the surface roughness of the silicate layers is low (rms = 2 to 3 nm), similar to that of bare glass slides. By tuning the experimental parameters such as HVLP gun pressure and layers deposited, different surface morphology could be obtained as revealed by fluorescence microscopy and SEM images. To demonstrate the utility of these ultrathin, fracture-free substrates, lipid bilayer membranes composed of phosphorylated derivatives of phosphoinositides (PIs) were deposited on the new substrates for biosensing applications. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) data indicated that these lipid components in the membranes were highly mobile. Furthermore, interactions of PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(4)P lipids with their respective binding proteins were detected with high sensitivity by using SPR spectroscopy. This method of glass deposition can be combined with already well-developed surface chemistry for a range of planar glass assay applications, and the process is amenable to automation for mass production of nanometer thick silicate chips in a highly

  13. Sensitivity of the structure of untripped mixing layers to small changes in initial conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesniak, M. W.; Bell, J. H.; Mehta, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted concerning the influence of small changes in initial conditions on the near- and far-field evolution of the three-dimensional structure of a plan mixing layer. A two-stream mixing layer with a velocity ratio of 0.6 was generated with the initial boundary layers on the splitter plate laminar and was nominally two-dimensional. The initial conditions were changed slightly by interchanging the high- and low-speed sides of the wind tunnel, while maintaining the same velocities, and hence velocity ratio. This resulted in small changes in the initial boundary layer properties, and the perturbations present in the boundary layers were interchanged between the high- and low-speed sides for the two cases. The results indicate that, even with this relatively minor change in initial conditions, the near-field regions of the two cases differ significantly. The peak Reynolds stress levels in the near-field differ by up to 100 percent, and this is attributed to a difference in the location of the initial spanwise vortex roll-up. In addition, the positions and shapes of the individual streamwise vortical structures differ for the two cases, although the overall structures differ for the two cases, although the overall qualitative description of these structures is comparable. The subsequent reorganization and decay of the streamwise vortical structures is very similar for the two cases. As a result, in the far field, both mixing layers achieve similar structure, yielding comparable growth rates, Reynolds stress, distribution, and spectral content.

  14. Mixing Acid Salts and Layered Double Hydroxides in Nanoscale under Solid Condition.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hirokazu; Hayashi, Aki

    2014-01-01

    The immobilization of potassium sorbate, potassium aspartate and sorbic acid in layered double hydroxide under solid condition was examined. By simply mixing two solids, immobilization of sorbate and aspartate in the interlayer space of nitrate-type layered double hydroxide, so called intercalation reaction, was achieved, and the uptakes, that is, the amount of immobilized salts and the interlayer distances of intercalation compounds were almost the same as those obtained in aqueous solution. However, no intercalation was achieved for sorbic acid. Although intercalation of sorbate and aspartate into chloride-type layered double hydroxide was possible, the uptakes for these intercalation compounds were lower than those obtained using nitrate-type layered double hydroxide. The intercalation under solid condition could be achieved to the same extent as for ion-exchange reaction in aqueous solution, and the reactivity was similar to that observed in aqueous solution. This method will enable the encapsulation of acidic drug in layered double hydroxide as nano level simply by mixing both solids. PMID:25080007

  15. Influence of external disturbances and compressibility on free turbulent mixing. [in free shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oh, Y. H.; Bushnell, D. M.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that disturbances in external flow can significantly affect, by as much as an order of magnitude, the turbulent mixing rate in free shear layers and that the length scale of the external flow disturbances is as important as the amplitude. The difference between the effect of wide-band and narrow-band disturbances is stressed. The model for pressure fluctuation term in the kinetic energy equation is included in a two-equation model. The reduced spreading rate in high Mach number, high Reynolds number, adiabatic, free turbulent shear layers is predicted.

  16. Mixed-layer kerolite/stevensite from the Amargosa Desert, Nevada.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Jones, B.F.; Khoury, H.N.

    1982-01-01

    Mixed-layer clays of randomly interstratified kerolite/stevensite occur as an abundant mineral in lake and/or spring deposits of probable Pliocene and Pleistocene age in the Amargosa Desert of S Nevada, USA. Kerolite is a trioctahedral mineral similar to talc, but with a basal spacing of approx 9.65 A (cf. talc at 9.38 A). The data suggest that talc, kerolite and stevensite may form a continuous structural series based on layer charge. (Following abstract) -D.F.B.

  17. Effects of Top Layer, Nozzle Arrangement, and Gas Flow Rate on Mixing Time in Agitated Ladles by Bottom Gas Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conejo, A. N.; Kitamura, S.; Maruoka, N.; Kim, S.-J.

    2013-08-01

    This research investigates mixing phenomena in bottom gas-stirred ladles using water modeling, which incorporates hexane as the top layer. The effects of slag thickness, nozzle position, number of nozzles, and gas flow rate on mixing time have been investigated. Conditions to improve mixing time have been identified. A single nozzle located at two-thirds of the ladle radius was found to produce the shortest mixing time. Under extremely low gas flow rates, an unusual behavior was observed, where the top layer promoted a decrease in mixing time.

  18. Flexible charged macromolecules on mixed fluid lipid membranes: theory and Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Tzlil, Shelly; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam

    2005-11-01

    Fluid membranes containing charged lipids enhance binding of oppositely charged proteins by mobilizing these lipids into the interaction zone, overcoming the concomitant entropic losses due to lipid segregation and lower conformational freedom upon macromolecule adsorption. We study this energetic-entropic interplay using Monte Carlo simulations and theory. Our model system consists of a flexible cationic polyelectrolyte, interacting, via Debye-Hückel and short-ranged repulsive potentials, with membranes containing neutral lipids, 1% tetravalent, and 10% (or 1%) monovalent anionic lipids. Adsorption onto a fluid membrane is invariably stronger than to an equally charged frozen or uniform membrane. Although monovalent lipids may suffice for binding rigid macromolecules, polyvalent counter-lipids (e.g., phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate), whose entropy loss upon localization is negligible, are crucial for binding flexible macromolecules, which lose conformational entropy upon adsorption. Extending Rosenbluth's Monte Carlo scheme we directly simulate polymer adsorption on fluid membranes. Yet, we argue that similar information could be derived from a biased superposition of quenched membrane simulations. Using a simple cell model we account for surface concentration effects, and show that the average adsorption probabilities on annealed and quenched membranes coincide at vanishing surface concentrations. We discuss the relevance of our model to the electrostatic-switch mechanism of, e.g., the myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate protein.

  19. A theoretical study of mixing downstream of transverse injection into a supersonic boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Zelazny, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and analytical study was made of mixing downstream of transverse hydrogen injection, from single and multiple orifices, into a Mach 4 air boundary layer over a flat plate. Numerical solutions to the governing three-dimensional, elliptic boundary layer equations were obtained using a general purpose computer program. Founded upon a finite element solution algorithm. A prototype three-dimensional turbulent transport model was developed using mixing length theory in the wall region and the mass defect concept in the outer region. Excellent agreement between the computed flow field and experimental data for a jet/freestream dynamic pressure ratio of unity was obtained in the centerplane region of the single-jet configuration. Poorer agreement off centerplane suggests an inadequacy of the extrapolated two-dimensional turbulence model. Considerable improvement in off-centerplane computational agreement occured for a multi-jet configuration, using the same turbulent transport model.

  20. On the Interaction of Buoyant Plumes With Ocean Mixed-Layer Fronts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özgökmen, Tamay

    2010-11-01

    The ocean's surface mixed layer is notoriously complex due to high spatial and temporal gradients of density and velocity fields. The understanding and modeling of such flows have a wide range of applications. For instance, anomalous currents and density perturbations in the acoustic and optical environment can affect a variety of naval operations. These flows can also influence strongly the dispersion of surface and sub-surface pollutants. Large eddy simulations of an idealized mixed-layer problem are conducted using the spectral element model Nek5000. Sampling strategies of these fields are investigated using passive tracers and Lagrangian particles. These idealized fields are then used in order to explore the behavior of a buoyant plume through the water column, namely its surface and sub-surface dispersion, which is motivated by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

  1. On the Interaction of Buoyant Plumes With Ocean Mixed-Layer Fronts (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozgokmen, T. M.; Fischer, P. F.

    2010-12-01

    The ocean's surface mixed layer is notoriously complex due to high spatial and temporal gradients of density and velocity fields. The understanding and modeling of such flows have a wide range of applications. For instance, anomalous currents and density perturbations in the acoustic and optical environment can affect a variety of naval operations. These flows can also influence strongly the dispersion of surface and sub-surface pollutants. Large eddy simulations of an idealized mixed-layer problem are conducted using a non-hydrostatic spectral element model. Sampling strategies of these fields are investigated using passive tracers and Lagrangian particles. These idealized fields are then used in order to explore the behavior of a buoyant plume through the water column, namely its surface and sub-surface dispersion, which is motivated by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

  2. Asymptotic solution of the turbulent mixing layer for velocity ratio close to unity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuera, F. J.; Jimenez, J.; Linan, A.

    1996-01-01

    The equations describing the first two terms of an asymptotic expansion of the solution of the planar turbulent mixing layer for values of the velocity ratio close to one are obtained. The first term of this expansion is the solution of the well-known time-evolving problem and the second, which includes the effects of the increase of the turbulence scales in the stream-wise direction, obeys a linear system of equations. Numerical solutions of these equations for a two-dimensional reacting mixing layer show that the correction to the time-evolving solution may explain the asymmetry of the entrainment and the differences in product generation observed in flip experiments.

  3. Efficiency of eddy mixing in a stable stratified atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatskiy, A. F.; Kurbatskaya, L. I.

    2011-12-01

    Based on a mesoscale RANS model of turbulence, the behavior of turbulent eddy mixing parameters is found to agree with the latest data of laboratory and atmospheric measurements. Some problems of the description of turbulent eddy mixing in the atmospheric boundary layer are studied. When the flow transforms to an extremely stable state, in particular, it is found the flux Richardson number Ri f can change nonmonotonically: it increases with increasing gradient Richardson number Rig until the state of saturation is reached at Ri g ≃ 1 and then decreases. The behavior of the coefficients of eddy diffusion of momentum and heat agrees with the concept of momentum (but not heat) transfer by internal waves propagating in an extremely stable atmospheric boundary layer.

  4. Mixed-layered bismuth-oxygen-iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2013-02-26

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  5. Mixed-layered bismuth--oxygen--iodine materials for capture and waste disposal of radioactive iodine

    DOEpatents

    Krumhansl, James L; Nenoff, Tina M

    2015-01-06

    Materials and methods of synthesizing mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine materials, which can be synthesized in the presence of aqueous radioactive iodine species found in caustic solutions (e.g. NaOH or KOH). This technology provides a one-step process for both iodine sequestration and storage from nuclear fuel cycles. It results in materials that will be durable for repository conditions much like those found in Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and estimated for Yucca Mountain (YMP). By controlled reactant concentrations, optimized compositions of these mixed-layered bismuth oxy-iodine inorganic materials are produced that have both a high iodine weight percentage and a low solubility in groundwater environments.

  6. Inviscid spatial stability of a compressible mixing layer. Part 2: The flame sheet model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Grosch, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    The results of an inviscid spatial calculation for a compressible reacting mixing layer are reported. The limit of infinitive activation energy is taken and the diffusion flame is approximated by a flame sheet. Results are reported for the phase speeds of the neutral waves and maximum growth rates of the unstable waves as a function of the parameters of the problem: the ratio of the temperature of the stationary stream to that of the moving stream, the Mach number of the moving streams, the heat release per unit mass fraction of the reactant, the equivalence ratio of the reaction, and the frequency of the disturbance. These results are compared to the phase speeds and growth rates of the corresponding nonreacting mixing layer. We show that the addition of combustion has important, and complex effects on the flow stability.

  7. Correcting the aero-optical aberration of the supersonic mixing layer with adaptive optics: concept validation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiong; Jiang, Zongfu; Yi, Shihe; Xie, Wenke; Liao, Tianhe

    2012-06-10

    We describe an adaptive optics (AO) system for correcting the aero-optical aberration of the supersonic mixing layer and test its performance with numerical simulations. The AO system is based on the measurement of distributed Strehl ratios and the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. The aero-optical aberration is computed by the direct numerical simulation of a two-dimensional supersonic mixing layer. When the SPGD algorithm is applied directly, the AO cannot give effective corrections. This paper suggests two strategies to improve the performance of the SPGD algorithm for use in aero-optics. The first one is using an iteration process keeping finite memory, and the second is based on the frozen hypothesis. With these modifications, the performance of AO is improved and the aero-optical aberration can be corrected to some noticeable extent. The possibility of experimental implementation is also discussed. PMID:22695671

  8. DNS of spark ignition and edge flame propagation in turbulent droplet-laden mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Neophytou, A.; Mastorakos, E.; Cant, R.S.

    2010-06-15

    A parametric study of forced ignition at the mixing layer between air and air carrying fine monosized fuel droplets is done through one-step chemistry direct numerical simulations to determine the influence of the size and volatility of the droplets, the spark location, the droplet-air mixing layer initial thickness and the turbulence intensity on the ignition success and the subsequent flame propagation. The propagation is analyzed in terms of edge flame displacement speed, which has not been studied before for turbulent edge spray flames. Spark ignition successfully resulted in a tribrachial flame if enough fuel vapour was available at the spark location, which occurred when the local droplet number density was high. Ignition was achieved even when the spark was offset from the spray, on the air side, due to the diffusion of heat from the spark, provided droplets evaporated rapidly. Large kernels were obtained by sparking close to the spray, since fuel was more readily available. At long times after the spark, for all flames studied, the probability density function of the displacement speed was wide, with a mean value in the range 0.55-0.75S{sub L}, with S{sub L} the laminar burning velocity of a stoichiometric gaseous premixed flame. This value is close to the mean displacement speed in turbulent edge flames with gaseous fuel. The displacement speed was negatively correlated with curvature. The detrimental effect of curvature was attenuated with a large initial kernel and by increasing the thickness of the mixing layer. The mixing layer was thicker when evaporation was slow and the turbulence intensity higher. However, high turbulence intensity also distorted the kernel which could lead to high values of curvature. The edge flame reaction component increased when the maximum temperature coincided with the stoichiometric contour. The results are consistent with the limited available experimental evidence and provide insights into the processes associated with

  9. Surface mixed layer deepening through wind shear alignment in a seasonally stratified shallow sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, B. J.; Rippeth, T. P.; Simpson, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    Inertial oscillations are a ubiquitous feature of the surface ocean. Here we combine new observations with a numerical model to investigate the role of inertial oscillations in driving deepening of the surface mixed layer in a seasonally stratified sea. Observations of temperature and current structure, from a mooring in the Western Irish Sea, reveal episodes of strong currents (>0.3 m s-1) lasting several days, resulting in enhanced shear across the thermocline. While the episodes of strong currents are coincident with windy periods, the variance in the shear is not directly related to the wind stress. The shear varies on a subinertial time scale with the formation of shear maxima lasting several hours occurring at the local inertial period of 14.85 h. These shear maxima coincide with the orientation of the surface current being at an angle of approximately 90° to the right of the wind direction. Observations of the water column structure during windy periods reveal deepening of the surface mixed layer in a series of steps which coincide with a period of enhanced shear. During the periods of enhanced shear gradient, Richardson number estimates indicate Ri-1 ≥ 4 at the base of the surface mixed layer, implying the deepening as a result of shear instability. A one-dimensional vertical exchange model successfully reproduces the magnitude and phase of the shear spikes as well as the step-like deepening. The observations and model results therefore identify the role of wind shear alignment as a key entrainment mechanism driving surface mixed layer deepening in a shallow, seasonally stratified sea.

  10. Trapped Heat and Cooling Processes in the Arctic Ocean Surface Mixed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, A. C.; Palo, S. E.; Steele, M.

    2015-12-01

    With the changing Arctic climate, sea ice is disintegrating earlier and there is an increasing length of time during which the ocean is exposed to solar radiation. The surface mixed layer of the Arctic Ocean is reaching unprecedentedly warm temperatures. This study examines the cooling processes in the summer mixed layer of the upper ocean between the warm late-summer and the onset of ice growth. In situ measurements of upper ocean temperatures from UpTempO buoys and a number of CTD profiles in the Beaufort and Chukchi regions indicate that as expected, most of the heat in the upper ocean is lost to the atmosphere at the surface. Cooling to the atmosphere occurs predominantly through sudden cooling events associated with passing weather systems, with cooling rates greater than 0.2 °C/hour. However, a not-insubstantial amount of heat gets trapped in the summer halocline forming temperature features like the Near Surface Temperature Maximum isolated from the cooling associated with passing storms. These are clearly visible in the included figure. They come and go over the course of the cooling season, but typically persist through freeze-up. Heat stored in this layer will, on erosion of the summer halocline with wintertime ice growth, be mixed into the surface mixed layer and slow the growth of sea ice. This presentation quantifies the relative balance between heat loss to the atmosphere, temporary and seasonal heat storage in the summer halocline, and the relationship to fall season storminess in the region.

  11. Shear rheology of mixed protein adsorption layers vs their structure studied by surface force measurements.

    PubMed

    Danov, Krassimir D; Kralchevsky, Peter A; Radulova, Gergana M; Basheva, Elka S; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Pelan, Eddie G

    2015-08-01

    The hydrophobins are proteins that form the most rigid adsorption layers at liquid interfaces in comparison with all other investigated proteins. The mixing of hydrophobin HFBII with other conventional proteins is expected to reduce the surface shear elasticity and viscosity, E(sh) and η(sh), proportional to the fraction of the conventional protein. However, the experiments show that the effect of mixing can be rather different depending on the nature of the additive. If the additive is a globular protein, like β-lactoglobulin and ovalbumin, the surface rigidity is preserved, and even enhanced. The experiments with separate foam films indicate that this is due to the formation of a bilayer structure at the air/water interface. The more hydrophobic HFBII forms the upper layer adjacent to the air phase, whereas the conventional globular protein forms the lower layer that faces the water phase. Thus, the elastic network formed by the adsorbed hydrophobin remains intact, and even reinforced by the adjacent layer of globular protein. In contrast, the addition of the disordered protein β-casein leads to softening of the HFBII adsorption layer. Similar (an even stronger) effect is produced by the nonionic surfactant Tween 20. This can be explained with the penetration of the hydrophobic tails of β-casein and Tween 20 between the HFBII molecules at the interface, which breaks the integrity of the hydrophobin interfacial elastic network. The analyzed experimental data for the surface shear rheology of various protein adsorption layers comply with a viscoelastic thixotropic model, which allows one to determine E(sh) and η(sh) from the measured storage and loss moduli, G' and G″. The results could contribute for quantitative characterization and deeper understanding of the factors that control the surface rigidity of protein adsorption layers with potential application for the creation of stable foams and emulsions with fine bubbles or droplets.

  12. Statistical comparison of classifiers applied to the interferential tear film lipid layer automatic classification.

    PubMed

    Remeseiro, B; Penas, M; Mosquera, A; Novo, J; Penedo, M G; Yebra-Pimentel, E

    2012-01-01

    The tear film lipid layer is heterogeneous among the population. Its classification depends on its thickness and can be done using the interference pattern categories proposed by Guillon. The interference phenomena can be characterised as a colour texture pattern, which can be automatically classified into one of these categories. From a photography of the eye, a region of interest is detected and its low-level features are extracted, generating a feature vector that describes it, to be finally classified in one of the target categories. This paper presents an exhaustive study about the problem at hand using different texture analysis methods in three colour spaces and different machine learning algorithms. All these methods and classifiers have been tested on a dataset composed of 105 images from healthy subjects and the results have been statistically analysed. As a result, the manual process done by experts can be automated with the benefits of being faster and unaffected by subjective factors, with maximum accuracy over 95%.

  13. Biomimetic biosensor based on lipidic layers containing tyrosinase and lutetium bisphthalocyanine for the detection of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Apetrei, C; Alessio, P; Constantino, C J L; de Saja, J A; Rodriguez-Mendez, M L; Pavinatto, F J; Ramos Fernandes, E Giuliani; Zucolotto, V; Oliveira, O N

    2011-01-15

    This paper describes the preparation of a biomimetic Langmuir-Blodgett film of tyrosinase incorporated in a lipidic layer and the use of lutetium bisphthalocyanine as an electron mediator for the voltammetric detection of phenol derivatives, which include one monophenol (vanillic acid), two diphenols (catechol and caffeic acid) and two triphenols (gallic acid and pyrogallol). The first redox process of the voltammetric responses is associated with the reduction of the enzymatically formed o-quinone and is favoured by the lutetium bisphthalocyanine because significant signal amplification is observed, while the second is associated with the electrochemical oxidation of the antioxidant and occurs at lower potentials in the presence of an electron mediator. The biosensor shows low detection limit (1.98×10(-6)-27.49×10(-6) M), good reproducibility, and high affinity to antioxidants (K(M) in the range of 62.31-144.87 μM). The excellent functionality of the enzyme obtained using a biomimetic immobilisation method, the selectivity afforded by enzyme catalysis, the signal enhancement caused by the lutetium bisphthalocyanine mediator and the increased selectivity of the curves due to the occurrence of two redox processes make these sensors exceptionally suitable for the detection of phenolic compounds.

  14. Mixed convection boundary layer flow over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with constant heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javed, Tariq; Ahmad, Hussain; Ghaffari, Abuzar

    2015-12-01

    Mixed convection boundary layer flow of a viscous fluid over a horizontal elliptic cylinder with a constant heat flux is investigated numerically. The governing partial differential equations are transformed to non-dimensional form and then are solved by an efficient implicit finite different scheme known as Keller-box method. The solutions are expressed in the form of skin friction and Nusselt number, which are plotted against the eccentric angle. The effect of pertinent parameters such as mixed convection parameter, aspect ratio (ratio of lengths of minor axis to major axis), and Prandtl number on skin friction and Nusselt number are illustrated through graphs for both blunt and slender orientations. The increase in the value of mixed convection parameter results in increase in skin friction coefficient and Nusselt number for blunt as well as slender orientations.

  15. An assumed pdf approach for the calculation of supersonic mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baurle, R. A.; Drummond, J. P.; Hassan, H. A.

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to predict the effect that turbulent mixing has on the extent of combustion, a one-equation turbulence model is added to an existing Navier-Stokes solver with finite-rate chemistry. To average the chemical-source terms appearing in the species-continuity equations, an assumed pdf approach is also used. This code was used to analyze the mixing and combustion caused by the mixing layer formed by supersonic coaxial H2-air streams. The chemistry model employed allows for the formation of H2O2 and HO2. Comparisons are made with recent measurements using laser Raman diagnostics. Comparisons include temperature and its rms, and concentrations of H2, O2, N2, H2O, and OH. In general, good agreement with experiment was noted.

  16. Estimation of Mixed Layer Depth in the Gulf of Aden: A New Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alsaafani, M. A.; Alraddadi, T. M.; Albarakati, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The mixed layer depth (MLD) in Gulf of Aden is analyzed using vertical high resolution (1m) profiles of both temperature and density. Firstly, we examined threshold and gradient methods for estimating the MLD. Close evaluation with individual profiles reveals the failure of both methods for most of the profiles. Furthermore, the curvature method, a relatively recent approach to define ocean MLDs, is established for open water profiles but for marginal seas, like the Gulf of Aden, it detects shallower depths than the actual MLD. These considerable differences motivated us to introduce a new approach of MLD identification, which is developed based on curvature method and is called segment method. Our segment method produces adequate MLD estimates for more than 95% of the profiles and overcomes major limitations of conventional methods. It is less biased and least scattered compared to other methods with a correlation coefficient > 0.95. The mixed layer in Gulf of Aden displays significant seasonal variability and is deeper in winter. Throughout the year, the western part of gulf experiences deeper mixed layer than the eastern part. Regional eddies dominate Gulf of Aden’s MLD pattern during all seasons. PMID:27788181

  17. Variations of surface mixed layer heat and salinity budget during DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, N.; Lien, R.; D'Asaro, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    The response of the oceanic surface mixed layer heat and salinity budget to different phases of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) in the central Indian Ocean is evaluated. Data from shipboard and mooring observations (September 2011 - January 2012) from the DYNAMO field campaign is analyzed. During the DYNAMO campaign, 2 to 3 MJO events (depending on definition) were recorded. Of particular interest is the 2011 Thanksgiving arrival of a strong cyclone-assisted MJO event. Variations in surface heat flux, time rate of change of heat content, turbulent flux, and the definition of the mixed layer depth seem to dominate the overall results for the mixed layer throughout the observation period. During the Thanksgiving event, preliminary results suggest a complicated combination of factors modulating the near surface salinity. Interestingly, each of the following factors: wind, precipitation and horizontal advection, appears to dominate over the others for a period of time. We anticipate that these results can provide accurate tests of air-sea coupled models and help interpret the role of air-sea coupling and ocean heat storage on the evolution of the MJO.

  18. Computational and experimental analysis of particle clustering in a shearless turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Peter; Good, Garrett; Warhaft, Zellman; Collins, Lance

    2011-11-01

    Entrainment, the drawing in of external fluid by a turbulent flow, is ubiquitous to both industrial and natural turbulent processes. This mechanism is particularly important in atmospheric clouds, where the entrainment of dry air by turbulence can affect precipitation mechanisms. We use parametrically matched wind-tunnel experiments and direct numerical simulations with inhomogeneous particle seeding to explore particle clustering in a shearless turbulent mixing layer. We find high degrees of clustering, both visually and statistically, even for particles with negligible inertia. These particle clusters have characteristic sizes on the order of the integral lengthscale of the turbulence and are thus much larger than those resulting from particle inertia. The degree of clustering at a particular location generally decreases as the mixing layer evolves and depends on both the turbulent kinetic energy ratio in the mixing layer and the magnitude and orientation of gravity. We observe the same qualitative trends in both the experiments and the simulations. We anticipate that a better understanding of particle clustering in entraining flows will lead to, among other things, improved cloud evolution predictions and more accurate climate models.

  19. The effects of temporal variability of mixed layer depth on primary productivity around Bermuda

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bissett, W. Paul; Meyers, Mark B.; Walsh, John J.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    Temporal variations in primary production and surface chlorophyll concentrations, as measured by ship and satellite around Bermuda, were simulated with a numerical model. In the upper 450 m of the water column, population dynamics of a size-fractionated phytoplankton community were forced by daily changes of wind, light, grazing stress, and nutrient availability. The temporal variations of production and chlorophyll were driven by changes in nutrient introduction to the euphotic zone due to both high- and low-frequency changes of the mixed layer depth within 32 deg-34 deg N, 62 deg-64 deg W between 1979 and 1984. Results from the model derived from high-frequency (case 1) changes in the mixed layer depth showed variations in primary production and peak chlorophyll concentrations when compared with results from the model derived from low-frequency (case 2) mixed layer depth changes. Incorporation of size-fractionated plankton state variables in the model led to greater seasonal resolution of measured primary production and vertical chlorophyll profiles. The findings of this study highlight the possible inadequacy of estimating primary production in the sea from data of low-frequency temporal resolution and oversimplified biological simulations.

  20. Experiments on the Southern Oscillation with CAM3 coupled to a Mixed Layer Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, E.; Sokolov, A. P.

    2010-12-01

    Recent modeling studies suggest that the atmospheric component plays a dominant role in the El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. In particular, simulations in which an Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) is coupled to a mixed-layer ocean model can produce ‘ENSO-like’ variability with associated patterns in SST, precipitation, or atmospheric circulation similar to that of ENSO, and referred to as 'Atmospheric Walker Mode' (AWM). In the absence of Bjerknes feedback (no ocean dynamics), the AWM relies on ocean-to-atmosphere latent heat flux and cloud forcing feedback. To study the AWM, we perform a number of experiments using the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) version 3 coupled to a mixed-layer ocean, including varying the model resolution and the depth of the mixed layer. We investigate the possible climate change impacts on the AWM by carrying out a number of equilibrium climate change simulations for a doubled CO2 with different values of the model's climate sensitivity. Results show that both the magnitude and the periodicity of the simulated AWM are rather different. This study provides further insight into the ENSO response to increasing greenhouse gas—induced radiative forcing.

  1. Boundary Layer CO2 mixing ratio measurements by an airborne pulsed IPDA lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A. K.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Since the primary signature of CO2 fluxes at the surface occurs in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), remote sensing measurements of CO2 that can resolve the CO2 absorption in the PBL separate from the total column are more sensitive to fluxes than those that can only measure a total column. The NASA Goddard CO2 sounder is a pulsed, range-resolved lidar that samples multiple (presently 30) wavelengths across the 1572.335 nm CO2 absorption line. The range resolution and line shape measurement enable CO2 mixing ratio measurements to be made in two or more altitude layers including the PBL via lidar cloud-slicing and multi-layer retrievals techniques. The pulsed lidar approach allows range-resolved backscatter of scattering from ground and cloud tops. Post flight data analysis can be used split the vertical CO2 column into layers (lidar cloud-slicing) and solve for the CO2 mixing ratio in each layer. We have demonstrated lidar cloud slicing with lidar measurements from a flight over Iowa, USA in August 2011 during the corn-growing season, remotely measuring a ≈15 ppm drawdown in the PBL CO2. We will present results using an improved lidar cloud slicing retrieval algorithm as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming ASCENDS 2014 flight campaign. The CO2 absorption line is also more pressure broadened at lower altitudes. Analyzing the line shape also allows solving for some vertical resolution in the CO2 distribution. By allowing the retrieval process to independently vary the column concentrations in two or more altitude layers, one can perform a best-fit retrieval to obtain the CO2 mixing ratios in each of the layers. Analysis of airborne lidar measurements (in 2011) over Iowa, USA and Four Corners, New Mexico, USA show that for altitudes above 8 km, the CO2 sounder can detect and measure enhanced or diminished CO2 mixing ratios in the PBL even in the absence of clouds. We will present these results as well as preliminary measurements from the upcoming

  2. Self-assembly of mixed lipids into bicelles and vesicles: molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Hari; Wang, Zilu; Dormidontova, Elena

    Formation of complex supramolecular nanostructures, such as micelles, bicelles, vesicles (liposomes) etc. via self-assembly of simple molecules has provided a new pathway for the design and development of effective drug carriers. Solid nanoparticles or functional biopolymers, such as RNA, DNA, peptides can be encapsulated into these carriers for controlled delivery or selective targeting. We performed coarse grained molecular dynamics simulation using the MARTINI force field to study the self-assembly of a binary surfactant mixture composed of long and short phospholipids, DPPC and DHPC, in the ratio 3:1. We found that at low temperature lipids self-assemble into a bicelle (nanodisc) with the longer lipid mainly forming the interior and short lipid the rim of the bicelle. At higher temperature the nanodisc transforms into a vesicle with homogeneously distributed lipids. The structural changes of these nanodiscs and vesicles imposed by gold nanoparticle encapsulation and pegylation will be addressed.

  3. Vertical distribution and composition of phytoplankton under the influence of an upper mixed layer.

    PubMed

    Ryabov, Alexei B; Rudolf, Lars; Blasius, Bernd

    2010-03-01

    The vertical distribution of phytoplankton is of fundamental importance for the dynamics and structure of aquatic communities. Here, using an advection-reaction-diffusion model, we investigate the distribution and competition of phytoplankton species in a water column, in which inverse resource gradients of light and a nutrient can limit growth of the biomass. This problem poses a challenge for ecologists, as the location of a production layer is not fixed, but rather depends on many internal parameters and environmental factors. In particular, we study the influence of an upper mixed layer (UML) in this system and show that it leads to a variety of dynamic effects: (i) Our model predicts alternative density profiles with a maximum of biomass either within or below the UML, thereby the system may be bistable or the relaxation from an unstable state may require a long-lasting transition. (ii) Reduced mixing in the deep layer can induce oscillations of the biomass; we show that a UML can sustain these oscillations even if the diffusivity is less than the critical mixing for a sinking phytoplankton population. (iii) A UML can strongly modify the outcome of competition between different phytoplankton species, yielding bistability both in the spatial distribution and in the species composition. (iv) A light limited species can obtain a competitive advantage if the diffusivity in the deep layers is reduced below a critical value. This yields a subtle competitive exclusion effect, where the oscillatory states in the deep layers are displaced by steady solutions in the UML. Finally, we present a novel graphical approach for deducing the competition outcome and for the analysis of the role of a UML in aquatic systems.

  4. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R.L.; Brutsaert, W.

    2003-01-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, w_pm???2, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with w_pm???2 was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on w_pm???2 and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of w_pm???2 versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  5. Vertical velocity variance in the mixed layer from radar wind profilers.

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, K.; Coulter, R. L.; Brutsaert, W.; Environmental Research; Cornell Univ.

    2003-11-01

    Vertical velocity variance data were derived from remotely sensed mixed layer turbulence measurements at the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiments (ABLE) facility in Butler County, Kansas. These measurements and associated data were provided by a collection of instruments that included two 915 MHz wind profilers, two radio acoustic sounding systems, and two eddy correlation devices. The data from these devices were available through the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE) database operated by Argonne National Laboratory. A signal processing procedure outlined by Angevine et al. was adapted and further built upon to derive vertical velocity variance, {omega}'{sup 2}, from 915 MHz wind profiler measurements in the mixed layer. The proposed procedure consisted of the application of a height-dependent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) filter, removal of outliers plus and minus two standard deviations about the mean on the spectral width squared, and removal of the effects of beam broadening and vertical shearing of horizontal winds. The scatter associated with {omega}'{sup 2} was mainly affected by the choice of SNR filter cutoff values. Several different sets of cutoff values were considered, and the optimal one was selected which reduced the overall scatter on {omega}'{sup 2} and yet retained a sufficient number of data points to average. A similarity relationship of {omega}'{sup 2} versus height was established for the mixed layer on the basis of the available data. A strong link between the SNR and growth/decay phases of turbulence was identified. Thus, the mid to late afternoon hours, when strong surface heating occurred, were observed to produce the highest quality signals.

  6. Adsorption of protein-coated lipid droplets to mixed biopolymer hydrogel surfaces: role of biopolymer diffusion.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Maria; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, D Julian

    2007-12-18

    The adsorption of charged particles to hydrogel surfaces is important in a number of natural and industrial processes. In this study, the adsorption of cationic lipid droplets to the surfaces of anionic hydrogels was examined. An oil-in-water emulsion containing cationic beta-lactoglobulin-coated lipid droplets was prepared (d32=0.24 microm, zeta=+74 mV, pH 3.0). An anionic hydrogel containing 0.1 wt % beet pectin and 1.5 wt % agar (pH 3.0) was prepared. Emulsions containing different lipid droplet concentrations (0.3-5 wt %) were brought into contact with the hydrogel surfaces for different times (0-24 h). The adsorption of lipid droplets to the hydrogel surfaces could not be explained by a typical adsorption isotherm. We found that the electrical charge on the nonadsorbed lipid droplets became less positive or even became negative in the presence of the hydrogel and that extensive droplet aggregation occurred, which was attributed to the ability of pectin molecules to diffuse through the hydrogels and interact with the lipid droplets. These results may have important consequences for understanding certain industrial and biological processes, as well as for the design of controlled or triggered release systems.

  7. Computing the reconnection rate in turbulent kinetic layers by using electron mixing to identify topology

    SciTech Connect

    Daughton, W.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Loring, B.

    2014-05-15

    Three-dimensional kinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection for parameter regimes relevant to the magnetopause current layer feature the development of turbulence, driven by the magnetic and velocity shear, and dominated by coherent structures including flux ropes, current sheets, and flow vortices. Here, we propose a new approach for computing the global reconnection rate in the presence of this complexity. The mixing of electrons originating from separate sides of the magnetopause layer is used as a proxy to rapidly identify the magnetic topology and track the evolution of magnetic flux. The details of this method are illustrated for an asymmetric current layer relevant to the subsolar magnetopause and for a flow shear dominated layer relevant to the lower latitude magnetopause. While the three-dimensional reconnection rates show a number of interesting differences relative to the corresponding two-dimensional simulations, the time scale for the energy conversion remains very similar. These results suggest that the mixing of field lines between topologies is more easily influenced by kinetic turbulence than the physics responsible for the energy conversion.

  8. Development of a Hybrid RANS/LES Method for Turbulent Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nicholas J.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Reshotko, Eli

    2001-01-01

    Significant research has been underway for several years in NASA Glenn Research Center's nozzle branch to develop advanced computational methods for simulating turbulent flows in exhaust nozzles. The primary efforts of this research have concentrated on improving our ability to calculate the turbulent mixing layers that dominate flows both in the exhaust systems of modern-day aircraft and in those of hypersonic vehicles under development. As part of these efforts, a hybrid numerical method was recently developed to simulate such turbulent mixing layers. The method developed here is intended for configurations in which a dominant structural feature provides an unsteady mechanism to drive the turbulent development in the mixing layer. Interest in Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methods have increased in recent years, but applying an LES method to calculate the wide range of turbulent scales from small eddies in the wall-bounded regions to large eddies in the mixing region is not yet possible with current computers. As a result, the hybrid method developed here uses a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) procedure to calculate wall-bounded regions entering a mixing section and uses a LES procedure to calculate the mixing-dominated regions. A numerical technique was developed to enable the use of the hybrid RANS-LES method on stretched, non-Cartesian grids. With this technique, closure for the RANS equations is obtained by using the Cebeci-Smith algebraic turbulence model in conjunction with the wall-function approach of Ota and Goldberg. The LES equations are closed using the Smagorinsky subgrid scale model. Although the function of the Cebeci-Smith model to replace all of the turbulent stresses is quite different from that of the Smagorinsky subgrid model, which only replaces the small subgrid turbulent stresses, both are eddy viscosity models and both are derived at least in part from mixing-length theory. The similar formulation of these two models enables the RANS

  9. Shear effects in the evaporatively driven cloud-top mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2013-11-01

    A stably stratified shear layer destabilized locally by moist convection is studied using direct numerical simulations as a model to investigate the role of evaporative cooling at the top of stratocumulus clouds in the presence of vertical mean shear. Velocity and time scales are obtained from the study of the vertical structure. It is found that, overlapping with the background shear layer that has been often documented in the cloud-free cases, with a thickness (1 / 3) (Δu) 2 / Δb , where Δu and Δb are the velocity and buoyancy increments across the cloud top, the system develops a turbulence layer that is dominated by free convection inside the cloud and by shear production inside the relatively thin overlap region. As turbulence intensifies, the turbulence layer encroaches upwards into the background shear layer and defines thereby the entrainment velocity. This encroachment is well characterized by the penetration length formed with the in-cloud convective velocity and the buoyancy frequency inside the background shear layer. Consistently, the turbulence intensity inside the overlap region follows a mixed scaling combining the background mean shear and the in-cloud convective velocity.

  10. Mixed Layer Dynamics and the Diurnal Cycle in the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenegrat, J. O.; McPhaden, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    A unique 8-month data set of moored near-surface velocity observations is used to examine the diurnal cycle of near-surface shear and stratification at 0°N, 23°W in the central equatorial Atlantic Ocean. The ocean diurnal cycle is strongly modulated by seasonal variability in wind forcing, and during trade wind conditions descending diurnal shear layers are observed regularly in the late afternoon and evening. These descending shear layers are associated with reduced Richardson number, and marginal instability of the equatorial undercurrent below the mixed layer. The significance of these findings for deep-cycle turbulence in the central equatorial Atlantic will be discussed in relation to recent work from the Pacific.

  11. Interactions between a tropical mixed boundary layer and cumulus convection in a radiative-convective model

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, C.L.

    1993-05-01

    This report details a radiative-convective model, combining previously developed cumulus, stable cloud and radiation parameterizations with a boundary layer scheme, which was developed in the current study. The cloud model was modified to incorporate the effects of both small and large clouds. The boundary layer model was adapted from a mixed layer model was only slightly modified to couple it with the more sophisticated cloud model. The model was tested for a variety of imposed divergence profiles, which simulate the regions of the tropical ocean from approximately the intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to the subtropical high region. The sounding used to initialize the model for most of the runs is from the trade wind region of ATEX. For each experiment, the model was run with a timestep of 300 seconds for a period of 7 days.

  12. Mixing and reaction in the subsonic 2-D turbulent free shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frieler, Clifford Eugene

    Several aspects of mixing and reaction in a turbulent two-dimensional shear layer have been studied. Experiments have been performed with reacting H2, F2, and NO in inert diluent gases. Sensing the heat release by these reactions, several aspects of the mixing process can be examined without the usual resolution limitations. For example, in contrast with direct measurements of composition, the amount of mixed fluid can be conservatively estimated with the results of the "flip" experiments. These have been performed over a range of density ratios, Reynolds numbers and heat release.The effects of initial conditions are of primary importance when comparisons to other studies are undertaken. Aspects as fundamental as growth rate of the turbulent region, or as obscure as the mixed fluid flux ratio depend strongly on the boundary conditions of this flow. These effects are examined in conjunction with those of Reynolds number and density ratio. For most cases studied here, tripping of the high speed boundary layer led to growth rate decreases. An exception was found for the case of high density ratio where the opposite effect was observed. This anomalous result occurred at conditions under which a new mode of instability has been shown to exist. Parallels exist between this unusual result and those of Batt in the uniform density case.An extensive study of the effects of density ratio on the mixing and reaction in the 2-D shear layer has been performed. Results indicate that several aspects of the mixing process are remarkably similar. Profiles of mixed fluid change little as the density ratio varies by a factor of 30. The integral amount of mixed fluid varies less than 6% for all density ratios examined. This insensitivity contrasts with that of the profiles of mixed fluid composition. While having very similar shapes the profiles are offset by an amount which depends very strongly upon the density ratio. The entrainment into the mixing layer has also been examined. Power

  13. Counterintuitive effect of fall mixed layer deepening on eukaryotic new production in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, S. E.; Lomas, M. W.; Ward, B. B.; Sigman, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Sargasso Sea is characterized by a short period of deep vertical mixing in the late winter and early spring, followed by strong thermal stratification during the summer. Stratification persists into the fall, impeding the upward flux of nitrate from depth so that recycled forms of nitrogen (N) such as ammonium are thought to support most primary production. We collected particles from surface waters during March, July, October, and December, used flow cytometry to separate the prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton, and analyzed their respective 15N/14N. In all months, the 15N/14N of the prokaryotic genera, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, was low, indicative of reliance on recycled N throughout the year. In July, the 15N/14N of eukaryotic phytoplankton was variable but consistently higher than that of the prokaryotes, reflecting eukaryotic consumption of subsurface nitrate. Two eukaryotic profiles from October and December were similar to those from July. In three other fall profiles, the eukaryotes had a 15N/14N similar to that of the prokaryotes, suggesting a switch toward greater reliance on recycled N. This change in the dominant N source supporting eukaryotic production appears to be driven by the density structure of the upper water column. The very shallow low-density surface "mixed layer" (≤20 m) that develops in early-to-mid summer does not contribute to stratification at the base of the euphotic zone, and subsurface nitrate can mix up into the lower euphotic zone, facilitating continued production. The deepening of the mixed layer into the fall, typically taken as an indication of weaker overall stratification, actually strengthens the isolation of the euphotic zone as a whole, reducing the upward supply of nitrate to the photosynthetically active layer. The same counterintuitive dynamic explains the latitudinal patterns in a set of three October depth profiles. Two northern stations (32°N and 27°N) were characterized by a thick, low

  14. Selective analysis of lipids by thin-layer chromatography blot matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zaima, Nobuhiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Adachi, Kohsuke; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is an essential method for food composition analyses such as lipid nutrition analysis. TLC can be used to obtain information about the lipid composition of foods; however, it cannot be used for analyses at the molecular level. Recently we developed a new method that combines matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) with TLC-blotting (TLC-Blot-MALDI-IMS). The combination of MALDI-IMS and TLC blotting enabled detailed and sensitive analyses of lipids. In this study, we applied TLC-Blot-MALDI-IMS for analysis of major phospholipids extracted from bluefin tuna. We showed that TLC-Blot-MALDI-IMS analysis could visualize and identify major phospholipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin.

  15. Simultaneous and instantaneous measurement of velocity and density in Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Wayne Neal

    There are two coupled primary objectives for this study of buoyancy-driven turbulence. The first objective is to create a new diagnostic for collection of measurements to capture the physics of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing. The second objective is to use the new diagnostic to specifically elucidate the physics of large Atwood number, At = (rho1 - rho 2)/(rho1+ rho2), RT mixing. Both of these objectives have been satisfied through the development of a new hot-wire diagnostic to study buoyancy-driven turbulence in a statistically steady gas channel of helium and air (0.03 ≤ At ≤ 0.6). The capability of the diagnostic to simultaneously and instantaneously measure turbulent velocity and density fluctuations allows for a unique investigation into the dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layers at large A t, through measurements of turbulence and mixing statistics. The new hot-wire diagnostic uses temperature as a fluid marker for helium and air, which is possible due to the Lewis number ˜ 1 (Le = ratio of thermal diffusivity to mass diffusivity) for helium and air, and the new diagnostic has been validated in an At = 0.03 mixing layer. The energy density spectrum of rho'v', measured experimentally for the first time in RT mixing, is found to closely follow the energy distribution of v', up to the Reynolds numbers investigated (Reh = (2h)3/2 gAt/6 /vmix ˜ 1450). Large A t experiments, with At = 0.6, have also been achieved for the first time in a miscible RT mixing layer. An asymmetric penetration of the bubbles (rising fluid) and spikes (falling fluid) has been observed, resulting in measured self similar growth parameters alpha b = 0.060 and alphas = 0.088 for the bubbles and spikes, respectively. The first experimental measurements of turbulent velocity and density fluctuations for the large At case, show a strong similarity to lower At behaviors when normalized. However conditional statistics, which separate the bubble (light fluid) and spike (heavy fluid

  16. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in HED blast-wave-driven shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Stefano, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    This talk describes work exploring the sensitivity to initial conditions of hydrodynamic mixing-layer growth due to shear flow in the high-energy-density regime. This work features an approach in two parts, experimental and theoretical. First, an experiment, conducted at the OMEGA-60 laser facility, seeks to measure the development of such a mixing layer. This is accomplished by placing a layer of low-density (initially of either 0.05 or 0.1 g/cm3, to vary the system's Atwood number) carbon foam against a layer of higher-density (initially 1.4 g/cm3) polyamide-imide that has been machined to a nominally-flat surface at its interface with the foam. Inherent roughness of this surface's finish is precisely measured and varied from piece to piece. Ten simultaneous OMEGA beams, comprising a 4.5 kJ, 1-ns pulse focused to a roughly 1-mm-diameter spot, irradiate a thin polycarbonate ablator, driving a blast wave into the foam, parallel to its interface with the polyamide-imide. The ablator is framed by a gold washer, such that the blast wave is driven only into the foam, and not into the polyamide-imide. The subsequent forward motion of the shocked foam creates the desired shear effect, and the system is imaged by X-ray radiography 35 ns after the beginning of the driving laser pulse. Second, a simulation is performed, intending to replicate the flow observed in the experiment as closely as possible. Using the resulting simulated flow parameters, an analytical model can be used to predict the evolution of the mixing layer, as well as track the motion of the fluid in the experiment prior to the snapshot seen in the radiograph. The ability of the model to predict growth of the mixing layer under the various conditions observed in the experiment is then examined. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE

  17. Characteristics and Evolution of Passive Tracers in the Oceanic Mixed Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Katherine; Hamlington, Peter; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2015-11-01

    Ocean tracers such as CO2 and plankton reside primarily in the mixed layer where air-sea gas exchange occurs and light is plentiful for photosynthesis. There can be substantial heterogeneity in the distributions of these tracers due to turbulent mixing, particularly in the submesoscale range where partly geostrophic eddies and small-scale 3D turbulence are both active. In this talk, LES spanning scales from 20km down to 5m are used to examine the role of turbulent mixing on nonreactive passive ocean tracers. The simulations include the effects of both wave-driven Langmuir turbulence and submesoscale eddies, and tracers with different initial and boundary conditions are examined. Tracer properties are characterized using spatial fields, statistics, multiscale fluxes, and spectra, and results show that passive tracer mixing depends on air-sea flux rate, release depth, and flow regime. The results indicate that while submesoscale eddies transport buoyancy upward to extract potential energy, the same is not true of passive tracers, whose entrainment is instead suppressed. Early in the evolution of some tracers, counter-gradient transport occurs co-located with regions of negative potential vorticity, suggesting that symmetric instabilities may act to oppose turbulent mixing.

  18. Comparison of Four Mixed Layer Mesoscale Parameterizations and the Equation for an Arbitrary Tracer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss two issues, the inter-comparison of four mixed layer mesoscale parameterizations and the search for the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer. It must be stressed that our analysis is limited to mixed layer mesoscales since we do not treat sub-mesoscales and small turbulent mixing. As for the first item, since three of the four parameterizations are expressed in terms of a stream function and a residual flux of the RMT formalism (residual mean theory), while the fourth is expressed in terms of vertical and horizontal fluxes, we needed a formalism to connect the two formulations. The standard RMT representation developed for the deep ocean cannot be extended to the mixed layer since its stream function does not vanish at the ocean's surface. We develop a new RMT representation that satisfies the surface boundary condition. As for the general form of the eddy induced velocity for an arbitrary tracer, thus far, it has been assumed that there is only the one that originates from the curl of the stream function. This is because it was assumed that the tracer residual flux is purely diffusive. On the other hand, we show that in the case of an arbitrary tracer, the residual flux has also a skew component that gives rise to an additional bolus velocity. Therefore, instead of only one bolus velocity, there are now two, one coming from the curl of the stream function and other from the skew part of the residual flux. In the buoyancy case, only one bolus velocity contributes to the mean buoyancy equation since the residual flux is indeed only diffusive.

  19. Part 1 of a Computational Study of a Drop-Laden Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, Nora A.; Bellan, Josette

    2004-01-01

    This first of three reports on a computational study of a drop-laden temporal mixing layer presents the results of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of well-resolved flow fields and the derivation of the large-eddy simulation (LES) equations that would govern the larger scales of a turbulent flow field. The mixing layer consisted of two counterflowing gas streams, one of which was initially laden with evaporating liquid drops. The gas phase was composed of two perfect gas species, the carrier gas and the vapor emanating from the drops, and was computed in an Eulerian reference frame, whereas each drop was tracked individually in a Lagrangian manner. The flow perturbations that were initially imposed on the layer caused mixing and eventual transition to turbulence. The DNS database obtained included transitional states for layers with various liquid mass loadings. For the DNS, the gas-phase equations were the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for conservation of momentum and additional conservation equations for total energy and species mass. These equations included source terms representing the effect of the drops on the mass, momentum, and energy of the gas phase. From the DNS equations, the expression for the irreversible entropy production (dissipation) was derived and used to determine the dissipation due to the source terms. The LES equations were derived by spatially filtering the DNS set and the magnitudes of the terms were computed at transitional states, leading to a hierarchy of terms to guide simplification of the LES equations. It was concluded that effort should be devoted to the accurate modeling of both the subgridscale fluxes and the filtered source terms, which were the dominant unclosed terms appearing in the LES equations.

  20. Beneath the Minerals, a Layer of Round Lipid Particles Was Identified to Mediate Collagen Calcification in Compact Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaohua; Yu, Jianqing J.

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts lose 1–2% of their bone minerals per month during space flights. A systematic search for a countermeasure relies on a good understanding of the mechanism of bone formation at the molecular level. How collagen fibers, the dominant matrix protein in bones, are mineralized remains mysterious. Atomic force microscopy was carried out, in combination with immunostaining and Western blotting, on bovine tibia to identify unrecognized building blocks involved in bone formation and for an elucidation of the process of collagen calcification in bone formation. Before demineralization, tiles of hydroxyapatite crystals were found stacked along bundles of collagen fibers. These tiles were homogeneous in size and shape with dimensions 0.69 × 0.77 × 0.2 μm3. Demineralization dissolved these tiles and revealed small spheres with an apparent diameter around 145 nm. These spheres appeared to be lipid particles since organic solvents dissolved them. The parallel collagen bundles had widths mostly <2 μm. Composition analysis of compact bones indicated a high content of apolar lipids, including triglycerides and cholesterol esters. Apolar lipids are known to form lipid droplets or lipoproteins, and these spheres are unlikely to be matrix vesicles as reported for collagen calcification in epiphyseal cartilages. Results from this study suggest that the layer of round lipid particles on collagen fibers mediates the mineral deposition onto the fibers. The homogeneous size of these lipid particles and the presence of apolipoprotein in demineralized bone tissue suggest the possibility that these particles might be of lipoprotein origin. More studies are needed to verify the last claim and to exclude the possibility that they are secreted lipid droplets. PMID:16980361

  1. Boundary-layer turbulence modeling and vorticity dynamics: I. A kangaroo-process mixing model of boundary-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; van den Brink, A. Maassen

    A nonlocal turbulence transport theory is presented by means of a novel analysis of the Reynolds stress, inter alia involving the construct of a sample path space and a stochastic hypothesis. An analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) and a nonlinear scaling relation (mapping the path space onto the boundary layer) lead to an integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities, which represents fully-developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The underlying near-wall behavior (i.e. for y +→0) of fluctuating velocities fully agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The model involves a scaling exponent ɛ, with ɛ→∞ in the diffusion limit. For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ɛ≈0.58. The significance of ɛ as a turbulence Cantor set dimension (in the logarithmic profile region, i.e. for y +→∞) is discussed.

  2. Some contributions to the thin-layer chromatographic analysis of complex natural phospholipid and neutral lipid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Helmy, F M; Hack, M H

    1986-01-10

    We have isolated a minor phosphatidyl ethanolamine component from pancreas and a minor phosphatidyl choline component from retina, which were revealed by their separate thin-layer chromatographic properties on silica gel and aluminum oxide sheets, respectively. We have described in some detail a number of modifications in thin-layer chromatography methodology which enhances the opportunity for assessing the glycerophospholipid and neutral lipid composition of tissues, as attested by a diverse set of examples, and have pointed out some of the associated technical problems.

  3. Numerical simulation of small-scale mixing processes in the upper ocean and atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druzhinin, O.; Troitskaya, Yu; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2016-02-01

    The processes of turbulent mixing and momentum and heat exchange occur in the upper ocean at depths up to several dozens of meters and in the atmospheric boundary layer within interval of millimeters to dozens of meters and can not be resolved by known large- scale climate models. Thus small-scale processes need to be parameterized with respect to large scale fields. This parameterization involves the so-called bulk coefficients which relate turbulent fluxes with large-scale fields gradients. The bulk coefficients are dependent on the properties of the small-scale mixing processes which are affected by the upper-ocean stratification and characteristics of surface and internal waves. These dependencies are not well understood at present and need to be clarified. We employ Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) as a research tool which resolves all relevant flow scales and does not require closure assumptions typical of Large-Eddy and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (LES and RANS). Thus DNS provides a solid ground for correct parameterization of small-scale mixing processes and also can be used for improving LES and RANS closure models. In particular, we discuss the problems of the interaction between small-scale turbulence and internal gravity waves propagating in the pycnocline in the upper ocean as well as the impact of surface waves on the properties of atmospheric boundary layer over wavy water surface.

  4. Vortex-scalar element calculations of a diffusion flame stabilized on a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghoniem, Ahmed F.; Givi, Peyman

    1987-01-01

    The vortex-scalar element method, a scheme which utilizes vortex elements to discretize the region of high vorticity and scalar elements to represent species or temperature fields, is utilized in the numerical simulations of a two-dimensional reacting mixing layer. Computations are performed for a diffusion flame at high Reynolds and Peclet numbers without resorting to turbulence models. In the nonreacting flow, the mean and fluctuation profiles of a conserved scalar show good agreement with experimental measurements. Results for the reacting flow indicate that for temperature independent kinetics, the chemical reaction begins immediately downstream of the splitter plate where mixing starts. Results for the reacting flow with Arrhenius kinetics show an ignition delay, which depends on reactant temperature, before significant chemical reaction occurs. Harmonic forcing changes the structure of the layer, and concomitantly the rates of mixing and reaction, in accordance with experimental results. Strong stretch within the braids in the nonequilibrium kinetics case causes local flame quenching due to the temperature drop associated with the large convective fluxes.

  5. Data/model integration for vertical mixing in the stable Arctic boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.; ReVelle, D.O.; Kao, C.Y.J.; Bigg, E.K.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a short Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Data on atmospheric trace constituents and the vertical structure of stratus clouds from a 1996 expedition to the central Arctic reveal mechanisms of vertical mixing that have not been observed in mid-latitudes. Time series of the altitude and thickness of summer arctic stratus have been observed using an elastic backscatter lidar aboard an icebreaker. With the ship moored to the pack ice during 14 data collection stations and the lidar staring vertically, the time series represent advected cloud fields. The lidar data reveal a significant amount of vertical undulation in the clouds, strongly suggestive of traveling waves in the buoyantly damped atmosphere that predominates in the high Arctic. Concurrent observations of trace gases associated with the natural sulfur cycle (dimethyl sulfide, SO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and aerosols show evidence of vertical mixing events that coincide with a characteristic signature in the cloud field that may be called dropout or lift out. A segment of a cloud deck appears to be relocated from the otherwise quasicontinuous layer to another altitude a few hundred meters lower or higher. Atmospheric models have been applied to identify the mechanism that cause the dropout phenomenon and connect it dynamically to the surface layer mixing.

  6. Effects of High-frequency Wind Sampling on Simulated Mixed Layer Depth and Upper Ocean Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Liu, W. Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Effects of high-frequency wind sampling on a near-global ocean model are studied by forcing the model with a 12 hourly averaged wind product and its 24 hourly subsamples in separate experiments. The differences in mixed layer depth and sea surface temperature resulting from these experiments are examined, and the underlying physical processes are investigated. The 24 hourly subsampling not only reduces the high-frequency variability of the wind but also affects the annual mean wind because of aliasing. While the former effect largely impacts mid- to high-latitude oceans, the latter primarily affects tropical and coastal oceans. At mid- to high-latitude regions the subsampled wind results in a shallower mixed layer and higher sea surface temperature because of reduced vertical mixing associated with weaker high-frequency wind. In tropical and coastal regions, however, the change in upper ocean structure due to the wind subsampling is primarily caused by the difference in advection resulting from aliased annual mean wind, which varies with the subsampling time. The results of the study indicate a need for more frequent sampling of satellite wind measurement and have implications for data assimilation in terms of identifying the nature of model errors.

  7. Evaluation of layered and mixed passive treatment systems for acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Jeen, Sung-Wook; Mattson, Bruce

    2016-11-01

    Laboratory column tests for passive treatment systems for mine drainage from a waste rock storage area were conducted to evaluate suitable reactive mixture, system configuration, effects of influent water chemistry, and required residence time. Five columns containing straw, chicken manure, mushroom compost, and limestone (LS), in either layered or mixed configurations, were set up to simulate the treatment system. The results showed that all of the five columns removed metals of concern (i.e. Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn) with a residence time of 15 h and greater. Reaction mechanisms responsible for the removal of metals may include sulfate reduction and subsequent sulfide precipitation, precipitation of secondary carbonates and hydroxides, co-precipitation, and sorption on organic substrates and secondary precipitates. The results suggest that the mixed systems containing organic materials and LS perform better than the layered systems, sequentially treated by organic and LS layers, due to the enhanced pH adjustment, which is beneficial to bacterial activity and precipitation of secondary minerals. The column tests provide a basis for the design of a field-scale passive treatment system, such as a reducing and alkalinity producing system or a permeable reactive barrier. PMID:26998668

  8. What percentage of the oceanic mixed layer is accessible to marine Lidar? Global and the Gulf of Mexico prospective.

    PubMed

    Bogucki, D J; Spiers, G

    2013-10-01

    The oceanic mixed layer is a nearly homogenous region of the upper ocean which, in principle, has a little or no variation in turbulence strength, temperature or density with depth. This layer mediates oceanic fluxes of gas, momentum and heat. Here, based on the chosen marine Lidar system, we have carried out estimates of the depth penetration of the Lidar when compared to the local mixed layer depth. On average, we have found that at least 50% of the global oceanic mixed layer depth is accessible to the Lidar observations. When operating in a single scattering mode, which is more attenuating but more amenable to analysis, the modeled Lidar was found to access 0.4 of global mixed layer depth in half of the cases. The single scattering Lidar was found to access a large fraction of the equatorial mixed layer - a region very important when addressing global climatic issues. In a coastal environment such as the Gulf of Mexico the single scattering Lidar was found to penetrate upper half of the mixed layer, underscoring the potential for Lidar to address environmental issues there.

  9. Band gap and refractive index tunability in thallium based layered mixed crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Gasanly, N. M.

    2015-07-21

    Compositional variation of the band gap energy and refractive index of TlMeX{sub 2}-type (Me = Ga or In and X = S or Se) layered mixed crystals have been studied by the transmission and reflection measurements in the wavelength range of 400–1100 nm. The analysis of absorption data of TlGa{sub 1-x}In{sub x}Se{sub 2}, TlGa(S{sub 1−x}Se{sub x}){sub 2}, TlGa{sub 1−x}In{sub x}S{sub 2}, and TlIn(Se{sub 1−x}S{sub x}){sub 2} mixed crystals revealed the presence of both optical indirect and direct transitions. It was found that the energy band gaps of mixed crystals decrease at the replacing of gallium atoms by indium and of sulfur atoms by selenium ones. Through the similar replacing of atoms (smaller atoms by larger ones) in the studied mixed crystals, the refractive index shows the quite opposite behavior.

  10. Vacuolar SNARE Protein Transmembrane Domains Serve as Nonspecific Membrane Anchors with Unequal Roles in Lipid Mixing*

    PubMed Central

    Pieren, Michel; Desfougères, Yann; Michaillat, Lydie; Schmidt, Andrea; Mayer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is induced by SNARE complexes that are anchored in both fusion partners. SNAREs zipper up from the N to C terminus bringing the two membranes into close apposition. Their transmembrane domains (TMDs) might be mere anchoring devices, deforming bilayers by mechanical force. Structural studies suggested that TMDs might also perturb lipid structure by undergoing conformational transitions or by zipping up into the bilayer. Here, we tested this latter hypothesis, which predicts that the activity of SNAREs should depend on the primary sequence of their TMDs. We replaced the TMDs of all vacuolar SNAREs (Nyv1, Vam3, and Vti1) by a lipid anchor, by a TMD from a protein unrelated to the membrane fusion machinery, or by artificial leucine-valine sequences. Individual exchange of the native SNARE TMDs against an unrelated transmembrane anchor or an artificial leucine-valine sequence yielded normal fusion activities. Fusion activity was also preserved upon pairwise exchange of the TMDs against unrelated peptides, which eliminates the possibility for specific TMD-TMD interactions. Thus, a specific primary sequence or zippering beyond the SNARE domains is not a prerequisite for fusion. Lipid-anchored Vti1 was fully active, and lipid-anchored Nyv1 permitted the reaction to proceed up to hemifusion, and lipid-anchored Vam3 interfered already before hemifusion. The unequal contribution of proteinaceous TMDs on Vam3 and Nyv1 suggests that Q- and R-SNAREs might make different contributions to the hemifusion intermediate and the opening of the fusion pore. Furthermore, our data support the view that SNARE TMDs serve as nonspecific membrane anchors in vacuole fusion. PMID:25817997

  11. The V-ATPase proteolipid cylinder promotes the lipid-mixing stage of SNARE-dependent fusion of yeast vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Bernd; Iwaszkiewicz, Justyna; Michielin, Olivier; Mayer, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The V-ATPase V0 sector associates with the peripheral V1 sector to form a proton pump. V0 alone has an additional function, facilitating membrane fusion in the endocytic and late exocytic pathways. V0 contains a hexameric proteolipid cylinder, which might support fusion as proposed in proteinaceous pore models. To test this, we randomly mutagenized proteolipids. We recovered alleles that preserve proton translocation, normal SNARE activation and trans-SNARE pairing but that impair lipid and content mixing. Critical residues were found in all subunits of the proteolipid ring. They concentrate within the bilayer, close to the ring subunit interfaces. The fusion-impairing proteolipid substitutions stabilize the interaction of V0 with V1. Deletion of the vacuolar v-SNARE Nyv1 has the same effect, suggesting that both types of mutations similarly alter the conformation of V0. Also covalent linkage of subunits in the proteolipid cylinder blocks vacuole fusion. We propose that a SNARE-dependent conformational change in V0 proteolipids might stimulate fusion by creating a hydrophobic crevice that promotes lipid reorientation and formation of a lipidic fusion pore. PMID:21934648

  12. Effect of wave-induced Stokes drift on the dynamics of ocean mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhifeng; Wu, Kejian; Dong, Sheng; Deng, Zeng'an; Zhang, Xiaoshuang

    2015-01-01

    The wave-forcing `Coriolis-Stokes forcing' and `Stokes-vortex force' induced by Stokes drift affect the upper ocean jointly. To study the effect of the wave-induced Stokes drift on the dynamics of the ocean mixed layer, a new three-dimensional (3D) numerical model is derived using the primitive basic equations and Eulerian wave averaging. The Princeton Ocean Model (POM), a 3D primitive equation ocean model is used with the upper wave-averaged basic equations. The global ocean circulation is simulated using the POM model, and the Stokes drift is evaluated based on the wave data generated by WAVEWATCH III. We compared simulations with and without the Stokes drift. The results show that the magnitude of the Stokes drift is comparable with the Eulerian mean current. Including the Stokes drift in the ocean model affects both the Eulerian current and the Lagranian drift and causes the vertical mixing coefficients to increase.

  13. Fractal interfaces and product generation in the two dimensional mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier; Martel, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of product generation on Peclet and Reynolds numbers in a numerically simulated, reacting, two dimensional, temporally growing mixing layer is related theoretically to the fractal dimension of the passive scalar interfaces. This relation is verified using product generation measurements and dimensions derived from a standard box counting technique. A transition from a low initial dimension to a higher one of approximately 5/3 is identified and shown to be associated to the kinematic distortion on the flow field during the first pairing interaction. It is suggested that the structures responsible for this transition are non-deterministic, non-random, inhomogeneous fractals. Only the large scales are involved. No further transitions, either in the spectra of the vorticity field or in the mixing behavior, are found for Reynolds numbers up to 90,000.

  14. Fractal interfaces and product generation in the two-dimensional mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jimenez, Javier; Martel, Carlos

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of product generation on Peclet and Reynolds numbers in a numerically simulated, reacting, two-dimensional, temporally growing mixing layer is related theoretically to the fractal dimension of the passive scalar interfaces. This reaction is verified using product generation measurements and fractal dimensions derived from the box counting technique. A transition from a low initial dimension to a higher one of approximately 5/3 is identified and shown to be associated to the kinematic distortion of the flow field during the first pairing interaction. It is suggested that the structures reponsible for this transition are nondeterministic, nonrandom, inhomogeneous fractals. In the range of Schmidt numbers investigated (0.25-4), only the large scales are involved. No further transitions, either in the spectra of the vorticity field or in the mixing behavior, are found for Reynolds numbers up to 90,000.

  15. Material transport in a convective surface mixed layer under weak wind forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensa, Jean A.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Poje, Andrew C.; Imberger, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Flows in the upper ocean mixed layer are responsible for the transport and dispersion of biogeochemical tracers, phytoplankton and buoyant pollutants, such as hydrocarbons from an oil spill. Material dispersion in mixed layer flows subject to diurnal buoyancy forcing and weak winds (| u10 | = 5m s-1) are investigated using a non-hydrostatic model. Both purely buoyancy-forced and combined wind- and buoyancy-forced flows are sampled using passive tracers, as well as 2D and 3D particles to explore characteristics of horizontal and vertical dispersion. It is found that the surface tracer patterns are determined by the convergence zones created by convection cells within a time scale of just a few hours. For pure convection, the results displayed the classic signature of Rayleigh-Benard cells. When combined with a wind stress, the convective cells become anisotropic in that the along-wind length scale gets much larger than the cross-wind scale. Horizontal relative dispersion computed by sampling the flow fields using both 2D and 3D passive particles is found to be consistent with the Richardson regime. Relative dispersion is an order of magnitude higher and 2D surface releases transition to Richardson regime faster in the wind-forced case. We also show that the buoyancy-forced case results in significantly lower amplitudes of scale-dependent horizontal relative diffusivity, kD(ℓ), than those reported by Okubo (1970), while the wind- and buoyancy-forced case shows a good agreement with Okubo's diffusivity amplitude, and the scaling is consistent with Richardson's 4/3rd law, kD ∼ ℓ4/3. These modeling results provide a framework for measuring material dispersion by mixed layer flows in future observational programs.

  16. Mixing layer height and its implications for air pollution over Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guiqian; Zhang, Jinqiang; Zhu, Xiaowan; Song, Tao; Münkel, Christoph; Hu, Bo; Schäfer, Klaus; Liu, Zirui; Zhang, Junke; Wang, Lili; Xin, Jinyuan; Suppan, Peter; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-03-01

    The mixing layer is an important meteorological factor that affects air pollution. In this study, the atmospheric mixing layer height (MLH) was observed in Beijing from July 2009 to December 2012 using a ceilometer. By comparison with radiosonde data, we found that the ceilometer underestimates the MLH under conditions of neutral stratification caused by strong winds, whereas it overestimates the MLH when sand-dust is crossing. Using meteorological, PM2.5, and PM10 observational data, we screened the observed MLH automatically; the ceilometer observations were fairly consistent with the radiosondes, with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9. Further analysis indicated that the MLH is low in autumn and winter and high in spring and summer in Beijing. There is a significant correlation between the sensible heat flux and MLH, and the diurnal cycle of the MLH in summer is also affected by the circulation of mountainous plain winds. Using visibility as an index to classify the degree of air pollution, we found that the variation in the sensible heat and buoyancy term in turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) is insignificant when visibility decreases from 10 to 5 km, but the reduction of shear term in TKE is near 70 %. When visibility decreases from 5 to 1 km, the variation of the shear term in TKE is insignificant, but the decrease in the sensible heat and buoyancy term in TKE is approximately 60 %. Although the correlation between the daily variation of the MLH and visibility is very poor, the correlation between them is significantly enhanced when the relative humidity increases beyond 80 %. This indicates that humidity-related physicochemical processes is the primary source of atmospheric particles under heavy pollution and that the dissipation of atmospheric particles mainly depends on the MLH. The presented results of the atmospheric mixing layer provide useful empirical information for improving meteorological and atmospheric chemistry models and the forecasting

  17. A three-dimensional simulation of transition and early turbulence in a time-developing mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, A. B.; Reynolds, W. C.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    The physics of the transition and early turbulence regimes in the time developing mixing layer was investigated. The sensitivity of the mixing layer to the disturbance field of the initial condition is considered. The growth of the momentum thickness, the mean velocity profile, the turbulence kinetic energy, the Reynolds stresses, the anisotropy tensor, and particle track pictures of computations are all examined in an effort to better understand the physics of these regimes. The amplitude, spectrum shape, and random phases of the initial disturbance field were varied. A scheme of generating discrete orthogonal function expansions on some nonuniform grids was developed. All cases address the early or near field of the mixing layer. The most significant result shows that the secondary instability of the mixing layer is produced by spanwise variations in the straining field of the primary vortex structures.

  18. Implementation of a 3D mixing layer code on parallel computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roe, K.; Thakur, R.; Dang, T.; Bogucz, E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes our progress and experience in the development of a Computational-Fluid-Dynamics code on parallel computers to simulate three-dimensional spatially-developing mixing layers. In this initial study, the three-dimensional time-dependent Euler equations are solved using a finite-volume explicit time-marching algorithm. The code was first programmed in Fortran 77 for sequential computers. The code was then converted for use on parallel computers using the conventional message-passing technique, while we have not been able to compile the code with the present version of HPF compilers.

  19. Seasonal cycle of the mixed-layer heat and freshwater budget in the eastern tropical Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, Willi; Dengler, Marcus; Lüdke, Jan; Schmidtko, Sunke; Schlundt, Michael; Brandt, Peter; Partners, Preface

    2016-04-01

    A new seasonal mixed-layer heat flux climatology is used to explore the mechanisms driving seasonal variability of sea surface temperature and salinity in the eastern tropical Atlantic (ETA) with a focus on the eastern boundary upwelling regions. Until recently, large areas at the continental margins of the ETA were not well covered by publically available hydrographic data hampering a detailed understanding of the involved processes. In a collaborative effort between African and European partners within the EU-funded PREFACE program, a new seasonal climatology for different components of the heat and freshwater budget was compiled for the ETA using all publically available hydrographic data sets and a large trove of previously not-publically available hydrographic measurements from the territorial waters of western African countries, either from national programs or from the FAO supported EAF-Nansen program. The publically available data includes hydrographic data from global data repositories including most recent ARGO floats and glider measurements. This data set was complemented by velocity data from surface drifter and ARGO floats to allow determining horizontal heat and freshwater advection. Monthly means of air-sea heat fluxes were derived from the TropFlux climatology while precipitation rates were derived from monthly mean fields of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project. Finally, microstructure data from individual measurement campaigns allow estimating diapycnal heat and salt fluxes for certain regions during specific months. A detailed analysis of the seasonal cycle of mixed-layer heat and freshwater balance in previously poorly covered regions in the eastern tropical Atlantic upwelling is presented. In both eastern boundary upwelling region, off Senegal/Mauritania and off Angola/Namibia, average net surface heat fluxes warm the mixed layer at a rate between 50 and 80 W/m2 with maxima in the respective summer seasons. Horizontal advection

  20. Low-frequency variability in a climate model with a mixed-layer ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Gould-Stewart, S.

    1984-11-01

    A mixed-layer ocean model coupled to a global spectral atmospheric circulation model produces a warming in the model equatorial Pacific Ocean similar to the El Nino or Southern Oscillation (SO) response. The mechanism for producing the SO-like response in an ocean with heat storage and without ocean dynamics is investigated. The model is capable of simulating SO-like time scales, but the details of the structure of the warming differ significantly from the observed El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) response. 22 refs.

  1. Influence of convective conditions on three dimensional mixed convective hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauf, A.; Siddiq, M. K.; Abbasi, F. M.; Meraj, M. A.; Ashraf, M.; Shehzad, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The present work deals with the steady laminar three-dimensional mixed convective magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) boundary layer flow of Casson nanofluid over a bidirectional stretching surface. A uniform magnetic field is applied normal to the flow direction. Similarity variables are implemented to convert the non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary ones. Convective boundary conditions are utilized at surface of the sheet. A numerical technique of Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg (RFK45) is used to obtain the results of velocity, temperature and concentration fields. The physical dimensionless parameters are discussed through tables and graphs.

  2. Nonstationary Axisymmetric Temperature Field in a Two-Layer Slab Under Mixed Heating Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchin, I. N.; Timar, I.; Kolodii, Yu. A.

    2015-09-01

    With the use of the Laguerre and Hankel integral transforms, the solution of a two-dimensional initial-boundary-value heat conduction problem for a two-layer slab under mixed boundary conditions is constructed: one of the surfaces is heated by a heat flux distributed axisymmetrically in a circle of radius R and is cooled by the Newton law outside this circle. The solution of the problem is reduced to a sequence of infinite quasi-regular systems of algebraic equations. The results of numerical analysis of the temperature field in the two-layer slab made from an aluminum alloy and ceramicsare presented depending on the relative geometric properties of the components and cooling intensity.

  3. Preliminary mixed-layer model results for FIRE marine stratocumulus IFO conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, R.; Nicholls, S.

    1990-01-01

    Some preliminary results from the Turton and Nicholls mixed layer model using typical FIRE boundary conditions are presented. The model includes entrainment and drizzle parametrizations as well as interactive long and shortwave radiation schemes. A constraint on the integrated turbulent kinetic energy balance ensures that the model remains energetically consistent at all times. The preliminary runs were used to identify the potentially important terms in the heat and moisture budgets of the cloud layer, and to assess the anticipated diurnal variability. These are compared with typical observations from the C130. Sensitivity studies also revealed the remarkable stability of these cloud sheets: a number of negative feedback mechanisms appear to operate to maintain the cloud over an extended time period. These are also discussed. The degree to which such a modelling approach can be used to explain observed features, the specification of boundary conditions and problems of interpretation in non-horizontally uniform conditions is also raised.

  4. The development of a mixing layer under the action of weak streamwise vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Mathew, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The action of weak, streamwise vortices on a plane, incompressible, steady mixing layer is examined in the large Reynolds number limit. The outer, inviscid region is bounded by a vortex sheet to which the viscous region is confined. It is shown that the local linear analysis becomes invalid at streamwise distances O(epsilon sup -1), where (epsilon much less than 1) is the crossflow amplitude, and a new nonlinear analysis is constructed for this region. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear problem show that the vortex sheet undergoes an O(1) change in position and that the solution is ultimately terminated by a breakdown in the numerical procedure. The corresponding viscous layer shows downstream thickening, but appears to remain well behaved up to the terminal location.

  5. The development of a mixing layer under the action of weak streamwise vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.; Mathew, Joseph

    1993-01-01

    The action of weak, streamwise vortices on a plane, incompressible, steady mixing layer is examined in the large Reynolds-number limit. The outer, inviscid region is bounded by a vortex sheet to which the viscous region is confined. It is shown that the local linear analysis becomes invalid at streamwise distances O(epsilon(sup -1)), where epsilon is much less than 1 is the cross flow amplitude, and a new nonlinear analysis is constructed for this region. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear problem show that the vortex sheet undergoes an O(1) change in position and that the solution is ultimately terminated by the appearance of a singularity. The corresponding viscous layer shows downstream thickening, but appears to remain well behaved up to the singular location.

  6. Mixed Layer Depth Seasonality within the Coral Sea Based on Argo Data

    PubMed Central

    Jaffrés, Jasmine B. D.

    2013-01-01

    The worldwide deployment of Argo floats has enabled much more detailed studies of global and regional seas over the last decade. Here, the seasonal variability of the mixed layer depth (MLD) within the Coral Sea was examined with CTD profiles from Argo floats. Multiple threshold values for both temperature and density have been employed to determine the most suitable threshold values for the Coral Sea. A threshold value of 0.04 kg/m3 for density and 0.2°C for temperature appear the most fitting for this region. Although MLD and isothermal layer depth (ILD) coincide quite well in most cases, the relatively common presence of temporary, non-seasonal barrier layers induces an ILD that is significantly deeper than the MLD. Consequently, an MLD estimation based on density is more appropriate. A distinct seasonality in the MLD is evident throughout the Coral Sea, but is generally more pronounced in higher southern latitudes (20–30°S). Salinity inversions are rare and mainly occur in the south-eastern Coral Sea, while barrier layers are more commonly associated with the north-eastern Coral Sea, a region characterised by high rainfall. The significance of regional currents is evident in the north-western Coral Sea, where temperature and ocean heat content is relatively low due to a northward moving boundary current. Shallow bathymetry, in turn, is linked to the absence of Argo data on the continental shelf and in the central Coral Sea. PMID:23593368

  7. Measured and calculated optical property profiles in the mixed layer and free troposphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, James M.; Bodhaine, Barry A.; Boatman, Joe F.; Deluisi, John J.; Post, M. J.; Kim, Young; Schnell, Russell C.; Sheridan, Patrick J.; Garvey, Dennis M.

    1992-01-01

    Nearly simultaneous measurements of the physical and optical properties of mixed layer and free tropospheric aerosols near Boulder, Colorado, were made on several occasions using aircraft, balloon, and ground-based sensors. This effort (Front Range Lidar, Aircraft, and Balloon experiment (FRLAB)) was conducted with the purpose of obtaining a diverse, self-consistent data set that could be used for testing optical model calculations based on measured physical characteristics such as apparent size distribution, composition, and shape. It was found that even with the uncertainties involved, the model predictions are in good agreement with the measurements in the visible and near infrared wavelength regions. At CO2 lidar wavelengths there is considerably more uncertainty in both the calculated and measured values; however, within the estimated errors there appears to be satisfactory agreement except for the highest free tropospheric layer studied. The results also indicate that during FRLAB the aerosol in the boundary layer and free troposphere behaved as spherical particles for optical modeling purposes. The utility of the observations for determining the extinction-to-backscatter ratio relevant to aerosols in the boundary layer and free troposphere is described with typical measured values being in the 20 to 30 sr range.

  8. Chlorophyll-a Variability in the Southern Ocean Mixed Layer and Euphotic Zone From Elephant Seals and Profiling Floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, M. M.; Gille, S. T.; Franks, P. J. S.; Johnson, K. S.; Girton, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Ocean contains some of the ocean's deepest mixed layers. Because deep mixed layers can transport phytoplankton below the euphotic zone, light levels depend on mixed-layer depth (MLD), and phytoplankton growth is hypothesized to be co-limited by iron and light. Estimates of Chl-a fluorescence, particle backscattering and hydrographic profiles collected by southern elephant seals, EM-APEX, and biogeochemical Argo floats are used to evaluate the extent to which MLD influences phytoplankton bloom development and the vertical structure of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in the Southern Ocean. We find that surface Chl-a (i.e., mean Chl-a for the upper light penetration depth) is a relatively good proxy of phytoplankton biomass (i.e., depth-integrated Chl-a) within the euphotic zone but gives an inadequate representation of biomass within the mixed layer, particularly in the summer. Although nearly vertically homogeneous Chl-a within the mixed layer prevails in seasonal mean profiles, subsurface Chl-a maxima are not uncommon from spring through fall. Deep Chl-a maxima that correlate with particle backscattering in summer and fall are found near the base of the mixed layer, closer to the nutrient maximum than the light maximum, suggesting that nutrient limitation (i.e., essentially iron) can play a greater role than light limitation in governing productivity.

  9. Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of myelin lipids, their differential O-deacylation by primary alkylamines and their selective staining by thionine. A limited phylogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Hack, M H; Helmy, F M

    1990-02-23

    A silica gel thin-layer chromatographic procedure is described for the study of the myelin lipid patterns in a small phylogenetic series of nerve tissue specimens. It involves the selective staining by the thiazine dye thionine and the interpretations were facilitated by a preceding primary alkylamine O-deacylation step. Glycolipids, including sulfatides, and ethanolamine plasmalogens were the principal characterizing lipids.

  10. The role of molecular layer mixing on the thermal conductance of organic-inorganic heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Shubhaditya; McGaughey, Alan J. H.; Malen, Jonathan A.

    The role of interfacial properties in affecting energy transport characteristics is an extensive area of research. Hybrid materials composed of organic-inorganic heterojunctions are gaining popularity as alternatives to conventional semiconductors for various energy-generation devices, thus requiring detailed study of their interfacial properties - especially thermal transport. Previous works have isolated the organic-inorganic interface thermal properties using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) junctions between two inorganic substrates and characterized them based on interfacial bonding strength, vibrational mismatch and molecule length. Here, we investigate the effect of having a mixed SAM layer on the thermal conductance of the SAM junction. The mixed SAM layers either have molecules of the same length but different end groups (thiols and methyl) or different lengths. This creates a modifiable bonding environment at one interface either through a varying ratio of strong and weakly bonded end groups or a decreasing surface coverage of the molecule. Both these scenarios are investigated to study the cooperative nature of the molecules/interface bonds and their effect on the heat transport across the junction. We follow a combined experimental and computational approach in our investigation - we fabricate the SAM junctions (alkanethiols between two gold substrates) and measure their thermal conductance using Frequency Domain Thermoreflectance, and use molecular dynamics simulations to get a deeper understanding of the role of intermolecular cross talk.

  11. Variable but persistent coexistence of Prochlorococcus ecotypes along temperature gradients in the ocean's surface mixed layer.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Jeremy W; Lin, Yajuan; Gainer, P Jackson; Post, Anton F; Johnson, Zackary I; Zinser, Erik R

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of the phytoplankton communities in surface mixed layer of the oligotrophic ocean are numerically dominated by one of two ecotypes of Prochlorococcus, eMIT9312 or eMED4. In this study, we surveyed large latitudinal transects in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean to determine if these ecotypes discretely partition the surface mixed layer niche, or if populations exist as a continuum along key environmental gradients, particularly temperature. Transitions of dominance occurred at approximately 19-21°C, with the eMED4 ecotype dominating the colder, and eMIT9312 ecotype dominating the warmer regions. Within these zones of regional dominance, however, the minority ecotype was not competed to extinction. Rather, a robust log-linear relationship between ecotype ratio and temperature characterized this stabilized coexistence: for every 2.5°C increase in temperature, the eMIT9312:eMED4 ratio increased by an order of magnitude. This relationship was observed in both quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in pyrosequencing assays. Water column stratification also contributed to the ecotype ratio along the basin-scale transects, but to a lesser extent. Finally, instances where the ratio of the eMED4 and eMIT9312 abundances did not correlate well with temperature were identified. Such occurrences are likely due to changes in water temperatures outpacing changes in community structure.

  12. Diffusion-flame ignition by shock-wave impingement on a supersonic mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Huete, Cesar; Williams, Forman A.; Urzay, Javier

    2015-11-01

    Ignition in a supersonic mixing layer interacting with an oblique shock wave is investigated analytically and numerically under conditions such that the post-shock flow remains supersonic. The study requires consideration of the structure of the post-shock ignition kernel that is found to exist around the point of maximum temperature, which may be located either near the edge of the mixing layer or in its interior. The ignition kernel displays a balance between the rates of chemical reaction and of post-shock flow expansion, including the acoustic interactions of the chemical heat release with the shock wave, leading to increased front curvature. The analysis, which adopts a one-step chemistry model with large activation energy, indicates that ignition develops as a fold bifurcation, the turning point in the diagram of the peak perturbation induced by the chemical reaction as a function of the Damköhler number providing the critical conditions for ignition. Subsequent to ignition the lead shock will rapidly be transformed into a thin detonation on the fuel side of the ignition kernel, and, under suitable conditions, a deflagration may extend far downstream, along with the diffusion flame that must separate the rich and lean reaction products.

  13. Profiling float-based observations of net respiration beneath the mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennon, Tyler D.; Riser, Stephen C.; Mecking, Sabine

    2016-06-01

    We employ profiling floats with dissolved oxygen sensors to observe in situ temporal oxygen evolution below the mixed layer, allowing us to characterize net respiration of organic carbon in eight distinct regions over the globe. Export and export efficiency are generally high in locations with strong seasonal variability and low in locations of weak seasonality. Vertically integrated respiration is weakly, yet significantly, correlated with remote observations of chlorophyll, net primary production, and planktonic community size structure. These correlations suggest that regimes of high net primary production and large phytoplankton fuel elevated respiration at depth. Several regions of float-based observations intersect with sites of other detailed observations (e.g., Hawaii and Sargasso Sea), which allows us to compare our results to independent studies. We find that there is good agreement among export production estimates at highly seasonal locations, and that float-based observations may be biased low at weakly seasonal locations. We posit that the reason for the low-latitude discrepancy is the relative steady state of oxygen concentration caused by weak seasonality and shallow wintertime mixed layer depths.

  14. Simulation of mixed-host emitting layer based organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Riku, C.; Kee, Y. Y.; Ong, T. S.; Tou, T. Y.; Yap, S. S.

    2015-04-24

    ‘SimOLED’ simulator is used in this work to investigate the efficiency of the mixed-host organic light emitting devices (MH-OLEDs). Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum(3) (Alq{sub 3}) and N,N-diphenyl-N,N-Bis(3-methylphenyl)-1,1-diphenyl-4,4-diamine (TPD) are used as the electron transport layer (ETL) material and hole transport layer (HTL) material respectively, and the indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) and aluminum (Al) as anode and cathode. Three MH-OLEDs, A, B and C with the same structure of ITO / HTM (15 nm) / Mixed host (70 nm) / ETM (10 nm) /Al, are stimulated with ratios TPD:Alq{sub 3} of 3:5, 5:5, and 5:3 respectively. The Poole-Frenkel model for electron and hole mobilities is employed to compute the current density-applied voltage-luminance characteristics, distribution of the electric field, carrier concentrations and recombination rate.

  15. Quantifying subtropical North Pacific gyre mixed layer primary productivity from Seaglider observations of diel oxygen cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, David P.; Wilson, Samuel T.; Doney, Scott C.; Karl, David M.

    2015-05-01

    Using autonomous underwater gliders, we quantified diurnal periodicity in dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll, and temperature in the subtropical North Pacific near the Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Station ALOHA during summer 2012. Oxygen optodes provided sufficient stability and precision to quantify diel cycles of average amplitude of 0.6 µmol kg-1. A theoretical diel curve was fit to daily observations to infer an average mixed layer gross primary productivity (GPP) of 1.8 mmol O2 m-3 d-1. Cumulative net community production (NCP) over 110 days was 500 mmol O2 m-2 for the mixed layer, which averaged 57 m in depth. Both GPP and NCP estimates indicated a significant period of below-average productivity at Station ALOHA in 2012, an observation confirmed by 14C productivity incubations and O2/Ar ratios. Given our success in an oligotrophic gyre where biological signals are small, our diel GPP approach holds promise for remote characterization of productivity across the spectrum of marine environments.

  16. Nonlocal stochastic mixing-length theory and the velocity profile in the turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-02-01

    Turbulence mixing by finite size eddies will be treated by means of a novel formulation of nonlocal K-theory, involving sample paths and a stochastic closure hypothesis, which implies a well defined recipe for the calculation of sampling and transition rates. The connection with the general theory of stochastic processes will be established. The relation with other nonlocal turbulence models (e.g. transilience and spectral diffusivity theory) is also discussed. Using an analytical sampling rate model (satisfying exchange) the theory is applied to the boundary layer (using a scaling hypothesis), which maps boundary layer turbulence mixing of scalar densities onto a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type stochastic process. The resulting transpport equation for longitudinal momentum P x ≡ ϱ U is solved for a unified description of both the inertial and the viscous sublayer including the crossover. With a scaling exponent ε ≈ 0.58 (while local turbulence would amount to ε → ∞) the velocity profile U+ = ƒ(y +) is found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Inter alia (i) the significance of ε as a turbulence Cantor set dimension, (ii) the value of the integration constant in the logarithmic region (i.e. if y+ → ∞), (iii) linear timescaling, and (iv) finite Reynolds number effects will be investigated. The (analytical) predictions of the theory for near-wall behaviour (i.e. if y+ → 0) of fluctuating quantities also perfectly agree with recent direct numerical simulations.

  17. Global and Koopman modes analysis of sound generation in mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Song, G.; Robinet, J.-C.; Gloerfelt, X.; Alizard, F.

    2013-12-15

    It is now well established that linear and nonlinear instability waves play a significant role in the noise generation process for a wide variety of shear flows such as jets or mixing layers. In that context, the problem of acoustic radiation generated by spatially growing instability waves of two-dimensional subsonic and supersonic mixing layers are revisited in a global point of view, i.e., without any assumption about the base flow, in both a linear and a nonlinear framework by using global and Koopman mode decompositions. In that respect, a timestepping technique based on disturbance equations is employed to extract the most dynamically relevant coherent structures for both linear and nonlinear regimes. The present analysis proposes thus a general strategy for analysing the near-field coherent structures which are responsible for the acoustic noise in these configurations. In particular, we illustrate the failure of linear global modes to describe the noise generation mechanism associated with the vortex pairing for the subsonic regime whereas they appropriately explain the Mach wave radiation of instability waves in the supersonic regime. By contrast, the Dynamic Mode Decomposition (DMD) analysis captures both the near-field dynamics and the far-field acoustics with a few number of modes for both configurations. In addition, the combination of DMD and linear global modes analyses provides new insight about the influence on the radiated noise of nonlinear interactions and saturation of instability waves as well as their interaction with the mean flow.

  18. Opposed-flow flame spread and extinction in mixed-convection boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altenkirch, R. A.; Wedha-Nayagam, M.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental data for flame spread down thin fuel samples in an opposing, mixed-convection, boundary-layer flow are analyzed to determine the gas-phase velocity that characterizes how the flame reacts as it spreads toward the leading edge of the fuel sample into a thinning boundary layer. In the forced-flow limit where the cube of the Reynolds number divided by the Grashof number, Re exp 3/Gr, is large, L(q)/L(e), where L(q) is a theoretical flame standoff distance at extinction and L(e) is the measured distance from the leading edge of the sample where extinction occurs, is found to be proportional to Re exp n with n = -0.874 and Re based on L(e). The value of n is established by the character of the flow field near the leading edge of the flame. The Re dependence is used, along with a correction for the mixed-convection situation where Re exp 3/Gr is not large, to construct a Damkohler number with which the measured spread rates correlate for all values of Re exp 3/Gr.

  19. Observed and modeled mixed-layer variability on the continental shelf of Sardinia (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onken, Reiner

    2016-04-01

    An important task of Military Oceanography is the prediction of mixed-layer properties and their spatial and temporal variability. In the mainframe of the REP14-MED sea trial which was conducted under the lead of CMRE in June 2014 in the waters west of Sardinia, an oceanographic mooring was deployed on the continental shelf which recorded the seawater temperature between the surface and 40-m depth with high resolution for about twelve days; meteorological parameters were collected at the same time on top of the mooring by a meteorological buoy. A series of ROMS model runs was conducted and validated against the observations. Those runs applied different setups for the forcing at the lateral open boundaries and at the surface, different arrangements of the vertical coordinates, and different strategies for the assimilation of data from CTD casts and gliders. The goal was to test the sensitivity of the forecast skill to the different setups and to find a "cheap" setup which predicts the observed temperature and the mixed-layer depth and their temporal variabilities to a satisfactory degree. That setup is supposed to provide also reliable forecasts for the other areas of the model domain.

  20. Mach waves produced in the supersonic jet mixing layer by shock/vortex interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oertel Sen, H.; Seiler, F.; Srulijes, J.; Hruschka, R.

    2016-05-01

    The noise emission of free jets has been extensively investigated for many decades. At subsonic jet velocities, coherent structures of the mixing layer move at subsonic speed and emit sound waves. Free jets blowing at supersonic speeds, however, can emit weak shock waves, called Mach waves. At supersonic speeds, two cases must be distinguished: the structures move either subsonically or supersonically relative to the inside and/or outside speed of sound. In the case of supersonic movement, the Mach waves exist inside as well as outside the jet. At subsonic speeds, no Mach waves appear. Although numerous theories have been established to find the origin of the Mach waves, to the authors' best knowledge, the mechanism of the Mach wave formation has not yet been clearly explained. Recently another theory of Mach waves in supersonic jets was developed, as described herein, which outlines the causes for the Mach wave production and stability as well as their dynamics. The theory's principle is that the Mach waves are initiated by vortices which move downstream at three speeds w, {w}' and {w}'' inside of the mixing layer. These three types of vortices and Mach waves are described in a comprehensive manner by the theory and are called the " w-, {w}'- and {w}''-vortices" and " w-, {w}'- and {w}''-Mach waves," respectively.

  1. Inviscid spatial stability of a compressible mixing layer. Part 3: Effect of thermodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Grosch, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive comparative study of the inviscid spatial stability of a parallel compressible mixing layer using various models for the mean flow are reported. The models are: (1) the hyperbolic tangent profile for the mean speed and the Crocco relation for the mean temperature, with the Chapman viscosity-temperature relation and a Prandtl number of one; (2) the Lock profile for the mean speed and the Crocco relation for the mean temperature, with the Chapman viscosity-temperature relation and a Prandtl number of one; and (3) the similarity solution for the coupled velocity and temperature equations using the Sutherland viscosity temperature relation and arbitrary but constant Prandtl number. The purpose was to determine the sensitivity of the stability characteristics of the compressible mixing layer to the assumed thermodynamic properties of the fluid. It is shown that the quantative features of the stability characteristics are quite similiar for all models but that there are quantitative differences resulting from the difference in the thermodynamic models. In particular, it is shown that the stability characteristics are sensitive to the value of the Prandtl number.

  2. Mixed mode transition in zero and adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Flow regimes exist where interaction of Klebanoff streaks and the Tollmien-Sclichting waves trigger transition but either mode is individually insufficient. Such interaction between orderly and bypass routes of transition is called Mixed mode transition. In zero pressure gradient boundary layers, mixed mode transition follows three routes depending upon strength of these perturbation modes. At high free-stream turbulence intensity (Tu), bypass transition is dominant and the flow is very weakly sensitive to the TS mode strength. In the presence of a strong TS mode, low Tu triggers secondary instability of the TS wave forming Λ vortices. The Λ vortices are forced response due to the weak streaks rather than resonance mechanism seen in monochromatic excitations. When both of these modes are weak, secondary instability of streaks trigger consequent breakdown to turbulent spots. Three-dimensional visualization of the perturbation fields shows toroidal n = 0 and helical n = 1 modes observed in instability of axisymmetric jets and wakes. In adverese pressure gradient boundary layers, the presence of an inflection point significantly increases the growth rate of TS mode thereby strengthening the secondary instability route and the interaction is more interesting. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1228195. Computer time was provided by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

  3. Perturbation Effects on a Supercritical C7H16/N2 Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okongo'o, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2008-01-01

    A computational-simulation study has been presented of effects of perturbation wavelengths and initial Reynolds numbers on the transition to turbulence of a heptane/nitrogen mixing layer at supercritical pressure. The governing equations for the simulations were the same as those of related prior studies reported in NASA Tech Briefs. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations were performed with initially im posed span wise perturbations whereas three-dimensional (3D) simulations had both streamwise and spanwise initial perturbations. The 2D simulations were undertaken to ascertain whether perturbations having the shortest unstable wavelength obtained from a linear stability analysis for inviscid flow are unstable in viscous nonlinear flows. The goal of the 3D simulations was to ascertain whether perturbing the mixing layer at different wavelengths affects the transition to turbulence. It was found that transitions to turbulence can be obtained at different perturbation wavelengths, provided that they are longer than the shortest unstable wavelength as determined by 2D linear stability analysis for the inviscid case and that the initial Reynolds number is proportionally increased as the wavelength is decreased. The transitional states thus obtained display different dynamic and mixture characteristics, departing strongly from the behaviors of perfect gases and ideal mixtures.

  4. Modulation on coherent vortex structures by dispersed solid particles in a three-dimensional mixing layer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianren; Luo, Kun; Zheng, Youqu; Jin, Hanhui; Cen, Kefa

    2003-09-01

    Large-scale vortex structures and their effects on the dispersion of particles in turbulent free shear flows are very important in many industrial applications, such as combustion, pollution control, and materials processing. In order to understand large-scale vortex structures and particle dispersion in depth, as well as their interaction effects, a two-way-coupled three-dimensional mixing layer laden with particles at a Stokes number of 5 initially located in the upper half region is studied numerically. A pseudospectral method was used to directly simulate the flow fluid, and the Lagrangian approach was used to trace particles. The concept of computational particles is introduced to vary the mass loading of particles. The momentum coupling effect introduced by a particle approximates to a point force. The simulation results show that coherent structures are still dominant in the mixing layer, but the flow dynamics and particle dispersion are modulated. The length of large-scale vortex structures is shortened and the pairing is delayed. Higher mass loading results in lower energy of the fluid in the phase of Kelvin-Helmholtz rolling up, while in the pairing process of large-scale vortex structures, the energy of the fluid increases as the mass loading increases. Higher mass loading also leads to larger mixed fluid thickness and Reynolds stresses of the flow. In addition, the particle dispersion along the transverse direction differs from that along the spanwise direction, which indicates that the effects of the addition of a particle on the spanwise large-scale vortex structures are different from those on the streamwise large-scale vortex structures.

  5. An octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether-based mixed micellar assay for determining the lipid acyl hydrolase activity of patatin.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, M; Escribano, J; Pérez-Gilabert, M; Chazarra, S; Cabanes, J; García-Carmona, F

    2001-10-01

    Patatin was extracted from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Spunta) and purified to homogeneity by ammonium sulfate salt fractionation and one sole chromatographic step. A spectrophotometric mixed micellar assay for patatin lipid acyl hydrolase (LAH) activity was designed with the detergent octaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C12E8). Patatin LAH used p-nitrophenyl butyrate (PNP-butyrate) as substrate when solubilized in (C12E8) micelles. In the mixed micellar system, patatin LAH responds to the PNP-butyrate surface concentration expressed as mol% (= [PNP-butyratel x 100/([detergentl critical micellar concentration)) and not to the molarity of PNP-butyrate. The kinetic parameters were determined; Vmax was independent of the mixed micelle concentration, as was Km, when expressed as mol%. However, Km was dependent on C12E8 concentration when expressed in molar concentration. C12E8/PNP-butyrate proved to be a reliable system for assaying patatin LAH activity and is superior to the commonly used Triton X-100 and SDS methods. It permits investigation of the substrate requirements of patatin LAH activity because the concentration-independent Km can be determined both in mol% and as the absolute number of substrate molecules per micelle. In addition, the detergent did not affect the enzyme activity.

  6. Improved pharmacokinetics and enhanced tumor growth inhibition using a nanostructured lipid carrier loaded with doxorubicin and modified with a layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte coating.

    PubMed

    Mussi, Samuel V; Parekh, Gaurav; Pattekari, Pravin; Levchenko, Tatyana; Lvov, Yuri; Ferreira, Lucas A M; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2015-11-10

    A nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) has been shown to be cytotoxic against the human cancer cell lines A549 and MCF-7/Adr. In attempts to improve formulation characteristics, enhance pharmacokinetics and antitumor effects, we modified the surface of these NLC with an alternating layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of polycation and polyanion polyelectrolytes and an additional coating with PEG using a simple method of core shell attachment. The formulation had a narrow size distribution, longer residence in the blood, lower accumulation in the liver, higher accumulation in tumors and a significant tumor growth inhibition effect. Thus, NLC-DOX nanopreparations complexes modified by LbL coating have the potential to enhance the anticancer effects of DOX against tumors. PMID:26325314

  7. Efficient white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes consisting of orange ultrathin and blue mixed host emission layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Ren; Zuo, Liangmei; Xue, Kaiwen; Duan, Yu; Chen, Ping; Cheng, Gang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    We have successfully demonstrated highly efficient white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by inserting an ultrathin non-doped orange layer within blue mixed host emission layer. The key feature of the novel device is the employment of blue mixed host and orange ultrathin layers, resulting in an extended recombination region and more balanced charge carrier. The maximum efficiencies of 33.8 lm W‑1 and 32.2 cd A‑1 are obtained. Moreover, the resulting white device achieves a slight efficiency roll-off and a high luminance at low operating voltage. Our versatile concept suggests a promising simple method to achieve high performance white OLEDs.

  8. Efficient white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes consisting of orange ultrathin and blue mixed host emission layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Ren; Zuo, Liangmei; Xue, Kaiwen; Duan, Yu; Chen, Ping; Cheng, Gang; Zhao, Yi

    2016-08-01

    We have successfully demonstrated highly efficient white phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by inserting an ultrathin non-doped orange layer within blue mixed host emission layer. The key feature of the novel device is the employment of blue mixed host and orange ultrathin layers, resulting in an extended recombination region and more balanced charge carrier. The maximum efficiencies of 33.8 lm W-1 and 32.2 cd A-1 are obtained. Moreover, the resulting white device achieves a slight efficiency roll-off and a high luminance at low operating voltage. Our versatile concept suggests a promising simple method to achieve high performance white OLEDs.

  9. Mixed culture of oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis and microalga Chlorella vulgaris for lipid production from industrial wastes and its use as biodiesel feedstock.

    PubMed

    Cheirsilp, Benjamas; Suwannarat, Warangkana; Niyomdecha, Rujira

    2011-07-01

    A mixed culture of oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula glutinis and microalga Chlorella vulgaris was performed to enhance lipid production from industrial wastes. These included effluent from seafood processing plant and molasses from sugar cane plant. In the mixed culture, the yeast grew faster and the lipid production was higher than that in the pure cultures. This could be because microalga acted as an oxygen generator for yeast, while yeast provided CO(2) to microalga and both carried out the production of lipids. The optimal conditions for lipid production by the mixed culture were as follows: ratio of yeast to microalga at 1:1; initial pH at 5.0; molasses concentration at 1%; shaking speed at 200 rpm; and light intensity at 5.0 klux under 16:8 hours light and dark cycles. Under these conditions, the highest biomass of 4.63±0.15 g/L and lipid production of 2.88±0.16 g/L were obtained after five days of cultivation. In addition, the plant oil-like fatty acid composition of yeast and microalgal lipids suggested their high potential for use as biodiesel feedstock.

  10. Effect of chemical heat release in a temporally evolving mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuera, F. J.; Moser, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulations of a temporally evolving mixing layer with an exothermic infinitely fast diffusion flame between two unmixed reactants have been carried out in the limit of zero Mach number to study the effect of the heat release on the early stages of the evolution of the flow. Attention has been directed to relatively large values of the oxidizer-to-fuel mass stoichiometric ratio typical of hydrocarbon flames, and initial vorticity distributions thicker than the temperature and species distributions have been chosen to mimic the situation at the outlet of a jet. The results show that, during the stages of the evolution covered by the present simulations, enhancement of combustion occurs by local stretching of the flame without much augmentation of its area. The rate of product generation depends strongly on the initial conditions, which suggests the possibility of controlling the combustion by acting on the flow. Rollup and vortex amalgamation still occur in these reacting flows but are very much affected by the production of new vorticity by baroclinic torques. These torques lead to counter rotating vortex pairs around the flame and, more importantly, in thin layers of light fluid that leave the vicinity of the flame when the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability begins to develop. Propelled by the vortex pairs, these layers wind around, split on reaching high pressure regions, and originate new vortex pairs in a process that ends up building large-scale vortices with a vorticity distribution more complex than for a constant density fluid.

  11. Mixed Layer Depth Trends in the Bay of Biscay over the Period 1975–2010

    PubMed Central

    Costoya, Xurxo; deCastro, Maite; Gómez-Gesteira, Moncho; Santos, Fran

    2014-01-01

    Wintertime trends in mixed layer depth (MLD) were calculated in the Bay of Biscay over the period 1975–2010 using the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) package. The reliability of the SODA database was confirmed correlating its results with those obtained from the experimental Argo database over the period 2003–2010. An iso-thermal layer depth (TLD) and an iso-pycnal layer depth (PLD) were defined using the threshold difference method with ΔT = 0.5°C and Δσθ = 0.125 kg/m3. Wintertime trends of the MLD were calculated using winter extended (December-March) anomalies and annual maxima. Trends calculated for the whole Bay of Biscay using both parameters (TLD and PLD) showed to be dependent on the area. Thus, MLD became deeper in the southeastern corner and shallower in the rest of the area. Air temperature was shown to play a key role in regulating the different spatial behavior of the MLD. Negative air temperature trends localized in the southeastern corner coincide with MLD deepening in this area, while, positive air temperature trends are associated to MLD shoaling in the rest of the bay. Additionally, the temperature trend calculated along the first 700 m of the water column is in good agreement with the different spatial behavior revealed for the MLD trend. PMID:24922066

  12. Selectivity of layered double hydroxides and their derivative mixed metal oxides as sorbents of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Othman, Mohamed A; Zahid, Waleed M; Abasaeed, Ahmed E

    2013-06-15

    In the context of finding high efficient sorbent materials for removing hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from air stream, a screening study was performed to find the best combination of metals for the synthesis of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and their derivative mixed metal oxides. Based on selectivity of 998 natural mineral species of sulfur-containing compounds, Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) were selected as divalent metals, and Fe(3+), Al(3+) and Cr(3+) as trivalent metals to synthesis the LDHs sorbents. 10 LDHs materials and their calcined mixed metal oxides, Ni(0.66)Al(0.34), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.32)Al(0.33), Zn(0.66)Al(0.34), Cu(0.36)Zn(0.32)Al(0.32), Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.31)Fe(0.34), Ni(0.66)Cr(0.34), Cu(0.35)Ni(0.31)Cr(0.34), Zn(0.66)Cr(0.34), Cu(0.33)Zn(0.32)Cr(0.35) were synthesized, characterized chemically and physically, and then tested using breakthrough test to determine their sulfur uptake. Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36) mixed metal oxides was found to have the best uptake of hydrogen sulfide (136 mg H₂S/g). Regeneration of spent Ni(0.64)Fe(0.36) mixed metal oxides was studied using two different mixture solutions, NaCl/NaOH and acetate-buffer/NaCl/NaOH. The latter mixture successfully desorbed the sulfur from the Ni0.64Fe0.36 sorbent for 2 cycles of regeneration/sorption.

  13. [Characteristics of Winter Atmospheric Mixing Layer Height in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region and Their Relationship with the Atmospheric Pollution].

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Tang, Gui-qian; Huang, Jun; Liu, Zi-rui; An, Jun-lin; Wang, Yue-si

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric mixing layer height (MLH) is one of the main factors affecting the atmospheric diffusion and plays an important role in air quality assessment and distribution of the pollutants. Based on the ceilometers data, this paper has made synchronous observation on MLH in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region (Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and Qinhuangdao) in heavy polluted February 2014 and analyzed the respective overall change and its regional features. Results show that in February 2014,the average of mixing layer height in Qinhuangdao is the highest, up to 865 +/- 268 m, and in Shijiazhuang is the lowest (568 +/- 207 m), Beijing's and Tianjin's are in between, 818 +/- 319 m and 834 +/- 334 m respectively; Combined with the meteorological data, we find that radiation and wind speed are main factors of the mixing layer height; The relationship between the particle concentration and mixing layer height in four sites suggests that mixing layer is less than 800 m, concentration of fine particulate matter in four sites will exceed the national standard (GB 3095-2012, 75 microg x m(-3)). During the period of observation, the proportion of days that mixing layer is less than 800 m in Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and Qinhuangdao are 50%, 43%, 80% and 50% respectively. Shijiazhuang though nearly formation contaminant concentration is high, within the atmospheric mixed layer pollutant load is not high. Unfavorable atmospheric diffusion conditions are the main causes of heavy pollution in Shijiazhuang for a long time. The results of the study are of great significance for cognitive Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area pollution distribution, and can provide a scientific reference for reasonable distribution of regional pollution sources.

  14. Change in Tear Film Lipid Layer Thickness, Corneal Thickness, Volume and Topography after Superficial Cauterization for Conjunctivochalasis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tommy C. Y.; Ye, Cong; Ng, Paul KF; Li, Emmy Y. M.; Yuen, Hunter K. L.; Jhanji, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the change in tear film lipid layer thickness, corneal thickness, volume and topography after superficial cauterization of symptomatic conjunctivochalasis. Bilateral superficial conjunctival cauterization was performed in 36 eyes of 18 patients with symptomatic conjunctivochalasis. The mean age of patients (12 males, 6 females) was 68.6 ± 10.9 years (range: 44–83 years). Preoperatively, 28 eyes (77.8%) had grade 1 conjunctivochalasis, and 8 eyes (22.2%) had grade 2 conjunctivochalasis. At 1 month postoperatively, the severity of conjunctivochalasis decreased significantly (p < 0.001) and 29 eyes (80.6%) had grade 0 conjunctivochalasis whereas 7 eyes (19.4%) had grade 1 conjunctivochalasis. The mean Ocular Surface Disease Index score decreased from 31.5 ± 15.2 preoperatively to 21.5 ± 14.2 at the end of 1 month postoperatively (p = 0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in mean tear film lipid layer thickness 1 month after the surgery (49.6 ± 16.1 nm vs 62.6 ± 21.6 nm; p < 0.001). The central corneal thickness, thinnest corneal thickness and corneal volume decreased significantly postoperatively (p < 0.001). Our study showed that superficial conjunctival cauterization is an effective technique for management of conjunctivochalasis in the short term. An increase in tear film lipid layer thickness along with a decrease in corneal thickness and volume were observed after surgical correction of conjunctivochalasis. PMID:26184418

  15. Change in Tear Film Lipid Layer Thickness, Corneal Thickness, Volume and Topography after Superficial Cauterization for Conjunctivochalasis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Tommy C Y; Ye, Cong; Ng, Paul K F; Li, Emmy Y M; Yuen, Hunter K L; Jhanji, Vishal

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the change in tear film lipid layer thickness, corneal thickness, volume and topography after superficial cauterization of symptomatic conjunctivochalasis. Bilateral superficial conjunctival cauterization was performed in 36 eyes of 18 patients with symptomatic conjunctivochalasis. The mean age of patients (12 males, 6 females) was 68.6 ± 10.9 years (range: 44-83 years). Preoperatively, 28 eyes (77.8%) had grade 1 conjunctivochalasis, and 8 eyes (22.2%) had grade 2 conjunctivochalasis. At 1 month postoperatively, the severity of conjunctivochalasis decreased significantly (p < 0.001) and 29 eyes (80.6%) had grade 0 conjunctivochalasis whereas 7 eyes (19.4%) had grade 1 conjunctivochalasis. The mean Ocular Surface Disease Index score decreased from 31.5 ± 15.2 preoperatively to 21.5 ± 14.2 at the end of 1 month postoperatively (p = 0.001). There was a statistically significant increase in mean tear film lipid layer thickness 1 month after the surgery (49.6 ± 16.1 nm vs 62.6 ± 21.6 nm; p < 0.001). The central corneal thickness, thinnest corneal thickness and corneal volume decreased significantly postoperatively (p < 0.001). Our study showed that superficial conjunctival cauterization is an effective technique for management of conjunctivochalasis in the short term. An increase in tear film lipid layer thickness along with a decrease in corneal thickness and volume were observed after surgical correction of conjunctivochalasis. PMID:26184418

  16. Aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing (ALCHIM): determining composition of complex lipid samples by 1H NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ruiyang; Volden, Paul A.; Conzen, Suzanne D.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying the amounts and types of lipids present in mixtures is important in fields as diverse as medicine, food science, and biochemistry. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can quantify the total amounts of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in mixtures, but identifying the length of saturated fatty acid or the position of unsaturation by NMR is a daunting challenge. We have developed an NMR technique, aliphatic chain length by isotropic mixing, to address this problem. Using a selective total correlation spectroscopy technique to excite and transfer magnetization from a resolved resonance, we demonstrate that the time dependence of this transfer to another resolved site depends linearly on the number of aliphatic carbons separating the two sites. This technique is applied to complex natural mixtures allowing the identification and quantification of the constituent fatty acids. The method has been applied to whole adipocytes demonstrating that it will be of great use in studies of whole tissues. PMID:24831341

  17. Mechanisms Controlling the Interannual Variation of Mixed Layer Temperature Averaged over the Nino-3 Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Seung-Bum; Lee, Tong; Fukumori, Ichiro

    2007-01-01

    The present study examines processes governing the interannual variation of MLT in the eastern equatorial Pacific.Processes controlling the interannual variation of mixed layer temperature (MLT) averaged over the Nino-3 domain (5 deg N-5 deg S, 150 deg-90 deg W) are studied using an ocean data assimilation product that covers the period of 1993-2003. The overall balance is such that surface heat flux opposes the MLT change but horizontal advection and subsurface processes assist the change. Advective tendencies are estimated here as the temperature fluxes through the domain's boundaries, with the boundary temperature referenced to the domain-averaged temperature to remove the dependence on temperature scale. This allows the authors to characterize external advective processes that warm or cool the water within the domain as a whole. The zonal advective tendency is caused primarily by large-scale advection of warm-pool water through the western boundary of the domain. The meridional advective tendency is contributed to mostly by Ekman current advecting large-scale temperature anomalies through the southern boundary of the domain. Unlike many previous studies, the subsurface processes that consist of vertical mixing and entrainment are explicitly evaluated. In particular, a rigorous method to estimate entrainment allows an exact budget closure. The vertical mixing across the mixed layer (ML) base has a contribution in phase with the MLT change. The entrainment tendency due to the temporal change in ML depth is negligible compared to other subsurface processes. The entrainment tendency by vertical advection across the ML base is dominated by large-scale changes in upwelling and the temperature of upwelling water. Tropical instability waves (TIWs) result in smaller-scale vertical advection that warms the domain during La Nina cooling events. However, such a warming tendency is overwhelmed by the cooling tendency associated with the large-scale upwelling by a factor of

  18. Control of Evaporation Behavior of an Inkjet-Printed Dielectric Layer Using a Mixed-Solvent System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hak Soon; Kang, Byung Ju; Oh, Je Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the evaporation behavior and the resulting morphology of inkjet-printed dielectric layers were controlled using a mixed-solvent system to fabricate uniform poly-4-vinylphenol (PVP) dielectric layers without any pinholes. The mixed-solvent system consisted of two different organic solvents: 1-hexanol and ethanol. The effects of inkjet-printing variables such as overlap condition, substrate temperature, and different printing sequences (continuous and interlacing printing methods) on the inkjet-printed dielectric layer were also investigated. Increasing volume fraction of ethanol (VFE) is likely to reduce the evaporation rate gradient and the drying time of the inkjet-printed dielectric layer; this diminishes the coffee stain effect and thereby improves the uniformity of the inkjet-printed dielectric layer. However, the coffee stain effect becomes more severe with an increase in the substrate temperature due to the enhanced outward convective flow. The overlap condition has little effect on the evaporation behavior of the printed dielectric layer. In addition, the interlacing printing method results in either a stronger coffee stain effect or wavy structures of the dielectric layers depending on the VFE of the PVP solution. All-inkjet-printed capacitors without electrical short circuiting can be successfully fabricated using the optimized PVP solution (VFE = 0.6); this indicates that the mixed-solvent system is expected to play an important role in the fabrication of high-quality inkjet-printed dielectric layers in various printed electronics applications.

  19. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  20. CVS Filtering of 3D Turbulent Mixing Layers Using Orthogonal Wavelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Kai; Farge, Marie; Pellegrino, Giulio; Rogers, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) filtering has been applied to Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data of forced and unforced time-developing turbulent mixing layers. CVS filtering splits the turbulent flow into two orthogonal parts, one corresponding to coherent vortices and the other to incoherent background flow. We have shown that the coherent vortices can be represented by few wavelet modes and that these modes are sufficient to reproduce the vorticity probability distribution function (PDF) and the energy spectrum over the entire inertial range. The remaining incoherent background flow is homogeneous, has small amplitude, and is uncorrelated. These results are compared with those obtained for the same compression rate using large eddy simulation (LES) filtering. In contrast to the incoherent background flow of CVS filtering, the LES subgrid scales have a much larger amplitude and are correlated, which makes their statistical modeling more difficult.

  1. A numerical study of polydisperse spray flame ignition and extinction fronts in a mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, J. B.; Kagan, L. S.; Sivashinsky, G. I.

    2013-12-01

    A new numerical study of laminar polydisperse flame ignition and extinction fronts in a mixing layer resulting from opposed streams of fuel and oxidant is presented. Two quite different initial droplet size distributions having the same Sauter mean diameter (SMD) are considered. The phenomenon of hysteresis is found to occur for a high initial droplet load but disappears as the latter decreases. The range of strain rate values for which hysteresis is prevalent depends on the initial size distribution. For example, whilst under certain operating conditions, an extinction front may result from using one initial droplet size distribution, use of another size distribution, even having the same SMD, can exhibit hysteresis. Other features of the influence of the initial spray polydispersity are discussed in depth.

  2. In situ atomic force microscopy imaging of electrodeposition of mixed layers of copper/cuprous oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefont, A.; Kostecki, R.; McLarnon, F.; Arrayet, J.C.; Servant, L.; Argoul, F.

    1999-11-01

    In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to the dynamic characterization of the growth of mixed Cu/Cu{sub 2}O layers obtained by galvanostatic electrodeposition from alkaline Cu(II) lactate solutions. The correlation of the cathode potential profile with the average topographic profiles computed from the AFM images provided evidence for two transitions in the deposit growth during which the average growth velocity underwent rapid accelerations, the first one corresponding to zero interfacial concentration (Sand's time) and the second one to the emergence of the oscillations by a smooth transition. Despite its temporal resolution, the AFM technique could not capture the details of a single oscillation, but it proved to be quite adequate for tracking the general evolution of the electrode surface.

  3. The three-dimensional evolution of a plane mixing layer - Pairing and transition to turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, Robert D.; Rogers, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of three-dimensional temporally evolving plane mixing layers through as many as three pairings has been simulated numerically. All simulations were begun from a few low-wavenumber disturbances, usually derived from linear stability theory, in addition to the mean velocity. Three-dimensional perturbations were used with amplitudes ranging from infinitesimal to large enough to trigger a rapid transition to turbulence. Pairing is found to inhibit the growth of infinitesimal three-dimensional disturbances, and to trigger the transition to turbulence in highly three-dimensional flows. The mechanisms responsible for the growth of three-dimensionality and onset of transition to turbulence are described. The transition to turbulence is accompanied by the formation of thin sheets of spanwise vorticity, which undergo secondary rollups. The post-transitional simulated flow fields exhibit many properties characteristic of turbulent flows.

  4. Behavior of streamwise rib vortices in a three-dimensional mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, J. M.; Bulbeck, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    The structure and behavior of a streamwise rib vortex in a direct numerical simulation of a time-developing three-dimensional incompressible plane mixing layer is examined. Where the rib vortex is being stretched, the vorticity vector is primarily directed in the vortex axial direction and the radial and azimuthal velocity distribution is similar to that of a Burger's vortex. In the region where the vortex stretching is negative, there is a change in the local topology of the vortex. The axial flow is decelerated and a negative azimuthal component of vorticity is induced. These features are characteristic of vortex breakdown. The temporal evolution of the rib vortex is similar to the evolution of an axisymmetric vortex in the early stages of vortex breakdown. The effect of vortex breakdown on other parts of the flow is, however, not as significant as the interaction between the rib vortex and other vortices.

  5. Effects of swell on transport and dispersion of oil plumes within the ocean mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bicheng; Yang, Di; Meneveau, Charles; Chamecki, Marcelo

    2016-05-01

    The transport in the ocean mixed layer (OML) of oil plumes originated from deepwater blowouts is studied using large eddy simulations. In particular, we focus on the effects of swell on the modulation of turbulence in the OML and its impact on oil transport. Results show that when the misalignment between the wind and the swell propagation is small, Langmuir cells develop and significantly enhance the vertical dilution of the oil plume. Conversely, when the misalignment is large, vertical dilution is suppressed when compared to the no-swell case. Due to the strong directional shear of the mean flow within the OML, plume depth significantly impacts mean transport direction. The size of oil droplets in the plume also plays an important role in vertical dilution and mean transport direction.

  6. Tidally driven mixing and dissipation in the stratified boundary layer above steep submarine topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winters, K. B.

    2015-09-01

    A tidally driven, stratified boundary layer over supercritical topography is simulated numerically. The near-boundary flow is characterized by quasiperiodic, bore-like motions and episodic expulsion events where fluid is ejected into the stratified interior. The character of the bores is compared to the high-resolution ocean mooring data of van Haren (2006). The diffusivity of the flow near the boundary is estimated by means of a synthetic dye tracer experiment. The average dissipation rate within the dye cloud is computed and combined with the diffusivity estimate to yield an overall mixing efficiency of 0.15. Both the estimated diffusivity and dissipation rates are in reasonable agreement with the microstructure observations of Kunze et al. (2012) when scaled to the environmental conditions at the Monterey and Soquel Canyons and to the values estimated by van Haren and Gostiaux (2012) above the sloping bottom of the Great Meteor Seamount in the Canary Basin.

  7. High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL)-2 Observations of Aerosol Variability and Mixing during Boundary Layer Evolution in Houston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, S. P.; Scarino, A. J.; Rogers, R. R.; Hostetler, C. A.; Ferrare, R. A.; Sawamura, P.; Berkoff, T.; Harper, D. B.; Cook, A. L.; Saide, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Langley airborne multi-wavelength High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2) provides the vertical distribution of aerosol optical properties as "curtains" of aerosol extinction, backscatter and depolarization along the flight track, plus intensive properties that are used to infer aerosol type and external mixing of types. Deployed aboard the NASA Langley King Air on the DISCOVER-AQ field mission in Houston in September 2013, HSRL-2 flew a pattern that included 18 ground sites, repeated four times a day, coordinated with a suite of airborne in situ measurements. The horizontally and vertically resolved curtains of HSRL-2 measurements give an unparalleled view of the spatial and temporal variability of aerosol, which provide broad context for interpreting other measurements and models. In Houston, HSRL-2 generally observed significant variability with distinct layering: boundary layer, residual layer, and frequent upper layers of smoke transported from the Mississippi Valley. The period from Sep. 11-14 is notable for a large aerosol build-up and persistent layers in the free troposphere. We investigate the aerosol properties and evolution using the vertically resolved HSRL-2 measurements, typing and mixture analysis techniques, and boundary layer detection. Between morning and afternoon overpasses, as the boundary layer grows, many distinctions between the layers are lost as the aerosols become mixed. As the boundary layer collapses overnight, the aerosols are cut off and are observed in a distinct residual layer the following morning. HSRL-2 measurements of the upper smoke layers suggest slightly different properties each day as new smoke enters the region, while the morning boundary layer indicates more similarity in local emissions day-to-day. HSRL-2 intensive variables (indicators of aerosol type) reflect complex yet predictable mixing. We will present the analysis of aerosol mixtures, and explore the WRF-Chem chemical transport model along the HSRL-2

  8. Part 2 of a Computational Study of a Drop-Laden Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okongo, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2004-01-01

    This second of three reports on a computational study of a mixing layer laden with evaporating liquid drops presents the evaluation of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models. The LES models were evaluated on an existing database that had been generated using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS). The DNS method and the database are described in the first report of this series, Part 1 of a Computational Study of a Drop-Laden Mixing Layer (NPO-30719), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No.7 (July 2004), page 59. The LES equations, which are derived by applying a spatial filter to the DNS set, govern the evolution of the larger scales of the flow and can therefore be solved on a coarser grid. Consistent with the reduction in grid points, the DNS drops would be represented by fewer drops, called computational drops in the LES context. The LES equations contain terms that cannot be directly computed on the coarser grid and that must instead be modeled. Two types of models are necessary: (1) those for the filtered source terms representing the effects of drops on the filtered flow field and (2) those for the sub-grid scale (SGS) fluxes arising from filtering the convective terms in the DNS equations. All of the filtered-sourceterm models that were developed were found to overestimate the filtered source terms. For modeling the SGS fluxes, constant-coefficient Smagorinsky, gradient, and scale-similarity models were assessed and calibrated on the DNS database. The Smagorinsky model correlated poorly with the SGS fluxes, whereas the gradient and scale-similarity models were well correlated with the SGS quantities that they represented.

  9. A numerical study of a class of TVD schemes for compressible mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandham, N. D.; Yee, H. C.

    1989-01-01

    At high Mach numbers the two-dimensional time-developing mixing layer develops shock waves, positioned around large-scale vortical structures. A suitable numerical method has to be able to capture the inherent instability of the flow, leading to the roll-up of vortices, and also must be able to capture shock waves when they develop. Standard schemes for low speed turbulent flows, for example spectral methods, rely on resolution of all flow-features and cannot handle shock waves, which become too thin at any realistic Reynolds number. The performance of a class of second-order explicit total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes on a compressible mixing layer problem was studied. The basic idea is to capture the physics of the flow correctly, by resolving down to the smallest turbulent length scales, without resorting to turbulence or sub-grid scale modeling, and at the same time capture shock waves without spurious oscillations. The present study indicates that TVD schemes can capture the shocks accurately when they form, but (without resorting to a finer grid) have poor accuracy in computing the vortex growth. The solution accuracy depends on the choice of limiter. However a larger number of grid points are in general required to resolve the correct vortex growth. The low accuracy in computing time-dependent problems containing shock waves as well as vortical structures is partly due to the inherent shock-capturing property of all TVD schemes. In order to capture shock waves without spurious oscillations these schemes reduce to first-order near extrema and indirectly produce clipping phenomena, leading to inaccuracy in the computation of vortex growth. Accurate simulation of unsteady turbulent fluid flows with shock waves will require further development of efficient, uniformly higher than second-order accurate, shock-capturing methods.

  10. Formation of mixed-layer structures in smectites intercalated with tryptone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, K. A.; Trusiak, A.; Steiner, J. C.; Katz, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Alimova, A.

    2012-12-01

    Stable clay-protein complexes are fundamental to studies of the critical zone, terrestrial ecosystems, pharmacology, and industrial applications such as bioremediation. Two sets of montmorillonite clays were purified and made homoionic for Na and Mg. Mg-montmorillonite and Na-montmorillonite were mixed with tryptone (casein digest) in a 9:1 and 18:1 clay:tryptone ratio, resulting in the formation of reversible intercalated structures. X-ray diffraction analysis of the protein-clay complexes produced profiles consisting of two peaks associated with the smectite 001 reflection and a related tryptone-packet peak similar to that produced by a mixed layer clay structure. Shifts in the 002, 003, and 004 diffraction maxima are attributed to disorder caused by the interaction with the protein. Line broadening in the smectite-tryptone XRD spectra is interpreted to be the result of interlayer absorption. Adsorption produces coherent crystalline packets of regularly interbedded tryptone and smectite platelets. SEM images reveal clay platelets with upwardly rolled edges that tend toward cylindrical structures with the production of occasional tubes in the smaller platelet size range as noted for organic compound-kaolinite intercalation reported by Fenoll Hach-Ali and Weiss (1969). Reference: Fenoll Hach-Ali, P.F., Weiss, A., 1969. Estudio de la reaccion de caolinita y N-metilform- amida. Quimica LXV, 769-790. Scanning electron micrograph of tryptone-intercalated clay platelets exhibiting rolled edge structure.

  11. Sputtering and Reflection Data for Mixed Tungsten/Beryllium Layers Under Typical FIRE Divertor Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzic, D. N.; Nieto, M.; Alman, D. A.; Brooks, J. N.

    2001-10-01

    Computer modeling has been done as part of the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE) design study. The current focus is on beryllium/tungsten mixed-material erosion. The FIRE design calls for a beryllium first wall and tungsten divertors. Beryllium can be sputtered from the first wall and transported to the divertor, forming a Be/W mixture on the divertor. The beryllium sputtering from the first wall is obtained from fluxes calculated by the DEGAS2 neutral transport code. Subsequent transport to the divertor is calculated by the REDEP code. VFTRIM-3D, a variant of the TRIM-SP binary-collision code, is used to investigate the sputtering properties of the Be/W divertor. Finally, WBC can compute beryllium and tungsten erosion and core plasma contamination using the sputtering and reflection coefficients obtained with VFTRIM-3D. In the present work, the VFTRIM-3D code was run on a W/Be surface with the Be content varied from 0 to 100 atomic percent. Deuterium and tritium (ions and neutrals), oxygen, beryllium from the first wall, and tungsten being redeposited are all incident on this mixed W/Be layer. Data on reflection and sputtering coefficients as a function of beryllium content in the bombarded surface will be presented.

  12. Mixed layers of sodium caseinate + dextran sulfate: influence of order of addition to oil-water interface.

    PubMed

    Jourdain, Laureline S; Schmitt, Christophe; Leser, Martin E; Murray, Brent S; Dickinson, Eric

    2009-09-01

    We report on the interfacial properties of electrostatic complexes of protein (sodium caseinate) with a highly sulfated polysaccharide (dextran sulfate). Two routes were investigated for preparation of adsorbed layers at the n-tetradecane-water interface at pH = 6. Bilayers were made by the layer-by-layer deposition technique whereby polysaccharide was added to a previously established protein-stabilized interface. Mixed layers were made by the conventional one-step method in which soluble protein-polysaccharide complexes were adsorbed directly at the interface. Protein + polysaccharide systems gave a slower decay of interfacial tension and stronger dilatational viscoelastic properties than the protein alone, but there was no significant difference in dilatational properties between mixed layers and bilayers. Conversely, shear rheology experiments exhibited significant differences between the two kinds of interfacial layers, with the mixed system giving much stronger interfacial films than the bilayer system, i.e., shear viscosities and moduli at least an order of magnitude higher. The film shear viscoelasticity was further enhanced by acidification of the biopolymer mixture to pH = 2 prior to interface formation. Taken together, these measurements provide insight into the origin of previously reported differences in stability properties of oil-in-water emulsions made by the bilayer and mixed layer approaches. Addition of a proteolytic enzyme (trypsin) to both types of interfaces led to a significant increase in the elastic modulus of the film, suggesting that the enzyme was adsorbed at the interface via complexation with dextran sulfate. Overall, this study has confirmed the potential of shear rheology as a highly sensitive probe of associative electrostatic interactions and interfacial structure in mixed biopolymer layers. PMID:19459686

  13. Spreading Layers in Accreting Objects: Role of Acoustic Waves for Angular Momentum Transport, Mixing, and Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippov, Alexander A.; Rafikov, Roman R.; Stone, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Disk accretion at a high rate onto a white dwarf (WD) or a neutron star has been suggested to result in the formation of a spreading layer (SL)—a belt-like structure on the object's surface, in which the accreted matter steadily spreads in the poleward (meridional) direction while spinning down. To assess its basic characteristics, we perform two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of supersonic SLs in the relevant morphology with a simple prescription for cooling. We demonstrate that supersonic shear naturally present at the base of the SL inevitably drives sonic instability that gives rise to large-scale acoustic modes governing the evolution of the SL. These modes dominate the transport of momentum and energy, which is intrinsically global and cannot be characterized via some form of local effective viscosity (e.g., α-viscosity). The global nature of the wave-driven transport should have important implications for triggering Type I X-ray bursts in low-mass X-ray binaries. The nonlinear evolution of waves into a system of shocks drives effective rearrangement (sensitively depending on thermodynamical properties of the flow) and deceleration of the SL, which ultimately becomes transonic and susceptible to regular Kelvin–Helmholtz instability. We interpret this evolution in terms of the global structure of the SL and suggest that mixing of the SL material with the underlying stellar fluid should become effective only at intermediate latitudes on the accreting object's surface, where the flow has decelerated appreciably. In the near-equatorial regions the transport is dominated by acoustic waves and mixing is less efficient. We speculate that this latitudinal nonuniformity of mixing in accreting WDs may be linked to the observed bipolar morphology of classical nova ejecta.

  14. Reduced kinetic mechanism of ignition for nonpremixed hydrogen/air in a supersonic mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, Y.; Niioka, T. . Inst. of Fluid Science)

    1994-11-01

    Transient ignition processes in a two-dimensional spatially evolving supersonic mixing layer consisting of a parallel nonpremixed airstream and a hydrogen stream both with temperatures higher than 1,000 K were investigated numerically by using the full chemistry and its reduced chemistry. A phenomenon different from that examined in previous studies, in which ignition of hydrogen/oxygen mixtures was considered, was found in the nonpremixed case examined here. It was shown that the concentration of O was greater than that of OH before ignition, but became smaller with the development of ignition process. Fourteen important reactions for ignition were obtained and verified using sensitivity analyses of ignition delay time and radical concentrations. Several different four-step and three-step reduced kinetic mechanisms were then deduced by introducing the steady-state approximation to different species. Comparison of these reduced kinetic mechanisms with the full chemistry showed that the steady-state approximation of O used in previous studies caused serious errors in the prediction of ignition delay time in supersonic flow, in which nonpremixed character is predominant and the transport phenomenon is important. Ignition locations predicted with the proper four-step and three-step reduced kinetic mechanisms were within 5% and 20% of those predicted with the full chemistry. Finally, these two reduced mechanisms were used to evaluate the effect of viscous dissipation on ignition in the supersonic shear layer. Good agreements between the results of the present reduced kinetic mechanisms and those of the full chemistry were obtained.

  15. Mixed Layer Heights Derived from the NASA Langley Research Center Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarino, Amy J.; Burton, Sharon P.; Ferrare, Rich A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Obland, Michael D.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.; Fast, Jerome; Dasilva, Arlindo; Benedetti, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The NASA airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) has been deployed on board the NASA Langley Research Center's B200 aircraft to several locations in North America from 2006 to 2012 to aid in characterizing aerosol properties for over fourteen field missions. Measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) during 349 science flights, many in coordination with other participating research aircraft, satellites, and ground sites, constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, as well as properties and variability of the Mixing Layer (ML) height. We describe the use of the HSRL data collected during these missions for computing ML heights and show how the HSRL data can be used to determine the fraction of aerosol optical thickness within and above the ML, which is important for air quality assessments. We describe the spatial and temporal variations in ML heights found in the diverse locations associated with these experiments. We also describe how the ML heights derived from HSRL have been used to help assess simulations of Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) derived using various models, including the Weather Research and Forecasting Chemistry (WRF-Chem), NASA GEOS-5 model, and the ECMWF/MACC models.

  16. Mapping the Interactions between Shocks and Mixing Layers in a 3-Stream Supersonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewalle, Jacques; Ruscher, Christopher; Kan, Pinqing; Tenney, Andrew; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry

    2015-11-01

    Pressure is obtained from an LES calculation of the supersonic jet (Ma1 = 1 . 6) issuing from a rectangular nozzle in a low-subsonic co-flow; a tertiary flow, also rectangular with Ma3 = 1 insulates the primary jet from an aft-deck plate. The developing jet exhibits complex three-dimensional interactions between oblique shocks, multiple mixing layers and corner vortices, which collectively act as a skeleton for the flow. Our study is based on several plane sections through the pressure field, with short signals (0.1 s duration at 80 kHz sampling rate). Using wavelet-based band-pass filtering and cross-correlations, we map the directions of propagation of information among the various ``bones'' in the skeleton. In particular, we identify upstream propagation in some frequency bands, 3-dimensional interactions between the various shear layers, and several key bones from which the pressure signals, when taken as reference, provide dramatic phase-locking for parts of the skeleton. We acknowledge the support of AFRL through an SBIR grant.

  17. Ozone Transport and Mixing Processes in the Boundary Layer Observed with Lidar during Discover-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senff, C. J.; Langford, A. O.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Choukulkar, A.; Brewer, A.; Weickmann, A. M.; Kirgis, G.; Sandberg, S.; Hardesty, M.; Delgado, R.; Long, R.; Brown, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    The final two Discover-AQ air quality studies were conducted in Houston, TX in September 2013 and the Colorado Front Range in July/August 2014. These two regions are characterized by different ozone precursor sources and exhibit unique regional wind flow patterns. During these studies, NOAA deployed its truck-based, scanning TOPAZ ozone lidar to document the vertical structure and temporal evolution of ozone concentrations from near the surface up to about 2.5 km above ground level. In Houston, TOPAZ was located next to a radar wind profiler while during the Colorado campaign, Doppler wind lidars collocated with TOPAZ measured wind profiles and vertical velocity statistics throughout the boundary layer (BL). For both studies, nearby in situ sensors provided continuous observations of surface ozone and NOx. These combinations of remote and in situ sensors lend themselves to study the influence of BL transport and mixing processes on surface-level ozone. In this presentation, we focus on characterizing and quantifying changes in surface ozone due to several BL processes, including the Houston land-sea breeze circulation, the terrain-driven BL flow in the Colorado Front Range area, thunderstorm outflows, BL growth rate and depth, and entrainment of air from the residual layer or lower free troposphere into the BL.

  18. Climatology of the mixed layer depth in the East/Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, SeHan; Jang, Chan Joo; Oh, Im Sang; Park, JongJin

    2012-08-01

    A climatology for the mixed layer depth (MLD) in the East/Japan Sea was produced using temperature profile data collected from 1931 to 2005. MLD is defined as the depth at which the temperature differs from that at 10 m depth by 0.2 °C. It varies seasonally with a range of about 20 m, a minimum, near the subpolar front (SPF, 38°-41°N), 60-100 m in south of 38°N and north of 41°N, and about 200 m near the winter convection region (132°-135°E & 41°-43°N). The weaker seasonality near the SPF seems to result from year-round strong stratification sustained largely by advected warm water of the East Korean Warm Current and a result of complex dynamic process of frontogenesis including lateral dynamics or wind-induced friction. The temperature-based MLD does not show any significant difference (mostly less than 20 m) from the density-based values over most of the East/Japan Sea except a few localized regions near the Russian and Japanese coasts where barrier layers form from late fall through early spring. This study confirms that atmospheric forcing largely dominates the overall magnitude of MLD seasonal variability in most of the East/Japan Sea.

  19. On the instabilities of supersonic mixing layers - A high-Mach-number asymptotic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsa, Thomas F.; Goldstein, M. E.

    1990-01-01

    The stability of a family of tanh mixing layers is studied at large Mach numbers using perturbation methods. It is found that the eigenfunction develops a multilayered structure, and the eigenvalue is obtained by solving a simplified version of the Rayleigh equation (with homogeneous boundary conditions) in one of these layers which lies in either of the external streams. This analysis leads to a simple hypersonic similarity law which explains how spatial and temporal phase speeds and growth rates scale with Mach number and temperature ratio. Comparisons are made with numerical results, and it is found that this similarity law provides a good qualitative guide for the behavior of the instability at high Mach numbers. In addition to this asymptotic theory, some fully numerical results are also presented (with no limitation on the Mach number) in order to explain the origin of the hypersonic modes (through mode splitting) and to discuss the role of oblique modes over a very wide range of Mach number and temperature ratio.

  20. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas.

    PubMed

    Calbet, Albert; Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Kaartvedt, Stein; Møhl, Malene; Møller, Eva Friis; Enghoff-Poulsen, Søren; Paulsen, Maria Lund; Solberg, Ingrid; Tang, Kam W; Tönnesson, Kajsa; Raitsos, Dionysios E; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2015-01-01

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform upper layer. These vertical structures were most likely the result of in situ growth and mortality (e.g., grazing) rather than physical or behavioural aggregation. Simulating a mixing event by adding nutrient-rich deep water abruptly triggered dense phytoplankton blooms in the nutrient-poor environment of the upper layer. These findings suggest that vertical structures within the mixed layer provide critical seeding stocks that can rapidly exploit nutrient influx during mixing, leading to winter bloom formation. PMID:26062783

  1. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calbet, Albert; Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Kaartvedt, Stein; Møhl, Malene; Møller, Eva Friis; Enghoff-Poulsen, Søren; Paulsen, Maria Lund; Solberg, Ingrid; Tang, Kam W.; Tönnesson, Kajsa; Raitsos, Dionysios E.; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2015-06-01

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform upper layer. These vertical structures were most likely the result of in situ growth and mortality (e.g., grazing) rather than physical or behavioural aggregation. Simulating a mixing event by adding nutrient-rich deep water abruptly triggered dense phytoplankton blooms in the nutrient-poor environment of the upper layer. These findings suggest that vertical structures within the mixed layer provide critical seeding stocks that can rapidly exploit nutrient influx during mixing, leading to winter bloom formation.

  2. Heterogeneous distribution of plankton within the mixed layer and its implications for bloom formation in tropical seas

    PubMed Central

    Calbet, Albert; Agersted, Mette Dalgaard; Kaartvedt, Stein; Møhl, Malene; Møller, Eva Friis; Enghoff-Poulsen, Søren; Paulsen, Maria Lund; Solberg, Ingrid; Tang, Kam W.; Tönnesson, Kajsa; Raitsos, Dionysios E.; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel

    2015-01-01

    Intensive sampling at the coastal waters of the central Red Sea during a period of thermal stratification, prior to the main seasonal bloom during winter, showed that vertical patches of prokaryotes and microplankton developed and persisted for several days within the apparently density uniform upper layer. These vertical structures were most likely the result of in situ growth and mortality (e.g., grazing) rather than physical or behavioural aggregation. Simulating a mixing event by adding nutrient-rich deep water abruptly triggered dense phytoplankton blooms in the nutrient-poor environment of the upper layer. These findings suggest that vertical structures within the mixed layer provide critical seeding stocks that can rapidly exploit nutrient influx during mixing, leading to winter bloom formation. PMID:26062783

  3. The effect of supplementing layer diets with shark cartilage or chitosan on egg components and yolk lipids.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, C M; Zapata, J F F; Fuentes, M F F; Freitas, E R; Craveiro, A A; Aguiar, C M

    2003-05-01

    1. An experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of the addition of shark cartilage (SC) or chitosan (CH) to layer diets on egg component weights, yolk lipids and hen plasma lipids. 2. Hy-Line laying hens (80) were used during a 56 d feeding trial. Treatments were: basal diet (BD), BD + 20 g/kg SC, BD + 30 g/kg SC, BD + 20 g/kg CH and BD + 30 g/kg CH. Eggs were analysed on d 14, 28, 42 and 56. 3. Egg weight and egg component weights were not affected by these treatments throughout the experimental period. 4. After 14d of experimental feeding, cholesterol levels were higher in eggs from birds given BD + 20 g/kg CH and BD + 30 g/kg CH than in those from birds given BD. 5. Furthermore, eggs from hens given BD + 20 g/kg SC or BD + 20 g/kg CH were higher in palmitic and stearic acids and lower in oleic acid than those from birds fed on BD. After 56 d feeding, however, palmitic and stearic acid contents in eggs from hens given any of the supplemented diets were lower than in those from hens given BD, and oleic acid in eggs from hens given BD + 20 g/kg SC, BD + 30 g/kg SC and BD + 30 g/kg CH was higher than in those from birds fed on BD. 6. Plasma cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were not significantly affected by dietary treatment. 7. Shark cartilage or chitosan at up to 30 g/kg in layer diets did not affect egg component weights (yolk, white and shell) and total lipid contents. During the period from 42 to 56d of experimental feeding, diets containing up to 30 g/kg chitosan reduced egg yolk contents of cholesterol, palmitic and stearic acids and increased the content of oleic acid. PMID:12828207

  4. Mixing layer height measurements determines influence of meteorology on air pollutant concentrations in urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Blumenstock, Thomas; Bonn, Boris; Gerwig, Holger; Hase, Frank; Münkel, Christoph; Nothard, Rainer; von Schneidemesser, Erika

    2015-10-01

    Mixing layer height (MLH) is a key parameter to determine the influence of meteorological parameters upon air pollutants such as trace gas species and particulate concentrations near the surface. Meteorology, and MLH as a key parameter, affect the budget of emission source strengths, deposition, and accumulation. However, greater possibilities for the application of MLH data have been identified in recent years. Here, the results of measurements in Berlin in 2014 are shown and discussed. The concentrations of NO, NO2, O3, CO, PM1, PM2.5, PM10 and about 70 volatile organic compounds (anthropogenic and biogenic of origin) as well as particle size distributions and contributions of SOA and soot species to PM were measured at the urban background station of the Berlin air quality network (BLUME) in Nansenstr./Framstr., Berlin-Neukölln. A Vaisala ceilometer CL51, which is a commercial mini-lidar system, was applied at that site to detect the layers of the lower atmosphere in real time. Special software for these ceilometers with MATLAB provided routine retrievals of MLH from vertical profiles of laser backscatter data. Five portable Bruker EM27/SUN FTIR spectrometers were set up around Berlin to detect column averaged abundances of CO2 and CH4 by solar absorption spectrometry. Correlation analyses were used to show the coupling of temporal variations of trace gas compounds and PM with MLH. Significant influences of MLH upon NO, NO2, PM10, PM2.5, PM1 and toluene (marker for traffic emissions) concentrations as well as particle number concentrations in the size modes 70 - 100 nm, 100 - 200 nm and 200 - 500 nm on the basis of averaged diurnal courses were found. Further, MLH was taken as important auxiliary information about the development of the boundary layer during each day of observations, which was required for the proper estimation of CO2 and CH4 source strengths from Berlin on the basis of atmospheric column density measurements.

  5. Effects of stable stratification on turbulent/nonturbulent interfaces in turbulent mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Riley, J. J.; Nagata, K.

    2016-08-01

    Direct numerical simulations are used for investigating the effects of stable stratification on the turbulent/nonturbulent (T/NT) interface in stably stratified mixing layers whose buoyancy Reynolds number Reb on the centerline is large enough for small-scale three-dimensional turbulence to exist. The stratification changes the interface geometry, and a large part of the interface is oriented with normal in the vertical direction in the stratified flows. The structures of the T/NT interface layer are similar between the nonstratified and stratified flows, and the T/NT interface consists of the viscous superlayer and the turbulent sublayer. The stratification is locally strengthened near the T/NT interface as evidenced by the large vertical density gradient, resulting in the decrease in Reb in the T/NT interface layer. Thus, even the small-scale dissipation range is directly affected by the buoyancy near the T/NT interface, although the small scales are somewhat free from the direct effects of the buoyancy in the turbulent core region. The production rates of enstrophy and scalar dissipation, which arise from the strain/vorticity and strain/density-gradient interactions, are decreased near the T/NT interface because the stratification modifies the alignments among the vorticity, density gradient, and strain-rate eigenvectors near the T/NT interface. This influence on the small-scale turbulence dynamics is not observed in the turbulent core region because of the large Reb. A possible explanation is given for the influence of buoyancy on the alignment statistics based on the suppression of the vertical turbulent motions by buoyancy.

  6. On the Behavior of Three-dimensional Wave Packets in Viscously Spreading Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsa, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    We consider analytically the evolution of a three-dimensional wave packet generated by an impulsive source in a mixing layer. The base flow is assumed to be spreading due to viscous diffusion. The analysis is restricted to small disturbances (linearized theory). A suitable high-frequency ansatz is used to describe the packet; the key elements of this description are a complex phase and a wave action density. It is found that the product of this density and an infinitesimal material volume convecting at the local group velocity is not conserved: there is a continuous interaction between the base flow and the wave action. This interaction is determined by suitable mode-weighted averages of the second and fourth derivatives of the base-flow velocity profile. Although there is some tendency for the dominant wave number in the packet to shift from the most unstable value toward the neutral value, this shift is quite moderate. In practice, wave packets do not become locally neutral in a diverging base flow (as do instability modes), therefore, they are expected to grow more suddenly than pure instability modes and do not develop critical layers. The group velocity is complex; the full significance of this is realized by analytically continuing the equations for the phase and wave action into a complex domain. The implications of this analytic continuation are discussed vis-a-vis the secondary instabilities of the packet: very small scale perturbations on the phase can grow very rapidly initially, but saturate later because most of the energy in these perturbations is convected away by the group velocity. This remark, as well as the one regarding critical layers, has consequences for the nonlinear theories.

  7. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, Michael; Muñoz-Esparza, Domingo; Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Knoth, Oswald; Haarig, Moritz; Ansmann, Albert; Tegen, Ina

    2016-04-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) with ASAM (All Scale Atmospheric Model) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. This method is now also validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud-Interaction Experiment) field campaign is used for both model initialization and comparisons. Several sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Additional simulation cases deal with modified surface characteristics and their impacts on the simulation results. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure and accurately reproduces the development of the daytime convective boundary layer measured by the Raman lidar.

  8. Pattern formation in fatty acid-nanoparticle and lipid-nanoparticle mixed monolayers at water surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, M.; Datta, A.; Iyengar, A. N. Sekar; Janaki, M. S.

    2015-06-01

    Dodecanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are self-organized in two different amphiphilic monolayers one of which is a single-tailed fatty acid Stearic acid (StA) and the other a double-tailed lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC). In the StA-AuNP film the AuNPs self-organize to form an interconnected network of nanoclusters on compression while in the DMPC-AuNP film the AuNPs aggregate to form random, isolated clusters in the film. The long time evolution of the films at constant surface pressure reveals ring structures in the former and diffusion limited aggregates in the latter that with time evolve into an irregular porous maze of AuNPs in the DMPC film. The difference in structure of the AuNP patterns in the two films can be attributed to a difference in the lipophilic interactions between the NPs and the amphiphilic molecules. The mean square intensity fluctuations f(ln) calculated along a typical line for the 2D structures in both the films at initial and final stages of long time evolution reflect the structural changes in the films over time.

  9. Radon-222, a proxy for vertical mixing of emissions in the urban nocturnal boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, S.; Williams, A. G.; Griffiths, A.; Crawford, J.; Zahorowski, W.

    2012-04-01

    There has been growing concern in recent decades regarding the health implications of fine particles (≤ 2.5μm), which are readily deposited deep within the lungs. In the interests of public health, and improving the predictive ability of Chemical Transport Models, it is imperative to improve our understanding of the diurnal variability of primary pollutant and precursor concentrations by, among others, improving our understanding of the underlying physics of transport and mixing processes. From the time of their release until they are removed from the atmosphere, the level of public exposure to emissions is closely related to rates of near-surface horizontal and vertical dispersion, the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer, and the venting from the boundary layer. These parameters, in turn, are dependent upon the amount and nature of mixing, which is closely related to atmospheric stability. With the exception of bushfires and dust storms, the greatest risk of public exposure to emissions occurs under "inversion" conditions, when the atmosphere is stably stratified. These very conditions are notoriously the most problematic for contemporary weather and chemical transport models. At such times the structure of the lowest 10-100m of the atmosphere can be quite complex, potentially containing multiple disconnected layers, and even stability measures based on surface similarity theory can fail (or yield inconclusive results) without sufficient vertical and temporal measurement resolution. Near-surface radon measurements provide a direct measure of the degree of dilution of surface-emitted scalar quantities by vertical mixing at night that is completely independent of local meteorological measurements and does not fail under conditions of near calm, which occur on the most stable nights. As such, they are a valuable proxy for potential pollution accumulation. In this study we analyse and discuss 22 months of continuous hourly observations within an urban airshed

  10. Simulation of the tropical oceans with an ocean GCM coupled to an atmospheric mixed-layer model

    SciTech Connect

    Murtugudde, R.; Seager, R.; Busalacchi, A.

    1996-08-01

    A reduced gravity, primitive equation, ocean general circulation model (GCM) is coupled to an advective atmospheric mixed-layer (AML) model to demonstrate the importance of a nonlocal atmospheric mixed-layer parameterization for a proper simulation of surface heat fluxes and sea surface temperatures (SST). Seasonal variability of the model SSTs and the circulation are generally in good agreement with the observations in each of the tropical oceans. These results are compared to other simulations that use a local equilibrium mixed-layer model. Inclusion of the advective AML model is demonstrated to lead to a significant improvement in the SST simulation in all three oceans. Advection and diffusion of the air humidity play significant roles in determining SSTs even in the tropical Pacific where the local equilibrium assumption was previously deemed quite accurate. The main, and serious, model flaw is an inadequate representation of the seasonal cycle in the upwelling regions of the eastern Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. The results indicate that the feedback between mixed-layer depths and SSTs can amplify SST errors, implying that increased realism in the modeling of the ocean mixed layer increases the demand for realism in the representation of the surface heat fluxes. The performance of the GCM with a local-equilibrium mixed-layer model in the Atlantic is as poor as previous simple ocean model simulations of the Atlantic. The conclusion of earlier studies that the simple ocean model was at fault may, in fact, not be correct. Instead the local-equilibrium heat flux parameterization appears to have been the major source of error. Accurate SST predictions may, hence, be feasible by coupling the AML model to computationally efficient simple ocean models. 69 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Weakly Penetrative Mixing in the Surface Layer of the Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovatsky, I.; Jinadasa, S. U. P.; Lucas, A.; MacKinnon, J. A.; Fernando, H. J.; Wijesekera, H. W.

    2014-12-01

    The first microstructure measurements under the ASIRI program were conducted in Bay of Bengal (BoB) during November 2014 in a region bounded by 16.95-16.25 N and 86.7- 87.0 E. Measurements were taken during the research cruise of r/v Roger Revelle using the VMP profiler down to ~ 140 m to infer the kinetic energy dissipation rate eps, temperature T, salinity S, and potential density anomaly sigT. Very strong stratification was observed just below a thin (less than 15-20 m deep) vertically homogeneous turbulent surface layer (SL), which effectively decoupled the former from the underlying thermohalocline. The upper boundary of the near-surface pycnocline was at z ~ 10 - 11 m and its lower boundary at z ~ 15 m. Under moderate (11 - 12 m/s) winds, the dissipation in the SL gradually decreased from the sea surface down to 10^-6 - 10^-8 W/kg at depths z ~ 10 - 15 m. Below z ~ 15 m, the dissipation rate sharply dropped to ~10^-9 W/kg, remaining approximately constant downward. The horizontal/temporal differences of T, S and sigT in the middle of SL were as high as dT ~ 0.25 C, dS ~ 0.4 psu, and dsigT ~ 0.22, respectively, over a distance of ~ 2 km. On the next day, under higher winds (~ 16 - 18 m/s), the SL deepened only slightly, being nominally decoupled from the pycnocline. The intensification of wind stress from ~ 0.16 to ~ 0.51 N/m2, led to an increase of eps to 10^-6 - 10^-7 W/kg across the entire mixing layer. The enhanced turbulence not only produced vertical mixing, but also initiated horizontal stirring, thus dramatically reducing thermohaline differences in the mixed SL down to dT ~ 0.017C, dS ~ 0.02 psu, and dsigT ~ 0.008, respectively. However, very strong stratification in the pycnocline suppressed the wind-induced vertical mixing, which did not penetrate below z ~ 22 - 25 m. No internal sources of turbulence were evident in the water interior, suggesting that under mild or even relatively strong but short-sustained winds small-scale dynamics of the SL and

  12. The seasonal cycle of the mixing layer height and its impact on black carbon concentrations in the Kathmandu Valley (Nepal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mues, Andrea; Rupakheti, Maheswar; Hoor, Peter; Bozem, Heiko; Münkel, Christoph; Lauer, Axel; Butler, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The properties and the vertical structure of the mixing layer as part of the planetary boundary layer are of key importance for local air quality. They have a substantial impact on the vertical dispersion of pollutants in the lower atmosphere and thus on their concentrations near the surface. In this study, ceilometer measurements taken within the framework of the SusKat project (Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley) are used to investigate the mixing layer height in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The applied method is based on the assumption that the aerosol concentration is nearly constant in the vertical and distinctly higher within the mixing layer than in the air above. Thus, the height with the steepest gradient within the ceilometer backscatter profile marks the top of the mixing layer. Ceilometer and black carbon (BC) measurements conducted from March 2013 through February 2014 provide a unique and important dataset for the analysis of the meteorological and air quality conditions in the Kathmandu Valley. In this study the mean diurnal cycle of the mixing layer height in the Kathmandu Valley for each season (pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon and winter season) and its dependency on the meteorological situation is investigated. In addition, the impact of the mixing layer height on the BC concentration is analyzed and compared to the relevance of other important processes such as emissions, horizontal advection and deposition. In all seasons the diurnal cycle is typically characterized by low mixing heights during the night, gradually increasing after sun rise reaching to maximum values in the afternoon before decreasing again. Seasonal differences can be seen particularly in the height of the mixing layer, e.g. from on average 153/1200 m (pre-monsoon) to 241/755 m (monsoon season) during the night/day, and the duration of enhanced mixing layer heights during daytime (around 12 hours (pre-monsoon season) to 8 hours (winter)). During the monsoon

  13. A Lipid-Accumulating Alga Maintains Growth in Outdoor, Alkaliphilic Raceway Pond with Mixed Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Tisza A. S.; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2016-01-01

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal “crop.” In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (∼9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgaris and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. The characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass productivity in an

  14. A Lipid-Accumulating Alga Maintains Growth in Outdoor, Alkaliphilic Raceway Pond with Mixed Microbial Communities.

    PubMed

    Bell, Tisza A S; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D; Fields, Matthew W; Peyton, Brent M

    2015-01-01

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal "crop." In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (∼9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgaris and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. The characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass productivity in an open

  15. A lipid-accumulating alga maintains growth in outdoor, alkaliphilic raceway pond with mixed microbial communities

    DOE PAGES

    Bell, Tisza A.S.; Prithiviraj, Bharath; Wahlen, Brad D.; Fields, Matthew W.; Peyton, Brent M.

    2016-01-07

    Algal biofuels and valuable co-products are being produced in both open and closed cultivation systems. Growing algae in open pond systems may be a more economical alternative, but this approach allows environmental microorganisms to colonize the pond and potentially infect or outcompete the algal “crop.” In this study, we monitored the microbial community of an outdoor, open raceway pond inoculated with a high lipid-producing alkaliphilic alga, Chlorella vulgaris BA050. The strain C. vulgaris BA050 was previously isolated from Soap Lake, Washington, a system characterized by a high pH (~9.8). An outdoor raceway pond (200 L) was inoculated with C. vulgarismore » and monitored for 10 days and then the culture was transferred to a 2,000 L raceway pond and cultivated for an additional 6 days. Community DNA samples were collected over the 16-day period in conjunction with water chemistry analyses and cell counts. Universal primers for the SSU rRNA gene sequences for Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea were used for barcoded pyrosequence determination. The environmental parameters that most closely correlated with C. vulgaris abundance were pH and phosphate. Community analyses indicated that the pond system remained dominated by the Chlorella population (93% of eukaryotic sequences), but was also colonized by other microorganisms. Bacterial sequence diversity increased over time while archaeal sequence diversity declined over the same time period. Using SparCC co-occurrence network analysis, a positive correlation was observed between C. vulgaris and Pseudomonas sp. throughout the experiment, which may suggest a symbiotic relationship between the two organisms. The putative relationship coupled with high pH may have contributed to the success of C. vulgaris. As a result, the characterization of the microbial community dynamics of an alkaliphilic open pond system provides significant insight into open pond systems that could be used to control photoautotrophic biomass

  16. Mixed layer impact of Hurricane Katia passing over the Amazon/Orinoco plume as viewed in remotely sensed salinity observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carton, J.; Grodsky, S. A.; Nicolas, R.; Lagerloef, G. S.; Reverdin, G. P.; Chapron, B.; Yves, Q.; Kudryavtsev, V. N.; Kao, H.

    2012-12-01

    Hurricane strength increases dramatically with increasing sea surface temperature (SST) and decreases in response to entrainment of cooler sub-mixed layer water into the ocean mixed layer. At its seasonal peak the Amazon/Orinoco plume covers a region of one million square kilometers in the western tropical Atlantic with more than 1m of extra freshwater, creating a near-surface barrier layer that inhibits this mixing and warms to temperatures >29C. Here new remotely sensed sea surface salinity (SSS) observations help elucidate the ocean response to hurricane Katia, which crossed the plume in early fall, 2011. Its passage left a 1.5psu high salinity wake (in its impact on density, the equivalent of a 3.5C cooling) due to mixing of the shallow barrier layer, reminiscent of features previously observed at fixed locations in the Indian Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. Destruction of this barrier layer decreased SST cooling in the plume that would otherwise have occurred, thus preserving elevated SST and evaporation.

  17. Remote Sensing of Urban Mixed Layer Structure in Los Angeles, with Applications to Greenhouse Gas Emissions Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, J.; Kort, E. A.; Duren, R. M.; Decola, P.

    2015-12-01

    Urban areas are responsible for a large and increasing part of global greenhouse gas emissions. Effective policy for controlling urban emissions depends on an accurate understanding of those emissions, including their trends in time, distribution across source types, and the effects of regulatory, economic, or technological changes on the rate of emissions. The level of detail required will demand input both from bottom-up inventories and from top-down atmospheric concentration measurements, which must then be translated into emissions fluxes. Among the meteorological information needed for that translation, the mixing dynamics of the lower atmosphere are crucial; an error in the depth of the mixed layer produces a proportional error in the flux estimate. Ground-based remote sensing can provide continuous information about the mixed layer. We present results highlighting the importance of such continuous information. A Sigma Space mini-Micro Pulse Lidar (miniMPL) and a Vaisala ceilometer were deployed in the Los Angeles megacity, California over a period of several years. A locally appropriate, wavelet-based algorithm was devised to estimate the depth of the mixed layer on the basis of this remote sensing data. A voting scheme, novel for this application, was used to establish confidence. While a seasonal trend in mixed layer depth does exist, that trend is masked by very high day-to-day variability. Daily maximum mixed layer depths often differ by a factor of two from monthly or seasonal averages. We use a simplified model to demonstrate the impact of this variability on top-down approaches to greenhouse gas emissions quantification, demonstrating the value of continuous observations.

  18. Effects of Precipitation on Ocean Mixed-Layer Temperature and Salinity as Simulated in a 2-D Coupled Ocean-Cloud Resolving Atmosphere Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiaofan; Sui, C.-H.; Lau, K-M.; Adamec, D.

    1999-01-01

    A two-dimensional coupled ocean-cloud resolving atmosphere model is used to investigate possible roles of convective scale ocean disturbances induced by atmospheric precipitation on ocean mixed-layer heat and salt budgets. The model couples a cloud resolving model with an embedded mixed layer-ocean circulation model. Five experiment are performed under imposed large-scale atmospheric forcing in terms of vertical velocity derived from the TOGA COARE observations during a selected seven-day period. The dominant variability of mixed-layer temperature and salinity are simulated by the coupled model with imposed large-scale forcing. The mixed-layer temperatures in the coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models show similar variations when salinity effects are not included. When salinity effects are included, however, differences in the domain-mean mixed-layer salinity and temperature between coupled experiments with 1-D and 2-D ocean models could be as large as 0.3 PSU and 0.4 C respectively. Without fresh water effects, the nocturnal heat loss over ocean surface causes deep mixed layers and weak cooling rates so that the nocturnal mixed-layer temperatures tend to be horizontally-uniform. The fresh water flux, however, causes shallow mixed layers over convective areas while the nocturnal heat loss causes deep mixed layer over convection-free areas so that the mixed-layer temperatures have large horizontal fluctuations. Furthermore, fresh water flux exhibits larger spatial fluctuations than surface heat flux because heavy rainfall occurs over convective areas embedded in broad non-convective or clear areas, whereas diurnal signals over whole model areas yield high spatial correlation of surface heat flux. As a result, mixed-layer salinities contribute more to the density differences than do mixed-layer temperatures.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of microstructure and mixing dynamics of cryoprotective solvents in water and in the presence of a lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Dyubko, Tatyana S

    2008-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is used to investigate the solubility behavior of cryoprotective (CP) solvents, such as DMSO, ethylene glycol (EG) and glycerol (GL), in pure water and in the presence of a lipid membrane. The MD study is focused on an equilibration timescale required for mixing large CP aggregates with aqueous and aqueous/lipid environments. The MD analysis demonstrates that DMSO mixes rapidly with water, so that all solute molecules are uniformly distributed in the equilibrium aqueous solution. Our investigation of the microstructure of binary EG/water and GL/water systems reveals that, despite the miscibility of both CP solvents with water, they are not ideally mixed in aqueous solutions at the molecular level. The MD simulations show that the mixing dynamics of the large CP cluster and surrounding water is found to be strongly dependent on nature of hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions acting between cryoprotectant molecules. In particular, a spatial hydrogen-bond network formed between CP molecules plays an important role in the mixing dynamics between CP agents and water. A further analysis on the mixing behavior of the CP solvents with pure water and with aqueous solutions at a lipid membrane interface shows that, due to strong binding of the CP molecules to membrane surface, the equilibration process in the lipid environment becomes very slow, at least of the order of microseconds. The MD results are discussed in the context of the better understanding on the composition of the aqueous mixtures of the EG and GL solvents. Knowledge of the microstructure and the dynamics of these systems helps to develop better cryopreservation protocols and to propose more optimal cooling/warming regimes for cellular cryosolutions. PMID:18495323

  20. Altered lipid metabolism in the aging kidney identified by three layered omic analysis.

    PubMed

    Braun, Fabian; Rinschen, Markus M; Bartels, Valerie; Frommolt, Peter; Habermann, Bianca; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Schumacher, Björn; Dollé, Martijn E T; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Kurschat, Christine E

    2016-03-01

    Aging-associated diseases and their comorbidities affect the life of a constantly growing proportion of the population in developed countries. At the center of these comorbidities are changes of kidney structure and function as age-related chronic kidney disease predisposes to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction or heart failure. To detect molecular mechanisms involved in kidney aging, we analyzed gene expression profiles of kidneys from adult and aged wild-type mice by transcriptomic, proteomic and targeted lipidomic methodologies. Interestingly, transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed differential expression of genes primarily involved in lipid metabolism and immune response. Additional lipidomic analyses uncovered significant age-related differences in the total amount of phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins as well as in subspecies of phosphatidylserines and ceramides with age. By integration of these datasets we identified Aldh1a1, a key enzyme in vitamin A metabolism specifically expressed in the medullary ascending limb, as one of the most prominent upregulated proteins in old kidneys. Moreover, ceramidase Asah1 was highly expressed in aged kidneys, consistent with a decrease in ceramide C16. In summary, our data suggest that changes in lipid metabolism are involved in the process of kidney aging and in the development of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26886165

  1. Altered lipid metabolism in the aging kidney identified by three layered omic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Fabian; Rinschen, Markus M.; Bartels, Valerie; Frommolt, Peter; Habermann, Bianca; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Schumacher, Björn; Dollé, Martijn E.T.; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Kurschat, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated diseases and their comorbidities affect the life of a constantly growing proportion of the population in developed countries. At the center of these comorbidities are changes of kidney structure and function as age-related chronic kidney disease predisposes to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction or heart failure. To detect molecular mechanisms involved in kidney aging, we analyzed gene expression profiles of kidneys from adult and aged wild-type mice by transcriptomic, proteomic and targeted lipidomic methodologies. Interestingly, transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed differential expression of genes primarily involved in lipid metabolism and immune response. Additional lipidomic analyses uncovered significant age-related differences in the total amount of phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins as well as in subspecies of phosphatidylserines and ceramides with age. By integration of these datasets we identified Aldh1a1, a key enzyme in vitamin A metabolism specifically expressed in the medullary ascending limb, as one of the most prominent upregulated proteins in old kidneys. Moreover, ceramidase Asah1 was highly expressed in aged kidneys, consistent with a decrease in ceramide C16. In summary, our data suggest that changes in lipid metabolism are involved in the process of kidney aging and in the development of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26886165

  2. Effect of cholesterol on the phase behavior of solid-supported lipid vesicle layers.

    PubMed

    Losada-Pérez, P; Khorshid, M; Yongabi, D; Wagner, P

    2015-04-16

    The interest in solid-supported biomimetic membranes stems from their utility in nanotechnology and biosensing. In particular, supported lipid vesicles (SLVs) have become popular in both fundamental biophysical studies and pharmaceutical screening applications. It is thus essential to gain information on the structural properties and phase behavior of SLVs. Here we report on a study on the influence of cholesterol on the phase behavior of SLVs of saturated phospholipids by using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, a label-free and nonintrusive surface-sensitive technique. Two complementary approaches have been used, a Voigt-based viscoelastic model yielding shear viscosity temperature profiles and the first-order derivative of the frequency (mass-sensitive) shifts. Anomalies in the shear viscosity and extrema in the first-order derivative frequency curves stand as a token of the main phase transition and provide information on its gradual suppression upon addition of cholesterol. This method proves convenient for its small sample volume needed, its short temperature equilibration time and the non-necessity of external labels. This work can be regarded as a starting point for further studies on more rare lipid systems and different geometries, such as tethered SLVs or biologically relevant vesicles produced by living cells.

  3. O3-induced formation of bioactive lipids: estimated surface concentrations and lining layer effects.

    PubMed

    Postlethwait, E M; Cueto, R; Velsor, L W; Pryor, W A

    1998-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests that inhaled ozone (O3) does not induce toxicity via direct epithelial interactions. Reactions with epithelial lining fluid (ELF) constituents limit cellular contact and generate products, including lipid ozonation products, postulated to initiate pathophysiological cascades. To delineate specific aspects of lipid ozonation product formation and to estimate in situ surface concentrations, we studied the O3 absorption characteristics of ELF constituent mixtures and measured hexanal, heptanal, and nonanal yields as a function of ascorbic acid (AH2) concentration. Exposures of isolated rat lungs, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes were conducted. 1) O3 absorption by AH2, uric acid, and albumin exceeded that by egg PC and glutathione. O3 reaction with egg PC occurred when AH2 concentrations were reduced. 2) Aldehydes were produced in low yield during lung and BALF exposures in a time- and O3 concentration-dependent manner. 3) Diminishing BALF AH2 content lowered O3 uptake but increased aldehyde yields. Conversely, AH2 addition to egg PC increased O3 uptake but reduced aldehyde yields. Estimations of bioactive ozonation and autoxidation product accumulation within the ELF suggested possible nanomolar to low micromolar concentrations. The use of reaction products as metrics of O3 exposure may have intrinsic sensitivity and specificity limitations. Moreover, due to the heterogenous nature of O3 reactions within the ELF, dose-response relationships may not be linear with respect to O3 absorption.

  4. Quantitative thin layer chromatography for the analysis of skin surface lipids. A time-saving method using a new TLC plate.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, A

    1979-07-30

    Recently a new thin layer chromatography plate (Whatman LK 6D) became available which is extremely easy to handle and permits highly reproducible qualitative and quantitative analysis. This plate proved to be of great value for the investigation of skin surface lipids. The use of a fatty acid methyl ester as an internal standard makes it unnecessary to employ additional gravimetrical or photometrical methods for quanitative lipid analysis. The method presented in this paper is simpler and requires much less time than alternative procedures and allows a large number of lipid samples to be processed simultaneously. PMID:475450

  5. Nonlinear interactions in mixing layers and compressible heated round jets. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarrah, Yousef Mohd

    1989-01-01

    The nonlinear interactions between a fundamental instability mode and both its harmonics and the changing mean flow are studied using the weakly nonlinear stability theory of Stuart and Watson, and numerical solutions of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. The first part focuses on incompressible cold (or isothermal; constant temperature throughout) mixing layers, and for these, the first and second Landau constants are calculated as functions of wavenumber and Reynolds number. It is found that the dominant contribution to the Landau constants arises from the mean flow changes and not from the higher harmonics. In order to establish the range of validity of the weakly nonlinear theory, the weakly nonlinear and numerical solutions are compared and the limitation of each is discussed. At small amplitudes and at low-to-moderate Reynolds numbers, the two results compare well in describing the saturation of the fundamental, the distortion of the mean flow, and the initial stages of vorticity roll-up. At larger amplitudes, the interaction between the fundamental, second harmonic, and the mean flow is strongly nonlinear and the numerical solution predicts flow oscillations, whereas the weakly nonlinear theory yields saturation. In the second part, the weakly nonlinear theory is extended to heated (or nonisothermal; mean temperature distribution) subsonic round jets where quadratic and cubic nonlinear interactions are present, and the Landau constants also depend on jet temperature ratio, Mach number and azimuthal mode number. Under exponential growth and nonlinear saturation, it is found that heating and compressibility suppress the growth of instability waves, that the first azimuthal mode is the dominant instability mode, and that the weakly nonlinear solution describes the early stages of the roll-up of an axisymmetric shear layer. The receptivity of a typical jet flow to pulse type input disturbance is also studied by solving the initial value problem

  6. In Situ Study of the Formation of Silicide Phases in Amorphous Co–Si Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Bockstael, C.; De Keyser, K; Demeulemeester, J; Vantomme, A; Van Meirhaeghe, R; Detavernier, C; Jordan-Sweet, J; Lavoie, C

    2010-01-01

    We investigate Co silicide phase formation when extra Si is added within an as deposited 50 nm Co film. The addition of Si is investigated for both the Co/SiO{sub 2} and Co/Si(1 0 0) system. A series of 10 Co-Si mixed films with a Si content varying from 21 to 59 at.% was prepared and investigated during annealing with in situ X-ray diffraction. The oxide system is used as reference system to identify phases that initially crystallize in an amorphous mixture of a given composition. Multiple phases can nucleate, and the temperature of crystallization depends on the Co-Si atomic ratio. Upon heating of the Co(Si)/Si system, the first reaction is a similar crystallization reaction of the Co(Si) mixture. Once the first phase is formed, one has the normal system of a silicide phase in contact with an unlimited amount of Si from the substrate, and the sequential phase formation towards CoSi{sub 2} is established. For deposited layers of composition ranging from 48%Si to 52%Si, the CoSi is the first phase to form and increasing the amount of Si leads to a remarkable improvement of the thermal stability of CoSi on Si(1 0 0). CoSi{sub 2} nucleation was extensively delayed by 150 C compared to the reaction observed from a pure Co film on Si(1 0 0). Electron backscatter diffraction measurements reveal that in this range, the gradual Si increase systematically leads to bigger CoSi grains (up to 20 {micro}m). This shows that the grain size of the CoSi precursor strongly affects the nucleation of the following CoSi{sub 2} phase. Laser-light scattering measurements suggest that adding more than 42%Si reduces the roughness of the CoSi{sub 2} layer.

  7. A MULTI-STREAM MODEL FOR VERTICAL MIXING OF A PASSIVE TRACER IN THE CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We study a multi-stream model (MSM) for vertical mixing of a passive tracer in the convective boundary layer, in which the tracer is advected by many vertical streams with different probabilities and diffused by small scale turbulence. We test the MSM algorithm for investigatin...

  8. FerryBox-assisted monitoring of mixed layer pH in the Norwegian Coastal Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reggiani, Emanuele R.; King, Andrew L.; Norli, Marit; Jaccard, Pierre; Sørensen, Kai; Bellerby, Richard G. J.

    2016-10-01

    The evaluation of marine carbonate system variability and the impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on coastal marine ecosystems increasingly rely on monitoring platforms capable of delivering near real-time in situ carbonate system observations. These observations are also used for developing models and scenarios of OA, including potential impacts on marine ecosystem structure and function. An embedded flow-through spectrophotometric pH detection system has been developed alongside an underway seawater sampling system - termed a FerryBox - operating on ships of opportunity (SOOP), and can deliver a continuous data stream of mixed layer seawater pH with an in situ uncertainty of < 0.003. We report metrological approaches behind the pH detection procedure and the evaluation of dye addition perturbation with analytical precision as low as 0.0005. In addition, we present field-based observations from a deployment of the pH detection system along the Norwegian Coastal Current in winter, spring, and summer periods of 2015. Spring and summertime pH was generally 0.1 higher, and up to 0.255 higher, in comparison to winter pH observations. Here we show the necessity for a regular, high density monitoring approach, and the suitability of this pH detection technique for unmanned observational platforms.

  9. Vapor phase hydrogenation of furfural over nickel mixed metal oxide catalysts derived from layered double hydroxides

    DOE PAGES

    Sulmonetti, Taylor P.; Pang, Simon H.; Claure, Micaela Taborga; Lee, Sungsik; Cullen, David A.; Agrawal, Pradeep K.; Jones, Christopher W.

    2016-03-09

    The hydrogenation of furfural is investigated over various reduced nickel mixed metal oxides derived from layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Ni-Mg-Al and Ni-Co-Al. Upon reduction, relatively large Ni(0) domains develop in the Ni-Mg-Al catalysts, whereas in the Ni-Co-Al catalysts smaller metal particles of Ni(0) and Co(0), potentially as alloys, are formed, as evidenced by XAS, XPS, STEM and EELS. All the reduced Ni catalysts display similar selectivities towards major hydrogenation products (furfuryl alcohol and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol), though the side products varied with the catalyst composition. The 1.1Ni-0.8Co-Al catalyst showed the greatest activity per titrated site when compared to the othermore » catalysts, with promising activity compared to related catalysts in the literature. In conclusion, the use of base metal catalysts for hydrogenation of furanic compounds may be a promising alternative to the well-studied precious metal catalysts for making biomass-derived chemicals if catalyst selectivity can be improved in future work by alloying or tuning metal-oxide support interactions.« less

  10. Evolution of streamwise vortices and generation of small-scale motion in a plane mixing layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nygaard, K. J.; Glezer, A.

    1991-01-01

    The present study investigates the evolution of streamwise vortices in a plane mixing layer and their role in the generation of small-scale 3D motion in a closed-return water facility. Spanwise-periodic streamwise vortices are excited by a time-harmonic wavetrain with spanwise-periodic amplitude variations synthesized by a mosaic of 32 surface film heaters flush-mounted on the low partition. The onset of streamwise vortices is accompanied by significant distortion in the transverse distribution of the streamwise velocity component. The presence of inflexion points, absent in corresponding velocity distributions of the unforced flow, suggests the formation of locally unstable regions of large shear in which broadband perturbations already present in the base flow undergo rapid amplification, followed by breakdown to small-scale motion. The cores of the primary vortices are significantly altered as a result of spanwise nonuniform excitation. The 3D features of the streamwise vortices and their interaction with the base flow are inferred from surfaces or rms velocity fluctuations and an approximation to cross-stream vorticity using 3D single component velocity data.

  11. Phytoplankton behavior affects ocean mixed layer dynamics through biological-physical feedback mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonntag, S.; Hense, I.

    2011-08-01

    Biologically induced changes in physical oceanic properties through phytoplankton provide potential positive and negative feedback loops. In particular, surface floating cyanobacteria, which are expected to be favored from future environmental conditions and can form large surface mats, can increase light absorption and the surface albedo and decrease momentum input from the atmosphere by wind. In this work we study the effect of a changing phytoplankton community composition to one dominated by buoyant cyanobacteria on the physical oceanic properties. We use the water column model General Ocean Turbulence Model and set up an idealized biological model taking into account the phytoplankton species' characteristics as well as the effects of biology on physics. The model results show that an increase of buoyant cyanobacteria leads to substantial changes in the seasonal cycle of the mixed layer. The results furthermore indicate that the effects due to altered absorption and biologically induced reduction of the wind drag are larger than contrary effects due to changes in the surface albedo. Overall, our model results suggest that the development of cyanobacterial surface blooms and their feedbacks on light absorption and wind drag need to be taken into account in ocean models used for climate scenarios in order to capture changes in the dynamics of the upper ocean.

  12. Defect physics vis-à-vis electrochemical performance in layered mixed-metal oxide cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Khang; Johannes, Michelle

    Layered mixed-metal oxides with different compositions of (Ni,Co,Mn) [NCM] or (Ni,Co,Al) [NCA] have been used in commercial lithium-ion batteries. Yet their defect physics and chemistry is still not well understood, despite having important implications for the electrochemical performance. In this presentation, we report a hybrid density functional study of intrinsic point defects in the compositions LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NCM1/3) and LiNi1/3Co1/3Al1/3O2 (NCA1/3) which can also be regarded as model compounds for NCM and NCA. We will discuss defect landscapes in NCM1/3 and NCA1/3 under relevant synthesis conditions with a focus on the formation of metal antisite defects and its implications on the electrochemical properties and ultimately the design of NCM and NCA cathode materials.

  13. Comparative Study of Three High Order Schemes for LES of Temporally Evolving Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, Helen M. C.; Sjogreen, Biorn Axel; Hadjadj, C.

    2012-01-01

    Three high order shock-capturing schemes are compared for large eddy simulations (LES) of temporally evolving mixing layers (TML) for different convective Mach numbers (Mc) ranging from the quasi-incompressible regime to highly compressible supersonic regime. The considered high order schemes are fifth-order WENO (WENO5), seventh-order WENO (WENO7) and the associated eighth-order central spatial base scheme with the dissipative portion of WENO7 as a nonlinear post-processing filter step (WENO7fi). This high order nonlinear filter method (H.C. Yee and B. Sjogreen, Proceedings of ICOSAHOM09, June 22-26, 2009, Trondheim, Norway) is designed for accurate and efficient simulations of shock-free compressible turbulence, turbulence with shocklets and turbulence with strong shocks with minimum tuning of scheme parameters. The LES results by WENO7fi using the same scheme parameter agree well with experimental results of Barone et al. (2006), and published direct numerical simulations (DNS) work of Rogers & Moser (1994) and Pantano & Sarkar (2002), whereas results by WENO5 and WENO7 compare poorly with experimental data and DNS computations.

  14. Improved layered mixed transition metal oxides for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, Marca M.; Conry, Thomas; Wilcox, James

    2010-03-05

    Recent work in our laboratory has been directed towards development of mixed layered transition metal oxides with general composition Li[Ni, Co, M, Mn]O2 (M=Al, Ti) for Li ion battery cathodes. Compounds such as Li[Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3]O2 (often called NMCs) are currently being commercialized for use in consumer electronic batteries, but the high cobalt content makes them too expensive for vehicular applications such as electric vehicles (EV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). To reduce materials costs, we have explored partial or full substitution of Co with Al, Ti, and Fe. Fe substitution generally decreases capacity and results in poorer rate and cycling behavior. Interestingly, low levels of substitution with Al or Ti improve aspects of performance with minimal impact on energy densities, for some formulations. High levels of Al substitution compromise specific capacity, however, so further improvements require that the Ni and Mn content be increased and Co correspondingly decreased. Low levels of Al or Ti substitution can then be used offset negative effects induced by the higher Ni content. The structural and electrochemical characterization of substituted NMCs is presented in this paper.

  15. LES of Temporally Evolving Mixing Layers by an Eighth-Order Filter Scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadjadj, A; Yee, H. C.; Sjogreen, B.

    2011-01-01

    An eighth-order filter method for a wide range of compressible flow speeds (H.C. Yee and B. Sjogreen, Proceedings of ICOSAHOM09, June 22-26, 2009, Trondheim, Norway) are employed for large eddy simulations (LES) of temporally evolving mixing layers (TML) for different convective Mach numbers (Mc) and Reynolds numbers. The high order filter method is designed for accurate and efficient simulations of shock-free compressible turbulence, turbulence with shocklets and turbulence with strong shocks with minimum tuning of scheme parameters. The value of Mc considered is for the TML range from the quasi-incompressible regime to the highly compressible supersonic regime. The three main characteristics of compressible TML (the self similarity property, compressibility effects and the presence of large-scale structure with shocklets for high Mc) are considered for the LES study. The LES results using the same scheme parameters for all studied cases agree well with experimental results of Barone et al. (2006), and published direct numerical simulations (DNS) work of Rogers & Moser (1994) and Pantano & Sarkar (2002).

  16. Numerical simulation of two-dimensional spatially-developing mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. V.; Demuren, A. O.

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional, incompressible, spatially developing mixing layer simulations are performed at Re = 10(exp 2) and 10(exp 4) with two classes of perturbations applied at the inlet boundary; combinations of discrete modes from linear stability theory, and a broad spectrum of modes derived from experimentally measured velocity spectra. The effect of the type and strength of inlet perturbations on vortex dynamics and time-averaged properties are explored. Two-point spatial velocity and autocorrelations are used to estimate the size and lifetime of the resulting coherent structures and to explore possible feedback effects. The computed time-averaged properties such as mean velocity profiles, turbulent statistics, and spread rates show good agreement with experimentally measured values. It is shown that by forcing with a broad spectrum of modes derived from an experimental energy spectrum many experimentally observed phenomena can be reproduced by a 2-D simulation. The strength of the forcing merely affected the length required for the dominant coherent structures to become fully-developed. Thus intensities comparable to those of the background turbulence in many wind tunnel experiments produced the same results, given sufficient simulation length.

  17. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  18. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-05-15

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case.

  19. Effects of swell on dispersion of oil plumes within the ocean mixed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bicheng; Yang, Di; Chamecki, Marcelo; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    Oil plumes from deep-water blowouts rise through the ocean and reach the ocean mixed layer (OML), where dispersion is strongly affected by Langmuir turbulence generated by interactions between the wind forcing and the wave regime. The wind-driven wave field is approximately aligned with wind direction. However, the swell wave can have an arbitrary orientation relative to the local wind. We used large-eddy simulation (LES) to study the influences of the misalignment between wind and wave field on the transport and dispersion of oil plumes in the OML. Results show that the plume response to these forcing is strongly dependent on the size of the oil droplets. For the large oil droplets, the center line of the time-averaged surface plume tends to follow the mean surface current direction; for small droplets, the change of orientation of center line with wave direction is smaller than that of large droplets. Vertical eddy diffusivity calculated from LES data is compared to closures currently used in ocean models (such as the KPP model employed in HYCOM). The magnitude of the eddy diffusivity changes by a factor of two as the misalignment between swell and wind changes, and it is typically much larger than predicted by KPP. This study is supported by a Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative research grant.

  20. Virosome engineering of colloidal particles and surfaces: bioinspired fusion to supported lipid layers.

    PubMed

    Fleddermann, J; Diamanti, E; Azinas, S; Košutić, M; Dähne, L; Estrela-Lopis, I; Amacker, M; Donath, E; Moya, S E

    2016-04-21

    Immunostimulating reconstituted influenza virosomes (IRIVs) are liposomes with functional viral envelope glycoproteins: influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase intercalated in the phospholipid bilayer. Here we address the fusion of IRIVs to artificial supported lipid membranes assembled on polyelectrolyte multilayers on both colloidal particles and planar substrates. The R18 assay is used to prove the IRIV fusion in dependence of pH, temperature and HA concentration. IRIVs display a pH-dependent fusion mechanism, fusing at low pH in analogy to the influenza virus. The pH dependence is confirmed by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance technique. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging shows that at low pH virosomes are integrated in the supported membrane displaying flattened features and a reduced vertical thickness. Virosome fusion offers a new strategy for transferring biological functions on artificial supported membranes with potential applications in targeted delivery and sensing. PMID:27006101

  1. Super-resolved thickness maps of thin film phantoms and in vivo visualization of tear film lipid layer using OCT

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Valentin Aranha; Schmetterer, Leopold; Triggs, Graham J.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Gröschl, Martin; Messner, Alina; Schmidl, Doreen; Garhofer, Gerhard; Aschinger, Gerold; Werkmeister, René M.

    2016-01-01

    In optical coherence tomography (OCT), the axial resolution is directly linked to the coherence length of the employed light source. It is currently unclear if OCT allows measuring thicknesses below its axial resolution value. To investigate spectral-domain OCT imaging in the super-resolution regime, we derived a signal model and compared it with the experiment. Several island thin film samples of known refractive indices and thicknesses in the range 46 – 163 nm were fabricated and imaged. Reference thickness measurements were performed using a commercial atomic force microscope. In vivo measurements of the tear film were performed in 4 healthy subjects. Our results show that quantitative super-resolved thickness measurement can be performed using OCT. In addition, we report repeatable tear film lipid layer visualization. Our results provide a novel interpretation of the OCT axial resolution limit and open a perspective to deeper extraction of the information hidden in the coherence volume. PMID:27446696

  2. Virosome engineering of colloidal particles and surfaces: bioinspired fusion to supported lipid layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleddermann, J.; Diamanti, E.; Azinas, S.; Košutić, M.; Dähne, L.; Estrela-Lopis, I.; Amacker, M.; Donath, E.; Moya, S. E.

    2016-04-01

    Immunostimulating reconstituted influenza virosomes (IRIVs) are liposomes with functional viral envelope glycoproteins: influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase intercalated in the phospholipid bilayer. Here we address the fusion of IRIVs to artificial supported lipid membranes assembled on polyelectrolyte multilayers on both colloidal particles and planar substrates. The R18 assay is used to prove the IRIV fusion in dependence of pH, temperature and HA concentration. IRIVs display a pH-dependent fusion mechanism, fusing at low pH in analogy to the influenza virus. The pH dependence is confirmed by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance technique. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging shows that at low pH virosomes are integrated in the supported membrane displaying flattened features and a reduced vertical thickness. Virosome fusion offers a new strategy for transferring biological functions on artificial supported membranes with potential applications in targeted delivery and sensing.Immunostimulating reconstituted influenza virosomes (IRIVs) are liposomes with functional viral envelope glycoproteins: influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase intercalated in the phospholipid bilayer. Here we address the fusion of IRIVs to artificial supported lipid membranes assembled on polyelectrolyte multilayers on both colloidal particles and planar substrates. The R18 assay is used to prove the IRIV fusion in dependence of pH, temperature and HA concentration. IRIVs display a pH-dependent fusion mechanism, fusing at low pH in analogy to the influenza virus. The pH dependence is confirmed by the Quartz Crystal Microbalance technique. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging shows that at low pH virosomes are integrated in the supported membrane displaying flattened features and a reduced vertical thickness. Virosome fusion offers a new strategy for transferring biological functions on artificial supported membranes with potential applications in targeted delivery and sensing

  3. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, M.; Muñoz-Esparza, D.; Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.; Knoth, O.; Haarig, M.; Ansmann, A.

    2016-01-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude potential temperature perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind and Raman lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ≈ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the downwind vertical wind structure. Additionally, the model results accurately reproduce the

  4. Combined urea-thin layer chromatography and silver nitrate-thin layer chromatography for micro separation and determination of hard-to-detect branched chain fatty acids in natural lipids.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xingguo; Liu, Yijun; Xiang, Jingying; Wang, Xiaosan; Zhang, Huijun; Yao, Yunping; Liu, Ruijie; Zou, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Jianhua; Jin, Qingzhe

    2015-12-18

    A simple, fast and efficient procedure was developed for micro separation and enrichment of branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) from natural products using successive thin layer chromatography (TLC) technique coupling novel urea-TLC with AgNO3-TLC, which rely on the formation of urea adduction and AgNO3 bonding in methanol. These natural lipids contain a significant amount of straight chain fatty acids (FA). Fresh and fast urea-TLC and AgNO3-TLC plate making techniques were developed with more even coating and less coating material contamination before being utilized for separation. Goat milk fat was used as a model. Various experimental parameters that affect urea-TLC and AgNO3-TLC separation of BCFA were investigated and optimized, including coating of urea, concentration of original oil sample, mobile phase and sample application format. High efficiency of removal of straight chain FA was achieved with a low amount of sample in an easy and fast way. A total BCFA mix with much higher purity than previous studies was successfully achieved. The developed method has also been applied for the concentration and analysis of BCFA in cow milk fat and Anchovy oil. PMID:26614174

  5. Combined urea-thin layer chromatography and silver nitrate-thin layer chromatography for micro separation and determination of hard-to-detect branched chain fatty acids in natural lipids.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuanyuan; Wang, Xingguo; Liu, Yijun; Xiang, Jingying; Wang, Xiaosan; Zhang, Huijun; Yao, Yunping; Liu, Ruijie; Zou, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Jianhua; Jin, Qingzhe

    2015-12-18

    A simple, fast and efficient procedure was developed for micro separation and enrichment of branched chain fatty acids (BCFA) from natural products using successive thin layer chromatography (TLC) technique coupling novel urea-TLC with AgNO3-TLC, which rely on the formation of urea adduction and AgNO3 bonding in methanol. These natural lipids contain a significant amount of straight chain fatty acids (FA). Fresh and fast urea-TLC and AgNO3-TLC plate making techniques were developed with more even coating and less coating material contamination before being utilized for separation. Goat milk fat was used as a model. Various experimental parameters that affect urea-TLC and AgNO3-TLC separation of BCFA were investigated and optimized, including coating of urea, concentration of original oil sample, mobile phase and sample application format. High efficiency of removal of straight chain FA was achieved with a low amount of sample in an easy and fast way. A total BCFA mix with much higher purity than previous studies was successfully achieved. The developed method has also been applied for the concentration and analysis of BCFA in cow milk fat and Anchovy oil.

  6. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. I: Single layer cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata; Morrison, H.; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; DeBoer, GIJS; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Mike; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Larson, Vince; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, M. R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, D.; Sud, Yogesh; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana; Von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, G.

    2009-05-21

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of –15°C. While the cloud was water dominated, ice precipitation appears to have lowered the liquid water path to about 2/3 of the adiabatic value. The simulations, which were performed by seventeen single column and nine cloud-resolving models, generally underestimate the liquid water path with the median single-column and cloud-resolving model liquid water path a factor of 3 smaller than observed. While the simulated ice water path is in general agreement with the observed values, results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice phase microphysics is responsible for the strong model underestimate of liquid water path. Although no single factor is found to lead to a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for care in the model treatment of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  7. Lidar observations of the diurnal variations in the depth of urban mixing layer: a case study on the air quality deterioration in Taipei, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chou, Charles C-K; Lee, C-T; Chen, W-N; Chang, S-Y; Chen, T-K; Lin, C-Y; Chen, J-P

    2007-03-01

    An aerosol light detection and ranging (LIDAR) system was used to measure the depth of the atmospheric mixing layer over Taipei, Taiwan in the spring of 2005. This paper presents the variations of the mixing height and the mixing ratios of air pollutants during an episode of air quality deterioration (March 7-10, 2005), when Taipei was under an anti-cyclonic outflow of a traveling high-pressure system. It was found that, during those days, the urban mixing height reached its daily maximum of 1.0-1.5 km around noon and declined to 0.3-0.5 km around 18:00 (LST). In terms of hourly averages, the mixing height increased with the ambient temperature linearly by a slope of 166 m/degrees C in daytime. The consistency between the changes in the mixing height and in the ambient temperature implied that the mixing layer dynamics were dominated by solar thermal forcing. As the cap of the mixing layer descended substantially in the afternoon, reduced dispersion in the shallow mixing layer caused the concentrations of primary air pollutants to increase sharply. Consequently, the pollutant concentration exhibited an anti-correlation with the mixing height. While attentions are usually focused on the pollution problems occurring in a morning inversion layer, the results of this study indicate that the air pollution and its health impacts could be even more severe as the mixing layer is getting shallow in the afternoon.

  8. Investigations of boundary layer structure, cloud characteristics and vertical mixing of aerosols at Barbados with large eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jähn, M.; Muñoz-Esparza, D.; Chouza, F.; Reitebuch, O.

    2015-08-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) are performed for the area of the Caribbean island Barbados to investigate island effects on boundary layer modification, cloud generation and vertical mixing of aerosols. Due to the presence of a topographically structured island surface in the domain center, the model setup has to be designed with open lateral boundaries. In order to generate inflow turbulence consistent with the upstream marine boundary layer forcing, we use the cell perturbation method based on finite amplitude perturbations. In this work, this method is for the first time tested and validated for moist boundary layer simulations with open lateral boundary conditions. Observational data obtained from the SALTRACE field campaign is used for both model initialization and a comparison with Doppler wind lidar data. Several numerical sensitivity tests are carried out to demonstrate the problems related to "gray zone modeling" when using coarser spatial grid spacings beyond the inertial subrange of three-dimensional turbulence or when the turbulent marine boundary layer flow is replaced by laminar winds. Especially cloud properties in the downwind area west of Barbados are markedly affected in these kinds of simulations. Results of an additional simulation with a strong trade-wind inversion reveal its effect on cloud layer depth and location. Saharan dust layers that reach Barbados via long-range transport over the North Atlantic are included as passive tracers in the model. Effects of layer thinning, subsidence and turbulent downward transport near the layer bottom at z ~ 1800 m become apparent. The exact position of these layers and strength of downward mixing is found to be mainly controlled atmospheric stability (especially inversion strength) and wind shear. Comparisons of LES model output with wind lidar data show similarities in the formation of the daytime convective plume and the mean vertical wind structure.

  9. The Effect of Particle Size on the Deposition of Solid Lipid Nanoparticles in Different Skin Layers: A Histological Study

    PubMed Central

    Mardhiah Adib, Zahra; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Yari Khosroshahi, Ahmad; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In the present study the effect of particle size, as a substantial parameters in skin penetration, on the deposition depth and rate of SLNs in different layers of skin was explored. Methods: SLNs in different particle size ranges (80, 333 and 971 nm) made of Precirol as solid lipid were prepared using hot melt homogenization technique and pigmented by Rhodamine B to be able to be tracked in the skin under inspection of fluorescent microscopy. After 0.5 h, 3 h, 6 h and 24 h of SLNs administration on rat skin, animals were sacrificed and exercised skins were sliced by a freeze microtome. SLNs were monitored in the skin structure under fluorescence microscope. Results: The size of SLNs played a crucial role in the penetration to deep skin layers. The sub100 nm size range of SLNs showed the most promising skin penetration rate and depth mainly via hair follicles. Conclusion: The results of the present study indicated that the selection of an appropriate size of particles may be a valuable factor impacting the therapeutic outcomes of dermal drug administration. PMID:27123415

  10. Mixed Layer Sub-Mesoscale Parameterization - Part 1: Derivation and Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Dubovikov, M. S.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sub-mesoscales (SM 1km horizontal scale) play an important role in mixed layer dynamics. In particular, high resolution simulations have shown that in the case of strong down-front wind, the re-stratification induced by the SM is of the same order of the de-stratification induced by small scale turbulence, as well as of that induced by the Ekman velocity. These studies have further concluded that it has become necessary to include SM in ocean global circulation models (OGCMs), especially those used in climate studies. The goal of our work is to derive and assess an analytic parameterization of the vertical tracer flux under baroclinic instabilities and wind of arbitrary directions and strength. To achieve this goal, we have divided the problem into two parts: first, in this work we derive and assess a parameterization of the SM vertical flux of an arbitrary tracer for ocean codes that resolve mesoscales, M, but not sub-mesoscales, SM. In Part 2, presented elsewhere, we have used the results of this work to derive a parameterization of SM fluxes for ocean codes that do not resolve either M or SM. To carry out the first part of our work, we solve the SM dynamic equations including the non-linear terms for which we employ a closure developed and assessed in previous work. We present a detailed analysis for down-front and up-front winds with the following results: (a) down-front wind (blowing in the direction of the surface geostrophic velocity) is the most favorable condition for generating vigorous SM eddies; the de-stratifying effect of the mean flow and re-stratifying effect of SM almost cancel each other out,

  11. A numerical study of ignition in the supersonic hydrogen/air laminar mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, M.; Law, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The ignition evolution in the supersonic nonpremixed hydrogen/air laminar mixing layer, consisting of a relatively hot, fast air stream next to a cold, slower hydrogen stream, was computationally simulated using detailed transport and chemical reaction mechanisms and compared with results from asymptotic analysis with reduced mechanisms. The study emphasizes identifying the controlling chemical mechanisms in effecting ignition, on the relative importance of external versus viscous heating as the dominant ignition source, on the roles of thermal versus kinetic-induced ignition in which heat release and hence nonlinear thermal feedback are not needed in initiating system runaway, and on the consequences of imposing the conventional constant property assumptions in analytical studies. Results show that the state of the hydrogen/oxygen second explosion limit has the dominant influence in the system response in that, for all practical purposes, ignition is not possible when the air-stream temperature is lower than the crossover temperature, even allowing for viscous heating. On the other hand, when the air-stream temperature is higher than the crossover temperature, the predicted ignition distance indicates that ignition is feasible within practical supersonic combustion engines. Furthermore, for the latter situations, the ignition event is initiated by radical proliferation and hence runaway instead of thermal runaway. Finally, it is shown that, while the present computed results qualitatively agree well with those from the asymptotic analysis with reduced mechanisms, the analytically predicted ignition distances are much shorter than the computed values because the analysis has overemphasized the viscous effect through the constant Chapman-Rubesin parameter {rho}{mu} and unity Prandtl number assumptions.

  12. Image analysis applied to the study of mixing in a stably stratified shear layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Monti, Paolo; Cenedese, Antonio

    2008-10-01

    The development and breaking of Kelvin Helmholtz waves is one of the primary causes of mixing in many geophysical and engineering flows with layers of fluids having different densities and horizontal velocities. Although this phenomenon was extensively studied in the field, a complete description can be experimentally obtained only by the use of image analysis techniques that are applicable only in laboratory experiments. The particular nature of the flow, especially before the development of the waves when the flow is parallel but in opposite direction, makes the application of the classical image velocimetry techniques non-trivial. With this in mind, a stably stratified shear flow was reproduced in the laboratory by means of a tilting tank. The velocity and density fields were measured simultaneously with multipoint time-resolved techniques during the formation and development of the Kelvin Helmholtz waves. A novel particle tracking procedure is proposed that includes the stretching of the acquired images in the direction orthogonal to the main motion. Tests on synthetic images show a meaningful improvement in the effectiveness of particle tracking when using the proposed technique. Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) data have been acquired by a second camera, equipped with a band-pass filter in order to measure only the fluoresced light. Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) and LIF data have been referenced to the same frame by a registration procedure based on an affine transformation. In the range of the parameters investigated during the experiments, the evolution of the interface thickness and sharpness scales with the advective time scale. The analysis of the space time evolution of the longitudinal statistics gives a comprehensive picture of the development and breaking of the waves.

  13. Data Assimilation In A Marine Ecosystem Coupled To A Mixed Layer Model of The Upper Ocean.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magri, S.; Brasseur, P.; Lacroix, G.

    Data assimilation have been conducted in a one-dimensional, coupled physical ecosys- tem model of the upper ocean to characterize the observability properties of in situ and satellite observing systems. The assimilation method is based on the Singular Evolu- tive Extended Kalman (SEEK) filter, in which the error sub-space is decomposed into multivariate orthogonal functions of the system's variability. The coupled model simulates the primary production in a coastal zone of the Ligurian Sea, where oligotrophic conditions prevail. The ecosystem dynamics is represented by 12 interacting compartments expressed in nitrogen units. The coupling with a hydrodynamic model determines the physical constraints asso- ciated to the development of a seasonal mixed layer. The stratification of the water column, according to the computation of the vertical turbulent diffusivities, is a key parameter of the evolution of the marine ecosystem. The coupled system has been developed and validated on the basis of field data col- lected during the FRONTAL campains, between 1984 and 1988. As a first approach, twin experiments are performed to check the algorithmic imple- mentation of the SEEK filter, and to verify the statistical consistence of the assimila- tion scheme in non-linear regimes. Vertical temperature and salinity profiles have been assimilated to evaluate the impact of a better representation of the water column strat- ification on the primary production. Then, nitrate and chlorophyll-a profiles have been assimilated to try to control the ecosystem in spite of an imperfect physical model. Finally, physical and biological profiles of in situ data collected during the FRONTAL campains, will be used to reconstruct the seasonal evolution of the ecosystem.

  14. Enhancing the comprehension of mixed layer depth control on the Mediterranean phytoplankton phenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavigne, HéLoïSe; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Migon, Christophe; Claustre, Hervé; Testor, Pierre; D'Alcalã, Maurizio Ribera; Lavezza, Rosario; Houpert, LoïC.; Prieur, Louis

    2013-07-01

    Phytoplankton phenology is primarily affected by physical forcing. However, its quantification is far from being completely understood. Among the physical forcing factors, the mixed layer depth (MLD) is considered to have the strongest impact on phytoplankton dynamics, and consequently, on their phenology. The role of MLD variations in shaping the phytoplankton phenology was explored in the Mediterranean Sea, a basin displaying contrasting phenological regimes. A database of MLD estimations was merged with ocean color chlorophyll concentrations ([Chl]SAT) to generate concomitant annual MLD and [Chl]SAT cycles. Several indices were calculated to quantitatively analyze these cycles. The relevance of indices summarizing the temporal difference between main characteristics of MLD and [Chl]SAT cycles was emphasized. As previously observed, two dominant phenological regimes coexist in the Mediterranean Sea. The first is marked by a typical spring bloom, as in temperate regions. The second displays a low seasonality and an absence of an intense [Chl]SAT peak as in subtropical areas. The MLD is shown to play a key role in determining the dominant phenological regime in a given area. Results also show that regions having low seasonality display concomitant MLD and [Chl]SAT maxima, whereas [Chl]SAT peaks are generally observed 30 days after MLD peaks in regions with strongest seasonality. Over the whole basin, [Chl]SAT increase starts 1 month after the initiation of MLD deepening. Finally, after examining the impact of MLD on light and nutrient availability for phytoplankton, mechanisms were proposed to explain the time lags between MLD and [Chl]SAT increase and MLD and [Chl]SAT maxima.

  15. Mixed-layer ocean responses to anthropogenic aerosol dimming from 1870 to 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, T. N.; Folini, D.; Knutti, R.; Wild, M.

    2016-01-01

    It is debated to what extent surface solar radiation (SSR) changes through varying anthropogenic aerosol emissions since industrialization affected surface temperatures (tsurf). We use mixed-layer ocean experiments with the general circulation model ECHAM6.1 and explicit aerosols (HAM2.2) to identify regions where this effect is discernible. For each decade from 1870 to 2000 we derive three equilibria: anthropogenic aerosol emissions and greenhouse gas concentrations at the respective decade's levels (ALL), either aerosols or greenhouse gases fixed at year 1850 levels (GHG and AERO). We duplicated parts of the experiments with different prescribed divergence of ocean heat transport (Q_ALL, Q_AERO, and Q_GHG). Comparing year 2000 with year 1870 equilibria, we find global average cooling of -1.4 K for AERO and warming of 1.4 K for GHG. ALL and Q_ALL warm by 0.6 K and 0.4 K, respectively. The way divergence of ocean heat transport is prescribed thus matters. Pattern correlations of year 2000 tsurf responses in ALL with the sum of AERO and GHG are higher (0.88) than with Q_ALL (0.71) confirming additivity of global patterns, but not of global means. The imprint of anthropogenic aerosols on tsurf response patterns in ALL is distinct, thus potentially detectable. Over the decades, ocean fractions affected by either changing aerosol optical depth or all-sky SSR vary in concert, supporting linkage between anthropogenic aerosols and all-sky SSR. SSR changes and tsurf responses are marginally collocated. Oceanic regions with strongest tsurf response to aerosol-induced SSR changes are the northern midlatitudes and North Pacific with tsurf sensitivities up to -0.7 K W m-2 SSR change.

  16. Dimming over the oceans: mixed layer ocean experiments from 1870 to 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Sea surface temperature (SSTs) changes are known to affect precipitation patterns. However, it is still subject to debate, whether anthropogenic aerosols are capable of affecting SSTs, which could feed back on precipitation patterns. To influence SSTs, anthropogenic aerosols need to reduce incoming surface solar radiation (SSR) through direct or indirect effects for a sufficiently long time span over a sufficiently large area. To quantify the maximum potential SST response to anthropogenic aerosol dimming over the past decades, we performed equilibrium experiments with the general circulation model, ECHAM and explicit aerosol representation (ECHAM6-HAM2.2) and a mixed-layer ocean (MLO). Every ten years, we let the system equilibrate to the conditions (aerosol and greenhouse gas burdens, GHG) of that specific year. Each experiment is conducted over 50 years, of which the first 10 years are discarded. We generated three sets of decadal equilibria covering the entire 20th century and part of the 19th century (from 1870) : One, where both GHG and anthropogenic aerosols are set to the respective decade, one where GHG levels are held constant at 1850s levels, and one where anthropogenic aerosols are held constant at 1850s levels. Deep ocean heat fluxes are prescribed based on the surface energy flux climatology derived from an atmosphere-only integration with pre-industrial (year 1850) conditions for aerosols and GHG and climatological SSTs (average of Hadley Center SSTs, observation based, over the years 1871-1900). Results of these findings will be discussed, especially the SST and precipitation responses seen in the different equilibria. Moreover, results will be put in context with transient experiments with prescribed SSTs. The presented results are part of a project aiming at quantifying the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on SSTs. The results will serve as a basis for future experiments using a dynamic ocean model to quantify the transient response of the ocean

  17. Mixed-layer ocean responses to anthropogenic aerosol dimming from 1870 to 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Knutti, Reto; Wild, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It is still debated, to what extent anthropogenic aerosol-induced changes in surface solar radiation (SSR) since industrialization affected surface temperatures (tsurf). We use mixed-layer ocean (MLO) experiments with the general circulation model ECHAM6.1 and explicit aerosols (HAM2.2) to identify regions where this effect is discernible. For each decade from 1870 to 2000 we derive three equilibria: anthropogenic aerosol emissions and greenhouse gas concentrations at the respective decade's levels (ALL), either aerosols or greenhouse gases fixed at year 1850 levels (GHG and AERO). We duplicated parts of the experiments with different prescribed divergence of ocean heat transport (Q_ALL, Q_AERO, Q_GHG). Comparing year 2000 with year 1870 equilibria, we find global average cooling of -1.4K for AERO, and warming of 1.4K for GHG. ALL and Q_ALL warm by 0.6K and 0.4K, respectively. The way divergence of ocean heat transport is prescribed thus matters. Pattern correlations of year 2000 tsurf responses in ALL with the sum of AERO and GHG are higher (0.88) than with Q_ALL (0.71) confirming additivity of global patterns, but not of global means. The imprint of anthropogenic aerosols on tsurf response patterns in ALL is distinct, thus potentially detectable. Over the decades, ocean fractions affected by either changing aerosol optical depth or all-sky SSR vary in concert, supporting linkage between anthropogenic aerosols and all-sky SSR. SSR changes and tsurf responses are marginally collocated. Oceanic regions with strongest tsurf response to aerosol-induced SSR changes are the northern mid-latitudes and North Pacific with tsurf sensitivities up to -0.7K per Wm-2 SSR change. Results presented have been published under the same title in the Journal of Geophysical Research, Volume 121, DOI 10.1002/2015JD024070.

  18. Investigating CloudSat Retrievals Sensitivity to Forward Iterative Algorithm Parameters in the Mixed Cloud Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yujun; Lu, Chunsong

    2016-08-01

    When millimeter-wave cloud radar data are used for the forward iterative retrieval of the liquid water content (LWC) and effective radius of cloud droplets (R e) in a cloud layer, the prior values and tolerance ranges of the cloud droplet number density (N t), scale parameter (R g) and spectral width parameter (W g) in the iterative algorithm are the main factors that affect the retrieval accuracy. In this study, we used data from stratus and convective clouds that were simultaneously observed by CloudSat and aircraft to conduct a sensitivity analysis of N t, R g, and W g for the retrieval accuracies of LWC and R e in both stratus and convective clouds. N t is the least sensitive parameter for accurately retrieving stratus LWC and R e in both stratus and convective clouds, except for retrieving the convective cloud LWC. Opposite to N t, R g is the most sensitive parameter for both LWC and R e retrievals. As to the effects of parameter tolerance ranges on the retrievals of LWC and R e, the least important parameter is the N t tolerance range; the most important one is the W g tolerance range for retrieving convective cloud LWC and R e, the R g is the important parameter for retrieving stratus LWC and R e. To obtain accurate retrieved values for clouds in a specific region, it is important to use typical values of the sensitive parameters, which could be calculated from in situ observations of cloud droplet size distributions. In addition, the sensitivities of the LWC and R e to the three parameters are stronger in convective clouds than in stratus clouds. This may be related to the melting and merging of solid cloud droplets during the convective mixing process in the convective clouds.

  19. Investigating CloudSat Retrievals Sensitivity to Forward Iterative Algorithm Parameters in the Mixed Cloud Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yujun; Lu, Chunsong

    2016-09-01

    When millimeter-wave cloud radar data are used for the forward iterative retrieval of the liquid water content (LWC) and effective radius of cloud droplets ( R e) in a cloud layer, the prior values and tolerance ranges of the cloud droplet number density ( N t), scale parameter ( R g) and spectral width parameter ( W g) in the iterative algorithm are the main factors that affect the retrieval accuracy. In this study, we used data from stratus and convective clouds that were simultaneously observed by CloudSat and aircraft to conduct a sensitivity analysis of N t, R g, and W g for the retrieval accuracies of LWC and R e in both stratus and convective clouds. N t is the least sensitive parameter for accurately retrieving stratus LWC and R e in both stratus and convective clouds, except for retrieving the convective cloud LWC. Opposite to N t, R g is the most sensitive parameter for both LWC and R e retrievals. As to the effects of parameter tolerance ranges on the retrievals of LWC and R e, the least important parameter is the N t tolerance range; the most important one is the W g tolerance range for retrieving convective cloud LWC and R e, the R g is the important parameter for retrieving stratus LWC and R e. To obtain accurate retrieved values for clouds in a specific region, it is important to use typical values of the sensitive parameters, which could be calculated from in situ observations of cloud droplet size distributions. In addition, the sensitivities of the LWC and R e to the three parameters are stronger in convective clouds than in stratus clouds. This may be related to the melting and merging of solid cloud droplets during the convective mixing process in the convective clouds.

  20. Seasonal and interannual variations of mixed layer salinity in the southeast tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ningning; Feng, Ming; Du, Yan; Lan, Jian; Wijffels, Susan E.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, seasonal and interannual variations of the mixed layer salinity (MLS) in the southeast tropical Indian Ocean (SETIO) are analyzed using satellite observations, historical data sets, and data-assimilating ocean model outputs. On the seasonal cycle, the MLS in the SETIO becomes fresher in austral winter and saltier in austral summer: between the Java-Lesser Sunda coast and the South Equatorial Current (SEC, 12°S), where positive entrainment and fresh advections counterbalance each other, the annual cycle of the MLS closely follows the variation of the air-sea freshwater forcing; off the northwest and west Australian coasts, the MLS variations are influenced by the annual cycles of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) and Leeuwin Current (LC) transports as well as the air-sea freshwater forcing, with eddy fluxes acting to freshen the MLS along the SEC, the Eastern Gyral Current, and the LC. On the interannual-scale, El Niño (La Niña) events are typically associated with saltier (fresher) MLS in the SETIO. Composite and budget analyses reveal that interannual variations in precipitations drive the MLS anomalies off the Java-Lesser Sunda coast; between 12°S and the northwest Australian coast, the MLS variations are influenced by both advection anomalies and local precipitation anomalies; whereas anomalous meridional currents contribute to the MLS variations off the west Australian coast. Both enhanced local precipitations and the ITF transport anomalies have substantial contributions to the drastic freshening of the Indonesian-Australian Basin between the Java-Lesser Sunda coast and the northwest Australian coast during the extended La Niña events in 1999-2001 and 2010-2012.

  1. A macroscopic description of lipid bilayer phase transitions of mixed-chain phosphatidylcholines: chain-length and chain-asymmetry dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Johnson, M L; Biltonen, R L

    2001-01-01

    A macroscopic model is presented to quantitatively describe lipid bilayer gel to fluid phase transitions. In this model, the Gibbs potential of the lipid bilayer is expressed in terms of a single order parameter q, the average chain orientational order parameter. The Gibbs potential is based on molecular mean-field and statistical mechanical calculations of inter and intrachain interactions. Chain-length and chain-asymmetry are incorporated into the Gibbs potential so that one equation provides an accurate description of mixed-chain phosphatidylcholines of a single class. Two general classes of lipids are studied in this work: lipid bilayers of partially or noninterdigitated gel phases, and bilayers of mixed interdigitated gel phases. The model parameters are obtained by fitting the transition temperature and enthalpy data of phosphatidylcholines to the model. The proposed model provides estimates for the transition temperature and enthalpy, van der Waals energy, number of gauche bonds, chain orientational order parameter, and bond rotational and excluded volume entropies, achieving excellent agreement with existing data obtained with various techniques. PMID:11159399

  2. Synthesis, characterization, and application of novel microporous mixed metal oxides, and nanostructured layered material-polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hae-Kwon

    Zeolites are microporous crystalline aluminosilicates with pores and cavities of molecular dimension. They consist of interconnected aluminum and silicon tetrahedra to build a variety of 3D open framework structures. Due to their structure, stability, and activity, zeolites have been widely used in a broad variety of applications in industry. It is, therefore, of great interest to make new structures with potentially novel properties. In this regard, there has recently been a growing interest in the synthesis of novel mixed metal oxides with octahedral and tetrahedral units owing to the possibility to find unique electronic and optical properties. Hence, these materials can find advanced applications as well as conventional applications, just like zeolites. Research efforts have led to the discovery of several mixed octahedral and tetrahedral metal oxides with novel crystal structures including titanium silicates and cerium silicate. Layered materials with transport paths along the thickness of the layers are of particular interest due to potential usage as selective layers of nanometer scale in nanocomposite membranes. A new layered silicate (we call AMH-3) has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The crystal structure solution via powder X-ray diffraction has revealed its unique layer structure of three dimensional microporosity within layers. Layered materials with porous layers will open up new areas of applications, such as selective nanocomposite separation membranes. Polymer/selective-flake nanocomposite membranes have been fabricated for the first time, which can, in principle, be scaled down to submicrometer structures. A layered aluminophosphate with a porous net layer is used as a selective phase and a polyimide as a continuous phase. The microstructures of the nanocomposite membranes were investigated using various characterization techniques. Nanocomposite membranes with 10 wt% layered aluminophosphate show substantial enhancement in

  3. Upper mixed layer temperature anomalies at the North Atlantic storm-track zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshonkin, S. N.; Diansky, N. A.

    1995-10-01

    Synoptic sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) were determined as a result of separation of time scales smaller than 183 days. The SSTAs were investigated using daily data of ocean weather station C (52.75°N; 35.5°W) from 1 January 1976 to 31 December 1980 (1827 days). There were 47 positive and 50 negative significant SSTAs (lifetime longer than 3 days, absolute value greater than 0.10 °C) with four main intervals of the lifetime repetitions: 1. 4-7 days (45% of all cases), 2. 9-13 days (20-25%), 3. 14-18 days (10-15%), and 4. 21-30 days (10-15%) and with a magnitude 1.5-2.0 °C. An upper layer balance model based on equations for temperature, salinity, mechanical energy (with advanced parametrization), state (density), and drift currents was used to simulate SSTA. The original method of modelling taking into account the mean observed temperature profiles proved to be very stable. The model SSTAs are in a good agreement with the observed amplitudes and phases of synoptic SSTAs during all 5 years. Surface heat flux anomalies are the main source of SSTAs. The influence of anomalous drift heat advection is about 30-50% of the SSTA, and the influence of salinity anomalies is about 10-25% and less. The influence of a large-scale ocean front was isolated only once in February-April 1978 during all 5 years. Synoptic SSTAs develop just in the upper half of the homogeneous layer at each winter. We suggest that there are two main causes of such active sublayer formation: 1. surface heat flux in the warm sectors of cyclones and 2. predominant heat transport by ocean currents from the south. All frequency functions of the ocean temperature synoptic response to heat and momentum surface fluxes are of integral character (red noise), though there is strong resonance with 20-days period of wind-driven horizontal heat advection with mixed layer temperature; there are some other peculiarities on the time scales from 5.5 to 13 days. Observed and modelled frequency functions

  4. Experimental study of an active grid-generated shearless mixing layer and comparisons with large-eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyung Suk; Meneveau, Charles

    2008-12-01

    A shearless mixing layer characterized by interactions between two regions with different turbulence intensities but without mean shear is investigated experimentally in a wind tunnel. Reynolds numbers higher than those of prior studies [B. Gilbert, "Diffusion mixing in grid turbulence without mean shear," J. Fluid Mech. 100, 349 (1980); S. Veeravalli and Z. Warhaft, "The shearless turbulent mixing layer," J. Fluid Mech. 207, 191 (1989); B. Knaepen, O. Debliquy, and D. Carati, "Direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation of a shear-free mixing layer," J. Fluid Mech. 514, 153 (2004); D. Tordella and M. Iovieno, "Numerical experiments on the intermediate asymptotics of shear-free turbulent transport and diffusion," J. Fluid Mech. 549, 429 (2006); D. A. Briggs, J. H. Ferziger, J. R. Koseff, and S. G. Monismith, "Entrainment in a shear-free turbulent mixing layer," J. Fluid Mech. 310, 215 (1996)] are achieved by using an active grid with rotating winglets on one-half of its cross section. Stationary flow-conditioning fine meshes are used to avoid mean velocity gradients. Measurements are performed at five different downstream wind-tunnel locations using an X-type hot-wire probe and a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry system. The Reynolds numbers based on the Taylor microscale in the high- and low-kinetic energy regions are 170 and 88, respectively. The energy and integral length-scale ratios between the two regions are 4.27 and 1.73, respectively. The inlet turbulence in the upper and lower portions of the shearless mixing layer is not fully isotropic, with the streamwise velocity fluctuations being between 6% and 13% higher than the cross-stream ones. Fundamental statistical properties of the flow are documented and analyzed at various scales using band-pass box-filtered velocities. Downstream evolution of variance and half-width of the mixing layer, skewness and flatness factors, as well as the statistics of two-point velocity increments at various

  5. Influence of surface forcing on near-surface and mixing layer turbulence in the tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callaghan, Adrian H.; Ward, Brian; Vialard, Jérôme

    2014-12-01

    An autonomous upwardly-moving microstructure profiler was used to collect measurements of the rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (ε) in the tropical Indian Ocean during a single diurnal cycle, from about 50 m depth to the sea surface. This dataset is one of only a few to resolve upper ocean ε over a diurnal cycle from below the active mixing layer up to the air-sea interface. Wind speed was weak with an average value of ~5 m s-1 and the wave field was swell-dominated. Within the wind and wave affected surface layer (WWSL), ε values were on the order of 10-7-10-6 W kg-1 at a depth of 0.75 m and when averaged, were almost a factor of two above classical law of the wall theory, possibly indicative of an additional source of energy from the wave field. Below this depth, ε values were closer to wall layer scaling, suggesting that the work of the Reynolds stress on the wind-induced vertical shear was the major source of turbulence within this layer. No evidence of persistent elevated near-surface ε characteristic of wave-breaking conditions was found. Profiles collected during night-time displayed relatively constant ε values at depths between the WWSL and the base of the mixing layer, characteristic of mixing by convective overturning. Within the remnant layer, depth-averaged values of ε started decaying exponentially with an e-folding time of 47 min, about 30 min after the reversal of the total surface net heat flux from oceanic loss to gain.

  6. Results from long-term detection of mixing layer height: ceilometer and comparison with Radio-Acoustic Sounding System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Klaus; Emeis, Stefan; Jahn, Carsten; Tuma, Michael; Münkel, Christoph; Suppan, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The mixing layer height (MLH) is an important factor which influences exchange processes of ground level emissions. The continuous knowledge of MLH is supporting the understanding of processes directing air quality. If the MLH is located near to the ground, which occurs mainly during winter and night-time, air pollution can be high due to a strongly limited air mass dilution. Since 2006 different methods for long-term continuous remote sensing of mixing layer height (MLH) are operated in Augsburg. The Vaisala ceilometers LD40 and CL31 are used which are eye-safe commercial mini-lidar systems. The ceilometer measurements provide information about the range-dependent aerosol concentration; gradient minima within this profile mark the borders of mixed layers. Special software for these ceilometers provides routine retrievals of lower atmosphere layering from vertical profiles of laser backscatter data. The radiosonde data from the station Oberschleissheim near Munich (about 50 km away from Augsburg city) are also used for MLH determination. The profile behavior of relative humidity (strong decrease) and virtual potential temperature (inversion) of the radiosonde agree mostly well with the MLH indication from ceilometer laser backscatter density gradients. A RASS (Radio-Acoustic Sounding System) from Metek is applied which detects the height of a turbulent layer characterized by high acoustic backscatter intensities due to thermal fluctuations and a high variance of the vertical velocity component as well as the vertical temperature profile from the detection of acoustic signal propagation and thus temperature inversions which mark atmospheric layers. These data of RASS measurements are the input for a software-based determination of MLH. A comparison of the results of the remote sensing methods during simultaneous measurements was performed. The information content of the different remote sensing instruments for MLH in dependence from different weather classes was

  7. A Priori Analysis of Subgrid-Scale Models for Large Eddy Simulations of Supercritical Binary-Species Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okong'o, Nora; Bellan, Josette

    2005-01-01

    Models for large eddy simulation (LES) are assessed on a database obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of supercritical binary-species temporal mixing layers. The analysis is performed at the DNS transitional states for heptane/nitrogen, oxygen/hydrogen and oxygen/helium mixing layers. The incorporation of simplifying assumptions that are validated on the DNS database leads to a set of LES equations that requires only models for the subgrid scale (SGS) fluxes, which arise from filtering the convective terms in the DNS equations. Constant-coefficient versions of three different models for the SGS fluxes are assessed and calibrated. The Smagorinsky SGS-flux model shows poor correlations with the SGS fluxes, while the Gradient and Similarity models have high correlations, as well as good quantitative agreement with the SGS fluxes when the calibrated coefficients are used.

  8. Measuring ice- and liquid-water properties in mixed-phase cloud layers at the Leipzig Cloudnet station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bühl, Johannes; Seifert, Patric; Myagkov, Alexander; Ansmann, Albert

    2016-08-01

    An analysis of the Cloudnet data set collected at Leipzig, Germany, with special focus on mixed-phase layered clouds is presented. We derive liquid- and ice-water content together with vertical motions of ice particles falling through cloud base. The ice mass flux is calculated by combining measurements of ice-water content and particle Doppler velocity. The efficiency of heterogeneous ice formation and its impact on cloud lifetime is estimated for different cloud-top temperatures by relating the ice mass flux and the liquid-water content at cloud top. Cloud radar measurements of polarization and Doppler velocity indicate that ice crystals formed in mixed-phase cloud layers with a geometrical thickness of less than 350 m are mostly pristine when they fall out of the cloud.

  9. The prediction of sea-surface temperature variations by means of an advective mixed-layer ocean model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    An advective mixed layer ocean model was developed by eliminating the assumption of horizontal homogeneity in an already existing mixed layer model, and then superimposing a mean and anomalous wind driven current field. This model is based on the principle of conservation of heat and mechanical energy and utilizes a box grid for the advective part of the calculation. Three phases of experiments were conducted: evaluation of the model's ability to account for climatological sea surface temperature (SST) variations in the cooling and heating seasons, sensitivity tests in which the effect of hypothetical anomalous winds was evaluated, and a thirty-day synoptic calculation using the model. For the case studied, the accuracy of the predictions was improved by the inclusion of advection, although nonadvective effects appear to have dominated.

  10. Formulation and In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Lipid-Based Terbutaline Sulphate Bi-layer Tablets for Once-Daily Administration.

    PubMed

    Hashem, Fahima M; Nasr, Mohamed; Fathy, Gihan; Ismail, Aliaa

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare and evaluate terbutaline sulphate (TBS) bi-layer tablets for once-daily administration. The bi-layer tablets consisted of an immediate-release layer and a sustained-release layer containing 5 and 10 mg TBS, respectively. The sustained-release layer was developed by using Compritol®888 ATO, Precirol® ATO 5, stearic acid, and tristearin, separately, as slowly eroding lipid matrices. A full 4 × 2(2) factorial design was employed for optimization of the sustained-release layer and to explore the effect of lipid type (X 1), drug-lipid ratio (X 2), and filler type (X 3) on the percentage drug released at 8, 12, and 24 h (Y 1, Y 2, and Y 3) as dependent variables. Sixteen TBS sustained-release matrices (F1-F16) were prepared by melt solid dispersion method. None of the prepared matrices achieved the targeted release profile. However, F2 that showed a relatively promising drug release was subjected to trial and error optimization for the filler composition to develop two optimized matrices (F17 and F18). F18 which consisted of drug-Compritol®888 ATO at ratio (1:6 w/w) and Avicel PH 101/dibasic calcium phosphate mixture of 2:1 (w/w) was selected as sustained-release layer. TBS bi-layer tablets were evaluated for their physical properties, in vitro drug release, effect of storage on drug content, and in vivo performance in rabbits. The bi-layer tablets showed acceptable physical properties and release characteristics. In vivo absorption in rabbits revealed initial high TBS plasma levels followed by sustained levels over 24 h compared to immediate-release tablets. PMID:26335420

  11. The effects of stabilizing and destabilizing longitudinal curvature on the structure of turbulent, two-stream mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesniak, Michael W.; Johnston, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    The construction and development of the multi-component traversing system and associated control hardware and software are presented. A hydrogen bubble/laser sheet flow visualization technique was developed to visually study the characteristics of the mixing layers. With this technique large-scale rollers arising from the Taylor-Gortler instability and its interaction with the primary Kelvin-Helmholtz structures can be studied.

  12. Comment on "Mixed-layer deepening during Heinrich events: a multi-planktonic foraminiferal delta18O approach".

    PubMed

    Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; de Vernal, Anne

    2008-05-30

    Rashid and Boyle (Reports, 19 October 2007, p. 439) analyzed oxygen isotopes in planktonic foraminera from marine sediments and concluded that Heinrich events (massive iceberg discharges into the North Atlantic Ocean) caused upper water masses to deepen. We question the robustness of this interpretation and argue that a strongly stratified mixed layer characterized by dense sea-ice cover and production of oxygen-18-depleted brines likely prevailed during such events. PMID:18511673

  13. The fluxes of CN neutrinos from the Sun in case of mixing in a spherical layer in the solar core

    SciTech Connect

    Kopylov, Anatoly; Petukhov, Valery E-mail: beril@inr.ru

    2012-03-01

    The results of the calculation are presented for the fluxes of CN neutrinos from the Sun in case of mixing in a spherical layer in the solar core, consistent with the seismic data and with the measured solar neutrino fluxes. It is shown that a substantial increase of the flux of {sup 13}N neutrinos can be gained in this case. The possible implications for experiment are discussed.

  14. Lidar measurements of the atmospheric entrainment zone and the potential temperature jump across the top of the mixed layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, R.; Eloranta, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    Lidar data of the atmospheric entrainment zone from six days of clear air convection obtained in central Illinois during July 1979 are presented. A new method to measure the potential temperature jump across the entrainment zone based on only one temperature sounding and continuous lidar measurements of the mixed layer height is developed. An almost linear dependence is found between the normalized entrainment rate and the normalized thickness of the entrainment zone.

  15. Effects of Mesoscale Eddies in the Active Mixed Layer: Test of the Parametrisation in Eddy Resolving Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luneva, M. V.; Clayson, C. A.; Dubovikov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    In eddy resolving simulations, we test a mixed layer mesoscale parametrisation, developed recently by Canuto and Dubovikov [Ocean Model., 2011, 39, 200-207]. With no adjustable parameters, the parametrisation yields the horizontal and vertical mesoscale fluxes in terms of coarse-resolution fields and eddy kinetic energy (EKE). We compare terms of the parametrisation diagnosed from coarse-grained fields with the eddy mesoscale fluxes diagnosed directly from the high resolution model. An expression for the EKE in terms of mean fields has also been found to get a closed parametrisation in terms of the mean fields only. In 40 numerical experiments we simulated two types of flows: idealised flows driven by baroclinic instabilities only, and more realistic flows, driven by wind and surface fluxes as well as by inflow-outflow. The diagnosed quasi-instantaneous horizontal and vertical mesoscale buoyancy fluxes (averaged over 1-2 degrees and 10 days) demonstrate a strong scatter typical for turbulent flows, however, the fluxes are positively correlated with the parametrisation with higher (0.5-0.74) correlations at the experiments with larger baroclinic radius Rossby. After being averaged over 3-4 months, diffusivities diagnosed from the eddy resolving simulations are consistent with the parametrisation for a broad range of parameters. Diagnosed vertical mesoscale fluxes restratify mixed layer and are in a good agreement with the parametrisation unless vertical turbulent mixing in the upper layer becomes strong enough in comparison with mesoscale advection. In the latter case, numerical simulations demonstrate that the deviation of the fluxes from the parametrisation is controlled by dimensionless parameter estimating the ratio of vertical turbulent mixing term to mesoscale advection. An analysis using a modified omega-equation reveals that the effects of the vertical mixing of vorticity is responsible for the two-three fold amplification of vertical mesoscale flux

  16. Influence of Computational Drop Representation in LES of a Droplet-Laden Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Radhakrishnan, Senthilkumaran

    2013-01-01

    Multiphase turbulent flows are encountered in many practical applications including turbine engines or natural phenomena involving particle dispersion. Numerical computations of multiphase turbulent flows are important because they provide a cheaper alternative to performing experiments during an engine design process or because they can provide predictions of pollutant dispersion, etc. Two-phase flows contain millions and sometimes billions of particles. For flows with volumetrically dilute particle loading, the most accurate method of numerically simulating the flow is based on direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the governing equations in which all scales of the flow including the small scales that are responsible for the overwhelming amount of dissipation are resolved. DNS, however, requires high computational cost and cannot be used in engineering design applications where iterations among several design conditions are necessary. Because of high computational cost, numerical simulations of such flows cannot track all these drops. The objective of this work is to quantify the influence of the number of computational drops and grid spacing on the accuracy of predicted flow statistics, and to possibly identify the minimum number, or, if not possible, the optimal number of computational drops that provide minimal error in flow prediction. For this purpose, several Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of a mixing layer with evaporating drops have been performed by using coarse, medium, and fine grid spacings and computational drops, rather than physical drops. To define computational drops, an integer NR is introduced that represents the ratio of the number of existing physical drops to the desired number of computational drops; for example, if NR=8, this means that a computational drop represents 8 physical drops in the flow field. The desired number of computational drops is determined by the available computational resources; the larger NR is, the less computationally

  17. Inferring strength and deformation properties of hot mix asphalt layers from the GPR signal: recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosti, Fabio; Benedetto, Andrea; Bianchini Ciampoli, Luca; Adabi, Saba; Pajewski, Lara

    2015-04-01

    , of both the different strength provision of each layer composing the hot mix asphalt pavement structure, and of the attenuation occurring to electromagnetic waves during their in-depth propagation. Promising results are achieved by matching modelled and measured elastic modulus data. This continuous statistically-based model enables to consider the whole set of information related to each single depth, in order to provide a more comprehensive prediction of the strength and deformation behavior of such a complex multi-layered medium. Amongst some further developments to be tackled in the near future, a model improvement could be reached through laboratory activities under controlled conditions and by adopting several frequency bandwidths suited for purposes. In addition, the perspective to compare electromagnetic data with mechanical measurements retrieved continuously, i.e., by means of specifically equipped lorries, could pave the way to considerable enhancements in this field of research. Acknowledgements - This work has benefited from networking activities carried out within the EU funded COST Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar".

  18. Imaging of oil layers, curvature and contact angle in a mixed-wet and a water-wet carbonate rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kamaljit; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of wettability of carbonate rocks on the morphologies of remaining oil after sequential oil and brine injection in a capillary-dominated flow regime at elevated pressure. The wettability of Ketton limestone was altered in situ using an oil phase doped with fatty acid which produced mixed-wet conditions (the contact angle where oil contacted the solid surface, measured directly from the images, θ=180°, while brine-filled regions remained water-wet), whereas the untreated rock (without doped oil) was weakly water-wet (θ=47 ± 9°). Using X-ray micro-tomography, we show that the brine displaces oil in larger pores during brine injection in the mixed-wet system, leaving oil layers in the pore corners or sandwiched between two brine interfaces. These oil layers, with an average thickness of 47 ± 17 µm, may provide a conductive flow path for slow oil drainage. In contrast, the oil fragments into isolated oil clusters/ganglia during brine injection under water-wet conditions. Although the remaining oil saturation in a water-wet system is about a factor of two larger than that obtained in the mixed-wet rock, the measured brine-oil interfacial area of the disconnected ganglia is a factor of three smaller than that of oil layers.

  19. Hydrographic and mixed layer depth variability on the shelf in the northern Gulf of Alaska, 1974 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Nandita; Royer, T. C.; Grosch, C. E.

    2005-11-01

    A time series of hydrographic measurements, temperature and salinity versus depth, on the shelf in the northern Gulf of Alaska (GAK 1) is used to determine the seasonal and interannual variability of the hydrography and mixed layer depth from 1974 through mid-1998. This is one of the first opportunities to incorporate salinity into the mixed layer depth (MLD) determination in this region where the density is highly dependent on salinity. The MLD changes seasonally from about 40 m in summer to more than 160 m in winter. This has potential implications for vertical fluxes of nutrients via winter MLD, leading to their annual replenishment. Spectral analysis of MLDs show that the time series have similar periodicities to the hydrography (decadal and El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)). The MLD trend during 1974-1998 has a slight increase in the deepest winter MLD that is, however, not statistically significant at the 90% level. This is in contrast to previous studies which found a significant shoaling of the winter MLD in the offshelf region of the Gulf of Alaska at Ocean Station P (OSP) [Freeland, H., Denman, K., Wong, C.S., Whitney, F., Jacques, R., 1997. Evidence of change in the winter mixed layer in the northeast Pacific Ocean. Deep Sea Research 44, 2117-2129]. This difference in the response of the marine system is consistent with an increase in the circulation of the Alaskan Gyre with enhanced upwelling in the central gulf (OSP) and enhanced downwelling along the coast (GAK 1).

  20. Observation and analysis of emergent coherent structures in a high-energy-density shock-driven planar mixing layer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doss, F. W.; Flippo, K. A.; Merritt, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Coherent emergent structures have been observed in a high-energy-density supersonic mixing layer experiment. A millimeter-scale shock tube uses lasers to drive Mbar shocks into the tube volume. The shocks are driven into initially solid foam (60 mg /cm3 ) hemicylinders separated by an Al or Ti metal tracer strip; the components are vaporized by the drive. Before the experiment disassembles, the shocks cross at the tube center, creating a very fast (Δ U > 200 km/s) shear-unstable zone. After several nanoseconds, an expanding mixing layer is measured, and after 10+ ns we observe the appearance of streamwise-periodic, spanwise-aligned rollers associated with the primary Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of mixing layers. We additionally image roller pairing and spanwise-periodic streamwise-aligned filaments associated with secondary instabilities. New closures are derived to connect length scales of these structures to estimates of fluctuating velocity data otherwise unobtainable in the high-energy-density environment. This analysis indicates shear-induced specific turbulent energies 103-104 times higher than the nearest conventional experiments. Because of difficulties in continuously driving systems under these conditions and the harshness of the experimental environment limiting the usable diagnostics, clear evidence of these developing structures has never before been observed in this regime.

  1. Observation and analysis of emergent coherent structures in a high-energy-density shock-driven planar mixing layer experiment.

    PubMed

    Doss, F W; Flippo, K A; Merritt, E C

    2016-08-01

    Coherent emergent structures have been observed in a high-energy-density supersonic mixing layer experiment. A millimeter-scale shock tube uses lasers to drive Mbar shocks into the tube volume. The shocks are driven into initially solid foam (60 mg/cm^{3}) hemicylinders separated by an Al or Ti metal tracer strip; the components are vaporized by the drive. Before the experiment disassembles, the shocks cross at the tube center, creating a very fast (ΔU> 200 km/s) shear-unstable zone. After several nanoseconds, an expanding mixing layer is measured, and after 10+ ns we observe the appearance of streamwise-periodic, spanwise-aligned rollers associated with the primary Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of mixing layers. We additionally image roller pairing and spanwise-periodic streamwise-aligned filaments associated with secondary instabilities. New closures are derived to connect length scales of these structures to estimates of fluctuating velocity data otherwise unobtainable in the high-energy-density environment. This analysis indicates shear-induced specific turbulent energies 10^{3}-10^{4} times higher than the nearest conventional experiments. Because of difficulties in continuously driving systems under these conditions and the harshness of the experimental environment limiting the usable diagnostics, clear evidence of these developing structures has never before been observed in this regime. PMID:27627387

  2. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  3. Photocatalytic degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol with MgAlTi mixed oxides catalysts obtained from layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Damián, G; Tzompantzi, F; Mantilla, A; Barrera, A; Lartundo-Rojas, L

    2013-12-15

    MgAl and MgAlTi mixed oxides were obtained from the thermal treatment of LDH materials synthesized by the sol-gel method; these materials were characterized by N2 physisorption, XRD, UV-vis, XPS, EDS-SEM and TEM techniques. According to the results, Ti was incorporated in the LDH layer when content in the material was low. The MgAl and MgAlTi mixed oxides were evaluated in the photo-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) in the presence of UV light. A superior efficiency in the photo-degradation of 2,4-DCP, in comparison with the Degussa P-25 TiO2 reference catalyst was observed, reaching a total decomposition of the 2,4-DCP molecule in less than 60 min. According to the results, Ti was incorporated in the LDH layer when the content in the material was low. The MgAl and MgAlTi mixed oxides were evaluated in the photo-degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) in the presence of UV light. A superior efficiency in the photo-degradation of 2,4-DCP with the MgAl and MgAlTi mixed oxides, in comparison with the Degussa P-25 TiO2 reference catalyst was observed, reaching a total decomposition of the 2,4-DCP molecule in less than 60 min.

  4. Relationship between the seasonal change in fluorescent dissolved organic matter and mixed layer depth in the subtropical western North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, Yuko; Hama, Takeo; Ishii, Masao; Saito, Shu

    2010-06-01

    Spatial and temporal distributions of marine humic-like fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOMM) were determined in the subtropical western North Pacific to evaluate the controlling factors of FDOMM behaviors. The observations were conducted at 4 stations (15-30°N) along 137°E in a subtropical area between January 2006 and April 2007. The florescence intensity of FDOMM was low (0.14-0.25 quinine sulfate units (QSU)) in the surface layer probably due to photodegradation, and increased with depth (0.90-1.10 QSU at 1000 m), irrespective of season and station. In the surface layer, the thickness of the water mass with low fluorescence intensity (<0.3 QSU) showed the seasonal change by being deeper in winter and shallower in summer, depending on the mixed layer depth (MLD). The average fluorescence intensity within the mixed layer also varied seasonally at midlatitudes; the intensity in summer was 40.8-53.8% of that in winter. Since the MLD was very much shallower in summer than in winter, FDOMM in the mixed layer would be kept within a shallow depth during the summer where intensive photodegradation could occur. The concentration of total organic carbon (TOC) was at its maximum at the water surface and decreased with depth, being adverse to FDOMM. Thus, the ratio of fluorescence intensity to TOC concentration was lowest (0.002-0.003) in surface water, which implies that FDOMM is not quantitatively important to the dissolved organic carbon pool. However, considering the possible difference in the stabilities of FDOMM against photochemical and microbial degradation, it is conceivable that photobleached FDOMM is one of the important organic groups constituting marine dissolved organic matter.

  5. Electrodeposition of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles onto ultra-fine TiO2 nanotube layer by electrochemical reaction in mixed electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Jung; Jang, Jae-Myung

    2011-08-01

    Electrochemical depositions of HAp nanoparticles onto Ultra-fine TiO2 nanotube layer were carried out by the electrochemical reaction in mixed electrolyte of 1.6 M (NH4)H2PO4 + 0.8 M NH4F containing 0.15 and 0.25 wt% HAp. The Ca/P ratios of the HAp nanoparticles were evaluated by EDS analysis and their values were 1.53 and 1.66 respectively. The distribution quantity of Ca and P were remained at the middle region of TiO2 nanotube, but the Ti element was mainly stayed at the bottom of barrier layer from the result of line scanning diagram. Especially, adsorbed phosphate ions facilitated nucleation of nanophase calcium phosphate material inside the TiO2 nanotubu layer that resulted in vertical growth of HAp nanoparticles. These surfaces and structures were all effective for biocompatibility from the SBF tests.

  6. Spring summer imbalance of dissolved inorganic carbon in the mixed layer of the north-western Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, Olivier; Monfray, Patrick; Bates, Nicholas R.

    1996-02-01

    The surface concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site (BATS) decreased gradually by ca. 30μmol kg-1from April to October in 1989. This decrease occurred almost in the absence of measurable nitrate in the mixed layer. Although ancillary data about the C system point to the possible importance of lateral transport, horizontal gradients in surface [DIC] and the mean flow in the area indicate that local effects should prevail in the seasonal drawdown of DIC. On the basis of an one-dimensional model, we hence estimate the mixed layer budget of DIC for this period, from surface [DIC] data, temperature profiles, and concomitant meteorological records. According to model uncertainties, the [DIC] drawdown should be mostly explained (71 93%) by a net community production (NCP) averaging 1.4 2.3 mgC m-3 d-1, and to a lesser extent, by outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere. These losses are partially compensated (<30%) by mixing with DIC-rich waters of the thermocline. This NCP must be regarded as a lower estimate, since the mean flow from the northeast should bring waters with slightly higher [DIC] to the mixed layer at the BATS site. The model, which is sensitive to short-term variations in atmospheric forcing (<1day), indicates that this layer has never reached the nitrocline for spring summer 1989, even as a hurricane passed through the region. Hence, the surface NCP should not have been supported by unsampled, pulse-like supplies of deep nutrients. Wet atmospheric deposition of nitrogen measured concurrently on Bermuda could contribute to the biological N requirement (10 20%). According to historical estimates, N2 fixation seems however, insufficient to

  7. Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides from Ce-containing layered double hydroxide precursors: Controllable preparation and catalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Zheng; Zhao Na; Liu Junfeng; Li Feng; Evans, David G.; Duan Xue; Forano, Claude; Roy, Marie de

    2011-12-15

    Cu/Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursors have been synthesized using an anion exchange method with anionic Ce complexes containing the dipicolinate (pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate) ligand. Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides were obtained by calcination of the Ce-containing LDHs. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis, elemental analysis, and low temperature N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption measurements. The results reveal that the inclusion of Ce has a significant effect on the specific surface area, pore structure, and chemical state of Cu in the resulting Cu-Ce-O mixed metal oxides. The resulting changes in composition and structure, particularly the interactions between Cu and Ce centers, significantly enhance the activity of the Ce-containing materials as catalysts for the oxidation of phenol by hydrogen peroxide. - Graphical Abstract: Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides calcined from [Ce(dipic){sub 3}]{sup 3-}- intercalated Cu/Zn/Al layered double hydroxides were synthesized and displayed good catalytic performances in phenol oxidation due to the Cu-Ce interactions. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [Ce(dipic){sub 3}]{sup 3-}-intercalated Cu/Zn/Al layered double hydroxides were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides derivated from the LDHs were characterized as catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of Ce influenced physicochemical property and catalytic performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cu-Ce interaction was largely responsible for enhanced catalytic ability.

  8. Anatomy of a metabentonite: nucleation and growth of illite crystals and their colescence into mixed-layer illite/smectite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eberl, D.D.; Blum, A.E.; Serravezza, M.

    2011-01-01

    The illite layer content of mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S) in a 2.5 m thick, zoned, metabentonite bed from Montana decreases regularly from the edges to the center of the bed. Traditional X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern modeling using Markovian statistics indicated that this zonation results from a mixing in different proportions of smectite-rich R0 I/S and illite-rich R1 I/S, with each phase having a relatively constant illite layer content. However, a new method for modeling XRD patterns of I/S indicates that R0 and R1 I/S in these samples are not separate phases (in the mineralogical sense of the word), but that the samples are composed of illite crystals that have continuous distributions of crystal thicknesses, and of 1 nm thick smectite crystals. The shapes of these distributions indicate that the crystals were formed by simultaneous nucleation and growth. XRD patterns for R0 and R1 I/S arise by interparticle diffraction from a random stacking of the crystals, with swelling interlayers formed at interfaces between crystals from water or glycol that is sorbed on crystal surfaces. It is the thickness distributions of smectite and illite crystals (also termed fundamental particles, or Nadeau particles), rather than XRD patterns for mixed-layer I/S, that are the more reliable indicators of geologic history, because such distributions are composed of well-defined crystals that are not affected by differences in surface sorption and particle arrangements, and because their thickness distribution shapes conform to the predictions of crystal growth theory, which describes their genesis.

  9. Leafy vegetable mix supplementation improves lipid profiles and antioxidant status in C57BL/6J mice fed a high fat and high cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Yeon; Cheong, Sun Hee; Kim, Min Hee; Son, ChanWok; Yook, Hong-Sun; Sok, Dai-Eun; Kim, Jin Hee; Cho, YongSik; Chun, HyeKyung; Kim, Mee Ree

    2009-08-01

    Daily consumption of an antioxidant-rich leafy vegetable mix (LVM) was assessed for beneficial effects on plasma lipid profiles, tissue lipid peroxidation, and oxidative DNA damage in C57BL/6J mice fed a high fat and high cholesterol diet (20% fat and 1% cholesterol, wt/wt) for 4 weeks. The LVM contained beet leaf, angelica, red leaf lettuce, dandelion, green cos lettuce, lollo rosso, romaine lettuce (12.5%, respectively), scotch kale, and red kale (6.25%, respectively). The mice (n = 16) were randomly divided into either the control (high fat and cholesterol diet without LVM) or the LVM (high fat and cholesterol diet with 8% LVM supplement) groups after a 1-week acclimation. Lipid peroxidation as measured by thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in the plasma, liver, heart, and kidney was significantly lower. Antioxidants (glutathione and beta-carotene) and antioxidant enzyme activities (glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and superoxide dismutase) were improved in mice fed LVM diet. In the comet assay, tail extent moment, olive tail moment, and tail length were significantly less in the hepatocyte and lymphocyte DNA of the LVM group, indicating the beneficial effect of LVM on the resistance of hepatocytes and lymphocytes DNA to oxidative damage. Findings from the present study suggest that dietary supplementation with LVM may be useful for protecting cells from lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage.

  10. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

    2009-02-02

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

  11. Small-Scale Dissipation in Binary-Species Transitional Mixing Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellan, Josette; Okong'o, Nora

    2011-01-01

    Motivated by large eddy simulation (LES) modeling of supercritical turbulent flows, transitional states of databases obtained from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of binary-species supercritical temporal mixing layers were examined to understand the subgrid-scale dissipation, and its variation with filter size. Examination of the DSN-scale domain- averaged dissipation confirms previous findings that, out of the three modes of viscous, temperature and species-mass dissipation, the species-mass dissipation is the main contributor to the total dissipation. The results revealed that the percentage of species-mass by total dissipation is nearly invariant across species systems and initial conditions. This dominance of the species-mass dissipation is due to high-density-gradient magnitude (HDGM) regions populating the flow under the supercritical conditions of the simulations; such regions have also been observed in fully turbulent supercritical flows. The domain average being the result of both the local values and the extent of the HDGM regions, the expectations were that the response to filtering would vary with these flow characteristics. All filtering here is performed in the dissipation range of the Kolmogorov spectrum, at filter sizes from 4 to 16 times the DNS grid spacing. The small-scale (subgrid scale, SGS) dissipation was found by subtracting the filtered-field dissipation from the DNS-field dissipation. In contrast to the DNS dissipation, the SGS dissipation is not necessarily positive; negative values indicate backscatter. Backscatter was shown to be spatially widespread in all modes of dissipation and in the total dissipation (25 to 60 percent of the domain). The maximum magnitude of the negative subgrid- scale dissipation was as much as 17 percent of the maximum positive subgrid- scale dissipation, indicating that, not only is backscatter spatially widespread in these flows, but it is considerable in magnitude and cannot be ignored for the purposes of

  12. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2006-03-24

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  13. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2005-09-26

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  14. Temperature stability of ultra-thin mixed BaSr-oxide layers and their transformation.

    PubMed

    Müller-Sajak, D; Islam, S; Pfnür, H; Hofmann, K R

    2012-08-01

    In the context of investigations of physical, chemical and electrical properties of ultra-thin layers of epitaxial and monocrystalline Sr(0.3)Ba(0.7)O on Si(100), we also investigated their thermal stability with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). At temperatures above 400 °C, transformation into silicate layers sets in. The stoichiometry after complete transformation was determined to be close to (Ba(0.8)Sr(0.2))(2)SiO(4) except for layers of only a few monolayers, where the silicate is not stoichiometric. There are strong indications that this silicate is stable until it desorbs at temperatures above 750 °C. Crystallinity, as seen with LEED, is lost during this transformation. Although transformation into silicate is coupled with metal desorption and compactification of the layers, they seem to remain closed. In addition, traces of Ba silicide at the Si interface were detected after layer desorption. This silicide cannot be desorbed thermally. The silicate layer has a bandgap of 5.9 ± 0.2 eV already for 3 ML thickness. Upon exposure to air, carbon and oxygen containing species, but no hydroxide, are formed irreversibly.

  15. Effect of a delta tab on fine scale mixing in a turbulent two-stream shear layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foss, J. K.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1996-01-01

    The fine scale mixing produced by a delta tab in a shear layer has been studied experimentally. The tab was placed at the trailing edge of a splitter plate which produced a turbulent two-stream mixing layer. The tab apex tilted downstream and into the high speed stream. Hot-wire measurements in the 3-D space behind the tab detailed the three velocity components as well as the small scale population distributions. These small scale eddies, which represent the peak in the dissipation spectrum, were identified and counted using the Peak-Valley-Counting technique. It was found that the small scale populations were greater in the shear region behind the tab, with the greatest increase occurring where the shear layer underwent a sharp turn. This location was near, but not coincident, with the core of the streamwise vortex, and away from the region exhibiting maximum turbulence intensity. Moreover, the tab increased the most probably frequency and strain rate of the small scales. It made the small scales smaller and more energetic.

  16. CO ppb sensors based on monodispersed SnOx:Pd mixed nanoparticle layers: Insight into dual conductance response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aruna, I.; Kruis, F. E.; Kundu, S.; Muhler, M.; Theissmann, R.; Spasova, M.

    2009-03-01

    This study reports the modifications in CO sensing of SnOx nanoparticle layers by utilizing monodispersed Pd nanoparticles. The distinct advantage of monosized particles and contaminant-free samples with open porosity in addition to size effects resulted in improved CO sensing with decrease in Pd nanoparticle size to 5 nm, decreasing the lowest detection levels of CO using SnOx-based sensor technology down to 10 ppb (parts per billion) in dry synthetic air. The homogeneously mixed nanoparticle layers also exhibit discrimination capability between CO and ethanol in dry air as a manifestation of the dual conductance response. Detailed x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies clearly reveal "Mars-van Krevelen" as the key mechanism responsible for the observed sensing in mixed nanoparticle layers. The interfacial/surface PdO formed upon pretreatment in air is continuously "consumed" and "reformed" upon exposure, respectively, to CO and synthetic air. In contrast to the case of ethanol exposure with n-type response, the Pd aided reduction of tin oxide surface in CO ambient leads to p-type response. The sensors of the present study have a wide range of promising applications from air quality control to food and fuel industries.

  17. Structure determination of functional membrane proteins using small-angle neutron scattering (sans) with small, mixed-lipid liposomes: native beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase forms dimers.

    PubMed

    Rubinson, Kenneth A; Pokalsky, Christine; Krueger, Susan; Prochaska, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    The low-resolution three-dimensional structure of purified native beef heart mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in asolectin unilamellar liposomes has been measured by small-angle neutron scattering under the conditions where the protein remains fully functional. From a neutron scattering perspective, the use of mixed-lipid liposomes provided for a more homogeneous matrix than can be achieved using a single lipid. As a result, the measurements were able to be performed under conditions where the liposome scattering was essentially eliminated (contrast-matched conditions). The protein structure in the membrane was modeled as a simple parallelepiped with side lengths of (59 × 70 × 120) Å with uncertainties, respectively, (11, 12, 20 Å). The molecular mass calculated for a typical protein with this volume is estimated to be (410 ± 124) kDa, which indicates the mass of a COX dimer. The longest dimension has some uncertainty due to intermolecular scattering contributing to the data. Nevertheless, that length was estimated using an average protein density and the known dimer molecular mass. Using the same cross sectional dimensions for the structure, the length is estimated to be 120 Å. However, the measured scattering curve of the dimer in the liposome differs significantly from that calculated from the X-ray structure of the dimer in a crystal of mixed micelles (PDB 3AG1). The calculated SANS scattering from the crystal structure was fit with a parallelepiped, measuring (59 × 101 × 129) Å with fitting uncertainties, respectively, (2, 3, 3 Å). Our results suggest that COX is a functional dimer when reconstituted into mixed-lipid liposomes.

  18. Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides from Ce-containing layered double hydroxide precursors: Controllable preparation and catalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Zheng; Zhao, Na; Liu, Junfeng; Li, Feng; Evans, David G.; Duan, Xue; Forano, Claude; de Roy, Marie

    2011-12-01

    Cu/Zn/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursors have been synthesized using an anion exchange method with anionic Ce complexes containing the dipicolinate (pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylate) ligand. Cu-Ce-O mixed oxides were obtained by calcination of the Ce-containing LDHs. The materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis, elemental analysis, and low temperature N 2 adsorption/desorption measurements. The results reveal that the inclusion of Ce has a significant effect on the specific surface area, pore structure, and chemical state of Cu in the resulting Cu-Ce-O mixed metal oxides. The resulting changes in composition and structure, particularly the interactions between Cu and Ce centers, significantly enhance the activity of the Ce-containing materials as catalysts for the oxidation of phenol by hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Determining Layer Homogeneity in Mixed Polar Self-Assembled Monolayers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing embedded dipolar groups offer the particular advantage of changing the electronic properties of a surface without affecting the SAM–ambient interface. Here we show that such systems can also be used for continuously tuning metal work functions by growing mixed monolayers consisting of molecules with different orientations of the embedded dipolar groups. To avoid injection hot-spots when using the SAM-modified electrodes in devices, a homogeneous mixing of the two components is crucial. We show that a combination of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with state-of-the-art simulations is an ideal tool for probing the electrostatic homogeneity of the layers and thus for determining phase separation processes in polar adsorbate assemblies down to inhomogeneities at the molecular level. PMID:27429041

  20. Airborne Lidar measurements of aerosols, mixed layer heights, and ozone during the 1980 PEPE/NEROS summer field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Shipley, S. T.; Butler, C. F.; Ismail, S.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed summary of the NASA Ultraviolet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV DIAL) data archive obtained during the EPA Persistent Elevated Pollution Episode/Northeast Regional Oxidant Study (PEPE/NEROS) Summer Field Experiment Program (July through August 1980) is presented. The UV dial data set consists of remote measurements of mixed layer heights, aerosol backscatter cross sections, and sequential ozone profiles taken during 14 long-range flights onboard the NASA Wallops Flight Center Electra aircraft. These data are presented in graphic and tabular form, and they have been submitted to the PEPE/NEROS data archive on digital magnetic tape. The derivation of mixing heights and ozone profiles from UV Dial signals is discussed, and detailed intercomparisons with measurements obtained by in situ sensors are presented.

  1. Color-tunable mixed photoluminescence emission from Alq3 organic layer in metal-Alq3-metal surface plasmon structure

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the color-tunable mixed photoluminescence (PL) emission from an Alq3 organic layer in an Au-Alq3-Au plasmonic structure through the combination of organic fluorescence emission and another form of emission that is enabled by the surface plasmons in the plasmonic structure. The emission wavelength of the latter depends on the Alq3 thickness and can be tuned within the Alq3 fluorescent spectra. Therefore, a two-color broadband, color-tunable mixed PL structure was obtained. Obvious changes in the Commission Internationale d’Eclairage (CIE) coordinates and the corresponding emission colors of Au-Alq3-Au samples clearly varied with the Alq3 thickness (90, 130, and 156 nm). PMID:25328506

  2. Employing X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy for Determining Layer Homogeneity in Mixed Polar Self-Assembled Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hehn, Iris; Schuster, Swen; Wächter, Tobias; Abu-Husein, Tarek; Terfort, Andreas; Zharnikov, Michael; Zojer, Egbert

    2016-08-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) containing embedded dipolar groups offer the particular advantage of changing the electronic properties of a surface without affecting the SAM-ambient interface. Here we show that such systems can also be used for continuously tuning metal work functions by growing mixed monolayers consisting of molecules with different orientations of the embedded dipolar groups. To avoid injection hot-spots when using the SAM-modified electrodes in devices, a homogeneous mixing of the two components is crucial. We show that a combination of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with state-of-the-art simulations is an ideal tool for probing the electrostatic homogeneity of the layers and thus for determining phase separation processes in polar adsorbate assemblies down to inhomogeneities at the molecular level. PMID:27429041

  3. Particle transport and flow modification in planar temporally evolving laminar mixing layers. I. Particle transport under one-way coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Chidambaram; Lakehal, Djamel

    2006-09-01

    Simulations of two-dimensional, particle-laden mixing layers were performed for particles with Stokes numbers of 0.3, 0.6, 1, and 2 under the assumption of one-way coupling using the Eulerian-Lagrangian method; two-way coupling is addressed in Part II. Analysis of interphase momentum transfer was performed in the Eulerian frame of reference by looking at the balance of fluid-phase mean momentum, mean kinetic energy, modal kinetic energy, and particle-phase mean momentum. The differences in the dominant mechanisms of vertical transport of streamwise momentum between the fluid and particle phases is clearly brought out. In the fluid phase, growth of the mixing layer is due to energy transfer from the mean flow to the unstable Kelvin-Helmholtz modes, and transport of mean momentum by these modes. In contrast, in the particle phase, the primary mechanism of vertical transport of streamwise momentum is convection due to the mean vertical velocity induced by the centrifuging of particles by the spanwise Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices. Although the drag force and the particle-phase modal stress play an important role in the early stages of the evolution of the mixing layer, their role is shown to decrease during the pairing process. After pairing, the particle-phase mean streamwise momentum balance is accounted for by the convection and drag force term. The particle-phase modal stress term is shown to be strongly connected to the fluid phase modal stress with a Stokes-number-dependent time lag in its evolution.

  4. Separation in the mixed convection boundary-layer radial flow over a constant temperature horizontal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Feria, R.; del Pino, C.; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A.

    2014-10-01

    The boundary-layer flow of a horizontal current emerging radially from a cylindrical vertical surface of radius r0 with a constant velocity over a heated horizontal wall at constant temperature is analyzed. The boundary-layer equations are made dimensionless with a radial characteristic length in which natural and forced convection become of the same order of magnitude, so that the Prandtl (Pr) number and Gr2/Re5 are the only nondimensional parameters governing the problem, where Gr and Re are the Grashof and Reynolds numbers based on r0, respectively. A similarity solution valid at the leading edge of the boundary-layer flow is obtained. It contains, as the first order correction to Blasius' thermal boundary layer solution, the effect of buoyancy, and as the second order correction the effect of the radial divergence of the flow. This solution is used to start the numerical integration of the equations to provide a criterion for when separation occurs. It is found that separation, based on the boundary layer model, occurs for Gr < B(Pr)Re5/2, where the Prandtl's number function B is characterized numerically and found to be almost constant. This separation location law is compared with experimental results for air flowing over a heated horizontal plate at constant temperature, finding a qualitative good agreement.

  5. Ignition and structure of a laminar diffusion flame in a compressible mixing layer with finite rate chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    The ignition and structure of a reacting compressible mixing layer is considered using finite rate chemistry lying between two streams of reactants with different freestream speeds and temperatures. Numerical integration of the governing equations show that the structure of the reacting flow can be quite complicated depending on the magnitude of the Zeldovich number. An analysis of both the ignition a diffusion flame regimes is presented using a combination of large Zeldovich number asymptotics and numerics. This allows to analyze the behavior of these regimes as a function of the parameters of the problem.

  6. Ignition and structure of a laminar diffusion flame in a compressible mixing layer with finite rate chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Jackson, T. L.

    1991-01-01

    The ignition and structure of a reacting compressible mixing layer is considered using finite rate chemistry lying between two streams of reactants with different freestream speeds and temperatures. Numerical integration of the governing equations show that the structure of the reacting flow can be quite complicated depending on the magnitude of the Zeldovich number. An analysis of both the ignition and diffusion flame regimes is presented using a combination of large Zeldovich number asymptotics and numerics. This allows to analyze the behavior of these regimes as a function of the parameters of the problem.

  7. Instability growth rate of two-phase mixing layers from a linear eigenvalue problem and an initial-value problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagué, Anne; Fuster, Daniel; Popinet, Stéphane; Scardovelli, Ruben; Zaleski, Stéphane

    2010-09-01

    The temporal instability of parallel two-phase mixing layers is studied with a linear stability code by considering a composite error function base flow. The eigenfunctions of the linear problem are used to initialize the velocity and volume fraction fields for direct numerical simulations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with the open-source GERRIS flow solver. We compare the growth rate of the most unstable mode from the linear stability problem and from the simulation results at moderate and large density and viscosity ratios in order to validate the code for a wide range of physical parameters. The efficiency of the adaptive mesh refinement scheme is also discussed.

  8. Ion species mix measurements in DIII-D and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor using ion-ion hybrid layer reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.; Watson, G.W.; Burrell, K.H.

    2004-10-01

    A superheterodyne reflectometer can provide a direct and inexpensive measurement of the concentrations of ion species with different charge to mass ratios. The ion-ion hybrid cutoff frequency is uniquely determined by the cyclotron frequencies and concentrations of the different species. The phase of a {approx}20 MHz wave that travels from a launching antenna on the low-field side of a tokamak, reflects off the cutoff layer, then travels to a receiving antenna provides a direct measure of the species mix. Hydrogen concentrations between 3% and 67% are measured in DIII-D using this technique. In theory, the technique can measure the spatial profile of the tritium concentration in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. Possible practical difficulties include attenuation of the wave in the evanescent layer near the antenna.

  9. Calculation of the flow field including boundary layer effects for supersonic mixed compression inlets at angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadyak, J.; Hoffman, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    The flow field in supersonic mixed compression aircraft inlets at angle of attack is calculated. A zonal modeling technique is employed to obtain the solution which divides the flow field into different computational regions. The computational regions consist of a supersonic core flow, boundary layer flows adjacent to both the forebody/centerbody and cowl contours, and flow in the shock wave boundary layer interaction regions. The zonal modeling analysis is described and some computational results are presented. The governing equations for the supersonic core flow form a hyperbolic system of partial differential equations. The equations for the characteristic surfaces and the compatibility equations applicable along these surfaces are derived. The characteristic surfaces are the stream surfaces, which are surfaces composed of streamlines, and the wave surfaces, which are surfaces tangent to a Mach conoid. The compatibility equations are expressed as directional derivatives along streamlines and bicharacteristics, which are the lines of tangency between a wave surface and a Mach conoid.

  10. Comparative Study of MIL-96(Al) as Continuous Metal-Organic Frameworks Layer and Mixed-Matrix Membrane.

    PubMed

    Knebel, Alexander; Friebe, Sebastian; Bigall, Nadja Carola; Benzaqui, Marvin; Serre, Christian; Caro, Jürgen

    2016-03-23

    MIL-96(Al) layers were prepared as supported metal-organic frameworks membrane via reactive seeding using the α-alumina support as the Al source for the formation of the MIL-96(Al) seeds. Depending on the solvent mixture employed during seed formation, two different crystal morphologies, with different orientation of the transport-active channels, have been formed. This crystal orientation and habit is predefined by the seed crystals and is kept in the subsequent growth of the seeds to continuous layers. In the gas separation of an equimolar H2/CO2 mixture, the hydrogen permeability of the two supported MIL-96(Al) layers was found to be highly dependent on the crystal morphology and the accompanied channel orientation in the layer. In addition to the neat supported MIL-96(Al) membrane layers, mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs, 10 wt % filler loading) as a composite of MIL-96(Al) particles as filler in a continuous Matrimid polymer phase have been prepared. Five particle sizes of MIL-96(Al) between 3.2 μm and 55 nm were synthesized. In the preparation of the MIL-96(Al)/Matrimid MMM (10 wt % filler loading), the following preparation problems have been identified: The bigger micrometer-sized MIL-96(Al) crystals show a trend toward sedimentation during casting of the MMM, whereas for nanoparticles aggregation and recrystallization to micrometer-sized MIL-96(Al) crystals has been observed. Because of these preparation problems for MMM, the neat supported MIL-96(Al) layers show a relatively high H2/CO2 selectivity (≈9) and a hydrogen permeance approximately 2 magnitudes higher than that of the best MMM. PMID:26886432

  11. Comparative Study of MIL-96(Al) as Continuous Metal-Organic Frameworks Layer and Mixed-Matrix Membrane.

    PubMed

    Knebel, Alexander; Friebe, Sebastian; Bigall, Nadja Carola; Benzaqui, Marvin; Serre, Christian; Caro, Jürgen

    2016-03-23

    MIL-96(Al) layers were prepared as supported metal-organic frameworks membrane via reactive seeding using the α-alumina support as the Al source for the formation of the MIL-96(Al) seeds. Depending on the solvent mixture employed during seed formation, two different crystal morphologies, with different orientation of the transport-active channels, have been formed. This crystal orientation and habit is predefined by the seed crystals and is kept in the subsequent growth of the seeds to continuous layers. In the gas separation of an equimolar H2/CO2 mixture, the hydrogen permeability of the two supported MIL-96(Al) layers was found to be highly dependent on the crystal morphology and the accompanied channel orientation in the layer. In addition to the neat supported MIL-96(Al) membrane layers, mixed-matrix membranes (MMMs, 10 wt % filler loading) as a composite of MIL-96(Al) particles as filler in a continuous Matrimid polymer phase have been prepared. Five particle sizes of MIL-96(Al) between 3.2 μm and 55 nm were synthesized. In the preparation of the MIL-96(Al)/Matrimid MMM (10 wt % filler loading), the following preparation problems have been identified: The bigger micrometer-sized MIL-96(Al) crystals show a trend toward sedimentation during casting of the MMM, whereas for nanoparticles aggregation and recrystallization to micrometer-sized MIL-96(Al) crystals has been observed. Because of these preparation problems for MMM, the neat supported MIL-96(Al) layers show a relatively high H2/CO2 selectivity (≈9) and a hydrogen permeance approximately 2 magnitudes higher than that of the best MMM.

  12. HH110 Jet Near Infrared Imaging. I. The Outflow Mixing Layer?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noriega-Crespo, A.; Garnavich, P. M.; Raga, A. C.; Canto, J.; Bohm, K. -H.

    1995-01-01

    Near infrared images are presented of the Herbig-Haro 110 jet centered at the molecular hydrogen lines. The ratio of these lines provides a preliminary diagnostic of molecular gas excitation, which is expected from low velocity shocks and turbulent processes. It is suggested that the morphological properties of the molecular hydrogen emission are consistent with that of a boundary layer.

  13. Layer rigidity effects on dynamical properties of mixed ion pillared clays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Solin, S. A.

    1989-10-01

    We have discussed a peculiar composition dependent torsional mode frequency shift for mixed ion pillared vermiculite compounds in terms of the phenomenological contact interaction. We have also constructed a plot of the normalized basal spacing versus normalized torsional mode frequency for two vermiculite intercalation compounds, CsxRb1- x- Vm and [( CH3) 4N+] x[( CH3) 3NH+] 1- x- Vm. This plot shows a striking "scaling-like" behavior for the two different mixed-ion systems. An attempt to understand this behavior based on the virtual crystal approximation has been made. This model calculation reveals a very close relationship between the basal spacing and the gallery ion-oxygen interaction.

  14. The counterintuitive effect of summer-to-fall mixed layer deepening on eukaryotic new production in the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, Sarah E.; Lomas, Michael W.; Ward, Bess B.; Sigman, Daniel M.

    2014-02-01

    The Sargasso Sea is characterized by strong summertime stratification that is thought to drive oligotrophy, but export production is surprisingly similar to that of high-latitude regions with ample major nutrient supply. Here we use the summer-to-fall progression in the northwestern Sargasso Sea to investigate the relationship between upper ocean stratification and phytoplankton nitrogen (N) uptake. Euphotic zone particles collected in July, October, and December were sorted by flow cytometry, and the 15N/14N of separated prokaryotic and eukaryotic phytoplankton was analyzed. The 15N/14N of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus was always low, indicating uniform reliance on recycled N. In July and in two fall profiles, the 15N/14N of eukaryotic phytoplankton was high, reflecting consumption of subsurface nitrate. In three other fall profiles, eukaryotic 15N/14N was similar to prokaryote 15N/14N, suggesting a shift toward more complete reliance on recycled N. The progressive deepening of the mixed layer from summer to fall, although reducing the surface-to-deep density contrast, increases the density difference of the euphotic zone as a whole from underlying nutrient-rich waters, which may play a role in the observed decline in euphotic zone nitrate supply into the fall. The apparent summertime nitrate supply to the euphotic zone, when the mixed layer is shallowest, may help to explain the surprisingly high export production of the subtropical and tropical ocean.

  15. Horizontal heat fluxes over complex terrain computed using a simple mixed-layer model and a numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Fujio; Kuwagata, Tuneo

    1995-02-01

    The thermally induced local circulation over a periodic valley is simulated by a two-dimensional numerical model that does-not include condensational processes. During the daytime of a clear, calm day, heat is transported from the mountainous region to the valley area by anabatic wind and its return flow. The specific humidity is, however, transported in an inverse manner. The horizontal exchange rate of sensible heat has a horizontal scale similarity, as long as the horizontal scale is less than a critical width of about 100 km. The sensible heat accumulated in an atmospheric column over an arbitrary point can be estimated by a simple model termed the uniform mixed-layer model (UML). The model assumes that the potential temperature is both vertically and horizontally uniform in the mixed layer, even over the complex terrain. The UML model is valid only when the horizontal scale of the topography is less than the critical width and the maximum difference in the elevation of the topography is less than about 1500 m. Latent heat is accumulated over the mountainous region while the atmosphere becomes dry over the valley area. When the horizontal scale is close to the critical width, the largest amount of humidity is accumulated during the late afternoon over the mountainous region. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, G.N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are disclosed. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. 6 figs.

  17. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic-impedance measurements. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-06-10

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material are presented. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  18. Warmer, deeper, and greener mixed layers in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre over the last 50 years.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Elodie; Raitsos, Dionysios E; Antoine, David

    2016-02-01

    Shifts in global climate resonate in plankton dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, and marine food webs. We studied these linkages in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre (NASG), which hosts extensive phytoplankton blooms. We show that phytoplankton abundance increased since the 1960s in parallel to a deepening of the mixed layer and a strengthening of winds and heat losses from the ocean, as driven by the low frequency of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In parallel to these bottom-up processes, the top-down control of phytoplankton by copepods decreased over the same time period in the western NASG, following sea surface temperature changes typical of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation (AMO). While previous studies have hypothesized that climate-driven warming would facilitate seasonal stratification of surface waters and long-term phytoplankton increase in subpolar regions, here we show that deeper mixed layers in the NASG can be warmer and host a higher phytoplankton biomass. These results emphasize that different modes of climate variability regulate bottom-up (NAO control) and top-down (AMO control) forcing on phytoplankton at decadal timescales. As a consequence, different relationships between phytoplankton, zooplankton, and their physical environment appear subject to the disparate temporal scale of the observations (seasonal, interannual, or decadal). The prediction of phytoplankton response to climate change should be built upon what is learnt from observations at the longest timescales.

  19. Nonlinear interaction between a pair of oblique modes in a supersonic mixing layer: Long-wave limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsa, Thomas F.; Gartside, James

    1995-01-01

    The nonlinear interaction between a pair of symmetric, oblique, and spatial instability modes is studied in the long-wave limit using asymptotic methods. The base flow is taken to be a supersonic mixing layer whose Mach number is such that the corresponding vortex sheet is marginally stable according to Miles' criterion. It is shown that the amplitude of the mode obeys a nonlinear integro-differential equation. Numerical solutions of this equation show that, when the obliqueness angle is less than pi/4, the effect of the nonlinearity is to enhance the growth rate of the instability. The solution terminates in a singularity at a finite streamwise location. This result is reminiscent of that obtained in the vicinity of the neutral point by other authors in several different types of flows. On the other hand, when the obliqueness angle is more than pi/4, the streamwise development of the amplitude is characterized by a series of modulations. This arises from the fact that the nonlinear term in the amplitude equation may be either stabilizing or destabilizing, depending on the value of the streamwise coordinate. However, even in this case the amplitude of the disturbance increases, though not as rapidly as in the case for which the angle is less than pi/4. Quite generally then, the nonlinear interaction between two oblique modes in a supersonic mixing layer enhances the growth of the disturbance.

  20. Locating interfaces in vertically-layered materials and determining concentrations in mixed materials utilizing acoustic impedance measurements

    DOEpatents

    Langlois, Gary N.

    1983-09-13

    Measurement of the relative and actual value of acoustic characteristic impedances of an unknown substance, location of the interfaces of vertically-layered materials, and the determination of the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material. A highly damped ultrasonic pulse is transmitted into one side of a reference plate, such as a tank wall, where the other side of the reference plate is in physical contact with the medium to be measured. The amplitude of a return signal, which is the reflection of the transmitted pulse from the interface between the other side of the reference plate and the medium, is measured. The amplitude value indicates the acoustic characteristic impedance of the substance relative to that of the reference plate or relative to that of other tested materials. Discontinuities in amplitude with repeated measurements for various heights indicate the location of interfaces in vertically-layered materials. Standardization techniques permit the relative acoustic characteristic impedance of a substance to be converted to an actual value. Calibration techniques for mixtures permit the amplitude to be converted to the concentration of a first material mixed in a second material.

  1. Evaluation of simulated climatological diurnal temperature range in CMIP5 models from the perspective of planetary boundary layer turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Nan; Zhou, Liming; Dai, Yongjiu

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the effects of modeled planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing on the simulated temperature diurnal cycle climatology over land in 20 CMIP5 models with AMIP simulations. When compared with observations, the magnitude of diurnal temperature range (DTR) is systematically underestimated over almost all land areas due to a widespread warm bias of daily minimum temperature (Tmin) and mostly a cold bias of daily maximum temperature (Tmax). Analyses of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble means suggest that the biases of the simulated PBL mixing could very likely contribute to the temperature biases. For the regions with the cold bias in Tmax, the daytime PBL mixing is generally underestimated. The consequent more dry air entrainment from the free atmosphere could help maintain the surface humidity gradient, and thus produce more surface evaporation and potentially lower the Tmax. The opposite situation holds true for the regions with the warm bias of Tmax. This mechanism could be particularly applicable to the regions with moderate and wet climate conditions where surface evaporation depends more on the surface humidity gradient, but less on the available soil moisture. For the widespread warm bias of Tmin, the widely-recognized overestimated PBL mixing at nighttime should play a dominant role by transferring more heat from the atmosphere to the near-surface to warm the Tmin. Further analyses using the high resolution CFMIP2 output also support the CMIP5 results about the connections of the biases between the simulated turbulent mixing and the temperature diurnal cycle. The large inter-model variations of the simulated temperature diurnal cycle primarily appear over the arid and semi-arid regions and boreal arctic regions where the model differences in the PBL turbulence mixing could make equally significant contributions to the inter-model variations of DTR, Tmax and Tmin compared to the model differences in surface radiative processes. These results

  2. Vorticity and velocity measurements in a 2:1 mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foss, J. F.; Haw, R. C.

    A transverse vorticity measurement in a two stream shear layer are reported. These are compared with the similar results from a nine-wire probe that was used in the same flow field and a four-spot LDA technique from a similar flow field. Basic agreement is found between these different measuring techniques. A rational influence of probe size on the observed rms omega(z) value is observed.

  3. Employment of Mixed Layer Models and Large Eddy Simulations to Determine the Factors Controlling Stratocumulus Cloud Lifetime over the Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghonima, M. S.; Heus, T.; Norris, J. R.; Kleissl, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Summertime marine boundary layer stratocumulus (Sc) clouds have a strong impact on ecology and infrastructure over the coast of California. Modeling the lifetime of such clouds in global climate models (GCM) or numerical weather prediction models (NWP) is difficult and significant errors are typically observed. For instance, stratocumulus clouds over the coast of southern California in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model were found to dissipate, on average, 1.9 hours earlier than observed via satellite. In order to determine the factors controlling the Sc lifetime, we have employed large eddy simulations (LES) and a mixed layer model (MLM). Enhancements to previous MLMs include a temperature dependent radiation scheme, a land surface model, and a novel entrainment parameterization scheme for stratocumulus clouds over land in which the entrainment velocity is derived as a function of the surface buoyancy flux and the buoyancy flux integrated over the cloud layer. The advantage of using the MLM is that different mechanisms and feedbacks controlling stratocumulus cloud thickness can be examined rapidly through sensitivity studies. We find that during the night cloud lifetime is modulated by longwave cooling of the boundary layer and entrainment flux warming and drying. During the day, surface shortwave radiative heating drives surface flux therefore increasing the turbulence within the boundary layer and increasing entrainment flux. For wet surface conditions, the increase in latent heat flux moistens the boundary layer and offsets the increase in entrainment flux warming and drying of the boundary layer and clouds persist throughout the day. For dry surface conditions, the combination of increased surface sensible heat flux warming the boundary layer and increased entrainment flux act to dissipate the cloud within a couple of hours after sunrise. For both cases, the sea breeze advects cool ocean air that acts to thicken and prolong the cloud lifetime

  4. Inhibition of mixed-layer deepening during winter in the northeastern Arabian Sea by the West India Coastal Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, D.; Remya, R.; Vinayachandran, P. N.; Chatterjee, Abhisek; Behera, Ambica

    2016-08-01

    Though the deep mixed layers (MLs) that form in the northeastern Arabian Sea (NEAS) during the winter monsoon (November-February) have been attributed to convective mixing driven by dry, cool northeasterly winds from the Indian subcontinent, data show that the deepest MLs occur in the northern NEAS and the maxima of latent-heat and net heat fluxes in the southern NEAS. We use an oceanic general circulation model to show that the deep MLs in the NEAS extend up to ~20°N till the end of December, but are restricted poleward of ~22°N (~23°N) in January (February). This progressive restriction of the deep mixed layers within the NEAS is due to poleward advection of water of lower salinity by the West India Coastal Current (WICC). The deep MLs are sustained till February in the northern NEAS because convective mixing deepens the ML before the waters of lower salinity reach this region and the wind stirring and convective overturning generate sufficient turbulent energy for the ML to maintain the depth attained in January. Though the atmospheric fluxes tend to cool the ML in the southern NEAS, this cooling is countered by the warming due to horizontal advection. Likewise, the cooling due to entrainment, which continues in the southern NEAS even as the ML shallows during January-February, is almost cancelled by the warming caused by a downwelling vertical velocity field. Therefore, the SST changes very little during December-February even as the ML shallows dramatically in the southern NEAS. These deep MLs of the NEAS also preclude a strong intraseasonal response to the intraseasonal variability in the fluxes. This role of horizontal advection implies that the ML depth in the NEAS is determined by an interplay of physical processes that are forced differently. The convective mixing depends on processes that are local to the region, but the advection is due to the WICC, whose seasonal cycle is primarily forced by remote winds. By inhibiting the formation of deep MLs in

  5. Intercomparison of cloud model simulations of Arctic mixed-phase boundary layer clouds observed during SHEBA/FIRE-ACE

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, H.; Zuidema, Paquita; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Luo, Yali; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shipway, Ben

    2011-06-16

    An intercomparison of six cloud-resolving and large-eddy simulation models is presented. This case study is based on observations of a persistent mixed-phase boundary layer cloud gathered on 7 May, 1998 from the Surface Heat Budget of Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) and First ISCCP Regional Experiment - Arctic Cloud Experiment (FIRE-ACE). Ice nucleation is constrained in the simulations in a way that holds the ice crystal concentration approximately fixed, with two sets of sensitivity runs in addition to the baseline simulations utilizing different specified ice nucleus (IN) concentrations. All of the baseline and sensitivity simulations group into two distinct quasi-steady states associated with either persistent mixed-phase clouds or all-ice clouds after the first few hours of integration, implying the existence of multiple equilibria. These two states are associated with distinctly different microphysical, thermodynamic, and radiative characteristics. Most but not all of the models produce a persistent mixed-phase cloud qualitatively similar to observations using the baseline IN/crystal concentration, while small increases in the IN/crystal concentration generally lead to rapid glaciation and conversion to the all-ice state. Budget analysis indicates that larger ice deposition rates associated with increased IN/crystal concentrations have a limited direct impact on dissipation of liquid in these simulations. However, the impact of increased ice deposition is greatly enhanced by several interaction pathways that lead to an increased surface precipitation flux, weaker cloud top radiative cooling and cloud dynamics, and reduced vertical mixing, promoting rapid glaciation of the mixed-phase cloud for deposition rates in the cloud layer greater than about 1-2x10-5 g kg-1 s-1. These results indicate the critical importance of precipitation-radiative-dynamical interactions in simulating cloud phase, which have been neglected in previous fixed-dynamical parcel studies of the cloud

  6. Microfluidic Synthesis of Hybrid Nanoparticles with Controlled Lipid Layers: Understanding Flexibility-Regulated Cell-Nanoparticle Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Feng, Qiang; Wang, Jiuling; Zhang, Shuai; Ding, Baoquan; Wei, Yujie; Dong, Mingdong; Ryu, Ji-Young; Yoon, Tae-Young; Shi, Xinghua; Sun, Jiashu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-10-27

    The functionalized lipid shell of hybrid nanoparticles plays an important role for improving their biocompatibility and in vivo stability. Yet few efforts have been made to critically examine the shell structure of nanoparticles and its effect on cell-particle interaction. Here we develop a microfluidic chip allowing for the synthesis of structurally well-defined lipid-polymer nanoparticles of the same sizes, but covered with either lipid-monolayer-shell (MPs, monolayer nanoparticles) or lipid-bilayer-shell (BPs, bilayer nanoparticles). Atomic force microscope and atomistic simulations reveal that MPs have a lower flexibility than BPs, resulting in a more efficient cellular uptake and thus anticancer effect than BPs do. This flexibility-regulated cell-particle interaction may have important implications for designing drug nanocarriers.

  7. X-ray attenuation measurements in a cavitating mixing layer for instantaneous two-dimensional void ratio determination

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschlimann, Vincent; Barre, Stephane; Legoupil, Samuel

    2011-05-15

    The purpose of this experimental study was to analyze a two-dimensional cavitating shear layer. The global aim of this work was to obtain a better understanding and modeling of cavitation phenomenon in a 2D turbulent sheared flow which can be considered as quite representative of cavitating rocket engine turbopomp inducers. This 2D mixing layer flow provided us a well documented test case which can be used for the characterization of the cavitation effects in sheared flows. The development of a velocity gradient was observed inside a liquid water flow: Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities developed at the interface. Vaporizations and implosions of cavitating structures inside the vortices were observed. X-ray attenuation measurements were performed to estimate the amount of vapor present inside the mixing area. Instantaneous two-dimensional void ratio fields were acquired. The real spatial resolutions are 0.5 mm with 2000 fps and 1.5 mm with 20 000 fps. The effective time resolution is equal to the camera frame rate up to a 19% void ratio variation between two consecutive images. This seems to be sufficient in the context of the present flow configuration. The two-phase structures present inside the mixing area were analyzed at three different cavitation levels and their behaviors were compared to non-cavitating flow dynamic. Convection velocities and vortices shedding frequencies were estimated. Results show that vapor was transported by the turbulent velocity field. Statistical analysis of the void ratio signal was carried out up to the fourth order moment. This study provided a global understanding of the cavitating structure evolution and of the cavitation effects on turbulent sheared flows.

  8. Plasma-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Ruthenium-Titanium Nitride Mixed-Phase Layers for Direct-Plate Liner and Copper Diffusion Barrier Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildea, Adam James

    Current interconnect networks in semiconductor processing utilize a sputtered TaN diffusion barrier, Ta liner, and Cu seed to improve the adhesion, microstructure, and electromigration resistance of electrochemically deposited copper that fills interconnect wires and vias. However, as wire/via widths shrink due to device scaling, it becomes increasingly difficult to have the volume of a wire/via be occupied with ECD Cu which increases line resistance and increases the delay in signal propagation in IC chips. A single layer that could serve the purpose of a Cu diffusion barrier and ECD Cu adhesion promoter could allow ECD Cu to occupy a larger volume of a wire/via, leading to a decrease in line resistance and decrease in signal delay. Previous work has shown RuTaN, RuWCN, and RuCo films can act as Cu diffusion barriers and be directly platable to thickness of 2-3nm. However, other material selections may prove as effective or possibly better. Mixed-phase films of ruthenium titanium nitride grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were investigated for their performance as a Cu diffusion barrier and as a surface for the direct plating of ECD Cu. All Ru was deposited by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) while TiN was deposited by either thermal ALD or PEALD. RuTiN, films with thermal ALD TiN and a Ru:Ti of 20:1 showed barrier performance comparable to PVD TaN at 3-4 nm thickness and 15 nm planar films were directly platable. Follow up work is certainly needed for this material set, yet initial results indicate RuTiN could serve as an effective direct plate liner for Cu interconnects.

  9. Performance test of the synergetic use of simulated lidar and microwave radiometer observations for mixing-layer height detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Umar; Rocadenbosch, Francesc; Crewell, Susanne

    2015-10-01

    There are several instruments and methods to retrieve the atmospheric Mixing Layer Height (MLH). However, none of these instruments or methods can measure the development of the MLH under all atmospheric conditions. For example, aerosol signatures measured by backscatter lidars can be used to determine the MLH but this approach is reasonable only when the atmosphere is well-mixed. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) derived profiles have low vertical resolution and cannot resolve fine structures in the boundary layer, especially, at higher altitudes. Here we propose a method which combines data from a ground-based lidar and a MWR, in simulated as well as real measurements scenarios, to overcome these limitations. The method works by fitting an erf-like transition model function to the section of range-corrected lidar backscatter signal. The section of the lidar backscatter signal for fitting the model function is obtained by incorporating the MWR estimates of MLH along with their uncertainties. The fitting is achieved by using an extended Kalman filter (EKF). The proposed approach, by exploiting the synergy between the two instruments, enables to detect MLH with original vertical and temporal resolutions. Test cases combining simulated data for a co-located lidar-ceilometer and a MWR are presented. The simulated data is obtained from the Dutch Atmospheric Large Eddy Simulation (DALES) model for boundary layer studies. Doppler wind lidar along with radiosondes (whenever available) data is used to assess the quality of the synergetic MLH estimates. Data from the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) campaign at Jülich, Germany is used to test the proposed method.

  10. An experimental and numerical study of the modifications of mixed-layer structure by inhomogeneous surface fluxes and secondary circulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, S.; Doran, J.C.

    1994-07-01

    The problem of scale interactions in the planetary boundary layer (PBL), i.e., how forcing mechanisms of differing spatial and temporal scales affect the properties of the PBL, has been a subject of considerable interest for some time. One aspect of this problem that has received increasing attention in recent years is the representation, in mesoscale and general circulation models. of the effects of subgrid-scale inhomogeneities in surface properties. Differences in sensible and latent heat fluxes between adjacent areas can result in secondary circulations. modifications to the boundary layer structure, and the transport of heat and moisture from one area to another. Despite their potential included on local PBL properties, such effects can not be resolved by numerical models whose scale is too coarse; thus, suitable parameterizations that account for these phenomena are needed. In this paper the authors present some results of wind and temperature measurements over an area with significant variations in surface fluxes on scales of O(10 km). They then use fine resolution numerical simulations to show how synoptic, topographical, and thermal forcing combine to affect the properties of the PBL in the region. Specifically, they consider the relative importance of topography and land-use differences on the generation of secondary circulations and on the depth of the mixed layer, and they show how these effects are modified by synoptic wind fields. Implications for coarser resolution models are also discussed.

  11. Remote sensing measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio in the planetary boundary layer using cloud slicing with airborne lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Anand K.; Mao, Jianping; Abshire, James B.; Allan, Graham R.

    2015-03-01

    We have measured the CO2 volume mixing ratio (VMR) within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) using cloud slicing with an airborne pulsed integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar from flight altitudes of up to 13 km. During a flight over Iowa in summer 2011, simultaneous measurement of the optical range and CO2 absorption to clouds and the ground were made using time-resolved detection of pulse echoes from each scattering surface. We determined the CO2 absorption in the PBL by differencing the two lidar-measured absorption line shapes, one to a broken shallow cumulus cloud layer located at the top of the PBL and the other to the ground. Solving for the CO2 VMR in the PBL and that of the free troposphere, we measured a ≈15 ppm (4%) drawdown in the PBL. Both CO2 VMRs were within ≈3 ppm of in situ CO2 profile measurements. We have also demonstrated cloud slicing using scatter from thin, diffuse cirrus clouds and cumulus clouds, which allowed solving for the CO2 VMR for three vertical layers. The technique and retrieval algorithm are applicable to a space-based lidar instrument as well as to lidar IPDA measurements of other trace gases. Thus, lidar cloud slicing also offers promise toward space-based remote sensing of vertical trace gas profiles in the atmosphere using a variety of clouds.

  12. Mixing ALD/MLD-grown ZnO and Zn-4-aminophenol layers into various thin-film structures.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, Pia; Sood, Anjali; Liu, Xuwen; Karppinen, Maarit

    2013-11-14

    Building 2D inorganic-organic hybrids by combining inorganic and organic constituents with molecular-layer precision is an attractive approach to fabricate novel materials with a tailored combination of properties from both entities. Here we demonstrate the potential of the combined atomic and molecular layer deposition (ALD/MLD) technique for the state-of-the-art synthesis of such materials and to fabricate both homogeneous thin-film mixtures and nanolaminates of ZnO and the Zn-4-aminophenol inorganic-organic hybrid. The thin films are deposited by varying the number of precursor cycles during the depositions. Diethyl zinc and 4-aminophenol (AP) are used as precursors for the Zn-AP hybrid depositions, and diethyl zinc and water for the ZnO depositions. The characterization of the mixed Zn-AP and ZnO films reveals that crystallinity, density, surface roughness, chemical stability, hardness and contact modulus are sensitively altered by even a minor insertion of Zn-AP hybrid into the ZnO structure. Fabrication of Zn-AP + ZnO nanolaminates with different thicknesses of the Zn-AP and ZnO layers provides us with an even better way to control the hardness and contact modulus, and also to enhance the chemical stability of the films.

  13. Feed array metrology and correction layer for large antenna systems in ASIC mixed signal technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centureli, F.; Scotti, G.; Tommasino, P.; Trifiletti, A.; Romano, F.; Cimmino, R.; Saitto, A.

    2014-08-01

    The paper deals with a possible use of the feed array present in a large antenna system, as a layer for measuring the antenna performance with a self-test procedure and a possible way to correct residual errors of the Antenna geometry and of the antenna distortions. Focus has been concentrated on a few key critical elements of a possible feed array metrology program. In particular, a preliminary contribution to the design and development of the feed array from one side, and the subsystem dedicated to antenna distortion monitoring and control from the other, have been chosen as the first areas of investigation. Scalability and flexibility principles and synergic approach with other coexistent technologies have been assumed of paramount importance to ensure ease of integrated operation and therefore allowing in principle increased performance and efficiency. The concept is based on the use of an existing feed array grid to measure antenna distortion with respect to the nominal configuration. Measured data are then processed to develop a multilayer strategy to control the mechanical movable devices (when existing) and to adjust the residual fine errors through a software controlled phase adjustment of the existing phase shifter The signal from the feed array is converted passing through a FPGA/ASIC level to digital data channels. The kind of those typically used for the scientific experiments. One additional channel is used for monitoring the antenna distortion status. These data are processed to define the best correction strategy, based on a software managed control system capable of operating at three different levels of the antenna system: reflector rotation layer, sub reflector rotation and translation layer (assuming the possibility of controlling a Stewart machine), phase shifter of the phased array layer. The project is at present in the design phase, a few elements necessary for a sound software design of the control subsystem have been developed at a

  14. Effects of mixed discrete surface charges on the electrical double layer.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Ángeles, Felipe

    2012-08-01

    Adsorption of surface coions and charge reversal are induced at the electrical double layer of a wall charged with positive and negative surface sites next to an electrolyte solution. While for the considered surface charge density these effects are found over a wide range of conditions, they are not observed for the typically employed surface models in equivalent conditions. Important consequences in electrophoresis experiments for different colloids with equal effective surface charge density are foreseen. This study is carried out by means of molecular dynamics simulations.

  15. Porous layered and open-framework mixed-valence copper tellurites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovski, Mishel R.; Siidra, Oleg I.; Kayukov, Roman A.; Nazarchuk, Evgeni W.

    2016-11-01

    |Cu+Cl3|[Cu2+2(TeO3)] (1), |Cu+1.7Cl3.8|[Cu2+4O(TeO3)2] (2) and Tl+2[Cu2+2Te6+Te4+6O18] (3) were obtained by CVT and hydrothermal methods in CuCl-CuCl2-TeO2 and Tl2CO3-CuO-TeO2 systems. 1 demonstrates layered topology with pores (1×0.65 nm), whereas 2 has open-framework structural architecture with two-dimensional system of channels (1.16×0.74 nm). Channels in open-framework of 3 are occupied by Tl+ cations. 'Host-guest' structural organization of 1 and 2 with host Cu2+-tellurite units of different dimensionality formed by oxocentered OCu4 tetrahedra and OCu2Te triangles and guest Cu+-chloride species is the result of formation from gases in CVT reactions. Oxocentered units determine basic topologies of the structures of 1 and 2 and influence their stability and properties. [Te6+Te4+6O18]6- polytellurite-tellurate framework in 3 can be represented as consisting of Kagome-like layers.

  16. Friction Modifier Using Adherent Metallic Multilayered or Mixed Element Layer Conversion Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F. (Inventor); Defalco, Francis G. (Inventor); Starks, Lloyd L., Sr. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A process for creating conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes for surfaces, wherein the conversion coatings and spin, drawing, and extrusion finishes contain potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The process comprises forming an aqueous solution of water, phosphoric acid or sulfuric acid, ammonium hydroxide, an alkali metal hydroxide, and one or more non-alkaline metals and/or one or more metalloids. The aqueous solution forms an anti-friction multilayer conversion and/or mixed element coating or a spin, drawing, and extrusion finish on a surface when applied to the surface, either directly without the use of applied external electromotive force, or as an additive in lubricating fluids.

  17. Interactions of Lipidic Cubic Phase Nanoparticles with Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Nazaruk, Ewa; Matyszewska, Dorota; Speziale, Chiara; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Landau, Ehud M; Bilewicz, Renata

    2016-09-20

    The interactions of liquid-crystalline monoolein (GMO) cubic phase nanoparticles with various model lipid membranes spread at the air-solution interface by the Langmuir technique were investigated. Cubosomes have attracted attention as potential biocompatible drug delivery systems, and thus understanding their mode of interaction with membranes is of special interest. Cubosomes spreading at the air-water interface as well as interactions with a monolayer of 1, 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) compressed to different surface pressures were studied by monitoring surface pressure-time dependencies at constant area. Progressive incorporation of the nanoparticles was shown to lead to mixed monolayer formation. The concentration of cubosomes influenced the mechanism of incorporation, as well as the fluidity and permeability of the resulting lipid membranes. Brewster angle microscopy images reflected the dependence of the monolayer structure on the cubosomes presence in the subphase. A parameter Csat was introduced to indicate the point of saturation of the lipid membrane with the cubosomal material. This parameter was found to depend on the surface pressure showing that the cubosomes disintegrate in prolonged contact with the membrane, filling available voids in the lipid membrane. At highest surface pressures when the layer is most compact, the penetration of cubosomal material is not possible and only some exchange with the membrane lipid becomes the route of including GMO into the layer. Finally, comparative studies of the interactions between lipids with various headgroup charges with cubosomes suggest that at high surface pressure an exchange of lipid component between the monolayer and the cubosome in its intact form may occur. PMID:27550742

  18. Interactions of Lipidic Cubic Phase Nanoparticles with Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Jabłonowska, Elżbieta; Nazaruk, Ewa; Matyszewska, Dorota; Speziale, Chiara; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Landau, Ehud M; Bilewicz, Renata

    2016-09-20

    The interactions of liquid-crystalline monoolein (GMO) cubic phase nanoparticles with various model lipid membranes spread at the air-solution interface by the Langmuir technique were investigated. Cubosomes have attracted attention as potential biocompatible drug delivery systems, and thus understanding their mode of interaction with membranes is of special interest. Cubosomes spreading at the air-water interface as well as interactions with a monolayer of 1, 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) compressed to different surface pressures were studied by monitoring surface pressure-time dependencies at constant area. Progressive incorporation of the nanoparticles was shown to lead to mixed monolayer formation. The concentration of cubosomes influenced the mechanism of incorporation, as well as the fluidity and permeability of the resulting lipid membranes. Brewster angle microscopy images reflected the dependence of the monolayer structure on the cubosomes presence in the subphase. A parameter Csat was introduced to indicate the point of saturation of the lipid membrane with the cubosomal material. This parameter was found to depend on the surface pressure showing that the cubosomes disintegrate in prolonged contact with the membrane, filling available voids in the lipid membrane. At highest surface pressures when the layer is most compact, the penetration of cubosomal material is not possible and only some exchange with the membrane lipid becomes the route of including GMO into the layer. Finally, comparative studies of the interactions between lipids with various headgroup charges with cubosomes suggest that at high surface pressure an exchange of lipid component between the monolayer and the cubosome in its intact form may occur.

  19. Evidence for the mixing of granitic and basaltic magmas in the Pleasant Bay layered intrusion, coastal Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, P.M. . Geology Dept.)

    1993-03-01

    The Pleasant Bay layered intrusion has the shape of a shallow basin about 200 km[sup 2] in area and crops out along the coast of Maine between Bar Harbor and Machias. This intrusion evolved as repeated replenishments of basaltic magma were emplaced into a silicic magma chamber (Wiebe, in press). These replenishments surged into the chamber through fractures, spreading laterally on a floor of silicic cumulates and beneath silicic magma. This produced a sequence of layers (up to 100 m thick) that grade from chilled basalt at the base to gabbroic, dioritic, or granitic emulates at the top. This study focuses on two layers, each of which grades from chilled gabbro at the base to quartz syenite at the top. Petrography and geochemistry suggest that mechanical mixing and other interactions between two stably stratified magmas were responsible for much of this variation. Plagioclase grains typically have corroded calcic cores (An[sub 52--56]) that decrease in size upward and sodic rims (An[sub 32--36]) that thicken upward. Larger plagioclase grains at higher levels often have K-spar cores. Scarce large zircon, apatite, and biotite crystals in the lower parts of the layers are often corroded. The apatites have dark pleochroic halos, suggesting they crystallized from a liquid enriched in U and Th. The silicic melt was likely the source of K and H[sub 2]O needed to crystallize hornblende and biotite. The large corroded zircon, apatite, and biotite crystals, as well as much of the hornblende, probably grew at an interface between separately convecting silicic and basaltic magmas.

  20. Investigations regarding mixed laminar-turbulent boundary layers on blade profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gundlach, W.; Porochnicki, J.; Debiec, S.

    For the further perfection of the highly stressed blades of modern turbines, an accurate calculation of the development of the flow in the wall boundary layer is absolutely indispensable, taking into account also aspects of energy dissipation. It is shown that the currently available computational models are unsatisfactory in the case of the transition to a separation bubble at highly stressed profiles. Measurem