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Sample records for mixed lubrication analysis

  1. Analysis of mixed lubrication mechanism in metal-on-metal hip joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z M

    2002-01-01

    A simple mixed lubrication model has been developed to predict the asperity contact and wear for the metal-on-metal bearing couple for total hip joint replacements. It has been shown that the femoral head radius has a large effect on the predicted asperity contact and wear depending on the lubrication regime. An increase in the femoral head radius can lead to an increase in wear under a predominantly boundary lubrication regime, but this trend can be reversed under a mixed lubrication regime towards fluid film lubrication. These observations are consistent with the recent experimental findings from hip simulator studies by Smith and co-workers.

  2. Experimental Analysis of Damping and Tribological Characteristics of Nano-CuO Particle Mixed Lubricant in Ball Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, E.; Sivakumar, K.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental analysis of damping capacity and tribological characteristics of nano CuO added Servosystem 68 lubricant is attempted. CuO nano particles were synthesized by aqueous precipitation method and characterized. Prior to dispersion into lubricant, CuO nano particles were coated with 0.2 wt.% surfactant (Span-80) to stabilize the nano fluid. Tribological characteristics of particle added lubricant were tested in ASTM D 4172 four ball wear tester. Scanning electron microscopy test results of worn surfaces of nano CuO particle added lubricant were smoother than base lubricant. The particle added lubricant was applied in a new ball bearing and three defected ball bearings. When particle added lubricant was used, the ball defected bearing's vibration amplitude was reduced by 21.94% whereas it was 16.46% for new bearing and was ≤ 11% for other defected bearings. The formation of protection film of CuO over ball surface and regime of full film lubrication near the ball zone were observed to be reason for improved damping of vibrations.

  3. Effect of surface roughness pattern on transient mixed elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, Amir; Akbarzadeh, Saleh; Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Taei, Morteza

    2016-03-01

    Besides the surface roughness of two contacting surfaces, the surface roughness pattern i.e. longitudinal, transverse and isotropic significantly influences the tribological performance of the mechanical element. Their impression is more pronounced under the mixed elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication condition. The cam and flat follower mechanism is a typical sample in which adverse tribological conditions, including direct boundary interactions occurs. In this paper, the effect of surface roughness pattern on the film thickness and friction coefficient in a cam follower mechanism is investigated. Asperity interaction and friction coefficient analysis is conducted based on a novel elasto-plastic model. The lubrication model is qualitatively compared with the experimental results obtained from the pin on disk experiments for various surface roughness orientations. The results of transient lubrication analysis for a cam and follower lubrication problem are presented. It is shown that the longitudinal surface roughness pattern has a more desirable tribological performance than transverse surface pattern.

  4. The effect of refrigerants in the mixed lubrication regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuhara, Kazuyuki; Tomimoto, Makoto

    1997-12-31

    Because of environmental concerns, CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) refrigerants must be replaced with HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons). As a result, many tribological problems are caused especially in rotary piston compressors. To solve the problem, the effects of refrigerants on friction and wear characteristics of the oil and refrigerant mixtures at the mixed lubrication regime are investigated. The difference in refrigerants are clearly observed not only in boundary but also in the mixed lubrication regime. The effects of operating conditions on sliding conditions and experimental results are also discussed. It is concluded that for practical application where long life is essential, experiments must be conducted under the mixed lubrication regime. Also, the importance of defining the lubrication regime in terms of film parameter is emphasized.

  5. Spectroscopic Analysis of Perfluoropolyether Lubricant Degradation During Boundary Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The degradation of a branched perfluoropolyether (PFPE) under boundary lubrication conditions was studied using mu-FTIR and mu-Raman spectroscopies. Stainless steel (440C) discs coated with thin (600A), uniform films of the PFPE were tested in a ball-on-disc apparatus until various levels of friction coefficient were attained. Discs were then examined using the above techniques. When the friction coefficient surpassed the value obtained with an un-lubricated control, the lubricant film had either been physically displaced or partially transformed in to a 'friction polymer'. Infrared analysis of this 'friction polymer' indicated the presence of a polymeric fluorinated acid species (R(sub f)COOH). Raman spectroscopy indicated the presence of amorphous carbon in the wear track and in the friction polymer. Some reaction mechanisms are suggested to explain the results.

  6. Lubrication mode analysis of articular cartilage using Stribeck surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2008-01-01

    Lubrication of articular cartilage occurs in distinct modes with various structural and biomolecular mechanisms contributing to the low-friction properties of natural joints. In order to elucidate relative contributions of these factors in normal and diseased tissues, determination and control of lubrication mode must occur. The objectives of these studies were (1) to develop an in vitro cartilage on glass test system to measure friction coefficient, mu; (2) to implement and extend a framework for the determination of cartilage lubrication modes; and (3) to determine the effects of synovial fluid on mu and lubrication mode transitions. Patellofemoral groove cartilage was linearly oscillated against glass under varying magnitudes of compressive strain utilizing phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and equine and bovine synovial fluid as lubricants. The time-dependent frictional properties were measured to determine the lubricant type and strain magnitude dependence for the initial friction coefficient (mu(0)=mu(t-->0)) and equilibrium friction coefficient (mu(eq)=mu(t-->infinity)). Parameters including tissue-glass co-planarity, normal strain, and surface speed were altered to determine the effect of the parameters on lubrication mode via a 'Stribeck surface'. Using this testing apparatus, cartilage exhibited biphasic lubrication with significant influence of strain magnitude on mu(0) and minimal influence on mu(eq), consistent with hydrostatic pressurization as reported by others. Lubrication analysis using 'Stribeck surfaces' demonstrated clear regions of boundary and mixed modes, but hydrodynamic or full film lubrication was not observed even at the highest speed (50mm/s) and lowest strain (5%).

  7. Mixed film lubrication with biobased oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most tribological processes (e.g. metalworking), occur in the mixed film regime where the boundary and hydrodynamic properties of the oils play critical roles. In the work described here, the boundary and hydrodynamic properties of various biobased oils were evaluated. The oils were then investiga...

  8. Mixed lubrication after rewetting of blotted pleural mesothelium.

    PubMed

    Bodega, Francesca; Sironi, Chiara; Porta, Cristina; Pecchiari, Matteo; Zocchi, Luciano; Agostoni, Emilio

    2013-01-15

    Coefficient of kinetic friction (μ) of pleural mesothelium blotted with filter paper, and rewetted with Ringer solution markedly increases; this increase is removed if a sufficient amount of sialomucin or hyaluronan is added to Ringer (Bodega et al., 2012. Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology 180, 34-39). In this research we found that μ of pleural mesothelium blotted, rewetted, and sliding at physiological velocities and loads, decreased with increase of velocity, mainly at low velocities. Despite this decrease, μ at highest velocity was still double that before blotting. With small concentration of sialomucin or hyaluronan μ was markedly smaller at each velocity, decreased less with increase of velocity, and at highest velocity approached preblotting value. These findings indicate a regime of mixed lubrication in post-blotting Ringer, at variance with boundary lubrication occurring before blotting or postblotting with sufficient macromolecule addition. Greater roughness of mesothelial surface, caused by blotting, likely induces zones of elastohydrodynamic lubrication, which increase with velocity, while contact area decreases.

  9. Wear particle analysis from grease lubricated bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenlieb, W.; Maciejewski, A.S.

    1980-11-01

    Ferrographic analysis has been shown to be useful in evaluating the wear/state condition of grease lubricated components. The major achievement was the successful application of dissolving the grease utilizing a solvent mixture and making ferrograms of equal quality as to that found in oil analysis. The types of wear particles found in used grease samples are comparative to those found in oil lubricated systems. Work is presently being performed on grease lubricated taper roller bearings, similar to the test conditions utilized in this study. The analysis of the grease samples was qualitative vs quantitative. Due to the uneven distribution of wear particulate in the grease and the relatively small amount of grease used in making the ferrograms. The primary emphasis was placed upon size distribution, morphology and elemental composition. The results of the ferrogram analysis showed a good correlation to those of the SKF personnel in terms of monitoring the wear state/condition of the bearings throughout their life. However, the on-condition monitoring of grease lubricated components in the field, is complicated by the physical location of the components and inaccessibility by maintenance personnel to remove grease samples. Where accessibility is no problem, this technique is highly recommended. As it appears presently, this analysis technique seems best suited to the examination of grease obtained from dismantled grease lubricated components or in design applications.

  10. The Chevron Foil Thrust Bearing: Improved Performance Through Passive Thermal Management and Effective Lubricant Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An improved foil thrust bearing is described that eliminates or reduces the need for forced cooling of the bearing foils while at the same time improves the load capacity of the bearing, enhances damping, provides overload tolerance, and eliminates the high speed load capacity drop-off that plagues the current state of the art. The performance improvement demonstrated by the chevron foil thrust bearing stems from a novel trailing edge shape that splays the hot lubricant in the thin film radially, thus preventing hot lubricant carry-over into the ensuing bearing sector. Additionally, the chevron shaped trailing edge induces vortical mixing of the hot lubricant with the gas that is naturally resident within the inter-pad region of a foil thrust bearing. The elimination of hot gas carry-over in combination with the enhanced mixing has enabled a completely passive thermally managed foil bearing design. Laboratory testing at NASA has confirmed the original analysis and reduced this concept to practice.

  11. NMR relaxometry analysis of lubricant oils degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballari, M.; Bonetto, F.; Anoardo, E.

    2005-10-01

    The present work was undertaken in order to investigate lubricant oil degradation at the molecular level. Ageing effects, as reflected on the proton spin-lattice relaxation rate (T_1^{-1}) dispersion, were studied in two different lubricant engine oils. The proton field cycling technique was used to scan relaxation of new and aged samples of monograde and multigrade oils. Relaxation dispersions were interpreted in terms of self-diffusion and molecular rotations. Our study shows that proton T_1^{-1} could be very sensitive to degradation processes, especially at low Larmor frequencies. The analysis reveals a noticeable sensitivity of the involved correlation times. The pros and cons of the technique are also discussed.

  12. Thermohydrodynamic analysis for laminar lubricating films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, H. G.; Brewe, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    A Galerkin-type analysis to include thermal effects in laminar lubricating films was performed. The lubricant properties were assumed constant except for a temperature-dependent Newtonian viscosity. The cross-film temperature profile is established by collocation at the film boundaries and two interior Lobatto points. The interior temperatures are determined by requiring that the zeroth and first moment of the energy equation be satisfied across the film. The fluidity is forced to conform to a third--degree polynomial appropriate to the Lobatto-point temperatures. Preliminary indications are that the use of just two such sampling points enables satisfactory prediction of bearing performance even in the presence of substantial viscosity variation.

  13. Lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Shubkin, R.L.

    1980-08-19

    Hydrogenated dimers of /sup 12 -18/C alpha olefins (e.g., 1-tetradecene) made using a friedel-crafts catalyst (e.g., /sup 3/Bf promoted with water) have low pour points, low volatility and viscosities which make them suitable as crankcase lubricants for internal combustion engines.

  14. Two methodologies for optical analysis of contaminated engine lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghayan, Hamid; Bordatchev, Evgueni; Yang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The performance, efficiency and lifetime of modern combustion engines significantly depend on the quality of the engine lubricants. However, contaminants, such as gasoline, moisture, coolant and wear particles, reduce the life of engine mechanical components and lubricant quality. Therefore, direct and indirect measurements of engine lubricant properties, such as physical-mechanical, electro-magnetic, chemical and optical properties, are intensively utilized in engine condition monitoring systems and sensors developed within the last decade. Such sensors for the measurement of engine lubricant properties can be used to detect a functional limit of the in-use lubricant, increase drain interval and reduce the environmental impact. This paper proposes two new methodologies for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the presence of contaminants in the engine lubricants. The methodologies are based on optical analysis of the distortion effect when an object image is obtained through a thin random optical medium (e.g. engine lubricant). The novelty of the proposed methodologies is in the introduction of an object with a known periodic shape behind a thin film of the contaminated lubricant. In this case, an acquired image represents a combined lubricant-object optical appearance, where an a priori known periodic structure of the object is distorted by a contaminated lubricant. In the object shape-based optical analysis, several parameters of an acquired optical image, such as the gray scale intensity of lubricant and object, shape width at object and lubricant levels, object relative intensity and width non-uniformity coefficient are newly proposed. Variations in the contaminant concentration and use of different contaminants lead to the changes of these parameters measured on-line. In the statistical optical analysis methodology, statistical auto- and cross-characteristics (e.g. auto- and cross-correlation functions, auto- and cross-spectrums, transfer function

  15. Contact ratio of rough surfaces with multiple asperities in mixed lubrication at high pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Huaping; Guo, Dan; Liu, Shuhai; Pan, Guoshun; Lu, Xinchun

    2012-02-01

    Relative optical intensity interference was used to measure the lubrication film thickness when four kinds of polyalphaolefin (PAO) were used as lubricants confined between a smooth sapphire disc surface and a rough steel ball surface. Maximum Hertz contact pressure up to 3 GPa was applied in the central part of the contact region in mixed lubrication. It was found that the contact ratio (the ratio of real contact region to the whole nominal contact region) is related to the film thickness, the applied pressure, the surface roughness and the rolling speed, and so on. Contact ratio evidently reduces as lubrication film thickness or rolling speed increases. Quantitative relationship between the contact ratio and the influence factors was summarized based on the nonlinear fitting of experimental measurements. A formula was put forward to calculate the contact ratio at high pressure conditions according to the current experimental results.

  16. Lubricant flow analysis for effective lubrication of tractor forward/reverse clutch.

    PubMed

    Noh, Daekyung; Kim, Soochul; Kim, Yongjoo; Jang, Joosup

    2017-04-01

    Owing to the high power requirements of tractors, their low-power transmission gears often experience durability problems such as burning of the clutch. The operation of tractors under high load conditions also causes clutch slip, with the consequent longer operation duration exacerbating the burning of the friction plate. Solving this problem requires effective lubricant distribution. This was achieved in the present study by the development of an analysis model for predicting the lubricant flow rate. The reliability of the model was verified by comparing its predictions for various operation conditions with experimental measurements. Using the model, it was determined that effective distribution of the lubricant could be achieved without significant modification of the system, by only adjusting the gaps between the clutch piston and the housing, and between the separation plates and the case.

  17. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of metal-on-metal hip-resurfacing prostheses.

    PubMed

    Udofia, I J; Jin, Z M

    2003-04-01

    The elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis was carried out in this study for a typical metal-on-metal hip-resurfacing prosthesis under a simple steady-state rotation. Both the Reynolds equation and the elasticity equation were coupled and solved numerically by the finite difference method. The finite element method was used to determine the elastic deformation of both the femoral and the acetabular components required for the lubrication analysis. The effect of the radial clearance between the femoral head and the acetabular cup on the predicted film thickness and pressure distribution was investigated. The predicted minimum lubricating film thickness was found to compare favourably with the prediction using the Hamrock and Dowson [J. Lubrication Technol. 100 (1978) 236] formula based on the assumption of ball-on-plane semi-infinite solids. This implies that the non-metallic materials such as bone and cement underlying the metallic components have a small effect on the predicted lubrication performance for the particular metal-on-metal hip-resurfacing prosthesis considered in this study. Under realistic physiological walking conditions, a decrease in the radial clearance from 150 to 50 microm resulted in a 137% increase in the predicted minimum film thickness from 19 to 45 nm. Consequently, given a surface roughness of 0.01 microm for both the metallic femoral and acetabular bearing surfaces, the predicted mixed lubrication regime for the larger clearance was changed to a full fluid film lubrication regime for the smaller clearance. This clearly highlighted the importance of the design and manufacturing parameters on the tribological performance of these hard-on-hard hip prostheses.

  18. Analysis and self-lubricating treatment of porous anodic alumina film formed in a compound solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yi, Hongzhan; Wang, Haowei

    2005-12-01

    A porous anodic film on aluminum was prepared in a mixed electrolyte of phosphoric acid and organic acid and cerium salt, and ultrasonic impregnation technology was applied on it to form self-lubricating surface composite. The structure and chemical composition of the film and its lubricity after self-lubricating treatment were investigated in detail. EPMA indicates the cross-section of anodized film has two distinct oxide layers. Al, O and P are found in the film with different distribution in the two layers. XPS analysis on the electron binding energy of the component elements show the chemical composition of film surface are Al 2O 3, Ce(OH) and some phosphates. The structure of anodized film is amorphous with XRD analysis. The tribological tests shows the frictional coefficient of the self-lubricating surface composite coating is 0.25, much lower than anodized aluminum and aluminum substrate, which is about 0.55 and 0.85, respectively, and it is also durable for a long period of time in comparison with the lubricating coating fabricated by hot-dipping method. SEM images show some PTFE particles are added into the nanoholes of anodic oxide film.

  19. Waste lubricating oil removal in a batch reactor by mixed bacterial consortium: a kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Munna; Guchhait, Sugata; Biswas, Dipa; Datta, Sriparna

    2015-11-01

    The growth kinetics and biodegradation of two waste lubricating oil samples including waste engine oil (WEO) and waste transformer oil (WTO) were studied using pure isolates and mixed culture of Ochrobactrum sp. C1 and Bacillus sp. K1. The mixed culture significantly influenced degradation efficiency of the pure isolates through bioaugmentation process. In particular, the mixed culture was capable of growing on various n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and was able to tolerate unusually high concentrations of waste lubricants (WEO-86.0 g/L and WTO-81.5 g/L). The initial concentration of waste lubricating oils has been varied in the range of 1-10 % (v/v). Under this experimental range, the bacterial growth has been observed to follow Haldane-type kinetics characterizing the presence of substrate inhibition. Haldane model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μ max = 0.078 h(-1), K S = 23.101 g/L, K i = 43.844 g/L for WEO; and μ max = 0.044 h(-1), K S = 10.662 g/L, K i = 58.310 g/L for WTO. The values of intrinsic kinetic parameters, like specific growth rate μ max, half saturation constant, K S, inhibition constant, K i and the maximum substrate concentration, S max and growth yield coefficient Y x/s , have been determined using each model hydrocarbon and their mixture as limiting substrate. Relative changes in the values of the kinetic parameters have been correlated to the number of carbon atoms present in n-alkanes. The metabolites from degradation of model hydrocarbon compounds have been identified by GC-MS to elucidate the possible pathway of waste lubricating oil degradation process.

  20. Tribological performance analysis of textured steel surfaces under lubricating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. C.; Pandey, R. K.; Rooplal; Ranganath, M. S.; Maji, S.

    2016-09-01

    The tribological analysis of the lubricated conformal contacts formed between the smooth/textured surfaces of steel discs and smooth surface of steel pins under sliding conditions have been considered. Roles of dimples’ pitch of textured surfaces have been investigated experimentally to understand the variations of coefficient of friction and wear at the tribo-contacts under fully flooded lubricated conditions. Substantial reductions in coefficient of friction and wear at the tribo-interfaces have been observed in presence of textures on the rotating discs for both fully flooded and starved conditions in comparison to the corresponding lubricating conditions of the interfaces formed between the smooth surfaces of disc and pin. In presence of surface texture, the coefficient of friction reduces considerable at elevated sliding speeds (>2 m/s) and unit loads (>0.5 MPa) for the set of operating parameters considered in the analysis.

  1. Lubrication background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Surface topography, including the various physical methods of measuring surfaces, and the various lubrication regimes (hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, boundary, and mixed) are discussed. The historical development of elastohydrodynamic lubrication is outlined. The major accomplishments in four periods, the pre-1950's, the 1950's, the 1960's, and the 1970's are presented.

  2. Mixed Lubrication Simulation of Hydrostatic Spherical Bearings for Hydraulic Piston Pumps and Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazama, Toshiharu

    Mixed and fluid film lubrication characteristics of hydrostatic spherical bearings for swash-plate-type axial piston pumps and motors are studied theoretically under non-steady-state conditions. The basic equations incorporating interference and contact of surface roughness are derived fundamentally through combination of the GW and PC models. Furthermore, a programming code that is applicable to the caulked-socket-type and open-socket-type bearings is developed. Effects of caulking, operating conditions, and the bearing dimension on the motion of the sphere and tribological performance of the bearings are examined. Salient conclusions are the following: The sphere's eccentricity increases in the low supply pressure period. The time-lag of the load change engenders greater motion of the sphere. Caulking of the bearing socket suppresses the sphere's motion. The bearing stiffness increases and power loss decreases for smaller recess angles. Minimum power loss is given under the condition that the bearing socket radius nearly equals the equivalent load radius.

  3. Wear Debris Analysis of Grease Lubricated Ball Bearings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-12

    fluid and debris were placed in a glass bottle and sealed with a plastic cap using a teflon sealing disk. The grease and cleaning fluid were...manner. 1. Ten 3m-diameter glass beads were placed in a 1/2 ounce bottle . The use of these glass beads aided the agitation process of the grease...AD-A19’ 470 NAVAL AIR ENGINEERING CENTER LAKEHURST NJ SUPPORT EGU -ETC F/B 11/9 WEAR DEBRIS ANALYSIS OF GREASE LUBRICATED BALL BEARINGS(U

  4. Gear Lubrication and Cooling Experiment and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Akin, L. S.

    1983-01-01

    A gear tooth temperature analysis was performed using a finite element method combined with a calculated heat input, a calculated oil jet impingement depth, and estimated heat transfer coefficients for the different parts of the gear tooth that are oil cooled and air cooled. Experimental measurements of gear tooth average surface temperature and gear tooth instantaneous surface temperature were made with a fast response, infrared, radiometric microscope. Increasing oil pressure has a significant effect on both average surface temperature and peak surface temperature at loads above 1895 N/cm(1083 lb/in) and speeds of 10,000 and 7500 rpm. Both increasing speed (from 5000 to 10,000 rpm) at constant speed cause a significant rise in the average surface temperature and in the instantaneous peak surface temperatures on the gear teeth. The oil jet pressure required to provide the best cooling for gears is the pressure required to obtain full gear tooth impingement. Calculated results for gear tooth temperatures were close to experimental results for various oil jet impingement depths for identical operating conditions.

  5. Analysis of elastohydrodynamic lubrication in McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Yew, A; Udofia, I; Jagatia, M; Jin, Z M

    2004-01-01

    An elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was carried out in this study for a typical McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip prosthesis under a simple steady state rotation. The finite element method was used initially to investigate the effect of the cement and bone on the predicted contact pressure distribution between the two articulating surfaces under dry conditions, and subsequently to determine the elastic deformation of both the femoral and the acetabular components required for the lubrication analysis. Both Reynolds equation and the elasticity equation were coupled and solved numerically using the finite difference method. Important features in reducing contact stresses and promoting fluid-film lubrication associated with the McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip implant were identified as the large femoral head and the thin acetabular cup. For the typical McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip prosthesis considered under typical walking conditions, an increase in the femoral head radius from 14 to 17.4 mm (for a fixed radial clearance of 79 microm) was shown to result in a 25 per cent decrease in the maximum dry contact pressure and a 60 per cent increase in the predicted minimum film thickness. Furthermore, the predicted maximum contact pressure considering both the cement and the bone was found to be decreased by about 80 per cent, while the minimum film thickness was predicted to be increased by 50 per cent. Despite a significant increase in the predicted minimum lubricating film thickness due to the large femoral head and the thin acetabular cup, a mixed lubrication regime was predicted for the McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip implant under estimated in vivo steady state walking conditions, depending on the surface roughness of the bearing surfaces. This clearly demonstrated the important influences of the material, design and manufacturing parameters on the tribological performance of these hard-on-hard hip prostheses. Furthermore, in the present contact

  6. Determination of useful ranges of mixing conditions for glycerin Fatty Acid ester by multiple regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Uchimoto, Takeaki; Iwao, Yasunori; Hattori, Hiroaki; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of the effects of the triglycerin full behenate (TR-FB) concentration and the mixing time on lubrication and tablet properties were analyzed under a two-factor central composite design, and compared with those of magnesium stearate (Mg-St). Various amounts of lubricant (0.07-3.0%) were added to granules and mixed for 1-30 min. A multiple linear regression analysis was performed to identify the effect of the mixing conditions on each physicochemical property. The mixing conditions did not significantly affect the lubrication properties of TR-FB. For tablet properties, tensile strength decreased and disintegration time increased when the lubricant concentration and the mixing time were increased for Mg-St. The direct interaction of the Mg-St concentration and the mixing time had a significant negative effect on the disintegration time. In contrast, any mixing conditions of TR-FB did not affect the tablet properties. In addition, the range of mixing conditions which satisfied the lubrication and tablet property criteria was broader for TR-FB than that for Mg-St, suggesting that TR-FB allows tablets with high quality attributes to be produced consistently. Therefore, TR-FB is a potential lubricant alternative to Mg-St.

  7. Quantitative Analysis for Monitoring Formulation of Lubricating Oil Using Terahertz Time-Domain Transmission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Lu; Zhao, Kun; Zhou, Qing-Li; Shi, Yu-Lei; Zhang, Cun-Lin

    2012-04-01

    The quantitative analysis of zinc isopropyl-isooctyl-dithiophosphate (T204) mixed with lube base oil from Korea with viscosity index 70 (T204-Korea70) is presented by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). Compared with the middle-infrared spectra of zinc n-butyl-isooctyl-dithiophosphate (T202) and T204, THz spectra of T202 and T204 show the weak broad absorption bands. Then, the absorption coefficients of the T204-Korea70 system follow Beer's law at the concentration from 0.124 to 4.024%. The experimental absorption spectra of T204-Korea70 agree with the calculated ones based on the standard absorption coefficients of T204 and Korea70. The quantitative analysis enables a strategy to monitor the formulation of lubricating oil in real time.

  8. Hypernated supercritical fluid chromatography: potential application for car lubricant analysis.

    PubMed

    Lavison-Bompard, Gwenaelle; Bertoncini, Fabrice; Thiébaut, Didier; Beziau, Jean-François; Carrazé, Bernadette; Valette, Pascale; Duteurtre, Xavier

    2012-12-28

    Car lubricant additives are added to mineral or synthetic base stocks to improve viscosity and resistance to oxidation of the lubricant and to limit wear of engines. In previous papers related to this purpose, it was demonstrated that SFC allows the elution of common low molecular weight additives. Since their total resolution could not be achieved owing to the limited peak capacity of packed columns, the hyphenation of selective and informative detectors, atomic emission and mass spectrometry, were also carried out for identification. This paper describes the final implementation of a packed column SFC/FID-UV-AED-FTIR-MS system to contribute to the characterisation of both the base stock, mineral or semi-synthetic, and the low molecular weight additives. SFC/FID-UV-FTIR ensures the easy confirmation of the presence of esters in the base stock. Reference additives are used to demonstrate the performances of the multi hyphenated system prior to its implementation for their identification in packages and in formulated lubricants. Identification and partial structure elucidation of additives and families of additives in package and formulated car lubricants are presented: using combined information obtained from AED traces and FTIR chemigrams, chemical families of additives can be deduced. Then, the mass spectra can be interpreted in the elution zone of interest in order to go further in the determination of the additive molecular structure. The hypernated SFC system was also employed to follow the ageing of car lubricants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic analysis of liquid-lubricated hydrostatic journal bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Kocur, J.A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A hybrid bearing reduces the dependency of its behavior on the lubricant viscosity, bearing clearance, bearing surface area by combining the hydrostatic and hydrodynamic effects. The combination permits the hybrid bearing to be incorporated into rotor designs, where the working fluids of the rotor may be used in place of externally supplied lubricants. An effective and practical method to predict the static and dynamic behavior of hybrid bearings is developed. The model includes the three major fluid effects in the bearing; the orifice restriction, inertia losses at the pocket edges, and hydrodynamic effects on the bearing land regions. Lubrication is modeled and calculated using a finite element solution of Reynolds equation with turbulence corrections.

  10. Ellipsometric surface analysis of wear tracks produced by different lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Marxer, N.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ellipsometric analyses of wear tracks in berings of M-50 steel were carried out after operation under severe conditions with different lubricant additives. The base lubricant was a synthetic ester. It was found that the surface and wear additives benzotirazole and tricresylyphosphate produced very patchy oxide layers. Dioctyldiphenylamine, a common antioxidant, on the other hand produced smoother films. The analyses were performed with a specially designed and constructed ellipsometer of very high (20 micron) spatial resolution. The results are consistent with data obtained by Auger electron spectroscopy.

  11. Ellipsometric surface analysis of wear tracks produced by different lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Marxer, N.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A scanning ellipsometer with high spatial resolution was used to analyze wear tracks generated on M-50 surfaces operated in several lubricant formulations. These formulations included a pure ester base stock of trimethyol propane triheptanoate with additives of either benzotriazole (BTZ), dioctyldiphenylamine (DODPA), or tricresylphosphate (TCP). Results indicated that BTZ and TCP produced patchy oxide surface films consisting mainly of Fe304. DOPDA produced a much more uniform oxide film. These findings may explain the tendency of lubricant formulations containing TCP to scuff more readily than those containing only antioxidants.

  12. Analysis of a thioether lubricant by infrared Fourier microemission spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Morales, W.; Lauer, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    An infrared Fourier microemission spectrophotometer is used to obtain spectra (wavenumber range, 630 to 1230 0.1 cm) from microgram quantities of thioether lubricant samples deposited on aluminum foil. Infrared bands in the spectra are reproducible and could be identified as originating from aromatic species (1,3-disubstituted benzenes). Spectra from all samples (neat and formulated, used and unused) are very similar. Additives (an acid and a phosphinate) present in low concentration (0.10 percent) in the formulated fluid are not detected. This instrument appears to be a viable tool in helping to identify lubricant components separated by liquid chromatography.

  13. Analysis of fluid film lubrication in artificial hip joint replacements with surfaces of high elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Z M; Dowson, D; Fisher, J

    1997-01-01

    Lubrication mechanisms and contact mechanics have been analysed for total hip joint replacements made from hard bearing surfaces such as metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic. A similar analysis for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) against a hard bearing surface has also been carried out and used as a reference. The most important factor influencing the predicted lubrication film thickness has been found to be the radial clearance between the ball and the socket. Full fluid film lubrication may be achieved in these hard/hard bearings provided that the surface finish of the bearing surface and the radial clearance are chosen correctly and maintained. Furthermore, there is a close relation between the predicted contact half width and the predicted lubrication film thickness. Therefore, it is important to analyse the contact mechanics in artificial hip joint replacements. Practical considerations of manufacturing these bearing surfaces have also been discussed.

  14. Rapid analysis of lubricants by atmospheric solid analysis probe-ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barrère, Caroline; Hubert-Roux, Marie; Afonso, Carlos; Racaud, Amandine

    2014-08-01

    Formulated lubricants are complex mixtures composed of base oil(s) and additives with various functions (detergents, corrosion inhibiter, antioxidant, viscosity modifiers, etc.). Because of the aliphatic nature of base oil and the chemical diversity of additives, the characterization of lubricant is currently a long and complex process. The comprehensive analysis of lubricant samples involves several techniques such as nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, chromatography and infrared spectroscopy. The coupling of atmospheric solid analysis probe (ASAP) with ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) has been shown to be an efficient tool for the characterization of complex mixture containing vaporizable polar to non-polar compounds. This approach affords the coupling of a direct ionization technique that does not require sample preparation, with a bi-dimensional separation method with high peak capacity. In this work, we show that ASAP-IM-MS is a suitable method for rapid and direct characterization of lubricant samples. Indeed, base oil and additives yielded, by ASAP, ions series which could be separated by IM-MS. Molecular additives such as Zn-dithiocarbamate, phosphite, thiophosphate and Alkyl diphenylamine were ionized as molecular ions [M](+•) or protonated molecules [M + H](+), depending of their polarity. In some cases, fragment ions were observed, confirming the additive identification. In addition, high molecular weight polymeric additives such as poly(alkyl methacrylate) (PAM) were pyrolized in the ASAP source leading to characteristic fragment ions. ASAP-IM-MS is shown to be a powerful tool for studying complex mixtures, allowing the first comprehensive analysis of lubricants in just a few minutes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Simulation of automotive wrist pin joint and tribological studies of tin coated Al-Si alloy, metal matrix composites and nitrogen ceramics under mixed lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian

    Development of automotive engines with high power output demands the application of high strength materials with good tribological properties. Metal matrix composites (MMC's) and some nitrogen ceramics are of interest to replace some conventional materials in the piston/pin/connecting rod design. A simulation study has been developed to explore the possibility to employ MMC's as bearing materials and ceramics as journal materials, and to investigate the related wear mechanisms and the possible journal bearing failure mechanisms. Conventional tin coated Al-Si alloy (Al-Si/Sn) have been studied for the base line information. A mixed lubrication model for journal bearing with a soft coating has been developed and applied to the contact and temperature analysis of the Al-Si/Sn bearing. Experimental studies were performed to reveal the bearing friction and wear behavior. Tin coating exhibited great a advantage in friction reduction, however, it suffered significant wear through pitting and debonding. When the tin wore out, the Al-Si/steel contact experienced higher friction. A cast and P/M MMC's in the lubricated contact with case hardened steel and ceramic journals were studied experimentally. Without sufficient material removal in the conformal contact situation, MMC bearings in the MMC/steel pairs gained weight due to iron transfer and surface tribochemical reactions with the lubricant additives and contact failure occurred. However, the MMC/ceramic contacts demonstrated promising tribological behavior with low friction and high wear resistance, and should be considered for new journal bearing design. Ceramics are wear resistant. Ceramic surface roughness is very crucial when the journals are in contact with the tin coated bearings. In contact with MMC bearings, ceramic surface quality and fracture toughness seem to play some important roles in affecting the friction coefficient. The wear of silicon nitride and beta sialon (A) journals is pitting due to grain

  16. Analysis of starvation effects on hydrodynamic lubrication in nonconforming contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical methods were used to determine the effects of lubricant starvation on the minimum film thickness under conditions of a hydrodynamic point contact. Starvation was effected by varying the fluid inlet level. The Reynolds boundary conditions were applied at the cavitation boundary and zero pressure was stipulated at the meniscus or inlet boundary. A minimum-fill-thickness equation as a function of both the ratio of dimensionless load to dimensionless speed and inlet supply level was determined. By comparing the film generated under the starved inlet condition with the film generated from the fully flooded inlet, an expression for the film reduction factor was obtained. Based on this factor a starvation threshold was defined as well as a critically starved inlet. The changes in the inlet pressure buildup due to changing the available lubricant supply are presented in the form of three dimensional isometric plots and also in the form of contour plots.

  17. Failure Analysis and Regeneration Performances Evaluation on Engine Lubricating Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X. L.; Zhang, G. N.; Zhang, J. Y.; Yin, Y. L.; Xu, Y.

    To investigate the behavior of failure and recycling of lubricating oils, three sorts of typical 10w-40 lubricating oils used in heavy-load vehicle including the new oil, waste oil and regeneration oil regenerated by self-researched green regeneration technology were selected. The tribology properties were tested by four-ball friction wear tester as well. The results indicated that the performance of anti-extreme pressure of regeneration oil increase by 34.1% compared with the waste one and its load- carrying ability is close to the new oil; the feature of wear spot are better than those of the waste oil and frictional coefficient almost reach the level of the new oil's. As a result, the performance of anti-wear and friction reducing are getting better obviously.

  18. [The method of time series modeling and its application in the spectral analysis of lubricating oil].

    PubMed

    Gan, M; Zuo, H; Yang, Z; Jiang, Y

    2000-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the applications of time series modeling method in the analysis of lubricating oil of mechanical equipment. We obtained satisfactory results by applying AR model to perform time series modeling and forecasting analysis to the collected spectral analysis data of the air engine. So we have built a practical method for state monitoring and trouble forecasting of mechanical equipment.

  19. Wear Debris Analysis of Grease-Lubricated Spur Gear.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-30

    I& SUPPLEMGNTARY MOTES Gear testing performed by SKF Technology Services, SKF Industties, King of Prussia, PA. Is. KEY WORDS (CauM.. an rverm...Ifilal p s of an investigation of the wear de- bris generation characteristics of g8ease-lubricated mechanical components. SKF Technology Services...conducted at the Naval Air Engin- eering Center’s (NAVAIRENGCEN’s) Tribology Laboratory, in conjunction with SKF 1Technology Services, in a combined

  20. Transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of metal-on-metal hip implant under simulated walking conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Jin, Z M; Hirt, F; Rieker, C; Roberts, P; Grigoris, P

    2006-01-01

    The transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was performed in this study for a typical metal-on-metal bearing employing a polyethylene backing underneath a metallic cup inlay under dynamic operating conditions of load and speed representative of normal walking. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup. The governing Reynolds and elasticity equations were solved simultaneously by using both finite difference and finite element methods. The predicted transient film thickness from the present study was compared with the estimation based on the quasi-static analysis. It was found that the polyethylene backing employed in the typical metal-on-metal hip bearing, combined with dynamic squeeze-film action, significantly improved the transient lubricant film thickness under cyclic walking and consequently a fluid film lubrication regime was possible for smooth bearing surfaces with an average roughness less than 0.005 microm.

  1. Lubrication Flows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Tasos C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses fluid mechanics for undergraduates including the differential Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis and simplified dimensionless numbers, control volume principles, the Reynolds lubrication equation for confined and free surface flows, capillary pressure, and simplified perturbation techniques. Provides a vertical dip coating…

  2. Lubrication Flows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Tasos C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses fluid mechanics for undergraduates including the differential Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis and simplified dimensionless numbers, control volume principles, the Reynolds lubrication equation for confined and free surface flows, capillary pressure, and simplified perturbation techniques. Provides a vertical dip coating…

  3. XPS analysis of 440C steel surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyethers under sliding conditions in high vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Masuko, Masabumi; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1994-01-01

    This work presents the results of the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of AISI 440C ball surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE) oils after friction experiments under sliding conditions at high load in air and vacuum environments. The PFPE lubricants tested were Demnum S100, Fomblin Z-25, and Krytox 143AB. It was found that all the PFPE lubricants were degraded by sliding contact causing the formation of inorganic fluorides on the metallic surfaces and a layer of organic decomposition products. KRYTOX 143AB was the least reactive of the three lubricants tested. It was also found that metal fluoride formed at off-scar areas. This suggests the formation of reactive species, such as COF2 or R(sub f)COF, during sliding experiments, which can diffuse through the lubricant film and react with the metallic surfaces away from the contact region. Comparison of reference specimens before sliding with those that had undergone the sliding tests showed that the amount of non-degraded PFPE remaining on the surface of the balls after the sliding experiments was greater than that of the balls without sliding.

  4. XPS analysis of 440C steel surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyethers under sliding conditions in high vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera-Fierro, P.; Masuko, M.; Jones, W.R. Jr.; Pepper, S.V.

    1994-04-01

    This work presents the results of the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of AISI 440C ball surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE) oils after friction experiments under sliding conditions at high load in air and vacuum environments. The PFPE lubricants tested were Demnum S100, Fomblin Z-25, and Krytox 143AB. It was found that all the PFPE lubricants were degraded by sliding contact causing the formation of inorganic fluorides on the metallic surfaces and a layer of organic decomposition products. KRYTOX 143AB was the least reactive of the three lubricants tested. It was also found that metal fluoride formed at off-scar areas. This suggests the formation of reactive species, such as COF2 or R[sub f]COF, during sliding experiments, which can diffuse through the lubricant film and react with the metallic surfaces away from the contact region. Comparison of reference specimens before sliding with those that had undergone the sliding tests showed that the amount of non-degraded PFPE remaining on the surface of the balls after the sliding experiments was greater than that of the balls without sliding.

  5. Mixing order of glidant and lubricant – Influence on powder and tablet properties

    PubMed Central

    Pingali, Kalyana; Mendez, Rafael; Lewis, Daniel; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena; Cuitino, Alberto; Muzzio, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study the effect of mixing order of Cab-O-Sil (CS) and magnesium stearate (MgSt) and microlayers during mixing on blend and tablet properties. A first set of pharmaceutical blend containing Avicel PH200, Pharmatose and micronized acetaminophen was prepared with three mixing orders (mixing order-1: CS added first; mixing order-2: MgSt added first; mixing order-3: CS and MgSt added together). All the blends were subjected to a shear rate of 80 rpm and strain of 40, 160 and 640 revolutions in a controlled shear environment resulting in nine different blends. A second set of nine blends was prepared by replacing Avicel PH200 with Avicel PH102. A total of eighteen blends thus prepared were tested for powder hydrophobicity, powder flow, tablet weight, tablet hardness and tablet dissolution. Results indicated that powder hydrophobicity increased significantly for mixing order-1. Intermediate hydrophobic behavior was found for mixing order-3. Additionally, mixing order 1 resulted in improved powder flow properties, low weight variability, higher average tablet weight and slow drug release rates. Dissolution profiles obtained were found to be strongly dependent not only on the mixing order of flowing agents, but also on the strain and the resulting hydrophobicity. PMID:21356286

  6. Testing the ecotoxicology of vegetable versus mineral based lubricating oils: 2. Induction of mixed function oxidase enzymes in barramundi, Lates calcarifer, a tropical fish species.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Philip; Burns, Kathryn A; Cavanagh, Joanne

    2004-05-01

    An increasing number of vegetable-based oils are being developed as environmentally friendly alternatives to petroleum products. However, toxicity towards key tropical marine species has not been investigated. In this study we used laboratory-based biomarker induction experiments to compare the relative stress of a vegetable-based lubricating oil for marine 2-stroke engines with its mineral oil-based counterpart on tropical fish. The sub-lethal stress of 2-stoke outboard lubricating oils towards the fish Lates calcarifer (barramundi) was examined using liver microsomal mixed function oxidase (MFO) induction assays. This study is the first investigation into the use of this key commercial species in tropical North Queensland, Australia in stress assessment of potential hydrocarbon pollution using ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) induction. Our results indicated that barramundi provide a wide range of inducible rates of EROD activity in response to relevant organic stressors. The vegetable- and mineral-based lubricants induced significant EROD activity at 1.0 mg kg(-1) and there was no significant difference between the two oil treatments at that concentration. At increasing concentrations of 2 and 3 mg kg(-1), the mineral-based lubricant resulted in slightly higher EROD activity than the vegetable-based lubricant. The EROD activity of control and treated barramundi are found to be within ranges for other species from temperate and tropical environments. These results indicate that vegetable-based lubricants may be less stressful to barramundi than their mineral counterparts at concentrations of lubricant > or =2 mg kg(-1). There is great potential for this species to be used in the biomonitoring of waterways around tropical North Queensland and SE Asia.

  7. Nanopolishing by colloidal nanodiamond in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvani, Khosro A.; Mosleh, Mohsen; Smith, Sonya T.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using explosion synthesized diamond nanoparticles with an average particle size (APS) of 3-5 nm with a concentration of 1 % by weight for improving lubrication and friction in elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) was investigated. Owing to the orders of magnitude increase in the viscosity of the lubricant in the EHL contact zone, diamond nanoparticles in the lubricant polish the surfaces at the nanoscale which decreases the composite roughness of contacting surfaces. The reduced composite roughness results in an increased film thickness ratio which yields lower friction. In the numerical analysis, governing equations of lubricant flow in the full elastohydrodynamic lubrication were solved, and the shear stress distribution over the fluid film was calculated. Using an abrasion model and the shear stress distribution profile, the material removal by the nanofluid containing nanoparticles and the resultant surface roughness were determined. The numerical analysis showed that in full EHL regime, the nanolubricant can reduce the composite roughness of moving surfaces. Experimental results from prior studies which exhibited surface polishing by such nanolubricants in boundary, mixed, and full elastohydrodynamic lubrication were used for comparison to the numerical model.

  8. Molecular rheological analysis on binary blends of perfluoropolyether lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seung Chung, Pil; Hari Vemuri, Sesha; Park, Sejoon; Jhon, Myung S.

    2014-05-01

    The molecular rheology of PFPE becomes critically important in designing optimal lubricants that control the friction/wear and air-bearing by tuning elastic or viscous shear/elongation deformations, which affect the performance and reliability of the hard disk drive. In this paper, we examine the rheological responses of nano blended PFPEs including storage (elastic) and loss (viscous) moduli (G' and G″), by monitoring the time-dependent-stress-strain relationship via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. By introducing binary blend of nonfunctional and functional PFPEs, we control the degree of liquid/solid-like behavior using the rheology as a complementary tool for design criteria by tuning molecular conformation and diffusion with nano blend ratio.

  9. Time-dependent elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of total knee replacement under walking conditions.

    PubMed

    Su, Yonglin; Yang, Peiran; Fu, Zengliang; Jin, Zhongmin; Wang, Chengtao

    2011-06-01

    This work is concerned with the lubrication analysis of artificial knee joints, which plays an increasing significant role in clinical performance and longevity of components. Time-dependent elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis for normal total knee replacement is carried out under the cyclic variation in both load and speed representative of normal walking. An equivalent ellipsoid-on-plane model is adopted to represent an actual artificial knee. A full numerical method is developed to simultaneously solve the Reynolds and elasticity equations using the multigrid technique. The elastic deformation is based on the constrained column model. Results show that, under the combined effect of entraining and squeeze-film actions throughout the walking cycle, the predicted central film thickness tends to decrease in the stance phase but keeps a relatively larger value at the swing phase. Furthermore, the geometry of knee joint implant is verified to play an important role under its lubrication condition, and the length of time period is a key point to influence the lubrication performance of joint components.

  10. Analysis of a spacecraft instrument ball bearing assembly lubricated by a perfluoroalkylether

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, W.; Jones, W. R., Jr.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of a spacecraft instrument ball bearing assembly, subjected to a scanning life test, was performed to determine the possible case of rotational problems involving these units aboard several satellites. The analysis indicated an ineffective transfer of a fluorinated liquid lubricant from a phenolic retainer to the bearing balls. Part of the analysis led to a novel HPLC separation method employing a fluorinated mobile phase in conjunction with silica based size exclusion columns.

  11. A new model of water-lubricated rubber bearings for vibration analysis of flexible multistage rotor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shibing; Yang, Bingen

    2015-08-01

    Flexible multistage rotating systems that are supported or guided by long water-lubricated rubber bearings (WLRBs) have a variety of engineering applications. Vibration analysis of this type of machinery for performance and duality requires accurate modeling of WLRBs and related rotor-bearing assemblies. This work presents a new model of WLRBs, with attention given to the determination of bearing dynamic coefficients. Due to its large length-to-diameter ratio, a WLRB cannot be described by conventional pointwise bearing models with good fidelity. The bearing model proposed in this paper considers spatially distributed bearing forces. For the first time in the literature, the current study addresses the issue of mixed lubrication in the operation of WLRBs, which involves interactions of shaft vibration, elastic deformation of rubber material and fluid film pressure, and validates the WLRB model in experiments. Additionally, with the new bearing model, vibration analysis of WLRB-supported flexible multistage rotating systems is performed through use of a distributed transfer function method, which delivers accurate and closed-form analytical solutions of steady-state responses without discretization.

  12. Investigation of anti-wear performance of automobile lubricants using thin layer activation analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswal, Jayashree; Thakre, G. D.; Pant, H. J.; Samantray, J. S.; Arya, P. K.; Sharma, S. C.; Gupta, A. K.

    2017-05-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the anti-wear behavior of automobile lubricants using thin layer activation analysis technique. For this study disc gears made of EN 31 steel were labeled with a small amount of radioactivity by irradiating with 13 MeV proton beam from a particle accelerator. Experiments on wear rate measurement of the gear were carried out by mounting the irradiated disc gear on a twin-disc tribometer under lubricated condition. The activity loss was monitored by using a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector integrated with a multichannel analyzer. The relative remnant activity was correlated with thickness loss by generating a calibration curve. The wear measurements were carried out for four different types of lubricants, named as, L1, L2, L3 and L4. At lower load L1 and L4 were found to exhibit better anti-wear properties than L2 and L3, whereas, L4 exhibited the best anti-wear performance behavior than other three lubricants at all the loads and speeds investigated.

  13. PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) Based Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty: Contact Stress and Lubrication Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xin, H; Shepherd, Det; Dearn, Kd

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the maximum contact stress and the lubrication regimes for PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) based self-mating cervical total disc arthroplasty. The NuNec(®) cervical disc arthroplasty system was chosen as the study object, which was then analytically modelled as a ball on socket joint. A non-adhesion Hertzian contact model and elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory were used to predict the maximum contact stress and the minimum film thickness, respectively. The peak contact stress and the minimum film thickness between the bearing surfaces were then determined, as the radial clearance or lubricant was varied. The obtained results show that under 150 N loading, the peak contact stress was in the range 5.9 - 32.1 MPa, well below the yield and fatigue strength of PEEK; the calculated minimum film thickness ranged from 0 to 0.042 µm and the corresponding lambda ratio range was from 0 to 0.052. This indicates that the PEEK based cervical disc arthroplasty will operate under a boundary lubrication regime, within the natural angular velocity range of the cervical spine.

  14. PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) Based Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty: Contact Stress and Lubrication Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, H; Shepherd, DET; Dearn, KD

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the maximum contact stress and the lubrication regimes for PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) based self-mating cervical total disc arthroplasty. The NuNec® cervical disc arthroplasty system was chosen as the study object, which was then analytically modelled as a ball on socket joint. A non-adhesion Hertzian contact model and elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory were used to predict the maximum contact stress and the minimum film thickness, respectively. The peak contact stress and the minimum film thickness between the bearing surfaces were then determined, as the radial clearance or lubricant was varied. The obtained results show that under 150 N loading, the peak contact stress was in the range 5.9 – 32.1 MPa, well below the yield and fatigue strength of PEEK; the calculated minimum film thickness ranged from 0 to 0.042 µm and the corresponding lambda ratio range was from 0 to 0.052. This indicates that the PEEK based cervical disc arthroplasty will operate under a boundary lubrication regime, within the natural angular velocity range of the cervical spine. PMID:22670159

  15. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, J.; Viola, M. B.

    2013-10-31

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  16. Bifurcation and chaos analysis of nonlinear rotor system with axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearing support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongfang; Hei, Di; Lü, Yanjun; Wang, Quandai; Müller, Norbert

    2014-03-01

    Axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearings have been widely applied to precision instrument due to their high accuracy, low friction, low noise and high stability. The rotor system with axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearing support is a typical nonlinear dynamic system. The nonlinear analysis measures have to be adopted to analyze the behaviors of the axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearing-rotor nonlinear system as the linear analysis measures fail. The bifurcation and chaos of nonlinear rotor system with three axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearing support are investigated by nonlinear dynamics theory. A time-dependent mathematical model is established to describe the pressure distribution in the axial-grooved compressible gas-lubricated journal bearing. The time-dependent compressible gas-lubricated Reynolds equation is solved by the differential transformation method. The gyroscopic effect of the rotor supported by gas-lubricated journal bearing with three axial grooves is taken into consideration in the model of the system, and the dynamic equation of motion is calculated by the modified Wilson- θ-based method. To analyze the unbalanced responses of the rotor system supported by finite length gas-lubricated journal bearings, such as bifurcation and chaos, the bifurcation diagram, the orbit diagram, the Poincaré map, the time series and the frequency spectrum are employed. The numerical results reveal that the nonlinear gas film forces have a significant influence on the stability of rotor system and there are the rich nonlinear phenomena, such as the periodic, period-doubling, quasi-periodic, period-4 and chaotic motion, and so on. The proposed models and numerical results can provide a theoretical direction to the design of axial-grooved gas-lubricated journal bearing-rotor system.

  17. Total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy as a semiconductor lubricant elemental analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshehabi, Abbas; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Kawai, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Photoelectron spectra from a typical hard disk storage media device (HDD) were measured at total reflection and non-total reflection at unburnished, acetone-cleaned, and argon-sputtered conditions. F, O, N, and C usually making the upper layer of a typical hard disk medium were detected. Enhancement of the photoelectron emission of the fluorocarbon lubricant was observed at total reflection. Pt and Co were only found by non-total X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) because they are constituents of a deeper region than the top and interface regions. Argon-sputtered, ultrasonic acetone-cleaned, and unburnished top layers were compared at total and non-total reflection conditions. Total reflection X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (TRXPS) is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for storage media lubrication layer chemical state analysis, reliable for industrial quality control application , and reproducible.

  18. Theoretical and experimental analysis of the lubricating system of a high speed multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, V. G.; Mirică, R. F.; Prisecaru, T.

    2017-02-01

    Flywheel-based energy storage systems are used for energy storage in form of kinetic energy using a flywheel rotating at high speed. In order to achieve this high rotating speed a high speed multiplier could be used in order to increase the rotation speed of a conventional motor. This article presents a theoretical and experimental analysis of the lubricating system of a high speed multiplier used in a flywheel-based energy storage system. The necessary oil flow is theoretically computed using analytical formulas. The oil is used for lubricating the gears, the roller bearings and the sliding bearings. An experimental test rig is used to measure the oil flow. Finally the two results are compared.

  19. Characterizing and classifying water-based lubricants using direct analysis in real time(®)-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maric, Mark; Bridge, Candice

    2016-09-01

    Lubricant analysis is a relatively recent addition to the examination protocol in sexual assault cases by the forensic science community. Currently, lubricants cannot be unequivocally identified, although their presence can be determined based on the detection of a few chemical components, i.e. polydimethylsiloxane, polyethylene glycol, glycerol or nonoxynol-9. Confirmation of their presence typically requires that an authentic reference sample be submitted and compared to the unknown sample to determine if they potentially came from the same source. In this study, 33 individual personal water-based lubricants were characterized by direct analysis in real time-time of flight mass spectroscopy (DART-TOFMS). The resultant mass spectral data were evaluated using well-established multivariate statistical techniques, such as principal component and linear discriminant analysis. Statistical analysis revealed six different groupings within the data that could be correlated to sub-categories of water-based lubricants that contain additives in the form of anesthetics, sensation enhancers and flavorings. This variability in the personal lubricant sources can be utilized to aid in identifying the specific type of lubricant when only a questioned sample is available.

  20. The quantitative surface analysis of an antioxidant additive in a lubricant oil matrix by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Caitlyn; Reynolds, James C; Whitmarsh, Samuel; Lynch, Tom; Creaser, Colin S

    2013-11-15

    Chemical additives are incorporated into commercial lubricant oils to modify the physical and chemical properties of the lubricant. The quantitative analysis of additives in oil-based lubricants deposited on a surface without extraction of the sample from the surface presents a challenge. The potential of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for the quantitative surface analysis of an oil additive in a complex oil lubricant matrix without sample extraction has been evaluated. The quantitative surface analysis of the antioxidant additive octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix was carried out by DESI-MS in the presence of 2-(pentyloxy)ethyl 3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)propionate as an internal standard. A quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with an in-house modified ion source enabling non-proximal DESI-MS was used for the analyses. An eight-point calibration curve ranging from 1 to 80 µg/spot of octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix and in the presence of the internal standard was used to determine the quantitative response of the DESI-MS method. The sensitivity and repeatability of the technique were assessed by conducting replicate analyses at each concentration. The limit of detection was determined to be 11 ng/mm(2) additive on spot with relative standard deviations in the range 3-14%. The application of DESI-MS to the direct, quantitative surface analysis of a commercial lubricant additive in a native oil lubricant matrix is demonstrated. © 2013 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. The quantitative surface analysis of an antioxidant additive in a lubricant oil matrix by desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Da Costa, Caitlyn; Reynolds, James C; Whitmarsh, Samuel; Lynch, Tom; Creaser, Colin S

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE Chemical additives are incorporated into commercial lubricant oils to modify the physical and chemical properties of the lubricant. The quantitative analysis of additives in oil-based lubricants deposited on a surface without extraction of the sample from the surface presents a challenge. The potential of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) for the quantitative surface analysis of an oil additive in a complex oil lubricant matrix without sample extraction has been evaluated. METHODS The quantitative surface analysis of the antioxidant additive octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix was carried out by DESI-MS in the presence of 2-(pentyloxy)ethyl 3-(3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)propionate as an internal standard. A quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with an in-house modified ion source enabling non-proximal DESI-MS was used for the analyses. RESULTS An eight-point calibration curve ranging from 1 to 80 µg/spot of octyl (4-hydroxy-3,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)propionate in an oil lubricant matrix and in the presence of the internal standard was used to determine the quantitative response of the DESI-MS method. The sensitivity and repeatability of the technique were assessed by conducting replicate analyses at each concentration. The limit of detection was determined to be 11 ng/mm2 additive on spot with relative standard deviations in the range 3–14%. CONCLUSIONS The application of DESI-MS to the direct, quantitative surface analysis of a commercial lubricant additive in a native oil lubricant matrix is demonstrated. © 2013 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24097398

  2. Analysis of wear properties of aluminium based journal bearing alloys with and without lubrication.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathavan, J. Joy; Patnaik, Amar

    2016-09-01

    Apart from classical bearing materials, Aluminium alloys are used as bearing materials these days because of their superior quality. In this analysis, new Aluminium based bearing materials, with filler metals Si, Ni, and Cr are prepared by metal mould casting in burnout furnace machine, and tribological properties of these alloys with and without lubrication were tested. The experiments for wear with lubrication are conducted on multiple specimen tester and experiments without lubrication is conducted on Pin on disk tribometer. The disc material used was SAE 1050 steel. Wear tests were conducted at a sliding speed of 0.785 m/s and at a normal load of 20 N. Coefficient of friction values, temperature changes and wear of the specimens were plotted on graph according to the above mentioned working conditions. Hardness and weight losses of the specimens were calculated. The obtained results demonstrate how the friction and wear properties of these samples have changed with the % addition of Silicon, Chromium and Nickel to the base metal aluminium.

  3. Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) Lubrication Interval Test and Evaluation (LITE). Post-Test Grease Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L.; Martinez, James E.; Devivar, Rodrigo V.

    2015-01-01

    The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (SARJ) is a mechanism of the International Space Station (ISS) that orients the solar power generating arrays toward the sun as the ISS orbits our planet. The orientation with the sun must be maintained to fully charge the ISS batteries and maintain all the other ISS electrical systems operating properly. In 2007, just a few months after full deployment, the starboard SARJ developed anomalies that warranted a full investigation including ISS Extravehicular Activity (EVA). The EVA uncovered unexpected debris that was due to degradation of a nitride layer on the SARJ bearing race. ISS personnel identified the failure root-cause and applied an aerospace grease to lubricate the area associated with the anomaly. The corrective action allowed the starboard SARJ to continue operating within the specified engineering parameters. The SARJ LITE (Lubrication Interval Test and Evaluation) program was initiated by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and Boeing to simulate the operation of the ISS SARJ for an extended time. The hardware was designed to test and evaluate the exact material components used aboard the ISS SARJ, but in a controlled area where engineers could continuously monitor the performance. After running the SARJ LITE test for an equivalent of 36+ years of continuous use, the test was opened to evaluate the metallography and lubrication. We have sampled the SARJ LITE rollers and plate to fully assess the grease used for lubrication. Chemical and thermal analysis of these samples has generated information that has allowed us to assess the location, migration, and current condition of the grease. The collective information will be key toward understanding and circumventing any performance deviations involving the ISS SARJ in the years to come.

  4. Advanced in aerospace lubricant and wear metal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saba, C.S.; Centers, P.W.

    1995-09-01

    Wear metal analysis continues to play an effective diagnostic role for condition monitoring of gas turbine engines. Since the early 1960s the United States` military services have been using spectrometric oil analysis program (SOAP) to monitor the condition of aircraft engines. The SOAP has proven to be effective in increasing reliability, fleet readiness and avoiding losses of lives and machinery. Even though historical data have demonstrated the success of the SOAP in terms of detecting imminent engine failure verified by maintenance personnel, the SOAP is not a stand-alone technique and is limited in its detection of large metallic wear debris. In response, improved laboratory, portable, in-line and on-line diagnostic techniques to perfect SOAP and oil condition monitoring have been sought. The status of research and development as well as the direction of future developmental activities in oil analysis due to technological opportunities, advanced in engine development and changes in military mission are reviewed and discussed. 54 refs.

  5. Piezoviscosity In Lubrication Of Nonconformal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren; Hamrock, Bernard J.; Brewe, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Developments in theory of lubrication. Analysis of piezoviscous-rigid regime of lubrication of two ellipsoidal contacts. Begins with Reynolds equation for point contact. Equation nondimensionalized using Roelands empirical formula and Dowson and Higginson formula. Equation solved numerically. Solutions obtained for full spectrum of conditions to find effects of dimensionless load, speed, parameters of lubricated and lubricating materials, and angle between direction of rolling and direction of entrainment of lubricant.

  6. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of metal-on-metal hip prostheses under steady state entraining motion.

    PubMed

    Jagatia, M; Jin, Z M

    2001-01-01

    The elastohydrodynamic lubrication problem of metal-on-metal hip joint replacements was considered in this study. A simple ball-in-socket configuration was used to represent the hip prosthesis. The Reynolds equation in a spherical coordinate was adopted for the fluid-film lubrication analysis, to account for the ball-in-socket geometry. The corresponding elastic deformation was calculated by means of the finite element method in order to consider the complex ball-in-socket geometry as well as the backing materials underneath the acetabular cup. Both the Reynolds and the elasticity equations were solved simultaneously using the Newton-Raphson finite difference method. The general methodology developed was then applied to a recent experimental prototype metal-on-metal hip implant. It was shown that the backing materials underneath the acetabular cup had little influence on the predicted contact pressure and the elastic deformation at the bearing surfaces for this particular example. Both the film thickness and the hydrodynamic pressure distributions were obtained under various loads up to 2500 N. The predicted minimum lubricating film thickness from the present study was compared with a simple estimation using the Hamrock and Dowson formulae based upon an equivalent ball-on-plane model and excellent agreement was found. However, it was pointed out that for some forms of metal-on-metal hip prostheses with a thin acetabular cup, a polyethylene inlay underneath a metallic bearing insert or a taper connection between a bearing insert and a fixation shell, the general methodology developed in the present study should be used and this will be considered in future studies.

  7. Analysis of elastohydrodynamic lubrication in a novel metal-on-metal hip joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Jagatia, M; Jin, Z M

    2002-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was carried out in this study for a novel metal-on-metal hip prosthesis, which consists of a cobalt-chrome alloy femoral head articulating against a cobalt-chrome alloy acetabular insert connected to a titanium fixation shell through a taper. Finite element models were developed to investigate the effect of the pelvic bone and the load on the predicted contact pressure distribution between the two bearing surfaces under dry conditions. The finite element method was used to develop elasticity models for both the femoral and the acetabular components; it was found that the elastic deformation of the acetabular insert was mainly dependent on the load, rather than the detailed pressure distribution. A modified solution methodology was accordingly developed to couple the elasticity models for both the femoral and the acetabular surfaces with the Reynolds equation and to solve these numerically by the finite difference method. It was found that a load increase from 500 to 2500 N had a negligible effect on the predicted maximum contact pressure and the minimum film thickness, due to the relatively flexible and accommodating structure of the acetabular insert. Furthermore, the predicted minimum film thickness was shown to be significantly greater than the simple estimation based on the assumption of semi-infinite solids (mono-block design) using the Hamrock and Dowson formula. The effects of the viscosity of the lubricant and the radial clearance between the femoral and the acetabular components on the predicted lubricating film thickness were investigated under both in vitro simulator testing and in vivo walking conditions.

  8. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  9. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  10. Pipe flow of pumping wet shotcrete based on lubrication layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianjun; Liu, Guoming; Cheng, Weimin; Pan, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Wet shotcrete can reduce dust and improve supporting strength, however, safe and efficient pipage is a key technical part of wet shotcrete process. The paper studied the pipe flow law of wet shotcrete based on lubrication layer by build the experimental pumping circuit of wet shotcrete that can carry out a number of full-scale pumping tests. The experimental results show there was a linear relationship between pressure loss and flow rate. Combined with the Buckingham rheological equation, the computing equations of the yield shear stress and plastic viscosity were deduced through linear regression. A simple analytical method allowing for a rough estimation of the pumping pressure was proposed and used when considering the lubrication layer of wet shotcrete in pipes. In addition, two kinds of particulate distributive models were established along the time axial to analyze the formation of lubrication layer which is related with particles migration. By computational fluid dynamics simulation, the lubrication layer thickness of different mix proportions was estimated. A new method for measuring the thickness of lubrication layer was proposed to verify it by binarization processing. Finally, according to the comparative analysis of experiments, simulation and computed value, it can be seen that the lubrication layer plays a key role in the process of wet shotcrete flow and with the increase of lubrication layer thickness pipe pressure declines gradually.

  11. (1) H-NMR with Multivariate Analysis for Automobile Lubricant Comparison.

    PubMed

    Kim, Siwon; Yoon, Dahye; Lee, Dong-Kye; Yoon, Changshin; Kim, Suhkmann

    2017-02-23

    Identification of suspected automobile-related lubricants could provide valuable information in forensic cases. We examined that automobile lubricants might exhibit the chemometric characteristics to their individual usages. To compare the degree of clustering in the plots, we co-plotted general industrial oils that were highly dissimilar with automobile lubricants in additive compositions. (1) H-NMR spectroscopy was used with multivariate statistics as a tool for grouping, clustering, and identification of automobile lubricants in laboratory conditions. We analyzed automobile lubricants including automobile engine oils, automobile transmission oils, automobile gear oils, and motorcycle oils. In contrast to the general industrial oils, automobile lubricants showed relatively high tendencies of clustering to their usages. Our pilot study demonstrated that the comparison of known and questioned samples to their usages might be possible in forensic fields.

  12. Effect of lubricant on the reliability of dental implant abutment screw joint: An in vitro laboratory and three-dimension finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Fan, Hongyi; Ma, Ruiyang; Chen, Hongyu; Li, Zhi; Yu, Haiyang

    2017-06-01

    Biomechanical factors play a key role in the success of dental implants. Fracture and loosening of abutment screws are major issues. This study investigated the effect of lubricants on the stability of dental implant-abutment connection. As lubricants, graphite and vaseline were coated on the abutment screw surface, respectively, and a blank without lubricant served as the control. The total friction coefficient (μtot), clamping force, fatigue behavior and detorque of the joint combined with dynamic cyclic loading were measured under different lubricating conditions. Further, a three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to investigate stress distribution, in conjunction with experimental images. The results showed that the lubricant reduced μtot, which in turn led to an increase in clamping force. Decrease in loading increased the fatigue life of the screw. However, use of lubricant at high load reduced the fatigue life. Ductile fracture at the first thread of the screw was the chief failure mode, which was due to maximum von Mises stress. Higher stress levels occurred in the lubricant groups. Lubricated screws resulted in lower detorque which made the joint easier to loosen. In conclusion, the lubricant cannot effectively improve the reliability of dental implant-abutment connection. Keeping the interfaces of implant-screw uncontaminated and strengthening the surface of the screw may be recommend for clinical operation and future design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical discrimination of lubricant marketing types using direct analysis in real time time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maric, Mark; Harvey, Lauren; Tomcsak, Maren; Solano, Angelique; Bridge, Candice

    2017-06-30

    In comparison to other violent crimes, sexual assaults suffer from very low prosecution and conviction rates especially in the absence of DNA evidence. As a result, the forensic community needs to utilize other forms of trace contact evidence, like lubricant evidence, in order to provide a link between the victim and the assailant. In this study, 90 personal bottled and condom lubricants from the three main marketing types, silicone-based, water-based and condoms, were characterized by direct analysis in real time time of flight mass spectrometry (DART-TOFMS). The instrumental data was analyzed by multivariate statistics including hierarchal cluster analysis, principal component analysis, and linear discriminant analysis. By interpreting the mass spectral data with multivariate statistics, 12 discrete groupings were identified, indicating inherent chemical diversity not only between but within the three main marketing groups. A number of unique chemical markers, both major and minor, were identified, other than the three main chemical components (i.e. PEG, PDMS and nonoxynol-9) currently used for lubricant classification. The data was validated by a stratified 20% withheld cross-validation which demonstrated that there was minimal overlap between the groupings. Based on the groupings identified and unique features of each group, a highly discriminating statistical model was then developed that aims to provide the foundation for the development of a forensic lubricant database that may eventually be applied to casework. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Process for preparing lubricating oil from used waste lubricating oil

    DOEpatents

    Whisman, Marvin L.; Reynolds, James W.; Goetzinger, John W.; Cotton, Faye O.

    1978-01-01

    A re-refining process is described by which high-quality finished lubricating oils are prepared from used waste lubricating and crankcase oils. The used oils are stripped of water and low-boiling contaminants by vacuum distillation and then dissolved in a solvent of 1-butanol, 2-propanol and methylethyl ketone, which precipitates a sludge containing most of the solid and liquid contaminants, unspent additives, and oxidation products present in the used oil. After separating the purified oil-solvent mixture from the sludge and recovering the solvent for recycling, the purified oil is preferably fractional vacuum-distilled, forming lubricating oil distillate fractions which are then decolorized and deodorized to prepare blending stocks. The blending stocks are blended to obtain a lubricating oil base of appropriate viscosity before being mixed with an appropriate additive package to form the finished lubricating oil product.

  15. Dynamic analysis of turbulent annular seals based on Hirs' lubrication equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Expressions are derived which define dynamic coefficients for high-pressure annular seals typical of neck-ring and interstage seals employed in multistage centrifugal pumps. Completely developed turbulent flow is assumed in both the circumferential and axial directions, and is modeled in this analysis by Hirs' turbulent lubrication equations. Linear zeroth and first-order 'short-bearing' perturbation solutions are developed by an expansion in the eccentricity ratio. The influence of inlet swirl is accounted for in the development of the circumferential flow field. Comparisons are made between the stiffness, damping, and inertia coefficients derived herein based on Hirs' model and previously published results based on other models. Finally, numerical results are presented for interstage seals in the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopump and a water pump.

  16. Lubrication analysis of interacting rigid cylindrical particles in confined shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinaels, R.; Stone, H. A.

    2015-07-15

    Lubrication analysis is used to determine analytical expressions for the elements of the resistance matrix describing the interaction of two rigid cylindrical particles in two-dimensional shear flow in a symmetrically confined channel geometry. The developed model is valid for non-Brownian particles in a low-Reynolds-number flow between two sliding plates with thin gaps between the two particles and also between the particles and the walls. Using this analytical model, a comprehensive overview of the dynamics of interacting cylindrical particles in shear flow is presented. With only hydrodynamic interactions, rigid particles undergo a reversible interaction with no cross-streamline migration, irrespective of the confinement value. However, the interaction time of the particle pair substantially increases with confinement, and at the same time, the minimum distance between the particle surfaces during the interaction substantially decreases with confinement. By combining our purely hydrodynamic model with a simple on/off non-hydrodynamic attractive particle interaction force, the effects of confinement on particle aggregation are qualitatively mapped out in an aggregation diagram. The latter shows that the range of initial relative particle positions for which aggregation occurs is increased substantially due to geometrical confinement. The interacting particle pair exhibits tangential and normal lubrication forces on the sliding plates, which will contribute to the rheology of confined suspensions in shear flow. Due to the combined effects of the confining walls and the particle interaction, the particle velocities and resulting forces both tangential and perpendicular to the walls exhibit a non-monotonic evolution as a function of the orientation angle of the particle pair. However, by incorporating appropriate scalings of the forces, velocities, and doublet orientation angle with the minimum free fraction of the gap height and the plate speed, master curves for

  17. SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    azelaic , and sebacic acids are the most readily available dibasic acids suitable for ester lubricant production, while the petroleum derived Oxo alcohols...of synthetic lubricants for use at low and high temperatures. The diesters of straight-chain dibasic acids lead the field of esters mutable as...dibasic acid esters in all the characteristics studied so far, and this type of ester therefore represents a promising source of synthetic oil. Mono

  18. Marine Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. H.; Green, D.

    Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either large (medium speed) or very large (slow speed) with high efficiencies and burning low-quality fuel. Slow-speed engines, up to 200 rpm, are two-stroke with separate combustion chamber and sump connected by a crosshead, with trunk and system oil lubricants for each. Medium-speed diesels, 300-1500 rpm, are of conventional automotive design with one lubricant. Slow-speed engines use heavy fuel oil of much lower quality than conventional diesel with problems of deposit cleanliness, acidity production and oxidation. Lubricants are mainly SAE 30/40/50 monogrades using paraffinic basestocks. The main types of additives are detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and anti-foam compounds. There are no simple systems for classifying marine lubricants, as for automotive, because of the wide range of engine design, ratings and service applications they serve. There are no standard tests; lubricant suppliers use their own tests or the Bolnes 3DNL, with final proof from field tests. Frequent lubricant analyses safeguard engines and require standard sampling procedures before determination of density, viscosity, flash point, insolubles, base number, water and wear metal content.

  19. Hyphenation of atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry to supercritical fluid chromatography for polar car lubricant additives analysis.

    PubMed

    Lavison-Bompard, Gwenaelle; Thiébaut, Didier; Beziau, Jean-François; Carrazé, Bernadette; Valette, Pascale; Duteurtre, Xavier; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2009-01-30

    Car lubricant additives are added to mineral or synthetic base stocks to improve viscosity and resistance to oxidation of the lubricant and to limit wear of engines. As they belong to various chemical classes and are added to a very complex medium, the base stock, their detailed chromatographic analysis is very difficult and time consuming. In a previous paper, it was demonstrated that supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) allows the elution of common low-molecular-weight additives. Since their total resolution could not be achieved owing to the limited peak capacity of packed columns, the hyphenation of selective and informative detection methods such as atomic emission detection (AED) was required. Further to results obtained in SFC-AED, this work describes the hyphenation of SFC to atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry (MS). SFC-MS hyphenation is detailed: temperature, flow rates of gas and mobile phase introduced in the source, position of the restrictor, ionisation additives and conditions of autotune are studied. Car lubricant monitoring requires negative and positive ionisation modes with or without the addition of ionisation auxiliary solvent according to the nature of additives. Moreover, when sensitivity is of major concern for a selected additive, the autotuning routine of the MS has to be performed in conditions as close as possible to analytical conditions, i.e. under subcritical conditions. Unambiguous identification and structure elucidation of several additives in formulated car lubricants are also presented.

  20. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Wang, F C; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Udofia, I; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M

    2008-03-07

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  1. Ocular lubricant use in medically and surgically treated glaucoma: a retrospective longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Jayant Venkatramani; Zhao, Yang; Lim, Fiona Pin Miao; Tong, Louis; Wong, Tina Tzee Ling

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic use of intraocular pressure-lowering medications is associated with ocular surface disease (OSD). In this study, we assess the incidence of topical lubricant use as a surrogate marker for underlying OSD, in medically and surgically treated glaucoma patients. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed for newly diagnosed glaucoma patients who were started on topical medications in 2007 and followed up over a 5-year period. Primary outcome measure was the incidence of topical lubricant use in these patients and a subset of these patients who required glaucoma or cataract surgery during follow-up. Results Charts of 505 newly diagnosed glaucoma patients with no prior history of ocular lubricant use were analyzed. Mean age was 63.9 years (SD 11.1), 42.8% were women. One hundred one (20.0%) patients underwent phacoemulsification surgery, 80 underwent mitomycin C (MMC) augmented phacotrabeculectomy, 16 underwent MMC-augmented trabeculectomy and 3 underwent tube surgery during the course of follow-up as their only type of surgery. Five-year incidence of lubricant use was 59% in all glaucoma subjects; 54.1% of patients were on medical treatment and 74.0% of patients who underwent phacotrabeculectomy or trabeculectomy were started on lubricants, respectively (P=0.0011); 60.4% of glaucoma subjects who underwent phacoemulsification surgery were started on lubricants. Incidence of lubricant use increased from 17.7% preoperatively to 74.0% postoperatively in subjects who required trabeculectomy or phacotrabeculectomy. Incidence of lubricant use was similar in patients on one or multiple glaucoma medications, with the mean onset of lubricant use being 10 months after starting glaucoma medication in both groups. Females were more likely to use artificial tears compared with males (P=0.002). Conclusion Both medical and surgical management of glaucoma have an adverse effect on the ocular surface. Chronic use of glaucoma medications was associated with a high

  2. Ocular lubricant use in medically and surgically treated glaucoma: a retrospective longitudinal analysis.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Jayant Venkatramani; Zhao, Yang; Lim, Fiona Pin Miao; Tong, Louis; Wong, Tina Tzee Ling

    2017-01-01

    Chronic use of intraocular pressure-lowering medications is associated with ocular surface disease (OSD). In this study, we assess the incidence of topical lubricant use as a surrogate marker for underlying OSD, in medically and surgically treated glaucoma patients. Retrospective chart review was performed for newly diagnosed glaucoma patients who were started on topical medications in 2007 and followed up over a 5-year period. Primary outcome measure was the incidence of topical lubricant use in these patients and a subset of these patients who required glaucoma or cataract surgery during follow-up. Charts of 505 newly diagnosed glaucoma patients with no prior history of ocular lubricant use were analyzed. Mean age was 63.9 years (SD 11.1), 42.8% were women. One hundred one (20.0%) patients underwent phacoemulsification surgery, 80 underwent mitomycin C (MMC) augmented phacotrabeculectomy, 16 underwent MMC-augmented trabeculectomy and 3 underwent tube surgery during the course of follow-up as their only type of surgery. Five-year incidence of lubricant use was 59% in all glaucoma subjects; 54.1% of patients were on medical treatment and 74.0% of patients who underwent phacotrabeculectomy or trabeculectomy were started on lubricants, respectively (P=0.0011); 60.4% of glaucoma subjects who underwent phacoemulsification surgery were started on lubricants. Incidence of lubricant use increased from 17.7% preoperatively to 74.0% postoperatively in subjects who required trabeculectomy or phacotrabeculectomy. Incidence of lubricant use was similar in patients on one or multiple glaucoma medications, with the mean onset of lubricant use being 10 months after starting glaucoma medication in both groups. Females were more likely to use artificial tears compared with males (P=0.002). Both medical and surgical management of glaucoma have an adverse effect on the ocular surface. Chronic use of glaucoma medications was associated with a high incidence of ocular lubricant use

  3. Lubricating compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.J.; Campbell, C.B.

    1993-08-03

    A lubricating composition is described comprising a major amount of oil of lubricating viscosity and a minor amount of an oil-soluble composition selected from the group consisting of: (A) an alkali metal salt of a polyalkenyl succinimide which is the reaction product of (a) a polyalkenyl succinic acid or polyalkenyl succinic anhydride, with (b) an amine selected from the group consisting of polyamines and hydroxy-substituted polyamines; and (B) a mixture comprising: (1) an oil-soluble alkali metal compound; and (2) a polyalkenyl succinimide which is the reaction product of (a) a polyalkenyl succinic acid or polyalkenyl succinic anhydride, with (b) an amine selected from the group consisting of polyamines and hydroxy-substituted polyamines; wherein the polyalkenyl succinic acid and polyalkenyl succinic anhydride are prepared by a thermal reaction, and the lubricating composition has a sufficient amount of basic nitrogen content so that the use of from 7.91 to about 50 mmoles of alkali metal/kg lubricant composition provides for reductions in the lower piston deposits as compared to the lubricant composition not containing alkali.

  4. Tribological performance evaluation of oil mist lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Shamim, A.; Kettleborough, C.F. )

    1994-09-01

    In this research work, the tribological performance of oil mist lubrication (pure mist), as applied to rolling element bearings, was investigated. In the first part of this research, tests were conducted to compare the performances of oil mist and conventional oil sump lubrication in terms of operating temperature and friction with variation of load and speed. In the second part, the two methods of lubrication were compared directly under endurance test conditions. The oil mist lubricated high-precision angular contact test bearings ran cooler by about 10 C. Also, the oil mist lubricated bearings had about 25 percent less friction. In the third part, endurance tests were conducted to investigate the influence of oil mist lubrication on the life of rolling element bearings. Weibull and maximum likelihood analysis of the endurance test data indicated that, in addition to savings in energy, oil mist lubrication provides better wear and fatigue protection to the test bearings compared to conventional sump lubrication.

  5. The effects of vaginal lubricants on sperm function: an in vitro analysis.

    PubMed

    Mowat, Alex; Newton, Cora; Boothroyd, Clare; Demmers, Kristy; Fleming, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Despite being marketed as "sperm friendly", some vaginal lubricants are known to be detrimental to sperm function and therefore could negatively affect fertility. Many others have not yet been assessed in regards to their effect on sperm function. This issue may concern couples trying to conceive both naturally and via artificial reproductive technologies (ART). The aim of this research was to analyse the effects that lubricants, commonly used in the setting of natural conception and ART, have on sperm function in an in vitro setting. This was done by assessing sperm motility, vitality and DNA fragmentation following treatment with commercial lubricants or control preparations. We have attempted to mimic the conditions of the vaginal environment in our clinical trial, and so have compiled a list of lubricants that are likely to have minimal negative effect on sperm function in vivo or are "sperm friendly". Ten samples were obtained for the study from patients attending a fertility clinic. Once collected, the sperm samples were prepared by density gradient centrifugation and incubated with 11 different lubricants including positive and negative controls for 30 min at 37 °C to mimic the temperature inside the female reproductive tract. Sperm motility, vitality and DNA fragmentation were assessed to determine the effects of the lubricants on sperm function and DNA integrity. Nine lubricants were investigated including Sylk™, Conceive Plus®, glycerol, Johnson's® Baby Oil, SAGE® Culture Oil, Yes®, Forelife™, MaybeBaby® and Pre-seed®. The lubricant which had the best results in terms of vitality, at 92%, was Pre-seed® and the worst was Forelife™ with 28% vitality. In terms of motility, Pre-seed® resulted in the highest percentage of spermatozoa with progressive motility at 86% and Sylk™ resulted in the lowest percentage of progressively motile cells in the sample with 31% of sperm progressively motile. There were no significant effects on DNA integrity

  6. Advanced Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Three Sun Coast Chemicals (SCC) of Daytona, Inc. products were derived from NASA technology: Train Track Lubricant, Penetrating Spray Lube, and Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid. NASA contractor Lockheed Martin Space Operations contacted SCC about joining forces to develop an environmentally safe spray lubricant for the Shuttle Crawler. The formula was developed over an eight-month period resulting in new products which are cost effective and environmentally friendly. Meeting all Environmental Protection Agency requirements, the SCC products are used for applications from train tracks to bicycle chains.

  7. Lubricant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.L.; Lawson, R.D.; Root, J.C.

    1981-12-15

    Lubricant compositions adapted for use under extreme pressure conditions are disclosed. They comprise a major proportion of a lubricating grease, and a minor proportion of an additive consisting essentially of a solid, oil insoluble arylene sulfide polymer, and a metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt of a phosphorus acid, for example, mono- or dicalcium phosphate, or an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal carbonate exemplified by calcium carbonate, or a mixture of such a phosphate salt and carbonate.

  8. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  9. Solid lubricants: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    A survey is presented of the most recent developments and trends in the field of solid lubrication. Topics discussed include: a history of solid lubrication, lubricating solids, bonded lubricants, new developments, methods of evaluation, environmental effects, application methods, novel materials, and designs for the use of solid lubricants. Excerpts of solid lubricant specifications and a discussion of contact stresses imposed on specimens in three types of test machines used for the evaluation of solid lubricants are presented.

  10. Characteristics analysis and dynamic responses of micro-gas-lubricated journal bearings with a new slip model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Meng, Guang; Huang, Hai; Zhou, Jian-Bin; Chen, Jie-Yu; Chen, Di

    2008-08-01

    In this paper, a new slip model based on kinetic theory of gases for gas-lubricated journal bearings in micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) is applied using a physical approach. The corresponding modified governing equation and mathematic model are presented and the flow rate is plotted versus the inverse Knudsen number. Pressure distributions along the gas bearing at various Knudsen numbers and bearing numbers are plotted and the load carrying capacities are also obtained. A numerical analysis of a rigid rotor supported by gas-lubricated journal bearings is presented for dynamic behaviour. The slip flow effect on the properties, including pressure distribution, load carrying capacity and dynamic coefficients, of the micro-gas-lubricated journal bearings and dynamic responses of the micro rotor-bearing system are estimated and analysed in detail. It is shown that the dynamic coefficients increase with increasing bearing number except for two damping coefficients and the rotor-bearing system runs at a much higher rotating speed to keep stable when slip flow occurs. Moreover, the oscillation period of the rotor operating with the slip model is longer than that with the continuum flow. In addition, the whirl frequency is reduced from 0.422 to 0.079 under the slip effect. Therefore, the results of this study contribute to a further understanding of the characteristics and nonlinear dynamics of gas-film rotor-bearing systems in MEMS.

  11. Auger spectroscopy analysis of lubrication with zinc dialkyldithiophosphate of several metal combinations in sliding contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with aluminum and other riders rubbing on disks of various elemental metals in the presence of a thin film of zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDP). Auger emission spectroscopy was used to in situ monitor the changes in surface chemistry with rubbing under various loads. The metal disks examined included iron, titanium, rhodium, tungsten, molybdenum, and copper. For equivalent films of ZDP the film is a more effective lubricant for some metals than it is for others. The important active element in the compound varies with the metal lubricated and is a function of metal chemistry. The zinc in the ZDP is susceptible to electron beam induced desorption.

  12. Importance of head diameter, clearance, and cup wall thickness in elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing prostheses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Jin, Zhongmin; Roberts, P; Grigoris, P

    2006-08-01

    The main design features of metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing prostheses in promoting elastohydrodynamic lubrication were investigated in the present study, including the femoral head diameter, the clearance, and the cup wall thickness. Simplified conceptual models were developed, based on equivalent uniform wall thicknesses for both the cup and the head as well as the support materials representing bone and cement, and subsequently used for elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis. Both typical first- and second-generation MOM hip resurfacing prostheses with different clearances and cup wall thicknesses were considered with a fixed large bearing diameter of 50 mm, as well as a 28 mm diameter MOM total hip replacement bearing for the purpose of comparison. The importance of the head diameter and the clearance in promoting elastohydrodynamic lubrication was confirmed. Furthermore, it was also predicted that a relatively thin acetabular cup in the more recently introduced second-generation MOM hip resurfacing prostheses would be capable of improving elastohydrodynamic lubrication even further.

  13. Evaluation of selected micronized poloxamers as tablet lubricants.

    PubMed

    Desai, D; Zia, H; Quadir, A

    2007-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to compare the lubrication properties of micronized poloxamer 188 (Lmicrotrol micro 68) and micronized poloxamer 407 (Lmicrotrol micro 127) with certain conventional lubricants such as magnesium stearate and stearic acid. The secondary objective was to use these micronized poloxamers as water-soluble tablet lubricants in preparation of effervecsent tablets. The results showed that these micronized poloxamers have superior lubrication properties compared with stearic acid, with no negative effect on tablet hardness, friability, disintegration, or dissolution. Moreover, lubricant mixing time had no significant effect on tablet properties when poloxamers were used as lubricants. Effervescent tablets also were produced successfully using micronized poloxamers as lubricants. The micronized poloxamers had a better lubrication effect in comparison with that of water-soluble lubricant l-leucine.

  14. Tethered Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Lynden

    2010-09-15

    We have performed extensive experimental and theoretical studies of interfacial friction, relaxation dynamics, and thermodynamics of polymer chains tethered to points, planes, and particles. A key result from our tribology studies using lateral force microscopy (LFM) measurements of polydisperse brushes of linear and branched chains densely grafted to planar substrates is that there are exceedingly low friction coefficients for these systems. Specific project achievements include: (1) Synthesis of three-tiered lubricant films containing controlled amounts of free and pendent PDMS chains, and investigated the effect of their molecular weight and volume fraction on interfacial friction. (2.) Detailed studies of a family of hairy particles termed nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) and demonstration of their use as lubricants.

  15. Simulated 'On-Line' Wear Metal Analysis of Lubricating Oils by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelliher, Warren C.; Partos, Richard D.; Nelson, Irina

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the sensitivity of X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XFS) for quantitative evaluation of metal particle content in engine oil suspensions and the feasibility of real-time, dynamic wear metal analysis. The study was focused on iron as the majority wear metal component. Variable parameters were: particle size, particle concentration and oil velocity. A commercial XFS spectrometer equipped with interchangeable static/dynamic (flow cell) sample chambers was used. XFS spectra were recorded for solutions of Fe-organometallic standard and for a series of DTE oil suspensions of high purity spherical iron particles of 2g, 4g, and 8g diameter, at concentrations from 5 ppm to 5,000 ppm. Real contaminated oil samples from Langley Air Force Base aircraft engines and NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels were also analyzed. The experimental data conform the reliability of XFS as the analytical method of choice for this project. Intrinsic inadequacies of the instrument for precise analytic work at low metal concentrations were identified as being related to the particular x-ray beam definition, system geometry, and flow-cell materials selection. This work supports a proposal for the design, construction and testing of a conceptually new, miniature XFS spectrometer with superior performance, dedicated to on-line, real-time monitoring of lubricating oils in operating engines. Innovative design solutions include focalization of the incident x-ray beam, non-metal sample chamber, and miniaturization of the overall assembly. The instrument would contribute to prevention of catastrophic engine failures. A proposal for two-year funding has been presented to NASA Langley Research Center Internal Operation Group (IOG) Management, to continue the effort begun by this summer's project.

  16. Simulated 'On-Line' Wear Metal Analysis of Lubricating Oils by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelliher, Warren C.; Partos, Richard D.; Nelson, Irina

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the sensitivity of X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XFS) for quantitative evaluation of metal particle content in engine oil suspensions and the feasibility of real-time, dynamic wear metal analysis. The study was focused on iron as the majority wear metal component. Variable parameters were: particle size, particle concentration and oil velocity. A commercial XFS spectrometer equipped with interchangeable static/dynamic (flow cell) sample chambers was used. XFS spectra were recorded for solutions of Fe-organometallic standard and for a series of DTE oil suspensions of high purity spherical iron particles of 2g, 4g, and 8g diameter, at concentrations from 5 ppm to 5,000 ppm. Real contaminated oil samples from Langley Air Force Base aircraft engines and NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels were also analyzed. The experimental data conform the reliability of XFS as the analytical method of choice for this project. Intrinsic inadequacies of the instrument for precise analytic work at low metal concentrations were identified as being related to the particular x-ray beam definition, system geometry, and flow-cell materials selection. This work supports a proposal for the design, construction and testing of a conceptually new, miniature XFS spectrometer with superior performance, dedicated to on-line, real-time monitoring of lubricating oils in operating engines. Innovative design solutions include focalization of the incident x-ray beam, non-metal sample chamber, and miniaturization of the overall assembly. The instrument would contribute to prevention of catastrophic engine failures. A proposal for two-year funding has been presented to NASA Langley Research Center Internal Operation Group (IOG) Management, to continue the effort begun by this summer's project.

  17. A Thermal Equilibrium Analysis of Line Contact Hydrodynamic Lubrication Considering the Influences of Reynolds Number, Load and Temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaoli; Sun, Zheng; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yuqi

    2015-01-01

    Thermal effects such as conduction, convection and viscous dissipation are important to lubrication performance, and they vary with the friction conditions. These variations have caused some inconsistencies in the conclusions of different researchers regarding the relative contributions of these thermal effects. To reveal the relationship between the contributions of the thermal effects and the friction conditions, a steady-state THD analysis model was presented. The results indicate that the contribution of each thermal effect sharply varies with the Reynolds number and temperature. Convective effect could be dominant under certain conditions. Additionally, the accuracy of some simplified methods of thermo-hydrodynamic analysis is further discussed.

  18. A Thermal Equilibrium Analysis of Line Contact Hydrodynamic Lubrication Considering the Influences of Reynolds Number, Load and Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaoli; Sun, Zheng; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yuqi

    2015-01-01

    Thermal effects such as conduction, convection and viscous dissipation are important to lubrication performance, and they vary with the friction conditions. These variations have caused some inconsistencies in the conclusions of different researchers regarding the relative contributions of these thermal effects. To reveal the relationship between the contributions of the thermal effects and the friction conditions, a steady-state THD analysis model was presented. The results indicate that the contribution of each thermal effect sharply varies with the Reynolds number and temperature. Convective effect could be dominant under certain conditions. Additionally, the accuracy of some simplified methods of thermo-hydrodynamic analysis is further discussed. PMID:26244665

  19. Space Station long term lubrication analysis. Phase 1 preliminary tribological survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Kannel, J. W.; Lowry, J. A.; Montgomery, E. E.

    1990-01-01

    Increases in the size, complexity, and life requirements of satellites and space vehicles have put increasing demands on the lubrication requirements for trouble-free service. Since the development costs of large systems are high, long lives with minimum maintenance are dictated. The Space Station represents the latest level of size and complexity in satellite development; it will be nearly 100 meters in major dimensions and will have a life requirement of thirty years. It will have numerous mechanisms critical to its success, some of which will be exposed to the space environment. Designing long-life lubrication systems and choosing appropriate lubricants for these systems will be necessary for their meeting the requirements and for avoiding failures with associated dependent mechanisms. The purpose of this program was to identify the various critical mechanisms and review their designs during the overall design and development stage so that problem areas could be avoided or minimized prior to the fabrication of hardware. The specific objectives were fourfold: (1) to perform a tribology survey of the Space Station for the purpose of documenting each wear point as to materials involved, environmental conditions, and operating characteristics; (2) to review each wear point (point of relative motion) as to the lubrication used and substrate materials selected in the context of its operating characteristics and the environmental conditions imposed; (3) to make recommendations for improvement in areas where the lubricant chosen and/or where the substrate (materials of the wear couple) are not considered optimum for the application; and (4) to make or recommend simulated or full scale tests in tribological areas where the state-of-the-art is being advanced, in areas where new designs are obviously being employed and a critical review would indicate that problems are a strong possibility, and/or where excessive wear, a malfunction, or excessive leakage would create fluid

  20. Liquid lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Khonsari, Michael M.

    1992-01-01

    Reviewed here is the state of the art of liquid lubrication for space applications. The areas discussed are types of liquid lubrication mechanisms, space environmental effects on lubrication, classification of lubricants, liquid lubricant additives, grease lubrication, mechanism materials, bearing anomalies and failures, lubricant supply techniques, and application types and lubricant needs for those applications.

  1. Liquid lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Khonsari, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    Reviewed here is the state of the art of liquid lubrication for space applications. The areas discussed are types of liquid lubrication mechanisms, space environmental effects on lubrication, classification of lubricants, liquid lubricant additives, grease lubrication, mechanism materials, bearing anomalies and failures, lubricant supply techniques, and application types and lubricant needs for those applications.

  2. Liquid cryogenic lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, M. W.; Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1970-01-01

    Fluorinated polyethers are suitable lubricants for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic systems. Lubrication effectiveness is comparable to that of super-refined mineral oil lubricants operating at room temperature.

  3. Rheology in lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    The rheological effects on lubrication are discussed. The types of lubrication considered are thick film hydrodynamic lubrication and thin film elastohydrodynamic lubrication. The temperature-viscosity, viscoelastic, shear-thinning, and normal stess effects on the lubrication of journal bearings are analyzed. A graph of the pressure distribution of viscoelastic liquids in journal bearings is provided. Mathematical models are developed to define the effects of various properties of the lubricants on friction reduction.

  4. Synergistic lubricating compositions

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.

    1980-07-08

    A synergistic lubricating composition a lubricant selected from the group consisting of base lubricating oils and greases having admixed with the lubricant a friction reducing amount of a synergistic mixture of 1 to 99% weight molybdenum disulfide and 99 to 1% weight of a polymer of thiadiazoledithiols. The lubricant is a base lubricating grease selected from the group consisting of lithium grease, clay grease, silicone grease and aluminum complex grease.

  5. Rheology in lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    The rheological effects on lubrication are discussed. The types of lubrication considered are thick film hydrodynamic lubrication and thin film elastohydrodynamic lubrication. The temperature-viscosity, viscoelastic, shear-thinning, and normal stess effects on the lubrication of journal bearings are analyzed. A graph of the pressure distribution of viscoelastic liquids in journal bearings is provided. Mathematical models are developed to define the effects of various properties of the lubricants on friction reduction.

  6. Intercalation Compounds: A New Class of Materials as Advanced Solid Lubricants (Wear Life Studies and Differential Thermal Analysis).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-08

    intercalation compounds at metal-to-metal contact junctions where "hot spots can reach temperatures as high as 10000C. The intercalated species which comes out ...lubrication on two relatively moving surfaces under essentially dry condi- tions as opposed to oil or grease lubrication. Molybdenum disulfide ( MoS2 ) and...common usage of solids as lubricants is in the form of bonded films. Typical formulations consist of lubricating pigment ( MoS2 ) incorporating either

  7. Glass microsphere lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  8. Solid lubrication design methodology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallini, R. A.; Wedeven, L. D.; Ragen, M. A.; Aggarwal, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    The high temperature performance of solid lubricated rolling elements was conducted with a specially designed traction (friction) test apparatus. Graphite lubricants containing three additives (silver, phosphate glass, and zinc orthophosphate) were evaluated from room temperature to 540 C. Two hard coats were also evaluated. The evaluation of these lubricants, using a burnishing method of application, shows a reasonable transfer of lubricant and wear protection for short duration testing except in the 200 C temperature range. The graphite lubricants containing silver and zinc orthophosphate additives were more effective than the phosphate glass material over the test conditions examined. Traction coefficients ranged from a low of 0.07 to a high of 0.6. By curve fitting the traction data, empirical equations for slope and maximum traction coefficient as a function of contact pressure (P), rolling speed (U), and temperature (T) can be developed for each lubricant. A solid lubricant traction model was incorporated into an advanced bearing analysis code (SHABERTH). For comparison purposes, preliminary heat generation calculations were made for both oil and solid lubricated bearing operation. A preliminary analysis indicated a significantly higher heat generation for a solid lubricated ball bearing in a deep groove configuration. An analysis of a cylindrical roller bearing configuration showed a potential for a low friction solid lubricated bearing.

  9. Influence of lubricant contamination by methylesters of plant oils on oxidation stability and life

    SciTech Connect

    Siekmann, R.W.; Blackman, D.; Pischinger, G.H.; Carvalho, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Lubricating oil deterioration due to contamination by methylester of plant oil is studied in laboratory tests in MacCoull apparatus and, for comparison, bench and mixed-driving tests. Methylester of soybean oil (MESO) is added intentionally to the lubricating oil. Laboratory tests show that the amount of double bonds introduced is significant in increasing viscosity and reducing TBN. Gas-chromatographic analysis of extracted ester shows degradation mainly in fatty acids with conjugated double bonds. Tests in engines, both bench and mixed-driving, gave results similar to MacCoull but respectively and much less pronounced.

  10. Lubricant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Baile, G.H.

    1980-12-16

    Lubricating compositions and shaped articles composed thereof are described which consist essentially of about 30 to about 60% by weight of an oil of lubricating viscosity, about 20 to about 50% by weight of a high molecular weight polymer, and about 20 about 50% by weight of a heat conductive agent capable of conducting heat away from a bearing surface where it is generated. The high molecular weight polymer may, for example, be polyethylene, having average molecular weights in the range from about 1.0 X 105 to about 5.0 X 106. The oil may be a mineral oil, a diester oil or preferably a synthetic hydrocarbon oil having a viscosity in the range from about 13 to about 1200 mm''/s (Mm2/s) at 38/sup 0/C. (100/sup 0/F.) the heat conductive agent may be powdered zinc oxide, aluminum powder, or equivalents thereof in this invention. The compositions are semi-rigid gels which may be formed in a mold and used as is, or which may be shaped further after molding. The gels are formed by blending the heat conductive agent and polymer and then blending that mixture with the oil and heating to a temperature above the softening temperature of the polymer for a period of time (About 5 to about 75 minutes) sufficient that the mixture will form a firm, tough solid gel on cooling having an oily surface provided by oil exuding from the gel thus producing a lubricative mass operable for extended periods of time. The heat conductive substance dispersed in the gel aids in dissipating heat produced at the bearing surfaces during use thus improving the performance of the gel both in withstanding higher bulk operating temperatures and in resisting breakdown of the gel under prolonged use.

  11. Flowability analysis of uranium dioxide powder at different temperatures containing different lubricants.

    PubMed

    Santana, H H S; Maier, G; Ródenas, J

    2011-08-01

    Powder flowability characteristics are often intentionally modified in order to improve their production process. The UO(2) pellet manufacturing process can consist of many steps, e.g. milling, granulation, homogenization, die filling for pressing, etc. By the addition of flow additives, lubricants or glidants the desired workability can be achieved. Temperature also influences the powder processability, leading to an easier or more complex powder flow. The work aims to determine some flowability characteristics for UO(2) powder at different temperatures.

  12. Steady-state and dynamic analysis of a jet engine, gas lubricated shaft seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, W.; Colsher, R.

    1974-01-01

    Dynamic response of a gas-lubricated, jet-engine main shaft seal was analytically established as a function of collar misalignment and secondary seal friction. Response was obtained by a forward integration-in-time (time-transient) scheme, which traces a time history of seal motions in all its degrees of freedom. Results were summarized in the form of a seal tracking map which indicated regions of acceptable collar misalignments and secondary seal friction. Methodology, results and interpretations are comprehensively described.

  13. Engine Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    PS 212, a plasma-sprayed coating developed by NASA, is used to coat valves in a new rotorcam engine. The coating eliminates the need for a liquid lubricant in the rotorcam, which has no crankshaft, flywheel, distributor or water pump. Developed by Murray United Development Corporation, it is a rotary engine only 10 inches long with four cylinders radiating outward from a central axle. Company officials say the engine will be lighter, more compact and cheaper to manufacture than current engines and will feature cleaner exhaust emissions. A licensing arrangement with a manufacturer is under negotiation. Primary applications are for automobiles, but the engine may also be used in light aircraft.

  14. Investigations of lubricant rheology as applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, S.; Turchina, V.; Jakobsen, J.; Sanborn, D. M.; Winer, W. O.

    1973-01-01

    The pressure viscometer was modified to permit the measurement of viscosity at elevated pressures and shear stresses up to 5 x 10 to the 6th power N/sq m (720 psi). This shear stress is within a factor of three of the shear stress occurring in a sliding ehd point contact such as occurs in the ehd simulator. Viscosity data were taken on five lubricant samples, and it was found that viscous heating effects on the viscosity were predominant and not non-Newtonian behavior at the high shear stresses. The development of the infrared temperature measuring technique for the ehd simulator was completed, and temperature data for a set of operating conditions and one lubricant are reported. The numerical analysis of the behavior of nonlinear lubricants in the lubrication of rollers is reported.

  15. Steady-state elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of a metal-on-metal hip implant employing a metallic cup with an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene backing.

    PubMed

    Liu, F; Wang, F C; Jin, Z M; Hirt, F; Rieker, C; Grigoris, P

    2004-01-01

    The elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was carried out in this study for a 28 mm diameter metal-on-metal hip prosthesis employing a metallic cup with an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) backing under a simple steady state rotation representing the flexion/extension during walking. Both Reynolds and elasticity equations were coupled and solved numerically by the finite difference method. The elastic deformation was determined by means of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) technique using the displacement coefficients obtained from the finite element method. Excellent agreement of the predicted elastic deformation was obtained between the FFT technique and the conventional direct summation method. The number of grid points used in the lubrication analysis was found to be important in predicting accurate film thicknesses, particularly at low viscosities representative of physiological lubricants. The effect of the clearance between the femoral head and the acetabular cup on the predicted lubricant film thickness was shown to be significant, while the effect of load was found to be negligible. Overall, the UHMWPE backing was found not only to reduce the contact pressure as identified in a previous study by the authors (Liu et al., 2003) but also significantly to increase the lubricant film thickness for the 28 mm diameter metal-on-metal hip implant, as compared with a metallic mono-block cup.

  16. Lubrication Of Nonconformal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses advances in knowledge of lubrication of nonconformal contacts in bearings and other machine elements. Reviews previous developments in theory of lubrication, presents advances in theory of lubrication to determine minimum film thickness, and describes experiments designed to investigate one of regimes of lubrication for ball bearings.

  17. MIXING QUANTIFICATION BY VISUAL IMAGING ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reports on development of a method for quantifying two measures of mixing, the scale and intensity of segregation, through flow visualization, video recording, and software analysis. This non-intrusive method analyzes a planar cross section of a flowing system from an ...

  18. MIXING QUANTIFICATION BY VISUAL IMAGING ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reports on development of a method for quantifying two measures of mixing, the scale and intensity of segregation, through flow visualization, video recording, and software analysis. This non-intrusive method analyzes a planar cross section of a flowing system from an ...

  19. Mixed FE analysis of viscoelastic cylindrical helixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arıbaş, Ü. N.; Omurtag, M. H.

    2012-09-01

    In this study, analysis of viscoelastic cylindrical helixes with circular and square cross section is investigated by using the mixed FEM based on Timoshenko beam theory. The Kelvin model is used for the viscoelastic behavior. The analysis is performed in the Laplace domain and the results are transformed back to time domain numerically by Modified Durbin algorithm. The outcome is quite satisfactory besides the necessary engineering precision.

  20. A Mixed Finite Analysis of Axial Foreshortening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzicka, Gene; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies, a mixed finite element was derived and shown to be effective in facilitating accurate modal reduction of rotor blades. This study builds upon that earlier work through the development of algorithms that allow the element's Lagrangian axial displacement degrees of freedom to be eliminated in favor of the axial force degrees of freedom. This reduction process, which had been demonstrated previously for the case of a single mixed finite element, may be viewed as a generalization of the UMARC blade analysis methodology to arbitrary topologies. A unique strength of the method. developed here is that the model may consist of two dimensional or even three dimensional elements.

  1. A Mixed Approach Of Automated ECG Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, A. K.; Das, J.; Majumder, D. Dutta

    1982-11-01

    ECG is one of the non-invasive and risk-free technique for collecting data about the functional state of the heart. However, all these data-processing techniques can be classified into two basically different approaches -- the first and second generation ECG computer program. Not the opposition, but simbiosis of these two approaches will lead to systems with the highest accuracy. In our paper we are going to describe a mixed approach which will show higher accuracy with lesser amount of computational work. Key Words : Primary features, Patients' parameter matrix, Screening, Logical comparison technique, Multivariate statistical analysis, Mixed approach.

  2. Lubricant Evaluation and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    Changes on COBRA Response 313 c. Nature of Charge Carrier in COBRA Active Lubricants 313 (I) Adsorption Chromatography of Degraded Lubricants 316 (2...Lubricant 0-67-1 160 (5) Summary 162 b. Micro Carbon Residue Tester (MCRT) 163 (1) Introduction 163 (2) Test Apparatus and Procedure 164 (3) Test...Other COBRA Active Compounds 326 d. Conclusions 329 4. DIELECTRIC BREAKDOWN STRENGTH OF MIL-L-7808 LUBRICANTS 330 V LUBRICANT LOAD CARRYING

  3. Analysis of the gas-lubricated flat-sector-pad thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A flat sector-shaped pad geometry for a gas-lubricated thrust bearing is analyzed considering both the pitch and roll of the pad. It is shown that maximum load capacity is achieved when the pad is tilted so as to create uniform minimum film thickness along the pad trailing edge. Performance characteristics for various geometries and operating conditions of gas thrust bearings are presented in the form of design curves, and a comparison is made with the rectangular slider approximation. It is found that this approximation is unsafe for practical design, since it always overestimates load capacity.

  4. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1982-01-01

    The isothermal elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) of a point contact was analyzed numerically by simultaneously solving the elasticity and Reynolds equations. In the elasticity analysis the contact zone was divided into equal rectangular areas, and it was assumed that a uniform pressure was applied over each area. In the numerical analysis of the Reynolds equation, a phi analysis (where phi is equal to the pressure times the film thickness to the 3/2 power) was used to help the relaxation process. The EHL point contact analysis is applicable for the entire range of elliptical parameters and is valid for any combination of rolling and sliding within the contact.

  5. DOE mixed waste treatment capacity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, W.A.; Wehrman, R.R.; Young, J.R.; Shaver, S.R.

    1994-06-01

    This initial DOE-wide analysis compares the reported national capacity for treatment of mixed wastes with the calculated need for treatment capacity based on both a full treatment of mixed low-level and transuranic wastes to the Land Disposal Restrictions and on treatment of transuranic wastes to the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The status of treatment capacity is reported based on a fifty-element matrix of radiation-handling requirements and functional treatment technology categories. The report defines the classifications for the assessment, describes the models used for the calculations, provides results from the analysis, and includes appendices of the waste treatment facilities data and the waste stream data used in the analysis.

  6. Consider synthetic lubricants for process machinery

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, H.P. , Montgomery, TX ); Pate, A.R. Jr. )

    1995-01-01

    Judicious application of properly formulated synthetic lubricants can benefit a wide spectrum of process machinery. This informed usage is very likely to drive down overall maintenance and downtime expenditures and can markedly improve plant efficiency. The paper describes the origin of synthetic lubricants, then explains the principal features and attributes of the six base fluids: synthetic hydrocarbon fluids; organic esters; polyglycols; phosphate esters; silicones; and blends of the synthetic lubricants. The paper discusses the properties and advantages and gives brief highlights of successful case histories of the use of synthetic lubricants. These include: circulating oil system for furnace air preheaters; Right angle gear drives for fin fan coolers; plant-wide oil mist systems; and pulverizing mills in coal-fired generating plant. In the last case, an economic analysis is done to point out the savings possible in lubricant consumption cost, reduced maintenance cost, lubricant disposal cost, and reduction in power consumption.

  7. An online debris sensor system with vibration resistance for lubrication analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yongbin; Wang, Yanxue; Xiang, Jiawei

    2016-02-01

    The health condition of the lubricated systems can be directly indicated by the concentration and material type of the abrasive particles, which may provide very early warnings of faults/failures and benefit the condition based maintenance. Oil debris particle detecting techniques are thus important for machinery condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. This work proposes a new structure of online debris sensor (ODS), which applies the radial magnetic field, different from the traditional axial magnetic field. The designed ODS can effectively reduce the interferences of the background noise and the vibration of the machine in operation. Moreover, in order to optimally determine the number of turns of an inductive coil and the current of the drive coils, two methods are developed respectively in this work which can ensure sensitivity and anti-vibration features of the ODS. The instrumentation circuit system for detecting debris particles and sensing signals has been also designed to extract and to record the signatures of particles. The designed ODS device is then applied to analyze micro debris particles in the lubricating system on a test rig. Experimental results have demonstrated that ODS can successfully detect the 120 μm(H) ferrous particles and 500 μm(H) non-ferrous particles under vibration conditions.

  8. An online debris sensor system with vibration resistance for lubrication analysis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongbin; Wang, Yanxue; Xiang, Jiawei

    2016-02-01

    The health condition of the lubricated systems can be directly indicated by the concentration and material type of the abrasive particles, which may provide very early warnings of faults/failures and benefit the condition based maintenance. Oil debris particle detecting techniques are thus important for machinery condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. This work proposes a new structure of online debris sensor (ODS), which applies the radial magnetic field, different from the traditional axial magnetic field. The designed ODS can effectively reduce the interferences of the background noise and the vibration of the machine in operation. Moreover, in order to optimally determine the number of turns of an inductive coil and the current of the drive coils, two methods are developed respectively in this work which can ensure sensitivity and anti-vibration features of the ODS. The instrumentation circuit system for detecting debris particles and sensing signals has been also designed to extract and to record the signatures of particles. The designed ODS device is then applied to analyze micro debris particles in the lubricating system on a test rig. Experimental results have demonstrated that ODS can successfully detect the 120 μm(H) ferrous particles and 500 μm(H) non-ferrous particles under vibration conditions.

  9. Comparison of friction and lubrication of different hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Scholes, S C; Unsworth, A

    2000-01-01

    It is well documented that an important cause of osteolysis and subsequent loosening of replacement hip joints is polyethylene wear debris. To avoid this, interest has been renewed in metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic prostheses. Various workers have assessed the lubrication modes of different joints by measuring the friction at the bearing surfaces, using different lubricants. Measurements of friction factors of a series of hip prostheses were undertaken using carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) fluids, silicone fluids, synovial fluid and different concentrations of bovine serum as the lubricant. The experimental results were compared with theoretical predictions of film thicknesses and lubrication modes. A strong correlation was observed between experiment and theory when employing CMC fluids or silicone fluids as the lubricant. Mixed lubrication was found to occur in the metal-on-metal (CoCrMo/CoCrMo) joints with all lubricants at a viscosity within the physiological range. This was also the case for the metal-on-plastic (CoCrMo/ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene) joints. The ceramic-on-ceramic (Al2O3/Al2O3) joints, however, exhibited full fluid film lubrication with the synthetic lubricants but mixed lubrication with the biological lubricants. Employing a biological fluid as the lubricant affected the friction to varying degrees when compared with the synthetic lubricants. In the case of the ceramic-on-ceramic joints it acted to increase the friction factor tenfold; however, for the metal-on-metal joints, biological fluids gave slightly lower friction than the synthetic lubricants did. This suggests that, when measuring friction and wear of artificial joints, a standard lubricant should be used.

  10. Lubrication in tablet formulations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jennifer; Wen, Hong; Desai, Divyakant

    2010-05-01

    Theoretical aspects and practical considerations of lubrication in tablet compression are reviewed in this paper. Properties of the materials that are often used as lubricants, such as magnesium stearate, in tablet dosage form are summarized. The manufacturing process factors that may affect tablet lubrication are discussed. As important as the lubricants in tablet formulations are, their presence can cause some changes to the tablet physical and chemical properties. Furthermore, a detailed review is provided on the methodologies used to characterize lubrication process during tablet compression with relevant process analytical technologies. Finally, the Quality-by-Design considerations for tablet formulation and process development in terms of lubrication are discussed.

  11. Evaluation and auger analysis of a zinc-dialkyl-dithiophosphate antiwear additive in several diester lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Ferrante, J.

    1979-01-01

    The wear of pure iron in sliding contact with hardened M-2 tool steel was measured for a series of synthetic diester fluids, both with and without a zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDP) antiwear additive, as test lubricants. Selected wear scars were analyzed by an Auger emission spectroscopy (AES) depth profiling technique in order to assess the surface film elemental composition. The ZDP was an effective antiwear additive for all the diesters except dibutyl oxalate and dibutyl sebacate. The high wear measured for the additive-containing oxalate was related to corrosion; the higher wear measured for the additive-containing sebacate was due to an oxygen interaction. The AES of dibutyl sebacate surfaces run in dry air and in dry nitrogen showed large differences only in the amount of oxygen present. The AES of worn surfaces where the additive was effective showed no zinc, only a little phosphorus, and large amounts of sulfur.

  12. The role of thermal and lubricant boundary layers in the transient thermal analysis of spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Bayoumy, L. E.; Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.; Choy, F. C.

    1989-01-01

    An improved convection heat-transfer model has been developed for the prediction of the transient tooth surface temperature of spur gears. The dissipative quality of the lubricating fluid is shown to be limited to the capacity extent of the thermal boundary layer. This phenomenon can be of significance in the determination of the thermal limit of gears accelerating to the point where gear scoring occurs. Steady-state temperature prediction is improved considerably through the use of a variable integration time step that substantially reduces computer time. Computer-generated plots of temperature contours enable the user to animate the propagation of the thermal wave as the gears come into and out of contact, thus contributing to better understanding of this complex problem. This model has a much better capability at predicting gear-tooth temperatures than previous models.

  13. Role of thermal and lubricant boundary layers in the transient thermal analysis of spur gears

    SciTech Connect

    El-Bayoumy, L.E.; Akin, L.S.; Townsend, D.P.; Choy, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    An improved convection heat-transfer model has been developed for the prediction of the transient tooth surface temperature of spur gears. The dissipative quality of the lubricating fluid is shown to be limited to the capacity extent of the thermal boundary layer. This phenomenon can be of significance in the determination of the thermal limit of gears accelerating to the point where gear scoring occurs. Steady-state temperature prediction is improved considerably through the use of a variable integration time step that substantially reduces computer time. Computer-generated plots of temperature contours enable the user to animate the propagation of the thermal wave as the gears come into and out of contact, thus contributing to better understanding of this complex problem. This model has a much better capability at predicting gear-tooth temperatures than previous models.

  14. Analysis of DRIRU bearings and lubricant from solar max repair mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uber, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Repair Mission (SMRM) by the shuttle astronauts in April 1984, returned to Earth the Delta Redundant Inertial Reference Unit 2 (DRIRU 2) from the Solar Maximum satellite. The DRIRU 2 included three gyroscopes. The gyroscope, S/N 094, in position 2 was disassembled by Teledyne Systems personnel of Northridge, California, and the bearings were returned to Goddard Space Flight Center for examination. The Solar Max Satellite was in orbit for 4 years with the bearings running continuously at 6000 rpm. The ball bearings, had sufficient remaining lubrication and had runs successfully for over the last 4 years. As a result of these findings, the bearings should have lasted their predicted life of 5 years with no problems.

  15. Complex frictional analysis of self-lubricant W-S-C/Cr coating.

    PubMed

    Polcar, Tomas; Gustavsson, Fredrik; Thersleff, Thomas; Jacobson, Staffan; Cavaleiro, Albano

    2012-01-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides belong to one of the most developed classes of materials for solid lubrication. However, one of the main drawbacks of most of the self-lubricating coatings is their low load-bearing capacity, particularly in terrestrial atmospheres. In our previous work, alloying thin films based on tungsten disulfide with non-metallic interstitial elements, such as carbon or nitrogen, has been studied in order to improve tribological performance in different environments. Excellent results were reached with the deposited coatings hardness, in some cases, more than one order of magnitude higher than single W-S films. In this work, W-S-C films were deposited with increasing Cr contents by co-sputtering chromium and composite WS2-C and targets. Two films were prepared with approx. 7 and 13 at.% of Cr. Alloying with chromium led to dense films with amorphous microstructure; the hardness and adhesion was improved. Sliding tests were carried out in dry and humid air using a pin-on-disc tribometer with 100Cr6 steel balls as a counterpart. To analyse the sliding process, the surfaces in the contact were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (bonding), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Surface and sub-surface structural modification of the coating and composition of the transferred tribolayer are discussed in detail. High friction in humid air was attributed to the absence of a well-ordered WS2 sliding interface. On the other hand, the existence of such an interface explained the very low friction observed in dry air.

  16. Multi-elemental analysis of jet engine lubricating oils and hydraulic fluids and their implication in aircraft air quality incidents.

    PubMed

    van Netten, C

    1999-05-07

    The flight crews of aircraft often report symptoms including dizziness, nausea, disorientation, blurred vision and tingling in legs and arms. Many of these incidents have been traced to contamination of cabin air with lubricating oil, as well as hydraulic fluid, constituents. Considering that these air contaminants are often subjected to temperatures in excess of 500 degrees C, a large number of different exposures can be expected. Although the reported symptoms are most consistent with exposures to volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, and the organophosphate constituents in these oils and fluids, the involvement of these agents has not been clearly demonstrated. Possible exposure to toxic elements, such as lead, mercury, thallium and others, have not been ruled out. In order to assess the potential of exposure to toxic elements a multi-elemental analysis was done on two hydraulic fluids and three lubricating oils which have been implicated in a number of air quality incidents. A secondary objective was to establish if the multi-elemental concentrations of the fluids tested are different enough to allow such an analysis to be used as a possible method of identifying the source of exposure that might have been present during aircraft air quality incidents. No significant concentrations of toxic elements were identified in any of the oils or hydraulic fluids. The elemental compositions of the samples were different enough to be used for identification purposes and the measurement of only three elements was able to achieve this. Whether these findings have an application, in aircraft air quality incident investigations, needs to be established with further studies.

  17. Determination of aluminum by electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy in lubricating oils emulsified in a sequential injection analysis system.

    PubMed

    Burguera, José L; Burguera, Marcela; Antón, Raquel E; Salager, Jean-Louis; Arandia, María A; Rondón, Carlos; Carrero, Pablo; de Peña, Yaneira Petit; Brunetto, Rosario; Gallignani, Máximo

    2005-12-15

    The sequential injection (SIA) technique was applied for the on-line preparation of an "oil in water" microemulsion and for the determination of aluminum in new and used lubricating oils by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET AAS) with Zeeman-effect background correction. Respectively, 1.0, 0.5 and 1.0ml of surfactants mixture, sample and co-surfactant (sec-butanol) solutions were sequentially aspirated to a holding coil. The sonication and repetitive change of the flowing direction improved the stability of the different emulsion types (oil in water, water in oil and microemulsion). The emulsified zone was pumped to fill the sampling arm of the spectrometer with a sub-sample of 200mul. Then, 10mul of this sample solution were introduced by means of air displacement in the graphite tube atomizer. This sequence was timed to synchronize with the previous introduction of 15mug of Mg(NO(3))(2) (in a 10mul) by the spectrometer autosampler. The entire SIA system was controlled by a computer, independent of the spectrometer. The furnace program was carried out by employing a heating cycle in four steps: drying (two steps at 110 and 130 degrees C), pyrolisis (at 1500 degrees C), atomization (at 2400 degrees C) and cleaning (at 2400 degrees C). The calibration graph was linear from 7.7 to 120mugAll(-1). The characteristic mass (mo) was 33.2pg/0.0044s and the detection limit was 2.3mugAll(-1). The relative standard (RSD) of the method, evaluated by replicate analyses of different lubricating oil samples varied in all cases between 1.5 and 1.7%, and the recovery values found in the analysis of spiked samples ranged from 97.2 to 100.4%. The agreement between the observed and reference values obtained from two NIST Standard Certified Materials was good. The method was simple and satisfactory for determining aluminum in new and used lubricating oils.

  18. [A new water-soluble lubricant of tablets-L-leucine combined with PEG6000].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Kai; Rao, Xiaoyong; Liu, Xiaoyan; Sun, Shasha; Luo, Xiaojian

    2011-08-01

    To prepare an effective and water-soluble lubricant. Co-sprayed lubricant (L-leucine and polyethylene glycol 6000 co-sprayed according to a certain proportion) and mixed lubricant (the physical mixture of spayed L-leucine and crushed polyethylene glycol 6000) were prepared and polyethylene glycol 6000, L-leucine, magnesium stearate, sodium stearyl fumarate and sodium chloride are crushed and sieved, respectively. Residual force, appearance of solution and disintegration time were considered as response variables of the lubrication effect to evaluate different lubricants. The changes of the co-sprayed lubricant were studied by differential scanning calorimetry, fourier infrared, electronic scanning microscope and X-ray diffraction. The efficacy of co-sprayed lubricant is better than other lubricants. Efficacy is improved by external form change without inner components and crystal changes. Co-sprayed lubricant is a good water soluble tablet lubricant which has good efficacy.

  19. Top-of-Rail lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.; Boparai, A. S.

    2000-07-14

    Analysis of the volatile and semivolatile fractions collected after use of the TOR lubricant indicated that other than contaminants in the collection laboratory, no compounds on the EPA's Target Compound Lists (Tables 2 and 5) were detected in these fractions. The data of these qualitative analyses, given in the various tables in the text, indicate only the relative amounts of the tentatively identified compounds. The authors recommend that quantitative analysis be performed on the volatile and semivolatile fractions to allow confirmation of the tentatively identified compounds and to obtain absolute amounts of the detected compounds. Additionally, the semivolatile fraction should be analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify compounds that are not chromatographable under the temperature program used for determination of semivolatile compounds. Introducing the top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant into the wheel/rail interface results in a reduction of almost 60% of lateral friction force over the forces encountered under dry conditions. This reveals good potential for energy savings, as well as wear reduction, for railroad companies. In TOR lubrication, an increase in the angle of attack and axle load results in increased lateral friction and rate of lubricant consumption. The most efficient TOR lubricant quantity to be used in the wheel/rail interface must be calculated precisely according to the number of cars, axle loads, train speed, and angle of attack.

  20. Study on a Miniature Mixed-gases Joule-Thomson Cooler Driven by an Oil-lubricated Mini-compressor for 120 K Temperature Ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Yan, B.; Zou, X.; Zhuang, X. R.; Hu, Q. G.

    In this paper, a miniature J-T cooler using multicomponent mixtures was developed and tested, in which an oil-lubricated mini-compressor was used. Experimental tests on the performance of the miniature J-T cooler were carried out with two kinds of recuperative heat exchangers. One is a shell-and-tube heat exchanger, and the other is a plate-fin type recuperative heat exchanger with whereas a micro-channel configuration fabricated by the wire-electrode cutting method. The former one gave a no-load minimum temperature of 140 K, while the later one showsbetter performance. No-load minimum temperature of 110 K and about 4 W cooling capacity at 118 K were achieved with the plate-fin micro J-T cooler. Such miniature J-T coolers driven by oil-lubricated mini-compressors show good prospects in many applications.

  1. Lubrication with solids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Johnson, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Brief discussion of the historical background, variety range, chemistry, physics, and other properties of solid lubricants, and review of their current uses. The widespread use of solid lubricants did not occur until about 1947. At present, they are the object of such interest that a special international conference on their subject was held in 1971. They are used at temperatures beyond the useful range of conventional lubricating oils and greases. Their low volatility provides them with the capability of functioning effectively in vacuum and invites their use in space applications. Their high load carrying ability makes them useful with heavily loaded components. Solid lubricants, however, do lack some of the desirable properties of conventional lubricants. Unlike oils and greases, which have fluidity and can continuously be carried back into contact with lubricated surfaces, solid lubricants, because of their immobility, have finite lives. Also, oils and greases can carry away frictional heat from contacting surfaces, while solid lubricants cannot.

  2. Environmentally Acceptable Lubricants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-30

    referred to as environmentally friendly lubricants ( EFLs ) or biolubricants. EPA, wastewater, lubricants, oil, biolubricants, VGP, vessels U U U UU 27...qualities, but have not been demonstrated to meet these standards, are referred to as environmentally friendly lubricants ( EFLs ) or biolubricants...clarify the difference between EAL and EFL products in the marketplace. Because the majority of a lubricant is composed of the base oil, the base oil

  3. Solid Lubricant For Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Pepper, Stephen V.; Honecy, Frank S.

    1993-01-01

    Outer layer of silver lubricates, while intermediate layer of titanium ensures adhesion. Lubricating outer films of silver deposited on thin intermediate films of titanium on alumina substrates found to reduce sliding friction and wear. Films provide effective lubrication for ceramic seals, bearings, and other hot sliding components in advanced high-temperature engines.

  4. Analysis of Human Rotavirus Mixed Electropherotypes

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Eugenio G.; Avendaño, Luis F.; García, Bernardo I.

    1983-01-01

    Mixed human rotavirus electropherotypes were detected in stool samples from patients with acute gastroenteritis in Santiago, Chile. These electropherotypes accounted for 10% of 149 samples studied. The finding of extra RNA fragments with respect to the regular 11 genome segments suggests the possibility of simultaneous or sequential infection by more than one electropherotype in a single diarrhea event or occurrence of modification in the length of the RNA segments during an infection. These possibilities arose from gel electrophoretic analysis of unique and sequential samples of human rotavirus genome RNA. Images PMID:6299944

  5. Analysis of hazardous organic residues from sodium hydrosulfite industry and utilization as raw materials in a novel solid lubricant production.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jiwu; Zhang, Yihe; Zhou, Fengshan; Lv, Fengzhu; Han, Feng; Lu, Jinbo; Meng, Xianghai; Chu, Paul K; Ye, Zhengfang; Xing, Jing

    2011-12-30

    The hazardous organic residual wastes produced by the sodium hydrosulfite industry are demonstrated to be convertible into a novel solid lubricant. Identification and isolation of the organic residues are achieved by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). FTIR and GC-MS provide important information about the residues and the two main components obtained by column chromatography are further analyzed by NMR. The main organic residues are found to be thiodiglycol and 2,2'-dithiodiethanol which have potential applications in petroleum drilling because of their S-S and/or C-S functional groups. The lubricity of the organic residues is subsequently studied and the influence of different adsorbents on the lubricity is investigated and discussed. This homemade lubricant is observed to have good lubricity and by increasing the concentration of the commercial solid lubricant M, the lubricity diminishes. The process is expected to not only have commercial impact but also help to reduce environmental pollution. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Numerical analysis of micro-/nanoscale gas-film lubrication of sliding surface with complicated structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kawagoe, Yoshiaki; Isono, Susumu; Takeno, Takanori; Yonemura, Shigeru; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Miki, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-09

    It has been reported that the friction between a partially polished diamond-coated surface and a metal surface was drastically reduced to zero when they are slid at a few m/s. Since the sliding was noiseless, it seems that the diamond-coated surface was levitated over the counter surface and the sliding mechanism was the gas film lubrication. Recently, the mechanism of levitation of a slider with a micro/nanoscale surface structure on a rotating disk was theoretically clarified [S. Yonemura et al., Tribol. Lett., (2014), doi:10.1007/s11249-014-0368-2]. Probably, the partially polished diamond-coated surface may be levitated by high gas pressure generated by the micro/nanoscale surface structure on it. In this study, in order to verify our deduction, we performed numerical simulations of sliding of partially polished diamond-coated surface by reproducing its complicated surface structure using the data measured by an atomic force microscope (AFM). As a result, we obtained the lift force which is large enough to levitate the slider used in the experiment.

  7. LatMix 2011 and 2012 Dispersion Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. LatMix 2011 and 2012 Dispersion Analysis Miles A...continue analysis and publication of results obtained during the “Scalable Lateral Mixing and Coherent Turbulence” (a.k.a., LatMix) DRI. The initial...work included the airborne lidar operations as well as a substantial part of the field operations and analysis . A primary objective of our LatMix

  8. Lubricant rheology applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winer, W. O.; Sanborn, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    Viscosity measurements in a high pressure rheometer, elastohydrodynamic simulator studies (including the development of a temperature measuring technique), and analytical fluid modeling for elastohydrodynamic contacts are described. The more recent research which is described concerns infrared temperature measurements in elastohydrodynamic contacts and the exploration of the glassy state of lubricants. A correlation, of engineering significance, was made between transient surface temperature measurements and surface roughness profiles. Measurements of glass transitions of lubricants and the study of the effect of rate processes on materials lead to the conclusion that typical lubricants go into the glassy state as they pass through the contact region of typical elastohydrodynamic contacts.

  9. Analysis of chain saw lubricating oils commonly used in Thailand's southern border provinces for forensic science purpose.

    PubMed

    Choodum, Aree; Tripuwanard, Kijja; Daeid, Niamh Nic

    2014-08-01

    In recent years, Thailand's southern border provinces (Malay-Muslim-majority border provinces) have become the scene of violence and insurgency. One of the attack patterns is the blocking of roads with perennial plants followed by planned attacks using improvised explosive devices (IEDs) or weapons on first responders. Containers of viscous dark lubricating oil and traces of lubricants on the felled trees were usually found at the scene. These were suspected to be chain oil lubricant from the chainsaws used to cut down the trees used for the roadblock. This work aimed to differentiate the chromatographic patterns of used lubricating oils available in automobile repair shops from various locations across Thailand's southern border provinces. Lubricating oils were analyzed using gas chromatography/flame ionization detector (GC/FID) every two weeks to study their variation in chemical compositions over time. The results obtained from GC/FID were normalized for differentiation. This included four two-stroke, six four-stroke, and three recycled oils. Two lubricating oils found at an incident scene were also analyzed and the results compared with the chain oil from five seized chainsaws. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of boric acid additive size on green lubricant performance.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Michael R; Kabir, M A; Menezes, Pradeep L; Higgs, C Fred

    2010-10-28

    As the industrial community moves towards green manufacturing processes, there is an increased demand for multi-functional, environmentally friendly lubricants with enhanced tribological performance. In the present investigation, green (environmentally benign) lubricant combinations were prepared by homogeneously mixing nano- (20 nm), sub-micrometre- (600 nm average size) and micrometre-scale (4 μm average size) boric acid powder additives with canola oil in a vortex generator. As a basis for comparison, lubricants of base canola oil and canola oil mixed with MoS(2) powder (ranging from 0.5 to 10 μm) were also prepared. Friction and wear experiments were carried out on the prepared lubricants using a pin-on-disc apparatus under ambient conditions. Based on the experiments, the nanoscale (20 nm) particle boric acid additive lubricants significantly outperformed all of the other lubricants with respect to frictional and wear performance. In fact, the nanoscale boric acid powder-based lubricants exhibited a wear rate more than an order of magnitude lower than the MoS(2) and larger sized boric acid additive-based lubricants. It was also discovered that the oil mixed with a combination of sub-micrometre- and micrometre-scale boric acid powder additives exhibited better friction and wear performance than the canola oil mixed with sub-micrometre- or micrometre-scale boric acid additives alone.

  11. The O-glycomap of Lubricin, a Novel Mucin Responsible for Joint Lubrication, Identified by Site-specific Glycopeptide Analysis*

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Liaqat; Flowers, Sarah A.; Jin, Chunsheng; Bennet, Eric Paul; Ekwall, Anna-Karin H.; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2014-01-01

    The lubricative, heavily glycosylated mucin-like synovial glycoprotein lubricin has previously been observed to contain glycosylation changes related to rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Thus, a site-specific investigation of the glycosylation of lubricin was undertaken, in order to further understand the pathological mechanisms involved in these diseases. Lubricin contains an serine/threonine/proline (STP)-rich domain composed of imperfect tandem repeats (EPAPTTPK), the target for O-glycosylation. In this study, using a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry approach, employing both collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation fragmentation methods, we identified 185 O-glycopeptides within the STP-rich domain of human synovial lubricin. This showed that adjacent threonine residues within the central STP-rich region could be simultaneously and/or individually glycosylated. In addition to core 1 structures responsible for biolubrication, core 2 O-glycopeptides were also identified, indicating that lubricin glycosylation may have other roles. Investigation of the expression of polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase genes was carried out using cultured primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes, a cell type that expresses lubricin in vivo. This analysis showed high mRNA expression levels of the less understood polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 15 and 5 in addition to the ubiquitously expressed polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 and 2 genes. This suggests that there is a unique combination of transferase genes important for the O-glycosylation of lubricin. The site-specific glycopeptide analysis covered 82% of the protein sequence and showed that lubricin glycosylation displays both micro- and macroheterogeneity. The density of glycosylation was shown to be high: 168 sites of O-glycosylation, predominately sialylated, were identified. These glycosylation sites were focused in the central STP-rich region, giving the domain a

  12. The O-glycomap of lubricin, a novel mucin responsible for joint lubrication, identified by site-specific glycopeptide analysis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Liaqat; Flowers, Sarah A; Jin, Chunsheng; Bennet, Eric Paul; Ekwall, Anna-Karin H; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2014-12-01

    The lubricative, heavily glycosylated mucin-like synovial glycoprotein lubricin has previously been observed to contain glycosylation changes related to rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Thus, a site-specific investigation of the glycosylation of lubricin was undertaken, in order to further understand the pathological mechanisms involved in these diseases. Lubricin contains an serine/threonine/proline (STP)-rich domain composed of imperfect tandem repeats (EPAPTTPK), the target for O-glycosylation. In this study, using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach, employing both collision-induced and electron-transfer dissociation fragmentation methods, we identified 185 O-glycopeptides within the STP-rich domain of human synovial lubricin. This showed that adjacent threonine residues within the central STP-rich region could be simultaneously and/or individually glycosylated. In addition to core 1 structures responsible for biolubrication, core 2 O-glycopeptides were also identified, indicating that lubricin glycosylation may have other roles. Investigation of the expression of polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase genes was carried out using cultured primary fibroblast-like synoviocytes, a cell type that expresses lubricin in vivo. This analysis showed high mRNA expression levels of the less understood polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 15 and 5 in addition to the ubiquitously expressed polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 1 and 2 genes. This suggests that there is a unique combination of transferase genes important for the O-glycosylation of lubricin. The site-specific glycopeptide analysis covered 82% of the protein sequence and showed that lubricin glycosylation displays both micro- and macroheterogeneity. The density of glycosylation was shown to be high: 168 sites of O-glycosylation, predominately sialylated, were identified. These glycosylation sites were focused in the central STP-rich region, giving the domain a

  13. 3D Two-way coupled TEHD analysis on the lubricating characteristics of thrust bearings in pump-turbine units by combining CFD and FEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Liming; Luo, Yongyao; Wang, Zhengwei; Liu, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The thermal elastic hydro dynamic (TEHD) lubrication analysis for the thrust bearing is usually conducted by combining Reynolds equation with finite element analysis (FEA). But it is still a problem to conduct the computation by combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and FEA which can simulate the TEHD more accurately. In this paper, by using both direct and separate coupled solutions together, steady TEHD lubrication considering the viscosity-temperature effect for a bidirectional thrust bearing in a pump-turbine unit is simulated combining a 3D CFD model for the oil film with a 3D FEA model for the pad and mirror plate. Cyclic symmetry condition is used in the oil film flow as more reasonable boundary conditions which avoids the oil temperature assumption at the leading and trailing edge. Deformations of the pad and mirror plate are predicted and discussed as well as the distributions of oil film thickness, pressure, temperature. The predicted temperature shows good agreement with measurements, while the pressure shows a reasonable distribution comparing with previous studies. Further analysis of the three-coupled-field reveals the reason of the high pressure and high temperature generated in the film. Finally, the influence of rotational speed of the mirror plate on the lubrication characteristics is illustrated which shows the thrust load should be balanced against the oil film temperature and pressure in optimized designs. This research proposes a thrust bearing computation method by combining CFD and FEA which can do the TEHD analysis more accurately.

  14. Tribology and energy efficiency: from molecules to lubricated contacts to complete machines.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert Ian

    2012-01-01

    The impact of lubricants on energy efficiency is considered. Molecular details of base oils used in lubricants can have a great impact on the lubricant's physical properties which will affect the energy efficiency performance of a lubricant. In addition, molecular details of lubricant additives can result in significant differences in measured friction coefficients for machine elements operating in the mixed/boundary lubrication regime. In single machine elements, these differences will result in lower friction losses, and for complete systems (such as cars, trucks, hydraulic circuits, industrial gearboxes etc.) lower fuel consumption or lower electricity consumption can result.

  15. Automatic determination of insolubles in lubricating oils by flow injection analysis employing an LED-photometer detector.

    PubMed

    Pignalosa, Gustavo; Sixto, Alexandra; Knochen, Moisés

    2007-10-31

    A flow injection system is presented for the determination of the insolubles content in used lubricating oil samples. The system is based on the injection of an aliquot of the sample in a stream of organic solvent where it is dispersed, and measurement of the scattered radiation (measured as apparent absorbance) in the visible range (lambda=640nm). An LED-based photometer was used for this purpose. The whole system including sample injection and data acquisition was controlled by a personal computer. Calibration curves exhibited good linearity (h=0.415+/-0.016C+0.00+/-0.03, r(2)=0.9995, confidence level of 95%) in the range up to 2.68% (insolubles in pentane). Detection and quantification limits were respectively 0.07% and 0.16% (w/w). The method was validated by analysis of 25 real samples by the proposed method and the FTIR method finding high correlation. Waste generation and reactive consumption is much less than in the official method (ASTM D-893). The proposed method employs 25mL of kerosene per sample while the official method employs 200mL of pentane.

  16. Lubrication of Nitinol 60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Glennon, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Nitinol 60, 60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti (55 at.% Ni, 45 at.% Ti) are sufficiently attractive to warrant its consideration as a lubricated triboelement. Triboelements are always run lubricated. The ability to lubricate Nitinol 60 by the oils usually used on spacecraft mechanisms--Pennzane 2001A, Krytox 143AC and Castrol 815Z--was experimentally determined. These oils were run in the boundary lubrication regime for Nitinol 60 balls running against Nitinol 60 counterfaces in the vacuum spiral orbit tribometer. Test results consisting of the coefficient of friction versus time (friction traces) and relative degradation rates of the oils are presented. Contrary to the inability to successfully lubricate other metal alloys with high titanium content, it was found that Nitinol 60 is able to be lubricated by these oils. Overall, the results presented here indicate that Nitinol 60 is a credible candidate material for bearing applications.

  17. Experimental study and analysis of lubricants dispersed with nano Cu and TiO2 in a four-stroke two wheeler.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Pullela K; Srinivas, Vadapalli; Rao, Vedula Dharma; Kumar, Ayyagari Kiran

    2011-03-17

    The present investigation summarizes detailed experimental studies with standard lubricants of commercial quality known as Racer-4 of Hindustan Petroleum Corporation (India) dispersed with different mass concentrations of nanoparticles of Cu and TiO2. The test bench is fabricated with a four-stroke Hero-Honda motorbike hydraulically loaded at the rear wheel with proper instrumentation to record the fuel consumption, the load on the rear wheel, and the linear velocity. The whole range of data obtained on a stationery bike is subjected to regression analysis to arrive at various relationships between fuel consumption as a function of brake power, linear velocity, and percentage mass concentration of nanoparticles in the lubricant. The empirical relation correlates with the observed data with reasonable accuracy. Further, extension of the analysis by developing a mathematical model has revealed a definite improvement in brake thermal efficiency which ultimately affects the fuel economy by diminishing frictional power in the system with the introduction of nanoparticles into the lubricant. The performance of the engine seems to be better with nano Cu-Racer-4 combination than the one with nano TiO2.

  18. Experimental study and analysis of lubricants dispersed with nano Cu and TiO2 in a four-stroke two wheeler

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation summarizes detailed experimental studies with standard lubricants of commercial quality known as Racer-4 of Hindustan Petroleum Corporation (India) dispersed with different mass concentrations of nanoparticles of Cu and TiO2. The test bench is fabricated with a four-stroke Hero-Honda motorbike hydraulically loaded at the rear wheel with proper instrumentation to record the fuel consumption, the load on the rear wheel, and the linear velocity. The whole range of data obtained on a stationery bike is subjected to regression analysis to arrive at various relationships between fuel consumption as a function of brake power, linear velocity, and percentage mass concentration of nanoparticles in the lubricant. The empirical relation correlates with the observed data with reasonable accuracy. Further, extension of the analysis by developing a mathematical model has revealed a definite improvement in brake thermal efficiency which ultimately affects the fuel economy by diminishing frictional power in the system with the introduction of nanoparticles into the lubricant. The performance of the engine seems to be better with nano Cu-Racer-4 combination than the one with nano TiO2. PMID:21711765

  19. Boundary lubrication: Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the various lubrication regimes, with particular, emphasis on boundary lubrication, is presented. The types of wear debris and extent of surface damage is illustrated for each regime. The role of boundary surface films along with their modes of formation and important physical properties are discussed. In addition, the effects of various operating parameters on friction and wear in the boundary lubrication regime are considered.

  20. Lubrication of Machine Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    The understanding of hydrodynamic lubrication began with the classical experiments of Tower and Petrov. Reynolds used a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations and the continuity equation to generate a second order differential equation for the pressure in the narrow, converging gap of a bearing contact. Such a pressure enables a load to be transmitted between the surfaces with very low friction since the surfaces are completely separated by a film of fluid. In such a situation it is the physical properties of the lubricant, notably the dynamic viscosity, that dictate the behavior of the contact. The understanding of boundary lubrication is normally attributed to Hardy and Doubleday. In boundary lubrication it is the physical and chemical properties of thin films of molecular proportions and the surfaces to which they are attached that determine contact behavior. The lubricant viscosity is not an influential parameter. Research is devoted to a better understanding and more precise definition of other lubrication regimes between these extremes. One such regime, elastohydrodynamic lubrication, occurs in nonconformal contacts, where the pressures are high and the bearing surfaces deform elastically. In this situation the viscosity of the lubricant may raise considerably, and this further assists the formation of an effective fluid film. The science of these three lubrication regimes (hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary) are described and the manner in which this science is used in the design of machine elements is examined.

  1. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  2. DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

  3. Worldwide lubricant trends

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on lubricating oils for internal combustion engines. Topics considered at the conference included worldwide environmental regulations and their impact on lubricant additives, passenger car gasoline engine oils in Japan, valve train wear, the field performance of super premium engine oils, wear resistance, deposits, scale control, oil thickening, low-phosphorus engine oils, bore polishing, the Tornado test, the coordination of international needs for lubricant quality,and the corrosive wear of cast iron under reciprocating lubrication.

  4. Assessment of Introital Lubrication.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Samantha J; Sawatsky, Megan L; Lalumière, Martin L

    2015-08-01

    Vaginal vasocongestion and lubrication serve to prepare the vaginal lumen for sexual activity. Lubrication is important for sexual functioning and difficulties with lubrication are one of the most commonly reported symptoms of sexual dysfunction. Few studies have empirically examined how vasocongestion and lubrication relate to one another and there are currently no well-established measures of lubrication. In this study, we designed and tested a simple method to assess lubrication at the vaginal introitus in 19 healthy women, using litmus test strips. We examined the relationship between lubrication and vaginal vasocongestion (measured with a photoplethysmograph) when elicited by audiovisual sexual stimuli (male-female sexual interactions). Lubrication was elicited by the sexual stimuli and was strongly correlated with reports of sexual arousal. Unexpectedly, lubrication was not correlated with vasocongestion, even though the latter was also elicited by the sexual stimuli. We discuss the implications of these findings for informing our understanding of the female sexual response and the potential clinical and scientific utility of this new measure.

  5. Ocean Spray Lubricates Winds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    According to a new study by two University of California, Berkeley, mathematicians and their Russian colleague, the water droplets kicked up by rough seas serve to lubricate the swirling winds of hurricanes and cyclones, letting them build to speeds approaching 200 miles per hour. Without the lubricating effect of the spray, the mathematicians…

  6. Ocean Spray Lubricates Winds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    According to a new study by two University of California, Berkeley, mathematicians and their Russian colleague, the water droplets kicked up by rough seas serve to lubricate the swirling winds of hurricanes and cyclones, letting them build to speeds approaching 200 miles per hour. Without the lubricating effect of the spray, the mathematicians…

  7. Sporting Good Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Sun Coast Chemicals was originally contracted by Lockheed Martin Space Operations to formulate a spray lubricant free of environmental drawbacks for the Mobile Launch Platform used to haul the Space Shuttle from the Kennedy Space Center Vehicle Assembly Building to a launch pad. From this work, Sun Coast introduced Train Track Lubricant, Penetrating Spray Lube, and Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid. Based on the original lubricant work, two more products have also been introduced. First, the X-1R Super Gun Cleaner and Lubricant protects guns from rust and corrosion caused by environmental conditions. Second, the X-1R Tackle Pack, endorsed by both fresh and saltwater guides and certain reel manufacturers, penetrates, cleans, reduces friction, lubricates, and provides extra protection against rust and corrosion.

  8. High temperature lubricating process

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Robert W.; Shell, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    It has been difficult to provide adaquate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475.degree. C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface (14), such as in an engine (10) being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475.degree. C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining steps. A gas phase (42) is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant. The gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface. The load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant. The solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  9. High temperature lubricating process

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.W.; Shell, T.E.

    1979-10-04

    It has been difficult to provide adequate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface, such as in an engine being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining the following steps: a gas phase is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant; the gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface; the load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant; and the solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  10. Approximate Analysis of Dynamic Characteristics of Short Journal Bearings in Turbulent Micropolar Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, N. K.; Gautam, S. S.; Samanta, S.

    2014-10-01

    An approximate analysis has been carried out for short journal bearing to determine the dynamic behavior under micropolar turbulent flow condition. In this analysis, the Constantinescu's turbulent shear coefficient has been considered, which was later proposed by Taylor and Dowson. For the calculation of dynamic pressures, the classical Reynolds equation has been modified to incorporate turbulence and micropolar fluid parameters. The analysis has been further extended to determine the mass and whirl parameters to analyze the stability of the bearing. The bearing is found to be more stable with increase in eccentricity with high speed and large Reynolds number.

  11. Assessing Friction Stress on a Liquid Lubricant by Stable Isotope Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-17

    multivariate data and test if significant isotopic shifts or FTIR spectral changes could be related to sliding cycles. δ13C Isotope ratios only were...chloride solvent (run alone) and exported to Matlab® for modeling and analysis. 2.4. Data Analysis Isotope ratio values were calculated and output...in spreadsheet format by IsoDAT NT software (Thermo-Fisher). Isotope ratio data for each identified peak were collated, transferred to Matlab

  12. [Unequal interval jump grey modeling and its application to the spectral analysis of lubricating oil].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Li, Zhu-guo; Chen, Zhao-neng

    2004-05-01

    Unequal interval jump grey model was built for raw data series with unequal interval and jump trend in this paper. Levenberg-Marquardt arithmetic that belongs to non-linear least-square. estimation was used to recognize the parameters. The model built was used to fit spectrometric analysis values of diesel engine and the fitting precision is good. It is helpful to improve the accuracy and reliability of spectrometric analysis by revising test data after oil change with model parameter.

  13. Microfog lubrication for aircraft engine bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenlieb, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis and system study was performed to provide design information regarding lubricant and coolant flow rates and flow paths for effective utilization of the lubricant and coolant in a once through bearing oil mist (microfog) and coolant air system. Both static and dynamic tests were performed. Static tests were executed to evaluate and calibrate the mist supply system. A total of thirteen dynamic step speed bearing tests were performed using four different lubricants and several different mist and air supply configurations. The most effective configuration consisted of supplying the mist and the major portion of the cooling air axially through the bearing. The results of these tests have shown the feasibility of using a once through oil mist and cooling air system to lubricate and cool a high speed, high temperature aircraft engine mainshaft bearing.

  14. Global analysis of fermion mixing with exotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nardi, Enrico; Roulet, Esteban; Tommasini, Daniele

    1991-01-01

    The limits are analyzed on deviation of the lepton and quark weak-couplings from their standard model values in a general class of models where the known fermions are allowed to mix with new heavy particles with exotic SU(2) x U(1) quantum number assignments (left-handed singlets or right-handed doublets). These mixings appear in many extensions of the electroweak theory such as models with mirror fermions, E(sub 6) models, etc. The results update previous analyses and improve considerably the existing bounds.

  15. Dynamic-reservoir lubricating device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficken, W. H.; Schulien, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dynamic-reservoir lubricating device supplies controlled amounts of lubricating oil to ball bearings during operation of the bearings. The dynamic reservoir lubricating device includes a rotating reservoir nut, a hollow cylinder filled with lubricating oil, flow restrictors and a ball bearing retainer.

  16. Analysis and design of a cantilever-mounted resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A thrust bearing consisting of pads mounted on resilient, metallic, cantilever beams is described and analyzed. Compliance and stiffness of the bearing assembly are discussed, and the effects of bearing design parameters on performance are shown. After the general analysis, a design example is presented for a flat sector-shaped gas bearing. A special case where zero axial movement of the runner can be obtained is pointed out.

  17. Dairy Equipment Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lake To Lake Dairy Cooperative, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, operates four plants in Wisconsin for processing milk, butter and cheese products from its 1,300 member farms. The large co-op was able to realize substantial savings by using NASA information for improved efficiency in plant maintenance. Under contract to Marshall Space Flight Center, Midwest Research Institute compiled a handbook consolidating information about commercially available lubricants. The handbook details chemical and physical properties, applications, specifications, test procedures and test data for liquid and solid lubricants. Lake To Lake's plant engineer used the handbook to effect savings in maintenance labor and materials costs by reducing the number of lubricants used on certain equipment. Strict U.S. Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration regulations preclude lubrication changes n production equipment, but the co-op's maintenance chief was able to eliminate seven types of lubricants for ancillary equipment, such as compressors and high pressure pumps. Handbook data enabled him to select comparable but les expensive lubricants in the materials consolidation process, and simplified lubrication schedules and procedures. The handbook is in continuing use as a reference source when a new item of equipment is purchased.

  18. Environmentally friendly lubricating oil candidate.

    PubMed

    Ozgülsün, A; Karaosmanoğlu, F

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic lubricating oils based on renewable sources, excluding petroleum, have a great importance among all of the lubricating oil alternatives that are included in the research field about clean and environmentally friendly lubricating oil technologies. One of the environmentally friendly lubricating oils is a vegetable oil-based product. In this study, the esterification product of oleic acid with a fraction of molasses fusel oil as a lubricating oil candidate was determined according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard tests. The results indicate that the ester product can be used as an environmental friendly lubricating oil or lubricating oil additive.

  19. Tribometer for Lubrication Studies in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed a new way to evaluate the liquid lubricants used in ball bearings in space mechanisms. For this evaluation, a liquid lubricant is exercised in the rolling contact vacuum tribometer shown in the photo. This tribometer, which is essentially a thrust bearing with three balls and flat races, has contact stresses similar to those in a typical preloaded, angular contact ball bearing. The rotating top plate drives the balls in an outward-winding spiral orbit instead of a circular path. Upon contact with the "guide plate," the balls are forced back to their initial smaller orbit radius; they then repeat this spiral orbit thousands of times. The orbit rate of the balls is low enough, 2 to 5 rpm, to allow the system to operate in the boundary lubrication regime that is most stressful to the liquid lubricant. This system can determine the friction coefficient, lubricant lifetime, and species evolved from the liquid lubricant by tribodegradation. The lifetime of the lubricant charge is only few micrograms, which is "used up" by degradation during rolling. The friction increases when the lubricant is exhausted. The species evolved by the degrading lubricant are determined by a quadrupole residual gas analyzer that directly views the rotating elements. The flat races (plates) and 0.5-in.-diameter balls are of a configuration and size that permit easy post-test examination by optical and electron microscopy and the full suite of modern surface and thin-film chemical analytical techniques, including infrared and Raman microspectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, the simple sphere-on-a-flat-plate geometry allows an easy analysis of the contact stresses at all parts of the ball orbit and an understanding of the frictional energy losses to the lubricant. The analysis showed that when the ball contacts the guide plate, gross sliding occurs between the ball and rotating upper plate as the ball forced back to a smaller

  20. Identifying geochemical processes using End Member Mixing Analysis to decouple chemical components for mixing ratio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelizardi, Flavia; Bea, Sergio A.; Carrera, Jesús; Vives, Luis

    2017-07-01

    Mixing calculations (i.e., the calculation of the proportions in which end-members are mixed in a sample) are essential for hydrological research and water management. However, they typically require the use of conservative species, a condition that may be difficult to meet due to chemical reactions. Mixing calculation also require identifying end-member waters, which is usually achieved through End Member Mixing Analysis (EMMA). We present a methodology to help in the identification of both end-members and such reactions, so as to improve mixing ratio calculations. The proposed approach consists of: (1) identifying the potential chemical reactions with the help of EMMA; (2) defining decoupled conservative chemical components consistent with those reactions; (3) repeat EMMA with the decoupled (i.e., conservative) components, so as to identify end-members waters; and (4) computing mixing ratios using the new set of components and end-members. The approach is illustrated by application to two synthetic mixing examples involving mineral dissolution and cation exchange reactions. Results confirm that the methodology can be successfully used to identify geochemical processes affecting the mixtures, thus improving the accuracy of mixing ratios calculations and relaxing the need for conservative species.

  1. Positive lubrication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dennis W.; Hooper, Fred L.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the development of an autonomous lubrication system for spin bearings, a system was developed to deliver oil to grease-lubricated bearings upon demand. This positive oil delivery system (PLUS) consists of a pressurized reservoir with a built-in solenoid valve that delivers a predictable quantity of oil to the spin bearing through a system of stainless steel tubes. Considerable testing was performed on the PLUS to characterize its performance and verify its effectiveness, along with qualifying it for flight. Additional development is underway that will lead to the fully autonomous active lubrication system.

  2. Micro-elastohydrodynamic Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. S.

    1984-01-01

    Conventional elastohydrodynamics, which is based on assumption of smooth surfaces, is reviewed to show its insufficiency for explaining the failure processes in these contacts. For conditions approaching failure, lubrication breakdown occurs locally at asperity contacts where the lubrication behavior is controlled by microelastohydrodynamic lubrication (micro-EHL). The film formation mechanisms in micro-EHL conjunctions is described. The level of film thickness due to normal approach and sliding of a single asperity and due to asperity-asperity collision between two asperities is assessed. Possible influence of the micro-EHL to incipient scuffing failure, surface crack propagation and wear are discussed.

  3. Driveline Fundamentals and Lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, I.

    The various gear types and automotive transmissions in drive trains are described. The need for automotive differential axle gears is demonstrated. SAE gear lubricant classifications are related to performance specifications. Automatic transmission fluids, ATFs, are described together with agricultural and off-highway fluids. Generic formulations of driveline fluids are discussed in terms of their tribology and performance and also the contribution of various additive classes to that performance. The main functions of manual gearbox, automatic transmission and axle lubricants are described. General trends and emerging technologies in drive train components are discussed in terms of the requirements placed on the lubricant, evolution in transmission technologies and relative market penetration.

  4. Processing and Formulation of Lithium Lubricating Greases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, M. A.; Franco, J. M.; Valencia, C.; Moreno, G.; Gallegos, C.

    2006-05-01

    The effects that soap concentration, base oil viscosity and additives exert on the rheology of lubricating greases have been studied. Also, changes in both microstructure and rheology of lithium lubricating greases during their manufacturing process have been evaluated. With this aim, different lithium lubricating grease formulations were manufactured by modifying the concentration of lithium 12-hydroxystearate, base oil viscosity and processing conditions or using different polymeric additives. The manufacturing process was followed through the mixing rheometry technique by measuring the evolution of torque with processing time, and samples of incipient and finished greases were taken from the stirred tank at different processing times. Rheological (small-amplitude oscillatory shear (SAOS)) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) observations were carried out on each sample. The experimental results obtained demonstrate that the values of the linear viscoelasticity functions and the mechanical behaviour of lubricating grease strongly depend on the processing variables and grease composition. Also, it has been found that the structural skeleton (size and shape of the disperse phase particles) is highly influenced by the base oil viscosity. These results have been explained taking into account the balance between the solvency of the thickener in the base oil and the level of entanglements formed by soap fibres, which influence the lubricating grease network.

  5. A self-lubricating bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An improved bearing structure is described which includes a permanently magnetized porous body filled with an interstitial magnetic lubricant for extending the operational life of self-lubricating bearings. The bearing structure is characterized by a permanently magnetized retainer formed of a porous material and filled with an interstitial magnetic lubricant, whereby the pores serve as lubricant reservoirs from which the lubricant continuously is delivered to a film disposed between contiguous bearing surfaces.

  6. X-ray fluorescence analysis of wear metals in used lubricating oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, W. E.; Kelliher, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Used oils from several aircraft at NASA's Langley Research Center were analyzed over a three year period using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and atomic emission spectrometry. The results of both analyses are presented and comparisons are made. Fe and Cu data for oil from four internal combustion engines are provided and XRF and atomic emission spectrometry measurements were found to be in perfect agreement. However, distributions were found in the case of oil from a jet aircraft engine whereby the latter method gave values for total iron concentration in the oil and did not distinguish between suspended particles and oil additives. XRF does not have these particle-size limitations; moreover, it is a faster process. It is concluded that XRF is the preferred method in the construction of a man-portable oil wear analysis instrument.

  7. X-ray fluorescence analysis of wear metals in used lubricating oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddox, W. E.; Kelliher, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    Used oils from several aircraft at NASA's Langley Research Center were analyzed over a three year period using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and atomic emission spectrometry. The results of both analyses are presented and comparisons are made. Fe and Cu data for oil from four internal combustion engines are provided and XRF and atomic emission spectrometry measurements were found to be in perfect agreement. However, distributions were found in the case of oil from a jet aircraft engine whereby the latter method gave values for total iron concentration in the oil and did not distinguish between suspended particles and oil additives. XRF does not have these particle-size limitations; moreover, it is a faster process. It is concluded that XRF is the preferred method in the construction of a man-portable oil wear analysis instrument.

  8. LatMix 2011 and 2012 Dispersion Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-15

    was to complete the analysis and write -up of additional manuscripts relating to LatMix, and to further strengthen the results for multiple manuscripts...raw waveforms co llected during the LatMix 20 l I airborne lidar surveys, and completion of the analysis and write -up of major results stemming from...manuscripts published or submitted for publication. 2) Specific Objectives The primary objective of present effort was to complete the analysis and write

  9. Analysis of Mixed Methods Using Mesh Dependent Norms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    This paper presents a new approach to the analysis of mixed methods for the approximate solution of 4th order elliptic boundary value problems. In...formulation of this lower order system, thereby obtaining direct approximations to both the original and auxiliary variables. Three particular mixed methods for the approximate solution of the biharmonic problem are examined in detail.

  10. Wormgear geometry adopted for implementing hydrostatic lubrication and formulation of the lubrication problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Yuan, Qin

    1995-01-01

    The geometrical parameters for a wormgear intended to be used as the transmission in advanced helicopters are finalized. The resulting contact pattern of the meshing tooth surfaces is suitable for the implementation of hydrostatic lubrication Fluid film lubrication of the contact is formulated considering external pressurization as well as hydrodynamic wedge and squeeze actions. The lubrication analysis is aimed at obtaining the oil supply pressure needed to separate the worm and gear surfaces by a prescribed minimum film thickness. The procedure of solving the mathematical problem is outlined.

  11. Quantifying chemical reactions by using mixing analysis.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Anna; Vázquez-Suñé, Enric; Carrera, Jesús; Tubau, Isabel; Pujades, Estanislao

    2015-01-01

    This work is motivated by a sound understanding of the chemical processes that affect the organic pollutants in an urban aquifer. We propose an approach to quantify such processes using mixing calculations. The methodology consists of the following steps: (1) identification of the recharge sources (end-members) and selection of the species (conservative and non-conservative) to be used, (2) identification of the chemical processes and (3) evaluation of mixing ratios including the chemical processes. This methodology has been applied in the Besòs River Delta (NE Barcelona, Spain), where the River Besòs is the main aquifer recharge source. A total number of 51 groundwater samples were collected from July 2007 to May 2010 during four field campaigns. Three river end-members were necessary to explain the temporal variability of the River Besòs: one river end-member is from the wet periods (W1) and two are from dry periods (D1 and D2). This methodology has proved to be useful not only to compute the mixing ratios but also to quantify processes such as calcite and magnesite dissolution, aerobic respiration and denitrification undergone at each observation point.

  12. Characterization of Spray Lubricants for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-01-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. The cooling effects of the die lubricant were investigated using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), heat flux sensors (HFS), and infrared imaging. The evolution of the heat flux and pictures taken using a high speed infrared camera revealed that lubricant application was a transient process. The short time response of the HFS allows the monitoring and data acquisition of the surface temperature and heat flux without additional data processing. A similar set of experiments was performed with deionized water in order to assess the lubricant effect. The high heat flux obtained at 300 C was attributed to the wetting and absorbant properties of the lubricant. Pictures of the spray cone and lubricant flow on the die were also used to explain the heat flux evolution.

  13. Nanoscale flow past a colloidal cylinder confined in a slit channel: Lubrication theory and molecular dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Amir M.; Shao, Yang; Jupiterwala, Mehlam; Colosqui, Carlos E.

    2015-08-01

    Plane Poiseuille flow past a nanoscale cylinder that is arbitrarily confined (i.e., symmetrically or asymmetrically confined) in a slit channel is studied via hydrodynamic lubrication theory and molecular dynamics simulations, considering cases where the cylinder remains static or undergoes thermal motion. Analytical expressions for the drag force and volumetric flow rate valid for high confinement and arbitrary off-center displacements are derived for the first time in this work. Lubrication theory predictions are in close agreement with molecular dynamics simulations of flows having molecularly thin lubrication gaps, despite the presence of significant structural forces induced by the crystalline structure of the modeled solid. While the maximum drag force is observed in symmetric confinement, i.e., when the cylinder is equidistant from both channel walls, the drag decays significantly as the cylinder moves away from the channel centerline and approaches a wall. Hence, significant reductions in the mean drag force on the cylinder and hydraulic resistance of the channel can be observed when thermal motion induces random off-center displacements. Analytical expressions and numerical results in this work provide useful insights into the hydrodynamics of colloidal solids and macromolecules in confinement.

  14. Electrical conductive composite lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarchuk, Bruce J.; Wehrman, Ken A.; Yang Zhang, Teh-Shing Lee, Krishnagopalan, Gopal A.

    1995-01-01

    In power and electronic systems, electrical contact resistance is a major issue. For mechanical connections and sliding contacts, power losses and electrical noise are critical concerns. These issues are of particular interest to all industrial members of the Auburn CCDS. Research has been conducted to develop a variety of contact materials, both for solid lubricant films and composite paper lubricants. A combination of low electrical resistance, good lubricating properties, long wear-life, and low sliding electrical noise was achieved using a metal-cellulose composite paper with dichalcogenide powders entrapped in the porous paper matrix. Advancements in developing these conductive lubricants can increase contact lifetime and reliability in many space and terrestrial applications.

  15. Solid lubrication design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, B. B.; Yonushonis, T. M.; Bovenkerk, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A single element traction rig was used to measure the traction forces at the contact of a ball against a flat disc at room temperature under combined rolling and sliding. The load and speed conditions were selected to match those anticipated for bearing applications in adiabatic diesel engines. The test program showed that the magnitude of traction forces were almost the same for all the lubricants tested; a lubricant should, therefore, be selected on the basis of its ability to prevent wear of the contact surfaces. Traction vs. slide/roll ratio curves were similar to those for liquid lubricants but the traction forces were an order of magnitude higher. The test data was used to derive equations to predict traction force as a function of contact stress and rolling speed. Qualitative design guidelines for solid lubricated concentrated contacts are proposed.

  16. Liquid lubrication in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for long-term, reliable operation of aerospace mechanisms has, with a few exceptions, pushed the state of the art in tribology. Space mission life requirements in the early 1960s were generally 6 months to a year. The proposed U.S. space station schedule to be launched in the 1990s must be continuously usable for 10 to 20 years. Liquid lubrication systems are generally used for mission life requirements longer than a year. Although most spacecraft or satellites have reached their required lifetimes without a lubrication-related failure, the application of liquid lubricants in the space environment presents unique challenges. The state of the art of liquid lubrication in space as well as the problems and their solutions are reviewed.

  17. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  18. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  19. Effect of fullerene containing lubricants on wear resistance of machine components in boundary lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Andriy

    Fullerenes, a new form of carbon nanomaterials, possess unique physical and mechanical properties that make their use as additives to liquid lubricants potentially beneficial. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of fullerene containing lubricants on wear resistance of steel-bronze couples operating under boundary lubrication conditions. A mathematical model of deformed asperity contact was built to calculate real contact area and real contact pressure. Computer controlled wear friction testing methodology and equipment were designed, developed and implemented for obtaining reliable and objective experimental data. In addition, optical and scanning electron microscopy and standard surface texture analysis were employed. Heavy duty motor oil SAE 10 was modified by admixing fullerenes C60, a fullerene mixture of C60 and C70, fullerene containing soot, and graphite powder. The experiments showed that all of the selected fullerene additives dissolved in liquid lubricants reduce wear of the tested materials. In addition, it was found that despite improvements in wear resistance, the selected modified lubricants did not significantly change friction characteristics. Improvement of wear resistance of contact surfaces operating with fullerene modified lubricants can be explained by the presence of fullerenes in real contact while the liquid lubricant is squeezed out. Fullerenes are considered to function as minute hard particles that do not break down under applied normal force, and tend to separate direct contact of functional surfaces of selected materials.

  20. Lubrication and cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V; Dowson, D

    1976-01-01

    Mechanisms of lubrication of human synovial joints have been analysed in terms of the operating conditions of the joint, the synovial fluid and articular cartilage. In the hip and knee during a walking cycle the load may rise up to four times body weight. In the knee on dropping one metre the load may go up to 25 time body weight. The elastic modulus of cartilage is similar to that of the synthetic rubber of a car tyre. The cartilage surface is rough and in elderly specimens the centre line average is 2-75 mum. The friction force generated in reciprocating tests shows that both cartilage and synovial fluid are important in lubrication. The viscosity-shear rate relationships of normal synovial fluid show that it is non-Newtonian. Osteoarthrosic fluid is less so and rheumatoid fluid is more nearly Newtonian. Experiments with hip joints in a pendulum machine show that fluid film lubrication obtains at some phases of joint action. Boundary lubrication prevails under certain conditions and has been examined with a reciprocating friction machine. Digestion of hyaluronate does not alter the boundary lubrication, but trypsin digestion does. Surface active substances (lauryl sulphate and cetyl 3-ammonium bromide) give a lubricating ability similar to that of synovial fluid. The effectiveness of the two substances varies with pH. Images Fig. 10 PMID:3490

  1. Boundary lubrication in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A

    2000-01-01

    Evidence is reviewed for the concept that the body employs essentially the same lubrication system in many sites in the body where tissues slide over each other with such ease. This system consists of fluid adjacent to surfaces coated with an oligolamellar lining of surface-active phospholipid (SAPL) acting as a back-up boundary lubricant wherever the fluid film fails to support the load--a likely event at physiological velocities. Particular attention is paid to the load-bearing joints, where the issue of identifying the vital active ingredient in synovial fluid is reviewed, coming down--perhaps predictably--in favour of SAPL. It is also explained how Lubricin and hyaluronic acid (HA) could have 'carrier' functions for the highly insoluble SAPL, while HA has good wetting properties needed to promote hydrodynamic lubrication of a very hydrophobic articular surface by an aqueous fluid wherever the load permits. In addition to friction and wear, release is included as another major role of boundary lubricants, especially relevant in environments where proteins are found, many having adhesive properties. The discussion is extended to a mention of the lubrication of prosthetic implants and to disease states where a deficiency of boundary lubricant is implicated, particular attention being paid to osteoarthritis.

  2. Methods to improve lubricity of fuels and lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, Ali

    2009-06-16

    A method for providing lubricity in fuels and lubricants includes adding a boron compound to a fuel or lubricant to provide a boron-containing fuel or lubricant. The fuel or lubricant may contain a boron compound at a concentration between about 30 ppm and about 3,000 ppm and a sulfur concentration of less than about 500 ppm. A method of powering an engine to minimize wear, by burning a fuel containing boron compounds. The boron compounds include compound that provide boric acid and/or BO.sub.3 ions or monomers to the fuel or lubricant.

  3. Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, Alice Mae

    This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. Base fluids were studied through comparison of synthetic fluids (simulated body fluid and hyaluronic acid) as well as natural biofluids (from dogs, horses, and humans) in terms of viscosity and fluid shear stress. The nano-structured biofluids were formed using molecules having well-defined shapes. Understanding nano-structured biofluids leads to new ways of design and synthesis of biofluids that are beneficial for artificial joint performance. Experimental approaches were utilized in the present research. This includes basic analysis of biofluids' property, such as viscosity, fluid shear stress, and shear rate using rheological experiments. Tribological investigation and surface characterization were conducted in order to understand effects of molecular and nanostructures on fluid lubrication. Workpiece surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The surface topography was examined using a profilometer. The results demonstrated that with the adding of solid additives, such as crown ether or fullerene acted as rough as the other solids in the 3-body wear systems. In addition, the fullerene supplied low friction and low wear, which designates the lubrication purpose of this particular particle system. This dissertation is constructed of six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction to body fluids, as mentioned earlier. After Chapter II, it examines the motivation and approach of the present research, Chapter III discusses the experimental approaches, including materials, experimental setup, and conditions. In Chapter IV, lubrication properties of various fluids are discussed. The tribological properties and performance nanostructured biofluids are

  4. A Rolling Element Tribometer for the Study of Liquid Lubricants in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.; Ebihara, Ben T.; Kingsbury, Edward

    1996-01-01

    A tribometer for the evaluation of liquid lubricants in vacuum is described. This tribometer is essentially a thrust bearing with three balls and flat races having contact stresses and ball motions similar to those in an angular contact ball bearing operating in the boundary lubrication regime. The friction coefficient, lubrication lifetime, and species evolved from the liquid lubricant by tribodegradation can be determined. A complete analysis of the contact stresses and energy dissipation together with experimental evidence supporting the analysis are presented.

  5. Material nonlinear analysis via mixed-iterative finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1992-01-01

    The performance of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is examined through a set of convergence studies. Membrane and bending behaviors are tested using 4-node quadrilateral finite elements. The membrane result is excellent, which indicates the implementation of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is appropriate. On the other hand, further research to improve bending performance of the method seems to be warranted.

  6. Cluster analysis using multivariate mixed effects models.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Luis; Marshall, Guillermo; Barón, Anna E

    2009-09-10

    A common situation in the biological and social sciences is to have data on one or more variables measured longitudinally on a sample of individuals. A problem of growing interest in these areas is the grouping of individuals into one of two or more clusters according to their longitudinal behavior. Recently, methods have been proposed to deal with cases where individuals are classified into clusters through a linear model of mixed univariate effects deriving from a longitudinally measured variable. The method proposed in the current work deals with the case of clustering and then classification based on two or more variables measured longitudinally, through the fitting of non-linear multivariate mixed effect models, and with consideration given to parameter estimation for balanced and unbalanced data using an EM algorithm. The application of the method is illustrated with an example in which the clusters are identified and the classification into clusters is compared with the true membership of individuals in one of two groups, which is known at the end of the follow-up period.

  7. In vitro friction and lubrication of large bearing hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, S; Jones, E; Birkinshaw, C

    2010-01-01

    New material combinations and designs of artificial hip implants are being introduced in an effort to improve proprioception and functional longevity. Larger joints in particular are being developed to improve joint stability, and it is thought that these larger implants will be more satisfactory for younger and more physically active patients. The study detailed here used a hip friction simulator to assess the friction and lubrication properties of large-diameter hip bearings of metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-reinforced-polymer couplings. Joints of different diameters were evaluated to determine what effect, if any, bearing diameter had on lubrication. In addition, the effects of lubricant type are considered, using carboxymethyl cellulose and bovine calf serum, and the physiological lubricant is shown to be considerably more effective at reducing friction. The frictional studies showed that the metal-on-metal joints worked under a mixed lubrication regime, producing similar friction factor values to each other. The addition of bovine calf serum (BCS) reduced the friction. The ceramic-on-reinforced-polymer samples were shown to operate with high friction factors and mixed lubrication. When tested with BCS, the larger-diameter bearings showed a decrease in friction compared with the smaller-size bearings, and the addition of BCS resulted in an increase in friction, unlike the metal-on-metal system. The study demonstrated that the component's diameter had little or no influence on the lubrication and friction of the large bearing combinations tested.

  8. Power system with an integrated lubrication circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Brian D.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Lane, William H.

    2009-11-10

    A power system includes an engine having a first lubrication circuit and at least one auxiliary power unit having a second lubrication circuit. The first lubrication circuit is in fluid communication with the second lubrication circuit.

  9. Lubrication of Space Systems (c)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the current state-of-the-art tribology, some current and future perceived space lubrication problem areas, and some potential new lubrication technologies. It is the author's opinion that tribology technology, in general, has not significantly advanced over the last 20 to 30 years, even though some incremental improvements in the technology have occurred. There is a better understanding of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication, some new lubricating and wear theories have been developed, and some new liquid and solid lubricants have been formulated. However, the important problems of being able to lubricate reliably at high temperatures or at cryogenic temperatures have not been adequately address.

  10. An analytical method for lubricant quality control by NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zamora, David; Blanco, Marcelo; Bautista, Manel; Mulero, Rufí; Mir, Miquel

    2012-01-30

    The excellent compatibility of polyol esters (POEs) with general fluids coolants such as CO(2) and non-chlorinated coolants (e.g. hydrofluorocarbons, HFCs) in terms of solubility, miscibility and chemical stability has fostered their use as lubricants by the refrigeration industry. The most widely used POEs bases consist of esters of polyalcohols - such as pentaerythritol, dipentaerythritol and neopentylglycol - with mixtures of carboxylic acids of 4-10 carbon atoms. Their thermophysical properties (viscosity mainly) are crucial with a view to producing efficient lubricants for specific applications. Usually, POE formulations, which usually contain several bases, are characterized in terms of global indices. In this work, we developed a methodology based on NIR spectroscopy for the characterization and analysis of lubricant formulations. The products, including lubricant bases and lubricant formulations, are characterized by reference to two spectral libraries that are used to identify as the starting lubricant bases as well as the lubricant formulations. It has been proposed to build libraries in cascade for the differentiation of lubricant formulations without and with low content in additives. Once the identification of the formulation is applied PLS multivariate models are used to determine the components of a lubricant formulation and its viscosity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lubrication properties of potential alternative lubricants, glycerin fatty acid esters, to magnesium stearate.

    PubMed

    Uchimoto, Takeaki; Iwao, Yasunori; Ikegami, Yuki; Murata, Takashi; Sonobe, Takashi; Miyagishima, Atsuo; Itai, Shigeru

    2010-02-15

    To study the usefulness of glycerin fatty acid ester Poem TR-FB (TR-FB) and Poem TR-HB (TR-HB) as lubricants, pressure transmission ratio, ejection force, disintegration time, and tensile strength were measured at different concentrations and mixing times for granules and tablets. When each lubricant was mixed at 0.1-3.0%, the increase in the pressure transmission ratio that was equal to or greater than that of Mg-St as well as the reduction in the ejection force was observed at a low concentration in both TR-FB and TR-HB, proving that they have excellent lubrication performance. The granules that were lubricated with TR-FB and TR-HB at even low concentration of 0.4% showed a more stable and sufficiently lower ejection force than with Mg-St from the first tablet after the start of compression. When they were mixed for 5-60 min, while the mixture with Mg-St showed a low pressure transmission ratio of 82% and a high ejection force of 500 N in the first tablet even when the mixing time was 60 min, a high pressure transmission ratio and a low ejection force were observed in TR-FB and TR-HB from the first tablet after mixing for 5-60 min, and these were maintained thereafter. As for the disintegration time and the tensile strength, a prolonged disintegration time and a decreased tensile strength, which are disadvantages of Mg-St, were not observed in TR-FB and TR-HB. Based on these results, it was concluded that TR-FB and TR-HB are useful as alternative lubricants to Mg-St. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Synthesis and testing was begun on a number of new classes of lubricants: perfluoropolyethers (branching effects), perfluoromethylene oxide ethers, chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyethers, fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants, glycerine- based perfluoropolyesters, perfluoro epoxy ether chains, etc.

  13. Using EMMA and MIX analysis to assess mixing ratios and to identify hydrochemical reactions in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Tubau, Isabel; Vàzquez-Suñé, Enric; Jurado, Anna; Carrera, Jesús

    2014-02-01

    This study presents a methodology using an end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) and MIX to compute mixing ratios and to identify hydrochemical reactions in groundwater. The methodology consists of (1) identifying the potential sources of recharge, (2) characterising recharge sources and mixed water samples using hydrogeochemistry, (3) selecting chemical species to be used in the analysis and (4) calculating mixing ratios and identification of hydrochemical reactions in groundwater. This approach has been applied in the Besòs River Delta area, where we have collected 51 groundwater samples and a long data register of the hydrogeochemistry of the Besòs River created by the Catalan Water Agency is also available. The EMMA performed in the Besòs River suggests that 3 end-members are required to explain its temporal variability, accounting for the species chloride, sulphate, sodium, bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, potassium, ammonium, total nitrogen, and electrical conductivity. One river end-member is from the wet periods (W1), and two are from dry periods (D1 and D2). These end-members have been used to compute mixing ratios in groundwater samples because the Besòs River is considered the main recharge source for the aquifer. Overall, dry season end-members dominated over the wet season end-member, in a proportion of 4:1. Moreover, when departures from the mixing line exist, geochemical processes might be identified. Redox processes, carbonate dissolution/precipitation and ion exchange processes may occur in Besòs Delta aquifer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A pad roughness model for the analysis of lubrication in the chemical mechanical polishing of a silicon wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dongming; Liu, Jingyuan; Kang, Renke; Jin, Zhuji

    2007-07-01

    The slurry flow beneath the wafer in chemical mechanical polishing (CMP), involving the chemical reaction and the lubrication, is critical to the planarity and surface quality of a large-sized silicon wafer. In order to analyse the effects of pad roughness and some important operating parameters on the slurry flow with the suspended abrasives between the wafer and the pad, a complicated three-dimensional model based on the micropolar fluid theory, Brinkman equations and Darcy's law is developed. The effects of pad roughness and vital parameters on the slurry flow between the pad and the wafer are well discussed.

  15. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of a functionally graded layered bearing surface, with particular reference to 'cushion form bearings' for artificial knee joints.

    PubMed

    Virdee, S S; Wang, F C; Xu, H; Jin, Z M

    2003-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication of a functionally graded layered (FGL) bearing surface, whose elastic modulus increases with depth from the bearing surface, was investigated in this study. The finite difference method was employed to solve the Reynolds equation, simultaneously with the elasticity equation of the bearing surface, under circular point contacts. The finite element method was adopted to solve the elasticity equation for the FGL bearing surface. The displacement coefficients thus obtained were used to calculate the elastic deformation of the bearing surface, required for the elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis. Good agreement of the predicted film thickness and pressure distribution was obtained, between the present method and a previous study for a single layered bearing surface with a uniform elastic modulus. The general numerical methodology was then applied to an FGL bearing surface with both linear and exponential variations in elastic modulus, with particular reference to the 'cushion form bearing' for artificial knee joints. The predicted film thickness and pressure distribution were shown to be quite close to those obtained for a single layer under typical operating conditions representative of artificial knee joints, provided that the elastic modulus of the single layer was chosen to be the average elastic modulus of the graded layer.

  16. Linkage analysis with an alternative formulation for the mixed model of inheritance: The finite polygenic mixed model

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, C.; Fernando, R.L.; Elston, R.C.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents an extension of the finite polygenic mixed model of Fernando et al. to linkage analysis. The finite polygenic mixed model, extended for linkage analysis, leads to a likelihood that can be calculated using efficient algorithms developed for oligogenic models. For comparison, linkage analysis of 5 simulated 4021-member pedigrees was performed using the usual mixed model of inheritance, approximated by Hasstedt, and the finite polygenic mixed model extended for linkage analysis presented here. Maximum likelihood estimates of the finite polygenic mixed model could be inferred to be closer to the simulated values in these pedigrees. 31 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Linkage Analysis with an Alternative Formulation for the Mixed Model of Inheritance: The Finite Polygenic Mixed Model

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, C.; Fernando, R. L.; Elston, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of the finite polygenic mixed model of FERNANDO et al. (1994) to linkage analysis. The finite polygenic mixed model, extended for linkage analysis, leads to a likelihood that can be calculated using efficient algorithms developed for oligogenic models. For comparison, linkage analysis of 5 simulated 4021-member pedigrees was performed using the usual mixed model of inheritance, approximated by HASSTEDT (1982), and the finite polygenic mixed model extended for linkage analysis presented here. Maximum likelihood estimates of the finite polygenic mixed model could be inferred to be closer to the simulated values in these pedigrees. PMID:8601502

  18. Safety analysis approaches or mixed transuranic waste.

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, J. C.; Dwight, C. C.; Forrester, R. J.; Lehto, M. A.; Pan, Y. C.

    1999-02-10

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has completed a survey of assumptions and techniques used for safety analyses at seven sites that handle or store mixed transuranic (TRU) waste operated by contractors for the US Department of Energy (DOE). While approaches to estimating on-site and off-site consequences of hypothetical accidents differ, there are commonalities in all of the safety studies. This paper identifies key parameters and methods used to estimate the radiological consequences associated with release of waste forms under abnormal conditions. Specific facilities are identified by letters with their safety studies listed in a bibliography rather than as specific references so that similarities and differences are emphasized in a nonjudgmental manner. References are provided for specific parameters used to project consequences associated with compromise of barriers and dispersion of potentially hazardous materials. For all of the accidents and sites, estimated dose commitments are well below guidelines even using highly conservative assumptions. Some of the studies quantified the airborne concentrations of toxic materials; this paper only addresses these analyses briefly, as an entire paper could be dedicated to this subject.

  19. Life Cycle Cost Analysis of Ready Mix Concrete Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topkar, V. M.; Duggar, A. R.; Kumar, A.; Bonde, P. P.; Girwalkar, R. S.; Gade, S. B.

    2013-11-01

    India, being a developing nation is experiencing major growth in its infrastructural sector. Concrete is the major component in construction. The requirement of good quality of concrete in large quantities can be fulfilled by ready mix concrete batching and mixing plants. The paper presents a technique of applying the value engineering tool life cycle cost analysis to a ready mix concrete plant. This will help an investor or an organization to take investment decisions regarding a ready mix concrete facility. No economic alternatives are compared in this study. A cost breakdown structure is prepared for the ready mix concrete plant. A market survey has been conducted to collect realistic costs for the ready mix concrete facility. The study establishes the cash flow for the ready mix concrete facility helpful in investment and capital generation related decisions. Transit mixers form an important component of the facility and are included in the calculations. A fleet size for transit mixers has been assumed for this purpose. The life cycle cost has been calculated for the system of the ready mix concrete plant and transit mixers.

  20. Computational Chemistry and Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Members of NASA Lewis Research Center's Tribology and Surface Science Branch are applying high-level computational chemistry techniques to the development of new lubrication systems for space applications and for future advanced aircraft engines. The next generation of gas turbine engines will require a liquid lubricant to function at temperatures in excess of 350 C in oxidizing environments. Conventional hydrocarbon-based lubricants are incapable of operating in these extreme environments, but a class of compounds known as the perfluoropolyether (PFAE) liquids (see the preceding illustration) shows promise for such applications. These commercially available products are already being used as lubricants in conditions where low vapor pressure and chemical stability are crucial, such as in satellite bearings and composite disk platters. At higher temperatures, however, these compounds undergo a decomposition process that is assisted (catalyzed) by metal and metal oxide bearing surfaces. This decomposition process severely limits the applicability of PFAE's at higher temperatures. A great deal of laboratory experimentation has revealed that the extent of fluid degradation depends on the chemical properties of the bearing surface materials. Lubrication engineers would like to understand the chemical breakdown mechanism to design a less vulnerable PFAE or to develop a chemical additive to block this degradation.

  1. Space Station lubrication considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Lubert J.; Dufrane, Keith

    1987-01-01

    Future activities in space will require the use of large structures and high power availability in order to fully exploit opportunities in Earth and stellar observations, space manufacturing and the development of optimum space transportation vehicles. Although these large systems will have increased capabilities, the associated development costs will be high, and will dictate long life with minimum maintenance. The Space Station provides a concrete example of such a system; it is approximately one hundred meters in major dimensions and has a life requirement of thirty years. Numerous mechanical components will be associated with these systems, a portion of which will be exposed to the space environment. If the long life and low maintenance goals are to be satisfied, lubricants and lubrication concepts will have to be carefully selected. Current lubrication practices are reviewed with the intent of determining acceptability for the long life requirements. The effects of exposure of lubricants and lubricant binders to the space environment are generally discussed. Potential interaction of MoS2 with atomic oxygen, a component of the low Earth orbit environment, appears to be significant.

  2. Fluid lubricated bearing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.; Menke, John R.

    1976-01-01

    1. A support for a loaded rotatable shaft comprising in combination on a housing having a fluid-tight cavity encasing an end portion of said shaft, a thrust bearing near the open end of said cavity for supporting the axial thrust of said shaft, said thrust bearing comprising a thrust plate mounted in said housing and a thrust collar mounted on said shaft, said thrust plate having a central opening the peripheral portion of which is hermetically sealed to said housing at the open end of said cavity, and means for supplying a fluid lubricant to said thrust bearing, said thrust bearing having a lubricant-conducting path connecting said lubricant supplying means with the space between said thrust plate and collar intermediate the peripheries thereof, the surfaces of said plate and collar being constructed and arranged to inhibit radial flow of lubricant and, on rotation of said thrust collar, to draw lubricant through said path between the bearing surfaces and to increase the pressure therebetween and in said cavity and thereby exert a supporting force on said end portion of said shaft.

  3. Commercial scale validation of a process scale-up model for lubricant blending of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Joseph; Schlack, Holger

    2014-11-20

    An experimental study was conducted to verify that lubrication mixing in commercial-scale bin blenders can be described by a previously-reported lubrication blending process scale-up model. Specifically, the mixing of two placebo formulations (2:1 MCC:lactose, and 2:1 MCC:DCP) with 1% magnesium stearate in 100, 400, and 2000 L bin blenders at 30% and 70% blend fill levels for several extents of lubricant mixing was examined. The lubricated powder blends were assessed for bulk/tapped density and powder flow, as measured by Hausner's ratio. The blends were then compressed into tablets and evaluated for tensile strength, friability, and disintegration. It was observed that the lubrication rate constant, γ, for tablet tensile strength and for bulk specific volume were similar. Furthermore, powder flow, as measured by Hausner's ratio, improved with increased extent of lubrication. Tablet disintegration and tablet friability were both minimally affected as a result of extended lubrication for the placebos blends evaluated in this study. The results of this study confirm that the lubrication mixing model can be applied to scale-up the lubrication blending process from batches made in 30 mL bottle blenders to batches made in 2000 L bin blenders, which is a range of nearly five orders of magnitude.

  4. Lubrication of chocolate during oral processing.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, S A; Selway, N; Morgenstern, M P; Motoi, L; Stokes, J R; James, B J

    2017-02-22

    The structure of chocolate is drastically transformed during oral processing from a composite solid to an oil/water fluid emulsion. Using two commercial dark chocolates varying in cocoa solids content, this study develops a method to identify the factors that govern lubrication in molten chocolate and saliva's contribution to lubrication following oral processing. In addition to chocolate and its individual components, simulated boluses (molten chocolate and phosphate buffered saline), in vitro boluses (molten chocolate and whole human saliva) and ex vivo boluses (chocolate expectorated after chewing till the point of swallow) were tested. The results reveal that the lubrication of molten chocolate is strongly influenced by the presence of solid sugar particles and cocoa solids. The entrainment of particles into the contact zone between the interacting surfaces reduces friction such that the maximum friction coefficient measured for chocolate boluses is much lower than those for single-phase Newtonian fluids. The addition of whole human saliva or a substitute aqueous phase (PBS) to molten chocolate dissolves sugar and decreases the viscosity of molten chocolate so that thinner films are achieved. However, saliva is more lubricating than PBS, which results in lower friction coefficients for chocolate-saliva mixtures when compared to chocolate-PBS mixtures. A comparison of ex vivo and in vitro boluses also suggests that the quantity of saliva added and uniformity of mixing during oral processing affect bolus structure, which leads to differences in measured friction. It is hypothesized that inhomogeneous mixing in the mouth introduces large air bubbles and regions of non-emulsified fat into the ex vivo boluses, which enhance wetting and lubrication.

  5. High-temperature bearing lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1968-01-01

    Synthetic paraffinic oil lubricates ball bearings at temperatures in the 600 degrees F range. The lubricant contains antiwear and antifoam additives, is thermally stable in the high temperature range, but requires protection from oxygen.

  6. Magnetically-controlled bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed magnetic-lubricant ball-bearing assembly has permanently-magnetized bearing retainer fabricated of porous material. Pores of retainer are filled with ferrolubricant. Surface tension causes retainer to deliver sufficient lubricant to nonmagnetic ball bearings.

  7. Effects of two lubricant oils on marine nematode assemblages in a laboratory microcosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Beyrem, H; Louati, H; Essid, N; Aïssa, P; Mahmoudi, E

    2010-05-01

    The effects of two lubricating oils on nematode assemblages of a Tunisian lagoon were investigated in a microcosm experiment. Sediment from a pristine site in Ghar El Melh lagoon (Western Mediterranean) was treated with either mineral oil (Mobil 20 W-50), a synthetic lubricant (Mobil 0 W-40), the same two lubricants after use in a vehicle, and effects were examined after 5 weeks. Univariate analysis showed significant differences between most univariate indices of the nematode assemblages in all the lubricant treatments as compared to the control. Total nematode abundance (I), species richness (d) and number of species (S) decreased significantly in all lubricant contaminated microcosms. However, evenness was not affected in all treated replicates except in used mineral lubricant treatment where it was significantly higher than in the control. Diversity (H') was only altered in synthetic lubricant treatments. Results from multivariate analyses of the species abundance data demonstrated that responses of nematode species to the two lubricants treatments were varied: Daptonema trabeculosum was eliminated in all lubricant treatments and seemed to be an intolerant species to oil contamination. Spirinia gerlachi increased in mineral lubricant treatments ("clean" and used) but was eliminated in all synthetic lubricant treatments. This species could be categorized as "resistant" to mineral oil contamination and intolerant to synthetic lubricant contamination. Terschellingia longicaudata increased only in synthetic lubricant treatments ("clean" and used) and appeared to be a "synthetic oil-resistant" species. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Traction behavior of two traction lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Rohn, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    In the analysis of rolling-sliding concentrated contacts, such as gears, bearings and traction drives, the traction characteristics of the lubricant are of prime importance. The elastic shear modulus and limiting shear stress properties of the lubricant dictate the traction/slip characteristics and power loss associated with an EHD contact undergoing slip and/or spin. These properties can be deducted directly from the initial slope m and maximum traction coefficient micron of an experimental traction curve. In this investigation, correlation equations are presented to predict m and micron for two modern traction fluids based on the regression analysis of 334 separate traction disk machine experiments. The effects of contact pressure, temperature, surface velocity, ellipticity ratio are examined. Problems in deducing lubricant shear moduli from disk machine tests are discussed.

  9. Basic lubrication equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Lubricants, usually Newtonian fluids, are assumed to experience laminar flow. The basic equations used to describe the flow are the Navier-Stokes equation of motion. The study of hydrodynamic lubrication is, from a mathematical standpoint, the application of a reduced form of these Navier-Stokes equations in association with the continuity equation. The Reynolds equation can also be derived from first principles, provided of course that the same basic assumptions are adopted in each case. Both methods are used in deriving the Reynolds equation, and the assumptions inherent in reducing the Navier-Stokes equations are specified. Because the Reynolds equation contains viscosity and density terms and these properties depend on temperature and pressure, it is often necessary to couple the Reynolds with energy equation. The lubricant properties and the energy equation are presented. Film thickness, a parameter of the Reynolds equation, is a function of the elastic behavior of the bearing surface. The governing elasticity equation is therefore presented.

  10. High-Temperature Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the early 1980's, Lewis Research Center began a program to develop high-temperature lubricants for use on future aircraft flying at three or more times the speed of sound, which can result in vehicle skin temperatures as high as 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit. A material that emerged from this research is a plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating metal- glass-fluoride coating able to reduce oxidation at very high temperatures. Technology is now in commercial use under the trade name Surf-Kote C-800, marketed by Hohman Plating and Manufacturing Inc. and manufactured under a patent license from NASA. Among its uses are lubrication for sliding contact bearings, shaft seals for turbopumps, piston rings for high performance compressors and hot glass processing machinery; it is also widely used in missile and space applications.

  11. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  12. Environmental Capability of Liquid Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beerbower, A.

    1973-01-01

    The methods available for predicting the properties of liquid lubricants from their structural formulas are discussed. The methods make it possible to design lubricants by forecasting the results of changing the structure and to determine the limits to which liquid lubricants can cope with environmental extremes. The methods are arranged in order of their thermodynamic properties through empirical physical properties to chemical properties.

  13. Additional aspects of elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    An up-to-date review of the varying aspects of elastohydrodynamic lubrication is presented.. Some recent work on elastohydrodynamic lubrication of materials of low elastic modulus as well as on hydrodynamic lubrication is included. Both these topics are applicable for contacts with any ellipticity parameter (ranging from a circular contact to a line contact).

  14. Lubrication of rolling element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a broad survey of the lubrication of rolling-element bearings. Emphasis is on the critical design aspects related to speed, temperature, and ambient pressure environment. Types of lubrication including grease, jets, mist, wick, and through-the-race are discussed. The paper covers the historical development, present state of technology, and the future problems of rolling-element bearing lubrication.

  15. Fuel-efficient lubricating oil

    SciTech Connect

    Erdman, T.R.

    1986-04-22

    A method is described of improving the fuel economy of an internal combustion engine comprising lubricating the crankcase of the engine with a lubricating composition consisting of a hydrocarbon oil of lubricating viscosity and from 15 to 25 millimols per kilogram of zinc O,O-di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphorodithioate and from 0.25 to 2 weight percent of pentaerythritol monooleate.

  16. Railway diesel crankcase lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, R.L.; Zoleski, B.H.; O'Rourke, R.L.

    1987-06-30

    A railway diesel crankcase lubricant composition is described comprising a diesel lubricating oil and from about 0.25 to 2.0 weight percent of minor amount of oxidation and corrosion inhibiting agent. The reaction product is of a polyoxyisopropylene diamine, diabasic acid anhydride and polyalkylene polyamine wherein: (i) reacting a dibasic acid anhydride with a polyoxyisopropylenediamine where x is a numeral of about 2 to about 50, forming a maleamic acid; (ii) reacting the maleamic acid with a polyalkylene polyamine, forming a condensate product and; (iii) recovering the condensate product.

  17. Lubricants in conveyor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Paton, C.G.; Bland, S.B.; Melley, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    This paper looks at four critical lubricants used in the conveyor systems of the northern Albertan oil sand facility. The requirements for the lubricants used in the electric motors and gear boxes of the drive systems, the pulley bearings and the idler bearings are discussed in terms of the application and the environment. A number of developments that have occurred in recent years are presented. Data from the field and from custom designed testing in the laboratory are used to support the role of simulation testing in problem solving in this area of technology. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  18. Vapor/Mist Used to Lubricate Gears After Loss of Primary Lubrication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2001-01-01

    Loss of lubrication in rotorcraft drive systems is a demanding requirement placed on drive system manufacturers. The drive system must operate for at least 30 minutes once the primary lubrication system has failed. This test is a military requirement that must be passed prior to certification of the aircraft. As new aircraft engines, operating at higher speeds, are fielded, the requirements for the drive system become increasingly more difficult. Also, the drive system must be lightweight, which minimizes the opportunity to use the gear bodies to absorb the tremendous amount of heating that takes place. In many cases, the amount of heat generated because of the high speed and load requires an emergency lubrication system that negatively impacts the aircraft's weight, complexity, and cost. A single mesh spur gear test rig is being used at the NASA Glenn Research Center to investigate possible emergency lubrication system improvements that will minimize the impact of having these systems onboard rotorcraft. A technique currently being investigated uses a vapor/mist system to lubricate the contacting surfaces after the primary lubrication system has been shut down. A number of tests were conducted in which the vapor/mist used the same lubricant as the primary system, but at a greatly reduced flow rate. Each test was initiated with the primary lubrication system operational and at steady-state conditions for a given speed and load. Then the primary lubrication system was shut down, and the vapor/mist lubrication system was initiated. An example of the tests conducted is shown in the figures. These preliminary tests have uncovered a mechanism that provides a lubricious, carbonaceous solid on the surface that actually reduces the surface temperature of the meshing gear teeth during operation. Surface analysis of the carbonaceous solid revealed it was graphitic. This mechanism is the synthetic lubricant "coking" on the active profile of the gears, which reduces the

  19. Modeling and Analysis of Mixed Synchronous/Asynchronous Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driscoll, Kevin R.; Madl. Gabor; Hall, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Practical safety-critical distributed systems must integrate safety critical and non-critical data in a common platform. Safety critical systems almost always consist of isochronous components that have synchronous or asynchronous interface with other components. Many of these systems also support a mix of synchronous and asynchronous interfaces. This report presents a study on the modeling and analysis of asynchronous, synchronous, and mixed synchronous/asynchronous systems. We build on the SAE Architecture Analysis and Design Language (AADL) to capture architectures for analysis. We present preliminary work targeted to capture mixed low- and high-criticality data, as well as real-time properties in a common Model of Computation (MoC). An abstract, but representative, test specimen system was created as the system to be modeled.

  20. Mixed time integration methods for transient thermal analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.

    1982-01-01

    The computational methods used to predict and optimize the thermal structural behavior of aerospace vehicle structures are reviewed. In general, two classes of algorithms, implicit and explicit, are used in transient thermal analysis of structures. Each of these two methods has its own merits. Due to the different time scales of the mechanical and thermal responses, the selection of a time integration method can be a different yet critical factor in the efficient solution of such problems. Therefore mixed time integration methods for transient thermal analysis of structures are being developed. The computer implementation aspects and numerical evaluation of these mixed time implicit-explicit algorithms in thermal analysis of structures are presented. A computationally useful method of estimating the critical time step for linear quadrilateral element is also given. Numerical tests confirm the stability criterion and accuracy characteristics of the methods. The superiority of these mixed time methods to the fully implicit method or the fully explicit method is also demonstrated.

  1. LUBRICATED TRANSPORT OF VISCOUS FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    JOSEPH, DANIEL D

    2004-06-21

    We became the acknowledged world leaders in the science fundamentals of the technology of water lubricated pipelines focusing on stability, numerical and experimental studies. We completed the first direct numerical simulation of axisymmetric core flow. We showed that the pressure at the front of the wave is large (the fluid enters a converging region) and it pushes the interface in, steepening the wave at its front. At the backside of the wave, behind the crest, the pressure is low (diverging flow) and it pulls the interface to the wall, smoothing the backside of the wave. The steepening of the wave can be regarded as a shock up by inertia and it shows that dynamics works against the formation of long waves which are often assumed but not justified in the analysis of such problems. We showed that the steep wave persists even as the gap between the core and the wall decreases to zero. The wave length also decreases in proportion, so that the wave shape is preserved in this limit. This leads to the first mathematical solution giving rise sharkskin. The analysis also showed that there is a threshold Reynolds number below which the total force reckoned relative to a zero at the wave crest is negative, positive above, and we conjectured, therefore that inertia is required to center a density matched core and to levitate the core off the wall when the density is not matched. Other work relates to self-lubricated transport of bitumen froth and self-lubricated transport of bitumen froth.

  2. An event-level analysis of adding exogenous lubricant to condoms in a sample of men who have vaginal sex with women.

    PubMed

    Reece, Michael; Mark, Kristen; Herbenick, Debby; Hensel, Devon J; Jawed-Wessel, Sofia; Dodge, Brian

    2012-03-01

    Little is known about the characteristics of sexual events during which individuals choose to use lubricant with condoms. The aims of this article were to evaluate the determinants of adding lubricant to condoms during baseline and at the event level, to assess the event-level variables' influence on adding lubricants to condoms, and to assess the event-level influence of using condoms with lubricant on event-level condom attitudes. A total of 1,874 men completed a 30-day Internet-based prospective daily diary study of sexual behavior and condom use. Baseline data included demographic variables and information about condom education. Daily diary data included reports of penile-vaginal sex regarding intercourse duration, intercourse intensity, intoxication level, condom application method, partner contraceptive method, and partner and relationship characteristics. Lubricant was added to 24.3% of the study-provided condoms and 26.2% of the condoms selected by study participants. Those with more education and those who were married were more likely to add lubrication to condoms. Adding lubricant to condoms, a female partner putting the condom on with her hands and using contraception, and the event occurring with a wife (vs. girlfriend) was significantly associated with longer intercourse. Event-level lubricant and condom use significantly predicted lower willingness to buy the condom it was used with, as well as to recommend the condom. Adding exogenous lubricant was not related to the participants' confidence in condoms as a method to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. The event-level nature of this study provided for a more comprehensive assessment of the situational factors that are associated with applying lubricant to condoms. Findings from this study suggest that men are adding lubricant to condoms for reasons other than to increase condom efficacy. © 2012 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  3. Electrophoretically-deposited solid film lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, M.T.; Panitz, J.K.J.; Vanecek, C.W.

    1995-04-01

    An aqueous-based process that uses electrophoresis to attract powdered lubricant in suspension to a charged target was developed. The deposition process yields coatings with low friction, complies with environmental safety regulations, requires minimal equipment, and has several advantages over processes involving organic binders or vacuum techniques. This work focuses on development of the deposition process, includes an analysis of the friction coefficient of the material in sliding contact with stainless steel under a range of conditions, and a functional evaluation of coating performance in a precision mechanical device application. Results show that solid lubricant films with friction coefficients as low as 0.03 can be produced. A 0.03 friction coefficient is superior to solid lubricants with binder systems and is comparable to friction coefficients generated with more costly vacuum techniques.

  4. Rheological effects on friction in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachman, E. G.; Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation is presented of the friction in a rolling and sliding elastohydrodynamic lubricated contact. The rheological behavior of the lubricant is described in terms of two viscoelastic models. These models represent the separate effects of non-Newtonian behavior and the transient response of the fluid. A unified description of the non-Newtonian shear rate dependence of the viscosity is presented as a new hyperbolic liquid model. The transient response of viscosity, following the rapid pressure rise encountered in the contact, is described by a compressional viscoelastic model of the volume response of a liquid to an applied pressure step. The resulting momentum and energy equations are solved by an iterative numerical technique, and a friction coefficient is calculated. The experimental study was performed, with two synthetic paraffinic lubricants, to verify the friction predictions of the analysis. The values of friction coefficient from theory and experiment are in close agreement.

  5. Single-cell growth analysis in a mixed cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Jun; Bato, Mary Grace P.; Daria, Vincent Ricardo

    2008-06-01

    We perform single cell analysis of cell growth in a mixed cell culture. Two species of yeast cells: Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, are optically trapped using focused continuous-wave near infrared laser. Cell growth for both cells is inhibited only when the two species of cells are in contact with each other. This indicates cell-cell interaction mediated cell growth inhibition mechanism. Single cell level analysis of cell growth studied here contributes to the further understanding of yeast growth arrest in a mixed yeast culture.

  6. Natural oils as lubricants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is currently an availability of vegetable oil lubricants, with the exception of engine oils. Vegetable oils are environmentally friendly, renewable, contribute to the reduction of our dependence on imported petroleum, and add value to the farmer. However, there are inherent weaknesses in veg...

  7. Biobased lubricant additives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  8. Lubricating oil composition

    SciTech Connect

    Malec, R.E.

    1980-01-29

    The reaction product of (A) high molecular weight hydrocarbon-substituted phenols, (B) aldehydes, (C) ammonia or amines having a reactive hydrogen atom, and (D) alkylene oxides are effective dispersants for lubricating oil and impart detergent properties to liquid hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline.

  9. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  10. Fundamentals of Solid Lubrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During this program, we have worked to develop a fundamental understanding of the chemical and tribological issues related to...approach, tribological measurements performed over a range of length scales, and the correlation of the two classes of information. Research activities...correlated measurements of surface composition and environmentally specific tribological performance of thin film solid lubricants. • Correlate shear

  11. JET MIXING ANALYSIS FOR SRS HIGH-LEVEL WASTE RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-07-05

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. The slurry pump may be fixed in position or they may rotate depending on the specific mixing requirements. The high-level waste in Tank 48 contains insoluble solids in the form of potassium tetraphenyl borate compounds (KTPB), monosodium titanate (MST), and sludge. Tank 48 is equipped with 4 slurry pumps, which are intended to suspend the insoluble solids prior to transfer of the waste to the Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) process. The FBSR process is being designed for a normal feed of 3.05 wt% insoluble solids. A chemical characterization study has shown the insoluble solids concentration is approximately 3.05 wt% when well-mixed. The project is requesting a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) mixing study from SRNL to determine the solids behavior with 2, 3, and 4 slurry pumps in operation and an estimate of the insoluble solids concentration at the suction of the transfer pump to the FBSR process. The impact of cooling coils is not considered in the current work. The work consists of two principal objectives by taking a CFD approach: (1) To estimate insoluble solids concentration transferred from Tank 48 to the Waste Feed Tank in the FBSR process and (2) To assess the impact of different combinations of four slurry pumps on insoluble solids suspension and mixing in Tank 48. For this work, several different combinations of a maximum of four pumps are considered to determine the resulting flow patterns and local flow velocities which are thought to be associated with sludge particle mixing. Two different elevations of pump nozzles are used for an assessment of the flow patterns on the tank mixing. Pump design and operating parameters used for the analysis are summarized in Table 1. The baseline

  12. The pressure and deformation profile between two colliding lubricated cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K.; Cheng, H. S.

    1971-01-01

    The pressure and deformation profiles between two colliding lubricated cylinders are obtained by solving the coupled, time-dependent elastohydrodynamic equations with an iterative procedure. The analysis includes effects which were not considered in a previous solution, namely, the effect of the lubricant compressibility and the effect of a lubricant with composite pressure-viscosity coefficients. It is found that the local approach velocity plays an important role during final stages of normal approach. It causes the lubricant to be entrapped within the contact region; neither the pressure nor the deformation profile converges to the Hertzian profile for a dry contact. The use of a smaller pressure-viscosity coefficient at high pressures reduces the sharp pressure gradient at the center of the contact and produces a much milder variation of load with respect to the film thickness. The effect of compressibility of the lubricant is found to be relatively small.

  13. Effects of monoesters of dicarboxylic acids on jet fuel lubricity

    SciTech Connect

    Kislenko, A.S.; Krylov, I.F.; Sokolova, G.I.; Seregin, V.P.; Skovorodin, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have prepared monoesters of dicarboxylic acids (DCAs) and aliphatic alcohols to study their effects on jet fuel lubricity. The effects of the synthesized compounds on the lubricity of a hydrotreated jet fuel were evaluated in a KIIGA-2 unit. The monoesters were added to the fuel at a concentration of 0.15 mole/m/sup 3/ and an analysis of the data shows that the monoesters of the DCAs do have significant effects on the fuel lubricity. The lubricity effect of these compounds depends on the molecular structure. It was found that dicarboxylic acids and higher fatty alcohols can be used to prepare effective lubricity additives for hydrotreated jet fuels.

  14. The relationship between fuel lubricity and diesel injection system wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Paul I.

    1992-01-01

    Use of low-lubricity fuel may have contributed to increased failure rates associated with critical fuel injection equipment during the 1991 Operation Desert Storm. However, accurate quantitative analysis of failed components from the field is almost impossible due to the unique service history of each pump. This report details the results of pump stand tests with fuels of equal viscosity, but widely different lubricity. Baseline tests were also performed using reference no. 2 diesel fuel. Use of poor lubricity fuel under these controlled conditions was found to greatly reduce both pump durability and engine performance. However, both improved metallurgy and fuel lubricity additives significantly reduced wear. Good correlation was obtained between standard bench tests and lightly loaded pump components. However, high contact loads on isolated components produced a more severe wear mechanism that is not well reflected by the Ball-on-Cylinder Lubricity Evaluator.

  15. Scuffing and Lubrication of Gears and Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B.; Houpert, L.

    1986-01-01

    New Reynolds equation developed for elastohydrodynamic-lubrication analysis. Method developed to study macro- and micro-EHL, without restriction on load applied to contact. Macro-EHL refers to lubricantfilm thickness developed in inlet zone of EHL conjunction. Powerful tool used to study scuffing. Using new approach, researchers have analyzed stress concentrations near both bump and groove in bearing surface.

  16. Determination of Zinc-Based Additives in Lubricating Oils by Flow-Injection Analysis with Flame-AAS Detection Exploiting Injection with a Computer-Controlled Syringe

    PubMed Central

    Pignalosa, Gustavo; Cabrera, Noel

    2005-01-01

    A flow-injection system is proposed for the determination of metal-based additives in lubricating oils. The system, operating under computer control uses a motorised syringe for measuring and injecting the oil sample (200 μL) in a kerosene stream, where it is dispersed by means of a packed mixing reactor and carried to an atomic absorption spectrometer which is used as detector. Zinc was used as model analyte. Two different systems were evaluated, one for low concentrations (range 0–10 ppm) and the second capable of providing higher dilution rates for high concentrations (range 0.02%–0.2% w/w). The sampling frequency was about 30 samples/h. Calibration curves fitted a second-degree regression model (r 2 = 0.996). Commercial samples with high and low zinc levels were analysed by the proposed method and the results were compared with those obtained with the standard ASTM method. The t test for mean values showed no significant differences at the 95% confidence level. Precision (RSD%) was better than 5% (2% typical) for the high concentrations system. The carryover between successive injections was found to be negligible. PMID:18924720

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of Mixed Models for Incomplete Longitudinal Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Shu; Blozis, Shelley A.

    2011-01-01

    Mixed models are used for the analysis of data measured over time to study population-level change and individual differences in change characteristics. Linear and nonlinear functions may be used to describe a longitudinal response, individuals need not be observed at the same time points, and missing data, assumed to be missing at random (MAR),…

  18. Views of Effective College Faculty: A Mixed Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slate, John R.; LaPrairie, Kimberly Nichols; Schulte, Don P.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    A mixed analysis of the perceived characteristics of effective college faculty members was conducted through surveying 615 students, predominantly Hispanic, enrolled in courses at two southwest Hispanic-serving universities. Beliefs were identified that led to 29 prevailing themes: Knowledgeable; Understanding; Communication; Teaches Well; Caring;…

  19. Sensitivity Analysis of Mixed Models for Incomplete Longitudinal Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Shu; Blozis, Shelley A.

    2011-01-01

    Mixed models are used for the analysis of data measured over time to study population-level change and individual differences in change characteristics. Linear and nonlinear functions may be used to describe a longitudinal response, individuals need not be observed at the same time points, and missing data, assumed to be missing at random (MAR),…

  20. Discriminant Analysis Using Mixed Continuous, Dichotomous, and Ordered Categorical Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Song, Xin-Yuan; Lu, Bin

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes an intuitive approach for predictive discriminant analysis with mixed continuous, dichotomous, and ordered categorical variables that are defined via an underlying multivariate normal distribution with a threshold specification. The classification rule is based on the comparison of the observed data logarithm probability…

  1. Discriminant Analysis Using Mixed Continuous, Dichotomous, and Ordered Categorical Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sik-Yum; Song, Xin-Yuan; Lu, Bin

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes an intuitive approach for predictive discriminant analysis with mixed continuous, dichotomous, and ordered categorical variables that are defined via an underlying multivariate normal distribution with a threshold specification. The classification rule is based on the comparison of the observed data logarithm probability…

  2. Lubrication handbook for the space industry. Part A: Solid lubricants. Part B: Liquid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide a ready reference for many of the solid and liquid lubricants used in the space industry. Lubricants and lubricant properties are arranged systematically so that designers, engineers, and maintenance personnel can conveniently locate data needed for their work. This handbook is divided into two major parts (A and B). Part A is a compilation of solid lubricant suppliers information on chemical and physical property of data of more than 250 solid lubricants, bonded solid lubricants, dispersions, and composites. Part B is a compilation of chemical and physical porperty data of more then 250 liquid lubricants, greases, oils, compounds, and fluids. The listed materials cover a broad spectrum from manufacturing and ground support to hardware applications of spacecraft.

  3. Sensitive Chiral Analysis via Microwave Three-Wave Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, David; Doyle, John M.

    2013-07-01

    We demonstrate chirality-induced three-wave mixing in the microwave regime, using rotational transitions in cold gas-phase samples of 1,2-propanediol and 1,3-butanediol. We show that bulk three-wave mixing, which can only be realized in a chiral environment, provides a sensitive, species-selective probe of enantiomeric excess and is applicable to a broad class of molecules. The doubly resonant condition provides simultaneous identification of species and of handedness, which should allow sensitive chiral analysis even within a complex mixture.

  4. Dual functional star polymers for lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Cosimbescu, Lelia; Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Qu, Jun

    2016-09-12

    Star-shaped poly(alkyl methacrylate)s (PAMAs) with a three arm architecturewere designed, prepared and their performance as a dual additive (viscosity index improver and friction modifier) for engine oils was evaluated. Furthermore, the structure property relationships between the macromolecular structure and lubricant performance were studied, such as molecular weight and polarity effects on the viscosity index. Several copolymers of dodecylmethacrylate with polar methacrylates in various amounts and various topologies, were synthesized as model compounds. Star polymers with a polar content of at least 10% in a block or tapered block topology effectively reduced the friction coefficient in both mixed and boundary lubrication regimes. Furthermore, a polar content of 20% was efficient in reducing friction in both random and block topologies.

  5. Dual Functional Star Polymers for Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Cosimbescu, Lelia; Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Qu, Jun

    2016-09-12

    Star-shaped poly(alkyl methacrylate)s (PAMAs) with a 3-arm architecture were designed, prepared and their performance as a dual additive (viscosity index improver and friction modifier) for engine oils was evaluated. Furthermore, the structure-property relationships between macromolecular structure and lubricant performance were studied. Several co-polymers of dodecylmethacrylate with polar methacrylates in various amounts and various topologies, were synthesized as model compounds. Star polymers with a polar content of at least 10% effectively reduced the friction coefficient in both mixed and boundary lubrication regime only in block or tapered block topology. However, a polar content of 20% was efficient in reducing friction in both random and block topologies.

  6. Dual functional star polymers for lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Cosimbescu, Lelia; Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Qu, Jun

    2016-09-12

    Star-shaped poly(alkyl methacrylate)s (PAMAs) with a three arm architecturewere designed, prepared and their performance as a dual additive (viscosity index improver and friction modifier) for engine oils was evaluated. Furthermore, the structure property relationships between the macromolecular structure and lubricant performance were studied, such as molecular weight and polarity effects on the viscosity index. Several copolymers of dodecylmethacrylate with polar methacrylates in various amounts and various topologies, were synthesized as model compounds. Star polymers with a polar content of at least 10% in a block or tapered block topology effectively reduced the friction coefficient in both mixed and boundary lubrication regimes. Furthermore, a polar content of 20% was efficient in reducing friction in both random and block topologies.

  7. Lubrication Handbook For The Space Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, Ernest L.

    1988-01-01

    A 458-page handbook covers many of solid and liquid lubricants used in space industry. Also useful reference in industrial and military applications of lubricants. Part A of handbook compilation of data on chemical and physical properties of over 250 solid lubricants, including bonded solid lubricants, dispersions, and composites. Part B covers over 250 liquid lubricants, greases, oils, compounds, and fluids.

  8. Lubrication, adsorption, and rheology of aqueous polysaccharide solutions.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Jason R; Macakova, Lubica; Chojnicka-Paszun, Agnieszka; de Kruif, Cornelis G; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2011-04-05

    Aqueous lubrication is currently at the forefront of tribological research due to the desire to learn and potentially mimic how nature lubricates biotribological contacts. We focus here on understanding the lubrication properties of naturally occurring polysaccharides in aqueous solution using a combination of tribology, adsorption, and rheology. The polysaccharides include pectin, xanthan gum, gellan, and locus bean gum that are all widely used in food and nonfood applications. They form rheologically complex fluids in aqueous solution that are both shear thinning and elastic, and their normal stress differences at high shear rates are found to be characteristic of semiflexible/rigid molecules. Lubrication is studied using a ball-on-disk tribometer with hydrophobic elastomer surfaces, mimicking biotribological contacts, and the friction coefficient is measured as a function of speed across the boundary, mixed, and hydrodynamic lubrication regimes. The hydrodynamic regime, where the friction coefficient increases with increasing lubricant entrainment speed, is found to depend on the viscosity of the polysaccharide solutions at shear rates of around 10(4) s(-1). The boundary regime, which occurs at the lowest entrainment speeds, depends on the adsorption of polymer to the substrate. In this regime, the friction coefficient for a rough substrate (400 nm rms roughness) is dependent on the dry mass of polymer adsorbed to the surface (obtained from surface plasmon resonance), while for a smooth substrate (10 nm rms roughness) the friction coefficient is strongly dependent on the hydrated wet mass of adsorbed polymer (obtained from quartz crystal microbalance, QCM-D). The mixed regime is dependent on both the adsorbed film properties and lubricant's viscosity at high shear rates. In addition, the entrainment speed where the friction coefficient is a minimum, which corresponds to the transition between the hydrodynamic and mixed regime, correlates linearly with the ratio

  9. Evaluation of mixed-population flood-frequency analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    A mixed population of flood flows was shown to cause quality-of-fit problems if a single-population flood-frequency distribution was used to describe the flood data. The three populations in this mix were "ordinary," tropical cyclone, and ice-jam-release floods. Parametric descriptions of the single and separated flood populations were evaluated using probability-plot correlation-coefficient tests. These tests quantified how well the flood-probability distributions agreed with plotting-position descriptions of the data and quantified the differences due to the mixed-population analysis. High outliers caused the high skewness found in the single- population analyses. The tropical cyclone component was underestimated by single-population analyses at gauging stations in Massachusetts that had little data.

  10. Self-mixing grating interferometer: theoretical analysis and experimental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dongmei; Wang, Ming; Hao, Hui

    2016-08-01

    By combining self-mixing interferometer (SMI) and grating interferometer (GI), a self-mixing grating interferometer (SMGI) is proposed in this paper. Self-mixing interference occurs when light emitted from a laser diode is diffracted by the doublediffraction system and re-enters the laser active cavity, thus generating a modulation of both the amplitude and the frequency of the lasing field. Theoretical analysis and experimental observations show that the SMGI has the same phase sensitivity as that of the conventional GI and the direction of the phase movement can be obtained from inclination of the interference signal. Compared with the traditional SMI, the phase change of interference signal in SMGI is independent of laser wavelength, providing better immunity against environmental disturbances such as temperature, pressure, and humidity variation. Compared with the traditional GI, the SMGI provides a potential displacement sensor with directional discrimination and quite compact configuration.

  11. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground type...

  12. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground type...

  13. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground type...

  14. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground type...

  15. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground type...

  16. Effect of particle size on compaction of materials with different deformation mechanisms with and without lubricants.

    PubMed

    Almaya, Ahmad; Aburub, Aktham

    2008-01-01

    This work investigates the effect of excipient particle size on compaction properties of brittle, plastic and viscoelastic materials with and without added lubricants. Sieve cuts of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC), starch and dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate were obtained by sieving, then samples were tested without lubrication or with added lubricant (0.5% Mg stearate mixed for either 5 or 30-min). Compacts were left overnight before testing. It was found that in the absence of lubricant, compact tensile strength (TS) was dependent on particle size only for starch. With Mg stearate, lubricant sensitivity shows a strong dependence on excipient particle size for both starch and MCC, where smaller particles are less affected by lubricant. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate was not sensitive to lubricant even after 30 min mixing. This study highlights that in the absence of lubricant, initial particle size of excipients has no impact on compact strength not only for dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate (brittle), but also for MCC (plastic). On the other hand, TS is dependent on particle size both with or without added lubricant for starch (viscoelastic).

  17. Wide-temperature-spectrum self-lubricating coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1979-01-01

    Self-lubricating, multicomponent coatings, which lubricate over a wide range of operating conditions, are described. The coatings were successfully applied by plasma-spraying mixed powders onto superalloy substrates. They were evaluated in friction and wear experiments, and in sliding contact bearing tests. These coatings are wear resistant by virtue of their self lubricating characteristics rather than because of extreme hardness; a further benefit is low friction. Experiments with simple pin on disk sliding specimens and oscillating plain cylindrical bearing tests were performed to evaluate the tribological properties of the coatings. It was shown that coatings of nichrome, glass and calcium fluoride are self-lubricating from about 500 to 900 C, but give high friction at the lower temperatures. The addition of silver to the coating composition improved the low temperature bearing properties and resulted in coatings which are self-lubricating from cryogenic temperatures to at least 870 C; they are therefore, wide temperature spectrum, self-lubricating compositions.

  18. Analysis of Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) for Different Coating Tools during Turning of TC11 Titanium Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sheng; Li, Zhongquan; Guo, Guoqiang; An, Qinglong; Chen, Ming; Ming, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    The tool coating and cooling strategy are two key factors when machining difficult-to-cut materials such as titanium alloy. In this paper, diamond coating was deposited on a commercial carbide insert as an attempt to increase the machinability of TC11 alloy during the turning process. An uncoated carbide insert and a commercial Al2O3/TiAlN-coated tool were also tested as a comparison. Furthermore, MQL was applied to improve the cutting condition. Cutting performances were analyzed by cutting force, cutting temperate and surface roughness measurements. Tool wears and tool lives were evaluated to find a good matchup between the tool coating and cooling strategy. According to the results, using MQL can slightly reduce the cutting force. By applying MQL, cutting temperatures and tool wears were reduced by a great amount. Besides, MQL can affect the tool wear mechanism and tool failure modes. The tool life of an Al2O3/TiAlN-coated tool can be prolonged by 88.4% under the MQL condition. Diamond-coated tools can obtain a good surface finish when cutting parameters and lubrication strategies are properly chosen. PMID:28773926

  19. Lubrication of space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has many high-technology programs plannned for the future, such as the space station, Mission to Planet Earth (a series of Earth-observing satellites), space telescopes, and planetary orbiters. These missions will involve advanced mechanical moving components, space mechanisms that will need wear protection and lubrication. The tribology practices used in space today are primarily based on a technology that is more than 20 years old. The question is the following: Is this technology base good enough to meet the needs of these future long-duration NASA missions? This paper examines NASA's future space missions, how mechanisms are currently lubricated, some of the mechanism and tribology challenges that may be encountered in future missions, and some potential solutions to these future challenges.

  20. Object shape-based optical sensing methodology and system for condition monitoring of contaminated engine lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordatchev, Evgueni; Aghayan, Hamid; Yang, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Presence of contaminants, such as gasoline, moisture, and coolant in the engine lubricant indicates mechanical failure within the engine and significantly reduces lubricant quality. This paper describes a novel sensing system, its methodology and experimental verifications for analysis of the presence of contaminants in the engine lubricants. The sensing methodology is based on the statistical shape analysis methodology utilizing optical analysis of the distortion effect when an object image is obtained through a thin random optical medium. The novelty of the proposed sensing system lies within the employed methodology which an object with a known periodic shape is introduced behind a thin film of the contaminated lubricant. In this case, an acquired image represents a combined lubricant-object optical appearance, where an a priori known periodical structure of the object is distorted by a contaminated lubricant. The object, e.g. a stainless steel woven wire cloth with a mesh size of 65×65 µm2 and a circular wire diameter of 33 µm was placed behind a microfluidic channel, containing engine lubricant and optical images of flowing lubricant with stationary object were acquired and analyzed. Several parameters of acquired optical images, such as, color of lubricant and object, object shape width at object and lubricant levels, object relative color, and object width non-uniformity coefficient, were proposed. Measured on-line parameters were used for optical analysis of fresh and contaminated lubricants. Estimation of contaminant presence and lubricant condition was performed by comparison of parameters for fresh and contaminated lubricants. Developed methodology was verified experimentally showing ability to distinguish lubricants with 1%, 4%, 7%, and 10% coolant, gasoline and water contamination individually and in a combination form of coolant (0%-5%) and gasoline (0%-5%).

  1. Solid film lubricants and thermal control coatings flown aboard the EOIM-3 MDA sub-experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Taylor J.; David, Kaia E.; Babel, Hank W.

    1995-01-01

    Additional experimental data were desired to support the selection of candidate thermal control coatings and solid film lubricants for the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA) Space Station hardware. The third Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions With Materials Mission (EOIM-3) flight experiment presented an opportunity to study the effects of the low Earth orbit environment on thermal control coatings and solid film lubricants. MDA provided five solid film lubricants and two anodic thermal control coatings for EOIM-3. The lubricant sample set consisted of three solid film lubricants with organic binders one solid film lubricant with an inorganic binder, and one solid film lubricant with no binder. The anodize coating sample set consisted of undyed sulfuric acid anodize and cobalt sulfide dyed sulfuric acid anodize, each on two different substrate aluminum alloys. The organic and inorganic binders in the solid film lubricants experienced erosion, and the lubricating pigments experienced oxidation. MDA is continuing to assess the effect of exposure to the low Earth orbit environment on the life and friction properties of the lubricants. Results to date support the design practice of shielding solid film lubricants from the low Earth orbit environment. Post-flight optical property analysis of the anodized specimens indicated that there were limited contamination effects and some atomic oxygen and ultraviolet radiation effects. These effects appeared to be within the values predicted by simulated ground testing and analysis of these materials, and they were different for each coating and substrate.

  2. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  3. Lubricant Performance and Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    responds to changes in concentration of ferromagnetic wear debris. A 5-gallon capacity microfiltration test rig was constructed to simulate fine filtration ...in turbine engine lubrication systems. A wear test machine was used to generate wear particles in order to study the impact of fine filtration on...Chromatogram of 0-79-17E from Squires Oxidative Test at 2050C after 24 Hours 76 29 Log Molecular Weight of Compounds I, II, III, and PANA vs Gel Permeation

  4. Fluids, Lubrication, Fuels and Related Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-06-01

    Procedures for the recovery and analysis of the debris fomed at the wear surfaces in a four-ball wear tester are presented. A lubrication model based on...liquid phase are suggested. Procedures for the recovery and analysis of the debris formed at the wear surfaces in a four-ball wear tester are...1 B. HIGH TEMPERATURE OXIDATION OF SOME ORGANIC LIQUIDS. ... 3 1. Apparatus and Procedures 3 2. Methods of Analysis ...... 6 3. ?actors

  5. An Aerodynamic Analysis of a Mixed Flow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Chan M.; Civinskas, Kestutis C.

    1994-01-01

    The aerodynamic performance of a high-work Mixed Flow Turbine (MFT) is computed and compared with experimental data. A three dimensional (3-D) viscous analysis is applied to the single stage MFT geometry with a relatively long upstream transition duct. Predicted vane surface static pressures and circumferentially averaged spanwise quantities at stator and rotor exits agree favorably with data. Compared to the results of axisymmetric flow analysis from design intent, the 3-D computation agrees much better especially in the endwall regions where throughflow prediction fails to assess the loss mechanism properly. Potential sources of performance loss such as tip leakage and secondary flows are also properly captured by the analysis.

  6. Viscous boundary lubrication of hydrophobic surfaces by mucin.

    PubMed

    Yakubov, Gleb E; McColl, James; Bongaerts, Jeroen H H; Ramsden, Jeremy J

    2009-02-17

    The lubricating behavior of the weakly charged short-side-chain glycoprotein mucin "Orthana" (Mw=0.55 MDa) has been investigated between hydrophobic and hydrophilic PDMS substrates using soft-contact tribometry. It was found that mucin facilitates lubrication between hydrophobic PDMS surfaces, leading to a 10-fold reduction in boundary friction coefficient for rough surfaces. The presence of mucin also results in a shift of the mixed lubrication regime to lower entrainment speeds. The observed boundary lubrication behavior of mucin was found to depend on the bulk concentration, and we linked this to the structure and dynamics of the adsorbed mucin films, which are assessed using optical waveguide light spectroscopy. We observe a composite structure of the adsorbed mucin layer, with its internal structure governed by entanglement. The film thickness of this adsorbed layer increases with concentration, while the boundary friction coefficient for rough surfaces was found to be inversely proportional to the thickness of the adsorbed film. This link between lubrication and structure of the film is consistent with a viscous boundary lubrication mechanism, i.e., a thicker adsorbed film, at a given sliding speed, results in a lower local shear rate and, hence, in a lower local shear stress. The estimated local viscosities of the adsorbed layer, derived from the friction measurements and the polymer layer density, are in agreement with each other.

  7. Selective Surface Modification on Lubricant Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu; Suvanto, Mika; Pakkanen, Tapani A.

    2016-11-01

    While surface patterns are effective in improving tribological properties, nevertheless they alter the surface wettability, which will in turn affect the surface-lubricant interactions. When there is a shortage of lubricant on a patterned surface, the lubricant stored inside the cavities will be extracted to compensate the surface lubricant dissipation. Additionally, the lubricant retention effect provided by the cavities is competing with the release of the lubricant. With weak surface-lubricant interaction, the retention is limited. Therefore, the lubrication will have a sudden failure, giving a dramatic transition to abrasive wear. To improve the performance of polar lubricants on hydrophobic polymer surfaces, both topographical and selective surface modifications were incorporated on injection molded polypropylene surfaces. Distinctive lubrication improvement was observed when the surface structure density for the lubricant storage was high, and the release of the lubricant was controlled by the interaction with the selectively modified surfaces.

  8. Stability of mixed time integration schemes for transient thermal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. K.; Lin, J. I.

    1982-01-01

    A current research topic in coupled-field problems is the development of effective transient algorithms that permit different time integration methods with different time steps to be used simultaneously in various regions of the problems. The implicit-explicit approach seems to be very successful in structural, fluid, and fluid-structure problems. This paper summarizes this research direction. A family of mixed time integration schemes, with the capabilities mentioned above, is also introduced for transient thermal analysis. A stability analysis and the computer implementation of this technique are also presented. In particular, it is shown that the mixed time implicit-explicit methods provide a natural framework for the further development of efficient, clean, modularized computer codes.

  9. Oil film thickness measurement and analysis for an angular contact ball bearing operating in parched elastohydrodynamic lubrication. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Scott D.

    1986-01-01

    The capacitance method is used to estimate the oil film thickness in the Hertzian contact zone of an angular contact ball bearing operating in parched elastohydrodynamic lubrication. The parched elastohydrodynamic lubrication regime is characterized by a transient film thickness and basic speed ratio (ball spin rate over combined race speed) and the formation of a friction polymer. The experimental apparatus tests 40 mm 108 H ball bearings in the counter rotating race mode at loads of 200 and 300 lb, a film parameter of 1.6 and nominal inner and outer race speeds of 38 and 26 rps, respectively. Experimental results are presented for the capacitance, thickness, and conductance of the oil film as functions of elapsed time and for the basic speed ratios as a function of elapsed time, load, and amount of lubricant applied to the test bearing. Results indicate that a friction polymer formed from the initial lubricant has an effect on the capacitance and basic speed ratio measurements.

  10. Agitator Mixing Analysis in a HB-Line Flat Tank

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2002-07-31

    In support of the HB-Line Engineering agitator mixing project, flow pattern calculations have been made for a 45 degrees pitched three-blade agitator submerged in a flat rectangular tank. The work is intended to determine agitator speeds that provide acceptable mixing performance for various tank liquid levels based on flow rates past solids deposited on the bottom surface of the flat tank. The modeling results will help ensure the acceptable suspension of solid particles as a function of agitator speed and tank liquid level during precipitation operations. The numerical modeling and calculations have been performed using a computational fluid dynamics approach. Three-dimensional steady-state momentum and continuity equations were used as the basic equations to estimate fluid motion driven by an agitator with three 45 degrees pitched blades. Hydraulic conditions were fully turbulent (Reynolds number about 2x104). A standard two-equation turbulence model (k-e), was used to capture turbulent eddy motion. The commercial finite volume code, Fluent [7], was used to create a prototypic geometry file with a non-orthogonal mesh. Hybrid meshing was used to fill the computational region between the round-edged tank bottom and agitator regions. At high rotational speeds and low tank levels, a surface vortex can reach the agitator blades and allow air to be drawn into the solid-fluid mixing zone. This is not desirable in terms of mixing performance. The analysis results show that the lowest liquid level among the four considered, 4.5 inches, is higher than the critical liquid height for air entrainment for agitator speeds up to 600 rpm. All the analysis results demonstrate that about 600 rpm provides adequate solids mixing capability for various tank levels (12, 8.5, 7, and 4.5 inches) containing 20-micron solids with a specific gravity of 2.5.

  11. Measurement of solubility, viscosity, and density of R-410A refrigerant/lubricant mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Cavestri, R.C.; Schafer, W.R.

    2000-07-01

    Measurements of the refrigerant vapor/liquid lubricant equilibrium viscosity reduction of four polyolester lubricants, viscosity grades 32 and 68 ISO VG, with the refrigerant R-410A were taken between {minus}13 F and 257 F and up to 700 psia. A high and low miscibility grade polyolester was analyzed for each viscosity. The viscosity, density, and composition of the solubilized gas mixture in solution with the lubricant was obtained with constant gas vapor composition in the viscometer head space. This refrigerant has a very small temperature glide but is considered a zeotropic blend nonetheless. The fractionation data presented were obtained from individual isothermal measurements. The isotherm for each temperature detailed the composition of the equilibrium gas fractionation of R-32 and R-125 in the lubricant, mixed vapor pressure, concentration of the total mixed blend (percent by weight) in the lubricant, and viscosity in centipoise (cP) and centistokes (cSt).

  12. Piezoviscous effects in nonconformal contacts lubricated hydrodynamically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Y. R.; Hamrock, B. J.; Brewe, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The analysis is concerned with the piezoviscous-rigid regime of lubrication for the general case of elliptical contacts. In this regime several formulas of the lubricant film thickness have been proposed by Hamrock and Dowson, by Dowson et al., and more recently by Houpert. However, either they do not include the load parameter W, which has a strong effect on film thickness, or they overestimate the film thickness by using the Barus formula for pressure-viscosity characteristics. The Roelands formula was used for the pressure-viscosity relationship. The effects of the dimensionless load, speed, and materials parameters, the radius ratio, and the lubricant entrainment direction were investigated. The dimensionless load parameter was varied over a range of one order of magnitude. The dimensionless speed parameter was varied by 5.6 times the lowest value. Conditions corresponding to the use of solid materials of steel, bronze, and silicon nitride and lubricants of paraffinic and naphthenic mineral oil were considered in obtaining the exponent in the dimensionless materials parameter. The radius ratio was varied from 0.2 to 64 (a configuration approaching a line contact). Forty-one cases were used in obtaining a minimum film thickness formula. Contour plots indicate in detail the pressure developed between the contacting solids.

  13. Piezoviscous effects in nonconformal contacts lubricated hydrodynamically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren; Hamrock, Bernard J.; Brewe, David E.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis is concerned with the piezoviscous-rigid regime of lubrication for the general case of elliptical contacts. In this regime several formulas of the lubricant film thickness have been proposed by Hamrock and Dowson, by Dowson et al., and more recently by Houpert. However, either they do not include the load parameter W, which has a strong effect on film thickness, or they overestimate the film thickness by using the Barus formula for pressure-viscosity characteristics. The Roelands formula was used for the pressure-viscosity relationship. The effects of the dimensionless load, speed, and materials parameters, the radius ratio, and the lubricant entrainment direction were investigated. The dimensionless load parameter was varied over a range of one order of magnitude. The dimensionless speed parameter was varied by 5.6 times the lowest value. Conditions corresponding to the use of solid materials of steel, bronze, and silicon nitride and lubricants of paraffinic and naphthenic mineral oil were considered in obtaining the exponent in the dimensionless materials parameter. The radius ratio was varied from 0.2 to 64 (a configuration approaching a line contact). Forty-one cases were used in obtaining a minimum film thickness formula. Contour plots indicate in detail the pressure developed between the contacting solids.

  14. Lubrication handbook for use in the space industry. Part A: Solid lubricants. Part B: Liquid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. E.; Thompson, M. B.

    1972-01-01

    This handbook provides a ready reference for many of the solid and liquid lubricants used in the space industry. Lubricants and lubricant properties are arranged systematically so that designers, engineers, and maintenance personnel in the space industry can conveniently locate data needed for their work. The handbook is divided into two major parts. Part A is a compilation of chemical and physical property data of more than 250 solid lubricants, bonded solid lubricants, dispersions and composites. Part B is a compilation of chemical and physical property data of more than 250 liquid lubricants, greases, oils, compounds and fluids. The listed materials cover a broad spectrum, from manufacturing and ground support to hardware applications for missiles and spacecraft.

  15. The effect of lubricants on powder flowability for pharmaceutical application.

    PubMed

    Morin, Garett; Briens, Lauren

    2013-09-01

    Pharmaceutical tablets are manufactured through a series of batch steps finishing with compression into a form using a tablet press. Lubricants are added to the powder mixture prior to the tabletting step to ensure that the tablet is ejected properly from the press. The addition of lubricants also affects tablet properties and can affect the behavior of the powder mixture. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of lubricants on powder flowability as flowability into the tablet press is critical. Four lubricants (magnesium stearate, magnesium silicate, stearic acid, and calcium stearate) were mixed, in varying amounts, with spray-dried lactose. In addition, magnesium stearate was also mixed with placebo granules from a high-shear granulator. Measurements based on avalanche behavior indicated flowability potential and dynamic density and were more sensitive to changes in the mixture and provided a more accurate and reproducible indication of flowability than traditional static measurements. Of the tested lubricants, magnesium stearate provided the best increase in flowability even in the low amounts commonly added in formulations.

  16. Comparability of mixed IC₅₀ data - a statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalliokoski, Tuomo; Kramer, Christian; Vulpetti, Anna; Gedeck, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) is the most commonly used metric for on-target activity in lead optimization. It is used to guide lead optimization, build large-scale chemogenomics analysis, off-target activity and toxicity models based on public data. However, the use of public biochemical IC50 data is problematic, because they are assay specific and comparable only under certain conditions. For large scale analysis it is not feasible to check each data entry manually and it is very tempting to mix all available IC50 values from public database even if assay information is not reported. As previously reported for Ki database analysis, we first analyzed the types of errors, the redundancy and the variability that can be found in ChEMBL IC50 database. For assessing the variability of IC50 data independently measured in two different labs at least ten IC50 data for identical protein-ligand systems against the same target were searched in ChEMBL. As a not sufficient number of cases of this type are available, the variability of IC50 data was assessed by comparing all pairs of independent IC50 measurements on identical protein-ligand systems. The standard deviation of IC50 data is only 25% larger than the standard deviation of Ki data, suggesting that mixing IC50 data from different assays, even not knowing assay conditions details, only adds a moderate amount of noise to the overall data. The standard deviation of public ChEMBL IC50 data, as expected, resulted greater than the standard deviation of in-house intra-laboratory/inter-day IC50 data. Augmenting mixed public IC50 data by public Ki data does not deteriorate the quality of the mixed IC50 data, if the Ki is corrected by an offset. For a broad dataset such as ChEMBL database a Ki- IC50 conversion factor of 2 was found to be the most reasonable.

  17. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  18. Friction of self-lubricating surfaces by ion beam techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, R. S.; Rai, A. K.

    1992-05-01

    UES, Inc. conducted a research and development program designed to establish conditions for ion implantation/mixing of suitable additives into the surfaces of bulk ceramics and metals for obtaining self-lubricating low friction and wear characteristics. The substrates considered were ZrO2, Al2O3, Si3N4, steel, and Ni-base superalloy. The lubricant additives chosen were BaF2/CaF2Ag, MoS2, WS2, and B2O3. The initial tasks of the program were to synthesis these lubricant compounds by co-implantation of constituent elements if sufficient beams of desired elements were obtained. The final tasks were to investigate high energy (MeV) ion mixing of deposited coatings as well as to investigate ion beam assisted deposition using low energy ion beams. It was shown that MoS2 can be synthesized by co-implantation of Mo(+) and S(+) in ceramic materials with appropriate choice of energies to obtain nearly overlapping depth profiles. The sliding life of DC magnetron sputtered MoS(2) films of thicknesses approximately 7500 A on ceramic materials such as sapphire, Si3N4 and ZrO3 were improved by ten to thousand fold after 2 Mev Ag(+) ion mixing. Ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and ion beam mixing were utilized to fabricate self-lubricating coatings of CaF2/Ag and BaF/CaF2/Ag composites.

  19. RO1 Funding for Mixed Methods Research: Lessons learned from the Mixed-Method Analysis of Japanese Depression Project.

    PubMed

    Arnault, Denise Saint; Fetters, Michael D

    2011-10-01

    Mixed methods research has made significant in-roads in the effort to examine complex health related phenomenon. However, little has been published on the funding of mixed methods research projects. This paper addresses that gap by presenting an example of an NIMH funded project using a mixed methods QUAL-QUAN triangulation design entitled "The Mixed-Method Analysis of Japanese Depression." We present the Cultural Determinants of Health Seeking model that framed the study, the specific aims, the quantitative and qualitative data sources informing the study, and overview of the mixing of the two studies. Finally, we examine reviewer's comments and our insights related to writing mixed method proposal successful for achieving RO1 level funding.

  20. Thermal elastohydrodynamic lubrication of spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, K. L.; Cheng, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis and computer program called TELSGE were developed to predict the variations of dynamic load, surface temperature, and lubricant film thickness along the contacting path during the engagement of a pair of involute spur gears. The analysis of dynamic load includes the effect of gear inertia, the effect of load sharing of adjacent teeth, and the effect of variable tooth stiffness which are obtained by a finite-element method. Results obtained from TELSGE for the dynamic load distributions along the contacting path for various speeds of a pair of test gears show patterns similar to that observed experimentally. Effects of damping ratio, contact ratio, tip relief, and tooth error on the dynamic load were examined. In addition, two dimensionless charts are included for predicting the maximum equilibrium surface temperature, which can be used to estimate directly the lubricant film thickness based on well established EHD analysis.

  1. Metal-containing lubricant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, M.W.; Kennedy, S.

    1987-05-12

    A lubricating oil composition is described comprising: a major amount of a lubricating oil; from 1 to 10 (wt)% of an ashless dispersant compound; or from 0.3 to 10 (wt)% of a nitrogen or ester containing polymeric viscosity index improver dispersant.

  2. Engine sealing and lubrication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1975-01-01

    Engine sealing programs are discussed which are directed toward the two major classes of engine seals: engine shaft seals and primary gas path seals. In addition, some concepts and results from fundamental lubrication research, as it pertains to the lubrication of bearings, are presented.

  3. Lubricant Coating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    "Peen Plating," a NASA developed process for applying molybdenum disulfide, is the key element of Techniblast Co.'s SURFGUARD process for applying high strength solid lubricants. The process requires two machines -- one for cleaning and one for coating. The cleaning step allows the coating to be bonded directly to the substrate to provide a better "anchor." The coating machine applies a half a micron thick coating. Then, a blast gun, using various pressures to vary peening intensities for different applications, fires high velocity "media" -- peening hammers -- ranging from plastic pellets to steel shot. Techniblast was assisted by Rural Enterprises, Inc. Coating service can be performed at either Techniblast's or a customer's facility.

  4. Use of high pressure liquid chromatography in the study of liquid lubricant oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, W.

    1982-01-01

    The general principles of classical liquid chromatography and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) are reviewed, and their advantages and disadvantages are compared. Several chromatographic techniques are reviewed, and the analysis of a C-ether liquid lubricant by each technique is illustrated. An analysis by size exclusion chromatography of an ester lubricant, which had been degraded using a micro-oxidation apparatus, is illustrated to show how HPLC can be used in the study of high-temperature lubricant degradation.

  5. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 13) to 10(exp 15) n per square centimeters. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 16) n per square centimeters with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  6. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  7. Tribological investigation of diamond nanoparticles for steel/steel contacts in boundary lubrication regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raina, Ankush; Anand, Ankush

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation of nanodiamond additives (ND) in combination with copper oxide (CuO) and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) particles mixed in PAO (poly-alpha-olefin) oil. The experimentation was performed for a ball on disc configuration using steel/steel contacts in the boundary lubrication regime. The loads were varied from 20 to 100 N and sliding velocity was kept constant at 0.58 m/s. The wear behavior was evaluated using SEM images of the worn-out disc surfaces. EDS analysis of the samples was performed to find out the chemical content of the worn surfaces. Results obtained therein demonstrated that oil containing CuO/ND and h-BN/ND exhibited better frictional and wear characteristics. For CuO/ND containing lubricant, the maximum decrease in friction coefficient is 15.45% in comparison to the CuO oil, whereas for h-BN/ND containing additives the overall decrease is 25.45%. It was observed that the combined effect of CuO/ND and h-BN/ND due to their intrinsic characteristics led to the overall improvement in lubrication properties of the base oil.

  8. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-30

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  9. Transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of a novel metal-on-metal hip prosthesis with a non-spherical femoral bearing surface.

    PubMed

    Meng, Q E; Liu, F; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M

    2011-01-01

    Effective lubrication performance of metal-on-metal hip implants only requires optimum conformity within the main loaded area, while it is advantageous to increase the clearance in the equatorial region. Such a varying clearance can be achieved by using non-spherical bearing surfaces for either acetabular or femoral components. An elastohydrodynamic lubrication model of a novel metal-on-metal hip prosthesis using a non-spherical femoral bearing surface against a spherical cup was solved under loading and motion conditions specified by ISO standard. A full numerical methodology of considering the geometric variation in the rotating non-spherical head in elastohydrodynamic lubrication solution was presented, which is applicable to all non-spherical head designs. The lubrication performance of a hip prosthesis using a specific non-spherical femoral head, Alpharabola, was analysed and compared with those of spherical bearing surfaces and a non-spherical Alpharabola cup investigated in previous studies. The sensitivity of the lubrication performance to the anteversion angle of the Alpharabola head was also investigated. Results showed that the non-spherical head introduced a large squeeze-film action and also led to a large variation in clearance within the loaded area. With the same equatorial clearance, the lubrication performance of the metal-on-metal hip prosthesis using an Alpharabola head was better than that of the conventional spherical bearings but worse than that of the metal-on-metal hip prosthesis using an Alpharabola cup. The reduction in the lubrication performance caused by the initial anteversion angle of the non-spherical head was small, compared with the improvement resulted from the non-spherical geometry.

  10. In vitro tests of substitute lubricants for wear testing orthopaedic biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Susan C; Joyce, Thomas J

    2013-06-01

    Bovine serum is the lubricant recommended by several international standards for the wear testing of orthopaedic biomaterials; however, there are issues over its use due to batch variation, degradation, cost and safety. For these reasons, alternative lubricants were investigated. A 50-station Super-CTPOD (circularly translating pin-on-disc) wear test rig was used, which applied multidirectional motion to ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene test pins rubbing against cobalt chromium discs. Thirteen possible alternative lubricants were tested. The use of soy protein as a lubricant gave statistically higher wear, while soya oil, olive oil, Channel Island milk, whole milk, whey, wheatgerm oil, 11 mg/mL egg white, albumin/globulin mix and albumin/globulin/chondroitin sulphate mix all gave statistically lower wear than bovine serum. The lubricants giving the closest wear results to bovine serum were 20 and 40 mg/mL egg white solutions. A light absorbance assay found that these egg white solutions suffered from a high degradation rate that increased with increasing protein content. While egg white solutions offer the best alternative lubricant to bovine serum due to the wear volumes produced, cost-effectiveness and safety of handling, protein degradation will still occur, leading to the need for regular lubricant replacement. Of the lubricants tested in this study, none were found to be superior to bovine serum.

  11. Boundary lubrication under water.

    PubMed

    Briscoe, Wuge H; Titmuss, Simon; Tiberg, Fredrik; Thomas, Robert K; McGillivray, Duncan J; Klein, Jacob

    2006-11-09

    Boundary lubrication, in which the rubbing surfaces are coated with molecular monolayers, has been studied extensively for over half a century. Such monolayers generally consist of amphiphilic surfactants anchored by their polar headgroups; sliding occurs at the interface between the layers, greatly reducing friction and especially wear of the underlying substrates. This process, widespread in engineering applications, is also predicted to occur in biological lubrication via phospholipid films, though few systematic studies on friction between surfactant layers in aqueous environments have been carried out. Here we show that the frictional stress between two sliding surfaces bearing surfactant monolayers may decrease, when immersed in water, to as little as one per cent or less of its value in air (or oil). We attribute this to the shift of the slip plane from between the surfactant layers, to the surfactant/substrate interface. The low friction would then be due to the fluid hydration layers surrounding the polar head groups attached to the substrate. These results may have implications for future technological and biomedical applications.

  12. JTMIX - CRYOGENIC MIXED FLUID JOULE-THOMSON ANALYSIS PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    JTMIX was written to allow the prediction of both ideal and realistic properties of mixed gases in the 65-80K temperature range. It allows mixed gas J-T analysis for any fluid combination of neon, nitrogen, various hydrocarbons, argon, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. When used in conjunction with the NIST computer program DDMIX, JTMIX has accurately predicted order-of-magnitude increases in J-T cooling capacities when various hydrocarbons are added to nitrogen, and it predicts nitrogen normal boiling point depressions to as low as 60K when neon is added. JTMIX searches for heat exchanger "pinch points" that can result from insolubility of various components in each other. These points result in numerical solutions that cannot exist. The length of the heat exchanger is searched for such points and, if they exist, the user is warned and the temperatures and heat exchanger effectiveness are corrected to provide a real solution. JTMIX gives very good correlation (within data accuracy) to mixed gas data published by the USSR and data taken by APD for the U.S. Naval Weapons Lab. Data taken at JPL also confirms JTMIX for all cases tested. JTMIX is written in Turbo C for IBM PC compatible computers running MS-DOS. The National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST, Gaithersburg, MD, 301-975-2208) computer code DDMIX is required to provide mixed-fluid enthalpy data which is input into JTMIX. The standard distribution medium for this program is a 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. JTMIX was developed in 1991 and is a copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA.

  13. Spatial Analysis of Case-Mix and Dialysis Modality Associations.

    PubMed

    Phirtskhalaishvili, Tamar; Bayer, Florian; Edet, Stephane; Bongiovanni, Isabelle; Hogan, Julien; Couchoud, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ♦ Health-care systems must attempt to provide appropriate, high-quality, and economically sustainable care that meets the needs and choices of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). France offers 9 different modalities of dialysis, each characterized by dialysis technique, the extent of professional assistance, and the treatment site. The aim of this study was 1) to describe the various dialysis modalities in France and the patient characteristics associated with each of them, and 2) to analyze their regional patterns to identify possible unexpected associations between case-mixes and dialysis modalities. ♦ The clinical characteristics of the 37,421 adult patients treated by dialysis were described according to their treatment modality. Agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis was used to aggregate the regions into clusters according to their use of these modalities and the characteristics of their patients. ♦ The gradient of patient characteristics was similar from home hemodialyis (HD) to in-center HD and from non-assisted automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) to assisted continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Analyzing their spatial distribution, we found differences in the patient case-mix on dialysis across regions but also differences in the health-care provided for them. The classification of the regions into 6 different clusters allowed us to detect some unexpected associations between case-mixes and treatment modalities. ♦ The 9 modalities of treatment available make it theoretically possible to adapt treatment to patients' clinical characteristics and abilities. However, although we found an overall appropriate association of dialysis modalities to the case-mix, major inter-region heterogeneity and the low rate of peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home HD suggest that factors besides patients' clinical conditions impact the choice of dialysis modality. The French organization should now be evaluated in terms of patients' quality of

  14. MIXING MODELING ANALYSIS FOR SRS SALT WASTE DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.

    2011-01-18

    Nuclear waste at Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tanks consists of three different types of waste forms. They are the lighter salt solutions referred to as supernate, the precipitated salts as salt cake, and heavier fine solids as sludge. The sludge is settled on the tank floor. About half of the residual waste radioactivity is contained in the sludge, which is only about 8 percentage of the total waste volume. Mixing study to be evaluated here for the Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) project focuses on supernate preparations in waste tanks prior to transfer to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The methods to mix and blend the contents of the SRS blend tanks were evalutaed to ensure that the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank such as Tank 50H to the SWPF feed tank. The work consists of two principal objectives to investigate two different pumps. One objective is to identify a suitable pumping arrangement that will adequately blend/mix two miscible liquids to obtain a uniform composition in the tank with a minimum level of sludge solid particulate in suspension. The other is to estimate the elevation in the tank at which the transfer pump inlet should be located where the solid concentration of the entrained fluid remains below the acceptance criterion (0.09 wt% or 1200 mg/liter) during transfer operation to the SWPF. Tank 50H is a Waste Tank that will be used to prepare batches of salt feed for SWPF. The salt feed must be a homogeneous solution satisfying the acceptance criterion of the solids entrainment during transfer operation. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The modeling results will provide quantitative design and operation information during the mixing/blending process and the transfer operation of the blended

  15. Radiograph and passive data analysis using mixed variable optimization

    DOEpatents

    Temple, Brian A.; Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Buescher, Kevin L.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-02

    Disclosed herein are representative embodiments of methods, apparatus, and systems for performing radiography analysis. For example, certain embodiments perform radiographic analysis using mixed variable computation techniques. One exemplary system comprises a radiation source, a two-dimensional detector for detecting radiation transmitted through a object between the radiation source and detector, and a computer. In this embodiment, the computer is configured to input the radiographic image data from the two-dimensional detector and to determine one or more materials that form the object by using an iterative analysis technique that selects the one or more materials from hierarchically arranged solution spaces of discrete material possibilities and selects the layer interfaces from the optimization of the continuous interface data.

  16. An asymptotic analysis of supersonic reacting mixing layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. L.; Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an asymptotic analysis of the laminar mixing of the simultaneous chemical reaction between parallel supersonic streams of two reacting species. The study is based on a one-step irreversible Arrhenius reaction and on large activation energy asymptotics. Essentially it extends the work of Linan and Crespo to include the effect of free shear and Mach number on the ignition regime, the deflagration regime and the diffusion flame regime. It is found that the effective parameter is the product of the characteristic Mach number and a shear parameter.

  17. 183-H Basin Mixed Waste Analysis and Testing Report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this sampling and analysis report is to provide data necessary to support treatment and disposal options for the low-level mixed waste from the 183-H solar evaporation ponds. In 1973, four of the 16 flocculation and sedimentation basins were designated for use as solar evaporation basins to provide waste reduction by natural evaporation of liquid chemical wastes from the 300 Area fuel fabrication facilities. The primary purpose of this effort is to gather chemical and bulk property data for the waste in the drums/boxes of sediment removed from the basin at Central Waste Complex.

  18. Program For Joule-Thomson Analysis Of Mixed Cryogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Lund, Alan

    1994-01-01

    JTMIX computer program predicts ideal and realistic properties of mixed gases at temperatures between 65 and 80 K. Performs Joule-Thomson analysis of any gaseous mixture of neon, nitrogen, various hydrocarbons, argon, oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide. When used in conjunction with DDMIX computer program of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), JTMIX accurately predicts order-of-magnitude increases in Joule-Thomson cooling capacities occuring when various hydrocarbons added to nitrogen. Also predicts boiling temperature of nitrogen depressed from normal value to as low as 60 K upon addition of neon. Written in Turbo C.

  19. Numerical analysis for radial MHD and mixed convection effects in peristalsis of non-Newtonian nanomaterial with zero mass flux conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Farooq, S.; Alsaedi, A.; Ahmad, B.

    Here peristalsis of Carreau nanofluid in presence of mixed convection and radial magnetohydrodynamics is addressed. Flow in a curved channel is addressed. Heat and mass transfer analysis includes Brownian motion and thermophoresis impacts. Zero mass flux at the channel walls is taken. The relevant equations are first modelled and then simplified through lubrication technique. The system of non-linear equations is solved numerically. Plots for velocity, temperature and concentration are studied through numerical solution. Heat and mass transfer rates at the upper wall of the curved channel is also discussed. Enhancement in concentration is observed. Temperature of the nanoliquid enhances for larger radial magnetic parameter when velocity of the nanoliquids reduces. Significant enhancement in mass transfer rate is seen for larger theromophoretic parameter.

  20. Interdisciplinary Approach to Liquid Lubricant Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, P. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference of liquid lubricant technology are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) requirements and functions of liquid lubricants, (2) mineral oils, (3) greases, (4) theory of rheology, (5) mechanics and thermodynamics in lubrication, (6) environmental capability of liquid lubricants, and (7) wear corrosion and erosion.

  1. Automotive gear oil lubricant from soybean oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The use of lubricants that are based on renewable materials is rapidly increasing. Vegetable oils have good lubricity, wear protection and low volatility which are desired properties for automotive gear lubricant applications. Soybean oil is used widely in the lubricant industry due to its properti...

  2. 7 CFR 2902.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 2902.46 Section 2902.46... Items § 2902.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication during... forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing...

  3. 7 CFR 3201.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 3201.46 Section 3201.46... Designated Items § 3201.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication... preference for qualifying biobased forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the...

  4. 7 CFR 3201.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 3201.46 Section 3201.46... Designated Items § 3201.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication... preference for qualifying biobased forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the...

  5. 7 CFR 3201.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 3201.46 Section 3201.46... Designated Items § 3201.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication... preference for qualifying biobased forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the...

  6. Lubrication-related residue as a fundamental process scaling limit to gravure printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Kitsomboonloha, Rungrot; Subramanian, Vivek

    2014-04-01

    In gravure printing, excess ink is removed from a patterned plate or roll by wiping with a doctor blade, leaving a thin lubrication film in the nonpatterned area. Reduction of this lubrication film is critical for gravure printing of electronics, since the resulting residue can lower device performance or even catastrophically impact circuit yield. We report on experiments and quantitative analysis of lubrication films in a highly scaled gravure printing process. We investigate the effects of ink viscosity, wiping speed, loading force, blade stiffness and blade angle on the lubrication film, and further, use the resulting data to investigate the relevant lubrication regimes associated with wiping during gravure printing. Based on this analysis, we are able to posit the lubrication regime associated with wiping during gravure printing, provide insight into the ultimate limits of residue reduction, and, furthermore, are able to provide process guidelines and design rules to achieve these limits.

  7. Liquid Lubricants for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, S.; Rowntree, A.

    Liquid lubricants used for spacecraft have advantages over solid lubricants but there are also disadvantages to consider. The challenge is to ensure that the liquid lubricant does not disappear from the mechanism by evaporation or creep. Lubricants can be used as fluids or formulated as greases. The liquids can be highly refined hydrocarbons, PAOs, silicones, polyol esters (POEs), multiply alkylated cycloparaffins, (MACs) or various perfluoropolyethers (PFPEs). Greases are made from these liquids using thickeners such as lithium, calcium or sodium soaps, PTFE, graphite or lead. Operational temperatures range from - 45°C to over 100°C. Low vapour pressures are crucial, below 10-8 mbar at 20°C and total weight loss must be <1% for general applications, <0.1% for optical applications. 'Surface creep rates' must be low, temperature gradients and surface Ra are important factors. The wear rates for standard tests using different lubricants vary over several orders of magnitude for different lubricants, surface coatings and rpm. Unexpected effects, such as PTFE 'plating out' at low rpm, occur. The main issues are to prevent the lubricant escaping from working areas and to protect it from degradation by chemical reactions or radiation.

  8. Lubricant Rheology in Concentrated Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.

    1984-01-01

    Lubricant behavior in highly stressed situtations shows that a Newtonian model for lubricant rheology is insufficient for explanation of traction behavior. The oil film build up is predicted by using a Newtonian lubricant model except at high slide to roll ratios and at very high loads, where the nonNewtonian behavior starts to be important already outside the Hertzian contact area. Static and dynamic experiments are reported. In static experiments the pressure is applied to the lubricant more than a million times longer than in an EHD contact. Depending on the pressure-temperature history of the experiment the lubricant will become a crystallized or amorphous solid at high pressures. In dynamic experiments, the oil is in an amorphous solid state. Depending on the viscosity, time scale, elasticity of the oil and the bearing surfaces, the oil film pressure, shear strain rate and the type of lubricant, different properties of the oil are important for prediction of shear stresses in the oil. The different proposed models for the lubricant, which describe it to a Newtonian liquid, an elastic liquid, a plastic liquid and an elastic-plastic solid.

  9. Comparison of Ocular Lubricant Osmolalities.

    PubMed

    Bitton, Etty; Perugino, Carolyn; Charette, Stéphanie

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the osmolality of commercially available ocular tear lubricants. Thirty-seven (n = 37) ocular lubricants, measured three times each, were evaluated for osmolality using a vapor pressure osmometer (Wescor VAPRO 5520). The osmometer was calibrated before each use, and the order of the lubricants was randomized. Ambient temperature and humidity were monitored for stability. Of the 37 ocular lubricants tested, 35 (94.6%) had an osmolality of less than 295 mmol/kg, one (2.7%) had between 295 and 308 mmol/kg, and one (2.7%) had more than 308 mmol/kg. The ambient room temperature was stable and ranged from 21.9°C to 22.0°C, and the relative humidity ranged from 21.2% to 25.6% during experimentation. When ocular lubricants were grouped by ingredient (carboxymethylcellulose and hydroxylpropyl methylcellulose, hyaluronic acid, and hydroxypropyl guar), no significant difference in osmolality was noted between groups (Mann-Whitney U test, P > .05). The majority of the ocular lubricants tested had low osmolalities, mimicking the osmolarity of newly formed tears (295 to 300 mOsm/L). Several factors need to be considered when choosing a tear lubricant, which have more complex formulations than ever. Knowledge of their osmolality may be an added parameter to consider when choosing therapeutic options for dry eye.

  10. Lubrication potential of magnesium stearate studied on instrumented rotary tablet press.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sarsvatkumar; Kaushal, Aditya Mohan; Bansal, Arvind Kumar

    2007-10-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate the lubrication potential of 2 grades of magnesium stearate (MS) blended with a mix of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and microcrystalline cellulose. Force-displacement, force-time, and ejection profiles were generated using an instrumented rotary tablet press, and the effect of MS mixing time (10, 20, and 30 minutes) and tableting speed (10.7, 13.8, and 17.5 rpm) was investigated. The packing index (PI), frictional index (FI), and packing energy (PE) derived from the force-displacement profiles showed that MS sample I performed better than sample II. At higher lubricant mixing times, the values of PI were observed to increase, and values of FI and PE were observed to decrease for both MS samples. Lower values of area under the curve (AUC) calculated from force-time compression profiles also showed sample I to be superior to sample II in lubrication potential. For both the samples, the values of AUC were observed to decrease with higher lubricant mixing times. Tapping volumetry that simulates the initial particle rearrangement gave values of parameter a and C(max) that were higher for sample I than sample II and also increased with lubricant mixing time. The superior lubrication potential of sample I was also established by the lower values of peak ejection force encountered in the ejection profile. Lower ejection forces were also found to result from higher tableting speeds and longer lubricant mixing times. The difference in lubrication efficacy of the 2 samples could be attributed to differences in their solid-state properties, such as particle size, specific surface area, and d-spacing.

  11. Green waxes, adhesives and lubricants.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Kong, X H; Ruan, M; Ma, F M; Jiang, Y F; Liu, M Z; Chen, Y; Zuo, X H

    2010-10-28

    General characteristics of waxes, adhesives and lubricants as well as the recent fundamental investigations on their physical and mechanical behaviour are introduced. The current R&D status for new type/generation of waxes, adhesives and lubricants from natural products is reviewed, with an emphasis on their tribological applications. In particular, some crucial issues and challenges relating to technological improvement and materials development are discussed. Based on the current predicted shortage of energy resources and environmental concerns, prospective research on the development of green waxes, adhesives and lubricants is suggested.

  12. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications description of the adhesion, friction, abrasion, and wear behavior of solid film lubricants and related tribological materials, including diamond and diamond-like solid films. The book details the properties of solid surfaces, clean surfaces, and contaminated surfaces as well as discussing the structures and mechanical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds; chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film; surface design and engineering toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. The author provides selection and design criteria as well as applications for synthetic and natural coatings in the commercial, industrial and aerospace industries..

  13. Automotive Lubricant Specification and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M. F.

    This chapter concerns commercial lubricant specification and testing, drawing together the many themes of previous chapters. Military lubricant standards were a very strong initial influence during World War II and led to the separate historical development of the North American and European specification systems. The wide range of functions that a successful lubricant must satisfy is discussed, together with issues of balancing special or universal applications, single or multiple engine tests, the philosophy of accelerated testing and the question of 'who sets the standards?' The role of engine tests and testing organisations is examined.

  14. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications description of the adhesion, friction, abrasion, and wear behavior of solid film lubricants and related tribological materials, including diamond and diamond-like solid films. The book details the properties of solid surfaces, clean surfaces, and contaminated surfaces as well as discussing the structures and mechanical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds; chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film; surface design and engineering toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. The author provides selection and design criteria as well as applications for synthetic and natural coatings in the commercial, industrial and aerospace industries..

  15. Lubricant effects on bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1986-01-01

    Lubricant considerations for rolling-element bearings have within the last two decades taken on added importance in the design and operation of mechanical systems. The phenomenon which limits the useful life of bearings is rolling-element or surface pitting fatigue. The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness which separates the ball or roller surface from those of the raceways of the bearing directly affects bearing life. Chemical additives added to the lubricant can also significantly affect bearings life and reliability. The interaction of these physical and chemical effects is important to the design engineer and user of these systems. Design methods and lubricant selection for rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed.

  16. Theoretical analysis of mixing in liquid clouds - Part 3: Inhomogeneous mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinsky, Mark; Khain, Alexander; Korolev, Alexei

    2016-07-01

    An idealized diffusion-evaporation model of time-dependent mixing between a cloud volume and a droplet-free volume is analyzed. The initial droplet size distribution (DSD) in the cloud volume is assumed to be monodisperse. It is shown that evolution of the microphysical variables and the final equilibrium state are unambiguously determined by two non-dimensional parameters. The first one is the potential evaporation parameter R, proportional to the ratio of the saturation deficit to the liquid water content in the cloud volume, that determines whether the equilibrium state is reached at 100 % relative humidity, or is characterized by a complete evaporation of cloud droplets. The second parameter Da is the Damkölher number equal to the ratio of the characteristic mixing time to the phase relaxation time. Parameters R and Da determine the type of mixing.The results are analyzed within a wide range of values of R and Da. It is shown that there is no pure homogeneous mixing, since the first mixing stage is always inhomogeneous. The mixing type can change during the mixing process. Any mixing type leads to formation of a tail of small droplets in DSD and, therefore, to DSD broadening that depends on Da. At large Da, the final DSD dispersion can be as large as 0.2. The total duration of mixing varies from several to 100 phase relaxation time periods, depending on R and Da.The definitions of homogeneous and inhomogeneous types of mixing are reconsidered and clarified, enabling a more precise delimitation between them. The paper also compares the results obtained with those based on the classic mixing concepts. >

  17. Support of Oil Lubrication by Bonded Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holinski, R.

    1984-01-01

    A new generation of lubricating lacquers for treatment of metal surfaces has been developed. These coatings have proved to be oil-compatible and are used in oil-lubricated systems. The oil lubrication is supported thereby through reduction of friction and increase of load-carrying capacity during boundary conditions. For difficult tribological systems, the problem-solving lubricating concept has proved to be the beneficial combination of lubricating oil and bonded coatings. A number of practical applications are presented.

  18. Prediction of lubrication regimes in wrist implants with spherical bearing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pylios, T; Shepherd, D E T

    2004-03-01

    The wrist joint is frequently affected by rheumatoid arthritis, resulting in wrist pain, deformity and ultimately loss of function. Artificial wrist implants have been introduced to treat the rheumatoid wrist, to attempt to alleviate pain and restore some function to the joint. The aim of this study was to predict the likely lubrication regimes that occur in wrist implants with spherical bearing surfaces. The implant was modelled as an equivalent ball-on-plane. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory was used to determine the minimum film thickness for the implant under different load, entraining velocity, lubricant viscosity, size of implant and material combinations. The results show that the highest film thickness is found in large implants, with high viscosity, high entraining velocity and low load. Hard-on-soft material combinations will operate with a boundary lubrication regime. Material combinations involving ceramic bearing surfaces have the potential to operate with a mixed lubrication regime.

  19. Ultrasmooth submicrometer carbon spheres as lubricant additives for friction and wear reduction.

    PubMed

    Alazemi, Abdullah A; Etacheri, Vinodkumar; Dysart, Arthur D; Stacke, Lars-Erik; Pol, Vilas G; Sadeghi, Farshid

    2015-03-11

    Ultrasmooth submicrometer carbon spheres are demonstrated as an efficient additive for improving the tribological performance of lubricating oils. Carbon spheres with ultrasmooth surfaces are fabricated by ultrasound assisted polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde followed by controlled heat treatment. The tribological behavior of the new lubricant mixture is investigated in the boundary and mixed lubrication regimes using a pin-on-disk apparatus and cylinder-on-disk tribometer, respectively. The new lubricant composition containing 3 wt % carbon spheres suspended in a reference SAE 5W30 engine oil exhibited a substantial reduction in friction and wear (10-25%) compared to the neat oil, without change in the viscosity. Microscopic and spectroscopic investigation of the carbon spheres after the tribological experiments illustrated their excellent mechanical and chemical stability. The significantly better tribological performance of the hybrid lubricant is attributed to the perfectly spherical shape and ultrasmooth surface of carbon sphere additive filling the gap between surfaces and acting as a nanoscale ball bearing.

  20. Mixed Spectrum Analysis on fMRI Time-Series.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arun; Lin, Feng; Rajapakse, Jagath C

    2016-06-01

    Temporal autocorrelation present in functional magnetic resonance image (fMRI) data poses challenges to its analysis. The existing approaches handling autocorrelation in fMRI time-series often presume a specific model of autocorrelation such as an auto-regressive model. The main limitation here is that the correlation structure of voxels is generally unknown and varies in different brain regions because of different levels of neurogenic noises and pulsatile effects. Enforcing a universal model on all brain regions leads to bias and loss of efficiency in the analysis. In this paper, we propose the mixed spectrum analysis of the voxel time-series to separate the discrete component corresponding to input stimuli and the continuous component carrying temporal autocorrelation. A mixed spectral analysis technique based on M-spectral estimator is proposed, which effectively removes autocorrelation effects from voxel time-series and identify significant peaks of the spectrum. As the proposed method does not assume any prior model for the autocorrelation effect in voxel time-series, varying correlation structure among the brain regions does not affect its performance. We have modified the standard M-spectral method for an application on a spatial set of time-series by incorporating the contextual information related to the continuous spectrum of neighborhood voxels, thus reducing considerably the computation cost. Likelihood of the activation is predicted by comparing the amplitude of discrete component at stimulus frequency of voxels across the brain by using normal distribution and modeling spatial correlations among the likelihood with a conditional random field. We also demonstrate the application of the proposed method in detecting other desired frequencies.

  1. Multivariate meta-analysis of mixed outcomes: a Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    Bujkiewicz, Sylwia; Thompson, John R; Sutton, Alex J; Cooper, Nicola J; Harrison, Mark J; Symmons, Deborah PM; Abrams, Keith R

    2013-01-01

    Multivariate random effects meta-analysis (MRMA) is an appropriate way for synthesizing data from studies reporting multiple correlated outcomes. In a Bayesian framework, it has great potential for integrating evidence from a variety of sources. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian model for MRMA of mixed outcomes, which extends previously developed bivariate models to the trivariate case and also allows for combination of multiple outcomes that are both continuous and binary. We have constructed informative prior distributions for the correlations by using external evidence. Prior distributions for the within-study correlations were constructed by employing external individual patent data and using a double bootstrap method to obtain the correlations between mixed outcomes. The between-study model of MRMA was parameterized in the form of a product of a series of univariate conditional normal distributions. This allowed us to place explicit prior distributions on the between-study correlations, which were constructed using external summary data. Traditionally, independent ‘vague’ prior distributions are placed on all parameters of the model. In contrast to this approach, we constructed prior distributions for the between-study model parameters in a way that takes into account the inter-relationship between them. This is a flexible method that can be extended to incorporate mixed outcomes other than continuous and binary and beyond the trivariate case. We have applied this model to a motivating example in rheumatoid arthritis with the aim of incorporating all available evidence in the synthesis and potentially reducing uncertainty around the estimate of interest. © 2013 The Authors. Statistics inMedicine Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23630081

  2. Analysis of mixed model in gear transmission based on ADAMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiufeng; Wang, Yabin

    2012-09-01

    The traditional method of mechanical gear driving simulation includes gear pair method and solid to solid contact method. The former has higher solving efficiency but lower results accuracy; the latter usually obtains higher precision of results while the calculation process is complex, also it is not easy to converge. Currently, most of the researches are focused on the description of geometric models and the definition of boundary conditions. However, none of them can solve the problems fundamentally. To improve the simulation efficiency while ensure the results with high accuracy, a mixed model method which uses gear tooth profiles to take the place of the solid gear to simulate gear movement is presented under these circumstances. In the process of modeling, build the solid models of the mechanism in the SolidWorks firstly; Then collect the point coordinates of outline curves of the gear using SolidWorks API and create fit curves in Adams based on the point coordinates; Next, adjust the position of those fitting curves according to the position of the contact area; Finally, define the loading conditions, boundary conditions and simulation parameters. The method provides gear shape information by tooth profile curves; simulates the mesh process through tooth profile curve to curve contact and offer mass as well as inertia data via solid gear models. This simulation process combines the two models to complete the gear driving analysis. In order to verify the validity of the method presented, both theoretical derivation and numerical simulation on a runaway escapement are conducted. The results show that the computational efficiency of the mixed model method is 1.4 times over the traditional method which contains solid to solid contact. Meanwhile, the simulation results are more closely to theoretical calculations. Consequently, mixed model method has a high application value regarding to the study of the dynamics of gear mechanism.

  3. Evaluation of antifriction bearing lubrication methods on motor life-cycle cost

    SciTech Connect

    Hodowanec, M.M.

    1999-12-01

    The number 1 cause of induction motor failures is bearing failure. Antifriction bearing failures most commonly are the consequences of inadequate lubrication. Antifriction motor bearings are found in four lubrication configurations: regreasable, sealed, oil mist, and oil lubricated. Bearings are oil lubricated when the operating conditions (i.e., bearing size, speed, thrust, etc.) require it. However, there is much debate about the best lubrication configuration, given a choice between regreasable, sealed, or oil-misted bearings. Within their own rights, all three methods have their advantages. Selection of the proper configuration is dependent upon many factors, such as motor size/type (i.e., bearing size/type), plant maintenance practice, bearing replacement availability/cost, duty cycle, environmental conditions, and downtime cost. This paper discusses the relationship between these factors and lubrication configuration, and presents an analysis of the subsequent impact on bearing life and system cost.

  4. Research into Oil-based Colloidal-Graphite Lubricants for Forging of Al-based Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, A.; Petrov, P.; Petrov, M.

    2011-05-04

    The presented paper describes the topical problem in metal forging production. It deals with the choice of an optimal lubricant for forging of Al-based alloys. Within the scope of the paper, the properties of several oil-based colloidal-graphite lubricants were investigated. The physicochemical and technological properties of these lubricants are presented. It was found that physicochemical properties of lubricant compositions have an influence on friction coefficient value and quality of forgings.The ring compression method was used to estimate the friction coefficient value. Hydraulic press was used for the test. The comparative analysis of the investigated lubricants was carried out. The forging quality was estimated on the basis of production test. The practical recommendations were given to choose an optimal oil-based colloidal-graphite lubricant for isothermal forging of Al-based alloy.

  5. Emergency and microfog lubrication and cooling of bearings for Army helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenlieb, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis and system study was performed to provide design information regarding lubricant and coolant flow rates and flow paths for effective utilization of the lubricant and coolant in a once-through oil-mist (microfog) and coolant air system. A system was designed, manufactured, coupled with an existing rig and evaluation tests were performed using 46 mm bore split-inner angular-contact ball bearings under 1779N (400 lb.) thrust load. An emergency lubrication aspirator system was also manufactured and tested under lost lubricant conditions. The testing demonstrated the feasibility of using a mist oil and cooling air system to lubricate and cool a high speed helicopter engine mainshaft bearing. The testing also demonstrated the feasibility of using an emergency aspirator lubrication system as a viable survivability concept for helicopter mainshaft engine bearing for periods as long as 30 minutes.

  6. A Case Study of a Mixed Methods Study Engaged in Integrated Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiazza, Daniela Marie

    2013-01-01

    The nascent field of mixed methods research has yet to develop a cohesive framework of guidelines and procedures for mixed methods data analysis (Greene, 2008). To support the field's development of analytical frameworks, this case study reflects on the development and implementation of a mixed methods study engaged in integrated data analysis.…

  7. A Case Study of a Mixed Methods Study Engaged in Integrated Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiazza, Daniela Marie

    2013-01-01

    The nascent field of mixed methods research has yet to develop a cohesive framework of guidelines and procedures for mixed methods data analysis (Greene, 2008). To support the field's development of analytical frameworks, this case study reflects on the development and implementation of a mixed methods study engaged in integrated data analysis.…

  8. Research into oil-based high-dispersion graphite lubricants for extrusion of Ni-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Alexander N.; Petrov, Mikhail A.; Petrov, Pavel A.

    2016-10-01

    The presented paper deals with oil-based high-dispersion graphite lubricants for hot extrusion Ni-based alloys. This paper emphasize an influence of the lubricant's flash point and oil burning on composition changing of the lubricants. It was found out that oil-based lubricants increase heat shielding properties of the die during extrusion. The temperature of a die surface was estimated on the base of production tests on the mechanical press with nominal force of 1,6MN. The practical recommendations were presented and should help to choose lubricants properly in accordance to the analysis.

  9. Oil-mist lubrication handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Bloch, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book gives one sound working knowledge of the design, specifications, applications, and implementation of oil-mist lubrication systems for machine tools, pumps, electric motors, and other rotating equipment in the paper, pharmaceutical, steel, petrochemical, and similar process industries.

  10. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cihan, Ebru; İpek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (∼4,000–130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold–graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions. PMID:27350035

  11. Self-lubricating composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two types of self lubricating composites (polymer matrix composites and inorganic composites) are discussed. Specific emphasis is given to the applicability of these composites in the aerospace industry.

  12. Environmentally friendly and biobased lubricants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biobased and environmentally friendly lubricants are finding applications in many areas ranging from hydraulic fluids to grease. They offer excellent biodegradability and very low ecotoxicity; high viscosity index; improved tribological properties; lower volatility and flash points relative to petro...

  13. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Ebru; Ipek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-06-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (~4,000-130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold-graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions.

  14. Analysis of turbulent mixing in Dewakang Sill, Southern Makassar Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risko; Atmadipoera, A. S.; Jaya, I.; Sudjono, E. H.

    2017-01-01

    Dewakang Sill is located in southern Makassar Strait, conveying major path of Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), as a confluence region of different water masses, such as salty Pacific water and fresh Java Sea water. Its depth is about 680 m which blocks the ITF flow below this depth into Flores Sea. This research aimed to estimate turbulent mixing in the Dewakang Sill by applying Thorpe analysis using 24 hours “yoyo” CTD data sets, acquired from MAJAFLOX Cruise in August 2015. The results showed that stratification of water masses is dominated by Pacific water origin. Those are North Pacific Subtropical thermocline and Intermediate water masses. Mean dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy (ɛ) and turbulent vertical diffusivity (Kρ ) value in the Dewakang Sill are of O(1.08 × 10-6)Wkg-1, and O(2.84 × 10-4) m2s-1 respectively. High correlation between epsilon and internal waves oscillation suggested that internal tidal waves activities are the major forcing for turbulent mixing in the study area.

  15. Application of End-Member Mixing Analysis to karst hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marechal, J.; Ladouche, B.; Batiot-Guilhe, C.; Seidel, J.

    2013-12-01

    The End-Member Mixing Analysis (EMMA) is used in hydrology to determine the origin of water from solute contents measurements. This method assumes that the water collected at a sampling point originates from a mixing between several end-members. Classically, in hydrology, the water sampled at the outlet of a small head watershed may result from a mixing between rainfall, soil water and groundwater. The objective of EMMA is to compute the relative contributions of the end-members and their evolution with time. This provides valuable information on the origin of water and hydrologic characteristics of the water cycle. Similarly, in hydrogeology, the origin of groundwater can vary according to hydrological conditions, during a pumping test for example or during a flood event. In this paper, this approach still poorly used in hydrogeology, is applied to two Mediterranean karst systems with contrasted objectives. The Lez karst system is a major resource for the water supply of Montpellier city in Southern France. During autumn, it is observed that the first rainy events create an increase of water mineralization at the main karstic spring. An EMMA analysis (Figure 1) has been conducted on the spring water during three hydrological cycles. It determines the respective contributions of two carbonate reservoirs to the spring discharge that fluctuate according to hydrologic conditions. In addition, a contribution from a deep aquifer during the first rainy events is also highlighted (Figure 2). The Nîmes city (Southern France) faced many flood events with devastating inundations. The main spring of the Nimes karst system is located in the centre of the city. Hydrochemical and water level data have highlighted the role of the karst groundwater in the flood genesis in surface streams. EMMA has confirmed the role of the epikarst during flood event once the karst system is saturated. The monitoring of water streams during high flow conditions shows the relative contributions of

  16. Method for lubricating contacting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Dugger, Michael T [Tijeras, NM; Ohlhausen, James A [Albuquerque, NM; Asay, David B [Boalsburg, PA; Kim, Seong H [State College, PA

    2011-12-06

    A method is provided for tribological lubrication of sliding contact surfaces, where two surfaces are in contact and in motion relative to each other, operating in a vapor-phase environment containing at least one alcohol compound at a concentration sufficiently high to provide one monolayer of coverage on at least one of the surfaces, where the alcohol compound continuously reacts at the surface to provide lubrication.

  17. Lubricant Evaluation and Performance 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    POWER DIRECTORATE WRIGHT LABORATORY AIR FORCE MATERIEL COMMAND WRIGHT-PATrERSON AIR FORCE BASE , OHIO 45433-7103 94 5 10 011 NOTICE When government...INTRODUCTION I R DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED METHODS FOR MEASURING LUBRICANT PERFORMANCE 3 1 OXIDATIVE STABILITY OF ESTER BASE LUBRICANTS 3 a. Introduction 3 b...7) Conclusions 134 i. Stability Testing of Cyclophosphazene Based Fluids 134 (1) Introduction 134 (2) Effect of Metal Specimens 134 (3) Effect of a

  18. Determination of physical and chemical states of lubricants in concentrated contacts, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared emission spectroscopy through a window in an operating bearing continued to provide most of the information gathered on the state of lubricants subjected to elastohydrodynamic (EHD) conditions. Other measurements were traction, scanning electron microscopy and elemental surface analysis X-rays. A very significant finding was the decomposition of a naphthenic oil lubricant in the presence of small concentrations of an organic chloride. Olefins and aromatics were formed in ever increasing amounts prior to total lubricant failure. An aromatic fluid also failed in the presence of chloride. A correlation was found between changes of the alignment of lubricant molecules evidence by infrared polarization and changes of traction under varying EHD stresses.

  19. Miscibility of lubricants with refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, M.B.; Zoz, S.C.; Berkenbosch, L.J.

    1992-07-01

    Miscibility data is being obtained for a variety of non-CFC refrigerants and their potential lubricants. Ten different refrigerants and seven different lubricants are being investigated. Experiments are being performed in two phases: Phase I focuses on performing screening tests and Phase II consists of developing miscibility plots. The miscibility tests are being performed in a test facility consisting of a series of miniature test cells submerged in a constant temperature bath. The bath temperature can be precisely controlled over a temperature range of -50{degrees}C to 100{degrees}C. The test cells are constructed to allow for complete visibility of lubricant-refrigerant mixtures under all test conditions. Early in this reporting period, new procedures for charging the lubricant and refrigerant into the cells for testing were adopted. All of the refrigerants and all but one of the lubricants have been received from the manufacturers. Data obtained to date includes that for R-134a, R142b, R-32, R-134, R-125, and R-143a with four lubricants, namely, two esters and two polypropylene glycols.

  20. [Scanning electron microscopy studies for the analysis of mixed script].

    PubMed

    Oehmichen, M; von Kortzfleisch, D; Hegner, B

    1989-01-01

    Mixed script is a criminalistic problem which--though it is described in different papers--is not systematically investigated. We, therefore, analyzed the mixed script produced by different instruments by SEM: pencil, ink/India ink, ball point pen, felt-tip pen, copied scripts and typewriter. The significance of REM investigations in mixed scripts is stressed.

  1. Analysis of mixed-layer clay mineral structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, W.F.

    1953-01-01

    Among the enormously abundant natural occurrences of clay minerals, many examples are encountered in which no single specific crystallization scheme extends through a single ultimate grain. The characterization of such assemblages becomes an analysis of the distribution of matter within such grains, rather than the simple identification of mineral species. It having become established that the particular coordination complex typified by mica is a common component of many natural subcrystalline assemblages, the opportunity is afforded to analyze scattering from random associations of these complexes with other structural units. Successful analyses have been made of mixed hydration states of montmorillonite, of montmorillonite with mica, of vermiculite with mica, and of montmorillonite with chlorite, all of which are variants of the mica complex, and of halloysite with hydrated halloysite.

  2. Generalized linear mixed models for meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Platt, R W; Leroux, B G; Breslow, N

    1999-03-30

    We examine two strategies for meta-analysis of a series of 2 x 2 tables with the odds ratio modelled as a linear combination of study level covariates and random effects representing between-study variation. Penalized quasi-likelihood (PQL), an approximate inference technique for generalized linear mixed models, and a linear model fitted by weighted least squares to the observed log-odds ratios are used to estimate regression coefficients and dispersion parameters. Simulation results demonstrate that both methods perform adequate approximate inference under many conditions, but that neither method works well in the presence of highly sparse data. Under certain conditions with small cell frequencies the PQL method provides better inference.

  3. Effect of vaginal lubricants on natural fertility.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Anne Z; Long, D Leann; Tanner, Catherine; Herring, Amy H

    2012-07-01

    Over-the-counter vaginal lubricants have been shown to negatively affect in vitro sperm motility. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of vaginal lubricant use during procreative intercourse on natural fertility. Women aged 30-44 years with no history of infertility who had been trying to conceive for less than 3 months completed a baseline questionnaire on vaginal lubricant use. Subsequently, women kept a diary to record menstrual bleeding, intercourse, and vaginal lubricant use and conducted standardized pregnancy testing for up to 6 months. Diary data were used to determine the fertile window and delineate lubricant use during the fertile window. A proportional hazards model was used to estimate fecundability ratios with any lubricant use in the fertile window considered as a time-varying exposure. Of the 296 participants, 75 (25%) stated in their baseline questionnaire that they use vaginal lubricants while attempting to conceive. Based on daily diary data, 57% of women never used a lubricant, 29% occasionally used a lubricant, and 14% used a lubricant frequently. Women who used lubricants during the fertile window had similar fecundability to those women who did not use lubricants (fecundability ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.59-1.85) after adjusting for age, partner race, and intercourse frequency in the fertile window. Lubricants are commonly used by couples during procreative intercourse. Lubricant use during procreative intercourse does not appear to reduce the probability of conceiving.

  4. Effect of Vaginal Lubricants on Natural Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Anne Z.; Long, D. Leann; Tanner, Catherine; Herring, Amy H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Over-the-counter vaginal lubricants have been shown to negatively affect in vitro sperm motility. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of vaginal lubricant use during procreative intercourse on natural fertility. Methods Women aged 30–44 years with no history of infertility who had been trying to conceive for less than 3 months completed a baseline questionnaire on vaginal lubricant use. Subsequently, women kept a diary to record menstrual bleeding, intercourse, and vaginal lubricant use and conducted standardized pregnancy testing for up to 6 months. Diary data were used to determine the fertile window and delineate lubricant use during the fertile window. A proportional hazards model was used to estimate fecundability ratios with any lubricant use in the fertile window considered as a time-varying exposure. Results Of the 296 participants, 75 (25%) stated in their baseline questionnaire that they use vaginal lubricants while attempting to conceive. Based on daily diary data, 57% of women never used a lubricant, 29% occasionally used a lubricant, and 14% used a lubricant frequently. Women who used lubricants during the fertile window had similar fecundability to those women who did not use lubricants (fecundability ratio 1.05, 95% CI: 0.59, 1.85) after adjusting for age, partner race, and intercourse frequency in the fertile window. Conclusion Lubricants are commonly used by couples during procreative intercourse. Lubricant use during procreative intercourse does not appear to reduce the probability of conceiving. PMID:22914390

  5. A study of micronized poloxamers as lubricants in direct compression of tablets.

    PubMed

    Muzíková, Jitka; Vyhlídalová, Barbora; Pekárek, Tomás

    2013-01-01

    The study evaluates the micronized poloxamers Lptrol micro127 (poloxamer 407) and Lptrol micro 68 (poloxamer 188) as lubricants in combination with the dry binders microcrystalline cellulose and spray-dried lactose. Magnesium stearate was employed as the comparative lubricant. The parameters under study included energy for friction, plasticity, ejection force, tensile strength of tablets, and disintegration time of tablets. The factors of influence were the concentration of lubricants, compression force, and mixing parameters. The lubricating effect of micronized poloxamers was smaller than that of magnesium stearate. Higher concentrations of poloxamers decreased the tensile strength of tablets from microcrystalline cellulose, shortened the disintegration time, and slightly prolonged the disintegration time in the case of spray-dried lactose. Parameters of mixing of dry binders with poloxamers influenced the tested parameters of compression more in the case of spray-dried lactose. In microcrystalline cellulose, they influenced more the tensile strength and disintegration time of tablets.

  6. [A Composition Analysis Method of Mixed Pigments Based on Spectrum Expression and Independent Component Analysis].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gong-ming; Liu, Zhi-yong

    2015-06-01

    Reflectance spectrometry is a common method in composition analysis of mixed pigments. In this method, similarity is used to determine the type of basic pigments that constitute the mixed pigments. But its result may be inaccurate because it is easily influenced by a variety of basic pigments. In this study, a composition analysis method of mixed pigments based on spectrum expression and independent component analysis is proposed, and the composition of mixed pigments can be calculated accurately. First of all, the spectral information of mixed pigments is obtained with spectrometer, and is expressed as the discrete signal. After that, the spectral information of basic pigments is deduced with independent component analysis. Then, the types of basic pigments are determined by calculating the spectrum similarity between the basic pigments and known pigments. Finally, the ratios of basic pigments are obtained by solving the Kubelka-Munk equation system. In addition, the simulated spectrum data of Munsell color card is used to validate this method. The compositions of mixed pigments from three basic pigments are determined under the circumstance of normality and disturbance. And the compositions of mixture from several pigments within the set of eight basic pigments are deduced successfully. The curves of separated pigment spectrums are very similar to the curves of original pigment spectrums. The average similarity is 97.72%, and the maximum one can reach to 99.95%. The calculated ratios of basic pigments close to the original one. It can be seen that this method is suitable for composition analysis of mixed pigments.

  7. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 1; Introduction and Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction and historical background to the field of tribology, especially solid lubrication and lubricants and sets them in the perspective of techniques and materials in lubrication. Also, solid and liquid lubrication films are defined and described.

  8. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications: Introduction and Background. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction and historical background to the field of tribology, especially solid lubrication and lubricants and sets them in the perspective of techniques and materials in lubrication. Also, solid and liquid lubrication films are defined and described.

  9. Pulsed Plasma Lubrication Device and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor); D'Agostino, Saverio A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a lubrication device comprising a solid lubricant disposed between and in contact with a first electrode and a second electrode dimensioned and arranged such that application of an electric potential between the first electrode and the second electrode sufficient to produce an electric arc between the first electrode and the second electrode to produce a plasma in an ambient atmosphere at an ambient pressure which vaporizes at least a portion of the solid lubricant to produce a vapor stream comprising the solid lubricant. Methods to lubricate a surface utilizing the lubrication device in-situ are also disclosed.

  10. Boundary cartilage lubrication: review of current concepts.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Matej

    2014-03-01

    Effective lubrication of synovial joints is important to prevent cartilage degeneration and to keep the joints healthy. This paper sets out the basics of engineering lubrication with respect to the composition and properties of synovial fluid constituents. Two basic types of boundary lubrication are discussed: the presence of highly hydrophilic proteoglycans that provide a water liquid film, and the existence of multilamellar phospholipids lubricating layers at the surface ofarticular cartilage. Based on current knowledge, we may conclude that no single mechanism of boundary lubrication exists, and that effective boundary lubrication of synovial joints is maintained by the synergic effect of all synovial fluid constituents.

  11. Equations For Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Of Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1993-01-01

    Equation for thickness of elastohydrodynamic (EHD) lubricant film in rolling-element bearing reduced to simplified form involving only inside and outside diameters of bearing, speed of rotation, parameter related to type of lubricant, and viscosity of lubricant at temperature of bearing. In addition, experimentally derived graph of EHD-film-thickness-reduction factor as function of contact-lubricant-flow number. Accounts for lubricant starvation within Hertzian contact. Graph relating ratio of minimum film thickness to composite roughness of bearing surfaces and to lubrication-life correction factor also provided. Life-correction factor used to determine resultant life of bearing.

  12. Equations For Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Of Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1993-01-01

    Equation for thickness of elastohydrodynamic (EHD) lubricant film in rolling-element bearing reduced to simplified form involving only inside and outside diameters of bearing, speed of rotation, parameter related to type of lubricant, and viscosity of lubricant at temperature of bearing. In addition, experimentally derived graph of EHD-film-thickness-reduction factor as function of contact-lubricant-flow number. Accounts for lubricant starvation within Hertzian contact. Graph relating ratio of minimum film thickness to composite roughness of bearing surfaces and to lubrication-life correction factor also provided. Life-correction factor used to determine resultant life of bearing.

  13. Binding and lubrication of biomimetic boundary lubricants on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Samaroo, Kirk J; Tan, Mingchee; Putnam, David; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-03-01

    The glycoprotein, lubricin, is the primary boundary lubricant of articular cartilage and has been shown to prevent cartilage damage after joint injury. In this study, a library of eight bottle-brush copolymers were synthesized to mimic the structure and function of lubricin. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafted onto a polyacrylic acid (pAA) core mimicked the hydrophilic mucin-like domain of lubricin, and a thiol terminus anchored the polymers to cartilage surfaces much like lubricin's C-terminus. These copolymers, abbreviated as pAA-g-PEG, rapidly bound to cartilage surfaces with binding time constants ranging from 20 to 39 min, and affected lubrication under boundary mode conditions with coefficients of friction ranging from 0.140 ± 0.024 to 0.248 ± 0.030. Binding and lubrication were highly correlated (r(2)  = 0.89-0.99), showing that boundary lubrication in this case strongly depends on the binding of the lubricant to the surface. Along with time-dependent and dose-dependent behavior, lubrication and binding of the lubricin-mimetics also depended on copolymer structural parameters including pAA backbone length, PEG side chain length, and PEG:AA brush density. Polymers with larger backbone sizes, brush sizes, or brush densities took longer to bind (p < 0.05). Six of the eight polymers reduced friction relative to denuded cartilage plugs (p < 0.05), suggesting their potential to lubricate and protect cartilage in vivo. In copolymers with shorter pAA backbones, increasing hydrodynamic size inhibited lubrication (p < 0.08), while the opposite was observed in copolymers with longer backbones (p < 0.05). These polymers show similar in vitro lubricating efficacy as recombinant lubricins and as such have potential for in vivo treatment of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:548-557, 2017.

  14. Mixed-culture transcriptome analysis reveals the molecular basis of mixed-culture growth in Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Sieuwerts, Sander; Molenaar, Douwe; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; Beerthuyzen, Marke; Stevens, Marc J A; Janssen, Patrick W M; Ingham, Colin J; de Bok, Frank A M; de Vos, Willem M; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E T

    2010-12-01

    Many food fermentations are performed using mixed cultures of lactic acid bacteria. Interactions between strains are of key importance for the performance of these fermentations. Yogurt fermentation by Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus (basonym, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus) is one of the best-described mixed-culture fermentations. These species are believed to stimulate each other's growth by the exchange of metabolites such as folic acid and carbon dioxide. Recently, postgenomic studies revealed that an upregulation of biosynthesis pathways for nucleotides and sulfur-containing amino acids is part of the global physiological response to mixed-culture growth in S. thermophilus, but an in-depth molecular analysis of mixed-culture growth of both strains remains to be established. We report here the application of mixed-culture transcriptome profiling and a systematic analysis of the effect of interaction-related compounds on growth, which allowed us to unravel the molecular responses associated with batch mixed-culture growth in milk of S. thermophilus CNRZ1066 and L. bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365. The results indicate that interactions between these bacteria are primarily related to purine, amino acid, and long-chain fatty acid metabolism. The results support a model in which formic acid, folic acid, and fatty acids are provided by S. thermophilus. Proteolysis by L. bulgaricus supplies both strains with amino acids but is insufficient to meet the biosynthetic demands for sulfur and branched-chain amino acids, as becomes clear from the upregulation of genes associated with these amino acids in mixed culture. Moreover, genes involved in iron uptake in S. thermophilus are affected by mixed-culture growth, and genes coding for exopolysaccharide production were upregulated in both organisms in mixed culture compared to monocultures. The confirmation of previously identified responses in S. thermophilus using a different strain combination

  15. New nanotechnology solid lubricants for superior dry lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, N.; Genut, M.; Rapoport, L.; Tenne, R.

    2003-09-01

    This paper presents a new commercial breakthrough for advanced anti-friction materials based on unique inorganic nanospheres that can be used as dry lubricants, coatings, and for impregnating parts. The new material reduces friction and wear significantly better than other layered solid lubricants and is especially useful in self-lubricating, maintenance-free, and oil-free applications of the types encountered in aerospace markets. The material, NanoLubTM, is the world's first commercial lubricant based on spherical inorganic nanoparticles. NanoLub's particles have a unique structure of hollow nested spheres of about only 0.1 micron in diameter. This paper presents tribological evaluations of tungsten and molybdenum disulphide NanoLubTM. The material reduces friction and wear under conditions that are especially relevant for space such as ultra-high vacuum, UV radiation, and high loads. Suitable applications could include rotors, bearings, robots, planetary rovers, space vehicles and transport devices. Extensive testing by a number of independent groups clearly shows that these special nanoparticles improve considerably the tribological properties of different contact pairs in comparison to other solid lubricants.

  16. Simulation Analysis for HB-Line Dissolver Mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2006-03-22

    In support of the HB-Line Engineering agitator mixing project, flow pattern calculations have been made for a 90{sup o} apart and helical pitch agitator submerged in a flat tank containing dissolver baskets. The work is intended to determine maximum agitator speed to keep the dissolver baskets from contacting the agitator for the nominal tank liquid level. The analysis model was based on one dissolver basket located on the bottom surface of the flat tank for a conservative estimate. The modeling results will help determine acceptable agitator speeds and tank liquid levels to ensure that the dissolver basket is kept from contacting the agitator blade during HB-Line dissolver tank operations. The numerical modeling and calculations have been performed using a computational fluid dynamics approach. Three-dimensional steady-state momentum and continuity equations were used as the basic equations to estimate fluid motion driven by an agitator with four 90{sup o} pitched blades or three flat blades. Hydraulic conditions were fully turbulent (Reynolds number about 1 x 10{sup 5}). A standard two-equation turbulence model ({kappa},{var_epsilon}), was used to capture turbulent eddy motion. The commercial finite volume code, Fluent [5], was used to create a prototypic geometry file with a non-orthogonal mesh. Hybrid meshing was used to fill the computational region between the round-edged tank bottom and agitator regions. The nominal calculations and a series of sensitivity runs were made to investigate the impact of flow patterns on the lifting behavior of the dissolver basket. At high rotational speeds and low tank levels, local turbulent flow reaches the critical condition for the dissolver basket to be picked up from the tank floor and to touch the agitator blades during the tank mixing operations. This is not desirable in terms of mixing performance. The modeling results demonstrate that the flow patterns driven by the agitators considered here are not strong enough to

  17. Effects of Water in Synthetic Lubricant Systems and Clathrate Formation: A Literature Search and Review

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, Ngoc Dung T.

    2001-08-08

    An extensive literature search and a confidential survey were critically analyzed to determine the effects of water on the stability of hydrofluorocarbon/synthetic lubricant systems and to identify key areas requiring further investigation. Following are highlights from the analysis: Clathrate hydrates are solid solutions formed when water molecules are linked through hydrogen bonding creating cavities that can enclose various guest molecules from hydrate formers, such as hydrofluorocarbons R-32, R-125, R-134a, R-407C and R-410A. The four methods for preventing clathrate formation were drying the gas, heating it, reducing its pressure, or using inhibitors. The hydrolysis of polyolester lubricants was mostly acid-catalyzed and its reaction rate constant typically followed the Arrhenius equation of an activated process. Hydrolytic stability improved with hindered molecular structures, and with the presence of acid catcher additives and desiccants. Water vapor can effect the adsorption of long-chain fatty acids and the chemistry of formation of protective oxide film. However, these effects on lubrication can be either positive or negative. Fifty to sixty percent of the moisture injected into an air-conditioning system remained in the refrigerant and the rest mixed with the compressor oil. In an automotive air-conditioning system using R-134a, ice would form at 0 C evaporating temperature when the water content in the vapor refrigerant on the low-pressure side was more than 350 ppm. Moisture would cause the embrittlement of polyethylene terephthalate and the hydrolysis of polyesters, but would reduce the effect of amine additives on fluoroelastomer rubbers. The reactions of water with refrigerants and lubricants would cause formicary and large-pit corrosion in copper tubes, as well as copper plating and sludge formation. Moreover, blockage of capillary tubes increased rapidly in the presence of water. Twenty-four companies responded to the survey. From the responses

  18. Lubricator valve apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, R. T.

    1984-10-16

    A lubricator valve assembly comprises a reciprocably rotatable ball valve which is operated between open and closed positions solely through the selective application of control pressures and/or tubing pressure above the valve to a double acting sleeve type actuating piston. One end of the actuating piston has a valving piston formed thereon which cooperates with a seal bore in the housing to effect the opening or closing of a bypass fluid passage extending from a region below the ball valve to a region above the ball valve. Such valving piston also functions as part of a lost motion connection between the actuating sleeve piston and a reciprocable actuator for rotating the ball valve. In opening the ball valve, the valving piston first moves upwardly to establish a fluid bypass around the closed ball valve and then establishes contact with the actuator to rotate the ball valve to an open position. The same fluid bypass may be utilized to pump through fluid around the closed ball valve by applying fluid pressure above the ball valve. Improved sealing elements for the ball valve are also provided.

  19. Bisexuality, poverty and mental health: A mixed methods analysis.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lori E; O'Gorman, Laurel; MacLeod, Melissa A; Bauer, Greta R; MacKay, Jenna; Robinson, Margaret

    2016-05-01

    Bisexuality is consistently associated with poor mental health outcomes. In population-based data, this is partially explained by income differences between bisexual people and lesbian, gay, and/or heterosexual individuals. However, the interrelationships between bisexuality, poverty, and mental health are poorly understood. In this paper, we examine the relationships between these variables using a mixed methods study of 302 adult bisexuals from Ontario, Canada. Participants were recruited using respondent-driven sampling to complete an internet-based survey including measures of psychological distress and minority stress. A subset of participants completed a semi-structured qualitative interview to contextualize their mental health experiences. Using information regarding household income, number of individuals supported by the income and geographic location, participants were categorized as living below or above the Canadian Low Income Cut Off (LICO). Accounting for the networked nature of the sample, participants living below the LICO had significantly higher mean scores for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and reported significantly more perceived discrimination compared to individuals living above the LICO. Grounded theory analysis of the qualitative interviews suggested four pathways through which bisexuality and poverty may intersect to impact mental health: through early life experiences linked to bisexuality or poverty that impacted future financial stability; through effects of bisexual identity on employment and earning potential; through the impact of class and sexual orientation discrimination on access to communities of support; and through lack of access to mental health services that could provide culturally competent care. These mixed methods data help us understand the income disparities associated with bisexual identity in population-based data, and suggest points of intervention to address their impact on bisexual mental

  20. Numerical Prediction of Flow and Heat Transfer on lubricant Supplying and Scavenging Flow Path of an Aero-Engine Lubrication System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S. Q.; Liu, Z. X.; Lv, Y. G.; Zhang, L. F.; Xu, T.

    This paper presents a numerical model of internal flows on lubricant supplying and scavenging flow path of an aero-engine lubrication system. The numerical model was built in the General Analysis Software of Aero-engine Lubrication System (GASLS), developed by Northwestern Polytechnical University. The lubricant flow flux, pressure and temperature distribution at steady state were calculated. GASLS is a general purpose computer program employed a ID steady state network algorithm for analyzing flowrates, pressures and temperatures in a complex flow network. All kinds of aero-engine lubrication systems can be divided into finite correlative typical elements and nodes from which the calculation network is developed in GASLS. Special emphasis is put on how to use combinational elements which is a type of typical elements to replace some complex components such as bearing compartments, accessory drive gearboxes or heat exchangers. This method can reduce network complexity and improve calculation efficiency. The computational results show good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Mixed-effects Poisson regression analysis of adverse event reports

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Robert D.; Segawa, Eisuke; Karabatsos, George; Amatya, Anup K.; Bhaumik, Dulal K.; Brown, C. Hendricks; Kapur, Kush; Marcus, Sue M.; Hur, Kwan; Mann, J. John

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY A new statistical methodology is developed for the analysis of spontaneous adverse event (AE) reports from post-marketing drug surveillance data. The method involves both empirical Bayes (EB) and fully Bayes estimation of rate multipliers for each drug within a class of drugs, for a particular AE, based on a mixed-effects Poisson regression model. Both parametric and semiparametric models for the random-effect distribution are examined. The method is applied to data from Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) on the relationship between antidepressants and suicide. We obtain point estimates and 95 per cent confidence (posterior) intervals for the rate multiplier for each drug (e.g. antidepressants), which can be used to determine whether a particular drug has an increased risk of association with a particular AE (e.g. suicide). Confidence (posterior) intervals that do not include 1.0 provide evidence for either significant protective or harmful associations of the drug and the adverse effect. We also examine EB, parametric Bayes, and semiparametric Bayes estimators of the rate multipliers and associated confidence (posterior) intervals. Results of our analysis of the FDA AERS data revealed that newer antidepressants are associated with lower rates of suicide adverse event reports compared with older antidepressants. We recommend improvements to the existing AERS system, which are likely to improve its public health value as an early warning system. PMID:18404622

  2. NIR Analysis of Powder Mixing Quality in a Ribbon Blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodridge, Chris; Duong, Nhat-Hang; Muzzio, Fernando

    2001-11-01

    We present experimental results on powder mixing performed in a common industrial mixer, the batch ribbon blender. Our experiments explore the effectiveness of this device on mixture quality as a function of fill level, loading pattern, ribbon speed, mixing time, and ribbon angle. We study two powder formulations consisting of common compounds used in food and pharmaceutical processing. Mixture quality is evaluated by core sampling throughout the blender and determining the composition of small samples using NIR spectroscopy. We use the spectra from NIR to calculate the intensity and scale of segregation for the three-dimensional mixing region. The mixing rates in the axial and radial directions are obtained from plots of composition variance vs. mixing time. We examine the effects of ribbon speed and fill level as the main parameters affecting mixing rate. Dead regions that remain isolated from the remainder of the flow are identified.

  3. Analysis of injury types for mixed martial arts athletes.

    PubMed

    Ji, MinJoon

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the types of injuries associated with mixed martial arts and their location in order to provide substantial information to help reduce the risk of these injuries during mixed martial arts. [Subjects and Methods] Data were collected from 455 mixed martial arts athletes who practiced mixed martial arts or who participated in mixed martial arts competitions in the Seoul Metropolitan City and Gyeongnam Province of Korea between June 3, 2015, and November 6, 2015. Questionnaires were used to collect the data. The convenience sampling method was used, based on the non-probability sampling extraction method. [Results] The arm, neck, and head were the most frequent locations of the injuries; and lacerations, concussions, and contusions were the most frequently diagnosed types of injuries in the mixed martial arts athletes in this study. [Conclusion] Reducing the risk of injury by establishing an alert system and preventing critical injuries by incorporating safety measures are important.

  4. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOEpatents

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  5. The Structure of Mixed Method Studies in Educational Research: A Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Lauren H.

    2011-01-01

    Educational researchers are beginning to use mixed methods designs to answer complex research questions. This content analysis investigates the structure and use of mixed methods in educational research in order to work toward a more standardized presentation. I used a concurrent mixed methods approach to analyze 30 studies from three prominent…

  6. Biocidal additives for lubricating/cooling fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Morozova, L.P.; Klyavlina, E.A.; Lebedev, E.V.; Shakhgel'diev, M.A.

    1984-03-01

    This article reports on the synthesis of new biocidal products for the protection of water emulsions of lubricating/cooling fluids (LCFs) against microbiological damage. The new biocides are based on compounds belonging to the classes of oxazolidines and oxazines, and also compounds of these classes but activated by nitro derivatives of aromatic hydrocarbons. Results are presented from evaluations of the biocidal activity of the new products with respect to aerobes, anaerobes, and fungi growing in a 3% emulsion of the widely used LCF Ukrinol-1. The comparative evaluation was based on the optimal biocidal concentration corresponding to the smallest quantity of added biocide to give maximum suppression of the microorganisms in a minimum time, and with the longest period of effectiveness. The lubricating properties of the biocides were evaluated in an emulsion of the Ukrinol-1 LCF is a four-ball tester. It is concluded that the developed biocides are homogeneous, transparent liquids with a specific odor and can be considered as nontoxic to man; they mix readily with components used in formulating LCFs and detergents (sulfonates, oxyethylated alcohols, phenols, polyglycols, fatty acid soaps, etc.). They are readily soluble in water and in oils. Includes 3 tables.

  7. A perturbative thermal analysis for an electro-osmotic flow in a slit microchannel based on a Lubrication theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Ali; Mendez, Federico; Bautista, Oscar; Lizardi, José

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we develop a new thermal analysis for an electro-osmotic flow in a rectangular microchannel. The central idea is very simple: the Debye length that defines the length of the electrical double-layer depends on temperature T. Therefore, if exists any reason to include variable temperature effects, the above length should be utilized with caution because it appears in any electro-osmotic mathematical model. For instance, the presence of the Joule effect is a source that can generate important longitudinal temperature gradients along the microchannel and the isothermal hypothesis is no longer valid. In this manner, the Debye length is altered and as a consequence, new longitudinal temperature gradient terms appear into the resulting governing equations. These terms are enough to change the electric potential and the flow field. Taking into account the above comments, in the present study the momentum equations together with the energy, Poisson and Ohmic current conservation equations are solved by using a regular perturbation technique. For this purpose, we introduce a dimensionless parameter α that measures the temperature deviations of a reference temperature.

  8. Fabrication and Wear Behavior Analysis on AlCrFeNi High Entropy Alloy Coating Under Dry Sliding and Oil Lubrication Test Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yipin; Wang, Shouren; Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Qiao, Yang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, AlCrFeNi high entropy alloy coating was fabricated on the surface of Q235 steel using hot pressing sintering process. The coating has the controlled thickness size and excellent mechanical properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), XRD and hardness testing method were used to study the morphology, phase structure and hardness of high entropy alloys coating. The lattice distortion plays a significant role in increasing the hardness. Coating formation mechanism caused by the element diffusion under the hot pressing effect is also discussed in the paper. Simultaneously, the dry sliding and oil lubrication wear tests, wear morphology observation and wear mechanism discussion were completed. As the result shows, AlCrFeNi high entropy alloys coating exhibits superior wear resistance either at dry sliding or oil lubrication tests owing to its hard high entropy solid solution structure.

  9. Molecular-Scale Lubricants for Micromachine Applications: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, A.R.; Dugger, M.T.; Houston, J.E.; Lopez, G.P.; Mayer, T.M.; Michalske, T.A.; Miller, S.L.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Stevens, M.J.; Zhou, Y.

    1998-12-01

    The nature of this work was to develop the physics and chemistry base for understanding molecular-scale lubricants used to reduce of friction- and adhesion-induced failure in silicon micromachines (MEMS). We acquired this new knowledge by tailoring the molecular properties of the lubricants, applying local probes that can directly monitor the response of lubricants in contact conditions, and evaluating the performance of model lubricants MEMS devices. Model lubricants under investigation were the silane coupling agents that form monolayer films on native oxide silicon surfaces, which is the substrate in MEMS. These molecules bind via strong surface bonds and produce a layer of hydro- or fluoro-carbon chains normal to the substrate. "Tailoring" the lubricants entails modifying the chain length, the chain chemical reactivity (H or F), and the density of chain structures. Thus much effort went into understanding the surface chemistry of silane-silicon oxide coupling. With proximal probes such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), interracial force microscopy (FM), and shear force microscopy in combination with IFM, we examined the frictional and adhesive properties of the silane films with very high spatial resolution (< 100 nm) and sensitivity. MEMS structures are treated with silanes under identical conditions, and examined for friction and adhesion under operating conditions. Proper assessment of the lubricants required quantitative analysis of MEMS performance at high speeds and long operating times. Our proximal probe measurements and WS performance analyses form a very important link for future molecular dynamics simulations, that, in turn, should be able to predict MEMS performance under all conditions.

  10. Assessment of ospemifene or lubricants on clinical signs of VVA.

    PubMed

    Constantine, Ginger; Graham, Shelli; Koltun, William D; Kingsberg, Sheryl A

    2014-04-01

    Ospemifene is a new oral estrogen receptor agonist/antagonist with tissue-selective effects approved for the treatment of moderate to severe dyspareunia, a symptom of postmenopausal vulvar and vaginal atrophy (VVA). The aim of the study is to assess ospemifene or lubricant use on the clinical signs of VVA. Subjects in three double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials were randomized to ospemifene or placebo. In two of the trials, women were provided nonhormonal lubricants for use as needed, and a preplanned evaluation of the frequency of lubricant use was performed. Additionally, a post hoc placebo group analysis for impact of lubricant use or nonuse on physiologic effects of the percentage of superficial and parabasal cells (maturation index) and vaginal pH was conducted. A secondary preplanned end point included visual examination of the vagina (clinical signs of vaginal dryness, petechiae, pallor, friability, and redness of the mucosa) comparing change from baseline to end of treatment for the ospemifene 60-mg/day group and vs. placebo. The primary end points in the phase 3 clinical trials included the percentage of superficial cells, parabasal cells, vaginal pH, and most bothersome symptoms compared with placebo. There was no significant difference in physiologic effects between placebo lubricant users vs. nonusers in either 12-week study. Compared with baseline, substantially more subjects receiving ospemifene 60 mg/day than placebo showed complete resolution of clinical signs of VVA after 12 and 52 weeks of treatment. Ospemifene substantially improved clinical signs of VVA. Within the placebo group, there was no difference in physiologic effects in lubricant users vs. nonusers. Based on gynecologic evaluation of the vagina, benefits were apparent at 12 weeks and sustained for 52 weeks in the ospemifene-treated subjects with significant improvement over placebo. In these three clinical trials, in contrast to ospemifene-treated women, placebo subjects

  11. Cost-Cutting Powdered Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Scientists at NASA's Glenn Research Center developed a high-temperature, solid lubricant coating material that is saving the manufacturing industry millions of dollars. The material came out of 3 decades of tribological research, work studying high-temperature friction, lubrication, and the wearing of interacting surfaces that are in relative motion. It was developed as a shaft coating deposited by thermal spraying to protect foil air bearings used in oil-free turbomachinery, like gas turbines, and is meant to be part of a larger project: an oil-free aircraft engine capable of operating at high temperatures with increased reliability, lowered weight, reduced maintenance requirements, and increased power. This advanced coating, PS300, is a self-lubricating bearing material containing chromium oxide, with additions of a low-temperature start up lubricant (silver) and a high-temperature lubricant, making it remarkably stable at high temperatures, and better suited than previously available materials for high-stress conditions. It improves efficiency, lowers friction, reduces emissions, and has been used by NASA in advanced aeropropulsion engines, refrigeration compressors, turbochargers, and hybrid electrical turbogenerators. PS300 is ideal in any application where lowered weight and reduced maintenance are desired, and high-temperature uses and heavy operating speeds are expected. It has notable uses for the Space Agency, but it has even further-reaching potential for the industrial realm.

  12. The effect of lubrication on the friction and wear of Biolox®delta.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Rainforth, W M

    2012-07-01

    The performance of total hip-joint replacements depends strongly on the state of lubrication in vivo. In order to test candidate prosthetic materials, in vitro wear testing requires a lubricant that behaves in the same manner as synovial fluid. The current study investigated three lubricants and looked in detail at the lubrication conditions and the consequent effect on ball-on-flat reciprocating wear mechanisms of Biolox®delta against alumina. Biolox®delta, the latest commercial material for artificial hip-joint replacements, is an alumina-matrix composite with improved mechanical properties through the addition of zirconia and other mixed oxides. Three commonly used laboratory lubricants, ultra pure water, 25 vol.% new-born calf serum solution and 1 wt.% carboxymethyl cellulose sodium salt (CMC-Na) solution, were used for the investigation. The lubrication regimes were defined by constructing Stribeck curves. Full fluid-film lubrication was observed for the serum solution whereas full fluid-film and mixed lubrications were observed in both water and the CMC-Na solution. The wear rates in the CMC-Na and new-born calf serum were similar, but were an order of magnitude higher in water. The worn surfaces all exhibited pitting, which is consistent with the transition from mild wear to severe or "stripe" wear. The extent of pitting was greatest in the serum solution, but least in the water. On all worn surfaces, the zirconia appeared to have fully transformed from tetragonal to monoclinic symmetry. However, there was no evidence of microcracking associated with the transformed zirconia. Nevertheless, AFM indicated that zirconia was lost preferentially to the alumina grains during sliding. Thus, the current study has shown conclusively that the wear mechanisms for Biolox®delta clearly depend on the lubricant used, even where wear rates were similar.

  13. Investigations of lubricant rheology as applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, S.; Winer, W. O.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of lubricant shear rheological behavior in the amorphous solid region and near the liquid-solid transition are reported. Elastic, plastic and viscous behavior was observed. A shear rheological model based on primary laboratory data is proposed for concentrated contact lubrication. The model is a Maxwell model modified with a limiting shear stress. Three material properties are required: low shear stress viscosity, limiting elastic shear modulus, and the limiting shear stress the material can withstand. All three are functions of temperature and pressure. In applying the model to EHD contacts the predicted response possesses the characteristics expected from several experiments reported in the literature.

  14. Bio-based lubricants for numerical solution of elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupu, Dedi Rosa Putra; Sheriff, Jamaluddin Md; Osman, Kahar

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a programming code to provide numerical solution of elastohydrodynamic lubrication problem in line contacts which is modeled through an infinite cylinder on a plane to represent the application of roller bearing. In this simulation, vegetable oils will be used as bio-based lubricants. Temperature is assumed to be constant at 40°C. The results show that the EHL pressure for all vegetable oils was increasing from inlet flow until the center, then decrease a bit and rise to the peak pressure. The shapes of EHL film thickness for all tested vegetable oils are almost flat at contact region.

  15. Study of turbocharger shaft motion by means of non-invasive optical techniques: Application to the behaviour analysis in turbocharger lubrication failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, J. V.; Serrano, J. R.; Dolz, V.; López, M. A.; Bouffaud, F.

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents a novel non-invasive technique to estimate the turbocharger shaft whirl motion. The aim of this article is to present a system for monitoring the shaft motion of a turbocharger, which will be used in turbocharger destructive testing. To achieve this, a camera and a light source were installed in a turbocharger test bench with a controlled lubrication circuit. An image recording methodology and a process algorithm have been developed, in order to estimate the shaft motion. This processing consists on differentiating specific zones of the image, in order to obtain their coordinates. Two reference points have been configured on the compressor side, which help to calculate the relative position of the shaft, avoiding the errors due to structural vibrations. Maximum eccentricity of the turbocharger has been determined and it has been compared with shaft motion when it is spinning in different conditions. A luminosity study has been also done, in order to improve the process and to obtain locus of shaft position in a picture exposition time period. The technique has been applied to diagnosis of a lubrication failure test and the main results will be presented in this article: like shaft motion figures; thermodynamic variables and pictures of the shaft while it is spinning at abnormal lubrication conditions. The measuring components used in this technique have the ability to withstand the catastrophic failure of the turbocharger in this type of test.

  16. Combination of ultrasonic extraction and stripping analysis: an effective and reliable way for the determination of Cu and Pb in lubricating oils.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Rodrigo A A; Oliveira, Pedro V; Angnes, Lúcio

    2006-01-15

    The determination of metals in lubricating oil has been used as an important way to prevent components failures, to provide environmental information and in some cases, to identify adulteration. In this work, an effective and simple procedure is proposed for Cu and Pb determination in lubricating oils. An ultrasonic bath was employed for extraction of these elements from oil samples in a mixture 1:1 (v/v) of concentrated HCl and H(2)O(2). A very efficient extraction of Cu and Pb (approximately 100%) was attained after 30 min of ultrasound, allowing the simultaneous determination of both metals using square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry at thin-film gold electrodes. The extraction procedure was performed in 4 mL polypropylene closed vessels and dozens of samples could be treated simultaneously in the same ultrasonic bath. The regions of the ultrasonic bath, where the maximum efficiency of extraction was attained were evaluated. Over the optimized region, 30 samples can be treated simultaneously. Used lubricating oils from automotive engines were analyzed by using the optimized extraction procedure.

  17. Experimental investigation, model development and sensitivity analysis of rheological behavior of ZnO/10W40 nano-lubricants for automotive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmat Esfe, Mohammad; Saedodin, Seyfolah; Rejvani, Mousa; Shahram, Jalal

    2017-06-01

    In the present study, rheological behavior of ZnO/10W40 nano-lubricant is investigated by an experimental approach. Firstly, ZnO nanoparticles of 10-30 nm were dispersed in 10W40 engine oil with solid volume fractions of 0.25-2%, then the viscosity of the composed nano-lubricant was measured in temperature ranges of 5-55 °C and in various shear rates. From analyzing the results, it was revealed that both of the base oil and nano-lubricants are non-Newtonian fluids which exhibit shear thinning behavior. Sensitivity of viscosity to the solid volume fraction enhancement was calculated by a new correlation which was proposed in terms of solid volume fraction and temperature. In order to attain an accurate model by which experimental data are predicted, an artificial neural network (ANN) with a hidden layer and 5 neurons was designed. This model was considerably accurate in predicting experimental data of dynamic viscosity as R-squared and average absolute relative deviation (AARD %) were respectively 0.9999 and 0.0502.

  18. Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants

    DOEpatents

    Ohi, James; De La Cruz, Jose L.; Lacey, Paul I.

    2006-01-03

    A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

  19. Metalworking corrosion inhibition/drawing lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, H.F.; Wantling, S.J.

    1980-05-06

    A metalworking lubricant composition is disclosed which is effective as both a corrosion inhibitor and drawing lubricant and comprises a mineral oil and an additive combination of barium lanolate soap and barium sulfonate.

  20. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere to...

  1. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere to...

  2. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere to...

  3. Effect of vaginal lubricants on natural fertility.

    PubMed

    Mesen, Tolga B; Steiner, Anne Z

    2014-06-01

    Vaginal lubricants are commonly utilized to facilitate more comfortable and enjoyable intercourse. The impact of these lubricants on fertility is unclear. The aim of this review is to summarize the current in-vitro and clinical data pertaining to lubricants' effect on natural conception. In-vitro studies suggest lubricants can be toxic to sperm in the artificial laboratory environment. Lubricants formulated to be nontoxic to sperm have no effect on sperm motility or viability in vitro compared to controls. However, a recent longitudinal cohort study suggests lubricant use and choice has no effect of fecundity. As a result of the conflicting in-vitro and clinical data, the effect of vaginal lubricants on fertility is still unresolved. A randomized controlled trial is needed to determine the effects of vaginal lubricants on fertility.

  4. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere to...

  5. F-AREA PUMP TANK 1 MIXING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Tamburello, D; Richard Dimenna, R; Si Lee, S

    2008-11-05

    The F-area pump tanks are used to transfer supernate, sludge, and other materials. In any transfer, the solution must stay well mixed without allowing particulate matter to settle out of the liquid and, thus, accumulate in the bottom of the pump tank. Recently, the pulse jet mixing in F-area Pump Tank 1 (FPT1) has been decommissioned. An analysis of the liquid transfer through FPT1 has been performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to assess whether or not the velocities throughout the tank will remain high enough to keep all particulate suspended using only transfer and recirculation pumps. The following paragraph is an abbreviated synopsis of the transfer procedure for FPT1 [1, 2]. Prior to a transfer, FPT1 begins to be filled with inhibited water through the inlet transfer line (TI). When the tank liquid level reaches 52.5 inches above the absolute tank bottom, the recirculation pump (RI and RO) is activated. At a tank liquid level of 72.5 inches above the absolute tank bottom, the outlet transfer line (TO) is activated to reduce the liquid level in FPT1 and transfer inhibited water to H-area Pump Tank 7 (HPT7). The liquid level is reduced down to 39.5 inches, with an allowable range from 37.5 to 41.5 inches above the absolute tank bottom. HPT7 goes through a similar procedure as FPT1 until both have tank liquid levels of approximately 39.5 inches above the absolute tank bottom. The transfer of inhibited water continues until a steady-state has been reached in both pump tanks. At this point, the supernate/sludge transfer begins with a minimum flow rate of 70 gpm and an average flow rate of 150 gpm. After the transfer is complete, the pump tanks (both FPT1 and HPT7) are pumped down to between 20.5 and 22.5 inches (above absolute bottom) and then flushed with 25,000 gallons of inhibited water to remove any possible sludge heal. After the flushing, the pump tanks are emptied. Note that the tank liquid level is measured using diptubes. Figure 2

  6. PFPE, A Unique Lubricant for a Unique Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    PFPE , A Unique Lubricant for a Unique Application Mahmoud A. Fowzy Castrol Industrial North America Specialty Products Division 1001 West 31st Street...Downers Grove, Illinois 60148 (630)241-4000 Abstract: PFPE (Perfluoropolyether) is a clear colorless fluorinated synthetic oil that is nonreactive...nonflammable, safe in chemical and oxygen service, and is long lasting. PFPE grease is made by mixing different types of non-soap thickeners with the

  7. Lubricants for High-Vacuum Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-15

    systems. Thus, contacting metal surfaces that might not require lubrication in atmospheric conditions may require antiseize lubricants to prevent cold ...not as susceptible to the " cold -welding" phenomenon as are metals. There are two categories of systems in which ultrahigh- vacuum lubricants are...requires proper consideration of lubricant specification to prevent cold -welding, to promote low torque noise performance, and to ensure adequate

  8. MIXREGLS: A Program for Mixed-Effects Location Scale Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hedeker, Donald; Nordgren, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    MIXREGLS is a program which provides estimates for a mixed-effects location scale model assuming a (conditionally) normally-distributed dependent variable. This model can be used for analysis of data in which subjects may be measured at many observations and interest is in modeling the mean and variance structure. In terms of the variance structure, covariates can by specified to have effects on both the between-subject and within-subject variances. Another use is for clustered data in which subjects are nested within clusters (e.g., clinics, hospitals, schools, etc.) and interest is in modeling the between-cluster and within-cluster variances in terms of covariates. MIXREGLS was written in Fortran and uses maximum likelihood estimation, utilizing both the EM algorithm and a Newton-Raphson solution. Estimation of the random effects is accomplished using empirical Bayes methods. Examples illustrating stand-alone usage and features of MIXREGLS are provided, as well as use via the SAS and R software packages. PMID:23761062

  9. Evaluation of Moyer's mixed dentition space analysis in Indian children

    PubMed Central

    Baheti, Kamalshikha; Babaji, Prashant; Ali, Meer J.; Surana, Ashish; Mishra, Samvit; Srivastava, Madhulika

    2016-01-01

    Aim and Objectives: Tooth size prediction values are not universal for all ethnic and racial groups. The present study evaluated the applicability of Moyer's mixed dentition space analysis in the Marwari community of Rajasthan, India. Materials and Methods: The mesiodistal dimension of permanent mandibular incisors, maxillary and mandibular canine, and premolars of both sides were measured and averaged in 200 adolescents (100 males and 100 females) of the Marwari population in Rajasthan using digital Vernier caliper. Data were statistically analyzed using Student's t–test. The data were then compared with Moyer's predicted values. The tooth measurements of male and female participants were compared with unpaired t-test. Results: Moyer's prediction chart was not comparable with the study population group. The coefficient of correlation and coefficient of determination in our study was 0.57 and 0.25, respectively. Mesiodistal width of measured teeth was lesser in females compared to males for both canine and premolars (P = 0.471 and P = 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion: There was significant statistical difference between values of the present study and Moyer's prediction values. Hence, new regression equation and prediction table can be used to predict mesiodistal dimensions of canine and premolars in Marwari children of Rajasthan. PMID:27891312

  10. Obesity in social media: a mixed methods analysis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Ying Sylvia; Prestin, Abby; Kunath, Stephen

    2014-09-01

    The escalating obesity rate in the USA has made obesity prevention a top public health priority. Recent interventions have tapped into the social media (SM) landscape. To leverage SM in obesity prevention, we must understand user-generated discourse surrounding the topic. This study was conducted to describe SM interactions about weight through a mixed methods analysis. Data were collected across 60 days through SM monitoring services, yielding 2.2 million posts. Data were cleaned and coded through Natural Language Processing (NLP) techniques, yielding popular themes and the most retweeted content. Qualitative analyses of selected posts add insight into the nature of the public dialogue and motivations for participation. Twitter represented the most common channel. Twitter and Facebook were dominated by derogatory and misogynist sentiment, pointing to weight stigmatization, whereas blogs and forums contained more nuanced comments. Other themes included humor, education, and positive sentiment countering weight-based stereotypes. This study documented weight-related attitudes and perceptions. This knowledge will inform public health/obesity prevention practice.

  11. Differential expression analysis for RNAseq using Poisson mixed models

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiquan; Hood, Michelle; Scott, Laura; Peng, Qinke; Mukherjee, Sayan; Tung, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Identifying differentially expressed (DE) genes from RNA sequencing (RNAseq) studies is among the most common analyses in genomics. However, RNAseq DE analysis presents several statistical and computational challenges, including over-dispersed read counts and, in some settings, sample non-independence. Previous count-based methods rely on simple hierarchical Poisson models (e.g. negative binomial) to model independent over-dispersion, but do not account for sample non-independence due to relatedness, population structure and/or hidden confounders. Here, we present a Poisson mixed model with two random effects terms that account for both independent over-dispersion and sample non-independence. We also develop a scalable sampling-based inference algorithm using a latent variable representation of the Poisson distribution. With simulations, we show that our method properly controls for type I error and is generally more powerful than other widely used approaches, except in small samples (n <15) with other unfavorable properties (e.g. small effect sizes). We also apply our method to three real datasets that contain related individuals, population stratification or hidden confounders. Our results show that our method increases power in all three data compared to other approaches, though the power gain is smallest in the smallest sample (n = 6). Our method is implemented in MACAU, freely available at www.xzlab.org/software.html. PMID:28369632

  12. Differential expression analysis for RNAseq using Poisson mixed models.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiquan; Hood, Michelle; Scott, Laura; Peng, Qinke; Mukherjee, Sayan; Tung, Jenny; Zhou, Xiang

    2017-06-20

    Identifying differentially expressed (DE) genes from RNA sequencing (RNAseq) studies is among the most common analyses in genomics. However, RNAseq DE analysis presents several statistical and computational challenges, including over-dispersed read counts and, in some settings, sample non-independence. Previous count-based methods rely on simple hierarchical Poisson models (e.g. negative binomial) to model independent over-dispersion, but do not account for sample non-independence due to relatedness, population structure and/or hidden confounders. Here, we present a Poisson mixed model with two random effects terms that account for both independent over-dispersion and sample non-independence. We also develop a scalable sampling-based inference algorithm using a latent variable representation of the Poisson distribution. With simulations, we show that our method properly controls for type I error and is generally more powerful than other widely used approaches, except in small samples (n <15) with other unfavorable properties (e.g. small effect sizes). We also apply our method to three real datasets that contain related individuals, population stratification or hidden confounders. Our results show that our method increases power in all three data compared to other approaches, though the power gain is smallest in the smallest sample (n = 6). Our method is implemented in MACAU, freely available at www.xzlab.org/software.html. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Tethered Lubricants for Small Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lynden A. Archer

    2006-01-09

    The objective of this research project is two-fold. First, to fundamentally understand friction and relaxation dynamics of polymer chains near surfaces; and second, to develop novel self-lubricated substrates suitable for MEMS devices. During the three-year performance period of this study the PI and his students have shown using theory and experiments that systematic introduction of disorder into tethered lubricant coatings (e.g. by using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) mixtures or SAMs with nonlinear, branched architectures) can be used to significantly reduce the friction coefficient of a surface. They have also developed a simple procedure based on dielectric spectroscopy for quantifying the effect of surface disorder on molecular relaxation in lubricant coatings. Details of research accomplishments in each area of the project are described in the body of the report.

  14. Lubricants and Their Environmental Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betton, C. I.

    Environmental considerations have increased in importance in the last two decades and lubricants are part of that. The REACH Regulations apply to the components of lubricants. About 50% of a lubricant can be reclaimed using refining processes ranging from acid/clay treatment through to distillation/hydrogenation to produce up to Gp. II quality re-refined base oils. The major possible contaminants are the PAHs, which are effectively removed by optimised distillation/hydrogenation, metals, remnants of VI improvers, water and untreated acids. Sulphur contents of these base oils must be viewed differently from those of virgin mineral base oils. Certain PAHs are recognised carcinogens and pose a health and safety risk and must be controlled. The use of re-refined base oils is driven by the concept of 'sustainability', to minimise pollution and maximise the use of resources.

  15. Antidepressant Prescribing by Pediatricians: A Mixed-Methods Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tulisiak, Anne K; Klein, Jillian A; Harris, Emily; Luft, Marissa J; Schroeder, Heidi K; Mossman, Sarah A; Varney, Sara T; Keeshin, Brooks R; Cotton, Sian; Strawn, Jeffrey R

    2017-01-01

    Among pediatricians, perceived knowledge of efficacy, tolerability, dosing, and side effects of antidepressants represent significant sources of variability in the use of these medications in youth with depressive and anxiety disorders. Importantly, the qualitative factors that relate to varying levels of comfort with antidepressants and willingness to prescribe are poorly understood. Using a mixed-methods approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with community-based and academic medical center-based pediatricians (N = 14). Interviews were audio recorded and iteratively coded; themes were then generated using inductive thematic analysis. The relationship between demographic factors, knowledge of antidepressants, dosing, and side effects, as well as prescribing likelihood scores for depressive disorders, anxiety disorders or co-morbid anxiety and depressive disorders, were evaluated using mixed models. Pediatricians reported antidepressants to be effective and well-tolerated. However, the likelihood of individual physicians initiating an antidepressant was significantly lower for anxiety disorders relative to depressive disorders with similar functional impairment. Pediatricians considered symptom severity/functional impairment, age and the availability of psychotherapy as they considered prescribing antidepressants to individual patients. Antidepressant choice was related to the physician׳s perceived knowledge and comfort with a particular antidepressant, financial factors, and the disorder-specific evidence base for that particular medication and consultation with mental health practitioners. Pediatricians noted similar efficacy and tolerability profiles for antidepressants in youth with depressive disorders and anxiety disorders, but tended to utilize "therapy first" approaches for anxiety disorders relative to depressive disorders. Parental and family factors that influenced prescribing of antidepressants by pediatricians included parental ambivalence

  16. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  17. Engineering lubrication in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-04-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  18. Lubrication of rolling-element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The lubrication of rolling element bearings is surveyed. Emphasis is on the critical design aspects related to speed, temperature, and ambient pressure environment. Types of lubrication including grease, jets, mist, wick, and through the race are discussed. The historical development, present state of technology, and the future problems of rolling element bearing lubrication are discussed.

  19. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Lubrication system. 33.39 Section 33.39... system. (a) The lubrication system of the engine must be designed and constructed so that it will... supply is in the engine. (b) The lubrication system of the engine must be designed and constructed to...

  20. Research on Liquid Lubricants for Space Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jansen, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Four research areas at the NASA Glenn Research Center involving the tribology of space mechanisms are highlighted. These areas include: soluble boundary lubrication additives for perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants, a Pennzane dewetting phenomenon, the effect of ODC-free bearing cleaning processes on bearing lifetimes and the development of a new class of liquid lubricants based on silahydrocarbons.

  1. 7 CFR 3201.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 3201.38 Section 3201.38... Designated Items § 3201.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon...

  2. 7 CFR 2902.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 2902.38 Section 2902.38... Items § 2902.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon clean and...

  3. 7 CFR 3201.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 3201.38 Section 3201.38... Designated Items § 3201.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon...

  4. 7 CFR 3201.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 3201.38 Section 3201.38... Designated Items § 3201.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon...

  5. 7 CFR 2902.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 2902.38 Section 2902.38... Items § 2902.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon clean and...

  6. Research on liquid lubricants for space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jansen, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    Four research areas at the NASA Lewis Research Center involving the tribology of space mechanisms are highlighted. These areas include: soluble boundary lubrication additives for perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants, a Pennzane dewetting phenomenon, the effect of ODC-free bearing cleaning processes on bearing lifetimes, and the development of a new class of liquid lubricants based on silahydrocarbons.

  7. New Vapor/Mist Phase Lubricant Formulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    To meet the increased thermal stresses of future advanced aircraft engines, new lubricants will have to be developed to replace the currently used ester-based liquid lubricants. If a suitable conventional replacement cannot be found, a different lubrication method will have to be used. The conventional method circulates bulk lubricant (stored in a sump) through a lubricating system containing cooling and filtering elements. Solid lubricants have been studied as a replacement for bulk liquid lubricants, and have been found to provide reasonable lubrication for lightly loaded systems. Solid lubricants, however, have proved inadequate for highly loaded, high-speed applications. Vapor/mist phase lubrication (VMPL), on the other hand, may be a viable alternative. VMPL has been used successfully to lubricate high-temperature bearings or gears. It can be used as an emergency backup system or as the primary source of lubrication. With VMPL, minimal weight is added to the system and minimal debris is formed. It works over a wide temperature range.

  8. New Vapor/Mist Phase Lubricant Formulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    To meet the increased thermal stresses of future advanced aircraft engines, new lubricants will have to be developed to replace the currently used ester-based liquid lubricants. If a suitable conventional replacement cannot be found, a different lubrication method will have to be used. The conventional method circulates bulk lubricant (stored in a sump) through a lubricating system containing cooling and filtering elements. Solid lubricants have been studied as a replacement for bulk liquid lubricants, and have been found to provide reasonable lubrication for lightly loaded systems. Solid lubricants, however, have proved inadequate for highly loaded, high-speed applications. Vapor/mist phase lubrication (VMPL), on the other hand, may be a viable alternative. VMPL has been used successfully to lubricate high-temperature bearings or gears. It can be used as an emergency backup system or as the primary source of lubrication. With VMPL, minimal weight is added to the system and minimal debris is formed. It works over a wide temperature range.

  9. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical...

  10. Research on liquid lubricants for space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jansen, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    Four research areas at the NASA Lewis Research Center involving the tribology of space mechanisms are highlighted. These areas include: soluble boundary lubrication additives for perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants, a Pennzane dewetting phenomenon, the effect of ODC-free bearing cleaning processes on bearing lifetimes, and the development of a new class of liquid lubricants based on silahydrocarbons.

  11. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical...

  12. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical...

  13. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical...

  14. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for medical...

  15. Multifunctional lubricant additives and compositions thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Farng, L.O.; Horodysky, A.G.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses an antioxidant/ antiwear/extreme pressure/load carrying lubricant composition. It comprises a major proportion of an oil of lubricating viscosity or grease or other solid lubricant prepared therefrom and a minor amount of an ashless multifunctional antioxidant/antiwear/extreme pressure/load carrying additive product comprising a thiophosphate derived from a dihydrocarbyl dithiocarbamate.

  16. Dual functional star polymers for lubricants

    DOE PAGES

    Cosimbescu, Lelia; Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; ...

    2016-09-12

    Star-shaped poly(alkyl methacrylate)s (PAMAs) with a three arm architecturewere designed, prepared and their performance as a dual additive (viscosity index improver and friction modifier) for engine oils was evaluated. Furthermore, the structure property relationships between the macromolecular structure and lubricant performance were studied, such as molecular weight and polarity effects on the viscosity index. Several copolymers of dodecylmethacrylate with polar methacrylates in various amounts and various topologies, were synthesized as model compounds. Star polymers with a polar content of at least 10% in a block or tapered block topology effectively reduced the friction coefficient in both mixed and boundary lubricationmore » regimes. Furthermore, a polar content of 20% was efficient in reducing friction in both random and block topologies.« less

  17. Linear mixed-effects modeling approach to FMRI group analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Saad, Ziad S.; Britton, Jennifer C.; Pine, Daniel S.; Cox, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional group analysis is usually performed with Student-type t-test, regression, or standard AN(C)OVA in which the variance–covariance matrix is presumed to have a simple structure. Some correction approaches are adopted when assumptions about the covariance structure is violated. However, as experiments are designed with different degrees of sophistication, these traditional methods can become cumbersome, or even be unable to handle the situation at hand. For example, most current FMRI software packages have difficulty analyzing the following scenarios at group level: (1) taking within-subject variability into account when there are effect estimates from multiple runs or sessions; (2) continuous explanatory variables (covariates) modeling in the presence of a within-subject (repeated measures) factor, multiple subject-grouping (between-subjects) factors, or the mixture of both; (3) subject-specific adjustments in covariate modeling; (4) group analysis with estimation of hemodynamic response (HDR) function by multiple basis functions; (5) various cases of missing data in longitudinal studies; and (6) group studies involving family members or twins. Here we present a linear mixed-effects modeling (LME) methodology that extends the conventional group analysis approach to analyze many complicated cases, including the six prototypes delineated above, whose analyses would be otherwise either difficult or unfeasible under traditional frameworks such as AN(C)OVA and general linear model (GLM). In addition, the strength of the LME framework lies in its flexibility to model and estimate the variance–covariance structures for both random effects and residuals. The intraclass correlation (ICC) values can be easily obtained with an LME model with crossed random effects, even at the presence of confounding fixed effects. The simulations of one prototypical scenario indicate that the LME modeling keeps a balance between the control for false positives and the

  18. CFD analysis of jet mixing in low NOx flametube combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talpallikar, M. V.; Smith, C. E.; Lai, M. C.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor was identified as a potential gas turbine combustor concept to reduce NO(x) emissions in High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft. To demonstrate reduced NO(x) levels, cylindrical flametube versions of RQL combustors are being tested at NASA Lewis Research Center. A critical technology needed for the RQL combustor is a method of quickly mixing by-pass combustion air with rich-burn gases. Jet mixing in a cylindrical quick-mix section was numerically analyzed. The quick-mix configuration was five inches in diameter and employed twelve radial-inflow slots. The numerical analyses were performed with an advanced, validated 3-D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code named REFLEQS. Parametric variation of jet-to-mainstream momentum flux ratio (J) and slot aspect ratio was investigated. Both non-reacting and reacting analyses were performed. Results showed mixing and NO(x) emissions to be highly sensitive to J and slot aspect ratio. Lowest NO(x) emissions occurred when the dilution jet penetrated to approximately mid-radius. The viability of using 3-D CFD analyses for optimizing jet mixing was demonstrated.

  19. Numerical analysis of mixing enhancement for micro-electroosmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G. H.; He, Y. L.; Tao, W. Q.

    2010-05-01

    Micro-electroosmotic flow is usually slow with negligible inertial effects and diffusion-based mixing can be problematic. To gain an improved understanding of electroosmotic mixing in microchannels, a numerical study has been carried out for channels patterned with wall blocks, and channels patterned with heterogeneous surfaces. The lattice Boltzmann method has been employed to obtain the external electric field, electric potential distribution in the electrolyte, the flow field, and the species concentration distribution within the same framework. The simulation results show that wall blocks and heterogeneous surfaces can significantly disturb the streamlines by fluid folding and stretching leading to apparently substantial improvements in mixing. However, the results show that the introduction of such features can substantially reduce the mass flow rate and thus effectively prolongs the available mixing time when the flow passes through the channel. This is a non-negligible factor on the effectiveness of the observed improvements in mixing efficiency. Compared with the heterogeneous surface distribution, the wall block cases can achieve more effective enhancement in the same mixing time. In addition, the field synergy theory is extended to analyze the mixing enhancement in electroosmotic flow. The distribution of the local synergy angle in the channel aids to evaluate the effectiveness of enhancement method.

  20. Problems in Bearings and Lubrication

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    tj +1.75 :6 6 el..7 224.6 +k.tk 7 12 235.2 236.0 +.34. .-. 06 .4405x10- 3 0.05139 0.4276 131.8 133.7 +1.e44 Speed plus J1 .J54, ’ 8.1 .94 𔃻.96 caso 5...Lubricants Re- search Laboratory, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio , TX, Report AFLRL No. 102, (AD-A062792), 1978. S S 20-5 Tabie 1 Test lubricant

  1. Analysis of lithology: Vegetation mixes in multispectral images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, J. B.; Smith, M.; Adams, J. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discrimination and identification of lithologies from multispectral images is discussed. Rock/soil identification can be facilitated by removing the component of the signal in the images that is contributed by the vegetation. Mixing models were developed to predict the spectra of combinations of pure end members, and those models were refined using laboratory measurements of real mixtures. Models in use include a simple linear (checkerboard) mix, granular mixing, semi-transparent coatings, and combinations of the above. The use of interactive computer techniques that allow quick comparison of the spectrum of a pixel stack (in a multiband set) with laboratory spectra is discussed.

  2. Analysis of the Performance of Mixed Finite Element Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-01

    October 1986 SUMMARY The initial goal of this project is to analyze various mixed methods based on the p- and h-p versions of the finite element methods...The convergence of mixed methods depends on two factors: (1) Approximability of polynomial spaces used (2) Stability. In the past year, the question...significant portion of the research is geared towards the investigation of mixed methods based on the ’p’ and ’h-p’ versions of the finite element method

  3. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1993-04-08

    In our second year of funding we began the testing phase of a number of new classes of lubricants. Three different testing collaborations have already begun and a fourth one is In the works with Dr. Stephen Hsu of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Dr. Hsu also plans to test some of the same materials for us that Shell Development is studying. With Dr. Bill Jones of NASA, we are studying the effects of branching an high temperature lubricant properties in perfluoropolyethers, Initially Bill Jones is comparing the lubrication and physical properties of perfluorotetraglyme and the following two spherical perfluoropolyethers, Note that one contains a fluorocarbon chain and the other one contains a fluorocarbon ether chain. The synthesis of these was reported in the last progress report. With Professor Patricia Thiel of Iowa State University, we are working on studies of perfluoromethylene oxide ethers and have prepared a series of four of these polyethers to study in collaboration with her research group. These perfluoromethylene oxide ethers have the best low temperature properties of any known lubricants. Thiel's group is studying their interactions with metals under extreme conditions. Thirdly, we have also begun an Interaction with W. August Birke of Shell Development Company in Houston for whom we have already prepared samples of the chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyether lubricants whose structures appear on page 54 of our research proposal. Each of these four structures is thought to have potential as lubricant additives to motor oils. We also have underway syntheses of other fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants. These new materials which are also promising as antifriction additives for motor oils appear ahead of the perfluoro additives as Appendix I to the progress report. Additionally for Birke and Shell Development we have at their request prepared the novel compound perfluoro salicylic acid. This synthesis was suggested by the

  4. Analysis of injury types for mixed martial arts athletes

    PubMed Central

    Ji, MinJoon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to examine the types of injuries associated with mixed martial arts and their location in order to provide substantial information to help reduce the risk of these injuries during mixed martial arts. [Subjects and Methods] Data were collected from 455 mixed martial arts athletes who practiced mixed martial arts or who participated in mixed martial arts competitions in the Seoul Metropolitan City and Gyeongnam Province of Korea between June 3, 2015, and November 6, 2015. Questionnaires were used to collect the data. The convenience sampling method was used, based on the non-probability sampling extraction method. [Results] The arm, neck, and head were the most frequent locations of the injuries; and lacerations, concussions, and contusions were the most frequently diagnosed types of injuries in the mixed martial arts athletes in this study. [Conclusion] Reducing the risk of injury by establishing an alert system and preventing critical injuries by incorporating safety measures are important. PMID:27313367

  5. Towards an optimised sputtered MoS2 lubricant film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, E. W.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the tribological quality of MoS2 lubricant films formed by magnetron sputtering is determined by the choice of sputtering conditions. By selecting the appropriate conditions, films of extremely high lubricity and endurance (in vacuum), which are well suited to many space applications, are obtained. Such MoS2 films, when applied to precision ball hearings, give rise to the lowest torques (for the given test conditions) yet seen in our laboratory. While a remarkably good performance is obtained in vacuum, tests in air show a marked deterioration in lubricating qualities. It is demonstrated that this is attributable to the adsorption of water vapor on MoS2 surfaces and that the degree of deterioration is related to the partial pressure of water vapor present. Analysis of results indicates that the factors relevant to obtaining optimum films are deposition rate and film composition.

  6. Transient Shear Flow of Model Lithium Lubricating Greases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, M. A.; Franco, J. M.; Valencia, C.; Kuhn, E.; Gallegos, C.

    2008-07-01

    This work deals with the analysis of the transient shear flow behaviour of lithium lubricating greases differing in soap concentration and base oil viscosity. The shear-induced evolution of lithium grease microstructure has been studied by means of stress-growth experiments. With this aim, different lubricating grease formulations were manufactured by modifying lithium 12-hydroxystearate concentration and base oil viscosity. Different rheological parameters, related to both the elastic response and the structural breakdown of greases, have been analysed. In this sense, it has been found that the elastic properties of lithium lubricating greases were highly influenced by soap concentration and oil viscosity. Moreover, an asymptotic tendency has been found for the stress overshoot by increasing shear rate. The asymptotic values of this parameter have been correlated to the friction coefficient obtained in a ball-disc tribometer.

  7. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28

    the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest

  8. Optical fiber spectroscopy for measuring quality indicators of lubricant oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazia Mignani, Anna; Ciaccheri, Leonardo; Díaz-Herrera, Natalia; Azelio Mencaglia, Andrea; Ottevaere, Heidi; Thienpont, Hugo; Francalanci, Stefano; Paccagnini, Alessandro; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2009-03-01

    A collection of lubricant oils from different types of turbines, which were characterized by different degrees of degradation, were analyzed by means of wide-range absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and scattering measurements. All these measurements were performed by means of optical fiber-based instrumentation that made use of compact lamps or LED illumination, and miniaturized spectrometers for detection. Multivariate data analysis was used to successfully correlate the wide optical spectral signature of lubricant oils with some of the most important parameters indicating the degree of oil degradation, such as TAN, JOAP index, water content and phosphorus.

  9. Optical fiber spectroscopy for measuring quality indicators of lubricant oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Díaz-Herrera, N.; Mencaglia, A. A.; Ottevaere, H.; Thienpont, H.; Francalanci, S.; Paccagnini, A.; Pavone, F.

    2008-04-01

    A collection of lubricant oils from different types of turbines, which were characterized by different degrees of degradation, were analyzed by means of UV-VIS-NIR absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and scattering measurements. All these measurements were performed by means of optical fiber-based instrumentation that made use of LEDs or compact lamps for illumination and miniaturized spectrometers for detection. Multivariate data analysis was used to successfully correlate the wide optical spectral signature of lubricant oils to some of the most important parameters for indicating the degree of degradation of the oil, such as TAN, JOAP-index, water content, and phosphorus.

  10. Tribological Properties of Carbon Nanocapsule Particles as Lubricant Additive.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren; Huang, Yao-Huei; Tsai, Ping-Chi; Hwang, Gan-Lin

    2014-10-01

    An experimental investigation is performed into the tribological properties of mineral oil lubricants containing carbon nanocapsules (CNCs) additives with various concentrations (wt.%). Friction characteristics and wear behaviors at contact interfaces are examined by the block-on-ring tests, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and mapping (MAP) analysis. The results suggest that the addition of CNCs to the mineral oil yields an effective reduction in the friction coefficient at the contact interface. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations clarify the lubrication mechanism of CNCs at the sliding system, indicating the tribological properties are essentially sensitive to the structural evolutions of CNCs.

  11. Self lubrication of bitumen froth in pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, D.D.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper I will review the main properties of water lubricated pipelines and explain some new features which have emerged from studies of self-lubrication of Syncrudes` bitumen froth. When heavy oils are lubricated with water, the water and oil are continuously injected into a pipeline and the water is stable when in a lubricating sheath around the oil core. In the case of bitumen froth obtained from the Alberta tar sands, the water is dispersed in the bitumen and it is liberated at the wall under shear; water injection is not necessary because the froth is self-lubricating.

  12. Lubricant Selection Manual, Phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Lowry, J. A.; Dufrane, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    Future spacecraft must be designated to operate for very long time periods in space. For example, a target goal for the Space Station is 30 years of operation. Although the actual life may be significantly less than this optimistic goal, the life will certainly be a critical issue in design. The bearings on primary components such as the alpha and beta joints must obviously be designed and lubricated with the objective of optimum performance life. In addition to these joints, there will be numerous other tribological (rubbing or rolling) interfaced that will be required to function for the life of the spacecraft. A major key to adequate performance of tribological interface is proper lubrication. Lubricants can be divided into two basic classes: solid films and liquids. Both types have been used extensively in space applications. Both have advantages and disadvantages that must be carefully considered in their selection. The purpose here is to summarize selection criteria for liquid and solid lubricants applied to long-life spacecraft.

  13. Perfluorinated polyalkylether based lubricant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.I.; Kaufman, J.; Kratzer, R.H.; Nakahara, J.H.; Paciorek, K.J.

    1980-03-25

    A description is given of a lubricant composition comprising a perfluorinated polyalkylether base fluid and a minor amount of a diphospha-striazine in which the two phosphorus atoms are substituted by aromatic groups and the carbon atom is substituted by a perfluoroalkyl or perfluoroalkylether moiety.

  14. Biobased lubricants via ruthenium catalysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The development of effective lubricants from natural oils is an ongoing mission. A few of the efforts have led to some promise, but many others have led elsewhere. An alternative approach to the direct use of natural oils may be needed. The drop-in replacement strategy allows industry to utilize mon...

  15. Thin Film Solid Lubricant Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoy, Patricia A.

    1997-01-01

    Tribological coatings for high temperature sliding applications are addressed. A sputter-deposited bilayer coating of gold and chromium is investigated as a potential solid lubricant for protection of alumina substrates during sliding at high temperature. Evaluation of the tribological properties of alumina pins sliding against thin sputtered gold films on alumina substrates is presented.

  16. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  17. Longevity Of Dry Film Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Stockwell, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes evaluation of dry film lubricants candidate for use in rotary joints of proposed Space Station. Study included experiments and theoretical analyses focused on longevity of sputtered molybdenum disulfide films and ion-plated lead films under conditions partially simulating rolling contact.

  18. Automotive Cooling and Lubricating Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This correspondence course, originally developed for the Marine Corps, is designed to provide new mechanics with a source of study materials to assist them in becoming more proficient in their jobs. The course contains four study units covering automotive cooling system maintenance, cooling system repair, lubricating systems, and lubrication…

  19. The influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings: Experimental analysis of the lubricant film and surface wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, William; Van Hooreweder, Brecht; Boonen, Rene; Sas, Paul; Moens, David

    2016-06-01

    Precise prediction of the lifetime of rolling element bearings is a crucial step towards a reliable design of many rotating machines. For bearings subjected to highly varying loads, recent research emphasises a strong reduction of the actual bearing lifetime w.r.t. the classically calculated bearing lifetime. This paper experimentally analyses the influence of external dynamic loads on the lifetime of rolling element bearings. A novel bearing test rig is introduced. The test rig is able to apply a fully controlled multi-axial static and dynamic load on a single test bearing. Also, different types and sizes of bearings can be tested. Two separate investigations are conducted. First, the behaviour of the lubricant film between the rolling elements and raceways is analysed. Increased metallic contact or breakdown of the film during dynamic excitation is investigated based on the measured electrical resistance through the bearing. The study shows that the lubricant film thickness follows the imposed variations of the load. Variations of the lubricant film thickness are similar to the variations when the magnitude of the static bearing load is changed. Second, wear of the raceway surfaces is analysed. Surface wear is investigated after a series of accelerated lifetime tests under high dynamic load. Due to sliding motion between asperities of the contacting surfaces in the bearing, polishing of the raceway honing structure occurs. This polishing is clearly observed on SEM images of the inner raceway after a test duration of only 0.5% of the calculated L10 life. Polishing wear of the surfaces, such as surface induced cracks and material delamination, is expected when the bearing is further exposed to the high dynamic load.

  20. Solubility, viscosity and density of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, D.R.

    1993-04-01

    This report presents results for low refrigerant concentration (70, 80, 90 and 100 weight percent lubricant) mixtures of the following fluids: CFC-12/ISO 32 naphthenic mineral oil, HCFC-22/ISO 32 naphthenic mineral oil, CFC-12/ISO 100 naphthenic mineral oil, HFC-134a/ISO 22 pentaerythritol ester mixed acid, HFC-134a/ISO 32 pentaerythritol ester mixed acid [number sign]1, HFC-134a/ISO 68 pentaerythritol ester mixed acid, HFC-134a/ISO 100 pentaerythritol ester mixed acid, HFC-134a/ISO 32 pentaerythritol ester mixed acid [number sign]2, HCFC-123/ISO 32 naphthenic mineral oil, HCFC-123/ISO 100 naphthenic mineral oil, HCFC-123/150 SUS alkylbenzene, HCFC-123/300 SUS alkylbenzene. These data have been reduced to engineering form and are presented in the form of a Daniel Chart. Equations are given along with statistical measures of goodness of fit.

  1. Lubrication of saliva substitutes at enamel-to-enamel contacts in an artificial mouth.

    PubMed

    Reeh, E S; Douglas, W H; Levine, M J

    1996-06-01

    Mechanisms of salivary lubrication can be quantitatively measured by a reduction in the coefficient of friction. It is important that lubrication be assessed under the conditions of the oral cavity to properly assess lubrication regimes. The relative lubricity of three artificial salivas and two controls were assessed at a bovine enamel interface in an artificial mouth with a range of conditions that approximate oral function. Statistical analysis indicated that the enamel lubricity of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and Oracare-D saliva substitutes were different from the other saliva substitutes and water. The low friction with Oracare-D and SDS saliva substitutes was because of resident amphipaths adsorbed at the enamel interface. Amphipaths adsorbed on enamel may provide a reduction in interocculsal friction and its resulting complications for patients with xerostomia.

  2. Solid Lubricants for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in gas foil bearing solid lubricants and computer based modeling has enabled the development of revolulionary Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These innovative new and solid lubricants at low speeds (start-up and shut down). Foil bearings are hydrodynamic, self acting fluid film bearings made from thin, flexible sheet metal foils. These thin foils trap a hydrodynamic lubricating air film between their surfaces and moving shaft surface. For low temperature applications, like ainrafl air cycle machines (ACM's), polymer coatings provide important solid lubrication during start-up and shut down prior to the development of the lubricating fluid film. The successful development of Oil-Free gas turbine engines requires bearings which can operate at much higher temperatures (greater than 300 C). To address this extreme solid lubrication need, NASA has invented a new family of compostie solid lubricant coatings, NASA PS300.

  3. Theory and practice of self-lubricated, oscillatory bearings for high-vacuum applications. II - Accelerated life tests and analysis of bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeks, C. R.

    1980-08-01

    Accelerated vacuum life tests of dry self-lubricating bearings were carried out by monitoring of friction torque and evaluation of the effects of thermal cycling and radial temperature gradients. Twenty-two bearings were tested for periods up to 15,000 hr in high vacuum and operated to 31 x 10 to the 9th degrees of oscillatory travel. A theoretical model of wear was constructed on the basis of friction, wear, and bearing torque test results, along with optical-scanning electron microscope and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopic examination of bearing components.

  4. Effect of an isotonic lubricant on sperm collection and sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Malvezzi, Helena; Sharma, Rakesh

    2013-05-01

    To assess the influence of an isotonic lubricant used during sperm sample collection on [1] ease of collection and [2] resultant sperm quality. Paired randomized cross-over design. Tertiary hospital. Healthy men over 18 years old with normal semen analysis as per World Health Organization 2010 guidelines. Collection of semen sample from 22 subjects by masturbation with or without the use of Pre-Seed personal lubricant. Qualitative survey results and quantitative sperm function outcomes were measured to determine resultant sperm quality and collection experience with and without Pre-Seed lubricant. The qualitative questionnaire results showed that 73% of donors prefer the semen collection process with the isotonic lubricant and 55% recommended the use of lubricant in their everyday collection. The motility, viability, membrane integrity, levels of reactive oxygen species, total antioxidant capacity, and percentage of DNA damage in collected semen samples were not affected by the use of the lubricant. More donors prefer, and find it easier, to collect semen samples with the use of the lubricant. The isotonic lubricant Pre-Seed did not compromise sperm quality as evaluated in an array of sperm assays, suggesting its safe use in fertility patients as required during sperm collection. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Keeping Your Compressor Healthy: Developing the Right Lubricant Formulation is the Key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnaz, Joseph A.; Kultgen, Derek W.

    2015-08-01

    Selecting the correct compressor lubricant is crucial to the duration of the compressor and the refrigerant systems’ useful life. However, developing an optimized lubricant for a refrigeration system requires a multitude of screenings and tests. The compatibility and stability of the lubricant with the refrigerant and compressor components needs to be examined at various accelerated conditions. The lubricant and refrigerant working viscosity must be determined at various refrigerant concentrations, temperatures and pressures as the diluted refrigerant in the lubricant has a significant effect on the viscosity. The correct lubricant formulation needs to be investigated for optimal performance. A compressor lubricant can provide many benefits to a refrigeration system such as bearing durability, sealing, and increased efficiency. Sometimes it is necessary to formulate the lubricant in order to optimize system performance. Specifically, this study investigated anti-wear properties of different oil additives to create a more robust refrigeration system. Many different additives and concentrations were considered and screened. Pending a successful screen test; these different additives’ anti-wear properties were analyzed using bench top tribology tests. To reduce uncertainty and provide more in-situ results the different additives were operated in a refrigerant compressor on a gas-loop testing apparatus. Oil samples were taken periodically during the test duration for analysis. Lastly, upon test completion the compressors were dismantled and the parts were examined to determine the effectiveness of the anti-wear additives.

  6. Treatment technology analysis for mixed waste containers and debris

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, R.J.; Brown, C.H.; Langton, C.A.; Askew, N.M.; Kan, T.; Schwinkendorf, W.E.

    1994-03-01

    A team was assembled to develop technology needs and strategies for treatment of mixed waste debris and empty containers in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, and to determine the advantages and disadvantages of applying the Debris and Empty Container Rules to these wastes. These rules issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) apply only to the hazardous component of mixed debris. Hazardous debris that is subjected to regulations under the Atomic Energy Act because of its radioactivity (i.e., mixed debris) is also subject to the debris treatment standards. The issue of treating debris per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) at the same time or in conjunction with decontamination of the radioactive contamination was also addressed. Resolution of this issue requires policy development by DOE Headquarters of de minimis concentrations for radioactivity and release of material to Subtitle D landfills or into the commercial sector. The task team recommends that, since alternate treatment technologies (for the hazardous component) are Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT): (1) funding should focus on demonstration, testing, and evaluation of BDAT on mixed debris, (2) funding should also consider verification of alternative treatments for the decontamination of radioactive debris, and (3) DOE should establish criteria for the recycle/reuse or disposal of treated and decontaminated mixed debris as municipal waste.

  7. Engine wear and lubricating oil contamination from plant oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Darcey, C.L.; LePori, W.A.; Yarbrough, C.M.

    1982-12-01

    Engine disassembly with wear measurements, and lubricating oil analysis were used to determine wear rates on a one cylinder diesel engine. Results are reported from short duration tests on the wear rates of various levels of processed sunflower oil, a 25% blend with diesel fuel, and processed cottonseed oil.

  8. Graphene based composite grease for elastohydrodynamic lubricated point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jayant; Anand, Gautam; Kumar, Deepak; Tandon, Naresh

    2016-09-01

    This paper present tribological and dynamic evaluation of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets as an additive in lithium grease. Highly dispersion mixing method is used to mix rGO in commercial lithium grease to prepare composite grease. Tribological contact under investigation is established by ball-on-disc configuration. Friction, noise and vibration responses are recorded for the point contact lubricated with composite grease and base lithium grease in rolling and sliding- induced-rolling conditions. Relative speed of disc with the speed of ball is varied in order to get sliding-induced-rolling contact. Observations are performed at different nornal loads and fixed speed in elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime. Results show existence of an optimum concentration (0.4% w/w) of rGO in commercial lithium grease. Friction, noise and vibration are recorded minimum for concentration of 0.4% w/w of rGO in commercial lithium grease. Reduction in friction coefficient is recorded up to 30% and 20% for rolling contact and sliding-induced-rolling contact respectively at optimum concentration of rGO in lithium grease. The lamellar structure of rGO in base grease controls the lubricity of concentrated point contact.

  9. Mixed methods analysis of urban environmental stewardship networks

    Treesearch

    James J.T. Connolly; Erika S. Svendsen; Dana R. Fisher; Lindsay K. Campbell

    2015-01-01

    While mixed methods approaches to research have been accepted practice within the social sciences for several decades (Tashakkori and Teddlie 2003), the rising demand for cross-disciplinary analyses of socio-environmental processes has necessitated a renewed examination of this approach within environmental studies. Urban environmental stewardship is one area where it...

  10. Regional Conference on the Analysis of the Unbalanced Mixed Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-31

    this complicated problem. Paper titles: The Present Status of Confidence Interval Estimation on Variance Components in Balanced and Unbalanced Random...Models; Prediction-Interval Procedures and (Fixed Effects) Confidence - Interval Procedures for Mixed Linear Models; The Use of Equivalent linear Models

  11. Optical analysis of liquid mixing in a minibioreactor.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, Jose R; Kostov, Yordan; Ram, Arun; French, Joseph A; Marten, Mark R; Rao, Govind

    2006-04-05

    A novel optical sensor was used to study mixing and mean circulation time in a model minibioreactor (12.5 mL stirred vessel, equipped with a paddle impeller). Rotational rates in the range of 10-1,000 rpm corresponding to Reynolds number between 14 and 1,350 were studied. Results suggest that depending on the impeller rotational speed, mixing times up to 214 +/- 87 s can be reproducibly achieved. The minibioreactor was operated in the transitional regime, and it was determined that the non-dimensional form for mixing time, NTheta(M) was linearly dependent on Reynolds number. A linear correlation between mean circulation time and the inverse of rotational speed was also determined. The mean circulation time dependence on rotational speed in the 12.5 mL stirred vessel is similar to those found in large-scale stirred vessels. These results suggest that mixing and circulation times found in large-scale reactors can be replicated in minibioreactors. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Consent, Informal Organization and Job Rewards: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laubach, Marty

    2005-01-01

    This study uses a mixed methods approach to workplace dynamics. Ethnographic observations show that the consent deal underlies an informal stratification that divides the workplace into an "informal periphery," a "conventional core" and an "administrative clan." The "consent deal" is defined as an exchange of autonomy, voice and schedule…

  13. First Generation College Student Leadership Potential: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojan-Clark, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    This mixed methods research compared the leadership potential of traditionally aged first generation college students to that of college students whose parents are college educated. A college education provides advantages to those who can obtain it (Baum & Payea, 2004; Black Issues in Higher Education, 2005; Education and the Value of…

  14. Consent, Informal Organization and Job Rewards: A Mixed Methods Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laubach, Marty

    2005-01-01

    This study uses a mixed methods approach to workplace dynamics. Ethnographic observations show that the consent deal underlies an informal stratification that divides the workplace into an "informal periphery," a "conventional core" and an "administrative clan." The "consent deal" is defined as an exchange of autonomy, voice and schedule…

  15. Investigations of lubricant rheology as applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, R. K.; Nagaraj, H. S.; Sanborn, D. M.; Winer, W. O.

    1975-01-01

    Traction prediction in sliding elastohydrodynamic (EHD) contacts was examined along with an elastohydrodynamic lubrication simulation of the effects of load and speed on temperatures in the EHD contact. An existing shear stress theory and lubricant rheological model were studied and evaluated by applying them to traction prediction. Results obtained using measured film thickness and surface temperature data, were compared with measured traction values. The infrared technique for measuring temperatures in an EHD contact was further developed and ball surface and fluid temperatures are reported for sliding speeds of 0.35 to 5.08 m/s at 0.52 to 2.03 GN/sq m maximum pressure and surface roughnesses of .011 to .381 micrometers c.1.a. The relationship between asperity interaction, as measured by relocation surface profilimetry and high frequency temperature measurements, and the ratio of film thickness to surface roughness was also studied.

  16. USDOE Top-of-Rail Lubricant Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mohumad F. Alzoubi; George R. Fenske; Robert A. Erck; Amrit S. Boparai

    2002-02-01

    Lubrication of wheel/rail systems has been recognized for the last two decades as a very important issue for railroads. Energy savings and less friction and wear can be realized if a lubricant can be used at the wheel/rail interface. On the other hand, adverse influences are seen in operating and wear conditions if improper or excessive lubrication is used. Also, inefficiencies in lubrication need to be avoided for economic and environmental reasons. The top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant concept was developed by Texaco Corporation to lubricate wheels and rails effectively and efficiently. Tranergy Corporation has been developing its SENTRAEN 2000{trademark} lubrication system for the last ten years, and this revolutionary new high-tech on-board rail lubrication system promises to dramatically improve the energy efficiency, performance, safety, and track environment of railroads. The system is fully computer-controlled and ensures that all of the lubricant is consumed as the end of the train passes. Lubricant quantity dispensed is a function of grade, speed, curve, and axle load. Tranergy also has its LA4000{trademark} wheel and rail simulator, a lubrication and traction testing apparatus. The primary task of this project was collecting and analyzing the volatile and semivolatile compounds produced as the lubricant was used. The volatile organic compounds were collected by Carbotrap cartridges and analyzed by adsorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The semivolatile fraction was obtained by collecting liquid that dripped from the test wheel. The collected material was also analyzed by GC/MS. Both of these analyses were qualitative. The results indicated that in the volatile fraction, the only compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund List of Analytes detected were contaminants either in the room air or from other potential contamination sources in the laboratory. Similarly, in the semivolatile fraction none of the detected

  17. Lubricant Use Among Men Who Have Sex With Men Reporting Anal Intercourse in Bangkok, Thailand: Impact of HIV Status and Implications for Prevention.

    PubMed

    Thienkrua, Warunee; Todd, Catherine S; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Sukwicha, Wichuda; Yafant, Somsak; Tippanont, Narongritt; Varangrat, Anchalee; Khlaimanee, Pechpailin; Sirivongrangson, Pachara; Holtz, Timothy H

    2016-01-01

    This analysis measures prevalence and correlates of consistent lubricant use among a cohort of Thai men who have sex with men (MSM). Lubricant use was queried at the 12-month follow-up visit. Consistent lubricant use was evaluated with logistic regression. Consistent lubricant use was reported by 77.0% of men and was associated with consistent condom use with casual partners, while binge drinking, payment for sex, and inconsistent condom use with casual, and steady, partners were negatively associated. Though consistent lubricant use is common among this Thai MSM cohort, further promotion is needed with MSM engaging in risky sexual practices.

  18. Identifying lubricant options for compressor bearing designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnaz, J.; Seeton, C.; Dixon, L.

    2017-08-01

    Today’s refrigeration and air conditioning market is not only driven by the environmental aspects of the refrigerants, but also by the energy efficiency and reliability of system operation. Numerous types of compressor designs are used in refrigeration and air conditioning applications which means that different bearings are used; and in some cases, multiple bearing types within a single compressor. Since only one lubricant is used, it is important to try to optimize the lubricant to meet the various demands and requirements for operation. This optimization entails investigating different types of lubricant chemistries, viscosities, and various formulation options. What makes evaluating these options more challenging is the refrigerant which changes the properties of the lubricant delivered to the bearing. Once the lubricant and refrigerant interaction are understood, through various test methods, then work can start on collaborating with compressor engineers on identifying the lubricant chemistry and formulation options. These interaction properties are important to the design engineer to make decisions on the adequacy of the lubricant before compressor tests are started. This paper will discuss the process to evaluate lubricants for various types of compressors and bearing design with focus on what’s needed for current refrigerant trends. In addition, the paper will show how the lubricant chemistry choice can be manipulated through understanding of the bearing design and knowledge of interaction with the refrigerant to maximize performance. Emphasis will be placed on evaluation of synthetic lubricants for both natural and synthetic low GWP refrigerants.

  19. Self-adaptive surface texture design for friction reduction across the lubrication regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen M.; Jing, Yang; Zhao, Fei

    2016-03-01

    Surface texturing has been shown to reduce friction and improve durability in mechanical face seals and metal forming operations, and lightly loaded thrust bearings. However, the success has been limited to conformal contacts and low load high speed operating conditions, i.e. hydrodynamic lubrication dominated regime. Both experiments and numerical simulations have shown that textural patterns, under higher loading and/or slower speeds may increase friction and even cause the lubrication film collapse. Specific designs of surface texture pattern, as its shape, depth and density, are required for different lubrication regimes. Our own study has shown (Hsu et al 2014 J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 47 335307) that large/shallow dimple reduces friction in hydrodynamic lubrication regime, whereas small/deep dimple shows benefit in mixed/boundary lubrication regimes (if the textural designs can provides hydrodynamic/hydrostatic lift forces to reduce the machine loading). In considering an engine component typically experiences duty cycles that may cross various lubrication regimes, a multiscale surface texture design appears attractive. This type of mixed shape texturing combines textures designed for low load, high speed operating conditions and the textures that are designed for high load, low speed operations. In this paper, two types of multiscale surface texture designs are presented. Ball-on-three-flats (BOTF) wear tester (under high loading conditions) is used to evaluate the performance of these multiscale texture designs along with the baselines of un-textured surfaces under the same surface preparation procedures. Two texture designs with only a single shape dimples are included in the study. Results suggest that multiscale surface texture design not only further reduces friction in comparison to the textures with single shape dimples, but also shows the effectiveness across hydrodynamic regimes to the mixed lubrication regimes.

  20. Determinants of friction in soft elastohydrodynamic lubrication.

    PubMed

    Moghani, Taraneh; Butler, James P; Loring, Stephen H

    2009-05-29

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) protects soft tissues from damage and wear in many biological systems (e.g. synovial joints, cornea of the eye, and pleural surfaces of the lung and chest wall). Among studies of lubrication of deformable solids, few have examined the effects of external loads, geometry, and material properties on EHL of soft tissues. To examine these effects, we studied the tribology of soft tissues in a two-dimensional finite element simulation of a thin layer of fluid separating a sliding rigid surface from a soft asperity or bump with an initial sinusoidal shape. We computed the frictional force, deformation of the solid, and change in fluid thickness as functions of independent variables: sliding velocity, normal load, material properties, and bump amplitude and length. Double-logarithmic regression was used to determine the exponents of the scaling relationships of friction coefficient and minimum fluid thickness to the independent variables. The analysis showed that frictional shear force is strongly dependent on velocity, viscosity, and load, moderately dependent on bump length and elasticity, and only weakly dependent on the bump amplitude. The minimum fluid thickness is strongly dependent on velocity and viscosity, and changes moderately with load, elasticity, amplitude, and length. The shape of the bump has little effect. The results confirm that the shear-induced deformation of an initially symmetrical shape, including generalizations to other symmetrical geometries such as quadratic or piecewise linear bumps, leads to load-supporting behavior.

  1. Determinants of friction in soft elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    PubMed Central

    Moghani, Taraneh; Butler, James P.; Loring, Stephen H.

    2009-01-01

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) protects soft tissues from damage and wear in many biological systems (e.g. synovial joints, cornea of the eye, and pleural surfaces of the lung and chest wall). Among studies of lubrication of deformable solids, few have examined the effects of external loads, geometry, and material properties on EHL of soft tissues. To examine these effects, we studied the tribology of soft tissues in a two dimensional finite element simulation of a thin layer of fluid separating a sliding rigid surface from a soft asperity or bump with an initial sinusoidal shape. We computed the frictional force, deformation of the solid, and change in fluid thickness as functions of independent variables: sliding velocity, normal load, material properties, and bump amplitude and length. Double logarithmic regression was used to determine the exponents of the scaling relationships of friction coefficient and minimum fluid thickness to the independent variables. The analysis showed that frictional shear force is strongly dependent on velocity, viscosity, and load, moderately dependent on bump length and elasticity, and only weakly dependent on the bump amplitude. The minimum fluid thickness is strongly dependent on velocity and viscosity, and changes moderately with load, elasticity, amplitude, and length. The shape of the bump has little effect. The results confirm that the shear-induced deformation of an initially symmetrical shape, including generalizations to other symmetrical geometries such as quadratic or piecewise linear bumps, leads to load-supporting behavior. PMID:19358993

  2. The characterisation of commercial lubricant formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Scrivens, J.; Yates, H.; Bunn, A.

    1995-12-31

    Modern lubricant formulations are complex mixtures of base esters, antiwear additives, corrosion inhibitors and other modifiers. Their characterisation poses a difficult analytical challenge. A major market for these products is in the replacement of traditional CFC based refrigerants by modern alternatives. Conventional lubricants such as mineral oil are incompatible with the new refrigerants. Soft ionisation mass spectrometry (CI, LSIMS and FID), coupled with tandem mass spectrometry where required, has been used in conjunction with GC-MS and NMR in order to characterise these formulations. Statistical analysis of the soft ionisation data has provided further information regarding the detailed composition of the complex esters. This combination of experimental approaches provides a powerful method for the characterisation of these materials. A number of different types of polyol are used in the manufacture of the base esters with tetra- and hexa-esters the most common. The acids used, in general, vary in carbon number and in isomeric distribution and this leads to considerable complexity in the product.

  3. Linear Stability Regime Analysis of the Compressible Reacting Mixing Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, M. J.; Reynolds, William C.; Mansour, N. N.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that a compressible reacting mixing layer can develop two peaks in the mean density weighted vorticity profile. Linear stability analyses show that at these peaks two distinct 'outer' instability modes appear in addition to the more common central mode, which exists unaccompanied in incompressible nonreacting flows. The present study parametrically analyzes the effects of compressibility, heat release, stoichiometry, and density ratio on the amplification rate and obliquity of each stability mode. The mean profiles used in the spatial stability calculation are generated by self-similar solutions of the compressible boundary layer equations combined with the assumption of infinitely fast chemistry. It is shown that the influence of stoichiometry and density ratio on the peaks of the density weighted vorticity profile determines which modes will dominate. Of particular interest are the conditions where two modes are equally amplified, causing the mixing layer to develop into a 'colayer' structure.

  4. Design and analysis of mixed cropping experiments for indigenous Pacific Islands

    Treesearch

    Mareko P. Tofinga

    1993-01-01

    Mixed cropping (including agroforestry) often gives yield advan-tages as opposed to monocropping. Many criteria have been used to assess yield advantage in crop mixtures. Some of these are presented. In addition, the relative merits of replacement, additive and bivariate factorial designs are discussed. The concepts of analysis of mixed cropping are applied to an...

  5. The Analysis of Repeated Measurements with Mixed-Model Adjusted "F" Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalchuk, Rhonda K.; Keselman, H. J.; Algina, James; Wolfinger, Russell D.

    2004-01-01

    One approach to the analysis of repeated measures data allows researchers to model the covariance structure of their data rather than presume a certain structure, as is the case with conventional univariate and multivariate test statistics. This mixed-model approach, available through SAS PROC MIXED, was compared to a Welch-James type statistic.…

  6. Mixing Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Insights into Design and Analysis Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieber, Eli

    2009-01-01

    This article describes and discusses issues related to research design and data analysis in the mixing of qualitative and quantitative methods. It is increasingly desirable to use multiple methods in research, but questions arise as to how best to design and analyze the data generated by mixed methods projects. I offer a conceptualization for such…

  7. Mixing Qualitative and Quantitative Methods: Insights into Design and Analysis Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieber, Eli

    2009-01-01

    This article describes and discusses issues related to research design and data analysis in the mixing of qualitative and quantitative methods. It is increasingly desirable to use multiple methods in research, but questions arise as to how best to design and analyze the data generated by mixed methods projects. I offer a conceptualization for such…

  8. Elastic-plastic mixed-iterative finite element analysis: Implementation and performance assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutjahjo, Edhi; Chamis, Christos C.

    1993-01-01

    An elastic-plastic algorithm based on Von Mises and associative flow criteria is implemented in MHOST-a mixed iterative finite element analysis computer program developed by NASA Lewis Research Center. The performance of the resulting elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is examined through a set of convergence studies. Membrane and bending behaviors of 4-node quadrilateral shell finite elements are tested for elastic-plastic performance. Generally, the membrane results are excellent, indicating the implementation of elastic-plastic mixed-iterative analysis is appropriate.

  9. The effect of the electrical double layer on hydrodynamic lubrication: a non-monotonic trend with increasing zeta potential

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Dalei

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, a modified Reynolds equation including the electrical double layer (EDL)-induced electroviscous effect of lubricant is established to investigate the effect of the EDL on the hydrodynamic lubrication of a 1D slider bearing. The theoretical model is based on the nonlinear Poisson–Boltzmann equation without the use of the Debye–Hückel approximation. Furthermore, the variation in the bulk electrical conductivity of the lubricant under the influence of the EDL is also considered during the theoretical analysis of hydrodynamic lubrication. The results show that the EDL can increase the hydrodynamic load capacity of the lubricant in a 1D slider bearing. More importantly, the hydrodynamic load capacity of the lubricant under the influence of the EDL shows a non-monotonic trend, changing from enhancement to attenuation with a gradual increase in the absolute value of the zeta potential. This non-monotonic hydrodynamic lubrication is dependent on the non-monotonic electroviscous effect of the lubricant generated by the EDL, which is dominated by the non-monotonic electrical field strength and non-monotonic electrical body force on the lubricant. The subject of the paper is the theoretical modeling and the corresponding analysis. PMID:28884056

  10. The effect of the electrical double layer on hydrodynamic lubrication: a non-monotonic trend with increasing zeta potential.

    PubMed

    Jing, Dalei; Pan, Yunlu; Wang, Xiaoming

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, a modified Reynolds equation including the electrical double layer (EDL)-induced electroviscous effect of lubricant is established to investigate the effect of the EDL on the hydrodynamic lubrication of a 1D slider bearing. The theoretical model is based on the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation without the use of the Debye-Hückel approximation. Furthermore, the variation in the bulk electrical conductivity of the lubricant under the influence of the EDL is also considered during the theoretical analysis of hydrodynamic lubrication. The results show that the EDL can increase the hydrodynamic load capacity of the lubricant in a 1D slider bearing. More importantly, the hydrodynamic load capacity of the lubricant under the influence of the EDL shows a non-monotonic trend, changing from enhancement to attenuation with a gradual increase in the absolute value of the zeta potential. This non-monotonic hydrodynamic lubrication is dependent on the non-monotonic electroviscous effect of the lubricant generated by the EDL, which is dominated by the non-monotonic electrical field strength and non-monotonic electrical body force on the lubricant. The subject of the paper is the theoretical modeling and the corresponding analysis.

  11. Analysis of Azodicarbonamide in Wheat Flour and Prepared Flour Mixes.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Akiko; Oishi, Mitsuo; Hayafuji, Chieko; Kobayashi, Chigusa; Shindo, Tetsuya; Ozawa, Hideki; Nakazato, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Azodicarbonamide (ADA) is used in some countries as a flour bleaching agent and a dough conditioner. However, ADA is prohibited for use as a food additive in Japan. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an efficient and sensitive method to determine ADA in wheat flour. A simple and practical procedure to analyze ADA in wheat flour and prepared flour mixes was developed. ADA was extracted from samples by ultrasonication with acetone. ADA in the solution was derivatized with triphenylphosphine (TPP). The ADA-TPP derivative was concentrated and cleaned up using a reversed-phase solid-phase extraction cartridge, and the ADA-TPP derivative was analyzed using HPLC for determination and LC-MS/MS for identification. Good linearity was achieved over the concentration range of 0.25-100 ppm ADA in wheat flour and prepared flour mixes. The mean recoveries from wheat flour and prepared flour mixes fortified at the levels of 1 and 10 ppm ranged from 86.9 to 101.0%, and the coefficients of variation ranged from 1.9 to 3.4%.

  12. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants. Progress report, April 1992--March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, R.J.

    1993-04-01

    Synthesis and testing was begun on a number of new classes of lubricants: perfluoropolyethers (branching effects), perfluoromethylene oxide ethers, chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyethers, fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants, glycerine- based perfluoropolyesters, perfluoro epoxy ether chains, etc.

  13. A Mixed Methods Content Analysis of the Research Literature in Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schram, Asta B.

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, more and more researchers in science education have been turning to the practice of combining qualitative and quantitative methods in the same study. This approach of using mixed methods creates possibilities to study the various issues that science educators encounter in more depth. In this content analysis, I evaluated 18 studies from science education journals as they relate to the definition, design, and overall practice of using mixed methods. I scrutinized a purposeful sample, derived from 3 journals (the International Journal of Science Education, the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, and the Research in Science Education) in terms of the type of data collected, timing, priority, design, the mixing of the 2 data strands in the studies, and the justifications authors provide for using mixed methods. Furthermore, the articles were evaluated in terms of how well they met contemporary definitions for mixed methods research. The studies varied considerably in the use and understanding of mixed methods. A systematic evaluation of the employment of mixed methods methodology was used to identify the studies that best reflected contemporary definitions. A comparison to earlier content analyses of mixed methods research indicates that researchers' knowledge of mixed methods methodology may be increasing. The use of this strategy in science education research calls, however, for an improved methodology, especially concerning the practice of mixing. Suggestions are given on how to best use this approach.

  14. Performance Of Perfluoropolyalkylether Lubricant System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K.; Masuda, S.; Lin, Wen-Huey; Bierschenk, T.; Kawa, H.; Juhlke, T.; Lagow, R.

    1995-01-01

    Perfluoro-polyalkylethers (PFPAE) constitute class of fluids having characteristics of high thermal oxidative stability, good vicosity-temperature characteristics, good elastohydrodynamic film-forming capabilities, low volatility, and non-flammability. One unfortunate drawback PFPAE causes severe metal corrosion and fluid degradation when used in oxidizing atmosphere. Reports of interest deal with synthesis of PFPAE-type liquids and development of additive to reduce oxidizing atmosphere degradation. Properties and molecular structures reported in detail. Also lubricant performance over range of conditions.

  15. Solid Lubricated Rolling Element Bearings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-02-15

    where L coefficient of friction Sf = film shear strength Pf = film yield pressure 0 P = substrate yield pressure 5 S becomes the...as supported by known facts. , In addition to reducing the coefficient of friction and, therefore, controlling the traction of a solid lubricated...appropriate friction coefficients . For a much closer simulation, 40 it will be necessary to make certain modifications to the program. These required

  16. Physiological effects of diet mixing on consumer fitness: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lefcheck, Jonathan S; Whalen, Matthew A; Davenport, Theresa M; Stone, Joshua P; Duffy, J Emmett

    2013-03-01

    The degree of dietary generalism among consumers has important consequences for population, community, and ecosystem processes, yet the effects on consumer fitness of mixing food types have not been examined comprehensively. We conducted a meta-analysis of 161 peer-reviewed studies reporting 493 experimental manipulations of prey diversity to test whether diet mixing enhances consumer fitness based on the intrinsic nutritional quality of foods and consumer physiology. Averaged across studies, mixed diets conferred significantly higher fitness than the average of single-species diets, but not the best single prey species. More than half of individual experiments, however, showed maximal growth and reproduction on mixed diets, consistent with the predicted benefits of a balanced diet. Mixed diets including chemically defended prey were no better than the average prey type, opposing the prediction that a diverse diet dilutes toxins. Finally, mixed-model analysis showed that the effect of diet mixing was stronger for herbivores than for higher trophic levels. The generally weak evidence for the nutritional benefits of diet mixing in these primarily laboratory experiments suggests that diet generalism is not strongly favored by the inherent physiological benefits of mixing food types, but is more likely driven by ecological and environmental influences on consumer foraging.

  17. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication of elliptical contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The determination of the minimum film thickness within contact is considered for both fully flooded and starved conditions. A fully flooded conjunction is one in which the film thickness is not significantly changed when the amount of lubricant is increased. The fully flooded results presented show the influence of contact geometry on minimum film thickness as expressed by the ellipticity parameter and the dimensionless speed, load, and materials parameters. These results are applied to materials of high elastic modulus (hard EHL), such as metal, and to materials of low elastic modulus(soft EHL), such as rubber. In addition to the film thickness equations that are developed, contour plots of pressure and film thickness are given which show the essential features of elastohydrodynamically lubricated conjunctions. The crescent shaped region of minimum film thickness, with its side lobes in which the separation between the solids is a minimum, clearly emerges in the numerical solutions. In addition to the 3 presented for the fully flooded results, 15 more cases are used for hard EHL contacts and 18 cases are used for soft EHL contacts in a theoretical study of the influence of lubricant starvation on film thickness and pressure. From the starved results for both hard and soft EHL contacts, a simple and important dimensionless inlet boundary distance is specified. This inlet boundary distance defines whether a fully flooded or a starved condition exists in the contact. Contour plots of pressure and film thickness in and around the contact are shown for conditions.

  18. The PM-200 lubrication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma sprayed composite coating of metal-bonded chromium carbide with additions of silver and thermochemically stable fluorides were previously reported to be lubricative in pin on desk bench tests from room temperature to 900 C. An early coating formulation of this type, designated as PS-200, was successfully tested as a cylinder coating in a Stirling engine at a TRRT of 760 C in a hydrogen atmosphere, and as a backup lubricant for gas bearings to 650 C. A subsequent optimization program has shown that tribological properties are further improved by increasing the solid lubricant content. The improved coating is designated as PS-212. The same powder formulation was used to make free-standing powder metallurgy (PM-212) parts by sintering or hot isostatic pressing. The process is very attractive for making parts that cannot be readily plasma sprayed such as bushings and cylinders that have small bore diameters and/or high length to diameter ratios. The properties of coatings and free-standing parts fabricated from these powders are reviewed.

  19. Model analysis of influences of aerosol mixing state upon its optical properties in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Zhang, Meigen; Zhu, Lingyun; Xu, Liren

    2013-07-01

    The air quality model system RAMS (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System)-CMAQ (Models-3 Community Multi-scale Air Quality) coupled with an aerosol optical/radiative module was applied to investigate the impact of different aerosol mixing states (i.e., externally mixed, half externally and half internally mixed, and internally mixed) on radiative forcing in East Asia. The simulation results show that the aerosol optical depth (AOD) generally increased when the aerosol mixing state changed from externally mixed to internally mixed, while the single scattering albedo (SSA) decreased. Therefore, the scattering and absorption properties of aerosols can be significantly affected by the change of aerosol mixing states. Comparison of simulated and observed SSAs at five AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites suggests that SSA could be better estimated by considering aerosol particles to be internally mixed. Model analysis indicates that the impact of aerosol mixing state upon aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF) is complex. Generally, the cooling effect of aerosols over East Asia are enhanced in the northern part of East Asia (Northern China, Korean peninsula, and the surrounding area of Japan) and are reduced in the southern part of East Asia (Sichuan Basin and Southeast China) by internal mixing process, and the variation range can reach ±5 W m-2. The analysis shows that the internal mixing between inorganic salt and dust is likely the main reason that the cooling effect strengthens. Conversely, the internal mixture of anthropogenic aerosols, including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon, and organic carbon, could obviously weaken the cooling effect.

  20. Silica Lubrication in Faults (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Rempe, M.; Lamothe, K.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; White, J. C.; Mitchell, T. M.; Andrews, M.; Di Toro, G.

    2013-12-01

    Silica-rich rocks are common in the crust, so silica lubrication may be important for causing fault weakening during earthquakes if the phenomenon occurs in nature. In laboratory friction experiments on chert, dramatic shear weakening has been attributed to amorphization and attraction of water from atmospheric humidity to form a 'silica gel'. Few observations of the slip surfaces have been reported, and the details of weakening mechanism(s) remain enigmatic. Therefore, no criteria exist on which to make comparisons of experimental materials to natural faults. We performed a series of friction experiments, characterized the materials formed on the sliding surface, and compared these to a geological fault in the same rock type. Experiments were performed in the presence of room humidity at 2.5 MPa normal stress with 3 and 30 m total displacement for a variety of slip rates (10-4 - 10-1 m/s). The friction coefficient (μ) reduced from >0.6 to ~0.2 at 10-1 m/s, but only fell to ~0.4 at 10-2 - 10-4 m/s. The slip surfaces and wear material were observed using laser confocal Raman microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Experiments at 10-1 m/s formed wear material consisting of ≤1 μm powder that is aggregated into irregular 5-20 μm clumps. Some material disaggregated during analysis with electron beams and lasers, suggesting hydrous and unstable components. Compressed powder forms smooth pavements on the surface in which grains are not visible (if present, they are <100 nm). Powder contains amorphous material and as yet unidentified crystalline and non-crystalline forms of silica (not quartz), while the worn chert surface underneath shows Raman spectra consistent with a mixture of quartz and amorphous material. If silica amorphization facilitates shear weakening in natural faults, similar wear materials should be formed, and we may be able to identify them through microstructural studies. However, the sub