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Sample records for mixed quantum classical

  1. High-NOON states by mixing quantum and classical light.

    PubMed

    Afek, Itai; Ambar, Oron; Silberberg, Yaron

    2010-05-14

    Precision measurements can be brought to their ultimate limit by harnessing the principles of quantum mechanics. In optics, multiphoton entangled states, known as NOON states, can be used to obtain high-precision phase measurements, becoming more and more advantageous as the number of photons grows. We generated "high-NOON" states (N = 5) by multiphoton interference of quantum down-converted light with a classical coherent state in an approach that is inherently scalable. Super-resolving phase measurements with up to five entangled photons were produced with a visibility higher than that obtainable using classical light only.

  2. Mixed quantum-classical versus full quantum dynamics: Coupled quasiparticle-oscillator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, Holger; Esser, Bernd

    1997-05-01

    The relation between the dynamical properties of a coupled quasiparticle-oscillator system in the mixed quantum-classical and fully quantized descriptions is investigated. The system is considered as a model for applying a stepwise quantization. Features of the nonlinear dynamics in the mixed description such as the presence of a separatrix structure or regular and chaotic motion are shown to be reflected in the evolu- tion of the quantum state vector of the fully quantized system. In particular, it is demonstrated how wave packets propagate along the separatrix structure of the mixed description, and that chaotic dynamics leads to a strongly entangled quantum state vector. Special emphasis is given to viewing the system from a dyn- amical Born-Oppenheimer approximation defining integrable reference oscillators, and elucidating the role of the nonadiabatic couplings which complement this approximation into a rigorous quantization scheme.

  3. Mixed quantum-classical equilibrium in global flux surface hopping

    SciTech Connect

    Sifain, Andrew E.; Wang, Linjun; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2015-06-14

    Global flux surface hopping (GFSH) generalizes fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH)—one of the most popular approaches to nonadiabatic molecular dynamics—for processes exhibiting superexchange. We show that GFSH satisfies detailed balance and leads to thermodynamic equilibrium with accuracy similar to FSSH. This feature is particularly important when studying electron-vibrational relaxation and phonon-assisted transport. By studying the dynamics in a three-level quantum system coupled to a classical atom in contact with a classical bath, we demonstrate that both FSSH and GFSH achieve the Boltzmann state populations. Thermal equilibrium is attained significantly faster with GFSH, since it accurately represents the superexchange process. GFSH converges closer to the Boltzmann averages than FSSH and exhibits significantly smaller statistical errors.

  4. Dynamically consistent method for mixed quantum-classical simulations: A semiclassical approach.

    PubMed

    Antipov, Sergey V; Ye, Ziyu; Ananth, Nandini

    2015-05-14

    We introduce a new semiclassical (SC) framework, the Mixed Quantum-Classical Initial Value Representation (MQC-IVR), that can be tuned to reproduce existing quantum-limit and classical-limit SC approximations to quantum real-time correlation functions. Applying a modified Filinov transformation to a quantum-limit SC formulation leads to the association of a Filinov parameter with each degree of freedom in the system; varying this parameter from zero to infinity controls the extent of quantization of the corresponding mode. The resulting MQC-IVR expression provides a consistent dynamic framework for mixed quantum-classical simulations and we demonstrate its numerical accuracy in the calculation of real-time correlation functions for a model 1D system and a model 2D system over the full range of quantum- to classical-limit behaviors.

  5. Dynamically consistent method for mixed quantum-classical simulations: A semiclassical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, Sergey V.; Ye, Ziyu; Ananth, Nandini

    2015-05-14

    We introduce a new semiclassical (SC) framework, the Mixed Quantum-Classical Initial Value Representation (MQC-IVR), that can be tuned to reproduce existing quantum-limit and classical-limit SC approximations to quantum real-time correlation functions. Applying a modified Filinov transformation to a quantum-limit SC formulation leads to the association of a Filinov parameter with each degree of freedom in the system; varying this parameter from zero to infinity controls the extent of quantization of the corresponding mode. The resulting MQC-IVR expression provides a consistent dynamic framework for mixed quantum-classical simulations and we demonstrate its numerical accuracy in the calculation of real-time correlation functions for a model 1D system and a model 2D system over the full range of quantum- to classical-limit behaviors.

  6. Analysis of the forward-backward trajectory solution for the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Kapral, Raymond

    2013-04-07

    Mixed quantum-classical methods provide powerful algorithms for the simulation of quantum processes in large and complex systems. The forward-backward trajectory solution of the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation in the mapping basis [C.-Y. Hsieh and R. Kapral, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 22A507 (2012)] is one such scheme. It simulates the dynamics via the propagation of forward and backward trajectories of quantum coherent state variables, and the propagation of bath trajectories on a mean-field potential determined jointly by the forward and backward trajectories. An analysis of the properties of this solution, numerical tests of its validity and an investigation of its utility for the study of nonadiabtic quantum processes are given. In addition, we present an extension of this approximate solution that allows one to systematically improve the results. This extension, termed the jump forward-backward trajectory solution, is analyzed and tested in detail and its various implementations are discussed.

  7. Modeling vibrational resonance in linear hydrocarbon chain with a mixed quantum-classical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2009-04-01

    The quantum dynamics of a vibrational excitation in a linear hydrocarbon model system is studied with a new mixed quantum-classical method. The method is suited to treat many-body systems consisting of a low dimensional quantum primary part coupled to a classical bath. The dynamics of the primary part is governed by the quantum corrected propagator, with the corrections defined in terms of matrix elements of zeroth order propagators. The corrections are taken to the classical limit by introducing the frozen Gaussian approximation for the bath degrees of freedom. The ability of the method to describe dynamics of multidimensional systems has been tested. The results obtained by the method have been compared to previous quantum simulations performed with the quasiadiabatic path integral method.

  8. Calculating two-dimensional spectra with the mixed quantum-classical Ehrenfest method.

    PubMed

    van der Vegte, C P; Dijkstra, A G; Knoester, J; Jansen, T L C

    2013-07-25

    We present a mixed quantum-classical simulation approach to calculate two-dimensional spectra of coupled two-level electronic model systems. We include the change in potential energy of the classical system due to transitions in the quantum system using the Ehrenfest method. We study how this feedback of the quantum system on the classical system influences the shape of two-dimensional spectra. We show that the feedback leads to the expected Stokes shift of the energy levels in the quantum system. This subsequently leads to changes in the population transfer between quantum sites, which in turn influence the intensities of the peaks in two-dimensional spectra. The obtained spectra are compared with spectra calculated using the Hierarchical Equations of Motion method which is exact. While the spectra match perfectly for short waiting times, clear differences are found for longer waiting times. This is attributed to a violation of detailed balance between the quantum states in the Ehrenfest method. The energy of the total quantum-classical system however does obey a Boltzmann distribution, when coupled to a stochastic heat bath.

  9. Mixed Quantum-Classical Liouville Approach for Calculating Proton-Coupled Electron-Transfer Rate Constants.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-07-12

    In this work, we derive a general mixed quantum-classical formula for calculating thermal proton-coupled electron-transfer (PCET) rate constants, starting from the time integral of the quantum flux-flux correlation function. This formula allows for the direct simulation of PCET reaction dynamics via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach. Owing to the general nature of the derivation, this formula does not rely on any prior mechanistic assumptions and can be applied across a wide range of electronic and protonic coupling regimes. To test the validity of this formula, we applied it to a reduced model of a condensed-phase PCET reaction. Good agreement with the numerically exact rate constant is obtained, demonstrating the accuracy of our formalism. We believe that this approach constitutes a solid foundation for future investigations of the rates and mechanisms of a wide range of PCET reactions.

  10. Accurate Calculations of Rotationally Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections Using Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-16

    For computational treatment of rotationally inelastic scattering of molecules, we propose to use the mixed quantum/classical theory, MQCT. The old idea of treating translational motion classically, while quantum mechanics is used for rotational degrees of freedom, is developed to the new level and is applied to Na + N2 collisions in a broad range of energies. Comparison with full-quantum calculations shows that MQCT accurately reproduces all, even minor, features of energy dependence of cross sections, except scattering resonances at very low energies. The remarkable success of MQCT opens up wide opportunities for computational predictions of inelastic scattering cross sections at higher temperatures and/or for polyatomic molecules and heavier quenchers, which is computationally close to impossible within the full-quantum framework.

  11. Can Quantized Vibrational Effects Be Obtained from Ehrenfest Mixed Quantum-Classical Dynamics?

    PubMed

    Goings, Joshua J; Lingerfelt, David B; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-12-15

    We explore the question of whether mean-field or "Ehrenfest" mixed quantum-classical dynamics is capable of capturing the quantized vibrational features in photoabsorption spectra that result from infrared and Raman-active vibrational transitions. We show that vibrational and electronic absorption spectra can indeed be obtained together within a single Ehrenfest simulation. Furthermore, the electronic transitions show new sidebands that are absent in electronic dynamics simulations with fixed nuclei. Inspection of the electronic sidebands reveals that the spacing corresponds to vibrational frequencies of totally symmetric vibrational modes of the ground electronic state. A simple derivation of the time-evolving dipole in the presence of external fields and vibrational motion shows the origin of these features, demonstrating that mixed quantum-classical Ehrenfest dynamics is capable of producing infrared, Raman, and electronic absorption spectra from a single simulation.

  12. A new trajectory branching approximation to propagate the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shuming; Xie, Weiwei; Shi, Qiang

    2014-10-02

    Starting from the mixed quantum-classical Liouville (MQCL) equation, we derive a new trajectory branching method as a modification to the conventional mean field approximation. In the new method, the mean field approximation is used to propagate the mixed quantum-classical dynamics for short times. When the mean field description becomes invalid, new trajectories are added in the simulation by branching the single trajectory into multiple ones. To achieve this, a new set of variables are defined to monitor the deviations of the dynamics on different potential energy surfaces from the reference mean field trajectory, and their equations of motion are derived from the MQCL equation based on the method of first moment expansion. The new method is tested on several one-dimensional two surface problems and is shown to correctly solve the problem of the mean field approximation in several cases.

  13. Mixed quantum-classical simulations of the vibrational relaxation of photolyzed carbon monoxide in a hemoprotein.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Alexander; Falvo, Cyril; Meier, Christoph

    2016-08-07

    We present mixed quantum-classical simulations on relaxation and dephasing of vibrationally excited carbon monoxide within a protein environment. The methodology is based on a vibrational surface hopping approach treating the vibrational states of CO quantum mechanically, while all remaining degrees of freedom are described by means of classical molecular dynamics. The CO vibrational states form the "surfaces" for the classical trajectories of protein and solvent atoms. In return, environmentally induced non-adiabatic couplings between these states cause transitions describing the vibrational relaxation from first principles. The molecular dynamics simulation yields a detailed atomistic picture of the energy relaxation pathways, taking the molecular structure and dynamics of the protein and its solvent fully into account. Using the ultrafast photolysis of CO in the hemoprotein FixL as an example, we study the relaxation of vibrationally excited CO and evaluate the role of each of the FixL residues forming the heme pocket.

  14. Mixed quantum-classical simulations of the vibrational relaxation of photolyzed carbon monoxide in a hemoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Alexander; Falvo, Cyril; Meier, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    We present mixed quantum-classical simulations on relaxation and dephasing of vibrationally excited carbon monoxide within a protein environment. The methodology is based on a vibrational surface hopping approach treating the vibrational states of CO quantum mechanically, while all remaining degrees of freedom are described by means of classical molecular dynamics. The CO vibrational states form the "surfaces" for the classical trajectories of protein and solvent atoms. In return, environmentally induced non-adiabatic couplings between these states cause transitions describing the vibrational relaxation from first principles. The molecular dynamics simulation yields a detailed atomistic picture of the energy relaxation pathways, taking the molecular structure and dynamics of the protein and its solvent fully into account. Using the ultrafast photolysis of CO in the hemoprotein FixL as an example, we study the relaxation of vibrationally excited CO and evaluate the role of each of the FixL residues forming the heme pocket.

  15. Mixed Quantum/Classical Approach for Description of Molecular Collisions in Astrophysical Environments.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2015-05-21

    An efficient and accurate mixed quantum/classical theory approach for computational treatment of inelastic scattering is extended to describe collision of an atom with a general asymmetric-top rotor polyatomic molecule. Quantum mechanics, employed to describe transitions between the internal states of the molecule, and classical mechanics, employed for description of scattering of the atom, are used in a self-consistent manner. Such calculations for rotational excitation of HCOOCH3 in collisions with He produce accurate results at scattering energies above 15 cm(-1), although resonances near threshold, below 5 cm(-1), cannot be reproduced. Importantly, the method remains computationally affordable at high scattering energies (here up to 1000 cm(-1)), which enables calculations for larger molecules and at higher collision energies than was possible previously with the standard full-quantum approach. Theoretical prediction of inelastic cross sections for a number of complex organic molecules observed in space becomes feasible using this new computational tool.

  16. Classical and Mixed Quantum-Classical Dynamics of Adsorbate-Surface Systems: Application to Non-Thermal Desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzegilenko, Fedor N.

    1995-01-01

    Both classical and mixed quantum-classical approaches have been used to study the non-thermal desorption of CO from a variety of model surfaces to which it is weakly adsorbed. In addition to three degrees of freedom for the CO adsorbate (bond stretching, physisorption, libration) which are treated quantum mechanically in the mixed method, a significant number of lattice degrees of freedom have been included using the generalized Langevin approximation. In the mixed method, two sets of equations for the quantum and classical subsystems (coupled via the Ehrenfest theorem) are solved self-consistently using the discrete variable representation method for the propagation of the quantum wave function. Non-thermal amounts of energy have been put into both the CO stretching and librational modes at t = 0. We find that for initial values of the stretching quantum number vstr = 0 -4 desorption does not take place at all within the simulation time unless there is also significant librational excitation. The detailed mechanism by which librational energy causes desorption is discussed. The role of the surface is also explored; we find that the probability of desorption is a non-monotonic function of the Debye frequency of the solid in the range 28-5000 cm^{-1}, and is larger for "non-rigid" lattices with low Debye frequencies in both of the methods. The classical results are explained in terms of resonances between low frequency libration and physisorption modes and high frequency phonon modes. For the combined method, two different mechanisms for desorption (due to lattice effects and due to symmetry properties of wave function) have been found and analyzed in detail. A comparative analysis of the two methods is presented and the limitations of the mixed scheme are discussed. An indirect mechanism for populating rapidly desorbing, highly excited levels of surface CO, based on intermolecular V to V,R energy exchange between the CO and vibrationally excited surface hydroxyl

  17. Tunneling dynamics with a mixed quantum-classical method: Quantum corrected propagator combined with frozen Gaussian wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2008-07-01

    The recently developed mixed quantum-classical propagation method is extended to treat tunneling effects in multidimensional systems. Formulated for systems consisting of a quantum primary part and a classical bath of heavier particles, the method employs a frozen Gaussian description for the bath degrees of freedom, while the dynamics of the quantum subsystem is governed by a corrected propagator. The corrections are defined in terms of matrix elements of zeroth-order propagators. The method is applied to a model system of a double-well potential bilinearly coupled to a harmonic oscillator. The extension of the method, which includes nondiagonal elements of the correction propagator, enables an accurate treatment of tunneling in an antisymmetric double-well potential.

  18. Recent Advances in Development and Applications of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Babikov, Dmitri; Semenov, Alexander

    2016-01-28

    A mixed quantum/classical approach to inelastic scattering (MQCT) is developed in which the relative motion of two collision partners is treated classically, and the rotational and vibrational motion of each molecule is treated quantum mechanically. The cases of molecule + atom and molecule + molecule are considered including diatomics, symmetric-top rotors, and asymmetric-top rotor molecules. Phase information is taken into consideration, permitting calculations of elastic and inelastic, total and differential cross sections for excitation and quenching. The method is numerically efficient and intrinsically parallel. The scaling law of MQCT is favorable, which enables calculations at high collision energies and for complicated molecules. Benchmark studies are carried out for several quite different molecular systems (N2 + Na, H2 + He, CO + He, CH3 + He, H2O + He, HCOOCH3 + He, and H2 + N2) in a broad range of collision energies, which demonstrates that MQCT is a viable approach to inelastic scattering. At higher collision energies it can confidently replace the computationally expensive full-quantum calculations. At low collision energies and for low-mass systems results of MQCT are less accurate but are still reasonable. A proposal is made for blending MQCT calculations at higher energies with full-quantum calculations at low energies.

  19. Fast Numerical Evaluation of Time-Derivative Nonadiabatic Couplings for Mixed Quantum-Classical Methods.

    PubMed

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Nagesh, Jayashree; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2015-11-05

    We have developed a numerical differentiation scheme that eliminates evaluation of overlap determinants in calculating the time-derivative nonadiabatic couplings (TDNACs). Evaluation of these determinants was the bottleneck in previous implementations of mixed quantum-classical methods using numerical differentiation of electronic wave functions in the Slater determinant representation. The central idea of our approach is, first, to reduce the analytic time derivatives of Slater determinants to time derivatives of molecular orbitals and then to apply a finite-difference formula. Benchmark calculations prove the efficiency of the proposed scheme showing impressive several-order-of-magnitude speedups of the TDNAC calculation step for midsize molecules.

  20. Multipartite quantum and classical correlations in symmetric n-qubit mixed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Gian Luca; Campbell, Steve

    2016-11-01

    We discuss how to calculate genuine multipartite quantum and classical correlations in symmetric, spatially invariant, mixed n-qubit density matrices. We show that the existence of symmetries greatly reduces the amount of free parameters to be optimized in order to find the optimal measurement that minimizes the conditional entropy in the discord calculation. We apply this approach to the states exhibited dynamically during a thermodynamic protocol to extract maximum work. We also apply the symmetry criterion to a wide class of physically relevant cases of spatially homogeneous noise over multipartite entangled states. Exploiting symmetries we are able to calculate the non-local and genuine quantum features of these states and note some interesting properties.

  1. A mixed quantum-classical description of pheophorbide a linear absorption spectra: Quantum-corrections of the Qy- and Qx-absorption vibrational satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megow, Jörg; Kulesza, Alexander; May, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    The ground-state classical path approximation is utilized to compute molecular absorption spectra in a mixed quantum-classical frame. To improve the description for high-frequency vibrational satellites, related quantum correction factors are introduced. The improved method is demonstrated for the Qy- and Qx-bands of pheophorbide a.

  2. A mixed quantum-classical description of excitation energy transfer in supramolecular complexes: Förster theory and beyond.

    PubMed

    Megow, Jörg; Röder, Beate; Kulesza, Alexander; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; May, Volkhard

    2011-02-25

    Electronic excitation energy transfer (EET) is described theoretically for the chromophore complex P(4) formed by a butanediamine dendrimer to which four pheophorbide-a molecules are covalently linked. To achieve a description with atomic resolution, and to account for the effect of an ethanol solvent, a mixed quantum-classical methodology is utilized. Room-temperature molecular dynamics simulations are used to describe the nuclear dynamics, and EET is accounted for in utilizing a mixed quantum-classical formulation of the transition rates. Therefore, the full quantum expression of the EET rates is given and the change to a mixed quantum-classical version is briefly explained. The description results in the calculation of transition rates which coincide rather satisfactory with available experimental data on P(4). It is also shown that different assumptions of classical Förster theory are not valid for P(4). The temporal behavior of EET deduced from the rate equations is confronted with that following from the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation entering the mixed quantum-classical description of EET. From this we can conclude that EET in flexible chromophore complexes such as P(4) can be rather satisfactory estimated by single transition rates. A correct description, however, is only achievable by using a sufficiently large set of rates that correspond to the various possible equilibrium configurations of the complex.

  3. Mixed Quantum-Classical Dynamics Using Collective Electronic Variables: A Better Alternative to Electronic Friction Theories.

    PubMed

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2017-01-19

    An accurate description of nonadiabatic dynamics of molecular species on metallic surfaces poses a serious computational challenge associated with a multitude of closely spaced electronic states. We propose a mixed quantum-classical scheme that addresses this challenge by introducing collective electronic variables. These variables are defined through analytic block-diagonalization applied to the time-dependent Hamiltonian matrix governing the electronic dynamics. We compare our scheme with a simplified Ehrenfest approach and with a full-memory electronic friction model on a 1D "adatom + atomic chain" model. Our simulations demonstrate that collective-mode dynamics with only a few (two to three) electronic variables is robust and can describe a variety of situations: from a chemisorbed atom on an insulator to an atom on a metallic surface. Our molecular model also reveals that the friction approach is prone to unpredictable and catastrophic failures.

  4. Rotational quenching of H2O by He: mixed quantum/classical theory and comparison with quantum results.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Mikhail; Dubernet, Marie-Lise; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-04-07

    The mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT) formulated in the space-fixed reference frame is used to compute quenching cross sections of several rotationally excited states of water molecule by impact of He atom in a broad range of collision energies, and is tested against the full-quantum calculations on the same potential energy surface. In current implementation of MQCT method, there are two major sources of errors: one affects results at energies below 10 cm(-1), while the other shows up at energies above 500 cm(-1). Namely, when the collision energy E is below the state-to-state transition energy ΔE the MQCT method becomes less accurate due to its intrinsic classical approximation, although employment of the average-velocity principle (scaling of collision energy in order to satisfy microscopic reversibility) helps dramatically. At higher energies, MQCT is expected to be accurate but in current implementation, in order to make calculations computationally affordable, we had to cut off the basis set size. This can be avoided by using a more efficient body-fixed formulation of MQCT. Overall, the errors of MQCT method are within 20% of the full-quantum results almost everywhere through four-orders-of-magnitude range of collision energies, except near resonances, where the errors are somewhat larger.

  5. Nonadiabatic mixed quantum-classical dynamic simulation of pi-stacked oligophenylenevinylenes.

    PubMed

    Sterpone, Fabio; Bedard-Hearn, Michael J; Rossky, Peter J

    2009-04-16

    We present results from the first nonadiabatic (NA), nonequilibrium mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations of pi-stacked oligophenylvinylene (OPV) chains with a quantum electronic Hamiltonian (Pariser-Parr-Pople with excited states given by configuration interaction) that goes beyond the tight-binding approximation. The chains pack approximately 3.6 A apart in the ground state at 300 K, and we discuss how thermal motions, chiefly a relative sliding motion along the oligomer backbone, affect the electronic structure. We assign the electronic absorption spectrum primarily to the S(0) --> S(2) transition as transitions from the ground state to S(1) and S(3) are particularly weak. After photoexcitation, the system rapidly decays via NA transitions to S(1) in under 150 fs. On S(1), the system relaxes as a bound exciton, localized on one chain that may hop between chains with a characteristic time between 300 and 800 fs. We find that the system does not make a rapid transition to the ground state because both the NA and radiative couplings between S(1) and S(0) are weak.

  6. Mixed quantum-classical studies of energy partitioning in unimolecular chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bladow, Landon Lowell

    A mixed quantum-classical reaction path Hamiltonian method is utilized to study the dynamics of unimolecular reactions. The method treats motion along the reaction path classically and treats the transverse vibrations quantum mechanically. The theory leads to equations that predict the disposai of the exit-channel potential energy to product translation and vibration. In addition, vibrational state distributions are obtained for the product normal modes. Vibrational excitation results from the curvature of the minimum energy reaction path. The method is applied to six unimolecular reactions: HF elimination from fluoroethane, 1,1-difluoroethane, 1,1-difluoroethene, and trifluoromethane; and HCl elimination from chloroethane and acetyl chloride. The minimum energy paths were calculated at either the MP2 or B3LYP level of theory. In all cases, the majority of the vibrational excitation of the products occurs in the HX fragment. The results are compared to experimental data and other theoretical results, where available. The best agreement between the experimental and calculated HX vibrational distributions is found for the halogenated ethanes, and the experimental deduction that the majority of the HX vibrational excitation arises from the potential energy release is supported. It is believed that the excess energy provided in experiments contributes to the poorer agreement between experiment and theory observed for HF elimination from 1,1-difluoroethene and trifluoromethane. An attempt is described to incorporate a treatment of the excess energy into the present method. However, the sign of the curvature coupling elements is then found to affect the dynamics. Overall, the method appears to be an efficient dynamical tool for modeling the disposal of the exit-channel potential energy in unimolecular reactions.

  7. On the equivalence between non-factorizable mixed-strategy classical games and quantum games

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Azhar; Chappell, James M.; Abbott, Derek

    2016-01-01

    A game-theoretic setting provides a mathematical basis for analysis of strategic interaction among competing agents and provides insights into both classical and quantum decision theory and questions of strategic choice. An outstanding mathematical question is to understand the conditions under which a classical game-theoretic setting can be transformed to a quantum game, and under which conditions there is an equivalence. In this paper, we consider quantum games as those that allow non-factorizable probabilities. We discuss two approaches for obtaining a non-factorizable game and study the outcome of such games. We demonstrate how the standard version of a quantum game can be analysed as a non-factorizable game and determine the limitations of our approach. PMID:26909174

  8. Dissipative dynamics with the corrected propagator method. Numerical comparison between fully quantum and mixed quantum/classical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2010-05-01

    The recently developed quantum-classical method has been applied to the study of dissipative dynamics in multidimensional systems. The method is designed to treat many-body systems consisting of a low dimensional quantum part coupled to a classical bath. Assuming the approximate zeroth order evolution rule, the corrections to the quantum propagator are defined in terms of the total Hamiltonian and the zeroth order propagator. Then the corrections are taken to the classical limit by introducing the frozen Gaussian approximation for the bath degrees of freedom. The evolution of the primary part is governed by the corrected propagator yielding the exact quantum dynamics. The method has been tested on two model systems coupled to a harmonic bath: (i) an anharmonic (Morse) oscillator and (ii) a double-well potential. The simulations have been performed at zero temperature. The results have been compared to the exact quantum simulations using the surrogate Hamiltonian approach.

  9. An analysis of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz A; Hanna, Gabriel

    2014-07-28

    The nonadiabatic dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions is investigated for the first time using a surface-hopping algorithm based on the solution of the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE). This method provides a rigorous treatment of quantum coherence/decoherence effects in the dynamics of mixed quantum-classical systems, which is lacking in the molecular dynamics with quantum transitions surface-hopping approach commonly used for simulating PCET reactions. Within this approach, the protonic and electronic coordinates are treated quantum mechanically and the solvent coordinate evolves classically on both single adiabatic surfaces and on coherently coupled pairs of adiabatic surfaces. Both concerted and sequential PCET reactions are studied in detail under various subsystem-bath coupling conditions and insights into the dynamical principles underlying PCET reactions are gained. Notably, an examination of the trajectories reveals that the system spends the majority of its time on the average of two coherently coupled adiabatic surfaces, during which a phase enters into the calculation of an observable. In general, the results of this paper demonstrate the applicability of QCLE-based surface-hopping dynamics to the study of PCET and emphasize the importance of mean surface evolution and decoherence effects in the calculation of PCET rate constants.

  10. Randomness: Quantum versus classical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2016-05-01

    Recent tremendous development of quantum information theory has led to a number of quantum technological projects, e.g. quantum random generators. This development had stimulated a new wave of interest in quantum foundations. One of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations is the elaboration of a consistent and commonly accepted interpretation of a quantum state. Closely related problem is the clarification of the notion of quantum randomness and its interrelation with classical randomness. In this short review, we shall discuss basics of classical theory of randomness (which by itself is very complex and characterized by diversity of approaches) and compare it with irreducible quantum randomness. We also discuss briefly “digital philosophy”, its role in physics (classical and quantum) and its coupling to the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (QM).

  11. Comparing classical and quantum equilibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malabarba, Artur S. L.; Farrelly, Terry; Short, Anthony J.

    2016-09-01

    By using a physically relevant and theory independent definition of measurement-based equilibration, we show quantitatively that equilibration is easier for quantum systems than for classical systems, in the situation where the initial state of the system is completely known (a pure state). This shows that quantum equilibration is a fundamental aspect of many quantum systems, while classical equilibration relies on experimental ignorance. When the state is not completely known (a mixed state), this framework also shows that quantum equilibration requires weaker conditions.

  12. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of mixed quantum classical ensembles: application to noncontact atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kantorovich, L N

    2002-08-26

    Using the nonequilibrium statistical operator method, we suggest a new general method of treating dynamics of a combined system consisting of interacting classical and quantum parts. The method is illustrated on the tip dynamics in the noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) where a macroscopic tip interacts with a quantum microscopic system (the surface and the nanotip). The derived general equation of motion for the tip and the Fokker-Planck equation, applicable even at low temperatures, contain memory effects and a friction term which should (at least partially) be responsible for the observed energy dissipation in NC-AFM experiments.

  13. Mixed quantum classical calculation of proton transfer reaction rates: From deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Weiwei; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang

    2014-05-07

    We present mixed quantum classical calculations of the proton transfer (PT) reaction rates represented by a double well system coupled to a dissipative bath. The rate constants are calculated within the so called nontraditional view of the PT reaction, where the proton motion is quantized and the solvent polarization is used as the reaction coordinate. Quantization of the proton degree of freedom results in a problem of non-adiabatic dynamics. By employing the reactive flux formulation of the rate constant, the initial sampling starts from the transition state defined using the collective reaction coordinate. Dynamics of the collective reaction coordinate is treated classically as over damped diffusive motion, for which the equation of motion can be derived using the path integral, or the mixed quantum classical Liouville equation methods. The calculated mixed quantum classical rate constants agree well with the results from the numerically exact hierarchical equation of motion approach for a broad range of model parameters. Moreover, we are able to obtain contributions from each vibrational state to the total reaction rate, which helps to understand the reaction mechanism from the deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes. The numerical results are also compared with those from existing approximate theories based on calculations of the non-adiabatic transmission coefficients. It is found that the two-surface Landau-Zener formula works well in calculating the transmission coefficients in the deep tunneling regime, where the crossing point between the two lowest vibrational states dominates the total reaction rate. When multiple vibrational levels are involved, including additional crossing points on the free energy surfaces is important to obtain the correct reaction rate using the Landau-Zener formula.

  14. Mixed quantum classical calculation of proton transfer reaction rates: from deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes.

    PubMed

    Xie, Weiwei; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Lili; Shi, Qiang

    2014-05-07

    We present mixed quantum classical calculations of the proton transfer (PT) reaction rates represented by a double well system coupled to a dissipative bath. The rate constants are calculated within the so called nontraditional view of the PT reaction, where the proton motion is quantized and the solvent polarization is used as the reaction coordinate. Quantization of the proton degree of freedom results in a problem of non-adiabatic dynamics. By employing the reactive flux formulation of the rate constant, the initial sampling starts from the transition state defined using the collective reaction coordinate. Dynamics of the collective reaction coordinate is treated classically as over damped diffusive motion, for which the equation of motion can be derived using the path integral, or the mixed quantum classical Liouville equation methods. The calculated mixed quantum classical rate constants agree well with the results from the numerically exact hierarchical equation of motion approach for a broad range of model parameters. Moreover, we are able to obtain contributions from each vibrational state to the total reaction rate, which helps to understand the reaction mechanism from the deep tunneling to over the barrier regimes. The numerical results are also compared with those from existing approximate theories based on calculations of the non-adiabatic transmission coefficients. It is found that the two-surface Landau-Zener formula works well in calculating the transmission coefficients in the deep tunneling regime, where the crossing point between the two lowest vibrational states dominates the total reaction rate. When multiple vibrational levels are involved, including additional crossing points on the free energy surfaces is important to obtain the correct reaction rate using the Landau-Zener formula.

  15. Classical-Quantum Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliynyk, Todd A.

    2016-12-01

    We introduce a new approach to analyzing the interaction between classical and quantum systems that is based on a limiting procedure applied to multi-particle Schrödinger equations. The limit equations obtained by this procedure, which we refer to as the classical-quantum limit, govern the interaction between classical and quantum systems, and they possess many desirable properties that are inherited in the limit from the multi-particle quantum system. As an application, we use the classical-quantum limit equations to identify the source of the non-local signalling that is known to occur in the classical-quantum hybrid scheme of Hall and Reginatto. We also derive the first order correction to the classical-quantum limit equation to obtain a fully consistent first order approximation to the Schrödinger equation that should be accurate for modeling the interaction between particles of disparate mass in the regime where the particles with the larger masses are effectively classical.

  16. On the alternatives for bath correlators and spectral densities from mixed quantum-classical simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Valleau, Stephanie; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2012-12-14

    We investigate on the procedure of extracting a 'spectral density' from mixed QM/MM calculations and employing it in open quantum systems models. In particular, we study the connection between the energy gap correlation function extracted from ground state QM/MM and the bath spectral density used as input in open quantum system approaches. We introduce a simple model which can give intuition on when the ground state QM/MM propagation will give the correct energy gap. We also discuss the role of higher order correlators of the energy-gap fluctuations which can provide useful information on the bath. Further, various semiclassical corrections to the spectral density, are applied and investigated. Finally, we apply our considerations to the photosynthetic Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. For this system, our results suggest the use of the Harmonic prefactor for the spectral density rather than the Standard one, which was employed in the simulations of the system carried out to date.

  17. Mixed quantum/classical investigation of the photodissociation of NH3(A) and a practical method for maintaining zero-point energy in classical trajectories.

    PubMed

    Bonhommeau, David; Truhlar, Donald G

    2008-07-07

    The photodissociation dynamics of ammonia upon excitation of the out-of-plane bending mode (mode nu(2) with n(2)=0,[ellipsis (horizontal)],6 quanta of vibration) in the A electronic state is investigated by means of several mixed quantum/classical methods, and the calculated final-state properties are compared to experiments. Five mixed quantum/classical methods are tested: one mean-field approach (the coherent switching with decay of mixing method), two surface-hopping methods [the fewest switches with time uncertainty (FSTU) and FSTU with stochastic decay (FSTU/SD) methods], and two surface-hopping methods with zero-point energy (ZPE) maintenance [the FSTUSD+trajectory projection onto ZPE orbit (TRAPZ) and FSTUSD+minimal TRAPZ (mTRAPZ) methods]. We found a qualitative difference between final NH(2) internal energy distributions obtained for n(2)=0 and n(2)>1, as observed in experiments. Distributions obtained for n(2)=1 present an intermediate behavior between distributions obtained for smaller and larger n(2) values. The dynamics is found to be highly electronically nonadiabatic with all these methods. NH(2) internal energy distributions may have a negative energy tail when the ZPE is not maintained throughout the dynamics. The original TRAPZ method was designed to maintain ZPE in classical trajectories, but we find that it leads to unphysically high internal vibrational energies. The mTRAPZ method, which is new in this work and provides a general method for maintaining ZPE in either single-surface or multisurface trajectories, does not lead to unphysical results and is much less time consuming. The effect of maintaining ZPE in mixed quantum/classical dynamics is discussed in terms of agreement with experimental findings. The dynamics for n(2)=0 and n(2)=6 are also analyzed to reveal details not available from experiment, in particular, the time required for quenching of electronic excitation and the adiabatic energy gap and geometry at the time of quenching.

  18. Mixed quantum-classical reaction path dynamics of C2H5F --> C2H4 + HF.

    PubMed

    Stopera, Christopher J; Bladow, Landon L; Thweatt, W David; Page, Michael

    2008-11-20

    A mixed quantum-classical method for calculating product energy partitioning based on a reaction path Hamiltonian is presented and applied to HF elimination from fluoroethane. The goal is to describe the effect of the potential energy release on the product energies using a simple model of quantized transverse vibrational modes coupled to a classical reaction path via the path curvature. Calculations of the minimum energy path were done at the B3LYP/6-311++G(2d,2p) and MP2/6-311++G** levels of theory, followed by energy-partitioning dynamics calculations. The results for the final HF vibrational state distribution were found to be in good qualitative agreement with both experimental studies and quasiclassical trajectory simulations.

  19. Plasmon enhanced molecular absorption: A mixed quantum-classical description of supramolecular complexes attached to a metal nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megow, Jörg; May, Volkhard

    2014-01-01

    The application of a mixed quantum-classical methodology for an investigation of single pheophorbide-a molecules (Pheos) and respective supramolecular complexes is continued to effects caused by a nearby placed metal nanoparticle (MNP). Therefore, the classical simulation of the molecular nuclear degrees of freedom is combined with a uniform quantum description of the molecular electronic excitations coupled to those of the MNP. To account for the short MNP plasmon life time the quantum dynamics of the electronic degrees of freedom is formulated in the framework of a system-bath theory. Linear absorption spectra are calculated for a spherical 14 nm diameter Au-MNP decorated with isolated Pheos or with P16 complexes formed by 16 Pheos. The spectra are analyzed with respect to the molecular orientation at the MNP surface. While all studies on P16 only account for the Pheo Qy-transition we also present data on the MNP induced change of the single Pheo Qx-absorption.

  20. Mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics analysis of the molecular-level mechanisms of vibrational frequency shifts.

    PubMed

    Morales, Christine M; Thompson, Ward H

    2007-06-28

    A detailed analysis of the origins of vibrational frequency shifts of diatomic molecules (I2 and ICl) in a rare gas (Xe) liquid is presented. Specifically, vibrationally adiabatic mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain the instantaneous frequency shifts and correlate the shifts to solvent configurations. With this approach, important mechanistic questions are addressed, including the following: How many solvent atoms determine the frequency shift? What solvent atom configurations lead to blue shifts, and which lead to red shifts? What is the effect of solute asymmetry? The mechanistic analysis can be generally applied and should be useful in understanding what information is provided by infrared and Raman spectra about the environment of the probed vibrational mode.

  1. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solutions based upon mixed quantum-classical approximation. I. Proton transfer reaction in water.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Atsushi; Kojima, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Susumu

    2014-08-28

    In order to investigate proton transfer reaction in solution, mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations have been carried out based on our previously proposed quantum equation of motion for the reacting system [A. Yamada and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044507 (2008)]. Surface hopping method was applied to describe forces acting on the solvent classical degrees of freedom. In a series of our studies, quantum and solvent effects on the reaction dynamics in solutions have been analysed in detail. Here, we report our mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations for intramolecular proton transfer of malonaldehyde in water. Thermally activated proton transfer process, i.e., vibrational excitation in the reactant state followed by transition to the product state and vibrational relaxation in the product state, as well as tunneling reaction can be described by solving the equation of motion. Zero point energy is, of course, included, too. The quantum simulation in water has been compared with the fully classical one and the wave packet calculation in vacuum. The calculated quantum reaction rate in water was 0.70 ps(-1), which is about 2.5 times faster than that in vacuum, 0.27 ps(-1). This indicates that the solvent water accelerates the reaction. Further, the quantum calculation resulted in the reaction rate about 2 times faster than the fully classical calculation, which indicates that quantum effect enhances the reaction rate, too. Contribution from three reaction mechanisms, i.e., tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing reactions, is 33:46:21 in the mixed quantum-classical calculations. This clearly shows that the tunneling effect is important in the reaction.

  2. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solutions based upon mixed quantum-classical approximation. I. Proton transfer reaction in water

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Atsushi; Kojima, Hidekazu; Okazaki, Susumu

    2014-08-28

    In order to investigate proton transfer reaction in solution, mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations have been carried out based on our previously proposed quantum equation of motion for the reacting system [A. Yamada and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044507 (2008)]. Surface hopping method was applied to describe forces acting on the solvent classical degrees of freedom. In a series of our studies, quantum and solvent effects on the reaction dynamics in solutions have been analysed in detail. Here, we report our mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics calculations for intramolecular proton transfer of malonaldehyde in water. Thermally activated proton transfer process, i.e., vibrational excitation in the reactant state followed by transition to the product state and vibrational relaxation in the product state, as well as tunneling reaction can be described by solving the equation of motion. Zero point energy is, of course, included, too. The quantum simulation in water has been compared with the fully classical one and the wave packet calculation in vacuum. The calculated quantum reaction rate in water was 0.70 ps{sup −1}, which is about 2.5 times faster than that in vacuum, 0.27 ps{sup −1}. This indicates that the solvent water accelerates the reaction. Further, the quantum calculation resulted in the reaction rate about 2 times faster than the fully classical calculation, which indicates that quantum effect enhances the reaction rate, too. Contribution from three reaction mechanisms, i.e., tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing reactions, is 33:46:21 in the mixed quantum-classical calculations. This clearly shows that the tunneling effect is important in the reaction.

  3. Inelastic Scattering of Identical Molecules within Framework of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory: Application to Rotational Excitations in H2 + H2.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2016-06-09

    Theoretical foundation is laid out for description of permutation symmetry in the inelastic scattering processes that involve collisions of two identical molecules, within the framework of the mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT). In this approach, the rotational (and vibrational) states of two molecules are treated quantum-mechanically, whereas their translational motion (responsible for scattering) is treated classically. This theory is applied to H2 + H2 system, and the state-to-state transition cross sections are compared versus those obtained from the full-quantum calculations and experimental results from the literature. Good agreement is found in all cases. It is also found that results of MQCT, where the Coriolis coupling is included classically, are somewhat closer to exact full-quantum results than results of the other approximate quantum methods, where those coupling terms are neglected. These new developments allow applications of MQCT to a broad variety of molecular systems and processes.

  4. Perspective: Quantum or classical coherence?

    PubMed

    Miller, William H

    2012-06-07

    Some coherence effects in chemical dynamics are described correctly by classical mechanics, while others only appear in a quantum treatment--and when these are observed experimentally it is not always immediately obvious whether their origin is classical or quantum. Semiclassical theory provides a systematic way of adding quantum coherence to classical molecular dynamics and thus provides a useful way to distinguish between classical and quantum coherence. Several examples are discussed which illustrate both cases. Particularly interesting is the situation with electronically non-adiabatic processes, where sometimes whether the coherence effects are classical or quantum depends on what specific aspects of the process are observed.

  5. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  6. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region. PMID:27189039

  7. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-18

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  8. Photodynamics and time-resolved fluorescence of azobenzene in solution: a mixed quantum-classical simulation.

    PubMed

    Cusati, Teresa; Granucci, Giovanni; Persico, Maurizio

    2011-04-06

    We have simulated the photodynamics of azobenzene by means of the Surface Hopping method. We have considered both the trans → cis and the cis → trans processes, caused by excitation in the n → π* band (S(1) state). To bring out the solvent effects on the excited state dynamics, we have run simulations in four different environments: in vacuo, in n-hexane, in methanol, and in ethylene glycol. Our simulations reproduce very well the measured quantum yields and the time dependence of the intensity and anisotropy of the transient fluorescence. Both the photoisomerization and the S(1) → S(0) internal conversion require the torsion of the N═N double bond, but the N-C bond rotations and the NNC bending vibrations also play a role. In the trans → cis photoconversion the N═N torsional motion and the excited state decay are delayed by increasing the solvent viscosity, while the cis → trans processes are less affected. The analysis of the simulation results allows the experimental observations to be explained in detail, and in particular the counterintuitive increase of the trans → cis quantum yield with viscosity, as well as the relationship between the excited state dynamics and the solvent effects on the fluorescence lifetimes and depolarization.

  9. Quantum dynamics in open quantum-classical systems.

    PubMed

    Kapral, Raymond

    2015-02-25

    Often quantum systems are not isolated and interactions with their environments must be taken into account. In such open quantum systems these environmental interactions can lead to decoherence and dissipation, which have a marked influence on the properties of the quantum system. In many instances the environment is well-approximated by classical mechanics, so that one is led to consider the dynamics of open quantum-classical systems. Since a full quantum dynamical description of large many-body systems is not currently feasible, mixed quantum-classical methods can provide accurate and computationally tractable ways to follow the dynamics of both the system and its environment. This review focuses on quantum-classical Liouville dynamics, one of several quantum-classical descriptions, and discusses the problems that arise when one attempts to combine quantum and classical mechanics, coherence and decoherence in quantum-classical systems, nonadiabatic dynamics, surface-hopping and mean-field theories and their relation to quantum-classical Liouville dynamics, as well as methods for simulating the dynamics.

  10. Solvent fluctuations drive the hole transfer in DNA: a mixed quantum-classical study.

    PubMed

    Kubar, Tomás; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Elstner, Marcus

    2009-10-01

    We studied the hole transfer across adenine bridges in double-stranded DNA by means of a multiscale approach, propagating the hole in the framework of time-dependent DFT coupled to classical molecular dynamics simulation using a QM/MM scheme. The hole transfer in DNA is codetermined by the large fluctuations of site energies on the order of 0.4 eV, induced by the solvent degrees of freedom. These fluctuations lead to charge-transfer active conformations with large transfer efficiency, which are characterized by a favorable alignment of site energies along the DNA strand. This reduces the barrier for the hole transfer dramatically. Consequently, we find that a charge hopping mechanism is operative already for short bridges with fewer than four adenines, in contrast to the charge-transfer models assuming static DNA structures, where only tunneling occurs. The solvent fluctuations introduce a significant correlation between neighboring sites, enhancing the charge-transfer rate, while the fluctuation of electronic couplings has only a minor impact on the charge-transfer characteristics. Our results emphasize the importance of an accurate description of solvent effects as well as proper sampling, and it is suggested that charge transfer in DNA is gated by the dynamics of solvent.

  11. Ro-vibrational quenching of CO (v = 1) by He impact in a broad range of temperatures: A benchmark study using mixed quantum/classical inelastic scattering theory.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Ivanov, Mikhail; Babikov, Dmitri

    2013-08-21

    The mixed quantum/classical approach is applied to the problem of ro-vibrational energy transfer in the inelastic collisions of CO(v = 1) with He atom, in order to predict the quenching rate coefficient in a broad range of temperatures 5 < T < 2500 K. Scattering calculations are done in two different ways: direct calculations of quenching cross sections and, alternatively, calculations of the excitation cross sections plus microscopic reversibility. In addition, a symmetrized average-velocity method of Billing is tried. Combination of these methods allows reproducing experiment in a broad range of temperatures. Excellent agreement with experiment is obtained at 400 < T < 2500 K (within 10%), good agreement in the range 100 < T < 400 K (within 25%), and semi-quantitative agreement at 40 < T < 100 K(within a factor of 2). This study provides a stringent test of the mixed quantum/classical theory, because the vibrational quantum in CO molecule is rather large and the quencher is very light (He atom). For heavier quenchers and closer to dissociation limit of the molecule, the mixed quantum/classical theory is expected to work even better.

  12. Quantum money with classical verification

    SciTech Connect

    Gavinsky, Dmitry

    2014-12-04

    We propose and construct a quantum money scheme that allows verification through classical communication with a bank. This is the first demonstration that a secure quantum money scheme exists that does not require quantum communication for coin verification. Our scheme is secure against adaptive adversaries - this property is not directly related to the possibility of classical verification, nevertheless none of the earlier quantum money constructions is known to possess it.

  13. Quantum money with classical verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavinsky, Dmitry

    2014-12-01

    We propose and construct a quantum money scheme that allows verification through classical communication with a bank. This is the first demonstration that a secure quantum money scheme exists that does not require quantum communication for coin verification. Our scheme is secure against adaptive adversaries - this property is not directly related to the possibility of classical verification, nevertheless none of the earlier quantum money constructions is known to possess it.

  14. Classical and quantum ghosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sbisà, Fulvio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of these notes is to provide a self-contained review of why it is generically a problem when a solution of a theory possesses ghost fields among the perturbation modes. We define what a ghost field is and we show that its presence is associated with a classical instability whenever the ghost field interacts with standard fields. We then show that the instability is more severe at quantum level, and that perturbative ghosts can exist only in low energy effective theories. However, if we do not consider very ad hoc choices, compatibility with observational constraints implies that low energy effective ghosts can exist only at the price of giving up Lorentz invariance or locality above the cut-off, in which case the cut-off has to be much lower that the energy scales we currently probe in particle colliders. We also comment on the possible role of extra degrees of freedom which break Lorentz invariance spontaneously.

  15. Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Molecule-Molecule Inelastic Scattering: Derivations of Equations and Application to N2 + H2 System.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2015-12-17

    The mixed quantum classical theory, MQCT, for inelastic scattering of two molecules is developed, in which the internal (rotational, vibrational) motion of both collision partners is treated with quantum mechanics, and the molecule-molecule scattering (translational motion) is described by classical trajectories. The resultant MQCT formalism includes a system of coupled differential equations for quantum probability amplitudes, and the classical equations of motion in the mean-field potential. Numerical tests of this theory are carried out for several most important rotational state-to-state transitions in the N2 + H2 system, in a broad range of collision energies. Besides scattering resonances (at low collision energies) excellent agreement with full-quantum results is obtained, including the excitation thresholds, the maxima of cross sections, and even some smaller features, such as slight oscillations of energy dependencies. Most importantly, at higher energies the results of MQCT are nearly identical to the full quantum results, which makes this approach a good alternative to the full-quantum calculations that become computationally expensive at higher collision energies and for heavier collision partners. Extensions of this theory to include vibrational transitions or general asymmetric-top rotor (polyatomic) molecules are relatively straightforward.

  16. Quantum vs. classical walks with memory two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimcovic, Zlatko; Kovchegov, Yevgeniy

    2010-03-01

    Quantum walks is an emerging field in quantum computing. It is expected to become the next most effective tool in speeding up quantum algorithms, possibly achieving the similar gain in speed as was the case with Gibbs sampling in classical computing. There already exist examples of super-exponential speed up using only quantum walks. Markov chains, or random walks on graphs, have many uses in physics; and walks with memory are standard models for a number of phenomena. We study persistent quantum walks, and compare them with equivalent classical Markov processes. The first question to ask is how the mixing time compares between persistent quantum and classical walks. Since quantum walks are generated by unitary matrices, they do not converge to a stationary state. The mixing time is then naturally introduced via a limiting distribution defined as the average of the probability distributions over time (Cesaro sum). We compare the mixing times, along with other properties, using numerical methods and spectral analysis. Our preliminary results indicate a significant speedup in some cases, and a number of other interesting aspects of quantum walks.

  17. Quantum reduplication of classical solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sveshnikov, Konstantin

    1993-09-01

    The possible existence of a series of quantum copies of classical soliton solutions is discussed, which do not exist when the effective Planck constant of the theory γ tends to zero. Within the conventional weak-coupling expansion in √ γ such non-classical solitons are O(√ γ) in energy and therefore lie in between the true classical solutions and elementary quantum excitations. Analytic results concerning the shape functions, masses and characteristic scales of such quantum excitations are given for soliton models of a self-interacting scalar field. Stability properties and quantization of fluctuations in the neighborhood of these configurations are also discussed in detail.

  18. Mean-field dynamics with stochastic decoherence (MF-SD): A new algorithm for nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical molecular-dynamics simulations with nuclear-induced decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedard-Hearn, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2005-12-01

    The key factors that distinguish algorithms for nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) simulations from each other are how they incorporate quantum decoherence—the fact that classical nuclei must eventually cause a quantum superposition state to collapse into a pure state—and how they model the effects of decoherence on the quantum and classical subsystems. Most algorithms use distinct mechanisms for modeling nonadiabatic transitions between pure quantum basis states ("surface hops") and for calculating the loss of quantum-mechanical phase information (e.g., the decay of the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix). In our view, however, both processes should be unified in a single description of decoherence. In this paper, we start from the density matrix of the total system and use the frozen Gaussian approximation for the nuclear wave function to derive a nuclear-induced decoherence rate for the electronic degrees of freedom. We then use this decoherence rate as the basis for a new nonadiabatic MQC molecular-dynamics (MD) algorithm, which we call mean-field dynamics with stochastic decoherence (MF-SD). MF-SD begins by evolving the quantum subsystem according to the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, leading to mean-field dynamics. MF-SD then uses the nuclear-induced decoherence rate to determine stochastically at each time step whether the system remains in a coherent mixed state or decoheres. Once it is determined that the system should decohere, the quantum subsystem undergoes an instantaneous total wave-function collapse onto one of the adiabatic basis states and the classical velocities are adjusted to conserve energy. Thus, MF-SD combines surface hops and decoherence into a single idea: decoherence in MF-SD does not require the artificial introduction of reference states, auxiliary trajectories, or trajectory swarms, which also makes MF-SD much more computationally efficient than other nonadiabatic MQC MD algorithms. The unified definition of

  19. From classical to quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podolsky, Daniel; Shimshoni, Efrat; Silvi, Pietro; Montangero, Simone; Calarco, Tommaso; Morigi, Giovanna; Fishman, Shmuel

    2014-06-01

    We study the crossover from classical to quantum phase transitions at zero temperature within the framework of ϕ4 theory. The classical transition at zero temperature can be described by the Landau theory, turning into a quantum Ising transition with the addition of quantum fluctuations. We perform a calculation of the transition line in the regime where the quantum fluctuations are weak. The calculation is based on a renormalization group analysis of the crossover between classical and quantum transitions, and is well controlled even for space-time dimensionality D below 4. In particular, for D =2 we obtain an analytic expression for the transition line which is valid for a wide range of parameters, as confirmed by numerical calculations based on the density matrix renormalization group. This behavior could be tested by measuring the phase diagram of the linear-zigzag instability in systems of trapped ions or repulsively interacting dipoles.

  20. Classical and quantum Malus laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wódkiewicz, Krzysztof

    1995-04-01

    The classical and the quantum Malus laws for light and spin are discussed. It is shown that for spin 1/2, the quantum Malus law is equivalent in form to the classical Malus law provided the statistical average involves a quasidistribution function that can become negative. A generalization of Malus's law for arbitrary spin s is obtained in the form of a Feynman path-integral representation for the Malus amplitude. The classical limit of the Malus amplitude for s-->∞ is discussed.

  1. Why Do Mixed Quantum-Classical Methods Describe Short-Time Dynamics through Conical Intersections So Well? Analysis of Geometric Phase Effects.

    PubMed

    Gherib, Rami; Ryabinkin, Ilya G; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2015-04-14

    Adequate simulation of nonadiabatic dynamics through conical intersection requires accounting for a nontrivial geometric phase (GP) emerging in electronic and nuclear wave functions in the adiabatic representation. Popular mixed quantum-classical (MQC) methods, surface hopping and Ehrenfest, do not carry a nuclear wave function to be able to incorporate the GP into nuclear dynamics. Surprisingly, the MQC methods reproduce ultrafast interstate crossing dynamics generated with the exact quantum propagation so well as if they contained information about the GP. Using two-dimensional linear vibronic coupling models we unravel how the MQC methods can effectively mimic the most significant dynamical GP effects: (1) compensation for repulsive diagonal second-order nonadiabatic couplings and (2) transfer enhancement for a fully cylindrically symmetric component of a nuclear distribution.

  2. Nonequilibrium Mixed Quantum-Classical simulations of Hydrogen-bond Structure and Dynamics in Methanol-d Carbon tetrachloride liquid mixtures and its spectroscopic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2011-03-01

    Liquid mixtures of methanol-d and carbon tetrachloride provide attractive model systems for investigating hydrogen-bond structure and dynamics. The hydrogen-bonded methanol oligomers in these mixtures give rise to a very broad hydroxyl stretch IR band (~ 150 cm-1). We have employed mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the nature of hydrogen- bond structure and dynamics in this system and its spectroscopic signature. In our simulations, the hydroxyl stretch mode is treated quantum mechanically. We have found that the absorption spectrum is highly sensitive to the type of force fields used. Obtaining absorption spectra consistent with experiment required the use of corrected polarizabile force fields and a dipole damping scheme. We have established mapping relationships between the electric field along the hydroxyl bond and the hydrogen-stretch frequency and bond length thereby reducing the computational cost dramatically to simulate the complex nonequilibrium dynamics underlying pump-probe spectra.

  3. Quantum teleportation without classical channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Amri, M.; Li, Zheng-Hong; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-11-01

    For the first time, we show how quantum teleportation can be achieved without the assistance of classical channels. Our protocol does not need any pre-established entangled photon pairs beforehand. Just by utilizing quantum Zeno effect and couterfactual communication idea, we can achieve two goals; entangling a photon and an atom and also disentangling them by non-local interaction. Information is completely transferred from atom to photon with controllable disentanglement processes. More importantly, there is no need to confirm teleportation results via classical channels.

  4. Quantum localization of classical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batalin, Igor A.; Lavrov, Peter M.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum localization of classical mechanics within the BRST-BFV and BV (or field-antifield) quantization methods are studied. It is shown that a special choice of gauge fixing functions (or BRST-BFV charge) together with the unitary limit leads to Hamiltonian localization in the path integral of the BRST-BFV formalism. In turn, we find that a special choice of gauge fixing functions being proportional to extremals of an initial non-degenerate classical action together with a very special solution of the classical master equation result in Lagrangian localization in the partition function of the BV formalism.

  5. Quantum to classical randomness extractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Stephanie; Berta, Mario; Fawzi, Omar

    2013-03-01

    The goal of randomness extraction is to distill (almost) perfect randomness from a weak source of randomness. When the source yields a classical string X, many extractor constructions are known. Yet, when considering a physical randomness source, X is itself ultimately the result of a measurement on an underlying quantum system. When characterizing the power of a source to supply randomness it is hence a natural question to ask, how much classical randomness we can extract from a quantum system. To tackle this question we here introduce the notion of quantum-to-classical randomness extractors (QC-extractors). We identify an entropic quantity that determines exactly how much randomness can be obtained. Furthermore, we provide constructions of QC-extractors based on measurements in a full set of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs), and certain single qubit measurements. As the first application, we show that any QC-extractor gives rise to entropic uncertainty relations with respect to quantum side information. Such relations were previously only known for two measurements. As the second application, we resolve the central open question in the noisy-storage model [Wehner et al., PRL 100, 220502 (2008)] by linking security to the quantum capacity of the adversary's storage device.

  6. Mixed classical-quantum simulation of vibro-rotational absorption spectra of HCl diluted in dense Ar: Anisotropic interaction and the Q-branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Antonio; Pérez, Justo

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a mixed classical-quantum dynamical simulation of HCl diluted in dense Ar in which both the rotation and vibration of the diatomic molecule are treated from a quantum point of view while the remaining translational degree of freedoms of the diatomic and solvent atoms, are treated classically. We have calculated the spectral density of the fundamental band and the rotational absorption coefficient of HCl in Ar at different thermodynamic conditions and we have compared them with the available experimental data. Unlike our previous simulation works on HCl in Ar, in this study we treat the diatomic vibration explicitly, so we can carry out a detailed theoretical-experimental comparative analysis of the spectral profiles. We have considered different models for the HCl-Ar binary anisotropic interaction, founding also different predictions for the absorption line shape, in one case with the presence of the central Q-branch observed in the experimental spectrum, and in another case with the absence of such spectral component. We have found that the theoretical Q-branch noticeably depends on the characteristic of the different anisotropic diatomic-solvent potentials proposed in the literature.

  7. Quantum remnants in the classical limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, A. M.; Plastino, A.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze here the common features of two dynamical regimes: a quantum and a classical one. We deal with a well known semi-classic system in its route towards the classical limit, together with its purely classic counterpart. We wish to ascertain i) whether some quantum remnants can be found in the classical limit and ii) the details of the quantum-classic transition. The so-called mutual information is the appropriate quantifier for this task. Additionally, we study the Bandt-Pompe's symbolic patterns that characterize dynamical time series (representative of the semi-classical system under scrutiny) in their evolution towards the classical limit.

  8. Strong Analog Classical Simulation of Coherent Quantum Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    A strong analog classical simulation of general quantum evolution is proposed, which serves as a novel scheme in quantum computation and simulation. The scheme employs the approach of geometric quantum mechanics and quantum informational technique of quantum tomography, which applies broadly to cases of mixed states, nonunitary evolution, and infinite dimensional systems. The simulation provides an intriguing classical picture to probe quantum phenomena, namely, a coherent quantum dynamics can be viewed as a globally constrained classical Hamiltonian dynamics of a collection of coupled particles or strings. Efficiency analysis reveals a fundamental difference between the locality in real space and locality in Hilbert space, the latter enables efficient strong analog classical simulations. Examples are also studied to highlight the differences and gaps among various simulation methods. Funding support from NSERC of Canada and a research fellowship at Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia are acknowledged

  9. Classical analog of quantum phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ord, G.N.

    1992-07-01

    A modified version of the Feynman relativistic chessboard model (FCM) is investigated in which the paths involved are spirals in the space-time. Portions of the paths in which the particle`s proper time is reversed are interpreted in terms of antiparticles. With this intepretation the particle-antiparticle field produced by such trajectories provides a classical analog of the phase associated with particle paths in the unmodified FCM. It is shwon that in the nonrelativistic limit the resulting kernel is the correct Dirac propagator and that particle-antiparticle symmetry is in this case responsible for quantum interference. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Moving solvated electrons with light: Nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the relocalization of photoexcited solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran (THF)

    SciTech Connect

    Bedard-Hearn, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross E.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2006-11-21

    Motivated by recent ultrafast spectroscopic experiments [Martini et al., Science 293, 462 (2001)], which suggest that photoexcited solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran (THF) can relocalize (that is, return to equilibrium in solvent cavities far from where they started), we performed a series of nonequilibrium, nonadiabatic, mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations that mimic one-photon excitation of the THF-solvated electron. We find that as photoexcited THF-solvated electrons relax to their ground states either by continuous mixing from the excited state or via nonadiabatic transitions, {approx}30% of them relocalize into cavities that can be over 1 nm away from where they originated, in close agreement with the experiments. A detailed investigation shows that the ability of excited THF-solvated electrons to undergo photoinduced relocalization stems from the existence of preexisting cavity traps that are an intrinsic part of the structure of liquid THF. This explains why solvated electrons can undergo photoinduced relocalization in solvents like THF but not in solvents like water, which lack the preexisting traps necessary to stabilize the excited electron in other places in the fluid. We also find that even when they do not ultimately relocalize, photoexcited solvated electrons in THF temporarily visit other sites in the fluid, explaining why the photoexcitation of THF-solvated electrons is so efficient at promoting recombination with nearby scavengers. Overall, our study shows that the defining characteristic of a liquid that permits the photoassisted relocalization of solvated electrons is the existence of nascent cavities that are attractive to an excess electron; we propose that other such liquids can be found from classical computer simulations or neutron diffraction experiments.

  11. Exploring the role of decoherence in condensed-phase nonadiabatic dynamics: a comparison of different mixed quantum/classical simulation algorithms for the excited hydrated electron.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ross E; Bedard-Hearn, Michael J; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2006-10-12

    Mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics simulation has become the method of choice for simulating the dynamics of quantum mechanical objects that interact with condensed-phase systems. There are many MQC algorithms available, however, and in cases where nonadiabatic coupling is important, different algorithms may lead to different results. Thus, it has been difficult to reach definitive conclusions about relaxation dynamics using nonadiabatic MQC methods because one is never certain whether any given algorithm includes enough of the necessary physics. In this paper, we explore the physics underlying different nonadiabatic MQC algorithms by comparing and contrasting the excited-state relaxation dynamics of the prototypical condensed-phase MQC system, the hydrated electron, calculated using different algorithms, including: fewest-switches surface hopping, stationary-phase surface hopping, and mean-field dynamics with surface hopping. We also describe in detail how a new nonadiabatic algorithm, mean-field dynamics with stochastic decoherence (MF-SD), is to be implemented for condensed-phase problems, and we apply MF-SD to the excited-state relaxation of the hydrated electron. Our discussion emphasizes the different ways quantum decoherence is treated in each algorithm and the resulting implications for hydrated-electron relaxation dynamics. We find that for three MQC methods that use Tully's fewest-switches criterion to determine surface hopping probabilities, the excited-state lifetime of the electron is the same. Moreover, the nonequilibrium solvent response function of the excited hydrated electron is the same with all of the nonadiabatic MQC algorithms discussed here, so that all of the algorithms would produce similar agreement with experiment. Despite the identical solvent response predicted by each MQC algorithm, we find that MF-SD allows much more mixing of multiple basis states into the quantum wave function than do other methods. This leads to an

  12. Reexamining the Quantum-Classical Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokulich, Alisa

    2008-10-01

    1. Intertheoretic relations: are imperialism and isolationism our only options?; 2. Heisenberg's closed theories and pluralistic realism; 3. Dirac's open theories and the reciprocal correspondence principle; 4. Bohr's generalization of classical mechanics; 5. Semiclassical mechanics: putting quantum flesh on classical bones; 6. Can classical structures explain quantum phenomena?; 7. A structural approach to intertheoretic relations; References; Index.

  13. Secure quantum communication using classical correlated channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, D.; de Almeida, N. G.; Villas-Boas, C. J.

    2016-10-01

    We propose a secure protocol to send quantum information from one part to another without a quantum channel. In our protocol, which resembles quantum teleportation, a sender (Alice) and a receiver (Bob) share classical correlated states instead of EPR ones, with Alice performing measurements in two different bases and then communicating her results to Bob through a classical channel. Our secure quantum communication protocol requires the same amount of classical bits as the standard quantum teleportation protocol. In our scheme, as in the usual quantum teleportation protocol, once the classical channel is established in a secure way, a spy (Eve) will never be able to recover the information of the unknown quantum state, even if she is aware of Alice's measurement results. Security, advantages, and limitations of our protocol are discussed and compared with the standard quantum teleportation protocol.

  14. A quantum equation of motion for chemical reaction systems on an adiabatic double-well potential surface in solution based on the framework of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Atsushi; Okazaki, Susumu

    2008-01-28

    We present a quantum equation of motion for chemical reaction systems on an adiabatic double-well potential surface in solution in the framework of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics, where the reactant and product states are explicitly defined by dividing the double-well potential into the reactant and product wells. The equation can describe quantum reaction processes such as tunneling and thermal excitation and relaxation assisted by the solvent. Fluctuations of the zero-point energy level, the height of the barrier, and the curvature of the well are all included in the equation. Here, the equation was combined with the surface hopping technique in order to describe the motion of the classical solvent. Applying the present method to model systems, we show two numerical examples in order to demonstrate the potential power of the present method. The first example is a proton transfer by tunneling where the high-energy product state was stabilized very rapidly by solvation. The second example shows a thermal activation mechanism, i.e., the initial vibrational excitation in the reactant well followed by the reacting transition above the barrier and the final vibrational relaxation in the product well.

  15. Open quantum dots—probing the quantum to classical transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, D. K.; Burke, A. M.; Akis, R.; Brunner, R.; Day, T. E.; Meisels, R.; Kuchar, F.; Bird, J. P.; Bennett, B. R.

    2011-04-01

    Quantum dots provide a natural system in which to study both quantum and classical features of transport. As a closed testbed, they provide a natural system with a very rich set of eigenstates. When coupled to the environment through a pair of quantum point contacts, each of which passes several modes, the original quantum environment evolves into a set of decoherent and coherent states, which classically would compose a mixed phase space. The manner of this breakup is governed strongly by Zurek's decoherence theory, and the remaining coherent states possess all the properties of his pointer states. These states are naturally studied via traditional magnetotransport at low temperatures. More recently, we have used scanning gate (conductance) microscopy to probe the nature of the coherent states, and have shown that families of states exist through the spectrum in a manner consistent with quantum Darwinism. In this review, we discuss the nature of the various states, how they are formed, and the signatures that appear in magnetotransport and general conductance studies.

  16. Mixed quantum-classical dynamics of an amide-I vibrational excitation in a protein α -helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Holly; Martel, Paulo; Cruzeiro, Leonor

    2010-11-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is known to be the main energy currency of the living cell, and is used as a coenzyme to generate energy for many cellular processes through hydrolysis to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), although the mechanism of energy transfer is not well understood. It has been proposed that following hydrolysis of the ATP cofactor bound to a protein, up to two quanta of amide-I vibrational energy are excited and utilized to bring about important structural changes in the protein. To study whether, and how, amide-I vibrational excitations are capable of leading to protein structural changes, we have added components arising from quantum-mechanical amide-I vibrational excitations to the total energy and force terms within a molecular-dynamics simulation. This model is applied to helical deca-alanine as a test case to investigate how its dynamics differs in the presence or absence of an amide-I excitation. We find that the presence of an amide-I excitation can bias the structure toward a more helical state.

  17. Quantum Simulations of Classical Annealing Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, R. D.; Boixo, S.; Barnum, H.; Knill, E.

    2008-09-01

    We describe a quantum algorithm that solves combinatorial optimization problems by quantum simulation of a classical simulated annealing process. Our algorithm exploits quantum walks and the quantum Zeno effect induced by evolution randomization. It requires order 1/δ steps to find an optimal solution with bounded error probability, where δ is the minimum spectral gap of the stochastic matrices used in the classical annealing process. This is a quadratic improvement over the order 1/δ steps required by the latter.

  18. Dimension of discrete variable representation for mixed quantum/classical computation of three lowest vibrational states of OH stretching in liquid water.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kiyoung; Yang, Mino

    2017-02-07

    Three low-lying vibrational states of molecular systems are responsible for the signals of linear and third-order nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies. Theoretical studies based on mixed quantum/classical calculations provide a powerful way to analyze those experiments. A statistically meaningful result can be obtained from the calculations by solving the vibrational Schrödinger equation over many numbers of molecular configurations. The discrete variable representation (DVR) method is a useful technique to calculate vibrational eigenstates subject to an arbitrary anharmonic potential surface. Considering the large number of molecular configurations over which the DVR calculations are repeated, the calculations are desired to be optimized in balance between the cost and accuracy. We determine a dimension of the DVR method which appears to be optimum for the calculations of the three states of molecular vibrations with anharmonic strengths often found in realistic molecular systems. We apply the numerical technique to calculate the local OH stretching frequencies of liquid water, which are well known to be widely distributed due to the inhomogeneity in molecular configuration, and found that the frequencies of the 0-1 and 1-2 transitions are highly correlated. An empirical relation between the two frequencies is suggested and compared with the experimental data of nonlinear IR spectroscopies.

  19. Dimension of discrete variable representation for mixed quantum/classical computation of three lowest vibrational states of OH stretching in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Kiyoung; Yang, Mino

    2017-02-01

    Three low-lying vibrational states of molecular systems are responsible for the signals of linear and third-order nonlinear vibrational spectroscopies. Theoretical studies based on mixed quantum/classical calculations provide a powerful way to analyze those experiments. A statistically meaningful result can be obtained from the calculations by solving the vibrational Schrödinger equation over many numbers of molecular configurations. The discrete variable representation (DVR) method is a useful technique to calculate vibrational eigenstates subject to an arbitrary anharmonic potential surface. Considering the large number of molecular configurations over which the DVR calculations are repeated, the calculations are desired to be optimized in balance between the cost and accuracy. We determine a dimension of the DVR method which appears to be optimum for the calculations of the three states of molecular vibrations with anharmonic strengths often found in realistic molecular systems. We apply the numerical technique to calculate the local OH stretching frequencies of liquid water, which are well known to be widely distributed due to the inhomogeneity in molecular configuration, and found that the frequencies of the 0-1 and 1-2 transitions are highly correlated. An empirical relation between the two frequencies is suggested and compared with the experimental data of nonlinear IR spectroscopies.

  20. Quantum simulation of classical thermal states.

    PubMed

    Dür, W; Van den Nest, M

    2011-10-21

    We establish a connection between ground states of local quantum Hamiltonians and thermal states of classical spin systems. For any discrete classical statistical mechanical model in any spatial dimension, we find an associated quantum state such that the reduced density operator behaves as the thermal state of the classical system. We show that all these quantum states are unique ground states of a universal 5-body local quantum Hamiltonian acting on a (polynomially enlarged) qubit system on a 2D lattice. The only free parameters of the quantum Hamiltonian are coupling strengths of two-body interactions, which allow one to choose the type and dimension of the classical model as well as the interaction strength and temperature. This opens the possibility to study and simulate classical spin models in arbitrary dimension using a 2D quantum system.

  1. New insights into the nonadiabatic state population dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions from the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shakib, Farnaz A.; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-01-14

    In a previous study [F. A. Shakib and G. Hanna, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 044122 (2014)], we investigated a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville (MQCL) approach and found that the trajectories spend the majority of their time on the mean of two coherently coupled adiabatic potential energy surfaces. This suggested a need for mean surface evolution to accurately simulate observables related to ultrafast PCET processes. In this study, we simulate the time-dependent populations of the three lowest adiabatic states in the ET-PT (i.e., electron transfer preceding proton transfer) version of the same PCET model via the MQCL approach and compare them to the exact quantum results and those obtained via the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) approach. We find that the MQCL population profiles are in good agreement with the exact quantum results and show a significant improvement over the FSSH results. All of the mean surfaces are shown to play a direct role in the dynamics of the state populations. Interestingly, our results indicate that the population transfer to the second-excited state can be mediated by dynamics on the mean of the ground and second-excited state surfaces, as part of a sequence of nonadiabatic transitions that bypasses the first-excited state surface altogether. This is made possible through nonadiabatic transitions between different mean surfaces, which is the manifestation of coherence transfer in MQCL dynamics. We also investigate the effect of the strength of the coupling between the proton/electron and the solvent coordinate on the state population dynamics. Drastic changes in the population dynamics are observed, which can be understood in terms of the changes in the potential energy surfaces and the nonadiabatic couplings. Finally, we investigate the state population dynamics in the PT-ET (i.e., proton transfer preceding electron transfer) and concerted versions of the model. The PT

  2. New insights into the nonadiabatic state population dynamics of model proton-coupled electron transfer reactions from the mixed quantum-classical Liouville approach.

    PubMed

    Shakib, Farnaz A; Hanna, Gabriel

    2016-01-14

    In a previous study [F. A. Shakib and G. Hanna, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 044122 (2014)], we investigated a model proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction via the mixed quantum-classical Liouville (MQCL) approach and found that the trajectories spend the majority of their time on the mean of two coherently coupled adiabatic potential energy surfaces. This suggested a need for mean surface evolution to accurately simulate observables related to ultrafast PCET processes. In this study, we simulate the time-dependent populations of the three lowest adiabatic states in the ET-PT (i.e., electron transfer preceding proton transfer) version of the same PCET model via the MQCL approach and compare them to the exact quantum results and those obtained via the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) approach. We find that the MQCL population profiles are in good agreement with the exact quantum results and show a significant improvement over the FSSH results. All of the mean surfaces are shown to play a direct role in the dynamics of the state populations. Interestingly, our results indicate that the population transfer to the second-excited state can be mediated by dynamics on the mean of the ground and second-excited state surfaces, as part of a sequence of nonadiabatic transitions that bypasses the first-excited state surface altogether. This is made possible through nonadiabatic transitions between different mean surfaces, which is the manifestation of coherence transfer in MQCL dynamics. We also investigate the effect of the strength of the coupling between the proton/electron and the solvent coordinate on the state population dynamics. Drastic changes in the population dynamics are observed, which can be understood in terms of the changes in the potential energy surfaces and the nonadiabatic couplings. Finally, we investigate the state population dynamics in the PT-ET (i.e., proton transfer preceding electron transfer) and concerted versions of the model. The PT

  3. Dynamics in the quantum/classical limit based on selective use of the quantum potential

    SciTech Connect

    Garashchuk, Sophya Dell’Angelo, David; Rassolov, Vitaly A.

    2014-12-21

    A classical limit of quantum dynamics can be defined by compensation of the quantum potential in the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The quantum potential is a non-local quantity, defined in the trajectory-based form of the Schrödinger equation, due to Madelung, de Broglie, and Bohm, which formally generates the quantum-mechanical features in dynamics. Selective inclusion of the quantum potential for the degrees of freedom deemed “quantum,” defines a hybrid quantum/classical dynamics, appropriate for molecular systems comprised of light and heavy nuclei. The wavefunction is associated with all of the nuclei, and the Ehrenfest, or mean-field, averaging of the force acting on the classical degrees of freedom, typical of the mixed quantum/classical methods, is avoided. The hybrid approach is used to examine evolution of light/heavy systems in the harmonic and double-well potentials, using conventional grid-based and approximate quantum-trajectory time propagation. The approximate quantum force is defined on spatial domains, which removes unphysical coupling of the wavefunction fragments corresponding to distinct classical channels or configurations. The quantum potential, associated with the quantum particle, generates forces acting on both quantum and classical particles to describe the backreaction.

  4. Coherent quantum states from classical oscillator amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, John S.; Eisfeld, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    In the first days of quantum mechanics Dirac pointed out an analogy between the time-dependent coefficients of an expansion of the Schrödinger equation and the classical position and momentum variables solving Hamilton's equations. Here it is shown that the analogy can be made an equivalence in that, in principle, systems of classical oscillators can be constructed whose position and momenta variables form time-dependent amplitudes which are identical to the complex quantum amplitudes of the coupled wave function of an N-level quantum system with real coupling matrix elements. Hence classical motion can reproduce quantum coherence.

  5. A mixed quantum-classical Liouville study of the population dynamics in a model photo-induced condensed phase electron transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Rekik, Najeh; Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Freedman, Holly; Hanna, Gabriel

    2013-04-14

    We apply two approximate solutions of the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) in the mapping representation to the simulation of the laser-induced response of a quantum subsystem coupled to a classical environment. These solutions, known as the Poisson Bracket Mapping Equation (PBME) and the Forward-Backward (FB) trajectory solutions, involve simple algorithms in which the dynamics of both the quantum and classical degrees of freedom are described in terms of continuous variables, as opposed to standard surface-hopping solutions in which the classical degrees of freedom hop between potential energy surfaces dictated by the discrete adiabatic state of the quantum subsystem. The validity of these QCLE-based solutions is tested on a non-trivial electron transfer model involving more than two quantum states, a time-dependent Hamiltonian, strong subsystem-bath coupling, and an initial energy shift between the donor and acceptor states that depends on the strength of the subsystem-bath coupling. In particular, we calculate the time-dependent population of the photoexcited donor state in response to an ultrafast, on-resonance pump pulse in a three-state model of an electron transfer complex that is coupled asymmetrically to a bath of harmonic oscillators through the optically dark acceptor state. Within this approach, the three-state electron transfer complex is treated quantum mechanically, while the bath oscillators are treated classically. When compared to the more accurate QCLE-based surface-hopping solution and to the numerically exact quantum results, we find that the PBME solution is not capable of qualitatively capturing the population dynamics, whereas the FB solution is. However, when the subsystem-bath coupling is decreased (which also decreases the initial energy shift between the donor and acceptor states) or the initial shift is removed altogether, both the PBME and FB results agree better with the QCLE-based surface-hopping results. These findings

  6. A mixed quantum-classical Liouville study of the population dynamics in a model photo-induced condensed phase electron transfer reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Rekik, Najeh; Freedman, Holly; Hanna, Gabriel; Hsieh, Chang-Yu

    2013-04-14

    We apply two approximate solutions of the quantum-classical Liouville equation (QCLE) in the mapping representation to the simulation of the laser-induced response of a quantum subsystem coupled to a classical environment. These solutions, known as the Poisson Bracket Mapping Equation (PBME) and the Forward-Backward (FB) trajectory solutions, involve simple algorithms in which the dynamics of both the quantum and classical degrees of freedom are described in terms of continuous variables, as opposed to standard surface-hopping solutions in which the classical degrees of freedom hop between potential energy surfaces dictated by the discrete adiabatic state of the quantum subsystem. The validity of these QCLE-based solutions is tested on a non-trivial electron transfer model involving more than two quantum states, a time-dependent Hamiltonian, strong subsystem-bath coupling, and an initial energy shift between the donor and acceptor states that depends on the strength of the subsystem-bath coupling. In particular, we calculate the time-dependent population of the photoexcited donor state in response to an ultrafast, on-resonance pump pulse in a three-state model of an electron transfer complex that is coupled asymmetrically to a bath of harmonic oscillators through the optically dark acceptor state. Within this approach, the three-state electron transfer complex is treated quantum mechanically, while the bath oscillators are treated classically. When compared to the more accurate QCLE-based surface-hopping solution and to the numerically exact quantum results, we find that the PBME solution is not capable of qualitatively capturing the population dynamics, whereas the FB solution is. However, when the subsystem-bath coupling is decreased (which also decreases the initial energy shift between the donor and acceptor states) or the initial shift is removed altogether, both the PBME and FB results agree better with the QCLE-based surface-hopping results. These findings

  7. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon tetrachloride mixtures III: nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics and infrared pump-probe spectra.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2013-06-27

    We present a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics following vibrational energy relaxation of the hydroxyl stretch in a 10 mol % methanol/carbon tetrachloride mixture and pure methanol. The ground and first-excited energy levels and wave functions are identified with the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the hydroxyl's adiabatic Hamiltonian and as such depend parametrically on the configuration of the remaining, classically treated, degrees of freedom. The dynamics of the classical degrees of freedom are in turn governed by forces obtained by taking the expectation value of the force with respect to the ground or excited vibrational wave functions. Polarizable force fields and nonlinear mapping relations between the hydroxyl transition frequencies and dipole moments and the electric field along the hydroxyl bond are used, which were previously shown to quantitatively reproduce the experimental infrared steady-state absorption spectra and excited state lifetime [Kwac, K.; Geva, E. J. Phys. Chem. B 2011, 115, 9184; 2012, 116, 2856]. The relaxation from the first-excited state to the ground state is treated as a nonadiabatic transition. Within the mixed quantum-classical treatment, relaxation from the excited state to the ground state is accompanied by a momentum-jump in the classical degrees of freedom, which is in turn dictated by the nonadiabatic coupling vector. We find that the momentum jump leads to breaking of hydrogen bonds involving the relaxing hydroxyl, thereby blue-shifting the transition frequency by more than the Stokes shift between the steady-state emission and absorption spectra. The subsequent nonequilibrium relaxation toward equilibrium on the ground state potential energy surface is thereby accompanied by red shifting of the transition frequency. The signature of this nonequilibrium relaxation process on the pump-probe spectrum is analyzed in detail. The calculated pump-probe spectrum is found

  8. The structure of the hydrated electron. Part 2. A mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics embedded cluster density functional theory: single-excitation configuration interaction study.

    PubMed

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2007-06-21

    Adiabatic mixed quantum/classical (MQC) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to generate snapshots of the hydrated electron in liquid water at 300 K. Water cluster anions that include two complete solvation shells centered on the hydrated electron were extracted from the MQC MD simulations and embedded in a roughly 18 Ax18 Ax18 A matrix of fractional point charges designed to represent the rest of the solvent. Density functional theory (DFT) with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional and single-excitation configuration interaction (CIS) methods were then applied to these embedded clusters. The salient feature of these hybrid DFT(CIS)/MQC MD calculations is significant transfer (approximately 18%) of the excess electron's charge density into the 2p orbitals of oxygen atoms in OH groups forming the solvation cavity. We used the results of these calculations to examine the structure of the singly occupied and the lower unoccupied molecular orbitals, the density of states, the absorption spectra in the visible and ultraviolet, the hyperfine coupling (hfcc) tensors, and the infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of these embedded water cluster anions. The calculated hfcc tensors were used to compute electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectra for the hydrated electron that compared favorably to the experimental spectra of trapped electrons in alkaline ice. The calculated vibrational spectra of the hydrated electron are consistent with the red-shifted bending and stretching frequencies observed in resonance Raman experiments. In addition to reproducing the visible/near IR absorption spectrum, the hybrid DFT model also accounts for the hydrated electron's 190-nm absorption band in the ultraviolet. Thus, our study suggests that to explain several important experimentally observed properties of the hydrated electron, many-electron effects must be accounted for: one-electron models that do not allow for mixing of the excess

  9. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness.

    PubMed

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-10-20

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as 'D-Wave' chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional 'classical' computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize 'temperature chaos' as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip.

  10. Mixed quantum/classical calculations of total and differential elastic and rotationally inelastic scattering cross sections for light and heavy reduced masses in a broad range of collision energies

    SciTech Connect

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-28

    The mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT) for rotationally inelastic scattering developed recently [A. Semenov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174108 (2013)] is benchmarked against the full quantum calculations for two molecular systems: He + H{sub 2} and Na + N{sub 2}. This allows testing new method in the cases of light and reasonably heavy reduced masses, for small and large rotational quanta, in a broad range of collision energies and rotational excitations. The resultant collision cross sections vary through ten-orders of magnitude range of values. Both inelastic and elastic channels are considered, as well as differential (over scattering angle) cross sections. In many cases results of the mixed quantum/classical method are hard to distinguish from the full quantum results. In less favorable cases (light masses, larger quanta, and small collision energies) some deviations are observed but, even in the worst cases, they are within 25% or so. The method is computationally cheap and particularly accurate at higher energies, heavier masses, and larger densities of states. At these conditions MQCT represents a useful alternative to the standard full-quantum scattering theory.

  11. Classical Trajectories and Quantum Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielnik, Bogdan; Reyes, Marco A.

    1996-01-01

    A classical model of the Schrodinger's wave packet is considered. The problem of finding the energy levels corresponds to a classical manipulation game. It leads to an approximate but non-perturbative method of finding the eigenvalues, exploring the bifurcations of classical trajectories. The role of squeezing turns out decisive in the generation of the discrete spectra.

  12. Decoherence, chaos, the quantum and the classical

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, W.H.; Paz, J.P.

    1994-04-01

    The key ideas of the environment-induced decoherence approach are reviewed. Application of decoherence to the transition from quantum to classical in open quantum systems with chaotic classical analogs is described. The arrow of time is, in this context, a result of the information loss to the correlations with the environment. The asymptotic rate of entropy production (which is reached quickly, on the dynamical timescale) is independent of the details of the coupling of the quantum system to the environment, and is set by the Lyapunov exponents. We also briefly outline the existential interpretation of quantum mechanics, justifying the slogan ``No information without representation.``

  13. Thermodynamic integration from classical to quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Habershon, Scott; Manolopoulos, David E

    2011-12-14

    We present a new method for calculating quantum mechanical corrections to classical free energies, based on thermodynamic integration from classical to quantum mechanics. In contrast to previous methods, our method is numerically stable even in the presence of strong quantum delocalization. We first illustrate the method and its relationship to a well-established method with an analysis of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator. We then show that our method can be used to calculate the quantum mechanical contributions to the free energies of ice and water for a flexible water model, a problem for which the established method is unstable.

  14. Quantum and Classical Electrostatics Among Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, T. P.; Obolensky, O. I.; Ogurtsov, A. Y.; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    Quantum theory has been unquestionably successful at describing physics at the atomic scale. However, it becomes more difficult to apply as the system size grows. On the other hand, classical physics breaks down at sufficiently short length scales but is clearly correct at larger distances. The purpose of methods such as QM/MM is to gain the advantages of both quantum and classical regimes: quantum theory should provide accuracy at the shortest scales, and classical theory, with its somewhat more tractable computational demands, allows results to be computed for systems that would be inaccessible with a purely quantum approach. This strategy will be most effective when one knows with good accuracy the length scale at which quantum calculations are no longer necessary and classical calculations are sufficient. To this end, we have performed both classical and quantum calculations for systems comprising a small number of atoms for which experimental data is also available. The classical calculations are fully exact; the quantum calculations are at the MP4(SDTQ)/aug-cc-pV5Z and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pV5Z levels. The precision of both sets of calculations along with the existence of experimental results allows us to draw conclusions about the range of utility of the respective calculations. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, NLM and utilized the computational resources of the NIH HPC Biowulf cluster.

  15. Classical and Quantum Spreading of Position Probability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farina, J. E. G.

    1977-01-01

    Demonstrates that the standard deviation of the position probability of a particle moving freely in one dimension is a function of the standard deviation of its velocity distribution and time in classical or quantum mechanics. (SL)

  16. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-10-01

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as ‘D-Wave’ chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional ‘classical’ computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize ‘temperature chaos’ as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip.

  17. Unraveling Quantum Annealers using Classical Hardness

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Mayor, Victor; Hen, Itay

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum technology have led to the development and manufacturing of experimental programmable quantum annealing optimizers that contain hundreds of quantum bits. These optimizers, commonly referred to as ‘D-Wave’ chips, promise to solve practical optimization problems potentially faster than conventional ‘classical’ computers. Attempts to quantify the quantum nature of these chips have been met with both excitement and skepticism but have also brought up numerous fundamental questions pertaining to the distinguishability of experimental quantum annealers from their classical thermal counterparts. Inspired by recent results in spin-glass theory that recognize ‘temperature chaos’ as the underlying mechanism responsible for the computational intractability of hard optimization problems, we devise a general method to quantify the performance of quantum annealers on optimization problems suffering from varying degrees of temperature chaos: A superior performance of quantum annealers over classical algorithms on these may allude to the role that quantum effects play in providing speedup. We utilize our method to experimentally study the D-Wave Two chip on different temperature-chaotic problems and find, surprisingly, that its performance scales unfavorably as compared to several analogous classical algorithms. We detect, quantify and discuss several purely classical effects that possibly mask the quantum behavior of the chip. PMID:26483257

  18. Classical field approach to quantum weak measurements.

    PubMed

    Dressel, Justin; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-21

    By generalizing the quantum weak measurement protocol to the case of quantum fields, we show that weak measurements probe an effective classical background field that describes the average field configuration in the spacetime region between pre- and postselection boundary conditions. The classical field is itself a weak value of the corresponding quantum field operator and satisfies equations of motion that extremize an effective action. Weak measurements perturb this effective action, producing measurable changes to the classical field dynamics. As such, weakly measured effects always correspond to an effective classical field. This general result explains why these effects appear to be robust for pre- and postselected ensembles, and why they can also be measured using classical field techniques that are not weak for individual excitations of the field.

  19. Quantum approach to classical statistical mechanics.

    PubMed

    Somma, R D; Batista, C D; Ortiz, G

    2007-07-20

    We present a new approach to study the thermodynamic properties of d-dimensional classical systems by reducing the problem to the computation of ground state properties of a d-dimensional quantum model. This classical-to-quantum mapping allows us to extend the scope of standard optimization methods by unifying them under a general framework. The quantum annealing method is naturally extended to simulate classical systems at finite temperatures. We derive the rates to assure convergence to the optimal thermodynamic state using the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. For simulated and quantum annealing, we obtain the asymptotic rates of T(t) approximately (pN)/(k(B)logt) and gamma(t) approximately (Nt)(-c/N), for the temperature and magnetic field, respectively. Other annealing strategies are also discussed.

  20. Understanding singularities — Classical and quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konkowski, Deborah A.; Helliwell, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    The definitions of classical and quantum singularities are reviewed. Examples are given of both as well as their utility in general relativity. In particular, the classical and quantum singularity structure of certain interesting conformally static spherically symmetric spacetimes modeling scalar field collapse are reviewed. The spacetimes include the Roberts spacetime, the Husain-Martinez-Nuñez spacetime and the Fonarev spacetime. The importance of understanding spacetime singularity structure is discussed.

  1. Quantum Backreaction on Classical'' Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A. Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Rd., London SW7 2BZ )

    1995-01-30

    A mathematically consistent procedure for coupling quasiclassical and quantum variables through coupled Hamilton-Heisenberg equations of motion is derived from a variational principle. During evolution, the quasiclassical variables become entangled with the quantum variables with the result that the value of the quasiclassical variables depends on the quantum state. This provides a formalism to compute the backreaction of any quantum system on a quasiclassical one. In particular, it leads to a natural candidate for a theory of gravity coupled to quantized matter in which the gravitational field is not quantized.

  2. Classical and Quantum-Mechanical State Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanna, F. C.; Mello, P. A.; Revzen, M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the subject of state reconstruction in classical and in quantum physics, a subject that deals with the experimentally acquired information that allows the determination of the physical state of a system. Our first purpose is to explain a method for retrieving a classical state in phase space, similar to that…

  3. Quantum phase uncertainties in the classical limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franson, James D.

    1994-01-01

    Several sources of phase noise, including spontaneous emission noise and the loss of coherence due to which-path information, are examined in the classical limit of high field intensities. Although the origin of these effects may appear to be quantum-mechanical in nature, it is found that classical analogies for these effects exist in the form of chaos.

  4. Classical underpinnings of gravitationally induced quantum interference

    SciTech Connect

    Mannheim, P.D.

    1998-02-01

    We show that the gravitational modification of the phase of a neutron beam [the Colella-Overhauser-Werner (COW) experiment] has a classical origin, being due to the time delay that classical particles experience in traversing a background gravitational field. Similarly, we show that classical light waves also undergo a phase shift in traversing a gravitational field. We show that the COW experiment respects the equivalence principle even in the presence of quantum mechanics. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannous, C.; Langlois, J.

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  6. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon tetrachloride mixtures: equilibrium hydrogen-bond structure and dynamics at the ground state and the infrared absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2011-07-28

    We present a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of the structure and dynamics of the hydroxyl stretch in methanol/carbon tetrachloride mixtures. One of the methanol molecules is tagged, and its hydroxyl stretch is treated quantum-mechanically, while the remaining degrees of freedom are treated classically. The adiabatic Hamiltonian of the quantum-mechanical hydroxyl is diagonalized on-the-fly to obtain the corresponding adiabatic energy levels and wave functions which depend parametrically on the instantaneous configuration of the classical degrees of freedom. The dynamics of the classical degrees of freedom are in turn affected by the quantum-mechanical state of the tagged hydroxyl stretch via the corresponding Hellmann-Feynman forces. The ability of five different force-field combinations to reproduce the experimental absorption infrared spectrum of the hydroxyl stretch is examined for different isotopomers and on a wide range of compositions. It is found that, in addition to accounting for the anharmonic nature of the hydroxyl stretch, one also has to employ polarizable force fields and account for the damping of the polarizability at short distances. The equilibrium ground-state hydrogen-bonding structure and dynamics is analyzed, and its signature on the absorption infrared spectrum of the hydroxyl stretch is investigated in detail. Five different hydroxyl stretch subpopulations are identified and spectrally assigned: monomers (α), hydrogen-bond acceptors (β), hydrogen-bond donors (γ), simultaneous hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors (δ), and simultaneous hydrogen-bond donors and double-acceptors (ε). The fundamental transition frequencies of the α and β subpopulations are found to be narrowly distributed and to overlap, thereby giving rise to a single narrow band whose intensity is significantly diminished by rotational relaxation. The fundamental transition frequency distributions of the γ, δ, and ε subpopulations are found to be

  7. Macroscopic quantum mechanics in a classical spacetime.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Miao, Haixing; Lee, Da-Shin; Helou, Bassam; Chen, Yanbei

    2013-04-26

    We apply the many-particle Schrödinger-Newton equation, which describes the coevolution of a many-particle quantum wave function and a classical space-time geometry, to macroscopic mechanical objects. By averaging over motions of the objects' internal degrees of freedom, we obtain an effective Schrödinger-Newton equation for their centers of mass, which can be monitored and manipulated at quantum levels by state-of-the-art optomechanics experiments. For a single macroscopic object moving quantum mechanically within a harmonic potential well, its quantum uncertainty is found to evolve at a frequency different from its classical eigenfrequency-with a difference that depends on the internal structure of the object-and can be observable using current technology. For several objects, the Schrödinger-Newton equation predicts semiclassical motions just like Newtonian physics, yet quantum uncertainty cannot be transferred from one object to another.

  8. Quantum and classical phases in optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armata, Federico; Latmiral, Ludovico; Pikovski, Igor; Vanner, Michael R.; Brukner, Časlav; Kim, M. S.

    2016-06-01

    The control of quantum systems requires the ability to change and read-out the phase of a system. The noncommutativity of canonical conjugate operators can induce phases on quantum systems, which can be employed for implementing phase gates and for precision measurements. Here we study the phase acquired by a radiation field after its radiation pressure interaction with a mechanical oscillator, and compare the classical and quantum contributions. The classical description can reproduce the nonlinearity induced by the mechanical oscillator and the loss of correlations between mechanics and optical field at certain interaction times. Such features alone are therefore insufficient for probing the quantum nature of the interaction. Our results thus isolate genuine quantum contributions of the optomechanical interaction that could be probed in current experiments.

  9. Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, P. J. D.; Äńurić, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

    2014-10-01

    Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations that an open system can support and degrade the power of such adiabatic computation. We quantify this effect by allowing the system to evolve over a restricted set of quantum states, providing a link between physically inspired classical optimization algorithms and quantum adiabatic optimization. This perspective allows us to develop benchmarks to bound the quantum correlations harnessed by an adiabatic computation. We apply these to the D-Wave Vesuvius machine with revealing—though inconclusive—results.

  10. Classical teleportation of a quantum Bit

    PubMed

    Cerf; Gisin; Massar

    2000-03-13

    Classical teleportation is defined as a scenario where the sender is given the classical description of an arbitrary quantum state while the receiver simulates any measurement on it. This scenario is shown to be achievable by transmitting only a few classical bits if the sender and receiver initially share local hidden variables. Specifically, a communication of 2.19 bits is sufficient on average for the classical teleportation of a qubit, when restricted to von Neumann measurements. The generalization to positive-operator-valued measurements is also discussed.

  11. Classical and Quantum Thermal Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, R.

    2016-11-01

    List of figures; List of tables; Preface; Acknowledgement; Dedication; 1. The kinetic theory of gases; 2. Ideal to real gas, viscosity, conductivity and diffusion; 3. Thermodynamics: definitions and Zeroth law; 4. First Law of Thermodynamics and some of its applications; 5. Second Law of Thermodynamics and some of its applications; 6. TdS equations and their applications; 7. Thermodynamic functions, potentials, Maxwell equations, the Third Law and equilibrium; 8. Some applications of thermodynamics to problems of physics and engineering; 9. Application of thermodynamics to chemical reactions; 10. Quantum thermodynamics; 11. Some applications of quantum thermodynamics; 12. Introduction to the thermodynamics of irreversible processes; Index.

  12. Quantum-classical crossover in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos

    2006-09-15

    A classical field theory is proposed for the electric current and the electromagnetic field interpolating between microscopic and macroscopic domains. It represents a generalization of the density functional for the dynamics of the current and the electromagnetic field in the quantum side of the crossover and reproduces standard classical electrodynamics on the other side. The effective action derived in the closed time path formalism and the equations of motion follow from the variational principle. The polarization of the Dirac-sea can be taken into account in the quadratic approximation of the action by the introduction of the deplacement field strengths as in conventional classical electrodynamics. Decoherence appears naturally as a simple one-loop effect in this formalism. It is argued that the radiation time arrow is generated from the quantum boundary conditions in time by decoherence at the quantum-classical crossover and the Abraham-Lorentz force arises from the accelerating charge or from other charges in the macroscopic or the microscopic side, respectively. The functional form of the quantum renormalization group, the generalization of the renormalization group method for the density matrix, is proposed to follow the scale dependence through the quantum-classical crossover in a systematical manner.

  13. Entanglement in Quantum-Classical Hybrid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    It is noted that the phenomenon of entanglement is not a prerogative of quantum systems, but also occurs in other, non-classical systems such as quantum-classical hybrids, and covers the concept of entanglement as a special type of global constraint imposed upon a broad class of dynamical systems. Application of hybrid systems for physics of life, as well as for quantum-inspired computing, has been outlined. In representing the Schroedinger equation in the Madelung form, there is feedback from the Liouville equation to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the form of the quantum potential. Preserving the same topology, the innovators replaced the quantum potential with other types of feedback, and investigated the property of these hybrid systems. A function of probability density has been introduced. Non-locality associated with a global geometrical constraint that leads to an entanglement effect was demonstrated. Despite such a quantum like characteristic, the hybrid can be of classical scale and all the measurements can be performed classically. This new emergence of entanglement sheds light on the concept of non-locality in physics.

  14. NUCLEAR MIXING METERS FOR CLASSICAL NOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Keegan J.; Iliadis, Christian; Downen, Lori; Champagne, Art; José, Jordi

    2013-11-10

    Classical novae are caused by mass transfer episodes from a main-sequence star onto a white dwarf via Roche lobe overflow. This material possesses angular momentum and forms an accretion disk around the white dwarf. Ultimately, a fraction of this material spirals in and piles up on the white dwarf surface under electron-degenerate conditions. The subsequently occurring thermonuclear runaway reaches hundreds of megakelvin and explosively ejects matter into the interstellar medium. The exact peak temperature strongly depends on the underlying white dwarf mass, the accreted mass and metallicity, and the initial white dwarf luminosity. Observations of elemental abundance enrichments in these classical nova events imply that the ejected matter consists not only of processed solar material from the main-sequence partner but also of material from the outer layers of the underlying white dwarf. This indicates that white dwarf and accreted matter mix prior to the thermonuclear runaway. The processes by which this mixing occurs require further investigation to be understood. In this work, we analyze elemental abundances ejected from hydrodynamic nova models in search of elemental abundance ratios that are useful indicators of the total amount of mixing. We identify the abundance ratios ΣCNO/H, Ne/H, Mg/H, Al/H, and Si/H as useful mixing meters in ONe novae. The impact of thermonuclear reaction rate uncertainties on the mixing meters is investigated using Monte Carlo post-processing network calculations with temperature-density evolutions of all mass zones computed by the hydrodynamic models. We find that the current uncertainties in the {sup 30}P(p, γ){sup 31}S rate influence the Si/H abundance ratio, but overall the mixing meters found here are robust against nuclear physics uncertainties. A comparison of our results with observations of ONe novae provides strong constraints for classical nova models.

  15. Large classical universes emerging from quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Pinto-Neto, Nelson

    2009-04-15

    It is generally believed that one cannot obtain a large universe from quantum cosmological models without an inflationary phase in the classical expanding era because the typical size of the universe after leaving the quantum regime should be around the Planck length, and the standard decelerated classical expansion after that is not sufficient to enlarge the universe in the time available. For instance, in many quantum minisuperspace bouncing models studied in the literature, solutions where the universe leaves the quantum regime in the expanding phase with appropriate size have negligible probability amplitude with respect to solutions leaving this regime around the Planck length. In this paper, I present a general class of moving Gaussian solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation where the velocity of the wave in minisuperspace along the scale factor axis, which is the new large parameter introduced in order to circumvent the above-mentioned problem, induces a large acceleration around the quantum bounce, forcing the universe to leave the quantum regime sufficiently big to increase afterwards to the present size, without needing any classical inflationary phase in between, and with reasonable relative probability amplitudes with respect to models leaving the quantum regime around the Planck scale. Furthermore, linear perturbations around this background model are free of any trans-Planckian problem.

  16. Classical Ising model test for quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Joseph; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2010-07-01

    We exploit a recently constructed mapping between quantum circuits and graphs in order to prove that circuits corresponding to certain planar graphs can be efficiently simulated classically. The proof uses an expression for the Ising model partition function in terms of quadratically signed weight enumerators (QWGTs), which are polynomials that arise naturally in an expansion of quantum circuits in terms of rotations involving Pauli matrices. We combine this expression with a known efficient classical algorithm for the Ising partition function of any planar graph in the absence of an external magnetic field, and the Robertson-Seymour theorem from graph theory. We give as an example a set of quantum circuits with a small number of non-nearest-neighbor gates which admit an efficient classical simulation.

  17. Quantum and classical optics-emerging links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberly, J. H.; Qian, Xiao-Feng; Qasimi, Asma Al; Ali, Hazrat; Alonso, M. A.; Gutiérrez-Cuevas, R.; Little, Bethany J.; Howell, John C.; Malhotra, Tanya; Vamivakas, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum optics and classical optics are linked in ways that are becoming apparent as a result of numerous recent detailed examinations of the relationships that elementary notions of optics have with each other. These elementary notions include interference, polarization, coherence, complementarity and entanglement. All of them are present in both quantum and classical optics. They have historic origins, and at least partly for this reason not all of them have quantitative definitions that are universally accepted. This makes further investigation into their engagement in optics very desirable. We pay particular attention to effects that arise from the mere co-existence of separately identifiable and readily available vector spaces. Exploitation of these vector-space relationships are shown to have unfamiliar theoretical implications and new options for observation. It is our goal to bring emerging quantum-classical links into wider view and to indicate directions in which forthcoming and future work will promote discussion and lead to unified understanding.

  18. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of anti-tetrol and syn-tetrol dissolved in liquid chloroform: hydrogen-bond structure and its signature on the infrared absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2013-12-27

    The intramolecular hydrogen-bond structure of stereoselectively synthesized syn-tetrol and anti-tetrol dissolved in deuterated chloroform is investigated via a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation. An extensive conformational analysis is performed in order to determine the dominant conformations, the distributions among them, and their sensitivity to the method for assigning partial charges (RESP vs AM1-BCC). The signature of the conformational distribution and method of assigning partial charges on the infrared absorption spectra is analyzed in detail. The relationship between the spectra and the underlying hydrogen-bond structure is elucidated.

  19. Study of the redox properties of singlet and triplet Tris(2,2'-bipyridine)ruthenium(II) ([Ru(bpy)3]2+) in aqueous solution by full quantum and mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, Polydefkis; Gonthier, Jérôme Florian; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2014-04-10

    The oxidation of ground-state (singlet) and triplet [Ru(bpy)3](2+) were studied by full quantum-mechanical (QM) and mixed quantum/classical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulations. Both approaches provide reliable results for the redox potentials of the two spin states. The two redox reactions closely obey Marcus theory for electron transfer. The free energy difference between the two [Ru(bpy)3](2+) states amounts to 1.78 eV from both QM and QM/MM simulations. The two methods also provide similar results for the reorganization free energy associated with the transition from singlet to triplet [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (0.06 eV for QM and 0.07 eV for QM/MM). On the basis of single-point calculations, we estimate the entropic contribution to the free energy difference between singlet and triplet [Ru(bpy)3](2+) to be 0.27 eV, which is significantly greater than previously assumed (0.03 eV) and in contradiction with the assumption that the transition between these two states can be accurately described using purely energetic considerations. Employing a thermodynamic cycle involving singlet [Ru(bpy)3](2+), triplet [Ru(bpy)3](2+), and [Ru(bpy)3](3+), we calculated the triplet oxidation potential to be -0.62 V vs the standard hydrogen electrode, which is significantly different from a previous experimental estimate based on energetic considerations only (-0.86 V).

  20. Communication: quantum dynamics in classical spin baths.

    PubMed

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2013-07-21

    A formalism for studying the dynamics of quantum systems embedded in classical spin baths is introduced. The theory is based on generalized antisymmetric brackets and predicts the presence of open-path off-diagonal geometric phases in the evolution of the density matrix. The weak coupling limit of the equation can be integrated by standard algorithms and provides a non-Markovian approach to the computer simulation of quantum systems in classical spin environments. It is expected that the theory and numerical schemes presented here have a wide applicability.

  1. Classical enhancement of quantum vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lorenci, V. A.; Ford, L. H.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a mechanism for the enhancement of vacuum fluctuations by means of a classical field. The basic idea is that if an observable quantity depends quadratically upon a quantum field, such as the electric field, then the application of a classical field produces a cross term between the classical and quantum fields. This cross term may be significantly larger than the purely quantum part, but also undergoes fluctuations driven by the quantum field. We illustrate this effect in a model for light-cone fluctuations involving pulses in a nonlinear dielectric. Vacuum electric field fluctuations produce fluctuations in the speed of a probe pulse, and form an analog model for quantum gravity effects. If the material has a nonzero third-order susceptibility, then the fractional light speed fluctuations are proportional to the square of the fluctuating electric field. Hence the application of a classical electric field can enhance the speed fluctuations. We give an example where this enhancement can be an increase of 1 order of magnitude, increasing the possibility of observing the effect.

  2. Uniform Additivity in Classical and Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Andrew; Li, Ke; Smith, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    Information theory quantifies the optimal rates of resource interconversions, usually in terms of entropies. However, nonadditivity often makes evaluating entropic formulas intractable. In a few auspicious cases, additivity allows a full characterization of optimal rates. We study uniform additivity of formulas, which is easily evaluated and captures all known additive quantum formulas. Our complete characterization of uniform additivity exposes an intriguing new additive quantity and identifies a remarkable coincidence—the classical and quantum uniformly additive functions with one auxiliary variable are identical.

  3. Gauge-fields and integrated quantum-classical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    Physical situations in which quantum systems communicate continuously to their classically described environment are not covered by contemporary quantum theory, which requires a temporary separation of quantum degrees of freedom from classical ones. A generalization would be needed to cover these situations. An incomplete proposal is advanced for combining the quantum and classical degrees of freedom into a unified objective description. It is based on the use of certain quantum-classical structures of light that arise from gauge invariance to coordinate the quantum and classical degrees of freedom. Also discussed is the question of where experimenters should look to find phenomena pertaining to the quantum-classical connection. 17 refs.

  4. Quantum-to-classical transition in cavity quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Fink, J M; Steffen, L; Studer, P; Bishop, Lev S; Baur, M; Bianchetti, R; Bozyigit, D; Lang, C; Filipp, S; Leek, P J; Wallraff, A

    2010-10-15

    The quantum properties of electromagnetic, mechanical or other harmonic oscillators can be revealed by investigating their strong coherent coupling to a single quantum two level system in an approach known as cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). At temperatures much lower than the characteristic energy level spacing the observation of vacuum Rabi oscillations or mode splittings with one or a few quanta asserts the quantum nature of the oscillator. Here, we study how the classical response of a cavity QED system emerges from the quantum one when its thermal occupation-or effective temperature-is raised gradually over 5 orders of magnitude. In this way we explore in detail the continuous quantum-to-classical crossover and demonstrate how to extract effective cavity field temperatures from both spectroscopic and time-resolved vacuum Rabi measurements.

  5. Classical Simulated Annealing Using Quantum Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Cour, Brian R.; Troupe, James E.; Mark, Hans M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we consider the use of certain classical analogues to quantum tunneling behavior to improve the performance of simulated annealing on a discrete spin system of the general Ising form. Specifically, we consider the use of multiple simultaneous spin flips at each annealing step as an analogue to quantum spin coherence as well as modifications of the Boltzmann acceptance probability to mimic quantum tunneling. We find that the use of multiple spin flips can indeed be advantageous under certain annealing schedules, but only for long anneal times.

  6. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point

    DOE PAGES

    Vasin, M.; Ryzhov, V.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-12-21

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transitionmore » from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d+zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T)ε[0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T=0) = 1 and Λ(T →∞) = 0. Lastly, our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover.« less

  7. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point

    PubMed Central

    Vasin, M.; Ryzhov, V.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-01-01

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transition from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d + zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T) ∈ [0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T = 0) = 1 and Λ(T → ∞) = 0. Our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover. PMID:26688102

  8. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, M.; Ryzhov, V.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-12-21

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transition from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d+zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T)ε[0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T=0) = 1 and Λ(T →∞) = 0. Lastly, our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover.

  9. Quantum-to-classical crossover near quantum critical point.

    PubMed

    Vasin, M; Ryzhov, V; Vinokur, V M

    2015-12-21

    A quantum phase transition (QPT) is an inherently dynamic phenomenon. However, while non-dissipative quantum dynamics is described in detail, the question, that is not thoroughly understood is how the omnipresent dissipative processes enter the critical dynamics near a quantum critical point (QCP). Here we report a general approach enabling inclusion of both adiabatic and dissipative processes into the critical dynamics on the same footing. We reveal three distinct critical modes, the adiabatic quantum mode (AQM), the dissipative classical mode [classical critical dynamics mode (CCDM)], and the dissipative quantum critical mode (DQCM). We find that as a result of the transition from the regime dominated by thermal fluctuations to that governed by the quantum ones, the system acquires effective dimension d + zΛ(T), where z is the dynamical exponent, and temperature-depending parameter Λ(T) ∈ [0, 1] decreases with the temperature such that Λ(T = 0) = 1 and Λ(T → ∞) = 0. Our findings lead to a unified picture of quantum critical phenomena including both dissipation- and dissipationless quantum dynamic effects and offer a quantitative description of the quantum-to-classical crossover.

  10. Noisy quantum cellular automata for quantum versus classical excitation transfer.

    PubMed

    Avalle, Michele; Serafini, Alessio

    2014-05-02

    We introduce a class of noisy quantum cellular automata on a qubit lattice that includes all classical Markov chains, as well as maps where quantum coherence between sites is allowed to build up over time. We apply such a construction to the problem of excitation transfer through 1D lattices, and compare the performance of classical and quantum dynamics with equal local transition probabilities. Our discrete approach has the merits of stripping down the complications of the open system dynamics, of clearly isolating coherent effects, and of allowing for an exact treatment of conditional dynamics, all while capturing a rich variety of dynamical behaviors.

  11. Noisy Quantum Cellular Automata for Quantum versus Classical Excitation Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avalle, Michele; Serafini, Alessio

    2014-05-01

    We introduce a class of noisy quantum cellular automata on a qubit lattice that includes all classical Markov chains, as well as maps where quantum coherence between sites is allowed to build up over time. We apply such a construction to the problem of excitation transfer through 1D lattices, and compare the performance of classical and quantum dynamics with equal local transition probabilities. Our discrete approach has the merits of stripping down the complications of the open system dynamics, of clearly isolating coherent effects, and of allowing for an exact treatment of conditional dynamics, all while capturing a rich variety of dynamical behaviors.

  12. Bridging classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, D.; Seifert, F.; Chao, L. S.; Li, S.; Newell, D. B.; Pratt, J. R.; Williams, C.; Schlamminger, S.

    2016-10-01

    Using a watt balance and a frequency comb, a mass-energy equivalence is derived. The watt balance compares mechanical power measured in terms of the meter, the second, and the kilogram to electrical power measured in terms of the volt and the ohm. A direct link between mechanical action and the Planck constant is established by the practical realization of the electrical units derived from the Josephson and the quantum Hall effects. By using frequency combs to measure velocities and acceleration of gravity, the unit of mass can be realized from a set of three defining constants: the Planck constant h, the speed of light c, and the hyperfine splitting frequency of 133Cs.

  13. Comparing classical and quantum PageRanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, T.; Tang, J. W.; Rodriguez, J.; Small, M.; Wang, J. B.

    2017-01-01

    Following recent developments in quantum PageRanking, we present a comparative analysis of discrete-time and continuous-time quantum-walk-based PageRank algorithms. Relative to classical PageRank and to different extents, the quantum measures better highlight secondary hubs and resolve ranking degeneracy among peripheral nodes for all networks we studied in this paper. For the discrete-time case, we investigated the periodic nature of the walker's probability distribution for a wide range of networks and found that the dominant period does not grow with the size of these networks. Based on this observation, we introduce a new quantum measure using the maximum probabilities of the associated walker during the first couple of periods. This is particularly important, since it leads to a quantum PageRanking scheme that is scalable with respect to network size.

  14. Comparison of Classical and Quantum Mechanical Uncertainties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peslak, John, Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Comparisons are made for the particle-in-a-box, the harmonic oscillator, and the one-electron atom. A classical uncertainty principle is derived and compared with its quantum-mechanical counterpart. The results are discussed in terms of the statistical interpretation of the uncertainty principle. (Author/BB)

  15. Categorical quantum mechanics II: Classical-quantum interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coecke, Bob; Kissinger, Aleks

    2016-08-01

    This is the second part of a three-part overview, in which we derive the category-theoretic backbone of quantum theory from a process ontology, treating quantum theory as a theory of systems, processes and their interactions. In this part, we focus on classical-quantum interaction. Classical and quantum systems are treated as distinct types, of which the respective behavioral properties are specified in terms of processes and their compositions. In particular, classicality is witnessed by ‘spiders’ which fuse together whenever they connect. We define mixedness and show that pure processes are extremal in the space of all processes, and we define entanglement and show that quantum theory indeed exhibits entanglement. We discuss the classification of tripartite qubit entanglement and show that both the GHZ-state and the W-state come from spider-like families of processes, which differ only in how they behave when they are connected by two or more wires. We define measurements and provide fully comprehensive descriptions of several quantum protocols involving classical data flow. Finally, we give a notion of ‘genuine quantumness’, from which special processes called ‘phase spiders’ arise, and get a first glimpse of quantum nonlocality.

  16. A molecular dynamics study of intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in solution based upon a mixed quantum-classical approximation. II. Proton transfer reaction in non-polar solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, H.; Yamada, A.; Okazaki, S.

    2015-05-01

    The intramolecular proton transfer reaction of malonaldehyde in neon solvent has been investigated by mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics (QCMD) calculations and fully classical molecular dynamics (FCMD) calculations. Comparing these calculated results with those for malonaldehyde in water reported in Part I [A. Yamada, H. Kojima, and S. Okazaki, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 084509 (2014)], the solvent dependence of the reaction rate, the reaction mechanism involved, and the quantum effect therein have been investigated. With FCMD, the reaction rate in weakly interacting neon is lower than that in strongly interacting water. However, with QCMD, the order of the reaction rates is reversed. To investigate the mechanisms in detail, the reactions were categorized into three mechanisms: tunneling, thermal activation, and barrier vanishing. Then, the quantum and solvent effects were analyzed from the viewpoint of the reaction mechanism focusing on the shape of potential energy curve and its fluctuations. The higher reaction rate that was found for neon in QCMD compared with that found for water solvent arises from the tunneling reactions because of the nearly symmetric double-well shape of the potential curve in neon. The thermal activation and barrier vanishing reactions were also accelerated by the zero-point energy. The number of reactions based on these two mechanisms in water was greater than that in neon in both QCMD and FCMD because these reactions are dominated by the strength of solute-solvent interactions.

  17. Sudden Transition between Classical to Quantum Decoherence in bipartite correlated Qutrit Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cárdenas-López, F. A.; Allende, S.; Retamal, J. C.

    2017-03-01

    Classical to quantum decoherence transition, an issue existing for incoherent superposition of Bell-diagonal states is studied for three dimensional bipartite AB mixed quantum systems. Depending on the initial conditions, the dynamics of classical and quantum correlations can exhibit a sudden transition between classical to quantum decoherence. This result is calculated numerically by using entropic and geometric measures of correlations. An alternative explanation for this effect could be obtained by extending the bipartite A ⊗ B qutrit system to a pure tripartite A ⊗ B ⊗ C system. The freezing of classical correlations in AB is related to a freezing of the entanglement in the AC bipartition.

  18. Sudden Transition between Classical to Quantum Decoherence in bipartite correlated Qutrit Systems.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-López, F A; Allende, S; Retamal, J C

    2017-03-20

    Classical to quantum decoherence transition, an issue existing for incoherent superposition of Bell-diagonal states is studied for three dimensional bipartite AB mixed quantum systems. Depending on the initial conditions, the dynamics of classical and quantum correlations can exhibit a sudden transition between classical to quantum decoherence. This result is calculated numerically by using entropic and geometric measures of correlations. An alternative explanation for this effect could be obtained by extending the bipartite A ⊗ B qutrit system to a pure tripartite A ⊗ B ⊗ C system. The freezing of classical correlations in AB is related to a freezing of the entanglement in the AC bipartition.

  19. Isoperiodic classical systems and their quantum counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; Cariñena, J. F.; Marmo, G.; Perelomov, A.

    2007-06-01

    One-dimensional isoperiodic classical systems have been first analyzed by Abel. Abel's characterization can be extended for singular potentials and potentials which are not defined on the whole real line. The standard shear equivalence of isoperiodic potentials can also be extended by using reflection and inversion transformations. We provide a full characterization of isoperiodic rational potentials showing that they are connected by translations, reflections or Joukowski transformations. Upon quantization many of these isoperiodic systems fail to exhibit identical quantum energy spectra. This anomaly occurs at order O( ℏ2) because semiclassical corrections of energy levels of order O( ℏ) are identical for all isoperiodic systems. We analyze families of systems where this quantum anomaly occurs and some special systems where the spectral identity is preserved by quantization. Conversely, we point out the existence of isospectral quantum systems which do not correspond to isoperiodic classical systems.

  20. Classical simulation of quantum fields I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, T.; Holdom, B.

    2006-10-01

    We study classical field theories in a background field configuration where all modes of the theory are excited, matching the zero-point energy spectrum of quantum field theory. Our construction involves elements of a theory of classical electrodynamics by Wheeler-Feynman and the theory of stochastic electrodynamics of Boyer. The nonperturbative effects of interactions in these theories can be very efficiently studied on the lattice. In lambda phi(4) theory in 1 + 1 dimensions, we find results, in particular, for mass renormalization and the critical coupling for symmetry breaking that are in agreement with their quantum counterparts. We then study the perturbative expansion of the n-point Green's functions and find a loop expansion very similar to that of quantum field theory. When compared to the usual Feynman rules, we find some differences associated with particular combinations of internal lines going on-shell simultaneously.

  1. Geometric uncertainty relation for mixed quantum states

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson, Ole Heydari, Hoshang

    2014-04-15

    In this paper we use symplectic reduction in an Uhlmann bundle to construct a principal fiber bundle over a general space of unitarily equivalent mixed quantum states. The bundle, which generalizes the Hopf bundle for pure states, gives in a canonical way rise to a Riemannian metric and a symplectic structure on the base space. With these we derive a geometric uncertainty relation for observables acting on quantum systems in mixed states. We also give a geometric proof of the classical Robertson-Schrödinger uncertainty relation, and we compare the two. They turn out not to be equivalent, because of the multiple dimensions of the gauge group for general mixed states. We give examples of observables for which the geometric relation provides a stronger estimate than that of Robertson and Schrödinger, and vice versa.

  2. Monogamy properties of quantum and classical correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Giorgi, Gian Luca

    2011-11-15

    In contrast with entanglement, as measured by concurrence, in general, quantum discord does not possess the property of monogamy; that is, there is no tradeoff between the quantum discord shared by a pair of subsystems and the quantum discord that both of them can share with a third party. Here, we show that, as far as monogamy is considered, quantum discord of pure states is equivalent to the entanglement of formation. This result allows one to analytically prove that none of the pure three-qubit states belonging to the subclass of W states is monogamous. A suitable physical interpretation of the meaning of the correlation information as a quantifier of monogamy for the total information is also given. Finally, we prove that, for rank 2 two-qubit states, discord and classical correlations are bounded from above by single-qubit von Neumann entropies.

  3. Classical and quantum-mechanical state reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanna, F. C.; Mello, P. A.; Revzen, M.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the subject of state reconstruction in classical and in quantum physics, a subject that deals with the experimentally acquired information that allows the determination of the physical state of a system. Our first purpose is to explain a method for retrieving a classical state in phase space, similar to that used in medical imaging known as computer-aided tomography. It is remarkable that this method can be taken over to quantum mechanics, where it leads to a description of the quantum state in terms of the Wigner function which, although it may take on negative values, plays the role of the probability density in phase space in classical physics. We then present another approach to quantum state reconstruction based on the notion of mutually unbiased bases—a notion of current research interest, for which we give explanatory remarks—and indicate the relation between these two approaches. Since the subject of state reconstruction is rarely considered at the level of textbooks, the presentation in this paper is aimed at graduate-level readers.

  4. The classical-quantum boundary for correlations: Discord and related measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Kavan; Brodutch, Aharon; Cable, Hugo; Paterek, Tomasz; Vedral, Vlatko

    2012-10-01

    One of the best signatures of nonclassicality in a quantum system is the existence of correlations that have no classical counterpart. Different methods for quantifying the quantum and classical parts of correlations are among the more actively studied topics of quantum-information theory over the past decade. Entanglement is the most prominent of these correlations, but in many cases unentangled states exhibit nonclassical behavior too. Thus distinguishing quantum correlations other than entanglement provides a better division between the quantum and classical worlds, especially when considering mixed states. Here different notions of classical and quantum correlations quantified by quantum discord and other related measures are reviewed. In the first half, the mathematical properties of the measures of quantum correlations are reviewed, related to each other, and the classical-quantum division that is common among them is discussed. In the second half, it is shown that the measures identify and quantify the deviation from classicality in various quantum-information-processing tasks, quantum thermodynamics, open-system dynamics, and many-body physics. It is shown that in many cases quantum correlations indicate an advantage of quantum methods over classical ones.

  5. Nonadiabatic dynamics in open quantum-classical systems: forward-backward trajectory solution.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Yu; Kapral, Raymond

    2012-12-14

    A new approximate solution to the quantum-classical Liouville equation is derived starting from the formal solution of this equation in forward-backward form. The time evolution of a mixed quantum-classical system described by this equation is obtained in a coherent state basis using the mapping representation, which expresses N quantum degrees of freedom in a 2N-dimensional phase space. The solution yields a simple dynamics in which a set of N coherent state coordinates evolves in forward and backward trajectories, while the bath coordinates evolve under the influence of the mean potential that depends on these forward and backward trajectories. It is shown that the solution satisfies the differential form of the quantum-classical Liouville equation exactly. Relations to other mixed quantum-classical and semi-classical schemes are discussed.

  6. Mapping quantum-classical Liouville equation: projectors and trajectories.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Aaron; van Zon, Ramses; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2012-02-28

    The evolution of a mixed quantum-classical system is expressed in the mapping formalism where discrete quantum states are mapped onto oscillator states, resulting in a phase space description of the quantum degrees of freedom. By defining projection operators onto the mapping states corresponding to the physical quantum states, it is shown that the mapping quantum-classical Liouville operator commutes with the projection operator so that the dynamics is confined to the physical space. It is also shown that a trajectory-based solution of this equation can be constructed that requires the simulation of an ensemble of entangled trajectories. An approximation to this evolution equation which retains only the Poisson bracket contribution to the evolution operator does admit a solution in an ensemble of independent trajectories but it is shown that this operator does not commute with the projection operators and the dynamics may take the system outside the physical space. The dynamical instabilities, utility, and domain of validity of this approximate dynamics are discussed. The effects are illustrated by simulations on several quantum systems.

  7. Mesoscopic systems: classical irreversibility and quantum coherence.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Bernard

    2012-09-28

    Mesoscopic physics is a sub-discipline of condensed-matter physics that focuses on the properties of solids in a size range intermediate between bulk matter and individual atoms. In particular, it is characteristic of a domain where a certain number of interacting objects can easily be tuned between classical and quantum regimes, thus enabling studies at the border of the two. In magnetism, such a tuning was first realized with large-spin magnetic molecules called single-molecule magnets (SMMs) with archetype Mn(12)-ac. In general, the mesoscopic scale can be relatively large (e.g. micrometre-sized superconducting circuits), but, in magnetism, it is much smaller and can reach the atomic scale with rare earth (RE) ions. In all cases, it is shown how quantum relaxation can drastically reduce classical irreversibility. Taking the example of mesoscopic spin systems, the origin of irreversibility is discussed on the basis of the Landau-Zener model. A classical counterpart of this model is described enabling, in particular, intuitive understanding of most aspects of quantum spin dynamics. The spin dynamics of mesoscopic spin systems (SMM or RE systems) becomes coherent if they are well isolated. The study of the damping of their Rabi oscillations gives access to most relevant decoherence mechanisms by different environmental baths, including the electromagnetic bath of microwave excitation. This type of decoherence, clearly seen with spin systems, is easily recovered in quantum simulations. It is also observed with other types of qubits such as a single spin in a quantum dot or a superconducting loop, despite the presence of other competitive decoherence mechanisms. As in the molecular magnet V(15), the leading decoherence terms of superconducting qubits seem to be associated with a non-Markovian channel in which short-living entanglements with distributions of two-level systems (nuclear spins, impurity spins and/or charges) leading to 1/f noise induce τ(1)-like

  8. New variables for classical and quantum gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    1986-01-01

    A Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity based on certain spinorial variables is introduced. These variables simplify the constraints of general relativity considerably and enable one to imbed the constraint surface in the phase space of Einstein's theory into that of Yang-Mills theory. The imbedding suggests new ways of attacking a number of problems in both classical and quantum gravity. Some illustrative applications are discussed.

  9. Time in classical and in quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elçi, A.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the time concept in classical mechanics from the perspective of the invariants of a motion. The analysis shows that there is a conceptual gap concerning time in the Dirac-Heisenberg-von Neumann formalism and that Bohr's complementarity principle does not fill the gap. In the Dirac-Heisenberg-von Neumann formalism, a particle's properties are represented by Heisenberg matrices. This axiom is the source of the time problem in quantum mechanics.

  10. Classical system boundaries cannot be determined within quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Chris

    Multiple observers who interact with environmental encodings of the states of a macroscopic quantum system S as required by quantum Darwinism cannot demonstrate that they are jointly observing S without a joint a priori assumption of a classical boundary separating S from its environment E. Quantum Darwinism cannot, therefore, be regarded as providing a purely quantum-mechanical explanation of the "emergence" of classicality.

  11. Quantum-classical path integral. I. Classical memory and weak quantum nonlocality.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Roberto; Makri, Nancy

    2012-12-14

    We consider rigorous path integral descriptions of the dynamics of a quantum system coupled to a polyatomic environment, assuming that the latter is well approximated by classical trajectories. Earlier work has derived semiclassical or purely classical expressions for the influence functional from the environment, which should be sufficiently accurate for many situations, but the evaluation of quantum-(semi)classical path integral (QCPI) expressions has not been practical for large-scale simulation because the interaction with the environment introduces couplings nonlocal in time. In this work, we analyze the nature of the effects on a system from its environment in light of the observation [N. Makri, J. Chem. Phys. 109, 2994 (1998)] that true nonlocality in the path integral is a strictly quantum mechanical phenomenon. If the environment is classical, the path integral becomes local and can be evaluated in a stepwise fashion along classical trajectories of the free solvent. This simple "classical path" limit of QCPI captures fully the decoherence of the system via a classical mechanism. Small corrections to the classical path QCPI approximation may be obtained via an inexpensive random hop QCPI model, which accounts for some "back reaction" effects. Exploiting the finite length of nonlocality, we argue that further inclusion of quantum decoherence is possible via an iterative evaluation of the path integral. Finally, we show that the sum of the quantum amplitude factors with respect to the system paths leads to a smooth integrand as a function of trajectory initial conditions, allowing the use of Monte Carlo methods for the multidimensional phase space integral.

  12. Statistical mechanics of quantum-classical systems with holonomic constraints.

    PubMed

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2006-01-14

    The statistical mechanics of quantum-classical systems with holonomic constraints is formulated rigorously by unifying the classical Dirac bracket and the quantum-classical bracket in matrix form. The resulting Dirac quantum-classical theory, which conserves the holonomic constraints exactly, is then used to formulate time evolution and statistical mechanics. The correct momentum-jump approximation for constrained systems arises naturally from this formalism. Finally, in analogy with what was found in the classical case, it is shown that the rigorous linear-response function of constrained quantum-classical systems contains nontrivial additional terms which are absent in the response of unconstrained systems.

  13. Sharing the Quantum State and the Classical Information Simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Huawang; Dai, Yuewei

    2016-08-01

    An efficient quantum secret sharing scheme is proposed, in which the quantum state and the classical information can be shared simultaneously through only one distribution. The dealer uses the operations of quantum-controlled-not and Hadamard gate to encode the secret quantum state and classical information, and the participants use the single-particle measurements to recover the original quantum state and classical information. Compared to the existing schemes, our scheme is more efficient when the quantum state and the classical information need to be shared simultaneously.

  14. On quantum coding for ensembles of mixed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard; Caves, Carlton M.; Fuchs, Christopher A.; Jozsa, Richard; Schumacher, Benjamin

    2001-09-01

    We consider the problem of optimal asymptotically faithful compression for ensembles of mixed quantum states. Although the optimal rate is unknown, we prove upper and lower bounds and describe a series of illustrative examples of compression of mixed states. We also discuss a classical analogue of the problem.

  15. Classical and quantum routes to linear magnetoresistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jingshi

    The transverse, positive magnetoresistance of suitably doped silver chalcogenides and indium antimonides changes linearly with magnetic field by thousands of percent, with no sign of saturation up to MegaGauss. A precise characterization of these unexpected observations has led to two very different, yet equally interesting magnetotransport mechanisms: the classical inhomogeneity-induced current jetting, and quantum linear magnetoresistance. The inhomogeneous distribution of excess/deficient silver atoms lies behind the anomalous magnetoresistive response of silver chalcogenides, introducing spatial conductivity fluctuations with length scales independent of the cyclotron radius. We show that a systematic investigation of the resistivity tensor in longitudinal field could be used to identify the spatial inhomogeneities and determine the associated length scale of the current distortion. By contrast, the linear magnetoresistance observed in single-crystalline InSb presents a spectacular manifestation of magnetotransport in the extreme quantum limit, when only one Landau band is partially filled. Harnessing both the classical and quantum effects opens the gate to artificial fabrication of conducting networks with micron scale unit size for enhanced magnetoresistive sensitivity.

  16. Probing quantum entanglement, quantum discord, classical correlation, and the quantum state without disturbing them

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhenni; Jin Jiasen; Yu Changshui

    2011-01-15

    We present schemes for a type of one-parameter bipartite quantum state to probe quantum entanglement, quantum discord, the classical correlation, and the quantum state based on cavity QED. It is shown that our detection does not influence all these measured quantities. We also discuss how the spontaneous emission introduced by our probe atom influences our detection.

  17. Quantum theory of an electromagnetic observer: Classically behaving macroscopic systems and the emergence of the classical world in quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimak, L. I.; Ivanov, Misha; Aiello, A.; Stenholm, S.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum electrodynamics under conditions of distinguishability of interacting matter entities, and of controlled actions and back-actions between them, is considered. Such "mesoscopic quantum electrodynamics" is shown to share its dynamical structure with the classical stochastic electrodynamics. In formal terms, we demonstrate that all general relations of the mesoscopic quantum electrodynamics may be recast in a form lacking Planck's constant. Mesoscopic quantum electrodynamics is therefore subject to "doing quantum electrodynamics while thinking classically," allowing one to substitute essentially classical considerations for quantum ones without any loss in generality. Implications of these results for the quantum measurement theory are discussed.

  18. A mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics study of anti-tetrol and syn-tetrol dissolved in liquid chloroform II: infrared emission spectra, vibrational excited-state lifetimes, and nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kwac, Kijeong; Geva, Eitan

    2013-11-21

    The effect of vibrational excitation and relaxation of the hydroxyl stretch on the hydrogen-bond structure and dynamics of stereoselectively synthesized syn-tetrol and anti-tetrol dissolved in deuterated chloroform are investigated via a mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulation. Emphasis is placed on the changes in hydrogen-bond structure upon photoexcitation and the nonequilibrium hydrogen-bond dynamics that follows the subsequent relaxation from the excited to the ground vibrational state. The propensity to form hydrogen bonds is shown to increase upon photoexcitation of the hydroxyl stretch, thereby leading to a sizable red-shift of the infrared emission spectra relative to the corresponding absorption spectra. The vibrational excited state lifetimes are calculated within the framework of Fermi's golden rule and the harmonic-Schofield quantum correction factor, and found to be sensitive reporters of the underlying hydrogen-bond structure. The energy released during the relaxation from the excited to the ground state is shown to break hydrogen bonds involving the relaxing hydroxyl. The spectral signature of this nonequilibrium relaxation process is analyzed in detail.

  19. Classical and nonclassical randomness in quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farenick, Douglas; Plosker, Sarah; Smith, Jerrod

    2011-12-01

    The space POVM_H(X) of positive operator-valued probability measures on the Borel sets of a compact (or even locally compact) Hausdorff space X with values in B(H), the algebra of linear operators acting on a d-dimensional Hilbert space H, is studied from the perspectives of classical and nonclassical convexity through a transform Γ that associates any positive operator-valued measure ν with a certain completely positive linear map Γ(ν) of the homogeneous C*-algebra C(X)⊗ B(H) into B(H). This association is achieved by using an operator-valued integral in which nonclassical random variables (that is, operator-valued functions) are integrated with respect to positive operator-valued measures and which has the feature that the integral of a random quantum effect is itself a quantum effect. A left inverse Ω for Γ yields an integral representation, along the lines of the classical Riesz representation theorem for linear functionals on C(X), of certain (but not all) unital completely positive linear maps φ :C(X)⊗ B(H)rArr B(H). The extremal and C*-extremal points of POVM_H(X) are determined.

  20. Selected Studies in Classical and Quantum Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saotome, Ryo

    This thesis is composed of two parts, one corresponding to classical and the other to quantum gravitational phenomena. In the classical part, we focus on the behavior of various classical scalar fields in the presence of black holes. New fundamental results discussed include the first confirmation of the Belinskii, Khalatnikov, and Lifschitz (BKL) conjecture for an asymptotically flat spacetime, where we find that the dynamics of a canonical test scalar field near a black hole singularity are dominated by terms with time derivatives. We also perform a numerical simulation of the gravitational collapse of a non-canonical scalar field showing that signals can escape black holes in the k-essence dark energy model and find numerical confirmation that the accretion of various scalar fields onto a black hole from generic initial conditions is stationary. In the second part, we focus on the long distance behavior of perturbative quantum gravity. New results discussed include a proof of the cancellation of collinear divergences to all orders in the amplitudes of the theory as well as a characterization of all infrared divergent diagrams. In particular, we find that the only diagrams that can have soft divergences are ladder and crossed ladder diagrams, and that the only collinearly divergent diagrams are those with only three point vertices and no internal jet loops. Also presented is a construction of a double copy relation between gravity and gauge theory amplitudes similar to that conjectured by Bern, Carrasco, and Johansson for the case where there is no hard momentum exchange in the scattering, which we find implies a squaring relation between the classical shockwave solutions of the two theories as well. Finally, the first calculation of a gravitational scattering amplitude through the next-to-leading eikonal order is performed. We find that this correction to the scattering amplitude exponentiates, and that these power corrections probe smaller impact parameters

  1. Quantum evaporation of flavor-mixed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, Mikhail V.

    2014-03-01

    Particles whose propagation (mass) and interaction (flavor) bases are misaligned are mixed, e.g., neutrinos, quarks, Kaons, etc. We show that interactions (elastic scattering) of individual mass-eigenstates can result in their inter-conversions. Most intriguing and counter-intuitive implication of this process is a new process, which we refer to as the ``quantum evaporation.'' Consider a mixed particle trapped in a gravitational potential. If such a particle scatters off something (e.g., from another mixed particle) elastically from time to time, this particle (or both particles, respectively) can eventually escape to infinity with no extra energy supplied. That is as if a ``flavor-mixed satellite'' hauled along a bumpy road puts itself in space without a rocket, fuel, etc. Of course, the process at hand is entirely quantum and has no counterpart in classical mechanics. It also has nothing to do with tunneling or other known processes. We discuss some implications to the dark matter physics, cosmology and cosmic neutrino background. Supported by grant DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER54940 and NSF grant AST-1209665.

  2. Classical simulation of quantum energy flow in biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Stock, Gerhard

    2009-03-20

    Based on a comparison of classical and quantum-mechanical perturbation theory, the validity of classical nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to describe vibrational energy redistribution in biomolecules is studied. Adopting a small model peptide in aqueous solution as an example, the theory correctly predicts quantum correction factors that need to be applied to the results of classical simulations in order to match the correct quantum results.

  3. Coarsening Measurement References and the Quantum-to-Classical Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunseok; Lim, Youngrong; Kim, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of inefficiency in quantum measurements in the quantum-to-classical transition, and consistently observe the quantum-to-classical transition by coarsening the references of the measurements (e.g., when and where to measure). Our result suggests that the definition of measurement precision in quantum theory should include the degree of the observer's ability to precisely control the measurement references.

  4. Emergence of a classical Universe from quantum gravity and cosmology.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Claus

    2012-09-28

    I describe how we can understand the classical appearance of our world from a universal quantum theory. The essential ingredient is the process of decoherence. I start with a general discussion in ordinary quantum theory and then turn to quantum gravity and quantum cosmology. There is a whole hierarchy of classicality from the global gravitational field to the fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background, which serve as the seeds for the structure in the Universe.

  5. Classical Physics and the Bounds of Quantum Correlations.

    PubMed

    Frustaglia, Diego; Baltanás, José P; Velázquez-Ahumada, María C; Fernández-Prieto, Armando; Lujambio, Aintzane; Losada, Vicente; Freire, Manuel J; Cabello, Adán

    2016-06-24

    A unifying principle explaining the numerical bounds of quantum correlations remains elusive, despite the efforts devoted to identifying it. Here, we show that these bounds are indeed not exclusive to quantum theory: for any abstract correlation scenario with compatible measurements, models based on classical waves produce probability distributions indistinguishable from those of quantum theory and, therefore, share the same bounds. We demonstrate this finding by implementing classical microwaves that propagate along meter-size transmission-line circuits and reproduce the probabilities of three emblematic quantum experiments. Our results show that the "quantum" bounds would also occur in a classical universe without quanta. The implications of this observation are discussed.

  6. Quantum-Classical Hybrid for Information Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2011-01-01

    Based upon quantum-inspired entanglement in quantum-classical hybrids, a simple algorithm for instantaneous transmissions of non-intentional messages (chosen at random) to remote distances is proposed. The idea is to implement instantaneous transmission of conditional information on remote distances via a quantum-classical hybrid that preserves superposition of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods. Such a hybrid system reinforces the advantages, and minimizes the limitations, of both quantum and classical characteristics. Consider n observers, and assume that each of them gets a copy of the system and runs it separately. Although they run identical systems, the outcomes of even synchronized runs may be different because the solutions of these systems are random. However, the global constrain must be satisfied. Therefore, if the observer #1 (the sender) made a measurement of the acceleration v(sub 1) at t =T, then the receiver, by measuring the corresponding acceleration v(sub 1) at t =T, may get a wrong value because the accelerations are random, and only their ratios are deterministic. Obviously, the transmission of this knowledge is instantaneous as soon as the measurements have been performed. In addition to that, the distance between the observers is irrelevant because the x-coordinate does not enter the governing equations. However, the Shannon information transmitted is zero. None of the senders can control the outcomes of their measurements because they are random. The senders cannot transmit intentional messages. Nevertheless, based on the transmitted knowledge, they can coordinate their actions based on conditional information. If the observer #1 knows his own measurements, the measurements of the others can be fully determined. It is important to emphasize that the origin of entanglement of all the observers is the joint probability density that couples their actions. There is no centralized source

  7. Excited State Quantum-Classical Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstic, Predrag

    2005-05-01

    The development of a new theoretical, algorithmic, and computational framework is reported describing the corresponding excited state many-body dynamics by applying multiphysics described by classical equations of motion for nuclei and Hartree-Fock/Multi-Configuration Hartree-Fock and multiresolution techniques for solving the quantum part of the problem (i.e. the motion of the electrons). We primarily have in mind reactive and electron-transition dynamics which involves molecular clusters, containing hundreds of atoms, perturbed by a slow ionic/atomic/molecular projectile, with possible applications in plasma-surface interactions, cluster physics, chemistry and biotechnology. The validation of the developed technique is performed at three-body systems. Application to the transition dynamics in small carbon clusters and hydrocarbons perturbed by slow carbon ions resolves some long-standing issues in the ion-surface interactions in fusion tokamaks.

  8. Trotter-based simulation of quantum-classical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kernan, Dónal Mac; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Kapral, Raymond

    2008-01-17

    Quantum rate processes in condensed phase systems are often computed by combining quantum and classical descriptions of the dynamics. An algorithm for simulating the quantum-classical Liouville equation, which describes the dynamics of a quantum subsystem coupled to a classical bath, is presented in this paper. The algorithm is based on a Trotter decomposition of the quantum-classical propagator, in conjunction with Monte Carlo sampling of quantum transitions, to yield a surface-hopping representation of the dynamics. An expression for the nonadiabatic propagator that is responsible for quantum transitions and associated bath momentum changes is derived in a form that is convenient for Monte Carlo sampling and exactly conserves the total energy of the system in individual trajectories. The expectation values of operators or quantum correlation functions can be evaluated by initial sampling of quantum states and use of quantum-classical Liouville dynamics for the time evolution. The algorithm is tested by calculations on the spin-boson model, for which exact quantum results are available, and is shown to reproduce the exact results for stronger nonadiabatic coupling and much longer times using fewer trajectories than other schemes for simulating quantum-classical Liouville dynamics.

  9. Extended hydrodynamic approach to quantum-classical nonequilibrium evolution. I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, David; Hughes, Keith H; Micha, David A; Burghardt, Irene

    2011-02-14

    A mixed quantum-classical formulation is developed for a quantum subsystem in strong interaction with an N-particle environment, to be treated as classical in the framework of a hydrodynamic representation. Starting from the quantum Liouville equation for the N-particle distribution and the corresponding reduced single-particle distribution, exact quantum hydrodynamic equations are obtained for the momentum moments of the single-particle distribution coupled to a discretized quantum subsystem. The quantum-classical limit is subsequently taken and the resulting hierarchy of equations is further approximated by various closure schemes. These include, in particular, (i) a Grad-Hermite-type closure, (ii) a Gaussian closure at the level of a quantum-classical local Maxwellian distribution, and (iii) a dynamical density functional theory approximation by which the hydrodynamic pressure term is replaced by a free energy functional derivative. The latter limit yields a mixed quantum-classical formulation which has previously been introduced by I. Burghardt and B. Bagchi, Chem. Phys. 134, 343 (2006).

  10. Clean Quantum and Classical Communication Protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhrman, Harry; Christandl, Matthias; Perry, Christopher; Zuiddam, Jeroen

    2016-12-01

    By how much must the communication complexity of a function increase if we demand that the parties not only correctly compute the function but also return all registers (other than the one containing the answer) to their initial states at the end of the communication protocol? Protocols that achieve this are referred to as clean and the associated cost as the clean communication complexity. Here we present clean protocols for calculating the inner product of two n -bit strings, showing that (in the absence of preshared entanglement) at most n +3 qubits or n +O (√{n }) bits of communication are required. The quantum protocol provides inspiration for obtaining the optimal method to implement distributed cnot gates in parallel while minimizing the amount of quantum communication. For more general functions, we show that nearly all Boolean functions require close to 2 n bits of classical communication to compute and close to n qubits if the parties have access to preshared entanglement. Both of these values are maximal for their respective paradigms.

  11. Beyond quantum-classical analogies: high time for agreement?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, Michele

    Lately, many quantum-classical analogies have been investigated and published in many acknowledged journals. Such a surge of research on conceptual connections between quantum and classical physics forces us to ask whether the correspondence between the quantum and classical interpretation of the reality is deeper than the correspondence principle stated by Bohr. Here, after a short introduction to quantum-classical analogies from the recent literature, we try to examine the question from the perspective of a possible agreement between quantum and classical laws. A paradigmatic example is given in the striking equivalence between the classical Mie theory of electromagnetic scattering from spherical scatterers and the corresponding quantum-mechanical wave scattering analyzed in terms of partial waves. The key features that make the correspondence possible are examined and finally employed to deal with the fundamental blackbody problem that marks the initial separation between classical and quantum physics. The procedure allows us to recover the blackbody spectrum in classical terms and the proof is rich in consequences. Among them, the strong analogy between the quantum vacuum and its classical counterpart.

  12. Simulation of Pake doublet with classical spins and correspondence between the quantum and classical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henner, Victor K.; Klots, Andrey; Belozerova, Tatyana

    2016-12-01

    Problems of interacting quantum magnetic moments become exponentially complex with increasing number of particles. As a result, classical equations are often used to model spin systems. In this paper we show that a classical spins based approach can be used to describe the phenomena essentially quantum in nature such as of the Pake doublet.

  13. Complementarity of quantum discord and classically accessible information

    SciTech Connect

    Zwolak, Michael P.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2013-05-20

    The sum of the Holevo quantity (that bounds the capacity of quantum channels to transmit classical information about an observable) and the quantum discord (a measure of the quantumness of correlations of that observable) yields an observable-independent total given by the quantum mutual information. This split naturally delineates information about quantum systems accessible to observers – information that is redundantly transmitted by the environment – while showing that it is maximized for the quasi-classical pointer observable. Other observables are accessible only via correlations with the pointer observable. In addition, we prove an anti-symmetry property relating accessible information and discord. It shows that information becomes objective – accessible to many observers – only as quantum information is relegated to correlations with the global environment, and, therefore, locally inaccessible. Lastly, the resulting complementarity explains why, in a quantum Universe, we perceive objective classical reality while flagrantly quantum superpositions are out of reach.

  14. Complementarity of quantum discord and classically accessible information

    DOE PAGES

    Zwolak, Michael P.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2013-05-20

    The sum of the Holevo quantity (that bounds the capacity of quantum channels to transmit classical information about an observable) and the quantum discord (a measure of the quantumness of correlations of that observable) yields an observable-independent total given by the quantum mutual information. This split naturally delineates information about quantum systems accessible to observers – information that is redundantly transmitted by the environment – while showing that it is maximized for the quasi-classical pointer observable. Other observables are accessible only via correlations with the pointer observable. In addition, we prove an anti-symmetry property relating accessible information and discord. Itmore » shows that information becomes objective – accessible to many observers – only as quantum information is relegated to correlations with the global environment, and, therefore, locally inaccessible. Lastly, the resulting complementarity explains why, in a quantum Universe, we perceive objective classical reality while flagrantly quantum superpositions are out of reach.« less

  15. Heterotic quantum and classical computing on convergence spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patten, D. R.; Jakel, D. W.; Irwin, R. J.; Blair, H. A.

    2015-05-01

    Category-theoretic characterizations of heterotic models of computation, introduced by Stepney et al., combine computational models such as classical/quantum, digital/analog, synchronous/asynchronous, etc. to obtain increased computational power. A highly informative classical/quantum heterotic model of computation is represented by Abramsky's simple sequential imperative quantum programming language which extends the classical simple imperative programming language to encompass quantum computation. The mathematical (denotational) semantics of this classical language serves as a basic foundation upon which formal verification methods can be developed. We present a more comprehensive heterotic classical/quantum model of computation based on heterotic dynamical systems on convergence spaces. Convergence spaces subsume topological spaces but admit finer structure from which, in prior work, we obtained differential calculi in the cartesian closed category of convergence spaces allowing us to define heterotic dynamical systems, given by coupled systems of first order differential equations whose variables are functions from the reals to convergence spaces.

  16. Sudden Transition between Classical to Quantum Decoherence in bipartite correlated Qutrit Systems

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-López, F. A.; Allende, S.; Retamal, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Classical to quantum decoherence transition, an issue existing for incoherent superposition of Bell-diagonal states is studied for three dimensional bipartite AB mixed quantum systems. Depending on the initial conditions, the dynamics of classical and quantum correlations can exhibit a sudden transition between classical to quantum decoherence. This result is calculated numerically by using entropic and geometric measures of correlations. An alternative explanation for this effect could be obtained by extending the bipartite A ⊗ B qutrit system to a pure tripartite A ⊗ B ⊗ C system. The freezing of classical correlations in AB is related to a freezing of the entanglement in the AC bipartition. PMID:28317916

  17. Quantum and classical behavior in interacting bosonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2016-11-01

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that in fact the classical theory can describe the quantum behavior in the high occupancy regime, even when interactions are large. The connection is that the expectation values of quantum operators in a single quantum micro-state are approximated by a corresponding classical ensemble average over many classical micro-states. Furthermore, by the ergodic theorem, a classical ensemble average of local fields with statistical translation invariance is the spatial average of a single micro-state. So the correlation functions of the quantum and classical field theories of a single micro-state approximately agree at high occupancy, even in interacting systems. Furthermore, both quantum and classical field theories can thermalize, when appropriate coarse graining is introduced, with the classical case requiring a cutoff on low occupancy UV modes. We discuss applications of our results.

  18. Quantum and classical behavior in interacting bosonic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2016-11-21

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that in fact the classical theory can describe the quantum behavior in the high occupancy regime, even when interactions are large. The connection is that the expectation values of quantum operators in a single quantum micro-state are approximated by a corresponding classical ensemble average over many classical micro-states. Furthermore, by the ergodic theorem, a classical ensemble average of local fields with statistical translation invariance is the spatial average of a single micro-state. So the correlation functions of the quantum and classical field theories of a single micro-state approximately agree at high occupancy, even in interacting systems. Furthermore, both quantum and classical field theories can thermalize, when appropriate coarse graining is introduced, with the classical case requiring a cutoff on low occupancy UV modes. We discuss applications of our results.

  19. On the correspondence between quantum and classical variational principles

    DOE PAGES

    Ruiz, D. E.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2015-06-10

    Here, classical variational principles can be deduced from quantum variational principles via formal reparameterization of the latter. It is shown that such reparameterization is possible without invoking any assumptions other than classicality and without appealing to dynamical equations. As examples, first principle variational formulations of classical point-particle and cold-fluid motion are derived from their quantum counterparts for Schrodinger, Pauli, and Klein-Gordon particles.

  20. INCLINATION MIXING IN THE CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Volk, Kathryn; Malhotra, Renu

    2011-07-20

    We investigate the long-term evolution of the inclinations of the known classical and resonant Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This is partially motivated by the observed bimodal inclination distribution and by the putative physical differences between the low- and high-inclination populations. We find that some classical KBOs undergo large changes in inclination over gigayear timescales, which means that a current member of the low-inclination population may have been in the high-inclination population in the past, and vice versa. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the time variability of inclinations are predominantly distant encounters with Neptune and chaotic diffusion near the boundaries of mean motion resonances. We reassess the correlations between inclination and physical properties including inclination time variability. We find that the size-inclination and color-inclination correlations are less statistically significant than previously reported (mostly due to the increased size of the data set since previous works with some contribution from inclination variability). The time variability of inclinations does not change the previous finding that binary classical KBOs have lower inclinations than non-binary objects. Our study of resonant objects in the classical Kuiper Belt region includes objects in the 3:2, 7:4, 2:1, and eight higher-order mean motion resonances. We find that these objects (some of which were previously classified as non-resonant) undergo larger changes in inclination compared to the non-resonant population, indicating that their current inclinations are not generally representative of their original inclinations. They are also less stable on gigayear timescales.

  1. Noise-enhanced classical and quantum capacities in communication networks.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Filippo; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2010-11-05

    The unavoidable presence of noise is thought to be one of the major problems to solve in order to pave the way for implementing quantum information technologies in realistic physical platforms. However, here we show a clear example in which noise, in terms of dephasing, may enhance the capability of transmitting not only classical but also quantum information, encoded in quantum systems, through communication networks. In particular, we find analytically and numerically the quantum and classical capacities for a large family of quantum channels and show that these information transmission rates can be strongly enhanced by introducing dephasing noise in the complex network dynamics.

  2. Quasi-superactivation for the classical capacity of quantum channels

    SciTech Connect

    Gyongyosi, Laszlo; Imre, Sandor

    2014-12-04

    The superactivation effect has its roots in the extreme violation of additivity of the channel capacity and enables to reliably transmit quantum information over zero-capacity quantum channels. In this work we demonstrate a similar effect for the classical capacity of a quantum channel which previously was thought to be impossible.

  3. Classical and quantum stability in putative landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dine, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Landscape analyses often assume the existence of large numbers of fields, N , with all of the many couplings among these fields (subject to constraints such as local supersymmetry) selected independently and randomly from simple (say Gaussian) distributions. We point out that unitarity and perturbativity place significant constraints on behavior of couplings with N , eliminating otherwise puzzling results. In would-be flux compactifications of string theory, we point out that in order that there be large numbers of light fields, the compactification radii must scale as a positive power of N ; scaling of couplings with N may also be necessary for perturbativity. We show that in some simple string theory settings with large numbers of fields, for fixed R and string coupling, one can bound certain sums of squares of couplings by order one numbers. This may argue for strong correlations, possibly calling into question the assumption of uncorrelated distributions. We consider implications of these considerations for classical and quantum stability of states without supersymmetry, with low energy supersymmetry arising from tuning of parameters, and with dynamical breaking of supersymmetry.

  4. Fokker-Planck quantum master equation for mixed quantum-semiclassical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jin-Jin; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Hou-Dao; Xu, Rui-Xue; Zheng, Xiao; Yan, YiJing

    2017-01-14

    We revisit Caldeira-Leggett's quantum master equation representing mixed quantum-classical theory, but with limited applications. Proposed is a Fokker-Planck quantum master equation theory, with a generic bi-exponential correlation function description on semiclassical Brownian oscillators' environments. The new theory has caustic terms that bridge between the quantum description on primary systems and the semiclassical or quasi-classical description on environments. Various parametrization schemes, both analytical and numerical, for the generic bi-exponential environment bath correlation functions are proposed and scrutinized. The Fokker-Planck quantum master equation theory is of the same numerical cost as the original Caldeira-Leggett's approach but acquires a significantly broadened validity and accuracy range, as illustrated against the exact dynamics on model systems in quantum Brownian oscillators' environments, at moderately low temperatures.

  5. Functional methods underlying classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A.

    2013-04-01

    The paper investigates the physical content of a recently proposed mathematical framework that unifies the standard formalisms of classical mechanics, relativity and quantum theory. In the framework states of a classical particle are identified with Dirac delta functions. The classical space is "made" of these functions and becomes a submanifold in a Hilbert space of states of the particle. The resulting embedding of the classical space into the space of states is highly non-trivial and accounts for numerous deep relations between classical and quantum physics and relativity. One of the most striking results is the proof that the normal probability distribution of position of a macroscopic particle (equivalently, position of the corresponding delta state within the classical space submanifold) yields the Born rule for transitions between arbitrary quantum states.

  6. Generic emergence of classical features in quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Piani, Marco; Horodecki, Paweł

    2015-08-01

    Quantum Darwinism posits that only specific information about a quantum system that is redundantly proliferated to many parts of its environment becomes accessible and objective, leading to the emergence of classical reality. However, it is not clear under what conditions this mechanism holds true. Here we prove that the emergence of classical features along the lines of quantum Darwinism is a general feature of any quantum dynamics: observers who acquire information indirectly through the environment have effective access at most to classical information about one and the same measurement of the quantum system. Our analysis does not rely on a strict conceptual splitting between a system-of-interest and its environment, and allows one to interpret any system as part of the environment of any other system. Finally, our approach leads to a full operational characterization of quantum discord in terms of local redistribution of correlations.

  7. Generic emergence of classical features in quantum Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fernando G S L; Piani, Marco; Horodecki, Paweł

    2015-08-12

    Quantum Darwinism posits that only specific information about a quantum system that is redundantly proliferated to many parts of its environment becomes accessible and objective, leading to the emergence of classical reality. However, it is not clear under what conditions this mechanism holds true. Here we prove that the emergence of classical features along the lines of quantum Darwinism is a general feature of any quantum dynamics: observers who acquire information indirectly through the environment have effective access at most to classical information about one and the same measurement of the quantum system. Our analysis does not rely on a strict conceptual splitting between a system-of-interest and its environment, and allows one to interpret any system as part of the environment of any other system. Finally, our approach leads to a full operational characterization of quantum discord in terms of local redistribution of correlations.

  8. Models on the boundary between classical and quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Hooft, Gerard 't

    2015-08-06

    Arguments that quantum mechanics cannot be explained in terms of any classical theory using only classical logic seem to be based on sound mathematical considerations: there cannot be physical laws that require 'conspiracy'. It may therefore be surprising that there are several explicit quantum systems where these considerations apparently do not apply. In this report, several such counterexamples are shown. These are quantum models that do have a classical origin. The most curious of these models is superstring theory. So now the question is asked: how can such a model feature 'conspiracy', and how bad is that? Is there conspiracy in the vacuum fluctuations? Arguments concerning Bell's theorem are further sharpened.

  9. Quantum physics of classical waves in plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodin, I. Y.

    2012-10-01

    The Lagrangian approach to plasma wave physics is extended to a universal nonlinear theory which yields generic equations invariant with respect to the wave nature. The traditional understanding of waves as solutions of the Maxwell-Vlasov system is abandoned. Oscillations are rather treated as physical entities, namely, abstract vectors |ψ> in a specific Hilbert space. The invariant product <ψ|ψ> is the total action and has the sign of the oscillation energy. The action density is then an operator. Projections of the corresponding operator equation generate assorted wave kinetic equations; the nonlinear Wigner-Moyal equation is just one example and, in fact, may be more delicate than commonly assumed. The linear adiabatic limit of this classical theory leads to quantum mechanics in its general form. The action conservation theorem, together with its avatars such as Manley-Rowe relations, then becomes manifest and in partial equilibrium can modify statistical properties of plasma fluctuations. In the quasi-monochromatic limit geometrical optics (GO) is recovered and can as well be understood as a particular field theory in its own right. For linear waves, the energy-momentum equations, in both canonical and (often) kinetic form, then follow automatically, even without a reference to electromagnetism. Yet for waves in plasma the general GO Lagrangian is also derived explicitly, in terms of single-particle oscillation-center Hamiltonians. Applications to various plasma waves are then discussed with an emphasis on the advantages of an abstract theory. Specifically covered are nonlinear dispersion, dynamics, and stability of BGK modes, and also other wave transformations in laboratory and cosmological plasmas.

  10. Two-slit experiment: quantum and classical probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    Inter-relation between quantum and classical probability models is one of the most fundamental problems of quantum foundations. Nowadays this problem also plays an important role in quantum technologies, in quantum cryptography and the theory of quantum random generators. In this letter, we compare the viewpoint of Richard Feynman that the behavior of quantum particles cannot be described by classical probability theory with the viewpoint that quantum-classical inter-relation is more complicated (cf, in particular, with the tomographic model of quantum mechanics developed in detail by Vladimir Man'ko). As a basic example, we consider the two-slit experiment, which played a crucial role in quantum foundational debates at the beginning of quantum mechanics (QM). In particular, its analysis led Niels Bohr to the formulation of the principle of complementarity. First, we demonstrate that in complete accordance with Feynman's viewpoint, the probabilities for the two-slit experiment have the non-Kolmogorovian structure, since they violate one of basic laws of classical probability theory, the law of total probability (the heart of the Bayesian analysis). However, then we show that these probabilities can be embedded in a natural way into the classical (Kolmogorov, 1933) probability model. To do this, one has to take into account the randomness of selection of different experimental contexts, the joint consideration of which led Feynman to a conclusion about the non-classicality of quantum probability. We compare this embedding of non-Kolmogorovian quantum probabilities into the Kolmogorov model with well-known embeddings of non-Euclidean geometries into Euclidean space (e.g., the Poincaré disk model for the Lobachvesky plane).

  11. Line mixing effects in isotropic Raman spectra of pure N2: a classical trajectory study.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Sergey V; Boulet, Christian; Buzykin, Oleg G; Thibault, Franck

    2014-11-14

    Line mixing effects in the Q branch of pure N2 isotropic Raman scattering are studied at room temperature using a classical trajectory method. It is the first study using an extended modified version of Gordon's classical theory of impact broadening and shift of rovibrational lines. The whole relaxation matrix is calculated using an exact 3D classical trajectory method for binary collisions of rigid N2 molecules employing the most up-to-date intermolecular potential energy surface (PES). A simple symmetrizing procedure is employed to improve off-diagonal cross-sections to make them obeying exactly the principle of detailed balance. The adequacy of the results is confirmed by the sum rule. The comparison is made with available experimental data as well as with benchmark fully quantum close coupling [F. Thibault, C. Boulet, and Q. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044303 (2014)] and refined semi-classical Robert-Bonamy [C. Boulet, Q. Ma, and F. Thibault, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 084310 (2014)] results. All calculations (classical, quantum, and semi-classical) were made using the same PES. The agreement between classical and quantum relaxation matrices is excellent, opening the way to the analysis of more complex molecular systems.

  12. Line mixing effects in isotropic Raman spectra of pure N2: A classical trajectory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Sergey V.; Boulet, Christian; Buzykin, Oleg G.; Thibault, Franck

    2014-11-01

    Line mixing effects in the Q branch of pure N2 isotropic Raman scattering are studied at room temperature using a classical trajectory method. It is the first study using an extended modified version of Gordon's classical theory of impact broadening and shift of rovibrational lines. The whole relaxation matrix is calculated using an exact 3D classical trajectory method for binary collisions of rigid N2 molecules employing the most up-to-date intermolecular potential energy surface (PES). A simple symmetrizing procedure is employed to improve off-diagonal cross-sections to make them obeying exactly the principle of detailed balance. The adequacy of the results is confirmed by the sum rule. The comparison is made with available experimental data as well as with benchmark fully quantum close coupling [F. Thibault, C. Boulet, and Q. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044303 (2014)] and refined semi-classical Robert-Bonamy [C. Boulet, Q. Ma, and F. Thibault, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 084310 (2014)] results. All calculations (classical, quantum, and semi-classical) were made using the same PES. The agreement between classical and quantum relaxation matrices is excellent, opening the way to the analysis of more complex molecular systems.

  13. Quantum-classical correspondence in steady states of nonadiabatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Mikiya; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-12-31

    We first present nonadiabatic path integral which is exact formulation of quantum dynamics in nonadiabatic systems. Then, by applying the stationary phase approximations to the nonadiabatic path integral, a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems is presented as a nonadiabatic trace formula. The present quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow degree of freedom, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels.

  14. Comparisons of classical chemical dynamics simulations of the unimolecular decomposition of classical and quantum microcanonical ensembles.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, Paranjothy; Hase, William L

    2012-05-14

    Previous studies have shown that classical trajectory simulations often give accurate results for short-time intramolecular and unimolecular dynamics, particularly for initial non-random energy distributions. To obtain such agreement between experiment and simulation, the appropriate distributions must be sampled to choose initial coordinates and momenta for the ensemble of trajectories. If a molecule's classical phase space is sampled randomly, its initial decomposition will give the classical anharmonic microcanonical (RRKM) unimolecular rate constant for its decomposition. For the work presented here, classical trajectory simulations of the unimolecular decomposition of quantum and classical microcanonical ensembles, at the same fixed total energy, are compared. In contrast to the classical microcanonical ensemble, the quantum microcanonical ensemble does not sample the phase space randomly. The simulations were performed for CH(4), C(2)H(5), and Cl(-)---CH(3)Br using both analytic potential energy surfaces and direct dynamics methods. Previous studies identified intrinsic RRKM dynamics for CH(4) and C(2)H(5), but intrinsic non-RRKM dynamics for Cl(-)---CH(3)Br. Rate constants calculated from trajectories obtained by the time propagation of the classical and quantum microcanonical ensembles are compared with the corresponding harmonic RRKM estimates to obtain anharmonic corrections to the RRKM rate constants. The relevance and accuracy of the classical trajectory simulation of the quantum microcanonical ensemble, for obtaining the quantum anharmonic RRKM rate constant, is discussed.

  15. Classical and quantum distinctions between weak and strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimzadeh-Kalaleh Rodriguez, Said

    2016-03-01

    Coupled systems subject to dissipation exhibit two different regimes known as weak coupling and strong coupling. Two damped coupled harmonic oscillators (CHOs) constitute a model system where the key features of weak and strong coupling can be identified. Several of these features are common to classical and quantum systems, as a number of quantum-classical correspondences have shown. However, the condition defining the boundary between weak and strong coupling is distinct in classical and quantum formalisms. Here we describe the origin of two widely used definitions of strong coupling. Using a classical CHO model, we show that energy exchange cycles and avoided resonance crossings signal the onset of strong coupling according to one criterion. From the classical CHO model we derive a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian describing open quantum systems. Based on the analytic properties of the Hamiltonian, we identify the boundary between weak and strong coupling with a different feature: a non-Hermitian degeneracy known as the exceptional point. For certain parameter ranges the classical and quantum criterion for strong coupling coincide; for other ranges they do not. Examples of systems in strong coupling according to one or another criterion, but not both, are illustrated. The framework here presented is suitable for introducing graduate or advanced undegraduate students to the basic properties of strongly coupled systems, as well as to the similarities and subtle differences between classical and quantum descriptions of coupled dissipative systems.

  16. Classical to quantum correspondence in dissipative directed transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo, Gabriel G.; Rivas, Alejandro M. F.; Spina, María E.

    2015-11-01

    We compare the quantum and classical properties of the (quantum) isoperiodic stable structures [(Q)ISSs], which organize the parameter space of a paradigmatic dissipative ratchet model, i.e., the dissipative modified kicked rotator. We study the spectral behavior of the corresponding classical Perron-Frobenius operators with thermal noise and the quantum superoperators without it for small ℏeff values. We find a remarkable similarity between the classical and quantum spectra. This finding significantly extends previous results—obtained for the mean currents and asymptotic distributions only—and, on the other hand, unveils a classical to quantum correspondence mechanism where the classical noise is qualitatively different from the quantum one. This is crucial not only for simple attractors but also for chaotic ones, where just analyzing the asymptotic distribution is revealed as insufficient. Moreover, we provide with a detailed characterization of relevant eigenvectors by means of the corresponding Weyl-Wigner distributions, in order to better identify similarities and differences. Finally, this model being generic, it allows us to conjecture that this classical to quantum correspondence mechanism is a universal feature of dissipative systems.

  17. Is classical flat Kasner spacetime flat in quantum gravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Parampreet

    2016-05-01

    Quantum nature of classical flat Kasner spacetime is studied using effective spacetime description in loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We find that even though the spacetime curvature vanishes at the classical level, nontrivial quantum gravitational effects can arise. For the standard loop quantization of Bianchi-I spacetime, which uniquely yields universal bounds on expansion and shear scalars and results in a generic resolution of strong singularities, we find that a flat Kasner metric is not a physical solution of the effective spacetime description, except in a limit. The lack of a flat Kasner metric at the quantum level results from a novel feature of the loop quantum Bianchi-I spacetime: quantum geometry induces nonvanishing spacetime curvature components, making it not Ricci flat even when no matter is present. The noncurvature singularity of the classical flat Kasner spacetime is avoided, and the effective spacetime transits from a flat Kasner spacetime in asymptotic future, to a Minkowski spacetime in asymptotic past. Interestingly, for an alternate loop quantization which does not share some of the fine features of the standard quantization, flat Kasner spacetime with expected classical features exists. In this case, even with nontrivial quantum geometric effects, the spacetime curvature vanishes. These examples show that the character of even a flat classical vacuum spacetime can alter in a fundamental way in quantum gravity and is sensitive to the quantization procedure.

  18. Surface hopping from the perspective of quantum-classical Liouville dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapral, Raymond

    2016-12-01

    Fewest-switches surface hopping is studied in the context of quantum-classical Liouville dynamics. Both approaches are mixed quantum-classical theories that provide a way to describe and simulate the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics of many-body systems. Starting from a surface-hopping solution of the quantum-classical Liouville equation, it is shown how fewest-switches dynamics can be obtained by dropping terms that are responsible for decoherence and restricting the nuclear momentum changes that accompany electronic transitions to those events that occur between population states. The analysis provides information on some of the elements that are essential for the construction of accurate and computationally tractable algorithms for nonadiabatic processes.

  19. The roles of electronic exchange and correlation in charge-transfer- to-solvent dynamics: Many-electron nonadiabatic mixed quantum/classical simulations of photoexcited sodium anions in the condensed phase.

    PubMed

    Glover, William J; Larsen, Ross E; Schwartz, Benjamin J

    2008-10-28

    The charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) reactions of solvated atomic anions serve as ideal models for studying the dynamics of electron transfer: The fact that atomic anions have no internal degrees of freedom provides one of the most direct routes to understanding how the motions of solvent molecules influence charge transfer, and the relative simplicity of atomic electronic structure allows for direct contact between theory and experiment. To date, molecular dynamics simulations of the CTTS process have relied on a single-electron description of the atomic anion-only the electron involved in the charge transfer has been treated quantum mechanically, and the electronic structure of the atomic solute has been treated via pseudopotentials. In this paper, we examine the severity of approximating the electronic structure of CTTS anions with a one-electron model and address the role of electronic exchange and correlation in both CTTS electronic structure and dynamics. To do this, we perform many-electron mixed quantum/classical molecular dynamics simulations of the ground- and excited-state properties of the aqueous sodium anion (sodide). We treat both of the sodide valence electrons quantum mechanically and solve the Schrodinger equation using configuration interaction with singles and doubles (CISD), which provides an exact solution for two electrons. We find that our multielectron simulations give excellent general agreement with experimental results on the CTTS spectroscopy and dynamics of sodide in related solvents. We also compare the results of our multielectron simulations to those from one-electron simulations on the same system [C. J. Smallwood et al., J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11263 (2003)] and find substantial differences in the equilibrium CTTS properties and the nonadiabatic relaxation dynamics of one- and two-electron aqueous sodide. For example, the one-electron model substantially underpredicts the size of sodide, which in turn results in a dramatically

  20. Experimental device-independent tests of classical and quantum dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrens, Johan; Badziag, Piotr; Cabello, Adán; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2012-08-01

    A fundamental resource in any communication and computation task is the amount of information that can be transmitted and processed. The classical information encoded in a set of states is limited by the number of distinguishable states or classical dimension dc of the set. The sets used in quantum communication and information processing contain states that are neither identical nor distinguishable, and the quantum dimension dq of the set is the dimension of the Hilbert space spanned by these states. An important challenge is to assess the (classical or quantum) dimension of a set of states in a device-independent way, that is, without referring to the internal working of the device generating the states. Here we experimentally test dimension witnesses designed to efficiently determine the minimum dimension of sets of (three or four) photonic states from the correlations originated from measurements on them, and distinguish between classical and quantum sets of states.

  1. Quantum and classical operational complementarity for single systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo

    2005-07-15

    We investigate duality relations between conjugate observables after measurements performed on a single realization of the system. The application of standard inference methods implies the existence of duality relations for single systems when using classical as well as quantum physics.

  2. Quantum nonlocality and the end of classical spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shreya; Bera, Sayantani; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum nonlocal correlations and the acausal, spooky action at a distance suggest a discord between quantum theory and special relativity. We propose a resolution for this discord by first observing that there is a problem of time in quantum theory. There should exist a reformulation of quantum theory which does not refer to classical time. Such a reformulation is obtained by suggesting that spacetime is fundamentally noncommutative. Quantum theory without classical time is the equilibrium statistical thermodynamics of the underlying noncommutative relativity. Stochastic fluctuations about equilibrium give rise to the classical limit and ordinary spacetime geometry. However, measurement on an entangled state can be correctly described only in the underlying noncommutative spacetime, where there is no causality violation, nor a spooky action at a distance.

  3. Efficient classical simulation of optical quantum information circuits.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Stephen D; Sanders, Barry C

    2002-11-11

    We identify a broad class of physical processes in an optical quantum circuit that can be efficiently simulated on a classical computer: this class includes unitary transformations, amplification, noise, and measurements. This simulatability result places powerful constraints on the capability to realize exponential quantum speedups as well as on inducing an optical nonlinear transformation via linear optics, photodetection-based measurement, and classical feedforward of measurement results, optimal cloning, and a wide range of other processes.

  4. The Classical Scattering of Waves: Some Analogies with Quantum Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    Code . Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 13. Abstract (Maximum 200 words). The scattering of waves in classical physics and quantum...both areas. 92-235222’ 14. Subject Terms. IS. Number of Page. Acoustic scattering , shallow water, waveguide propagation . 27 16. Price Code . 17. Security...Numbers. The Classical Scattering of Waves: Some Analogies with Quantum Scattering Contract ,~~ ~ -V ,~Pom Element NO- 0601153N 6. Author(s). t

  5. Genuine quantum and classical correlations in multipartite systems.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Gian Luca; Bellomo, Bruno; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta

    2011-11-04

    Generalizing the quantifiers used to classify correlations in bipartite systems, we define genuine total, quantum, and classical correlations in multipartite systems. The measure we give is based on the use of relative entropy to quantify the distance between two density matrices. Moreover, we show that, for pure states of three qubits, both quantum and classical bipartite correlations obey a ladder ordering law fixed by two-body mutual informations, or, equivalently, by one-qubit entropies.

  6. Entropies and correlations in classical and quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, Margarita A.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.; Marmo, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    We present a review of entropy properties for classical and quantum systems including Shannon entropy, von Neumann entropy, Rényi entropy, and Tsallis entropy. We discuss known and new entropic and information inequalities for classical and quantum systems, both composite and noncomposite. We demonstrate matrix inequalities associated with the entropic subadditivity and strong subadditivity conditions and give a new inequality for matrix elements of unitary matrices.

  7. Playing with functions of positive type, classical and quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniello, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    A function of positive type can be defined as a positive functional on a convolution algebra of a locally compact group. In the case where the group is abelian, by Bochner’s theorem a function of positive type is, up to normalization, the Fourier transform of a probability measure. Therefore, considering the group of translations on phase space, a suitably normalized phase-space function of positive type can be regarded as a realization of a classical state. Thus, it may be called a function of classical positive type. Replacing the ordinary convolution on phase space with the twisted convolution, one obtains a noncommutative algebra of functions whose positive functionals we may call functions of quantum positive type. In fact, by a quantum version of Bochner’s theorem, a continuous function of quantum positive type is, up to normalization, the (symplectic) Fourier transform of a Wigner quasi-probability distribution; hence, it can be regarded as a phase-space realization of a quantum state. Playing with functions of positive type—classical and quantum—one is led in a natural way to consider a class of semigroups of operators, the classical-quantum semigroups. The physical meaning of these mathematical objects is unveiled via quantization, so obtaining a class of quantum dynamical semigroups that, borrowing terminology from quantum information science, may be called classical-noise semigroups.

  8. Isochronous classical systems and quantum systems with equally spaced spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñena, J. F.; Perelomov, A. M.; Rañada, M. F.

    2007-11-01

    We study isoperiodic classical systems, what allows us to find the classical isochronous systems, i.e. having a period independent of the energy. The corresponding quantum analog, systems with an equally spaced spectrum are analysed by looking for possible creation-like differential operators. The harmonic oscillator and the isotonic oscillator are the two main essentially unique examples of such situation.

  9. Reversing quantum dynamics with near-optimal quantum and classical fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, H.; Knill, E.

    2002-05-01

    We consider the problem of reversing quantum dynamics, with the goal of preserving an initial state's quantum entanglement or classical correlation with a reference system. We exhibit an approximate reversal operation, adapted to the initial density operator and the "noise" dynamics to be reversed. We show that its error in preserving either quantum or classical information is no more than twice that of the optimal reversal operation. Applications to quantum algorithms and information transmission are discussed.

  10. Classical-quantum arbitrarily varying wiretap channel: common randomness assisted code and continuity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boche, Holger; Cai, Minglai; Deppe, Christian; Nötzel, Janis

    2017-01-01

    We determine the secrecy capacities under common randomness assisted coding of arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels. Furthermore, we determine the secrecy capacity of a mixed channel model which is compound from the sender to the legitimate receiver and varies arbitrarily from the sender to the eavesdropper. We examine when the secrecy capacity is a continuous function of the system parameters as an application and show that resources, e.g., having access to a perfect copy of the outcome of a random experiment, can guarantee continuity of the capacity function of arbitrarily varying classical-quantum wiretap channels.

  11. Quantum-Classical Correspondence of Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2017-04-01

    We formulate the theory of shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical mechanics. For a reference Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is constructed from the dispersionless Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) hierarchy. Then the adiabatic theorem holds exactly for an arbitrary choice of time-dependent parameters. We use the Hamilton-Jacobi theory to define the generalized action. The action is independent of the history of the parameters and is directly related to the adiabatic invariant. The dispersionless KdV hierarchy is obtained from the classical limit of the KdV hierarchy for the quantum shortcuts to adiabaticity. This correspondence suggests some relation between the quantum and classical adiabatic theorems.

  12. Statistical mechanics based on fractional classical and quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Korichi, Z.; Meftah, M. T.

    2014-03-15

    The purpose of this work is to study some problems in statistical mechanics based on the fractional classical and quantum mechanics. At first stage we have presented the thermodynamical properties of the classical ideal gas and the system of N classical oscillators. In both cases, the Hamiltonian contains fractional exponents of the phase space (position and momentum). At the second stage, in the context of the fractional quantum mechanics, we have calculated the thermodynamical properties for the black body radiation, studied the Bose-Einstein statistics with the related problem of the condensation and the Fermi-Dirac statistics.

  13. Efficient classical simulation of continuous variable quantum information processes.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Stephen D; Sanders, Barry C; Braunstein, Samuel L; Nemoto, Kae

    2002-03-04

    We obtain sufficient conditions for the efficient simulation of a continuous variable quantum algorithm or process on a classical computer. The resulting theorem is an extension of the Gottesman-Knill theorem to continuous variable quantum information. For a collection of harmonic oscillators, any quantum process that begins with unentangled Gaussian states, performs only transformations generated by Hamiltonians that are quadratic in the canonical operators, and involves only measurements of canonical operators (including finite losses) and suitable operations conditioned on these measurements can be simulated efficiently on a classical computer.

  14. Faithful actions of locally compact quantum groups on classical spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Debashish; Roy, Sutanu

    2017-03-01

    We construct examples of locally compact quantum groups coming from bicrossed product construction, including non-Kac ones, which can faithfully and ergodically act on connected classical (noncompact) smooth manifolds. However, none of these actions can be isometric in the sense of Goswami (Commun Math Phys 285(1):141-160, 2009), leading to the conjecture that the result obtained by Goswami and Joardar (Rigidity of action of compact quantum groups on compact, connected manifolds, 2013. arXiv:1309.1294) about nonexistence of genuine quantum isometry of classical compact connected Riemannian manifolds may hold in the noncompact case as well.

  15. The ambiguity of simplicity in quantum and classical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghamohammadi, Cina; Mahoney, John R.; Crutchfield, James P.

    2017-04-01

    A system's perceived simplicity depends on whether it is represented classically or quantally. This is not so surprising, as classical and quantum physics are descriptive frameworks built on different assumptions that capture, emphasize, and express different properties and mechanisms. What is surprising is that, as we demonstrate, simplicity is ambiguous: the relative simplicity between two systems can change sign when moving between classical and quantum descriptions. Here, we associate simplicity with small model-memory. We see that the notions of absolute physical simplicity at best form a partial, not a total, order. This suggests that appeals to principles of physical simplicity, via Ockham's Razor or to the ;elegance; of competing theories, may be fundamentally subjective. Recent rapid progress in quantum computation and quantum simulation suggest that the ambiguity of simplicity will strongly impact statistical inference and, in particular, model selection.

  16. Absorbing State Phase Transition with Competing Quantum and Classical Fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Matteo; Buchhold, Michael; Diehl, Sebastian; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2016-06-17

    Stochastic processes with absorbing states feature examples of nonequilibrium universal phenomena. While the classical regime has been thoroughly investigated in the past, relatively little is known about the behavior of these nonequilibrium systems in the presence of quantum fluctuations. Here, we theoretically address such a scenario in an open quantum spin model which, in its classical limit, undergoes a directed percolation phase transition. By mapping the problem to a nonequilibrium field theory, we show that the introduction of quantum fluctuations stemming from coherent, rather than statistical, spin flips alters the nature of the transition such that it becomes first order. In the intermediate regime, where classical and quantum dynamics compete on equal terms, we highlight the presence of a bicritical point with universal features different from the directed percolation class in a low dimension. We finally propose how this physics could be explored within gases of interacting atoms excited to Rydberg states.

  17. Absorbing State Phase Transition with Competing Quantum and Classical Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcuzzi, Matteo; Buchhold, Michael; Diehl, Sebastian; Lesanovsky, Igor

    2016-06-01

    Stochastic processes with absorbing states feature examples of nonequilibrium universal phenomena. While the classical regime has been thoroughly investigated in the past, relatively little is known about the behavior of these nonequilibrium systems in the presence of quantum fluctuations. Here, we theoretically address such a scenario in an open quantum spin model which, in its classical limit, undergoes a directed percolation phase transition. By mapping the problem to a nonequilibrium field theory, we show that the introduction of quantum fluctuations stemming from coherent, rather than statistical, spin flips alters the nature of the transition such that it becomes first order. In the intermediate regime, where classical and quantum dynamics compete on equal terms, we highlight the presence of a bicritical point with universal features different from the directed percolation class in a low dimension. We finally propose how this physics could be explored within gases of interacting atoms excited to Rydberg states.

  18. A wave equation interpolating between classical and quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, W. P.; Greenberger, D. M.; Kobe, D. H.; Scully, M. O.

    2015-10-01

    We derive a ‘master’ wave equation for a family of complex-valued waves {{Φ }}\\equiv R{exp}[{{{i}}S}({cl)}/{{\\hbar }}] whose phase dynamics is dictated by the Hamilton-Jacobi equation for the classical action {S}({cl)}. For a special choice of the dynamics of the amplitude R which eliminates all remnants of classical mechanics associated with {S}({cl)} our wave equation reduces to the Schrödinger equation. In this case the amplitude satisfies a Schrödinger equation analogous to that of a charged particle in an electromagnetic field where the roles of the scalar and the vector potentials are played by the classical energy and the momentum, respectively. In general this amplitude is complex and thereby creates in addition to the classical phase {S}({cl)}/{{\\hbar }} a quantum phase. Classical statistical mechanics, as described by a classical matter wave, follows from our wave equation when we choose the dynamics of the amplitude such that it remains real for all times. Our analysis shows that classical and quantum matter waves are distinguished by two different choices of the dynamics of their amplitudes rather than two values of Planck’s constant. We dedicate this paper to the memory of Richard Lewis Arnowitt—a pioneer of many-body theory, a path finder at the interface of gravity and quantum mechanics, and a true leader in non-relativistic and relativistic quantum field theory.

  19. Information security: from classical to quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Stephen M.; Brougham, Thomas

    2012-09-01

    Quantum cryptography was designed to provide a new approach to the problem of distributing keys for private-key cryptography. The principal idea is that security can be ensured by exploiting the laws of quantum physics and, in particular, by the fact that any attempt to measure a quantum state will change it uncontrollably. This change can be detected by the legitimate users of the communication channel and so reveal to them the presence of an eavesdropper. In this paper I explain (briefly) how quantum key distribution works and some of the progress that has been made towards making this a viable technology. With the principles of quantum communication and quantum key distribution firmly established, it is perhaps time to consider how efficient it can be made. It is interesting to ask, in particular, how many bits of information might reasonably be encoded securely on each photon. The use of photons entangled in their time of arrival might make it possible to achieve data rates in excess of 10 bits per photon.

  20. Dynamics of tripartite quantum entanglement and discord under a classical dephasing random telegraph noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenfack, Lionel Tenemeza; Tchoffo, Martin; Fai, Lukong Cornelius

    2017-02-01

    We address the dynamics of quantum correlations, including entanglement and quantum discord of a three-qubit system interacting with a classical pure dephasing random telegraph noise (RTN) in three different physical environmental situations (independent, mixed and common environments). Two initial entangled states of the system are examined, namely the Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ)- and Werner (W)-type states. The classical noise is introduced as a stochastic process affecting the energy splitting of the qubits. With the help of suitable measures of tripartite entanglement (entanglement witnesses and lower bound of concurrence) and quantum discord (global quantum discord and quantum dissension), we show that the evolution of quantum correlations is not only affected by the type of the system-environment interaction but also by the input configuration of the qubits and the memory properties of the environmental noise. Indeed, depending on the memory properties of the environmental noise and the initial state considered, we find that independent, common and mixed environments can play opposite roles in preserving quantum correlations, and that the sudden death and revival phenomena or the survival of quantum correlations may occur. On the other hand, we also show that the W-type state has strong dynamics under this noise than the GHZ-type ones.

  1. Planck's radiation law: is a quantum-classical perspective possible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrocco, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Planck's radiation law provides the solution to the blackbody problem that marks the decline of classical physics and the rise of the quantum theory of the radiation field. Here, we venture to suggest the possibility that classical physics might be equally suitable to deal with the blackbody problem. A classical version of the Planck's radiation law seems to be achievable if we learn from the quantum-classical correspondence between classical Mie theory and quantum-mechanical wave scattering from spherical scatterers (partial wave analysis). This correspondence designs a procedure for countable energy levels of the radiation trapped within the blackbody treated within the multipole approach of classical electrodynamics (in place of the customary and problematic expansion in terms of plane waves that give rise to the ultraviolet catastrophe). In turn, introducing the Boltzmann discretization of energy levels, the tools of classical thermodynamics and statistical theory become available for the task. On the other hand, the final result depends on a free parameter whose physical units are those of an action. Tuning this parameter on the value given by the Planck constant makes the classical result agree with the canonical Planck's radiation law.

  2. Improved Classical Simulation of Quantum Circuits Dominated by Clifford Gates.

    PubMed

    Bravyi, Sergey; Gosset, David

    2016-06-24

    We present a new algorithm for classical simulation of quantum circuits over the Clifford+T gate set. The runtime of the algorithm is polynomial in the number of qubits and the number of Clifford gates in the circuit but exponential in the number of T gates. The exponential scaling is sufficiently mild that the algorithm can be used in practice to simulate medium-sized quantum circuits dominated by Clifford gates. The first demonstrations of fault-tolerant quantum circuits based on 2D topological codes are likely to be dominated by Clifford gates due to a high implementation cost associated with logical T gates. Thus our algorithm may serve as a verification tool for near-term quantum computers which cannot in practice be simulated by other means. To demonstrate the power of the new method, we performed a classical simulation of a hidden shift quantum algorithm with 40 qubits, a few hundred Clifford gates, and nearly 50 T gates.

  3. Quantum correction to classical gravitational interaction between two polarizable objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Puxun; Hu, Jiawei; Yu, Hongwei

    2016-12-01

    When gravity is quantized, there inevitably exist quantum gravitational vacuum fluctuations which induce quadrupole moments in gravitationally polarizable objects and produce a quantum correction to the classical Newtonian interaction between them. Here, based upon linearized quantum gravity and the leading-order perturbation theory, we study, from a quantum field-theoretic prospect, this quantum correction between a pair of gravitationally polarizable objects treated as two-level harmonic oscillators. We find that the interaction potential behaves like r-11 in the retarded regime and r-10 in the near regime. Our result agrees with what were recently obtained in different approaches. Our study seems to indicate that linearized quantum gravity is robust in dealing with quantum gravitational effects at low energies.

  4. Classical and quantum dynamics of the sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasukov, Vladimir; Moldovanova, Evgeniia; Abdrashitova, Maria; Malik, Hitendra; Gorbacheva, Ekaterina

    2016-07-01

    In Minkowski space, there has been developed the mathematic quantum model of the real particle located on the sphere evolving owing to the negative pressure inside the sphere. The developed model is analogous to the geometrodynamic model of the Lemaitre-Friedmann primordial atom in superspace-time, whose spatial coordinate is the scale factor functioning as a radial coordinate. There is a formulation of quantum geometrodynamics in which the spatial coordinate is an offset of the scale factor and wave function at the same time. With the help of the Dirac procedure for extracting the root from the Hamiltonian operator we have constructed a Dirac quantum dynamics of the sphere with fractional spin.

  5. Implementation of generalized quantum measurements: Superadditive quantum coding, accessible information extraction, and classical capacity limit

    SciTech Connect

    Takeoka, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Mikio; Mizuno, Jun; Sasaki, Masahide

    2004-05-01

    Quantum-information theory predicts that when the transmission resource is doubled in quantum channels, the amount of information transmitted can be increased more than twice by quantum-channel coding technique, whereas the increase is at most twice in classical information theory. This remarkable feature, the superadditive quantum-coding gain, can be implemented by appropriate choices of code words and corresponding quantum decoding which requires a collective quantum measurement. Recently, an experimental demonstration was reported [M. Fujiwara et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 167906 (2003)]. The purpose of this paper is to describe our experiment in detail. Particularly, a design strategy of quantum-collective decoding in physical quantum circuits is emphasized. We also address the practical implication of the gain on communication performance by introducing the quantum-classical hybrid coding scheme. We show how the superadditive quantum-coding gain, even in a small code length, can boost the communication performance of conventional coding techniques.

  6. Quantum Plasma Effects in the Classical Regime

    SciTech Connect

    Brodin, G.; Marklund, M.; Manfredi, G.

    2008-05-02

    For quantum effects to be significant in plasmas it is often assumed that the temperature over density ratio must be small. In this paper we challenge this assumption by considering the contribution to the dynamics from the electron spin properties. As a starting point we consider a multicomponent plasma model, where electrons with spin-up and spin-down are regarded as different fluids. By studying the propagation of Alfven wave solitons we demonstrate that quantum effects can survive in a relatively high-temperature plasma. The consequences of our results are discussed.

  7. New mixed quantum/semiclassical propagation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniou, Dimitri; Gelman, David; Schwartz, Steven D.

    2007-05-01

    The authors developed a new method for calculating the quantum evolution of multidimensional systems, for cases in which the system can be assumed to consist of a quantum subsystem and a bath subsystem of heavier atoms. The method combines two ideas: starting from a simple frozen Gaussian description of the bath subsystem, then calculate quantum corrections to the propagation of the quantum subsystem. This follows from recent work by one of them, showing how one can calculate corrections to approximate evolution schemes, even when the Hamiltonian that corresponds to these approximate schemes is unknown. Then, they take the limit in which the width of the frozen Gaussians approaches zero, which makes the corrections to the evolution of the quantum subsystem depend only on classical bath coordinates. The test calculations they present use low-dimensional systems, in which comparison to exact quantum dynamics is feasible.

  8. Observation of Quantum Fingerprinting Beating the Classical Limit.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian-Yu; Xu, Feihu; Yin, Hua-Lei; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Chen, Si-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Li; You, Li-Xing; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-06-17

    Quantum communication has historically been at the forefront of advancements, from fundamental tests of quantum physics to utilizing the quantum-mechanical properties of physical systems for practical applications. In the field of communication complexity, quantum communication allows the advantage of an exponential reduction in the transmitted information over classical communication to accomplish distributed computational tasks. However, to date, demonstrating this advantage in a practical setting continues to be a central challenge. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of a quantum fingerprinting protocol that for the first time surpasses the ultimate classical limit to transmitted information. Ultralow noise superconducting single-photon detectors and a stable fiber-based Sagnac interferometer are used to implement a quantum fingerprinting system that is capable of transmitting less information than the classical proven lower bound over 20 km standard telecom fiber for input sizes of up to 2 Gbits. The results pave the way for experimentally exploring the advanced features of quantum communication and open a new window of opportunity for research in communication complexity and testing the foundations of physics.

  9. Observation of Quantum Fingerprinting Beating the Classical Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jian-Yu; Xu, Feihu; Yin, Hua-Lei; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Chen, Si-Jing; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Li; You, Li-Xing; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Quantum communication has historically been at the forefront of advancements, from fundamental tests of quantum physics to utilizing the quantum-mechanical properties of physical systems for practical applications. In the field of communication complexity, quantum communication allows the advantage of an exponential reduction in the transmitted information over classical communication to accomplish distributed computational tasks. However, to date, demonstrating this advantage in a practical setting continues to be a central challenge. Here, we report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration of a quantum fingerprinting protocol that for the first time surpasses the ultimate classical limit to transmitted information. Ultralow noise superconducting single-photon detectors and a stable fiber-based Sagnac interferometer are used to implement a quantum fingerprinting system that is capable of transmitting less information than the classical proven lower bound over 20 km standard telecom fiber for input sizes of up to 2 Gbits. The results pave the way for experimentally exploring the advanced features of quantum communication and open a new window of opportunity for research in communication complexity and testing the foundations of physics.

  10. Quantum-classical transition and quantum activation of ratchet currents in the parameter space.

    PubMed

    Beims, M W; Schlesinger, M; Manchein, C; Celestino, A; Pernice, A; Strunz, W T

    2015-05-01

    The quantum ratchet current is studied in the parameter space of the dissipative kicked rotor model coupled to a zero-temperature quantum environment. We show that vacuum fluctuations blur the generic isoperiodic stable structures found in the classical case. Such structures tend to survive when a measure of statistical dependence between the quantum and classical currents are displayed in the parameter space. In addition, we show that quantum fluctuations can be used to overcome transport barriers in the phase space. Related quantum ratchet current activation regions are spotted in the parameter space. Results are discussed based on quantum, semiclassical, and classical calculations. While the semiclassical dynamics involves vacuum fluctuations, the classical map is driven by thermal noise.

  11. Quantum mechanics can reduce the complexity of classical models.

    PubMed

    Gu, Mile; Wiesner, Karoline; Rieper, Elisabeth; Vedral, Vlatko

    2012-03-27

    Mathematical models are an essential component of quantitative science. They generate predictions about the future, based on information available in the present. In the spirit of simpler is better; should two models make identical predictions, the one that requires less input is preferred. Yet, for almost all stochastic processes, even the provably optimal classical models waste information. The amount of input information they demand exceeds the amount of predictive information they output. Here we show how to systematically construct quantum models that break this classical bound, and that the system of minimal entropy that simulates such processes must necessarily feature quantum dynamics. This indicates that many observed phenomena could be significantly simpler than classically possible should quantum effects be involved.

  12. Classical-driving-assisted quantum speed-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Jie; Han, Wei; Xia, Yun-Jie; Cao, Jun-Peng; Fan, Heng

    2015-03-01

    We propose a method of accelerating the speed of evolution of an open system by an external classical driving field for a qubit in a zero-temperature structured reservoir. It is shown that, with a judicious choice of the driving strength of the applied classical field, a speed-up evolution of an open system can be achieved in both the weak system-environment couplings and the strong system-environment couplings. By considering the relationship between non-Makovianity of environment and the classical field, we can drive the open system from the Markovian to the non-Markovian regime by manipulating the driving strength of the classical field. That is the intrinsic physical reason that the classical field may induce the speed-up process. In addition, the role of this classical field on the variation of quantum evolution speed in the whole decoherence process is discussed.

  13. Electromagnetically induced classical and quantum Lau effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tianhui; Yang, Guojian; Xiong, Jun; Xu, Deqin

    2016-07-01

    We present two schemes of Lau effect for an object, an electromagnetically induced grating generated based on the electromagnetically induced effect. The Lau interference pattern is detected either directly in the way of the traditional Lau effect measurement with a classical thermal light being the imaging light, or indirectly and nonlocally in the way of two-photon coincidence measurement with a pair of entangled photons being the imaging light.

  14. PREFACE: Particles and Fields: Classical and Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; Clemente-Gallardo, J.; Marmo, G.

    2007-07-01

    This volume contains some of the contributions to the Conference Particles and Fields: Classical and Quantum, which was held at Jaca (Spain) in September 2006 to honour George Sudarshan on his 75th birthday. Former and current students, associates and friends came to Jaca to share a few wonderful days with George and his family and to present some contributions of their present work as influenced by George's impressive achievements. This book summarizes those scientific contributions which are presented as a modest homage to the master, collaborator and friend. At the social ceremonies various speakers were able to recall instances of his life-long activity in India, the United States and Europe, adding colourful remarks on the friendly and intense atmosphere which surrounded those collaborations, some of which continued for several decades. This meeting would not have been possible without the financial support of several institutions. We are deeply indebted to Universidad de Zaragoza, Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia de España (CICYT), Departamento de Ciencia, Tecnología y Universidad del Gobierno de Aragón, Universitá di Napoli 'Federico II' and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare. Finally, we would like to thank the participants, and particularly George's family, for their contribution to the wonderful atmosphere achieved during the Conference. We would like also to acknowledge the authors of the papers collected in the present volume, the members of the Scientific Committee for their guidance and support and the referees for their generous work. M Asorey, J Clemente-Gallardo and G Marmo The Local Organizing Committee George Sudarshan George Sudarshan

    International Advisory Committee

    A. Ashtekhar (Pennsylvania State University, USA)
    L. J. Boya (Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain)
    I. Cirac (Max Planck Institute, Garching

  15. Quantum and classical dynamics of Langmuir wave packets.

    PubMed

    Haas, F; Shukla, P K

    2009-06-01

    The quantum Zakharov system in three spatial dimensions and an associated Lagrangian description, as well as its basic conservation laws, are derived. In the adiabatic and semiclassical cases, the quantum Zakharov system reduces to a quantum modified vector nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation for the envelope electric field. The Lagrangian structure for the resulting vector NLS equation is used to investigate the time dependence of the Gaussian-shaped localized solutions, via the Rayleigh-Ritz variational method. The formal classical limit is considered in detail. The quantum corrections are shown to prevent the collapse of localized Langmuir envelope fields, in both two and three spatial dimensions. Moreover, the quantum terms can produce an oscillatory behavior of the width of the approximate Gaussian solutions. The variational method is shown to preserve the essential conservation laws of the quantum modified vector NLS equation. The possibility of laboratory tests in the next generation intense laser-solid plasma compression experiment is discussed.

  16. Experimental device-independent tests of classical and quantum entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Feng; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Sijing; You, Lixing; Wang, Zhen; Huang, Yidong

    2016-12-01

    In quantum information processing, it is important to witness the entropy of the message in the device-independent way which was proposed recently [R. Chaves, J. B. Brask, and N. Brunner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 110501 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.110501]. In this paper, we theoretically obtain the minimal quantum entropy for three widely used linear dimension witnesses, which is considered "a difficult question." Then we experimentally test the classical and quantum entropy in a device-independent manner. The experimental results agree well with the theoretical analysis, demonstrating that entropy is needed in quantum systems that is lower than the entropy needed in classical systems with the given value of the dimension witness.

  17. Revivals and classical-motion bases of quantum wave packets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronstein, David L.

    This thesis explores the boundary between classical and quantum mechanics by studying wave packets, coherent superpositions of the stationary states of a quantum system. Such wave packets travel as localized entities along the trajectories predicted by classical mechanics for small windows of time before they spread out and decay away. Our investigations focus on two central issues---the revivals of the shape and classical motion of these wave packets that occur long after their initial decay, and the classical-motion bases that describe the quantum wavefunction in terms of constitutive objects that move classically. We study the infinite square-well potential, a simple model of complete confinement in a one-dimensional interval. The quantum motion seen in this potential is compared with classical models of a particle bouncing between two walls and of a wave traveling along a stretched string with both ends secured. We uncover a remarkable wave-motion basis, with which the wavefunction at any moment in time can be decomposed into a sum of distinct wave propagations of the initial quantum wavefunction in the classical wave equation. These results are extended to the finite square-well potential and we show how the wave-motion basis can be reconciled with the seemingly disparate theory of revivals for highly excited quantum wave packets. We explore the commonalities of the quantum revivals seen in a wide variety of systems by developing a mathematical formalism called phase-difference equations. These equations connect physical models for revivals with the subsequent prediction of revival times in a general way and offer a comprehensive "calculus" for understanding revival phenomena. We apply this calculus to several examples to demonstrate its power and versatility. Using a recently developed semiclassical basis for quantum states, we explore the radial wave packets of the hydrogen atom. Viewed in the semiclassical basis, the revivals of these wave packets are shown

  18. Classical and quantum cosmology of minimal massive bigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darabi, F.; Mousavi, M.

    2016-10-01

    In a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) space-time background we study the classical cosmological models in the context of recently proposed theory of nonlinear minimal massive bigravity. We show that in the presence of perfect fluid the classical field equations acquire contribution from the massive graviton as a cosmological term which is positive or negative depending on the dynamical competition between two scale factors of bigravity metrics. We obtain the classical field equations for flat and open universes in the ordinary and Schutz representation of perfect fluid. Focusing on the Schutz representation for flat universe, we find classical solutions exhibiting singularities at early universe with vacuum equation of state. Then, in the Schutz representation, we study the quantum cosmology for flat universe and derive the Schrodinger-Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We find its exact and wave packet solutions and discuss on their properties to show that the initial singularity in the classical solutions can be avoided by quantum cosmology. Similar to the study of Hartle-Hawking no-boundary proposal in the quantum cosmology of de Rham, Gabadadze and Tolley (dRGT) massive gravity, it turns out that the mass of graviton predicted by quantum cosmology of the minimal massive bigravity is large at early universe. This is in agreement with the fact that at early universe the cosmological constant should be large.

  19. Quantum mean-field approximation for lattice quantum models: Truncating quantum correlations and retaining classical ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malpetti, Daniele; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2017-02-01

    The mean-field approximation is at the heart of our understanding of complex systems, despite its fundamental limitation of completely neglecting correlations between the elementary constituents. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 130401 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.130401], we have shown that in quantum many-body systems at finite temperature, two-point correlations can be formally separated into a thermal part and a quantum part and that quantum correlations are generically found to decay exponentially at finite temperature, with a characteristic, temperature-dependent quantum coherence length. The existence of these two different forms of correlation in quantum many-body systems suggests the possibility of formulating an approximation, which affects quantum correlations only, without preventing the correct description of classical fluctuations at all length scales. Focusing on lattice boson and quantum Ising models, we make use of the path-integral formulation of quantum statistical mechanics to introduce such an approximation, which we dub quantum mean-field (QMF) approach, and which can be readily generalized to a cluster form (cluster QMF or cQMF). The cQMF approximation reduces to cluster mean-field theory at T =0 , while at any finite temperature it produces a family of systematically improved, semi-classical approximations to the quantum statistical mechanics of the lattice theory at hand. Contrary to standard MF approximations, the correct nature of thermal critical phenomena is captured by any cluster size. In the two exemplary cases of the two-dimensional quantum Ising model and of two-dimensional quantum rotors, we study systematically the convergence of the cQMF approximation towards the exact result, and show that the convergence is typically linear or sublinear in the boundary-to-bulk ratio of the clusters as T →0 , while it becomes faster than linear as T grows. These results pave the way towards the development of semiclassical numerical

  20. Generating shortcuts to adiabaticity in quantum and classical dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarzynski, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Transitionless quantum driving achieves adiabatic evolution in a hurry, using a counterdiabatic Hamiltonian to stifle nonadiabatic transitions. Here this shortcut to adiabaticity is cast in terms of a generator of adiabatic transport. This yields a classical analog of transitionless driving, and provides a strategy for constructing quantal counterdiabatic Hamiltonians. As an application of this framework, exact classical and quantal counterdiabatic terms are obtained for a particle in a box and for even-power-law potentials in one degree of freedom.

    1. Interpretation of quantum and classical angular momentum polarization moments.

      PubMed

      de Miranda, Marcelo P; Aoiz, F Javier

      2004-08-20

      This Letter presents a derivation of the relationship between the quantum and classical descriptions of angular momentum polarization. The results involve an "uncertainty broadening" term that directly expresses the restrictions imposed by the uncertainty principle. It is argued that neglect of this term can lead to error in the interpretation of theoretical or experimental angular momentum polarization data. Functions that take the uncertainty broadening into account, appropriate for use in quantum or quasiclassical descriptions of spatial distributions of angular momenta, are defined.

    2. Physics on the boundary between classical and quantum mechanics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      't Hooft, Gerard

      2014-04-01

      Nature's laws in the domain where relativistic effects, gravitational effects and quantum effects are all comparatively strong are far from understood. This domain is called the Planck scale. Conceivably, a theory can be constructed where the quantum nature of phenomena at such scales can be attributed to something fundamentally simpler. However, arguments that quantum mechanics cannot be explained in terms of any classical theory using only classical logic seem to be based on sound mathematical considerations: there can't be physical laws that require "conspiracy". It may therefore be surprising that there are several explicit quantum systems where these considerations apparently do not apply. In the lecture we will show several such counterexamples. These are quantum models that do have a classical origin. The most curious of these models is superstring theory. This theory is often portrayed as to underly the quantum field theory of the subatomic particles, including the "Standard Model". So now the question is asked: how can this model feature "conspiracy", and how bad is that? Is there conspiracy in the vacuum fluctuations?

    3. Coulomb crystallization in classical and quantum systems

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bonitz, Michael

      2007-11-01

      Coulomb crystallization occurs in one-component plasmas when the average interaction energy exceeds the kinetic energy by about two orders of magnitude. A simple road to reach such strong coupling consists in using external confinement potentials the strength of which controls the density. This has been succsessfully realized with ions in traps and storage rings and also in dusty plasma. Recently a three-dimensional spherical confinement could be created [1] which allows to produce spherical dust crystals containing concentric shells. I will give an overview on our recent results for these ``Yukawa balls'' and compare them to experiments. The shell structure of these systems can be very well explained by using an isotropic statically screened pair interaction. Further, the thermodynamic properties of these systems, such as the radial density distribution are discussed based on an analytical theory [3]. I then will discuss Coulomb crystallization in trapped quantum systems, such as mesoscopic electron and electron hole plasmas in coupled layers [4,5]. These systems show a very rich correlation behavior, including liquid and solid like states and bound states (excitons, biexcitons) and their crystals. On the other hand, also collective quantum and spin effects are observed, including Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity of bound electron-hole pairs [4]. Finally, I consider Coulomb crystallization in two-component neutral plasmas in three dimensions. I discuss the necessary conditions for crystals of heavy charges to exist in the presence of a light component which typically is in the Fermi gas or liquid state. It can be shown that their exists a critical ratio of the masses of the species of the order of 80 [5] which is confirmed by Quantum Monte Carlo simulations [6]. Familiar examples are crystals of nuclei in the core of White dwarf stars, but the results also suggest the existence of other crystals, including proton or α-particle crystals in dense matter

    4. Simultaneous classical communication and quantum key distribution using continuous variables*

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Qi, Bing

      2016-10-01

      Presently, classical optical communication systems employing strong laser pulses and quantum key distribution (QKD) systems working at single-photon levels are very different communication modalities. Dedicated devices are commonly required to implement QKD. In this paper, we propose a scheme which allows classical communication and QKD to be implemented simultaneously using the same communication infrastructure. More specially, we propose a coherent communication scheme where both the bits for classical communication and the Gaussian distributed random numbers for QKD are encoded on the same weak coherent pulse and decoded by the same coherent receiver. Simulation results based on practical system parameters show that both deterministic classical communication with a bit error rate of 10-9 and secure key distribution could be achieved over tens of kilometers of single-mode fibers. It is conceivable that in the future coherent optical communication network, QKD will be operated in the background of classical communication at a minimal cost.

    5. Simultaneous classical communication and quantum key distribution using continuous variables

      SciTech Connect

      Qi, Bing

      2016-10-26

      Currently, classical optical communication systems employing strong laser pulses and quantum key distribution (QKD) systems working at single-photon levels are very different communication modalities. Dedicated devices are commonly required to implement QKD. In this paper, we propose a scheme which allows classical communication and QKD to be implemented simultaneously using the same communication infrastructure. More specially, we propose a coherent communication scheme where both the bits for classical communication and the Gaussian distributed random numbers for QKD are encoded on the same weak coherent pulse and decoded by the same coherent receiver. Simulation results based on practical system parameters show that both deterministic classical communication with a bit error rate of 10–9 and secure key distribution could be achieved over tens of kilometers of single-mode fibers. It is conceivable that in the future coherent optical communication network, QKD will be operated in the background of classical communication at a minimal cost.

    6. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

      SciTech Connect

      Balatsky, Alexander V.; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Thorlacius, Larus; Zarembo, Konstantin; Krikun, Alexander; Kedem, Yaron

      2014-05-27

      We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS space-time. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic sound modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom black hole in global AdS.

    7. Quantum density fluctuations in classical liquids.

      PubMed

      Ford, L H; Svaiter, N F

      2009-01-23

      We discuss the density fluctuations of a fluid due to zero point motion, assuming a linear dispersion relation. We argue that density fluctuations in a fluid can be a useful analog model for better understanding fluctuations in relativistic quantum field theory. We calculate the differential cross section for light scattering by the zero point density fluctuations, and find a result proportional to the fifth power of the light frequency. We give some estimates of the relative magnitude of this effect compared to the scattering by thermal density fluctuations, and find that it can be of the order 13% for liquid neon at optical frequencies. This relative magnitude is proportional to frequency and inversely proportional to temperature. Although the scattering by zero point density fluctuation is small, it may be observable.

    8. Bridging quantum and classical plasmonics with a quantum-corrected model.

      PubMed

      Esteban, Ruben; Borisov, Andrei G; Nordlander, Peter; Aizpurua, Javier

      2012-05-08

      Electromagnetic coupling between plasmonic resonances in metallic nanoparticles allows for engineering of the optical response and generation of strong localized near-fields. Classical electrodynamics fails to describe this coupling across sub-nanometer gaps, where quantum effects become important owing to non-local screening and the spill-out of electrons. However, full quantum simulations are not presently feasible for realistically sized systems. Here we present a novel approach, the quantum-corrected model (QCM), that incorporates quantum-mechanical effects within a classical electrodynamic framework. The QCM approach models the junction between adjacent nanoparticles by means of a local dielectric response that includes electron tunnelling and tunnelling resistivity at the gap and can be integrated within a classical electrodynamical description of large and complex structures. The QCM predicts optical properties in excellent agreement with fully quantum mechanical calculations for small interacting systems, opening a new venue for addressing quantum effects in realistic plasmonic systems.

    9. Equivalent emergence of time dependence in classical and quantum mechanics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Briggs, John S.

      2015-05-01

      Beginning with the principle that a closed mechanical composite system is timeless, time can be defined by the regular changes in a suitable position coordinate (clock) in the observing part, when one part of the closed composite observes another part. Translating this scenario into both classical and quantum mechanics allows a transition to be made from a time-independent mechanics for the closed composite to a time-dependent description of the observed part alone. The use of Hamilton-Jacobi theory yields a very close parallel between the derivations in classical and quantum mechanics. The time-dependent equations, Hamilton-Jacobi or Schrödinger, appear as approximations since no observed system is truly closed. The quantum case has an additional feature in the condition that the observing environment must become classical in order to define a real classical time variable. This condition leads to a removal of entanglement engendered by the interaction between the observed system and the observing environment. Comparison is made to the similar emergence of time in quantum gravity theory.

    10. Nilpotent representations of classical quantum groups at roots of unity

      SciTech Connect

      Abe, Yuuki; Nakashima, Toshiki

      2005-11-01

      Properly specializing the parameters in 'Schnizer modules', for types A,B,C, and D, we get its unique primitive vector. Then we show that the module generated by the primitive vector is an irreducible highest weight module of finite dimensional classical quantum groups at roots of unity.

    11. Making the Transition from Classical to Quantum Physics

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Dutt, Amit

      2011-01-01

      This paper reports on the nature of the conceptual understandings developed by Year 12 Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) physics students as they made the transition from the essentially deterministic notions of classical physics, to interpretations characteristic of quantum theory. The research findings revealed the fact that the…

    12. On the classical capacity of quantum Gaussian channels

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lupo, Cosmo; Pirandola, Stefano; Aniello, Paolo; Mancini, Stefano

      2011-02-01

      The set of quantum Gaussian channels acting on one bosonic mode can be classified according to the action of the group of Gaussian unitaries. We look for bounds on the classical capacity for channels belonging to such a classification. Lower bounds can be efficiently calculated by restricting the study to Gaussian encodings, for which we provide analytical expressions.

    13. Minimal classical communication and measurement complexity for quantum information splitting

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zhang, Zhan-jun; Cheung, Chi-Yee

      2008-01-01

      We present two quantum information splitting schemes using respectively tripartite GHZ and asymmetric W states as quantum channels. We show that if the secret state is chosen from a special ensemble and known to the sender (Alice), then she can split and distribute it to the receivers Bob and Charlie by performing only a single-qubit measurement and broadcasting a one-cbit message. It is clear that no other schemes could possibly achieve the same goal with simpler measurement and less classical communication. In comparison, existing schemes work for arbitrary quantum states which need not be known to Alice; however she is required to perform a two-qubit Bell measurement and communicate a two-cbit message. Hence there is a trade-off between flexibility and measurement complexity plus classical resource. In situations where our schemes are applicable, they will greatly reduce the measurement complexity and at the same time cut the communication overhead by one half.

    14. Positive Wigner functions render classical simulation of quantum computation efficient.

      PubMed

      Mari, A; Eisert, J

      2012-12-07

      We show that quantum circuits where the initial state and all the following quantum operations can be represented by positive Wigner functions can be classically efficiently simulated. This is true both for continuous-variable as well as discrete variable systems in odd prime dimensions, two cases which will be treated on entirely the same footing. Noting the fact that Clifford and Gaussian operations preserve the positivity of the Wigner function, our result generalizes the Gottesman-Knill theorem. Our algorithm provides a way of sampling from the output distribution of a computation or a simulation, including the efficient sampling from an approximate output distribution in the case of sampling imperfections for initial states, gates, or measurements. In this sense, this work highlights the role of the positive Wigner function as separating classically efficiently simulable systems from those that are potentially universal for quantum computing and simulation, and it emphasizes the role of negativity of the Wigner function as a computational resource.

    15. The simplified Fermi accelerator in classical and quantum mechanics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Karner, Gunther

      1994-11-01

      We review the simplified classical Fermi acceleration mechanism and construct a quantum counterpart by imposing time-dependent boundary conditions on solutions of the "free" Schrödinger equation at the unit interval. We find similiar dynamical features in the sense that limiting KAM curves, respectively purely singular quasienergy spectrum, exist(s) for sufficiently smooth "wall oscillations" (typically of C 2 type). In addition, we investigate quantum analogs to local approximations of the Fermi map both in its quasiperiodic and irregular phase space regions. In particular, we find pure point q.e. spectrum in the former case and conjecture that "random boundary conditions" are necessary to model a quantum analog to the chaotic regime of the classical accelerator.

    16. Decoherence control in open quantum systems via classical feedback

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ganesan, Narayan; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

      2007-03-01

      In this work we propose a strategy using techniques from systems theory to completely eliminate decoherence and also provide conditions under which it can be done. A construction employing an auxiliary system, the bait, which is instrumental to decoupling the system from the environment is presented. Our approach to decoherence control in contrast to other approaches in the literature involves the bilinear input affine model of quantum control system which lends itself to various techniques from classical control theory, but with nontrivial modifications to the quantum regime. The elegance of this approach yields interesting results on open loop decouplability and decoherence free subspaces. Additionally, the feedback control of decoherence may be related to disturbance decoupling for classical input affine systems, which entails careful application of the methods by avoiding all the quantum mechanical pitfalls. In the process of calculating a suitable feedback the system must be restructured due to its tensorial nature of interaction with the environment, which is unique to quantum systems. In the subsequent section we discuss a general information extraction scheme to gain knowledge of the state and the amount of decoherence based on indirect continuous measurement. The analysis of continuous measurement on a decohering quantum system has not been extensively studied before. Finally, a methodology to synthesize feedback parameters itself is given, that technology permitting, could be implemented for practical 2-qubit systems to perform decoherence free quantum computing. The results obtained are qualitatively different and superior to the ones obtained via master equations.

    17. Quantum Darwinism for mixed-state environment

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Quan, Haitao; Zwolak, Michael; Zurek, Wojciech

      2009-03-01

      We exam quantum darwinism when a system is in the presence of a mixed environment, and we find a general relation between the mutual information for the mixed-state environment and the change of the entropy of the fraction of the environment. We then look at a particular solvable model, and we numerically exam the time evolution of the ``mutual information" for large environment. Finally we discuss about the exact expressions for all entropies and the mutual information at special time.

    18. Quantum epistemology from subquantum ontology: Quantum mechanics from theory of classical random fields

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Khrennikov, Andrei

      2017-02-01

      The scientific methodology based on two descriptive levels, ontic (reality as it is) and epistemic (observational), is briefly presented. Following Schrödinger, we point to the possible gap between these two descriptions. Our main aim is to show that, although ontic entities may be unaccessible for observations, they can be useful for clarification of the physical nature of operational epistemic entities. We illustrate this thesis by the concrete example: starting with the concrete ontic model preceding quantum mechanics (the latter is treated as an epistemic model), namely, prequantum classical statistical field theory (PCSFT), we propose the natural physical interpretation for the basic quantum mechanical entity-the quantum state ("wave function"). The correspondence PCSFT ↦ QM is not straightforward, it couples the covariance operators of classical (prequantum) random fields with the quantum density operators. We use this correspondence to clarify the physical meaning of the pure quantum state and the superposition principle-by using the formalism of classical field correlations.

    19. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

      2016-02-01

      Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic and quantum computing devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics and electrical spin manipulation. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unravelled. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets on graphene. Whereas the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully coherent, resonant spin tunnelling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin manipulation in graphene nanodevices.

    20. Experimental multiplexing of quantum key distribution with classical optical communication

      SciTech Connect

      Wang, Liu-Jun; Chen, Luo-Kan; Ju, Lei; Xu, Mu-Lan; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Kai; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Chen, Teng-Yun Pan, Jian-Wei

      2015-02-23

      We demonstrate the realization of quantum key distribution (QKD) when combined with classical optical communication, and synchronous signals within a single optical fiber. In the experiment, the classical communication sources use Fabry-Pérot (FP) lasers, which are implemented extensively in optical access networks. To perform QKD, multistage band-stop filtering techniques are developed, and a wavelength-division multiplexing scheme is designed for the multi-longitudinal-mode FP lasers. We have managed to maintain sufficient isolation among the quantum channel, the synchronous channel and the classical channels to guarantee good QKD performance. Finally, the quantum bit error rate remains below a level of 2% across the entire practical application range. The proposed multiplexing scheme can ensure low classical light loss, and enables QKD over fiber lengths of up to 45 km simultaneously when the fibers are populated with bidirectional FP laser communications. Our demonstration paves the way for application of QKD to current optical access networks, where FP lasers are widely used by the end users.

    1. Experimental multiplexing of quantum key distribution with classical optical communication

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wang, Liu-Jun; Chen, Luo-Kan; Ju, Lei; Xu, Mu-Lan; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Kai; Chen, Zeng-Bing; Chen, Teng-Yun; Pan, Jian-Wei

      2015-02-01

      We demonstrate the realization of quantum key distribution (QKD) when combined with classical optical communication, and synchronous signals within a single optical fiber. In the experiment, the classical communication sources use Fabry-Pérot (FP) lasers, which are implemented extensively in optical access networks. To perform QKD, multistage band-stop filtering techniques are developed, and a wavelength-division multiplexing scheme is designed for the multi-longitudinal-mode FP lasers. We have managed to maintain sufficient isolation among the quantum channel, the synchronous channel and the classical channels to guarantee good QKD performance. Finally, the quantum bit error rate remains below a level of 2% across the entire practical application range. The proposed multiplexing scheme can ensure low classical light loss, and enables QKD over fiber lengths of up to 45 km simultaneously when the fibers are populated with bidirectional FP laser communications. Our demonstration paves the way for application of QKD to current optical access networks, where FP lasers are widely used by the end users.

    2. Team decision problems with classical and quantum signals.

      PubMed

      Brandenburger, Adam; La Mura, Pierfrancesco

      2016-01-13

      We study team decision problems where communication is not possible, but coordination among team members can be realized via signals in a shared environment. We consider a variety of decision problems that differ in what team members know about one another's actions and knowledge. For each type of decision problem, we investigate how different assumptions on the available signals affect team performance. Specifically, we consider the cases of perfectly correlated, i.i.d., and exchangeable classical signals, as well as the case of quantum signals. We find that, whereas in perfect-recall trees (Kuhn 1950 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 36, 570-576; Kuhn 1953 In Contributions to the theory of games, vol. II (eds H Kuhn, A Tucker), pp. 193-216) no type of signal improves performance, in imperfect-recall trees quantum signals may bring an improvement. Isbell (Isbell 1957 In Contributions to the theory of games, vol. III (eds M Drescher, A Tucker, P Wolfe), pp. 79-96) proved that, in non-Kuhn trees, classical i.i.d. signals may improve performance. We show that further improvement may be possible by use of classical exchangeable or quantum signals. We include an example of the effect of quantum signals in the context of high-frequency trading.

    3. Team decision problems with classical and quantum signals

      PubMed Central

      Brandenburger, Adam; La Mura, Pierfrancesco

      2016-01-01

      We study team decision problems where communication is not possible, but coordination among team members can be realized via signals in a shared environment. We consider a variety of decision problems that differ in what team members know about one another's actions and knowledge. For each type of decision problem, we investigate how different assumptions on the available signals affect team performance. Specifically, we consider the cases of perfectly correlated, i.i.d., and exchangeable classical signals, as well as the case of quantum signals. We find that, whereas in perfect-recall trees (Kuhn 1950 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 36, 570–576; Kuhn 1953 In Contributions to the theory of games, vol. II (eds H Kuhn, A Tucker), pp. 193–216) no type of signal improves performance, in imperfect-recall trees quantum signals may bring an improvement. Isbell (Isbell 1957 In Contributions to the theory of games, vol. III (eds M Drescher, A Tucker, P Wolfe), pp. 79–96) proved that, in non-Kuhn trees, classical i.i.d. signals may improve performance. We show that further improvement may be possible by use of classical exchangeable or quantum signals. We include an example of the effect of quantum signals in the context of high-frequency trading. PMID:26621985

    4. A quantum algorithm for Viterbi decoding of classical convolutional codes

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Grice, Jon R.; Meyer, David A.

      2015-07-01

      We present a quantum Viterbi algorithm (QVA) with better than classical performance under certain conditions. In this paper, the proposed algorithm is applied to decoding classical convolutional codes, for instance, large constraint length and short decode frames . Other applications of the classical Viterbi algorithm where is large (e.g., speech processing) could experience significant speedup with the QVA. The QVA exploits the fact that the decoding trellis is similar to the butterfly diagram of the fast Fourier transform, with its corresponding fast quantum algorithm. The tensor-product structure of the butterfly diagram corresponds to a quantum superposition that we show can be efficiently prepared. The quantum speedup is possible because the performance of the QVA depends on the fanout (number of possible transitions from any given state in the hidden Markov model) which is in general much less than . The QVA constructs a superposition of states which correspond to all legal paths through the decoding lattice, with phase as a function of the probability of the path being taken given received data. A specialized amplitude amplification procedure is applied one or more times to recover a superposition where the most probable path has a high probability of being measured.

    5. Classical simulation of quantum many-body systems

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Huang, Yichen

      Classical simulation of quantum many-body systems is in general a challenging problem for the simple reason that the dimension of the Hilbert space grows exponentially with the system size. In particular, merely encoding a generic quantum many-body state requires an exponential number of bits. However, condensed matter physicists are mostly interested in local Hamiltonians and especially their ground states, which are highly non-generic. Thus, we might hope that at least some physical systems allow efficient classical simulation. Starting with one-dimensional (1D) quantum systems (i.e., the simplest nontrivial case), the first basic question is: Which classes of states have efficient classical representations? It turns out that this question is quantitatively related to the amount of entanglement in the state, for states with "little entanglement'' are well approximated by matrix product states (a data structure that can be manipulated efficiently on a classical computer). At a technical level, the mathematical notion for "little entanglement'' is area law, which has been proved for unique ground states in 1D gapped systems. We establish an area law for constant-fold degenerate ground states in 1D gapped systems and thus explain the effectiveness of matrix-product-state methods in (e.g.) symmetry breaking phases. This result might not be intuitively trivial as degenerate ground states in gapped systems can be long-range correlated. Suppose an efficient classical representation exists. How can one find it efficiently? The density matrix renormalization group is the leading numerical method for computing ground states in 1D quantum systems. However, it is a heuristic algorithm and the possibility that it may fail in some cases cannot be completely ruled out. Recently, a provably efficient variant of the density matrix renormalization group has been developed for frustration-free 1D gapped systems. We generalize this algorithm to all (i.e., possibly frustrated) 1D

    6. Quantum-classical correspondence principles for locally nonequilibrium driven systems.

      PubMed

      Smith, Eric

      2008-02-01

      Many of the core concepts and (especially field-theoretic) tools of statistical mechanics have developed within the context of thermodynamic equilibrium, where state variables are all taken to be charges, meaning that their values are inherently preserved under reversal of the direction of time. A principle concern of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics is to understand the emergence and stability of currents, quantities whose values change sign under time reversal. Whereas the correspondence between classical charge-valued state variables and their underlying statistical or quantum ensembles is quite well understood, the study of currents away from equilibrium has been more fragmentary, with classical descriptions relying on the asymmetric auxiliary-field formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose (and often restricted to the Markovian assumption of Doi and Peliti), while quantum descriptions employ a symmetric two-field formalism introduced by Schwinger and further clarified by Keldysh. In this paper we demonstrate that for quantum ensembles in which superposition is not violated by very strong conditions of decoherence, there is a large natural generalization of the principles and tools of equilibrium, which not only admits but requires the introduction of current-valued state variables. For these systems, not only do Martin-Siggia-Rose (MSR) and Schwinger-Keldysh (SK) field methods both exist, in some cases they provide inequivalent classical and quantum descriptions of identical ensembles. With these systems for examples, we can both study the correspondence between classical and quantum descriptions of currents, and also clarify the nature of the mapping between the structurally homologous but interpretationally different MSR and SK formalisms.

    7. Non-Markovian Complexity in the Quantum-to-Classical Transition.

      PubMed

      Xiong, Heng-Na; Lo, Ping-Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Min; Feng, Da Hsuan; Nori, Franco

      2015-08-25

      The quantum-to-classical transition is due to environment-induced decoherence, and it depicts how classical dynamics emerges from quantum systems. Previously, the quantum-to-classical transition has mainly been described with memory-less (Markovian) quantum processes. Here we study the complexity of the quantum-to-classical transition through general non-Markovian memory processes. That is, the influence of various reservoirs results in a given initial quantum state evolving into one of the following four scenarios: thermal state, thermal-like state, quantum steady state, or oscillating quantum nonstationary state. In the latter two scenarios, the system maintains partial or full quantum coherence due to the strong non-Markovian memory effect, so that in these cases, the quantum-to-classical transition never occurs. This unexpected new feature provides a new avenue for the development of future quantum technologies because the remaining quantum oscillations in steady states are decoherence-free.

    8. Non-Markovian Complexity in the Quantum-to-Classical Transition

      PubMed Central

      Xiong, Heng-Na; Lo, Ping-Yuan; Zhang, Wei-Min; Feng, Da Hsuan; Nori, Franco

      2015-01-01

      The quantum-to-classical transition is due to environment-induced decoherence, and it depicts how classical dynamics emerges from quantum systems. Previously, the quantum-to-classical transition has mainly been described with memory-less (Markovian) quantum processes. Here we study the complexity of the quantum-to-classical transition through general non-Markovian memory processes. That is, the influence of various reservoirs results in a given initial quantum state evolving into one of the following four scenarios: thermal state, thermal-like state, quantum steady state, or oscillating quantum nonstationary state. In the latter two scenarios, the system maintains partial or full quantum coherence due to the strong non-Markovian memory effect, so that in these cases, the quantum-to-classical transition never occurs. This unexpected new feature provides a new avenue for the development of future quantum technologies because the remaining quantum oscillations in steady states are decoherence-free. PMID:26303002

    9. Classical and quantum mechanics of diatomic molecules in tilted fields.

      PubMed

      Arango, Carlos A; Kennerly, William W; Ezra, Gregory S

      2005-05-08

      We investigate the classical and quantum mechanics of diatomic molecules in noncollinear (tilted) static electric and nonresonant linearly polarized laser fields. The classical diatomic in tilted fields is a nonintegrable system, and we study the phase space structure for physically relevant parameter regimes for the molecule KCl. While exhibiting low-energy (pendular) and high-energy (free-rotor) integrable limits, the rotor in tilted fields shows chaotic dynamics at intermediate energies, and the degree of classical chaos can be tuned by changing the tilt angle. We examine the quantum mechanics of rotors in tilted fields. Energy-level correlation diagrams are computed, and the presence of avoided crossings quantified by the study of nearest-neighbor spacing distributions as a function of energy and tilting angle. Finally, we examine the influence of classical periodic orbits on rotor wave functions. Many wave functions in the tilted field case are found to be highly nonseparable in spherical polar coordinates. Localization of wave functions in the vicinity of classical periodic orbits, both stable and unstable, is observed for many states.

    10. Quantum tagging for tags containing secret classical data

      SciTech Connect

      Kent, Adrian

      2011-08-15

      Various authors have considered schemes for quantum tagging, that is, authenticating the classical location of a classical tagging device by sending and receiving quantum signals from suitably located distant sites, in an environment controlled by an adversary whose quantum information processing and transmitting power is potentially unbounded. All of the schemes proposed elsewhere in the literature assume that the adversary is able to inspect the interior of the tagging device. All of these schemes have been shown to be breakable if the adversary has unbounded predistributed entanglement. We consider here the case in which the tagging device contains a finite key string shared with distant sites but kept secret from the adversary, and show this allows the location of the tagging device to be authenticated securely and indefinitely. Our protocol relies on quantum key distribution between the tagging device and at least one distant site, and demonstrates a new practical application of quantum key distribution. It also illustrates that the attainable security in position-based cryptography can depend crucially on apparently subtle details in the security scenario considered.

    11. Statistical origin of classical mechanics and quantum mechanics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Chu, Shu-Yuan

      1993-11-01

      The classical action for interacting strings, obtained by generalizing the time-symmetric electrodynamics of Wheeler and Feynman, is exactly additive. The additivity of the string action suggests a connection between the area of the string world sheets and entropy. We find that the action principle of classical mechanics is the condition that the total entropy of the strings be at an extremum, and the path-integral representation of the quantum density matrix element is an approximation to the partition function of the string theory.

    12. Teleportation as a depolarizing quantum channel, relative entropy, and classical capacity.

      PubMed

      Bowen, G; Bose, S

      2001-12-24

      We show that standard teleportation with an arbitrary mixed state resource is equivalent to a generalized depolarizing channel with probabilities given by the maximally entangled components of the resource. This enables the usage of any quantum channel as a generalized depolarizing channel without additional twirling operations. It also provides a nontrivial upper bound on the entanglement of a class of mixed states. Our result allows a consistent and statistically motivated quantification of teleportation success in terms of the relative entropy and this quantification can be related to a classical capacity.

    13. Quantum simulation of frustrated classical magnetism in triangular optical lattices.

      PubMed

      Struck, J; Ölschläger, C; Le Targat, R; Soltan-Panahi, P; Eckardt, A; Lewenstein, M; Windpassinger, P; Sengstock, K

      2011-08-19

      Magnetism plays a key role in modern technology and stimulates research in several branches of condensed matter physics. Although the theory of classical magnetism is well developed, the demonstration of a widely tunable experimental system has remained an elusive goal. Here, we present the realization of a large-scale simulator for classical magnetism on a triangular lattice by exploiting the particular properties of a quantum system. We use the motional degrees of freedom of atoms trapped in an optical lattice to simulate a large variety of magnetic phases: ferromagnetic, antiferromagnetic, and even frustrated spin configurations. A rich phase diagram is revealed with different types of phase transitions. Our results provide a route to study highly debated phases like spin-liquids as well as the dynamics of quantum phase transitions.

    14. Implementation of quantum and classical discrete fractional Fourier transforms.

      PubMed

      Weimann, Steffen; Perez-Leija, Armando; Lebugle, Maxime; Keil, Robert; Tichy, Malte; Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Nolte, Stefan; Moya-Cessa, Hector; Weihs, Gregor; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Szameit, Alexander

      2016-03-23

      Fourier transforms, integer and fractional, are ubiquitous mathematical tools in basic and applied science. Certainly, since the ordinary Fourier transform is merely a particular case of a continuous set of fractional Fourier domains, every property and application of the ordinary Fourier transform becomes a special case of the fractional Fourier transform. Despite the great practical importance of the discrete Fourier transform, implementation of fractional orders of the corresponding discrete operation has been elusive. Here we report classical and quantum optical realizations of the discrete fractional Fourier transform. In the context of classical optics, we implement discrete fractional Fourier transforms of exemplary wave functions and experimentally demonstrate the shift theorem. Moreover, we apply this approach in the quantum realm to Fourier transform separable and path-entangled biphoton wave functions. The proposed approach is versatile and could find applications in various fields where Fourier transforms are essential tools.

    15. Implementation of quantum and classical discrete fractional Fourier transforms

      PubMed Central

      Weimann, Steffen; Perez-Leija, Armando; Lebugle, Maxime; Keil, Robert; Tichy, Malte; Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Nolte, Stefan; Moya-Cessa, Hector; Weihs, Gregor; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.; Szameit, Alexander

      2016-01-01

      Fourier transforms, integer and fractional, are ubiquitous mathematical tools in basic and applied science. Certainly, since the ordinary Fourier transform is merely a particular case of a continuous set of fractional Fourier domains, every property and application of the ordinary Fourier transform becomes a special case of the fractional Fourier transform. Despite the great practical importance of the discrete Fourier transform, implementation of fractional orders of the corresponding discrete operation has been elusive. Here we report classical and quantum optical realizations of the discrete fractional Fourier transform. In the context of classical optics, we implement discrete fractional Fourier transforms of exemplary wave functions and experimentally demonstrate the shift theorem. Moreover, we apply this approach in the quantum realm to Fourier transform separable and path-entangled biphoton wave functions. The proposed approach is versatile and could find applications in various fields where Fourier transforms are essential tools. PMID:27006089

    16. Classical and quantum magnetism in giant Keplerate magnetic molecules.

      PubMed

      Müller, A; Luban, M; Schröder, C; Modler, R; Kögerler, P; Axenovich, M; Schnack, J; Canfield, P; Bud'ko, S; Harrison, N

      2001-09-17

      Complementary theoretical modeling methods are presented for the classical and quantum Heisenberg model to explain the magnetic properties of nanometer-sized magnetic molecules. Excellent quantitative agreement is achieved between our experimental data down to 0.1 K and for fields up to 60 Tesla and our theoretical results for the giant Keplerate species {Mo72Fe30}, by far the largest paramagnetic molecule synthesized to date.

    17. Quantum-classical electron distributions in atoms and atomic ions

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Kunc, Joseph A.

      1988-01-01

      A quantum-classical approach is used to obtain the velocity distributions in atoms and positive and negative ions in both ground and excited states. In the analysis, Hartree-Fock electronic wavefunctions are used to determine the radial electron distributions, and the central-field approximation is used to study the the dynamic properties of the localized electrons. The distributions for the outer and inner shells are found to agree well with exact results obtained by numerical calculations.

    18. Classical simulation of quantum entanglement without local hidden variables

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Massar, Serge; Bacon, Dave; Cerf, Nicolas J.; Cleve, Richard

      2001-05-01

      Recent work has extended Bell's theorem by quantifying the amount of communication required to simulate entangled quantum systems with classical information. The general scenario is that a bipartite measurement is given from a set of possibilities and the goal is to find a classical scheme that reproduces exactly the correlations that arise when an actual quantum system is measured. Previous results have shown that, using local hidden variables, a finite amount of communication suffices to simulate the correlations for a Bell state. We extend this in a number of ways. First, we show that, when the communication is merely required to be finite on average, Bell states can be simulated without any local hidden variables. More generally, we show that arbitrary positive operator valued measurements on systems of n Bell states can be simulated with O(n2n) bits of communication on average (again, without local hidden variables). On the other hand, when the communication is required to be absolutely bounded, we show that a finite number of bits of local hidden variables is insufficient to simulate a Bell state. This latter result is based on an analysis of the nondeterministic communication complexity of the NOT-EQUAL function, which is constant in the quantum model and logarithmic in the classical model.

    19. Quantum Versus Classical Advantages in Secret Key Distillation (and Their Links to Quantum Entanglement

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Benjamin; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

      We consider the extraction of shared secret key from correlations that are generated by either a classical or quantum source. In the classical setting, two honest parties (Alice and Bob) use public discussion and local operations to distill secret key from some distribution pXYZ that is shared with an unwanted eavesdropper (Eve). In the quantum settings, the correlations pXYZ are delivered to the parties as either an incoherent mixture of orthogonal quantum states or as coherent superposition of such states. Here we demonstrate that the classical and quantum key rates are equivalent when the correlations are generated incoherently in the quantum setting. For coherent sources, we next show that the rates are incomparable, and in fact, their difference can be arbitrarily large in either direction. However, we identify a large class of non-trivial distributions that possess the following properties: (i) Eve's advantage is always greater in the quantum source than classically, and (ii) for the entanglement shared in the coherent source, the so-called entanglement cost/squashed entanglement/relative entropy of entanglement can all be computed. We thus present a rare instance in which various entropic entanglement measures of a quantum state can be explicitly computed.

    20. Classical and quantum dynamics in an inverse square potential

      SciTech Connect

      Guillaumín-España, Elisa; Núñez-Yépez, H. N.; Salas-Brito, A. L.

      2014-10-15

      The classical motion of a particle in a 3D inverse square potential with negative energy, E, is shown to be geodesic, i.e., equivalent to the particle's free motion on a non-compact phase space manifold irrespective of the sign of the coupling constant. We thus establish that all its classical orbits with E < 0 are unbounded. To analyse the corresponding quantum problem, the Schrödinger equation is solved in momentum space. No discrete energy levels exist in the unrenormalized case and the system shows a complete “fall-to-the-center” with an energy spectrum unbounded by below. Such behavior corresponds to the non-existence of bound classical orbits. The symmetry of the problem is SO(3) × SO(2, 1) corroborating previously obtained results.

    1. Representational Realism, Closed Theories and the Quantum to Classical Limit

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      de Ronde, Christian

      In this chapter, we discuss the representational realist stance as a pluralistontic approach to inter-theoretic relationships. Our stance stresses the fact that physical theories require the necessary consideration of a conceptual level of discourse which determines and configures the specific field of phenomena discussed by each particular theory. We will criticize the orthodox line of research which has grounded the analysis about QM in two (Bohrian) metaphysical presuppositions - accepted in the present as dogmas that all interpretations must follow. We will also examine how the orthodox project of "bridging the gap" between the quantum and the classical domains has constrained the possibilities of research, producing only a limited set of interpretational problems which only focus in the justification of "classical reality" and exclude the possibility of analyzing the possibilities of non-classical conceptual representations of QM. The representational realist stance introduces two new problems, namely, the superposition problem and the contextuality problem, which consider explicitly the conceptual representation of orthodox QM beyond the mere reference to mathematical structures and measurement outcomes. In the final part of the chapter, we revisit, from representational realist perspective, the quantum to classical limit and the orthodox claim that this inter-theoretic relation can be explained through the principle of decoherence.

    2. Security of quantum digital signatures for classical messages

      PubMed Central

      Wang, Tian-Yin; Cai, Xiao-Qiu; Ren, Yan-Li; Zhang, Rui-Ling

      2015-01-01

      Quantum digital signatures can be used to authenticate classical messages in an information-theoretically secure way. Previously, a novel quantum digital signature for classical messages has been proposed and gave an experimental demonstration of distributing quantum digital signatures from one sender to two receivers. Some improvement versions were subsequently presented, which made it more feasible with present technology. These proposals for quantum digital signatures are basic building blocks which only deal with the problem of sending single bit messages while no-forging and non-repudiation are guaranteed. For a multi-bit message, it is only mentioned that the basic building blocks must be iterated, but the iteration of the basic building block still does not suffice to define the entire protocol. In this paper, we show that it is necessary to define the entire protocol because some attacks will arise if these building blocks are used in a naive way of iteration. Therefore, we give a way of defining an entire protocol to deal with the problem of sending multi-bit messages based on the basic building blocks and analyse its security. PMID:25782417

    3. Classical and quantum emitters near a metal surface

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Mohammadi, Zahra; Kheirandish, Fardin

      2017-04-01

      The propagation of surface plasmon polaritons in an attenuating medium is investigated. The analytical calculations of the total electric-field Green’s tensor of a metal–dielectric interface structure are provided and novel explicit expressions for the Green’s tensor of a metal–dielectric interface are presented. The contribution of plasmons is obtained by evaluating the poles of the reflection coefficient for p-polarized waves incident on the metal interface. The emission pattern of a classical dipole located above the air/silver interface is studied. The relative intensity of the field to the field intensity in free space is studied for both normal and parallel orientations of the dipole. The quantum optical properties of a quantum emitter coupled to a metal surface are studied. Single photon emission is demonstrated for a quantum dot near a metal surface using second-order correlation functions.

    4. Quantum correlations of identical particles subject to classical environmental noise

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Beggi, Andrea; Buscemi, Fabrizio; Bordone, Paolo

      2016-09-01

      In this work, we propose a measure for the quantum discord of indistinguishable particles, based on the definition of entanglement of particles given in Wiseman and Vaccaro (Phys Rev Lett 91:097902, 2003. doi: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.91.097902). This discord of particles is then used to evaluate the quantum correlations in a system of two identical bosons (fermions), where the particles perform a quantum random walk described by the Hubbard Hamiltonian in a 1D lattice. The dynamics of the particles is either unperturbed or subject to a classical environmental noise—such as random telegraph, pink or brown noise. The observed results are consistent with those for the entanglement of particles, and we observe that on-site interaction between particles have an important protective effect on correlations against the decoherence of the system.

    5. Reduction of Classical Measurement Noise via Quantum-Dense Metrology.

      PubMed

      Ast, Melanie; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Schnabel, Roman

      2016-10-28

      Quantum-dense metrology constitutes a special case of quantum metrology in which two orthogonal phase space projections of a signal are simultaneously sensed beyond the shot-noise limit. Previously, it was shown that the additional sensing channel that is provided by quantum-dense metrology contains information that can be used to identify and to discard corrupted segments from the measurement data. Here, we propose and demonstrate a new method in which this information is used for improving the sensitivity without discarding any measurement segments. Our measurement reached sub-shot-noise performance, although initially strong classical noise polluted the data. The new method has high potential for improving the noise spectral density of gravitational-wave detectors at signal frequencies of high astrophysical relevance.

    6. Reduction of Classical Measurement Noise via Quantum-Dense Metrology

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ast, Melanie; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Schnabel, Roman

      2016-10-01

      Quantum-dense metrology constitutes a special case of quantum metrology in which two orthogonal phase space projections of a signal are simultaneously sensed beyond the shot-noise limit. Previously, it was shown that the additional sensing channel that is provided by quantum-dense metrology contains information that can be used to identify and to discard corrupted segments from the measurement data. Here, we propose and demonstrate a new method in which this information is used for improving the sensitivity without discarding any measurement segments. Our measurement reached sub-shot-noise performance, although initially strong classical noise polluted the data. The new method has high potential for improving the noise spectral density of gravitational-wave detectors at signal frequencies of high astrophysical relevance.

    7. Large Quantum Gravity Effects: Unforeseen Limitations of the Classical Theory

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ashtekar, Abhay

      1996-12-01

      Three-dimensional gravity coupled to Maxwell (or Klein-Gordon) fields is exactly soluble under the assumption of axisymmetry. The solution is used to probe several quantum gravity issues. In particular, it is found that if there is an electromagnetic wave of Planckian frequency even with such low amplitude that the curvature of the classical solution is small, the uncertainty in the quantum metric can be very large. More generally, the quantum fluctuations in the geometry are large unless the number and frequency of photons satisfy the inequality N\\(ħGω\\)2<<1. Results hold also for a sector of the four-dimensional theory (consisting of Einstein-Rosen gravitational waves).

    8. Parametric representation of open quantum systems and cross-over from quantum to classical environment.

      PubMed

      Calvani, Dario; Cuccoli, Alessandro; Gidopoulos, Nikitas I; Verrucchi, Paola

      2013-04-23

      The behavior of most physical systems is affected by their natural surroundings. A quantum system with an environment is referred to as open, and its study varies according to the classical or quantum description adopted for the environment. We propose an approach to open quantum systems that allows us to follow the cross-over from quantum to classical environments; to achieve this, we devise an exact parametric representation of the principal system, based on generalized coherent states for the environment. The method is applied to the s = 1/2 Heisenberg star with frustration, where the quantum character of the environment varies with the couplings entering the Hamiltonian H. We find that when the star is in an eigenstate of H, the central spin behaves as if it were in an effective magnetic field, pointing in the direction set by the environmental coherent-state angle variables (θ, ϕ), and broadened according to their quantum probability distribution. Such distribution is independent of ϕ, whereas as a function of θ is seen to get narrower as the quantum character of the environment is reduced, collapsing into a Dirac-δ function in the classical limit. In such limit, because ϕ is left undetermined, the Von Neumann entropy of the central spin remains finite; in fact, it is equal to the entanglement of the original fully quantum model, a result that establishes a relation between this latter quantity and the Berry phase characterizing the dynamics of the central spin in the effective magnetic field.

    9. Emergence of order in quantum extensions of the classical quasispecies evolution

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Narnhofer, Heide; Posch, Harald A.; Thirring, Walter

      2007-10-01

      We study evolution equations which model selection and mutation within the framework of quantum mechanics. The main question is to what extent order is achieved for an ensemble of typical systems. As an indicator for mixing or purification, a quadratic entropy is used which assumes values between zero for pure states and (d-1)/d for fully mixed states. Here, d is the dimension. Whereas the classical counterpart, the quasispecies dynamics, has previously been found to be predominantly mixing, the quantum quasispecies (QS) evolution surprisingly is found to be strictly purifying for all dimensions. This is also typically true for an alternative formulation (AQS) of this quantum mechanical flow. We compare this also to analogous results for the Lindblad evolution. Although the latter may be viewed as a simple linear superposition of the purifying QS and AQS evolutions, it is found to be predominantly mixing. The reason for this behavior may be explained by the fact that the two subprocesses by themselves converge to different pure states, such that the combined process is mixing. These results also apply to high-dimensional systems.

    10. Line mixing effects in isotropic Raman spectra of pure N{sub 2}: A classical trajectory study

      SciTech Connect

      Ivanov, Sergey V.; Boulet, Christian; Buzykin, Oleg G.; Thibault, Franck

      2014-11-14

      Line mixing effects in the Q branch of pure N{sub 2} isotropic Raman scattering are studied at room temperature using a classical trajectory method. It is the first study using an extended modified version of Gordon's classical theory of impact broadening and shift of rovibrational lines. The whole relaxation matrix is calculated using an exact 3D classical trajectory method for binary collisions of rigid N{sub 2} molecules employing the most up-to-date intermolecular potential energy surface (PES). A simple symmetrizing procedure is employed to improve off-diagonal cross-sections to make them obeying exactly the principle of detailed balance. The adequacy of the results is confirmed by the sum rule. The comparison is made with available experimental data as well as with benchmark fully quantum close coupling [F. Thibault, C. Boulet, and Q. Ma, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 044303 (2014)] and refined semi-classical Robert-Bonamy [C. Boulet, Q. Ma, and F. Thibault, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 084310 (2014)] results. All calculations (classical, quantum, and semi-classical) were made using the same PES. The agreement between classical and quantum relaxation matrices is excellent, opening the way to the analysis of more complex molecular systems.

    11. Simultaneous classical communication and quantum key distribution using continuous variables

      DOE PAGES

      Qi, Bing

      2016-10-26

      Currently, classical optical communication systems employing strong laser pulses and quantum key distribution (QKD) systems working at single-photon levels are very different communication modalities. Dedicated devices are commonly required to implement QKD. In this paper, we propose a scheme which allows classical communication and QKD to be implemented simultaneously using the same communication infrastructure. More specially, we propose a coherent communication scheme where both the bits for classical communication and the Gaussian distributed random numbers for QKD are encoded on the same weak coherent pulse and decoded by the same coherent receiver. Simulation results based on practical system parameters showmore » that both deterministic classical communication with a bit error rate of 10–9 and secure key distribution could be achieved over tens of kilometers of single-mode fibers. It is conceivable that in the future coherent optical communication network, QKD will be operated in the background of classical communication at a minimal cost.« less

    12. Classical and quantum cosmology of the little rip abrupt event

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Albarran, Imanol; Bouhmadi-López, Mariam; Kiefer, Claus; Marto, João; Vargas Moniz, Paulo

      2016-09-01

      We analyze from a classical and quantum point of view the behavior of the Universe close to a little rip, which can be interpreted as a big rip sent towards the infinite future. Like a big rip singularity, a little rip implies the destruction of all bounded structures in the Universe and is thus an event where quantum effects could be important. We present here a new phantom scalar field model for the little rip. The quantum analysis is performed in quantum geometrodynamics, with the Wheeler-DeWitt equation as its central equation. We find that the little rip can be avoided in the sense of the DeWitt criterion, that is, by having a vanishing wave function at the place of the little rip. Therefore our analysis completes the answer to the question: can quantum cosmology smoothen or avoid the divergent behavior genuinely caused by phantom matter? We show that this can indeed happen for the little rip, similar to the avoidance of a big rip and a little sibling of the big rip.

    13. Geometric control of quantum mechanical and nonlinear classical systems

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Nelson, Richard Joseph

      1999-10-01

      Geometric control refers to the judicious use of the non- commuting nature of inputs and natural dynamics as the basis for control. The last few decades in control system theory have seen the application of differential geometry in proving several important properties of systems, including controllability and observability. Until recently, however, the results of this mathematical geometry have rarely been used as the basis for designing and implementing an actual controller. This thesis demonstrates the application of a judicious selection of inputs, so that if the system is proven to be controllable using geometric methods, one can design input sequences using the same geometry. A demonstration of this method is shown in simulating the attitude control of a satellite: a highly non-linear, non- holonomic control problem. Although not a practical method for large re-orientations of a typical satellite, the approach can be applied to other nonlinear systems. The method is also applied to the closed-loop performance of a quantum mechanical system to demonstrate the feasibility of coherent quantum feedback-something impossible using a conventional controller. Finally, the method is applied in the open-loop control of a quantum mechanical system: in this case, the creation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger correlations among the nuclei of an ensemble of alanine molecules in a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. In each case, the data demonstrate the usefulness of a geometric approach to control. In addition to demonstrations of geometric control in practice, the quantum mechanical experiments also demonstrate for the first time peculiar quantum correlations, including GHZ correlations, that have no classical analog. The quantum experiments further establish nuclear magnetic resonance as a viable and accessible testbed of quantum predictions and processes. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax

    14. Decoherence and quantum-classical master equation dynamics.

      PubMed

      Grunwald, Robbie; Kapral, Raymond

      2007-03-21

      The conditions under which quantum-classical Liouville dynamics may be reduced to a master equation are investigated. Systems that can be partitioned into a quantum-classical subsystem interacting with a classical bath are considered. Starting with an exact non-Markovian equation for the diagonal elements of the density matrix, an evolution equation for the subsystem density matrix is derived. One contribution to this equation contains the bath average of a memory kernel that accounts for all coherences in the system. It is shown to be a rapidly decaying function, motivating a Markovian approximation on this term in the evolution equation. The resulting subsystem density matrix equation is still non-Markovian due to the fact that bath degrees of freedom have been projected out of the dynamics. Provided the computation of nonequilibrium average values or correlation functions is considered, the non-Markovian character of this equation can be removed by lifting the equation into the full phase space of the system. This leads to a trajectory description of the dynamics where each fictitious trajectory accounts for decoherence due to the bath degrees of freedom. The results are illustrated by computations of the rate constant of a model nonadiabatic chemical reaction.

    15. PT symmetry in classical and quantum statistical mechanics.

      PubMed

      Meisinger, Peter N; Ogilvie, Michael C

      2013-04-28

      PT-symmetric Hamiltonians and transfer matrices arise naturally in statistical mechanics. These classical and quantum models often require the use of complex or negative weights and thus fall outside the conventional equilibrium statistical mechanics of Hermitian systems. PT-symmetric models form a natural class where the partition function is necessarily real, but not necessarily positive. The correlation functions of these models display a much richer set of behaviours than Hermitian systems, displaying sinusoidally modulated exponential decay, as in a dense fluid, or even sinusoidal modulation without decay. Classical spin models with PT-symmetry include Z(N) models with a complex magnetic field, the chiral Potts model and the anisotropic next-nearest-neighbour Ising model. Quantum many-body problems with a non-zero chemical potential have a natural PT-symmetric representation related to the sign problem. Two-dimensional quantum chromodynamics with heavy quarks at non-zero chemical potential can be solved by diagonalizing an appropriate PT-symmetric Hamiltonian.

    16. The Pendulum as a Vehicle for Transitioning from Classical to Quantum Physics: History, Quantum Concepts, and Educational Challenges

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Barnes, Marianne B.; Garner, James; Reid, David

      2004-01-01

      In this article we use the pendulum as the vehicle for discussing the transition from classical to quantum physics. Since student knowledge of the classical pendulum can be generalized to all harmonic oscillators, we propose that a quantum analysis of the pendulum can lead students into the unanticipated consequences of quantum phenomena at the…

    17. Sudden transition between classical and quantum decoherence in dissipative cavity QED and stationary quantum discord

      SciTech Connect

      He Qiliang; Xu Jingbo; Zhang Yeqi; Yao Daoxin

      2011-08-15

      We investigate the phenomenon of sudden transition between classical and quantum decoherence in the study of quantum discord for a dissipative cavity QED system, which consists of two noninteracting two-level atoms, each trapped in a dissipative cavity. It is found that the quantum discord between the two atoms, which are prepared initially in the X-type quantum states, is not destroyed by the dissipation of the cavities for a finite time interval, and the stationary quantum discord can arise in the interaction of atoms with cavities as the time approaches infinity. The transition time is sensitive to the initial state parameter of the two atoms and the mean photon number of the coherent field. Interestingly, the quantum discord between the two atoms is completely unaffected by the dissipation of the cavities if we choose the suitable value of the ratio, which depends on the decay rate of the two cavities and the atom-field coupling constant.

    18. Numerical evidence of quantum melting of spin ice: quantum-classical crossover

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kato, Yasuyuki; Onoda, Shigeki

      2015-03-01

      Unbiased quantum Monte-Carlo simulations are performed on the simplest case of the quantum spin ice model, namely, the nearest-neighbor spin-1/2 XXZ model on the pyrochlore lattice with an antiferromagnetic longitudinal and a weak ferromagnetic transverse exchange couplings, J and J⊥. On cooling across TCSI ~ 0 . 2 J , the specific heat shows a broad peak associated with a crossover to a classical Coulomb liquid regime characterized by a remnant of the pinch-point singularity in longitudinal spin correlations as well as the Pauling ice entropy for | J⊥ | << J , as in classical spin ice. On further cooling, the entropy restarts gradually decaying to zero for J⊥ >J⊥ c ~ - 0 . 104 J , as expected for bosonic quantum Coulomb liquids. With negatively increasing J⊥ across J⊥ c, a first-order transition occurs at a nonzero temperature from the quantum Coulomb liquid to an XY ferromagnet. Relevance to magnetic rare-earth pyrochlore oxides is discussed.

    19. Classical and quantum cosmology of Born-Infeld type models

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kamenshchik, Alexander; Kiefer, Claus; Kwidzinski, Nick

      2016-04-01

      We discuss Born-Infeld type fields (tachyon fields) in classical and quantum cosmology. We first partly review and partly extend the discussion of the classical solutions and focus in particular on the occurrence of singularities. For quantization, we employ geometrodynamics. In the case of constant potential, we discuss both Wheeler-DeWitt quantization and reduced quantization. We are able to give various solutions and discuss their asymptotics. For the case of general potential, we transform the Wheeler-DeWitt equation to a form where it leads to a difference equation. Such a difference equation was previously found in the quantization of black holes. We give explicit results for the cases of constant potential and inverse squared potential and point out special features possessed by solutions of the difference equation.

    20. Gauge transformations and conserved quantities in classical and quantum mechanics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Berche, Bertrand; Malterre, Daniel; Medina, Ernesto

      2016-08-01

      We are taught that gauge transformations in classical and quantum mechanics do not change the physics of the problem. Nevertheless, here we discuss three broad scenarios where under gauge transformations: (i) conservation laws are not preserved in the usual manner; (ii) non-gauge-invariant quantities can be associated with physical observables; and (iii) there are changes in the physical boundary conditions of the wave function that render it non-single-valued. We give worked examples that illustrate these points, in contrast to general opinions from classic texts. We also give a historical perspective on the development of Abelian gauge theory in relation to our particular points. Our aim is to provide a discussion of these issues at the graduate level.

    1. Scattering theory for the quantum envelope of a classical system

      SciTech Connect

      Sudarshan, E.C.G.

      1993-12-31

      Classical dynamics, reformulated in terms of its quantum envelope is studied for the stationary states of the interacting system. The dynamical variable of ``elapsed time`` plays a crucial role in this study. It is shown that the perturbation series for the elapsed time can be summed in various simple cases even when standard perturbation series diverge. For the special class of systems where the interactions fall off sufficiently fast at infinity one could define ``in`` and ``out`` states; and consequently the wave matrices and scattering matrices. The scattering phase shifts bear a simple relation to the time delay in scattering.

    2. Operational dynamic modeling transcending quantum and classical mechanics.

      PubMed

      Bondar, Denys I; Cabrera, Renan; Lompay, Robert R; Ivanov, Misha Yu; Rabitz, Herschel A

      2012-11-09

      We introduce a general and systematic theoretical framework for operational dynamic modeling (ODM) by combining a kinematic description of a model with the evolution of the dynamical average values. The kinematics includes the algebra of the observables and their defined averages. The evolution of the average values is drawn in the form of Ehrenfest-like theorems. We show that ODM is capable of encompassing wide-ranging dynamics from classical non-relativistic mechanics to quantum field theory. The generality of ODM should provide a basis for formulating novel theories.

    3. Minimum length from quantum mechanics and classical general relativity.

      PubMed

      Calmet, Xavier; Graesser, Michael; Hsu, Stephen D H

      2004-11-19

      We derive fundamental limits on measurements of position, arising from quantum mechanics and classical general relativity. First, we show that any primitive probe or target used in an experiment must be larger than the Planck length lP. This suggests a Planck-size minimum ball of uncertainty in any measurement. Next, we study interferometers (such as LIGO) whose precision is much finer than the size of any individual components and hence are not obviously limited by the minimum ball. Nevertheless, we deduce a fundamental limit on their accuracy of order lP. Our results imply a device independent limit on possible position measurements.

    4. Quantum secret sharing via local operations and classical communication

      PubMed Central

      Yang, Ying-Hui; Gao, Fei; Wu, Xia; Qin, Su-Juan; Zuo, Hui-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

      2015-01-01

      We investigate the distinguishability of orthogonal multipartite entangled states in d-qudit system by restricted local operations and classical communication. According to these properties, we propose a standard (2, n)-threshold quantum secret sharing scheme (called LOCC-QSS scheme), which solves the open question in [Rahaman et al., Phys. Rev. A, 91, 022330 (2015)]. On the other hand, we find that all the existing (k, n)-threshold LOCC-QSS schemes are imperfect (or “ramp”), i.e., unauthorized groups can obtain some information about the shared secret. Furthermore, we present a (3, 4)-threshold LOCC-QSS scheme which is close to perfect. PMID:26586412

    5. Exact Classical and Quantum Dynamics in Background Electromagnetic Fields

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Heinzl, Tom; Ilderton, Anton

      2017-03-01

      Analytic results for (Q)ED processes in external fields are limited to a few special cases, such as plane waves. However, the strong focusing of intense laser fields implies a need to go beyond the plane wave model. By exploiting Poincaré symmetry and superintegrability we show how to construct, and solve without approximation, new models of laser-matter interactions. We illustrate the method with a model of a radially polarized (TM) laser beam, for which we exactly determine the classical orbits and quantum wave functions. Including in this way the effects of transverse field structure should improve predictions and analyses for experiments at intense laser facilities.

    6. Quantum secret sharing via local operations and classical communication.

      PubMed

      Yang, Ying-Hui; Gao, Fei; Wu, Xia; Qin, Su-Juan; Zuo, Hui-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

      2015-11-20

      We investigate the distinguishability of orthogonal multipartite entangled states in d-qudit system by restricted local operations and classical communication. According to these properties, we propose a standard (2, n)-threshold quantum secret sharing scheme (called LOCC-QSS scheme), which solves the open question in [Rahaman et al., Phys. Rev. A, 91, 022330 (2015)]. On the other hand, we find that all the existing (k, n)-threshold LOCC-QSS schemes are imperfect (or "ramp"), i.e., unauthorized groups can obtain some information about the shared secret. Furthermore, we present a (3, 4)-threshold LOCC-QSS scheme which is close to perfect.

    7. Quantum secret sharing via local operations and classical communication

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Yang, Ying-Hui; Gao, Fei; Wu, Xia; Qin, Su-Juan; Zuo, Hui-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

      2015-11-01

      We investigate the distinguishability of orthogonal multipartite entangled states in d-qudit system by restricted local operations and classical communication. According to these properties, we propose a standard (2, n)-threshold quantum secret sharing scheme (called LOCC-QSS scheme), which solves the open question in [Rahaman et al., Phys. Rev. A, 91, 022330 (2015)]. On the other hand, we find that all the existing (k, n)-threshold LOCC-QSS schemes are imperfect (or “ramp”), i.e., unauthorized groups can obtain some information about the shared secret. Furthermore, we present a (3, 4)-threshold LOCC-QSS scheme which is close to perfect.

    8. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene

      PubMed Central

      Cervetti, Christian; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Cornia, Andrea; Repollés, Ana; Luis, Fernando; Dressel, Martin; Rauschenbach, Stephan; Kern, Klaus; Burghard, Marko; Bogani, Lapo

      2015-01-01

      Controlling the dynamics of spins on surfaces is pivotal to the design of spintronic1 and quantum computing2 devices. Proposed schemes involve the interaction of spins with graphene to enable surface-state spintronics3,4, and electrical spin-manipulation4-11. However, the influence of the graphene environment on the spin systems has yet to be unraveled12. Here we explore the spin-graphene interaction by studying the classical and quantum dynamics of molecular magnets13 on graphene. While the static spin response remains unaltered, the quantum spin dynamics and associated selection rules are profoundly modulated. The couplings to graphene phonons, to other spins, and to Dirac fermions are quantified using a newly-developed model. Coupling to Dirac electrons introduces a dominant quantum-relaxation channel that, by driving the spins over Villain’s threshold, gives rise to fully-coherent, resonant spin tunneling. Our findings provide fundamental insight into the interaction between spins and graphene, establishing the basis for electrical spin-manipulation in graphene nanodevices. PMID:26641019

    9. Quantum and classical correlations in electron-nuclear spin echo

      SciTech Connect

      Zobov, V. E.

      2014-11-15

      The quantum properties of dynamic correlations in a system of an electron spin surrounded by nuclear spins under the conditions of free induction decay and electron spin echo have been studied. Analytical results for the time evolution of mutual information, classical part of correlations, and quantum part characterized by quantum discord have been obtained within the central-spin model in the high-temperature approximation. The same formulas describe discord in both free induction decay and spin echo although the time and magnetic field dependences are different because of difference in the parameters entering into the formulas. Changes in discord in the presence of the nuclear polarization β{sub I} in addition to the electron polarization β{sub S} have been calculated. It has been shown that the method of reduction of the density matrix to a two-spin electron-nuclear system provides a qualitatively correct description of pair correlations playing the main role at β{sub S} ≈ β{sub I} and small times. At large times, such correlations decay and multispin correlations ensuring nonzero mutual information and zero quantum discord become dominant.

    10. A classical approach to the graph isomorphism problem using quantum walks

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Douglas, Brendan L.; Wang, Jingbo B.

      2008-02-01

      Given the extensive application of classical random walks to classical algorithms in a variety of fields, their quantum analogue in quantum walks is expected to provide a fruitful source of quantum algorithms. So far, however, such algorithms have been scarce. In this work, we enumerate some important differences between quantum and classical walks, leading to their markedly different properties. We show that for many practical purposes, the implementation of quantum walks can be efficiently achieved using a classical computer. We then develop both classical and quantum graph isomorphism algorithms based on discrete-time quantum walks. We show that they are effective in identifying isomorphism classes of large databases of graphs, in particular groups of strongly regular graphs. We consider this approach to represent a promising candidate for an efficient solution to the graph isomorphism problem, and believe that similar methods employing quantum walks, or derivatives of these walks, may prove beneficial in constructing other algorithms for a variety of purposes.

    11. The quantum state of the universe from deformation quantization and classical-quantum correlation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Rashki, M.; Jalalzadeh, S.

      2017-02-01

      In this paper we study the quantum cosmology of homogeneous and isotropic cosmology, via the Weyl-Wigner-Groenewold-Moyal formalism of phase space quantization, with perfect fluid as a matter source. The corresponding quantum cosmology is described by the Moyal-Wheeler-DeWitt equation which has exact solutions in Moyal phase space, resulting in Wigner quasiprobability distribution functions peaking around the classical paths for large values of scale factor. We show that the Wigner functions of these models are peaked around the non-singular universes with quantum modified density parameter of radiation.

    12. Proton transport in barium stannate: classical, semi-classical and quantum regimes.

      PubMed

      Geneste, Grégory; Ottochian, Alistar; Hermet, Jessica; Dezanneau, Guilhem

      2015-07-15

      Density-functional theory calculations are performed to investigate proton transport in BaSnO3. Structural optimizations in the stable and saddle point configurations for transfer (hopping) and reorientation allow description of the high-temperature classical and semi-classical regimes, in which diffusion occurs by over-barrier motion. At lower temperature (typically below 300 K), we describe the thermally-assisted quantum regime, in which protonic motion is of quantum nature and occurs in "coincidence" configurations favored by thermal fluctuations of the surrounding atoms. Both the non-adiabatic and the adiabatic limits are examined. In the adiabatic limit, the protonic energy landscape in the coincidence configuration is very flat. Path-integral molecular dynamics simulations of the proton in the coincidence potential reveal, in the transfer case, that the density of probability of H(+) has its maximum at the saddle point, because the zero-point energy exceeds the coincidence barrier. Arguments are given that support the adiabatic picture for the transfer mechanism. In the case of reorientation, the time scales for the existence of the coincidence and for protonic motion, as estimated from the time-energy uncertainty principle by using a simple one-dimensional model, are of the same order of magnitude, suggesting that the adiabatic limit is not reached. Protonic transfer and reorientation in this oxide are therefore governed by different mechanisms below room temperature.

    13. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Biswas, Shyamal

      2015-05-01

      We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over 4He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

    14. Classical transients and the support of open quantum maps.

      PubMed

      Carlo, Gabriel G; Wisniacki, D A; Ermann, Leonardo; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

      2013-01-01

      The basic ingredients in a semiclassical theory are the classical invariant objects serving as a support for quantization. Recent studies, mainly obtained on quantum maps, have led to the commonly accepted belief that the classical repeller-the set of nonescaping orbits in the future and past evolution-is the object that suitably plays this role in open scattering systems. In this paper we present numerical evidence warning that this may not always be the case. For this purpose we study recently introduced families of tribaker maps [L. Ermann, G. G. Carlo, J. M. Pedrosa, and M. Saraceno, Phys. Rev. E 85, 066204 (2012)], which share the same asymptotic properties but differ in their short-time behavior. We have found that although the eigenvalue distribution of the evolution operator of these maps follows the fractal Weyl law prediction, the theory of short periodic orbits for open maps fails to describe the resonance eigenfunctions of some of them. This is a strong indication that new elements must be included in the semiclassical description of open quantum systems. We provide an interpretation of the results in order to have hints about them.

    15. Introduction of a Classical Level in Quantum Theory

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Prosperi, G. M.

      2016-11-01

      In an old paper of our group in Milano a formalism was introduced for the continuous monitoring of a system during a certain interval of time in the framework of a somewhat generalized approach to quantum mechanics (QM). The outcome was a distribution of probability on the space of all the possible continuous histories of a set of quantities to be considered as a kind of coarse grained approximation to some ordinary quantum observables commuting or not. In fact the main aim was the introduction of a classical level in the context of QM, treating formally a set of basic quantities, to be considered as beables in the sense of Bell, as continuously taken under observation. However the effect of such assumption was a permanent modification of the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the statistical operator by the introduction of a dissipative term which is in conflict with basic conservation rules in all reasonable models we had considered. Difficulties were even encountered for a relativistic extension of the formalism. In this paper I propose a modified version of the original formalism which seems to overcome both difficulties. First I study the simple models of an harmonic oscillator and a free scalar field in which a coarse grain position and a coarse grained field respectively are treated as beables. Then I consider the more realistic case of spinor electrodynamics in which only certain coarse grained electric and magnetic fields are introduced as classical variables and no matter related quantities.

    16. Direct detection of classically undetectable dark matter through quantum decoherence

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Riedel, C. Jess

      2014-03-01

      Although various pieces of indirect evidence about the nature of dark matter have been collected, its direct detection has eluded experimental searches despite extensive effort. If the mass of dark matter is below 1 MeV, it is essentially imperceptible to conventional detection methods because negligible energy is transferred to nuclei during collisions. Here I propose directly detecting dark matter through the quantum decoherence it causes rather than its classical effects such as recoil or ionization. I show that quantum spatial superpositions are sensitive to low-mass dark matter which is inaccessible to classical techniques. This provides new independent motivation for matter interferometry with large masses, especially on spaceborne platforms. The apparent dark matter wind we experience as the Sun travels through the Milky Way ensures interferometers and related devices are directional detectors, and so are able to provide unmistakable evidence that decoherence has galactic origins. This research was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD program, and by the John Templeton Foundation through grant number 21484.

    17. Classical transients and the support of open quantum maps

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Carlo, Gabriel G.; Wisniacki, D. A.; Ermann, Leonardo; Benito, R. M.; Borondo, F.

      2013-01-01

      The basic ingredients in a semiclassical theory are the classical invariant objects serving as a support for quantization. Recent studies, mainly obtained on quantum maps, have led to the commonly accepted belief that the classical repeller—the set of nonescaping orbits in the future and past evolution—is the object that suitably plays this role in open scattering systems. In this paper we present numerical evidence warning that this may not always be the case. For this purpose we study recently introduced families of tribaker maps [L. Ermann, G. G. Carlo, J. M. Pedrosa, and M. Saraceno, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.066204 85, 066204 (2012)], which share the same asymptotic properties but differ in their short-time behavior. We have found that although the eigenvalue distribution of the evolution operator of these maps follows the fractal Weyl law prediction, the theory of short periodic orbits for open maps fails to describe the resonance eigenfunctions of some of them. This is a strong indication that new elements must be included in the semiclassical description of open quantum systems. We provide an interpretation of the results in order to have hints about them.

    18. Occam’s Quantum Strop: Synchronizing and Compressing Classical Cryptic Processes via a Quantum Channel

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Mahoney, John R.; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Crutchfield, James P.

      2016-02-01

      A stochastic process’ statistical complexity stands out as a fundamental property: the minimum information required to synchronize one process generator to another. How much information is required, though, when synchronizing over a quantum channel? Recent work demonstrated that representing causal similarity as quantum state-indistinguishability provides a quantum advantage. We generalize this to synchronization and offer a sequence of constructions that exploit extended causal structures, finding substantial increase of the quantum advantage. We demonstrate that maximum compression is determined by the process’ cryptic order–a classical, topological property closely allied to Markov order, itself a measure of historical dependence. We introduce an efficient algorithm that computes the quantum advantage and close noting that the advantage comes at a cost–one trades off prediction for generation complexity.

    19. Occam's Quantum Strop: Synchronizing and Compressing Classical Cryptic Processes via a Quantum Channel.

      PubMed

      Mahoney, John R; Aghamohammadi, Cina; Crutchfield, James P

      2016-02-15

      A stochastic process' statistical complexity stands out as a fundamental property: the minimum information required to synchronize one process generator to another. How much information is required, though, when synchronizing over a quantum channel? Recent work demonstrated that representing causal similarity as quantum state-indistinguishability provides a quantum advantage. We generalize this to synchronization and offer a sequence of constructions that exploit extended causal structures, finding substantial increase of the quantum advantage. We demonstrate that maximum compression is determined by the process' cryptic order--a classical, topological property closely allied to Markov order, itself a measure of historical dependence. We introduce an efficient algorithm that computes the quantum advantage and close noting that the advantage comes at a cost-one trades off prediction for generation complexity.

    20. BOOK REVIEW: Classical Solutions in Quantum Field Theory Classical Solutions in Quantum Field Theory

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Mann, Robert

      2013-02-01

      Quantum field theory has evolved from its early beginnings as a tool for understanding the interaction of light with matter into a rather formidable technical paradigm, one that has successfully provided the mathematical underpinnings of all non-gravitational interactions. Over the eight decades since it was first contemplated the methods have become increasingly more streamlined and sophisticated, yielding new insights into our understanding of the subatomic world and our abilities to make clear and precise predictions. Some of the more elegant methods have to do with non-perturbative and semiclassical approaches to the subject. The chief players here are solitons, instantons, and anomalies. Over the past three decades there has been a steady rise in our understanding of these objects and of our ability to calculate their effects and implications for the rest of quantum field theory. This book is a welcome contribution to this subject. In 12 chapters it provides a clear synthesis of the key developments in these subjects at a level accessible to graduate students that have had an introductory course to quantum field theory. In the author's own words it provides both 'a survey and an overview of this field'. The first half of the book concentrates on solitons--kinks, vortices, and magnetic monopoles--and their implications for the subject. The reader is led first through the simplest models in one spatial dimension, into more sophisticated cases that required more advanced topological methods. The author does quite a nice job of introducing the various concepts as required, and beginning students should be able to get a good grasp of the subject directly from the text without having to first go through the primary literature. The middle part of the book deals with the implications of these solitons for both cosmology and for duality. While the cosmological discussion is quite nice, the discussion on BPS solitons, supersymmetry and duality is rather condensed. It is

    1. Locality and nonlocality of classical restrictions of quantum spin systems with applications to quantum large deviations and entanglement

      SciTech Connect

      De Roeck, W. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be; Maes, C. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be; Schütz, M. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be; Netočný, K. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be

      2015-02-15

      We study the projection on classical spins starting from quantum equilibria. We show Gibbsianness or quasi-locality of the resulting classical spin system for a class of gapped quantum systems at low temperatures including quantum ground states. A consequence of Gibbsianness is the validity of a large deviation principle in the quantum system which is known and here recovered in regimes of high temperature or for thermal states in one dimension. On the other hand, we give an example of a quantum ground state with strong nonlocality in the classical restriction, giving rise to what we call measurement induced entanglement and still satisfying a large deviation principle.

    2. Quantum ergodicity breaking in semi-classical electron transfer dynamics.

      PubMed

      Goychuk, Igor

      2017-01-25

      Can the statistical properties of single-electron transfer events be correctly predicted within a common equilibrium ensemble description? This fundamental in nanoworld question of ergodic behavior is scrutinized within a very basic semi-classical curve-crossing problem. It is shown that in the limit of non-adiabatic electron transfer (weak tunneling) well-described by the Marcus-Levich-Dogonadze (MLD) rate the answer is yes. However, in the limit of the so-called solvent-controlled adiabatic electron transfer, a profound breaking of ergodicity occurs. Namely, a common description based on the ensemble reduced density matrix with an initial equilibrium distribution of the reaction coordinate is not able to reproduce the statistics of single-trajectory events in this seemingly classical regime. For sufficiently large activation barriers, the ensemble survival probability in a state remains nearly exponential with the inverse rate given by the sum of the adiabatic curve crossing (Kramers) time and the inverse MLD rate. In contrast, near to the adiabatic regime, the single-electron survival probability is clearly non-exponential, even though it possesses an exponential tail which agrees well with the ensemble description. Initially, it is well described by a Mittag-Leffler distribution with a fractional rate. Paradoxically, the mean transfer time in this classical on the ensemble level regime is well described by the inverse of the nonadiabatic quantum tunneling rate on a single particle level. An analytical theory is developed which perfectly agrees with stochastic simulations and explains our findings.

    3. Parts and Wholes. An Inquiry into Quantum and Classical Correlations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Seevinck, M. P.

      2008-10-01

      The primary topic of this dissertation is, firstly, the study of the correlations between outcomes of measurements on the subsystems of a composed system as predicted by a particular physical theory; secondly, the study of what this physical theory predicts for the relationships these subsystems can have to the composed system they are a part of; and thirdly, the comparison of different physical theories with respect to these two aspects. The physical theories investigated and compared are generalized probability theories in a quasi-classical physics framework and non-relativistic quantum theory. The motivation for these enquiries is that a comparison of the relationships between parts and whole as described by each theory, and of the correlations predicted by each theory between separated subsystems yields a fruitful method to investigate what these physical theories say about the world. One then finds, independent of any physical model, relationships and constraints that capture the essential physical assumptions and structural aspects of the theory in question. As such one gains a larger and deeper understanding of the different physical theories under investigation and of what they say about the world. A large part of this dissertation is devoted to understanding different aspects of different kinds of correlations that can exist between the outcomes of measurement on subsystems of a larger system. Four different kinds of correlation have been investigated: local, partially-local, no-signaling and quantum mechanical. Novel characteristics of these correlations have been used to study how they are related and how they can be discerned. The main tool of this investigation has been the usage of Bell-type inequalities that give non-trivial bounds on the strength of the correlations. The study of quantum correlations has also prompted us to study the multi-partite qubit state space with respect to its entanglement and separability characteristics, and the differing

    4. Nonmonotonic quantum-to-classical transition in multiparticle interference

      PubMed Central

      Ra, Young-Sik; Tichy, Malte C.; Lim, Hyang-Tag; Kwon, Osung; Mintert, Florian; Buchleitner, Andreas; Kim, Yoon-Ho

      2013-01-01

      Quantum-mechanical wave–particle duality implies that probability distributions for granular detection events exhibit wave-like interference. On the single-particle level, this leads to self-interference—e.g., on transit across a double slit—for photons as well as for large, massive particles, provided that no which-way information is available to any observer, even in principle. When more than one particle enters the game, their specific many-particle quantum features are manifested in correlation functions, provided the particles cannot be distinguished. We are used to believe that interference fades away monotonically with increasing distinguishability—in accord with available experimental evidence on the single- and on the many-particle level. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that such monotonicity of the quantum-to-classical transition is the exception rather than the rule whenever more than two particles interfere. As the distinguishability of the particles is continuously increased, different numbers of particles effectively interfere, which leads to interference signals that are, in general, nonmonotonic functions of the distinguishability of the particles. This observation opens perspectives for the experimental characterization of many-particle coherence and sheds light on decoherence processes in many-particle systems. PMID:23297196

    5. Quantum darwinism in a mixed environment.

      PubMed

      Zwolak, Michael; Quan, H T; Zurek, Wojciech H

      2009-09-11

      Quantum Darwinism recognizes that we-the observers-acquire our information about the "systems of interest" indirectly from their imprints on the environment. Here, we show that information about a system can be acquired from a mixed-state, or hazy, environment, but the storage capacity of an environment fragment is suppressed by its initial entropy. In the case of good decoherence, the mutual information between the system and the fragment is given solely by the fragment's entropy increase. For fairly mixed environments, this means a reduction by a factor 1-h, where h is the haziness of the environment, i.e., the initial entropy of an environment qubit. Thus, even such hazy environments eventually reveal the state of the system, although now the intercepted environment fragment must be larger by approximately (1-h)(-1) to gain the same information about the system.

    6. Quantum Darwinism in a Mixed Environment

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zwolak, Michael; Quan, H. T.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

      2009-09-01

      Quantum Darwinism recognizes that we—the observers—acquire our information about the “systems of interest” indirectly from their imprints on the environment. Here, we show that information about a system can be acquired from a mixed-state, or hazy, environment, but the storage capacity of an environment fragment is suppressed by its initial entropy. In the case of good decoherence, the mutual information between the system and the fragment is given solely by the fragment’s entropy increase. For fairly mixed environments, this means a reduction by a factor 1-h, where h is the haziness of the environment, i.e., the initial entropy of an environment qubit. Thus, even such hazy environments eventually reveal the state of the system, although now the intercepted environment fragment must be larger by ˜(1-h)-1 to gain the same information about the system.

    7. On the hypothesis that quantum mechanism manifests classical mechanics: Numerical approach to the correspondence in search of quantum chaos

      SciTech Connect

      Lee, Sang-Bong

      1993-09-01

      Quantum manifestation of classical chaos has been one of the extensively studied subjects for more than a decade. Yet clear understanding of its nature still remains to be an open question partly due to the lack of a canonical definition of quantum chaos. The classical definition seems to be unsuitable in quantum mechanics partly because of the Heisenberg quantum uncertainty. In this regard, quantum chaos is somewhat misleading and needs to be clarified at the very fundamental level of physics. Since it is well known that quantum mechanics is more fundamental than classical mechanics, the quantum description of classically chaotic nature should be attainable in the limit of large quantum numbers. The focus of my research, therefore, lies on the correspondence principle for classically chaotic systems. The chaotic damped driven pendulum is mainly studied numerically using the split operator method that solves the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. For classically dissipative chaotic systems in which (multi)fractal strange attractors often emerge, several quantum dissipative mechanisms are also considered. For instance, Hoover`s and Kubo-Fox-Keizer`s approaches are studied with some computational analyses. But the notion of complex energy with non-Hermiticity is extensively applied. Moreover, the Wigner and Husimi distribution functions are examined with an equivalent classical distribution in phase-space, and dynamical properties of the wave packet in configuration and momentum spaces are also explored. The results indicate that quantum dynamics embraces classical dynamics although the classicalquantum correspondence fails to be observed in the classically chaotic regime. Even in the semi-classical limits, classically chaotic phenomena would eventually be suppressed by the quantum uncertainty.

    8. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Manti, S.

      2013-02-01

      We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

    9. Classical and quantum big brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kamenshchik, Alexander Y.; Manti, Serena

      2012-06-01

      We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the big brake singularity—the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field. It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the big brake type while it is present for the big bang and big crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical-quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong big bang and big crunch singularities are not traversable.

    10. Classical and Quantum Big Brake Cosmology for Scalar Field and Tachyonic Models

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kamenshchik, Alexander; Manti, Serena

      2015-01-01

      We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field. It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

    11. Classical and quantum Big Brake cosmology for scalar field and tachyonic models

      SciTech Connect

      Kamenshchik, A. Yu.; Manti, S.

      2013-02-21

      We study a relation between the cosmological singularities in classical and quantum theory, comparing the classical and quantum dynamics in some models possessing the Big Brake singularity - the model based on a scalar field and two models based on a tachyon-pseudo-tachyon field . It is shown that the effect of quantum avoidance is absent for the soft singularities of the Big Brake type while it is present for the Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities. Thus, there is some kind of a classical - quantum correspondence, because soft singularities are traversable in classical cosmology, while the strong Big Bang and Big Crunch singularities are not traversable.

    12. Public classical communication in quantum cryptography: Error correction, integrity, and authentication

      SciTech Connect

      Timofeev, A. V.; Pomozov, D. I.; Makkaveev, A. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

      2007-05-15

      Quantum cryptography systems combine two communication channels: a quantum and a classical one. (They can be physically implemented in the same fiber-optic link, which is employed as a quantum channel when one-photon states are transmitted and as a classical one when it carries classical data traffic.) Both channels are supposed to be insecure and accessible to an eavesdropper. Error correction in raw keys, interferometer balancing, and other procedures are performed by using the public classical channel. A discussion of the requirements to be met by the classical channel is presented.

    13. Classical and quantum particle dynamics in univariate background fields

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Heinzl, T.; Ilderton, A.; King, B.

      2016-09-01

      We investigate deviations from the plane wave model in the interaction of charged particles with strong electromagnetic fields. A general result is that integrability of the dynamics is lost when going from lightlike to timelike or spacelike field dependence. For a special scenario in the classical regime we show how the radiation spectrum in the spacelike (undulator) case becomes well-approximated by the plane wave model in the high-energy limit, despite the two systems being Lorentz inequivalent. In the quantum problem, there is no analogue of the WKB-exact Volkov solution. Nevertheless, WKB and uniform-WKB approaches give good approximations in all cases considered. Other approaches that reduce the underlying differential equations from second to first order are found to miss the correct physics for situations corresponding to barrier transmission and wide-angle scattering.

    14. Hidden symmetries of dynamics in classical and quantum physics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Cariglia, Marco

      2014-10-01

      This article reviews the role of hidden symmetries of dynamics in the study of physical systems, from the basic concepts of symmetries in phase space to the forefront of current research. Such symmetries emerge naturally in the description of physical systems as varied as nonrelativistic, relativistic, with or without gravity, classical or quantum, and are related to the existence of conserved quantities of the dynamics and integrability. In recent years their study has grown intensively, due to the discovery of nontrivial examples that apply to different types of theories and different numbers of dimensions. Applications encompass the study of integrable systems such as spinning tops, the Calogero model, systems described by the Lax equation, the physics of higher-dimensional black holes, the Dirac equation, and supergravity with and without fluxes, providing a tool to probe the dynamics of nonlinear systems.

    15. Molecular machines operating on the nanoscale: from classical to quantum

      PubMed Central

      2016-01-01

      Summary The main physical features and operating principles of isothermal nanomachines in the microworld, common to both classical and quantum machines, are reviewed. Special attention is paid to the dual, constructive role of dissipation and thermal fluctuations, the fluctuation–dissipation theorem, heat losses and free energy transduction, thermodynamic efficiency, and thermodynamic efficiency at maximum power. Several basic models are considered and discussed to highlight generic physical features. This work examines some common fallacies that continue to plague the literature. In particular, the erroneous beliefs that one should minimize friction and lower the temperature for high performance of Brownian machines, and that the thermodynamic efficiency at maximum power cannot exceed one-half are discussed. The emerging topic of anomalous molecular motors operating subdiffusively but very efficiently in the viscoelastic environment of living cells is also discussed. PMID:27335728

    16. Perturbative Quantum Analysis and Classical Limit of the Electron Scattering by a Solenoidal Magnetic Field

      SciTech Connect

      Murguia, Gabriela; Moreno, Matias; Torres, Manuel

      2009-04-20

      A well known example in quantum electrodynamics (QED) shows that Coulomb scattering of unpolarized electrons, calculated to lowest order in perturbation theory, yields a results that exactly coincides (in the non-relativistic limit) with the Rutherford formula. We examine an analogous example, the classical and perturbative quantum scattering of an electron by a magnetic field confined in an infinite solenoid of finite radius. The results obtained for the classical and the quantum differential cross sections display marked differences. While this may not be a complete surprise, one should expect to recover the classical expression by applying the classical limit to the quantum result. This turn not to be the case. Surprisingly enough, it is shown that the classical result can not be recuperated even if higher order corrections are included. To recover the classic correspondence of the quantum scattering problem a suitable non-perturbative methodology should be applied.

    17. Analytical examples, measurement models, and classical limit of quantum backflow

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Yearsley, J. M.; Halliwell, J. J.; Hartshorn, R.; Whitby, A.

      2012-10-01

      We investigate the backflow effect in elementary quantum mechanics—the phenomenon in which a state consisting entirely of positive momenta may have negative current and the probability flows in the opposite direction to the momentum. We compute the current and flux for states consisting of superpositions of Gaussian wave packets. These are experimentally realizable but the amount of backflow is small. Inspired by the numerical results of Penz [Penz, Grübl, Kreidl, and Wagner, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/39/2/012 39, 423 (2006)], we find two nontrivial wave functions whose current at any time may be computed analytically and which have periods of significant backflow, in one case with a backward flux equal to about 70% of the maximum possible backflow, a dimensionless number cbm≈0.04, discovered by Bracken and Melloy [Bracken and Melloy, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/27/6/040 27, 2197 (1994)]. This number has the unusual property of being independent of ℏ (and also of all other parameters of the model), despite corresponding to an obviously quantum-mechanical effect, and we shed some light on this surprising property by considering the classical limit of backflow. We discuss some specific measurement models in which backflow may be identified in certain measurable probabilities.

    18. Post-Markovian quantum master equations from classical environment fluctuations.

      PubMed

      Budini, Adrián A

      2014-01-01

      In this paper we demonstrate that two commonly used phenomenological post-Markovian quantum master equations can be derived without using any perturbative approximation. A system coupled to an environment characterized by self-classical configurational fluctuations, the latter obeying a Markovian dynamics, defines the underlying physical model. Both Shabani-Lidar equation [A. Shabani and D. A. Lidar, Phys. Rev. A 71, 020101(R) (2005)] and its associated approximated integrodifferential kernel master equation are obtained by tracing out two different bipartite Markovian Lindblad dynamics where the environment fluctuations are taken into account by an ancilla system. Furthermore, conditions under which the non-Markovian system dynamics can be unraveled in terms of an ensemble of measurement trajectories are found. In addition, a non-Markovian quantum jump approach is formulated. Contrary to recent analysis [L. Mazzola, E. M. Laine, H. P. Breuer, S. Maniscalco, and J. Piilo, Phys. Rev. A 81, 062120 (2010)], we also demonstrate that these master equations, even with exponential memory functions, may lead to non-Markovian effects such as an environment-to-system backflow of information if the Hamiltonian system does not commutate with the dissipative dynamics.

    19. Trajectory description of the quantum-classical transition for wave packet interference

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Chou, Chia-Chun

      2016-08-01

      The quantum-classical transition for wave packet interference is investigated using a hydrodynamic description. A nonlinear quantum-classical transition equation is obtained by introducing a degree of quantumness ranging from zero to one into the classical time-dependent Schrödinger equation. This equation provides a continuous description for the transition process of physical systems from purely quantum to purely classical regimes. In this study, the transition trajectory formalism is developed to provide a hydrodynamic description for the quantum-classical transition. The flow momentum of transition trajectories is defined by the gradient of the action function in the transition wave function and these trajectories follow the main features of the evolving probability density. Then, the transition trajectory formalism is employed to analyze the quantum-classical transition of wave packet interference. For the collision-like wave packet interference where the propagation velocity is faster than the spreading speed of the wave packet, the interference process remains collision-like for all the degree of quantumness. However, the interference features demonstrated by transition trajectories gradually disappear when the degree of quantumness approaches zero. For the diffraction-like wave packet interference, the interference process changes continuously from a diffraction-like to collision-like case when the degree of quantumness gradually decreases. This study provides an insightful trajectory interpretation for the quantum-classical transition of wave packet interference.

    20. Characterizing classical periodic orbits from quantum Green's functions in two-dimensional integrable systems: Harmonic oscillators and quantum billiards

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Chen, Y. F.; Tung, J. C.; Tuan, P. H.; Yu, Y. T.; Liang, H. C.; Huang, K. F.

      2017-01-01

      A general method is developed to characterize the family of classical periodic orbits from the quantum Green's function for the two-dimensional (2D) integrable systems. A decomposing formula related to the beta function is derived to link the quantum Green's function with the individual classical periodic orbits. The practicality of the developed formula is demonstrated by numerically analyzing the 2D commensurate harmonic oscillators and integrable quantum billiards. Numerical analyses reveal that the emergence of the classical features in quantum Green's functions principally comes from the superposition of the degenerate states for 2D harmonic oscillators. On the other hand, the damping factor in quantum Green's functions plays a critical role to display the classical features in mesoscopic regime for integrable quantum billiards, where the physical function of the damping factor is to lead to the coherent superposition of the nearly degenerate eigenstates.

    1. Characterizing classical periodic orbits from quantum Green's functions in two-dimensional integrable systems: Harmonic oscillators and quantum billiards.

      PubMed

      Chen, Y F; Tung, J C; Tuan, P H; Yu, Y T; Liang, H C; Huang, K F

      2017-01-01

      A general method is developed to characterize the family of classical periodic orbits from the quantum Green's function for the two-dimensional (2D) integrable systems. A decomposing formula related to the beta function is derived to link the quantum Green's function with the individual classical periodic orbits. The practicality of the developed formula is demonstrated by numerically analyzing the 2D commensurate harmonic oscillators and integrable quantum billiards. Numerical analyses reveal that the emergence of the classical features in quantum Green's functions principally comes from the superposition of the degenerate states for 2D harmonic oscillators. On the other hand, the damping factor in quantum Green's functions plays a critical role to display the classical features in mesoscopic regime for integrable quantum billiards, where the physical function of the damping factor is to lead to the coherent superposition of the nearly degenerate eigenstates.

    2. A Synthetic Approach to the Transfer Matrix Method in Classical and Quantum Physics

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Pujol, O.; Perez, J. P.

      2007-01-01

      The aim of this paper is to propose a synthetic approach to the transfer matrix method in classical and quantum physics. This method is an efficient tool to deal with complicated physical systems of practical importance in geometrical light or charged particle optics, classical electronics, mechanics, electromagnetics and quantum physics. Teaching…

    3. Quantum and classical chaos in kicked coupled Jaynes-Cummings cavities

      SciTech Connect

      Hayward, A. L. C.; Greentree, Andrew D.

      2010-06-15

      We consider two Jaynes-Cummings cavities coupled periodically with a photon hopping term. The semiclassical phase space is chaotic, with regions of stability over some ranges of the parameters. The quantum case exhibits dynamic localization and dynamic tunneling between classically forbidden regions. We explore the correspondence between the classical and quantum phase space and propose an implementation in a circuit QED system.

    4. Numerical Evidence of Quantum Melting of Spin Ice: Quantum-to-Classical Crossover

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kato, Yasuyuki; Onoda, Shigeki

      2015-08-01

      Unbiased quantum Monte Carlo simulations are performed on the nearest-neighbor spin-1/2 pyrochlore X X Z model with an antiferromagnetic longitudinal and the weak ferromagnetic transverse exchange couplings, J and J⊥ . The specific heat exhibits a broad peak at TCSI˜0.2 J associated with a crossover to a classical Coulomb liquid regime showing a suppressed spin-ice monopole density, a broadened pinch-point singularity, and the Pauling entropy for |J⊥|≪J , as in classical spin ice. On further cooling, the entropy restarts decaying for J⊥>J⊥c˜-0.104 J , producing another broad specific heat peak for a crossover to a bosonic quantum Coulomb liquid, where the spin correlation contains both photon and quantum spin-ice monopole contributions. With negatively increasing J⊥ across J⊥c, a first-order thermal phase transition occurs from the quantum Coulomb liquid to an X Y ferromagnet. Relevance to magnetic rare-earth pyrochlore oxides is discussed.

    5. Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states.

      PubMed

      Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J

      2012-10-13

      Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems.

    6. Entanglement-assisted classical capacities of compound and arbitrarily varying quantum channels

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Boche, Holger; Janßen, Gisbert; Kaltenstadler, Stephan

      2017-04-01

      We consider classical message transmission under entanglement assistance for compound memoryless and arbitrarily varying quantum channels. In both cases, we prove general coding theorems together with corresponding weak converse bounds. In this way, we obtain single-letter characterizations of the entanglement-assisted classical capacities for both channel models. Moreover, we show that the entanglement-assisted classical capacity does exhibit no strong converse property for some compound quantum channels for the average as well as the maximal error criterion. A strong converse to the entanglement-assisted classical capacities does hold for each arbitrarily varying quantum channel.

    7. Non-local classical optical correlation and implementing analogy of quantum teleportation.

      PubMed

      Sun, Yifan; Song, Xinbing; Qin, Hongwei; Zhang, Xiong; Yang, Zhenwei; Zhang, Xiangdong

      2015-03-17

      This study reports an experimental realization of non-local classical optical correlation from the Bell's measurement used in tests of quantum non-locality. Based on such a classical Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen optical correlation, a classical analogy has been implemented to the true meaning of quantum teleportation. In the experimental teleportation protocol, the initial teleported information can be unknown to anyone and the information transfer can happen over arbitrary distances. The obtained results give novel insight into quantum physics and may open a new field of applications in quantum information.

    8. Redundant Information and the Quantum-Classical Transition

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Riedel, Charles Jess

      A state selected at random from the Hilbert space of a many-body system is overwhelmingly likely to exhibit highly non-classical correlations. For these typical states, half of the environment must be measured by an observer to determine the state of a given subsystem. The objectivity of classical reality—the fact that multiple observers can each agree on the state of a subsystem after measuring just a small fraction of its environment—implies that the correlations found in nature between macroscopic systems and their environments are very exceptional. This is understood through the redundant recording of information about the preferred states of a decohering system by its environment, a phenomenon known as quantum Darwinism. To see this in action in the real world, we first consider the ubiquitous case of blackbody illumination. We show that it exhibits fast and extensive proliferation of information about an object into the environment, yielding redundancies orders of magnitude larger than the exactly soluble models considered previously. Turning to a universe of qubits, we examine the conditions needed for the creation of branching states and study their demise through many-body interactions. We show that even constrained dynamics can suppress redundancies to the values typical of random states on relaxation timescales, and prove that these results hold exactly in the thermodynamic limit. Finally, we connect these ideas to the consistent histories framework. Building on the criterion of partial-trace consistency, we introduce a sensible notion of mutual information between a fragment of the universe and a history itself.

    9. There is no classical analog of a quantum time-translation machine

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Vaidman, Lev

      1995-11-01

      In a recent article [D. Suter, Phys. Rev. A 51, 45 (1995)] Suter has claimed to present an optical implementation of the quantum time-translation machine that ``shows all the features that the general concept predicts and also allows, besides the quantum-mechanical, a classical description.'' It is argued that the experiment proposed and performed by Suter does not have the features of the quantum time-translation machine and that the latter has no classical analog.

    10. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

      SciTech Connect

      Biswas, Shyamal

      2015-05-15

      We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over {sup 4}He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

    11. Path-integral approach to 't Hooft's derivation of quantum physics from classical physics

      SciTech Connect

      Blasone, Massimo; Jizba, Petr; Kleinert, Hagen

      2005-05-15

      We present a path-integral formulation of 't Hooft's derivation of quantum physics from classical physics. The crucial ingredient of this formulation is Gozzi et al.'s supersymmetric path integral of classical mechanics. We quantize explicitly two simple classical systems: the planar mathematical pendulum and the Roessler dynamical system.

    12. Transient chaos - a resolution of breakdown of quantum-classical correspondence in optomechanics

      PubMed Central

      Wang, Guanglei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

      2016-01-01

      Recently, the phenomenon of quantum-classical correspondence breakdown was uncovered in optomechanics, where in the classical regime the system exhibits chaos but in the corresponding quantum regime the motion is regular - there appears to be no signature of classical chaos whatsoever in the corresponding quantum system, generating a paradox. We find that transient chaos, besides being a physically meaningful phenomenon by itself, provides a resolution. Using the method of quantum state diffusion to simulate the system dynamics subject to continuous homodyne detection, we uncover transient chaos associated with quantum trajectories. The transient behavior is consistent with chaos in the classical limit, while the long term evolution of the quantum system is regular. Transient chaos thus serves as a bridge for the quantum-classical transition (QCT). Strikingly, as the system transitions from the quantum to the classical regime, the average chaotic transient lifetime increases dramatically (faster than the Ehrenfest time characterizing the QCT for isolated quantum systems). We develop a physical theory to explain the scaling law. PMID:27748418

    13. Transient chaos - a resolution of breakdown of quantum-classical correspondence in optomechanics.

      PubMed

      Wang, Guanglei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

      2016-10-17

      Recently, the phenomenon of quantum-classical correspondence breakdown was uncovered in optomechanics, where in the classical regime the system exhibits chaos but in the corresponding quantum regime the motion is regular - there appears to be no signature of classical chaos whatsoever in the corresponding quantum system, generating a paradox. We find that transient chaos, besides being a physically meaningful phenomenon by itself, provides a resolution. Using the method of quantum state diffusion to simulate the system dynamics subject to continuous homodyne detection, we uncover transient chaos associated with quantum trajectories. The transient behavior is consistent with chaos in the classical limit, while the long term evolution of the quantum system is regular. Transient chaos thus serves as a bridge for the quantum-classical transition (QCT). Strikingly, as the system transitions from the quantum to the classical regime, the average chaotic transient lifetime increases dramatically (faster than the Ehrenfest time characterizing the QCT for isolated quantum systems). We develop a physical theory to explain the scaling law.

    14. Bi-photon spectral correlation measurements from a silicon nanowire in the quantum and classical regimes

      PubMed Central

      Jizan, Iman; Helt, L. G.; Xiong, Chunle; Collins, Matthew J.; Choi, Duk-Yong; Joon Chae, Chang; Liscidini, Marco; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Clark, Alex S.

      2015-01-01

      The growing requirement for photon pairs with specific spectral correlations in quantum optics experiments has created a demand for fast, high resolution and accurate source characterisation. A promising tool for such characterisation uses classical stimulated processes, in which an additional seed laser stimulates photon generation yielding much higher count rates, as recently demonstrated for a χ(2) integrated source in A. Eckstein et al. Laser Photon. Rev. 8, L76 (2014). In this work we extend these results to χ(3) integrated sources, directly measuring for the first time the relation between spectral correlation measurements via stimulated and spontaneous four wave mixing in an integrated optical waveguide, a silicon nanowire. We directly confirm the speed-up due to higher count rates and demonstrate that this allows additional resolution to be gained when compared to traditional coincidence measurements without any increase in measurement time. As the pump pulse duration can influence the degree of spectral correlation, all of our measurements are taken for two different pump pulse widths. This allows us to confirm that the classical stimulated process correctly captures the degree of spectral correlation regardless of pump pulse duration, and cements its place as an essential characterisation method for the development of future quantum integrated devices. PMID:26218609

    15. Sum Rules, Classical and Quantum - A Pedagogical Approach

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Karstens, William; Smith, David Y.

      2014-03-01

      Sum rules in the form of integrals over the response of a system to an external probe provide general analytical tools for both experiment and theory. For example, the celebrated f-sum rule gives a system's plasma frequency as an integral over the optical-dipole absorption spectrum regardless of the specific spectral distribution. Moreover, this rule underlies Smakula's equation for the number density of absorbers in a sample in terms of the area under their absorption bands. Commonly such rules are derived from quantum-mechanical commutation relations, but many are fundamentally classical (independent of ℏ) and so can be derived from more transparent mechanical models. We have exploited this to illustrate the fundamental role of inertia in the case of optical sum rules. Similar considerations apply to sum rules in many other branches of physics. Thus, the ``attenuation integral theorems'' of ac circuit theory reflect the ``inertial'' effect of Lenz's Law in inductors or the potential energy ``storage'' in capacitors. These considerations are closely related to the fact that the real and imaginary parts of a response function cannot be specified independently, a result that is encapsulated in the Kramers-Kronig relations. Supported in part by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

    16. Synchronization of active atomic clocks via quantum and classical channels

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Roth, Alexander; Hammerer, Klemens

      2016-10-01

      Superradiant lasers based on atomic ensembles exhibiting ultranarrow optical transitions can emit light of unprecedented spectral purity and may serve as active atomic clocks. We consider two frequency-detuned active atomic clocks, which are coupled in a cascaded setup, i.e., as master and slave lasers, and study the synchronization of the slave to the master clock. In a setup where both atomic ensembles are coupled to a common cavity mode, such synchronization phenomena have been predicted by Xu et al. [M. Xu, D. A. Tieri, E. C. Fine, J. K. Thompson, and M. J. Holland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 154101 (2014)., 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.154101] and experimentally observed by Weiner et al. (J. M. Weiner et al., arXiv:1503.06464). Here we demonstrate that synchronization still occurs in cascaded setups but exhibits distinctly different phase diagrams. We study the characteristics of synchronization in comparison to the case of coupling through a common cavity. We also consider synchronization through a classical channel where light of the master laser is measured phase sensitively and the slave laser is injection locked by feedback and compare to the results achievable by coupling through quantum channels.

    17. Metric freeness and projectivity for classical and quantum normed modules

      SciTech Connect

      Helemskii, A Ya

      2013-07-31

      In functional analysis, there are several diverse approaches to the notion of projective module. We show that a certain general categorical scheme contains all basic versions as special cases. In this scheme, the notion of free object comes to the foreground, and, in the best categories, projective objects are precisely retracts of free ones. We are especially interested in the so-called metric version of projectivity and characterize the metrically free classical and quantum (= operator) normed modules. Informally speaking, so-called extremal projectivity, which was known earlier, is interpreted as a kind of 'asymptotical metric projectivity'. In addition, we answer the following specific question in the geometry of normed spaces: what is the structure of metrically projective modules in the simplest case of normed spaces? We prove that metrically projective normed spaces are precisely the subspaces of l{sub 1}(M) (where M is a set) that are denoted by l{sub 1}{sup 0}(M) and consist of finitely supported functions. Thus, in this case, projectivity coincides with freeness. Bibliography: 28 titles.

    18. Classical and quantum radiation reaction in conformally flat spacetime

      SciTech Connect

      Higuchi, A.; Walker, P. J.

      2009-05-15

      We investigate the physics of a charged scalar particle moving in conformally flat spacetime with the conformal factor depending only on time in the framework of quantum electrodynamics (QED). In particular, we show that the radiation-reaction force derived from QED agrees with the classical counterpart in the limit ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){yields}0 using the fact that to lowest order in ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) the charged scalar field theory with mass m in conformally flat spacetime with conformal factor {omega}(t), which we call Model B, is equivalent to that in flat spacetime with a time-dependent mass m{omega}(t), which we call Model A, at tree level in this limit. We also consider the one-loop QED corrections to these two models in the semiclassical approximation. We find nonzero one-loop corrections to the mass and Maxwell's equations in Model A at order ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){sup -1}. This does not mean, however, that the corresponding one-loop corrections in Model B are nonzero because the equivalence of these models through a conformal transformation breaks down at one loop. We find that the one-loop corrections vanish in the limit ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}){yields}0 in Model B.

    19. Theoretical study of mixing in liquid clouds - Part 1: Classical concepts

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Korolev, Alexei; Khain, Alex; Pinsky, Mark; French, Jeffrey

      2016-07-01

      The present study considers final stages of in-cloud mixing in the framework of classical concept of homogeneous and extreme inhomogeneous mixing. Simple analytical relationships between basic microphysical parameters were obtained for homogeneous and extreme inhomogeneous mixing based on the adiabatic consideration. It was demonstrated that during homogeneous mixing the functional relationships between the moments of the droplets size distribution hold only during the primary stage of mixing. Subsequent random mixing between already mixed parcels and undiluted cloud parcels breaks these relationships. However, during extreme inhomogeneous mixing the functional relationships between the microphysical parameters hold both for primary and subsequent mixing. The obtained relationships can be used to identify the type of mixing from in situ observations. The effectiveness of the developed method was demonstrated using in situ data collected in convective clouds. It was found that for the specific set of in situ measurements the interaction between cloudy and entrained environments was dominated by extreme inhomogeneous mixing.

    20. Classical hypercorrelation and wave-optics analogy of quantum superdense coding

      PubMed Central

      Li, Pengyun; Sun, Yifan; Yang, Zhenwei; Song, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiangdong

      2015-01-01

      We report the first experimental realization of classical hypercorrelation, correlated simultaneously in every degree of freedom (DOF), from observing a Bell-type inequality violation in each DOF: polarization and orbital angular momentum (OAM). Based on such a classical hypercorrelation, we have realized the analogy of quantum superdense coding in classical optics. Comparing it with quantum superdense coding using pairs of photons simultaneously entangled in polarization and OAM, we find that it exhibits many advantages. It is not only very convenient to realize in classical optics, the attainable channel capacity in the experiment for such a superdense coding can also reach 3 bits, which is higher than that (2.8 bits) of usual quantum one. Our findings can not only give novel insight into quantum physics, they may also open a new field of applications in the classical optical information process. PMID:26689679

    1. Quantum and classical superballistic transport in a relativistic kicked-rotor system.

      PubMed

      Zhao, Qifang; Müller, Cord A; Gong, Jiangbin

      2014-08-01

      As an unusual type of anomalous diffusion behavior, (transient) superballistic transport is not well known but has been experimentally simulated recently. Quantum superballistic transport models to date are mainly based on connected sublattices which are constructed to have different properties. In this work, we show that both quantum and classical superballistic transport in the momentum space can occur in a simple periodically driven Hamiltonian system, namely, a relativistic kicked-rotor system with a nonzero mass term. The nonzero mass term essentially realizes a situation, now in the momentum space, in which two (momentum) sublattices with different dispersion relations (and hence different nature of on-site potential) are connected as a junction. It is further shown that the quantum and classical superballistic transport should occur under much different choices of the system parameters. The results are of interest to studies of anomalous transport, quantum and classical chaos, and the issue of quantum-classical correspondence.

    2. Correspondence behavior of classical and quantum dissipative directed transport via thermal noise

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Carlo, Gabriel G.; Ermann, Leonardo; Rivas, Alejandro M. F.; Spina, María E.

      2016-04-01

      We systematically study several classical-quantum correspondence properties of the dissipative modified kicked rotator, a paradigmatic ratchet model. We explore the behavior of the asymptotic currents for finite ℏeff values in a wide range of the parameter space. We find that the correspondence between the classical currents with thermal noise providing fluctuations of size ℏeff and the quantum ones without it is very good in general with the exception of specific regions. We systematically consider the spectra of the corresponding classical Perron-Frobenius operators and quantum superoperators. By means of an average distance between the classical and quantum sets of eigenvalues we find that the correspondence is unexpectedly quite uniform. This apparent contradiction is solved with the help of the Weyl-Wigner distributions of the equilibrium eigenvectors, which reveal the key role of quantum effects by showing surviving coherences in the asymptotic states.

    3. From the attempt of certain classical reformulations of quantum mechanics to quasi-probability representations

      SciTech Connect

      Stulpe, Werner

      2014-01-15

      The concept of an injective affine embedding of the quantum states into a set of classical states, i.e., into the set of the probability measures on some measurable space, as well as its relation to statistically complete observables is revisited, and its limitation in view of a classical reformulation of the statistical scheme of quantum mechanics is discussed. In particular, on the basis of a theorem concerning a non-denseness property of a set of coexistent effects, it is shown that an injective classical embedding of the quantum states cannot be supplemented by an at least approximate classical description of the quantum mechanical effects. As an alternative approach, the concept of quasi-probability representations of quantum mechanics is considered.

    4. Correspondence behavior of classical and quantum dissipative directed transport via thermal noise.

      PubMed

      Carlo, Gabriel G; Ermann, Leonardo; Rivas, Alejandro M F; Spina, María E

      2016-04-01

      We systematically study several classical-quantum correspondence properties of the dissipative modified kicked rotator, a paradigmatic ratchet model. We explore the behavior of the asymptotic currents for finite ℏ_{eff} values in a wide range of the parameter space. We find that the correspondence between the classical currents with thermal noise providing fluctuations of size ℏ_{eff} and the quantum ones without it is very good in general with the exception of specific regions. We systematically consider the spectra of the corresponding classical Perron-Frobenius operators and quantum superoperators. By means of an average distance between the classical and quantum sets of eigenvalues we find that the correspondence is unexpectedly quite uniform. This apparent contradiction is solved with the help of the Weyl-Wigner distributions of the equilibrium eigenvectors, which reveal the key role of quantum effects by showing surviving coherences in the asymptotic states.

    5. Classical to path-integral adaptive resolution in molecular simulation: towards a smooth quantum-classical coupling.

      PubMed

      Poma, A B; Delle Site, L

      2010-06-25

      Simulations that couple different molecular models in an adaptive way by changing resolution on the fly allow us to identify the relevant degrees of freedom of a system. This, in turn, leads to a detailed understanding of the essential physics which characterizes a system. While the delicate process of transition from one model to another is well understood for the adaptivity between classical molecular models the same cannot be said for the quantum-classical adaptivity. The main reason for this is the difficulty in describing a continuous transition between two different kinds of physical principles: probabilistic for the quantum and deterministic for the classical. Here we report the basic principles of an algorithm that allows for a continuous and smooth transition by employing the path integral description of atoms.

    6. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: application to ozone formation.

      PubMed

      Ivanov, Mikhail V; Babikov, Dmitri

      2012-05-14

      Efficient method is proposed for computing thermal rate constant of recombination reaction that proceeds according to the energy transfer mechanism, when an energized molecule is formed from reactants first, and is stabilized later by collision with quencher. The mixed quantum-classical theory for the collisional energy transfer and the ro-vibrational energy flow [M. Ivanov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144107 (2011)] is employed to treat the dynamics of molecule + quencher collision. Efficiency is achieved by sampling simultaneously (i) the thermal collision energy, (ii) the impact parameter, and (iii) the incident direction of quencher, as well as (iv) the rotational state of energized molecule. This approach is applied to calculate third-order rate constant of the recombination reaction that forms the (16)O(18)O(16)O isotopomer of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented.

    7. Quantum Darwinism: Entanglement, branches, and the emergent classicality of redundantly stored quantum information

      SciTech Connect

      Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H.

      2006-06-15

      We lay a comprehensive foundation for the study of redundant information storage in decoherence processes. Redundancy has been proposed as a prerequisite for objectivity, the defining property of classical objects. We consider two ensembles of states for a model universe consisting of one system and many environments: the first consisting of arbitrary states, and the second consisting of 'singly branching' states consistent with a simple decoherence model. Typical states from the random ensemble do not store information about the system redundantly, but information stored in branching states has a redundancy proportional to the environment's size. We compute the specific redundancy for a wide range of model universes, and fit the results to a simple first-principles theory. Our results show that the presence of redundancy divides information about the system into three parts: classical (redundant); purely quantum; and the borderline, undifferentiated or 'nonredundant', information.

    8. Quantum Darwinism: Entanglement, branches, and the emergent classicality of redundantly stored quantum information

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Blume-Kohout, Robin; Zurek, Wojciech H.

      2006-06-01

      We lay a comprehensive foundation for the study of redundant information storage in decoherence processes. Redundancy has been proposed as a prerequisite for objectivity, the defining property of classical objects. We consider two ensembles of states for a model universe consisting of one system and many environments: the first consisting of arbitrary states, and the second consisting of “singly branching” states consistent with a simple decoherence model. Typical states from the random ensemble do not store information about the system redundantly, but information stored in branching states has a redundancy proportional to the environment’s size. We compute the specific redundancy for a wide range of model universes, and fit the results to a simple first-principles theory. Our results show that the presence of redundancy divides information about the system into three parts: classical (redundant); purely quantum; and the borderline, undifferentiated or “nonredundant,” information.

    9. General approach to quantum-classical hybrid systems and geometric forces.

      PubMed

      Zhang, Qi; Wu, Biao

      2006-11-10

      We present a general theoretical framework for a hybrid system that is composed of a quantum subsystem and a classical subsystem. We approach such a system with a simple canonical transformation which is particularly effective when the quantum subsystem is dynamically much faster than the classical counterpart, which is commonly the case in hybrid systems. Moreover, this canonical transformation generates a vector potential which, on one hand, gives rise to the familiar Berry phase in the fast quantum dynamics and, on the other hand, yields a Lorentz-like geometric force in the slow classical dynamics.

    10. Splitting the Source Term for the Einstein Equation to Classical and Quantum Parts

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Biró, T. S.; Ván, P.

      2015-11-01

      We consider the special and general relativistic extensions of the action principle behind the Schrödinger equation distinguishing classical and quantum contributions. Postulating a particular quantum correction to the source term in the classical Einstein equation we identify the conformal content of the above action and obtain classical gravitation for massive particles, but with a cosmological term representing off-mass-shell contribution to the energy-momentum tensor. In this scenario the—on the Planck scale surprisingly small—cosmological constant stems from quantum bound states (gravonium) having a Bohr radius a as being Λ =3/a^2.

    11. Evolution of Rydberg states in half-cycle pulses: Classical, semiclassical, and quantum dynamics

      SciTech Connect

      Burgdoerfer, J.; Reinhold, C. |

      1994-12-31

      We summarize recent theoretical advances in the description of the evolution of Rydberg atoms subject to ultrashort pulses extending only a fraction of an optical cycle. We have performed classical. semiclassical and full quantum calculations in order to delineate the classical-quantum correspondence for impulsively perturbed atomic systems. We observe classical and quantum (or semiclassical) oscillations in excitation and ionization which depend on the initial state of atoms and on the strength of the perturbation. These predictions can be experimentally tested. 4 figs.

    12. Quantum-classical correspondence for motion on a plane with deficit angle

      SciTech Connect

      Makowski, Adam J.

      2010-08-15

      A particle constrained to move on a cone and bound to its tip by harmonic oscillator and Coulomb-Kepler potentials is considered both in the classical as well as in the quantum formulations. The SU(2) coherent states are formally derived for the former model and used for showing some relations between closed classical orbits and quantum probability densities. Similar relations are shown for the Coulomb-Kepler problem. In both cases a perfect localization of the densities on the classical solutions is obtained even for low values of quantum numbers.

    13. Quantization of the Maxwell fish-eye problem and the quantum-classical correspondence

      SciTech Connect

      Makowski, A. J.; Gorska, K. J.

      2009-05-15

      The so-called fish-eye model, originally investigated by Maxwell in geometrical optics, is studied both in the classical as well as in the quantum formulations. The best agreement between the two approaches is achieved by using a suitably constructed coherent state, which is of the SU(2) type. The perfect quantum-classical correspondence is obtained in the sense that classical rays go exactly over maxima of the corresponding quantum probability distributions. The distributions are made of linear combinations of the E=0 bound states of the considered model.

    14. A quantum-classical study of the OH + H2 reactive and inelastic collisions

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Martí, Carles; Pacifici, Leonardo; Laganà, Antonio; Coletti, Cecilia

      2017-04-01

      We carried out a study of OH + H2 scattering using a quantum-classical method, treating quantally vibrations and classically both translations and rotations. The good agreement between the state specific quantum-classical reactive probabilities and the corresponding quantum ones prompted the extension of the study to state to state probabilities for non reactive vibrational energy exchange. The study showed that H2 reactive dynamics depends on the vibrational excitation, while the non reactive one is mainly vibrationally adiabatic. On the contrary, OH reactive dynamics is not affected by its vibrational excitation, whereas the non reactive one might produce some pumping up to higher vibrational states.

    15. Deconfined Quantum Criticality, Scaling Violations, and Classical Loop Models

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Nahum, Adam; Chalker, J. T.; Serna, P.; Ortuño, M.; Somoza, A. M.

      2015-10-01

      Numerical studies of the transition between Néel and valence bond solid phases in two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnets give strong evidence for the remarkable scenario of deconfined criticality, but display strong violations of finite-size scaling that are not yet understood. We show how to realize the universal physics of the Néel-valence-bond-solid (VBS) transition in a three-dimensional classical loop model (this model includes the subtle interference effect that suppresses hedgehog defects in the Néel order parameter). We use the loop model for simulations of unprecedentedly large systems (up to linear size L =512 ). Our results are compatible with a continuous transition at which both Néel and VBS order parameters are critical, and we do not see conventional signs of first-order behavior. However, we show that the scaling violations are stronger than previously realized and are incompatible with conventional finite-size scaling, even if allowance is made for a weakly or marginally irrelevant scaling variable. In particular, different approaches to determining the anomalous dimensions ηVBS and ηN é el yield very different results. The assumption of conventional finite-size scaling leads to estimates that drift to negative values at large sizes, in violation of the unitarity bounds. In contrast, the decay with distance of critical correlators on scales much smaller than system size is consistent with large positive anomalous dimensions. Barring an unexpected reversal in behavior at still larger sizes, this implies that the transition, if continuous, must show unconventional finite-size scaling, for example, from an additional dangerously irrelevant scaling variable. Another possibility is an anomalously weak first-order transition. By analyzing the renormalization group flows for the noncompact CP n -1 field theory (the n -component Abelian Higgs model) between two and four dimensions, we give the simplest scenario by which an anomalously weak first

    16. Quantum and classical study of surface characterization by three-dimensional helium atom scattering.

      PubMed

      Moix, Jeremy M; Pollak, Eli; Allison, William

      2011-01-14

      Exact time-dependent wavepacket calculations of helium atom scattering from model symmetric, chiral, and hexagonal surfaces are presented and compared with their classical counterparts. Analysis of the momentum distribution of the scattered wavepacket provides a convenient method to obtain the resulting energy and angle resolved scattering distributions. The classical distributions are characterized by standard rainbow scattering from corrugated surfaces. It is shown that the classical results are closely related to their quantum counterparts and capture the qualitative features appearing therein. Both the quantum and classical distributions are capable of distinguishing between the structures of the three surfaces.

    17. Quantum-enhanced protocols with mixed states using cold atoms in dipole traps

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Krzyzanowska, K.; Copley-May, M.; Romain, R.; MacCormick, C.; Bergamini, S.

      2017-01-01

      We discuss the use of cold atoms in dipole traps to demonstrate experimentally a particular class of protocols for computation and metrology based on mixed states. Modelling of the system shows that, for a specific class of problems (tracing, phase estimation), a quantum advantage can be achieved over classical algorithms for very realistic conditions and strong decoherence. We discuss the results of the models and the experimental implementation.

    18. Finite-time quantum-to-classical transition for a Schroedinger-cat state

      SciTech Connect

      Paavola, Janika; Hall, Michael J. W.; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Maniscalco, Sabrina

      2011-07-15

      The transition from quantum to classical, in the case of a quantum harmonic oscillator, is typically identified with the transition from a quantum superposition of macroscopically distinguishable states, such as the Schroedinger-cat state, into the corresponding statistical mixture. This transition is commonly characterized by the asymptotic loss of the interference term in the Wigner representation of the cat state. In this paper we show that the quantum-to-classical transition has different dynamical features depending on the measure for nonclassicality used. Measures based on an operatorial definition have well-defined physical meaning and allow a deeper understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition. Our analysis shows that, for most nonclassicality measures, the Schroedinger-cat state becomes classical after a finite time. Moreover, our results challenge the prevailing idea that more macroscopic states are more susceptible to decoherence in the sense that the transition from quantum to classical occurs faster. Since nonclassicality is a prerequisite for entanglement generation our results also bridge the gap between decoherence, which is lost only asymptotically, and entanglement, which may show a ''sudden death''. In fact, whereas the loss of coherences still remains asymptotic, we emphasize that the transition from quantum to classical can indeed occur at a finite time.

    19. Analysis of the quantum-classical Liouville equation in the mapping basis.

      PubMed

      Nassimi, Ali; Bonella, Sara; Kapral, Raymond

      2010-10-07

      The quantum-classical Liouville equation provides a description of the dynamics of a quantum subsystem coupled to a classical environment. Representing this equation in the mapping basis leads to a continuous description of discrete quantum states of the subsystem and may provide an alternate route to the construction of simulation schemes. In the mapping basis the quantum-classical Liouville equation consists of a Poisson bracket contribution and a more complex term. By transforming the evolution equation, term-by-term, back to the subsystem basis, the complex term (excess coupling term) is identified as being due to a fraction of the back reaction of the quantum subsystem on its environment. A simple approximation to quantum-classical Liouville dynamics in the mapping basis is obtained by retaining only the Poisson bracket contribution. This approximate mapping form of the quantum-classical Liouville equation can be simulated easily by Newtonian trajectories. We provide an analysis of the effects of neglecting the presence of the excess coupling term on the expectation values of various types of observables. Calculations are carried out on nonadiabatic population and quantum coherence dynamics for curve crossing models. For these observables, the effects of the excess coupling term enter indirectly in the computation and good estimates are obtained with the simplified propagation.

    20. Photon nonlinear mixing in subcarrier multiplexed quantum key distribution systems.

      PubMed

      Capmany, José

      2009-04-13

      We provide, for the first time to our knowledge, an analysis of the influence of nonlinear photon mixing on the end to end quantum bit error rate (QBER) performance of subcarrier multiplexed quantum key distribution systems. The results show that negligible impact is to be expected for modulation indexes in the range of 2%.

    1. Beating the efficiency of both quantum and classical simulations with a semiclassical method.

      PubMed

      Mollica, Cesare; Vaníček, Jiří

      2011-11-18

      While rigorous quantum dynamical simulations of many-body systems are extremely difficult (or impossible) due to exponential scaling with dimensionality, the corresponding classical simulations ignore quantum effects. Semiclassical methods are generally more efficient but less accurate than quantum methods and more accurate but less efficient than classical methods. We find a remarkable exception to this rule by showing that a semiclassical method can be both more accurate and faster than a classical simulation. Specifically, we prove that for the semiclassical dephasing representation the number of trajectories needed to simulate quantum fidelity is independent of dimensionality and also that this semiclassical method is even faster than the most efficient corresponding classical algorithm. Analytical results are confirmed with simulations of fidelity in up to 100 dimensions with 2(1700)-dimensional Hilbert space.

    2. Minimum best success probability by classical strategies for quantum pseudo-telepathy

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gao, Fei; Fang, Wei; Wen, QiaoYan

      2014-07-01

      Quantum pseudo-telepathy (QPT) is a new type of game where the quantum team can win with certainty while the classical one cannot. It means the advantages of quantum participants over classical ones in game. However, there has been no systematic and formal analysis on the QPT game before. Here we present the formal description of the QPT game and the definition of the most simplified QPT. Based on the above definitions, we simplify a famous QPT game, i.e. the Cabllo game. Then, according to some instances, we analyze the minimum best success probability by classical strategies of the two-player QPT, which reflects the advantage of the quantum strategies. Finally, we prove the best success probability by classical strategies for the most simplified QPT is totally related to the number of all possible question combinations.

    3. A Compact Code for Simulations of Quantum Error Correction in Classical Computers

      SciTech Connect

      Nyman, Peter

      2009-03-10

      This study considers implementations of error correction in a simulation language on a classical computer. Error correction will be necessarily in quantum computing and quantum information. We will give some examples of the implementations of some error correction codes. These implementations will be made in a more general quantum simulation language on a classical computer in the language Mathematica. The intention of this research is to develop a programming language that is able to make simulations of all quantum algorithms and error corrections in the same framework. The program code implemented on a classical computer will provide a connection between the mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics and computational methods. This gives us a clear uncomplicated language for the implementations of algorithms.

    4. On the Brodutch and Modi method of constructing geometric measures of classical and quantum correlations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Walczak, Zbigniew; Wintrowicz, Iwona

      2017-03-01

      Recently, Brodutch and Modi proposed a general method of constructing meaningful measures of classical and quantum correlations. We systematically apply this method to obtain geometric classical and quantum correlations based on the Bures and the trace distances for two-qubit Bell diagonal states. Moreover, we argue that in general the Brodutch and Modi method may provide non-unique results, and we show how to modify this method to avoid this issue.

    5. Quantum phase transitions in the sub-Ohmic spin-boson model: failure of the quantum-classical mapping.

      PubMed

      Vojta, Matthias; Tong, Ning-Hua; Bulla, Ralf

      2005-02-25

      The effective theories for many quantum phase transitions can be mapped onto those of classical transitions. Here we show that the naive mapping fails for the sub-Ohmic spin-boson model which describes a two-level system coupled to a bosonic bath with power-law spectral density, J(omega) proportional, variantomega(s). Using an epsilon expansion we prove that this model has a quantum transition controlled by an interacting fixed point at small s, and support this by numerical calculations. In contrast, the corresponding classical long-range Ising model is known to display mean-field transition behavior for 0 < s < 1/2, controlled by a noninteracting fixed point. The failure of the quantum-classical mapping is argued to arise from the long-ranged interaction in imaginary time in the quantum model.

    6. Quantum mechanical ground state of hydrogen obtained from classical electrodynamics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Cole, Daniel C.; Zou, Yi

      2003-10-01

      The behavior of a classical charged point particle under the influence of only a Coulombic binding potential and classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, is shown to agree closely with the probability density distribution of Schrödinger's wave equation for the ground state of hydrogen. These results again raise the possibility that the main tenets of stochastic electrodynamics (SED) are correct.

    7. Redundant Information and the Quantum-Classical Transition

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Riedel, Charles Jess

      2012-01-01

      A state selected at random from the Hilbert space of a many-body system is overwhelmingly likely to exhibit highly non-classical correlations. For these typical states, half of the environment must be measured by an observer to determine the state of a given subsystem. The objectivity of classical reality--the fact that multiple observers can each…

    8. Heat control in opto-mechanical system using quantum non-classicality

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Sharma, Sushamana; Senwar, Subash

      2016-05-01

      Cooling of matter to the quantum ground state is a primary directive of quantum control. In other words, to extract entropy from a quantum system, efficient indirect quantum measurements may be implemented. The main objective is the cooling of the oscillator either to its motional ground state or to non-classical states, such as low-number Fock states, squeezed states or entangled states. It is shown that the use of quantum control procedure is better choice for even experimental realizations because it leads to a squeezed steady state with less than one phonon on average. The steady state of system corresponds to cooling of the system.

    9. Classical-Quantum Correspondence by Means of Probability Densities

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Vegas, Gabino Torres; Morales-Guzman, J. D.

      1996-01-01

      Within the frame of the recently introduced phase space representation of non relativistic quantum mechanics, we propose a Lagrangian from which the phase space Schrodinger equation can be derived. From that Lagrangian, the associated conservation equations, according to Noether's theorem, are obtained. This shows that one can analyze quantum systems completely in phase space as it is done in coordinate space, without additional complications.

    10. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

      2011-01-01

      The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

    11. Classical trajectory versus quantum interference. A linear chain model for the origin of uncertainty broadening

      SciTech Connect

      Tang, Jau

      1996-02-01

      A simple linear chain model, as an alternative to the orthodox Schroedinger approach, is proposed to explain the origin of the uncertainty broadening and to improve our physical insight into the difference between classical and quantum worlds. Quantum interference in space is manifested as a result of fast exchange between adjacent particles of different internal degrees of freedom.

    12. Revisiting coupled Shukla-Varma and convective cell mode in classical and quantum dusty magnetoplasmas

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Masood, W.; Mirza, Arshad M.; Nargis, Shahida

      2010-08-01

      The coupled Shukla-Varma (SV) and convective cell mode is revisited in classical and quantum dusty magnetoplasmas. It is shown that the inclusion of electron thermal effects modifies the original coupled SV and convective cell mode. It is also discussed how the quantum effects can be incorporated in the coupled SV and convective cell mode.

    13. Simulation of Ultra-Small Electronic Devices: The Classical-Quantum Transition Region

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Biegel, Bryan A.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

      1997-01-01

      Concern is increasing about how quantum effects will impact electronic device operation as down-scaling continues along the SIA Roadmap through 2010. This document describes part of a new semiconductor device modeling (SDM) program at NAS to investigate these concerns by utilizing advanced NAS and third-party numerical computation software to rapidly implement and investigate electronic device models including quantum effects. This SDM project will investigate quantum effects in devices in the classical-quantum transition region, especially sub-0.1 mm MOSFETs. Specific tasks planned for this project include the use of quantum corrections to the classical drift-diffusion and hydrodynamic models of electron transport, arid the use of nominally quantum models including significant scattering.

    14. Average coherence and its typicality for random mixed quantum states

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zhang, Lin

      2017-04-01

      The Wishart ensemble is a useful and important random matrix model used in diverse fields. By realizing induced random mixed quantum states as a Wishart ensemble with fixed unit trace, using matrix integral technique we give a fast track to the average coherence for random mixed quantum states induced via partial-tracing of the Haar-distributed bipartite pure states. As a direct consequence of this result, we get a compact formula for the average subentropy of random mixed states. These compact formulae extend our previous work.

    15. Quantum to Classical Transitions via Weak Measurements and Post-Selection

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Cohen, Eliahu; Aharonov, Yakir

      Alongside its immense empirical success, the quantum mechanical account of physical systems imposes a myriad of divergences from our thoroughly ingrained classical ways of thinking. These divergences, while striking, would have been acceptable if only a continuous transition to the classical domain was at hand. Strangely, this is not quite the case. The difficulties involved in reconciling the quantum with the classical have given rise to different interpretations, each with its own shortcomings. Traditionally, the two domains are sewed together by invoking an ad hoc theory of measurement, which has been incorporated in the axiomatic foundations of quantum theory. This work will incorporate a few related tools for addressing the above conceptual difficulties: deterministic operators, weak measurements, and post-selection. Weak Measurement, based on a very weak von Neumann coupling, is a unique kind of quantum measurement with numerous theoretical and practical applications. In contrast to other measurement techniques, it allows to gather a small amount of information regarding the quantum system, with only a negligible probability of collapsing it onto an eigenstate of the measured observable. A single weak measurement yieldsan almost random outcome, but when performed repeatedly over a large ensemble, the averaged outcome becomes increasingly robust and accurate. Importantly, a long sequence of weak measurements can be thought of as a single projective measurement. We claim in this work that classical variables appearing in the o-world, such as center of mass, moment of inertia, pressure, and average forces, result from a multitude of quantum weak measurements performed in the micro-world. Here again, the quantum outcomes are highly uncertain, but the law of large numbers obliges their convergence to the definite quantities we know from our everyday lives. By augmenting this description with a final boundary condition and employing the notion of "classical

    16. Quantum and classical statistics of the electromagnetic zero-point field

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ibison, Michael; Haisch, Bernhard

      1996-10-01

      A classical electromagnetic zero-point field (ZPF) analog of the vacuum of quantum field theory has formed the basis for theoretical investigations in the discipline known as random or stochastic electrodynamics (SED). In SED the statistical character of quantum measurements is imitated by the introduction of a stochastic classical background electromagnetic field. Random electromagnetic fluctuations are assumed to provide perturbations which can mimic certain quantum phenomena while retaining a purely classical basis, e.g., the Casimir force, the van der Waals force, the Lamb shift, spontaneous emission, the rms radius of a quantum-mechanical harmonic oscillator, and the radius of the Bohr atom. This classical ZPF is represented as a homogeneous, isotropic ensemble of plane electromagnetic waves whose amplitude is exactly equivalent to an excitation energy of hν/2 of the corresponding quantized harmonic oscillator, this being the state of zero excitation of such an oscillator. There is thus no randomness in the classical electric-field amplitudes: Randomness is introduced entirely in the phases of the waves, which are normally distributed. Averaging over the random phases is assumed to be equivalent to taking the ground-state expectation values of the corresponding quantum operator. We demonstrate that this is not precisely correct by examining the statistics of the classical ZPF in contrast to that of the electromagnetic quantum vacuum. Starting with a general technique for the calculation of classical probability distributions for quantum state operators, we derive the distribution for the individual modes of the electric-field amplitude in the ground state as predicted by quantum field theory. We carry out the same calculation for the classical ZPF analog, and show that the distributions are only in approximate agreement, diverging as the density of k states decreases. We then introduce an alternative classical ZPF with a different stochastic character, and

    17. Average subentropy, coherence and entanglement of random mixed quantum states

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zhang, Lin; Singh, Uttam; Pati, Arun K.

      2017-02-01

      Compact expressions for the average subentropy and coherence are obtained for random mixed states that are generated via various probability measures. Surprisingly, our results show that the average subentropy of random mixed states approaches the maximum value of the subentropy which is attained for the maximally mixed state as we increase the dimension. In the special case of the random mixed states sampled from the induced measure via partial tracing of random bipartite pure states, we establish the typicality of the relative entropy of coherence for random mixed states invoking the concentration of measure phenomenon. Our results also indicate that mixed quantum states are less useful compared to pure quantum states in higher dimension when we extract quantum coherence as a resource. This is because of the fact that average coherence of random mixed states is bounded uniformly, however, the average coherence of random pure states increases with the increasing dimension. As an important application, we establish the typicality of relative entropy of entanglement and distillable entanglement for a specific class of random bipartite mixed states. In particular, most of the random states in this specific class have relative entropy of entanglement and distillable entanglement equal to some fixed number (to within an arbitrary small error), thereby hugely reducing the complexity of computation of these entanglement measures for this specific class of mixed states.

    18. Quantum-mechanical machinery for rational decision-making in classical guessing game

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bang, Jeongho; Ryu, Junghee; Pawłowski, Marcin; Ham, Byoung S.; Lee, Jinhyoung

      2016-02-01

      In quantum game theory, one of the most intriguing and important questions is, “Is it possible to get quantum advantages without any modification of the classical game?” The answer to this question so far has largely been negative. So far, it has usually been thought that a change of the classical game setting appears to be unavoidable for getting the quantum advantages. However, we give an affirmative answer here, focusing on the decision-making process (we call ‘reasoning’) to generate the best strategy, which may occur internally, e.g., in the player’s brain. To show this, we consider a classical guessing game. We then define a one-player reasoning problem in the context of the decision-making theory, where the machinery processes are designed to simulate classical and quantum reasoning. In such settings, we present a scenario where a rational player is able to make better use of his/her weak preferences due to quantum reasoning, without any altering or resetting of the classically defined game. We also argue in further analysis that the quantum reasoning may make the player fail, and even make the situation worse, due to any inappropriate preferences.

    19. Quantum-mechanical machinery for rational decision-making in classical guessing game.

      PubMed

      Bang, Jeongho; Ryu, Junghee; Pawłowski, Marcin; Ham, Byoung S; Lee, Jinhyoung

      2016-02-15

      In quantum game theory, one of the most intriguing and important questions is, "Is it possible to get quantum advantages without any modification of the classical game?" The answer to this question so far has largely been negative. So far, it has usually been thought that a change of the classical game setting appears to be unavoidable for getting the quantum advantages. However, we give an affirmative answer here, focusing on the decision-making process (we call 'reasoning') to generate the best strategy, which may occur internally, e.g., in the player's brain. To show this, we consider a classical guessing game. We then define a one-player reasoning problem in the context of the decision-making theory, where the machinery processes are designed to simulate classical and quantum reasoning. In such settings, we present a scenario where a rational player is able to make better use of his/her weak preferences due to quantum reasoning, without any altering or resetting of the classically defined game. We also argue in further analysis that the quantum reasoning may make the player fail, and even make the situation worse, due to any inappropriate preferences.

    20. Phase-Sensitive Coherence and the Classical-Quantum Boundary in Ghost Imaging

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Erkmen, Baris I.; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Venkatraman, Dheera; Wong, Franco N. C.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

      2011-01-01

      The theory of partial coherence has a long and storied history in classical statistical optics. the vast majority of this work addresses fields that are statistically stationary in time, hence their complex envelopes only have phase-insensitive correlations. The quantum optics of squeezed-state generation, however, depends on nonlinear interactions producing baseband field operators with phase-insensitive and phase-sensitive correlations. Utilizing quantum light to enhance imaging has been a topic of considerable current interest, much of it involving biphotons, i.e., streams of entangled-photon pairs. Biphotons have been employed for quantum versions of optical coherence tomography, ghost imaging, holography, and lithography. However, their seemingly quantum features have been mimicked with classical-sate light, questioning wherein lies the classical-quantum boundary. We have shown, for the case of Gaussian-state light, that this boundary is intimately connected to the theory of phase-sensitive partial coherence. Here we present that theory, contrasting it with the familiar case of phase-insensitive partial coherence, and use it to elucidate the classical-quantum boundary of ghost imaging. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that classical phase-sensitive light produces ghost imaging most closely mimicking those obtained in biphotons, and we derived the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of a standoff-sensing ghost imager, taking into account target-induced speckle.

    1. Quantum-like model of processing of information in the brain based on classical electromagnetic field.

      PubMed

      Khrennikov, Andrei

      2011-09-01

      We propose a model of quantum-like (QL) processing of mental information. This model is based on quantum information theory. However, in contrast to models of "quantum physical brain" reducing mental activity (at least at the highest level) to quantum physical phenomena in the brain, our model matches well with the basic neuronal paradigm of the cognitive science. QL information processing is based (surprisingly) on classical electromagnetic signals induced by joint activity of neurons. This novel approach to quantum information is based on representation of quantum mechanics as a version of classical signal theory which was recently elaborated by the author. The brain uses the QL representation (QLR) for working with abstract concepts; concrete images are described by classical information theory. Two processes, classical and QL, are performed parallely. Moreover, information is actively transmitted from one representation to another. A QL concept given in our model by a density operator can generate a variety of concrete images given by temporal realizations of the corresponding (Gaussian) random signal. This signal has the covariance operator coinciding with the density operator encoding the abstract concept under consideration. The presence of various temporal scales in the brain plays the crucial role in creation of QLR in the brain. Moreover, in our model electromagnetic noise produced by neurons is a source of superstrong QL correlations between processes in different spatial domains in the brain; the binding problem is solved on the QL level, but with the aid of the classical background fluctuations.

    2. Quantum-mechanical machinery for rational decision-making in classical guessing game

      PubMed Central

      Bang, Jeongho; Ryu, Junghee; Pawłowski, Marcin; Ham, Byoung S.; Lee, Jinhyoung

      2016-01-01

      In quantum game theory, one of the most intriguing and important questions is, “Is it possible to get quantum advantages without any modification of the classical game?” The answer to this question so far has largely been negative. So far, it has usually been thought that a change of the classical game setting appears to be unavoidable for getting the quantum advantages. However, we give an affirmative answer here, focusing on the decision-making process (we call ‘reasoning’) to generate the best strategy, which may occur internally, e.g., in the player’s brain. To show this, we consider a classical guessing game. We then define a one-player reasoning problem in the context of the decision-making theory, where the machinery processes are designed to simulate classical and quantum reasoning. In such settings, we present a scenario where a rational player is able to make better use of his/her weak preferences due to quantum reasoning, without any altering or resetting of the classically defined game. We also argue in further analysis that the quantum reasoning may make the player fail, and even make the situation worse, due to any inappropriate preferences. PMID:26875685

    3. The incongruent correspondence: Seven non-classical years of old quantum theory

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Kaveh, Shahin

      2014-05-01

      The Correspondence Principle (CP) of old quantum theory is commonly considered to be the requirement that quantum and classical theories converge in their empirical predictions in the appropriate asymptotic limit. That perception has persisted despite the fact that Bohr and other early proponents of CP clearly did not intend it as a mere requirement, and despite much recent historical work. In this paper, I build on this work by first giving an explicit formulation to the mentioned asymptotic requirement (which I shall call the Congruence Requirement (CR)) and then discussing various possible formulations of CP for emission on the basis of the primary literature as well as general physical and metaphysical considerations. I shall then show that, in all of the most probable interpretations of CP that consider quantum theory as a universal theory, any system incorporating both CR and CP for emission would in fact be inconsistent. Old quantum theory measurably contradicts classical physics in the classical regime.

    4. The Development of Effective Classical Potentials and the Quantum Statistical Mechanical Second Virial Coefficient of Water

      SciTech Connect

      Schenter, Gregory K.

      2002-10-08

      The second virial coefficient of water is calculated at low temperature by considering full quantum statistical mechanical effects. At low enough temperatures experimental results are limited and molecular models can be used for accurate extrapolation. In doing so, one must separate inaccuracies of the intermolecular potential from limitations of simulation such as the neglect of higher-order quantum corrections. Effective classical potentials may be used to understand the limitations of classical simulation. In this work we calculate the exact quantum statistical mechanical second virial coefficient and find that using a simple form for the effective classical potential introduced by Miller we are able to reproduce the exact quantum statistical results. This approach provides a significant improvement to conventional first order expansions of the second virial coefficient.

    5. On classical and quantum dynamics of tachyon-like fields and their cosmological implications

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Dimitrijević, Dragoljub D.; Djordjević, Goran S.; Milošević, Milan; Vulcanov, Dumitru

      2014-11-01

      We consider a class of tachyon-like potentials, motivated by string theory, D-brane dynamics and inflation theory in the context of classical and quantum mechanics. A formalism for describing dynamics of tachyon fields in spatially homogenous and one-dimensional - classical and quantum mechanical limit is proposed. A few models with concrete potentials are considered. Additionally, possibilities for p-adic and adelic generalization of these models are discussed. Classical actions and corresponding quantum propagators, in the Feynman path integral approach, are calculated in a form invariant on a change of the background number fields, i.e. on both archimedean and nonarchimedean spaces. Looking for a quantum origin of inflation, relevance of p-adic and adelic generalizations are briefly discussed.

    6. Finite-block-length analysis in classical and quantum information theory.

      PubMed

      Hayashi, Masahito

      2017-01-01

      Coding technology is used in several information processing tasks. In particular, when noise during transmission disturbs communications, coding technology is employed to protect the information. However, there are two types of coding technology: coding in classical information theory and coding in quantum information theory. Although the physical media used to transmit information ultimately obey quantum mechanics, we need to choose the type of coding depending on the kind of information device, classical or quantum, that is being used. In both branches of information theory, there are many elegant theoretical results under the ideal assumption that an infinitely large system is available. In a realistic situation, we need to account for finite size effects. The present paper reviews finite size effects in classical and quantum information theory with respect to various topics, including applied aspects.

    7. On classical and quantum dynamics of tachyon-like fields and their cosmological implications

      SciTech Connect

      Dimitrijević, Dragoljub D. Djordjević, Goran S. Milošević, Milan; Vulcanov, Dumitru

      2014-11-24

      We consider a class of tachyon-like potentials, motivated by string theory, D-brane dynamics and inflation theory in the context of classical and quantum mechanics. A formalism for describing dynamics of tachyon fields in spatially homogenous and one-dimensional - classical and quantum mechanical limit is proposed. A few models with concrete potentials are considered. Additionally, possibilities for p-adic and adelic generalization of these models are discussed. Classical actions and corresponding quantum propagators, in the Feynman path integral approach, are calculated in a form invariant on a change of the background number fields, i.e. on both archimedean and nonarchimedean spaces. Looking for a quantum origin of inflation, relevance of p-adic and adelic generalizations are briefly discussed.

    8. Mesoscopi Detailed Balance Algorithms for Quantum and Classical Turbulence

      DTIC Science & Technology

      2013-02-01

      the one-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics-Burgers equations, KdV and nonlinear Schrodinger equations. Generalizing to three dimensions, quantum...Solitons We have investigated quantum unitary algorithms for both the 1D Korteweg-de-Vries and the Nonlinear Schrodinger equations [G. Vahala, J...Yepez and L. Vahala, Phys. Lett. A310, 187- 196 (2003)]. In particular to recover the 1D nonlinear Schrodinger equation for bright solitons

    9. Coherent state excitons in anisotropic quantum dots: classical and quantum correlations

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Thilagam, A.

      2012-06-01

      We investigate the entanglement dynamics of excitons confined in two adjacent quantum dots, which we describe through their algebraic properties using \\mathfrak {su}(1,1) in the z-direction. We use two explicit forms of coherent states: the Perelomov and Barut-Girardello states to represent the electronic component of the excitonic state in the z-direction. Our results show that in a coherent state basis, the concurrence of an excitonic-qubit pair shows subtle variations which are dependent on the algebraic parameters of the \\mathfrak {su}(1,1) group. These variations also appear in the classical and quantum correlations, present in the qubit-qubit density matrix that is associated with the purely Förster-coupled excitonic-qubit pair. A brief discussion of a plausible experimental technique of detecting excitonic coherent states is provided. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Coherent states: mathematical and physical aspects’.

    10. Laser-induced spatial symmetry breaking in quantum and classical mechanics.

      PubMed

      Franco, Ignacio; Brumer, Paul

      2006-07-28

      Phase-controllable transport in laser-irradiated spatially symmetric systems is shown to arise both quantum mechanically and classically from a common field-driven interference mechanism. Specifically, the quantum-to-classical transition for symmetry breaking in a quartic oscillator driven by an omega+2omega field is studied. For this, a double perturbation theory in the oscillator anharmonicity and external field strength, that admits an analytic classical limit, is carried out in the Heisenberg picture. The interferences responsible for the symmetry breaking are shown to survive in the classical limit and are the origins of classical control. Differences between reflection symmetry that plays a key role in the analysis, and parity that does not, are discussed.

    11. Engineering the quantum-classical interface of solid-state qubits

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Reilly, David J.

      2015-10-01

      Spanning a range of hardware platforms, the building-blocks of quantum processors are today sufficiently advanced to begin work on scaling-up these systems into complex quantum machines. A key subsystem of all quantum machinery is the interface between the isolated qubits that encode quantum information and the classical control and readout technology needed to operate them. As few-qubit devices are combined to construct larger, fault-tolerant quantum systems in the near future, the quantum-classical interface will pose new challenges that increasingly require approaches from the engineering disciplines in combination with continued fundamental advances in physics, materials and mathematics. This review describes the subsystems comprising the quantum-classical interface from the viewpoint of an engineer, experimental physicist or student wanting to enter the field of solid-state quantum information technology. The fundamental signalling operations of readout and control are reviewed for a variety of qubit platforms, including spin systems, superconducting implementations and future devices based on topological degrees-of-freedom. New engineering opportunities for technology development at the boundary between qubits and their control hardware are identified, transversing electronics to cryogenics.

    12. Fidelity between Gaussian mixed states with quantum state quadrature variances

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hai-Long, Zhang; Chun, Zhou; Jian-Hong, Shi; Wan-Su, Bao

      2016-04-01

      In this paper, from the original definition of fidelity in a pure state, we first give a well-defined expansion fidelity between two Gaussian mixed states. It is related to the variances of output and input states in quantum information processing. It is convenient to quantify the quantum teleportation (quantum clone) experiment since the variances of the input (output) state are measurable. Furthermore, we also give a conclusion that the fidelity of a pure input state is smaller than the fidelity of a mixed input state in the same quantum information processing. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB338002) and the Foundation of Science and Technology on Information Assurance Laboratory (Grant No. KJ-14-001).

    13. Classical-quantum correspondence for ionization in fast ion-atom collisions

      SciTech Connect

      Burgdoerfer, J. |; Reinhold, C.O.

      1994-10-01

      We analyze the interplay between classical and quantum dynamics in ionization of atoms by fast charged particles The convergence to the classical limit is studied as a function of the momentum transferred to the electron during the collision, the impact parameter. the energy and angle of the emitted electron, and the initial state of the target. One goal is to assess the validity of exact classical (CTMC) methods and approximate classical models such as the Thomson model. Applications to data for electron ejection at large angles are presented. The connection between collisional ionization by charged particles and ionization by half-cycle pulses is discussed.

    14. FREDERIC IVES MEDAL PAPER: From classical to quantum noise

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Haus, Hermann A.

      1995-11-01

      An account is given of noise in electrical circuits and its relation to quantum noise connected with Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. A phase-insensitive amplifier must introduce noise (most commonly the spontaneous emission noise) in order to satisfy the constraint imposed by quantum mechanics on the simultaneous measurement of two observables represented by noncommuting operators. Nonstationary, phase-sensitive amplifiers can employ squeezed radiation and reduce the noise below that of phase-insensitive amplifiers. Experiments on squeezing in optical fibers and the attendant noise reduction are presented. The squeezing apparatus can also be employed as a quantum nondemolition measurement of photon number. A thought experiment of a two-slit interferometer is described, in which the fringes are washed out progressively with the accuracy of the photon number determination in one of its arms. Implications of measurements of this kind for the resolution of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox are discussed. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

    15. Quantum extremal surfaces: holographic entanglement entropy beyond the classical regime

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C.

      2015-01-01

      We propose that holographic entanglement entropy can be calculated at arbitrary orders in the bulk Planck constant using the concept of a "quantum extremal surface": a surface which extremizes the generalized entropy, i.e. the sum of area and bulk entanglement entropy. At leading order in bulk quantum corrections, our proposal agrees with the formula of Faulkner, Lewkowycz, and Maldacena, which was derived only at this order; beyond leading order corrections, the two conjectures diverge. Quantum extremal surfaces lie outside the causal domain of influence of the boundary region as well as its complement, and in some spacetimes there are barriers preventing them from entering certain regions. We comment on the implications for bulk reconstruction.

    16. Oscillatory localization of quantum walks analyzed by classical electric circuits

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ambainis, Andris; PrÅ«sis, Krišjānis; Vihrovs, JevgÄ`nijs; Wong, Thomas G.

      2016-12-01

      We examine an unexplored quantum phenomenon we call oscillatory localization, where a discrete-time quantum walk with Grover's diffusion coin jumps back and forth between two vertices. We then connect it to the power dissipation of a related electric network. Namely, we show that there are only two kinds of oscillating states, called uniform states and flip states, and that the projection of an arbitrary state onto a flip state is bounded by the power dissipation of an electric circuit. By applying this framework to states along a single edge of a graph, we show that low effective resistance implies oscillatory localization of the quantum walk. This reveals that oscillatory localization occurs on a large variety of regular graphs, including edge-transitive, expander, and high-degree graphs. As a corollary, high edge connectivity also implies localization of these states, since it is closely related to electric resistance.

    17. A coherence preservation control strategy in cavity QED based on classical quantum feedback.

      PubMed

      Li, Ming; Chen, Wei; Gao, Junli

      2013-01-01

      For eliminating the unexpected decoherence effect in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED), the transfer function of Rabi oscillation is derived theoretically using optical Bloch equations. In particular, the decoherence in cavity QED from the atomic spontaneous emission is especially considered. A feedback control strategy is proposed to preserve the coherence through Rabi oscillation stabilization. In the scheme, a classical quantum feedback channel for the quantum information acquisition is constructed via the quantum tomography technology, and a compensation system based on the root locus theory is put forward to suppress the atomic spontaneous emission and the associated decoherence. The simulation results have proved its effectiveness and superiority for the coherence preservation.

    18. A Coherence Preservation Control Strategy in Cavity QED Based on Classical Quantum Feedback

      PubMed Central

      Chen, Wei; Gao, Junli

      2013-01-01

      For eliminating the unexpected decoherence effect in cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED), the transfer function of Rabi oscillation is derived theoretically using optical Bloch equations. In particular, the decoherence in cavity QED from the atomic spontaneous emission is especially considered. A feedback control strategy is proposed to preserve the coherence through Rabi oscillation stabilization. In the scheme, a classical quantum feedback channel for the quantum information acquisition is constructed via the quantum tomography technology, and a compensation system based on the root locus theory is put forward to suppress the atomic spontaneous emission and the associated decoherence. The simulation results have proved its effectiveness and superiority for the coherence preservation. PMID:23781154

    19. Coverage-dependent quantum versus classical scattering of thermal neon atoms from Li/Cu(100).

      PubMed

      Maclaren, D A; Huang, C; Levi, A C; Allison, W

      2008-09-07

      We show that subtle variations in surface structure can enhance quantum scattering and quench atom-surface energy transfer. The scattering of thermal energy neon atoms from a lithium overlayer on a copper substrate switches between a classical regime, dominated by multiphonon interactions, and a quantum regime, dominated by elastic diffraction. The transition is achieved by simple tailoring of the lithium coverage and quantum scattering dominates only in the narrow coverage range of theta=0.3-0.6 ML. The results are described qualitatively using a modified Debye-Waller model that incorporates an approximate quantum treatment of the adsorbate-substrate vibration.

    20. Quantum-classical model of retinal photoisomerization reaction in visual pigment rhodopsin.

      PubMed

      Lakhno, V D; Shigaev, A S; Feldman, T B; Nadtochenko, V A; Ostrovsky, M A

      2016-11-01

      A quantum-classical model of photoisomerization of the visual pigment rhodopsin chromophore is proposed. At certain (and more realistic) parameter value combinations, the model is shown to accurately reproduce a number of independent experimental data on the photoreaction dynamics: the quantum yield, the time to reach the point of conical intersection of potential energy surfaces, the termination time of the evolution of quantum subsystem, as well as the characteristic low frequencies of retinal molecular lattice fluctuations during photoisomerization. In addition, the model behavior is in good accordance with experimental data about coherence and local character of quantum transition.

    1. Quantum versus classical dynamics in a driven barrier: The role of kinematic effects.

      PubMed

      Papachristou, P K; Katifori, E; Diakonos, F K; Constantoudis, V; Mavrommatis, E

      2012-09-01

      We study the dynamics of the classical and quantum mechanical scattering of a wave packet from an oscillating barrier. Our main focus is on the dependence of the transmission coefficient on the initial energy of the wave packet for a wide range of oscillation frequencies. The behavior of the quantum transmission coefficient is affected by tunneling phenomena, resonances, and kinematic effects emanating from the time dependence of the potential. We show that when kinematic effects dominate (mainly in intermediate frequencies), classical mechanics provides very good approximation of quantum results. In that frequency region, the classical and quantum transmission coefficients are in optimal agreement. Moreover, the transmission threshold (i.e., the energy above which the transmission coefficient becomes larger than a specific small threshold value) is found to exhibit a minimum. We also consider the form of the transmitted wave packet and we find that for low values of the frequency the incoming classical and quantum wave packet can be split into a train of well-separated coherent pulses, a phenomenon that admits purely classical kinematic interpretation.

    2. Classical analogs of quasifree quantum stochastic processes given by stochastic states of the quantized electromagnetic field

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hertfelder, C.; Kümmerer, B.

      2001-03-01

      The mathematical model describing a light beam prepared in an arbitrary quantum optical state is a quasifree quantum stochastic process on the C* algebra of the canonical commutatation relations. For such quantum stochastic processes the concept of stochastic states is introduced. Stochastic quantum states have a classical analog in the following sense: If the light beam is prepared in a stochastic state, one can construct a generalized classical stochastic process, such that the distributions of the quantum observables and the classical random variables coincide. A sufficient algebraic condition for the stochasticity of a quantum state is formulated. The introduced formalism generalizes the Wigner representation from a single field mode to a continuum of modes. For the special case of a single field mode the stochasticity condition provides a new criterion for the positivity of the Wigner function related to the given state. As an example the quantized eletromagnetic field in empty space at temperature T=0 is discussed. It turns out that the corresponding classical stochastic process is not a white noise but a colored noise with a linearly increasing spectrum.

    3. Quantum Corrections to Classical Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Water and Ice.

      PubMed

      Waheed, Qaiser; Edholm, Olle

      2011-09-13

      Classical simulations of simple water models reproduce many properties of the liquid and ice but overestimate the heat capacity by about 65% at ordinary temperatures and much more for low temperature ice. This is due to the fact that the atomic vibrations are quantum mechanical. The application of harmonic quantum corrections to the molecular motion results in good heat capacities for the liquid and for ice at low temperatures but a successively growing positive deviation from experimental results for ice above 200 K that reaches 15% just below melting. We suggest that this deviation is due to the lack of quantum corrections to the anharmonic motions. For the liquid, the anharmonicities are even larger but also softer and thus in less need of quantum correction. Therefore, harmonic quantum corrections to the classically calculated liquid heat capacities result in agreement with the experimental values. The classical model underestimates the heat of melting by 15%, while the application of quantum corrections produces fair agreement. On the other hand, the heat of vaporization is overestimated by 10% in the harmonically corrected classical model.

    4. Quantum speed-up for turbulent mixing simulation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Xu, Guanglei; Daley, Andrew; Givi, Peyman; Somma, Rolando

      2016-11-01

      Quantum computing techniques have the potential in the future to generate revolutionary advances in many types of computation. The necessary hardware is under rapid development, making it an opportune time to identify possible specific applications across a range of fields, and properly identify the potential of this new paradigm of computing. Turbulent mixing simulation is important in a variety of fields, and is typically accomplished by Monte Carlo methods. To reach high precision in estimating parameters often requires vast computational resources. We have developed a quantum algorithm for turbulent mixing simulation that provides a quadratic speed-up over Monte Carlo methods in terms of number of repetitions needed to achieve designated accuracy. Taking the example of binary scalar mixing process described by a coaslescence/dispersion model, we demonstrate the advantages of our quantum algorithm by illustrating comparisons of statistical error scaling to repetition number between Monte Carlo method and quantum algorithm. This is an important starting point to further understand how quantum algorithms can be directly applied in fluid dynamics, and to estimate the timescales on which quantum hardware will have useful applications in this area of science. This work was supported by AFOSR Grant FA9550-12-1-0057.

    5. Time Symmetric Quantum Mechanics and Causal Classical Physics ?

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bopp, Fritz W.

      2017-02-01

      A two boundary quantum mechanics without time ordered causal structure is advocated as consistent theory. The apparent causal structure of usual "near future" macroscopic phenomena is attributed to a cosmological asymmetry and to rules governing the transition between microscopic to macroscopic observations. Our interest is a heuristic understanding of the resulting macroscopic physics.

    6. Adaptive resolution simulation of liquid para-hydrogen: testing the robustness of the quantum-classical adaptive coupling.

      PubMed

      Poma, A B; Delle Site, L

      2011-06-14

      Adaptive resolution simulations for classical systems are currently made within a reasonably consistent theoretical framework. Recently we have extended this approach to the quantum-classical coupling by mapping the quantum nature of an atom onto a classical polymer ring representation within the path integral approach [Poma & Delle Site, Phys. Rev. Lett., 2010, 104, 250201]. In this way the process of interfacing adaptively a quantum representation to a classical one corresponds to the problem of interfacing two regions with a different number of effective "classical" degrees of freedom; thus the classical formulation of the adaptive algorithm applies straightforwardly to the quantum-classical problem. In this work we show the robustness of such an approach for a liquid of para-hydrogen at low temperature. This system represents a highly challenging conceptual and technical test for the adaptive approach due to the extreme thermodynamical conditions where quantum effects play a central role.

    7. Long-distance copropagation of quantum key distribution and terabit classical optical data channels

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wang, Liu-Jun; Zou, Kai-Heng; Sun, Wei; Mao, Yingqiu; Zhu, Yi-Xiao; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Qing; Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Teng-Yun; Pan, Jian-Wei

      2017-01-01

      Quantum key distribution (QKD) generates symmetric keys between two remote parties and guarantees the keys are not accessible to any third party. Wavelength-division multiplexing between QKD and classical optical communications by sharing the existing fiber-optics infrastructure is highly desired in order to reduce the cost of QKD applications. However, comparing to the light for classical transmission, quantum signals are very weak and easily affected by impairments from classical light, such as the spontaneous Raman-scattering effect. Here, by selecting an optimal wavelength of quantum signals, we significantly reduce the influence of the Raman-scattering effect. In addition, through coherent optical communication technology, we achieve high-speed classical data transmission with relatively low launch powers, thereby further reducing the impairments from classical light. As a result, we realize the multiplexing and long-distance copropagation of QKD and terabit classical data transmission up to 80 km. The data capacity is two orders of magnitude larger than the existing results. Our demonstration verifies the feasibility of QKD and classical communication to share the resources of backbone fiber links and thus taking the utility of QKD a great step forward.

    8. Quantum and classical non-adiabatic dynamics of Li_{2}^{+}Ne photodissociation

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Pouilly, Brigitte; Monnerville, Maurice; Zanuttini, David; Gervais, Benoît

      2015-01-01

      The 3D photodissociation dynamics of Li2+Ne system is investigated by quantum calculations using the multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method and by classical simulations with the trajectory surface hopping (TSH) approach. Six electronic states of A’ symmetry and two states of A” symmetry are involved in the process. Couplings in the excitation region and two conical intersections in the vicinity of the Franck-Condon zone control the non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics. A diabatic representation including all the states and the couplings is determined. Diabatic and adiabatic populations calculated for initial excitation to pure diabatic and adiabatic states lead to a clear understanding of the mechanisms governing the non-adiabatic photodissociation process. The classical and quantum photodissociation cross-sections for absorption in two adiabatic states of the A’ symmetry are calculated. A remarkable agreement between quantum and classical results is obtained regarding the populations and the absorption cross-sections.

    9. Quantum versus classical foundation of statistical mechanics under experimentally realistic conditions.

      PubMed

      Reimann, Peter; Evstigneev, Mykhaylo

      2013-11-01

      Focusing on isolated macroscopic systems, described in terms of either a quantum mechanical or a classical model, our two key questions are how far does an initial ensemble (usually far from equilibrium and largely unknown in detail) evolve towards a stationary long-time behavior (equilibration) and how far is this steady state in agreement with the microcanonical ensemble as predicted by statistical mechanics (thermalization). A recently developed quantum mechanical treatment of the problem is briefly summarized, putting particular emphasis on the realistic modeling of experimental measurements and nonequilibrium initial conditions. Within this framework, equilibration can be proven under very weak assumptions about those measurements and initial conditions, while thermalization still requires quite strong additional hypotheses. An analogous approach within the framework of classical mechanics is developed and compared with the quantum case. In particular, the assumptions to guarantee classical equilibration are now rather strong, while thermalization then follows under relatively weak additional conditions.

    10. Quantum-classical correspondence for a particle in a homogeneous field

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Singh, Sumita; Suman, Smriti P.; Singh, Vijay A.

      2016-11-01

      The correspondence principle provides a prescription to connect quantum physics to classical. It asserts that the physical quantities evaluated quantum mechanically approach their respective classical values for large quantum numbers. This has been shown for the pedagogically important cases of the particle in a box and a harmonic oscillator. However, a particle in a constant field has a wave function related to the Airy function and has at best been treated numerically. Employing energy eigenstates we obtain the expectation values of the position, the momentum and their moments upto fourth order, rigorously and without resorting to numerical or graphical techniques. We compare them with the corresponding classical values. We also examine the uncertainty product for the system.

    11. Classically and quantum stable emergent universe from conservation laws

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      del Campo, Sergio; Guendelman, Eduardo I.; Herrera, Ramón; Labraña, Pedro

      2016-08-01

      It has been recently pointed out by Mithani-Vilenkin [1-4] that certain emergent universe scenarios which are classically stable are nevertheless unstable semiclassically to collapse. Here, we show that there is a class of emergent universes derived from scale invariant two measures theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking (s.s.b) of the scale invariance, which can have both classical stability and do not suffer the instability pointed out by Mithani-Vilenkin towards collapse. We find that this stability is due to the presence of a symmetry in the "emergent phase", which together with the non linearities of the theory, does not allow that the FLRW scale factor to be smaller that a certain minimum value a0 in a certain protected region.

    12. Continuous quantum error correction as classical hybrid control

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Mabuchi, Hideo

      2009-10-01

      The standard formulation of quantum error correction (QEC) comprises repeated cycles of error estimation and corrective intervention in the free dynamics of a qubit register. QEC can thus be seen as a form of feedback control, and it is of interest to seek a deeper understanding of the connection between the associated theories. Here we present a focused case study within this broad program, connecting continuous QEC with elements of hybrid control theory. We show that canonical methods of the latter engineering discipline, such as recursive filtering and dynamic programming approaches to solving the optimal control problem, can be applied fruitfully in the design of separated controller structures for quantum memories based on coding and continuous syndrome measurement.

    13. Quantum/classical mode evolution in free electron laser oscillators

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Bosco, P.; Colson, W. B.; Freedman, R. A.

      1983-01-01

      The problem of oscillator evolution and mode competition in free electron lasers is studied. Relativistic quantum field theory is used to calculate electron wave functions, the angular distribution of spontaneous emission, and the transition rates for stimulated emission and absorption in each mode. The photon rate equation for the weakfield regime is presented. This rate equation is applied to oscillator evolution with a conventional undulator, a two-stage optical klystron, and a tapered undulator. The effects of noise are briefly discussed.

    14. Properties of classical and quantum Jensen-Shannon divergence

      SciTech Connect

      Brieet, Jop; Harremoees, Peter

      2009-05-15

      Jensen-Shannon divergence (JD) is a symmetrized and smoothed version of the most important divergence measure of information theory, Kullback divergence. As opposed to Kullback divergence it determines in a very direct way a metric; indeed, it is the square of a metric. We consider a family of divergence measures (JD{sub {alpha}} for {alpha}>0), the Jensen divergences of order {alpha}, which generalize JD as JD{sub 1}=JD. Using a result of Schoenberg, we prove that JD{sub {alpha}} is the square of a metric for {alpha} is an element of (0,2], and that the resulting metric space of probability distributions can be isometrically embedded in a real Hilbert space. Quantum Jensen-Shannon divergence (QJD) is a symmetrized and smoothed version of quantum relative entropy and can be extended to a family of quantum Jensen divergences of order {alpha} (QJD{sub {alpha}}). We strengthen results by Lamberti and co-workers by proving that for qubits and pure states, QJD{sub {alpha}}{sup 1/2} is a metric space which can be isometrically embedded in a real Hilbert space when {alpha} is an element of (0,2]. In analogy with Burbea and Rao's generalization of JD, we also define general QJD by associating a Jensen-type quantity to any weighted family of states. Appropriate interpretations of quantities introduced are discussed and bounds are derived in terms of the total variation and trace distance.

    15. Evolution of quantum field, particle content, and classicality in the three stage universe

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Singh, Suprit; Modak, Sujoy Kumar; Padmanabhan, T.

      2013-12-01

      We study the evolution of a quantum scalar field in a toy universe which has three stages of evolution, viz., (i) an early (inflationary) de Sitter phase (ii) radiation-dominated phase and (iii) late-time (cosmological constant dominated) de Sitter phase. Using the Schrödinger picture, the scalar field equations are solved separately for the three stages and matched at the transition points. The boundary conditions are chosen so that field modes in the early de Sitter evolves from the Bunch-Davies vacuum state. We determine the (time-dependent) particle content of this quantum state for the entire evolution of the universe and describe the various features both numerically and analytically. We also describe the quantum to classical transition in terms of a classicality parameter which tracks the particle creation and its effect on phase space correlation of the quantum field.

    16. Classical simulation of quantum error correction in a Fibonacci anyon code

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Burton, Simon; Brell, Courtney G.; Flammia, Steven T.

      2017-02-01

      Classically simulating the dynamics of anyonic excitations in two-dimensional quantum systems is likely intractable in general because such dynamics are sufficient to implement universal quantum computation. However, processes of interest for the study of quantum error correction in anyon systems are typically drawn from a restricted class that displays significant structure over a wide range of system parameters. We exploit this structure to classically simulate, and thereby demonstrate the success of, an error-correction protocol for a quantum memory based on the universal Fibonacci anyon model. We numerically simulate a phenomenological model of the system and noise processes on lattice sizes of up to 128 ×128 sites, and find a lower bound on the error-correction threshold of approximately 0.125 errors per edge, which is comparable to those previously known for Abelian and (nonuniversal) non-Abelian anyon models.

    17. A novel framework of classical and quantum prisoner's dilemma games on coupled networks.

      PubMed

      Deng, Xinyang; Zhang, Qi; Deng, Yong; Wang, Zhen

      2016-03-15

      Evolutionary games on multilayer networks are attracting growing interest. While among previous studies, the role of quantum games in such a infrastructure is still virgin and may become a fascinating issue across a myriad of research realms. To mimick two kinds of different interactive environments and mechanisms, in this paper a new framework of classical and quantum prisoner's dilemma games on two-layer coupled networks is considered. Within the proposed model, the impact of coupling factor of networks and entanglement degree in quantum games on the evolutionary process has been studied. Simulation results show that the entanglement has no impact on the evolution of the classical prisoner's dilemma, while the rise of the coupling factor obviously impedes cooperation in this game, and the evolution of quantum prisoner's dilemma is greatly impacted by the combined effect of entanglement and coupling.

    18. Quantum-locked key distribution at nearly the classical capacity rate.

      PubMed

      Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

      2014-10-17

      Quantum data locking is a protocol that allows for a small secret key to (un)lock an exponentially larger amount of information, hence yielding the strongest violation of the classical one-time pad encryption in the quantum setting. This violation mirrors a large gap existing between two security criteria for quantum cryptography quantified by two entropic quantities: the Holevo information and the accessible information. We show that the latter becomes a sensible security criterion if an upper bound on the coherence time of the eavesdropper's quantum memory is known. Under this condition, we introduce a protocol for secret key generation through a memoryless qudit channel. For channels with enough symmetry, such as the d-dimensional erasure and depolarizing channels, this protocol allows secret key generation at an asymptotic rate as high as the classical capacity minus one bit.

    19. A novel framework of classical and quantum prisoner’s dilemma games on coupled networks

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Deng, Xinyang; Zhang, Qi; Deng, Yong; Wang, Zhen

      2016-03-01

      Evolutionary games on multilayer networks are attracting growing interest. While among previous studies, the role of quantum games in such a infrastructure is still virgin and may become a fascinating issue across a myriad of research realms. To mimick two kinds of different interactive environments and mechanisms, in this paper a new framework of classical and quantum prisoner’s dilemma games on two-layer coupled networks is considered. Within the proposed model, the impact of coupling factor of networks and entanglement degree in quantum games on the evolutionary process has been studied. Simulation results show that the entanglement has no impact on the evolution of the classical prisoner’s dilemma, while the rise of the coupling factor obviously impedes cooperation in this game, and the evolution of quantum prisoner’s dilemma is greatly impacted by the combined effect of entanglement and coupling.

    20. Generalized trace-distance measure connecting quantum and classical non-Markovianity

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wißmann, Steffen; Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Vacchini, Bassano

      2015-10-01

      We establish a direct connection of quantum Markovianity of an open system to its classical counterpart by generalizing the criterion based on the information flow. Here the flow is characterized by the time evolution of Helstrom matrices, given by the weighted difference of statistical operators, under the action of the quantum dynamical map. It turns out that the introduced criterion is equivalent to P divisibility of a quantum process, namely, divisibility in terms of positive maps, which provides a direct connection to classical Markovian stochastic processes. Moreover, it is shown that mathematical representations similar to those found for the original trace-distance-based measure hold true for the associated generalized measure for quantum non-Markovianity. That is, we prove orthogonality of optimal states showing a maximal information backflow and establish a local and universal representation of the measure. We illustrate some properties of the generalized criterion by means of examples.

    1. Quantum-Locked Key Distribution at Nearly the Classical Capacity Rate

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Lupo, Cosmo; Lloyd, Seth

      2014-10-01

      Quantum data locking is a protocol that allows for a small secret key to (un)lock an exponentially larger amount of information, hence yielding the strongest violation of the classical one-time pad encryption in the quantum setting. This violation mirrors a large gap existing between two security criteria for quantum cryptography quantified by two entropic quantities: the Holevo information and the accessible information. We show that the latter becomes a sensible security criterion if an upper bound on the coherence time of the eavesdropper's quantum memory is known. Under this condition, we introduce a protocol for secret key generation through a memoryless qudit channel. For channels with enough symmetry, such as the d-dimensional erasure and depolarizing channels, this protocol allows secret key generation at an asymptotic rate as high as the classical capacity minus one bit.

    2. Bremsstrahlung radiation from slow electrons in a Coulomb field: Classical limit and quantum correction

      SciTech Connect

      Manakov, N. L. Krylovetsky, A. A.; Marmo, S. I.

      2015-11-15

      Compact analytic expressions have been derived by a direct expansion in ħ → 0 for the nonrelativistic amplitude of Coulomb bremsstrahlung radiation (BR), the differential (in frequency and angles of the scattered electron) BR cross section, and the triply differential BR cross section that takes into account the bremsstrahlung photon direction and polarization and the scattered electron direction. They contain the classical limit and a quantum correction of the order of ħ at an arbitrary BR frequency ω. An explicit expression has been found for the quantum correction of the order of ħ to the classical BR spectrum.

    3. Quantum limits on optical phase estimation accuracy from classical rate-distortion theory

      SciTech Connect

      Nair, Ranjith

      2014-12-04

      The classical information-theoretic lower bound on the distortion of a random variable upon transmission through a noisy channel is applied to quantum-optical phase estimation. An approach for obtaining Bayesian lower bounds on the phase estimation accuracy is described that employs estimates of the classical capacity of the relevant quantum-optical channels. The Heisenberg limit for lossless phase estimation is derived for arbitrary probe state and prior distributions of the phase, and shot-noise scaling of the phase accuracy is established in the presence of nonzero loss for a parallel entanglement-assisted strategy with a single probe mode.

    4. Rotational excitation of water by hydrogen molecules: comparison of results from classical and quantum mechanics.

      PubMed

      Faure, Alexandre; Wiesenfeld, Laurent; Wernli, Michael; Valiron, Pierre

      2006-06-07

      Quasiclassical trajectory calculations are carried out for rotational excitation of water by hydrogen molecules. State-to-state rate coefficients are determined at 100 K and are compared to available quantum results. A good agreement between classical and quantum rates is observed for downward transitions, with an average accuracy of classical results better than a factor of 2. It is thus found that the ambiguities described by Faure and Wiesenfeld [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6771 (2004)] can be solved in the particular case of waterlike asymmetric-top molecules.

    5. Hybrid quantum/classical path integral approach for simulation of hydrogen transfer reactions in enzymes.

      PubMed

      Wang, Qian; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

      2006-11-14

      A hybrid quantum/classical path integral Monte Carlo (QC-PIMC) method for calculating the quantum free energy barrier for hydrogen transfer reactions in condensed phases is presented. In this approach, the classical potential of mean force along a collective reaction coordinate is calculated using umbrella sampling techniques in conjunction with molecular dynamics trajectories propagated according to a mapping potential. The quantum contribution is determined for each configuration along the classical trajectory with path integral Monte Carlo calculations in which the beads move according to an effective mapping potential. This type of path integral calculation does not utilize the centroid constraint and can lead to more efficient sampling of the relevant region of conformational space than free-particle path integral sampling. The QC-PIMC method is computationally practical for large systems because the path integral sampling for the quantum nuclei is performed separately from the classical molecular dynamics sampling of the entire system. The utility of the QC-PIMC method is illustrated by an application to hydride transfer in the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase. A comparison of this method to the quantized classical path and grid-based methods for this system is presented.

    6. Wave-like variables of a classical particle and their connections to quantum mechanics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Yang, Chen

      2017-01-01

      In many texts, the transition from classical mechanics to quantum mechanics is achieved by substituting the action for the phase angle. The paper presents a different approach to show some connections between classical and quantum mechanics for a single particle for an audience at graduate and postgraduate levels. Firstly, it is shown that a wave equation of action can be derived under the free particle condition and the Legendre transform. The wave-like solutions of the action, Hamiltonian and momentum of the free particle are presented. Using the discrete approximation, the equation of motion of a single particle, in scalar potential field, is obtained in a similar form to Schrödinger’s equation. The rest of the paper discusses the propagation, superposition of the wave-like dynamic variables and their connections to quantum mechanics. The superposition of the variables of a particle is generally distinct from the superposition of classical waves (e.g. acoustics). The quantum superposition provides a self-consistent interpretation of the wave-like solutions of the variables. Connections between the classical and quantum relations for corresponding variables are observed from the one-to-one comparisons.

    7. The calculation of the thermal rate coefficient by a method combining classical and quantum mechanics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wahnström, Göran; Carmeli, Benny; Metiu, Horia

      1988-02-01

      We propose and test a method for computing flux-flux correlation functions (and thermal rate coefficients) which divides the degrees of freedom in two groups, one treated classically and the other quantum mechanically. The method is tested by applying it to a simple model for which we can also obtain exact results. The approximate method gives good results if the mass associated with the classical degrees of freedom exceeds 16 a.u.

    8. Scanning gate microscopy of magnetic focusing in graphene devices: quantum vs. classical simulation.

      PubMed

      Petrović, Marko D; Milovanović, Slaviša; Peeters, Francois

      2017-03-17

      We compare classical versus quantum electron transport in recently investigated magnetic focusing devices [S. Bhandari et al., Nano Lett. 16, 1690 (2016)] exposed to the perturbing potential of a scanning gate microscope (SGM). Using the Landauer-Büttiker formalism for a multi-terminal device, we calculate resistance maps that are obtained as the SGM tip is scanned over the sample. There are three unique regimes in which the scanning tip can operate (focusing, repelling, and mixed regime) which are investigated. Tip interacts mostly with electrons with cyclotron trajectories passing directly underneath it, leaving a trail of modified current density behind it. Other (indirect) trajectories become relevant when the tip is placed near the edges of the sample, and current is scattered between the tip and the edge. We point out that, in contrast to SGM experiments on gapped semiconductors, the STM tip can induce a pn junction in graphene, which improves contrast and resolution in SGM. We also discuss possible explanations for spatial asymmetry of experimentally measured resistance maps, and connect it with specific configurations of the measuring probes.

    9. Acceleration of quantum optimal control theory algorithms with mixing strategies.

      PubMed

      Castro, Alberto; Gross, E K U

      2009-05-01

      We propose the use of mixing strategies to accelerate the convergence of the common iterative algorithms utilized in quantum optimal control theory (QOCT). We show how the nonlinear equations of QOCT can be viewed as a "fixed-point" nonlinear problem. The iterative algorithms for this class of problems may benefit from mixing strategies, as it happens, e.g., in the quest for the ground-state density in Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. We demonstrate, with some numerical examples, how the same mixing schemes utilized in this latter nonlinear problem may significantly accelerate the QOCT iterative procedures.

    10. Grand challenges in quantum-classical modeling of molecule-surface interactions.

      PubMed

      Herbers, Claudia R; Li, Chunli; van der Vegt, Nico F A

      2013-05-30

      A detailed understanding of the adsorption of small molecules or macromolecules to a materials surface is of importance, for example, in the context of material and biomaterial research. Classical atomistic simulations in principle provide microscopic insight in the complex entropic and enthalpic interplay at the interface. However, an application of classical atomistic simulation techniques to such interface systems is a nontrivial problem, mostly because commonly used force fields cannot be straightforwardly applied, as they are usually developed to reproduce bulk properties of either solids or liquids but not the interfacial region between two phases. Therefore, a dual-scale modeling approach has often been the method of choice in the past, in which the classical force field is parameterized such that quantum chemical information on near-surface conformations and adsorption energies is reproduced by the classical force field. We will discuss in this review the current state-of-the-art of quantum-classical modeling of molecule-surface interactions and outline the major challenges in this field. In this context, we will, among other things, lay emphasis on discussing ways to obtain representable force fields and propose systematic and system-independent strategies to optimize the quantum-classical fitting procedure.

    11. From Classical Nonlinear Integrable Systems to Quantum Shortcuts to Adiabaticity

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Okuyama, Manaka; Takahashi, Kazutaka

      2016-08-01

      Using shortcuts to adiabaticity, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation that is reduced to a classical nonlinear integrable equation. For a given time-dependent Hamiltonian, the counterdiabatic term is introduced to prevent nonadiabatic transitions. Using the fact that the equation for the dynamical invariant is equivalent to the Lax equation in nonlinear integrable systems, we obtain the counterdiabatic term exactly. The counterdiabatic term is available when the corresponding Lax pair exists and the solvable systems are classified in a unified and systematic way. Multisoliton potentials obtained from the Korteweg-de Vries equation and isotropic X Y spin chains from the Toda equations are studied in detail.

    12. Boltzmann-conserving classical dynamics in quantum time-correlation functions: “Matsubara dynamics”

      SciTech Connect

      Hele, Timothy J. H.; Willatt, Michael J.; Muolo, Andrea; Althorpe, Stuart C.

      2015-04-07

      We show that a single change in the derivation of the linearized semiclassical-initial value representation (LSC-IVR or “classical Wigner approximation”) results in a classical dynamics which conserves the quantum Boltzmann distribution. We rederive the (standard) LSC-IVR approach by writing the (exact) quantum time-correlation function in terms of the normal modes of a free ring-polymer (i.e., a discrete imaginary-time Feynman path), taking the limit that the number of polymer beads N → ∞, such that the lowest normal-mode frequencies take their “Matsubara” values. The change we propose is to truncate the quantum Liouvillian, not explicitly in powers of ħ{sup 2} at ħ{sup 0} (which gives back the standard LSC-IVR approximation), but in the normal-mode derivatives corresponding to the lowest Matsubara frequencies. The resulting “Matsubara” dynamics is inherently classical (since all terms O(ħ{sup 2}) disappear from the Matsubara Liouvillian in the limit N → ∞) and conserves the quantum Boltzmann distribution because the Matsubara Hamiltonian is symmetric with respect to imaginary-time translation. Numerical tests show that the Matsubara approximation to the quantum time-correlation function converges with respect to the number of modes and gives better agreement than LSC-IVR with the exact quantum result. Matsubara dynamics is too computationally expensive to be applied to complex systems, but its further approximation may lead to practical methods.

    13. Functional Basis for Efficient Physical Layer Classical Control in Quantum Processors

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Ball, Harrison; Nguyen, Trung; Leong, Philip H. W.; Biercuk, Michael J.

      2016-12-01

      The rapid progress seen in the development of quantum-coherent devices for information processing has motivated serious consideration of quantum computer architecture and organization. One topic which remains open for investigation and optimization relates to the design of the classical-quantum interface, where control operations on individual qubits are applied according to higher-level algorithms; accommodating competing demands on performance and scalability remains a major outstanding challenge. In this work, we present a resource-efficient, scalable framework for the implementation of embedded physical layer classical controllers for quantum-information systems. Design drivers and key functionalities are introduced, leading to the selection of Walsh functions as an effective functional basis for both programing and controller hardware implementation. This approach leverages the simplicity of real-time Walsh-function generation in classical digital hardware, and the fact that a wide variety of physical layer controls, such as dynamic error suppression, are known to fall within the Walsh family. We experimentally implement a real-time field-programmable-gate-array-based Walsh controller producing Walsh timing signals and Walsh-synthesized analog waveforms appropriate for critical tasks in error-resistant quantum control and noise characterization. These demonstrations represent the first step towards a unified framework for the realization of physical layer controls compatible with large-scale quantum-information processing.

    14. Atom and Electron Pump Based on Oscillating Wells: Classical versus Quantum features

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Garner, Joshua; Ruppert, Kevin; Das, Kunal

      2015-05-01

      The transport dynamics of ultracold atoms in quasi one-dimensional (1D) waveguides share much in common with that of electrons and holes in nanowires. In the latter system, biasless transport by time-varying potential, commonly called quantum pumping, has been much researched theoretically as a mechanism that can provide significant control over the current. With scant experimental success, ultracold atoms provide a promising alternate for exploring quantum pumps. Prior studies of quantum pumps have generally focused on using potential barriers as the pump elements. In this study, we undertake a first detailed study of the scattering dynamics involved in using quantum wells to drive the pumping. Specifically, we do a comparative study using quantum, classical and semiclassical picture in a common wavepacket approach that also allows direct comparison of quantum versus classical features. Notably, a static well, unlike a barrier, does not reflect; but oscillating ones do even in the classical limit, and moreover, particles can be trapped in wells indefinitely. Such features lead to distinctive features for well-based pumps that can have both practical and fundamental physics implications. Our study is done in the context of several different pump configurations. Supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1313871 and grants from PASSHE-FPDC and Kutztown University.

    15. Contrasting Classical and Quantum Vacuum States in Non-inertial Frames

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Boyer, Timothy H.

      2013-08-01

      Classical electron theory with classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation (stochastic electrodynamics) is the classical theory which most closely approximates quantum electrodynamics. Indeed, in inertial frames, there is a general connection between classical field theories with classical zero-point radiation and quantum field theories. However, this connection does not extend to noninertial frames where the time parameter is not a geodesic coordinate. Quantum field theory applies the canonical quantization procedure (depending on the local time coordinate) to a mirror-walled box, and, in general, each non-inertial coordinate frame has its own vacuum state. In particular, there is a distinction between the "Minkowski vacuum" for a box at rest in an inertial frame and a "Rindler vacuum" for an accelerating box which has fixed spatial coordinates in an (accelerating) Rindler frame. In complete contrast, the spectrum of random classical zero-point radiation is based upon symmetry principles of relativistic spacetime; in empty space, the correlation functions depend upon only the geodesic separations (and their coordinate derivatives) between the spacetime points. The behavior of classical zero-point radiation in a noninertial frame is found by tensor transformations and still depends only upon the geodesic separations, now expressed in the non-inertial coordinates. It makes no difference whether a box of classical zero-point radiation is gradually or suddenly set into uniform acceleration; the radiation in the interior retains the same correlation function except for small end-point (Casimir) corrections. Thus in classical theory where zero-point radiation is defined in terms of geodesic separations, there is nothing physically comparable to the quantum distinction between the Minkowski and Rindler vacuum states. It is also noted that relativistic classical systems with internal potential energy must be spatially extended and can not be point systems. The

    16. Classical and quantum chaotic angular-momentum pumps.

      PubMed

      Dittrich, T; Dubeibe, F L

      2015-03-06

      We study directed transport of charge and intrinsic angular momentum by periodically driven scattering in the regime of fast and strong driving. A spin-orbit coupling through a kicked magnetic field confined to a compact region in space leads to irregular scattering and triggers spin flips in a spatially asymmetric manner which allows us to generate polarized currents. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the spin separation carry over to the quantum level and give rise to spin pumping. Our theory based on the Floquet formalism is confirmed by numerical solutions of the time-dependent inhomogeneous Schrödinger equation with a continuous source term.

    17. Search for a border between classical and quantum worlds

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Alicki, Robert

      2002-03-01

      The effects of environmental decoherence on a mass-center position of a body consisting of many atoms are studied using a kind of linear quantum Boltzmann equation. It is shown that under realistic laboratory conditions these effects can be essentially eliminated for dust particles containing 1015 atoms. However, the initial velocity distribution and certain geometrical conditions make standard interference-type measurements extremally difficult beyond the nanometer scale. The results are illustrated by the analysis of the recent experiments involving fullerenes. Applications of decoherence effects to precise monitoring of environment or to separation of molecules are suggested.

    18. Classical and quantum aspects of brane-world cosmology

      SciTech Connect

      Cordero, Ruben; Rojas, Efrain

      2011-10-14

      We give a brief overview of several models in brane-world cosmology. In particular, we focus on the asymmetric DGP and Regge-Teiltelboim models. We present the associated equations of motion governing the dynamics of the brane and their corresponding Friedmann-like equations. In order to develop the quantum Regge-Teiltelboim type cosmology we construct its Ostrogradski Hamiltonian formalism which naturally leads to the corresponding Wheeler-DeWitt equation. In addition, we comment on possible generalizations for these models including second order derivative geometrical terms.

    19. Controlling photons in a box and exploring the quantum to classical boundary (Nobel Lecture).

      PubMed

      Haroche, Serge

      2013-09-23

      Microwave photons trapped in a superconducting cavity constitute an ideal system to realize some of the thought experiments imagined by the founding fathers of quantum physics. The interaction of these trapped photons with Rydberg atoms crossing the cavity illustrates fundamental aspects of measurement theory. The experiments performed with this "photon box" at Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS) belong to the domain of quantum optics called "Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics". We have realized the non-destructive counting of photons, the recording of field quantum jumps, the preparation and reconstruction of "Schrödinger cat" states of radiation and the study of their decoherence, which provides a striking illustration of the transition from the quantum to the classical world. These experiments have also led to the demonstration of basic steps in quantum information processing, including the deterministic entanglement of atoms and the realization of quantum gates using atoms and photons as quantum bits. This lecture starts by an introduction stressing the connection between the ENS photon box and the ion trap experiments of David Wineland, whose accompanying lecture recalls his own contribution to the field of single particle control. I give then a personal account of the early days of Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics before describing the main experiments performed at ENS during the last twenty years and concluding by a discussion comparing our work to other researches dealing with the control of single quantum particles.

    20. Absolutely classical spin states

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Giraud, O.; Braun, D.

      2017-01-01

      We introduce the concept of "absolutely classical" spin states, in analogy to absolutely separable states of bipartite quantum systems. Absolutely classical states are states that remain classical (i.e., a convex sum of projectors on coherent states of a spin j ) under any unitary transformation applied to them. We investigate the maximal size of the ball of absolutely classical states centered on the maximally mixed state and derive a lower bound for its radius as a function of the total spin quantum number. We also obtain a numerical estimate of this maximal radius and compare it to the case of absolutely separable states.

    1. Mixing times in quantum walks on two-dimensional grids

      SciTech Connect

      Marquezino, F. L.; Portugal, R.; Abal, G.

      2010-10-15

      Mixing properties of discrete-time quantum walks on two-dimensional grids with toruslike boundary conditions are analyzed, focusing on their connection to the complexity of the corresponding abstract search algorithm. In particular, an exact expression for the stationary distribution of the coherent walk over odd-sided lattices is obtained after solving the eigenproblem for the evolution operator for this particular graph. The limiting distribution and mixing time of a quantum walk with a coin operator modified as in the abstract search algorithm are obtained numerically. On the basis of these results, the relation between the mixing time of the modified walk and the running time of the corresponding abstract search algorithm is discussed.

    2. Quantum to classical transition of inflationary perturbations: Continuous spontaneous localization as a possible mechanism

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Das, Suratna; Lochan, Kinjalk; Sahu, Satyabrata; Singh, T. P.

      2013-10-01

      The inflationary paradigm provides a mechanism to generate the primordial perturbations needed to explain the observed large-scale structures in the Universe. Inflation traces back all the inhomogeneities to quantum fluctuations although the structures look classical today. The squeezing of primordial quantum fluctuations along with the mechanism of decoherence accounts for many aspects of this quantum-to-classical transition, although it remains a matter of debate as to whether this is sufficient to explain the issue of the realization of a single outcome (i.e. the issue of macro-objectification) from a quantum ensemble given that the Universe is a closed system. A similar question of the emergence of classical behavior of macroscopic objects exists also for laboratory systems and apart from decoherence there have been attempts to resolve this issue through continuous spontaneous localization (CSL), which is a stochastic nonlinear modification of the nonrelativistic Schrödinger equation. Recently, Martin et al. have investigated whether a CSL-like mechanism with a constant strength parameter—when the Mukhanov-Sasaki variable is taken as the “collapse operator”—can explain how the primordial quantum perturbations generated during inflation become classical. Within the scope of their assumptions they essentially come to a negative conclusion. In the present work, we generalize their analysis by allowing the CSL strength parameter to depend on physical scales so as to capture the CSL amplification mechanism. We show that such a generalization provides a mechanism for the macro-objectification (i.e. classicalization) of the inflationary quantum perturbations, while also preserving the scale invariance of the power spectrum and the phase coherence of superhorizon perturbation modes in a particular class of these models.

    3. Quantum chaotic scattering in graphene systems in the absence of invariant classical dynamics.

      PubMed

      Wang, Guang-Lei; Ying, Lei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

      2013-05-01

      Quantum chaotic scattering is referred to as the study of quantum behaviors of open Hamiltonian systems that exhibit transient chaos in the classical limit. Traditionally a central issue in this field is how the elements of the scattering matrix or their functions fluctuate as a system parameter, e.g., the electron Fermi energy, is changed. A tacit hypothesis underlying previous works was that the underlying classical phase-space structure remains invariant as the parameter varies, so semiclassical theory can be used to explain various phenomena in quantum chaotic scattering. There are, however, experimental situations where the corresponding classical chaotic dynamics can change characteristically with some physical parameter. Multiple-terminal quantum dots are one such example where, when a magnetic field is present, the classical chaotic-scattering dynamics can change between being nonhyperbolic and being hyperbolic as the Fermi energy is changed continuously. For such systems semiclassical theory is inadequate to account for the characteristics of conductance fluctuations with the Fermi energy. To develop a general framework for quantum chaotic scattering associated with variable classical dynamics, we use multi-terminal graphene quantum-dot systems as a prototypical model. We find that significant conductance fluctuations occur with the Fermi energy even for fixed magnetic field strength, and the characteristics of the fluctuation patterns depend on the energy. We propose and validate that the statistical behaviors of the conductance-fluctuation patterns can be understood by the complex eigenvalue spectrum of the generalized, complex Hamiltonian of the system which includes self-energies resulted from the interactions between the device and the semi-infinite leads. As the Fermi energy is increased, complex eigenvalues with extremely smaller imaginary parts emerge, leading to sharp resonances in the conductance.

    4. Structural transformations and melting in neon clusters: quantum versus classical mechanics.

      PubMed

      Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Meluzzi, Dario; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

      2006-03-24

      The extraordinary complexity of Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters, which exhibit numerous structures and "phases" when their size or temperature is varied, presents a great challenge for accurate numerical simulations, even without accounting for quantum effects. To study the latter, we utilize the variational Gaussian wave packet method in conjunction with the exchange Monte Carlo sampling technique. We show that the quantum nature of neon clusters has a substantial effect on their size-temperature "phase diagrams," particularly the critical parameters of certain structural transformations. We also give a numerical confirmation that none of the nonicosahedral structures observed for some classical LJ clusters are favorable in the quantum case.

    5. Modelling radiation emission in the transition from the classical to the quantum regime

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Martins, J. L.; Vranic, M.; Grismayer, T.; Vieira, J.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

      2016-01-01

      An emissivity formula is derived using the generalised Fermi-Weizäcker-Williams method of virtual photons, which accounts for the recoil the charged particle experiences as it emits radiation. It is found that through this derivation the result obtained by Sokolov et al using QED perturbation theory is recovered. The corrected emissivity formula is applied to nonlinear Thomson scattering scenarios in the transition from the classical to the quantum regime for small values of the nonlinear quantum parameter χ. In addition, signatures of the quantum corrections are identified and explored.

    6. On the Reasonable and Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in Classical and Quantum Physics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Plotnitsky, Arkady

      2011-03-01

      The point of departure for this article is Werner Heisenberg's remark, made in 1929: "It is not surprising that our language [or conceptuality] should be incapable of describing processes occurring within atoms, for … it was invented to describe the experiences of daily life, and these consist only of processes involving exceedingly large numbers of atoms. … Fortunately, mathematics is not subject to this limitation, and it has been possible to invent a mathematical scheme—the quantum theory [quantum mechanics]—which seems entirely adequate for the treatment of atomic processes." The cost of this discovery, at least in Heisenberg's and related interpretations of quantum mechanics (such as that of Niels Bohr), is that, in contrast to classical mechanics, the mathematical scheme in question no longer offers a description, even an idealized one, of quantum objects and processes. This scheme only enables predictions, in general, probabilistic in character, of the outcomes of quantum experiments. As a result, a new type of the relationships between mathematics and physics is established, which, in the language of Eugene Wigner adopted in my title, indeed makes the effectiveness of mathematics unreasonable in quantum but, as I shall explain, not in classical physics. The article discusses these new relationships between mathematics and physics in quantum theory and their implications for theoretical physics—past, present, and future.

    7. Itinerant density wave instabilities at classical and quantum critical points

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Feng, Yejun; van Wezel, Jasper; Wang, Jiyang; Flicker, Felix; Silevitch, D. M.; Littlewood, P. B.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

      2015-10-01

      Charge ordering in metals is a fundamental instability of the electron sea, occurring in a host of materials and often linked to other collective ground states such as superconductivity. What is difficult to parse, however, is whether the charge order originates among the itinerant electrons or whether it arises from the ionic lattice. Here we employ high-resolution X-ray diffraction, combined with high-pressure and low-temperature techniques and theoretical modelling, to trace the evolution of the ordering wavevector Q in charge and spin density wave systems at the approach to both thermal and quantum phase transitions. The non-monotonic behaviour of Q with pressure and the limiting sinusoidal form of the density wave point to the dominant role of the itinerant instability in the vicinity of the critical points, with little influence from the lattice. Fluctuations rather than disorder seem to disrupt coherence.

    8. CMB statistical anisotropies of classical and quantum origins

      SciTech Connect

      Chen, Xingang; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Wang, Yi E-mail: emami@ipm.ir E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

      2015-04-01

      We examine the impact of different anisotropic relics on inflation, in particular the predictions on the density perturbations. These relics can be the source of the large scale anomalies in the cosmic microwave background. There are two different types of background relics, one from the matter sector and the other purely from the metric. Although the angular-dependence of the statistical anisotropy in both cases are degenerate, the scale-dependence are observationally distinctive. In addition, we demonstrate that non-Bunch-Davies vacuum states can extend the statistical anisotropy to much shorter scales, and leave a scale-dependence that is insensitive to the different backgrounds but sensitive to the initial quantum state.

    9. Rise and fall of quantum and classical correlations in open-system dynamics

      SciTech Connect

      Khasin, Michael; Kosloff, Ronnie

      2007-07-15

      Interacting quantum systems evolving from an uncorrelated composite initial state generically develop quantum correlations--entanglement. As a consequence, a local description of interacting quantum systems is impossible as a rule. A unitarily evolving (isolated) quantum system generically develops extensive entanglement: the magnitude of the generated entanglement will increase without bounds with the effective Hilbert space dimension of the system. It is conceivable that coupling of the interacting subsystems to local dephasing environments will restrict the generation of entanglement to such extent that the evolving composite system may be considered as approximately disentangled. This conjecture is addressed in the context of some common models of a bipartite system with linear and nonlinear interactions and local coupling to dephasing environments. Analytical and numerical results obtained imply that the conjecture is generally false. Open dynamics of the quantum correlations is compared to the corresponding evolution of the classical correlations and a qualitative difference is found.

    10. Modelling Systems of Classical/Quantum Identical Particles by Focusing on Algorithms

      ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

      Guastella, Ivan; Fazio, Claudio; Sperandeo-Mineo, Rosa Maria

      2012-01-01

      A procedure modelling ideal classical and quantum gases is discussed. The proposed approach is mainly based on the idea that modelling and algorithm analysis can provide a deeper understanding of particularly complex physical systems. Appropriate representations and physical models able to mimic possible pseudo-mechanisms of functioning and having…

    11. Quantum-Classical Path Integral Simulation of Ferrocene-Ferrocenium Charge Transfer in Liquid Hexane.

      PubMed

      Walters, Peter L; Makri, Nancy

      2015-12-17

      We employ the quantum-classical path integral methodology to simulate the outer sphere charge-transfer process of the ferrocene-ferrocenium pair in liquid hexane with unprecedented accuracy. Comparison of the simulation results to those obtained by mapping the solvent on an effective harmonic bath demonstrates the accuracy of linear response theory in this system.

    12. Quantum mechanics vs local realism near the classical limit:A Bell inequality for spin s

      SciTech Connect

      Mermin, N.D.

      1980-07-15

      The quantitative quantum-mechanical analysis of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment for correlated particles of arbitrary spin s is shown to contradict a generalized form of Bell's inequality, for suitable orientations of the detectors. As the classical (s ..-->.. infinity ) limit is approached, the range of angles for which the contradiction arises vanishes as 1/s.

    13. Classical and quantum theories of proton disorder in hexagonal water ice

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Benton, Owen; Sikora, Olga; Shannon, Nic

      2016-03-01

      It has been known since the pioneering work of Bernal, Fowler, and Pauling that common, hexagonal (Ih) water ice is the archetype of a frustrated material: a proton-bonded network in which protons satisfy strong local constraints (the "ice rules") but do not order. While this proton disorder is well established, there is now a growing body of evidence that quantum effects may also have a role to play in the physics of ice at low temperatures. In this paper, we use a combination of numerical and analytic techniques to explore the nature of proton correlations in both classical and quantum models of ice Ih. In the case of classical ice Ih, we find that the ice rules have two, distinct, consequences for scattering experiments: singular "pinch points," reflecting a zero-divergence condition on the uniform polarization of the crystal, and broad, asymmetric features, coming from its staggered polarization. In the case of the quantum model, we find that the collective quantum tunneling of groups of protons can convert states obeying the ice rules into a quantum liquid, whose excitations are birefringent, emergent photons. We make explicit predictions for scattering experiments on both classical and quantum ice Ih, and show how the quantum theory can explain the "wings" of incoherent inelastic scattering observed in recent neutron scattering experiments [Bove et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 165901 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.165901]. These results raise the intriguing possibility that the protons in ice Ih could form a quantum liquid at low temperatures, in which protons are not merely disordered, but continually fluctuate between different configurations obeying the ice rules.

    14. Spectrum of quantum transfer matrices via classical many-body systems

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Gorsky, A.; Zabrodin, A.; Zotov, A.

      2014-01-01

      In this paper we clarify the relationship between inhomogeneous quantum spin chains and classical integrable many-body systems. It provides an alternative (to the nested Bethe ansatz) method for computation of spectra of the spin chains. Namely, the spectrum of the quantum transfer matrix for the inhomogeneous n -invariant XXX spin chain on N sites with twisted boundary conditions can be found in terms of velocities of particles in the rational N -body Ruijsenaars-Schneider model. The possible values of the velocities are to be found from intersection points of two Lagrangian submanifolds in the phase space of the classical model. One of them is the Lagrangian hyperplane corresponding to fixed coordinates of all N particles and the other one is an N -dimensional Lagrangian submanifold obtained by fixing levels of N classical Hamiltonians in involution. The latter are determined by eigenvalues of the twist matrix. To support this picture, we give a direct proof that the eigenvalues of the Lax matrix for the classical Ruijsenaars-Schneider model, where velocities of particles are substituted by eigenvalues of the spin chain Hamiltonians, calculated through the Bethe equations, coincide with eigenvalues of the twist matrix, with certain multiplicities. We also prove a similar statement for the n Gaudin model with N marked points (on the quantum side) and the Calogero-Moser system with N particles (on the classical side). The realization of the results obtained in terms of branes and supersymmetric gauge theories is also discussed.

    15. Dividing line between quantum and classical trajectories in a measurement problem: Bohmian time constant.

      PubMed

      Nassar, Antonio B; Miret-Artés, Salvador

      2013-10-11

      This Letter proposes an answer to a challenge posed by Bell on the lack of clarity in regards to the dividing line between the quantum and classical regimes in a measurement problem. To this end, a generalized logarithmic nonlinear Schrödinger equation is proposed to describe the time evolution of a quantum dissipative system under continuous measurement. Within the Bohmian mechanics framework, a solution to this equation reveals a novel result: it displays a time constant that should represent the dividing line between the quantum and classical trajectories. It is shown that continuous measurements and damping not only disturb the particle but compel the system to converge in time to a Newtonian regime. While the width of the wave packet may reach a stationary regime, its quantum trajectories converge exponentially in time to classical trajectories. In particular, it is shown that damping tends to suppress further quantum effects on a time scale shorter than the relaxation time of the system. If the initial wave packet width is taken to be equal to 2.8×10(-15) m (the approximate size of an electron), the Bohmian time constant is found to have an upper limit, i.e., τ(Bmax)=10(-26) s.

    16. An efficient monte carlo method for calculating the equilibrium properties for a quantum system coupled strongly to a classical one

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Carmeli, Benny; Metiu, Horia

      1987-02-01

      We calculate the equilibrium properties of a system consisting of two strongly interacting quantum and classical subsystems, by using a fast Fourier transform method to evaluate the quantum contribution and a Monte Carlo method to evaluate the contribution of the classical part. The method is applied to a model relevant to tunneling problems.

    17. Classical electromagnetic fields from quantum sources in heavy-ion collisions

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Holliday, Robert; McCarty, Ryan; Peroutka, Balthazar; Tuchin, Kirill

      2017-01-01

      Electromagnetic fields are generated in high energy nuclear collisions by spectator valence protons. These fields are traditionally computed by integrating the Maxwell equations with point sources. One might expect that such an approach is valid at distances much larger than the proton size and thus such a classical approach should work well for almost the entire interaction region in the case of heavy nuclei. We argue that, in fact, the contrary is true: due to the quantum diffusion of the proton wave function, the classical approximation breaks down at distances of the order of the system size. We compute the electromagnetic field created by a charged particle described initially as a Gaussian wave packet of width 1 fm and evolving in vacuum according to the Klein-Gordon equation. We completely neglect the medium effects. We show that the dynamics, magnitude and even sign of the electromagnetic field created by classical and quantum sources are different.

    18. Nonadditivity of quantum and classical capacities for entanglement breaking multiple-access channels and the butterfly network

      SciTech Connect

      Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Pawel

      2010-06-15

      We analyze quantum network primitives which are entanglement breaking. We show superadditivity of quantum and classical capacity regions for quantum multiple-access channels and the quantum butterfly network. Since the effects are especially visible at high noise they suggest that quantum information effects may be particularly helpful in the case of the networks with occasional high noise rates. The present effects provide a qualitative borderline between superadditivities of bipartite and multipartite systems.

    19. Characterizing correlations with full counting statistics: classical Ising and quantum XY spin chains.

      PubMed

      Ivanov, Dmitri A; Abanov, Alexander G

      2013-02-01

      We propose to describe correlations in classical and quantum systems in terms of full counting statistics of a suitably chosen discrete observable. The method is illustrated with two exactly solvable examples: the classical one-dimensional Ising model and the quantum spin-1/2 XY chain. For the one-dimensional Ising model, our method results in a phase diagram with two phases distinguishable by the long-distance behavior of the Jordan-Wigner strings. For the anisotropic spin-1/2 XY chain in a transverse magnetic field, we compute the full counting statistics of the magnetization and use it to classify quantum phases of the chain. The method, in this case, reproduces the previously known phase diagram. We also discuss the relation between our approach and the Lee-Yang theory of zeros of the partition function.

    20. Multiparty quantum secret sharing of classical messages based on entanglement swapping

      SciTech Connect

      Zhang Zhanjun; Man Zhongxiao

      2005-08-15

      A multiparty quantum secret sharing (QSS) protocol of classical messages (i.e., classical bits) is proposed by using swapping quantum entanglement of Bell states. The secret messages are imposed on Bell states by local unitary operations. The secret messages are split into several parts, and each part is distributed to a separate party so that no action of a subset of all the parties without the cooperation of the entire group is able to read out the secret messages. In addition, dense coding is used in this protocol to achieve a high efficiency. The security of the present multiparty QSS against eavesdropping has been analyzed and confirmed even in a noisy quantum channel.

    1. Quantum and Classical Description of H Atom Under Magnetic Field and Quadrupole Trap Potential

      SciTech Connect

      Mahecha, J.; Salas, J. P.

      2006-12-01

      A discussion regarding the energy levels spectrum of quantum systems whose classical analogous has states of chaotic motion is presented. The chaotic dynamics of the classical underlying system has its manifestation in the wave functions (in the form of 'scars') and in the energy levels (in the form of 'statistical repulsion' of the energy levels). The above mentioned signatures are named 'quantum chaos'. A typical study of quantum chaos requires finding accurate energy eigenvalues of highly excited states, to calculate the nearest neighbors spacing between levels, to perform the 'unfolding' of the spectrum in order to separate the fluctuations, and finally to find the probability distribution of the unfolded spectrum. This is exemplified by the hydrogen atom under uniform magnetic field and a quadrupole electric field.

    2. Resolving the Schwarzschild singularity in both classic and quantum gravity

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zeng, Ding-fang

      2017-04-01

      The Schwarzschild singularity's resolution has key values in cracking the key mysteries related with black holes, the origin of their horizon entropy and the information missing puzzle involved in their evaporations. We provide in this work the general dynamic inner metric of collapsing stars with horizons and with non-trivial radial mass distributions. We find that static central singularities are not the final state of the system. Instead, the final state of the system is a periodically zero-cross breathing ball. Through 3+1 decomposed general relativity and its quantum formulation, we establish a functional Schrödinger equation controlling the micro-state of this breathing ball and show that, the system configuration with all the matter concentrating on the central point is not the unique eigen-energy-density solution. Using a Bohr-Sommerfield like ;orbital; quantisation assumption, we show that for each black hole of horizon radius rh, there are about e rh2/#x2113;pl 2 allowable eigen-energy-density profiles. This naturally leads to physic interpretations for the micro-origin of horizon entropy, as well as solutions to the information missing puzzle involved in Hawking radiations.

    3. Thermodynamics and equilibrium structure of Ne38 cluster: quantum mechanics versus classical.

      PubMed

      Predescu, Cristian; Frantsuzov, Pavel A; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A

      2005-04-15

      The equilibrium properties of classical Lennard-Jones (LJ38) versus quantum Ne38 Lennard-Jones clusters are investigated. The quantum simulations use both the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and the recently developed variational-Gaussian wave packet Monte Carlo (VGW-MC) methods. The PIMC and the classical MC simulations are implemented in the parallel tempering framework. The classical heat capacity Cv(T) curve agrees well with that of Neirotti et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 10340 (2000)], although a much larger confining sphere is used in the present work. The classical Cv(T) shows a peak at about 6 K, interpreted as a solid-liquid transition, and a shoulder at approximately 4 K, attributed to a solid-solid transition involving structures from the global octahedral (Oh) minimum and the main icosahedral (C5v) minimum. The VGW method is used to locate and characterize the low energy states of Ne38, which are then further refined by PIMC calculations. Unlike the classical case, the ground state of Ne38 is a liquidlike structure. Among the several liquidlike states with energies below the two symmetric states (Oh and C5v), the lowest two exhibit strong delocalization over basins associated with at least two classical local minima. Because the symmetric structures do not play an essential role in the thermodynamics of Ne38, the quantum heat capacity is a featureless curve indicative of the absence of any structural transformations. Good agreement between the two methods, VGW and PIMC, is obtained. The present results are also consistent with the predictions by Calvo et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 7312 (2001)] based on the quantum superposition method within the harmonic approximation. However, because of its approximate nature, the latter method leads to an incorrect assignment of the Ne38 ground state as well as to a significant underestimation of the heat capacity.

    4. Quantum and classical optics of dispersive and absorptive structured media

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Bhat, Navin Andrew Rama

      This thesis presents a Hamiltonian formulation of the electromagnetic fields in structured (inhomogeneous) media of arbitrary dimensionality, with arbitrary material dispersion and absorption consistent with causality. The method is based on an identification of the photonic component of the polariton modes of the system. Although the medium degrees of freedom are introduced in an oscillator model, only the macroscopic response of the medium appears in the derived eigenvalue equation for the polaritons. For both the discrete transparent-regime spectrum and the continuous absorptive-regime spectrum, standard codes for photonic modes in nonabsorptive systems can easily be leveraged to calculate polariton modes. Two applications of the theory are presented: pulse propagation and spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC). In the propagation study, the dynamics of the nonfluctuating part of a classical-like pulse are expressed in terms of a Schrodinger equation for a polariton effective field. The complex propagation parameters of that equation can be obtained from the same generalized dispersion surfaces typically used while neglecting absorption, without incurring additional computational complexity. As an example I characterize optical pulse propagation in an Au/MgF 2 metallodielectric stack, using the empirical response function, and elucidate the various roles of Bragg scattering, interband absorption and field expulsion. Further, I derive the Beer coefficient in causal structured media. The SPDC calculation is rigorous, captures the full 3D physics, and properly incorporates linear dispersion. I obtain an expression for the down-converted state, quantify pair-production properties, and characterize the scaling behavior of the SPDC energy. Dispersion affects the normalization of the polariton modes, and calculations of the down-conversion efficiency that neglect this can be off by 100% or more for common media regardless of geometry if the pump is near the band

    5. Quantum error-correcting codes over mixed alphabets

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Wang, Zhuo; Yu, Sixia; Fan, Heng; Oh, C. H.

      2013-08-01

      We study the quantum error-correcting codes over mixed alphabets to deal with a more complicated and practical situation in which the physical systems for encoding may have different numbers of energy levels. In particular we investigate their constructions and propose the theory of quantum Singleton bound. Two kinds of code constructions are presented: a projection-based construction for general case and a graphical construction based on a graph-theoretical object composite coding clique dealing with the case of reducible alphabets. We find out some optimal one-error correcting or detecting codes over two alphabets. Our method of composite coding clique also sheds light on constructing standard quantum error-correcting codes, and other families of optimal codes are found.

    6. Probing the quantumness of channels with mixed states

      SciTech Connect

      Haeseler, Hauke; Luetkenhaus, Norbert

      2009-10-15

      We present an alternative approach to the derivation of benchmarks for quantum channels, such as memory or teleportation channels. Using the concept of effective entanglement and the verification thereof, a testing procedure is derived which demands very few experimental resources. The procedure is generalized by allowing for mixed test states. By constructing optimized measure and reprepare channels, the benchmarks are found to be very tight in the considered experimental regimes.

    7. Quantum-holographic and classical Hopfield-like associative nnets: implications for modeling two cognitive modes of consciousness

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Rakovic, D.; Dugic, M.

      2005-05-01

      Quantum bases of consciousness are considered with psychosomatic implications of three front lines of psychosomatic medicine (hesychastic spirituality, holistic Eastern medicine, and symptomatic Western medicine), as well as cognitive implications of two modes of individual consciousness (quantum-coherent transitional and altered states, and classically reduced normal states) alongside with conditions of transformations of one mode into another (considering consciousness quantum-coherence/classical-decoherence acupuncture system/nervous system interaction, direct and reverse, with and without threshold limits, respectively) - by using theoretical methods of associative neural networks and quantum neural holography combined with quantum decoherence theory.

    8. On the Hamilton-Jacobi method in classical and quantum nonconservative systems

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Dutra, A. de Souza; Correa, R. A. C.; Moraes, P. H. R. S.

      2016-08-01

      In this work we show how to complete some Hamilton-Jacobi solutions of linear, nonconservative classical oscillatory systems which appeared in the literature, and we extend these complete solutions to the quantum mechanical case. In addition, we obtain the solution of the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation for an electric charge in an oscillating pulsing magnetic field. We also argue that for the case where a charged particle is under the action of an oscillating magnetic field, one can apply nuclear magnetic resonance techniques in order to find experimental results regarding this problem. We obtain all results analytically, showing that the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi formalism is a powerful tool to describe quantum mechanics.

    9. A unified approach to quantum and classical TTW systems based on factorizations

      SciTech Connect

      Celeghini, E.; Kuru, Ş.; Negro, J.; Olmo, M.A. del

      2013-05-15

      A unifying method based on factorization properties is introduced for finding symmetries of quantum and classical superintegrable systems using the example of the Tremblay–Turbiner–Winternitz (TTW) model. It is shown that the symmetries of the quantum system can be implemented in a natural way to its classical version. Besides, by this procedure we get also other type of constants of motion depending explicitly on time that allow to find directly the motion of the system whose corresponding trajectories coincide with those obtained previously by using its symmetries. -- Highlights: ► A unified method is given to find symmetries of classical and quantum systems. ► Ladder–shift operators and functions have analog expressions and relations. ► This method is applied to the TTW system to obtain its symmetries. ► For the classical cases a set of time dependent constants of motion are obtained. ► They allow us to find directly the motion and trajectories.

    10. Symmetrical windowing for quantum states in quasi-classical trajectory simulations.

      PubMed

      Cotton, Stephen J; Miller, William H

      2013-08-15

      A microscopically reversible approach toward computing reaction probabilities via classical trajectory simulation has been developed that bins trajectories symmetrically on the basis of their initial and final classical actions. The symmetrical quasi-classical (SQC) approach involves defining a classical action window function centered at integer quantum values of the action, choosing a width parameter that is less than unit quantum width, and applying the window function to both initial reactant and final product vibrational states. Calculations were performed using flat histogram windows and Gaussian windows over a range of width parameters. Use of the Wigner distribution function was also investigated as a possible choice. It was demonstrated for collinear H + H2 reactive scattering on the BKMP2 potential energy surface that reaction probabilities computed via the SQC methodology using a Gaussian window function of 1/2 unit width produces good agreement with quantum mechanical results over the 0.4-0.6 eV energy range relevant to the ground vibrational state to the ground vibrational state reactive transition.

    11. Quantum vs Classical Magnetization Plateaus of S=1/2 Frustrated Heisenberg Chains

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Hida, Kazuo; Affleck, Ian

      2005-06-01

      The competition between quantum and classical magnetization plateaus of S=1/2 frustrated Heisenberg chains with modified exchange couplings is investigated. The conventional S=1/2 frustrated Heisenberg chain is known to exhibit a 3-fold degenerate \\uparrow\\downarrow\\uparrow-type classical plateau at 1/3 of the saturation magnetization accompanied by the spontaneous Z3 translational symmetry breakdown. The stability of this plateau phase against period 3 exchange modulation which favors the \\bullet\\hskip -1pt-\\hskip -1pt\\bullet \\uparrow-type quantum plateau state (\\bullet\\hskip -1pt-\\hskip -1pt\\bullet = singlet dimer) is studied by bosonization, renormalization group and numerical diagonalization methods. The ground state phase diagram and the spin configuration in each phase are numerically determined. The translationally invariant Valence Bond Solid-type model with 4-spin and third neighbor interactions, which has the exact \\bullet\\hskip -1pt-\\hskip -1pt\\bullet \\uparrow-type quantum plateau state, is also presented. The phase transition to the classical \\uparrow\\downarrow\\uparrow-type ground state is also observed by varying the strength of 4-spin and third neighbor interactions. The relation between these two types of models with quantum plateau states is discussed.

    12. Comparisons of electronic transport properties computed via classical and quantum molecular dynamics

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Whitley, Heather; Scullard, Christian; Benedict, Lorin; Desjarlais, Michael; Graziani, Frank; Cimarron Collaboration

      2013-10-01

      We have applied the ddcMD molecular dynamics (MD) code to the computation of the electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity of hydrogen plasmas at several points in phase space. Quantum mechanical effects on the electronic degrees of freedom are incorporated through the use of temperature-dependent statistical potentials. In order to examine the validity of this approach, we make comparisons with results from quantum MD simulations. We find that, while the electrical conductivities computed via classical MD are in reasonably good agreement with the quantum MD calculations, the thermal conductivity computed via classical MD is lower than the quantum MD result by a factor of 2-3. The Lorenz number determined from the classical MD is a factor of 2-3 lower than the Spitzer prediction. Similar discrepancies with Spitzer were also observed by Bernu and Hansen. LLNL-ABS-640881 This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

    13. Classical geometry to quantum behavior correspondence in a virtual extra dimension

      SciTech Connect

      Dolce, Donatello

      2012-09-15

      In the Lorentz invariant formalism of compact space-time dimensions the assumption of periodic boundary conditions represents a consistent semi-classical quantization condition for relativistic fields. In Dolce (2011) we have shown, for instance, that the ordinary Feynman path integral is obtained from the interference between the classical paths with different winding numbers associated with the cyclic dynamics of the field solutions. By means of the boundary conditions, the kinematical information of interactions can be encoded on the relativistic geometrodynamics of the boundary, see Dolce (2012) . Furthermore, such a purely four-dimensional theory is manifestly dual to an extra-dimensional field theory. The resulting correspondence between extra-dimensional geometrodynamics and ordinary quantum behavior can be interpreted in terms of AdS/CFT correspondence. By applying this approach to a simple Quark-Gluon-Plasma freeze-out model we obtain fundamental analogies with basic aspects of AdS/QCD phenomenology. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum behavior is related to the intrinsic periodicity of isolated systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A periodic phenomenon can be parameterized by a virtual extra dimension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer KK modes are used to describe the quantum excitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 5D classical geometry encodes 4D quantum behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Geometrodynamical description of AdS/QCD as modulation of space-time periodicity.

    14. Niels Bohr on the wave function and the classical/quantum divide

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Zinkernagel, Henrik

      2016-02-01

      It is well known that Niels Bohr insisted on the necessity of classical concepts in the account of quantum phenomena. But there is little consensus concerning his reasons, and what he exactly meant by this. In this paper, I re-examine Bohr's interpretation of quantum mechanics, and argue that the necessity of the classical can be seen as part of his response to the measurement problem. More generally, I attempt to clarify Bohr's view on the classical/quantum divide, arguing that the relation between the two theories is that of mutual dependence. An important element in this clarification consists in distinguishing Bohr's idea of the wave function as symbolic from both a purely epistemic and an ontological interpretation. Together with new evidence concerning Bohr's conception of the wave function collapse, this sets his interpretation apart from both standard versions of the Copenhagen interpretation, and from some of the reconstructions of his view found in the literature. I conclude with a few remarks on how Bohr's ideas make much sense also when modern developments in quantum gravity and early universe cosmology are taken into account.

    15. Shortcuts to adiabaticity in classical and quantum processes for scale-invariant driving

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Deffner, Sebastian; Jarzynski, Christopher; Del Campo, Adolfo

      2014-03-01

      All real physical processes in classical as well as in quantum devices operate in finite-time. For most applications, however, adiabatic, i.e. infinitely-slow processes, are more favorable, as these do not cause unwanted, parasitic excitations. A shortcut to adiabaticity is a driving protocol which reproduces in a short time the same final state that would result from an adiabatic process. A particular powerful technique to engineer such shortcuts is transitionless quantum driving by means of counterdiabatic fields. However, determining closed form expressions for the counterdiabatic field has generally proven to be a daunting task. In this paper, we introduce a novel approach, with which we find the explicit form of the counterdiabatic driving field in arbitrary scale-invariant dynamical processes, encompassing expansions and transport. Our approach originates in the formalism of generating functions, and unifies previous approaches independently developed for classical and quantum systems. We show how this new approach allows to design shortcuts to adiabaticity for a large class of classical and quantum, single-particle, non-linear, and many-body systems. SD and CJ acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation (USA) under grant DMR-1206971. This research is further supported by the U.S Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program and a LANL J. Robert Oppenheimer fellowship (AdC).

    16. Classical and quantum dynamics of a perfect fluid scalar-energy dependent metric cosmology

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Khodadi, M.; Nozari, K.; Vakili, B.

      2016-05-01

      Inspired from the idea of minimally coupling of a real scalar field to geometry, we investigate the classical and quantum models of a flat energy-dependent FRW cosmology coupled to a perfect fluid in the framework of the scalar-rainbow metric gravity. We use the standard Schutz' representation for the perfect fluid and show that under a particular energy-dependent gauge fixing, it may lead to the identification of a time parameter for the corresponding dynamical system. It is shown that, under some circumstances on the minisuperspace prob energy, the classical evolution of the of the universe represents a late time expansion coming from a bounce instead of the big-bang singularity. Then we go forward by showing that this formalism gives rise to a Schrödinger-Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the quantum-mechanical description of the model under consideration, the eigenfunctions of which can be used to construct the wave function of the universe. We use the resulting wave function in order to investigate the possibility of the avoidance of classical singularities due to quantum effects by means of the many-worlds and Bohmian interpretation of quantum cosmology.

    17. The Loschmidt echo in classically chaotic systems: Quantum chaos, irreversibility and decoherence

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Cucchietti, Fernando M.

      2004-10-01

      The Loschmidt echo (LE) is a measure of the sensitivity of quantum mechanics to perturbations in the evolution operator. It is defined as the overlap of two wave functions evolved from the same initial state but with slightly different Hamiltonians. Thus, it also serves as a quantification of irreversibility in quantum mechanics. In this thesis the LE is studied in systems that have a classical counterpart with dynamical instability, that is, classically chaotic. An analytical treatment that makes use of the semiclassical approximation is presented. It is shown that, under certain regime of the parameters, the LE decays exponentially. Furthermore, for strong enough perturbations, the decay rate is given by the Lyapunov exponent of the classical system. Some particularly interesting examples are given. The analytical results are supported by thorough numerical studies. In addition, some regimes not accessible to the theory are explored, showing that the LE and its Lyapunov regime present the same form of universality ascribed to classical chaos. In a sense, this is evidence that the LE is a robust temporal signature of chaos in the quantum realm. Finally, the relation between the LE and the quantum to classical transition is explored, in particular with the theory of decoherence. Using two different approaches, a semiclassical approximation to Wigner functions and a master equation for the LE, it is shown that the decoherence rate and the decay rate of the LE are equal. The relationship between these quantities results mutually beneficial, in terms of the broader resources of decoherence theory and of the possible experimental realization of the LE.

    18. Quantum partition functions from classical distributions: Application to rare-gas clusters

      NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

      Calvo, F.; Doye, J. P. K.; Wales, D. J.

      2001-05-01

      We investigate the thermodynamic behavior of quantum many-body systems using several methods based on classical calculations. These approaches are compared for the melting of Lennard-Jones (LJ) clusters, where path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) results are also available. First, we examine two quasiclassical approaches where the classical potential is replaced by effective potentials accounting for quantum corrections of low order in ℏ. Of the Wigner-Kirkwood and Feynman-Hibbs effective potentials, only the latter is found to be in quantitative agreement with quantum simulations. However, both potentials fail to describe even qualitatively the low-temperature regime, where quantum effects are strong. Our second approach is based on the harmonic superposition approximation, but with explicit quantum oscillators. In its basic form, this approach is in good qualitative agreement with PIMC results, and becomes more accurate at low temperatures. By including anharmonic corrections in the form of temperature-dependent frequency shifts, the agreement between the quantum superposition and the PIMC results becomes quantitative for the caloric curve of neon clusters. The superposition method is then applied to larger clusters to study the influence of quantum delocalization on the melting and premelting of LJ19, LJ31, LJ38, and LJ55. The quantum character strongly affects the thermodynamics via changes in the ground state structure due to increasing zero-point energies. Finally, we focus on the lowest temperature range, and we estimate the Debye temperatures of argon clusters and their size variation. A strong sensitivity to the cluster structure is found, especially when many surface atoms reorganize as in the anti-Mackay/Mackay transition. In the large size regime, the Debye temperature smoothly rises to its bulk limit, but still depends slightly on the growth sequence considered.

    19. Ice and water droplets on graphite: A comparison of quantum and classical simulations

      SciTech Connect

      Ramírez, Rafael; Singh, Jayant K.; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C.

      2014-11-28

      Ice and water droplets on graphite have been studied by quantum path integral and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The point-charge q-TIP4P/F potential was used to model the interaction between flexible water molecules, while the water-graphite interaction was described by a Lennard-Jones potential previously used to reproduce the macroscopic contact angle of water droplets on graphite. Several energetic and structural properties of water droplets with sizes between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} molecules were analyzed in a temperature interval of 50–350 K. The vibrational density of states of crystalline and amorphous ice drops was correlated to the one of ice Ih to assess the influence of the droplet interface and molecular disorder on the vibrational properties. The average distance of covalent OH bonds is found 0.01 Å larger in the quantum limit than in the classical one. The OO distances are elongated by 0.03 Å in the quantum simulations at 50 K. Bond distance fluctuations are large as a consequence of the zero-point vibrations. The analysis of the H-bond network shows that the liquid droplet is more structured in the classical limit than in the quantum case. The average kinetic and potential energy of the ice and water droplets on graphite has been compared with the values of ice Ih and liquid water as a function of temperature. The droplet kinetic energy shows a temperature dependence similar to the one of liquid water, without apparent discontinuity at temperatures where the droplet is solid. However, the droplet potential energy becomes significantly larger than the one of ice or water at the same temperature. In the quantum limit, the ice droplet is more expanded than in a classical description. Liquid droplets display identical density profiles and liquid-vapor interfaces in the quantum and classical limits. The value of the contact angle is not influenced by quantum effects. Contact angles of droplets decrease as the size of the water droplet

    20. Exact, E = 0, classical and quantum solutions for general power-law oscillators

      NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

      Nieto, Michael Martin; Daboul, Jamil

      1995-01-01

      For zero energy, E = 0, we derive exact, classical and quantum solutions for all power-law oscillators with potentials V(r) = -gamma/r(exp nu), gamma greater than 0 and -infinity less than nu less than infinity. When the angular momentum is non-zero, these solutions lead to the classical orbits (p(t) = (cos mu(phi(t) - phi(sub 0)t))(exp 1/mu) with mu = nu/2 - 1 does not equal 0. For nu greater than 2, the orbits are bound and go through the origin. We calculate the periods and precessions of these bound orbits, and graph a number of specific examples. The unbound orbits are also discussed in detail. Quantum mechanically, this system is also exactly solvable. We find that when nu is greater than 2 the solutions are normalizable (bound), as in the classical case. Further, there are normalizable discrete, yet unbound, states. They correspond to unbound classical particles which reach infinity in a finite time. Finally, the number of space dimensions of the system can determine whether or not an E = 0 state is bound. These and other interesting comparisons to the classical system will be discussed.