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Sample records for mixed water-borne volatile

  1. Using a biological aerated filter to treat mixed water-borne volatile organic compounds and assessing its emissions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Hsi

    2009-01-01

    A biological aerated filter (BAF) was evaluated as a fixed-biofilm process to remove water-borne volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a multiple layer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) manufacturing plant in southern Taiwan. The components of VOC were identified to be toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, bromodichloromethane and isopropanol (IPA). The full-scale BAF was constructed of two separate reactors in series, respectively, using 10- and 15-cm diameter polypropylene balls as the packing materials and a successful preliminary bench-scale experiment was performed to feasibility. Experimental results show that the BAF removed over 90% chemical oxygen demand (COD) from the influent with (1188 +/- 605) mg/L of COD. A total organic loading of 2.76 kg biochemical oxygen demand (BOD)/(m3 packing x d) was determined for the packed bed, in which the flow pattern approached that of a mixed flow. A limited VOC concentration of (0.97 +/- 0.29) ppmv (as methane) was emitted from the BAF system. Moreover, the emission rate of VOC was calculated using the proposed formula, based on an air-water mass equilibrium relationship, and compared to the simulated results obtained using the Water 9 model. Both estimation approaches of calculation and model simulation revealed that 0.1% IPA (0.0031-0.0037 kg/d) were aerated into a gaseous phase, and 30% to 40% (0.006-0.008 kg/d) of the toluene were aerated.

  2. Volatility and mixing states of ultrafine particles from biomass burning.

    PubMed

    Maruf Hossain, A M M; Park, Seungho; Kim, Jae-Seok; Park, Kihong

    2012-02-29

    Fine and ultrafine carbonaceous aerosols produced from burning biomasses hold enormous importance in terms of assessing radiation balance and public health hazards. As such, volatility and mixing states of size-selected ultrafine particles (UFP) emitted from rice straw, oak, and pine burning were investigated by using volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) technique in this study. Rice straw combustion produced unimodal size distributions of emitted aerosols, while bimodal size distributions from combustions of oak (hardwood) and pine (softwood) were obtained. A nearness of flue gas temperatures and a lower CO ratio of flaming combustion (FC) to smoldering combustion (SC) were characteristic differences found between softwood and hardwood. SC emitted larger mode particles in higher numbers than smaller mode particles, while the converse was true for FC. Rice straw open burning UFPs exhibited a volatilization behavior similar to that between FC and SC. In addition, internal mixing states were observed for size-selected UFPs in all biomasses for all combustion conditions, while external mixing states were only observed for rice straw combustion. Results for FC and open burning suggested there was an internal mixing of volatile organic carbon (OC) and non-volatile core (e.g., black carbon (BC)), while the SC in rice straw produced UFPs devoid of non-volatile core. Also, it was found that volatility of constituting OC in FC and SC particles was different. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bubble Nucleation in Rhyolitic Magmas Saturated With Mixed Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, J. E.; Webster, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    There is ample evidence that many, if not most, intermediate to evolved magmas (andesites to rhyolites) are saturated at depth with vapor that consists of water and lesser amounts of carbon dioxide and other volatiles. When such magmas erupt, it is generally assumed that bubble formation and degassing is driven by the exsolution of water, which occurs because its solubility decreases with lower pressure. Water solubility changes, however, when other gas species are present, and so the presence of other volatiles may also impact the kinetics of forming water-rich bubbles. Indeed, there is evidence that suggests that bubble nucleation may be easier in rhyolitic melts that contain dissolved water and carbon dioxide, compared to purely hydrous rhyolitic melts. It is not clear, however, if the ease of nucleation results from a lower surface tension (σ) between water bubbles and their host melt. To examine the impact of mixed H2O-CO2 on bubble nucleation, we are carrying out decompression experiments on rhyolitic melts. In one set of experiments, we hydrated high-silica rhyolite with ~5 wt.% water at 160 MPa and 875° C, producing super-liquidus melts that nucleate bubbles homogeneously when decompressions (ΔP) exceed ~105 MPa (equal to starting pressure minus final pressure). Those results indicate that σ for such melt is ~0.9 J m-1, comparable to previous studies on water-bearing rhyolitic melts that lack CO2. In a second set, we hydrated samples of the same rhyolite with 5 wt.% water, but then ran them again at 1000° C and 300 MPa to equilibrate melts with a mixed water-carbon dioxide fluid (mole fraction of water equal to ~0.6). The two-step hydration-carbonation allows non-vesicular melts to homogenize in relatively short time periods. The results are super-liquidus rhyolites that contain ~5 wt.% water and 700-750 ppm CO2. Preliminary decompressions at 875° C using the mixed-volatile rhyolite indicate that homogeneous nucleation is triggered when ΔP exceeds

  4. Volatility of mixed atmospheric humic-like substances and ammonium sulfate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Wei; Hong, Juan; Häme, Silja A. K.; Ding, Aijun; Li, Yugen; Yan, Chao; Hao, Liqing; Mikkilä, Jyri; Zheng, Longfei; Xie, Yuning; Zhu, Caijun; Xu, Zheng; Chi, Xuguang; Huang, Xin; Zhou, Yang; Lin, Peng; Virtanen, Annele; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku; Ehn, Mikael; Yu, Jianzhen; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Petäjä, Tuukka

    2017-03-01

    The volatility of organic aerosols remains poorly understood due to the complexity of speciation and multiphase processes. In this study, we extracted humic-like substances (HULIS) from four atmospheric aerosol samples collected at the SORPES station in Nanjing, eastern China, and investigated the volatility behavior of particles at different sizes using a Volatility Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (VTDMA). In spite of the large differences in particle mass concentrations, the extracted HULIS from the four samples all revealed very high-oxidation states (O : C > 0.95), indicating secondary formation as the major source of HULIS in Yangtze River Delta (YRD). An overall low volatility was identified for the extracted HULIS, with the volume fraction remaining (VFR) higher than 55 % for all the regenerated HULIS particles at the temperature of 280 °C. A kinetic mass transfer model was applied to the thermodenuder (TD) data to interpret the observed evaporation pattern of HULIS, and to derive the mass fractions of semi-volatile (SVOC), low-volatility (LVOC) and extremely low-volatility components (ELVOC). The results showed that LVOC and ELVOC dominated (more than 80 %) the total volume of HULIS. Atomizing processes led to a size-dependent evaporation of regenerated HULIS particles, and resulted in more ELVOC in smaller particles. In order to understand the role of interaction between inorganic salts and atmospheric organic mixtures in the volatility of an organic aerosol, the evaporation of mixed samples of ammonium sulfate (AS) and HULIS was measured. The results showed a significant but nonlinear influence of ammonium sulfate on the volatility of HULIS. The estimated fraction of ELVOC in the organic part of the largest particles (145 nm) increased from 26 %, in pure HULIS samples, to 93 % in 1 : 3 (mass ratio of HULIS : AS) mixed samples, to 45 % in 2 : 2 mixed samples, and to 70 % in 3 : 1 mixed samples, suggesting that the interaction with ammonium sulfate

  5. Parasitic food-borne and water-borne zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, C N; Gottstein, B; Geerts, S

    2000-04-01

    Estimates suggest that almost half of the population of the world is affected by water-borne and food-borne infections. Parasitic food-borne and water-borne zoonoses contribute to this statistic by inflicting a heavy toll on human health and causing serious direct and indirect losses to the agricultural industry. The inability of non-industrialised countries to keep pace with population growth, migration from rural to urban areas and the demand for clean, safe drinking water and proper sanitation means that water-borne zoonoses will continue to exact an increasing burden of ill health in these countries. The consumption of raw or undercooked meat, crustaceans, and fresh-water fish and vegetables facilitates transmission of large numbers of zoonotic infections. The burgeoning tourist industry, emigration and the importation of food from endemic regions has resulted in increasing diagnosis of these infections in non-endemic countries. The authors examine the epidemiology, medical and veterinary public health importance and recent developments in diagnosis, treatment and control of the most important parasitic food-borne and water-borne infections.

  6. Volatile Changes in Magma Related to Magma Evolution: Influences From Magma Mixing, Crustal Assimilation, and Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa-Ceballos, G.; Gardner, J.

    2008-12-01

    The volatile budget of magma is the cumulative product of magma mixing, crustal assimilation, and crystallization, with the concentration of each volatile resulting from how much is added by each process and whether the magma is gas saturate. In order to clarify how volatile budgets fluctuate during magma evolution, we are measuring volatile concentrations in melt inclusions trapped within individual zones of plagioclase crystals from different dacitic Plinian eruptions and a recent small-scale explosion of Popocatépetl Volcano. The plagioclase zones were analyzed for their anorthite (An) composition and their Sr isotopic (87Sr/86Sr) composition in order to investigate the evolutionary processes responsible for crystal growth and their relation to volatile concentrations measured in the melt inclusions. In general, plagioclase from all eruptions display three different correlations between An content and Sr isotopes, with each recording different conditions under which crystals grew. Some crystals have nearly constant 87Sr/86Sr compositions from core to rim with either variable An compositions or a continuous decrease in An, suggesting these crystals were affected only by crystallization and, in some cases, thermal fluctuations. Other crystals display anti-correlations between An and Sr isotopes, which record mass inputs into the system from either magma mixing or crustal assimilation. Single crystals record a variety of processes during their growth, and single pumices contain an extremely heterogeneous population of such crystals, suggesting that the magma system is highly dynamic. Our preliminary results show that water can vary by several weight percent and carbon dioxide by hundreds of ppm between different zones of individual crystals. Interestingly, we find that inclusions related to recharge events by hotter, more primitive magma are more hydrous than those related to assimilation of more radiogenic wall rock. This suggests that the volatile budget of

  7. 40 CFR 429.70 - Applicability; description of the wood preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... treatment processes employing water borne inorganic salts. ... preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory. 429.70 Section 429.70 Protection of Environment... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Preserving-Water Borne or Nonpressure Subcategory § 429.70...

  8. Corrosion-Prevention Capabilities of a Water-Borne, Silicone-Based, Primerless Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; MacDowell, Louis G.; Vinje, Rubie D.

    2005-01-01

    Comparative tests have been performed to evaluate the corrosion-prevention capabilities of an experimental paint of the type described in Water-Borne, Silicone-Based, Primerless Paints, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 26, No. 11 (November 2002), page 30. To recapitulate: these paints contain relatively small amounts of volatile organic solvents and were developed as substitutes for traditional anticorrosion paints that contain large amounts of such solvents. An additional desirable feature of these paints is that they can be applied without need for prior application of primers to ensure adhesion. The test specimens included panels of cold-rolled steel, stainless steel 316, and aluminum 2024-T3. Some panels of each of these alloys were left bare and some were coated with the experimental water-borne, silicone-based, primerless paint. In addition, some panels of aluminum 2024-T3 and some panels of a fourth alloy (stainless steel 304) were coated with a commercial solvent-borne paint containing aluminum and zinc flakes in a nitrile rubber matrix. In the tests, the specimens were immersed in an aerated 3.5-weight-percent aqueous solution of NaCl for 168 hours. At intervals of 24 hours, the specimens were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and measurements of corrosion potentials. The specimens were also observed visually. As indicated by photographs of specimens taken after the 168-hour immersion (see figure), the experimental primerless silicone paint was effective in preventing corrosion of stainless steel 316, but failed to protect aluminum 2024-T3 and cold-rolled steel. The degree of failure was greater in the case of the cold-rolled steel. On the basis of visual observations, EIS, and corrosion- potential measurements, it was concluded that the commercial aluminum and zinc-filled nitrile rubber coating affords superior corrosion protection to aluminum 2024-T3 and is somewhat less effective in protecting stainless steel 304.

  9. Mixing, volatile loss and compositional change during impact-driven accretion of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Alex N

    2004-02-05

    The degree to which efficient mixing of new material or losses of earlier accreted material to space characterize the growth of Earth-like planets is poorly constrained and probably changed with time. These processes can be studied by parallel modelling of data from different radiogenic isotope systems. The tungsten isotope composition of the silicate Earth yields a model timescale for accretion that is faster than current estimates based on terrestrial lead and xenon isotope data and strontium, tungsten and lead data for lunar samples. A probable explanation for this is that impacting core material did not always mix efficiently with the silicate portions of the Earth before being added to the Earth's core. Furthermore, tungsten and strontium isotope compositions of lunar samples provide evidence that the Moon-forming impacting protoplanet Theia was probably more like Mars, with a volatile-rich, oxidized mantle. Impact-driven erosion was probably a significant contributor to the variations in moderately volatile element abundance and oxidation found among the terrestrial planets.

  10. Latex-like water-borne polyaniline for coating applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Clark, R.; Yang, S.C.

    1998-07-01

    The authors report the synthesis of a polymeric complex of polyaniline that is dispersed in water as a stable suspension. The polymer, PAN:PVME-MLA, is a molecular complex of polyaniline and poly(vinylmethylether-co-maleic acid). The synthetic process leads to a stable latex-like suspension in water. The water-borne conducting polymer, once dried as a thin film on a substrate, is not dissolvable by water or other solvents. An example of piece-dyeing process is presented to show its potential for electrostatic dissipation of textile products. Another example illustrates that the material may be used as electroactive thin-films for electrochromic windows and for rechargeable battery applications.

  11. Volatile organic compound mixing ratios above Beijing in November and December 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, William; Shaw, Marvin; Huang, Zhonghui; Wang, Zhaoyi; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Yanli; Davison, Brian; Langford, Ben; Mullinger, Neil; Nemitz, Eiko; Fu, Pingqing; Squires, Freya; Carpenter, Lucy; Lewis, Alastair; Hewitt, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted into the atmosphere from vegetation and anthropogenic sources such as fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and the evaporation of petroleum products. These compounds play an important role in the chemistry of the lower atmosphere through secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation and facilitating the formation of tropospheric ozone. As well as their indirect impact on human health via the formation of ozone and SOA, some VOCs, including benzene, directly affect human health adversely. Here we report VOC mixing ratios measured in Beijing during a 5 week intensive field campaign from the 7th November to the 10th December 2016. This work was carried out as part of the Sources and Emissions of Air Pollutants in Beijing (AIRPOLL-Beijing) work project within the Air Pollution and Human Health in a Developing Megacity (APHH-Beijing) research programme. APHH is a large multi-institutional study which aims to record the concentrations and identify the sources of urban air pollutants in Beijing, determine exposure, understand their effects on human health, and to identify solutions. VOC mixing ratios were recorded using a Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS, Ionicon Analytik) and a Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrometer (SIFT-MS, SYFT Technologies). During the measurement period Beijing was subject to multiple pollution events that alternated with periods of relatively good air quality, allowing the VOCs within the polluted air masses to be identified and quantified. VOCs were sampled at 102 m with additional gradient measurements made at 3, 15, 32 and 64 m providing a vertical profile of VOC mixing ratios. Mixing ratios of methanol, acetonitrile, acetaldehyde, acetone, isoprene and aromatics species will be reported together with a discussion of potential sources. Comparisons will then be drawn with other large cities.

  12. Profile of volatile compounds during papaya juice fermentation by a mixed culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Williopsis saturnus.

    PubMed

    Lee, P-R; Ong, Y-L; Yu, B; Curran, P; Liu, S-Q

    2010-10-01

    This study investigated the formation and utilization of volatile compounds during papaya juice fermentation by a mixed culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Williopsis saturnus. Time-course papaya juice fermentations were carried out using pure cultures of S. cerevisiae var. bayanus R2 and W. saturnus var. mrakii NCYC2251 and a mixed culture of the two yeasts at a ratio of 1:1000 (R2:NCYC2251). Changes in S. cerevisiae cell population, Brix, sugar consumption and pH were similar in the mixed culture and in the S. cerevisiae monoculture. There was an early growth arrest of W. saturnus in the mixed culture fermentation. A range of volatile compounds were produced during fermentation including fatty acids, alcohols, aldehydes and esters and some volatile compounds including those initially present in the juice were utilized. The mixed culture fermentation of S. cerevisiae and W. saturnus benefited from the presence of both yeasts, with more esters being produced than the S. cerevisiae monoculture and more alcohols being formed than the W. saturnus monoculture. The study suggests that papaya juice fermentation with a mixed culture of S. cerevisiae and W. saturnus may be able to result in the formation of more complex aroma compounds and higher ethanol level than those using single yeasts. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic nitrates above a mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, K. A.; Mielke, L. H.; Shepson, P. B.; Bryan, A. M.; Steiner, A. L.; Ortega, J.; Daly, R.; Helmig, D.; Vogel, C. S.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Alaghmand, M.

    2012-07-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can react in the atmosphere to form organic nitrates, which serve as NOx (NO + NO2) reservoirs, impacting ozone and secondary organic aerosol production, the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and nitrogen availability to ecosystems. To examine the contributions of biogenic emissions and the formation and fate of organic nitrates in a forest environment, we simulated the oxidation of 57 individual BVOCs emitted from a rural mixed forest in Northern Michigan. Of the total simulated organic nitrates, monoterpenes contributed ~70% in the early morning at ~12 m above the forest canopy when isoprene emissions were low. In the afternoon, when vertical mixing and isoprene nitrate production were highest, the simulated contribution of isoprene-derived organic nitrates was greater than 90% at all altitudes, with the concentration of secondary isoprene nitrates increasing with altitude. Key BVOC-oxidant reactions were identified for future laboratory and field investigations into reaction rate constants, yields, and speciation of oxidation products. Forest succession, wherein aspen trees are being replaced by pine and maple trees, was predicted to lead to increased afternoon concentrations of monoterpene-derived organic nitrates. This further underscores the need to understand the formation and fate of these species, which have different chemical pathways and oxidation products compared to isoprene-derived organic nitrates and can lead to secondary organic aerosol formation.

  14. Volatility Properties of Internally- and Externally-Mixed Ambient Aerosols at an Anthropogenically-influenced Forest Site in Southeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlystov, A.; Subramanian, R.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic sources has a significant contribution to ambient aerosol loadings in Southeastern USA and thus contributes to adverse health effects of air pollution and influences regional and global climate. Volatility properties of biogenic SOA determine its concentration, reactivity, and lifetime, but are still largely unknown. As part of a larger study to assess the effect of biogenic SOA on aerosol optical properties, a set of instruments, including scanning mobility sizers (SMPS), single particle soot photometer (SP2), and a thermodenuder, was deployed during June 2015 at a Duke Forest site near Chapel Hill, NC. The site is characterized by a significant contribution of both biogenic and urban (mostly traffic) sources. Measurements of changes in aerosol volume and optical size upon heating in the thermodenuder at different temperatures are used to derive volatility properties of the ambient aerosol. A limited set of experiments was carried out using the tandem differential mobility analysis (TDMA) approach to investigate whether the ambient aerosol at the Duke Forest site is internally mixed with respect to its volatility properties. In this presentation we will discuss equilibrium and kinetic aspects of aerosol volatility observed during this study and implications of external vs. internal mixing for derivation of bulk volatility properties of ambient aerosol.

  15. Volatile organic compound emission rates from mixed deciduous and coniferous forests in Northern Wisconsin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isebrands, J. G.; Guenther, A. B.; Harley, P.; Helmig, D.; Klinger, L.; Vierling, L.; Zimmerman, P.; Geron, C.

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regions of the world to understand regional and global impacts and to implement possible mitigation strategies. The mixed deciduous and coniferous forests of northern Wisconsin, USA, were predicted to have significant VOC emission rates because they are comprised of many genera (i.e. Picea, Populus, Quercus, Salix) known to be high VOC emitters. In July 1993, a study was conducted on the Chequamegon National Forest near Rhinelander, WI, to identify and quantify VOC emitted from major trees, shrubs, and understory herbs in the mixed northern forests of this region. Emission rates were measured at various scales - at the leaf level with cuvettes, the branch level with branch enclosures, the canopy level with a tower based system, and the landscape level with a tethered balloon air sampling system. Area-average emission rates were estimated by scaling, using biomass densities and species composition along transects representative of the study site. Isoprene (C 5H 8) was the primary VOC emitted, although significant quantities of monoterpenes (C 10H 16) were also emitted. The highest emission rates of isoprene (at 30°C and photosynthetically active radiation of 1000 μmol m -2 s -1) were from northern red oak ( Quercus rubra, >110 μg(C) g -1 h -1); aspen ( Populus tremuloides, >77); willow ( Salix spp., >54); and black spruce ( Picea mariana, >10). Emission rates of hybrid poplar clones ranged from 40 to 90 μg(C) g -1 h -1 at 25°C; those of Picea provenances were generally <10, and emission rates of a hybrid between North American and European spruces were intermediate to parental rates. More than 30 species of plants were surveyed from the sites, including several from previously unstudied

  16. Contributions of individual reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds to organic nitrates above a mixed forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, K. A.; Mielke, L. H.; Shepson, P. B.; Bryan, A. M.; Steiner, A. L.; Ortega, J.; Daly, R.; Helmig, D.; Vogel, C. S.; Griffith, S.; Dusanter, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Alaghmand, M.

    2012-11-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can react in the atmosphere to form organic nitrates, which serve as NOx (NO + NO2) reservoirs, impacting ozone and secondary organic aerosol production, the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, and nitrogen availability to ecosystems. To examine the contributions of biogenic emissions and the formation and fate of organic nitrates in a forest environment, we simulated the oxidation of 57 individual BVOCs emitted from a rural mixed forest in northern Michigan. Key BVOC-oxidant reactions were identified for future laboratory and field investigations into reaction rate constants, yields, and speciation of oxidation products. Of the total simulated organic nitrates, monoterpenes contributed ~70% in the early morning at ~12 m above the forest canopy when isoprene emissions were low. In the afternoon, when vertical mixing and isoprene nitrate production were highest, the simulated contribution of isoprene-derived organic nitrates was greater than 90% at all altitudes, with the concentration of secondary isoprene nitrates increasing with altitude. Notably, reaction of isoprene with NO3 leading to isoprene nitrate formation was found to be significant (~8% of primary organic nitrate production) during the daytime, and monoterpene reactions with NO3 were simulated to comprise up to ~83% of primary organic nitrate production at night. Lastly, forest succession, wherein aspen trees are being replaced by pine and maple trees, was predicted to lead to increased afternoon concentrations of monoterpene-derived organic nitrates. This further underscores the need to understand the formation and fate of these species, which have different chemical pathways and oxidation products compared to isoprene-derived organic nitrates and can lead to secondary organic aerosol formation.

  17. Volatile Compounds Originating from Mixed Microbial Cultures on Building Materials under Various Humidity Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Korpi, Anne; Pasanen, Anna-Liisa; Pasanen, Pertti

    1998-01-01

    We examined growth of mixed microbial cultures (13 fungal species and one actinomycete species) and production of volatile compounds (VOCs) in typical building materials in outside walls, separating walls, and bathroom floors at various relative humidities (RHs) of air. Air samples from incubation chambers were adsorbed on Tenax TA and dinitrophenylhydrazine cartridges and were analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Metabolic activity was measured by determining CO2 production, and microbial concentrations were determined by a dilution plate method. At 80 to 82% RH, CO2 production did not indicate that microbial activity occurred, and only 10% of the spores germinated, while slight increases in the concentrations of some VOCs were detected. All of the parameters showed that microbial activity occurred at 90 to 99% RH. The microbiological analyses revealed weak microbial growth even under drying conditions (32 to 33% RH). The main VOCs produced on the building materials studied were 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octen-3-ol. In some cases fungal growth decreased aldehyde emissions. We found that various VOCs accompany microbial activity but that no single VOC is a reliable indicator of biocontamination in building materials. PMID:9687450

  18. Volatile compounds originating from mixed microbial cultures on building materials under various humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    Korpi, A; Pasanen, A L; Pasanen, P

    1998-08-01

    We examined growth of mixed microbial cultures (13 fungal species and one actinomycete species) and production of volatile compounds (VOCs) in typical building materials in outside walls, separating walls, and bathroom floors at various relative humidities (RHs) of air. Air samples from incubation chambers were adsorbed on Tenax TA and dinitrophenylhydrazine cartridges and were analyzed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Metabolic activity was measured by determining CO2 production, and microbial concentrations were determined by a dilution plate method. At 80 to 82% RH, CO2 production did not indicate that microbial activity occurred, and only 10% of the spores germinated, while slight increases in the concentrations of some VOCs were detected. All of the parameters showed that microbial activity occurred at 90 to 99% RH. The microbiological analyses revealed weak microbial growth even under drying conditions (32 to 33% RH). The main VOCs produced on the building materials studied were 3-methyl-1-butanol, 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, and 1-octen-3-ol. In some cases fungal growth decreased aldehyde emissions. We found that various VOCs accompany microbial activity but that no single VOC is a reliable indicator of biocontamination in building materials.

  19. Alcohol production through volatile fatty acids reduction with hydrogen as electron donor by mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Steinbusch, Kirsten J J; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2008-09-01

    In this research we demonstrated a new method to produce alcohols. It was experimentally feasible to produce ethanol, propanol and butanol from solely volatile fatty acids (VFAs) with hydrogen as electron donor. In batch tests, VFAs such as acetic, propionic and butyric acids were reduced by mixed microbial cultures with a headspace of 1.5 bar of hydrogen. Observed alcohol concentrations were 3.69+/-0.25 mM of ethanol, 8.08+/-0.85 mM of propanol and 3.66+/-0.05 mM of n-butanol. The conversion efficiency based on the electron balance was 55.1+/-5.6% with acetate as substrate, 50.3+/-4.7% with propionate and 46.7+/-2.2% with n-butyrate. Methane was the most predominant by-product in each batch experiment, 33.6+/-9.6% of VFA and hydrogen was converted to methane with acetate as substrate; which was 27.1+/-7.1% with propionate and 36.6+/-2.2% with n-butyrate. This VFAs reducing renewable fuel production process does not require carbohydrates like fermentable sugars, but uses biomass with high water content or low sugar content that is unsuitable as feedstock for current fermentation processes. This so-called low-grade biomass is abundantly present in many agricultural areas and is economically very attractive feedstock for the production of biofuels.

  20. Volatile compounds emission from canopy fine litterfall in a hemiboreal mixed forest at Järvselja

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo-Estrada, Miguel; Noe, Beate; Noe, Steffen M.

    2013-04-01

    The seasonal distribution of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emissions from canopy fine litterfall was investigated over a period of two years. Three stands of a hemiboreal mixed forest were studied. The stands presented different dominant tree species: (1) Norway spruce, (2) Scots pine, and (3) Silver birch and Downy birch. The litterfall was monthly collected in litter traps. The BVOC emission of litter was sampled by placing the litter into a glass jar equipped with a vent tube and pumping the head space air through a VOC adsorbing tube (carbotrap). Adsorbed BVOCs were analyzed in a GC-MS. Fifteen compounds were quantified. Seasonal differences in the total emission of BVOCs were found, defined by a maximum in summer and a minimum in autumn and winter. During summer months, litter emissions were dominated by limonene, α-pinene, camphene and 3-carene in the three litter types, accounting for 70-75 % of total BVOC emitted in June. 3-Carene, α-pinene and β-pinene were the main compounds emitted during winter time, accounting for 50-60 % of total BVOC emitted in January. Stand to stand differences were assessed. The spruce and birch dominated stands showed more similarities in their BVOC emission pattern if compared to the pine dominated stand. Together with the litterfall data, an estimation of the annual total BVOC emitted by the soil litter layer is presented for each stand type.

  1. 1998 equivalence of sensory responses to single and mixed volatile organic compounds at equimolar concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Prah, J D

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to low levels of chemicals indoors is often to a mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). It is of interest to determine if the symptomatic and sensory responses can be attributed to a single chemical or to a mixture of chemicals. To determine if sensory or symptomatic responses differ with exposure to single or mixed VOCs, 100 female subjects participated in a 6-hr exposure study. Subjects were exposed to one of six equimolar concentrations equivalent to 24 mg/m3 toluene, control, m-xylene, n-butyl acetate, m-xylene plus n-butyl acetate, a mixture of 21 chemicals including n-butyl acetate and m-xylene, and to the same mixture of chemicals without n-butyl acetate and m-xylene (19 chemicals). The results indicated that there was no difference in reporting of symptoms or sensory responses between the exposures. When the control group was added, some variables, primarily odor intensity and nasal irritation, attained significance. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9799190

  2. 40 CFR 429.70 - Applicability; description of the wood preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory. 429.70 Section 429.70 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Preserving-Water Borne or Nonpressure Subcategory § 429.70 Applicability; description of the wood preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges...

  3. Sources and migration of volatile organic compounds in mixed-use buildings.

    PubMed

    Jia, C; Batterman, S; Godwin, C; Charles, S; Chin, J-Y

    2010-10-01

    We examined concentrations and migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ten mixed-use buildings in southeast Michigan, USA. In an office and work zone in each building, air exchange rates (AERs) were measured using perfluorocarbon tracers, and over 96 VOC species were measured by GC/MS over a 7-day period. VOCs were then apportioned to sources in offices, work zones, and outdoors using a two-zone mass balance model. AERs averaged 3.9 h (0.2-14.2 h) in offices and 1.9 h (0.4-3.5 h) in work zones. The dominant VOCs included aromatics, terpenes and alkanes. VOC concentrations were uniform in the smaller spaces, and more variable in some of the very large spaces. Apportionments depended on the VOC and building, but emissions in industrial zones of buildings often migrated to office areas where they frequently accounted for the bulk of VOC concentrations. Outdoor sources accounted for most benzene and carbon tetrachloride, and a small fraction of aromatic and aliphatic compounds. This study shows that pollutant migration can be a significant and not uncommon problem in mixed-use buildings, and it demonstrates the need for better control of emissions and pollutant migration. Pollutant exposures in industrial, commercial, and institutional buildings arise from indoor and outdoor sources that can be identified, apportioned, and controlled with knowledge of emission sources and building airflows. We show that multi-tracer techniques are an effective and practical means of determining airflows and exchange rates in large buildings. In examining a set of mixed-use buildings, a substantial fraction of VOC exposures in otherwise relatively 'clean' offices is due to pollutant migration from 'dirty' zones of the building. This indicates the need for corrective actions to minimize exposures of office workers that are unwanted and probably unknown to building managers. These actions should include better control of emissions, isolation or control of air and

  4. A luminescent mixed-lanthanide-organic framework sensor for decoding different volatile organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Chao; Ou, Sha; Zou, Chao; Zhao, Min; Wu, Chuan-De

    2014-07-01

    A flexible tripodal polyaromatic acid (4,4',4″-(((2,4,6-trimethylbenzene-1,3,5-triyl)-tris(methylene))-tris(oxy))tribenzoic acid, H3TCM) was used to adapt the coordination sites of lanthanide ions for the construction of microporous lanthanide-organic frameworks (LOFs) [LnTCM(H2O)2]·3DMF·H2O (Ln-TCM; Ln = La, Eu, and/or Tb). In these LOFs, the emission band of TCM matches well with the excitation energy of lanthanide ions (Eu(3+) and Tb(3+)) which results in high-efficient resonance energy transfer from TCM to lanthanide ions. Moreover, the mixed EuxTb1-x-TCM has tunable pores to adapt different induced-fit-type host-guest interactions which can modulate both the energy transfer efficiency from TCM to Ln(3+) ions and the energy allocation between Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions in the luminescence spectra. We demonstrate that the Eu(x)Tb(1-x)-TCM sensor has the capability of decoding different volatile organic molecules (VOMs) with a clearly differentiable and unique emission intensity ratio of (5)D0 → (7)F2 (Eu(3+), 614 nm) to (5)D4 → (7)F5 (Tb(3+), 545 nm) transitions for every different VOM. Compared with the traditional absolute emission intensity method, such a self-referencing emission intensity strategy has generated self-calibrating, highly differentiable, and very stable luminescent signals for decoding different VOMs from the unique Eu(x)Tb(1-x)-TCM platform, which has great potential for practical applications.

  5. Mixing ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere of Karachi, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, Barbara; Meinardi, Simone; Simpson, Isobel J.; Khwaja, Haider A.; Blake, Donald R.; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    Mixing ratios of carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH 4), non-methane hydrocarbons, halocarbons and alkyl nitrates (a total of 72 species) were determined for 78 whole air samples collected during the winter of 1998-1999 in Karachi, Pakistan. This is the first time that volatile organic compound (VOC) levels in Karachi have been extensively characterized. The overall air quality of the urban environment was determined using air samples collected at six locations throughout Karachi. Methane (6.3 ppmv) and ethane (93 ppbv) levels in Karachi were found to be much higher than in other cities that have been studied. The very high CH 4 levels highlight the importance of natural gas leakage in Karachi. The leakage of liquefied petroleum gas contributes to elevated propane and butane levels in Karachi, although the propane and butane burdens were lower than in other cities (e.g., Mexico City, Santiago). High levels of benzene (0.3-19 ppbv) also appear to be of concern in the Karachi urban area. Vehicular emissions were characterized using air samples collected along the busiest thoroughfare of the city (M.A. Jinnah Road). Emissions from vehicular exhaust were found to be the main source of many of the hydrocarbons reported here. Significant levels of isoprene (1.2 ppbv) were detected at the roadside, and vehicular exhaust is estimated to account for about 20% of the isoprene observed in Karachi. 1,2-Dichloroethane, a lead scavenger added to leaded fuel, was also emitted by cars. The photochemical production of ozone (O 3) was calculated for CO and the various VOCs using the Maximum Incremental Reactivity (MIR) scale. Based on the MIR scale, the leading contributors to O 3 production in Karachi are ethene, CO, propene, m-xylene and toluene.

  6. Influences of mixed expiratory sampling parameters on exhaled volatile organic compound concentrations.

    PubMed

    Thekedar, B; Oeh, U; Szymczak, W; Hoeschen, C; Paretzke, H G

    2011-03-01

    Breath gas analysis is a promising technology for medical applications. By identifying disease-specific biomarkers in the breath of patients, a non-invasive and easy method for early diagnosis or therapy monitoring can be developed. In order to achieve this goal, one essential prerequisite is the reproducibility of the method applied, i.e. the quantification of exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The variability of breath gas VOC measurements can be affected by many factors. In this respect, sampling-specific parameters like flow rate and volume of exhalation, exhalation with or without breath holding, exhalation in single or multiple breathing and volume of air inhaled before breath gas exhalation can play a vital role. These factors affecting the measurements must be controlled by optimizing the sampling procedure. For such an optimization, it is important to know how exactly the different parameters affect the exhaled VOC concentrations. Therefore, a study has been undertaken in order to identify some effects of different breath sampling-specific parameters on the exhaled VOC profile using the mixed expired breath sampling technique. It was found that parameters such as filling the sampling bag with high or low flow rate of exhalation, with multiple or single exhalations, in different volumes of exhalation, with breath holding and under different surrounding air conditions significantly affect the concentrations of the exhaled VOCs. Therefore, the specific results of this work should be taken into account before planning new breath gas studies or developing new breath gas collection systems in order to minimize the number of artefacts affecting the concentration of exhaled VOCs.

  7. Volatilization of elemental mercury from fresh blast furnace sludge mixed with basic oxygen furnace sludge under different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Földi, Corinna; Dohrmann, Reiner; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2015-11-01

    Blast furnace sludge (BFS) is a waste with elevated mercury (Hg) content due to enrichment during the production process of pig iron. To investigate the volatilization potential of Hg, fresh samples of BFS mixed with basic oxygen furnace sludge (BOFS; a residue of gas purification from steel making, processed simultaneously in the cleaning devices of BFS and hence mixed with BFS) were studied in sealed column experiments at different temperatures (15, 25, and 35 °C) for four weeks (total Hg: 0.178 mg kg(-1)). The systems were regularly flushed with ambient air (every 24 h for the first 100 h, followed by every 72 h) for 20 min at a flow rate of 0.25 ± 0.03 L min(-1) and elemental Hg vapor was trapped on gold coated sand. Volatilization was 0.276 ± 0.065 ng (x m: 0.284 ng) at 15 °C, 5.55 ± 2.83 ng (x m: 5.09 ng) at 25 °C, and 2.37 ± 0.514 ng (x m: 2.34 ng) at 35 °C. Surprisingly, Hg fluxes were lower at 35 than 25 °C. For all temperature variants, an elevated Hg flux was observed within the first 100 h followed by a decrease of volatilization thereafter. However, the background level of ambient air was not achieved at the end of the experiments indicating that BFS mixed with BOFS still possessed Hg volatilization potential.

  8. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES FROM MIXED DECIDUOUS AND CONIFEROUS FORESTS IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regio...

  9. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSION RATES FROM MIXED DECIDUOUS AND CONIFEROUS FORESTS IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regio...

  10. MIEC (mixed-ionic-electronic-conduction)-based access devices for non-volatile crossbar memory arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Rohit S.; Burr, Geoffrey W.; Virwani, Kumar; Jackson, Bryan; Padilla, Alvaro; Narayanan, Pritish; Rettner, Charles T.; Shelby, Robert M.; Bethune, Donald S.; Raman, Karthik V.; BrightSky, Matthew; Joseph, Eric; Rice, Philip M.; Topuria, Teya; Kellock, Andrew J.; Kurdi, Bülent; Gopalakrishnan, Kailash

    2014-10-01

    Several attractive applications call for the organization of memristive devices (or other resistive non-volatile memory (NVM)) into large, densely-packed crossbar arrays. While resistive-NVM devices frequently possess some degree of inherent nonlinearity (typically 3-30× contrast), the operation of large (\\gt 1000×1000 device) arrays at low power tends to require quite large (\\gt 1e7) ON-to-OFF ratios (between the currents passed at high and at low voltages). One path to such large nonlinearities is the inclusion of a distinct access device (AD) together with each of the state-bearing resistive-NVM elements. While such an AD need not store data, its list of requirements is almost as challenging as the specifications demanded of the memory device. Several candidate ADs have been proposed, but obtaining high performance without requiring single-crystal silicon and/or the high processing temperatures of the front-end-of-the-line—which would eliminate any opportunity for 3D stacking—has been difficult. We review our work at IBM Research—Almaden on high-performance ADs based on Cu-containing mixed-ionic-electronic conduction (MIEC) materials [1-7]. These devices require only the low processing temperatures of the back-end-of-the-line, making them highly suitable for implementing multi-layer cross-bar arrays. MIEC-based ADs offer large ON/OFF ratios (\\gt 1e7), a significant voltage margin {{V}m} (over which current \\lt 10 nA), and ultra-low leakage (\\lt 10 pA), while also offering the high current densities needed for phase-change memory and the fully bipolar operation needed for high-performance RRAM. Scalability to critical lateral dimensions \\lt 30 nm and thicknesses \\lt 15 nm, tight distributions and 100% yield in large (512 kBit) arrays, long-term stability of the ultra-low leakage states, and sub-50 ns turn-ON times have all been demonstrated. Numerical modeling of these MIEC-based ADs shows that their operation depends on C{{u}+} mediated hole

  11. Volatile organic compound emmission rates from mixed deciduous and coniferous foest in Northern Wisconsin, USA

    Treesearch

    J. G. Isebrands; A. B. Guenther; P. Harley; D. Helmig; L. Klinger; L. Vierling; P. Zimmerman; C. Geron

    1999-01-01

    Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds {VOC) from forests play an important role in regulating the atmospheric trace gas composition including global tropospheric ozone concentrations. However, more information is needed on VOC emission rates from different forest regions of the world to understand regional and global impacts and to implement possible...

  12. Collaborative Research: Nanopore Confinement of C-H-O Mixed Volatile Fluids Relevant to Subsurface Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, Brian P.

    2015-03-11

    The scientific objective of this proposal was to obtain a fundamental atomic- to macro-scale understanding of the sorptivity, structure and dynamics of simple and complex hydrocarbon (HC) fluids at mineral surfaces or within nanoporous matrices over temperatures, pressures and compositions encountered in near-surface and shallow crustal environments. The research supported by this award was complementary to that conducted by the group of Prof. David cole at Ohio State University. The scope of the present award was to utilize molecular-level modeling to provide critically important insights into the interfacial properties of mineral-volatile systems, assist in the interpretation of experimental data and predict fluid behavior beyond the limits of current experimental capability. During the past three years the effort has focused primarily on the behavior of C-H volatiles including methane (CH4) and propane (C3H8), mixed-volatile systems including hydrocarbon - CO2 with and without H2O present. The long-range goal is to quantitatively link structure, dynamics and reactivity in complex mineral-/C-H-O systems from the atomic to the molecular to the macroscopic levels. The results are relevant to areas of growing importance such as gas shale, HC-bearing hydrothermal systems, and CO2 storage.

  13. Realtime nowcasting with a Bayesian mixed frequency model with stochastic volatility.

    PubMed

    Carriero, Andrea; Clark, Todd E; Marcellino, Massimiliano

    2015-10-01

    The paper develops a method for producing current quarter forecasts of gross domestic product growth with a (possibly large) range of available within-the-quarter monthly observations of economic indicators, such as employment and industrial production, and financial indicators, such as stock prices and interest rates. In light of existing evidence of time variation in the variances of shocks to gross domestic product, we consider versions of the model with both constant variances and stochastic volatility. We use Bayesian methods to estimate the model, to facilitate providing shrinkage on the (possibly large) set of model parameters and conveniently generate predictive densities. We provide results on the accuracy of nowcasts of realtime gross domestic product growth in the USA from 1985 through 2011. In terms of point forecasts, our proposal improves significantly on auto-regressive models and performs comparably with survey forecasts. In addition, it provides reliable density forecasts, for which the stochastic volatility specification is quite useful.

  14. Volatilization and mixing in glasses of some Apollo 14 regolith breccias

    SciTech Connect

    Vaniman, D.T.; Heiken, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    Three unique samples can be distinguished by analysis of all glass types, including devitrified glasses, in a suite of 26 Apollo 14 regolith breccias. These unique samples include the well-studied sample 14315, which has an abundance of anorthositic gabbro glasses and devitrified glasses; 14004,77, which has no glasses other than those that match the local soil; and 14076,5, which contains no glasses similar to the local soil or to LKFM. Sample 14076,5 is clearly exotic, for it contains devitrified glasses of anorthositic composition and of a silica-volatilized (HASP) trend that stems from anorthosite; these silica-volatilized glasses contain the new mineral yoshiokite. HASP glasses in this exotic sample and HASP glass spheres that stem from the Apollo 14 soil composition differ greatly from the HASP glasses at Apollo 16. The various HASP glasses can be just as useful as non-volatilized glasses in searching or major crustal or regolith lithologies. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Reversible assembly of magnetized particles: Application to water-borne pathogen enumeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Qasem

    2009-12-01

    Reversible assembly of magnetized particles and cells has been proposed and implemented. The approach is based on magnetized particles or magnetically labeled cell immobilization in an array of individual particle/cell for optical counting. The device has been tested for few types of magnetic particles and one water-borne pathogen: Giardia Lamblia. An individual particle immobilization efficiency of 92% was achieved.

  16. Effects of volatile solid concentration and mixing ratio on hydrogen production by co-digesting molasses wastewater and sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Yeol; Wee, Daehyun; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2014-11-28

    Co-digesting molasses wastewater and sewage sludge was evaluated for hydrogen production by response surface methodology (RSM). Batch experiments in accordance with various dilution ratios (40- to 5-fold) and waste mixing composition ratios (100:0, 80:20, 60:40, 40:60, 20:80, and 0:100, on a volume basis) were conducted. Volatile solid (VS) concentration strongly affected the hydrogen production rate and yield compared with the waste mixing ratio. The specific hydrogen production rate was predicted to be optimal when the VS concentration ranged from 10 to 12 g/l at all the mixing ratios of molasses wastewater and sewage sludge. A hydrogen yield of over 50 ml H2/g VS(removed) was obtained from mixed waste of 10% sewage sludge and 10 g/l VS (about 10-fold dilution ratio). The optimal chemical oxygen demand/ total nitrogen ratio for co-digesting molasses wastewater and sewage sludge was between 250 and 300 with a hydrogen yield above 20 ml H2/g VS(removed).

  17. Volatility of NH3 from internally mixed sodium succinate-NH4SO4 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Na; Zhang, Yunhong

    2016-04-01

    Contributing the complicacy of atmospheric constituents, aerosol particles may undergo complicated heterogeneous reactions that have profound consequences on their hygroscopic properties and volatility. Ammonia (NH3) is a ubiquitous trace atmospheric gas in the troposphere and has negative effects on human health and climate forcing of ambient aerosols. In addition, atmospheric cycle of NH3 is complex in atmosphere, therefore it necessary to get insights to the complexity of gas-to-aerosol NH3 partitioning, which results in large uncertainties in the sources and distributions of NH3. By using in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR), we report here the volatility of NH3 from the laboratory generated sodium succinate with ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) at a 1:1 molar ratio as well as its effect on the hygroscopicity of the mixtures. The loss of the NH4+ peak at 1451cm-1 and the formation of peaks at 1718 and 1134 cm-1 due to C = O stretching asymmetric vibration of -COOH and ν3 (SO42-) stretching of sodium sulfate indicate that sodium succinate reacts with (NH4)2SO4, releasing NH3 and forming succinic acid and sodium sulfate on dehydration process. The formation of less hygroscopic succinic acid and volatility of NH3 in mixtures leads to a significant decrease in the total water content. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the reaction between (NH4)2SO4 and dicarboxylate salts, which may represent an important particle-gas partitioning for ammonia and thus elucidate another underlying ammonia cycle in atmosphere. These results could be helpful to understand the mutual transformation process of dicarboxylic acids and dicarboxylate salts.

  18. Weathering characteristics and moisture uptake properties of wood coated with water-borne sol-gel thin films

    Treesearch

    M. A. Tshabalala; C. Starr; N. R. Sutherland

    2010-01-01

    In this study, wood specimens were coated with water-borne silsesquioxane oligomers by an in situ sol-gel deposition process. The effect of these water-borne sol-gel thin films on weathering characteristics and moisture-uptake properties of the wood specimens were investigated. The weathering characteristics were investigated by exposure of the specimens to artificial...

  19. 40 CFR 429.70 - Applicability; description of the wood preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Preserving-Water Borne or Nonpressure Subcategory § 429.70 Applicability; description of the wood preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory. This subpart applies...

  20. 40 CFR 429.70 - Applicability; description of the wood preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Preserving-Water Borne or Nonpressure Subcategory § 429.70 Applicability; description of the wood preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory. This subpart applies...

  1. 40 CFR 429.70 - Applicability; description of the wood preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability; description of the wood... SOURCE CATEGORY Wood Preserving-Water Borne or Nonpressure Subcategory § 429.70 Applicability; description of the wood preserving-water borne or nonpressure subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges...

  2. Photosynthetic mixed culture polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) production from individual and mixed volatile fatty acids (VFAs): substrate preferences and co-substrate uptake.

    PubMed

    Fradinho, J C; Oehmen, A; Reis, M A M

    2014-09-20

    This work studied the effect of the substrate feeding composition on the polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation capacity of an acetate enriched photosynthetic mixed culture (PMC). From the six tested organic acids - malate, citrate, lactate, acetate, propionate and butyrate - only the three volatile fatty acids (VFAs) enabled PHA production, with acetate and butyrate leading to polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) formation and propionate leading to a HB:HV copolymer with a 51% fraction of hydroxyvalerate (HV). Also, results showed an acceleration of butyrate and propionate consumption when fed in the presence of acetate, suggesting that the latter can act as a co-substrate for butyrate and propionate uptake. Furthermore, results suggest that some PMC bacterial groups present a substrate preference for butyrate in relation to acetate and propionate. These findings indicate the possibility of feeding the PMC with cheap VFA rich fermented wastes, leading to a more cost-effective and environmentally sustainable PHA production system.

  3. EVALUATION OF ENGINEERING CONTROLS FOR THE MIXING OF FLAVORINGS CONTAINING DIACETYL AND OTHER VOLATILE INGREDIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, Deborah V.L.; Dunn, Kevin H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Hammond, Duane R.; Sestito, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Exposures to diacetyl, a primary ingredient of butter flavoring, have been shown to cause respiratory disease among workers who mix flavorings. This study focused on evaluating ventilation controls designed to reduce emissions from the flavor mixing tanks, the major source of diacetyl in the plants. Five exhaust hood configurations were evaluated in the laboratory: standard hinged lid-opened, standard hinged lid-closed, hinged lid-slotted, dome with 38-mm gap, and dome with 114-mm gap. Tracer gas tests were performed to evaluate quantitative capture efficiency for each hood. A perforated copper coil was used to simulate an area source within the 1.2-meter diameter mixing tank. Capture efficiencies were measured at four hood exhaust flow rates (2.83, 5.66, 11.3, and 17.0 cubic meters per minute) and three cross draft velocities (0, 30, and 60 meters per minute). All hoods evaluated performed well with capture efficiencies above 90% for most combinations of exhaust volume and cross drafts. The standard hinged lid was the least expensive to manufacture and had the best average capture efficiency (over 99%) in the closed configuration for all exhaust flow rates and cross drafts. The hinged lid-slotted hood had some of the lowest capture efficiencies at the low exhaust flow rates compared to the other hood designs. The standard hinged lid performed well, even in the open position, and it provided a flexible approach to controlling emissions from mixing tanks. The dome hood gave results comparable to the standard hinged lid but it is more expensive to manufacture. The results of the study indicate that emissions from mixing tanks used in the production of flavorings can be controlled using simple inexpensive exhaust hoods. PMID:24649880

  4. Evaluation of engineering controls for the mixing of flavorings containing diacetyl and other volatile ingredients.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Deborah V L; Dunn, Kevin H; Shulman, Stanley A; Hammond, Duane R; Sestito, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Exposures to diacetyl, a primary ingredient of butter flavoring, have been shown to cause respiratory disease among workers who mix flavorings. This study focused on evaluating ventilation controls designed to reduce emissions from the flavor mixing tanks, the major source of diacetyl in the plants. Five exhaust hood configurations were evaluated in the laboratory: standard hinged lid-opened, standard hinged lid-closed, hinged lid-slotted, dome with 38-mm gap, and dome with 114-mm gap. Tracer gas tests were performed to evaluate quantitative capture efficiency for each hood. A perforated copper coil was used to simulate an area source within the 1.2-meter diameter mixing tank. Capture efficiencies were measured at four hood exhaust flow rates (2.83, 5.66, 11.3, and 17.0 cubic meters per min) and three cross draft velocities (0, 30, and 60 meters per min). All hoods evaluated performed well with capture efficiencies above 90% for most combinations of exhaust volume and cross drafts. The standard hinged lid was the least expensive to manufacture and had the best average capture efficiency (over 99%) in the closed configuration for all exhaust flow rates and cross drafts. The hinged lid-slotted hood had some of the lowest capture efficiencies at the low exhaust flow rates compared to the other hood designs. The standard hinged lid performed well, even in the open position, and it provided a flexible approach to controlling emissions from mixing tanks. The dome hood gave results comparable to the standard hinged lid but it is more expensive to manufacture. The results of the study indicate that emissions from mixing tanks used in the production of flavorings can be controlled using simple inexpensive exhaust hoods.

  5. Cooperativity between Volatilization of NH3, Evaporation of Water and Crystallization of Na2SO4 in Internally Mixed Sodium Succinate/Ammonium Sulfate Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pan; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Gas-to-particle partitioning is one of the most important physicochemical process in atmospheric aerosols. The chemical reaction in the internally mixed organic/inorganic aerosols attracts much attention on the volatility and hygroscopicity. In this study, FTIR spectra evolution with time were observed by FTIR-ATR technique at constant relative humidity for the internally mixed sodium succinate/ammonium sulfate aerosols with molar ratio of 1:1. The results showed that sodium succinate and ammonium sulfate in the mixed aerosols could react to form succinate acid and sodium sulfate accompanying NH3 volatile as followings: NaOOCCH2CH2COONa (aq) + (NH4)2SO4 (aq) → HOOCCH2CH2COOH (aq) + Na2SO4 (aq or crystal) + NH3 (g) The volatilization of NH3 speeded up the evaporation of water, and indirectly accelerated the crystallization of Na2SO4 in the mixed aerosols, which synergistically accelerated release of NH3. The complex reaction between dicarboxylic salt and (NH4)2SO4 could help us to understand the cooperativity between the gas-to-particle equilibrium, phase transition, atmospheric composition and volatility, which could reveal the formation mechanism of the secondary organic aerosols.

  6. River networks as ecological corridors for species, populations and pathogens of water-borne disease (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, A.; Bertuzzo, E.; Mari, L.; Suweis, S.; Ceola, S.; Carrara, F.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2010-12-01

    Recent works at the interface of hydrology, geomorphology and ecology under an integrated framework of analysis will be reviewed with a view to a general theory for reactive transport on networks. A number of related topics will be reviewed, linked by the characters of stochastic transport, and the networked environmental matrix (including biodiversity of freshwater fish in river networks and vegetation along riparian systems, how river networks affected historic spreading of human populations, and how they influence the spreading of water-borne disease). The unique, coherent ecohydrological thread and similar mathematical methods will be exposed. Metacommunity and individual-based models will be described in the contexts of hydrochory, population and species migrations, and the spreading of infections of water-borne disease along the ecological corridors generated by the river basin. A general effect is shown to emerge on the effects of dendritic geometries on the ecological processes and dynamics operating on river basins. Insights provided by such a theory will lend themselves to issues of practical importance such as integration of riparian systems into large-scale resource management, spatial strategies to minimize loss of freshwater biodiversity, and effective prevention/vaccination campaigns against water-borne diseases.

  7. Water quality and occurrence of water-borne diseases in the Douala 4th District, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ako, Andrew Ako; Nkeng, George Elambo; Takem, Gloria Eyong Eneke

    2009-01-01

    The monthly occurrence and mean age distribution of water-borne diseases in the Douala 4th District, Cameroon (1995-2006) were studied and probable causes of diseases spread were established. Diseases of interest included gastroenteritis, amoebic dysentery, typhoid fever and cholera. Water-borne disease occurrence was observed to follow a seasonal pattern with peaks occurring between the months of January and May followed by drops between June and October and rose again from November. Children below 5 years were found to be more vulnerable to diarrhoea, gastroenteritis, amoebic dysentery while persons between 15-44 years were more vulnerable to typhoid and cholera. Physico-chemically, water samples had turbidities varying between 5.5-86 NTU, pH values between 4.2 and 7.1 and zero residual chlorine. Bacteriological analysis showed that the total coliform count was averagely 74/100 ml, the faecal colform count was 43/100 ml and the faecal streptococci count was 27/100 ml. Lack of access to potable water, absence of sanitation facilities and environmental factors could be advanced as the probable causes of water-borne disease spread.

  8. Enzymatic activities produced by mixed Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces cultures: relationship with wine volatile composition.

    PubMed

    Maturano, Yolanda Paola; Assof, Mariela; Fabani, María Paula; Nally, María Cristina; Jofré, Viviana; Rodríguez Assaf, Leticia Anahí; Toro, María Eugenia; Castellanos de Figueroa, Lucía Inés; Vazquez, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    During certain wine fermentation processes, yeasts, and mainly non-Saccharomyces strains, produce and secrete enzymes such as β-glucosidases, proteases, pectinases, xylanases and amylases. The effects of enzyme activity on the aromatic quality of wines during grape juice fermentation, using different co-inoculation strategies of non-Saccharomyces and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts, were assessed in the current study. Three strains with appropriate enological performance and high enzymatic activities, BSc562 (S. cerevisiae), BDv566 (Debaryomyces vanrijiae) and BCs403 (Candida sake), were assayed in pure and mixed Saccharomyces/non-Saccharomyces cultures. β-Glucosidase, pectinase, protease, xylanase and amylase activities were quantified during fermentations. The aromatic profile of pure and mixed cultures was determined at the end of each fermentation. In mixed cultures, non-Saccharomyces species were detected until day 4-5 of the fermentation process, and highest populations were observed in MSD2 (10% S. cerevisiae/90% D. vanrijiae) and MSC1 (1% S. cerevisiae/99% C. sake). According to correlation and multivariate analysis, MSD2 presented the highest concentrations of terpenes and higher alcohols which were associated with pectinase, amylase and xylanase activities. On the other hand, MSC1 high levels of β-glucosidase, proteolytic and xylanolytic activities were correlated to esters and fatty acids. Our study contributes to a better understanding of the effect of enzymatic activities by yeasts on compound transformations that occur during wine fermentation.

  9. Competitive removal of water-borne copper, zinc and cadmium by a CaCO3-dominated red mud.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yingqun; Lin, Chuxia; Jiang, Yuehua; Lu, Wenzhou; Si, Chunhua; Liu, Yong

    2009-12-30

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the competitive removal of water-borne Cu, Zn and Cd by a CaCO(3)-dominated red mud. The results show that the water-borne Cu had a higher affinity to the red mud, as compared to the water-borne Zn and Cd. The major mechanism responsible for the preferential retention of Cu by red mud was the formation of atacamite. It is likely that, initially, atacamite was formed mainly through the reaction between CuCl(2) and NaOH. Reaction between CuCl(2) and CaCO(3) to form atacamite became more and more important with the gradual consumption of NaOH. Sequential extraction results show that the water-borne metals were preferentially associated with the NH(2)OH.HCl-extractable fractions at the early stage of the experiment. With increase in the saturation degree of binding sites on red mud particles by the metals, the proportion of HCH(3)COO-extractable Cu fraction increased accordingly. Water-borne Zn and Cd were also increasingly bound in the HCH(3)COO-extractable forms until the metal binding capacity of the red mud was nearly depleted. After the binding sites of red mud particles were saturated, part of the Zn and Cd previously retained by the red mud was displaced by water-borne Cu, resulting in the release of the previously immobilized Zn and Cd to the solution.

  10. Mixing ratios and eddy covariance flux measurements of volatile organic compounds from an urban canopy (Manchester, UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Davison, B.; Nemitz, E.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2009-03-01

    Mixing ratios and fluxes of six selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured above the city of Manchester (UK) during the summer of 2006. A proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer was used for the measurement of mixing ratios, and fluxes were calculated from these using both the disjunct and the virtual disjunct eddy covariance techniques. The two flux systems, which operated in alternate half hours, showed good agreement, with R2 values ranging between 0.74 and 0.9 for the individual analytes. On average, fluxes measured in the disjunct mode were approximately 20% lower than those measured in the virtual mode. This difference is due to both the dampening of the VOC signal by the disjunct flux sampler and carry over from one sample to the next. Correcting for these effects reduced the difference to less than 7%. Observed fluxes are thought to be largely controlled by anthropogenic sources, with vehicle emissions the major contributor. However, both evaporative and biogenic emissions may account for some of the VOCs present. Concentrations and fluxes of the oxygenated compounds were highest on average, ranging between 0.15 to 1 mg m-2 h-1; the fluxes of aromatic compounds were lower, between 0.12 to 0.28 mg m-2 h-1. The observed fluxes were up-scaled to give city wide emission estimates for each compound and the results compared to estimates made by the National Atmospheric Emission Inventory (NAEI) for the same flux footprint. Fluxes of toluene and benzene compared most closely differing by approximately 50%, while in contrast the oxygenated fluxes were found to be between 3.6-6.3 times larger than the annual average predicted by the NAEI.

  11. Flux balance analysis of mixed microbial cultures: application to the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates from complex mixtures of volatile fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Pardelha, Filipa; Albuquerque, Maria G E; Reis, Maria A M; Dias, João M L; Oliveira, Rui

    2012-12-31

    Fermented agro-industrial wastes are potential low cost substrates for polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production by mixed microbial cultures (MMC). The use of complex substrates has however profound implications in the PHA metabolism. In this paper we investigate PHA accumulation using a lumped metabolic model that describes PHA storage from arbitrary mixtures of volatile fatty acids (VFA). Experiments were conducted using synthetic and complex VFA mixtures obtained from the fermentation of sugar cane molasses. Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) and flux balance analysis (FBA) were performed at different stages of culture enrichment in order to investigate the effect of VFA composition and time of enrichment in PHA storage efficiency. Substrate uptake and PHA storage fluxes increased over enrichment time by 70% and 73%, respectively. MFA calculations show that higher PHA storage fluxes are associated to an increase in the uptake of VFA with even number of carbon atoms and a more effective synthesis of hydroxyvalerate (HV) precursors from VFA with odd number of carbons. Furthermore, FBA shows that the key metabolic objective of a MMC subjected to the feast and famine regimen is the minimization of the tricarboxylic acid cycle fluxes. The PHA flux and biopolymer composition (hydroxybutyrate (HB): HV) could be accurately predicted in several independent experiments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Threat-Sensitive Behavioral Responses to Concentrations of Water-Borne Cues from Predation.

    PubMed

    Kesavaraju, Banugopan; Damal, Kavitha; Juliano, Steven A

    2007-02-01

    Aquatic organisms often detect predators via water-borne chemical cues, and respond by showing reduced activity. Prey responses may be correlated with the concentration of predation cues, which would result in graded antipredator behavioral responses that adjust potentially costly behavioral changes to levels that are commensurate with the risk of predation. Larvae of the predatory mosquito Toxorhynchites rutilus prey upon other container-dwelling insects, including larvae of the mosquito Ochlerotatus triseriatus. Previous work has established that O. triseriatus reduce movement, foraging, and time below the surface, and increase the frequency of resting at the surface, in the presence of water-borne cues from predation by T. rutilus. We tested whether these responses by O. triseriatus are threat sensitive by recording behavior of fourth instar larvae in two runs of an experiment in which we created a series of concentrations (100, 10, 1, 0.1, and 0.01% and 100, 70, 40, 20, and 10%) of water that had held either O. triseriatus larvae alone (control) or a T. rutilus larva feeding on O. triseriatus (predation). We also tested whether associated effects on time spent feeding are threat sensitive by determining whether frequencies of filtering or browsing are also related to concentration of cues. The frequencies of resting and surface declined, whereas frequency of filtering (but not browsing) increased more rapidly with a decrease in concentration of predation cues compared with control cues. Thus, O. triseriatus shows a threat sensitive behavioral response to water-borne cues from this predator, adjusting its degree of behavioral response to the apparent risk of predation.

  13. Water-borne Infections, Weather Variability and Climate Change in Eastern Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirrell, A.; Naumova, E. N.; Liss, A.

    2012-12-01

    For this project, a time-series analysis of existing data will be used to assess temporal and spatial associations between long-term, seasonal and short-term weather variability and water-borne infectious diseases in several Siberian municipalities. Building on these associations, we will generate estimates of future changes in infectious disease patterns based upon existing forecasts of climate change and likely increases in extreme weather events in Eastern Russia. Finally, we will contemplate the public health implications of these findings, and offer appropriate policy recommendations.

  14. A Multiplex PCR/LDR Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Identification of the NIAID Category B Bacterial Food and Water-borne Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rundell, Mark S.; Pingle, Maneesh; Das, Sanchita; Hussain, Aashiq; Ocheretina, Oksana; Charles, Macarthur; Larone, Davise H.; Spitzer, Eric D.; Golightly, Linnie; Barany, Francis

    2014-01-01

    Enteric pathogens that cause gastroenteritis remain a major global health concern. The goal of this study was to develop a multiplex PCR/LDR assay for the detection of all NIAID category B bacterial food and water-borne pathogens directly from stool specimens. To validate the PCR/LDR assay, clinical isolates of Campylobacter spp., Vibrio spp., Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli were tested. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay was assessed using a large number of seeded culture-negative stool specimens and a smaller set of clinical specimens from Haiti. The overall sensitivity ranged from 91 to 100% (median 100%) depending on the species. For the majority of organisms the sensitivity was 100%. The overall specificity based on initial testing ranged from 98% to 100% depending on the species. After additional testing of discordant samples the lowest specificity was 99.4%. PCR/LDR detected additional category B agents (particularly diarrheagenic E. coli) in 11/40 specimens from Haiti that were culture-positive for V. cholerae and in approximately 1% of routine culture-negative stool specimens from a hospital in New York. This study demonstrated the ability of the PCR/LDR assay to detect a large comprehensive panel of category B enteric bacterial pathogens as well as mixed infections. This type of assay has the potential to provide earlier warnings of possible public health threats and more accurate surveillance of food and water-borne pathogens. PMID:24709368

  15. A multiplex PCR/LDR assay for simultaneous detection and identification of the NIAID category B bacterial food and water-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rundell, Mark S; Pingle, Maneesh; Das, Sanchita; Hussain, Aashiq; Ocheretina, Oksana; Charles, Macarthur; Larone, Davise H; Spitzer, Eric D; Golightly, Linnie; Barany, Francis

    2014-06-01

    Enteric pathogens that cause gastroenteritis remain a major global health concern. The goal of this study was to develop a multiplex PCR/ligation detection reaction (LDR) assay for the detection of all NIAID category B bacterial food and water-borne pathogens directly from stool specimens. To validate the PCR/LDR assay, clinical isolates of Campylobacter spp., Vibrio spp., Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, and diarrheagenic Escherichia coli were tested. The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were assessed using a large number of seeded culture-negative stool specimens and a smaller set of clinical specimens from Haiti. The overall sensitivity ranged from 91% to 100% (median 100%) depending on the species. For the majority of organisms, the sensitivity was 100%. The overall specificity based on initial testing ranged from 98% to 100% depending on the species. After additional testing of discordant samples, the lowest specificity was 99.4%. PCR/LDR detected additional category B agents (particularly diarrheagenic E. coli) in 11/40 specimens from Haiti that were culture-positive for V. cholerae and in approximately 1% of routine culture-negative stool specimens from a hospital in New York. This study demonstrated the ability of the PCR/LDR assay to detect a large comprehensive panel of category B enteric bacterial pathogens as well as mixed infections. This type of assay has the potential to provide earlier warnings of possible public health threats and more accurate surveillance of food and water-borne pathogens.

  16. FORMATION CONDITIONS OF ICY MATERIALS IN COMET C/2004 Q2 (MACHHOLZ). I. MIXING RATIOS OF ORGANIC VOLATILES

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hitomi; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2009-09-20

    We observed comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) with the Keck II telescope in late 2005 January and we obtained the spectra of C/2004 Q2 including many emission lines of volatile species such as H{sub 2}O, HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, and H{sub 2}CO with high-signal-to-noise ratios. Based on our observations, we determined the mixing ratios of the molecules relative to H{sub 2}O in C/2004 Q2. Since C/2004 Q2 is one of Oort Cloud comets, it is interesting to compare our results with other Oort Cloud comets. The mixing ratios of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}/H{sub 2}O in C/2004 Q2 are lower than typical Oort Cloud comets. Especially, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio in C/2004 Q2 is as lower as Jupiter Family comets. However, mixing ratios of other molecules in C/2004 Q2 are similar to typical Oort Cloud comets. C/2004 Q2 might be the intermediate type between Oort Cloud and Jupiter Family comets. To investigate the formation conditions of such intermediate type comet, we focused on the (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+C{sub 2}H{sub 6})/H{sub 2}O ratios and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}/(C{sub 2}H{sub 6}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) ratios in comets from the viewpoint of conversion from C{sub 2}H{sub 2} to C{sub 2}H{sub 6} in the precometary ices. We found that (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+C{sub 2}H{sub 6})/H{sub 2}O ratio in C/2004 Q2 is lower than the ratio in typical Oort Cloud comets while C{sub 2}H{sub 6}/(C{sub 2}H{sub 6}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) ratio in C/2004 Q2 is consistent with the ratio of the typical Oort Cloud comets and Jupiter family comets. If we assume that the cometary volatiles such as H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} formed similar environment, the C{sub 2}H{sub 6}/(C{sub 2}H{sub 6}+C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) ratio might not be sensitive in the temperature range where hydrogen-addition reactions occurred and cometesimals formed ({approx}30 K). We employed the dynamical-evolutional model and the chemical-evolutional model to determine the

  17. Water-borne sperm trigger vitellogenic egg growth in two sessile marine invertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, J D; Manríquez, P H; Hughes, R N

    2000-01-01

    A diverse array of sessile marine invertebrates mate by passive dispersal of sperm which fertilize the brooded eggs of neighbours. In two such species, a sea-mat (phylum Bryozoa) and an ascidian (phylum Chordata), vitellogenic egg growth is absent in reproductively isolated specimens, but is triggered by a water-borne factor released by conspecifics. In both of these colonial, hermaphroditic species, the active factor can be removed from water by filtration. The effect involves self-/non-self-recognition: water conditioned by a separate subcolony of the same genetic individual does not prompt oocyte growth. In each species, allosperm move from the surrounding water to the ovary and are then stored in close association with the growing oocytes. We concluded that sperm themselves are the water-borne factor that triggers the major phase of female reproductive investment. This mechanism is, to our knowledge, previously undescribed in animals, but has parallels with the initiation of maternal investment in flowering plants following the receipt of compatible pollen. The species studied may be representative of many other aquatic invertebrates which mate in a similar way. The stimulation of egg growth by allosperm could lead to intersexual conflict during oogenesis. PMID:10902681

  18. Molluscan attractins, a family of water-borne protein pheromones with interspecific attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Scott F; Schein, Catherine H; Xu, Yuan; Braun, Werner; Nagle, Gregg T

    2005-01-01

    The marine mollusk Aplysia releases the water-borne pheromone attractin during egg laying. This small protein stimulates the formation and maintenance of mating and egg-laying aggregations. Attractin has been characterized from five Aplysia species: A. californica, A. brasiliana, A. fasciata, A. vaccaria, and A. depilans. We describe here the isolation of attractin from Bursatella leachii, and show that it belongs to the same protein family. The pattern of residue conservation, especially the six invariant cysteines, suggests that all of these attractins have a common fold. The nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of A. californica attractin contains two antiparallel alpha-helices, the second of which contains the heptapeptide sequence IEECKTS that has been implicated in attractin function. Synthetic peptides containing this IEECKTS region are attractive, and mutating surface exposed charged residues within this region of attractin abolishes attractin activity. This suggests that the second helix is an essential part of the receptor-binding interface. In contrast to the peptide pheromonal attractants in amphibians, which are species specific, the attractins are, to our knowledge, the first water-borne peptide or protein pheromone family in invertebrates and vertebrates that are not species specific.

  19. Climate change and temperature rise: implications on food- and water-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Fadel, Mutasem; Ghanimeh, Sophia; Maroun, Rania; Alameddine, Ibrahim

    2012-10-15

    This study attempts to quantify climate-induced increases in morbidity rates associated with food- and water-borne illnesses in the context of an urban coastal city, taking Beirut-Lebanon as a study area. A Poisson generalized linear model was developed to assess the impacts of temperature on the morbidity rate. The model was used with four climatic scenarios to simulate a broad spectrum of driving forces and potential social, economic and technologic evolutions. The correlation established in this study exhibits a decrease in the number of illnesses with increasing temperature until reaching a threshold of 19.2 °C, beyond which the number of morbidity cases increases with temperature. By 2050, the results show a substantial increase in food- and water-borne related morbidity of 16 to 28% that can reach up to 42% by the end of the century under A1FI (fossil fuel intensive development) or can be reversed to ~0% under B1 (lowest emissions trajectory), highlighting the need for early mitigation and adaptation measures.

  20. Newly identified water-borne protein pheromones interact with attractin to stimulate mate attraction in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Scott F; Nichols, Amy E; Schein, Catherine H; Nagle, Gregg T

    2006-03-01

    The water-borne protein attractin is a potent sex pheromone involved in forming and maintaining mating and egg-laying aggregations in the marine mollusk Aplysia. Binary blends of attractin and either enticin, temptin, or seductin, three other Aplysia protein pheromones, stimulate mate attraction. The four pheromones are thought to act in concert during egg-laying. The new data presented here show that: (1) the water-borne odor of non-laying Aplysia brasiliana further increases the attractiveness of attractin and of eggs in T-maze bioassays. This suggests that individual Aplysia release additional factors that enhance the effects of attractin, enticin, temptin, and seductin during egg-laying; (2) the N-terminal region of enticin aligns well with the conserved epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domain of mammalian reproductive proteins known as fertilins, which may mediate intercellular adhesion interactions between eggs and sperm; (3) temptin, according to fold recognition servers, may also have an EGF-like fold. Enticin and temptin also have conserved metal binding sequences that may play a role in their signaling behavior. These results suggest that aspects of mammalian egg-sperm interactions (fertilins) may have evolved from pheromonal signaling mechanisms. We also review the structure, expression, localization, release, and behavioral actions of attractin, enticin, temptin, and seductin.

  1. Urbanization and human health in urban India: institutional analysis of water-borne diseases in Ahmedabad.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, V S; Ayessa Idenal, Marissa; Saiyed, Shahin; Saxena, Deepak; Gerke, Solvay

    2016-10-01

    Diseases are rapidly urbanizing. Ageing infrastructures, high levels of inequality, poor urban governance, rapidly growing economies and highly dense and mobile populations all create environments rife for water-borne diseases. This article analyzes the role of institutions as crosscutting entities among a myriad of factors that breed water-borne diseases in the city of Ahmedabad, India. It applies 'path dependency' and a 'rational choice' perspective to understand the factors facilitating the breeding of diseases. This study is based on household surveys of approximately 327 households in two case study wards and intermittent interviews with key informants over a period of 2 years. Principle component analysis is applied to reduce the data and convert a set of observations, which potentially correlate with each other, into components. Institutional analyses behind these components reveal the role of social actors in exploiting the deeply rooted inefficiencies affecting urban health. This has led to a vicious cycle; breaking this cycle requires understanding the political dynamics that underlie the exposure and prevalence of diseases to improve urban health. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Water-Borne Endovascular Embolics Inspired by the Undersea Adhesive of Marine Sandcastle Worms.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joshua P; Sima, Monika; O'Hara, Ryan G; Stewart, Russell J

    2016-04-06

    Transcatheter embolization is used to treat vascular malformations and defects, to control bleeding, and to selectively block blood supply to tissues. Liquid embolics are used for small vessel embolization that require distal penetration. Current liquid embolic agents have serious drawbacks, mostly centered around poor handling characteristics and toxicity. In this work, a water-borne in situ setting liquid embolic agent is described that is based on electrostatically condensed, oppositely charged polyelectrolytes-complex coacervates. At high ionic strengths, the embolic coacervates are injectable fluids that can be delivered through long narrow microcatheters. At physiological ionic strength, the embolic coacervates transition into a nonflowing solid morphology. Transcatheter embolization of rabbit renal arteries demonstrated capillary level penetration, homogeneous occlusion, and 100% devascularization of the kidney, without the embolic crossing into venous circulation. The benign water-borne composition and setting mechanism avoids many of the problems of current liquid embolics, and provides precise temporal and spatial control during endovascular embolization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Association of water-borne diseases morbidity pattern and water quality in parts of Ibadan City, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oguntoke, O; Aboderin, O J; Bankole, A M

    2009-10-01

    Occurrence of diarrhoea and other water-borne diseases in cities of developing countries has been on the increase over the decades largely due to unsafe water, inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene among human population. This study examined the relationship between the spatial pattern of water-borne diseases vis-a-vis water quality in parts of Ibadan City in Nigeria. Data on 1334 cases of various water-borne diseases was collected from eight public hospitals with catchments covering the study area. Three areas with relatively high incidence of water-borne diseases and another three areas with relatively low incidence were selected for water sampling and household survey. Water samples from rains, wells, and borehole were collected for physical and bacteriological analyses. A well structured questionnaire was administered to 350 residents of the selected areas to elicit information on water sourcing, handling and storage. Analysis of hospital records showed significant difference in the occurrence of water-borne diseases among residential areas (P < 0.05). Typhoid fever had the highest occurrence (39.3%) followed by bacillary dysentery and cholera. About 45% of water-borne diseases were reported in July to September. The majority (77.1%) of the respondents depended on wells as major source of domestic water. Faecal coliform contamination of water samples ranged between 0.1 x 10(4) and 1.8 x 10(4) CFU ml(-1). Furthermore, 18% of rain water and 23.6% of well water samples were positive to Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella typhi and Shigella dysenteriae. Potash alum application for domestic water treatment accounted for 68.6% explanation of waterborne diseases morbidity pattern in the study area (P < 0.05). Provision of adequate potable water remains the most important tool for preventing water-borne diseases in the study area.

  4. Propagated fixed-bed mixed-acid fermentation: Part I: Effect of volatile solid loading rate and agitation at high pH.

    PubMed

    Golub, Kristina W; Forrest, Andrea K; Mercy, Kevin L; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-11-01

    Countercurrent fermentation is a high performing process design for mixed-acid fermentation. However, there are high operating costs associated with moving solids, which is an integral component of this configuration. This study investigated the effect of volatile solid loading rate (VSLR) and agitation in propagated fixed-bed fermentation, a configuration which may be more commercially viable. To evaluate the role of agitation on fixed-bed configuration performance, continuous mixing was compared with periodic mixing. VSLR was also varied and not found to affect acid yields. However, increased VSLR and liquid retention time did result in higher conversions, productivity, acid concentrations, but lower selectivities. Agitation was demonstrated to be important for this fermentor configuration, the periodically-mixed fermentation had the lowest conversion and yields. Operating at a high pH (∼9) contributed to the high selectivity to acetic acid, which might be industrially desirable but at the cost of lower yield compared to a neutral pH.

  5. Propagated fixed-bed mixed-acid fermentation: effect of volatile solid loading rate and agitation at near-neutral pH.

    PubMed

    Golub, Kristina W; Golub, Stacey R; Meysing, Daniel M; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2012-11-01

    To increase conversion and product concentration, mixed-acid fermentation can use a countercurrent strategy where solids and liquids pass in opposite directions through a series of fermentors. To limit the requirement for moving solids, this study employed a propagated fixed-bed fermentation, where solids were stationary and only liquid was transferred. To evaluate the role of agitation, continuous mixing was compared with periodic mixing. The periodically mixed fermentation had similar conversion, but lower yield and selectivity. Increasing volatile solid loading rate from 1.5 to 5.1g non-acid volatile solids/(L(liq)·d) and increasing liquid retention time decreased yield, conversion, selectivity, but increased product concentrations. Compared to a previous study at high pH (~9), this study achieved higher performance at near neutral pH (~6.5) and optimal C-N ratios. Compared to countercurrent fermentation, propagated fixed-bed fermentations have similar selectivities and produce similar proportions of acetic acid, but have lower yields, conversion, productivities, and acid concentrations.

  6. Detection of coalescing agents in water-borne latex emulsions using an environment sensitive fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Raja, Tanzeela Nazir; Brouwer, Albert M; Biemans, Koen; Nabuurs, Tijs; Tennebroek, Ronald

    2010-07-30

    In this paper we report the determination of partitioning of coalescing agents (organic co-solvents) in water-borne latex emulsions by means of a fluorescence method. An environment-sensitive fluorescent probe was copolymerized via emulsion polymerization. The presence of organic co-solvents inside the polymer particles is revealed by the photophysical properties of the probe. In particular, the position of the fluorescence emission maximum of co-polymerized can be used to measure the amount of coalescing agent present in the polymer particles. The spectral shifts are shown to be due to the softening of the matrix, rather than to solvation of the probe by the added co-solvent.

  7. An integrated risk model of a drinking-water-borne cryptosporidiosis outbreak.

    PubMed

    Casman, E A; Fischhoff, B; Palmgren, C; Small, M J; Wu, F

    2000-08-01

    A dynamic risk model is developed to track the occurrence and evolution of a drinking-water-borne cryptosporidiosis outbreak. The model characterizes and integrates the various environmental, medical, institutional, and behavioral factors that determine outbreak development and outcome. These include contaminant delivery and detection, water treatment efficiency, the timing of interventions, and the choices that people make when confronted with a known or suspected risk. The model is used to evaluate the efficacy of alternative strategies for improving risk management during an outbreak, and to identify priorities for improvements in the public health system. Modeling results indicate that the greatest opportunity for curtailing a large outbreak is realized by minimizing delays in identifying and correcting a drinking-water problem. If these delays cannot be reduced, then the effectiveness of risk communication in preemptively reaching and persuading target populations to avoid exposure becomes important.

  8. Smart polymer nanoparticles for high-performance water-borne coatings.

    PubMed

    Piçarra, Susana; Fidalgo, Alexandra; Fedorov, Aleksander; Martinho, José M G; Farinha, José Paulo S

    2014-10-21

    Poly(butyl methacrylate) nanoparticles encapsulating a silica precursor, tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), were synthesized by a two-step emulsion polymerization process. We show that TEOS remains mostly unreacted inside the nanoparticles in water but acts both as a plasticizer and cross-linker in films cast from the dispersions. The diffusion-enhancing plasticizing effect is dominant at annealing temperatures closer to the glass-transition temperature of the polymer, and sol-gel cross-linking reactions predominate at higher temperatures. By choosing an appropriate annealing temperature, we were able to balance polymer interdiffusion and silica cross-linking to obtain films with good mechanical properties and excellent chemical resistance. The hybrid cross-linked films produced from these novel "smart" nanoparticles can be used in water-borne environmentally friendly coatings for high-performance applications.

  9. Bacteriological quality of water and water borne diseases in Bangalore: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Jyothi

    2011-03-01

    In developing countries diarrhea diseases take a big toll which can be prevented by adequate supply of safe drinking water. Thus a longitudinal study was taken up to determine the morbidity due to water borne diseases and bacteriological quality of water. 150 houses in two different areas, one supplied by bore well and other by tap water was selected by modified cluster sampling. Weekly morbidity details collected. Monthly water samples were assessed for bacteriological quality from main supply, household storage and morbidity reported houses. The difference in proportion of potable and non potable water at storage points was statistically significant. The overall incidence rate of target diseases was 3.58%,majority were diaarrhoel diseases with increased incidence in children less than five years.

  10. Hydroclimatic drivers, Water-borne Diseases, and Population Vulnerability in Bengal Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Jutla, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    Water-borne diarrheal disease outbreaks in the Bengal Delta region, such as cholera, rotavirus, and dysentery, show distinct seasonal peaks and spatial signatures in their origin and progression. However, the mechanisms behind these seasonal phenomena, especially the role of regional climatic and hydrologic processes behind the disease outbreaks, are not fully understood. Overall diarrheal disease prevalence and the population vulnerability to transmission mechanisms thus remain severely underestimated. Recent findings suggest that diarrheal incidence in the spring is strongly associated with scarcity of freshwater flow volumes, while the abundance of water in monsoon show strong positive correlation with autumn diarrheal burden. The role of large-scale ocean-atmospheric processes that tend to modulate meteorological, hydrological, and environmental conditions over large regions and the effects on the ecological states conducive to the vectors and triggers of diarrheal outbreaks over large geographic regions are not well understood. We take a large scale approach to conduct detailed diagnostic analyses of a range of climate, hydrological, and ecosystem variables to investigate their links to outbreaks, occurrence, and transmission of the most prevalent water-borne diarrheal diseases. We employ satellite remote sensing data products to track coastal ecosystems and plankton processes related to cholera outbreaks. In addition, we investigate the effect of large scale hydroclimatic extremes (e.g., droughts and floods, El Nino) to identify how diarrheal transmission and epidemic outbreaks are most likely to respond to shifts in climatic, hydrologic, and ecological changes over coming decades. We argue that controlling diarrheal disease burden will require an integrated predictive surveillance approach - a combination of prediction and prevention - with recent advances in climate-based predictive capabilities and demonstrated successes in primary and tertiary prevention

  11. Aplysia temptin - the 'glue' in the water-borne attractin pheromone complex.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Scott F; Xie, Fang; de Vries, Melissa R; Annangudi, Suresh P; Misra, Milind; Degnan, Bernard M; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Nagle, Gregg T; Schein, Catherine H

    2007-10-01

    Temptin, a component of the complex of water-borne protein pheromones that stimulate attraction and mating behavior in the marine mollusk Aplysia, has sequence homology to the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like domains of higher organisms that mediate protein-cell surface contact during fertilization and blood coagulation. In this work, recombinant temptin for structural and functional studies was produced in Escherichia coli using a cold shock promoter and purified by RP-HPLC. CD spectra confirmed a predominantly beta-sheet structure. Two disulfide bonds were determined via limited proteolysis and MS. One internal disulfide (Cys57-Cys77) was predicted from initial alignments with class I EGF-like domains; the second, between Cys18 and Cys103, could protect temptin against proteolysis in seawater and stabilize its interacting surface. A three-dimensional model of temptin was prepared with our MPACK suite, based on the Ca(2+)-binding, EGF-like domain of the extracellular matrix protein fibrillin. Two temptin residues, Trp52 and Trp79, which align with cysteine residues conserved in fibrillins, lie adjacent to and could stabilize the disulfide bonds and a proposed metal-binding loop. The water-borne pheromone attractin in egg cordon eluates is complexed with other proteins. Docking results with our model and the NMR structure of attractin suggest that one face of temptin interacts with the pheromone, perhaps controlling its access to the cellular receptors. Gel shifts confirmed that temptin complexes with wild-type attractin. These results indicate that temptin, analogous to the role of fibrillin in controlling transforming growth factor-beta concentration, modulates pheromone signaling by direct binding to attractin.

  12. The formation of volatile corrosion products during the mixed oxidation-chlorination of cobalt at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Mcnallan, M. J.; Lee, Y. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reaction of cobalt with 1 pct Cl2 in 1, 10, and 50 pct O2/Ar atmospheres has been studied at 650 C with thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. The principal vapor species appear to be CoCl2 and CoCl3. In all cases, CoCl2(s) forms at the oxide/metal interface and equilibration of the volatile chlorides with Co3O4 does not occur in the early stages of the reaction. In the 1 pct Cl2 1 pct O2-Ar case, continuous volatilization occurs. In the 1 pct Cl2-10 pct O2-Ar and 1 pct CL2-50 pct O2-Ar cases, volatilization occurs only in the first few minutes of reaction. Afterwards, the reaction is predominantly oxidation.

  13. The formation of volatile corrosion products during the mixed oxidation-chlorination of cobalt at 650 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, N. S.; Mcnallan, M. J.; Lee, Y. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The reaction of cobalt with 1 pct Cl2 in 1, 10, and 50 pct O2/Ar atmospheres has been studied at 650 C with thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. The principal vapor species appear to be CoCl2 and CoCl3. In all cases, CoCl2(s) forms at the oxide/metal interface and equilibration of the volatile chlorides with Co3O4 does not occur in the early stages of the reaction. In the 1 pct Cl2 1 pct O2-Ar case, continuous volatilization occurs. In the 1 pct Cl2-10 pct O2-Ar and 1 pct CL2-50 pct O2-Ar cases, volatilization occurs only in the first few minutes of reaction. Afterwards, the reaction is predominantly oxidation.

  14. Two-component mantle melting-mixing model for the generation of mid-ocean ridge basalts: Implications for the volatile content of the Pacific upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kei; Saal, Alberto E.; Myers, Corinne E.; Nagle, Ashley N.; Hauri, Erik H.; Forsyth, Donald W.; Kamenetsky, Vadim S.; Niu, Yaoling

    2016-03-01

    We report major, trace, and volatile element (CO2, H2O, F, Cl, S) contents and Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopes of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) glasses from the Northern East Pacific Rise (NEPR) off-axis seamounts, the Quebrada-Discovery-GoFar (QDG) transform fault system, and the Macquarie Island. The incompatible trace element (ITE) contents of the samples range from highly depleted (DMORB, Th/La ⩽ 0.035) to enriched (EMORB, Th/La ⩾ 0.07), and the isotopic composition spans the entire range observed in EPR MORB. Our data suggest that at the time of melt generation, the source that generated the EMORB was essentially peridotitic, and that the composition of NMORB might not represent melting of a single upper mantle source (DMM), but rather mixing of melts from a two-component mantle (depleted and enriched DMM or D-DMM and E-DMM, respectively). After filtering the volatile element data for secondary processes (degassing, sulfide saturation, assimilation of seawater-derived component, and fractional crystallization), we use the volatiles to ITE ratios of our samples and a two-component mantle melting-mixing model to estimate the volatile content of the D-DMM (CO2 = 22 ppm, H2O = 59 ppm, F = 8 ppm, Cl = 0.4 ppm, and S = 100 ppm) and the E-DMM (CO2 = 990 ppm, H2O = 660 ppm, F = 31 ppm, Cl = 22 ppm, and S = 165 ppm). Our two-component mantle melting-mixing model reproduces the kernel density estimates (KDE) of Th/La and 143Nd/144Nd ratios for our samples and for EPR axial MORB compiled from the literature. This model suggests that: (1) 78% of the Pacific upper mantle is highly depleted (D-DMM) while 22% is enriched (E-DMM) in volatile and refractory ITE, (2) the melts produced during variable degrees of melting of the E-DMM controls most of the MORB geochemical variation, and (3) a fraction (∼65% to 80%) of the low degree EMORB melts (produced by ∼1.3% melting) may escape melt aggregation by freezing at the base of the oceanic lithosphere, significantly enriching it in

  15. Schottky barrier-gated high performance photodetectors using a water-borne polymeric colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, J.; Sim, K. M.; Yoon, S.; Ha, J.; Chung, D. S.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we demonstrate the synergetic application of a cationic surfactant (CTAB) for the fabrication of a fast response organic photoconductor via an environmentally benign fabrication process. A water-borne colloid of the semiconducting polymer PBTTT was fabricated via a mini-emulsion process with CTAB as the surfactant, and deposited onto a Au-patterned substrate to complete the photoconductor device geometry. Due to the preferential adsorption of the ammonium cation of the CTAB molecules onto the Au surface, a dipole layer was created and thus the work function of Au was significantly reduced, as confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic studies. We show that the resulting Schottky barrier between Au-CTAB and PBTTT can be used as an artificial `gate' for a trap-limited photoconductive mechanism, leading to a fast temporal response of the photoconductor without sacrificing the efficient photoconductive gain-generating mechanism. As a result, a high detectivity of 4.92 × 1010 Jones, as well as a high gain of 107, can be realized from the PBTTT-based organic photoconductor. This result opens the possibility of fabricating high performance and simple structured organic photodetectors via a nontoxic fabrication process.Here, we demonstrate the synergetic application of a cationic surfactant (CTAB) for the fabrication of a fast response organic photoconductor via an environmentally benign fabrication process. A water-borne colloid of the semiconducting polymer PBTTT was fabricated via a mini-emulsion process with CTAB as the surfactant, and deposited onto a Au-patterned substrate to complete the photoconductor device geometry. Due to the preferential adsorption of the ammonium cation of the CTAB molecules onto the Au surface, a dipole layer was created and thus the work function of Au was significantly reduced, as confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic studies. We show that the resulting Schottky barrier between Au-CTAB and PBTTT can be used

  16. [Surveillance on drinking-water-born endemic fluorosis in China, 2013].

    PubMed

    Zhao, L J; Pei, J R; Zhang, W; Wang, W; Yu, G Q; Sun, D J; Gao, Y H

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the prevalence of fluorosis and related control measures on drinking water type of endemic fluorosis in China. According to the national program- "Surveillance Scheme of Drinking-Water-Borne Endemic Fluorosis" , 136 counties were selected in 29 provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities. Three epidemic villages were randomly selected as fixed monitoring sites in each county. Dental fluorosis of all the children aged 8-12 living in the villages under the monitoring program, was identified under the ariteria from "Diagnosis of dental fluorosis" (WS/T 208-2011). Operating conditions and contents of fluoride in all the'water-improved projects' were investigated. Contents of fluoride in drinking water were tested in villages without the 'water-improved projects'. "Standard Test Method for Drinking Water" (GB/T 5750.5-2006) was used to detect the water fluoride. The overall prevalence of dental fluorosis among children aged 8-12 in all the villages under monitor program, was 28.58% (7 950/27 817), with the dental fluorosis index (DFI) as 0.58. Among them, the prevalence was 22.28% (3 917/17 583) and DFI was 0.44 in the'water-improved projects' villages that under normal operation and with qualified fluoride contents. The prevalence appeared as 38.74% (1 926/4 971) with DFI as 0.84 in those villages with 'water-improved projects' but mal-operated or with excessive fluoride. The prevalence was 40.03% (2 107/5 263), and DFI was 0.81 in those villages without 'water-improved projects'. The prevalence rates of dental fluorosis in children from the three types of endemic areas were significantly different. For 'water-improved projects', the normal opration rate was 93.77% (286/305) and the qualification rate of fluoride content was 76.77% (228/297). Dental fluorosis in children living in the drinking-water-born endemic fluorosis areas was on the edge of epidemics in China. Effective improvement on the quality of drinking water can significantly reduce the

  17. Water-Borne Diseases, Cost of Illness and Willingness to Pay for Diseases Interventions in Rural Communities of Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Malik, A; Yasar, A; Tabinda, AB; Abubakar, M

    2012-01-01

    Background Almost one third of the global population is living in developing South Asia where disease occurrence is high especially in rural areas and people are unaware of water-borne diseases and cost of illness. Methods: The quantitative approach involved questionnaire based study (n=50 households). The community awareness, the occurrence of water-borne diseases with related cost of illness and community participation for the introduction of health interventions for water-borne diseases were evaluated through cross-tabulations, correlations, and ANOVA. Results: Majority (40%) of the community had no knowledge of water-borne diseases except some had little knowledge of diarrhea and typhoid. Diarrhea followed by stomach diseases was widespread in the community. Population below poverty level was bearing the cost of illness around US$ 0.6—1.2 (Rs 50—100) per day followed by low and average income level with direct cost of US$ 2.3 (Rs 200) per day. The indirect cost of illness had showed increasing trend between US$ 2.3—4.7 (Rs 200–400) per day with increase in income levels. Maximum willingness to pay (WTP) for water supply and sewerage system was US$ 3.6 (Rs 300) and US$ 1.2 (Rs 100) per month respectively. Income and water supply demand was strongly correlated with acceptability to pay for the facilities (r = 0.319, 0.307; P< 0.05). Income had a strong influence on WTP for water and sewerage system (r = 0.805, 0.797; P< 0.05). Conclusion: To maintain rural health, water-borne diseases can be reduced by introducing health interventions like proper water and sanitation facilities. PMID:23113192

  18. PEGylated chitosan protected silver nanoparticles as water-borne coating for leather with antibacterial property.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gongyan; Li, Kaijun; Luo, Quanqing; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Zongcai

    2017-03-15

    Development of eco-labeled and effectively antibacterial coatings for final leather products has been desiderated both by industry and by consumers. Herein, PEGylated chitosan modified silver nanoparticles (PEG-g-CS@AgNPs) were prepared and characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antimicrobial activity of such silver nanoparticles was investigated against Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), exhibiting much lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) than chitosan or PEG-g-CS. Water-borne coating was formed by immobilizing the PEG-g-CS@AgNPs onto the leather surface through the electrostatic interaction between amino groups of chitosan and carboxyl groups of leather collagen. Scanning electron microscopy and water contact angle were employed to study the coating's morphology and hydrophilicity, respectively. After coating, leather samples showed significantly high bactericidal efficiency with reusability after release of dead cells from the coating by simply water washing. The excellent antibacterial property of PEG-g-CS@AgNPs coating was ascribed to the combination of bacteria-resistance and bacteria-release by PEGylation, and dual bacteria-killing based on chitosan and Ag(+) release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Copper accumulation in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) exposed to water borne copper sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.; Griffin, B.; Schlenk, D.; Kadlubar, F.; Brand, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    Liver and axial muscle of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) was analyzed for residual copper after exposure to water borne copper sulfate. Copper sulfate was continuously introduced into well water in three fiber glass tanks to achieve 1.7 mg/L, 2.7 mg/L and 3.6 mg/L copper sulfate concentrations in exposure waters. Milli-Q quality water was metered into a fourth tank at the same rate for unexposed fish. Actual levels of copper in exposure waters were determined by daily sampling and analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (GFAA). Tissue samples were taken from six fish from each of the exposed and unexposed tanks at two-week intervals, Samples were collected until tissue analysis indicated an equilibrium had been established between the uptake and elimination in both the muscle and liver tissue. Elimination was followed until a clear rate of deputation could be established. Samples were digested in nitric acid in a micro wave digestor and analyzed by GFAA. Results of tissue analysis will be presented to demonstrate bioaccumulation and the effect of copper concentration, length of copper exposure, and gender on copper uptake, establishment of tissue:environmental copper equilibrium, and rate of copper elimination following exposure.

  20. New piezoelectric polymer for air-borne and water-borne sound transducers.

    PubMed

    Kressmann, R

    2001-04-01

    Acoustic transducers made of a charged cellular polymer called EMFi have been designed and investigated with respect to air-borne and water-borne sound. The longitudinal transducer constant is around 90 pC/N, strongly exceeding the values of other piezoelectric polymers. This is mainly attributed to the very low Young's modulus of about 2 MPa. The acoustic impedance is only 2.6 x 10(4) kg/(m2 s) and results in good matching to air but strong loading under water. Due to this strong loading, a pronounced reduction of resonance frequency from 300 kHz in air down to 17 kHz under water is observed. The experiments indicate that fluid loading is not only mass-like but also compliant, reducing the transducer's sensitivity below the resonance frequency of about -63 dB re 1 V/Pa (0.7 mV/Pa) in air to -71 dB re 1 V/Pa under water. This compliance is attributed to the medium's compressibility. Piezoelectricity of EMFi films is limited to temperatures below 70 degrees C; above, irreversible discharge of trapped charges takes place. Furthermore, a second type of EMFi, called "OS" was investigated, having a piezoelectric constant of 15 pC/N and a Young's modulus of 6 MPa. In quasi-static sensor measurements, the piezoelectric constant increases with the applied load. This nonlinearity explains the higher values reported in other publications on the same materials.

  1. [Determination of three isothiazolinone biocides in water-borne adhesives by high performance liquid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Li, Xiaolan; Chen, Zhiyan; Ye, Changwen; Zhou, Yun; Meng, Dongling

    2015-01-01

    A rapid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the quantitative analysis of three isothiazolinone biocides (2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (MI), 5-chloro-2-methyl-4-isothiazolin-3-one (CMI) and 1, 2-benzylisothiazolin-3-one (BIT)) in water-borne adhesives. The sample was extracted with methanol-water (1:1, v/v), and purified by centrifugation and filtration. The isothiazolones were separated on a C18 column with methanol-water as mobile phases under gradient elution and detected with a diode array detector (DAD). The pretreatment factors such as extraction solvent, extraction method, dilution ratio, extraction time were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the targets had good linearities (r2H > or = 0.9992) in the range of 0.25-10.0 mg/L. The recoveries were between 92% and 103% with the relative standard deviations not more than 4%. The limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.43 mg/kg and 1.14 mg/kg. The limits of quantification (LOQs) were between 1.44 mg/kg and 3.81 mg/kg. The results showed that the method can achieve the purpose of quantitative detection. The analyses of real samples verified the reliability of this method.

  2. Separation and concentration of water-borne contaminants utilizing insulator-based dielectrophoresis.

    SciTech Connect

    Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca Hazalia; Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Cummings, Eric B.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Kanouff, Michael P.; Simmons, Blake Alexander; McGraw, Gregory J.; Salmi, Allen J.; Ceremuga, Joseph T.; Fintschenko, Yolanda

    2006-01-01

    This report focuses on and presents the capabilities of insulator-based dielectrophoresis (iDEP) microdevices for the concentration and removal of water-borne bacteria, spores and inert particles. The dielectrophoretic behavior exhibited by the different particles of interest (both biological and inert) in each of these systems was observed to be a function of both the applied electric field and the characteristics of the particle, such as size, shape, and conductivity. The results obtained illustrate the potential of glass and polymer-based iDEP devices to act as a concentrator for a front-end device with significant homeland security and industrial applications for the threat analysis of bacteria, spores, and viruses. We observed that the polymeric devices exhibit the same iDEP behavior and efficacy in the field of use as their glass counterparts, but with the added benefit of being easily mass fabricated and developed in a variety of multi-scale formats that will allow for the realization of a truly high-throughput device. These results also demonstrate that the operating characteristics of the device can be tailored through the device fabrication technique utilized and the magnitude of the electric field gradient created within the insulating structures. We have developed systems capable of handling numerous flow rates and sample volume requirements, and have produced a deployable system suitable for use in any laboratory, industrial, or clinical setting.

  3. Comparison of Hygroscopicity, Volatility, and Mixing State of Submicrometer Particles between Cruises over the Arctic Ocean and the Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kim, Gibaek; Cho, Hee-Joo; Seo, Arom; Kim, Dohyung; Gim, Yeontae; Lee, Bang Yong; Yoon, Young Jun; Park, Kihong

    2015-10-20

    Ship-borne measurements of ambient aerosols were conducted during an 11 937 km cruise over the Arctic Ocean (cruise 1) and the Pacific Ocean (cruise 2). A frequent nucleation event was observed during cruise 1 under marine influence, and the abundant organic matter resulting from the strong biological activity in the ocean could contribute to the formation of new particles and their growth to a detectable size. Concentrations of particle mass and black carbon increased with increasing continental influence from polluted areas. During cruise 1, multiple peaks of hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of 1.1-1.2, 1.4, and 1.6 were found, and higher amounts of volatile organic species existed in the particles compared to that during cruise 2, which is consistent with the greater availability of volatile organic species caused by the strong oceanic biological activity (cruise 1). Internal mixtures of volatile and nonhygroscopic organic species, nonvolatile and less-hygroscopic organic species, and nonvolatile and hygroscopic nss-sulfate with varying fractions can be assumed to constitute the submicrometer particles. On the basis of elemental composition and morphology, the submicrometer particles were classified into C-rich mixture, S-rich mixture, C/S-rich mixture, Na-rich mixture, C/P-rich mixture, and mineral-rich mixture. Consistently, the fraction of biological particles (i.e., P-containing particles) increased when the ship traveled along a strongly biologically active area.

  4. Nonreversible immobilization of water-borne plutonium onto self-assembled adlayers of silanized humic materials.

    PubMed

    Shcherbina, Natalia S; Kalmykov, Stepan S; Karpiouk, Leonid A; Ponomarenko, Sergey A; Hatfield, Kirk; Haire, Richard; Perminova, Irina V

    2014-02-18

    The objective was to study plutonium partitioning between immobile and mobile humic materials at the water-solid interfaces. Immobilization of the humic materials on solid supports was performed in situ using self-adhesive silanized humic derivatives. The presence of the humic adlayers on solid supports was shown to significantly enhance Pu sorption and its retention under both steady state and dynamic conditions. While plutonium may exist in multiple oxidations states plus colloidal forms, the major thrust in this work was to study the behavior of most mobile--the PuO2(+) form in dilute solutions. The values of the plutonium partition coefficients (Kd) between water and humics-coated silica gels after 10 days exposure reached 1.6 × 10(4) L · kg(-1) at pH 7.5 under anaerobic conditions with a total plutonium concentration of 1.2 × 10(-8) M exceeding those for the uncoated SiO2 (6.3 × 10(2) L · kg(-1)). Column tests showed substantial sequestration of water-borne plutonium (up to 73%) on the humics-coated silica gels. Remobilization experiments conducted under batch conditions at different pH values (3.5, 4.5, 7.5) showed that no more than 3% of the sequestered Pu was remobilized from the humics-coated silica gels by treatment with dissolved humic materials at environmentally relevant pH of 7.5. Consequently, silanized humic materialas can be seen as both molecular probes and as potent candidate materials for scavenging mobile Pu from an aqueous phase.

  5. River Networks As Ecological Corridors for Species, Populations and Pathogens of Water-Borne Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, A.

    2014-12-01

    River basins are a natural laboratory for the study of the integration of hydrological, ecological and geomorphological processes. Moving from morphological and functional analyses of dendritic geometries observed in Nature over a wide range of scales, this Lecture addresses essential ecological processes that take place along dendritic structures, hydrology-driven and controlled, like e.g.: population migrations and human settlements, that historically proceeded along river networks to follow water supply routes; riparian ecosystems composition that owing to their positioning along streams play crucial roles in their watersheds and in the loss of biodiversity proceeding at unprecedented rates; waterborne disease spreading, like epidemic cholera that exhibits epidemic patterns that mirror those of watercourses and of human mobility and resurgences upon heavy rainfall. Moreover, the regional incidence of Schistosomiasis, a parasitic waterborne disease, and water resources developments prove tightly related, and proliferative kidney disease in fish thrives differently in pristine and engineered watercourses: can we establish quantitatively the critical linkages with hydrologic drivers and controls? How does connectivity within a river network affect community composition or the spreading mechanisms? Does the river basin act as a template for biodiversity or for species' persistence? Are there hydrologic controls on epidemics of water-borne disease? Here, I shall focus on the noteworthy scientific perspectives provided by spatially explicit eco-hydrological studies centered on river networks viewed as ecological corridors for species, populations and pathogens of waterborne disease. A notable methodological coherence is granted by the mathematical description of river networks as the support for reactive transport. The Lecture overviews a number of topics idiosyncratically related to my own research work but ideally aimed at a coherent body of materials and methods. A

  6. Characterization of Aplysia Alb-1, a candidate water-borne protein pheromone released during egg laying.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Scott F; Degnan, Bernard M; Nagle, Gregg T

    2008-02-01

    Pheromones are known to be important to the innate behavior of marine animals. Attraction in Aplysia involves the long-distance water-borne protein pheromones attractin, enticin, temptin and seductin, which are released from the albumen gland during egg laying. Other pheromones are predicted to act in concert with these pheromones, but their identities are unknown. To identify additional pheromone candidates, we employed differential library screening of an albumen gland cDNA library, RT-PCR, recombinant protein expression, rhinophore contraction bioassays and immunocytochemistry. Alb-1 is expressed in the Aplysia californica albumen gland and encodes a novel protein that does not share significant sequence identity with any proteins in the database. RT-PCR analysis detected Alb-1 transcripts in the albumen gland, exocrine atrial gland and ovotestis. The Alb-1 precursor has a signal peptide sequence followed by a predicted 101-residue protein sequence containing eight cysteine residues. Recombinant protein expression, RP-HPLC, microsequence analysis and MALDI mass spectrometry analyses demonstrated that mature recombinant Alb-1 was processed at a paired basic residue site to generate an N-terminal and C-terminal protein fragment; this was consistent with immunoblot observations on purified albumen gland extracts. In rhinophore contraction (twitch) bioassays, the recombinant N-terminal protein induced rhinophore contractions whereas the C-terminal protein did not. An antibody generated to the N-terminal protein was used for immunocytochemical and immunoblot analyses and demonstrated that this protein is present in albumen gland secretory cells, egg cordons and egg eluates. Overall, the data suggest that Alb-1 may be processed in the albumen gland and that the Alb-1 1-56 protein released during egg laying may serve a pheromonal function in concert with attractin, enticin, temptin and seductin.

  7. NMR solution structure of attractin, a water-borne protein pheromone from the mollusk Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Garimella, Ravindranath; Xu, Yuan; Schein, Catherine H; Rajarathnam, Krishna; Nagle, Gregg T; Painter, Sherry D; Braun, Werner

    2003-08-26

    Water-borne protein pheromones are essential for coordination of reproductive activities in many marine organisms. In this paper, we describe the first structure of a pheromone protein from a marine organism, that of attractin (58 residues) from Aplysia californica. The NMR solution structure was determined from TOCSY, NOESY, and DQF-COSY measurements of recombinant attractin expressed in insect cells. The sequential resonance assignments were done with standard manual procedures. Approximately 90% of the 949 unambiguous NOESY cross-peaks were assigned automatically with simultaneous three-dimensional structure calculation using our NOAH/DIAMOD/FANTOM program suite. The final bundle of energy-refined structures is well-defined, with an average rmsd value to the mean structure of 0.72 +/- 0.12 A for backbone and 1.32 +/- 0.11 A for heavy atoms for amino acids 3-47. Attractin contains two antiparallel helices, made up of residues Ile9-Gln16 and I30-S36. The NMR distance constraints are consistent with the three disulfide bonds determined by mass spectroscopy (C4-C41, C13-C33, and C20-C26), where the first two could be directly determined from NOESY cross-peaks between CH beta protons of the corresponding cysteines. The second helix contains the (L/I)(29)IEECKTS(36) sequence conserved in attractins from five species of Aplysia that could interact with the receptor. The sequence and structure of this region are similar to those of the recognition helix of the Er-11 pheromone of the unicellular ciliate Euplotes raikovi, suggesting a possible common pathway for intercellular communication of these two distinct pheromone families.

  8. Mechanistic aspects of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles against food- and water-borne microbes.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, Chandran; Harper, Stacey L; Choe, Ho Sung; Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Yun, Soon-Il

    2015-10-01

    In the present study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized from aqueous leaves extract of Malva crispa and their mode of interaction with food- and water-borne microbes were investigated. Formation of AgNPs was conformed through UV-Vis, FE-SEM, EDS, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses. Further the concentration of silver (Ag) in the reaction mixture was conformed through ICP-MS analysis. Different concentration of nanoparticles (1-3 mM) tested to know the inhibitory effect of bacterial pathogens such as Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella enterica and the fungal pathogens of Penicillium expansum, Penicillium citrinum, Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus sojae and Aspergillus niger. Interestingly, nanoparticles synthesized from 2 to 3 mM concentration of AgNO3 showed excellent inhibitory activities against both bacterial and fungal pathogens which are well demonstrated through well diffusion, poison food technique, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). In addition, mode of interaction of nanoparticles into both bacterial and fungal pathogens was documented through Bio-TEM analysis. Further the genomic DNA isolated from test bacterial strains and their interaction with nanoparticles was carried out to elucidate the possible mode of action of nanoparticles against bacteria. Interestingly, AgNPs did not show any genotoxic effect against all the tested bacterial strains which are pronounced well in agarose gel electrophoresis and for supporting this study, UV-Vis and Bio-TEM analyses were carried out in which no significant changes observed compared with control. Hence, the overall results concluded that the antimicrobial activity of biogenic AgNPs occurred without any DNA damage.

  9. Modeling of water-borne coating: stress relaxation of suspensions of colloids linked by telechelic HEUR polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihu; Larson, Ronald G.

    In water-borne coatings, the rheology of colloidal suspensions is modified by the presence of rheological modifiers, such as Hydrophobic Ethoxylated Urethane (HEUR) polymers. HEUR is a telechelic polymer with two hydrophobic tails (hydrophobes) and a long hydrophilic interblock consisting of poly(ethylene oxide), and its thickening effect is largely determined by the self-association of hydrophobes as well as their adsorption onto latex particles. Here we describe a model that simulates the complex interactions among latex particles due to the formation of bridges or superbridges via model HEURs. We calculate the stress relaxation of the system and identify different relaxation modes. We explore the relaxation time at different latex volume fractions, HEUR concentrations and energies of association between hydrophobes and latex particles, and discuss its relationship with the bridge or latex cluster formation. These results provide important insights for HEUR adsorption and water-borne coating rheology. We acknowledge the financial support from The Dow Chemical Company.

  10. Volcán Popocatépetl, Mexico. Petrology, magma mixing, and immediate sources of volatiles for the 1994- Present eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witter, J.B.; Kress, V.C.; Newhall, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Volcán Popocatépetl has been the site of voluminous degassing accompanied by minor eruptive activity from late 1994 until the time of writing (August 2002). This contribution presents petrological investigations of magma erupted in 1997 and 1998, including major-element and volatile (S, Cl, F, and H2O) data from glass inclusions and matrix glasses. Magma erupted from Popocatépetl is a mixture of dacite (65 wt % SiO2, two-pyroxenes + plagioclase + Fe–Ti oxides + apatite, ∼3 wt % H2O, P = 1·5 kbar, fO2 = ΔNNO + 0·5 log units) and basaltic andesite (53 wt % SiO2, olivine + two-pyroxenes, ∼3 wt % H2O, P = 1–4 kbar). Magma mixed at 4–6 km depth in proportions between 45:55 and 85:15 wt % silicic:mafic magma. The pre-eruptive volatile content of the basaltic andesite is 1980 ppm S, 1060 ppm Cl, 950 ppm F, and 3·3 wt % H2O. The pre-eruptive volatile content of the dacite is 130 ± 50 ppm S, 880 ± 70 ppm Cl, 570 ± 100 ppm F, and 2·9 ± 0·2 wt % H2O. Degassing from 0·031 km3 of erupted magma accounts for only 0·7 wt % of the observed SO2 emission. Circulation of magma in the volcanic conduit in the presence of a modest bubble phase is a possible mechanism to explain the high rates of degassing and limited magma production at Popocatépetl.

  11. Mixing ratios and eddy covariance flux measurements of volatile organic compounds from an urban canopy (Manchester, UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Davison, B.; Nemitz, E.; Hewitt, C. N.

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations and fluxes of six volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured above the city of Manchester (UK) during the summer of 2006. A proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer was used for the measurement of concentrations, and fluxes were calculated using both the disjunct and the virtual disjunct eddy covariance techniques. The two flux systems, which operated in alternate half hours, showed reasonable agreement, with R2 values ranging between 0.2 and 0.8 for the individual analytes. On average, fluxes measured in the disjunct mode were lower than those measured in the virtual mode by approximately 19%, of which at least 8% can be attributed to the differing measurement frequencies of the two systems and the subsequent attenuation of high frequency flux contributions. Observed fluxes are thought to be largely controlled by anthropogenic sources, with vehicle emissions the major contributor. However both evaporative and biogenic emissions may account for a fraction of the isoprene present. Fluxes of the oxygenated compounds were highest on average, ranging between 60-89 μg m-2 h-1, whereas the fluxes of aromatic compounds were lower, between 19-42 μg m-2 h-1. The observed fluxes of benzene were up-scaled to give a city wide emission estimate which was found to be significantly lower than that of the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory (NAEI).

  12. Flux estimates and OH reaction potential of reactive biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from a mixed northern hardwood forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, John; Helmig, Detlev; Guenther, Alex; Harley, Peter; Pressley, Shelley; Vogel, Christoph

    Diurnal branch-level emission rates of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) including isoprene, monoterpenes (MT), and sesquiterpenes (SQT) were determined at the University of Michigan Biological Station for the tree species red maple ( Acer rubrum), red oak ( Quercus rubra), paper birch ( Betula papyrifera), white pine ( Pinus strobus), and big tooth aspen ( Populus grandidentata). These emission rates were combined with detailed biomass distribution and meteorological data and incorporated into the canopy model, model of emissions of gasses and aerosols from nature (MEGAN), for estimating whole-canopy fluxes of isoprene. The modeled half-hour fluxes (mgCm-2h-1) and cumulative seasonal fluxes (mgCm-2) compared favorably with results from direct, canopy-level eddy covariance (EC) isoprene measurements; modeled cumulative seasonal flux deviated less than 30% from the EC results. Significant MT emissions were found from four of the five tree species. MT emissions from three of these were both light- and temperature-dependent and were approximately one order of magnitude greater than light-independent MT emissions. SQT emissions were identified from three of the five tree species. The model was modified to incorporate SQT and both light-dependent and light-independent MT emissions for determining fluxes. Isoprene comprised >95% of the total terpenoid flux with MT and SQT comprising 4% and 0.3%, respectively. The average cumulative fluxes (in mgCm-2) from June through September were 2490 for isoprene, 105 for MT, and 7 for SQT. A simple box model analysis was used to estimate the contribution of the isoprene, MT, and SQT emissions to the total OH reactivity. These results confirm that isoprene dominates OH reactions especially during daytime hours. Emissions of reactive MT and SQT increase the BVOC+OH reactivity, but are still lower than estimates of BVOC fluxes at this site necessary for affecting OH reactivity to the significant degree suggested by recent

  13. Canopy-scale flux measurements and bottom-up emission estimates of volatile organic compounds from a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, W. J. F.; Schallhart, S.; Langford, B.; Valach, A.; Rantala, P.; Fares, S.; Carriero, G.; Tillmann, R.; Tomlinson, S. J.; Dragosits, U.; Gianelle, D.; Hewitt, C. N.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the fluxes and mixing ratios of biogenically emitted volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) 4 m above a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy. Fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone + methacrolein, methyl ethyl ketone and monoterpenes were obtained using both a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a proton transfer reaction-time of flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) together with the methods of virtual disjunct eddy covariance (PTR-MS) and eddy covariance (PTR-ToF-MS). Isoprene was the dominant emitted compound with a mean day-time flux of 1.9 mg m-2 h-1. Mixing ratios, recorded 4 m above the canopy, were dominated by methanol with a mean value of 6.2 ppbv over the 28 day measurement period. Comparison of isoprene fluxes calculated using the PTR-MS and PTR-ToF-MS showed very good agreement while comparison of the monoterpene fluxes suggested a slight over estimation of the flux by the PTR-MS. A basal isoprene emission rate for the forest of 1.7 mg m-2 h-1 was calculated using the MEGAN isoprene emissions algorithms (Guenther et al., 2006). A detailed tree species distribution map for the site enabled the leaf-level emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes recorded using GC-MS to be scaled up to produce a "bottom-up" canopy-scale flux. This was compared with the "top-down" canopy-scale flux obtained by measurements. For monoterpenes, the two estimates were closely correlated and this correlation improved when the plant species composition in the individual flux footprint was taken into account. However, the bottom-up approach significantly underestimated the isoprene flux, compared with the top-down measurements, suggesting that the leaf-level measurements were not representative of actual emission rates.

  14. Effect of pH and retention time on volatile fatty acids production during mixed culture fermentation.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Ewelina; Chwiałkowska, Joanna; Stodolny, Mikołaj; Oleskowicz-Popiel, Piotr

    2015-08-01

    Mixed culture fermentation consists of stable microbial population hence waste could be potentially used as a substrates. The aim of the work was to investigate the impact of pH and retention time on the anaerobic mixed culture fermentation. Trials at different pH (4-12) in unbuffered systems were conducted for 5, 10 and 15days. The highest VFAs concentration was achieved after 15days at pH 10 (0.62g/gVSadded), promising results were also achieved for pH 11 (0.54g/gVSadded). For pH 4 and short retention time propionic acid was the major product instead of acetic acid. For batches run at 15days (besides pH 6) caproic acid presence was noticed whereas at pH 11 occurrence of succinic was quantified. Significant correlation between operational factors and fermentation's effluents was proved. Throughout changing simple operating parameters one could design process to produce desirable concentration and composition of VFAs.

  15. Compositional mixed modeling of methane emissions and ruminal volatile fatty acids from individual cattle and multiple experiments.

    PubMed

    Palarea-Albaladejo, J; Rooke, J A; Nevison, I M; Dewhurst, R J

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association of methane (CH) yields (g/kg DMI) with rumen VFA molar proportions and animal and diet-related covariates from individual animals and multiple experiments. The dataset available consisted of 284 measurements of CH yields for beef cattle from 6 experiments measured in indirect respiration chambers. A compositional modeling approach was employed where VFA measurements were considered as a whole, instead of in isolation, emphasizing their multivariate relative scale. The analysis revealed expected close groupings of acetate and butyrate; propionate and valerate; iso-butyrate and iso-valerate. Linear mixed models were then fitted to examine relationships between CH yield and VFA, represented by meaningful log-contrasts of components called compositional balances, while accounting for other animal and diet-related covariates and random variability between experiments. A compositional balance representing (acetate × butyrate)/propionate best explained the contribution of VFA to variation in CH yield. The covariates DMI, forage:concentrate proportion (expressed as a categorical variable diet type: high concentrate, mixed forage:concentrate or high forage), and diet ME were also statistically significant. These results provided new insights into the relative inter-relationships among VFA measurements and also between VFA and CH yield. In conclusion, VFA molar proportions as represented by compositional balances were a significant contributor to explaining variation in CH yields from individual cattle.

  16. Soybean oil in water-borne coatings and latex film formation study by AC impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiratumnukul, Nantana

    Conventional coalescing agents such as butyl cellosolve, butyl carbitol, and TexanolRTM are widely use in the latex coatings industry to facilitate film formation at ambient temperature. Coalescent aids are composed of solvents with low evaporation rates. After water evaporates, coalescent aids would help soften polymer molecules and form continuous films, then gradually evaporates from the film. Coalescent aids, therefore, are considered as volatile organic compounds (VOC), which are of environmental concern. The main purpose of this research project was to prepare a fatty acid glycol ester from soybean oil and glycol (polyols). The soybean oil glycol ester can be used as a coalescent aid in latex paint formulation. The soybean oil glycol ester not only lowered the minimum film formation temperature of latex polymers and continuous film formed at ambient temperature, but also after it has facilitated film formation, does not substantially evaporate, but becomes part of the film. Soybean oil glycol esters, therefore, can reduce the VOC levels and facilitate film formation of latex paints. In the second part of this research AC-Impedance was used to investigate the efficiency of soybean oil coalescent aid in latex film formation relative to the conventional ones. The coating resistance showed that the efficiency of film formation was increased as a function of dry time. The coating resistance also exhibited the effect of soybean oil ester in latex film formation in the same fashion as a conventional coalescent aid, TexanolRTM.

  17. Canopy-scale flux measurements and bottom-up emission estimates of volatile organic compounds from a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, W. Joe F.; Schallhart, Simon; Langford, Ben; Valach, Amy; Rantala, Pekka; Fares, Silvano; Carriero, Giulia; Tillmann, Ralf; Tomlinson, Sam J.; Dragosits, Ulrike; Gianelle, Damiano; Hewitt, C. Nicholas; Nemitz, Eiko

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the fluxes and mixing ratios of biogenically emitted volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) 4 m above a mixed oak and hornbeam forest in northern Italy. Fluxes of methanol, acetaldehyde, isoprene, methyl vinyl ketone + methacrolein, methyl ethyl ketone and monoterpenes were obtained using both a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) and a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) together with the methods of virtual disjunct eddy covariance (using PTR-MS) and eddy covariance (using PTR-ToF-MS). Isoprene was the dominant emitted compound with a mean daytime flux of 1.9 mg m-2 h-1. Mixing ratios, recorded 4 m above the canopy, were dominated by methanol with a mean value of 6.2 ppbv over the 28-day measurement period. Comparison of isoprene fluxes calculated using the PTR-MS and PTR-ToF-MS showed very good agreement while comparison of the monoterpene fluxes suggested a slight over estimation of the flux by the PTR-MS. A basal isoprene emission rate for the forest of 1.7 mg m-2 h-1 was calculated using the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) isoprene emission algorithms (Guenther et al., 2006). A detailed tree-species distribution map for the site enabled the leaf-level emission of isoprene and monoterpenes recorded using gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to be scaled up to produce a bottom-up canopy-scale flux. This was compared with the top-down canopy-scale flux obtained by measurements. For monoterpenes, the two estimates were closely correlated and this correlation improved when the plant-species composition in the individual flux footprint was taken into account. However, the bottom-up approach significantly underestimated the isoprene flux, compared with the top-down measurements, suggesting that the leaf-level measurements were not representative of actual emission rates.

  18. Characterization of major lithologic units underlying the lower American River using water-borne continuous resistivity profiling, Sacramento, California, June 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Teeple, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The levee system of the lower American River in Sacramento, California, is situated above a mixed lithology of alluvial deposits that range from clay to gravel. In addition, sand deposits related to hydraulic mining activities underlie the floodplain and are preferentially prone to scour during high-flow events. In contrast, sections of the American River channel have been observed to be scour resistant. In this study, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, explores the resistivity structure of the American River channel to characterize the extent and thickness of lithologic units that may impact the scour potential of the area. Likely lithologic structures are interpreted, but these interpretations are non-unique and cannot be directly related to scour potential. Additional geotechnical data would provide insightful data on the scour potential of certain lithologic units. Additional interpretation of the resistivity data with respect to these results may improve interpretations of lithology and scour potential throughout the American River channel and floodplain. Resistivity data were collected in three profiles along the American River using a water-borne continuous resistivity profiling technique. After processing and modeling these data, inverted resistivity profiles were used to make interpretations about the extent and thickness of possible lithologic units. In general, an intermittent high-resistivity layer likely indicative of sand or gravel deposits extends to a depth of around 30 feet (9 meters) and is underlain by a consistent low-resistivity layer that likely indicates a high-clay content unit that extends below the depth of investigation (60 feet or 18 meters). Immediately upstream of the Watt Avenue Bridge, the high-resistivity layer is absent, and the low-resistivity layer extends to the surface where a scour-resistant layer has been previously observed in the river bed.

  19. Use of a passive bioreactor to reduce water-borne plant pathogens, nitrate, and sulfate in greenhouse effluent.

    PubMed

    Gruyer, Nicolas; Dorais, Martine; Alsanius, Beatrix W; Zagury, Gérald J

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the use of passive bioreactors to reduce water-borne plant pathogens (Pythium ultimum and Fusarium oxysporum) and nutrient load (NO(-) 3 and SO(2-) 4) in greenhouse effluent. Sterilized and unsterilized passive bioreactors filled with a reactive mixture of organic carbon material were used in three replicates. After a startup period of 2 (sterilized) or 5 (unsterilized) weeks, the bioreactor units received for 14 weeks a reconstituted commercial greenhouse effluent composed of 500 mg L(-1) SO(2-) 4 and 300 mg L(-1) NO(-) 3 and were inoculated three times with P. ultimum and F. oxysporum (10(6) CFU mL(-1)). Efficacy in removing water-borne plant pathogens and nitrate reached 99.9% for both the sterilized and unsterilized bioreactors. However, efficacy in reducing the SO(2-) 4 load sharply decreased from 89% to 29% after 2 weeks of NO(-) 3-supply treatment for the unsterilized bioreactors. Although SO(2-) 4 removal efficacy for the sterilized bioreactors did not recover after 4 weeks of NO(-) 3-supply treatment, the unsterilized bioreactor nearly reached a similar level of SO(2-) 4 removal after 4 weeks of NO(-) 3-supply treatment compared with affluent loaded only with SO(2-) 4, where no competition for the carbohydrate source occurred between the denitrification process and sulfate-reducing bacteria activity. Performance differences between the sterilized and unsterilized bioreactors clearly show the predominant importance of sulfate-reducing bacteria. Consequently, when sulfate-reducing bacteria reach their optimal activity, passive bioreactors may constitute a cheap, low-maintenance method of treating greenhouse effluent to recycle wastewater and eliminate nutrient runoff, which has important environmental impacts.

  20. Dose-related carcinogenic effects of water-borne benzo(a)pyrene on livers of two small fish species

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, W.E.; Walker, W.W.; Overstreet, R.M.; Lytle, T.F.; Lytle, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) administered by water-borne exposures caused dose-related carcinogenic effects in livers of two small fish species, the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). Medaka and guppies each were given two 6-h exposures. The first exposure was conducted on 6- to 10-day-old specimens. The second exposure was given 7 days later. The tests incorporated five treatment groups: (1) control, (2) carrier (dimethylformamide) control, (3) low BaP dose (not detectable--4 ppb), (4) intermediate BaP dose (about 8-47 ppb BaP), and (5) high BaP dose (200-270 ppb). Following the high-dose exposure, hepatocellular lesions classified as foci of cellular alteration (altered foci), adenomas, and hepatocellular carcinomas occurred in both species. In medaka, the lesions appeared to develop sequentially with the appearance of altered foci followed by adenomas and then hepatocellular carcinomas. Most lesions in guppies, however, were classified as altered foci although a few adenomas occurred in the early (24-week) sample and hepatocellular carcinomas occurred in the late (52-week) sample. When total lesions were combined, medaka had an 11% incidence at 24 weeks after the initial exposure and 36% incidence at 36 weeks. In guppies, 8% had liver lesions at 24 weeks, 19% at 36 weeks, and 20% at 52 weeks. A single extrahepatic neoplasm, a capillary hemangioma in a gill filament, occurred in a medaka from the 36-week high-dose sample. The results suggest that the medaka and guppy are capable of metabolizing water-borne BaP to carcinogenic metabolites which initiate hepatic tumor development.

  1. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  2. Profiling of soil volatile organic compounds after long-term application of inorganic, organic and organic-inorganic mixed fertilizers and their effect on plant growth.

    PubMed

    Raza, Waseem; Mei, Xinlan; Wei, Zhong; Ling, Ning; Yuan, Jun; Wang, Jichen; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2017-12-31

    The complexity of soil processes involved in the production, consumption and accumulation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) makes hard to access the overall dynamics of VOCs in the soil. In this study, the field soil, applied with inorganic (CF), organic (OF) and inorganic-organic mixed (CFOF) fertilizers for ten years was evaluated for the emission of VOCs at different temperature and moisture levels. We identified 30-50 soil emitted VOCs representing the most common soil VOCs groups by using the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The highest total emission of VOCs was found in OF treatment, but it was non-significantly different with CF treatment. The emission of VOCs was significantly increased with the decrease in moisture contents and increase in the temperature of the soil. Among different fertilizer treatments, the emission of VOCs was significantly higher in OF treatment at 5% moisture, and in CF and OF treatments at 35°C. Further, the VOCs emitted from soil treated with CFOF showed the highest increase in plant growth while CF and OF treatments showed similar results. The VOCs were also extracted from the soil using methanol to better understand the dynamics of VOCs. The abundance of VOCs extracted from the soil was 44-61%, while the richness was 65-70% higher than the VOCs emitted from the soil in different treatments. Taken together the results of emitted and extracted VOCs from the soil, we conclude that the fertilizers are able to discriminate among the VOC patterns of soil. In addition, most of the VOCs are retained in the soil and the emission of VOCs from soil depends on the type of VOCs, soil properties and environmental conditions; however, more research is required to find out better soil VOCs analysis methods. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. TRACE METAL LEACHING BEHAVIOR STUDIED THROUGH THE USE OF PARAMETRIC MODELING OF WATER BORNE SOIL PARTICLES FRACTIONATED WITH A SPLIT-FLOW THIN CELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Removal of pollutant-laden particles via engineered structures such as settling ponds is one goal of storm water management. Leaching of metals as a function of particle size affects the ability of settling ponds to remoe the polluted particle. In this investigation, water borne ...

  4. TRACE METAL LEACHING BEHAVIOR STUDIED THROUGH THE USE OF PARAMETRIC MODELING OF WATER BORNE SOIL PARTICLES FRACTIONATED WITH A SPLIT-FLOW THIN CELL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Removal of pollutant-laden particles via engineered structures such as settling ponds is one goal of storm water management. Leaching of metals as a function of particle size affects the ability of settling ponds to remoe the polluted particle. In this investigation, water borne ...

  5. The role of water use patterns and sewage pollution in incidence of water-borne/enteric diseases along the Ganges river in Varanasi, India.

    PubMed

    Hamner, Steve; Tripathi, Anshuman; Mishra, Rajesh Kumar; Bouskill, Nik; Broadaway, Susan C; Pyle, Barry H; Ford, Timothy E

    2006-04-01

    In Varanasi, India, an estimated 200 million liters daily or more of untreated human sewage is discharged into the Ganges River. River water monitoring over the past 12 years has demonstrated faecal coliform counts up to 10(8) MPN (most probable number) per 100 ml and biological oxygen demand levels averaging over 40 mg/l in the most polluted part of the river in Varanasi. A questionnaire-based survey was used to estimate water-borne and enteric disease incidence and study river use among resident users of the Ganges River in Varanasi. The overall rate of water-borne/enteric disease incidence, including acute gastrointestinal disease, cholera, dysentery, hepatitis-A, and typhoid, was estimated to be about 66% during the one-year period prior to the survey. Logistic regression analysis revealed significant associations between water-borne/enteric disease occurrence and the use of the river for bathing, laundry, washing eating utensils, and brushing teeth. Thirty-three cases of cholera were identified among families exposed to washing clothing or bathing in the Ganges while no cholera cases occurred in unexposed families. Other exposure factors such as lack of sewerage and toilets at residence, children defecating outdoors, poor sanitation, low income and low education levels also showed significant associations with enteric disease outcome. This study provides an estimate of water-borne/enteric disease incidence and identifies possible risk factors for residents who live by and use the Ganges River in Varanasi.

  6. Comparing the relative importance of water-borne cues and direct grazing for the induction of defenses in the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Flöthe, Carla R; John, Uwe; Molis, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Some seaweed species have been shown to release water-borne cues after herbivore attack, for example, to attract natural enemies of the herbivore. These cues may also be sensed by neighboring seaweeds and used to adjust their defenses in anticipation of a possible herbivore attack. Several studies indicated information transfer between seaweed individuals in the past, including the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus. Previous work showed induction of defenses in F. vesiculosus in response to water-borne cues released by isopod-grazed conspecifics. In contrast, another study on induced responses after exposure to cues from isopod-grazed neighbors using the same seaweed species yielded contradictory results. This study reassessed the ability of F. vesiculosus individuals to sense water-borne cues released by isopod-grazed neighbors in a series of experiments that monitored F. vesiculosus palatability in response to direct grazing by Idotea baltica and water-borne cues from isopod-grazed neighbors relative to unmanipulated seaweed pieces. Two-choice feeding assays were conducted with both fresh and reconstituted seaweed pieces. Direct grazing by I. baltica induced a chemical defense in F. vesiculosus, confirming results of previous studies. In contrast, evidence for increased herbivore resistance in seaweed pieces that were located downstream of isopod-grazed F. vesiculosus could not be provided. The lack of defense induction in response to grazing of conspecific neighbors may be explained by the environmental conditions and the scattered distribution of F. vesiculosus individuals in the intertidal zone of Helgoland, which may render resource investment in the emission and/or response to water-borne cues at this site unprofitable.

  7. Comparing the Relative Importance of Water-Borne Cues and Direct Grazing for the Induction of Defenses in the Brown Seaweed Fucus vesiculosus

    PubMed Central

    Flöthe, Carla R.; John, Uwe; Molis, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Some seaweed species have been shown to release water-borne cues after herbivore attack, for example, to attract natural enemies of the herbivore. These cues may also be sensed by neighboring seaweeds and used to adjust their defenses in anticipation of a possible herbivore attack. Several studies indicated information transfer between seaweed individuals in the past, including the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus. Previous work showed induction of defenses in F. vesiculosus in response to water-borne cues released by isopod-grazed conspecifics. In contrast, another study on induced responses after exposure to cues from isopod-grazed neighbors using the same seaweed species yielded contradictory results. This study reassessed the ability of F. vesiculosus individuals to sense water-borne cues released by isopod-grazed neighbors in a series of experiments that monitored F. vesiculosus palatability in response to direct grazing by Idotea baltica and water-borne cues from isopod-grazed neighbors relative to unmanipulated seaweed pieces. Two-choice feeding assays were conducted with both fresh and reconstituted seaweed pieces. Direct grazing by I. baltica induced a chemical defense in F. vesiculosus, confirming results of previous studies. In contrast, evidence for increased herbivore resistance in seaweed pieces that were located downstream of isopod-grazed F. vesiculosus could not be provided. The lack of defense induction in response to grazing of conspecific neighbors may be explained by the environmental conditions and the scattered distribution of F. vesiculosus individuals in the intertidal zone of Helgoland, which may render resource investment in the emission and/or response to water-borne cues at this site unprofitable. PMID:25279662

  8. Virtual volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A. Christian; Prange, Richard E.

    2007-03-01

    We introduce the concept of virtual volatility. This simple but new measure shows how to quantify the uncertainty in the forecast of the drift component of a random walk. The virtual volatility also is a useful tool in understanding the stochastic process for a given portfolio. In particular, and as an example, we were able to identify mean reversion effect in our portfolio. Finally, we briefly discuss the potential practical effect of the virtual volatility on an investor asset allocation strategy.

  9. Fluxes of ozone and Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds in a mixed Mediterranean forest over a transition period between summer and fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fares, S.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Petersson, F.; Matteucci, G.; Scarascia Mugnozza, G.; Jiang, X.; Guenther, A. B.; Loreto, F.

    2012-12-01

    Mediterranean plant ecosystems are exposed to abiotic stressors that may be exacerbated by climate change dynamics. Moreover, plants need now to cope with increasing anthropogenic pressures, often associated with expanding impacts of urbanization. Anthropogenic stressors include harmful gases (e.g. ozone,) that are transported from anthropogenic pollution sources to the vegetation. They may alter ecophysiology and compromise metabolism of Mediterranean plants. A disproportionate number of Mediterranean ecosystems, many dominated by forest trees, are being transformed into "urban or pre-urban forests". This is in particular the case for Castelporziano Estate, a 6,000 ha Mediterranean forest located just 25 km from Rome downtown at the coast of the Mediterranean Sea. In September 2011 an intensive field campaign was performed in Castelporziano to investigate ozone deposition and biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds (BVOC) from a mixed Mediterranean forest, mainly composed by Quercus suber, Quercus ilex, Pinus pinea. Measurements were performed at canopy level with fast real-time instruments (a fast ozone analyzer and a Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer) that allowed eddy covariant flux measurements of ozone and BVOC. In the transitional period from a warm and dry summer to a wet and moderately cool fall we typically observed tropospheric ozone volume mixing ratios (VMR) of 60 ppb at around noon, with high deposition fluxes (up to -10 nmol m-2 s-1) into the forest canopy. Canopy models were used to to calculate that up to 90% of ozone uptake can be attributed to non-stomatal sinks, suggesting that chemical reactions between ozone and reactive BVOC may have played an important role. The concentrations of reactive isoprenoids (e.g. sesquiterpenes) were indeed observed to decrease during the central hours of the day, in coincidence with increased ozone concentrations. Concentrations and fluxes of isoprenoid

  10. Water-Borne Diseases and Extreme Weather Events in Cambodia: Review of Impacts and Implications of Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Grace I.; McIver, Lachlan; Kim, Yoonhee; Hashizume, Masahiro; Iddings, Steven; Chan, Vibol

    2014-01-01

    Cambodia is prone to extreme weather events, especially floods, droughts and typhoons. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and intensity of such events. The Cambodian population is highly vulnerable to the impacts of these events due to poverty; malnutrition; agricultural dependence; settlements in flood-prone areas, and public health, governance and technological limitations. Yet little is known about the health impacts of extreme weather events in Cambodia. Given the extremely low adaptive capacity of the population, this is a crucial knowledge gap. A literature review of the health impacts of floods, droughts and typhoons in Cambodia was conducted, with regional and global information reviewed where Cambodia-specific literature was lacking. Water-borne diseases are of particular concern in Cambodia, in the face of extreme weather events and climate change, due to, inter alia, a high pre-existing burden of diseases such as diarrhoeal illness and a lack of improved sanitation infrastructure in rural areas. A time-series analysis under quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the association between floods and diarrhoeal disease incidence in Cambodian children between 2001 and 2012 in 16 Cambodian provinces. Floods were significantly associated with increased diarrhoeal disease in two provinces, while the analysis conducted suggested a possible protective effect from toilets and piped water. Addressing the specific, local pre-existing vulnerabilities is vital to promoting population health resilience and strengthening adaptive capacity to extreme weather events and climate change in Cambodia. PMID:25546280

  11. Bay-Ocean Coupling and the Proximal Fate of Water-Borne Material Exported from San Francisco Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largier, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    The coupling between San Francisco Bay and the ocean is poorly known: how ocean waters intrude into bay and how bay waters flow out into the ocean. Here we address the outflow from the Bay with a view to describing the proximal fate of water-borne material in the coastal ocean, specifically finer particles and dissolved material. Flow trajectories longer than that in the tidal jet are thus the focus of this study - time scales of hours to days. We present data collected in both winter/runoff and spring/upwelling seasons that reflect the importance of tides and also the importance of wind, which introduces either northward or southward along-coast flow. Southward flow is offshore and typically this Bay effluent is removed from nearshore waters. In contrast, northward flow tends to remain attached to shore, and there is persistent presence of Bay waters in the surface layer up to Point Reyes, only occasionally separated from the coast by local upwelling within Drakes Bay. Perhaps most dramatic is outflow during winter storms, when wind is southerly and pushes water on shore in Drakes Bay as well as inducing an intense flow around Point Reyes, which turns cyclonically to reconnect with the shore in the vicinity of Bodega Bay before forming a wind-accelerated coast-attached current that looks very much like a coastal buoyancy current. This is the time when large volumes of low-salinity and high-load waters are exported from the Bay.

  12. Persistence of gentian violet and leucogentian violet in channel catfish (ictalurus punctatus) muscle after water-borne exposure.

    PubMed

    Thompson, H C; Rushing, L G; Gehring, T; Lochmann, R

    1999-02-19

    Gentian violet is a triphenylmethane dye that is an antifungal/antiparastic agent. GV is similar to malachite green that has been used in the aquaculture industry for treatment or prevention of external fungal and parasitic infections in fish and fish eggs although it (MG) is not approved for this use. For these reasons, GV's potential for misuse by the aquaculture industry is high. The uptake and depletion of gentian violet (GV) were determined in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) after water-borne exposure (100 ng ml(-1), 1 h) under simulated aquaculture farming conditions. Leucogentian violet (LGV) was rapidly formed, concentrated in the muscle tissue, and very slowly eliminated from muscle tissue. An isocratic (60% acetonitrile-40% water; 0.05 M ammonium acetate buffer, pH 4.5) HPLC system consisting of a 5 microm LC-CN 250x4.6 mm I.D. column, a 20x2.0 mm I.D. PbO2 oxidative post-column, and a UV-VIS detector set at 588 nm were used to determine uptake and depletion of tissue residues of GV and LGV with time. GV was rapidly depleted and converted to its major metabolite, LGV, which was detected out to 79 days. Therefore, LGV is the appropriate target analyte for monitoring exposure of channel catfish to GV.

  13. Water-borne diseases and extreme weather events in Cambodia: review of impacts and implications of climate change.

    PubMed

    Davies, Grace I; McIver, Lachlan; Kim, Yoonhee; Hashizume, Masahiro; Iddings, Steven; Chan, Vibol

    2014-12-23

    Cambodia is prone to extreme weather events, especially floods, droughts and typhoons. Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and intensity of such events. The Cambodian population is highly vulnerable to the impacts of these events due to poverty; malnutrition; agricultural dependence; settlements in flood-prone areas, and public health, governance and technological limitations. Yet little is known about the health impacts of extreme weather events in Cambodia. Given the extremely low adaptive capacity of the population, this is a crucial knowledge gap. A literature review of the health impacts of floods, droughts and typhoons in Cambodia was conducted, with regional and global information reviewed where Cambodia-specific literature was lacking. Water-borne diseases are of particular concern in Cambodia, in the face of extreme weather events and climate change, due to, inter alia, a high pre-existing burden of diseases such as diarrhoeal illness and a lack of improved sanitation infrastructure in rural areas. A time-series analysis under quasi-Poisson distribution was used to evaluate the association between floods and diarrhoeal disease incidence in Cambodian children between 2001 and 2012 in 16 Cambodian provinces. Floods were significantly associated with increased diarrhoeal disease in two provinces, while the analysis conducted suggested a possible protective effect from toilets and piped water. Addressing the specific, local pre-existing vulnerabilities is vital to promoting population health resilience and strengthening adaptive capacity to extreme weather events and climate change in Cambodia.

  14. A stochastic model for ecological systems with strong nonlinear response to environmental drivers: application to two water-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Codeço, Claudia Torres; Lele, Subhash; Pascual, Mercedes; Bouma, Menno; Ko, Albert I

    2008-02-06

    Ecological systems with threshold behaviour show drastic shifts in population abundance or species diversity in response to small variation in critical parameters. Examples of threshold behaviour arise in resource competition theory, epidemiological theory and environmentally driven population dynamics, to name a few. Although expected from theory, thresholds may be difficult to detect in real datasets due to stochasticity, finite population size and confounding effects that soften the observed shifts and introduce variability in the data. Here, we propose a modelling framework for threshold responses to environmental drivers that allows for a flexible treatment of the transition between regimes, including variation in the sharpness of the transition and the variance of the response. The model assumes two underlying stochastic processes whose mixture determines the system's response. For environmentally driven systems, the mixture is a function of an environmental covariate and the response may exhibit strong nonlinearity. When applied to two datasets for water-borne diseases, the model was able to capture the effect of rainfall on the mean number of cases as well as the variance. A quantitative description of this kind of threshold behaviour is of more general application to predict the response of ecosystems and human health to climate change.

  15. Structural and functional analysis of Aplysia attractins, a family of water-borne protein pheromones with interspecific attractiveness

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Sherry D.; Cummins, Scott F.; Nichols, Amy E.; Akalal, David-B. G.; Schein, Catherine H.; Braun, Werner; Smith, John S.; Susswein, Abraham J.; Levy, Miriam; de Boer, Pamela A. C. M.; ter Maat, Andries; Miller, Mark W.; Scanlan, Cory; Milberg, Richard M.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Nagle, Gregg T.

    2004-01-01

    Mate attraction in Aplysia involves a long-distance water-borne signal (the protein pheromone attractin), which is released during egg laying. Aplysia californica attractin attracts species that produce closely related attractins, such as Aplysia brasiliana, whose geographic distribution does not overlap that of A. californica. This finding suggests that other mollusks release attractin-related pheromones to form and maintain breeding aggregations. We describe four additional members of the attractin family: A. brasiliana, Aplysia fasciata, Aplysia depilans (which aggregates with A. fasciata aggregations), and Aplysia vaccaria (which aggregates with A. californica aggregations). On the basis of their sequence similarity with A. californica attractin, the attractin proteins fall into two groups: A. californica, A. brasiliana, and A. fasciata (91–95% identity), and A. depilans and A. vaccaria (41–43% identity). The sequence similarity within the attractin family, the conserved six cysteines, and the compact fold of the NMR solution structure of A. californica attractin suggest a common fold for this pheromone family containing two antiparallel helices. The second helix contains the IEECKTS sequence conserved in Aplysia attractins. Mutating surface-exposed charged residues within this heptapeptide sequence abolishes attractin activity, suggesting that the second helix is an essential part of the receptor-binding interface. PMID:15118100

  16. Production of medium-chain volatile fatty acids by mixed ruminal microorganisms is enhanced by ethanol in co-culture with Clostridium kluyveri

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fermentative production of medium-chain (C5-C8) volatile fatty acids by the carboxylate platform has several potential advantages as a route to biofuel precursors. However, its practicality is limited by the relatively slow synthesis of these acids from shorter precursors (C2-C4) that accumulate dur...

  17. Effects of particle size and dry matter content of a total mixed ration on intraruminal equilibration and net portal flux of volatile fatty acids in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Storm, A C; Kristensen, N B

    2010-09-01

    Effects of physical changes in consistency of ruminal contents on intraruminal equilibration and net portal fluxes of volatile fatty acids (VFA) in dairy cows were studied. Four Danish Holstein cows (121+/-17 d in milk, 591+/-24 kg of body weight, mean+/-SD) surgically fitted with a ruminal cannula and permanent indwelling catheters in the major splanchnic blood vessels were used. The experimental design was a 4x4 Latin square with a 2x2 factorial design of treatments. Treatments differed in forage (grass hay) particle size (FPS; 3.0 and 30 mm) and feed dry matter (DM) content of the total mixed ration (44.3 and 53.8%). The feed DM did not affect chewing time, ruminal variables, or net portal flux of VFA. However, decreasing the FPS decreased the overall chewing and rumination times by 151+/-55 and 135+/-29 min/d, respectively. No effect of the reduced chewing time was observed on ruminal pH or milk fat percentage. Cows maintained average ventral ruminal pH of 6.65+/-0.02, medial ruminal pH of 5.95+/-0.04, and milk fat of 4.42+/-0.12% with chewing time of 28.0+/-2.1 min/kg of DM when fed short particles. The medial ruminal pool of wet particulate matter was decreased by 10.53+/-2.29 kg with decreasing FPS, thereby decreasing the medial pool of total VFA, acetate, propionate, butyrate, isobutyrate, and isovalerate by 1,143+/-333, 720+/-205, 228+/-69, 140+/-51, 8.0+/-2.3, and 25.2+/-5.6 mmol, respectively. Ventral pool variables were not affected by treatments. Relatively large intraruminal differences of VFA concentrations and pH between the ventral and medial pools were observed, VFA concentrations being largest and pH being the lowest medially. This indicates that the ruminal mat acts as a barrier retaining VFA. The effects of reduced FPS were limited to the VFA pool sizes of the mat, leaving ruminal pH, ruminal VFA concentrations, and net portal flux of VFA unaffected. Consequently reduced FPS affected the intraruminal equilibration of VFA between mat and ventral

  18. Classification of Volatile Engine Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn

    2013-01-01

    Volatile particles cannot be detected at the engine exhaust by an aerosol detector. They are formed when the exhaust is mixed with ambient air downstream. Lack of a precise definition of volatile engine particles has been an impediment to engine manufacturers and regulatory agencies involved in the development of an effective control strategy. It is beyond doubt that volatile particles from combustion sources contribute to the atmospheric particulate burden, and the effect of that contribution is a critical issue in the ongoing research in the areas of air quality and climate change. A new instrument, called volatile particle separator (VPS), has been developed. It utilizes a proprietary microporous metallic membrane to separate particles from vapors. VPS data were used in the development of a two-parameter function to quantitatively classify, for the first time, the volatilization behavior of engine particles. The value of parameter A describes the volatilization potential of an aerosol. A nonvolatile particle has a larger A-value than a volatile one. The value of parameter k, an effective evaporation energy barrier, is found to be much smaller for small engine particles than that for large engine particles. The VPS instrument provides a means beyond just being a volatile particle remover; it enables a numerical definition to characterize volatile engine particles.

  19. Measuring water-borne cortisol in Poecilia latipinna:is the process stressful, can stress be minimized and is cortisol correlated with sex steroid release rates?

    PubMed

    Gabor, C R; Contreras, A

    2012-09-01

    The stress of water-borne hormone collection process was examined in sailfin mollies Poecilia latipinna. Baseline release rates of the stress hormone cortisol were measured and minimum confinement time for water sampling was evaluated for a standard 60 min v. a 30 min protocol. A 30 min hormone collection period reflects release rates over 60 min. Potential stress response to confinement in the beaker for the water-borne collection process was tested over 4 days. There was no evidence of stress due to the collection methods, as cortisol release rates did not differ significantly across four sequential days of handling for P. latipinna. Males and females did not differ significantly in baseline cortisol release rates. Baseline cortisol release rates from fish immediately after being collected in the field were also not significantly different than those in the 4 day confinement experiment. After exposure to a novel environment, however, P. latipinna mounted a stress response. Stress may also affect sex steroids and behaviour but cortisol release rates were not significantly correlated with sex steroids [11-ketotestosterone (KT), testosterone, or oestradiol], or mating attempts. The correlation between water-borne release rates and plasma steroid levels was validated for both cortisol and KT. Finally, normalizing cortisol release rates using standard length in lieu of mass is viable and accurate. Water-borne hormone assays are a valuable tool for investigating questions concerning the role of hormones in mediating stress responses and reproductive behaviours in P. latipinna and other livebearing fishes. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  20. Pesticide Volatilization

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We consider the risks posed when pesticides volatilize during or after application. The movement of vapors through the air is not the same as pesticide movement by spray drift, erosion, or windblown soil particles.

  1. INTEGRATED PROBABILISTIC AND DETERMINISTIC MODELING TECHNIQUES IN ESTIMATING EXPOSURE TO WATER-BORNE CONTAMINANTS: PART 1 EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to contaminants originating in the domestic water supply is influenced by a number of factors, including human activities, water use behavior, and physical and chemical processes. The key role of human activities is very apparent in exposure related to volatile water-...

  2. INTEGRATED PROBABILISTIC AND DETERMINISTIC MODELING TECHNIQUES IN ESTIMATING EXPOSURE TO WATER-BORNE CONTAMINANTS: PART 1 EXPOSURE MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to contaminants originating in the domestic water supply is influenced by a number of factors, including human activities, water use behavior, and physical and chemical processes. The key role of human activities is very apparent in exposure related to volatile water-...

  3. VOLATILIZATION OF ALKYLBENZENES FROM WATER.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Volatilization is a physical process of importance in determining the fate of many organic compounds in streams and rivers. This process is frequently described by the conceptual-two-film model. The model assumes uniformly mixed water and air phases separated by thin films of water and air in which mass transfer is by molecular diffusion. Mass-transfer coefficients for the water and air films are related to an overall mass-transfer coefficient for volatilization through the Henry's law constant.

  4. On the volatility of volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Stephen D. H.; Murray, Brian M.

    2007-07-01

    The Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE) Volatility Index, VIX, is calculated based on prices of out-of-the-money put and call options on the S&P 500 index (SPX). Sometimes called the “investor fear gauge”, the VIX is a measure of the implied volatility of the SPX, and is observed to be correlated with the 30-day realized volatility of the SPX. Changes in the VIX are observed to be negatively correlated with changes in the SPX. However, no significant correlation between changes in the VIX and changes in the 30-day realized volatility of the SPX are observed. We investigate whether this indicates a mispricing of options following large VIX moves, and examine the relation to excess returns from variance swaps. The sense in which the term “mispricing” is used is discussed in the paper.

  5. Fermentative capabilities and volatile compounds produced by Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora and Saccharomyces yeast strains in pure and mixed cultures during Agave tequilana juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Ivonne Wendolyne; Estarrón-Espinosa, Mirna; Díaz-Montaño, Dulce María

    2015-09-01

    The fermentative and aromatic capabilities of Kloeckera africana/Hanseniaspora vineae K1, K. apiculata/H. uvarum K2, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S1 and S2 were studied in pure and mixed culture fermentations using Agave tequila juice as the culture medium. In pure and mixed cultures, Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains showed limited growth and sugar consumption, as well as low ethanol yield and productivity, compared to S. cerevisiae, which yielded more biomass, ethanol and viable cell concentrations. In pure and mixed cultures, S. cerevisiae presented a similar behaviour reaching high biomass production, completely consuming the sugar, leading to high ethanol production. Furthermore, the presence of S. cerevisiae strains in the mixed cultures promoted the production of higher alcohols, acetaldehyde and ethyl esters, whereas Kloeckera/Hanseniaspora strains stimulated the production of ethyl acetate and 2-phenyl ethyl acetate compounds.

  6. Dysfunctions at human intestinal barrier by water-borne protozoan parasites: lessons from cultured human fully differentiated colon cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa

    2013-06-01

    Some water-borne protozoan parasites induce diseases through their membrane-associated functional structures and virulence factors that hijack the host cellular molecules and signalling pathways leading to structural and functional lesions in the intestinal barrier. In this Microreview we analyse the insights on the mechanisms of pathogenesis of Entamoeba intestinalis, Giardia and Cryptosporidium observed in the human colon carcinoma fully differentiated colon cancer cell lines, cell subpopulations and clones expressing the structural and functional characteristics of highly specialized fully differentiated epithelial cells lining the intestinal epithelium and mimicking structurally and functionally an intestinal barrier.

  7. Economic process to produce biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids by a mixed culture using vinasse from sugarcane ethanol industry as nutrient source.

    PubMed

    Sydney, Eduardo Bittencourt; Larroche, Christian; Novak, Alessandra Cristine; Nouaille, Regis; Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Letti, Luiz Alberto; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    This work evaluates the potential of vinasse (a waste obtained at the bottom of sugarcane ethanol distillation columns) as nutrient source for biohydrogen and volatile fatty acids production by means of anaerobic consortia. Two different media were proposed, using sugarcane juice or molasses as carbon source. The consortium LPBAH1 was selected for fermentation of vinasse supplemented with sugarcane juice, resulting in a higher H2 yield of 7.14 molH2 molsucrose(-1) and hydrogen content in biogas of approx. 31%, while consortium LPBAH2 resulted in 3.66 molH2/molsucrose and 32.7% hydrogen content in biogas. The proposed process showed a rational and economical use for vinasse, a mandatory byproduct of the renewable Brazilian energy matrix.

  8. Disinfection of the Water Borne Pathogens Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by Solar Photocatalysis Using Sonochemically Synthesized Reusable Ag@ZnO Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sourav; Ranjana, Neha; Misra, Ananyo Jyoti; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Mishra, Amrita; Tripathy, Suraj K.

    2017-01-01

    Water borne pathogens present a threat to human health and their disinfection from water poses a challenge, prompting the search for newer methods and newer materials. Disinfection of the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and the Gram-positive coccal bacterium Staphylococcus aureus in an aqueous matrix was achieved within 60 and 90 min, respectively, at 35 °C using solar-photocatalysis mediated by sonochemically synthesized Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The efficiency of the process increased with the increase in temperature and at 55 °C the disinfection for the two bacteria could be achieved in 45 and 60 min, respectively. A new ultrasound-assisted chemical precipitation technique was used for the synthesis of Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles. The characteristics of the synthesized material were established using physical techniques. The material remained stable even at 400 °C. Disinfection efficiency of the Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles was confirmed in the case of real world samples of pond, river, municipal tap water and was found to be better than that of pure ZnO and TiO2 (Degussa P25). When the nanoparticle- based catalyst was recycled and reused for subsequent disinfection experiments, its efficiency did not change remarkably, even after three cycles. The sonochemically synthesized Ag@ZnO core-shell nanoparticles thus have a good potential for application in solar photocatalytic disinfection of water borne pathogens. PMID:28698514

  9. [Simultaneous determination of 23 ester compounds in cigarette water-borne adhesives by liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Gong, Shuguo; Kong, Bo; Tuo, Suxing; Dai, Yunhui; Wu, Mingjian; Tan, Liquan; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    A method of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with liquid-liquid extraction has been developed for the simultaneous determination of 23 ester compounds including acetate esters, acrylic esters, metacrylic acid esters and phthalate acid esters in cigarette water-borne adhesives. After dispersed in water, the sample was extracted by n-hexane solution containing phenyl ethyl propionate as internal standard substance. Then, the solution was centrifuged and filtrated through a 0.45 microm organic membrane filter. Finally, the solution was separated on a DB-WAXETR column (60 m x 0.25 mm x 0.25 microm), and detected with MS in selected ion monitoring mode, and quantified by internal standard method. The results showed a good linear correlation in the range of 0.4-50.0 mg/L. The recoveries of the ester compounds spiked in the sample were 81.8%-109.1%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, n = 5) were less than 4%. The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs were in the ranges of 0.02-0.76 mg/kg and 0.04-2.52 mg/kg, respectively. The method is simple, time-saving, and has high sensitivity and good reproducibility. It can be applied to the determination of the 23 ester compounds in cigarette water-borne adhesives.

  10. Biotransformation of volatile fatty acids to polyhydroxyalkanoates by employing mixed microbial consortia: The effect of pH and carbon source.

    PubMed

    Kourmentza, C; Kornaros, M

    2016-12-01

    Mixed microbial cultures that undergo successful enrichment, following eco-biotechnological approaches, to form a community dominant in polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) forming bacteria, represent an attractive economic alternative towards the production of those biopolymers. In the present study, an enriched mixed culture was investigated for the production of PHA at different initial pH values under non-controlled conditions in order to minimize process control and operational costs. Short-chain fatty acids were provided as PHA precursors and they were tested as sole carbon sources and as mixtures under nitrogen deficiency. By the obtained kinetic and stoichiometric parameters it was shown that at an initial pH value of 6.90 PHA production was favored. Butyrate was characterized as the preferred carbon source, whereas simultaneous feeding led to increased rates and yields when butyrate and acetate were present. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Water-borne cues of a non-indigenous seaweed mediate grazer-deterrent responses in native seaweeds, but not vice versa.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hee Young; Engelen, Aschwin H; Santos, Rui O; Molis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Plants optimise their resistance to herbivores by regulating deterrent responses on demand. Induction of anti-herbivory defences can occur directly in grazed plants or from emission of risk cues to the environment, which modifies interactions of adjacent plants with, for instance, their consumers. This study confirmed the induction of anti-herbivory responses by water-borne risk cues between adjoining con-specific seaweeds and firstly examined whether plant-plant signalling also exists among adjacent hetero-specific seaweeds. Furthermore, differential abilities and geographic variation in plant-plant signalling by a non-indigenous seaweed as well as native seaweeds were assessed. Twelve-day induction experiments using the non-indigenous seaweed Sargassum muticum were conducted in the laboratory in Portugal and Germany with one local con-familiar (Portugal: Cystoseira humilis, Germany: Halidrys siliquosa) and hetero-familiar native species (Portugal: Fucus spiralis, Germany: F. vesiculosus). All seaweeds were grazed by a local isopod species (Portugal: Stenosoma nadejda, Germany: Idotea baltica) and were positioned upstream of con- and hetero-specific seaweeds. Grazing-induced modification in seaweed traits were tested in three-day feeding assays between cue-exposed and cue-free ( = control) pieces of both fresh and reconstituted seaweeds. Both Fucus species reduced their palatability when positioned downstream of isopod-grazed con-specifics. Yet, the palatability of non-indigenous S. muticum remained constant in the presence of upstream grazed con-specifics and native hetero-specifics. In contrast, both con-familiar (but neither hetero-familiar) native species reduced palatability when located downstream of grazed S. muticum. Similar patterns of grazer-deterrent responses to water-borne cues were observed on both European shores, and were almost identical between assays using fresh and reconstituted seaweeds. Hence, seaweeds may use plant-plant signalling to

  12. Water-Borne Cues of a Non-Indigenous Seaweed Mediate Grazer-Deterrent Responses in Native Seaweeds, but Not Vice Versa

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hee Young; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Santos, Rui O.; Molis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Plants optimise their resistance to herbivores by regulating deterrent responses on demand. Induction of anti-herbivory defences can occur directly in grazed plants or from emission of risk cues to the environment, which modifies interactions of adjacent plants with, for instance, their consumers. This study confirmed the induction of anti-herbivory responses by water-borne risk cues between adjoining con-specific seaweeds and firstly examined whether plant-plant signalling also exists among adjacent hetero-specific seaweeds. Furthermore, differential abilities and geographic variation in plant-plant signalling by a non-indigenous seaweed as well as native seaweeds were assessed. Twelve-day induction experiments using the non-indigenous seaweed Sargassum muticum were conducted in the laboratory in Portugal and Germany with one local con-familiar (Portugal: Cystoseira humilis, Germany: Halidrys siliquosa) and hetero-familiar native species (Portugal: Fucus spiralis, Germany: F. vesiculosus). All seaweeds were grazed by a local isopod species (Portugal: Stenosoma nadejda, Germany: Idotea baltica) and were positioned upstream of con- and hetero-specific seaweeds. Grazing-induced modification in seaweed traits were tested in three-day feeding assays between cue-exposed and cue-free ( = control) pieces of both fresh and reconstituted seaweeds. Both Fucus species reduced their palatability when positioned downstream of isopod-grazed con-specifics. Yet, the palatability of non-indigenous S. muticum remained constant in the presence of upstream grazed con-specifics and native hetero-specifics. In contrast, both con-familiar (but neither hetero-familiar) native species reduced palatability when located downstream of grazed S. muticum. Similar patterns of grazer-deterrent responses to water-borne cues were observed on both European shores, and were almost identical between assays using fresh and reconstituted seaweeds. Hence, seaweeds may use plant-plant signalling to

  13. Emission and Chemical Transformation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds(ECHO)- Investigation in and above a Mixed Forest Stand: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppmann, R.; FZJ Echo Team; Kesselmeier, J.; Meixner, F. X.; MPI Echo Team; Warnke, J.; Hoffmann, T.; Aubrun, S.; Leitl, B.; Schatzmann, M.; Dlugi, R.; Zelger, M.; Kleffmann, J.; Neftel, A.; Hansel, A.; Thomas, C.; Neininger, B.

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the ECHO project is to provide a better understanding of forest stands as a complex source of reactive trace gases into the troposphere. This will be achieved by a unique combination of field, laboratory, and simulation experiments investigating chemical and dynamical processes within the canopy and thus the forest stand as a net source of reactive trace compounds into the planetary boundary layer. The field experiments were carried out in the Stetternicher Forest on the area of the Research Center J\\x81lich. The area has been a deciduous forest for more than 300 years and is surrounded by farmland. Dominating tree species are oaks, beech, and birch. Prevailing wind direction is from the south west, more seldom from the south east. The site is only weakly influenced by urban air masses. At the site three towers were set up, which were equipped with a large set of instruments to measure micrometeorological parameters, biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and CO, as well as radiation in and above the forest. Additionally, measurements of meteorological parameters were done at the meteorological tower up to a height of 120 m and with a SODAR-RASS system up to 300 m. The first field study took place between June 3 and July 12, 2002, the second field campaign between June 23 and August 1, 2003. As a speciality of the ECHO project, important aspects of the different processes determining the net emission from forest stands into the atmosphere are investigated in laboratory and simulation experiments. The chemical processing of the trace gas mixtures observed in the forest stand is investigated in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR under controlled conditions. This enables a detailed study of the chemical processes under exclusion of transport processes and sensitivity studies by direct modification of individual chemical parameters. Emission and uptake of VOC by plants are investigated in plant chambers

  14. Ionic supramolecular bonds preserve mechanical properties and enable synergetic performance at high humidity in water-borne, self-assembled nacre-mimetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Paramita; Walther, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    Although tremendous effort has been focused on enhancing the mechanical properties of nacre-mimetic materials, conservation of high stiffness and strength against hydration-induced decay of mechanical properties at high humidity remains a fundamental challenge in such water-borne high-performance materials. Herein, we demonstrate that ionic supramolecular bonds, introduced by infiltration of divalent Cu2+ ions, allow efficient stabilization of the mechanical properties of self-assembled water-borne nacre-mimetics based on sustainable sodium carboxymethylcellulose (Na+CMC) and natural sodium montmorillonite nanoclay (Na+MTM) against high humidity (95% RH). The mechanical properties in the highly hydrated state (Young's modulus up to 13.5 GPa and tensile strength up to 125 MPa) are in fact comparable to a range of non-crosslinked nacre-mimetic materials in the dry state. Moreover, the Cu2+-treated nacre-inspired materials display synergetic mechanical properties as found in a simultaneous improvement of stiffness, strength and toughness, as compared to the pristine material. Significant inelastic deformation takes place considering the highly reinforced state. This contrasts the typical behaviour of tight, covalent crosslinks and is suggested to originate from a sacrificial, dynamic breakage and rebinding of transient supramolecular ionic bonds. Considering easy access to a large range of ionic interactions and alteration of counter-ion charge via external stimuli, we foresee responsive and adaptive mechanical properties in highly reinforced and stiff bio-inspired bulk nanocomposites and in other bio-inspired materials, e.g. nanocellulose papers and peptide-based materials.Although tremendous effort has been focused on enhancing the mechanical properties of nacre-mimetic materials, conservation of high stiffness and strength against hydration-induced decay of mechanical properties at high humidity remains a fundamental challenge in such water-borne high

  15. Cognitive disparities, lead plumbing, and water chemistry: prior exposure to water-borne lead and intelligence test scores among World War Two U.S. Army enlistees.

    PubMed

    Ferrie, Joseph P; Rolf, Karen; Troesken, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Higher prior exposure to water-borne lead among male World War Two U.S. Army enlistees was associated with lower intelligence test scores. Exposure was proxied by urban residence and the water pH levels of the cities where enlistees lived in 1930. Army General Classification Test scores were six points lower (nearly 1/3 standard deviation) where pH was 6 (so the water lead concentration for a given amount of lead piping was higher) than where pH was 7 (so the concentration was lower). This difference rose with time exposed. At this time, the dangers of exposure to lead in water were not widely known and lead was ubiquitous in water systems, so these results are not likely the effect of individuals selecting into locations with different levels of exposure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Addition of potassium carbonate to continuous cultures of mixed ruminal bacteria shifts volatile fatty acids and daily production of biohydrogenation intermediates.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, T C; Bridges, W C; Harrison, J H; Young, K M

    2014-02-01

    A recent study reported a 0.4 percentage unit increase in milk fat of lactating dairy cattle when dietary K was increased from 1.2 to 2% with potassium carbonate. Because milk fat yield has been associated with ruminal production of certain conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers, 2 studies were conducted to determine if increasing potassium carbonate in the rumen would alter patterns of fermentation and biohydrogenation. In experiment 1, 5 dual-flow continuous fermenters were injected just before each feeding with a 10% (wt/wt) stock potassium carbonate solution to provide the equivalent of 1.1 (K1), 2.2 (K2), and 3.3 (K3) % of diet dry matter (DM) as added K. One of the remaining fermenters received no K (K0) and the last fermenter (NaOH) was injected with adequate NaOH stock solution (10%, wt/wt) to match the pH observed for the K3 treatment. For experiment 2, 6 dual-flow continuous fermenters were used to evaluate 6 treatments arranged in a 2 × 3 factorial to examine 2 levels of soybean oil (0 and 3.64% of diet DM) and added K at 0, 1.6, and 3.3% of diet DM. In both experiments, fermenters were fed 55 to 57 g of DM/d of a typical dairy diet consisting of 1:1 forage (10% alfalfa hay and 90% corn silage) to concentrate mix in 2 equal portions at 0800 and 1630 h, and fed the respective diets for 10-d periods. Potassium carbonate addition increased pH in both experiments. Acetate:propionate ratio and pH in experiment 1 increased linearly for K0 to K3. Acetate:propionate ratio was lower for NaOH compared with K3 but the pH was the same. The trans-11 18:1 and cis-9,trans-11 CLA production rates (mg/d) increased linearly from K0 to K3, but K3 and NaOH did not differ. Production of trans-10 18:1 decreased and that of trans-10,cis-12 tended to decrease from K0 to K3, but production of trans-10,cis-12 CLA remained high for NaOH. Addition of K to the cultures in experiment 2 decreased propionate and increased acetate and acetate:propionate ratio for the 0% fat diet but

  17. Endogenous Lunar Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Liu, Y.; Barnes, J. J.; Boyce, J. W.; Day, J. M. D.; Elardo, S. M.; Hui, H.; Magna, T.; Ni, P.; Tartese, R.; hide

    2017-01-01

    The chapter will begin with an introduction that defines magmatic volatiles (e.g., H, F, Cl, S) versus geochemical volatiles (e.g., K, Rb, Zn). We will discuss our approach of understanding both types of volatiles in lunar samples and lay the ground work for how we will determine the overall volatile budget of the Moon. We will then discuss the importance of endogenous volatiles in shaping the "Newer Views of the Moon", specifically how endogenous volatiles feed forward into processes such as the origin of the Moon, magmatic differentiation, volcanism, and secondary processes during surface and crustal interactions. After the introduction, we will include a re-view/synthesis on the current state of 1) apatite compositions (volatile abundances and isotopic compositions); 2) nominally anhydrous mineral phases (moderately to highly volatile); 3) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of lunar pyroclastic glass beads; 4) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of lunar basalts; 5) volatile (moderately to highly volatile) abundances in and isotopic compositions of melt inclusions; and finally 6) experimental constraints on mineral-melt partitioning of moderately to highly volatile elements under lunar conditions. We anticipate that each section will summarize results since 2007 and focus on new results published since the 2015 Am Min review paper on lunar volatiles [9]. The next section will discuss how to use sample abundances of volatiles to understand the source region and potential caveats in estimating source abundances of volatiles. The following section will include our best estimates of volatile abundances and isotopic compositions (where permitted by available data) for each volatile element of interest in a number of important lunar reservoirs, including the crust, mantle, KREEP, and bulk Moon. The final section of the chapter will focus upon future work, outstanding questions

  18. Water-borne hepatitis E virus epidemic in Islamabad, Pakistan: a common source outbreak traced to the malfunction of a modern water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Rab, M A; Bile, M K; Mubarik, M M; Asghar, H; Sami, Z; Siddiqi, S; Dil, A S; Barzgar, M A; Chaudhry, M A; Burney, M I

    1997-08-01

    During December 1993 and in the first three months of 1994, an explosive water-borne epidemic of hepatitis E virus (HEV) occurred in two sectors of Islamabad, Pakistan. In a survey of a population of 36,705 individuals, a total of 3,827 cases of acute icteric hepatitis were recorded with an overall attack rate (AR) of 10.4%. The etiologic role of HEV in the epidemic was proven by demonstrating anti-HEV IgG and HEV IgM in the tested serum samples. The water-borne nature of the epidemic was suggested by a study of the case distribution according to water supply. Prior to the epidemic, there had been an operational breakdown in a water treatment plant that distributed water to the affected areas while transforming its purification system from slow sand to rapid sand filtration. The primary source of water for the plant was derived from a heavily contaminated stream. The highest AR (16.3%) was observed in the areas where the source of drinking water was exclusively from the purification plant, followed by ARs of 12.4% and 5.3% for those receiving 50% and 30% or less of their water supply from the treatment plant, respectively, while the lowest AR (1.8%) was observed in the neighboring areas that did not receive water from this source. The AR was significantly higher in the group 11-30 years of age (15.3%) as compared with children less than 11 years of age (1.4%) and also relative to the group greater than 30 years of age (10.5%). The AR among the 162 recorded pregnant females was 21.6%, which was higher than that found among nonpregnant females of child-bearing age (10.9%). All four reported adult deaths occurred among females in their third trimester of pregnancy with a case fatality rate of 11.4%, while the other four fatal cases were newborn infants of mothers with acute icteric hepatitis. Although the aggregation of cases within households was significantly related to family size, the temporal relationship between cases in households with two or more cases

  19. Hospitalization Records as a Tool for Evaluating Performance of Food- and Water-Borne Disease Surveillance Systems: A Massachusetts Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Siobhan M.; DeMaria Jr., Alfred; Naumova, Elena N.

    2014-01-01

    We outline a framework for evaluating food- and water-borne surveillance systems using hospitalization records, and demonstrate the approach using data on salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis and giardiasis in persons aged ≥65 years in Massachusetts. For each infection, and for each reporting jurisdiction, we generated smoothed standardized morbidity ratios (SMR) and surveillance to hospitalization ratios (SHR) by comparing observed surveillance counts with expected values or the number of hospitalized cases, respectively. We examined the spatial distribution of SHR and related this to the mean for the entire state. Through this approach municipalities that deviated from the typical experience were identified and suspected of under-reporting. Regression analysis revealed that SHR was a significant predictor of SMR, after adjusting for population age-structure. This confirms that the spatial “signal” depicted by surveillance is in part influenced by inconsistent testing and reporting practices since municipalities that reported fewer cases relative to the number of hospitalizations had a lower relative risk (as estimated by SMR). Periodic assessment of SHR has potential in assessing the performance of surveillance systems. PMID:24740304

  20. The water-borne protein signals (pheromones) of the Antarctic ciliated protozoan Euplotes nobilii: structure of the gene coding for the En-6 pheromone.

    PubMed

    La Terza, Antonietta; Dobri, Nicoleta; Alimenti, Claudio; Vallesi, Adriana; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2009-01-01

    The marine Antarctic ciliate, Euplotes nobilii, secretes a family of water-borne signal proteins, denoted as pheromones, which control vegetative proliferation and mating in the cell. Based on the knowledge of the amino acid sequences of a set of these pheromones isolated from the culture supernatant of wild-type strains, we designed probes to identify their encoding genes in the cell somatic nucleus (macronucleus). The full-length gene of the pheromone En-6 was determined and found to contain an open-reading frame specific for the synthesis of the En-6 cytoplasmic precursor (pre-pro-En-6), which requires 2 proteolytic cleavages to remove the signal peptide (pre) and the prosegment before secretion of the mature protein. In contrast to the sequence variability that distinguishes the secreted pheromones, the pre- and pro-sequences appear to be tightly conserved and useful for the construction of probes to clone every other E. nobilii pheromone gene. Potential intron sequences in the coding region of the En-6 gene imply the synthesis of more En-6 isoforms.

  1. Hospitalization records as a tool for evaluating performance of food- and water-borne disease surveillance systems: a Massachusetts case study.

    PubMed

    Mor, Siobhan M; DeMaria, Alfred; Naumova, Elena N

    2014-01-01

    We outline a framework for evaluating food- and water-borne surveillance systems using hospitalization records, and demonstrate the approach using data on salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis and giardiasis in persons aged ≥65 years in Massachusetts. For each infection, and for each reporting jurisdiction, we generated smoothed standardized morbidity ratios (SMR) and surveillance to hospitalization ratios (SHR) by comparing observed surveillance counts with expected values or the number of hospitalized cases, respectively. We examined the spatial distribution of SHR and related this to the mean for the entire state. Through this approach municipalities that deviated from the typical experience were identified and suspected of under-reporting. Regression analysis revealed that SHR was a significant predictor of SMR, after adjusting for population age-structure. This confirms that the spatial "signal" depicted by surveillance is in part influenced by inconsistent testing and reporting practices since municipalities that reported fewer cases relative to the number of hospitalizations had a lower relative risk (as estimated by SMR). Periodic assessment of SHR has potential in assessing the performance of surveillance systems.

  2. Testing for the induction of anti-herbivory defences in four Portuguese macroalgae by direct and water-borne cues of grazing amphipods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Hee Young; Cruz, Joana; Treitschke, Michaela; Wahl, Martin; Molis, Markus

    2007-09-01

    Herbivory is a key factor in regulating plant biomass, thereby driving ecosystem performance. Algae have developed multiple adaptations to cope with grazers, including morphological and chemical defences. In a series of experiments we investigated whether several species of macroalgae possess anti-herbivore defences and whether these could be regulated to demand, i.e. grazing events. The potential of direct grazing on defence induction was assessed for two brown ( Dictyopteris membranacea, Fucus vesiculosus) and two red seaweeds ( Gelidium sesquipedale, Sphaerococcus coronopifolius) from São Rafael and Ria Formosa, Portugal. Bioassays conducted with live algal pieces and agar-based food containing lipophilic algal extracts were used to detect changes in palatability after exposure to amphipod attacks (=treatment phase). Fucus vesiculosus was the only species significantly reducing palatability in response to direct amphipod-attacks. This pattern was observed in live F. vesiculosus pieces and agar-based food containing a lipophilic extract, suggesting that lipophilic compounds produced during the treatment phase were responsible for the repulsion of grazers. Water-borne cues of grazed F. vesiculosus as well as non-grazing amphipods also reduced palatability of neighbouring conspecifics. However, this effect was only observed in live tissues of F. vesiculosus. This study is the first to show that amphipods, like isopods, are capable to induce anti-herbivory defences in F. vesiculosus and that a seasonally variable effectiveness of chemical defences might serve as a dynamic control in alga-herbivore interactions.

  3. Occurrence of water-borne enteric viruses in two settlements based in Eastern Chad: analysis of hepatitis E virus, hepatitis A virus and human adenovirus in water sources.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Latorre, Laura; Carratala, Anna; Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus; Calgua, Byron; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Girones, Rosina

    2011-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a common cause of water-borne acute hepatitis in areas with poor sanitation. In 2004 an outbreak of HEV infection affected around 2,000 people in Eastern Chad (Dar Sila). This paper describes the decrease in the incidence of acute jaundice syndrome (AJS) from 2004 until 2009 when a mean incidence of 0.48 cases/1,000 people/year was recorded in the region. Outbreaks of AJS were identified in some of the camps in 2007 and 2008. Moreover, water samples from drinking water sources were screened for human adenoviruses considered as viral indicators and for hepatitis A virus and HEV. Screening of faecal samples from donkeys for HEV gave negative results. Some of the samples were also analysed for faecal coliforms showing values before disinfection treatment between 3 and >50 colony forming units per 100 mL. All water samples tested were negative for HEV and HAV; however, the presence of low levels of human adenoviruses in 4 out of 16 samples analysed indicates possible human faecal contamination of groundwater. Consequently, breakdowns in the treatment of drinking water and/or increased excretion of hepatitis viruses, which could be related to the arrival of a new population, could spread future outbreaks through drinking water.

  4. Plant extract-mediated biogenic synthesis of silver, manganese dioxide, silver-doped manganese dioxide nanoparticles and their antibacterial activity against food- and water-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, Chandran; Ji, Byoung-Jun; Harper, Stacey L; Yun, Soon-Il

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), manganese dioxide nanoparticles (MnO₂NPs) and silver-doped manganese dioxide nanoparticles (Ag-doped MnO₂NPs) were synthesized by simultaneous green chemistry reduction approach. Aqueous extract from the leaves of medicinally important plant Cucurbita pepo was used as reducing and capping agents. Various characterization techniques were carried out to affirm the formation of nanoparticles. HR-TEM analysis confirmed the size of nanoparticles in the range of 15-70 nm and also metal doping was confirmed through XRD and EDS analyses. FT-IR analysis confirmed that the presence of biomolecules in the aqueous leaves extract was responsible for nanoparticles synthesis. Further, the concentration of metals and their doping in the reaction mixture was achieved by ICP-MS. The growth curve and well diffusion study of synthesized nanoparticles were performed against food- and water-borne Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. The mode of interaction of nanoparticles on bacterial cells was demonstrated through Bio-TEM analysis. Interestingly, AgNPs and Ag-doped MnO₂NPs showed better antibacterial activity against all the tested bacterial pathogens; however, MnO₂NPs alone did not show any antibacterial properties. Hence, AgNPs and Ag-doped MnO₂NPs synthesized from aqueous plant leaves extract may have important role in controlling various food spoilage caused by bacteria.

  5. Molecular Structures and Coding Genes of the Water-Borne Protein Pheromones of Euplotes petzi, an Early Diverging Polar Species of Euplotes.

    PubMed

    Pedrini, Bill; Suter-Stahel, Thea; Vallesi, Adriana; Alimenti, Claudio; Luporini, Pierangelo

    2017-03-01

    Euplotes is diversified into dozens of widely distributed species that produce structurally homologous families of water-borne protein pheromones governing self-/nonself-recognition phenomena. Structures of pheromones and pheromone coding genes have so far been studied from species lying in different positions of the Euplotes phylogenetic tree. We have now cloned the coding genes and determined the NMR molecular structure of four pheromones isolated from Euplotes petzi, a polar species which is phylogenetically distant from previously studied species and forms the deepest branching clade in the tree. The E. petzi pheromone genes have significantly shorter sequences than in other congeners, lack introns, and encode products of only 32 amino acids. Likewise, the three-dimensional structure of the E. petzi pheromones is markedly simpler than the three-helix up-down-up architecture previously determined in another polar species, Euplotes nobilii, and in a temperate-water species, Euplotes raikovi. Although sharing the same up-down-up architecture, it includes only two short α-helices that find their topological counterparts with the second and third helices of the E. raikovi and E. nobilii pheromones. The overall picture that emerges is that the evolution of Euplotes pheromones involves progressive increases in the gene sequence length and in the complexity of the three-dimensional molecular structure. © 2016 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2016 International Society of Protistologists.

  6. School Needs, Tax Aversion a Volatile Mix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2011-01-01

    A year ago, Republicans piled up record victories in state elections on promises that they would keep taxes low and cut government spending--including money going to education. Now, elected officials and other partisans are laying the foundation for arguments they will take to the electorate next year that depict the cuts delivered by many…

  7. School Needs, Tax Aversion a Volatile Mix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2011-01-01

    A year ago, Republicans piled up record victories in state elections on promises that they would keep taxes low and cut government spending--including money going to education. Now, elected officials and other partisans are laying the foundation for arguments they will take to the electorate next year that depict the cuts delivered by many…

  8. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrametz, K.; Kofler, L.

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution were addressed.

  9. Conference on Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, R. O. (Compiler); Oconnell, R. (Compiler)

    1982-01-01

    Initial and present volatile inventories and distributions in the Earth, other planets, meteorites, and comets; observational evidence on the time history of volatile transfer among reservoirs; and volatiles in planetary bodies, their mechanisms of transport, and their relation to thermal, chemical, geological and biological evolution are addressed.

  10. Toxicological responses following short-term exposure through gavage feeding or water-borne exposure to Dechlorane Plus in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Kang, Habyeong; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Choi, Kyungho

    2016-03-01

    Dechlorane Plus (DP) is a chlorinated flame retardant widely used worldwide, and has been reported in environment and humans. However, only limited information is currently available on its toxicity on aquatic organisms. In this study, we employed zebrafish to evaluate possible toxicological responses including oxidative stress and endocrine disruption following exposure to DP. DP was dissolved in corn oil and was delivered to adult male zebrafish via gavage feeding. Delivery of DP was carried out twice on days 0 and 2, at up to 3 μg/g fish wet weight. Body residue level of DP in the fish at day 6 was within a range that has been reported in hot spot areas of China. On day 6, blood, liver, testis, and brain were collected and were evaluated for oxidative damage and endocrine disruption. Following DP exposure, hepatic catalase activity significantly increased, implying its oxidative damage potential. In addition, plasma thyroxine (T4) concentrations increased along with up-regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone β genes in brain. Following DP exposure, transcriptional responses of sex hormone related genes in brain were observed, suggesting possible sex hormone disrupting potentials of DP. However, water-borne exposure to DP up to 267 μg/L among the embryo and larval fish did not show any adverse effects on hatching time and transcription of thyroid hormone related genes. Our observations indicate for the first time that DP disrupts thyroid hormone balance of zebrafish by altering regulatory pathways in the brain. Handling editor: David Volz. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence and impact of water-borne zoonotic pathogens in water, cattle and humans in selected villages in Dodoma Rural and Bagamoyo districts, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusiluka, L. J. M.; Karimuribo, E. D.; Mdegela, R. H.; Luoga, E. J.; Munishi, P. K. T.; Mlozi, M. R. S.; Kambarage, D. M.

    A study on the prevalence of water-borne zoonotic pathogens in water, cattle and humans was conducted in six villages in Dodoma Rural (5) and Bagamoyo (1) districts, Tanzania. Water sources were screened for faecal coliform organisms, thermophilic Campylobacter, Salmonella, Cryptosporidium and Giardia. Faecal samples from cattle and humans were also analysed for the above specific pathogens. Results indicate that 70.8% ( n = 48) of the water sources screened were contaminated with faecal coliform organisms. Water sources in two villages, one each in Dodoma Rural and Bagamoyo districts were also contaminated with Giardia lamblia. The overall prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni in cattle in the two study areas was 2.3% ( n = 942) and at least one animal in each village was infected with C. jejuni. Cryptosporidium parvum was detected in 0.5% ( n = 942) of the cattle examined in three villages in Dodoma district. Salmonella spp. was demonstrated in only 1.4% ( n = 144) of the cattle in Chalinze village in Dodoma Rural district while G. lamblia was only detected in 1.5% ( n = 202) of the animals examined in Chamakweza village in Bagamoyo district. Nine (1.9%) of the people screened at three heath centres in the study areas were infected with C. jejuni while 3.7% ( n = 484) of the people had C. parvum oocysts. G. lamblia was detected in 2.5% of the 202 people screened at the Chalinze health centre in Bagamoyo district. Analysis of the secondary data revealed that clinical complaints related to enteric diseases were prevalent in humans in the two areas throughout the year and the prevalence varied from about 1% to 25% in both <5 years and ⩾5 years patients. In conclusion, this study has highlighted the possible public health risks, which may be associated with keeping of animals and sharing of water sources between humans and animals.

  12. High Prevalence of qnr and aac(6′)-Ib-cr Genes in Both Water-Borne Environmental Bacteria and Clinical Isolates of Citrobacter freundii in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong; Ichijo, Tomoaki; Huang, Yong-Lu; Cai, Jia-Chang; Zhou, Hong-Wei; Yamaguchi, Nobuyasu; Nasu, Masao; Chen, Gong-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of qnr and aac(6′)-Ib-cr genes in water-borne environmental bacteria and in clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, as well as the subtypes of qnr. Environmental bacteria were isolated from surface water samples obtained from 10 different locations in Hangzhou City, and clinical isolates of Citrobacter freundii were isolated from several hospitals in four cities in China. qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, and aac(6′)-Ib-cr genes were screened using PCR, and the genotypes were analyzed by DNA sequencing. Ten of the 78 Gram-negative bacilli isolated from water samples were C. freundii and 80% of these isolates carried the qnrB gene. qnrS1 and aac(6′)-Ib-cr genes were detected in two Escherichia coli isolates and qnrS2 was detected in one species, Aeromonas punctata. The qnr and aac(6′)-Ib-cr genes were present in 75 (72.8%) and 12 (11.6%) of 103 clinical isolates of C. freundii, respectively. Of the clinical C. freundii isolates with the qnr gene, 65 isolates (63.1%) carried qnrB, but only three (2.9%) and one (1.0%) carried qnrA1 and qnrS2, respectively, while five isolates carried both qnrA1 and qnrB, and one isolate carried both qnrS1 and qnrB. The qnrB9 gene was the dominant qnrB subtype, followed by qnrB8 and qnrB6. Southern hybridization studies indicated that the qnr genes are located on different plasmids. Plasmids isolated from both environmental and clinical C. freundii isolates appeared to be homogenous. PMID:22791048

  13. Fungal production of volatiles during growth on fiberglass.

    PubMed Central

    Ezeonu, I M; Price, D L; Simmons, R B; Crow, S A; Ahearn, D G

    1994-01-01

    Acoustic and thermal fiberglass insulation materials used in heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems were colonized with fungi in laboratory chambers. The mixed fungal population, principally Aspergillus versicolor, Acremonium obclavatum, and Cladosporium herbarum, produced odoriferous volatiles, including 2-ethyl hexanol, cyclohexane, and benzene. These volatiles may be related to poor indoor air quality and the sick building syndrome. PMID:7993098

  14. Volatile organic compound emissions from silage systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols with other impor...

  15. Food price volatility

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, C. L.; Morgan, C. W.

    2010-01-01

    The high food prices experienced over recent years have led to the widespread view that food price volatility has increased. However, volatility has generally been lower over the two most recent decades than previously. Variability over the most recent period has been high but, with the important exception of rice, not out of line with historical experience. There is weak evidence that grains price volatility more generally may be increasing but it is too early to say. PMID:20713400

  16. Volatilization of ketones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Volatilization fluxes of seven ketones were measured over a range of temperatures. Gas-film coefficients were calculated from these volatilization fluxes and related to the gas-film coefficient for the evaporation of water. These relations, when combined with an equation for estimating the gas-film coefficient for evaporation of water from a canal, permit estimating gas-film coefficients for the volatilization of ketones from streams and rivers.

  17. Iodine volatility. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Beahm, E.C.; Shockley, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The ultimate aim of this program is to couple experimental aqueous iodine volatilities to a fission product release model. Iodine partition coefficients, for inorganic iodine, have been measured during hydrolysis and radiolysis. The hydrolysis experiments have illustrated the importance of reaction time on iodine volatility. However, radiolysis effects can override hydrolysis in determining iodine volatility. In addition, silver metal in radiolysis samples can react to form silver iodide accompanied by a decrease in iodine volatility. Experimental data are now being coupled to an iodine transport and release model that was developed in the Federal Republic of Germany.

  18. Volatilization of ethylene dibromide from water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1987-01-01

    Overall mass-transfer coefficients for the volatilization of ethylene dibromide from water were measured simultaneously with the oxygen absorption coefficient in a laboratory stirred tank. Coefficients were measured as a function of mixing conditions in the water for two windspeeds. The ethylene dibromide mass-transfer coefficient depended on windspeed; the ethylene dibromide liquid-film coefficient did not, in agreement with theory. A constant relation existed between the liquid-film coefficients for ethylene dibromide and oxygen.

  19. Heterogeneous accretion and the moderately volatile element budget of Earth.

    PubMed

    Schönbächler, M; Carlson, R W; Horan, M F; Mock, T D; Hauri, E H

    2010-05-14

    Several models exist to describe the growth and evolution of Earth; however, variables such as the type of precursor materials, extent of mixing, and material loss during accretion are poorly constrained. High-precision palladium-silver isotope data show that Earth's mantle is similar in 107Ag/109Ag to primitive, volatile-rich chondrites, suggesting that Earth accreted a considerable amount of material with high contents of moderately volatile elements. Contradictory evidence from terrestrial chromium and strontium isotope data are reconciled by heterogeneous accretion, which includes a transition from dominantly volatile-depleted to volatile-rich materials with possibly high water contents. The Moon-forming giant impact probably involved the collision with a Mars-like protoplanet that had an oxidized mantle, enriched in moderately volatile elements.

  20. Martian Volatiles and Isotopic Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, Donald D.

    1997-01-01

    Data on martian volatiles gathered from Viking atmosphere measurements, modest groundbased spectra, shock-implanted atmospheric gases in martian (SNC) meteorites, trapped mantle gases in martian meteorites, and volatile-rich solid phases in martian meteorites, are presented. Atmospheric volatiles, surface volatiles, and isotopic chronologies are discussed, along with energetic particle interactions.

  1. Volatile halocarbons in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kroneld, R.

    1986-11-01

    Volatile halocarbons in drinking water have attracted increasing attention during recent years. These substances are also found in body fluids. All disinfectant chemicals used in water treatment seem to produce by-products. Of particular concern are the following substances from the use of various disinfectants according to US EPA: chlorine, bromine and iodine, and chlorine dioxide. The aim of the present study was to follow the formation and occurrence of volatile halocarbons in different types of water.

  2. Income volatility and psychological depression.

    PubMed

    Prause, Joann; Dooley, David; Huh, Jimi

    2009-03-01

    Income volatility appears to be increasing especially among lower income workers. Such volatility may reflect the ongoing shift of economic risk from employers to employees as marked by decreasing job security and employer-provided benefits. This study tests whether absolute volatility or downward volatility in income predict depression controlling for prior depression. A sample (n = 4,493) from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) with depression (CESD) measured at age 40 and prior depression measured eight to 10 years earlier was utilized. Downward volatility (frequency of income loss) was positively associated with depression; adjusting for downward volatility and other covariates, absolute volatility was negatively associated with depression. An interaction indicated a positive association between downward volatility and depression only when absolute volatility was high. These findings apply to respondents in a narrow age range (30 s) and the results warrant replication to identify the mediators linking absolute volatility and income loss to depression.

  3. The roles of fractional crystallization, magma mixing, crystal mush remobilization and volatile-melt interactions in the genesis of a young basalt-peralkaline rhyolite suite, the greater Olkaria volcanic complex, Kenya Rift valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macdonald, R.; Belkin, H.E.; Fitton, J.G.; Rogers, N.W.; Nejbert, K.; Tindle, A.G.; Marshall, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Greater Olkaria Volcanic Complex is a young (???20 ka) multi-centred lava and dome field dominated by the eruption of peralkaline rhyolites. Basaltic and trachytic magmas have been erupted peripherally to the complex and also form, with mugearites and benmoreites, an extensive suite of magmatic inclusions in the rhyolites. The eruptive rocks commonly represent mixed magmas and the magmatic inclusions are themselves two-, three- or four-component mixes. All rock types may carry xenocrysts of alkali feldspar, and less commonly plagioclase, derived from magma mixing and by remobilization of crystal mushes and/or plutonic rocks. Xenoliths in the range gabbro-syenite are common in the lavas and magmatic inclusions, the more salic varieties sometimes containing silicic glass representing partial melts and ranging in composition from anorthite ?? corundum- to acmite-normative. The peralkaline varieties are broadly similar, in major element terms, to the eruptive peralkaline rhyolites. The basalt-trachyte suite formed by a combination of fractional crystallization, magma mixing and resorption of earlier-formed crystals. Matrix glass in metaluminous trachytes has a peralkaline rhyolitic composition, indicating that the eruptive rhyolites may have formed by fractional crystallization of trachyte. Anomalous trace element enrichments (e.g. ??? 2000 ppm Y in a benmoreite) and negative Ce anomalies may have resulted from various Na- and K-enriched fluids evolving from melts of intermediate composition and either being lost from the system or enriched in other parts of the reservoirs. A small group of nepheline-normative, usually peralkaline, magmatic inclusions was formed by fluid transfer between peralkaline rhyolitic and benmoreitic magmas. The plumbing system of the complex consists of several independent reservoirs and conduits, repeatedly recharged by batches of mafic magma, with ubiquitous magma mixing. ?? The Author 2008. Published by Oxford University Press. All

  4. Mixing parameter regression applied to ground-water contaminant flow

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, R.; Tarter, M.E.; Lock, M.D.

    1992-01-01

    A new form of regression is applied to the problem of modeling the flow of water and contaminants through soil. In a fashion analogous to nested ANOVA, the new method parametrizes global distributional structure separately from local structure. A blind study is conducted to assess the precision of mixing parameter estimation as a function of depth. It is shown that accurate estimates of the regression relationship can be obtained from a sample of size n=1000 for mixing parameters and all other component parameters, with the exception of the standard deviation of small components which have large variances. It is shown that the hydraulic conductivity, transport, or infiltration of water borne contaminants through the vadose zone can be effectively modeled and simulated by the mixing parameter regression methods.

  5. Volatile compounds in samples of cork and also produced by selected fungi.

    PubMed

    Barreto, M C; Vilas Boas, L; Carneiro, L C; San Romão, M V

    2011-06-22

    The production of volatile compounds by microbial communities of cork samples taken during the cork manufacturing process was investigated. The majority of volatiles were found in samples collected at two stages: resting after the first boiling and nontreated cork disks. Volatile profiles produced by microbiota in both stages are similar. The releasable volatile compounds and 2,4,6-trichloroanisole (TCA) produced in cork-based culture medium by five isolated fungal species in pure and mixed cultures were also analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS).The results showed that 1-octen-3-ol and esters of fatty acids (medium chain length C8-C20) were the main volatile compounds produced by either pure fungal species or their mixture. Apparently, Penicillium glabrum is the main contributor to the overall volatile composition observed in the mixed culture. The production of releasable TCA on cork cannot be attributed to any of the assayed fungal isolates.

  6. Identification of grape juice aroma volatiles and attractiveness to the Mexican fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatiles from a Concord grape juice produced in Mexico were identified, tested for attractiveness and mixed into an attractant blend. Volatiles were sampled using solid phase microextraction (SPME). Chemicals were analyzed by gas chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Identi...

  7. Volatiles in High-K Lunar Basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Jessica J.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Messenger, Scott R.; Nguyen, Ann; Boyce, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    Chlorine is an unusual isotopic system, being essentially unfractionated ((delta)Cl-37 approximately 0 per mille ) between bulk terrestrial samples and chondritic meteorites and yet showing large variations in lunar (approximately -4 to +81 per mille), martian, and vestan (HED) samples. Among lunar samples, the volatile-bearing mineral apatite (Ca5(PO4)3[F,Cl,OH]) has been studied for volatiles in K-, REE-, and P (KREEP), very high potassium (VHK), low-Ti and high-Ti basalts, as well as samples from the lunar highlands. These studies revealed a positive correlation between in-situ (delta)Cl-37 measurements and bulk incompatible trace elements (ITEs) and ratios. Such trends were interpreted to originate from Cl isotopic fractionation during the degassing of metal chlorides during or shortly after the differentiation of the Moon via a magma ocean. In this study, we investigate the volatile inventories of a group of samples for which new-era volatile data have yet to be reported - the high-K (greater than 2000 ppm bulk K2O), high-Ti, trace element-rich mare basalts. We used isotope imaging on the Cameca NanoSIMS 50L at JSC to obtain the Cl isotopic composition [((Cl-37/(35)Clsample/C-37l/(35)Clstandard)-1)×1000, to get a value in per thousand (per mille)] which ranges from approximately -2.7 +/- 2 per mille to +16.1 +/- 2 per mille (2sigma), as well as volatile abundances (F & Cl) of apatite in samples 10017, 10024 & 10049. Simply following prior models, as lunar rocks with high bulk-rock abundances of ITEs we might expect the high-K, high-Ti basalts to contain apatite characterized by heavily fractionated (delta)Cl-37 values, i.e., Cl obtained from mixing between unfractionated mantle Cl (approximately 0 per mille) and the urKREEP reservoir (possibly fractionated to greater than +25 per mille.). However, the data obtained for the studied samples do not conform to either the early degassing or mixing models. Existing petrogentic models for the origin of the high

  8. Predicting the emission of volatile organic compounds from silage systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a precursor to smog, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to the atmosphere is an environmental concern in some regions. The major VOC emission source from farms is silage, with emissions coming from the silo face, mixing wagon, and feed bunk. The major compounds emitted are alcohols wit...

  9. Ammonia volatilization from crop residues and frozen green manure crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ruijter, F. J.; Huijsmans, J. F. M.; Rutgers, B.

    2010-09-01

    Agricultural systems can lose substantial amounts of nitrogen (N). To protect the environment, the European Union (EU) has adopted several directives that set goals to limit N losses. National Emission Ceilings (NEC) are prescribed in the NEC directive for nitrogen oxides and ammonia. Crop residues may contribute to ammonia volatilization, but sufficient information on their contribution to the national ammonia volatilization is lacking. Experiments were carried out with the aim to assess the ammonia volatilization of crop residues left on the soil surface or incorporated into the soil under the conditions met in practice in the Netherlands during late autumn and winter. Ammonia emission from residues of broccoli, leek, sugar beet, cut grass, fodder radish (fresh and frozen) and yellow mustard (frozen) was studied during two winter seasons using volatilization chambers. Residues were either placed on top of soil or mixed with soil. Mixing residues with soil gave insignificant ammonia volatilization, whereas volatilization was 5-16 percent of the N content of residues when placed on top of soil. Ammonia volatilization started after at least 4 days. Total ammonia volatilization was related to C/N-ratio and N concentration of the plant material. After 37 days, cumulative ammonia volatilization was negligible from plant material with N concentration below 2 percent, and was 10 percent of the N content of plant material with 4 percent N. These observations can be explained by decomposition of plant material by micro-organisms. After an initial built up of the microbial population, NH 4+ that is not needed for their own growth is released and can easily emit as NH 3 at the soil surface. The results of the experiments were used to estimate the contribution of crop residues to ammonia volatilization in the Netherlands. Crop residues of arable crops and residues of pasture topping may contribute more than 3 million kg NH 3-N to the national ammonia volatilization of the

  10. Volatiles trapped in coals: Second quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, J.R.; Halpern, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    We have been able to collect and characterize volatiles that are evolved in the grinding of coal. We have developed a very sensitive method for collecting volatiles evolved in grinding. A sealed, gas tight, grinding apparatus has been built. With this system we can collect volatiles freed from the coal matrix during grinding. To do this a 125 cm/sup 3/ sample of coal is placed in to a 1 liter sealable ball mill jar. The jar is evacuated and the coal ground for 1 hr. The jar is then removed from the ball mill and evacuated into our sample collection system. Gas from the jar is pumped through two stages of dust filtering into a liquid nitrogen cold trap charged with 5 ml of methylene chloride. After warming the trap is shaken so that any gas from the sample mixes with and dissolves in the methylene chloride. One microliter samples of the methylene chloride are injected into a Finnegan GCMS. Preliminary analysis of mass spectra from peaks in the RIC show the presence of hydrocarbons. It was possible to definitively identify cyclohexene. The total amount of hydrocarbons seen is low. The attached figure is the mass spectra of the cyclohexene that was collected from the ground coal. 1 fig.

  11. Volatilization of Mercury By Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Magos, L.; Tuffery, A. A.; Clarkson, T. W.

    1964-01-01

    Volatilization of mercury has been observed from various biological media (tissue homogenates, infusion broth, plasma, urine) containing mercuric chloride. That micro-organisms were responsible was indicated by the finding that the rates of volatilization were highly variable, that a latent period often preceded volatilization, that toluene inhibited the process, and that the capacity to volatilize mercury could be transferred from one biological medium to another. Two species of bacteria when isolated and cultured from these homogenates were able to volatilize mercury. Two other bacteria, one of which was isolated from the local water supply, were also highly active. The volatile mercury was identified as mercury vapour. The importance of these findings in relation to the storage of urine samples prior to mercury analysis is discussed. PMID:14249899

  12. Reduced Magmatic Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmann, M. M.; Withers, A. C.; Ardia, P.; Stanley, B. D.; Foley, N.

    2012-12-01

    Volatiles in Earth's upper mantle are dominated by H2O and CO2, but under more reduced conditions likely deeper in the mantle, other volatile species may be important or dominant. However, the speciation, solubilities, and effect on physical properties of reduced magmatic volatiles are poorly constrained. Here we summarize results from an experimental campaign to better understand reduced volatiles in magmas. Experiments emphasize spectroscopic and SIMS characterization of dissolved species in experiments for which fluid fugacities are known, thereby facilitating thermodynamic parameterization. Experimental determinations of molecular H2 solubility in basaltic and andesitic liquids show concentrations that are proportional to H2 fugacity. Because H2 increases with fH2 whereas dissolved H2O increases with fH2O1/2, the relative importance of H2 increases with pressure and for more hydrous magmas. At 1 GPa and IW-1, solubility in basalt reaches 0.3 wt.% (equivalent to 2.7 wt.% H2O). Solubilities at pressures of the deep upper mantle have not been explored experimentally (as is also true for H2O and CO2), but H2 could become the dominant hydrous species at 400 km and deeper, and so deep hydrous melts may have chiefly H2 rather than H2O or OH. Experiments suggest an extremely low partial specific density (0.18 kg/m3) for dissolved H2 at low pressure, and so appreciable dissolved H2 in melt atop the 410 km discontinuity or in the lower mantle may promote positive buoyancy. Solubilities of reduced C-species remain poorly known. In contrast to results in Na2O-SiO2 liquids (Mysen et al., 2009), experiments with a haplobasaltic liquid at controlled CH4 fugacities indicated very small (<0.05 wt.%) CH4 solubilities even at very reduced conditions (

  13. Biomass conversion to mixed alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Holtzapple, M.T.; Loescher, M.; Ross, M.

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses the MixAlco Process which converts a wide variety of biomass materials (e.g. municipal solid waste, sewage sludge, agricultural residues) to mixed alcohols. First, the biomass is treated with lime to enhance its digestibility. Then, a mixed culture of acid-forming microorganisms converts the lime-treated biomass to volatile fatty acids (VFA) such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids. To maintain fermentor pH, a neutralizing agent (e.g. calcium carbonate or lime) is added, so the fermentation actually produces VFA salts such as calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate. The VFA salts are recovered and thermally converted to ketones (e.g. acetone, methylethyl ketone, diethyl ketone) which are subsequently hydrogenated to mixed alcohols (e.g. isopropanol, isobutanol, isopentanol). Processing costs are estimated at $0.72/gallon of mixed alcohols making it potentially attractive for transportation fuels.

  14. Molecular plant volatile communication.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Jarmo K; Blande, James D

    2012-01-01

    Plants produce a wide array of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which have multiple functions as internal plant hormones (e.g., ethylene, methyl jasmonate and methyl salicylate), in communication with conspecific and heterospecific plants and in communication with organisms of second (herbivores and pollinators) and third (enemies of herbivores) trophic levels. Species specific VOCs normally repel polyphagous herbivores and those specialised on other plant species, but may attract specialist herbivores and their natural enemies, which use VOCs as host location cues. Attraction of predators and parasitoids by VOCs is considered an evolved indirect defence, whereby plants are able to indirectly reduce biotic stress caused by damaging herbivores. In this chapter we review these interactions where VOCs are known to play a crucial role. We then discuss the importance of volatile communication in self and nonself detection. VOCs are suggested to appear in soil ecosystems where distinction of own roots from neighbours roots is essential to optimise root growth, but limited evidence of above-ground plant self-recognition is available.

  15. Volatile signals during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vaglio, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Scents play a key role in mediating reproductive interactions in many vertebrates including mammals. Nowadays, several studies indicate that humans seem to use remarkably olfactory communication and are even able to produce and perceive pheromones. Furthermore, over the past several years, it became increasingly clear that pheromone-like chemical signals probably play a role in offspring identification and mother recognition. Recently developed technical procedures (solid-phase microextraction and dynamic headspace extraction) now allow investigators to characterize volatile compounds with high reliability. We analyzed the volatile compounds in sweat patch samples collected from the para-axillary and nipple-areola regions of women during pregnancy and after childbirth. We hypothesized that, at the time of birth and during the first weeks of life, the distinctive olfactory pattern of the para-axillary area is probably useful to newborn babies for recognizing and distinguishing their own mother, whereas the characteristic pattern of the nipple-areola region is probably useful as a guide to nourishment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Water-Borne Illnesses. Water in Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Carly Sporer

    The Water in Africa Project was realized over a 2-year period by a team of Peace Corps volunteers. As part of an expanded, detailed design, resources were collected from over 90 volunteers serving in African countries, photos and stories were prepared, and standards-based learning units were created for K-12 students. This unit, "Water-Borne…

  17. Volatile chemical reagent detector

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Liaohai; McBranch, Duncan; Wang, Rong; Whitten, David

    2004-08-24

    A device for detecting volatile chemical reagents based on fluorescence quenching analysis that is capable of detecting neutral electron acceptor molecules. The device includes a fluorescent material, a contact region, a light source, and an optical detector. The fluorescent material includes at least one polymer-surfactant complex. The polymer-surfactant complex is formed by combining a fluorescent ionic conjugated polymer with an oppositely charged surfactant. The polymer-surfactant complex may be formed in a polar solvent and included in the fluorescent material as a solution. Alternatively, the complex may be included in the fluorescent material as a thin film. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex in the fluorescent material allows the device to detect both neutral and ionic acceptor molecules. The use of a polymer-surfactant complex film allows the device and the fluorescent material to be reusable after exposing the fluorescent material to a vacuum for limited time.

  18. Governmentally amplified output volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funashima, Yoshito

    2016-11-01

    Predominant government behavior is decomposed by frequency into several periodic components: updating cycles of infrastructure, Kuznets cycles, fiscal policy over business cycles, and election cycles. Little is known, however, about the theoretical impact of such cyclical behavior in public finance on output fluctuations. Based on a standard neoclassical growth model, this study intends to examine the frequency at which public investment cycles are relevant to output fluctuations. We find an inverted U-shaped relationship between output volatility and length of cycle in public investment. This implies that periodic behavior in public investment at a certain frequency range can cause aggravated output resonance. Moreover, we present an empirical analysis to test the theoretical implication, using the U.S. data in the period from 1968 to 2015. The empirical results suggest that such resonance phenomena change from low to high frequency.

  19. Reduced Heart Rate Volatility

    PubMed Central

    Grogan, Eric L.; Morris, John A.; Norris, Patrick R.; France, Daniel J.; Ozdas, Asli; Stiles, Renée A.; Harris, Paul A.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Speroff, Theodore

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine if using dense data capture to measure heart rate volatility (standard deviation) measured in 5-minute intervals predicts death. Background: Fundamental approaches to assessing vital signs in the critically ill have changed little since the early 1900s. Our prior work in this area has demonstrated the utility of densely sampled data and, in particular, heart rate volatility over the entire patient stay, for predicting death and prolonged ventilation. Methods: Approximately 120 million heart rate data points were prospectively collected and archived from 1316 trauma ICU patients over 30 months. Data were sampled every 1 to 4 seconds, stored in a relational database, linked to outcome data, and de-identified. HR standard deviation was continuously computed over 5-minute intervals (CVRD, cardiac volatility–related dysfunction). Logistic regression models incorporating age and injury severity score were developed on a test set of patients (N = 923), and prospectively analyzed in a distinct validation set (N = 393) for the first 24 hours of ICU data. Results: Distribution of CVRD varied by survival in the test set. Prospective evaluation of the model in the validation set gave an area in the receiver operating curve of 0.81 with a sensitivity and specificity of 70.1 and 80.0, respectively. CVRD predict death as early as 24 hours in the validation set. Conclusions: CVRD identifies a subgroup of patients with a high probability of dying. Death is predicted within first 24 hours of stay. We hypothesize CVRD is a surrogate for autonomic nervous system dysfunction. PMID:15319726

  20. Determination on Monod kinetic coefficients for volatile hydrophobic organic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Guha, S.; Jaffe, P.R.

    1996-06-20

    A new procedure is presented to determine Monod kinetic coefficients and the microbial yield coefficient for volatile hydrophobic compounds such as phenanthrene. Batch experiments were conducted with a mixed culture capable of degrading phenanthrene. The phenanthrene disappearance and carbon dioxide production were monitored with time. A maximum likelihood estimator was formulated to fit the set of equations that describe the system to the measured data. The model takes into account a number of processes such as partition onto the apparatus, volatilization, and partition onto the biomass. The parameters required to describe these processes were obtained by independent experiments. The yield coefficient could be determined within a small range. However, the specific growth rate and the half-saturation constant were found to vary widely, with pairs of them describing the system adequately. It was shown that partition and volatilization processes can significantly affect the determination of the yield and Monod kinetic coefficients and need to be taken into account.

  1. Milt and endocrine responses of mature male Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) parr to water-borne testosterone, 17,20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one 20-sulfate, and the urines from adult female and male salmon.

    PubMed

    Waring, C P; Moore, A; Scott, A P

    1996-08-01

    Mature male Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) parr responded to the urine from ovulated females with significant increases in plasma gonadotropin II, 17,20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one, testosterone, and 11-ketotestosterone concentrations and volumes of expressible milt. There were also significant increases in biliary free steroid and steroid conjugate concentrations. Urine from mature adult male salmon also affected male parr, which responded with increased plasma gonadotropin II concentrations and expressible milt. However, male urine did not elevate the plasma and bile concentrations of any of the steroids. When two of the three known steroids which are detected by the mature male salmon parr olfactory epithelium were tested for priming activity, results showed that these compounds had little or no activity when added to the water. Only plasma gonadotropin II concentrations increased in mature male parr exposed to 17,20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one 20-sulfate. Female and mature adult male urines contain at least one priming pheromone and there was no conclusive evidence for this priming pheromone being one of the tested steroids. However, the fact that water-borne 17,20 beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one 20-sulfate can have a physiological effect in male parr suggests that it may have a role as one of a mixture of compounds in female urine that males detect and respond to. The lack of a priming-like effect of testosterone supports a previous hypothesis that the major pheromonal role of this steroid is as an attractant for mature male salmon parr.

  2. Volatile phytochemicals as mosquito semiochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Nyasembe, Vincent O.; Torto, Baldwyn

    2014-01-01

    Plant biochemical processes result in the release of an array of volatile chemical substances into the environment, some of which are known to play important plant fitness enhancing functions, such as attracting pollinators, thermal tolerance of photosynthesis, and defense against herbivores. Cunningly, phytophagous insects have evolved mechanisms to utilize these volatiles to their own advantage, either to colonize a suitable host for feeding, reproduction and oviposition or avoid an unsuitable one. The volatile compounds involved in plant–insect chemical interactions have been widely exploited in the management of agricultural pests. On the other hand, use of plant volatiles in the management of medically important insects is limited, mainly due to paucity of information on their role in disease vector–plant interactions. To date, a total of 29 plant volatile compounds from various chemical classes, including phenols, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones and terpenes, have been identified as mosquito semiochemicals. In this review, we present highlights of mosquito–plant interactions, the available evidence of nectar feeding, with particular emphasis on sources of plant attractants, methods of plant volatile collection and the candidate plant volatile compounds that attract mosquitoes to nectar sources. We also highlight the potential application of these phytochemical attractants in integrated mosquito management. PMID:25383131

  3. Brain Injury Alters Volatile Metabolome.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Bruce A; Cohen, Akiva S; Gordon, Amy R; Opiekun, Maryanne; Martin, Talia; Elkind, Jaclynn; Lundström, Johan N; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2016-06-01

    Chemical signals arising from body secretions and excretions communicate information about health status as have been reported in a range of animal models of disease. A potential common pathway for diseases to alter chemical signals is via activation of immune function-which is known to be intimately involved in modulation of chemical signals in several species. Based on our prior findings that both immunization and inflammation alter volatile body odors, we hypothesized that injury accompanied by inflammation might correspondingly modify the volatile metabolome to create a signature endophenotype. In particular, we investigated alteration of the volatile metabolome as a result of traumatic brain injury. Here, we demonstrate that mice could be trained in a behavioral assay to discriminate mouse models subjected to lateral fluid percussion injury from appropriate surgical sham controls on the basis of volatile urinary metabolites. Chemical analyses of the urine samples similarly demonstrated that brain injury altered urine volatile profiles. Behavioral and chemical analyses further indicated that alteration of the volatile metabolome induced by brain injury and alteration resulting from lipopolysaccharide-associated inflammation were not synonymous. Monitoring of alterations in the volatile metabolome may be a useful tool for rapid brain trauma diagnosis and for monitoring recovery. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of US Government 2016.

  4. Brain Injury Alters Volatile Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Akiva S.; Gordon, Amy R.; Opiekun, Maryanne; Martin, Talia; Elkind, Jaclynn; Lundström, Johan N.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical signals arising from body secretions and excretions communicate information about health status as have been reported in a range of animal models of disease. A potential common pathway for diseases to alter chemical signals is via activation of immune function—which is known to be intimately involved in modulation of chemical signals in several species. Based on our prior findings that both immunization and inflammation alter volatile body odors, we hypothesized that injury accompanied by inflammation might correspondingly modify the volatile metabolome to create a signature endophenotype. In particular, we investigated alteration of the volatile metabolome as a result of traumatic brain injury. Here, we demonstrate that mice could be trained in a behavioral assay to discriminate mouse models subjected to lateral fluid percussion injury from appropriate surgical sham controls on the basis of volatile urinary metabolites. Chemical analyses of the urine samples similarly demonstrated that brain injury altered urine volatile profiles. Behavioral and chemical analyses further indicated that alteration of the volatile metabolome induced by brain injury and alteration resulting from lipopolysaccharide-associated inflammation were not synonymous. Monitoring of alterations in the volatile metabolome may be a useful tool for rapid brain trauma diagnosis and for monitoring recovery. PMID:26926034

  5. Moderately volatile elements. [in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palme, H.; Larimer, J. W.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1988-01-01

    That the fractionation of moderately volatile and highly volatile elements was a major process in the early solar system is reflected in the variable concentrations of Rb and associated variations in initial Sr-isotopic ratios in chondritic meteorites. Greater knowledge of processes leading to volatile depletion would place stronger constraints on the formation conditions of solid material in the solar system. It will especially become possible to ascertain whether evaporation or incomplete condensation was the major process in establishing the elemental abundance patterns observed in primitive meteorites and planets.

  6. Estimation of gas phase mixing in packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, S.; Thunman, H.; Leckner, B.; Hermansson, S.

    2008-04-15

    An improved model is presented for estimation of the mixing of gaseous species in a packed bed for fuel conversion. In particular, this work clarifies the main characteristics of mixing of volatiles and oxidizers in a burning bed of high-volatile solid fuel. Expressions are introduced to represent the active role of degradation of the solid particles in the mixing within the gas phase. During drying and devolatilization the solids modify the behavior of the gas flow: the volatiles released from the surface of the particles increase the turbulence in the system, and hence the rates of the homogeneous reactions under mixing-limited conditions. Numerical experiments are carried out to test the validity of this conclusion regarding mixing in different geometries. The flow of volatiles leaving the fuel particles is shown to contribute significantly to mixing, especially at low air flows through a bed. However, the fraction of the particle surface where volatiles are released and its orientation in the bed should be better determined in order to increase the accuracy of the estimates of turbulent mixing. (author)

  7. MATRIX-VBS (v1.0): Implementing an Evolving Organic Aerosol Volatility in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2017-01-01

    The gas-particle partitioning and chemical aging of semi-volatile organic aerosol are presented in a newly developed box model scheme, where its effect on the growth, composition, and mixing state of particles is examined. The volatility-basis set (VBS) framework is implemented into the aerosol microphysical scheme MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state), which resolves mass and number aerosol concentrations and in multiple mixing-state classes. The new scheme, MATRIX-VBS, has the potential to significantly advance the representation of organic aerosols in Earth system models by improving upon the conventional representation as non-volatile particulate organic matter, often also with an assumed fixed size distribution. We present results from idealized cases representing Beijing, Mexico City, a Finnish forest, and a southeastern US forest, and investigate the evolution of mass concentrations and volatility distributions for organic species across the gas and particle phases, as well as assessing their mixing state among aerosol populations. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the intermediate-volatility range, while they remain in the particle phase in the low-volatility range. Their volatility distribution at any point in time depends on the applied emission factors, oxidation by OH radicals, and temperature. We also compare against parallel simulations with the original scheme, which represented only the particulate and non-volatile component of the organic aerosol, examining how differently the condensed-phase organic matter is distributed across the mixing states in the model. The results demonstrate the importance of representing organic aerosol as a semi-volatile aerosol, and explicitly calculating the partitioning of organic species between the gas and particulate phases.

  8. MATRIX-VBS (v1.0): Implementing an Evolving Organic Aerosol Volatility in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2017-01-01

    The gas-particle partitioning and chemical aging of semi-volatile organic aerosol are presented in a newly developed box model scheme, where its effect on the growth, composition, and mixing state of particles is examined. The volatility-basis set (VBS) framework is implemented into the aerosol microphysical scheme MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state), which resolves mass and number aerosol concentrations and in multiple mixing-state classes. The new scheme, MATRIX-VBS, has the potential to significantly advance the representation of organic aerosols in Earth system models by improving upon the conventional representation as non-volatile particulate organic matter, often also with an assumed fixed size distribution. We present results from idealized cases representing Beijing, Mexico City, a Finnish forest, and a southeastern US forest, and investigate the evolution of mass concentrations and volatility distributions for organic species across the gas and particle phases, as well as assessing their mixing state among aerosol populations. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the intermediate-volatility range, while they remain in the particle phase in the low-volatility range. Their volatility distribution at any point in time depends on the applied emission factors, oxidation by OH radicals, and temperature. We also compare against parallel simulations with the original scheme, which represented only the particulate and non-volatile component of the organic aerosol, examining how differently the condensed-phase organic matter is distributed across the mixing states in the model. The results demonstrate the importance of representing organic aerosol as a semi-volatile aerosol, and explicitly calculating the partitioning of organic species between the gas and particulate phases.

  9. MATRIX-VBS (v1.0): implementing an evolving organic aerosol volatility in an aerosol microphysics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2017-02-01

    The gas-particle partitioning and chemical aging of semi-volatile organic aerosol are presented in a newly developed box model scheme, where its effect on the growth, composition, and mixing state of particles is examined. The volatility-basis set (VBS) framework is implemented into the aerosol microphysical scheme MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state), which resolves mass and number aerosol concentrations and in multiple mixing-state classes. The new scheme, MATRIX-VBS, has the potential to significantly advance the representation of organic aerosols in Earth system models by improving upon the conventional representation as non-volatile particulate organic matter, often also with an assumed fixed size distribution. We present results from idealized cases representing Beijing, Mexico City, a Finnish forest, and a southeastern US forest, and investigate the evolution of mass concentrations and volatility distributions for organic species across the gas and particle phases, as well as assessing their mixing state among aerosol populations. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the intermediate-volatility range, while they remain in the particle phase in the low-volatility range. Their volatility distribution at any point in time depends on the applied emission factors, oxidation by OH radicals, and temperature. We also compare against parallel simulations with the original scheme, which represented only the particulate and non-volatile component of the organic aerosol, examining how differently the condensed-phase organic matter is distributed across the mixing states in the model. The results demonstrate the importance of representing organic aerosol as a semi-volatile aerosol, and explicitly calculating the partitioning of organic species between the gas and particulate phases.

  10. Improved exposure estimation in soil screening and clean-up criteria for volatile organic chemicals.

    PubMed

    DeVaull, George E

    2017-02-18

    Soil clean-up criteria define acceptable concentrations of organic chemical constituents for exposed humans. These criteria sum the estimated soil exposure over multiple pathways. Assumptions for ingestion, dermal contact, and dust exposure generally presume a chemical persists in surface soils at a constant concentration level for the entire exposure duration. For volatile chemicals this is an unrealistic assumption. A calculation method is presented for surficial soil criteria which include volatile depletion of chemical for these uptake pathways. The depletion estimates compare favorably with measured concentration profiles and with field measurements of soil concentration. Corresponding volatilization estimates compare favorably with measured data for a wide range of volatile and semi-volatile chemicals, including instances with and without the presence of a mixed-chemical residual phase. Selected examples show application of the revised factors in estimating screening levels for benzene in surficial soils. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Volatile Emission of Mechanically Damaged Almonds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mature almonds from the Monterey variety were evaluated for their volatile composition after mechanical damage and compared to the volatile composition of the corresponding undamaged almonds. Volatiles were collected on Tenax, desorbed with diethyl ether, and identified via GC-MS analyses. Volatile ...

  12. Trends in volatile substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Henry; Lorenz, Douglas J

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate whether social, geographic, and demographic factors have a relationship to trends in volatile substance abuse. Two datasets were obtained. Dataset 1 was all patients reported to U.S. poison centers with inhalation abuse of a non-pharmaceutical substance between 2000 and 2005. Dataset 2 was annual data from the U.S. Dept of Labor and U.S. Census Bureau for each of the 50 states for the years 2000 through 2005 for unemployment rate, population density, poverty rate, high school graduation rate and percentage of population with bachelor degree. The two datasets were compared for geographic (by state) and temporal (by year) relationships using U.S. government demographic categories. The U.S. poison centers state that 12,428 patients with volatile substance abuse have been reported over the 6 year period of 2000-2005, with a mean of 2,071 patients annually. A strong negative trend was found between volatile substance abuse and population density, with volatile substance abuse increasing as population density decreased. This trend remained consistent over the 6 years of evaluation. A negative trend was found with percentage of population with a bachelor's degree and volatile substance abuse. No trend was found when comparing volatile substance abuse and poverty rate, unemployment rate, or high school graduation rate. Volatile substance abuse appears to increase as population density decreases, following a previously suggested relationship with a rural setting. Volatile substance abuse appears to increase as percentage of population with a bachelor's degree decreases.

  13. Evolution of Triton's volatile budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1993-01-01

    Triton's volatile budget provides important links to planetary formation processes in the cold outer solar nebula. However, the budget has been modified by processes subsequent to the accretion of this body. It is of interest to assess whether certain formation environments can be ruled out for Triton on the basis of its current volatile abundances, and also to quantify some of the post-accretional processes by which the abundances have been modified.

  14. Volatile substance misuse: toward a research agenda.

    PubMed

    Howard, Matthew O; Garland, Eric L

    2013-01-01

    Volatile substance misuse (VSM) is a significant but under-researched global health problem. This perspective calls for additional VSM research in key areas including the phenomenology and adverse health and social consequences of acute inhalant intoxication and for prospective longitudinal studies of the natural history of VSM and related deleterious long-term biomedical and psychosocial outcomes. Taxonomic investigations are needed to identify subtypes of volatile substance misusers (VSMs), whereas qualitative and mixed methods evaluations would provide important information about cultural and interpersonal contexts and specific patterns, modalities and agents of VSM. Treatment outcome and health services studies have rarely been conducted with reference to VSMs and are needed. Studies of specific inhalants and high-risk populations for VSM would also contribute to current knowledge regarding VSM and help reduce the toll taken by this prevalent form of drug misuse. The authors draw on VSM studies that they and other researchers have conducted to exemplify the types of research needed in each of the domains identified above. Despite the global ubiquity of VSM, much remains to be learned about this form of substance use. This perspective identifies key elements of a systematic program for research in this area.

  15. Dilution and volatilization of groundwater contaminant discharges in streams.

    PubMed

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Bjerg, Poul L; Sonne, Anne T; Balbarini, Nicola; Rosenberg, Louise; Binning, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    An analytical solution to describe dilution and volatilization of a continuous groundwater contaminant plume into streams is developed for risk assessment. The location of groundwater plume discharge into the stream (discharge through the side versus bottom of the stream) and different distributions of the contaminant plume concentration (Gaussian, homogeneous or heterogeneous distribution) are considered. The model considering the plume discharged through the bank of the river, with a uniform concentration distribution was the most appropriate for risk assessment due to its simplicity and limited data requirements. The dilution and volatilization model is able to predict the entire concentration field, and thus the mixing zone, maximum concentration and fully mixed concentration in the stream. It can also be used to identify groundwater discharge zones from in-stream concentration measurement. The solution was successfully applied to published field data obtained in a large and a small Danish stream and provided valuable information on the risk posed by the groundwater contaminant plumes. The results provided by the dilution and volatilization model are very different to those obtained with existing point source models, with a distributed source leading to a larger mixing length and different concentration field. The dilution model can also provide recommendations for sampling locations and the size of impact zones in streams. This is of interest for regulators, for example when developing guidelines for the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive.

  16. Dilution and volatilization of groundwater contaminant discharges in streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisopou, Angeliki; Bjerg, Poul L.; Sonne, Anne T.; Balbarini, Nicola; Rosenberg, Louise; Binning, Philip J.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical solution to describe dilution and volatilization of a continuous groundwater contaminant plume into streams is developed for risk assessment. The location of groundwater plume discharge into the stream (discharge through the side versus bottom of the stream) and different distributions of the contaminant plume concentration (Gaussian, homogeneous or heterogeneous distribution) are considered. The model considering the plume discharged through the bank of the river, with a uniform concentration distribution was the most appropriate for risk assessment due to its simplicity and limited data requirements. The dilution and volatilization model is able to predict the entire concentration field, and thus the mixing zone, maximum concentration and fully mixed concentration in the stream. It can also be used to identify groundwater discharge zones from in-stream concentration measurement. The solution was successfully applied to published field data obtained in a large and a small Danish stream and provided valuable information on the risk posed by the groundwater contaminant plumes. The results provided by the dilution and volatilization model are very different to those obtained with existing point source models, with a distributed source leading to a larger mixing length and different concentration field. The dilution model can also provide recommendations for sampling locations and the size of impact zones in streams. This is of interest for regulators, for example when developing guidelines for the implementation of the European Water Framework Directive.

  17. Volatile pipe prices ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, C.

    1988-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, prices for oilfield casing and tubing have shot up and down like a roller coaster. Average pipe prices went up 80 percent in the 1979-81 drilling boom. They dropped 50 percent in the 1982-83 period, only to recover 20 percent in 1984-85. The collapse of crude prices caused another 30 percent drop in 1986. Since they bottomed out in August of that year, prices have come up by 60 percent. The key question: ''What lies ahead.'' The short answer: ''Probably more of the same''. This article looks at what has caused price fluctuations of such magnitude and volatility over the past several years to assess the outlook for 1988 and beyond. The author says we are not on the brink of a severe OCTG shortage of any sort, though there may be some very localized spot shortages in terms of deliverability and price. There is likely to be some build up of tubular inventory among supply houses wary of losing regular customers to those with adequate inventories. The characteristic first-of-the-year dip in the active rig count will supplement a slight inventory building, as will an expected increase in imports. The bottomline impact for the wellsite is there is little chance for substantial price increases until the third or fourth quarter of this year. Even then, a considerable jump in utilization would be needed and most analysts are predicting the rig count to slowly rise to about the 1500-plus range for the fourth quarter.

  18. Effects of NOx on the volatility of secondary organic aerosol from isoprene photooxidation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Kollman, Matthew S; Song, Chen; Shilling, John E; Ng, Nga L

    2014-02-18

    The effects of NOx on the volatility of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from isoprene photooxidation are investigated in environmental chamber experiments. Two types of experiments are performed. In HO2-dominant experiments, organic peroxy radicals (RO2) primarily react with HO2. In mixed experiments, RO2 reacts through multiple pathways, including with NO, NO2, and HO2. The volatility and oxidation state of isoprene SOA are sensitive to and exhibit a nonlinear dependence on NOx levels. Depending on the NOx levels, the SOA formed in mixed experiments can be of similar or lower volatility compared to that formed in HO2-dominant experiments. The dependence of SOA yield, volatility, and oxidation state on the NOx level likely arises from gas-phase RO2 chemistry and succeeding particle-phase oligomerization reactions. The NOx level also plays a strong role in SOA aging. While the volatility of SOA in mixed experiments does not change substantially over time, SOA becomes less volatile and more oxidized as oxidation progresses in HO2-dominant experiments.

  19. Measurements of non-volatile aerosols with a VTDMA and their correlations with carbonaceous aerosols in Guangzhou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Heidi H. Y.; Tan, Haobo; Xu, Hanbing; Li, Fei; Wu, Cheng; Yu, Jian Z.; Chan, Chak K.

    2016-07-01

    Simultaneous measurements of aerosol volatility and carbonaceous matters were conducted at a suburban site in Guangzhou, China, in February and March 2014 using a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) and an organic carbon/elemental carbon (OC / EC) analyzer. Low volatility (LV) particles, with a volatility shrink factor (VSF) at 300 °C exceeding 0.9, contributed 5 % of number concentrations of the 40 nm particles and 11-15 % of the 80-300 nm particles. They were composed of non-volatile material externally mixed with volatile material, and therefore did not evaporate significantly at 300 °C. Non-volatile material mixed internally with the volatile material was referred to as medium volatility (MV, 0.4 < VSF < 0.9) and high volatility (HV, VSF < 0.4) particles. The MV and HV particles contributed 57-71 % of number concentration for the particles between 40 and 300 nm in size. The average EC and OC concentrations measured by the OC / EC analyzer were 3.4 ± 3.0 and 9.0 ± 6.0 µg m-3, respectively. Non-volatile OC evaporating at 475 °C or above, together with EC, contributed 67 % of the total carbon mass. In spite of the daily maximum and minimum, the diurnal variations in the volume fractions of the volatile material, HV, MV and LV residuals were less than 15 % for the 80-300 nm particles. Back trajectory analysis also suggests that over 90 % of the air masses influencing the sampling site were well aged as they were transported at low altitudes (below 1500 m) for over 40 h before arrival. Further comparison with the diurnal variations in the mass fractions of EC and the non-volatile OC in PM2.5 suggests that the non-volatile residuals may be related to both EC and non-volatile OC in the afternoon, during which the concentration of aged organics increased. A closure analysis of the total mass of LV and MV residuals and the mass of EC or the sum of EC and non-volatile OC was conducted. It suggests that non-volatile OC, in addition to EC, was

  20. Lunar volatile depletion due to incomplete accretion within an impact-generated disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canup, Robin M.; Visscher, Channon; Salmon, Julien; Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    2015-12-01

    The Moon may have formed from an Earth-orbiting disk of vapour and melt produced by a giant impact. The mantles of the Moon and Earth have similar compositions. However, it is unclear why lunar samples are more depleted in volatile elements than terrestrial mantle rocks, given that an evaporative escape mechanism seems inconsistent with expected disk conditions. Dynamical models suggest that the Moon initially accreted from the outermost disk, but later acquired up to 60% of its mass from melt originating from the inner disk. Here we combine dynamical, thermal and chemical models to show that volatile depletion in the Moon can be explained by preferential accretion of volatile-rich melt in the inner disk to the Earth, rather than to the growing Moon. Melt in the inner disk is initially hot and volatile poor, but volatiles condense as the disk cools. In our simulations, the delivery of inner disk melt to the Moon effectively ceases when gravitational interactions cause the Moon’s orbit to expand away from the disk, and this termination of lunar accretion occurs before condensation of potassium and more volatile elements. Thus, the portion of the Moon derived from the inner disk is expected to be volatile depleted. We suggest that this mechanism may explain part or all of the Moon’s volatile depletion, depending on the degree of mixing within the lunar interior.

  1. Observability of market daily volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroni, Filippo; Serva, Maurizio

    2016-02-01

    We study the price dynamics of 65 stocks from the Dow Jones Composite Average from 1973 to 2014. We show that it is possible to define a Daily Market Volatility σ(t) which is directly observable from data. This quantity is usually indirectly defined by r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) where the r(t) are the daily returns of the market index and the ω(t) are i.i.d. random variables with vanishing average and unitary variance. The relation r(t) = σ(t) ω(t) alone is unable to give an operative definition of the index volatility, which remains unobservable. On the contrary, we show that using the whole information available in the market, the index volatility can be operatively defined and detected.

  2. A volatility index for comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, Fred L.

    1992-01-01

    The variations in total brightness of a comet when it is most active, near perihelion, are presently used as the bases of a volatility index (VI) for short-period (SP) and long-period (LP) comets. Volatility does not correlate with period among the LP comets, and thereby shows no 'aging' effect; similarly, the VI measurements are the same for SP and for LP comets and exhibit no correlation with (1) absolute magnitude near perihelion, (2) orbital inclination, or (3) activity index measuring the intrinsic brightness change from great solar distances to the maximum near perihelion. Active comets are shown to be basically alike irrespective of their orbits or 'ages'.

  3. Adaptive Sniping for Volatile and Stable Continuous Double Auction Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toft, I. E.; Bagnall, A. J.

    This paper introduces a new adaptive sniping agent for the Continuous Double Auction. We begin by analysing the performance of the well known Kaplan sniper in two extremes of market conditions. We generate volatile and stable market conditions using the well known Zero Intelligence-Constrained agent and a new zero-intelligence agent Small Increment (SI). ZI-C agents submit random but profitable bids/offers and cause high volatility in prices and individual trader performance. Our new zero-intelligence agent, SI, makes small random adjustments to the outstanding bid/offer and hence is more cautious than ZI-C. We present results for SI in self-play and then analyse Kaplan in volatile and stable markets. We demonstrate that the non-adaptive Kaplan sniper can be configured to suit either market conditions, but no single configuration is performs well across both market types. We believe that in a dynamic auction environment where current or future market conditions cannot be predicted a viable sniping strategy should adapt its behaviour to suit prevailing market conditions. To this end, we propose the Adaptive Sniper (AS) agent for the CDA. AS traders classify sniping opportunities using a statistical model of market activity and adjust their classification thresholds using a Widrow-Hoff adapted search. Our AS agent requires little configuration, and outperforms the original Kaplan sniper in volatile and stable markets, and in a mixed trader type scenario that includes adaptive strategies from the literature.

  4. Influence of semi-volatile species on particle hygroscopic growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Paolo; Sellegri, Karine; Monier, Marie; Laj, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we use a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyser (TDMA) system combining particle volatilization and humidification conditioning (VH-TDMA) to test the effect of the gentle volatilization of a small fraction of the atmospheric particles on the particle hygroscopic growth in several environments (urban to remote). We first give an overview of the Hygroscopic Growth Factors (HGF) in these various environments, showing that in most of them, aerosol particles are externally mixed. We then show that the particle hygroscopicity can either be increased or decreased after thermal conditioning of the particle at moderate temperatures (50-110 °C). The hygroscopic growth factor changes induced by volatilization indicate that some volatile compounds, although present at low concentrations, can significantly influence the hygroscopic growth of particles in a way that can most of time be theoretically explained if simplified assumptions are used. However, simplified assumptions occasionally fail over several hours to explain hygroscopic changes, kinetic/surface effects observed at remote environments are suspected to be important.

  5. Strong intrinsic mixing in vortex magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Martin, James E; Shea-Rohwer, Lauren; Solis, Kyle J

    2009-07-01

    We report a method of magnetic mixing wherein a "vortex" magnetic field applied to a suspension of magnetic particles creates strong homogeneous mixing throughout the fluid volume. Experiments designed to elucidate the microscopic mechanism of mixing show that the torque is quadratic in the field, decreases with field frequency, and is optimized at a vortex field angle of approximately 55 degrees . Theory and simulations indicate that the field-induced formation of volatile particle chains is responsible for these phenomena. This technique has applications in microfluidic devices and is ideally suited to applications such as accelerating the binding of target biomolecules to biofunctionalized magnetic microbeads.

  6. Mixing and phase partitioning of primary and secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asa-Awuku, A.; Miracolo, M. A.; Kroll, J. H.; Robinson, A. L.; Donahue, N. M.

    2009-08-01

    Predicting primary and secondary organic aerosol (POA and SOA) concentrations requires understanding the phase partitioning of semi-volatile organic species. A well-mixed single phase organic aerosol can absorb greater amounts of semi-volatile species but little experimental evidence exists on the phase distribution of particulate organics. We investigated the phase partitioning and mixing of semi-volatile POA and SOA in a smog chamber. Particle time of flight (PToF) data from an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) were used to quantify the extent of mixing. The SOA plus motor oil and diesel fuel combination produced a weakly mixed system, in which two particulate organic phases coexist. However, the POA in diesel exhaust readily mixed with SOA, forming a single phase after one hour. Although both POA types contain semi-volatile components, there is a fundamental difference in their partitioning behavior with SOA. The high resolution AMS data reveal minor differences in composition between the two types of POA. This work provides further evidence that there exists a set of unidentified components that influence particulate mixing that affect OA formation and suggests the extent of absorbent phase mixing (strong versus weak) can be observed and quantified with PToF data.

  7. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... community Use our Virtual Library Treatment and outcomes back to top Because most people with mixed dementia are diagnosed with a single type of dementia, physicians often base their prescribing decisions on the type of dementia ...

  8. Volatile Organic Compunds (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Mercury Lead Arsenic Volatile Organic Compounds Plastics Pesticides Climate Change Climate Change Home What is Climate ... Home Mercury Lead Arsenic Volatile Organic Compounds Plastics Pesticides Climate Change Climate Change Home What is Climate ...

  9. Fluctuation behaviors of financial return volatility duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hongli; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yunfan

    2016-04-01

    It is of significantly crucial to understand the return volatility of financial markets because it helps to quantify the investment risk, optimize the portfolio, and provide a key input of option pricing models. The characteristics of isolated high volatility events above certain threshold in price fluctuations and the distributions of return intervals between these events arouse great interest in financial research. In the present work, we introduce a new concept of daily return volatility duration, which is defined as the shortest passage time when the future volatility intensity is above or below the current volatility intensity (without predefining a threshold). The statistical properties of the daily return volatility durations for seven representative stock indices from the world financial markets are investigated. Some useful and interesting empirical results of these volatility duration series about the probability distributions, memory effects and multifractal properties are obtained. These results also show that the proposed stock volatility series analysis is a meaningful and beneficial trial.

  10. Mass Communication and Voter Volatility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Jack M.; And Others

    Personal interviews were conducted with 353 eligible voters in Madison, Wisconsin, in October 1976, and repeated with all but 30 after election day to examine the correlation between voters' age, paper reading (especially public affairs), and television watching (especially public affairs), and the amount of behavioral volatility (voter…

  11. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  12. Possible Sources of Polar Volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    2011-12-01

    Extensive analyses of returned Apollo samples demonstrated that the Moon is extremely volatile poor. While this conclusion remains true, various measurements since the late 90's implicated the presence of water: e.g., enhanced reflection of circularly polarized radar signals and suppression of epithermal neutrons near the poles. More recently, traces of H2O have been discovered inside volcanic glass, along with more significant amounts residing in hydrous minerals (apatite) returned from both highland and mare landing sites. Three recent lunar missions (DIXI, M3, Cassini) identified hydrous phases on/near the lunar surface, whereas the LCROSS probe detected significant quantities of volatiles (OH, H2O and other volatiles) excavated by the Centaur impact. These new mission results and sample studies, however, now allow testing different hypotheses for the generation, trapping, and replenishment of these volatiles. Solar-proton implantation must contribute to the hydrous phases in the lunar regolith in order to account for the observed time-varying abundances and occurrence near the lunar equator. This also cannot be the entire story. The relatively low speed LCROSS-Centaur impact (2.5km/s) could not vaporize such hydrous minerals, yet emissions lines of OH (from the thermal disassociation of H2O), along with other compounds (CO2, NH2) were detected within the first second, before ejecta could reach sunlight. Telescopic observations by Potter and Morgan (1985) discovered a tenuous lunar atmosphere of Na, but the LCROSS UV/Vis spectrometer did not detect the Na-D line until after the ejecta reached sunlight (along with a line pair attributed to Ag). With time, other volatile species emerged (OH, CO). The LAMP instrument on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter had a different viewpoint from the side (rather than from above) and detected many other atomic species release by the LCROSS-Centaur impact. Consequently, it appears that there is a stratigraphy for trapped species

  13. Pyrolysis and volatilization of cocaine

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.R.; Lue, L.P.; Boni, J.P. )

    1989-05-01

    The increasing popularity of inhaling cocaine vapor prompted the present study, to determine cocaine's fate during this process. The free base of (3H)cocaine (1 microCi/50 mg) was added to a glass pipe, which was then heated in a furnace to simulate freebasing. Negative pressure was used to draw the vapor through a series of glass wool, ethanol, acidic, and basic traps. Air flow rate and temperature were found to have profound effects on the volatilization and pyrolysis of cocaine. At a temperature of 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min, 37% of the radioactivity remained in the pipe, 39% was found in the glass wool trap, and less than 1% in the remainder of the volatilization apparatus after a 10-min volatilization. Reducing the air flow rate to 100 mL/min reduced the amount of radioactivity collected in the glass wool trap to less than 10% of the starting material and increased the amount that remained in the pipe to 58%. GC/MS analysis of the contents of the glass wool trap after volatilization at 260 degrees C and a flow rate of 400 mL/min revealed that 60% of the cocaine remained intact, while approximately 6 and 2% of the starting material was recovered as benzoic acid and methylecgonidine, respectively. As the temperature was increased to 650 degrees C, benzoic acid and methylecgonidine accounted for 83 and 89% of the starting material, respectively, whereas only 2% of the cocaine remained intact. Quantitation of cocaine in the vapor during the course of volatilization revealed high concentrations during the first two min and low concentrations for the remaining time.

  14. Early accretion of water and volatile elements to the inner Solar System: evidence from angrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarafian, Adam R.; Hauri, Erik H.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Lapen, Thomas J.; Berger, Eve L.; Nielsen, Sune G.; Marschall, Horst R.; Gaetani, Glenn A.; Righter, Kevin; Sarafian, Emily

    2017-04-01

    Inner Solar System bodies are depleted in volatile elements relative to chondrite meteorites, yet the source(s) and mechanism(s) of volatile-element depletion and/or enrichment are poorly constrained. The timing, mechanisms and quantities of volatile elements present in the early inner Solar System have vast implications for diverse processes, from planetary differentiation to the emergence of life. We report major, trace and volatile-element contents of a glass bead derived from the D'Orbigny angrite, the hydrogen isotopic composition of this glass bead and that of coexisting olivine and silicophosphates, and the 207Pb-206Pb age of the silicophosphates, 4568 ± 20 Ma. We use volatile saturation models to demonstrate that the angrite parent body must have been a major body in the early inner Solar System. We further show via mixing calculations that all inner Solar System bodies accreted volatile elements with carbonaceous chondrite H and N isotope signatures extremely early in Solar System history. Only a small portion (if any) of comets and gaseous nebular H species contributed to the volatile content of the inner Solar System bodies. This article is part of the themed issue 'The origin, history and role of water in the evolution of the inner Solar System'.

  15. Early accretion of water and volatile elements to the inner Solar System: evidence from angrites.

    PubMed

    Sarafian, Adam R; Hauri, Erik H; McCubbin, Francis M; Lapen, Thomas J; Berger, Eve L; Nielsen, Sune G; Marschall, Horst R; Gaetani, Glenn A; Righter, Kevin; Sarafian, Emily

    2017-05-28

    Inner Solar System bodies are depleted in volatile elements relative to chondrite meteorites, yet the source(s) and mechanism(s) of volatile-element depletion and/or enrichment are poorly constrained. The timing, mechanisms and quantities of volatile elements present in the early inner Solar System have vast implications for diverse processes, from planetary differentiation to the emergence of life. We report major, trace and volatile-element contents of a glass bead derived from the D'Orbigny angrite, the hydrogen isotopic composition of this glass bead and that of coexisting olivine and silicophosphates, and the (207)Pb-(206)Pb age of the silicophosphates, 4568 ± 20 Ma. We use volatile saturation models to demonstrate that the angrite parent body must have been a major body in the early inner Solar System. We further show via mixing calculations that all inner Solar System bodies accreted volatile elements with carbonaceous chondrite H and N isotope signatures extremely early in Solar System history. Only a small portion (if any) of comets and gaseous nebular H species contributed to the volatile content of the inner Solar System bodies.This article is part of the themed issue 'The origin, history and role of water in the evolution of the inner Solar System'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Herbivore-induced plant volatiles and tritrophic interactions across spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Aartsma, Yavanna; Bianchi, Felix J J A; van der Werf, Wopke; Poelman, Erik H; Dicke, Marcel

    2017-02-14

    Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are an important cue used in herbivore location by carnivorous arthropods such as parasitoids. The effects of plant volatiles on parasitoids have been well characterised at small spatial scales, but little research has been done on their effects at larger spatial scales. The spatial matrix of volatiles ('volatile mosaic') within which parasitoids locate their hosts is dynamic and heterogeneous. It is shaped by the spatial pattern of HIPV-emitting plants, the concentration, chemical composition and breakdown of the emitted HIPV blends, and by environmental factors such as wind, turbulence and vegetation that affect transport and mixing of odour plumes. The volatile mosaic may be exploited differentially by different parasitoid species, in relation to species traits such as sensory ability to perceive volatiles and the physical ability to move towards the source. Understanding how HIPVs influence parasitoids at larger spatial scales is crucial for our understanding of tritrophic interactions and sustainable pest management in agriculture. However, there is a large gap in our knowledge on how volatiles influence the process of host location by parasitoids at the landscape scale. Future studies should bridge the gap between the chemical and behavioural ecology of tritrophic interactions and landscape ecology.

  17. Fluoranthene, a volatile mutagenic compound, present in creosote and coal tar.

    PubMed

    Bos, R P; Prinsen, W J; van Rooy, J G; Jongeneelen, F J; Theuws, J L; Henderson, P T

    1987-03-01

    Creosote, a coal-tar distillation product, contains mutagens which are volatile at 37 degrees C. After distillation of creosote we found that these volatile mutagens were present in the distillation fraction with the highest boiling range (greater than 360 degrees C). The "volatile mutagenic activity" was connected with the presence of fluoranthene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Commercially available fluoranthene was positive in the so-called "taped-plate assay" (the test system used for the detection of volatile mutagens) towards the strains TA98 and TA100 in the presence of S9 mix. The tested creosote and coal tar contained fluoranthene in concentrations of 5.2 and 2.2%, respectively.

  18. Mantle Volatiles - Distribution and Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luth, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    Volatiles in the mantle have, for many years, been the subject of intensive study from a number of perspectives. They are of interest because of their potential effects on melting relationships, on transport of major and trace elements, and on the rheological and other physical properties of the mantle. By convention, "volatiles" in this context are constituents that are liquid or gaseous at normal Earth surface conditions. This review will look at the behavior of C-O-H-S-halogen volatiles, beginning with H2O and C-O volatiles.There have been tremendous strides made recently towards understanding how volatiles in general and water in particular is transported and stored in the mantle. This progress is based on research on a number of fronts: studies of mantle-derived samples have provided insight into the nature and occurrence of hydrous phases such as amphibole, mica, and chlorite, and have provided constraints on the capacity of nominally anhydrous minerals (NAMs) such as olivine, pyroxenes, and garnet to contain "water" by a variety of substitution mechanisms. Experimental studies on mantle-derived magmas have provided constraints on volatile contents in their source regions. Other studies have constrained the pressure, temperature, and composition conditions over which hydrous phases are stable in the mantle.Fundamental questions remain about the geochemical cycling of volatiles in the mantle, and between the mantle and the surface. Much attention has focused on the capability of hydrous phases such as amphibole, mica, serpentine, chlorite, and a family of "dense hydrous magnesian silicates" (DHMSs) to act as carriers of water in subducting slabs back into the mantle. It has been clear since the work of Ito et al. (1983) that there is a discrepancy between the amount of volatiles subducted into the mantle and those returned to the surface by arc magmatism. A recent overview of volatile cycling in subduction systems by Bebout (1996) suggests that 5-15% of the H2

  19. From Purgatory to Paradise: The Volatile Life of Hawaiian Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marske, J. P.; Hauri, E. H.; Trusdell, F.; Garcia, M. O.; Pietruszka, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Variations in radiogenic isotope ratios and magmatic volatile abundances (e.g., CO2 or H2O) in Hawaiian lavas reveal key processes within a deep-seated mantle plume (e.g., mantle heterogeneity, source lithology, partial melting, and magma degassing). Shield-stage Hawaiian lavas likely originate from a mixed plume source containing peridotite and recycled oceanic crust (pyroxenite) based on variations of radiogenic isotopes (e.g., 206Pb/204Pb). The mantle source region may also be heterogeneous with respect to volatile contents, yet the link between pre-eruptive volatile budgets and mantle source lithology in the Hawaiian plume is poorly constrained due to shallow magmatic degassing and mixing. Here, we use a novel approach to investigate this link using Os isotopic ratios, and major, trace, and volatile elements in olivines and mineral-hosted melt inclusions (MIs) from 34 samples from Koolau, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kilauea, and Loihi. These samples reveal a strong correlation between volatile contents in olivine-hosted MIs and Os isotopes of the same olivines, in which lavas that originated from greater proportions of recycled oceanic crust/pyroxenite (i.e. 'Loa' chain volcanoes: Koolau, Mauna Loa, Loihi) have MIs with the lower H2O, F, and Cl contents than 'Kea' chain volcanoes (i.e. Kilauea) that contain greater amounts of peridotite in the source region. No correlation is observed with CO2 or S. The depletion of fluid-mobile elements (H2O, F, and Cl) in 'Loa' chain volcanoes indicates ancient dehydrated oceanic crust is a plume component that controls much of the compositional variation of Hawaiian Volcanoes. The presence of dehydrated recycled mafic material in the plume source suggests that subduction effectively devolatilizes the mafic part of the oceanic crust. These results are similar to the observed shifts in H2O/Ce ratios near the Easter and Samoan hotspots [1,2]. Thus, it appears that multiple hotspots may record relative H2O depletions and possibly other

  20. Ion mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, S.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental studies of the ion-mixing phenomenon are summarized. Ion mixing is differentiated from ion implantation and shown to be a useful technique for overcoming the sputter-dependent limitations of implantation processes. The fundamental physical principles of ion/solid interactions are explored. The basic experimental configurations currently in use are characterized: bilayered samples, multilayered samples, and samples with a thin marker layer. A table listing the binary systems (metal-semiconductor or metal-metal) which have been investigated using each configuration is presented. Results are discussed, and some sample data are plotted. The prospects for future application of ion mixing to the alteration of solid surface properties are considered. Practical applications are seen as restricted by economic considerations to the production of small, expensive components or to fields (such as the semiconductor industry) which already have facilities for ion implantation.

  1. Volatile budget of Eyjafjallajokull magmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdsson, H.; Mandeville, C. W.

    2010-12-01

    Volatile elments played a critical role in the style of activity during the 2010 eruptions of the glacier-covered Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland. The alkali basalt flank eruption at Fimmvorduhals was dominated by vigorous fire fountaining that produced dominantly spatter-fed aa lava flows. Production of fine ash during the subsequent summit eruption has been variously attributed to magma fragmentation, either due to water-ice-magma interaction related to the 250 m thick glacier cover over the crater, or juvenile volatile content of the magma. Considering the great impact of the ash dispersal on trans-North Atlantic aviation, knowledge of the fragmentation mechanism and the relative roles of juvenile magmatic gases versus phreatomagmatic fragmentation is of prime significance. To evaluate the potential importance of juvenile components, the concentrations of volatiles in magmas erupted in 2010 from Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland have been measured. Analysis of glass inclusions in olivine Fo 77-85 and plagioclase phenocrysts in the alkali basalt magma erupted at Fimmvorduhals flank eruption contain high total volatiles in the range 0.96 - 2.12 wt.%, and sulfur 0.10 - 0.16 wt.%. These glass inclusions are comparable to major element bulk composition of Fimmvörduháls alkali basalt lavas. In contrast, tephra from the explosive summit crater eruption are trachy-andesitic. This magma contains a rather wide range of olivine and plagioclase phenocrysts of Fo48-79 and An 69-81, with both basaltic and andesitic glass inclusions. This diversity is also reflected in a much wider range of total volatile content from 0.1 - 2.88 wt.% and sulfur 0.1 - 0.24 wt.%. At the basic end, the glass inclusions are comparable to the Fimmvorduhals alkali basalt lava, but some have andesitic composition. The highest volatile content is observed in the andesitic glass inclusions in plagioclase An78. Further analysis of glass inclusions and matrix glass by FTIR and ion probe is in

  2. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Mixed population Minority Game with generalized strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferies, P.; Hart, M.; Johnson, N. F.; Hui, P. M.

    2000-11-01

    We present a quantitative theory, based on crowd effects, for the market volatility in a Minority Game played by a mixed population. Below a critical concentration of generalized strategy players, we find that the volatility in the crowded regime remains above the random coin-toss value regardless of the `temperature' controlling strategy use. Our theory yields good agreement with numerical simulations.

  3. Volatile element content of the heterogeneous upper mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, K.; Saal, A. E.; Hauri, E. H.; Forsyth, D. W.; Kamenetsky, V. S.; Niu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The physical properties of the asthenosphere (e.g., seismic velocity, viscosity, electrical conductivity) have been attributed to either mineral properties at relevant temperature, pressure, and water content or to the presence of a low melt fraction. We resort to the geochemical studies of MORB to unravel the composition of the asthenosphere. It is important to determine to what extent the geochemical variations in axial MORB do represent a homogeneous mantle composition and variations in the physical conditions of magma generation and transport; or alternatively, they represent mixing of melts from a heterogeneous upper mantle. Lavas from intra-transform faults and off-axis seamounts share a common mantle source with axial MORB, but experience less differentiation and homogenization. Therefore they provide better estimates for the end-member volatile budget of the heterogeneous upper mantle. We present major, trace, and volatile element data (H2O, CO2, Cl, F, S) as well as Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions [1, 2] of basaltic glasses (MgO > 6.0 wt%) from the NEPR seamounts, Quebrada-Discovery-Gofar transform fault system, and Macquarie Island. The samples range from incompatible trace element (ITE) depleted (DMORB: Th/La<0.035) to enriched (EMORB: Th/La>0.07) spanning the entire range of EPR MORB. The isotopic composition of the samples correlates with the degree of trace element enrichment indicating long-lived mantle heterogeneity. Once shallow-level processes (degassing, crystallization, and crustal assimilation) have been considered, we conducted a two-component (DMORB- and EMORB-) mantle melting-mixing model. Our model reproduces the major, trace and volatile element contents and isotopic composition of our samples and suggests that (1) 90% of the upper mantle is highly depleted in ITE (DMORB source) with only 10% of an enriched component (EMORB source), (2) the EMORB source is peridotitic rather than pyroxenitic, and (3) NMORB do not represent an actual

  4. Advances in fruit aroma volatile research.

    PubMed

    El Hadi, Muna Ahmed Mohamed; Zhang, Feng-Jie; Wu, Fei-Fei; Zhou, Chun-Hua; Tao, Jun

    2013-07-11

    Fruits produce a range of volatile compounds that make up their characteristic aromas and contribute to their flavor. Fruit volatile compounds are mainly comprised of esters, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, lactones, terpenoids and apocarotenoids. Many factors affect volatile composition, including the genetic makeup, degree of maturity, environmental conditions, postharvest handling and storage. There are several pathways involved in volatile biosynthesis starting from lipids, amino acids, terpenoids and carotenoids. Once the basic skeletons are produced via these pathways, the diversity of volatiles is achieved via additional modification reactions such as acylation, methylation, oxidation/reduction and cyclic ring closure. In this paper, we review the composition of fruit aroma, the characteristic aroma compounds of several representative fruits, the factors affecting aroma volatile, and the biosynthetic pathways of volatile aroma compounds. We anticipate that this review would provide some critical information for profound research on fruit aroma components and their manipulation during development and storage.

  5. Childhood income volatility and adult outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Bradley L

    2014-10-01

    Using data linked across generations in the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, I estimate the relationship between exposure to volatile income during childhood and a set of socioeconomic outcomes in adulthood. The empirical framework is an augmented intergenerational income mobility model that includes controls for income volatility. I measure income volatility at the family level in two ways: (1) instability as measured by squared deviations around a family-specific mean; and (2) instability as percentage changes of 25 % or more. Volatility enters the model both separately and interacted with income level. I find that family income volatility during childhood has a modest negative association with educational attainment. Volatility has a smaller descriptive role in explaining intergenerational outcomes relative to permanent income. Across the income distribution, the negative association between volatility exposure and educational attainment is largest for young adults from moderate-income families.

  6. Arbitrage and Volatility in Chinese Stock's Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shu Quan; Ito, Takao; Zhang, Jianbo

    From the point of view of no-arbitrage pricing, what matters is how much volatility the stock has, for volatility measures the amount of profit that can be made from shorting stocks and purchasing options. With the short-sales constraints or in the absence of options, however, high volatility is likely to mean arbitrage from stock market. As emerging stock markets for China, investors are increasingly concerned about volatilities of Chinese two stock markets. We estimate volatility's models for Chinese stock markets' indexes using Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method and GARCH. We find that estimated values of volatility parameters are very high for all data frequencies. It suggests that stock returns are extremely volatile even at long term intervals in Chinese markets. Furthermore, this result could be considered that there seems to be arbitrage opportunities in Chinese stock markets.

  7. The volatile composition of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    Comets may be our best probes of the physical and chemical conditions in the outer regions of the solar nebula during that crucial period when the planets formed. The volatile composition of cometary nuclei can be used to decide whether comets are the product of a condensation sequence similar to that invoked to explain the compositions of the planets and asteroids, or if comets are simply agglomerations of interstellar grains which have been insignificantly modified by the events that shaped the other bodies in the solar system. Although cometary nuclei are not generally accessible to observation, observations of cometary comae can illuminate at least some of the mysteries of the nuclei provided one has a detailed knowledge of the excitation conditions in the coma and also has access to basic atomic and molecular data on the many species present in comets. Examined here is the status of our knowledge of the volatile composition of cometary nuclei and how these data are obtained.

  8. Chirospecific analysis of plant volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkachev, A. V.

    2007-10-01

    Characteristic features of the analysis of plant volatiles by enantioselective gas (gas-liquid) chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry are discussed. The most recent advances in the design of enantioselective stationary phases are surveyed. Examples of the preparation of the most efficient phases based on modified cyclodextrins are given. Current knowledge on the successful analytical resolution of different types of plant volatiles (aliphatic and aromatic compounds and mono-, sesqui- and diterpene derivatives) into optical antipodes is systematically described. Chiral stationary phases used for these purposes, temperature conditions and enantiomer separation factors are summarised. Examples of the enantiomeric resolution of fragrance compounds and components of plant extracts, wines and essential oils are given.

  9. Effects of hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract on volatile fatty acid production by rumen bacteria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aims: To determine the effects of hops extract, on in vitro volatile fatty acid (VFA) production by bovine rumen microorganisms. Methods and Results: When mixed rumen microbes were suspended in media containing carbohydrates, the initial rates of VFA production were suppressed by beta-acid rich hops...

  10. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities.

  11. Volatiles in Inter-Specific Bacterial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tyc, Olaf; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    The importance of volatile organic compounds for functioning of microbes is receiving increased research attention. However, to date very little is known on how inter-specific bacterial interactions effect volatiles production as most studies have been focused on volatiles produced by monocultures of well-described bacterial genera. In this study we aimed to understand how inter-specific bacterial interactions affect the composition, production and activity of volatiles. Four phylogenetically different bacterial species namely: Chryseobacterium, Dyella, Janthinobacterium, and Tsukamurella were selected. Earlier results had shown that pairwise combinations of these bacteria induced antimicrobial activity in agar media whereas this was not the case for monocultures. In the current study, we examined if these observations were also reflected by the production of antimicrobial volatiles. Thus, the identity and antimicrobial activity of volatiles produced by the bacteria were determined in monoculture as well in pairwise combinations. Antimicrobial activity of the volatiles was assessed against fungal, oomycetal, and bacterial model organisms. Our results revealed that inter-specific bacterial interactions affected volatiles blend composition. Fungi and oomycetes showed high sensitivity to bacterial volatiles whereas the effect of volatiles on bacteria varied between no effects, growth inhibition to growth promotion depending on the volatile blend composition. In total 35 volatile compounds were detected most of which were sulfur-containing compounds. Two commonly produced sulfur-containing volatile compounds (dimethyl disulfide and dimethyl trisulfide) were tested for their effect on three target bacteria. Here, we display the importance of inter-specific interactions on bacterial volatiles production and their antimicrobial activities. PMID:26733959

  12. Escape of volatiles from Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand-Manterola, H. J.

    A model for describing the loss of atmosphere in Venus in the geologic time is presented. The amount of volatiles degassed from Venus in 4.6 Ga is in the order of 286.9 Terrestrial Atmospheric Masses (TAM) (1 TAM = 5.28x1018 kg). If the drag of the solar wind acted since the birth of Venus, 4.6 Ga ago, a minimum limit of the amount of atmosphere lost by the planet is 6.76 TAM. The current atmosphere of Venus has 88.44 TAM of mass. The sum of the lost and the current atmosphere is 95.2 TAM. This result is 191.7 TAM smaller than the estimation of the mass degassed in all the history of Venus. Then we have a deficit of 191.7 TAM of volatiles on Venus. It is well known that the surface of Venus is geologically young (≈ 500 Ma) In all this period the model predicts that Venus lost, by the solar wind, only 0.08 TAM of atmosphere. From this we can assume that the deficit of volatiles is due to events that occur before that time or perhaps at that time. It is possible to speculate that the resurfacing of Venus, the massive loss of volatiles, and a change from prograde to retrograde rotation of the planet occur at the same time and could be produced by a gigantic impact with a planetary-size body. In this catastrophic event the angular momentum of the planet could change from the original (possibly prograde) to the current one, all the surface of Venus could be melt producing a resurfacing and the water and part of the CO2 in the atmosphere could be ejected to space.

  13. Plant volatiles and the environment.

    PubMed

    Loreto, Francesco; Dicke, Marcel; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Turlings, Ted C J

    2014-08-01

    Volatile organic compounds emitted by plants represent the largest part of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) released into our atmosphere. Plant volatiles are formed through many biochemical pathways, constitutively and after stress induction. In recent years, our understanding of the functions of these molecules has made constant and rapid progress. From being considered in the past as a mere waste of carbon, BVOCs have now emerged as an essential element of an invisible language that is perceived and exploited by the plants' enemies, the enemies of plant enemies, and neighbouring plants. In addition, BVOCs have important functions in protecting plants from abiotic stresses. Recent advances in our understanding of the role of BVOC in direct and indirect defences are driving further attention to these emissions. This special issue gathers some of the latest and most original research that further expands our knowledge of BVOC. BVOC emissions and functions in (1) unexplored terrestrial (including the soil) and marine environments, (2) in changing climate conditions, and (3) under anthropic pressures, or (4) in complex trophic communities are comprehensively reviewed. Stepping up from scientific awareness, the presented information shows that the manipulation and exploitation of BVOC is a realistic and promising strategy for agricultural applications and biotechnological exploitations.

  14. Volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile compounds and in vitro bioactive properties of Chilean Ulmo (Eucryphia cordifolia Cav.) honey.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Francisca; Torres, Paulina; Oomah, B Dave; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Massarioli, Adna Prado; Martín-Venegas, Raquel; Albarral-Ávila, Vicenta; Burgos-Díaz, César; Ferrer, Ruth; Rubilar, Mónica

    2017-04-01

    Ulmo honey originating from Eucryphia cordifolia tree, known locally in the Araucania region as the Ulmo tree is a natural product with valuable nutritional and medicinal qualities. It has been used in the Mapuche culture to treat infections. This study aimed to identify the volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile compounds of Ulmo honey and elucidate its in vitro biological properties by evaluating its antioxidant, antibacterial, antiproliferative and hemolytic properties and cytotoxicity in Caco-2 cells. Headspace volatiles of Ulmo honey were isolated by solid-phase microextraction (SPME); non-volatiles/semi-volatiles were obtained by removing all saccharides with acidified water and the compounds were identified by GC/MS analysis. Ulmo honey volatiles consisted of 50 compounds predominated by 20 flavor components. Two of the volatile compounds, lyrame and anethol have never been reported before as honey compounds. The non-volatile/semi-volatile components of Ulmo honey comprised 27 compounds including 13 benzene derivatives accounting 75% of the total peak area. Ulmo honey exhibited weak antioxidant activity but strong antibacterial activity particularly against gram-negative bacteria and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), the main strain involved in wounds and skin infections. At concentrations >0.5%, Ulmo honey reduced Caco-2 cell viability, released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in a dose dependent manner in the presence of foetal bovine serum (FBS). The wide array of volatile and non-volatile/semi-volatile constituents of Ulmo honey rich in benzene derivatives may partly account for its strong antibacterial and antiproliferative properties important for its therapeutic use. Our results indicate that Ulmo honey can potentially inhibit cancer growth at least partly by modulating oxidative stress.

  15. Bidirectional Interaction between Phyllospheric Microbiotas and Plant Volatile Emissions.

    PubMed

    Farré-Armengol, Gerard; Filella, Iolanda; Llusia, Joan; Peñuelas, Josep

    2016-10-01

    Due to their antimicrobial effects and their potential role as carbon sources, plant volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions play significant roles in determining the characteristics of the microbial communities that can establish on plant surfaces. Furthermore, epiphytic microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi, can affect plant VOC emissions in different ways: by producing and emitting their own VOCs, which are added to and mixed with the plant VOC blend; by affecting plant physiology and modifying the production and emission of VOCs; and by metabolizing the VOCs emitted by the plant. The study of the interactions between plant VOC emissions and phyllospheric microbiotas is thus of great interest and deserves more attention.

  16. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part III. The simulation of volatile reduction in a multi-layer rotary hearth furnace process

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2006-04-15

    For reduction of iron oxides by volatiles from coal, the major reductant was found to be H{sub 2, and it can affect the overall reduction of iron oxides. In this study, the reduction by actual volatiles of composite pellets at 1000{sup o}C was studied. The volatile reduction of the hand-packed Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Coal composite pellet as it is devolatilizing out of the pellet was found to be negligible. However, the reduction of iron oxide pellets at the top layer by volatiles from the bottom layers of a three-layer pellet geometry was observed to be about 15 pct. From the morphological observations of partially reduced pellets and the computed rates of bulk mass transfer, volatile reduction appears to be controlled by a mixed-controlled mechanism of bulk gas mass transfer and the limited-mixed control reduction kinetics. Using the reduction rate obtained from the single pellet experiments with pure hydrogen and extrapolating this rate to an H{sub 2 partial pressure corresponding to the H{sub 2 from the volatiles, an empirical relationship was obtained to approximately predict the amount of volatile reduction up to 20 pct.

  17. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part III. The simulation of volatile reduction in a multi-layer rotary hearth furnace process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R. J.

    2006-04-01

    For reduction of iron oxides by volatiles from coal, the major reductant was found to be H2, and it can affect the overall reduction of iron oxides. In this study, the reduction by actual volatiles of composite pellets at 1000 °C was studied. The volatile reduction of the hand-packed Fe2O3/coal composite pellet as it is devolatilizing out of the pellet was found to be negligible. However, the reduction of iron oxide pellets at the top layer by volatiles from the bottom layers of a three-layer pellet geometry was observed to be about 15 pct. From the morphological observations of partially reduced pellets and the computed rates of bulk mass transfer, volatile reduction appears to be controlled by a mixed-controlled mechanism of bulk gas mass transfer and the limited-mixed control reduction kinetics. Using the reduction rate obtained from the single pellet experiments with pure hydrogen and extrapolating this rate to an H2 partial pressure corresponding to the H2 from the volatiles, an empirical relationship was obtained to approximately predict the amount of volatile reduction up to 20 pct.

  18. Nitrate radicals and biogenic volatile organic compounds ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) by the nitrate radical (NO3) represents one of the important interactions between anthropogenic emissions related to combustion and natural emissions from the biosphere. This interaction has been recognized for more than 3 decades, during which time a large body of research has emerged from laboratory, field, and modeling studies. NO3-BVOC reactions influence air quality, climate and visibility through regional and global budgets for reactive nitrogen (particularly organic nitrates), ozone, and organic aerosol. Despite its long history of research and the significance of this topic in atmospheric chemistry, a number of important uncertainties remain. These include an incomplete understanding of the rates, mechanisms, and organic aerosol yields for NO3-BVOC reactions, lack of constraints on the role of heterogeneous oxidative processes associated with the NO3 radical, the difficulty of characterizing the spatial distributions of BVOC and NO3 within the poorly mixed nocturnal atmosphere, and the challenge of constructing appropriate boundary layer schemes and non-photochemical mechanisms for use in state-of-the-art chemical transport and chemistry–climate models. This review is the result of a workshop of the same title held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2015. The first half of the review summarizes the current literature on NO3-BVOC chemistry, with a particular focus on recent advances in

  19. New treatment technologies for mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, G.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation describes new treatment technologies for mixed and low-level radioactive wastes. Several processes are described including mercury removal techniques, steam reforming from aqueous organic wastes, development of plasma treatment systems, waste vitrification and control and recovery of vapor phase mercury in combustion flue gas. Continuous monitoring of mercury, ammonia, acid gases, and volatile organic compounds and a brief description of final waste form development is presented.

  20. Lateral Mixing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    ocean as it responds to mesoscale forcing. APPROACH Figure 1: MVP system deployed from stern of R/V Endeavor in Sargasso Sea . My approach for...therefore requires integrative efforts with other sea -going investigators and numerical modelers. The Lateral Mixing Experiment project was an ideal...also participated in the sea -going part of this project, taking my group on the R/V Endeavor in June 2011. Our role was to sample around the center of

  1. Origin of Volatiles in Earth: Indigenous Versus Exogenous Sources Based on Highly Siderophile, Volatile Siderophile, and Light Volatile Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K. M.; Marin, N.; Nickodem, K.

    2015-01-01

    Origin of Earth's volatiles has traditionally been ascribed to late accretion of material after major differentiation events - chondrites, comets, ice or other exogenous sources. A competing theory is that the Earth accreted its volatiles as it was built, thus water and other building blocks were present early and during differentiation and core formation (indigenous). Here we discuss geochemical evidence from three groups of elements that suggests Earth's volatiles were acquired during accretion and did not require additional sources after differentiation.

  2. Photochemistry and vertical mixing. [in Uranus atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, S. K.; Sandel, B. R.; Romani, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    Earth-based observations relevant to the question of photochemistry and vertical mixing are discussed. Phytolysis of methane, the only known photochemically active volatile in the Uranian atmosphere, produces heavier hydrocarbons, the most abundant of which are ethane, acetylene, and the polyacetylenes. Unlike Jupiter and Saturn, these hydrocarbon products condense at the low temperatures prevalent in the middle atmosphere. Contrary to the pre-Voyager notion that the atmosphere of Uranus is remarkable clear, it is found that the aerosols are widely and extensively distributed. Despite its photodestruction, methane remains stable in the Uranian atmosphere. The vertical mixing on Uranus is found to be the least efficient of any of the planetary atmospheres.

  3. Volatile communication in plant-aphid interactions.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Martin; Jander, Georg

    2010-08-01

    Volatile communication plays an important role in mediating the interactions between plants, aphids, and other organisms in the environment. In response to aphid infestation, many plants initiate indirect defenses through the release of volatiles that attract ladybugs, parasitoid wasps, and other aphid-consuming predators. Aphid-induced volatile release in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana requires the jasmonate signaling pathway. Volatile release is also induced by infection with aphid-transmitted viruses. Consistent with mathematical models of optimal transmission, viruses that are acquired rapidly by aphids induce volatile release to attract migratory aphids, but discourage long-term aphid feeding. Although the ecology of these interactions is well-studied, further research is needed to identify the molecular basis of aphid-induced and virus-induced changes in plant volatile release.

  4. Volatile accretion history of the Earth.

    PubMed

    Wood, B J; Halliday, A N; Rehkämper, M

    2010-10-28

    It has long been thought that the Earth had a protracted and complex history of volatile accretion and loss. Albarède paints a different picture, proposing that the Earth first formed as a dry planet which, like the Moon, was devoid of volatile constituents. He suggests that the Earth's complement of volatile elements was only established later, by the addition of a small veneer of volatile-rich material at ∼100 Myr (here and elsewhere, ages are relative to the origin of the Solar System). Here we argue that the Earth's mass balance of moderately volatile elements is inconsistent with Albarède's hypothesis but is well explained by the standard model of accretion from partially volatile-depleted material, accompanied by core formation.

  5. Volatility and vapor saturation of pine resins

    Treesearch

    Richard H. Smith

    1963-01-01

    Volatility and vapor saturation were obtained for closed-faced collected resin of 10 pine species and 4 hybrids in California. Volatility ranged from 2 to 32 percent at 25°C., and from 14 to 36 percent at 100°C. Hybrids were usually less volatile than either parent. Vapor saturation ranged widely between species, from 2 to 20 mg. per 150 cc., but only...

  6. Apatite-Melt Partitioning of Volatiles in Basaltic Systems: Implications for Determining Volatile Abundances in Planetary Bodies from Apatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    Apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F,Cl,OH)] is present in a wide range of planetary materials, and due to the presence of volatiles within its crystal structure (X-site), many recent studies have attempted to use apatite to constrain the volatile contents of planetary magmas and mantle sources [i.e., 1]. Experimental studies have investigated the apatite-melt partitioning behavior of F, Cl, and OH in basaltic systems [e.g., 2- 3], reporting that apatite-melt partitioning of volatiles is best described as exchange equilibria similar to Fe-Mg partitioning between olivine and silicate melt. However, exchange coefficients may vary as a function of temperature, pressure, melt composition, and/or oxygen fugacity. Furthermore, exchange coefficients may vary in portions of apatite compositional space where F, Cl, and OH do not mix ideally in apatite [3]. In these regions of ternary space, we anticipate that crystal chemistry could influence partitioning behavior. Consequently, we conducted experiments to investigate the effect of apatite crystal chemistry on apatite-melt partitioning of F, Cl, and OH.

  7. Volatile halogenated hydrocarbons in foods

    SciTech Connect

    Miyahara, Makoto; Toyoda, Masatake; Saito, Yukio

    1995-02-01

    Volatile halogenated organic compounds were determined in foods. Statistical treatment of the data for 13 sampled from 20 families living in suburban Tokyo (Saitama prefecture) indicated that the foods were contaminated by water pollution and/or substances introduced by the process of food production. Butter and margarine were contaminated by chlorinated ethylene, ethane, and related compounds released by dry cleaning and other operations. Soybean sprouts and tofu (soybean curd) contained chloroform and related trihalomethanes absorbed during the production process. 27 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Mars' volatile and climate history.

    PubMed

    Jakosky, B M; Phillips, R J

    2001-07-12

    There is substantial evidence that the martian volatile inventory and climate have changed markedly throughout the planet's history. Clues come from areas as disparate as the history and properties of the deep interior, the composition of the crust and regolith, the morphology of the surface, composition of the present-day atmosphere, and the nature of the interactions between the upper atmosphere and the solar wind. We piece together the relevant observations into a coherent view of the evolution of the martian climate, focusing in particular on the observations that provide the strongest constraints.

  9. Volatiles Which Increase Magma Viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S.

    2015-12-01

    The standard model of an erupting volcano is one in which the viscosity of a decompressing magma increases as the volatiles leave the melt structure to form bubbles. It has now been observed that the addition of the "volatiles" P, Cl and F result in an increase in silicate melt viscosity. This observation would mean that the viscosity of selected degassing magmas would decrease rather than increase. Here we look at P, Cl and F as three volatiles which increase viscosity through different structural mechanisms. In all three cases the volatiles increase the viscosity of peralkaline composition melts, but appear to always decrease the viscosity of peraluminous melts. Phosphorus causes the melt to unmix into a Na-P rich phase and a Na-poor silicate phase. Thus as the network modifying Na (or Ca) are removed to the phosphorus-rich melt, the matrix melt viscosity increases. With increasing amounts of added phosphorus (at network modifying Na ~ P) the addition of further phosphorus causes a decrease in viscosity. The addition of chlorine to Fe-free aluminosilicate melts results in an increase in viscosity. NMR data on these glass indicates that the chlorine sits in salt-like structures surrounded by Na and/or Ca. Such structures would remove network-modifying atoms from the melt structure and thus result in an increase in viscosity. The NMR spectra of fluorine-bearing glasses shows that F takes up at least 5 different structural positions in peralkaline composition melts. Three of these positions should result in a decrease in viscosity due to the removal of bridging oxygens. Two of the structural positons of F, however, should result in an increase in viscosity as they require the removal of network-modifying atoms from the melt structure (with one of the structures being that observed for Cl). This would imply that increasing amounts of F might result in an increase in viscosity. This proposed increase in viscosity with increasing F has now been experimentally confirmed.

  10. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F [Laramie, WY; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M [Waxahachie, TX; Sorini-Wong, Susan S [Laramie, WY; Wong, Gregory K [Laramie, WY

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  11. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F [Laramie, WY; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M [Laramie, WY; Sorini-Wong, Susan S [Laramie, WY

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  12. Regolith Volatile Recovery at Simulated Lunar Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Paulsen, Gale; Zacny, Kris; Schmidt, Sherry; Boucher, Dale

    2016-01-01

    Lunar Polar Volatiles: Permanently shadowed craters at the lunar poles contain water, 5 wt according to LCROSS. Interest in water for ISRU applications. Desire to ground truth water using surface prospecting e.g. Resource Prospector and RESOLVE. How to access subsurface water resources and accurately measure quantity. Excavation operations and exposure to lunar environment may affect the results. Volatile capture tests: A series a ground based dirty thermal vacuum tests are being conducted to better understand the subsurface sampling operations. Sample removal and transfer. Volatiles loss during sampling operations. Concept of operations, Instrumentation. This presentation is a progress report on volatiles capture results from these tests with lunar polar drill prototype hardware.

  13. Conference on Deep Earth and Planetary Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The following topics are covered in the presented papers: (1) rare gases systematics and mantle structure; (2) volatiles in the earth; (3) impact degassing of water and noble gases from silicates; (4) D/H ratios and H2O contents of mantle-derived amphibole megacrysts; (5) thermochemistry of dense hydrous magnesium silicates; (6) modeling of the effect of water on mantle rheology; (7) noble gas isotopes and halogens in volatile-rich inclusions in diamonds; (8) origin and loss of the volatiles of the terrestrial planets; (9) structure and the stability of hydrous minerals at high pressure; (10) recycling of volatiles at subduction zones and various other topics.

  14. The effect of volatility on percutaneous absorption.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Nicole C; Maibach, Howard I

    2016-01-01

    Topically applied chemicals may volatilize, or evaporate, from skin leaving behind a chemical residue with new percutaneous absorptive capabilities. Understanding volatilization of topical medications, such as sunscreens, fragrances, insect repellants, cosmetics and other commonly applied topicals may have implications for their safety and efficacy. A systematic review of English language articles from 1979 to 2014 was performed using key search terms. Articles were evaluated to assess the relationship between volatility and percutaneous absorption. A total of 12 articles were selected and reviewed. Key findings were that absorption is enhanced when coupled with a volatile substance, occlusion prevents evaporation and increases absorption, high ventilation increases volatilization and reduces absorption, and pH of skin has an affect on a chemical's volatility. The articles also brought to light that different methods may have an affect on volatility: different body regions; in vivo vs. in vitro; human vs. Data suggest that volatility is crucial for determining safety and efficacy of cutaneous exposures and therapies. Few articles have been documented reporting evaporation in the context of percutaneous absorption, and of those published, great variability exists in methods. Further investigation of volatility is needed to properly evaluate its role in percutaneous absorption.

  15. [Solidification of volatile oil with graphene oxide].

    PubMed

    Yan, Hong-Mei; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Sun, E; Xu, Yi-Hao

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the properties of solidifying volatile oil with graphene oxide, clove oil and zedoary turmeric oil were solidified by graphene oxide. The amount of graphene oxide was optimized with the eugenol yield and curcumol yield as criteria. Curing powder was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of graphene oxide on dissolution in vitro and thermal stability of active components were studied. The optimum solidification ratio of graphene oxide to volatile oil was 1:1. Dissolution rate of active components had rare influence while their thermal stability improved after volatile oil was solidified. Solidifying herbal volatile oil with graphene oxide deserves further study.

  16. Vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inci, Levent; Bowles, Richard K.

    2013-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of miscible and partially miscible binary Lennard-Jones mixtures are used to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop in the canonical ensemble. When the system volume is large, the driving force for condensation is low and only a submonolayer of the solvent is adsorbed onto the liquid drop. A small degree of mixing of the solvent phase into the core of the particles occurs for the miscible system. At smaller volumes, complete film formation is observed and the dynamics of film growth are dominated by cluster-cluster coalescence. Mixing into the core of the droplet is also observed for partially miscible systems below an onset volume suggesting the presence of a solubility transition. We also develop a non-volatile liquid drop model, based on the capillarity approximations, that exhibits a solubility transition between small and large drops for partially miscible mixtures and has a hysteresis loop similar to the one observed in the deliquescence of small soluble salt particles. The properties of the model are compared to our simulation results and the model is used to study the formulation of classical nucleation theory for systems with low free energy barriers.

  17. Vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop

    SciTech Connect

    Inci, Levent; Bowles, Richard K.

    2013-12-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of miscible and partially miscible binary Lennard–Jones mixtures are used to study the dynamics and thermodynamics of vapor condensation onto a non-volatile liquid drop in the canonical ensemble. When the system volume is large, the driving force for condensation is low and only a submonolayer of the solvent is adsorbed onto the liquid drop. A small degree of mixing of the solvent phase into the core of the particles occurs for the miscible system. At smaller volumes, complete film formation is observed and the dynamics of film growth are dominated by cluster-cluster coalescence. Mixing into the core of the droplet is also observed for partially miscible systems below an onset volume suggesting the presence of a solubility transition. We also develop a non-volatile liquid drop model, based on the capillarity approximations, that exhibits a solubility transition between small and large drops for partially miscible mixtures and has a hysteresis loop similar to the one observed in the deliquescence of small soluble salt particles. The properties of the model are compared to our simulation results and the model is used to study the formulation of classical nucleation theory for systems with low free energy barriers.

  18. Evaluation of Models for Solubility and Volatility of Copper Compounds Under Steam Generation Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.; Petrov, A.

    1999-09-12

    The loss in efficiency of power plants with mixed metallurgy, due to transport and deposition of copper and its oxides in HP turbines, has been recognized as one of the key problems to be solved in the utility industry worldwide. Within this context, the most important problem to be addressed is the solubility and volatility of copper compounds under steam generation condition. This paper presents an evaluation of different solubility end volatility models for copper compounds, and presents a comparison between the calculated and test data.

  19. In vivo measurement of flavour release from mixed phase gels.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A J; Besnard, S; Puaud, M; Linforth, R S

    2001-05-01

    Flavour release was investigated from pure gelatin, pure agarose and mixed gelatin-agarose gels, all containing 25% sucrose and flavoured with p-cymene, ethyl butyrate, pyrazine and ethanol. Gels were characterised by optical microscopy, and rheological techniques to determine phase separation, elastic modulus and melting temperature. Volatile release was measured by monitoring the four volatiles in the expired air from one individual eating the gels, using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionisation-Mass Spectrometry. The release pattern of p-cymene was not affected by gel type. The release of ethanol, ethyl butyrate and pyrazine was affected to different extents by the matrix suggesting that both the properties of the volatile and the matrix determine volatile release in vivo.

  20. On-Plant Volatile Analysis Utilizing Solid-Phase Microextraction and a New Volatile Collection Technique

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatile emission of plants is typically measured by removal of the plant-part, transportation to a laboratory, and subsequent volatile analyses via a number of accepted methodologies. Studies performed by our laboratory have shown the volatile emission of removed plant parts are essentially identic...

  1. Volatilization of ketones from water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.; Tai, D.Y.

    1982-01-01

    The overall mass-transfer coefficients for the volatilization from water of acetone, 2-butanone, 2-pentanone, 3-pentanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, 2-heptanone, and 2-octanone were measured simultaneously with the oxygen-absorption coefficient in a laboratory stirred water bath. The liquid-film and gas-film coefficients of the two-film model were determined for the ketones from the overall coefficients, and both film resistances were important for volatilization of the ketones.The liquid-film coefficients for the ketones varied with the 0.719 power of the molecular-diffusion coefficient, in agreement with the literature. The liquid-film coefficients showed a variable dependence on molecular weight, with the dependence ranging from the −0.263 power for acetone to the −0.378 power for 2-octanone. This is in contrast with the literature where a constant −0.500 power dependence on the molecular weight is assumed.The gas-film coefficients for the ketones showed no dependence on molecular weight, in contrast with the literature where a −0.500 power is assumed.

  2. Configuration of Pluto's Volatile Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grundy, William M.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Ennico, K.; Jennings, D. E.; Howett, C. J. A.; Linscott, I. R.; Lunsford, A. W.; Olkin, C. B.; Parker, A. H.; Parker, J. Wm; Protopapa, S.; Reuter, D. C.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.; Berry, K.; Buie, M. W.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2015-11-01

    We report on near-infrared remote sensing by New Horizons' Ralph instrument (Reuter et al. 2008, Space Sci. Rev. 140, 129-154) of Pluto's N2, CO, and CH4 ices. These especially volatile ices are mobile even at Pluto's cryogenic surface temperatures. Sunlight reflected from these ices becomes imprinted with their characteristic spectral absorption bands. The detailed appearance of these absorption features depends on many aspects of local composition, thermodynamic state, and texture. Multiple-scattering radiative transfer models are used to retrieve quantitative information about these properties and to map how they vary across Pluto's surface. Using parameter maps derived from New Horizons observations, we investigate the striking regional differences in the abundances and scattering properties of Pluto's volatile ices. Comparing these spatial patterns with the underlying geology provides valuable constraints on processes actively modifying the planet's surface, over a variety of spatial scales ranging from global latitudinal patterns to more regional and local processes within and around the feature informally known as Sputnik Planum. This work was supported by the NASA New Horizons Project.

  3. Reduction of volatile acidity of acidic wines by immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Vilela, A; Schuller, D; Mendes-Faia, A; Côrte-Real, M

    2013-06-01

    Excessive volatile acidity in wines is a major problem and is still prevalent because available solutions are nevertheless unsatisfactory, namely, blending the filter-sterilized acidic wine with other wines of lower volatile acidity or using reverse osmosis. We have previously explored the use of an empirical biological deacidification procedure to lower the acetic acid content of wines. This winemaker's enological practice, which consists in refermentation associated with acetic acid consumption by yeasts, is performed by mixing the acidic wine with freshly crushed grapes, musts, or marc from a finished wine fermentation. We have shown that the commercial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae S26 is able to decrease the volatile acidity of acidic wines with a volatile acidity higher than 1.44 g L(-1) acetic acid, with no detrimental impact on wine aroma. In this study, we aimed to optimize the immobilization of S26 cells in alginate beads for the bioreduction of volatile acidity of acidic wines. We found that S26 cells immobilized in double-layer alginate-chitosan beads could reduce the volatile acidity of an acidic wine (1.1 g L(-1) acetic acid, 12.5 % (v/v) ethanol, pH 3.12) by 28 and 62 % within 72 and 168 h, respectively, associated with a slight decrease in ethanol concentration (0.7 %). Similar volatile acidity removal efficiencies were obtained in medium with high glucose concentration (20 % w/v), indicating that this process may also be useful in the deacidification of grape musts. We, therefore, show that immobilized S. cerevisiae S26 cells in double-layer beads are an efficient alternative to improve the quality of wines with excessive volatile acidity.

  4. Current status of fluoride volatility method development

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlir, J.; Marecek, M.; Skarohlid, J.

    2013-07-01

    The Fluoride Volatility Method is based on a separation process, which comes out from the specific property of uranium, neptunium and plutonium to form volatile hexafluorides whereas most of fission products (mainly lanthanides) and higher transplutonium elements (americium, curium) present in irradiated fuel form nonvolatile tri-fluorides. Fluoride Volatility Method itself is based on direct fluorination of the spent fuel, but before the fluorination step, the removal of cladding material and subsequent transformation of the fuel into a powdered form with a suitable grain size have to be done. The fluorination is made with fluorine gas in a flame fluorination reactor, where the volatile fluorides (mostly UF{sub 6}) are separated from the non-volatile ones (trivalent minor actinides and majority of fission products). The subsequent operations necessary for partitioning of volatile fluorides are the condensation and evaporation of volatile fluorides, the thermal decomposition of PuF{sub 6} and the finally distillation and sorption used for the purification of uranium product. The Fluoride Volatility Method is considered to be a promising advanced pyrochemical reprocessing technology, which can mainly be used for the reprocessing of oxide spent fuels coming from future GEN IV fast reactors.

  5. Analyzing volatile compounds in dairy products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatile compounds give the first indication of the flavor in a dairy product. Volatiles are isolated from the sample matrix and then analyzed by chromatography, sensory methods, or an electronic nose. Isolation may be performed by solvent extraction or headspace analysis, and gas chromatography i...

  6. Belief biases and volatility of assets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei-Sun, Wen-Zou, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Based on an overlapping generation model, this paper introduces the noise traders with belief biases and rational traders. With an equilibrium analysis, this paper examines the volatility of risky asset. The results show that the belief biases, the probability of economy state, and the domain capability are all the factors that have effects on the volatility of the market.

  7. Microbial Activity and Volatile Fluxes in Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, R. S.; Lowell, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding geographically and biologically the production or utilization of volatile chemical species such as CO2, CH4, and H2 is crucial not only for understanding hydrothermal processes but also for understanding life processes in the oceanic crust. To estimate the microbial effect on the transport of these volatiles, we consider a double-loop single pass model as shown in Figure 1 to estimate the mass fluxes shown. We then use a simple mixing formulation: C4Q4 = C3 (Q1 -Q3)+ C2Q2, where C2 is the concentration of the chemical in seawater, C3 is the average concentration of the chemical in high temperature focused flow, C4 is the expected concentration of the chemical as a result of mixing, and the relevant mass flows are as shown in Figure 1. Finally, we compare the calculated values of CO2, CH4, and H2 in diffuse flow fluids to those observed. The required data are available for both the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the East Pacific Rise 9°50' N systems. In both cases we find that, although individual diffuse flow sites have observed concentrations of some elements that are greater than average, the average concentration of these volatiles is smaller in all cases than the concentration that would be expected from simple mixing. This indicates that subsurface microbes are net utilizers of these chemical constituents at the Main Endeavour Field and at EPR 9°50' N on the vent field scale. Figure 1. Schematic of a 'double-loop' single-pass model above a convecting, crystallizing, replenished AMC (not to scale). Heat transfer from the vigorously convecting, cooling, and replenished AMC across the conductive boundary layer δ drives the overlying hydrothermal system. The deep circulation represented by mass flux Q1 and black smoker temperature T3 induces shallow circulation noted by Q2. Some black smoker fluid mixes with seawater resulting in diffuse discharge Q4, T4, while the direct black smoker mass flux with temperature T3 is reduced

  8. Release kinetics of volatiles from clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Pascal

    2007-03-01

    Smectite clay minerals are known to have interesting sorption properties, but the prediction of the kinetics of desorption of volatile molecules from such clays remains a challenge. The aim of this work is to relate the isothermal rate of desorption of volatile molecules from cation exchanged smectite clays to the chemical structures and geometries of the interacting species (clay platelet surface, type of counter-ion, type of volatile). It is thought that the rate of desorption of the volatiles at a given time is governed by their instantaneous diffusion in the clay and in the gas phase, which in turns is dependent on the volatile's interaction with its chemical and geometrical environment. Therefore, in addition to isothermal desorption rate measurements by thermogravimetry, activation energies of desorption are measured and calculated and the interacting compounds are characterized in terms of their chemical structure and geometry.

  9. Lunar Volatiles: An Earth-Moon Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.

    2011-01-01

    It has generally been accepted that the Moon is depleted in volatile elements. However, the recent discovery of measurable water in lunar glasses and apatites suggests that volatiles are not as depleted as was once thought. And, in fact, some authors have claimed that water contents of the lunar and terrestrial mantles are similar. Moderately volatile alkali elements may have a bearing on this issue. In general, bulk Moon alkalis are depleted relative to the bulk silicate Earth. Although the bulk lunar chemical composition is difficult to reconstruct, good correlations of alkali elements with refractory lithophile incompatible trace elements make this conclusion robust. These observations have been taken to mean that the Moon overall is depleted in volatiles relative to the Earth. Since water is more volatile than any of the alkali elements, presumably this conclusion is true for water, or even more so.

  10. Financial volatility: Issues and measuring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    This paper explains in non-technical terms various techniques used to measure volatility ranging from time invariant measures to time variant measures. It is shown that a weakness of the former measures arises from the underlying assumption that volatility is considered to be constant over time. This observation has led researchers to develop time variant measures based on the assumption that volatility changes over time. The introduction of the original ARCH model by Engle has spawned an ever increasing variety of models such as GARCH, EGARCH, NARCH, ARCH-M MARCH and the Taylor-Schwert model. The degree of sophistication employed in developing these models is discussed in detail as are the models characteristics used to capture the underlying economic and financial time series data including volatility clustering, leverage effects and the persistence of volatility itself. A feature of these more elaborate models is that they generally obtain a better fit to the data in-sample.

  11. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  12. Volatile compounds from Melicope obscura.

    PubMed

    Smadja, Jacqueline; Strasberg, Dominique; Legoff, Géraldine; Gauvin-Bialecki, Anne

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the interpopulation variability of volatile compounds in Melicope obscura, four samples representing four populations were collected all over the distribution area of the species in Reunion Island (Indian Ocean). The samples were extracted by hydrodistillation, and analyzed using GC/FID and GC/MS techniques. The study revealed that, in the four essential oils obtained, oxygenated sesquiterpenes were one of the major chemical classes (9.2-35.2%), mainly consisting of a new compound, (+)-6-ethenyl-2-hydroxy-6,10-dimethylundeca-2,9-dien-4-one (1), called melicopenol (8.6-30.1%). The compound was isolated by column chromatography and identified by spectral analyses including 1D- and 2D-NMR.

  13. Volatility smile as relativistic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakushadze, Zura

    2017-06-01

    We give an explicit formula for the probability distribution based on a relativistic extension of Brownian motion. The distribution (1) is properly normalized and (2) obeys the tower law (semigroup property), so we can construct martingales and self-financing hedging strategies and price claims (options). This model is a 1-constant-parameter extension of the Black-Scholes-Merton model. The new parameter is the analog of the speed of light in Special Relativity. However, in the financial context there is no ;speed limit; and the new parameter has the meaning of a characteristic diffusion speed at which relativistic effects become important and lead to a much softer asymptotic behavior, i.e., fat tails, giving rise to volatility smiles. We argue that a nonlocal stochastic description of such (Lévy) processes is inadequate and discuss a local description from physics. The presentation is intended to be pedagogical.

  14. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Gregory D.; Moore, Glenn A.; Stone, Mark L.; Reagen, William K.

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  15. Mixed cryoglobulinemia

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Clodoveo

    2008-01-01

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC), type II and type III, refers to the presence of circulating cryoprecipitable immune complexes in the serum and manifests clinically by a classical triad of purpura, weakness and arthralgias. It is considered to be a rare disorder, but its true prevalence remains unknown. The disease is more common in Southern Europe than in Northern Europe or Northern America. The prevalence of 'essential' MC is reported as approximately 1:100,000 (with a female-to-male ratio 3:1), but this term is now used to refer to a minority of MC patients only. MC is characterized by variable organ involvement including skin lesions (orthostatic purpura, ulcers), chronic hepatitis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, peripheral neuropathy, diffuse vasculitis, and, less frequently, interstitial lung involvement and endocrine disorders. Some patients may develop lymphatic and hepatic malignancies, usually as a late complication. MC may be associated with numerous infectious or immunological diseases. When isolated, MC may represent a distinct disease, the so-called 'essential' MC. The etiopathogenesis of MC is not completely understood. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is suggested to play a causative role, with the contribution of genetic and/or environmental factors. Moreover, MC may be associated with other infectious agents or immunological disorders, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or primary Sjögren's syndrome. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory findings. Circulating mixed cryoglobulins, low C4 levels and orthostatic skin purpura are the hallmarks of the disease. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis involving medium- and, more often, small-sized blood vessels is the typical pathological finding, easily detectable by means of skin biopsy of recent vasculitic lesions. Differential diagnoses include a wide range of systemic, infectious and neoplastic disorders, mainly autoimmune hepatitis, Sjögren's syndrome, polyarthritis, and B

  16. Mixed cryoglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Clodoveo

    2008-09-16

    Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC), type II and type III, refers to the presence of circulating cryoprecipitable immune complexes in the serum and manifests clinically by a classical triad of purpura, weakness and arthralgias. It is considered to be a rare disorder, but its true prevalence remains unknown. The disease is more common in Southern Europe than in Northern Europe or Northern America. The prevalence of 'essential' MC is reported as approximately 1:100,000 (with a female-to-male ratio 3:1), but this term is now used to refer to a minority of MC patients only. MC is characterized by variable organ involvement including skin lesions (orthostatic purpura, ulcers), chronic hepatitis, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, peripheral neuropathy, diffuse vasculitis, and, less frequently, interstitial lung involvement and endocrine disorders. Some patients may develop lymphatic and hepatic malignancies, usually as a late complication. MC may be associated with numerous infectious or immunological diseases. When isolated, MC may represent a distinct disease, the so-called 'essential' MC. The etiopathogenesis of MC is not completely understood. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is suggested to play a causative role, with the contribution of genetic and/or environmental factors. Moreover, MC may be associated with other infectious agents or immunological disorders, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or primary Sjögren's syndrome. Diagnosis is based on clinical and laboratory findings. Circulating mixed cryoglobulins, low C4 levels and orthostatic skin purpura are the hallmarks of the disease. Leukocytoclastic vasculitis involving medium- and, more often, small-sized blood vessels is the typical pathological finding, easily detectable by means of skin biopsy of recent vasculitic lesions. Differential diagnoses include a wide range of systemic, infectious and neoplastic disorders, mainly autoimmune hepatitis, Sjögren's syndrome, polyarthritis, and B

  17. Volatile element isotope systematics of volcanic geothermal fluids, Krafla Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefansson, A.; Gunnarsson Robin, J.; Keller, N. S.; Ono, S.; Barnes, J.

    2015-12-01

    Among the major goals of geothermal geochemistry is to identify the source of the geothermal fluids and the processes influencing their chemical composition. Such can be difficult given that geothermal systems are characterized by many phases (vapor, liquid and solid) and components. Here we report data on volatile element stable isotope systematics (H2O, CO2, Cl, H2S and SO4) in volcanic geothermal fluids at Krafla, NE Iceland. Fluid temperatures ranged from 192 to 437°C. The sources and reactions of these volatile elements is commonly based on identifying the variable end-member components in the system and their respective mixing ratios, or alternatively, comparing temperature dependence of isotope fractionation of given reactions with the measured isotope systematics. Isotopes of a given element fractionates upon reactions with key reactions in geothermal systems being aqueous speciation, vapor-water partitioning and water-rock interactions, these depending on solution composition, temperature and pressure. In order to study the effects of various reactions and processes affecting isotope systematics of geothermal fluids and to reconstruct reservoir isotope systematics, isotope geochemical models were developed by combining aqueous speciation, gas-water partitioning and water-rock modelling together with isotope fractionation and isotope mass action equations. Based on these models and data collected at Krafla it is concluded that the key factors controlling, reactive volatile element isotope systematics (S and C) are two, the isotope composition of the source material and isotope fractionation associated with aqueous and vapor speciation and how these changes as a function of processes occurring in the system including boiling and fluid-rock interaction, whereas the non-reactive element isotope systematics (Cl) is controlled their various end-member components in the system and their respective mixing ratios. Based on these data and models, the reservoir C, S

  18. Evaluation of aroma enhancement for "Ecolly" dry white wines by mixed inoculation of selected Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xing-Chen; Li, Ai-Hua; Dizy, Marta; Ullah, Niamat; Sun, Wei-Xuan; Tao, Yong-Sheng

    2017-08-01

    To improve the aroma profile of Ecolly dry white wine, the simultaneous and sequential inoculations of selected Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were performed in wine making of this work. The two yeasts were mixed in various ratios for making the mixed inoculum. The amount of volatiles and aroma characteristics were determined the following year. Mixed fermentation improved both the varietal and fermentative aroma compound composition, especially that of (Z)-3-hexene-1-ol, nerol oxide, certain acetates and ethyls group compounds. Citrus, sweet fruit, acid fruit, berry, and floral aroma traits were enhanced by mixed fermentation; however, an animal note was introduced upon using higher amounts of R. mucilaginosa. Aroma traits were regressed with volatiles as observed by the partial least-square regression method. Analysis of correlation coefficients revealed that the aroma traits were the multiple interactions of volatile compounds, with the fermentative volatiles having more impact on aroma than varietal compounds.

  19. Identification of volatile organic compounds in suburban Bangkok, Thailand and their potential for ozone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthawaree, Jeeranut; Tajima, Yosuke; Khunchornyakong, Alisa; Kato, Shungo; Sharp, Alice; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2012-02-01

    Measurement of Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) was carried out in suburban Bangkok during July 2-8, 2008. Analysis was performed using GC-FID and GC-MS. High mixing ratios of VOCs detected during the morning and evening are most likely due to vehicular emissions. Averaged VOC mixing ratios revealed distinct difference between mixing ratios of weekdays and weekend, which the latter were found to be lower. The most abundance species were propane and toluene. Ratios of benzene over toluene suggested that additional toluene mixing ratios was owing to industrial emission, which was particularly larger during weekdays. Comparison between C2Cl4 and CH3Cl mixing ratios obtained for suburban Tokyo reveal a relatively lower influence of biomass burning than suburban Bangkok. Elucidating by Ozone Formation Potential, toluene was found to contribute the most to O3 production followed by ethylene, m-,p-xylene, and propylene.

  20. Monitoring volatile compounds production throughout fermentation by Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces strains using headspace sorptive extraction.

    PubMed

    Morales, M L; Fierro-Risco, J; Callejón, R M; Paneque, P

    2017-02-01

    Currently, there is a growing interest in the use of non-Saccharomyces yeast to enhance the aromatic quality of wine, with pure or mixed cultures, as well as sequential inoculation. Volatile components of wines were closely related to their sensory quality. Hence, to study the evolution of volatile compounds during fermentation was of great interest. For this, sampling methods that did not alter the volume of fermentation media were the most suitable. This work reports the usefulness of headspace sorptive extraction as non-invasive method to monitor the changes in volatile compounds during fermentation. This method allowed monitoring of 141 compounds throughout the process of fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lachancea thermotolerans strains. Both strains showed a similar ability to ferment a must with high sugar content. The S. cerevisiae strain produced higher amount of volatile compounds especially esters that constitutes fruity aroma than L. thermotorelans.

  1. Flower Volatiles, Crop Varieties and Bee Responses

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Björn K.; Burmeister, Carina; Westphal, Catrin; Tscharntke, Teja; von Fragstein, Maximillian

    2013-01-01

    Pollination contributes to an estimated one third of global food production, through both the improvement of the yield and the quality of crops. Volatile compounds emitted by crop flowers mediate plant-pollinator interactions, but differences between crop varieties are still little explored. We investigated whether the visitation of crop flowers is determined by variety-specific flower volatiles using strawberry varieties (Fragaria x ananassa Duchesne) and how this affects the pollination services of the wild bee Osmia bicornis L. Flower volatile compounds of three strawberry varieties were measured via headspace collection. Gas chromatography showed that the three strawberry varieties produced the same volatile compounds but with quantitative differences of the total amount of volatiles and between distinct compounds. Electroantennographic recordings showed that inexperienced females of Osmia bicornis had higher antennal responses to all volatile compounds than to controls of air and paraffin oil, however responses differed between compounds. The variety Sonata was found to emit a total higher level of volatiles and also higher levels of most of the compounds that evoked antennal responses compared with the other varieties Honeoye and Darselect. Sonata also received more flower visits from Osmia bicornis females under field conditions, compared with Honeoye. Our results suggest that differences in the emission of flower volatile compounds among strawberry varieties mediate their attractiveness to females of Osmia bicornis. Since quality and quantity of marketable fruits depend on optimal pollination, a better understanding of the role of flower volatiles in crop production is required and should be considered more closely in crop-variety breeding. PMID:23977347

  2. Volatile Analyzer for Lunar Polar Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibons, Everett K.; Pillinger, Colin T.; McKay, David S.; Waugh, Lester J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major questions remaining for the future exploration of the Moon by humans concerns the presence of volatiles on our nearest neighbor in space. Observational studies, and investigations involving returned lunar samples and using robotic spacecraft infer the existence of volatile compounds particularly water [1]. It seems very likely that a volatile component will be concentrated at the poles in circumstances where low-temperatures exist to provide cryogenic traps. However, the full inventory of species, their concentration and their origin and sources are unknown. Of particular importance is whether abundances are sufficient to act as a resource of consumables for future lunar expeditions especially if a long-term base involving humans is to be established. To address some of these issues requires a lander designed specifically for operation at a high-lunar latitude. A vital part of the payload needs to be a volatile analyzer such as the Gas Analysis Package specifically designed for identification quantification of volatile substances and collecting information which will allow the origin of these volatiles to be identified [1]. The equipment included, particularly the gas analyzer, must be capable of operation in the extreme environmental conditions to be encountered. No accurate information yet exists regarding volatile concentration even for sites closer to the lunar equator (because of contamination). In this respect it will be important to understand (and thus limit) contamination of the lunar surface by extraneous material contributed from a variety of sources. The only data for the concentrations of volatiles at the poles comes from orbiting spacecraft and whilst the levels at high latitudes may be greater than at the equator, the volatile analyzer package under consideration will be designed to operate at the highest specifications possible and in a way that does not compromise the data.

  3. Basalt volatile fluctuations during continental rifting: An example from the Rio Grande Rift, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, Michael C.; Lassiter, John C.; Goff, Kathleen

    2015-05-01

    Hydration and metasomatism of the lithospheric mantle potentially influences both the magmatic and tectonic evolution of southwestern North America. Prior studies have suggested that volatile enrichments to the mantle underlying western North America resulted from shallow subduction of the Farallon Plate during the Laramide (˜74-40 Ma). This study examines temporal and spatial variations in volatile elements (H2O, Cl, F, and S) determined from olivine and orthopyroxene-hosted melt inclusions along and across the Rio Grande Rift, the easternmost extent of Laramide shallow subduction. Maximum chlorine enrichments are observed in the southern rift with a Cl/Nb of ˜210 and reduce with time to MORB-OIB levels (˜5-17). Measured water abundances are <0.8 wt % in rehomogenized inclusions; however, calculated H2O, based on Cl/Nb systematics, primarily varies from 0.5 to 2 wt % H2O. Sulfur abundances (<0.61 wt %), and calculated sulfide saturation, indicate magmas with high Cl/Nb also contain oxidized sulfur. The abundance of fluorine in melt inclusions (up to 0.2 wt %) is not correlated to other volatile elements. Temporal variations in melt inclusion volatile abundances coupled with varying isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb) whole-rock systematics suggest a transition from lithospheric to asthenospheric melt generation in the southern RGR and potential lithosphere-asthenosphere melt mixing in the central RGR. East to west decrease in volatile enrichment likely reflects a combination of varying mantle sources and early removal of metasomatized lithospheric mantle underlying regional extension. Results indicate, from multiple causes, subduction-related volatile enrichment to the lithospheric mantle is ephemeral, and strong enrichments in volatiles are not preserved in active magmatic-tectonic provenances.

  4. Host plant volatiles induce oriented flight behaviour in male European grapevine moths, Lobesia botrana.

    PubMed

    von Arx, Martin; Schmidt-Büsser, Daniela; Guerin, Patrick M

    2011-10-01

    The European grapevine moth Lobesia botrana relies on a female produced sex pheromone for long-distance mate finding. Grapevine moth males compete heavily during limited time windows for females. The aim of this study was to investigate the perception of host plant volatiles by grapevine moth males and whether such compounds elicit upwind oriented flights. We compared five host plant headspace extracts by means of gas chromatography linked electroantennogram (EAG) recording. We identified 12 common host plant volatiles (aliphatic esters, aldehydes, and alcohols, aromatic compounds and terpenes) that elicit EAG responses from grapevine moth males and that occur in at least three of the host plant volatile headspace extracts tested. Subsequently the behavioural response of grapevine moth males to four these compounds presented singly and in mixtures (1-hexanol, 1-octen-3-ol, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate and (E)-β-caryophyllene) was recorded in a wind tunnel. Grapevine moth males engaged in upwind flights to all of four compounds when released singly at 10,000 pg/min and to all, except 1-octen-3-ol, when released at 100 pg/min. A blend of the four host plant volatiles released at 10,000 pg/min and mixed at a ratio based on the analysis of Vitis vinifera cv. Solaris volatile emissions attracted significantly more males than any single compound. Grapevine moth males perceive and respond to host plant volatiles at biologically relevant levels indicating that host plant volatiles figure as olfactory cues and that L. botrana males can discern places where the likelihood of encountering females is higher.

  5. Effects of NOx on the volatility of secondary organic aerosol from isoprene photooxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lu; Kollman, Matthew S.; Song, Chen; Shilling, John E.; Ng, L. N.

    2014-01-28

    The effects of NOx on the volatility of the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from isoprene photooxidation are investigated in environmental chamber experiments. Two types of experiments are performed. In HO2-dominant experiments, organic peroxy radicals (RO2) primarily react with HO2. In mixed experiments, RO2 reacts through multiple pathways. The volatility and oxidation state of isoprene SOA is sensitive to and displays a non-linear dependence on NOx levels. When initial NO/isoprene ratio is approximately 3 (ppbv:ppbv), SOA are shown to be most oxidized and least volatile, associated with the highest SOA yield. A High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) is applied to characterize the key chemical properties of aerosols. While the composition of SOA in mixed experiments does not change substantially over time, SOA become less volatile and more oxidized as oxidation progresses in HO2-dominant experiments. Analysis of the SOA composition suggests that the further reactions of organic peroxides and alcohols may produce carboxylic acids, which might play a strong role in SOA aging.

  6. Return-volatility correlation in financial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Qiu, T; Zheng, B; Ren, F; Trimper, S

    2006-06-01

    We investigate the return-volatility correlation both local and nonlocal in time with daily and minutely data of the German DAX and Chinese indices, and observe a leverage effect for the German DAX, while an antileverage effect for the Chinese indices. In the negative time direction, i.e., for the volatility-return correlation, an antileverage effect nonlocal in time is detected for both the German DAX and Chinese indices, although the duplicate local in time does not exist. A retarded volatility model may describe the asymmetric properties of the financial indices in the positive time direction.

  7. Return-volatility correlation in financial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, T.; Zheng, B.; Ren, F.; Trimper, S.

    2006-06-01

    We investigate the return-volatility correlation both local and nonlocal in time with daily and minutely data of the German DAX and Chinese indices, and observe a leverage effect for the German DAX, while an antileverage effect for the Chinese indices. In the negative time direction, i.e., for the volatility-return correlation, an antileverage effect nonlocal in time is detected for both the German DAX and Chinese indices, although the duplicate local in time does not exist. A retarded volatility model may describe the asymmetric properties of the financial indices in the positive time direction.

  8. Analyzing volatile compounds in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Tunick, Michael H

    2014-07-01

    Volatile compounds give the first indication of the flavor in a dairy product. Volatiles are isolated from the sample matrix and then analyzed by chromatography, sensory methods or an electronic nose. Isolation may be performed by solvent extraction or headspace analysis, and gas chromatography is often employed with various detectors to identify odorants. The human nose is also used as a detector, and electronic noses are being developed to qualitate and quantitate volatiles. A reliable technique for analyzing odorants in dairy products has not yet been invented.

  9. Magmatic volatiles in explosive rhyolitic eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Eichelberger, J.C.; Westrich, H.R.

    1981-07-01

    Obsidian clasts in rhyolitic tephra deposits preserve preeruption magmatic volatile contents, providing a direct means for determining the volatile content of explosively erupted magmas. Small to moderate volume Plinian eruptions (10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -1/ km/sup 3/) appear to be driven by 0.5--1.0 wt.% volatiles, consisting dominantly of H/sub 2/O with minor CO/sub 2/. Analysis of obsidian from eruptive sequences consisting of tephra and flows indicates that this hydrous magma abruptly overlies magma with only 0.1--0.2 wt.% H/sub 2/O.

  10. Modelling of volatility in monetary transmission mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Dobešová, Anna; Klepáč, Václav; Kolman, Pavel; Bednářová, Petra

    2015-03-10

    The aim of this paper is to compare different approaches to modeling of volatility in monetary transmission mechanism. For this purpose we built time-varying parameter VAR (TVP-VAR) model with stochastic volatility and VAR-DCC-GARCH model with conditional variance. The data from three European countries are included in the analysis: the Czech Republic, Germany and Slovakia. Results show that VAR-DCC-GARCH system captures higher volatility of observed variables but main trends and detected breaks are generally identical in both approaches.

  11. Securing non-volatile memory regions

    DOEpatents

    Faraboschi, Paolo; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy; Muralimanohar, Naveen

    2013-08-20

    Methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture to secure non-volatile memory regions are disclosed. An example method disclosed herein comprises associating a first key pair and a second key pair different than the first key pair with a process, using the first key pair to secure a first region of a non-volatile memory for the process, and using the second key pair to secure a second region of the non-volatile memory for the same process, the second region being different than the first region.

  12. Concentrations of Volatiles in the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jeff; Taylor, Larry; Duke, Mike

    2007-01-01

    To set lower and upper limits on the overall amounts and types of volatiles released during heating of polar regolith, we examined the data for equatorial lunar regolith and for the compositions of comets. The purpose, specifically, was to answer these questions: 1. Upper/Lower limits and 'best guess' for total amount of volatiles (by weight %) released from lunar regolith up to 150C 2. Upper/Lower limit and 'best guess' for composition of the volatiles released from the lunar regolith by weight %

  13. Aerosol volatility in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Häkkinen, S. A. K.; ńijälä, M.; Lehtipalo, K.; Junninen, H.; Virkkula, A.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Petäjä, T.; Riipinen, I.

    2012-04-01

    Climate and health effects of atmospheric aerosols are determined by their properties such as their chemical composition. Aerosol chemical composition can be studied indirectly by measuring volatility of aerosol particles. The volatility of submicron aerosol particles (20-500 nm) was studied in a boreal forest site at SMEAR II (Station for Measuring Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II) station (Vesala et al., 1998) in Hyytiälä, Finland, during 01/2008-05/2010. The instrument used for the measurements was VDMPS (Volatility Differential Mobility Particle Sizer), which consists of two separate instruments: DMPS (Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, Aalto et al., 2001) and TD (Thermodenuder, Wehner et al., 2002). Aerosol evaporation was examined by heating the aerosol and comparing the total aerosol mass before and after heating. In the VDMPS system ambient aerosol sample was heated up to temperatures ranging from 80 °C to 280 °C. The higher the heating temperature was the more aerosol material was evaporated. There was a non-volatile residual present in aerosol particles when heated up to 280 °C. This residual explained (20±8)% of the total aerosol mass. Aerosol non-volatile mass fraction was highest during winter and smallest during summer months. The role of black carbon in the observed non-volatile residual was determined. Black carbon explained 40 to 90% of the non-volatile mass. Especially during colder seasons noticeable amount of non-volatile material, something else than black carbon, was observed. According to Kalberer et al. (2004) some atmospheric organic species can form polymers that have high evaporation temperatures. Also low-volatile organic salts may contribute to the non-volatile aerosol (Smith et al., 2010). Aerosol mass composition measured directly with AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, Jayne et al., 2000) was analyzed in order to examine the properties of the non-volatile material (other than black carbon). The AMS measurements were performed

  14. Biochar application reduce ammonia volatilization in a soil-plant system: A closed chamber experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Sanchita; Donner, Erica; Smith, Euan; Lombi, Enzo

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) volatilization is considered as one of the major mechanisms responsible for the loss of nitrogen (N) from soil-plant systems worldwide. About 10-30% of N can be lost as NH3 volatilization, which constitutes a significant economic loss. In recent years carbon-based materials such as biochar have created a great research interest because of their ability to increase soil fertility by reducing nutrient loss and pollutants bioavailability in soil. Most of the studies so far have investigated how biochar addition can reduce NH3 volatilization from soils but less information is available for soil-plant systems. In this research, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum, variety: Calingiri) were grown in a calcareous soil (pH 8, calcarosol) inside a closed chamber system to assess both ammonia volatilization and plant N uptake. In this specialized glass chamber air was passed through an inlet where the flow rate was maintained using an air pump (3.5 L min-1). The air outlet was passed through a sulphuric acid trap which was used to capture the volatilized NH3 from the chamber. Plants were watered using the inlet to maintain 50% field capacity throughout the incubation. Two different biochar samples were used in this study: a poultry manure biochar (PM-BC) and a green waste compost biochar (GW-BC) produced at 250 ˚C. Five different application rates were tested (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2%). The soil was mixed with biochar samples, water, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, and S for one week before sowing. After one week of germination, plants were transferred to the chamber for further three weeks incubation for NH3 volatilization measurement. The study identified that biochar application reduced the NH3 volatilization and increase the plant biomass. Biochar application at 0.5 and 2% decreased the NH3 volatilization by 36 and 48% respectively. The N uptake of the plants also increased from 2.9 to 28% at 0.5 and 2% application rates respectively. The dry biomass of the plant also increased

  15. Realized volatility and absolute return volatility: a comparison indicating market risk.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zeyu; Qiao, Zhi; Takaishi, Tetsuya; Stanley, H Eugene; Li, Baowen

    2014-01-01

    Measuring volatility in financial markets is a primary challenge in the theory and practice of risk management and is essential when developing investment strategies. Although the vast literature on the topic describes many different models, two nonparametric measurements have emerged and received wide use over the past decade: realized volatility and absolute return volatility. The former is strongly favored in the financial sector and the latter by econophysicists. We examine the memory and clustering features of these two methods and find that both enable strong predictions. We compare the two in detail and find that although realized volatility has a better short-term effect that allows predictions of near-future market behavior, absolute return volatility is easier to calculate and, as a risk indicator, has approximately the same sensitivity as realized volatility. Our detailed empirical analysis yields valuable guidelines for both researchers and market participants because it provides a significantly clearer comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods.

  16. Attraction of pea moth Cydia nigricana to pea flower volatiles.

    PubMed

    Thöming, Gunda; Knudsen, Geir K

    2014-04-01

    The pea moth Cydia nigricana causes major crop losses in pea (Pisum sativum) production. We investigated attraction of C. nigricana females to synthetic pea flower volatiles in a wind tunnel and in the field. We performed electroantennogram analysis on 27 previously identified pea plant volatiles, which confirmed antennal responses to nine of the compounds identified in pea flowers. A dose-dependent response was found to eight of the compounds. Various blends of the nine pea flower volatiles eliciting antennal responses were subsequently studied in a wind tunnel. A four-compound blend comprising hexan-1-ol, (E)-2-hexen-1-ol, (Z)-β-ocimene and (E)-β-ocimene was equally attractive to mated C. nigricana females as the full pea flower mimic blend. We conducted wind-tunnel tests on different blends of these four pea flower compounds mixed with a headspace sample of non-flowering pea plants. By considering the effects of such green leaf background odour, we were able to identify (Z)- and (E)-β-ocimene as fundamental for host location by the pea moths, and hexan-1-ol and (E)-2-hexen-1-ol as being of secondary importance in that context. In the field, the two isomers of β-ocimene resulted in trap catches similar to those obtained with the full pea flower mimic and the four-compound blend, which clearly demonstrated the prime significance of the β-ocimenes as attractants of C. nigricana. The high level of the trap catches of female C. nigricana noted in this first field experiment gives a first indication of the potential use of such artificial kairomones in pea moth control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Solar system formation and the distribution of volatile species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.

    1994-01-01

    To understand how the solar system formed we must understand the compositional distribution of the current system. Volatile species are particularly important in that their stability as condensed phases is limited in temperature-pressure space, and hence variations in their distribution at present potentially contain an imprint of processes by which temperature and pressure varied in the solar nebula. In this talk we restrict ourselves to species more volatile than water ice, and address issues related to processes in the outer solar system and the formation of bodies there; others in this conference will cover volatile species relevant to inner solar system processes. Study of the outer solar system is relevant both to understanding the interface between the solar nebula and the progenitor giant molecular cloud (since the chemical links to present-day observables in molecular clouds are species like methane, carbon monoxide, etc.), as well as the origin of terrestrial planet atmospheres and oceans (the latter to be covered by Owen). The wealth of compositional information on outer solar system bodies which has become available from spacecraft and ground-based observations challenges traditional simplistic views of the composition and hence dynamics of the solar nebula. The basic assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, promulgated in the 1950's, in which methane and ammonia dominate nitrogen- and carbon-bearing species, is demonstrably incorrect on both observational and theoretical grounds. However, the kinetic inhibition model which replaced it, in which carbon monoxide and molecular nitrogen dominate a nebula which is fully mixed and hence cycles outer solar system gases through a hot, chemically active zone near the disk center, is not supported either by observations. Instead, a picture of the outer solar system emerges in which the gas and grains are a mixture of relatively unaltered, or modestly altered, molecular cloud material, along with a fraction

  18. Solar system formation and the distribution of volatile species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, Jonathan I.

    1994-01-01

    To understand how the solar system formed we must understand the compositional distribution of the current system. Volatile species are particularly important in that their stability as condensed phases is limited in temperature-pressure space, and hence variations in their distribution at present potentially contain an imprint of processes by which temperature and pressure varied in the solar nebula. In this talk we restrict ourselves to species more volatile than water ice, and address issues related to processes in the outer solar system and the formation of bodies there; others in this conference will cover volatile species relevant to inner solar system processes. Study of the outer solar system is relevant both to understanding the interface between the solar nebula and the progenitor giant molecular cloud (since the chemical links to present-day observables in molecular clouds are species like methane, carbon monoxide, etc.), as well as the origin of terrestrial planet atmospheres and oceans (the latter to be covered by Owen). The wealth of compositional information on outer solar system bodies which has become available from spacecraft and ground-based observations challenges traditional simplistic views of the composition and hence dynamics of the solar nebula. The basic assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, promulgated in the 1950's, in which methane and ammonia dominate nitrogen- and carbon-bearing species, is demonstrably incorrect on both observational and theoretical grounds. However, the kinetic inhibition model which replaced it, in which carbon monoxide and molecular nitrogen dominate a nebula which is fully mixed and hence cycles outer solar system gases through a hot, chemically active zone near the disk center, is not supported either by observations. Instead, a picture of the outer solar system emerges in which the gas and grains are a mixture of relatively unaltered, or modestly altered, molecular cloud material, along with a fraction

  19. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Determination of Volatile Matter Content of Methacrylate Multicomponent Coatings Used as Traffic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... mixing, take aliquots from this 100 mL sample for determination of the total volatile content, water content, and density. To determine water content, follow section 3.4 of Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR... used to combine the components and the manufacturer's recommended ratio is by volume, the density...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Determination of Volatile Matter Content of Methacrylate Multicomponent Coatings Used as Traffic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... mixing, take aliquots from this 100 mL sample for determination of the total volatile content, water content, and density. To determine water content, follow section 3.4 of Method 24 of appendix A of 40 CFR... used to combine the components and the manufacturer's recommended ratio is by volume, the density...

  1. Microbial volatile emissions as insect semiochemicals

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We provide a synthesis of the literature describing biochemical interactions between microorganisms and arthropods by way of microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) production. We explored important metabolic pathways involved in MVOC production and evaluated the functionality, generality, and e...

  2. VOLATILE ORGANIC ANALYSIS BY DIRECT AQUEOUS INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas chromatographic environmental analysis by direct aqueous injection (DAI) was studied for 24 volatile organic analytes (VOAs). Internal standardization was used to determine the precision of analyzing these compounds by DAI. Aequous samples were directly introduced to a gas ch...

  3. Release of volatile mercury from vascular plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.; Puerner, N. J.; Speitel, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Volatile, organic solvent soluble mercury has been found in leaves and seeds of several angiosperms. Leaves of garlic vine, avocado, and haole-koa release mercury in volatile form rapidly at room temperature. In garlic vine, the most active release is temperature dependent, but does not parallel the vapor-pressure temperature relationship for mercury. Mercury can be trapped in nitric-perchloric acid digestion fluid, or n-hexane, but is lost from the hexane unless the acid mixture is present. Seeds of haole-koa also contain extractable mercury but volatility declines in the series n-hexane (90%), methanol (50%), water (10%). This suggests that reduced volatility may accompany solvolysis in the more polar media.

  4. Microwave spectra of some volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    A computer-controlled microwave (MRR) spectrometer was used to catalog reference spectra for chemical analysis. Tables of absorption frequency, peak absorption intensity, and integrated intensity are included for 26 volatile organic compounds, all but one of which contain oxygen.

  5. Reactive flash volatilization of fluid fuels

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Dreyer, Bradon J.; Salge, James R.

    2013-01-08

    The invention provides methods for the production of synthesis gas. More particularly, various embodiments of the invention relate to systems and methods for volatilizing fluid fuel to produce synthesis gas by using a metal catalyst on a solid support matrix.

  6. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS EXPOSURE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined...

  7. The Metabolism of the Volatile Amines

    PubMed Central

    Tobe, Barry A.

    1963-01-01

    As part of a series of studies into the etiology of acute hepatic encephalopathy the identity of the volatile base, which had been extracted from blood and presumed to be ammonia, was investigated. In order to differentiate between ammonia and the other volatile bases with which it can be confused, a method of separating these compounds by the use of gas chromatography was developed. The technique is described in detail because it incorporates several novel ideas that can be applied to the isolation and identification of similar compounds in many biological systems. The volatile base extracted from blood was found to be ammonia, and no other volatile base was demonstrable in blood from both healthy subjects and patients suffering from acute hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:14101451

  8. Release of volatile mercury from vascular plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, S. M.; Puerner, N. J.; Speitel, T. W.

    1974-01-01

    Volatile, organic solvent soluble mercury has been found in leaves and seeds of several angiosperms. Leaves of garlic vine, avocado, and haole-koa release mercury in volatile form rapidly at room temperature. In garlic vine, the most active release is temperature dependent, but does not parallel the vapor-pressure temperature relationship for mercury. Mercury can be trapped in nitric-perchloric acid digestion fluid, or n-hexane, but is lost from the hexane unless the acid mixture is present. Seeds of haole-koa also contain extractable mercury but volatility declines in the series n-hexane (90%), methanol (50%), water (10%). This suggests that reduced volatility may accompany solvolysis in the more polar media.

  9. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS AS EXPOSURE BIOMARKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alveolar breath sampling and analysis can be extremely useful in exposure assessment studies involving volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Over recent years scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Exposure Research Laboratory have developed and refined...

  10. Colors and Volatile Deposition Around Loki Patera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, R. S.; Howell, R. R.

    2007-03-01

    To evaluate the role of volatiles at Loki Patera we are reprocessing Galileo images to obtain the highest spatial resolution color information available, and comparing the resulting spectra to candidate materials and other regions on Io.

  11. Volatile composition of coffee berries at different stages of ripeness and their possible attraction to the coffee berry borer Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Américo; Ortiz, Aristófeles; Vega, Fernando E; Posada, Francisco

    2004-09-22

    The analysis of volatile emissions of coffee berries in different physiological states of ripeness was performed using dynamic headspace and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis for Coffea arabica, var. Colombia. The composition of the volatiles emitted by coffee berries is dominated by very high levels of alcohols, mainly ethanol, in all stages of ripeness in comparison with other compounds. Overripe coffee berries have high volatile emissions and show a composition dominated mainly by esters followed by alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. The lowest level compounds were monoterpenes. 2-Methyl furan was detected in various ripening stages; this compound has not been previously reported as a coffee berry volatile. The presence of ethanol and other alcohols in the volatile composition might explain the effectiveness of using traps with mixed alcohols for detection and capture of coffee berry borers.

  12. Examining Moderate Volatile Loss through Lunar History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Prabal; Killen, Rosemary M.; Airapetian, Vladimir; Petro, Noah; Mandell, Avi

    2017-06-01

    While the Moon and bulk silicate earth (BSE) share many compositional similarities, a notable difference is the apparent depletion of moderate volatiles in lunar samples. Depletion of elements such as sodium and potassium relative to BSE composition has been observed in Apollo samples. The source of these depletions is poorly understood but may be a result of preferential accretion of volatile-rich melt in the inner disk to the Earth during Moon formation.However, recent Kepler data has indicated that stellar analogues to our Sun experience enhanced flare activity early in their evolution. This implies that the Sun may have had a higher frequency and energy of flares and associated Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) in its distant past. We examine the potential impacts of this increased activity on lunar exosphere generation and specifically on potential loss of moderate volatiles including sodium and potassium.We use a surface bounded exosphere model that incorporates multiple processes including photon stimulated desorption, kinetic sputtering and impact vaporization in order to study potential moderate volatile loss under a variety of different conditions. This model is informed by appropriate solar wind and CME properties, which includes CMEs of different energies. We also incorporate regolith overturn to determine ranges of potential bulk depletion of moderate volatiles from the lunar regolith.Our work is aimed at determining the potential impact of solar activity on the depletion of moderate volatiles in the lunar regolith. Such a contribution is important to ascertain in order to isolate the depletion of volatiles due to disk processes and may thus help constrain details of the Moon's formation. Finally, we also examine the potential of lunar abundances of moderate volatiles as an observational tracer of past solar activity.

  13. Seasonal volatility dependence of ambient particle phase amines.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Kerri A; Hatch, Lindsay E; Prather, Kimberly A

    2009-07-15

    During the summer and fall of 2005 in Riverside, California, the seasonal volatility behavior of submicrometer aerosol particles was investigated by coupling an automated thermodenuder system to an online single-particle mass spectrometer. A strong seasonal dependence was observed for the gas/particle partitioning of alkylamines within individual ambient submicrometer aged organic carbon particles internally mixed with ammonium, nitrate, and sulfate. In the summer, the amines were strongly correlated with nitrate and sulfate, suggesting the presence of aminium nitrate and sulfate salts which were nonvolatile and comprised approximately 6-9% of the average particle mass at 230 degrees C. In the fall, 86 +/- 1% of the amines volatilized below 113 degrees C with aminium nitrate and sulfate salts representing less than 1% of the particle mass at 230 degrees C. In the summer, a more acidic particle core led to protonation of the amines and subsequent formation of aminium sulfate and nitrate salts; whereas, in the fall, the particles contained more ammonium and thus were less acidic, causing fewer aminium salts to form. Therefore, the acidity of individual particles can greatly affect gas/particle partitioning of organic species in the atmosphere, and the concentrations of amines, as strong bases, should be included in estimations of aerosol pH.

  14. Market volatility modeling for short time window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mattos Neto, Paulo S. G.; Silva, David A.; Ferreira, Tiago A. E.; Cavalcanti, George D. C.

    2011-10-01

    The gain or loss of an investment can be defined by the movement of the market. This movement can be estimated by the difference between the magnitudes of two stock prices in distinct periods and this difference can be used to calculate the volatility of the markets. The volatility characterizes the sensitivity of a market change in the world economy. Traditionally, the probability density function (pdf) of the movement of the markets is analyzed by using power laws. The contributions of this work is two-fold: (i) an analysis of the volatility dynamic of the world market indexes is performed by using a two-year window time data. In this case, the experiments show that the pdf of the volatility is better fitted by exponential function than power laws, in all range of pdf; (ii) after that, we investigate a relationship between the volatility of the markets and the coefficient of the exponential function based on the Maxwell-Boltzmann ideal gas theory. The results show an inverse relationship between the volatility and the coefficient of the exponential function. This information can be used, for example, to predict the future behavior of the markets or to cluster the markets in order to analyze economic patterns.

  15. Volatile flavor compounds in yogurt: a review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hefa

    2010-11-01

    Considerable knowledge has been accumulated on the volatile compounds contributing to the aroma and flavor of yogurt. This review outlines the production of the major flavor compounds in yogurt fermentation and the analysis techniques, both instrumental and sensory, for quantifying the volatile compounds in yogurt. The volatile compounds that have been identified in plain yogurt are summarized, with the few key aroma compounds described in detail. Most flavor compounds in yogurt are produced from lipolysis of milkfat and microbiological transformations of lactose and citrate. More than 100 volatiles, including carbonyl compounds, alcohols, acids, esters, hydrocarbons, aromatic compounds, sulfur-containing compounds, and heterocyclic compounds, are found in yogurt at low to trace concentrations. Besides lactic acid, acetaldehyde, diacetyl, acetoin, acetone, and 2-butanone contribute most to the typical aroma and flavor of yogurt. Extended storage of yogurt causes off-flavor development, which is mainly attributed to the production of undesired aldehydes and fatty acids during lipid oxidation. Further work on studying the volatile flavor compounds-matrix interactions, flavor release mechanisms, and the synergistic effect of flavor compounds, and on correlating the sensory properties of yogurt with the compositions of volatile flavor compounds are needed to fully elucidate yogurt aroma and flavor.

  16. Lunar apatite with terrestrial volatile abundances.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Jeremy W; Liu, Yang; Rossman, George R; Guan, Yunbin; Eiler, John M; Stolper, Edward M; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2010-07-22

    The Moon is thought to be depleted relative to the Earth in volatile elements such as H, Cl and the alkalis. Nevertheless, evidence for lunar explosive volcanism has been used to infer that some lunar magmas exsolved a CO-rich and CO(2)-rich vapour phase before or during eruption. Although there is also evidence for other volatile species on glass spherules, until recently there had been no unambiguous reports of indigenous H in lunar rocks. Here we report quantitative ion microprobe measurements of late-stage apatite from lunar basalt 14053 that document concentrations of H, Cl and S that are indistinguishable from apatites in common terrestrial igneous rocks. These volatile contents could reflect post-magmatic metamorphic volatile addition or growth from a late-stage, interstitial, sulphide-saturated melt that contained approximately 1,600 parts per million H(2)O and approximately 3,500 parts per million Cl. Both metamorphic and igneous models of apatite formation suggest a volatile inventory for at least some lunar materials that is similar to comparable terrestrial materials. One possible implication is that portions of the lunar mantle or crust are more volatile-rich than previously thought.

  17. Scaling properties of foreign exchange volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gençay, Ramazan; Selçuk, Faruk; Whitcher, Brandon

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the scaling properties of foreign exchange volatility. Our methodology is based on a wavelet multi-scaling approach which decomposes the variance of a time series and the covariance between two time series on a scale by scale basis through the application of a discrete wavelet transformation. It is shown that foreign exchange rate volatilities follow different scaling laws at different horizons. Particularly, there is a smaller degree of persistence in intra-day volatility as compared to volatility at one day and higher scales. Therefore, a common practice in the risk management industry to convert risk measures calculated at shorter horizons into longer horizons through a global scaling parameter may not be appropriate. This paper also demonstrates that correlation between the foreign exchange volatilities is the lowest at the intra-day scales but exhibits a gradual increase up to a daily scale. The correlation coefficient stabilizes at scales one day and higher. Therefore, the benefit of currency diversification is the greatest at the intra-day scales and diminishes gradually at higher scales (lower frequencies). The wavelet cross-correlation analysis also indicates that the association between two volatilities is stronger at lower frequencies.

  18. Volatile fatty acids production from marine macroalgae by anaerobic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Nhan; Nam, Woo Joong; Jeon, Young Joong; Yoon, Hyon Hee

    2012-11-01

    Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were produced from the marine macroalgae, Laminaria japonica, Pachymeniopsis elliptica, and Enteromorpha crinite by anaerobic fermentation using a microbial community derived from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Methanogen inhibitor (iodoform), pH control, substrate concentration, and alkaline and thermal pretreatments affected VFA productivity. Acetic, propionic, and butyric acids were the main products. A maximum VFA concentration of 15.2g/L was obtained from 50 g/L of L. japonica in three days at 35°C and pH 6.5-7.0. Pretreatment with 0.5 N NaOH improved VFA productivity by 56% compared to control. The result shows the applicability of marine macroalgae as biomass feedstock for the production of VFAs which can be converted to mixed alcohol fuels.

  19. Changes in Volatile Compounds of Chinese Luzhou-Flavor Liquor during the Fermentation and Distillation Process.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiaofei; Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the dynamic of volatile compounds in the Zaopei during the fermentation and distillation process by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GCMS). Physicochemical properties analysis of Zaopei (fermented grains [FG], fermented grains mixed with sorghum [FGS], streamed grains [SG], and streamed grains mixed with Daqu [SGD]) showed distinct changes. A total number of 66 volatile compounds in the Zaopei were identified, in which butanoic acid, hexanoic acid, ethyl hexanoate, ethyl lactate, ethyl octanoate, hexyl hexanoate, ethyl hydrocinnamate, ethyl oleate, ethyl hexadecanoate, and ethyl linoleate were considered to be the dominant compounds due to their high concentrations. FG had the highest volatile compounds (112.43 mg/kg), which significantly decreased by 17.05% in the FGS, 67.12% in the SG, and 73.75% in the SGD. Furthermore, about 61.49% of volatile compounds of FGS were evaporated into raw liquor, whereas head, heart, and tail liquor accounted for 29.84%, 39.49%, and 30.67%, respectively. Each volatile class generally presented a decreasing trend, except for furans. Especially, the percentage of esters was 55.51% to 67.41% in the Zaopei, and reached 92.60% to 97.67% in the raw liquor. Principal component analysis based ordination of volatile compounds data segregated FGS and SGD samples. In addition, radar diagrams of the odor activity values suggested that intense flavor of fruit was weakened most from FG to SGD. The dynamic of volatile compounds in the Zaopei during the fermentation and distillation process was tested by SPME-GCMS. The result of this study demonstrated that both volatile compounds of Zaopei and thermal reaction during distillation simply determined the unique feature of raw liquor. This study was conducted based on the real products from liquor manufactory, so it is practicable that the method can be used in an industry setting. © 2015 Institute of Food

  20. Emerging Trends on the Volatile Chemistry in Comets as Measured with High-Resolution Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dello Russo, Neil; Kawakita, Hideyo; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    A systematic analysis of the mixing ratios with respect to H2O for eight species (CH3OH, HCN, NH3, H2CO, C2H2, C2H6, CH4, and CO) measured with high-resolution infrared spectroscopy is presented. Some trends are beginning to emerge when mixing ratios in individual comets are compared to average mixing ratios obtained for all species within the population. The variation in mixing ratios for all measured species is at least an order of magnitude. Overall, Jupiter-family comets are depleted in volatile species with respect to H2O compared to long-period Oort cloud comets, with the most volatile species showing the greatest relative depletion. There is a high positive correlation between the mixing ratios of HCN, C2H6, and CH4, whereas NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 are moderately correlated with each other but generally uncorrelated or show only weak correlation with other species. CO is generally uncorrelated with the other measured species possibly because it has the highest volatility and is therefore more susceptible to thermal evolutionary effects. Molecular mixing ratios for CH3OH, HCN, C2H6, and CH4 show an expected behavior with heliocentric distance suggesting a dominant ice source, whereas there is emerging evidence that the mixing ratios of NH3, H2CO, and C2H2 may increase at small heliocentric distances, suggesting the possibility of additional sources related to the thermal decomposition of organic dust. Although this provides information on the composition of the most volatile grains in comets, it presents an additional difficulty in classifying comet chemistry because most comets within this dataset were only observed over a limited range of heliocentric distance. Optical and infrared comparisons indicate that mixing ratios of daughter species and potential parents from cometary ices are sometimes but not always consistent with one another. This suggests that in many comets there are significant sources of C2 and/or CN from grains, and that the importance of these

  1. Volatile Emissions from Compressed Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Dini, Francesca; Capuano, Rosamaria; Strand, Tillan; Ek, Anna-Christina; Lindgren, Margareta; Paolesse, Roberto; Di Natale, Corrado; Lundström, Ingemar

    2013-01-01

    Since almost every fifth patient treated in hospital care develops pressure ulcers, early identification of risk is important. A non-invasive method for the elucidation of endogenous biomarkers related to pressure ulcers could be an excellent tool for this purpose. We therefore found it of interest to determine if there is a difference in the emissions of volatiles from compressed and uncompressed tissue. The ultimate goal is to find a non-invasive method to obtain an early warning for the risk of developing pressure ulcers for bed-ridden persons. Chemical analysis of the emissions, collected in compresses, was made with gas-chromatography – mass spectrometry and with a chemical sensor array, the so called electronic nose. It was found that the emissions from healthy and hospitalized persons differed significantly irrespective of the site. Within each group there was a clear difference between the compressed and uncompressed site. Peaks that could be certainly deemed as markers of the compression were, however, not identified. Nonetheless, different compounds connected to the application of local mechanical pressure were found. The results obtained with GC-MS reveal the complexity of VOC composition, thus an array of non-selective chemical sensors seems to be a suitable choice for the analysis of skin emission from compressed tissues; it may represent a practical instrument for bed side diagnostics. Results show that the adopted electronic noses are likely sensitive to the total amount of the emission rather than to its composition. The development of a gas sensor-based device requires then the design of sensor receptors adequate to detect the VOCs bouquet typical of pressure. This preliminary experiment evidences the necessity of studies where each given person is followed for a long time in a ward in order to detect the insurgence of specific VOCs pattern changes signalling the occurrence of ulcers. PMID:23874929

  2. Multifractal diffusion entropy analysis on stock volatility in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingjing; Shang, Pengjian; Zhao, Xiaojun

    2012-11-01

    This paper introduces a generalized diffusion entropy analysis method to analyze long-range correlation then applies this method to stock volatility series. The method uses the techniques of the diffusion process and Rényi entropy to focus on the scaling behaviors of regular volatility and extreme volatility respectively in developed and emerging markets. It successfully distinguishes their differences where regular volatility exhibits long-range persistence while extreme volatility reveals anti-persistence.

  3. Lunar volatiles: balancing science and resource development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Dana

    In the context of human exploration of the moon, the volatiles postulated to exist at the lunar poles have value as resources as well as scientific significance. Once sustained human operations commence on the moon, society will move from a paradigm in which examination of planetary materials has been unconstrained to one where use of those materials will support habitability and further exploration. A framework for the scientific investigation of lunar volatiles that allows for eventual economic exploitation can guide both activities and resolve the conflicts that will inevitably develop if the postulated lunar volatiles prove to be both extant and accessible. Scientific constraints on the framework include characterization at both poles of the isotopes, elements, and molecules in the volatiles, their relative and absolute abundances, and their horizontal and vertical distribution. A subset of this data is necessary in order to assess, develop, and initiate resource exploitation. In addition, the scientific record of volatiles in the cold traps can be contaminated by the cold-trapping of migrating volatiles released from operations elsewhere on the moon even if the indigenous, cold-trapped volatiles are not utilized. Possible decision points defining the transition from science-dominated to exploitation-dominated use include technology limits in the 70K environment, evolving science priorities (funding), and the resolution of major science issues. Inputs to policy development include any North vs. South Pole differences in volatile characteristics and the suitability of the volatiles to enable further scientific exploration of the moon. In the absence of national sovereignty on the moon, enforcement of any framework is an open question, particularly if science and commercial interests are in competition. The framework, processes, and precedent set by how we as a society choose to handle the scientific bounty and resource promise of lunar volatiles may eventually

  4. Lunar volatile depletion due to incomplete accretion within an impact-generated disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canup, Robin M.; Visscher, Channon; Salmon, Julien; Fegley, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    depleted elements. The portion of the Moon derived from the inner disk is then volatile depleted, even without escape. This mechanism could produce part or all of the observed depletion pattern, depending primarily on the degree of mixing within the Moon.

  5. Composition and location of volatiles at Loki Patera, Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Robert R.; Landis, Claire E.; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.

    2014-02-01

    Volatiles play a critical role in determining the nature of volcanic activity on Earth, but their role in the volcanism on Io is less clear. To help determine that role we analyze Voyager and Galileo images of Loki Patera. Loki is the largest caldera in the Solar System and Io’s most powerful volcano, however its eruptive behavior is still not understood. It appears to be relatively volatile poor, in comparison to other sites like Pele where volatiles drive a 350 km high plume. A resurfacing wave, either from spreading flows or from foundering of a lava lake crust, periodically sweeps around Loki Patera. Photometry from Voyager I and II violet and blue images shows that most of the features in and around Loki have colors well matched by macroscopic mixing of sulfur and basalt. The dark western portion of the patera has the color of bare basalt. Assuming such a macroscopic sulfur-basalt mix, in the Voyager I images most of the rest of the patera appears to be covered with a background of 13-38% sulfur. We infer this background sulfur was deposited from the nearby plume observed by Voyager I and II. The surface of the patera is also dotted by numerous small bright areas which have colloquially been called “bergs”. We find that they are also composed of sulfur, with coverage ranging up to 100%. Darker regions adjacent to the patera, such as the “southwest overflow”, are a mixture of intermediate amounts of sulfur and basalt. The “bathtub ring” at the edge of the overflow is again roughly 100% sulfur, perhaps with significant amounts of SO2 included. Colors seen during the Voyager II flyby are also consistent with this general pattern, but most of the patera has a sulfur abundance higher than that seen in Voyager I, while the then-dark southern portion is again close to the reflectance of bare basalt. We have also analyzed the spatial distribution of the bergs. They clearly avoid the inner and outer margins of the patera, and they also avoid each other

  6. Thermodynamics of the Volatilization of Actinind metals in the High-Temperature Treatment of Radioactive Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Martyn, G.; Olander, Donald R.

    1999-06-01

    We are performing a detailed study of the volatilization behavior of U, Pu and possibly Am and Np under conditions relevant to the thermal treatment (destruction) of actinide containing organic-based mixed and radioactive wastes. The primary scientific goal of the work is to develop a basic thermochemical understanding of actinide volatilization and partitioning/speciation behavior in the thermal processes that are central to DOE/EM's mixed waste treatment program. This subject addresses at least two key technical needs/problem areas recently identified by DOE/EM's Office of Science & Technology: emission-free destruction of organic wastes, and interactions between actinides and organic residues in materials stabilization. A sound basis for designing safe and effective treatment systems, and the ability to allay public concerns about radioactive fugitive emissions, will be the principal benefits of the project. The proposed work is a combination of experimental studies and thermodynamic modeling. Vapor pressure measurements will be made to determine U, Pu and possibly Am volatile species and the extent of their volatilization when UO2/U3O8, PuO2 and AmO2 solids are heated to temperatures of 500 to1200 C under pyrolyzing (reducing) conditions or under oxidizing conditions in the presence of chlorine. Work on uranium volatilization under reducing conditions is being performed in a laboratory at UC Berkeley in a collaboration with Professor D.R. Olander. In parallel with the experimental effort, a complete thermodynamic database for expected actinide gaseous species will be developed from literature data, from the proposed measurements, and from data predictions using bond energy correlation and statistical thermodynamics estimation methods.

  7. Combination of volatile and non-volatile functions in a single memory cell and its scalability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungjin; Hwang, Sungmin; Lee, Jong-Ho; Park, Byung-Gook

    2017-04-01

    A single memory cell which combines volatile memory and non-volatile memory functions has been demonstrated with an independent asymmetric dual-gate structure. Owing to the second gate whose dielectric is composed of oxide/nitride/oxide layers, floating body effect was observed even on a fully depleted silicon-on-insulator device and the non-volatile memory function was measured. In addition, read retention characteristics of the volatile memory function depending on the non-volatile memory state were evaluated and analyzed. Further scalability in body thickness was also verified through simulation studies. These results indicate that the proposed device is a promising candidate for high-density embedded memory applications.

  8. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H.; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity. PMID:26553982

  9. A bacterial volatile signal for biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Gozzi, Kevin; Chai, Yunrong

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria constantly monitor the environment they reside in and respond to potential changes in the environment through a variety of signal sensing and transduction mechanisms in a timely fashion. Those signaling mechanisms often involve application of small, diffusible chemical molecules. Volatiles are a group of small air-transmittable chemicals that are produced universally by all kingdoms of organisms. Past studies have shown that volatiles can function as cell-cell communication signals not only within species, but also cross-species. However, little is known about how the volatile-mediated signaling mechanism works. In our recent study (Chen, et al. mBio (2015), 6: e00392-15), we demonstrated that the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis uses acetic acid as a volatile signal to coordinate the timing of biofilm formation within physically separated cells in the community. We also showed that the bacterium possesses an intertwined gene network to produce, secrete, sense, and respond to acetic acid, in stimulating biofilm formation. Interestingly, many of those genes are highly conserved in other bacterial species, raising the possibility that acetic acid may act as a volatile signal for cross-species communication. PMID:28357266

  10. Volatile aldehydes in libraries and archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenech, Ann; Strlič, Matija; Kralj Cigić, Irena; Levart, Alenka; Gibson, Lorraine T.; de Bruin, Gerrit; Ntanos, Konstantinos; Kolar, Jana; Cassar, May

    2010-06-01

    Volatile aldehydes are produced during degradation of paper-based materials. This may result in their accumulation in archival and library repositories. However, no systematic study has been performed so far. In the frame of this study, passive sampling was carried out at ten locations in four libraries and archives. Despite the very variable sampling locations, no major differences were found, although air-filtered repositories were found to have lower concentrations while a non-ventilated newspaper repository exhibited the highest concentrations of volatile aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural and hexanal). Five employees in one institution were also provided with personal passive samplers to investigate employees' exposure to volatile aldehydes. All values were lower than the presently valid exposure limits. The concentration of volatile aldehydes, acetic acid, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in general was also compared with that of outdoor-generated pollutants. It was evident that inside the repository and particularly inside archival boxes, the concentration of VOCs and acetic acid was much higher than the concentration of outdoor-generated pollutants, which are otherwise more routinely studied in connection with heritage materials. This indicates that further work on the pro-degradative effect of VOCs on heritage materials is necessary and that monitoring of VOCs in heritage institutions should become more widespread.

  11. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2015-11-24

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity.

  12. A bacterial volatile signal for biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Gozzi, Kevin; Chai, Yunrong

    2015-09-23

    Bacteria constantly monitor the environment they reside in and respond to potential changes in the environment through a variety of signal sensing and transduction mechanisms in a timely fashion. Those signaling mechanisms often involve application of small, diffusible chemical molecules. Volatiles are a group of small air-transmittable chemicals that are produced universally by all kingdoms of organisms. Past studies have shown that volatiles can function as cell-cell communication signals not only within species, but also cross-species. However, little is known about how the volatile-mediated signaling mechanism works. In our recent study (Chen, et al. mBio (2015), 6: e00392-15), we demonstrated that the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis uses acetic acid as a volatile signal to coordinate the timing of biofilm formation within physically separated cells in the community. We also showed that the bacterium possesses an intertwined gene network to produce, secrete, sense, and respond to acetic acid, in stimulating biofilm formation. Interestingly, many of those genes are highly conserved in other bacterial species, raising the possibility that acetic acid may act as a volatile signal for cross-species communication.

  13. Biogenic volatile emissions from the soil.

    PubMed

    Peñuelas, J; Asensio, D; Tholl, D; Wenke, K; Rosenkranz, M; Piechulla, B; Schnitzler, J P

    2014-08-01

    Volatile compounds are usually associated with an appearance/presence in the atmosphere. Recent advances, however, indicated that the soil is a huge reservoir and source of biogenic volatile organic compounds (bVOCs), which are formed from decomposing litter and dead organic material or are synthesized by underground living organism or organs and tissues of plants. This review summarizes the scarce available data on the exchange of VOCs between soil and atmosphere and the features of the soil and particle structure allowing diffusion of volatiles in the soil, which is the prerequisite for biological VOC-based interactions. In fact, soil may function either as a sink or as a source of bVOCs. Soil VOC emissions to the atmosphere are often 1-2 (0-3) orders of magnitude lower than those from aboveground vegetation. Microorganisms and the plant root system are the major sources for bVOCs. The current methodology to detect belowground volatiles is described as well as the metabolic capabilities resulting in the wealth of microbial and root VOC emissions. Furthermore, VOC profiles are discussed as non-destructive fingerprints for the detection of organisms. In the last chapter, belowground volatile-based bi- and multi-trophic interactions between microorganisms, plants and invertebrates in the soil are discussed.

  14. Impact of turbulent mixing on isoprene chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Barth, M. C.; Trainer, M.

    2016-07-01

    Isoprene, a volatile organic compound that is mainly emitted from trees, rapidly reacts with hydroxyl radical (OH) during daytime and subsequently forms ozone and aerosols in the troposphere. The isoprene-OH reaction can be affected by the interplay between chemistry and mixing because the two processes occur at a similar time scale. We investigate the impact of turbulent mixing on isoprene-OH reactivity with large eddy simulations (LES) coupled with comprehensive chemistry. Our results show that the covariance of isoprene and OH causes ~20% decrease to ~10% increase of the horizontal average reaction rate, depending on nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) abundances, compared to the rate that neglects the covariance. This wide range of effects on reaction rates is caused by the primary production and loss reactions of OH in each NOx regime. Our research promotes the use of LES for better understanding the role of turbulence in isoprene-OH reaction and parameterizations in large-scale models.

  15. Volatile components and continental material of planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, K. P.; Nikolayeva, O. V.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that the continental material of the terrestrial planets varies in composition from planet to planet according to the abundances and composition of true volatiles (H20, CO2, etc.) in the outer shells of the planets. The formation of these shells occurs very early in a planet's evolution when the role of endogenous processes is indistinct and continental materials are subject to melting and vaporizing in the absence of an atmosphere. As a result, the chemical properties of continental materials are related not only to fractionation processes but also to meltability and volatility. For planets retaining a certain quantity of true volatile components, the chemical transformation of continental material is characterized by a close interaction between impact melting vaporization and endogeneous geological processes.

  16. Volatile species retention during metallic fuel casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Randall S.; Porter, Douglas L.

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, and although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Based on these results it is very probable that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  17. Volatile compounds in shergottite and nakhlite meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gooding, James L.; Aggrey, Kwesi E.; Muenow, David W.

    1990-01-01

    Since discovery of apparent carbonate carbon in Nakhla, significant evidence has accumulated for occurrence of volatile compounds in shergotties and nakhlites. Results are presented from a study of volatile compounds in three shergottites, one nakhlite, and three eucrite control samples. Shergotties ALHA77005, EETA79001, and Shergotty, and the nakhlite Nakhla, all contain oxidized sulfur (sulfate) of preterrestrial origin; sulfur oxidation is most complete in EETA79001/Lith-C. Significant bulk carbonate was confirmed in Nakhla and trace carbonate was substantiated for EETA79001, all of which appears to be preterrestrial in origin. Chlorine covaries with oxidized sulfur, whereas carbonate and sulfate are inversely related. These volatile compounds were probably formed in a highly oxidizing, aqueous environment sometime in the late stage histories of the rocks that are now represented as meteorites. They are consistent with the hypothesis that shergottite and nakhlite meteorites originated on Mars and that Mars has supported aqueous geochemistry during its history.

  18. Analyzing method on biogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J. H.; Wang, M. X.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. P.; Guenther, A. B.

    2002-02-01

    In order to analyze biogenic volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere, an automated gas chromatography is developed and employed at the laboratory of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) during January to July, 2000. A small refrigerator was used so as to remove water in the air sample from gas line, and get accurate concentrations of volatile organic compounds. At 5degreesC, good water removing efficiency can be obtained at controlled flow rate. Air samples were collected around the building of Mesa Lab. of NCAR and analyzed by this gas chromatography system. This paper reports this gas chromatography system and results of air samples. The experimental results show that this gas chromatography system has a good reproducibility and stability, and main interesting volatile organic compounds such as isoprene, monoterpenes have an evident diurnal variation.

  19. Volatile Species Retention During Metallic Fuel Casting

    SciTech Connect

    Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Proter

    2013-10-01

    Metallic nuclear fuels are candidate transmutation fuel forms for advanced fuel cycles. Through the operation of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II metallic nuclear fuels have been shown to be robust and easily manufactured. However, concerns have been raised concerning loss of americium during the casting process because of its high vapor pressure. In order to address these concerns a gaseous diffusion model was developed and a series of experiments using both manganese and samarium as surrogates for americium were conducted. The modeling results showed that volatility losses can be controlled to essentially no losses with a modest overpressure. Experimental results also showed volatile species retention down to no detectable losses through overpressure, although the loss values varied from the model results the same trend was seen. Bases on these results it is very probably that americium losses through volatility can be controlled to no detectable losses through application of a modest overpressure during casting.

  20. Redistribution of volatiles during lunar metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirlin, E. H.; Housley, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal release profiles of Pb, Zn, and Cd in sample 66095 (highly shocked breccia with melt rock matrix) showed that these volatiles were mostly present on the surface of the grains. Zn in rusty grains from 66095 was also mostly surface Zn, probably from sphalerite in grain boundaries and cracks. Simulation experiments of volatile transfer showed that Fe, FeCl2, iron phosphide, and troilite (FeS) can be produced and transported during subsolidus reactions. These results suggest that volatiles, rust, schreibersite, and possible siderophiles which are observed in lunar highland samples might have been redistributed during disequilibrium thermal metamorphism in hot ejecta blankets, and were not necessarily introduced by volcanic activity or meteoritic addition.

  1. The volatility of stock market prices.

    PubMed

    Shiller, R J

    1987-01-02

    If the volatility of stock market prices is to be understood in terms of the efficient markets hypothesis, then there should be evidence that true investment value changes through time sufficiently to justify the price changes. Three indicators of change in true investment value of the aggregate stock market in the United States from 1871 to 1986 are considered: changes in dividends, in real interest rates, and in a direct measure of intertemporal marginal rates of substitution. Although there are some ambiguities in interpreting the evidence, dividend changes appear to contribute very little toward justifying the observed historical volatility of stock prices. The other indicators contribute some, but still most of the volatility of stock market prices appears unexplained.

  2. Redistribution of volatiles during lunar metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirlin, E. H.; Housley, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal release profiles of Pb, Zn, and Cd in sample 66095 (highly shocked breccia with melt rock matrix) showed that these volatiles were mostly present on the surface of the grains. Zn in rusty grains from 66095 was also mostly surface Zn, probably from sphalerite in grain boundaries and cracks. Simulation experiments of volatile transfer showed that Fe, FeCl2, iron phosphide, and troilite (FeS) can be produced and transported during subsolidus reactions. These results suggest that volatiles, rust, schreibersite, and possible siderophiles which are observed in lunar highland samples might have been redistributed during disequilibrium thermal metamorphism in hot ejecta blankets, and were not necessarily introduced by volcanic activity or meteoritic addition.

  3. Volatiles of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum K

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Gun-Hee

    2012-01-01

    The volatile aroma constituents of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum K. were separated by hydro distillation extraction (HDE) method using a Clevenger-type apparatus, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The yield of C. zawadskii var. latilobum K. flower essential oil (FEO) was 0.12% (w/w) and the color was light green. Fifty-five volatile chemical components, which make up 88.38% of the total aroma composition, were tentatively characterized. C. zawadskii var. latilobum K. FEOs contained 27 hydrocarbons, 12 alcohols, 7 ketones, 4 esters, 1 aldehyde, 1 amine, and 3 miscellaneous components. The major functional groups were terpene alcohol and ketone. Borneol (12.96), (±)-7-epi-amiteol (12.60), and camphor (10.54%) were the predominant volatiles. These compounds can be used in food and pharmaceutical industries due to their active bio-functional properties. PMID:24471090

  4. Catalyst for Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, George M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia P. (Inventor); Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); Schyryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); DAmbrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing volatile organic compounds to carbon dioxide and water with the minimal addition of energy. A mixture of the volatile organic compound and an oxidizing agent (e.g. ambient air containing the volatile organic compound) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  5. Volatiles in Earths interior (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, H.

    2010-12-01

    Water is certainly the most important volatile. Recycling of water into the mantle occurs in subduction zones where water also triggers melting in the mantle wedge above the subducted slab. However, both the flux of water into the zone of melting as well as the composition of the fluids are poorly constrained. Moreover, it is uncertain whether fluids percolate through the mantle wedge primarily by channelized flow or by pervasive flow, with major implications for the relative contributions of subducted slab and the mantle wedge to the trace element budget of island arc volcanics. To constrain the composition and the flux of fluids in subduction zones, we have measured the solubilities of UO2, ThSiO4, MoOx and WOx in fluids of variable salinity and over a range of oxygen fugacities (Bali et al., in prep). In separate sets of experiments, we measured the solubility of U, Th, Mo, and W in mantle minerals coexisting with the corresponding phases in order to determine fluid/mineral partition coefficients. Our data show that the U/Th ratio in calcalkaline volcanics is a sensitive indicator of redox state and salinity and observed enrichments of U over Th require transport by oxidizing and moderately saline fluids. W, on the other hand, is always very incompatible in mantle minerals and strongly partitioned into aqueous fluids, irrespective of oxidation state and salinity. W contents in magmas can therefore be used to constrain the amount of fluids involved in melting. To distinguish between channelized and pervasive flow in subduction zones, we also looked at the partitioning of halogens, particularly chlorine between aqueous fluids and mantle minerals (Bernini et al., in prep.). Chlorine is highly incompatible in upper mantle minerals, with concentrations below 1 ppm in mantle minerals in equilibrium with fluids containing several wt. % of NaCl. Since water solubility in mantle minerals is much higher than Cl solubility, fluids percolating through the mantle will loose

  6. Changes in dark chocolate volatiles during storage.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Lia M; Cadwallader, Keith R; Engeseth, Nicki J

    2012-05-09

    Chocolate storage is critical to the quality of the final product. Inadequate storage, especially with temperature fluctuations, may lead to a change in crystal structure, which may eventually cause fat bloom. Bloom is the main cause of quality loss in the chocolate industry. The impact of various storage conditions on the flavor quality of dark chocolate was determined. Dark chocolate was stored in different conditions leading to either fat or sugar bloom and analyzed at 0, 4, and 8 weeks of storage. Changes in chocolate flavor were determined by volatile analysis and descriptive sensory evaluation. Results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA), cluster analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and linear partial least-squares regression analysis (PLS). Volatile concentration and loss were significantly affected by storage conditions. Chocolates stored at high temperature were the most visually and texturally compromised, but volatile concentrations were affected the least, whereas samples stored at ambient, frozen, and high relative humidity conditions had significant volatile loss during storage. It was determined that high-temperature storage caused a change in crystal state due to the polymorphic shift to form VI, leading to an increase in sample hardness. Decreased solid fat content (SFC) during high-temperature storage increased instrumentally determined volatile retention, although no difference was detected in chocolate flavor during sensory analysis, possibly due to instrumental and sensory sampling techniques. When all instrumental and sensory data had been taken into account, the storage condition that had the least impact on texture, surface roughness, grain size, lipid polymorphism, fat bloom formation, volatile concentrations, and sensory attributes was storage at constant temperature and 75% relative humidity.

  7. Different methods for volatile sampling in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Manfred; Marcillo, Andrea; Einspanier, Almuth; Weiß, Brigitte M.

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that olfactory cues are important for mammalian communication. However, many specific compounds that convey information between conspecifics are still unknown. To understand mechanisms and functions of olfactory cues, olfactory signals such as volatile compounds emitted from individuals need to be assessed. Sampling of animals with and without scent glands was typically conducted using cotton swabs rubbed over the skin or fur and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). However, this method has various drawbacks, including a high level of contaminations. Thus, we adapted two methods of volatile sampling from other research fields and compared them to sampling with cotton swabs. To do so we assessed the body odor of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) using cotton swabs, thermal desorption (TD) tubes and, alternatively, a mobile GC-MS device containing a thermal desorption trap. Overall, TD tubes comprised most compounds (N = 113), with half of those compounds being volatile (N = 52). The mobile GC-MS captured the fewest compounds (N = 35), of which all were volatile. Cotton swabs contained an intermediate number of compounds (N = 55), but very few volatiles (N = 10). Almost all compounds found with the mobile GC-MS were also captured with TD tubes (94%). Hence, we recommend TD tubes for state of the art sampling of body odor of mammals or other vertebrates, particularly for field studies, as they can be easily transported, stored and analysed with high performance instruments in the lab. Nevertheless, cotton swabs capture compounds which still may contribute to the body odor, e.g. after bacterial fermentation, while profiles from mobile GC-MS include only the most abundant volatiles of the body odor. PMID:28841690

  8. Mercury volatilization from salt marsh sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Lora M.; Reinfelder, John R.

    2009-06-01

    In situ volatilization fluxes of gaseous elemental mercury, Hg(0), were estimated for tidally exposed salt marsh sediments in the summer at the urban/industrial Secaucus High School Marsh, New Jersey Meadowlands (Secaucus, New Jersey) and in the early autumn at a regional background site in the Great Bay estuary (Tuckerton, New Jersey). Estimated daytime sediment-air mercury volatilization fluxes at the Secaucus High School Marsh ranged from -375 to +677 ng m-2 h-1 and were positive (land to air flux) in 16 out of 20 measurement events. At the Great Bay estuary, mercury fluxes measured continuously over a 48-h period ranged from -34 to +81 ng m-2 h-1 and were positive during the day and negative at night. At both sites, mercury volatilization fluxes peaked at midday, and cumulative mercury fluxes exhibited strong positive correlations with cumulative solar radiation (r2 = 0.97, p < 0.01) consistent with a light-driven mercury volatilization efficiency of about 15 ng Hg mol PAR-1 or about 0.06 ng Hg kJ-1. No significant correlations were found between mercury fluxes and wind speed, air temperature, or tide height at either site. Thus despite a tenfold difference in sediment mercury concentration, photochemistry appears to be the dominant factor controlling mercury volatilization from these salt marsh sediments. The average mercury volatilization flux estimated for the Great Bay salt marsh in this study (17 ng m-2 h-1) compares well with other micrometeorological mercury fluxes for nonpoint source contaminated salt marsh and forest soils (8-18 ng m-2 h-1) and is more than 10 times higher than the average mercury emission flux from land (˜1 ng m-2 h-1). Annual mercury emissions from salt marsh wetlands may be comparable to individual industrial emissions sources in coastal states of the eastern United States.

  9. Different methods for volatile sampling in mammals.

    PubMed

    Kücklich, Marlen; Möller, Manfred; Marcillo, Andrea; Einspanier, Almuth; Weiß, Brigitte M; Birkemeyer, Claudia; Widdig, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies showed that olfactory cues are important for mammalian communication. However, many specific compounds that convey information between conspecifics are still unknown. To understand mechanisms and functions of olfactory cues, olfactory signals such as volatile compounds emitted from individuals need to be assessed. Sampling of animals with and without scent glands was typically conducted using cotton swabs rubbed over the skin or fur and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). However, this method has various drawbacks, including a high level of contaminations. Thus, we adapted two methods of volatile sampling from other research fields and compared them to sampling with cotton swabs. To do so we assessed the body odor of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) using cotton swabs, thermal desorption (TD) tubes and, alternatively, a mobile GC-MS device containing a thermal desorption trap. Overall, TD tubes comprised most compounds (N = 113), with half of those compounds being volatile (N = 52). The mobile GC-MS captured the fewest compounds (N = 35), of which all were volatile. Cotton swabs contained an intermediate number of compounds (N = 55), but very few volatiles (N = 10). Almost all compounds found with the mobile GC-MS were also captured with TD tubes (94%). Hence, we recommend TD tubes for state of the art sampling of body odor of mammals or other vertebrates, particularly for field studies, as they can be easily transported, stored and analysed with high performance instruments in the lab. Nevertheless, cotton swabs capture compounds which still may contribute to the body odor, e.g. after bacterial fermentation, while profiles from mobile GC-MS include only the most abundant volatiles of the body odor.

  10. Volatilization of EPTC: Simulation and measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, J.M.; Koskinen, W.C.; Dowdy, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    Many of the organic chemicals used in agricultural production are susceptible to loss from the soil surface to the atmosphere by volatilization. Adequate prediction of the impact of these chemicals on the environment thus requires consideration of both downward movement through the soil to groundwater and upward movement in the gas phase to the atmosphere. We developed a method to mechanistically simulate volatilization within the framework of a conventionally formulated solute transport model and used it to simulate the gas-phase losses of EPTC, a commonly used volatile herbicide. The model considers efflux of a trace gas at the sod surface to be a process of unsteady diffusion, interrupted intermittently by dispersive events that can be thought of as eddies at the innermost scale. Model results were compared to measurements of volatilization during the first 7 d following application of EPTC, conducted with a Bowen ratio system in a 17-ha field at Rosemount, MN. The measurements indicated a relatively large initial flux (ca. 150 g ha{sup -1} h{sup -1}) that rapidly decreased to negligible levels within a day following application. The model agreed reasonably well on the first day, if a measured value for Henry`s constant was used rather than a value estimated from the saturation vapor pressure and the solubility. However, on subsequent days the model considerably overestimated volatilization, regardless of the Henry`s constant that was used. It is likely that hysteresis in sorption/desorption, particularly as surface soil dries following herbicide incorporation, may be the primary reason why volatile losses are lower than might be predicted on the basis of equilibrium partitioning theory. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Measurements of volatile organic compounds over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. G.; Oram, D. E.; Reeves, C. E.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we describe measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOC) made using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) aboard the UK Facility for Atmospheric Airborne Measurements during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) campaign. Observations were made during approximately 85 h of flying time between 17 July and 17 August 2006, above an area between 4° N and 18° N and 3° W and 4° E, encompassing ocean, mosaic forest, and the Sahel desert. High time resolution observations of counts at mass to charge (m/z) ratios of 42, 59, 69, 71, and 79 were used to calculate mixing ratios of acetonitrile, acetone, isoprene, the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and benzene respectively using laboratory-derived humidity-dependent calibration factors. Strong spatial associations between vegetation and isoprene and its oxidation products were observed in the boundary layer, consistent with biogenic emissions followed by rapid atmospheric oxidation. Acetonitrile, benzene, and acetone were all enhanced in airmasses which had been heavily influenced by biomass burning. Benzene and acetone were also elevated in airmasses with urban influence from cities such as Lagos, Cotonou, and Niamey. The observations provide evidence that both deep convection and mixing associated with fair-weather cumulus were responsible for vertical redistribution of VOC emitted from the surface. Profiles over the ocean showed a depletion of acetone in the marine boundary layer, but no significant decrease for acetonitrile.

  12. Measurements of volatile organic compounds over West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, J. G.; Oram, D. E.; Reeves, C. E.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper we describe measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) made using a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) aboard the UK Facility for Atmospheric Airborne Measurements during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) campaign. Observations were made during approximately 85 h of flying time between 17 July and 17 August 2006, above an area between 4° N and 18° N and 3° W and 4° E, encompassing ocean, mosaic forest, and the Sahel desert. High time resolution observations of counts at mass to charge (m/z) ratios of 42, 59, 69, 71, and 79 were used to calculate mixing ratios of acetonitrile, acetone, isoprene, the sum of methyl vinyl ketone and methacrolein, and benzene, respectively using laboratory-derived humidity-dependent calibration factors. Strong spatial associations between vegetation and isoprene and its oxidation products were observed in the boundary layer, consistent with biogenic emissions followed by rapid atmospheric oxidation. Acetonitrile, benzene, and acetone were all enhanced in airmasses which had been heavily influenced by biomass burning. Benzene and acetone were also elevated in airmasses with urban influence from cities such as Lagos, Cotonou, and Niamey. The observations provide evidence that both deep convection and mixing associated with fair-weather cumulus were responsible for vertical redistribution of VOCs emitted from the surface. Profiles over the ocean showed a depletion of acetone in the marine boundary layer, but no significant decrease for acetonitrile.

  13. Volatile compound formation during argan kernel roasting.

    PubMed

    El Monfalouti, Hanae; Charrouf, Zoubida; Giordano, Manuela; Guillaume, Dominique; Kartah, Badreddine; Harhar, Hicham; Gharby, Saïd; Denhez, Clément; Zeppa, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Virgin edible argan oil is prepared by cold-pressing argan kernels previously roasted at 110 degrees C for up to 25 minutes. The concentration of 40 volatile compounds in virgin edible argan oil was determined as a function of argan kernel roasting time. Most of the volatile compounds begin to be formed after 15 to 25 minutes of roasting. This suggests that a strictly controlled roasting time should allow the modulation of argan oil taste and thus satisfy different types of consumers. This could be of major importance considering the present booming use of edible argan oil.

  14. Radon as a Tracer for Lunar Volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friesen, Larry Jay

    1992-01-01

    Radon and its decay product polonium can be used as tracers to search for lunar volatiles. One effective technique to look for them would be by using alpha-particle spectrometers from lunar orbit. Alpha spectrometers were flown in the Apollo Service Modules during the Apollo 15 and 16 missions, and did observe Rn-222 and its decay product Po-210 on the lunar surface from orbit. This demonstrates that radon and polonium can be observed from orbit; what must next be shown is that such observations can reveal something about the locations of volatiles on the Moon.

  15. Non-volatile memory for checkpoint storage

    SciTech Connect

    Blumrich, Matthias A.; Chen, Dong; Cipolla, Thomas M.; Coteus, Paul W.; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Ohmacht, Martin; Takken, Todd E.

    2014-07-22

    A system, method and computer program product for supporting system initiated checkpoints in high performance parallel computing systems and storing of checkpoint data to a non-volatile memory storage device. The system and method generates selective control signals to perform checkpointing of system related data in presence of messaging activity associated with a user application running at the node. The checkpointing is initiated by the system such that checkpoint data of a plurality of network nodes may be obtained even in the presence of user applications running on highly parallel computers that include ongoing user messaging activity. In one embodiment, the non-volatile memory is a pluggable flash memory card.

  16. PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES

    DOEpatents

    Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

    1957-10-01

    This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

  17. Volatile substance misuse in the United States.

    PubMed

    Garland, Eric L; Howard, Matthew O; Vaughn, Michael G; Perron, Brian E

    2011-01-01

    Volatile substance misuse (VSM) is prevalent in the United States and associated with manifold deleterious outcomes. This review summarizes research on: (1) the prevalence of VSM in the United States and its trends since 1975, (2) population subgroups at an elevated risk for VSM, (3) key correlates of VSM, (4) psychosocial consequences of VSM, including emerging public health threats, and (5) etiological and contextual considerations of VSM use. Implications for future research and practice with volatile substance misusers in the United States are identified.

  18. Radon as a tracer for lunar volatiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friesen, Larry Jay

    Radon and its decay product polonium can be used as tracers to search for lunar volatiles. One effective technique to look for them would be by using alpha-particle spectrometers from lunar orbit. Alpha spectrometers were flown in the Apollo Service Modules during the Apollo 15 and 16 missions, and did observe Rn-222 and its decay product Po-210 on the lunar surface from orbit. This demonstrates that radon and polonium can be observed from orbit; what must next be shown is that such observations can reveal something about the locations of volatiles on the Moon.

  19. The partial volatilization of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1985-01-01

    During recent years research on the primitive solar nebula has followed two main themes: (1) Very early in the development of the nebula conditions probably favored the occurrence of major gaseous instabilities leading to the formation of giant gaseous protoplanets, but the rapid rise of the external temperature soon evaporated the envelopes of these protoplanets, possibly leaving behind precipitated solids which formed the cores and mantles of the terrestrial planets. (2) Models of the nebula indicate a later stage when conditions in the inner Solar System became very hot; at the position of Mercury the temperature was probably in the range 2500-3500 K. This leads to the hypothesis that the original protomercury was a body substantially more massive than the present planet and of normal composition, but that when it was immersed in the high-temperature field of the dissipating solar nebula, most of the rocky mantle was vaporized and mixed into the solar nebula gases and carried away by them. This hypothesis is investigated in the present paper. For simplicity the vaporization of a mantle composed of enstatite, MgSiO3, was computed for a planet with 2.25 the mass of Mercury at a temperature of 3000 K. It is argued that the mantle could probably be largely removed in the available time of 30,000 yrs. Subsequent accretion would restore some magnesium silicates to the mantle of the planet.

  20. Asymptotic Behavior of the Stock Price Distribution Density and Implied Volatility in Stochastic Volatility Models

    SciTech Connect

    Gulisashvili, Archil; Stein, Elias M.

    2010-06-15

    We study the asymptotic behavior of distribution densities arising in stock price models with stochastic volatility. The main objects of our interest in the present paper are the density of time averages of the squared volatility process and the density of the stock price process in the Stein-Stein and the Heston model. We find explicit formulas for leading terms in asymptotic expansions of these densities and give error estimates. As an application of our results, sharp asymptotic formulas for the implied volatility in the Stein-Stein and the Heston model are obtained.

  1. Analysis of volatile organic compounds. [trace amounts of organic volatiles in gas samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described for reproducibly analyzing trace amounts of a large number of organic volatiles existing in a gas sample. Direct injection of the trapped volatiles into a cryogenic percolum provides a sharply defined plug. Applications of the method include: (1) analyzing the headspace gas of body fluids and comparing a profile of the organic volatiles with standard profiles for the detection and monitoring of disease; (2) analyzing the headspace gas of foods and beverages and comparing the profile with standard profiles to monitor and control flavor and aroma; and (3) analyses for determining the organic pollutants in air or water samples.

  2. Enhanced hydrophobicity and volatility of submicron aerosols under severe emission control conditions in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuying; Zhang, Fang; Li, Zhanqing

    2017-04-01

    A series of strict emission control measures were implemented in Beijing and the surrounding seven provinces to ensure good air quality during the 2015 China Victory Day parade, rendering a unique opportunity to investigate anthropogenic impact of aerosol properties. Submicron aerosol hygroscopicity and volatility were measured during and after the control period using a hygroscopic and volatile tandem differential mobility analyzer (H/V-TDMA) system. Three periods, namely, the control clean period (Clean1), the non-control clean period (Clean2), and the non-control pollution period (Pollution), were selected to study the effect of the emission control measures on aerosol hygroscopicity and volatility. Aerosol particles became more hydrophobic and volatile due to the emission control measures. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of 40-200 nm particles decreased by 32.0%-8.5% during the Clean1 period relative to the Clean2 period, while the volatile shrink factor (SF) of 40-300 nm particles decreased by 7.5%-10.5%. The emission controls also changed the diurnal variation patterns of both the probability density function of κ (κ-PDF) and the probability density function of SF (SF-PDF). During Clean1 the κ-PDF showed one nearly-hydrophobic (NH) mode for particles in the nucleation mode, which was likely due to the dramatic reduction in industrial emissions of inorganic trace gases. Compared to the Pollution period, particles observed during the Clean1 and Clean2 periods exhibited a more significant non-volatile (NV) mode throughout the day, suggesting a more externally-mixed state particularly for the 150 nm particles. Aerosol hygroscopicities increased as particle sizes increased, with the greatest increases seen during the Pollution period. Accordingly, the aerosol volatility became weaker (i.e., SF increased) during the Clean1 and Clean2 periods, but no apparent trend was observed during the Pollution period. Based on a correlation analysis of the number fractions

  3. Production of isotopically-labeled standards from a uniformly labeled precursor for quantitative volatile metabolomic studies

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Brenna, J. Thomas; Sacks, Gavin L.

    2012-01-01

    Optimal accuracy and precision in small molecule profiling by mass spectrometry generally requires isotopically labeled standards chemically representative of all compounds of interest. However, preparation of mixed standards from commercially available pure compounds is often prohibitively expensive and time consuming, and many labeled compounds are not available in pure form. We used a single prototype uniformly labeled [U-13C]-compound to generate [U-13C]-volatile standards for use in subsequent experimental profiling studies. [U-13C]-α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3, ALA) was thermally oxidized to produce labeled lipid degradation volatiles which were subsequently characterized qualitatively and quantitatively. Twenty-five [U-13C]-labeled volatiles were identified by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-TOF-MS) by comparison of spectra with unlabeled volatiles. Using 250 μL starting sample, labeled volatiles were quantified by a reverse isotope dilution procedure. Using the [U-13C]-labeled standards, limits of detection comparable to or better than previous HS-SPME reports were achieved, 0.010–1.04 ng/g. The performance of the [U-13C]-volatile standards was evaluated using a commodity soybean oil (CSO) oxidized at 60°C from 0 to 15 d. Relative responses of n-decane, an unlabeled internal standard otherwise absent from the mixture, and [U-13C]-oxidation products changed by up to 8-fold as the CSO matrix was oxidized, demonstrating that reliance on a single standard in volatile profiling studies yields inaccurate results due to changing matrix effects. The [U-13C]-standard mixture was used to quantify 25 volatiles in oxidized CSO and low-ALA soybean oil with an average relative standard deviation of 8.5%. Extension of this approach to other labeled substrates, e.g., [U-13C]-sugars and amino acids, for profiling studies should be feasible and can dramatically improve quantitative results compared to

  4. Production of isotopically labeled standards from a uniformly labeled precursor for quantitative volatile metabolomic studies.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Cortés, Pilar; Brenna, J Thomas; Sacks, Gavin L

    2012-06-19

    Optimal accuracy and precision in small-molecule profiling by mass spectrometry generally requires isotopically labeled standards chemically representative of all compounds of interest. However, preparation of mixed standards from commercially available pure compounds is often prohibitively expensive and time-consuming, and many labeled compounds are not available in pure form. We used a single-prototype uniformly labeled [U-(13)C]compound to generate [U-(13)C]-labeled volatile standards for use in subsequent experimental profiling studies. [U-(13)C]-α-Linolenic acid (18:3n-3, ALA) was thermally oxidized to produce labeled lipid degradation volatiles which were subsequently characterized qualitatively and quantitatively. Twenty-five [U-(13)C]-labeled volatiles were identified by headspace solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/TOF-MS) by comparison of spectra with unlabeled volatiles. Labeled volatiles were quantified by a reverse isotope dilution procedure. Using the [U-(13)C]-labeled standards, limits of detection comparable to or better than those of previous HS-SPME reports were achieved, 0.010-1.04 ng/g. The performance of the [U-(13)C]-labeled volatile standards was evaluated using a commodity soybean oil (CSO) oxidized at 60 °C from 0 to 15 d. Relative responses of n-decane, an unlabeled internal standard otherwise absent from the mixture, and [U-(13)C]-labeled oxidation products changed by up to 8-fold as the CSO matrix was oxidized, demonstrating that reliance on a single standard in volatile profiling studies yields inaccurate results due to changing matrix effects. The [U-(13)C]-labeled standard mixture was used to quantify 25 volatiles in oxidized CSO and low-ALA soybean oil with an average relative standard deviation of 8.5%. Extension of this approach to other labeled substrates, e.g., [U-(13)C]-labeled sugars and amino acids, for profiling studies should be feasible and can dramatically improve

  5. A two-component volatile atmosphere for Pluto. I. The bulk hydrodynamic escape regime

    SciTech Connect

    Trafton, L. )

    1990-08-01

    The seasonal effects on Pluto's atmosphere of a simplified system of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} saturated over a solid solution are investigated, and the results are compared with previous CH{sub 4} models. It is found that bulk escape occurs for CH{sub 4} mole fractions less than 0.7 of Pluto's volatile reservoir. Greater CH{sub 4} abundance leads to diffusive separation during the escape of both species and an atmospheric mixing ratio of about Xc(0). If Xc(0) is in the range 0.02-0.10, Pluto's atmosphere remains largely intact at aphelion rather than virtually freezing out as it does for Xc(0) greater than 0.3 or less than 0.001, or form an atmosphere with only a single volatile gas. An upper limit for the CH{sub 4} mixing ratio is about 0.07 if N{sub 2} is the second gas. On the other hand, CH{sub 4} is the dominant surface constituent of the volatile deposit if Xc(0) is greater than 0.0001. 29 refs.

  6. Water-borne protozoa parasites: The Latin American perspective.

    PubMed

    Rosado-García, Félix Manuel; Guerrero-Flórez, Milena; Karanis, Gabriele; Hinojosa, María Del Carmen; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2017-07-01

    Health systems, sanitation and water access have certain limitations in nations of Latin America (LA): typical matters of developing countries. Water is often contaminated and therefore unhealthy for the consumers and users. Information on prevalence and detection of waterborne parasitic protozoa are limited or not available in LA. Only few reports have documented in this field during the last forty years and Brazil leads the list, including countries in South America and Mexico within Central America region and Caribbean islands. From 1979 to 2015, 16 outbreaks of waterborne-protozoa, were reported in Latin American countries. T. gondii and C. cayetanensis were the protozoa, which caused more outbreaks and Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. were the most frequently found protozoa in water samples. On the other hand, Latin America countries have not got a coherent methodology for detection of protozoa in water samples despite whole LA is highly vulnerable to extreme weather events related to waterborne-infections; although Brazil and Colombia have some implemented laws in their surveillance systems. It would be important to coordinate all surveillance systems in between all countries for early detection and measures against waterborne-protozoan and to establish effective and suitable diagnosis tools according to the country's economic strength and particular needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. On return-volatility correlation in financial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Zheng, B.

    2009-10-01

    With the daily and minutely data of the German DAX and Chinese indices, we investigate how the return-volatility correlation originates in financial dynamics. Based on a retarded volatility model, we may eliminate or generate the return-volatility correlation of the time series, while other characteristics, such as the probability distribution of returns and long-range time correlation of volatilities etc., remain essentially unchanged. This suggests that the leverage effect or anti-leverage effect in financial markets arises from a kind of feedback return-volatility interactions, rather than the long-range time correlation of volatilities and asymmetric probability distribution of returns. Further, we show that large volatilities dominate the return-volatility correlation in financial dynamics.

  8. Workshop on Evolution of Martian Volatiles. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakosky, B. (Editor); Treiman, A. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    Different aspects of martian science are discussed. Topics covered include: early Mars volatile inventory, evolution through time, geological influences, present atmospheric properties, soils, exobiology, polar volatiles, and seasonal and diurnal cycles

  9. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: SUBSURFACE VOLATILIZATION AND VENTILATION SYSTEM (SVVS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Subsurface Volatilization and Ventilation System is an integrated technology used for attacking all phases of volatile organic compound (VOC) contamination in soil and groundwater. The SVVS technology promotes insitu remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated with or-ga...

  10. Mass Spectrometry in Jupiter's Atmosphere: Vertical Variation of Volatile Vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Mahaffy, Paul R.

    2014-05-01

    The Galileo Probe made the first and only in situ measurements of composition in Jupiter's atmosphere, led by the Galileo Probe Mass Spectrometer, or GPMS [1]. The major contribution from this instrument was the measurement of abundances and isotope ratios of the noble gases, as well as the volatile gases CH4, NH3, H2O, and H2S [2,3]. These initial results were further refined by detailed laboratory calibrations for the noble gases [4] and the volatiles [5]. The probe measurements resulted in the first determination of the heavy element abundances (except carbon that was known previously) and He/H ratio, which provide critical constraints to models of the formation of Jupiter and the origin of its atmosphere [6,7]. The condensable volatiles, or CVs (ammonia, H2S, and water), increased with depth in the probe entry site. This vertical variation was observed at levels much deeper than the modeled cloud bases, as predicted by one-dimensional chemical equilibrium models. The discrepancy is due to the probe's entry into a dry region known as a 5-μm hot spot. The 5-μm hot spots are part of an atmospheric wave system that encircles Jupiter just north of the equator. Despite the anomalous meteorology, the bulk abundances of NH3 and H2S were measured by the probe, and found to be enriched with respect to solar composition (similarly to the non-condensable volatile CH4). The deepest water mixing ratio, however, was observed to be depleted relative to solar composition. We review an updated context for the CV vertical profiles measured by the GPMS, based on the latest results from remote sensing, simulation, and reinterpretation of Galileo Probe measurements. In particular, we find that (1) the bulk abundance of water in Jupiter's atmosphere must be greater than the subsolar abundance derived from the deepest GPMS measurements [8], and that (2) CV mixing ratios are controlled by a range of processes in addition to condensation of the ices NH3, NH4SH, and H2O [5-9]. Both

  11. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS) CHAPTER 31.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term "volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) was originally coined to refer, as a class, to carbon-containing chemicals that participate in photochemical reactions in the ambient (outdoor) are. The regulatory definition of VOCs used by the U.S. EPA is: Any compound of carbon, ex...

  12. Modeling volatility using state space models.

    PubMed

    Timmer, J; Weigend, A S

    1997-08-01

    In time series problems, noise can be divided into two categories: dynamic noise which drives the process, and observational noise which is added in the measurement process, but does not influence future values of the system. In this framework, we show that empirical volatilities (the squared relative returns of prices) exhibit a significant amount of observational noise. To model and predict their time evolution adequately, we estimate state space models that explicitly include observational noise. We obtain relaxation times for shocks in the logarithm of volatility ranging from three weeks (for foreign exchange) to three to five months (for stock indices). In most cases, a two-dimensional hidden state is required to yield residuals that are consistent with white noise. We compare these results with ordinary autoregressive models (without a hidden state) and find that autoregressive models underestimate the relaxation times by about two orders of magnitude since they do not distinguish between observational and dynamic noise. This new interpretation of the dynamics of volatility in terms of relaxators in a state space model carries over to stochastic volatility models and to GARCH models, and is useful for several problems in finance, including risk management and the pricing of derivative securities. Data sets used: Olsen & Associates high frequency DEM/USD foreign exchange rates (8 years). Nikkei 225 index (40 years). Dow Jones Industrial Average (25 years).

  13. Gas chromatography of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlatkis, A.

    1973-01-01

    System has been used for problems such as analysis of volatile metabolities in human blood and urine, analysis of air pollutants, and in tobacco smoke chemistry. Since adsorbent is reusable after porper reconditioning, method is both convenient and economical. System could be used for large scale on-site sampling programs in which sample is shipped to central location for analysis.

  14. Headspace Volatiles of Scutellaria Baicalensis Georgi Flowers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatile constituents of Baikal skullcap (Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi) flowers were isolated by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and analyzed by GC and GC/MS. A total of 64 constituents was identified (constituting 57.1 – 89.9% of the total area), 13 of which were tentatively identified. beta...

  15. Analytical aspects of volatile substance abuse (VSA).

    PubMed

    Gaulier, Jean-Michel; Tonnay, Véronique; Faict, Thierry; Sayer, Hervé; Marquet, Pierre; Lachâtre, Gérard

    2003-07-01

    Through a case report, the authors illustrate the volatile substance abuse (VSA) toxicological investigation difficulties mainly due to evaporation of the compounds from postmortem samples and to the lack of reference data for interpretation. A 17-year-old man, student in a chemistry institute, was found dead with a plastic bag placed over his head. Several chemical substances were found in his belongings. Autopsy findings included serious pulmonary lesions and hemorrhagic digestive ulcerations. A large screening of drugs and toxic compounds and selective analyses for several classes of drugs of abuse were carried out in the autopsy samples. In particular, a headspace (HS), -gas chromatography/-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) technique was used to screen for volatile substances and metabolites in the biological samples and for residues of volatile substances on the surface of the plastic bag and in the chemicals found on the scene. The main analytical finding was the presence of alkanes (heptane, methyl-2-pentane, methyl-3-hexane, methylcyclohexane) in the gastric content. The literature data, VSA practices, long time-delay between death and autopsy, preservation conditions of the biological samples before analysis, and in-lab experiments on evaporation of volatile substances were considered to interpret this result. The present fatality was attributed to VSA with a gasoline-based stain remover like "eau écarlate," associated with a hypoxic recreation practice using a plastic bag.

  16. Linux Incident Response Volatile Data Analysis Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Cyber incident response is an emphasized subject area in cybersecurity in information technology with increased need for the protection of data. Due to ongoing threats, cybersecurity imposes many challenges and requires new investigative response techniques. In this study a Linux Incident Response Framework is designed for collecting volatile data…

  17. Volatiles in the outer solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.

    1991-01-01

    Telescopic data on asteroids, comets, planets, and planetary satellites are acquired and analyzed in the study of volatile ices and gases that occur on their surfaces and in their atmospheres. Infrared spectral studies of certain classes of asteroids for an analysis of their mineralogical and organic constituents are included.

  18. Methyl bromide volatility measurements from treated fields

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, M.S.; Woodrow, J.E.; Seiber, J.N. |

    1995-12-31

    Methyl bromide is used as an agricultural soil fumigant and concern is growing over the role it may play in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Methyl bromide is applied using various techniques and little is known about how much of the applied fumigant volatilizes into the atmosphere after application. The post-application volatilization losses of methyl bromide from two fields using different application practices were measured using an aerodynamic-gradient technique. One field was covered with a high-barrier plastic film tarp during application and the other was left uncovered, but the furrows made by the injection shanks were bedded over. The cumulative volatilization losses from the tarped field were 22% of the nominal application within the first 5 days of the experiment and about 32% of the nominal application within 9 days including the one day after the tarp was removed on day 8. The nontarped field lost 89%of the nominal application by volatilization in 5 days. The error associated, with each flux measurement, as well as variations in daily flux losses with differing sampling period lengths show the degree of variability inherent in this type of study.

  19. Recent advances in volatile oxygen scavenger technology

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, D.I.; Engstrom, G.G.; Fryer, M.T.

    1994-12-31

    In recent years alternatives to hydrazine for oxygen removal in boiler systems have been introduced. One technology based on diethyl hydroxylamine has proven successful in protecting boiler and steam systems. This paper introduces a new volatile oxygen scavenger technology to compliment diethyl hydroxylamine application. Both laboratory data and case studies are documented.

  20. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles and aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Harmetz, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    Volatiles measured in 25 interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are a mixture of both indigenous materials and contaminants associated with the collection and processing of the ODPs prior to analysis. Most IDPs have been collected in the stratosphere using a silicone oil/freon mixture (20:1 ratio) coated on collector plates. Studies have shown that silicone oil, freon and hexane residues remain with the ODPs, despite attempts to clean the IDPs. Analysis of the IDPs with the LMMS-technique produces spectra with a mixture of indigeneous and contaminants components. The contamination signal can be identified and removed; however, the contamination signal may obscure some of the indigeneous component's signal. Employing spectra stripping techniques, the indigenous volatile constituents associated with the IDPs can be identified. Volatiles are similar to those measured in CI or CM carbonaceous chondrites. Collection of IDPs in low-Earth orbit utilizing a Cosmic Dust Collection Facility attached to Space Station Freedom has been proposed. The low-density material aerogel has been proposed as a collection substrate for IDPs. Our studies have concentrated on identifying volatile contaminants that are associated with aerogel. We have found that solvents used for the preparation of aerogel remain in aerogel and methods must be developed for removing the entrapped solvents before aerogels can be used for an IDP collection substrate.

  1. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOCS) CHAPTER 31.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term "volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) was originally coined to refer, as a class, to carbon-containing chemicals that participate in photochemical reactions in the ambient (outdoor) are. The regulatory definition of VOCs used by the U.S. EPA is: Any compound of carbon, ex...

  2. Volatile terpenoids from aeciospores of Cronartium fusiforme.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laseter, J. L.; Weete, J. D.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1973-01-01

    Identification of the terpenoids present in the volatile fraction from aeciospores of the gall rust fungus Cronartium fusiforme. The major monoterpenoid hydrocarbons found to be present with only traces of camphene include alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, delta(3)-carene, myrcene, linonene, beta-phellandrene, and delta-terpinene. A number of monoterpenoid alcohols, acyclic sesquiterpenes, and aromatic compounds were also present.

  3. Linux Incident Response Volatile Data Analysis Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Cyber incident response is an emphasized subject area in cybersecurity in information technology with increased need for the protection of data. Due to ongoing threats, cybersecurity imposes many challenges and requires new investigative response techniques. In this study a Linux Incident Response Framework is designed for collecting volatile data…

  4. Proboscis extension reflex platform for volatiles and semi-volatiles detection

    DOEpatents

    Wingo, Robert M.; McCabe, Kirsten J.; Haarmann, Timothy K.

    2010-11-30

    The present invention provides an apparatus for the detection of volatile and semi-volatile chemicals using the olfactory abilities of honey bees that are trained to respond to the presence of a specific chemical in a sample of gas with the proboscis extension reflex (PER). In particular, the geometry and arrangement of the parts of the apparatus are such that the amount of surface area in contact with the sample of gas prior to its introduction to the bees is minimized to improve the detection of particular volatile and semi-volatile that have a tendency to "stick" to contacting surfaces, especially certain chemicals associated with explosives and narcotics. According to another aspect of the present invention, a pre-concentrating means is incorporated with the device to effectively increase the concentration of "sticky" chemicals presented to the insects.

  5. Lunar Volatiles and their characterisation by L-VRAP (the Lunar Volatiles Resources Analysis Package)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, A. D.; Barber, S. J.; Dewar, K. R.; Pillinger, J. M.; Sheridan, S.; Wright, I. P.; Gibson, E. K.; Merrifield, J. A.; Howe, C. J.; Waugh, L. J.; Pillinger, C. T.

    2012-09-01

    Although it's more than 40 years since space missions landed on the Moon and brought back samples, both though human exploration and by robots, the volatile inventory of our satellite is still uncertain. The unanswered questions are both scientifically significant and the presence and abundance of lunar volatiles is an important consideration for ISRU (In Situ Resource Utilisation) since this is likely to be a part of a strategy for supporting a long term human presence and for the wider exploration of the solar system. The Lunar Volatile Resources Analysis Package (L-VRAP) is part of the provisional payload for the ESA European Lander [1] and aims to measure the abundance and chemical/isotopic composition of volatiles from regolith samples and the lunar exosphere.

  6. Does implied volatility of currency futures option imply volatility of exchange rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Alan T.

    2007-02-01

    By investigating currency futures options, this paper provides an alternative economic implication for the result reported by Stein [Overreactions in the options market, Journal of Finance 44 (1989) 1011-1023] that long-maturity options tend to overreact to changes in the implied volatility of short-maturity options. When a GARCH process is assumed for exchange rates, a continuous-time relationship is developed. We provide evidence that implied volatilities may not be the simple average of future expected volatilities. By comparing the term-structure relationship of implied volatilities with the process of the underlying exchange rates, we find that long-maturity options are more consistent with the exchange rates process. In sum, short-maturity options overreact to the dynamics of underlying assets rather than long-maturity options overreacting to short-maturity options.

  7. Oceanic Emissions and Atmospheric Depositions of Volatile Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, M.; Blomquist, B.; Beale, R.; Nightingale, P. D.; Liss, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs) affect the tropospheric oxidative capacity due to their ubiquitous abundance and relatively high reactivity towards the hydroxyal radical. Over the ocean and away from terrestrial emission sources, oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) make up a large fraction of VOCs as airmasses age and become more oxidized. In addition to being produced or destroyed in the marine atmosphere, OVOCs can also be emitted from or deposited to the surface ocean. Here we first present direct air-sea flux measurements of three of the most abundant OVOCs - methanol, acetone, and acetaldehyde, by the eddy covariance technique from two cruises in the Atlantic: the Atlantic Meridional Transect in 2012 and the High Wind Gas Exchange Study in 2013. The OVOC mixing ratios were quantified by a high resolution proton-reaction-transfer mass spectrometer with isotopically labeled standards and their air-sea (net) fluxes were derived from the eddy covariance technique. Net methanol flux was consistently from the atmosphere to the surface ocean, while acetone varied from supersaturation (emission) in the subtropics to undersaturation (deposition) in the higher latitudes of the North Atlantic. The net air-sea flux of acetaldehyde is near zero through out the Atlantic despite the apparent supersaturation of this compound in the surface ocean. Knowing the dissolved concentrations and in situ production rates of these compounds in seawater, we then estimate their bulk atmospheric depositions and oceanic emissions. Lastly, we summarize the state of knowledge on the air-sea transport of a number of organic gasses, and postulate the magnitude and environmental impact of total organic carbon transfer between the ocean and the atmosphere.

  8. The Role and Behavior of Exsolved Volatiles in Magma Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, M.; Woods, A.

    2016-12-01

    There is an abundance of evidence for complex, vertically protracted and frequently recharged magma reservoirs in a range of tectonic settings. Geophysical evidence suggests that vertically protracted mushy zones with liquid-rich regions may extend throughout much of the crust and even beyond the Moho. Geochemical evidence suggests that magma mixing, as well as extensive fractional crystallization, dominates the differentiation of crystal-rich magmas. These magmas may reside for long timescales close to their solidus temperatures in the crust before being recharged by mafic magmas, which supply heat and volatiles. The volatile budgets and gas emissions associated with eruptions from these long-lived reservoirs typically show that there is an abundance of magmatic vapor emitted, far above that expected from syn-eruptive degassing of the erupted, crystal-rich intermediate or evolved melts. Eruptions are often associated with muted ground deformation, far less than expected to account for the volumes erupted, suggesting a compressible magma. Breccia pipes in a number of mafic layered intrusion settings, thought to be the expression of diatreme-like volcanism, testify to the importance of gas overpressure in slowly crystallizing magmas. These observations are all consistent with the existence of a substantial fraction of exsolved magmatic vapor throughout much of the upper crustal zones of the magma reservoir, which holds much of the sulfur, as well as carbon dioxide, chlorine and metal species. Reconstruction of the distribution and form of this exsolved vapor phase is a challenge, as there is little geochemical record in the erupted rocks, beyond that which may be established from melt inclusion studies. The most promising approach to understand the distribution and role of exsolved vapor in magma reservoir dynamics is through analogue experiments, which have yielded valuable insights into the role of crystals in modulating gas storage and flow in the plutonic and

  9. Emissions of volatile fatty acids from feed at dairy facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanis, Phillip; Ashkan, Shawn; Krauter, Charles; Campbell, Sean; Hasson, Alam S.

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that dairy operations may be a major source of non-methane volatile organic compounds in dairy-intensive regions such as Central California, with short chain carboxylic acids (volatile fatty acids or VFAs) as the major components. Emissions of four VFAs (acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid and hexanoic acid) were measured from two feed sources (silage and total mixed rations (TMR)) at six Central California Dairies over a fifteen-month period. Measurements were made using a combination of flux chambers, solid phase micro-extraction fibers coupled to gas chromatography mass spectrometry (SPME/GC-MS) and infra-red photoaccoustic detection (IR-PAD for acetic acid only). The relationship between acetic acid emissions, source surface temperature and four sample composition factors (acetic acid content, ammonia-nitrogen content, water content and pH) was also investigated. As observed previously, acetic acid dominates the VFA emissions. Fluxes measured by IR-PAD were systematically lower than SPME/GC-MS measurements by a factor of two. High signals in field blanks prevented emissions from animal waste sources (flush lane, bedding, open lot) from being quantified. Acetic acid emissions from feed sources are positively correlated with surface temperature and acetic acid content. The measurements were used to derive a relationship between surface temperature, acetic acid content and the acetic acid flux. The equation derived from SPME/GC-MS measurements predicts estimated annual average acetic acid emissions of (0.7 + 1/-0.4) g m -2 h -1 from silage and (0.2 + 0.3/-0.1) g m -2 h -1 from TMR using annually averaged acetic acid content and meteorological data. However, during the summer months, fluxes may be several times higher than these values.

  10. Oxidation and volatilization of a niobium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.

    1992-07-01

    This report presents the findings from a preliminary investigation into oxidation and volatilization characteristics of a niobium alloy. Niobium is a candidate alloy for use in plasma facing components (PFCS) in experimental fusion reactors like the Intemational Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). An experimental alloy was tailored to simulate small changes in chemistry which could result from transmutations from irradiation. The alloy was exposed in air and steam between 800[degree]C and 1200[degree]C. Volatilized products and hydrogen were collected and measured. Post-test examinations were also performed on the samples to determine the amount of material loss during the exposures. The obtained measurements of volatilization flux (g/m[sup 2]-s), hydrogen generation rates (liters/m[sup 2]-s), and recession rates (mm/s) are data which can be used for safety analyses and material performance to predict consequences which may result from an accident involving the ingress of air or steam into the plasma chamber of fusion reactor. In our volatility tests, only molybdenum and niobium were found at release levels above the detection limit. Although molybdenum is present at only 0.12 wt%, the quantities of this element volatilized in air are nearly comparable to the quantities of niobium released. The niobium release in steam is only three to four times higher than that of molybdenum in steam. The hydrogen production of the niobium alloy is compared with other PFC materials that we have tested, specifically, beryllium, graphite, and a tunesten alloy. At high temperatures, the hydrogen production rate of the niobium alloy is among the lowest of these materials, significantly lower than beryllium. To understand what this means in an accident situation, modeling is necessary to predict temperatures, and therefore total hydrogen production. The INEL is currently doing this modeling.

  11. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell J.; Aitken, Carolyn M.; Jones, D. Martin; Head, Ian M.; Gray, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5–nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes) were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12–nC34) and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene) were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales) were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 μmol CH4/g sediment/day) with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12–nC34). For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 μmol CH4/g sediment/day). This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers. PMID:24765087

  12. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation.

    PubMed

    Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell J; Aitken, Carolyn M; Jones, D Martin; Head, Ian M; Gray, Neil D

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5-nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes) were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12-nC34) and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene) were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales) were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 μmol CH4/g sediment/day) with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12-nC34). For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 μmol CH4/g sediment/day). This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers.

  13. The reduction of iron oxides by volatiles in a rotary hearth furnace process: Part I. The role and kinetics of volatile reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Sohn, I.; Fruehan, R.J.

    2005-10-06

    With iron ore reduction processes using coal-ore pellets or mixtures, it is possible that volatiles can contribute to reduction. By simulating the constituents of the individual reducing species in the volatiles, the rates for H{sub 2} and CO were investigated in the temperature and reduction range of interest; hydrogen is the major reductant and was studied in detail. The kinetics of the reduction by H{sub 2} has been found to be a complex mechanism with, initially, nucleation and growth controlling the rate. There is a catalytic effect by the existing iron nuclei, followed by a mixed control of chemical kinetics and pore diffusion. This results in a topochemical reduction of these iron oxide particles. Up to 1173 K, reduction by H{sub 2} is considerably faster than by carbon in the pellet/mixture or by CO. It was also found that H{sub 2}S, which is involved with the volatiles, does not affect the rate at the reduction range of interest.

  14. Along-arc trends in volatile composition within the Aleutian Arc with implications for volatile cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, T. M.; Fischer, T. P.; Rizzo, A. L.; Werner, C. A.; Kern, C.

    2016-12-01

    Volatile cycling drives volcanism in subduction zone settings. Specifically, the release of volatiles from subducted oceanic crust and marine sediments into the overlying mantle wedge induces mantle-melting, and generates fluid-rich melts which ultimately reach the surface and erupt through volcanism. This process differs significantly from divergent plate boundaries where plate extension causes lithospheric stretching, depressurization and melting of the upper mantle. We speculate that differences in convergence angle, plate coupling and tectonic forcings in subduction zone settings lead to differences in the relative proportion of volatiles sourced from the crust, mantle wedge, and subducted slab, which may in turn influence eruption style and frequency. To investigate this hypothesis we target the Aleutian Arc, Alaska, which is known for significant along-strike variations in convergence angle, subducted sediment flux and volcanic activity. Here we present new measurements of carbon and helium isotopes from volcanic gas emissions emanating from fumarolic vents from seven Central and Western Aleutian volcanoes collected during field campaigns in 2015 and 2016. We integrate the isotopic compositions of fumarolic gases measured from our target volcanoes with previously measured Aleutian volcanoes to evaluate along-arc trends in volatile provenance. Preliminary results suggest longitudinal trends in carbon isotopic composition, with lighter carbon released from Central Aleutian volcanoes, relative to the Eastern and Western Aleutian volcanoes. This trend suggests a predominance of volatiles sourced from subducted sediments in the Central portion of the Aleutian Arc, which is consistent with observations of higher subducted sediment fluxes in this region. We speculate that volatiles from the Western and Eastern volcanoes may be derived largely from mantle or crustal sources, and use helium isotopes and the composition of other magmatic volatiles, to test this

  15. The role of chondrules in nebular fractionations of volatiles and other elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, J. N.

    1994-01-01

    For at least 30 years, cosmochemists have been grappling with the question of how and why groups of geochemically and volatility related elements became fractionated in the major chondrite groups. At least five relatively independent fractionations are known. Virtually everyone who has thought about these facts has been attempted to attribute at least some of the fractionations to the physical separation or mixing of the visible components. By far the most abundant of these components in meteorites is chondrules, and indeed chondrules have long been suspected of playing a direct role in fractionation of volatile elements. The question addressed here is whether chondrules formed before or after chemical components became separated is of fundamental importance to our understanding of the early solar system, as the answer constrains how, when, where, and from what chondrules formed, and tells us about how materials were processed in the nebula.

  16. The role of chondrules in nebular fractionations of volatiles and other elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, J. N.

    1994-01-01

    For at least 30 years, cosmochemists have been grappling with the question of how and why groups of geochemically and volatility related elements became fractionated in the major chondrite groups. At least five relatively independent fractionations are known. Virtually everyone who has thought about these facts has been attempted to attribute at least some of the fractionations to the physical separation or mixing of the visible components. By far the most abundant of these components in meteorites is chondrules, and indeed chondrules have long been suspected of playing a direct role in fractionation of volatile elements. The question addressed here is whether chondrules formed before or after chemical components became separated is of fundamental importance to our understanding of the early solar system, as the answer constrains how, when, where, and from what chondrules formed, and tells us about how materials were processed in the nebula.

  17. (Dis)similarity in Impulsivity and Marital Satisfaction: A Comparison of Volatility, Compatibility, and Incompatibility Hypotheses

    PubMed Central

    Derrick, Jaye L.; Houston, Rebecca J.; Quigley, Brian M.; Testa, Maria; Kubiak, Audrey; Levitt, Ash; Homish, Gregory G.; Leonard, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity is negatively associated with relationship satisfaction, but whether relationship functioning is harmed or helped when both partners are high in impulsivity is unclear. The influence of impulsivity might be exacerbated (the Volatility Hypothesis) or reversed (the Compatibility Hypothesis). Alternatively, discrepancies in impulsivity might be particularly problematic (the Incompatibility Hypothesis). Behavioral and self-report measures of impulsivity were collected from a community sample of couples. Mixed effect polynomial regressions with response surface analysis provide evidence in favor of both the Compatibility Hypothesis and the Incompatibility Hypothesis, but not the Volatility Hypothesis. Mediation analyses suggest results for satisfaction are driven by perceptions of the partner's negative behavior and responsiveness. Implications for the study of both impulsivity and relationship functioning are discussed. PMID:26949275

  18. The impact of market volatility on the cell therapy industry.

    PubMed

    Brindley, David A; Reeve, Brock C; Sahlman, William A; Bonfiglio, Greg A; Davie, Natasha L; Culme-Seymour, Emily J; Mason, Chris

    2011-11-04

    Stock market volatility in the cell therapy industry has greatly hindered the investment necessary to fund translational therapies. Here, we review the volatility of leading companies and suggest that a distinct industry is maturing to a point at which the volatility should subside, providing a more attractive environment for future growth.

  19. Volatile compounds in milled/unmilled Queso Fresco during storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The profile of volatile compounds that contribute to the flavor of Queso Fresco (QF), a popular high-moisture Hispanic-style cheese, is not well defined. The effects of curd milling on the volatile compounds in QF were determined for cheeses aged at 4 deg C for up to 8 wks. Volatiles from preheate...

  20. Another Look at the Volatility of Stock Prices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Investors are interested in the volatility of a stock for various reasons. One investor may desire to purchase a low volatility stock for peace of mind. Another may be interested in a high volatility stock in order to have the opportunity to buy low and sell high as the price of the stock oscillates. This author had the fortunate timing of reading…

  1. Multi-year measurements of field-scale metolachlor volatilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Volatilization is a critical pathway for herbicide loss from agricultural fields, and subsequent deposition downwind from the edge of the field. To better understand the volatilization process, field-scale turbulent volatilization fluxes of metolachlor (2-chloro-N-(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)-N-(2-metho...

  2. System of extraction of volatiles from soil using microwave processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, Edwin C. (Inventor); Kaukler, William F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A device for the extraction and collection of volatiles from soil or planetary regolith. The device utilizes core drilled holes to gain access to underlying volatiles below the surface. Microwave energy beamed into the holes penetrates through the soil or regolith to heat it, and thereby produces vapor by sublimation. The device confines and transports volatiles to a cold trap for collection.

  3. Gas chromatography column as an ambient-temperature volatile trap

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Open tube volatile traps have largely been shunned in favor of solid-adsorbent-containing traps. Anecdotally, there is a bias against open tube volatile traps due to the belief that they are only effective when chilled as volatiles are expected to pass through unchilled tubes’ lumens or chromatograp...

  4. Another Look at the Volatility of Stock Prices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maruszewski, Richard F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Investors are interested in the volatility of a stock for various reasons. One investor may desire to purchase a low volatility stock for peace of mind. Another may be interested in a high volatility stock in order to have the opportunity to buy low and sell high as the price of the stock oscillates. This author had the fortunate timing of reading…

  5. [Volatilization behavior of BTEX on different underlying materials].

    PubMed

    Tong, Ling; Zheng, Xi-Lai; Li, Mei; Hu, Zhi-Feng

    2008-07-01

    Volatilization behavior of benzene, toluene, ethylb-enzene and xylene (BTEX) behaves complicatedly with different characteristics of the underlying materials. For the need to control and take precautions against volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leak and pollution, and consider the diversification of underlying materials in the area of petroleum works, the test was carried out to study the volatilization behavior of BTEX on three kinds of typical underlying materials in Zibo, Shandong, China. The studies include volatilization dynamic curves of BTEX compounds and mixture and the optimized simulation formulas for them in the base of volatilization kinetics model. The results indicated that, under the same condition, volatility speed of BTEX compounds and mixture was Benzene > Toluene > BTEX > Dimethyl-benzene > Ethylbenzene, and for the three underlying materials, the order of volatility speed was water, sand and soil in sequence. The volatility coefficient linear positive correlated with the vapor pressure, the volatility coefficient remarkably increased with the vapor pressure of BTEX compounds on all the three underlying materials. The mechanism of underlying materials acted on volatilization of BTEX were mainly shown as increasing volatility area and influence the available original (amount) of pore in the course of volatilization and spread.

  6. Emerald ash borer responses to induced plant volatiles

    Treesearch

    Cesar Rodriguez-Saona; Therese M. Poland; James Miller; Lukasz Stelinski; Linda Buchan; Gary Grant; Peter de Groot; Linda MacDonald

    2007-01-01

    Herbivore feeding and methyl jasmonate, a volatile derivative of the stress-eliciting plant hormone, jasmonic acid, induce responses in plants which include the synthesis and emission of volatiles. These induced volatiles can serve to attract or repel herbivores; therefore, they may have potential use in pest management programs. The exotic emerald ash borer (EAB),...

  7. Realized Volatility and Absolute Return Volatility: A Comparison Indicating Market Risk

    PubMed Central

    Takaishi, Tetsuya; Stanley, H. Eugene; Li, Baowen

    2014-01-01

    Measuring volatility in financial markets is a primary challenge in the theory and practice of risk management and is essential when developing investment strategies. Although the vast literature on the topic describes many different models, two nonparametric measurements have emerged and received wide use over the past decade: realized volatility and absolute return volatility. The former is strongly favored in the financial sector and the latter by econophysicists. We examine the memory and clustering features of these two methods and find that both enable strong predictions. We compare the two in detail and find that although realized volatility has a better short-term effect that allows predictions of near-future market behavior, absolute return volatility is easier to calculate and, as a risk indicator, has approximately the same sensitivity as realized volatility. Our detailed empirical analysis yields valuable guidelines for both researchers and market participants because it provides a significantly clearer comparison of the strengths and weaknesses of the two methods. PMID:25054439

  8. Theoretical predictions of volatile bearing phases and volatile resources in some carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, Jibamitra; Saxena, Surendra K.

    1989-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are usually believed to be the primary constituents of near-Earth asteroids and Phobos and Diemos, and are potential resources of fuels which may be exploited for future planetary missions. The nature and abundances are calculated of the major volatile bearing and other phases, including the vapor phase that should form in C1 and C2 type carbonaceous chondrites as functions of pressure and temperature. The results suggest that talc, antigorite plus or minus magnesite are the major volatile bearing phases and are stable below 400 C at 1 bar in these chondritic compositions. Simulated heating of a kilogram of C2 chondrite at fixed bulk composition between 400 and 800 C at 1 bar yields about 135 gm of volatile, which is made primarily of H2O, H2, CH4, CO2 and CO. The relative abundances of these volatile species change as functions of temperature, and on a molar basis, H2 becomes the most dominant species above 500 C. In contrast, Cl chondrites yield about 306 gm of volatile under the same condition, which consist almost completely of 60 wt percent H2O and 40 wt percent CO2. Preliminary kinetic considerations suggest that equilibrium dehydration of hydrous phyllosilicates should be attainable within a few hours at 600 C. These results provide the framework for further analyses of the volatile and economic resource potentials of carbonaceous chondrites.

  9. Theoretical predictions of volatile bearing phases and volatile resources in some carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jibamitra; Saxena, Surendra K.

    Carbonaceous chondrites are usually believed to be the primary constituents of near-Earth asteroids and Phobos and Diemos, and are potential resources of fuels which may be exploited for future planetary missions. The nature and abundances are calculated of the major volatile bearing and other phases, including the vapor phase that should form in C1 and C2 type carbonaceous chondrites as functions of pressure and temperature. The results suggest that talc, antigorite plus or minus magnesite are the major volatile bearing phases and are stable below 400 C at 1 bar in these chondritic compositions. Simulated heating of a kilogram of C2 chondrite at fixed bulk composition between 400 and 800 C at 1 bar yields about 135 gm of volatile, which is made primarily of H2O, H2, CH4, CO2 and CO. The relative abundances of these volatile species change as functions of temperature, and on a molar basis, H2 becomes the most dominant species above 500 C. In contrast, Cl chondrites yield about 306 gm of volatile under the same condition, which consist almost completely of 60 wt percent H2O and 40 wt percent CO2. Preliminary kinetic considerations suggest that equilibrium dehydration of hydrous phyllosilicates should be attainable within a few hours at 600 C. These results provide the framework for further analyses of the volatile and economic resource potentials of carbonaceous chondrites.

  10. Measurements of hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles during ultrafine particle formation events at urban, industrial, and coastal sites.

    PubMed

    Park, Kihong; Kim, Jae-Seok; Park, Seung Ho

    2009-09-01

    The tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique was applied to determine the hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles in three sites of urban Gwangju, industrial Yeosu, and coastal Taean in South Korea. A database for the hygroscopicity and volatility of the known compositions and sizes of the laboratory-generated particles wasfirst constructed for comparison with the measured properties of atmospheric ultrafine particles. Distinct differences in hygroscopicity and volatility of atmospheric ultrafine particles werefound between a "photochemical event" and a "combustion event" as well as among different sites. At the Gwangju site, ultrafine particles in the "photochemical event" were determined to be more hygroscopic (growth factor (GF) = 1.05-1.33) than those in the "combustion event" (GF = 1.02-1.12), but their hygroscopicity was not as high as pure ammonium sulfate or sulfuric acid particles in the laboratory-generated database, suggesting they were internally mixed with less soluble species. Ultrafine particles in the "photochemical event" at the Yeosu site, having a variety of SO2, CO, and VOC emission sources, were more hygroscopic (GF = 1.34-1.60) and had a higher amount of volatile species (47-75%)than those observed at the Gwangju site. Ultrafine particle concentration at the Taean site increased during daylight hours with low tide, having a higher GF (1.34-1.80) than the Gwangju site and a lower amount of volatile species (17-34%) than the Yeosu site. Occasionally ultrafine particles were externally mixed according to their hygroscopicity and volatility, and TEM/EDS data showed that each type of particle had a distinct morphology and elemental composition.

  11. Volatiles in melt inclusions and osmium isotopes from Hawaiian lavas: investigating the relationship between CO2 and H2O contents with mantle source lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marske, J. P.; Hauri, E. H.; Garcia, M. O.; Pietruszka, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Variations in radiogenic isotopes (Pb, Sr, Nd, Hf, He, etc.) and magmatic volatiles (CO2 or H2O) in Hawaiian volcanoes reveal a range of important processes that occur from the source to surface (mantle source heterogeneity, extents of melting, magma transportation, mixing, and storage, and eruption style). Hawaiian lavas are thought to originate from partial melting of a heterogeneous plume source containing a mixture of peridotite and ancient recycled oceanic crust (pyroxenite or eclogite). These lavas display a considerable range in volatile abundances (e.g. <1 to >1000 ppm for Kilauea) that is generally attributed to magmatic degassing or mixing during ascent. However, the source region for Hawaiian volcanoes may also be heterogeneous with respect to volatile concentrations. The effect of shallow degassing makes it difficult to determine if there is a relationship between mantle source composition, lithology, and the volatile budget. We will present Os isotopic ratios and volatile contents for over 25 samples from six Hawaiian volcanoes (Koolau, Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai, Kilauea, and Loihi) to determine if pre-eruptive volatiles in shield-stage magmas correlate with the different Hawaiian components (i.e. 'Kea' or 'Loa') and lithologies (i.e. peridotite or pyroxenite) identified by radiogenic isotopes. Rapidly-cooled submarine glasses and tephras will be analyzed, as subaerial lavas cool too slowly to prevent diffusive loss of H2O from melt inclusions. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions or groundmass glasses from each eruption will be analyzed for a range of volatiles (CO2, H2O, S, Cl, F). Additionally, olivine separates from each of these samples will be analyzed for Os isotopes. This study assesses the role of mantle heterogeneity, degree of partial melting, magma transportation, and degassing, in controlling the primary melt volatile concentrations. Although volatile abundances in parental magmas are likely to be modified by variable extents of exsolution

  12. Mixing in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  13. Mixing in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee

    2011-01-07

    Turbulent mixing plays a vital role in many fields in astronomy. Here I review a few of these sites, discuss the importance of this turbulent mixing and the techniques used by astrophysicists to solve these problems.

  14. [Research progress on plate mixed culture of lignocellulolytic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yao-Ning; Zhao, Ming-Jie; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Yu, Zhen; Zhang, Jia-Chao; Yu, Yong; Hu, Chun-Xiao

    2012-06-01

    Mixed culture of microorganisms has been widely used for the research of lignocellulose transformation and degradation, but the results of the mixed culture are largely affected by the interactions of different lignocellulolytic microorganisms. At present, the researches on these interactions are mainly based on plate mixed culture assay. For this assay, two types of plate were used, namely, basic medium plate and improved medium plate. The basic medium plate is mainly used for the study of colony morphology, mycelia color, exocellular volatile organic compounds, and exocellular enzyme activity, whereas the improved medium plate is used for comparative study, with the carbon sources replaced by natural lignocelloses. This paper summarized the present research status and advancement about the plate mixed culture of lignocellulolytic microorganisms, and put forward a prospect about the focuses of future research in this field.

  15. Volatility of methylglyoxal cloud SOA formed through OH radical oxidation and droplet evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Montalvo, Diana L.; Schwier, Allison N.; Lim, Yong B.; McNeill, V. Faye; Turpin, Barbara J.

    2016-04-01

    The volatility of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed through cloud processing (aqueous hydroxyl radical (radOH) oxidation and droplet evaporation) of methylglyoxal (MGly) was studied. Effective vapor pressure and effective enthalpy of vaporization (ΔHvap,eff) were determined using 1) droplets containing MGly and its oxidation products, 2) a Vibrating Orifice Aerosol Generator (VOAG) system, and 3) Temperature Programmed Desorption Aerosol-Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TPD Aerosol-CIMS). Simulated in-cloud MGly oxidation (for 10-30 min) produces an organic mixture of higher and lower volatility components with an overall effective vapor pressure of (4 ± 7) × 10-7 atm at pH 3. The effective vapor pressure decreases by a factor of 2 with addition of ammonium hydroxide (pH 7). The fraction of organic material remaining in the particle-phase after drying was smaller than for similar experiments with glycolaldehyde and glyoxal SOA. The ΔHvap,eff of pyruvic acid and oxalic acid + methylglyoxal in the mixture (from TPD Aerosol-CIMS) were smaller than the theoretical enthalpies of the pure compounds and smaller than that estimated for the entire precursor/product mix after droplet evaporation. After 10-30 min of aqueous oxidation (one cloud cycle) the majority of the MGly + radOH precursor/product mix (even neutralized) will volatilize during droplet evaporation; neutralization and at least 80 min of oxidation at 10-12 M radOH (or >12 h at 10-14 M) is needed before low volatility ammonium oxalate exceeds pyruvate.

  16. Expanding the modular ester fermentative pathways for combinatorial biosynthesis of esters from volatile organic acids.

    PubMed

    Layton, Donovan S; Trinh, Cong T

    2016-08-01

    Volatile organic acids are byproducts of fermentative metabolism, for example, anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosic biomass or organic wastes, and are often times undesired inhibiting cell growth and reducing directed formation of the desired products. Here, we devised a general framework for upgrading these volatile organic acids to high-value esters that can be used as flavors, fragrances, solvents, and biofuels. This framework employs the acid-to-ester modules, consisting of an AAT (alcohol acyltransferase) plus ACT (acyl CoA transferase) submodule and an alcohol submodule, for co-fermentation of sugars and organic acids to acyl CoAs and alcohols to form a combinatorial library of esters. By assembling these modules with the engineered Escherichia coli modular chassis cell, we developed microbial manufacturing platforms to perform the following functions: (i) rapid in vivo screening of novel AATs for their catalytic activities; (ii) expanding combinatorial biosynthesis of unique fermentative esters; and (iii) upgrading volatile organic acids to esters using single or mixed cell cultures. To demonstrate this framework, we screened for a set of five unique and divergent AATs from multiple species, and were able to determine their novel activities as well as produce a library of 12 out of the 13 expected esters from co-fermentation of sugars and (C2-C6) volatile organic acids. We envision the developed framework to be valuable for in vivo characterization of a repertoire of not-well-characterized natural AATs, expanding the combinatorial biosynthesis of fermentative esters, and upgrading volatile organic acids to high-value esters. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1764-1776. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Aerosol hygroscopcity, volatility and chemical composition between the Pearl River Delta Region and Okinawa: a comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, M.; Tan, H.; Zhao, J.; Hatakeyama, S.; Mochida, M.; Kondo, Y.; Xu, H.; Li, F.; Shimada, K.; Deng, Y.; Liu, L.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosol physical and chemical properties play important roles in affecting visibility and cloud formation, and the direct and indirect effects of Earth's radiative forcing. It is hence vital to understand aerosol properties in order to assess impacts of atmospheric aerosol particles. Aerosol hygroscopicity, volatility and chemical composition were measured at an urban site in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) Region of China and at a marine site in Okinawa of Japan in November 2014 and November 2016, respectively. A hygroscopic/volatile tandem differential mobility analyzer (H/V-TDMA) and aerodyne high resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) were used to measure hygroscopicity/volatility and chemical composition respectively during the campaign. Aerosol particles were apportioned to more complex emission sources in the PRD than in Okinawa, resulting in about an order of magnitude higher number concentrations of particles (10nm-400nm) in the PRD than in Okinawa. The HR-ToF-AMS measurements show much higher total non-refractory PM1 (NR-PM1) in the PRD than in Okinawa. The two sites represent distinctly different chemical compositions in the total NR-PM1: organics was dominant in the PRD, while sulfate is the major component in Okinawa, reflecting different emission sources. The V-TDMA measurements showed almost no non-volatile (NV) species in 40-300nm particles, while particles in the same size range might contain black carbon or low volatile organics in the PRD. Size-resolved particles hygroscopicity and mixing state between the two measurement sites are also compared in the presentation.

  18. Mixed methods research.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Hickman, Louise

    2015-04-08

    Mixed methods research involves the use of qualitative and quantitative data in a single research project. It represents an alternative methodological approach, combining qualitative and quantitative research approaches, which enables nurse researchers to explore complex phenomena in detail. This article provides a practical overview of mixed methods research and its application in nursing, to guide the novice researcher considering a mixed methods research project.

  19. Proteomic and metabolomic analyses provide insight into production of volatile and non-volatile flavor components in mandarin hybrid fruit

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although many of the volatile constituents of flavor and aroma in citrus have been identified, the molecular mechanism and regulation of volatile production is not well understood. Our aim was to understand mechanisms of flavor volatile production and regulation in mandarin fruit. To this end fruits...

  20. Volatile behavior and trace metal transport in the magmatic-geothermal system at Pūtauaki (Mt. Edgecumbe), New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norling, B.; Rowe, M. C.; Chambefort, I.; Tepley, F. J.; Morrow, S.

    2016-05-01

    The present-day hydrothermal system beneath the Kawerau Geothermal Field, in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, is likely heated from the Pūtauaki (Mt. Edgecumbe) magma system. The aim of this work, as an analog for present day processes, is to identify whether or not earlier erupted Pūtauaki magmas show evidence for volatile exsolution. This may have led to the transfer of volatile components from the magmatic to hydrothermal systems. To accomplish this, minerals and melt inclusions from volcanic products were analyzed for abundances of volatile and ore-forming elements (S, Cl, Li, Cu, Sn, Mo, W, Sb, As, and Tl). The variations in abundance of these elements were used to assess magma evolution and volatile exsolution or fluxing in the magma system. Melt inclusions suggest the evolution of Pūtauaki andesite-dacite magmas is predominantly driven by crystallization processes resulting in rhyodacite-rhyolite glass compositions (although textural and geochemical evidence still indicate a role for magma mixing). Measured mineral-melt partition coefficients for trace metals of interest indicates that, with the exception of Tl in biotite, analyzed metals are all incompatible in Pūtauaki crystallization products. Excluding Li and Cu, other volatile and ore metals recorded in melt inclusions behave incompatibly, with concentrations increasing during evolution from rhyodacitic to rhyolitic melt compositions. Li and Cu appear to have increased mobility likely resulting from diffusive exchange post-crystallization, and may be related to late volatile fluxing. Although S and Cl concentrations decrease with melt evolution, no mineralogical evidence exists to indicate the exsolution and mobility of ore-forming metals from the magma at the time of crystallization. This observation cannot rule out the potential for post-crystallization volatile exsolution and ore-forming metal mobilization, which may only be recorded as diffusive re-equilibration of more rapidly diffusing

  1. Cytotoxic evaluation of volatile oil from Descurainia sophia seeds on MCF-7 and HeLa cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Khodarahmi, E.; Asghari, G.H.; Hassanzadeh, F.; Mirian, M.; Khodarahmi, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    Descurainia sophia is a plant widely distributed and used as folk medicine throughout the world. Different extracts of aerial parts and seeds of this plant have been shown to inhibit the growth of different cancer cell lines in vitro. In this study, cytotoxic activity of D. sophia seed volatile oil was evaluated. D. sophia seed powder was mixed with distilled water and left at 25 °C for 17 h (E1), 23 h (E2) and 28 h (E3) to autolyse. Then, the volatile fractions of E1, E2, and E3 were collected after steam distillation for 3 h. Cytotoxic effects of the volatile oils alone or in combination with doxorubicin (mixture of E1 or E2 at 50 μg/ml or E1 at 100 μg/ml with doxorubicin at 0.1, 1, 10 μM) against MCF-7 cell line were determined using MTT assay. Cytotoxic effect of E1 volatile oil was also determined on HeLa cell line. The results indicated that 1-buten-4-isothiocyanate was the major isothiocyanate found in the volatile oils. The results of cytotoxic evaluations showed that volatile constituents were more toxic on MCF-7 cells with IC50< 100 μg/ml than HeLa cells with IC50> 100 μg/ml. No significant differences were observed between cytotoxic activities of E1, E2 and E3 on MCF-7 cell line. Concomitant use of E1 and E2 (50 μg/ml) with doxurubicin (1 μM) significantly reduced the viability of MCF-7 cells compared to the negative control, doxorubicin alone, or each volatile fraction. The same result was obtained on HeLa cells, when E1 (100 μg/ml) was concurrently used with doxorubicin (1 μM). PMID:26487894

  2. Source apportionment of volatile organic compounds measured in Edmonton, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Michael C.; Aklilu, Yayne-Abeba; Brown, Steven G.; Lyder, David A.

    2013-12-01

    From 2003 to 2009, whole air samples were collected at two sites in Edmonton and analyzed for over 77 volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs were sampled in the downtown area (Central site) and an industrial area on the eastern side of the city (East site). Concentrations of most VOCs were highest at the East site, with an average total VOC mass concentration of 221 μg m-3. The average total VOC mass concentration at the Central site was 65 μg m-3. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's positive matrix factorization receptor model (EPA PMF) was used to apportion ambient concentrations of VOCs into eleven factors, which were associated with emissions sources. On average, 94 and 99% of the measured mass were apportioned by PMF at the East and Central site, respectively. Factors include transportation combustion (gasoline and diesel), industrial sources (industrial evaporative, industrial feedstock, gasoline production/storage, industrial chemical use), mixed mobile and industrial (gasoline evaporative, fugitive butane), a biogenic source, a natural gas related source, and a factor that was associated with global background pollutants transported into the area. Transportation sources accounted for more than half of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the Central site, but less than 10% of the reconstructed mass concentration at the East site. By contrast, industrial sources accounted for ten times more of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the East site than at the Central site and were responsible for approximately 75% of the reconstructed VOC mass concentration observed at the East site. Of the six industrial factors identified at the East site, four were linked to petrochemical industry production and storage. The two largest contributors to the reconstructed VOC mass concentration at the East site were associated with fugitive emissions of volatile species (butanes, pentanes, hexane, and cyclohexane); together, these two factors

  3. Direct effect of chlorine dioxide, zinc chloride and chlorhexidine solution on the gaseous volatile sulfur compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Sik; Park, Ji-Woon; Kim, Dae-Jung; Kim, Young-Ku; Lee, Jeong-Yun

    2014-11-01

    This study focused on the ability of aqueous anti-volatile-sulfur-compound (VSC) solutions to eliminate gaseous VSCs by direct contact in a sealed space to describe possible mode of action of anti-VSC agents. Twenty milliliters of each experimental solution, 0.16% sodium chlorite, 0.25% zinc chloride, 0.1% chlorhexidine and distilled water, was injected into a Teflon bag containing mixed VSCs, hydrogen sulfide, methyl mercaptan and dimethyl sulfide and mixed vigorously for 30 s. The VSC concentration was measured by gas chromatography before, immediately after, 30 min and 60 min after mixing. The sodium chlorite solution reduced the VSC concentration remarkably. After mixing, nearly all VSCs were eliminated immediately and no VSCs were detected at 30 and 60 min post-mixing. However, in the other solutions, the VSC concentration decreased by ∼30% immediately after mixing and there was no further decrease. The results suggest that sodium chlorite solution has the effect of eliminating gaseous VSCs directly. This must be because it can release chlorine dioxide gas which can react directly with gaseous VSCs. In the case of other solutions that have been proved to be effective to reduce halitosis clinically, it can be proposed that their anti-VSC effect is less likely due to the direct chemical elimination of gaseous VSCs in the mouth.

  4. Enhanced hydrophobicity and volatility of submicron aerosols under severe emission control conditions in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuying; Zhang, Fang; Li, Zhanqing; Tan, Haobo; Xu, Hanbing; Ren, Jingye; Zhao, Jian; Du, Wei; Sun, Yele

    2017-04-01

    A series of strict emission control measures was implemented in Beijing and the surrounding seven provinces to ensure good air quality during the 2015 China Victory Day parade, rendering a unique opportunity to investigate the anthropogenic impact of aerosol properties. Submicron aerosol hygroscopicity and volatility were measured during and after the control period using a hygroscopic and volatile tandem differential mobility analyzer (H/V-TDMA) system. Three periods, namely the control clean period (Clean1), the non-control clean period (Clean2), and the non-control pollution period (Pollution), were selected to study the effect of the emission control measures on aerosol hygroscopicity and volatility. Aerosol particles became more hydrophobic and volatile due to the emission control measures. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of 40-200 nm particles decreased by 32.0-8.5 % during the Clean1 period relative to the Clean2 period, while the volatile shrink factor (SF) of 40-300 nm particles decreased by 7.5-10.5 %. The emission controls also changed the diurnal variation patterns of both the probability density function of κ (κ-PDF) and the probability density function of SF (SF-PDF). During Clean1 the κ-PDF showed one nearly hydrophobic (NH) mode for particles in the nucleation mode, which was likely due to the dramatic reduction in industrial emissions of inorganic trace gases. Compared to the Pollution period, particles observed during the Clean1 and Clean2 periods exhibited a more significant nonvolatile (NV) mode throughout the day, suggesting a more externally mixed state particularly for the 150 nm particles. Aerosol hygroscopicities increased as particle sizes increased, with the greatest increases seen during the Pollution period. Accordingly, the aerosol volatility became weaker (i.e., SF increased) as particle sizes increased during the Clean1 and Clean2 periods, but no apparent trend was observed during the Pollution period. Based on a correlation

  5. Volatile Systematics of the Icelandic Mantle from Olivine-Hosted Melt Inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. G. R.; Maclennan, J.; Thordarson, T.

    2014-12-01

    The behaviour of volatiles within a volcanic system can tell us about melt storage depths, melt evolution, and degassing processes. It is therefore important to be able to quantify the amount of each volatile species entering the system. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions can provide compositions of the primitive mantle melt entering volcanic systems. In some cases they have been unaffected by processes such as melt mixing, fractional crystallisation and degassing; so chemical variations are source signatures. With the knowledge that volatiles behave as very incompatible elements, and with measured volatile/trace-element ratios, we can estimate volatile concentrations within the Icelandic mantle source. Abundances of CO2, H2O, Cl, F, S and trace elements have been measured by SIMS for over 100 olivine-hosted (Fo87.8-88.6) melt inclusions from Kistufell, a monogenic subglacial eruption known to have elevated 3He/4He (15.5 R/Ra)[1] and situated above the inferred locus of the Icelandic mantle plume. H2O concentrations in the melt inclusions are near uniform and similar to that of the carrier glass (0.10-0.15 wt%), likely due to diffusive equilibration through the olivine host at low pressure. CO2 shows more variation, ranging from 1200 to 0ppm, probably from a combination of melt heterogeneity and degassing. The majority of melt inclusions are incompatible trace element-depleted (La/Yb = 1.3), indicating that they were probably generated by high fraction melting of a depleted source in the shallow mantle. The CO2/Nb ratio of this source mantle is ~308, very similar to that of Borgarhraun, ~314[2], which has a lower 3He/4He ratio (12.2 R/Ra)[3]. This CO2/Nb ratio, along with H2O/Ce ~200 and F/Nd ~18, are consistent with other measured melt inclusion suites from Iceland, suggesting limited volatile/trace-element ratio variation within the Icelandic depleted melt source. By analysing more eruptions across Iceland, we hope to identify any spatial variations in volatile

  6. Volatility: A hidden Markov process in financial time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisler, Zoltán; Perelló, Josep; Masoliver, Jaume

    2007-11-01

    Volatility characterizes the amplitude of price return fluctuations. It is a central magnitude in finance closely related to the risk of holding a certain asset. Despite its popularity on trading floors, volatility is unobservable and only the price is known. Diffusion theory has many common points with the research on volatility, the key of the analogy being that volatility is a time-dependent diffusion coefficient of the random walk for the price return. We present a formal procedure to extract volatility from price data by assuming that it is described by a hidden Markov process which together with the price forms a two-dimensional diffusion process. We derive a maximum-likelihood estimate of the volatility path valid for a wide class of two-dimensional diffusion processes. The choice of the exponential Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (expOU) stochastic volatility model performs remarkably well in inferring the hidden state of volatility. The formalism is applied to the Dow Jones index. The main results are that (i) the distribution of estimated volatility is lognormal, which is consistent with the expOU model, (ii) the estimated volatility is related to trading volume by a power law of the form σ∝V0.55 , and (iii) future returns are proportional to the current volatility, which suggests some degree of predictability for the size of future returns.

  7. Endogenous Lunar Volatiles: Insights into the Abundances of Volatiles in the Moon from Lunar Apatite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCubbin, Francis

    2016-01-01

    At the time of publication of New Views of the Moon, it was thought that the Moon was bone dry with less than about 1 ppb H2O. However in 2007, initial reports at the 38th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference speculated that H-species were present in both apatites and pyroclastic volcanic lunar glasses. These early reports were later confirmed through peer-review, which motivated many subsequent studies on magmatic volatiles in and on the Moon within the last decade. Some of these studies have cast into question the post-Apollo view of lunar formation, the distribution and sources of volatiles in the Earth-Moon system, and the thermal and magmatic evolution of the Moon. The mineral apatite has been one of the pillars of this new field of study, and it will be the primary focus of this abstract. Although apatite has been used both to understand the abundances of volatiles in lunar systems as well as the isotopic compositions of those volatiles, the focus here will be on the abundances of F, Cl, and H2O. This work demonstrates the utility of apatite in advancing our understanding of lunar volatiles, hence apatite should be among the topics covered in the endogenous lunar volatile chapter in NVM II. Truncated ternary plot of apatite X-site occupancy (mol%) from highlands apatite and mare basalt apatite plotted on the relative volatile abundance diagram from. The solid black lines delineate fields of relative abundances of F, Cl, and H2O (on a weight basis) in the melt from which the apatite crystallized. The diagram was constructed using available apatite/melt partitioning data for fluorine, chlorine, and hydroxyl.

  8. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  9. Exploring heterogeneous market hypothesis using realized volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Wen Cheong; Isa, Zaidi; Mohd Nor, Abu Hassan Shaari

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates the heterogeneous market hypothesis using high frequency data. The cascaded heterogeneous trading activities with different time durations are modelled by the heterogeneous autoregressive framework. The empirical study indicated the presence of long memory behaviour and predictability elements in the financial time series which supported heterogeneous market hypothesis. Besides the common sum-of-square intraday realized volatility, we also advocated two power variation realized volatilities in forecast evaluation and risk measurement in order to overcome the possible abrupt jumps during the credit crisis. Finally, the empirical results are used in determining the market risk using the value-at-risk approach. The findings of this study have implications for informationally market efficiency analysis, portfolio strategies and risk managements.

  10. Volatiles in Hydrothermal Systems: Then and Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilley, M. D.

    2004-12-01

    Jack Diamond was one of the principal investigators on the original proposal to dive on the Galapagos hydrothermal system. Jack participated on the cruise and, along with his graduate student (Richard Cobbler), made the first measurements of radon in hydrothermal systems. Louis I. Gordon and the author were also participants on this cruise and we made measurements of methane and hydrogen. In the ensuing 27 years much has been learned about volatiles in hydrothermal systems. For example, we have learned that phase separation and water/rock reactions play major roles in the volatile composition of hydrothermal fluids and that temporal variability is the rule rather than the exception. A summary of progress in this field will be given.

  11. Pediatrics: a unique and volatile risk.

    PubMed

    Greve, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric risk is both unique and volatile. Children are more vulnerable when treated in any healthcare environment, but especially in the acute care setting. Children with chronic healthcare conditions are more challenging to treat and more susceptible to medical errors. Despite marked improvement in the national medical malpractice environment, the most volatile claims involve severely injured patients under age eighteen and especially those patients in the first year of life. This article provides the context of pediatric care in reviewing the demographics of children and the healthcare delivery system. The unique factors of pediatric care that create increased risk are also reviewed. Low frequency/high severity claims involving children are discussed in detail as well as physician claims in the specialty of general pediatrics. Risk management solutions for pediatric issues are proposed. © 2011 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  12. Something in the air? The impact of volatiles on mollusc attack of oilseed rape seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Félix, Anne-Emmanuelle; Poppy, Guy M.; Newland, Philip L.; van Dam, Nicole M.; Hanley, Mick E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Mounting concerns about balancing food security with the environmental impacts of agro-chemical use underpin the need to better understand the mechanisms by which crop plants, particularly during the vulnerable seedling stage, attract or repel herbivores. Methods The feeding preferences of the mollusc Helix aspersa were determined for several oilseed rape (Brassica napus) cultivars and a rank order of acceptability was established. This was compared with glucosinolate concentrations and volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles to determine whether seedling acceptability to molluscs was linked to either form of defence. Key Results While VOC profiles for each oilseed rape cultivar could be separated by canonical discriminant analysis and associated with mollusc feeding preferences, glucosinolate profiles were unrelated to snail feeding behaviour. A mixture of monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-myrcene and δ-3-carene) was identified as a putative attractant, while a blend of the green leaf volatiles 3-hexen-1-ol, 3-hexen-1-ol acetate and the monoterpene α-terpinene was identified as a putative repellent mix. Added to the VOC profile of oilseed rape seedlings, the ‘repellent’ mix reduced mollusc selection, while the ‘attractant’ mix had no effect. Conclusions Despite the widespread assumption that seedling selection by generalist herbivores is governed by chemical defence and taste, we show that olfactory cues may be more important. Oilseed rape may be atypical of wild plants, but our ability to identify repellent volatile organic compounds that can influence snail olfactory selection points to new methods for crop protection using modified VOC profiles during the vulnerable seedling stage. PMID:27009912

  13. Something in the air? The impact of volatiles on mollusc attack of oilseed rape seedlings.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Roger W R; Félix, Anne-Emmanuelle; Poppy, Guy M; Newland, Philip L; van Dam, Nicole M; Hanley, Mick E

    2016-05-01

    Mounting concerns about balancing food security with the environmental impacts of agro-chemical use underpin the need to better understand the mechanisms by which crop plants, particularly during the vulnerable seedling stage, attract or repel herbivores. The feeding preferences of the mollusc Helix aspersa were determined for several oilseed rape (Brassica napus) cultivars and a rank order of acceptability was established. This was compared with glucosinolate concentrations and volatile organic compound (VOC) profiles to determine whether seedling acceptability to molluscs was linked to either form of defence. While VOC profiles for each oilseed rape cultivar could be separated by canonical discriminant analysis and associated with mollusc feeding preferences, glucosinolate profiles were unrelated to snail feeding behaviour. A mixture of monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-myrcene and δ-3-carene) was identified as a putative attractant, while a blend of the green leaf volatiles 3-hexen-1-ol, 3-hexen-1-ol acetate and the monoterpene α-terpinene was identified as a putative repellent mix. Added to the VOC profile of oilseed rape seedlings, the 'repellent' mix reduced mollusc selection, while the 'attractant' mix had no effect. Despite the widespread assumption that seedling selection by generalist herbivores is governed by chemical defence and taste, we show that olfactory cues may be more important. Oilseed rape may be atypical of wild plants, but our ability to identify repellent volatile organic compounds that can influence snail olfactory selection points to new methods for crop protection using modified VOC profiles during the vulnerable seedling stage. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se

  15. Mars polar volatiles: Topographic and geologic setting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, B.; Soderblom, L.; Herkenhoff, K.

    1984-01-01

    Progress on a project to elucidate the geological and topographic setting of the Martian polar volatiles is reported. The following accomplishments are enumerated: (1) all of the Mariner 9 imaging data sets available through JPL were acquired and copied; (2) Mariner 9 imagery was investigated in terms of the accuracy of the imaging footprints, dark current, and residual image; (3) the transfer functions of both vidicons were investigated; and (4) the magnitude of the atmospheric scattering was examined.

  16. Volatile and Isotopic Imprints of Ancient Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Conrad, Pamela G.

    2015-01-01

    The science investigations enabled by Curiosity rover's instruments focus on identifying and exploring the habitability of the Martian environment. Measurements of noble gases, organic and inorganic compounds, and the isotopes of light elements permit the study of the physical and chemical processes that have transformed Mars throughout its history. Samples of the atmosphere, volatiles released from soils, and rocks from the floor of Gale Crater have provided a wealth of new data and a window into conditions on ancient Mars.

  17. Volatile processes in Triton's atmosphere and surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1992-01-01

    A basic model for latitudinal transport of nitrogen is reviewed focusing on its limitations and some complications associated with surface and atmospheric physics. Data obtained by 1989 Voyager encounter with the Neptune system revealed the complexity in the pure nitrogen transport which is caused by the nonuniform albedo of the frosts. It is concluded that Triton is similar to Mars in terms of the complexity of volatile transport and to understand Triton's surface-atmosphere system, Mars may be a very good analog.

  18. Market dynamics and stock price volatility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Rosser, J. B., Jr.

    2004-06-01

    This paper presents a possible explanation for some of the empirical properties of asset returns within a heterogeneous-agents framework. The model turns out, even if we assume the input fundamental value follows an simple Gaussian distribution lacking both fat tails and volatility dependence, these features can show up in the time series of asset returns. In this model, the profit comparison and switching between heterogeneous play key roles, which build a connection between endogenous market and the emergence of stylized facts.

  19. Volatile and Isotopic Imprints of Ancient Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Conrad, Pamela G.

    2015-01-01

    The science investigations enabled by Curiosity rover's instruments focus on identifying and exploring the habitability of the Martian environment. Measurements of noble gases, organic and inorganic compounds, and the isotopes of light elements permit the study of the physical and chemical processes that have transformed Mars throughout its history. Samples of the atmosphere, volatiles released from soils, and rocks from the floor of Gale Crater have provided a wealth of new data and a window into conditions on ancient Mars.

  20. Plant Volatile Analogues Strengthen Attractiveness to Insect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yufeng; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Jing-Jiang; Pickett, John A.; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Green leaf bug Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) is one of the major pests in agriculture. Management of A. lucorum was largely achieved by using pesticides. However, the increasing population of A. lucorum since growing Bt cotton widely and the increased awareness of ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety makes their population-control very challenging. Therefore this study was conducted to explore a novel ecological approach, synthetic plant volatile analogues, to manage the pest. Here, plant volatile analogues were first designed and synthesized by combining the bioactive components of β-ionone and benzaldehyde. The stabilities of β-ionone, benzaldehyde and analogue 3 g were tested. The electroantennogram (EAG) responses of A. lucorum adult antennae to the analogues were recorded. And the behavior assay and filed experiment were also conducted. In this study, thirteen analogues were acquired. The analogue 3 g was demonstrated to be more stable than β-ionone and benzaldehyde in the environment. Many of the analogues elicited EAG responses, and the EAG response values to 3 g remained unchanged during seven-day period. 3 g was also demonstrated to be attractive to A. lucorum adults in the laboratory behavior experiment and in the field. Its attractiveness persisted longer than β-ionone and benzaldehyde. This indicated that 3 g can strengthen attractiveness to insect and has potential as an attractant. Our results suggest that synthetic plant volatile analogues can strengthen attractiveness to insect. This is the first published study about synthetic plant volatile analogues that have the potential to be used in pest control. Our results will support a new ecological approach to pest control and it will be helpful to ecoenvironment and agricultural product safety. PMID:24911460

  1. Volatility of fragrance chemicals: patch testing implications.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, Sarah J; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic and predictive patch testing to determine contact allergy due to fragrance materials requires applying a fixed dose of material to the skin. This dose can be affected by the volatile nature of fragrances; little data exist on how the loss of fragrance dose due to volatility affects patch testing. (1) To evaluate pH dependence and evaporation rates of two fragrance chemicals, geraniol, citronellol, and a common fragrance solvent, diethyl phthalate (DEP) and (2) Assess implications for predictive patch-testing methods for fragrances. pH analysis of each material at 1% for three values (4.0, 5.0, 7.0) was done over 40 hours. Volatility experiments for each material, nonradiolabeled and radiolabeled, were conducted over a 24-hour period, taking readings at six time points (5 minutes, 15 minutes, 40 minutes, 1 hour, 3 hours, and 24 hours). Evaporation rates were not sensitive to pH shifts from 4.0 to 7.0. Evaporation rates for nonradiolabeled materials were low: after 24 hours, geraniol lost 8.9%, citronellol 27.0% and DEP 14.5%. The volatility data for radiolabeled materials demonstrated that geraniol loses up to 39% of its dose, citronellol loses up to 26%, and DEP up to 14% within 40 minutes. The tendency of fragrance materials to evaporate can impact the dose being applied to the patch and therefore the result of the patch and ultimately the decision-making process regarding that fragrance material's safety. These data, developed with DEP, utilized in a predictive sensitization assay cannot be generalized.

  2. Volatile Metabolites of Pathogens: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2013-01-01

    Ideally, invading bacteria are detected as early as possible in critically ill patients: the strain of morbific pathogens is identified rapidly, and antimicrobial sensitivity is known well before the start of new antimicrobial therapy. Bacteria have a distinct metabolism, part of which results in the production of bacteria-specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which might be used for diagnostic purposes. Volatile metabolites can be investigated directly in exhaled air, allowing for noninvasive monitoring. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of VOCs produced by the six most abundant and pathogenic bacteria in sepsis, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Such VOCs could be used as biological markers in the diagnostic approach of critically ill patients. A systematic review of existing literature revealed 31 articles. All six bacteria of interest produce isopentanol, formaldehyde, methyl mercaptan, and trimethylamine. Since humans do not produce these VOCs, they could serve as biological markers for presence of these pathogens. The following volatile biomarkers were found for identification of specific strains: isovaleric acid and 2-methyl-butanal for Staphylococcus aureus; 1-undecene, 2,4-dimethyl-1-heptane, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-quinazoline, hydrogen cyanide, and methyl thiocyanide for Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and methanol, pentanol, ethyl acetate, and indole for Escherichia coli. Notably, several factors that may effect VOC production were not controlled for, including used culture media, bacterial growth phase, and genomic variation within bacterial strains. In conclusion, VOCs produced by bacteria may serve as biological markers for their presence. Goal-targeted studies should be performed to identify potential sets of volatile biological markers and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these markers in critically ill patients. PMID

  3. Mixed waste treatment using the ChemChar thermolytic detoxification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchynka, D.

    1995-10-01

    The diversity of mixed waste matrices contained at Department of Energy sites that require treatment preclude a single, universal treatment technology capable of handling sludges, solids, heterogeneous debris, aqueous and organic liquids and soils. This report describes the ChemChar thermolytic detoxification process. The process is a thermal, chemically reductive technology that converts the organic portion of mixed wastes to a synthesis gas, while simultaneously absorbing volatile inorganics on a carbon-based char.

  4. Volatilization of Selenium by Alternaria alternata

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Eagle, E. T.; Frankenberger, W. T.; Karlson, U.

    1989-01-01

    Seleniferous water continues to be a serious problem to wildlife in the central valley of California. Water samples collected from Kesterson Reservoir, Peck Ranch, and Lost Hills evaporation pond facilities contained between 0.005 and 5 mg of Se per liter. The objective of this study was to isolate Se-methylating organisms in evaporation pond water and to assess, through enrichment and manipulation of their optimal growth parameters, the environmental factors which govern microbial Se methylation. Alternaria alternata was isolated as an active Se-methylating organism. The volatile product was identified as dimethylselenide. The effects of pH, temperature, Se substrates, and methyl donors on the ability of A. alternata to methylate Se were investigated in liquid medium containing 100 mg of Se per liter. The optimum pH and temperature for methylation were 6.5 and 30°C, respectively. Selenate and selenite were methylated more rapidly than selenium sulfide and various organic Se compounds (6-selenoguanosine, 6-selenoinosine, seleno-dl-methionine, and 6-selenopurine). l-Methionine and methyl cobalamine (0.1 μM) stimulated dimethylselenide production. This study demonstrates that Se-methylating organisms are present in evaporation pond water and are capable of liberating substantial quantities of Se in the volatile dimethylselenide form. By determining the optimum environmental conditions which stimulate volatilization, it may be possible to design a way to remove Se from seleniferous water in situ. PMID:16347933

  5. Subduction and volatile recycling in Earth's mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, S. D.; Ita, J. J.; Staudigel, H.

    1994-01-01

    The subduction of water and other volatiles into the mantle from oceanic sediments and altered oceanic crust is the major source of volatile recycling in the mantle. Until now, the geotherms that have been used to estimate the amount of volatiles that are recycled at subduction zones have been produced using the hypothesis that the slab is rigid and undergoes no internal deformation. On the other hand, most fluid dynamical mantle flow calculations assume that the slab has no greater strength than the surrounding mantle. Both of these views are inconsistent with laboratory work on the deformation of mantle minerals at high pressures. We consider the effects of the strength of the slab using two-dimensional calculations of a slab-like thermal downwelling with an endothermic phase change. Because the rheology and composition of subducting slabs are uncertain, we consider a range of Clapeyron slopes which bound current laboratory estimates of the spinel to perovskite plus magnesiowustite phase transition and simple temperature-dependent rheologies based on an Arrhenius law diffusion mechanism. In uniform viscosity convection models, subducted material piles up above the phase change until the pile becomes gravitationally unstable and sinks into the lower mantle (the avalanche). Strong slabs moderate the 'catastrophic' effects of the instabilities seen in many constant-viscosity convection calculations; however, even in the strongest slabs we consider, there is some retardation of the slab descent due to the presence of the phase change.

  6. Subduction and volatile recycling in Earth's mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, S. D.; Ita, J. J.; Staudigel, H.

    1994-01-01

    The subduction of water and other volatiles into the mantle from oceanic sediments and altered oceanic crust is the major source of volatile recycling in the mantle. Until now, the geotherms that have been used to estimate the amount of volatiles that are recycled at subduction zones have been produced using the hypothesis that the slab is rigid and undergoes no internal deformation. On the other hand, most fluid dynamical mantle flow calculations assume that the slab has no greater strength than the surrounding mantle. Both of these views are inconsistent with laboratory work on the deformation of mantle minerals at high pressures. We consider the effects of the strength of the slab using two-dimensional calculations of a slab-like thermal downwelling with an endothermic phase change. Because the rheology and composition of subducting slabs are uncertain, we consider a range of Clapeyron slopes which bound current laboratory estimates of the spinel to perovskite plus magnesiowustite phase transition and simple temperature-dependent rheologies based on an Arrhenius law diffusion mechanism. In uniform viscosity convection models, subducted material piles up above the phase change until the pile becomes gravitationally unstable and sinks into the lower mantle (the avalanche). Strong slabs moderate the 'catastrophic' effects of the instabilities seen in many constant-viscosity convection calculations; however, even in the strongest slabs we consider, there is some retardation of the slab descent due to the presence of the phase change.

  7. Formation and Volatile Content of Terrestrial Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, S.

    2014-04-01

    Earth contains only 0.1% water by mass. Yet Earth formed in a part of the protoplanetary disk that was probably completely dry. Water and other volatiles were delivered from colder regions to the growing terrestrial planets. Recent thinking suggests that Jupiter's large-scale migration played a prominent role in delivering water to Earth (the "Grand Tack" model). A large fraction of Sun-like stars host planets somewhat larger than Earth (so-called "super-Earths"). Planets as small as Earth have been discovered in the habitable zones of their host stars. To estimate the volatile contents of these planets we first need to understand how they formed. Current thinking suggests that they either accreted in-situ or, more likely, migrated inward from farther out. The planets' volatile contents should vary substantially in the different models. When systems contain gas giants, they have a strong effect on water delivery. Most of the observed systems with giant exoplanets probably only harbor small, dry terrestrial planets on eccentric and inclined orbits.

  8. Photometric Evidence for Volatile Transport on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbert, B. D.; Buratti, B.; Schmidt, B.; Bauer, J.

    2003-12-01

    Past observations of Neptune's moon Triton reveal that its surface is exhibiting both long and short term variability in color relative to baseline data gathered in the 1989 Voyager 2 flyby. These changes are likely due to the seasonal sublimation and deposition of Nitrogen frost and other volatiles (Buratti et al. 1994). Photometric light curves provide an additional verification that volatile transport is occurring on Triton. Steady state models, based on Voyager data and the assumption that Triton's surface is not changing, suggest a visual light curve amplitude of less than 0.05 magnitudes (Hillier et al.1991). Measurements taken in July 2000, however, indicated an amplitude of nearly 0.20 magnitudes (Cobb et al. 2001). Follow-up photometric observations in B,V,R,I broadband filters and an 890nm narrow band filter, covering a broader range in sub-Earth longitudes, were taken in June, July, and August 2003. They indicate a visual amplitude of 0.17 +/- 0.05 magnitudes, in close agreement with the 2001 data. These amplitudes are far larger than expected and may imply substantial volatile transport on Triton's surface. In addition, we observed a larger than expected opposition surge that demands further investigation.

  9. VOLATILIZATION RATES FROM WATER TO INDOOR AIR ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contaminated water can lead to volatilization of chemicals to residential indoor air. Previous research has focused on only one source (shower stalls) and has been limited to chemicals in which gas-phase resistance to mass transfer is of marginal significance. As a result, attempts to extrapolate chemical emissions from high-volatility chemicals to lower volatility chemicals, or to sources other than showers, have been difficult or impossible. This study involved the development of two-phase, dynamic mass balance models for estimating chemical emissions from washing machines, dishwashers, and bathtubs. An existing model was adopted for showers only. Each model required the use of source- and chemical-specific mass transfer coefficients. Air exchange (ventilation) rates were required for dishwashers and washing machines as well. These parameters were estimated based on a series of 113 experiments involving 5 tracer chemicals (acetone, ethyl acetate, toluene, ethylbenzene, and cyclohexane) and 4 sources (showers, bathtubs, washing machines, and dishwashers). Each set of experiments led to the determination of chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients (overall, liquid-phase, gas-phase), and to an assessment of the importance of gas- phase resistance to mass transfer. Stripping efficiencies ranged from 6.3% to 80% for showers, 2.6% to 69% for bathtubs, 18% to 100% for dishwashers, and 3.8% to 100% for washing machines. Acetone and cyclohexane al

  10. Volatile metabolite profiling reveals the changes in the volatile compounds of new spontaneously generated loquat cultivars.

    PubMed

    Besada, C; Sanchez, G; Gil, R; Granell, A; Salvador, A

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, the advantageous traits of three new loquat cultivars have drawn the attention of breeders and growers. All three have spontaneously arisen from the 'Algerie' cultivar: the new 'Xirlero' cultivar is a bud mutant of 'Algerie', while 'Amadeo' and 'Raúl' arose as chance seedlings. Following a non-targeted approach based on HS-SPME-GC-MS, the volatile compounds profile of the fruits from the new cultivars were obtained and compared to the original 'Algerie' cultivar. Carboxylic acids clearly dominated the volatile profile of all the loquat cultivars, but esters, aldehydes, ketones and alcohols were also predominant compounds. Interestingly when the bud mutant event did not lead to marked changes in the volatile compounds complement, pronounced changes in the volatile composition of chance seedling-generated cultivars 'Amadeo' and 'Raúl' were observed. 'Amadeo' fruits showed lower levels of 2-methyl butanoic acid and much higher levels of methylhexanoate, methylbutanoate and 2-hydroxy-5-methylacetophenone. The 'Raúl' cultivar also had a distinctive volatile profile characterised by high levels of C6-aldehydes, (E)-2-hexanal, 2-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenal and hexanal, and several carotenoid-derived volatiles; e.g. 2-pentene-1,4-dione 1-(1,2,2-trimethylcyclopentyl), (S)-dihydroactinidiolide, isodurene, cis-geranyl acetone, β-damascenone, β-ionone, α-ionone and 3,4-dehydro-β-ionone. These changes in volatiles were associated with a more intense flavour in cultivars 'Amadeo' and 'Raúl', according to the sensory evaluation of the flavour intensity carried out by a semi-trained panel. A metabolomic correlation network analysis provided insights as to how volatiles were regulated, and revealed that the compounds modified in 'Amadeo' were uncoupled from the rest of the volatilome, while the volatiles modified in 'Raul' changed according to specific groups. To conclude, this work provides a holistic view of how the loquat volatilome was affected, and this

  11. Impact of high hydrostatic pressure on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jin; Zhang, Yifeng; Jin, Yafang; Deng, Yun; Zhao, Yanyun

    2016-03-01

    The effects of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HHP at 200, 400 or 600MPa) on non-volatile and volatile compounds of squid muscles during 10-day storage at 4°C were investigated. HHP increased the concentrations of Cl(-) and volatile compounds, reduced the level of PO4(3-), but did not affect the contents of 5'-uridine monophosphate (UMP), 5'-guanosine monophosphate (GMP), 5'-inosine monophosphate (IMP), Na(+) and Ca(2+) in squids on Day 0. At 600MPa, squids had the highest levels of 5'-adenosine monophosphate, Cl(-) and lactic acid, but the lowest contents of CMP and volatile compounds on Day 10. Essential free amino acids and succinic acids were lower on Day 0 than on Day 10. HHP at 200MPa caused higher equivalent umami concentration (EUC) on Day 0, and the EUC decreased with increasing pressure on Day 10. Generally, HHP at 200MPa was beneficial for improving EUC and volatile compounds of squids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Financial market volatility and contagion effect: A copula-multifractal volatility approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wang; Wei, Yu; Lang, Qiaoqi; Lin, Yu; Liu, Maojuan

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a new approach based on the multifractal volatility method (MFV) to study the contagion effect between the U.S. and Chinese stock markets. From recent studies, which reveal that multifractal characteristics exist in both developed and emerging financial markets, according to the econophysics literature we could draw conclusions as follows: Firstly, we estimate volatility using the multifractal volatility method, and find out that the MFV method performs best among other volatility models, such as GARCH-type and realized volatility models. Secondly, we analyze the tail dependence structure between the U.S. and Chinese stock market. The estimated static copula results for the entire period show that the SJC copula performs best, indicating asymmetric characteristics of the tail dependence structure. The estimated dynamic copula results show that the time-varying t copula achieves the best performance, which means the symmetry dynamic t copula is also a good choice, for it is easy to estimate and is able to depict both the upper and lower tail dependence structure. Finally, with the results of the previous two steps, we analyze the contagion effect between the U.S. and Chinese stock markets during the subprime mortgage crisis. The empirical results show that the subprime mortgage crisis started in the U.S. and that its stock market has had an obvious contagion effect on the Chinese stock market. Our empirical results should/might be useful for investors allocating their portfolios.

  13. Capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of volatile and semi-volatile compounds of Salvia officinalis.

    PubMed

    Radulescu, Valeria; Chiliment, Silvia; Oprea, Eliza

    2004-02-20

    The essential oil and infusion of Salvia officinalis leaves have been widely applied in traditional medicine since ancient times and nowadays subjected to extensive research of their antibacterial, antiviral and cytotoxic properties. This paper shows chemical composition data of S. officinalis leaves essential oil isolated by steam distillation using a Clevenger-type apparatus. Also, the paper presents the chemical content of volatile and semi-volatile compounds of S. officinalis leaves infusion. The volatile and semi-volatile compounds of S. officinalis leaves infusion were isolated by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and liquid-liquid extraction with hexane and dichloromethane. SPE was carried out on 500 mg octadecylsilane (C18) cartridges and elution with dichloromethane. Liquid-liquid extraction was performed with hexane and dichloromethane. The essential oil in dichloromethane and infusion extracts in hexane and dichloromethane were analyzed by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The quantitative results obtained by solid-phase extraction and liquid-liquid extraction showed that SPE on C18 performed the highest recovery of the volatile compounds from infusion sample.

  14. Redox mediators modify end product distribution in biomass fermentations by mixed ruminal microbes in vitro

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The fermentation system of mixed ruminal bacteria is capable of generating large amounts of short-chain volatile fatty acids (VFA) via the carboxylate platform in vitro. These VFAs are subject to elongation to larger, more energy-dense products through reverse beta-oxidation. This study examined the...

  15. Detecting Volatiles Deep in the Lunar Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, A.; Heggy, E.; Ciarletti, V.; Colaprete, A.; Moghaddam, M.; Siegler, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    There is increasing theoretical and empirical evidence, from the Apollo era and after, of volatiles deep in the lunar interior, in the crust and deeper, both hydrogen-rich and otherwise. This comes in the form of fire fountain samples from Apollo 15 and Apollo 17, of hydrated minerals excavated by impacts which reach the base of the lunar crust e.g., crater Bullialdus, of hydration of apatite and other minerals, as well as predictions of a water-concentrated layer along with the KREEP material at the base of the lunar crust. We discuss how the presence of these volatiles might be directly explored. In particular water vapor molecules percolating to the surface through lunar regolith might be expected to stick and freeze into the regolith, at depths of several meters depending on the regolith temperature profile, porosity and particle size distribution, quantities that are not well known beyond two meters depth. To explore these depths in the regolith we use and propose several modes of penetrating radar. We will present results using the SELENE/Kaguya's Lunar Sounding RADAR (LSR) to probe the bulk volatile dielectric and loss structure properties of the regolith in various locations, both within permanently shadowed regions (PSRs) and without, and within neutron suppression regions (NSRs) as traced by epithermal neutrons and without. We also propose installation of ground penetrating RADAR (GPR) on a roving lunar platform that should be able to probe between 0.2 and 1.6 GHz, which will provide a probe of the entire depth of the lunar regolith as well as a high-resolution (about 4 cm FWHM) probe of the upper meter or two of the lunar soil, where other probes of volatiles such as epithermal neutron absorption or drilling might be employed. We discuss predictions for what kinds of volatile density profiles might be distinguished in this way, and whether these will be detected from orbit as NSRs, whether these must be restricted to PSRs, and how these might appear in

  16. Fruit volatile analysis using an electronic nose.

    PubMed

    Vallone, Simona; Lloyd, Nathan W; Ebeler, Susan E; Zakharov, Florence

    2012-03-30

    Numerous and diverse physiological changes occur during fruit ripening, including the development of a specific volatile blend that characterizes fruit aroma. Maturity at harvest is one of the key factors influencing the flavor quality of fruits and vegetables. The validation of robust methods that rapidly assess fruit maturity and aroma quality would allow improved management of advanced breeding programs, production practices and postharvest handling. Over the last three decades, much research has been conducted to develop so-called electronic noses, which are devices able to rapidly detect odors and flavors. Currently there are several commercially available electronic noses able to perform volatile analysis, based on different technologies. The electronic nose used in our work (zNose, EST, Newbury Park, CA, USA), consists of ultra-fast gas chromatography coupled with a surface acoustic wave sensor (UFGC-SAW). This technology has already been tested for its ability to monitor quality of various commodities, including detection of deterioration in apple; ripeness and rot evaluation in mango; aroma profiling of thymus species; C(6) volatile compounds in grape berries; characterization of vegetable oil and detection of adulterants in virgin coconut oil. This system can perform the three major steps of aroma analysis: headspace sampling, separation of volatile compounds, and detection. In about one minute, the output, a chromatogram, is produced and, after a purging cycle, the instrument is ready for further analysis. The results obtained with the zNose can be compared to those of other gas-chromatographic systems by calculation of Kovats Indices (KI). Once the instrument has been tuned with an alkane standard solution, the retention times are automatically converted into KIs. However, slight changes in temperature and flow rate are expected to occur over time, causing retention times to drift. Also, depending on the polarity of the column stationary phase, the

  17. Stable carbon isotope ratios of ambient aromatic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilova, Anna; Huang, Lin; Saccon, Marina; Rudolph, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of mixing ratios and stable carbon isotope ratios of aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere were made in Toronto (Canada) in 2009 and 2010. Consistent with the kinetic isotope effect for reactions of aromatic VOC with the OH radical the observed stable carbon isotope ratios are on average significantly heavier than the isotope ratios of their emissions. The change of carbon isotope ratio between emission and observation is used to determine the extent of photochemical processing (photochemical age, [OH]dt) of the different VOC. It is found that [OH]dt of different VOC depends strongly on the VOC reactivity. This demonstrates that for this set of observations the assumption of a uniform [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity is not justified and that the observed values for [OH]dt are the result of mixing of VOC from air masses with different values for [OH]dt. Based on comparison between carbon isotope ratios and VOC concentration ratios it is also found that the varying influence of sources with different VOC emission ratios has a larger impact on VOC concentration ratios than photochemical processing. It is concluded that for this data set the use of VOC concentration ratios to determine [OH]dt would result in values for [OH]dt inconsistent with carbon isotope ratios and that the concept of a uniform [OH]dt for an air mass has to be replaced by the concept of individual values of an average [OH]dt for VOC with different reactivity.

  18. Regolith Volatile Characterization (RVC) in RESOLVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, Janine; Lueck, Dale; Gibson, Tracy; Levine, Lanfang

    2010-01-01

    Resource investigation in the lunar poles is of importance to the potential impact of in-situ resource utilization (ISRU). The RESOLVE project developed a payload to investigate the permanently shadowed areas of the lunar poles and demonstrate ISRU technology. As a part of the RESOLVE project, the regolith volatile characterization (RVC) subsystem was designed to examine the release of volatiles from sample cores. The test sample was heated in the reactor to release the volatiles where they were analyzed with gas chromatography. Subsequently, the volatile sample was introduced into the lunar water resource demonstration (LWRD) subsystem where the released hydrogen and water were selectively captured. The objective of the Regolith Volatile Characterization (RVC) subsystem was to heat the crushed core sample and determine the desorption of volatile species of interest. The RVC subsystem encompasses the reactor and the system for volatile analysis. The system was designed to analyze H2, He, CO, CO2, N2, 02, CH4, H2S and H2O. The GC chosen for this work is a Siemens MicroSAM process GC with 3 columns and 8 TCD detectors. Neon was chosen as the carrier gas to enhance the analysis of hydrogen and helium.The limit of detection for the gases is approx.1000ppm for H2, CO. CO2 , N2, O2 and H2 S. The limit of detection for CH4 is approx.4000ppm and the water limit of detection is -10000 ppm with a sample analysis time of 2-3 minutes. These values (with the exception of water and H2S) were determined by dilution of a six gas mixture from Scott Gas (5% CO2, CO, O2, N2, 4% CH4 and H2) using mass flow controllers (MFC5). Water was calibrated at low levels using an in house relative humidity (RH) generator. H 2S and high concentrations of H2 were calibrated by diluting a pure stream of gas with MFCs. Higher concentrations of N2 and 02 were calibrated using Air again diluting with MFCs. There were three modification goals for the GC in EBU2 that would allow this process GC to be

  19. Origin of Earth's Volatiles: The Case for a Cometary Contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, T. C.

    2001-12-01

    The existence and extent of a cometary contribution to the Earth's oceans and atmosphere can be sought through studies of isotopic ratios and noble gas abundances. We learn from D/H that comets could not have delivered all the Earth's water, while 84Kr/132Xe and the isotopic composition of Xe show that chondrites did not deliver the atmospheric noble gases. Because its atmosphere is so thin and it lacks plate tectonics, Mars provides a useful control on models for volatile delivery. Here we find evidence for a cometary-delivered hydrosphere decoupled from a lithosphere that contains xenon with solar isotope ratios. The Martian atmosphere reveals krypton and xenon relative abundances and isotope ratios remarkably similar to Earth's, despite obvious evidence for atmospheric escape. An external source seems necessary to satisfy both Martian and terrestrial data, with the D/H result pointing toward comets. This result requires that Earth formed with its own water, to mix with the cometary component. The ratios of 15N/14N on Mars and Earth (in the atmosphere and rocks) are also consistent with cometary delivery of nitrogen in the form of N-compounds. The ultimate evaluation of cometary contributions will come from missions: DS-1 to C/Borrelly 22 September 2001 (results to be discussed by R. Nelson at this meeting) and CONTOUR, first stop C/Encke in 2003.

  20. Removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using biofilters

    SciTech Connect

    Carriere, P.E.; Mohaghegh, S.D.; Madabhushi, B.S.

    1995-12-31

    One of the most significant air pollution control challenges being faced by the Federal and State agencies and the chemical process industries is the control of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are discharged from process industries as major components of mixed organic wastes which contaminate the environment. Among these wastes, benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene are classified as major pollutants with high frequencies of occurrence on the EPA list of priority pollutants. Biofiltration, a recent air pollution control technology, is the removal and decomposition of contaminants present in emissions of non hazardous substances using a biologically activated medium. Biofiltration involves contacting the contaminated emission gas stream with microorganisms in a filter media. Biofiltration utilizes microorganisms immobilized in the form of a biofilm layer on an adsorptive filter media. Compared to other technologies, biofiltration is inexpensive, reliable and requires no post treatment. The main objective of this study was to compare the performance of both Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) and Biologically Activated Carbon (BAC) for the removal of benzene and toluene.

  1. Volatile organic compounds exposure and cardiovascular effects in hair salons.

    PubMed

    Ma, C-M; Lin, L-Y; Chen, H-W; Huang, L-C; Li, J-F; Chuang, K-J

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between occupational exposures to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and cardiovascular effects among hairdressing assistants has not been well characterized. To investigate whether or not exposure to VOCs was associated with autonomic dysfunction, inflammation and oxidative stress in hairdressing assistants. We recruited 62 young healthy assistants working in different hair salons in Taipei. Blood samples were taken from each assistant and heart rate variability (HRV) indices were recorded. VOCs were measured at each assistant's workplace. Mixed-effects models were used to examine the association between blood markers, HRV and VOCs. Exposure to VOCs was associated with increases in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) as well as decreases in HRV indices. The effect of VOCs exposure on the health parameters measured in this study was greatest during the days on which the subjects were working. Occupational exposure to VOCs in hair salons can lead to increases in serum CRP and 8-OHdG levels and decreases in HRV indices. Time spent away from the workplace could modify the effects these exposures have on the health parameters described above in these assistants.

  2. MAVEN - Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's MAVEN mission (to be launched in late 2013) is the first mission to Mars devoted to sampling all of the upper atmosphere neutral and plasma environments, including the well-mixed atmosphere, the exosphere, ionosphere, outer magnetosphere and near-Mars solar wind. It will fill in some measurement gaps remaining from the successful Mars Global Surveyor and the on-going Mars Express missions. The primary science objectives of MAVEN are: 1. Provide a comprehensive picture of the present state of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars; 2. Understand the processes controlling the present state; and 3. Determine how loss of volatiles to outer space in the present epoch varies with changing solar condition - EUY, solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field measurements will provide the varying solar energy inputs into the system. Knowing how these processes respond to the Sun's energy inputs in the current epoch will provide a framework for projecting atmospheric processes back in time to profile MARS' atmospheric evolution and to explore "where the water went", A description will be given of the science objectives, the instruments, and the current status of the project, emphasizing the value of having collaborations between the MAVEN project and the Mars upper atmosphere science community.

  3. Volatile organic emissions from adhesives with indoor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Girman, J.R.; Hodgson, A.T.; Newton, A.S.; Winkes, A.W.

    1984-02-01

    Studies have shown that volatile organic compounds (VOC) emitted from building materials are a potentially important source of indoor air pollution. In this study, we investigated emissions of VOC from both solvent- and water-based adhesives. Adhesives were applied to an inert substrate and dried for at least a week. VOC were cryogenically trapped and identified by GC-MS or sorbent trapped, solvent extracted, and quantified by GC-FID. Among the compounds emitted by adhesives were toluene, styrene, and a variety of normal, branched, and cyclic alkanes. The measured emission rates ranged from below the limit of detection for some adhesives to a total alkane emission rate of over 700 ..mu..g g/sup -1/h/sup -1/ for a water-based adhesive. A simple, well-mixed tank model was used to assess the potential impacts of the adhesives studied and to demonstrate that adhesives can be significant sources of VOC. 8 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  4. Diesel oil volatilization processes affected by selected porous media.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanfei; Zheng, Xilai; Anderson, S H; Lu, Jie; Feng, Xuedong

    2014-03-01

    Volatilization plays an important role in attenuating petroleum products in contaminated soils. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of wind speed, vessel diameter and mean grain size of porous media on diesel oil volatilization. Experiments were conducted to investigate the volatilization behavior of diesel oil from porous media by weighing contaminated samples pre- and post-volatilization. Three selected field porous media materials were evaluated: Silty Clay Loam, Fine Sand, and Coarse Sand along with six individual sand fractions of the Coarse Sand. Results indicate that increasing wind speed accelerates the diesel oil volatilization process, especially for wind speeds below 2.10ms(-1). The low-carbon components of diesel oil volatilize more rapidly, with the effects of wind speed more pronounced on C10 to C15 volatilization than on C16 and higher. The volatilization rate coefficient of diesel oil increases with decreasing mean grain size of porous media, and with increasing vessel diameter. A power function expressed the relationship with mean grain size. All processes (wind speed, vessel diameter, and mean grain size) were included in an equation which explained over 92% of the measured diesel oil volatilization rate coefficient variations for the experiments. Diesel oil volatilization appears to be boundary-layer regulated to some extent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Microbial Small Talk: Volatiles in Fungal–Bacterial Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ruth; Etalo, Desalegn W.; de Jager, Victor; Gerards, Saskia; Zweers, Hans; de Boer, Wietse; Garbeva, Paolina

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play an important role in the interactions between fungi and bacteria, two major groups of soil inhabiting microorganisms. Yet, most of the research has been focused on effects of bacterial volatiles on suppression of plant pathogenic fungi whereas little is known about the responses of bacteria to fungal volatiles. In the current study we performed a metabolomics analysis of volatiles emitted by several fungal and oomycetal soil strains under different nutrient conditions and growth stages. The metabolomics analysis of the tested fungal and oomycetal strains revealed different volatile profiles dependent on the age of the strains and nutrient conditions. Furthermore, we screened the phenotypic responses of soil bacterial strains to volatiles emitted by fungi. Two bacteria, Collimonas pratensis Ter291 and Serratia plymuthica PRI-2C, showed significant changes in their motility, in particular to volatiles emitted by Fusarium culmorum. This fungus produced a unique volatile blend, including several terpenes. Four of these terpenes were selected for further tests to investigate if they influence bacterial motility. Indeed, these terpenes induced or reduced swimming and swarming motility of S. plymuthica PRI-2C and swarming motility of C. pratensis Ter291, partly in a concentration-dependent manner. Overall the results of this work revealed that bacteria are able to sense and respond to fungal volatiles giving further evidence to the suggested importance of volatiles as signaling molecules in fungal–bacterial interactions. PMID:26779150

  6. Herbivore-induced Blueberry Volatiles and Intra-plant Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar R.

    2011-01-01

    Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are commonly emitted from plants after herbivore attack1,2. These HIPVs are mainly regulated by the defensive plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and its volatile derivative methyl jasmonate (MeJA)3,4,5. Over the past 3 decades researchers have documented that HIPVs can repel or attract herbivores, attract the natural enemies of herbivores, and in some cases they can induce or prime plant defenses prior to herbivore attack. In a recent paper6, I reported that feeding by gypsy moth caterpillars, exogenous MeJA application, and mechanical damage induce the emissions of volatiles from blueberry plants, albeit differently. In addition, blueberry branches respond to HIPVs emitted from neighboring branches of the same plant by increasing the levels of JA and resistance to herbivores (i.e., direct plant defenses), and by priming volatile emissions (i.e., indirect plant defenses). Similar findings have been reported recently for sagebrush7, poplar8, and lima beans9.. Here, I describe a push-pull method for collecting blueberry volatiles induced by herbivore (gypsy moth) feeding, exogenous MeJA application, and mechanical damage. The volatile collection unit consists of a 4 L volatile collection chamber, a 2-piece guillotine, an air delivery system that purifies incoming air, and a vacuum system connected to a trap filled with Super-Q adsorbent to collect volatiles5,6,10. Volatiles collected in Super-Q traps are eluted with dichloromethane and then separated and quantified using Gas Chromatography (GC). This volatile collection method was used n my study6 to investigate the volatile response of undamaged branches to exposure to volatiles from herbivore-damaged branches within blueberry plants. These methods are described here. Briefly, undamaged blueberry branches are exposed to HIPVs from neighboring branches within the same plant. Using the same techniques described above, volatiles emitted from branches after exposure to HIPVs are

  7. Herbivore-induced blueberry volatiles and intra-plant signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Saona, Cesar R

    2011-12-18

    Herbivore-induced plant volatiles (HIPVs) are commonly emitted from plants after herbivore attack. These HIPVs are mainly regulated by the defensive plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and its volatile derivative methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Over the past 3 decades researchers have documented that HIPVs can repel or attract herbivores, attract the natural enemies of herbivores, and in some cases they can induce or prime plant defenses prior to herbivore attack. In a recent paper, I reported that feeding by gypsy moth caterpillars, exogenous MeJA application, and mechanical damage induce the emissions of volatiles from blueberry plants, albeit differently. In addition, blueberry branches respond to HIPVs emitted from neighboring branches of the same plant by increasing the levels of JA and resistance to herbivores (i.e., direct plant defenses), and by priming volatile emissions (i.e., indirect plant defenses). Similar findings have been reported recently for sagebrush, poplar, and lima beans. Here, I describe a push-pull method for collecting blueberry volatiles induced by herbivore (gypsy moth) feeding, exogenous MeJA application, and mechanical damage. The volatile collection unit consists of a 4 L volatile collection chamber, a 2-piece guillotine, an air delivery system that purifies incoming air, and a vacuum system connected to a trap filled with Super-Q adsorbent to collect volatiles. Volatiles collected in Super-Q traps are eluted with dichloromethane and then separated and quantified using Gas Chromatography (GC). This volatile collection method was used in my study to investigate the volatile response of undamaged branches to exposure to volatiles from herbivore-damaged branches within blueberry plants. These methods are described here. Briefly, undamaged blueberry branches are exposed to HIPVs from neighboring branches within the same plant. Using the same techniques described above, volatiles emitted from branches after exposure to HIPVs are collected and

  8. Mixed oxide solid solutions

    DOEpatents

    Magno, Scott; Wang, Ruiping; Derouane, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is a mixed oxide solid solution containing a tetravalent and a pentavalent cation that can be used as a support for a metal combustion catalyst. The invention is furthermore a combustion catalyst containing the mixed oxide solid solution and a method of making the mixed oxide solid solution. The tetravalent cation is zirconium(+4), hafnium(+4) or thorium(+4). In one embodiment, the pentavalent cation is tantalum(+5), niobium(+5) or bismuth(+5). Mixed oxide solid solutions of the present invention exhibit enhanced thermal stability, maintaining relatively high surface areas at high temperatures in the presence of water vapor.

  9. Cement mixing with vibrator

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.E.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes a method of cementing a casing string in a bore hole of a well. It comprises introducing water and dry cement material into a mixing vessel; mixing the water and dry cement material in the mixing vessel to form a cement slurry, the slurry including lumps of the dry cement material, the mixing including steps of: agitating the slurry; and while agitating the slurry, transmitting vibrational energy into the slurry and thereby aiding disintegration and subsequent wetting of the lumps of the dry cement material in the slurry; and pumping the slurry into an annulus between the casing string and the bore hole.

  10. Volatile organic compound concentrations and emission rates in new manufactured and site-built houses.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, A T; Rudd, A F; Beal, D; Chandra, S

    2000-09-01

    Concentrations of 54 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and ventilation rates were measured in four new manufactured houses over 2-9.5 months following installation and in seven new site-built houses 1-2 months after completion. The houses were in four projects located in hot-humid and mixed-humid climates. They were finished and operational, but unoccupied. Ventilation rates ranged from 0.14-0.78 h-1. Several of the site-built houses had ventilation rates below the ASHRAE recommended value. In both manufactured and site-built houses, the predominant airborne compounds were alpha-pinene, formaldehyde, hexanal, and acetic acid. Formaldehyde concentrations were below or near 50 ppb with a geometric mean value for all houses of 40 ppb. Similarities in the types of VOCs and in VOC concentrations indicated that indoor air quality in the houses was impacted by the same or similar sources. Major identified sources included plywood flooring, latex paint and sheet vinyl flooring. One site-built house was operated at ventilation rates of 0.14 and 0.32 h-1. VOC emission rates calculated at the two conditions agreed within +/- 10% for the most volatile compounds. Generally, the ratios of emission rates at the low and high ventilation rates decreased with decreasing compound volatility. Changes in VOC emission rates in the manufactured houses over 2-9.5 months after installation varied by compound. Only several compounds showed a consistent decrease in emission rate over this period.

  11. Pattern recognition of peach cultivars (Prunus persica L.) from their volatile components.

    PubMed

    Montero-Prado, Pablo; Bentayeb, Karim; Nerín, Cristina

    2013-05-01

    The volatile compounds of four peach cultivars (Prunus persica L.) were studied: Sudanell, San Lorenzo, Miraflores and Calanda (two clones, Calante and Jesca). 17-23 Samples of each cultivar with the same maturity level were analyzed, measuring color, firmness, and soluble solids content. The pulp was crushed and mixed with water prior to HS-SPME analysis, and GC-MS was used to determine the volatile compounds. Sixty-five compounds were identified using spectral library matching, Kovat's indices and, when available, pure standards. The main components were lactones and C6 compounds. From the distribution of these compounds, Principal Component Analysis led to the clustering of the samples according to their different cultivars. Finally, Canonical Component Analysis was used to create a classification function that identifies the origin of an unknown sample from its volatile composition. The results obtained will help to avoid fraud and protect the European Designation of Origin 'Melocotón de Calanda'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multilevel non-volatile data storage utilizing common current hysteresis of networked single walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ihn; Wang, Wei; Hwang, Sun Kak; Cho, Sung Hwan; Kim, Kang Lib; Jeong, Beomjin; Huh, June; Park, Cheolmin

    2016-05-21

    The characteristic source-drain current hysteresis frequently observed in field-effect transistors with networked single walled carbon-nanotube (NSWNT) channels is problematic for the reliable switching and sensing performance of devices. But the two distinct current states of the hysteresis curve at a zero gate voltage can be useful for memory applications. In this work, we demonstrate a novel non-volatile transistor memory with solution-processed NSWNTs which are suitable for multilevel data programming and reading. A polymer passivation layer with a small amount of water employed on the top of the NSWNT channel serves as an efficient gate voltage dependent charge trapping and de-trapping site. A systematic investigation evidences that the water mixed in a polymer passivation solution is critical for reliable non-volatile memory operation. The optimized device is air-stable and temperature-resistive up to 80 °C and exhibits excellent non-volatile memory performance with an on/off current ratio greater than 10(4), a switching time less than 100 ms, data retention longer than 4000 s, and write/read endurance over 100 cycles. Furthermore, the gate voltage dependent charge injection mediated by water in the passivation layer allowed for multilevel operation of our memory in which 4 distinct current states were programmed repetitively and preserved over a long time period.

  13. New volatile selenium and tellurium species in fermentation gases produced by composting duck manure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinel-Raffaitin, P.; Pécheyran, C.; Amouroux, D.

    The occurrence of volatile metal(loid) compounds is investigated in gases released from a compost composed of pine shavings, duck feathers and duck excreta. The fermentation gases were sampled using Tedlar bags, pre-concentrated with cryogenic trap and finally analysed by cryo-trapping followed by gas chromatography hyphenated to inductively coupled mass spectrometry (CT-GC-ICPMS). In addition to arsenic (As), bismuth (Bi), lead (Pb), antimony (Sb) and tin (Sn) volatile species, up to eight selenium (Se) and seven tellurium (Te) species, namely methylated, ethylated and mixed methyl-ethylated ones, are detected for the first time. Although few volatile species standards are available, their identification or semi-identification is established by using quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) through the correlation between boiling point and retention time of each compound. Their semi-quantification highlights maximal concentrations ranging from 30 to 2300 ng m -3 for Se species and from 10 to 500 ng m -3 for Te species. The variations of their concentrations are examined by emphasizing the influences of both compost nature and compost maturation stage. Finally, the results obtained in this study outline the diversity and the quantity of Se and Te species especially in comparison with other fermentation gases. Their release could thus induce "olfactory pollution" and potential sanitary and environmental impacts if no effluent treatment is applied during the compost production.

  14. Determination of refractive and volatile elements in sediment using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Duodu, Godfred Odame; Goonetilleke, Ashantha; Allen, Charlotte; Ayoko, Godwin A

    2015-10-22

    Wet-milling protocol was employed to produce pressed powder tablets with excellent cohesion and homogeneity suitable for laser ablation (LA) analysis of volatile and refractive elements in sediment. The influence of sample preparation on analytical performance was also investigated, including sample homogeneity, accuracy and limit of detection. Milling in volatile solvent for 40 min ensured sample is well mixed and could reasonably recover both volatile (Hg) and refractive (Zr) elements. With the exception of Cr (-52%) and Nb (+26%) major, minor and trace elements in STSD-1 and MESS-3 could be analysed within ±20% of the certified values. Comparison of the method with total digestion method using HF was tested by analysing 10 different sediment samples. The laser method recovers significantly higher amounts of analytes such as Ag, Cd, Sn and Sn than the total digestion method making it a more robust method for elements across the periodic table. LA-ICP-MS also eliminates the interferences from chemical reagents as well as the health and safety risks associated with digestion processes. Therefore, it can be considered as an enhanced method for the analysis of heterogeneous matrices such as river sediments.

  15. Mixed waste minimization/mixed waste avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    Todisco, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation describes methods for the minimization and volume reduction of low-level radioactive and mixed wastes. Many methods are presented including: source reduction, better waste monitoring activities, waste segregation, recycling, administrative controls, and optimization of waste-generating processes.

  16. Statistical mixing and aggregation in Feller diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anteneodo, C.; Duarte Queirós, S. M.

    2009-10-01

    We consider Feller mean-reverting square-root diffusion, which has been applied to model a wide variety of processes with linearly state-dependent diffusion, such as stochastic volatility and interest rates in finance, and neuronal and population dynamics in the natural sciences. We focus on the statistical mixing (or superstatistical) process in which the parameter related to the mean value can fluctuate—a plausible mechanism for the emergence of heavy-tailed distributions. We obtain analytical results for the associated probability density function (both stationary and time-dependent), its correlation structure and aggregation properties. Our results are applied to explain the statistics of stock traded volume at different aggregation scales.

  17. Assessing Requirements Volatility and Risk Using Bayesian Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    There are many factors that affect the level of requirements volatility a system experiences over its lifecycle and the risk that volatility imparts. Improper requirements generation, undocumented user expectations, conflicting design decisions, and anticipated / unanticipated world states are representative of these volatility factors. Combined, these volatility factors can increase programmatic risk and adversely affect successful system development. This paper proposes that a Bayesian Network can be used to support reasonable judgments concerning the most likely sources and types of requirements volatility a developing system will experience prior to starting development and by doing so it is possible to predict the level of requirements volatility the system will experience over its lifecycle. This assessment offers valuable insight to the system's developers, particularly by providing a starting point for risk mitigation planning and execution.

  18. Method of recovering volatile metals from material containing metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Santen, S.

    1984-12-18

    A method of reducing and recovering volatile metal from metal oxides comprising the steps of injecting metal oxide-containing material into a shaft reactor, simultaneously injecting reducing agent into said reactor, continuously maintaining said reactor substantially filled with coke, supplying thermal energy to the reactor, preferably by means of a plasma burner, such that at least some of the metal oxides are reduced to metal and melted or volatilized depending upon whether the metal is volatile. The melted metal is removed from the bottom of the reactor while the volatilized metal is permitted to flow upwardly through the shaft reactor in the form of metal vapor together with a gas flow. The coke in the shaft reactor through which the volatilized metal passes is maintained at a temperature in excess of 1000/sup 0/ C., thus screening the upper portion of the shaft reactor and the reactor top by means of the coke so as to prevent condensation of the volatilized metal.

  19. Variation of volatile compounds among wheat varieties and landraces.

    PubMed

    Starr, G; Petersen, M A; Jespersen, B M; Hansen, Å S

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of volatile compounds was performed on 81 wheat varieties and landraces, grown under controlled greenhouse conditions, in order to investigate the possibility of differentiating wheat varieties according to their volatile compound profiles. Volatile compounds from wheat samples were extracted by dynamic headspace extraction and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Seventy-two volatile compounds were identified in the wheat samples. Multivariate analysis of the data showed a large diversity in volatile profiles between samples. Differences occurred between samples from Austria compared to British, French and Danish varieties. Landraces were distinguishable from modern varieties and they were characterised by higher averaged peak areas for esters, alcohols, and some furans. Modern varieties were characterised by higher averaged peak areas for terpenes, pyrazines and straight-chained aldehydes. Differences in volatile profiles are demonstrated between wheat samples for the first time, based on variety. These results are significant to plant breeders and commercial users of wheat.

  20. Ecology of plant volatiles: taking a plant community perspective.

    PubMed

    Pierik, Ronald; Ballaré, Carlos L; Dicke, Marcel

    2014-08-01

    Although plants are sessile organisms, they can modulate their phenotype so as to cope with environmental stresses such as herbivore attack and competition with neighbouring plants. Plant-produced volatile compounds mediate various aspects of plant defence. The emission of volatiles has costs and benefits. Research on the role of plant volatiles in defence has focused primarily on the responses of individual plants. However, in nature, plants rarely occur as isolated individuals but are members of plant communities where they compete for resources and exchange information with other plants. In this review, we address the effects of neighbouring plants on plant volatile-mediated defences. We will outline the various roles of volatile compounds in the interactions between plants and other organisms, address the mechanisms of plant neighbour perception in plant communities, and discuss how neighbour detection and volatile signalling are interconnected. Finally, we will outline the most urgent questions to be addressed in the future. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. GADOLINIUM SOLUBILITY AND VOLATILITY DURING DWPF PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Reboul, S

    2008-01-30

    Understanding of gadolinium behavior, as it relates to potential neutron poisoning applications at the DWPF, has increased over the past several years as process specific data have been generated. Of primary importance are phenomena related to gadolinium solubility and volatility, which introduce the potential for gadolinium to be separated from fissile materials during Chemical Process Cell (CPC) and Melter operations. Existing data indicate that gadolinium solubilities under moderately low pH conditions can vary over several orders of magnitude, depending on the quantities of other constituents that are present. With respect to sludge batching processes, the gadolinium solubility appears to be highly affected by iron. In cases where the mass ratio of Fe:Gd is 300 or more, the gadolinium solubility has been observed to be low, one milligram per liter or less. In contrast, when the ratio of Fe:Gd is 20 or less, the gadolinium solubility has been found to be relatively high, several thousands of milligrams per liter. For gadolinium to serve as an effective neutron poison in CPC operations, the solubility needs to be limited to approximately 100 mg/L. Unfortunately, the Fe:Gd ratio that corresponds to this solubility limit has not been identified. Existing data suggest gadolinium and plutonium are not volatile during melter operations. However, the data are subject to inherent uncertainties preventing definitive conclusions on this matter. In order to determine if gadolinium offers a practical means of poisoning waste in DWPF operations, generation of additional data is recommended. This includes: Gd solubility testing under conditions where the Fe:Gd ratio varies from 50 to 150; and Gd and Pu volatility studies tailored to quantifying high temperature partitioning. Additional tests focusing on crystal aging of Gd/Pu precipitates should be pursued if receipt of gadolinium-poisoned waste into the Tank Farm becomes routine.

  2. Remote observations of parent volatiles in comets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, M.

    Cometary nuclei are orts of the early solar system; they contain key information from the time when planets were forming, and even earlier -- some contain material from the natal interstellar cloud. During the first 500 million years of Earth's existence, comets likely delivered vast quantities of pre-biotic organic material along with water for its oceans. The most easily modified forms of matter --the ices, low- temperature -refractory organics, and refractory minerals -- hold special significance for understanding these processes. The unequivocal detection of parent volatile species was first a chieved in 1985 (H2 O and HCN). This capability has exploded since then, until now more than two dozen parent volatile species can be characterized directly from Earth-based observatories . Hyakutake and Hale-Bopp were the first bright comets to be studied with powerful new astronomical facilities. A wealth of new information on cometary organic composition was obtained, including the discovery of symmetric hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, acetylene) by infrared spectroscopy and the detection of six new parent volatiles at radio wavelengths. Since then, larger telescopes and even more powerful instruments have become available, permitting in-depth investigation of much fainter comets. Especially, the advent of a powerful cross-dispersed cryogenic infrared echelle spectrometer (NIRSPEC, at the 10-m Keck-2 telescope) has revolutionized our ability to measure cometary c mposition. Ten parent volatileo species can be characterized in about two hours, eliminating many sources of systematic error. Six Oort cloud comets have been studied with it since 1999. The compositions of nine Oort -cloud comets (including comet Halley and the deceased comet C/1999 S4 LINEAR) will be compared and discussed in the context of chemical diversity in the giant-planets' nebular region. Implications for future research will be mentioned. Mumma, M. J. et al. (2001), Ap. J. 546, 1183-1193. Mumma, M. J

  3. Volatile transport in subvolcanic magma reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Parmigiani, A.; Degruyter, W.; Bachmann, O.; Lecleaire, S.

    2016-12-01

    Volatiles exsolving from magma reservoirs within magmatic columns play a significant role in their thermo-mechanical state, impacting forthcoming eruptions. The transport of these volatiles across reservoirs and up to the surface is an essential component of volatile cycling between the earth's mantle and atmosphere, and also plays an important role for the formation of ore deposits. We focus here on three fundamental questions (1) how does magmatic vapor migrate in heterogeneous shallow magma reservoirs, (2) how does it influence the evolution of the reservoir itself and (3) what are the physical processes and optimal conditions that allow crystal-rich magma to outgas efficiently and become ultimately dry (< 1 wt% water) as they solidify to form plutons? We approach these questions by investigating the pore-scale fluid dynamics that controls the transport of the vapor in crystal-rich and crystal-poor magmas. We show how the interplay between capillary stresses and the viscosity contrast between the vapor phase and the host melt results in counterintuitive dynamics, whereby the vapor tends to migrate efficiently in crystal-rich parts of a magma reservoir and accumulate in crystal-poor regions. We find that outgassing by permeable buoyant migration is most efficient between 50 and 70 vol. % of crystals for typical magmatic conditions, and that subsequent outgassing is promoted by capillary fracturing to overcome the large capillary stresses. We implement these results in a magma chamber model to test several outgassing scenarios and to assess how macro-scale processes might control the efficiency of gas loss.

  4. Volatile loss from accreting icy protoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1993-03-01

    A large self-gravitating body does not easily lose significant mass because the escape velocity is much larger than the sound speed of atmosphere-forming species under ambient thermal conditions. The most significant exceptions to this are giant impacts or impact jetting by fast-moving projectiles. A very small object (e.g. a comet) also does not easily lose significant volatile mass upon formation because the energy release associated with its accretion is so small. (It can however lose a great deal of mass if it is subsequently moved closer to the Sun.) I argue that there is an intermediate mass range (corresponding to bodies with radii of approximately 300-800 km) for which the ambient steady-state mass loss is a maximum. By ambient, I mean those conditions pertaining to the formation region of the body. By steady state, I mean to exclude infrequent traumas (giant impacts). The existence of a preferred intermediate mass arises through the competition of growing gravitational containment and growing energy release by accretion; it corresponds typically to GM/(Rcs2) approximately equals 2 to 4, where M is the protoplanet mass of radius R, and cs is the sound speed. Several factors determine the amount of volatile loss is this vulnerable zone during accretion but in general the loss is a substantial fraction of the volatiles, sometimes approaching 100 percent. The principal implication is that bodies larger than a few hundred kilometers in radius will not have a 'primitive' (i.e. cometary) composition. This is relevant for understanding Triton, Pluto, Charon, and perhaps Chiron.

  5. Research on Surfactant Warm Mix Asphalt Construction Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoliang; Sun, Jingxin; Guo, Xiufeng

    Discharging temperature of hot asphalt mixture is about 150°C-185°C, volatilization of asphalt fume harms people's health and fuel cost is high. Jinan Urban Construction Group applies PTL/01 asphalt warm mix agent to produce warm mix asphalt to construction of urban roads' asphalt bituminous pavement. After comparing it with performance of traditional hot asphalt mixture, mixing temperature may be reduced by 30°C-60°C, emission of poisonous gas is reduced, energy conservation and environmental protection are satisfied, construction quality reaches requirements of construction specifications and economic, social and environmental benefits are significant. Thus, it can be used for reference for green construction of urban roads.

  6. Rhizobacterial volatiles affect the growth of fungi and Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Vespermann, Anja; Kai, Marco; Piechulla, Birgit

    2007-09-01

    Volatiles of Stenotrophomonas, Serratia, and Bacillus species inhibited mycelial growth of many fungi and Arabidopsis thaliana (40 to 98%), and volatiles of Pseudomonas species and Burkholderia cepacia retarded the growth to lesser extents. Aspergillus niger and Fusarium species were resistant, and B. cepacia and Staphylococcus epidermidis promoted the growth of Rhizoctonia solani and A. thaliana. Bacterial volatiles provide a new source of compounds with antibiotic and growth-promoting features.

  7. Dynamic headspace analyses of residual volatiles in pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Wampler, T P; Bowe, W A; Levy, E J

    1985-02-01

    Pharmaceutical preparations may be assayed for volatile organic compounds by purging them with a stream of inert carrier gas and collecting the organics onto a suitable sorbent material, from which they may be backflushed to a gas chromatograph. Compared to solvent extraction, the process offers advantages of increased sensitivity, ease of automation, and elimination of the solvent peak. Examples are given of three major sources of volatiles in pharmaceuticals, with the development of a method for quantitating the volatiles using an internal standard.

  8. Fractionation of moderately volatile elements in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasson, J. T.; Chou, C.-L.

    1974-01-01

    The CI chondrites are the most volatile-rich meteorites. Relative to the CI chondrites, the ordinary chondrites have lower abundances of refractory and volatile elements. Four types of fractionations are summarized in a table. Ordinary-chondrite/CI abundance ratios for moderately volatile elements in H- and L-group chondrites are presented in a graph. Possible explanations for the observed relations are considered, giving attention to several processes which could result in the separation of nebular solids and gases.

  9. Taxonomy of Magma Mixing II: Thermochemistry of Mixed Crystal-Bearing Magmas Using the Magma Chamber Simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrson, W. A.; Spera, F. J.; Neilson, R.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Magma recharge and magma mixing contribute to the diversity of melt and crystal populations, the abundance and phase state of volatiles, and thermal and mass characteristics of crustal magma systems. The literature is replete with studies documenting mixing end-members and associated products, from mingled to hybridized, and a catalytic link between recharge/mixing and eruption is likely. Given its importance and the investment represented by thousands of detailed magma mixing studies, a multicomponent, multiphase magma mixing taxonomy is necessary to systematize the array of governing parameters (e.g., pressure (P), temperature (T), composition (X)) and attendant outcomes. While documenting the blending of two melts to form a third melt is straightforward, quantification of the mixing of two magmas and the subsequent evolution of hybrid magma requires application of an open-system thermodynamic model. The Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS) is a thermodynamic, energy, and mass constrained code that defines thermal, mass and compositional (major, trace element and isotope) characteristics of melt×minerals×fluid phase in a composite magma body-recharge magma-crustal wallrock system undergoing recharge (magma mixing), assimilation, and crystallization. In order to explore fully hybridized products, in MCS, energy and mass of recharge magma (R) are instantaneously delivered to resident magma (M), and M and R are chemically homogenized and thermally equilibrated. The hybrid product achieves a new equilibrium state, which may include crystal resorption or precipitation and/or evolution of a fluid phase. Hundreds of simulations systematize the roles that PTX (and hence mineral identity and abundance) and the mixing ratio (mass of M/mass of R) have in producing mixed products. Combinations of these parameters define regime diagrams that illustrate possible outcomes, including: (1) Mixed melt composition is not necessarily a mass weighted mixture of M and R magmas because

  10. Admission mixing duct assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, Robert J. (Inventor); Dunbar, Lawrence W. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A variable cycle jet engine is provided with a mixing duct assembly which mixes core engine exhaust gas with bypass air when the engine is operating in a turbofan mode and which blocks flow from the core engine and isolates the core engine from the bypass flow when the engine is operating as a ramjet.

  11. Dilution Zone Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Studies to characterize dilution zone mixing; experiments on the effects of free-stream turbulence on a jet in crossflow; and the development of an interactive computer code for the analysis of the mixing of jets with a confined crossflow are reviewed.

  12. Two Contrasting Volatile Element Compositions in Primary Melt Inclusions From Mount Shasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voyer, M.; Rose-Koga, E. F.; Shimizu, N.; Grove, T. L.; Schiano, P.

    2008-12-01

    In order to get the pre-eruptive volatile contents of Mount Shasta lavas, we selected primary melt inclusions from samples 85-38 (high alumina olivine tholeite, HAOT), 85-47, 85-1a and 95-15 (basaltic andesites, BA; Baker et al., 1994, CMP; Grove et al., 2002, CMP). We analyzed the H2O, CO2, F, Cl and S contents from olivine-hosted (Fo86-91) primitive melt inclusions (SiO2 <50 wt% and MgO >8 wt%) using the CAMECA 1280 ion probe of WHOI (MA, USA) and a broad range of standard compositions. As the melt inclusions were partially crystallized, they were experimentally heated in order to melt the daughter minerals. A preliminary study show that our heating procedure did not create any significant loss in the CO2, F, Cl, and S content of the melt inclusions and may not even result in a partial loss of the H2O content of the melt inclusions. The major element compositions of the Shasta melt inclusions fall on a continuous extension of the trend defined by the whole rocks and represent a more primitive endmember. Regarding the volatile contents, they can be divided into two groups: HAOT melt inclusions have low and clustered volatiles compositions (H2O: ~0.04 wt%; F: ~120 ppm; Cl: ~30 ppm; CO2: 250-450 ppm and S: 800- 1100 ppm), similar to primitive MORB compositions, whereas BA melt inclusions show higher and more variable volatile compositions (H2O: 0.1-2.6 wt%; CO2: 70-840, F: 120-1180 ppm; Cl: 480-1230 ppm and S: 480-4600 ppm). They are enriched in volatile elements compared to the primitive MORB compositions. Moreover, the BA melt inclusions are enriched in mobile elements such as K, Ba and B. The results suggest that HAOT melt inclusions and more enriched BA melt inclusions represent two endmembers of a mixing process between a depleted mantle melt and a slab-derived fluid component. The variations in the BA volatiles compositions can indicate an addition of various amounts of aqueous fluid into the mantle source, at different stage of the lavas formation. The

  13. Waste gas monitor reduces wasted volatile anesthetic.

    PubMed

    Euliano, T Y; van Oostrom, J H; van der Aa, J

    1999-07-01

    The increasing focus on health care costs requires that all physicians evaluate practice behaviors. The primary emphasis in anesthesia has been limiting the use of expensive medications and interventions. Reducing waste is another approach, and volatile anesthetics are an appropriate target in that simple reduction of fresh gas-flow (FGF) rates is effective. A monitor that measures and displays the cost of wasted volatile anesthetic was developed and used to determine if real-time display of the cost would result in decreased FGF rates, which, in turn, would decrease wasted anesthetic. The waste gas monitor (WGM) measures flow rate at the anesthesia machine's scavenger port, integrates this with agent concentration, and displays the calculated cost, real-time, on a portable computer screen. The WGM equipment was attached to the anesthesia machine in the gynecologic surgery operating room (OR) and those cases performed under general endotracheal anesthesia and lasting longer than one hour were eligible for inclusion. First year anesthesiology residents assigned to the study OR as part of a non-specialty rotation, were the subjects of the study. For each resident, after data were collected from at least two eligible baseline cases (Baseline Phase, WGM not visible and resident unaware of its presence), the monitor was introduced and data collection continued for at least three more eligible cases (Visible Phase). Nine residents were initially enrolled, but due to scheduling difficulties only five residents completed the protocol. Data from cases using the WGM demonstrated a 50% decrease (3.58 +/- 1.34 l/min vs. 1.78 +/- 0.51 l/min (p = 0.009)) in the scavenger flow rates, which resulted in a 48% ($5.28 +/- 0.68 vs. $2.72 +/- 0.80 (p = 0.002)) decrease in hourly cost of wasted volatile anesthetic. There was no difference between the Baseline and Visible phases with regard to use of nitrous oxide or intravenous anesthetic agents. CONCLUSIONS. The WGM decreased wasted

  14. Volatility of patulin in apple juice.

    PubMed

    Kryger, R A

    2001-08-01

    Patulin is a mycotoxin produced by certain fungi, such as those found commonly on apples. The patulin content of apple juice is a regulatory concern because patulin is a suspected carcinogen and mutagen. A simple model of the apple juice concentration process was carried out to examine the possible contamination of patulin in apple aroma, a distillate produced commercially in the concentration of apple juice. The results show no evidence for patulin volatility, and document a reduction in patulin content by at least a factor of 250 in the apple distillate obtained from apple juice. Furthermore, a survey of several commercial apple aroma samples found no evidence of patulin content.

  15. Thermodynamics of Volatile Silicon Hydroxides Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copland, Evan H.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    2001-01-01

    Silicon-based ceramics are promising candidate structural materials for heat engines. The long-term stability of these materials to environmental degradation is dependent on the formation and retention of a protective SiO2 layer. It is well known that SiO2 forms stable volatile hydroxides in the presence of water vapor at elevated temperatures. Combustion conditions, which characteristically are at high velocities, contain significant water vapor pressures, and high temperatures tend to promote continuous formation of these hydroxides with resulting material degradation. For the degradation of silicon-based ceramics to be predicted, accurate thermodynamic data on the formation of silicon hydroxides are needed.

  16. Volatile Origin and Recycling Into the Mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, G.; Ballentine, C.

    2004-12-01

    Noble gas isotopes in magmatic CO2 well gases provide a unique insight into mantle volatile origin and dynamics. Previous work has resolved mantle 20Ne/22Ne ratios and suggests a Solar wind irradiated meteoritic source for mantle He and Ne. This constrains the mechanism of volatile addition to the mantle during accretion and the relationship between volatiles in MORB and OIB (Ballentine et al., 2003). We present here complimentary high precision analyses of Ar and Xe isotopes from three CO2 gas fields from the SW USA; Bravo Dome, Sheep Mountain and McElmo Dome. All fields contain 129Xe excesses from 129I decay. In addition, Sheep Mountain and Bravo Dome contain correlated non-radiogenic 124Xe, 126Xe and 128Xe excesses indicating up to a 10% non-air contribution to these gases. Whilst mass dependent fractionation can theoretically produce correlated excesses in 124Xe-128Xe, it cannot generate the correlated excess of 124Xe-128Xe and radiogenic 129Xe therefore this excess must be due to a resolvable primordial component (Caffee et al., 1999). Preliminary results for the first time show a 38Ar/36Ar ratio in Bravo Dome lower than air implying a 5% contribution from a primordial reservoir with Solar 38/36Ar. The resolved primordial component in Ne, Xe and now Ar produces 132Xe/36Ar and 22Ne/36Ar in the well gases that are similar to those of irradiated protoplanetary material. This is distinct from Solar values and provides crucial corroborative evidence for the interpretation of the mantle 20Ne/22Ne. Furthermore, preservation of the relative amounts of primordial Ar and Xe is most simply explained by recycling and homogenisation of seawater-derived noble gases into the mantle. Mass balance calculations show that seawater recycling would have a negligible impact upon the Ne isotopic ratios. These results suggest that the noble gas subduction barrier (Staudacher et al., 1988) is not effective; that the dominance of air-like non-radiogenic Ar (Kr) and Xe isotopes in the

  17. Production of volatile organohalogens by phytoplankton cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarczyk, R.; Moore, R.M. )

    1994-02-15

    The authors report on laboratory experiments which have demonstrated that types of unialgal cultures of marine phytoplankton can produce a range of halocarbons, including CHBr[sub 3], CHBr[sub 2]Cl, CH[sub 2]Br[sub 2]. In the laboratory environment the production rate is shown to be dependent upon the species of phytoplankton, and the development stage. Such volatile halocarbons, coming from natural sources in the seas, are thought to be important sources of reactive halogens in the troposphere, and perhaps even in the stratosphere, if the compounds are stable enough.

  18. Magmatic volatiles and the weathering of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.

    1993-01-01

    The sources for volatiles on Mars have been the subject of many hypotheses for exogenous influences including late accretion of volatile-enriched material, impact devolatilization to create massive early atmospheres, and even major bombardment by comets. However, the inventory of chemically active volatiles observable at the contemporary surface of Mars is consistent with domination by endogenous, subsequent planetary processes, viz., persistent magmatic outgassing. Volcanism on Mars has been widespread in both space and time. Notwithstanding important specific differences between the mantles of Earth and Mars, the geochemical similarities are such that the suite of gases emitted from Martian volcanic activity should include H2O, CO2, S-containing gases (e.g. H2S and/or SO2), and Cl-containing gases (e.g., Cl2 and/or HCl). H2O and CO2 exist in the atmosphere of Mars. Both are also present as surface condensates. However, spectroscopic observations of the Martian atmosphere clearly show that the S- and Cl-containing gases are severely depleted, with upper limits of less than or equal to 10(exp -7) the abundance of CO2. Likewise, there is no evidence of polar condensates of compounds of these elements as there is for CO2 and H2O. Within the soil, on the other hand, there has been direct measurement of incorporated H2O and abundant compounds containing S and Cl. Barring some as yet implausible geochemical sequestering process, the S/Cl ratio of about 6:1 in Martian soils implies a limit of 5% on the contribution of matter of solarlike composition (e.g., carbonaceous chondrite or cometary material) to these volatiles. Hence, exogenous sources are minor or not yet observed. From analysis of elemental trends in Martian soils, it has been recently shown that a simple two-component model can satisfy the Viking in situ measurements. Component A includes Si and most or all the Al, Ca, Ti, and Fe. Component B, taken as 16 +/- 3% by weight of the total, contains S and most or

  19. Microfluidic Mixing: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chia-Yen; Chang, Chin-Lung; Wang, Yao-Nan; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2011-01-01

    The aim of microfluidic mixing is to achieve a thorough and rapid mixing of multiple samples in microscale devices. In such devices, sample mixing is essentially achieved by enhancing the diffusion effect between the different species flows. Broadly speaking, microfluidic mixing schemes can be categorized as either “active”, where an external energy force is applied to perturb the sample species, or “passive”, where the contact area and contact time of the species samples are increased through specially-designed microchannel configurations. Many mixers have been proposed to facilitate this task over the past 10 years. Accordingly, this paper commences by providing a high level overview of the field of microfluidic mixing devices before describing some of the more significant proposals for active and passive mixers. PMID:21686184

  20. Theory for Neutrino Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiao-Gang

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of neutrino oscillations, for which Takaaki Kajita and Arthur B. McDonald were awarded the 2015 Nobel prize in physics, tremendous progresses have been made in measuring the mixing angles which determine the oscillation pattern. A lot of theoretical efforts have been made to understand how neutrinos mix with each other. Present data show that in the standard parameterization of the mixing matrix, θ23 is close to π/4 and the CP violating phase is close to - π/2. In this talk I report results obtained in arXiv:1505.01932 (Phys. Lett. B750(2015)620) and arXive:1404.01560 (Chin. J. Phys.53(2015)100101) and discuss some implications for theoretical model buildings for such mixing pattern. Specific examples for neutrino mixing based on A4 family symmetry are given.