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Sample records for mixta-like transcriptional regulator

  1. The Tomato MIXTA-Like Transcription Factor Coordinates Fruit Epidermis Conical Cell Development and Cuticular Lipid Biosynthesis and Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lashbrooke, Justin; Adato, Avital; Lotan, Orfa; Alkan, Noam; Tsimbalist, Tatiana; Rechav, Katya; Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Widemann, Emilie; Grausem, Bernard; Pinot, Franck; Granell, Antonio; Costa, Fabrizio; Aharoni, Asaph

    2015-12-01

    The epidermis of aerial plant organs is the primary source of building blocks forming the outer surface cuticular layer. To examine the relationship between epidermal cell development and cuticle assembly in the context of fruit surface, we investigated the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MIXTA-like gene. MIXTA/MIXTA-like proteins, initially described in snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) petals, are known regulators of epidermal cell differentiation. Fruit of transgenically silenced SlMIXTA-like tomato plants displayed defects in patterning of conical epidermal cells. They also showed altered postharvest water loss and resistance to pathogens. Transcriptome and cuticular lipids profiling coupled with comprehensive microscopy revealed significant modifications to cuticle assembly and suggested SlMIXTA-like to regulate cutin biosynthesis. Candidate genes likely acting downstream of SlMIXTA-like included cytochrome P450s (CYPs) of the CYP77A and CYP86A subfamilies, LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE2, GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE SN-2-ACYLTRANSFERASE4, and the ATP-BINDING CASSETTE11 cuticular lipids transporter. As part of a larger regulatory network of epidermal cell patterning and L1-layer identity, we found that SlMIXTA-like acts downstream of SlSHINE3 and possibly cooperates with homeodomain Leu zipper IV transcription factors. Hence, SlMIXTA-like is a positive regulator of both cuticle and conical epidermal cell formation in tomato fruit, acting as a mediator of the tight association between fruit cutin polymer formation, cuticle assembly, and epidermal cell patterning. PMID:26443676

  2. The Tomato MIXTA-Like Transcription Factor Coordinates Fruit Epidermis Conical Cell Development and Cuticular Lipid Biosynthesis and Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lashbrooke, Justin; Adato, Avital; Lotan, Orfa; Alkan, Noam; Tsimbalist, Tatiana; Rechav, Katya; Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Widemann, Emilie; Grausem, Bernard; Pinot, Franck; Granell, Antonio; Costa, Fabrizio; Aharoni, Asaph

    2015-12-01

    The epidermis of aerial plant organs is the primary source of building blocks forming the outer surface cuticular layer. To examine the relationship between epidermal cell development and cuticle assembly in the context of fruit surface, we investigated the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MIXTA-like gene. MIXTA/MIXTA-like proteins, initially described in snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) petals, are known regulators of epidermal cell differentiation. Fruit of transgenically silenced SlMIXTA-like tomato plants displayed defects in patterning of conical epidermal cells. They also showed altered postharvest water loss and resistance to pathogens. Transcriptome and cuticular lipids profiling coupled with comprehensive microscopy revealed significant modifications to cuticle assembly and suggested SlMIXTA-like to regulate cutin biosynthesis. Candidate genes likely acting downstream of SlMIXTA-like included cytochrome P450s (CYPs) of the CYP77A and CYP86A subfamilies, LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE2, GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE SN-2-ACYLTRANSFERASE4, and the ATP-BINDING CASSETTE11 cuticular lipids transporter. As part of a larger regulatory network of epidermal cell patterning and L1-layer identity, we found that SlMIXTA-like acts downstream of SlSHINE3 and possibly cooperates with homeodomain Leu zipper IV transcription factors. Hence, SlMIXTA-like is a positive regulator of both cuticle and conical epidermal cell formation in tomato fruit, acting as a mediator of the tight association between fruit cutin polymer formation, cuticle assembly, and epidermal cell patterning.

  3. Promoters of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 genes of Artemisia annua direct reporter gene expression in glandular and non-glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Sunita; Longchar, Bendangchuchang; Singh, Alka; Gupta, Vikrant

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report cloning and analysis of promoters of GLABRA2 (AaGL2) homolog and a MIXTA-Like (AaMIXTA-Like1) gene from Artemisia annua. The upstream regulatory regions of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 showed the presence of several crucial cis-acting elements. Arabidopsis and A. annua seedlings were transiently transfected with the promoter-GUS constructs using a robust agro-infiltration method. Both AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters showed GUS expression preferentially in Arabidopsis single-celled trichomes and glandular as well as T-shaped trichomes of A. annua. Transgenic Arabidopsis harboring constructs in which AaGL2 or AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters would control GFP expression, showed fluorescence emanating specifically from trichome cells. Our study provides a fast and efficient method to study trichome-specific expression, and 2 promoters that have potential for targeted metabolic engineering in plants. PMID:26340695

  4. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  5. Transcriptional Regulation of Hepatic Lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhui; Viscarra, Jose; Kim, Sun-Joong; Sul, Hei Sook

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid and fat synthesis in liver is a highly regulated metabolic pathway critical for energy distribution. Having common features at their promoter regions, lipogenic genes are coordinately regulated at the transcription level. Transcription factors, such as USF, SREBP-1c, LXR and ChREBP play critical roles in this process. Recently, insights have been gained into how various signaling pathways regulate these transcription factors. After feeding, high blood glucose and insulin induce lipogenic genes through several pathways, including DNA-PK, aPKC and Akt-mTOR. Various transcription factors and coregulators undergo specific modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation, or ubiquitination, which affect their function, stability, or localization. Dysregulation of lipogenesis can contribute to hepatosteatosis, which is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26490400

  6. Transcriptional Regulation: a Genomic Overview

    PubMed Central

    Riechmann, José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The availability of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comprehensive analysis of transcriptional regulation in plants using novel genomic approaches and methodologies. Such a genomic view of transcription first necessitates the compilation of lists of elements. Transcription factors are the most numerous of the different types of proteins involved in transcription in eukaryotes, and the Arabidopsis genome codes for more than 1,500 of them, or approximately 6% of its total number of genes. A genome-wide comparison of transcription factors across the three eukaryotic kingdoms reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the components of the regulatory machinery of transcription. However, as illustrated by Arabidopsis, transcription in plants follows similar basic principles and logic to those in animals and fungi. A global view and understanding of transcription at a cellular and organismal level requires the characterization of the Arabidopsis transcriptome and promoterome, as well as of the interactome, the localizome, and the phenome of the proteins involved in transcription. PMID:22303220

  7. RNA polymerase and the regulation of transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Reznikoff, W.S.; Gross, C.A.; Burgess, R.R.; Record, M.T.; Dahlberg, J.E.; Wickens, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book consists of eight sections, each containing several papers. The section titles are: RNA Polymerases; Transcription Initiation - Bacterial; Regulation of Bacterial Transcription Initiation; Stable RNA Synthesis in Eukaryotes: Chromatin Structure; Promoters; Enhancers; and the Global Control of Eukaryotic Transcription; Specific Eukaryotic Transcription Factors; Termination of Transcription; and Short Communications.

  8. Informational requirements for transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Patrick K; Forder, Robert; Erill, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate transcription by binding to specific sites in promoter regions. Information theory provides a useful mathematical framework to analyze the binding motifs associated with TFs but imposes several assumptions that limit their applicability to specific regulatory scenarios. Explicit simulations of the co-evolution of TFs and their binding motifs allow the study of the evolution of regulatory networks with a high degree of realism. In this work we analyze the impact of differential regulatory demands on the information content of TF-binding motifs by means of evolutionary simulations. We generalize a predictive index based on information theory, and we validate its applicability to regulatory scenarios in which the TF binds significantly to the genomic background. Our results show a logarithmic dependence of the evolved information content on the occupancy of target sites and indicate that TFs may actively exploit pseudo-sites to modulate their occupancy of target sites. In regulatory networks with differentially regulated targets, we observe that information content in TF-binding motifs is dictated primarily by the fraction of total probability mass that the TF assigns to its target sites, and we provide a predictive index to estimate the amount of information associated with arbitrarily complex regulatory systems. We observe that complex regulatory patterns can exert additional demands on evolved information content, but, given a total occupancy for target sites, we do not find conclusive evidence that this effect is because of the range of required binding affinities. PMID:24689750

  9. Transcriptional Regulation and its Misregulation in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tong Ihn; Young, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The gene expression programs that establish and maintain specific cell states in humans are controlled by thousands of transcription factors, cofactors and chromatin regulators. Misregulation of these gene expression programs can cause a broad range of diseases. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of transcriptional regulation and discuss how these have provided new insights into transcriptional misregulation in disease. PMID:23498934

  10. Transcriptional regulation of tenascin genes

    PubMed Central

    Chiovaro, Francesca; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Chiquet, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins of the tenascin family resemble each other in their domain structure, and also share functions in modulating cell adhesion and cellular responses to growth factors. Despite these common features, the 4 vertebrate tenascins exhibit vastly different expression patterns. Tenascin-R is specific to the central nervous system. Tenascin-C is an “oncofetal” protein controlled by many stimuli (growth factors, cytokines, mechanical stress), but with restricted occurrence in space and time. In contrast, tenascin-X is a constituitive component of connective tissues, and its level is barely affected by external factors. Finally, the expression of tenascin-W is similar to that of tenascin-C but even more limited. In accordance with their highly regulated expression, the promoters of the tenascin-C and -W genes contain TATA boxes, whereas those of the other 2 tenascins do not. This article summarizes what is currently known about the complex transcriptional regulation of the 4 tenascin genes in development and disease. PMID:25793574

  11. Nickel-responsive transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Musiani, Francesco; Zambelli, Barbara; Bazzani, Micaela; Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Nickel is an essential micronutrient for a large number of living organisms, but it is also a toxic metal ion when it accumulates beyond the sustainable level as it may result if and when its cellular trafficking is not properly governed. Therefore, the homeostasis and metabolism of nickel is tightly regulated through metal-specific protein networks that respond to the available Ni(II) concentration. These are directed by specific nickel sensors, able to couple Ni(II) binding to a change in their DNA binding affinity and/or specificity, thus translating the cellular level of Ni(II) into a modification of the expression of the proteins devoted to modulating nickel uptake, efflux and cellular utilization. This review describes the Ni(II)-dependent transcriptional regulators discovered so far, focusing on their structural features, metal coordination modes and metal binding thermodynamics. Understanding these properties is essential to comprehend how these sensors correlate nickel availability to metal coordination and functional responses. A broad and comparative study, described here, reveals some general traits that characterize the binding stoichiometry and Ni(II) affinity of these metallo-sensors.

  12. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fei; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis. PMID:27148546

  13. Mechanisms of mutational robustness in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Robustness is the invariance of a phenotype in the face of environmental or genetic change. The phenotypes produced by transcriptional regulatory circuits are gene expression patterns that are to some extent robust to mutations. Here we review several causes of this robustness. They include robustness of individual transcription factor binding sites, homotypic clusters of such sites, redundant enhancers, transcription factors, redundant transcription factors, and the wiring of transcriptional regulatory circuits. Such robustness can either be an adaptation by itself, a byproduct of other adaptations, or the result of biophysical principles and non-adaptive forces of genome evolution. The potential consequences of such robustness include complex regulatory network topologies that arise through neutral evolution, as well as cryptic variation, i.e., genotypic divergence without phenotypic divergence. On the longest evolutionary timescales, the robustness of transcriptional regulation has helped shape life as we know it, by facilitating evolutionary innovations that helped organisms such as flowering plants and vertebrates diversify. PMID:26579194

  14. Catching transcriptional regulation by thermostatistical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Till D.; Cheong, Alex; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is frequently regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Thermostatistical methods allow for a quantitative description of interactions between TFs, RNA polymerase and DNA, and their impact on the transcription rates. We illustrate three different scales of the thermostatistical approach: the microscale of TF molecules, the mesoscale of promoter energy levels and the macroscale of transcriptionally active and inactive cells in a cell population. We demonstrate versatility of combinatorial transcriptional activation by exemplifying logic functions, such as AND and OR gates. We discuss a metric for cell-to-cell transcriptional activation variability known as Fermi entropy. Suitability of thermostatistical modeling is illustrated by describing the experimental data on transcriptional induction of NFκB and the c-Fos protein.

  15. Transcriptional regulation by CHIP/LDB complexes.

    PubMed

    Bronstein, Revital; Levkovitz, Liron; Yosef, Nir; Yanku, Michaela; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded; Westphal, Heiner; Oliver, Brian; Segal, Daniel

    2010-08-12

    It is increasingly clear that transcription factors play versatile roles in turning genes "on" or "off" depending on cellular context via the various transcription complexes they form. This poses a major challenge in unraveling combinatorial transcription complex codes. Here we use the powerful genetics of Drosophila combined with microarray and bioinformatics analyses to tackle this challenge. The nuclear adaptor CHIP/LDB is a major developmental regulator capable of forming tissue-specific transcription complexes with various types of transcription factors and cofactors, making it a valuable model to study the intricacies of gene regulation. To date only few CHIP/LDB complexes target genes have been identified, and possible tissue-dependent crosstalk between these complexes has not been rigorously explored. SSDP proteins protect CHIP/LDB complexes from proteasome dependent degradation and are rate-limiting cofactors for these complexes. By using mutations in SSDP, we identified 189 down-stream targets of CHIP/LDB and show that these genes are enriched for the binding sites of APTEROUS (AP) and PANNIER (PNR), two well studied transcription factors associated with CHIP/LDB complexes. We performed extensive genetic screens and identified target genes that genetically interact with components of CHIP/LDB complexes in directing the development of the wings (28 genes) and thoracic bristles (23 genes). Moreover, by in vivo RNAi silencing we uncovered novel roles for two of the target genes, xbp1 and Gs-alpha, in early development of these structures. Taken together, our results suggest that loss of SSDP disrupts the normal balance between the CHIP-AP and the CHIP-PNR transcription complexes, resulting in down-regulation of CHIP-AP target genes and the concomitant up-regulation of CHIP-PNR target genes. Understanding the combinatorial nature of transcription complexes as presented here is crucial to the study of transcription regulation of gene batteries required for

  16. Transcriptional Mechanisms Regulating Ca2+ Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Michael F.; Zhou, Yandong; Soboloff, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+ is a dynamic cellular secondary messenger which mediates a vast array of cellular responses. Control over these processes is achieved via an extensive combination of pumps and channels which regulate the concentration of Ca2+ within not only the cytosol but also all intracellular compartments. Precisely how these pumps and channels are regulated is only partially understood, however, recent investigations have identified members of the Early Growth Response (EGR) family of zinc finger transcription factors as critical players in this process. The roles of several other transcription factors in control of Ca2+ homeostasis have also been demonstrated, including Wilms Tumor Suppressor 1 (WT1), Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) and c-myc. In this review, we will discuss not only how these transcription factors regulate the expression of the major proteins involved in control of Ca2+ homeostasis, but also how this transcriptional remodeling of Ca2+ homeostasis affects Ca2+ dynamics and cellular responses. PMID:21074851

  17. Identifying Novel Transcriptional Regulators with Circadian Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Sandra; Thakurela, Sudhir; Fournier, David; Hampel, Mareike Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    Organisms adapt their physiology and behavior to the 24-h day-night cycle to which they are exposed. On a cellular level, this is regulated by intrinsic transcriptional-translational feedback loops that are important for maintaining the circadian rhythm. These loops are organized by members of the core clock network, which further regulate transcription of downstream genes, resulting in their circadian expression. Despite progress in understanding circadian gene expression, only a few players involved in circadian transcriptional regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long noncoding RNAs, are known. Aiming to discover such genes, we performed a high-coverage transcriptome analysis of a circadian time course in murine fibroblast cells. In combination with a newly developed algorithm, we identified many transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long intergenic noncoding RNAs that are cyclically expressed. In addition, a number of these genes also showed circadian expression in mouse tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of one such factor, Zfp28, influenced the core clock network. Mathematical modeling was able to predict putative regulator-effector interactions between the identified circadian genes and may help for investigations into the gene regulatory networks underlying circadian rhythms. PMID:26644408

  18. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity. PMID:27337479

  19. Regulation of Transcription by Long Noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bonasio, Roberto; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a greater understanding of genomic complexity in eukaryotes ushered in by the immense technological advances in high-throughput sequencing of DNA and its corresponding RNA transcripts. This has resulted in the realization that beyond protein-coding genes, there are a large number of transcripts that do not encode for proteins and, therefore, may perform their function through RNA sequences and/or through secondary and tertiary structural determinants. This review is focused on the latest findings on a class of noncoding RNAs that are relatively large (>200 nucleotides), display nuclear localization, and use different strategies to regulate transcription. These are exciting times for discovering the biological scope and the mechanism of action for these RNA molecules, which have roles in dosage compensation, imprinting, enhancer function, and transcriptional regulation, with a great impact on development and disease. PMID:25251851

  20. The evolution of transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Gregory A.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Abouheif, Ehab; Balhoff, James P.; Pizer, Margaret; Rockman, Matthew V.; Romano, Laura A.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression is central to the genotype-phenotype relationship in all organisms, and it is an important component of the genetic basis for evolutionary change in diverse aspects of phenotype. However, the evolution of transcriptional regulation remains understudied and poorly understood. Here we review the evolutionary dynamics of promoter, or cis-regulatory, sequences and the evolutionary mechanisms that shape them. Existing evidence indicates that populations harbor extensive genetic variation in promoter sequences, that a substantial fraction of this variation has consequences for both biochemical and organismal phenotype, and that some of this functional variation is sorted by selection. As with protein-coding sequences, rates and patterns of promoter sequence evolution differ considerably among loci and among clades for reasons that are not well understood. Studying the evolution of transcriptional regulation poses empirical and conceptual challenges beyond those typically encountered in analyses of coding sequence evolution: promoter organization is much less regular than that of coding sequences, and sequences required for the transcription of each locus reside at multiple other loci in the genome. Because of the strong context-dependence of transcriptional regulation, sequence inspection alone provides limited information about promoter function. Understanding the functional consequences of sequence differences among promoters generally requires biochemical and in vivo functional assays. Despite these challenges, important insights have already been gained into the evolution of transcriptional regulation, and the pace of discovery is accelerating.

  1. Transcriptional Regulation by the Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Hernan; Bintu, Lacramioara; Phillips, Rob

    2005-03-01

    The study of gene regulation and expression is becoming ever more quantitative. In particular, with increasing regularity the expression of genes is characterized quantitatively with respect to how much, when and where. The key argument of the present work is that such quantitative data demands quantitative models. We examine a class of models (``thermodynamic models'') which exploit the tools of statistical mechanics to compute the probability that RNA polymerase will be found at the appropriate promoter. Recent arguments have suggested that in some instances, the action of activators can be thought of strictly as agents of recruitment which increase the probability that RNA polymerase will be found at the promoter of interest. We develop an allied mathematical framework which describes the interactions of repressors, activators, helper molecules and RNA polymerase and culminates in an expression for the probability of RNA polymerase binding at the promoter of interest as a function of the concentrations of all of these regulatory agents. These ideas are applied to several case studies which illuminate the general formalism and shed light on the role of DNA looping.

  2. Regulation of gene transcription by Polycomb proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Sergi; Mas, Gloria; Di Croce, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins defines a subset of factors that physically associate and function to maintain the positional identity of cells from the embryo to adult stages. PcG has long been considered a paradigmatic model for epigenetic maintenance of gene transcription programs. Despite intensive research efforts to unveil the molecular mechanisms of action of PcG proteins, several fundamental questions remain unresolved: How many different PcG complexes exist in mammalian cells? How are PcG complexes targeted to specific loci? How does PcG regulate transcription? In this review, we discuss the diversity of PcG complexes in mammalian cells, examine newly identified modes of recruitment to chromatin, and highlight the latest insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the function of PcGs in transcription regulation and three-dimensional chromatin conformation. PMID:26665172

  3. Transcriptional regulation of xenobiotic detoxification in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Jyoti R.; Horner, Michael A.; Lam, Geanette; Thummel, Carl S.

    2011-01-01

    Living organisms, from bacteria to humans, display a coordinated transcriptional response to xenobiotic exposure, inducing enzymes and transporters that facilitate detoxification. Several transcription factors have been identified in vertebrates that contribute to this regulatory response. In contrast, little is known about this pathway in insects. Here we show that the Drosophila Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) ortholog CncC (cap ‘n’ collar isoform-C) is a central regulator of xenobiotic detoxification responses. A binding site for CncC and its heterodimer partner Maf (muscle aponeurosis fibromatosis) is sufficient and necessary for robust transcriptional responses to three xenobiotic compounds: phenobarbital (PB), chlorpromazine, and caffeine. Genetic manipulations that alter the levels of CncC or its negative regulator, Keap1 (Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1), lead to predictable changes in xenobiotic-inducible gene expression. Transcriptional profiling studies reveal that more than half of the genes regulated by PB are also controlled by CncC. Consistent with these effects on detoxification gene expression, activation of the CncC/Keap1 pathway in Drosophila is sufficient to confer resistance to the lethal effects of the pesticide malathion. These studies establish a molecular mechanism for the regulation of xenobiotic detoxification in Drosophila and have implications for controlling insect populations and the spread of insect-borne human diseases. PMID:21896655

  4. Respiratory gases and the regulation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Eoin P; Keogh, Ciara E

    2016-08-01

    What is the topic of this review? This review highlights the transcriptional consequences for decreased cellular O2 levels (hypoxia) and increased cellular CO2 levels (hypercapnia). What advances does it highlight? We discuss recent advances in our understanding of the cellular response to hypoxia and consider the potential cross-talk between O2 - and CO2 -dependent transcriptional regulation. Oxygen and carbon dioxide are the substrate and product of aerobic metabolism, respectively. Thus, the levels of these physiological gases are inextricably linked in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Increased mitochondrial consumption of O2 (to produce ATP) will produce more CO2 . Furthermore, in lung pathologies such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sleep apnoea and central hypoventilation syndrome, hypoxia and hypercapnia are co-incident. Acute responses to hypoxia involve carotid body-mediated changes in the rate and depth of breathing. Chronic adaptation to hypoxia involves a multitude of changes on a transcriptional level, which simultaneously increases oxygen utilization (via hypoxia-inducible factor and others), while suppressing superfluous energy-demanding processes. Acute responses to CO2 affect breathing primarily via central chemoreceptors. The nature of hypercapnia-dependent transcriptional regulation is an emerging area of research, but at present the mechanisms underpinning this response are not fully characterized and understood. Thus, given the juxtaposition of hypoxia and hypercapnia in health and disease, this manuscript reviews the current evidence for transcriptional responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Finally, we discuss the potential cross-talk between hypoxia and hypercapnia on a transcriptional level. PMID:27474261

  5. Combinatorial Transcription Control in Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Terence; Buchler, Nicolas E.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2003-03-01

    We develop a simple thermodynamic model for the regulation of gene transcription and explore the limits of combinatorial control. Our model is based on the ``regulated recruitment'' mechanism [M. Ptashne and A. Gann, Nature 386 (1997) 569], assuming weak contact interaction between the regulatory proteins together with specific protein-DNA interactions. We further assume "programmability" in the strengths of these interactions within a biophysically allowed range [U. Gerland, J.D. Moroz, and T.Hwa, PNAS 99 (2002) 12015], through the choices and the locations of the protein-binding DNA sequences in the regulatory region. Within our thermodynamic model, we demonstrate the implementability of various binary logic functions (including XOR) by computing the degree of gene transcription (output) for all combinations of regulatory protein concentrations (input).

  6. The Mediator complex and transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Poss, Zachary C.; Ebmeier, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator complex is a multi-subunit assembly that appears to be required for regulating expression of most RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcripts, which include protein-coding and most non-coding RNA genes. Mediator and pol II function within the pre-initiation complex (PIC), which consists of Mediator, pol II, TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIID, TFIIE, TFIIF and TFIIH and is approximately 4.0 MDa in size. Mediator serves as a central scaffold within the PIC and helps regulate pol II activity in ways that remain poorly understood. Mediator is also generally targeted by sequence-specific, DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) that work to control gene expression programs in response to developmental or environmental cues. At a basic level, Mediator functions by relaying signals from TFs directly to the pol II enzyme, thereby facilitating TF-dependent regulation of gene expression. Thus, Mediator is essential for converting biological inputs (communicated by TFs) to physiological responses (via changes in gene expression). In this review, we summarize an expansive body of research on the Mediator complex, with an emphasis on yeast and mammalian complexes. We focus on the basics that underlie Mediator function, such as its structure and subunit composition, and describe its broad regulatory influence on gene expression, ranging from chromatin architecture to transcription initiation and elongation, to mRNA processing. We also describe factors that influence Mediator structure and activity, including TFs, non-coding RNAs and the CDK8 module. PMID:24088064

  7. Information flow and optimization in transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacik, Gasper

    2008-03-01

    In the simplest view of transcriptional regulation, the expression of a gene is turned on or off by the changes in the concentration of a transcription factor (TF). Here we analyze transcriptional regulatory elements with the tools of information theory. Recent data on noise levels in gene expression are used to show that it should be possible to transmit much more than just one regulatory bit. Realizing this optimal information capacity would require that the dynamic range of TF concentrations used by the cell, the input/output relation of the regulatory module, and the noise levels of binding and transcription satisfy certain matching relations. This parameter-free prediction is in good agreement with recent experiments on the Bicoid/Hunchback system in the early Drosophila embryo, and this system achieves around 90% of its theoretical maximum information transmission. The dependence of information capacity on parameters that govern gene expression for simple, single-input / single-output, genetic regulatory elements is systematically examined and the extensions of the work to genetic circuits consisting of several interacting elements are presented.

  8. Ultraviolet B Regulation of Transcription Factor Families

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, S.J.; Bowden, G.T.

    2008-01-01

    Prolonged and repeated exposure of the skin to ultraviolet light (UV) leads not only to aging of the skin but also increases the incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Damage of cells induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) light both at the DNA level and molecular level initiates the activation of transcription factor pathways, which in turn regulate the expression of a number of genes termed the “UV response genes”. Two such transcription factor families that are activated in this way are those of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) families. These two transcription factor families have been identified to be involved in the processes of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and cell survival and therefore play important roles in tumorigenesis. The study of these two transcription factor pathways and the cross-talk between them in response to UVB exposure may help with the development of new chemopreventive strategies for the prevention of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. PMID:17979627

  9. Peroxide-Sensing Transcriptional Regulators in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2012-01-01

    The ability to maintain intracellular concentrations of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) within safe limits is essential for all aerobic life forms. In bacteria, as well as other organisms, ROS are produced during the normal course of aerobic metabolism, necessitating the constitutive expression of ROS scavenging systems. However, bacteria can also experience transient high-level exposure to ROS derived either from external sources, such as the host defense response, or as a secondary effect of other seemingly unrelated environmental stresses. Consequently, transcriptional regulators have evolved to sense the levels of ROS and coordinate the appropriate oxidative stress response. Three well-studied examples of these are the peroxide responsive regulators OxyR, PerR, and OhrR. OxyR and PerR are sensors of primarily H2O2, while OhrR senses organic peroxide (ROOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). OxyR and OhrR sense oxidants by means of the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine residues. In contrast, PerR senses H2O2 via the Fe-catalyzed oxidation of histidine residues. These transcription regulators also influence complex biological phenomena, such as biofilm formation, the evasion of host immune responses, and antibiotic resistance via the direct regulation of specific proteins. PMID:22797754

  10. Transcriptional regulation of cranial sensory placode development

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Cranial sensory placodes derive from discrete patches of the head ectoderm, and give rise to numerous sensory structures. During gastrulation, a specialized “neural border zone” forms around the neural plate in response to interactions between the neural and non-neural ectoderm and signals from adjacent mesodermal and/or endodermal tissues. This zone subsequently gives rise to two distinct precursor populations of the peripheral nervous system: the neural crest and the pre-placodal ectoderm (PPE). The PPE is a common field from which all cranial sensory placodes arise (adenohypophyseal, olfactory, lens, trigeminal, epibranchial, otic). Members of the Six family of transcription factors are major regulators of PPE specification, in partnership with co-factor proteins such as Eya. Six gene activity also maintains tissue boundaries between the PPE, neural crest and epidermis by repressing genes that specify the fates of those adjacent ectodermally-derived domains. As the embryo acquires anterior-posterior identity, the PPE becomes transcriptionally regionalized, and it subsequently subdivides into specific placodes with distinct developmental fates in response to signaling from adjacent tissues. Each placode is characterized by a unique transcriptional program that leads to the differentiation of highly specialized cells, such as neurosecretory cells, somatic sensory receptor cells, chemosensory neurons, peripheral glia and supporting cells. In this review, we summarize the transcriptional and signaling factors that regulate key steps of placode development, influence subsequent sensory neuron specification, and discuss what is known about mutations in some of the essential PPE genes that underlie human congenital syndromes. PMID:25662264

  11. Transcriptional regulation of topology modulators and transcription regulators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Tare, Priyanka; Ahmed, Wareed; Vasu, Kommireddy; China, Arnab; Kumar, Rupesh; Mitra, Anirban; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a formidable pathogen which has the ability to survive the hostile environment of the host by evading the host defense system. The re-configuration of its transcriptional and metabolic process allows the pathogen to confront the adverse environment within the host macrophages. The factors that assist the transcription and modulate the DNA topology would have to play a key role in the regulation of global gene expression of the organism. How transcription of these essential housekeeping genes alters in response to growth conditions and environmental stress has not been addressed together in a set of experimental conditions in Mtb. Now, we have mapped the transcription start sites (TSS) and promoters of several genes that play a central role in the regulation of DNA topology and transcription in Mtb. Using in vivo reporter assays, we validated the activity of the identified promoter elements in different growth conditions. The variation in transcript abundance of these essential genes was also analyzed in growth phase-dependent manner. These data provide the first glimpse into the specific adaptive changes in the expression of genes involved in transcription and DNA topology modulation in Mtb.

  12. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of cyanobacterial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Annegret; Hihara, Yukako

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria are well established model organisms for the study of oxygenic photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, toxin biosynthesis, and salt acclimation. However, in comparison to other model bacteria little is known about regulatory networks, which allow cyanobacteria to acclimate to changing environmental conditions. The current work has begun to illuminate how transcription factors modulate expression of different photosynthetic regulons. During the past few years, the research on other regulatory principles like RNA-based regulation showed the importance of non-protein regulators for bacterial lifestyle. Investigations on modulation of photosynthetic components should elucidate the contributions of all factors within the context of a larger regulatory network. Here, we focus on regulation of photosynthetic processes including transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, citing examples from a limited number of cyanobacterial species. Though, the general idea holds true for most species, important differences exist between various organisms, illustrating diversity of acclimation strategies in the very heterogeneous cyanobacterial clade. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of plant phosphate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Muchhal, Umesh S.; Raghothama, K. G.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphorus is acquired by plant roots primarily via the high-affinity inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. The transcripts for Pi transporters are highly inducible upon Pi starvation, which also results in enhanced Pi uptake when Pi is resupplied. Using antibodies specific to one of the tomato Pi transporters (encoded by LePT1), we show that an increase in the LePT1 transcript under Pi starvation leads to a concurrent increase in the transporter protein, suggesting a transcriptional regulation for Pi acquisition. LePT1 protein accumulates rapidly in tomato roots in response to Pi starvation. The level of transporter protein accumulation depends on the Pi concentration in the medium, and it is reversible upon resupply of Pi. LePT1 protein accumulates all along the roots under Pi starvation and is localized primarily in the plasma membranes. These results clearly demonstrate that plants increase their capacity for Pi uptake during Pi starvation by synthesis of additional transporter molecules. PMID:10318976

  14. IKAROS: a multifunctional regulator of the polymerase II transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Bottardi, Stefania; Mavoungou, Lionel; Milot, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Transcription factors are important determinants of lineage specification during hematopoiesis. They favor recruitment of cofactors involved in epigenetic regulation, thereby defining patterns of gene expression in a development- and lineage-specific manner. Additionally, transcription factors can facilitate transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) formation and assembly on chromatin. Interestingly, a few lineage-specific transcription factors, including IKAROS, also regulate transcription elongation. IKAROS is a tumor suppressor frequently inactivated in leukemia and associated with a poor prognosis. It forms a complex with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex and the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is required for productive transcription elongation. It has also been reported that IKAROS interacts with factors involved in transcription termination. Here we review these and other recent findings that establish IKAROS as the first transcription factor found to act as a multifunctional regulator of the transcription cycle in hematopoietic cells.

  15. Approaches to characterizing Entamoeba histolytica transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Richard J; Singh, Upinder

    2010-12-01

    Entamoeba histolytica causes an estimated 100,000 deaths per year and is one of the leading causes of death among parasitic infections. Studies using E. histolytica-specific polymerase chain reaction identified that 13.8% of adults in a rural Mexican community and 11.2% of adults in central Vietnam are asymptomatically colonized. Such high incidents of asymptomatic infection suggest that only a minority of infections proceed to invasive disease. Understanding the mechanisms that underpin variable disease outcome will be critical in developing therapeutic strategies. In recent years there have been a plethora of gene expression profiling data documenting the transcriptome differences between virulent and non-virulent strains of E. histolytica as well as changes induced by external environmental changes or stimuli. While these studies have successfully identified co-regulated genes and potential virulence factors, there is still little known about the transcriptional mechanisms that induce the changes observed in this non-model organism. In this review, we have looked at how molecular technological advances have shaped our understanding of transcriptional regulation in amoeba and what we may expect from the application of powerful new techniques. PMID:20812994

  16. Transcriptional regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Yun; Jeoung, Nam Ho; Park, Keun-Gyu; Lee, In-Kyu

    2012-10-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) activity is crucial to maintains blood glucose and ATP levels, which largely depends on the phosphorylation status by pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK) isoenzymes. Although it has been reported that PDC is phosphorylated and inactivated by PDK2 and PDK4 in metabolically active tissues including liver, skeletal muscle, heart, and kidney during starvation and diabetes, the precise mechanisms by which expression of PDK2 and PDK4 are transcriptionally regulated still remains unclear. Insulin represses the expression of PDK2 and PDK4 via phosphorylation of FOXO through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Several nuclear hormone receptors activated due to fasting or increased fat supply, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, glucocorticoid receptors, estrogen-related receptors, and thyroid hormone receptors, also participate in the up-regulation of PDK2 and PDK4; however, the endogenous ligands that bind those nuclear receptors have not been identified. It has been recently suggested that growth hormone, adiponectin, epinephrine, and rosiglitazone also control the expression of PDK4 in tissue-specific manners. In this review, we discuss several factors involved in the expressional regulation of PDK2 and PDK4, and introduce current studies aimed at providing a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development of metabolic diseases such as diabetes. PMID:23130316

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation in budding yeast meiosis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Neiman, Aaron M

    2016-05-01

    The precise regulation of gene expression is essential for developmental processes in eukaryotic organisms. As an important post-transcriptional regulatory point, translational control is complementary to transcriptional regulation. Sporulation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a developmental process controlled by a well-studied transcriptional cascade that drives the cell through the events of DNA replication, meiotic chromosome segregation, and spore assembly. Recent studies have revealed that as cells begin the meiotic divisions, translational regulation of gene expression fine tunes this transcriptional cascade. The significance and mechanisms of this translational regulation are beginning to emerge. These studies may also provide insights into translational regulation in germ cell development of multicellular organisms.

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of Mononuclear Phagocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Tussiwand, Roxane; Gautier, Emmanuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MP) are a quite unique subset of hematopoietic cells, which comprise dendritic cells (DC), monocytes as well as monocyte-derived and tissue-resident macrophages. These cells are extremely diverse with regard to their origin, their phenotype as well as their function. Developmentally, DC and monocytes are constantly replenished from a bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor. The ontogeny of macrophages is more complex and is temporally linked and specified by the organ where they reside, occurring early during embryonic or perinatal life. The functional heterogeneity of MPs is certainly a consequence of the tissue of residence and also reflects the diverse ontogeny of the subsets. In this review, we will highlight the developmental pathways of murine MP, with a particular emphasis on the transcriptional factors that regulate their development and function. Finally, we will discuss and point out open questions in the field. PMID:26539196

  19. Method to determine transcriptional regulation pathways in organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Timothy S.; Collins, James J.; Hayete, Boris; Faith, Jeremiah

    2012-11-06

    The invention relates to computer-implemented methods and systems for identifying regulatory relationships between expressed regulating polypeptides and targets of the regulatory activities of such regulating polypeptides. More specifically, the invention provides a new method for identifying regulatory dependencies between biochemical species in a cell. In particular embodiments, provided are computer-implemented methods for identifying a regulatory interaction between a transcription factor and a gene target of the transcription factor, or between a transcription factor and a set of gene targets of the transcription factor. Further provided are genome-scale methods for predicting regulatory interactions between a set of transcription factors and a corresponding set of transcriptional target substrates thereof.

  20. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a NAC1 transcription factor in Medicago truncatula roots.

    PubMed

    D'haeseleer, Katrien; Den Herder, Griet; Laffont, Carole; Plet, Julie; Mortier, Virginie; Lelandais-Brière, Christine; De Bodt, Stefanie; De Keyser, Annick; Crespi, Martin; Holsters, Marcelle; Frugier, Florian; Goormachtig, Sofie

    2011-08-01

    • Legume roots develop two types of lateral organs, lateral roots and nodules. Nodules develop as a result of a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia and provide a niche for the bacteria to fix atmospheric nitrogen for the plant. • The Arabidopsis NAC1 transcription factor is involved in lateral root formation, and is regulated post-transcriptionally by miRNA164 and by SINAT5-dependent ubiquitination. We analyzed in Medicago truncatula the role of the closest NAC1 homolog in lateral root formation and in nodulation. • MtNAC1 shows a different expression pattern in response to auxin than its Arabidopsis homolog and no changes in lateral root number or nodulation were observed in plants affected in MtNAC1 expression. In addition, no interaction was found with SINA E3 ligases, suggesting that post-translational regulation of MtNAC1 does not occur in M. truncatula. Similar to what was found in Arabidopsis, a conserved miR164 target site was retrieved in MtNAC1, which reduced protein accumulation of a GFP-miR164 sensor. Furthermore, miR164 and MtNAC1 show an overlapping expression pattern in symbiotic nodules, and overexpression of this miRNA led to a reduction in nodule number. • This work suggests that regulatory pathways controlling a conserved transcription factor are complex and divergent between M. truncatula and Arabidopsis.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of glial cell specification.

    PubMed

    Ragone, Gianluca; Van De Bor, Véronique; Sorrentino, Sandro; Kammerer, Martial; Galy, Anne; Schenck, Annette; Bernardoni, Roberto; Miller, Alita A; Roy, Nivedita; Giangrande, Angela

    2003-03-01

    Neuronal differentiation relies on proneural factors that also integrate positional information and contribute to the specification of the neuronal type. The molecular pathway triggering glial specification is not understood yet. In Drosophila, all lateral glial precursors and glial-promoting activity have been identified, which provides us with a unique opportunity to dissect the regulatory pathways controlling glial differentiation and specification. Although glial lineages are very heterogeneous with respect to position, time of differentiation, and lineage tree, they all express and require two homologous genes, glial cell deficient/glial cell missing (glide/gcm) and glide2, that act in concert, with glide/gcm constituting the major glial-promoting factor. Here, we show that glial specification resides in glide/gcm transcriptional regulation. The glide/gcm promoter contains lineage-specific elements as well as quantitative and turmoil elements scattered throughout several kilobases. Interestingly, there is no correlation between a specific regulatory element and the type of glial lineage. Thus, the glial-promoting factor acts as a naive switch-on button that triggers gliogenesis in response to multiple pathways converging onto its promoter. Both negative and positive regulation are required to control glide/gcm expression, indicating that gliogenesis is actively repressed in some neural lineages. PMID:12618139

  2. Transcriptional Regulation of the Pancreatic Islet: Implications for Islet Function

    PubMed Central

    Stitzel, Michael L.; Kycia, Ina; Kursawe, Romy; Ucar, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans contain multiple hormone-producing endocrine cells controlling glucose homeostasis. Transcription establishes and maintains islet cellular fates and identities. Genetic and environmental disruption of islet transcription triggers cellular dysfunction and disease. Early transcriptional regulation studies of specific islet genes, including insulin (INS) and the transcription factor PDX1, identified the first cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors governing islet function. Here, we review how human islet “omics” studies are reshaping our understanding of transcriptional regulation in islet (dys)function and diabetes. First, we highlight the expansion of islet transcript number, form, and function and of DNA transcriptional regulatory elements controlling their production. Next, we cover islet transcriptional effects of genetic and environmental perturbation. Finally, we discuss how these studies’ emerging insights should empower our diabetes research community to build mechanistic understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and to equip clinicians with tailored, precision medicine options to prevent and treat islet dysfunction and diabetes. PMID:26272056

  3. L-type Calcium Channel Auto-Regulation of Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Satin, Jonathan; Schroder, Elizabeth A.; Crump, Shawn M.

    2011-01-01

    L-type calcium channels (LTCC) impact the function of nearly all excitable cells. The classical LTCC function is to mediate trans-sarcolemmal Ca2+ flux. This review focuses on the contribution of a mobile segment of the LTCC that regulates ion channel function, and also serves as a regulator of transcription in the nucleus. Specifically we highlight recent work demonstrating an auto-feedback regulatory pathway whereby the LTCC transcription factor regulates the LTCC. Also discussed is acute and long-term regulation of function by the LTCC-transcription regulator. PMID:21295347

  4. The Lrp family of transcription regulators in archaea.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniel

    2010-11-30

    Archaea possess a eukaryotic-type basal transcription apparatus that is regulated by bacteria-like transcription regulators. A universal and abundant family of transcription regulators are the bacterial/archaeal Lrp-like regulators. The Lrp family is one of the best studied regulator families in archaea, illustrated by investigations of proteins from the archaeal model organisms: Sulfolobus, Pyrococcus, Methanocaldococcus, and Halobacterium. These regulators are extremely versatile in their DNA-binding properties, response to effector molecules, and molecular regulatory mechanisms. Besides being involved in the regulation of the amino acid metabolism, they also regulate central metabolic processes. It appears that these regulatory proteins are also involved in large regulatory networks, because of hierarchical regulations and the possible combinatorial use of different Lrp-like proteins. Here, we discuss the recent developments in our understanding of this important class of regulators.

  5. The Role of Notch Receptors in Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HONGFANG; ZANG, CHONGZHI; LIU, X. SHIRLEY; ASTER, JON C.

    2015-01-01

    Notch signaling has pleiotropic context-specific functions that have essential roles in many processes, including embryonic development and maintenance and homeostasis of adult tissues. Aberrant Notch signaling (both hyper- and hypoactive) is implicated in a number of human developmental disorders and many cancers. Notch receptor signaling is mediated by tightly regulated proteolytic cleavages that lead to the assembly of a nuclear Notch transcription complex, which drives the expression of downstream target genes and thereby executes Notch’s functions. Thus, understanding regulation of gene expression by Notch is central to deciphering how Notch carries out its many activities. Here, we summarize the recent findings pertaining to the complex interplay between the Notch transcriptional complex and interacting factors involved in transcriptional regulation, including co-activators, cooperating transcription factors, and chromatin regulators, and discuss emerging data pertaining to the role of Notch-regulated noncoding RNAs in transcription. PMID:25418913

  6. Transcriptional regulation by Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) in pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Hassan, Hosni M

    2013-01-01

    In the ancient anaerobic environment, ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) was one of the first metal cofactors. Oxygenation of the ancient world challenged bacteria to acquire the insoluble ferric iron (Fe(3+)) and later to defend against reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the Fenton chemistry. To acquire Fe(3+), bacteria produce low-molecular weight compounds, known as siderophores, which have extremely high affinity for Fe(3+). However, during infection the host restricts iron from pathogens by producing iron- and siderophore-chelating proteins, by exporting iron from intracellular pathogen-containing compartments, and by limiting absorption of dietary iron. Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) is a transcription factor which utilizes Fe(2+) as a corepressor and represses siderophore synthesis in pathogens. Fur, directly or indirectly, controls expression of enzymes that protect against ROS damage. Thus, the challenges of iron homeostasis and defense against ROS are addressed via Fur. Although the role of Fur as a repressor is well-documented, emerging evidence demonstrates that Fur can function as an activator. Fur activation can occur through three distinct mechanisms (1) indirectly via small RNAs, (2) binding at cis regulatory elements that enhance recruitment of the RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and (3) functioning as an antirepressor by removing or blocking DNA binding of a repressor of transcription. In addition, Fur homologs control defense against peroxide stress (PerR) and control uptake of other metals such as zinc (Zur) and manganese (Mur) in pathogenic bacteria. Fur family members are important for virulence within bacterial pathogens since mutants of fur, perR, or zur exhibit reduced virulence within numerous animal and plant models of infection. This review focuses on the breadth of Fur regulation in pathogenic bacteria.

  7. HnRNP-like proteins as post-transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Yeap, Wan-Chin; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Ho, Chai-Ling

    2014-10-01

    Plant cells contain a diverse repertoire of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that coordinate a network of post-transcriptional regulation. RBPs govern diverse developmental processes by modulating the gene expression of specific transcripts. Recent gene annotation and RNA sequencing clearly showed that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP)-like proteins which form a family of RBPs, are also expressed in higher plants and serve specific plant functions. In addition to their involvement in post-transcriptional regulation from mRNA capping to translation, they are also involved in telomere regulation, gene silencing and regulation in chloroplast. Here, we review the involvement of plant hnRNP-like proteins in post-transcription regulation of RNA processes and their functional roles in control of plant developmental processes especially plant-specific functions including flowering, chloroplastic-specific mRNA regulation, long-distance phloem transportation and plant responses to environmental stresses.

  8. HnRNP-like proteins as post-transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Yeap, Wan-Chin; Namasivayam, Parameswari; Ho, Chai-Ling

    2014-10-01

    Plant cells contain a diverse repertoire of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that coordinate a network of post-transcriptional regulation. RBPs govern diverse developmental processes by modulating the gene expression of specific transcripts. Recent gene annotation and RNA sequencing clearly showed that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP)-like proteins which form a family of RBPs, are also expressed in higher plants and serve specific plant functions. In addition to their involvement in post-transcriptional regulation from mRNA capping to translation, they are also involved in telomere regulation, gene silencing and regulation in chloroplast. Here, we review the involvement of plant hnRNP-like proteins in post-transcription regulation of RNA processes and their functional roles in control of plant developmental processes especially plant-specific functions including flowering, chloroplastic-specific mRNA regulation, long-distance phloem transportation and plant responses to environmental stresses. PMID:25219311

  9. Methylation of an intragenic alternative promoter regulates transcription of GARP.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Sonja; Söntgerath, Viktoria Sophie Apollonia; Leipe, Jan; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik; Skapenko, Alla

    2016-02-01

    Alternative promoter usage has been proposed as a mechanism regulating transcriptional and translational diversity in highly elaborated systems like the immune system in humans. Here, we report that transcription of human glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP) in regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs) is tightly regulated by two alternative promoters. An intragenic promoter contains several CpGs and acts as a weak promoter that is demethylated and initiates transcription Treg-specifically. The strong up-stream promoter containing a CpG-island is, in contrast, fully demethylated throughout tissues. Transcriptional activity of the strong promoter was surprisingly down-regulated upon demethylation of the weak promoter. This demethylation-induced transcriptional attenuation regulated the magnitude of GARP expression and correlated with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Treg-specific GARP transcription was initiated by synergistic interaction of forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) with nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and was underpinned by permissive chromatin remodeling caused by release of the H3K4 demethylase, PLU-1. Our findings describe a novel function of alternative promoters in regulating the extent of transcription. Moreover, since GARP functions as a transporter of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), a cytokine with broad pleiotropic traits, GARP transcriptional attenuation by alternative promoters might provide a mechanism regulating peripheral TGFβ to avoid unwanted harmful effects.

  10. Transcription factor networks regulating hepatic fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Karagianni, Panagiota; Talianidis, Iannis

    2015-01-01

    Tight regulation of lipid levels is critical for cellular and organismal homeostasis, not only in terms of energy utilization and storage, but also to prevent potential toxicity. The liver utilizes a set of hepatic transcription factors to regulate the expression of genes implicated in all aspects of lipid metabolism including catabolism, transport, and synthesis. In this article, we will review the main transcriptional mechanisms regulating the expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. The principal regulatory pathways are composed of simple modules of transcription factor crosstalks, which correspond to building blocks of more complex regulatory networks. These transcriptional networks contribute to the regulation of proper lipid homeostasis in parallel to posttranslational mechanisms and end product-mediated modulation of lipid metabolizing enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Linking transcription to physiology in lipodomics.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of IL-2 in health and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Crispín, José C.; Tsokos, George C.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of IL-2 production is central to our understanding of the immune system. Key during T cell activation, it also plays an essential role in the regulation of the immune response. This review discusses the function of recently described factors that modulate transcription and chromatin remodeling at the IL2 promoter. Also, it addresses the role of FoxP3 as a transcriptional regulator in conventional T cells and regulatory T cells, and the mechanisms whereby CD28 stabilizes IL2 transcription and translation. Finally, the alterations that prevent T cells from SLE patients from producing normal amounts of IL-2 upon stimulation are described. PMID:18723131

  12. Transcriptional Regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Transcription Factor Regulation and Function, Mechanisms of Initiation, and Roles of Activators and Coactivators

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Steven; Young, Elton T.

    2011-01-01

    Here we review recent advances in understanding the regulation of mRNA synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many fundamental gene regulatory mechanisms have been conserved in all eukaryotes, and budding yeast has been at the forefront in the discovery and dissection of these conserved mechanisms. Topics covered include upstream activation sequence and promoter structure, transcription factor classification, and examples of regulated transcription factor activity. We also examine advances in understanding the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery, conserved coactivator complexes, transcription activation domains, and the cooperation of these factors in gene regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22084422

  13. Using targeted chromatin regulators to engineer combinatorial and spatial transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Keung, Albert J; Bashor, Caleb J; Kiriakov, Szilvia; Collins, James J; Khalil, Ahmad S

    2014-07-01

    The transcription of genomic information in eukaryotes is regulated in large part by chromatin. How a diverse array of chromatin regulator (CR) proteins with different functions and genomic localization patterns coordinates chromatin activity to control transcription remains unclear. Here, we take a synthetic biology approach to decipher the complexity of chromatin regulation by studying emergent transcriptional behaviors from engineered combinatorial, spatial, and temporal patterns of individual CRs. We fuse 223 yeast CRs to programmable zinc finger proteins. Site-specific and combinatorial recruitment of CRs to distinct intralocus locations reveals a range of transcriptional logic and behaviors, including synergistic activation, long-range and spatial regulation, and gene expression memory. Comparing these transcriptional behaviors with annotated CR complex and function terms provides design principles for the engineering of transcriptional regulation. This work presents a bottom-up approach to investigating chromatin-mediated transcriptional regulation and introduces chromatin-based components and systems for synthetic biology and cellular engineering.

  14. Oxytocin Regulates Stress-Induced Crf Gene Transcription through CREB-Regulated Transcription Coactivator 3

    PubMed Central

    Jurek, Benjamin; Slattery, David A.; Hiraoka, Yuichi; Liu, Ying; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Aguilera, Greti; van den Burg, Erwin H.

    2015-01-01

    The major regulator of the neuroendocrine stress response in the brain is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), whose transcription is controlled by CREB and its cofactors CRTC2/3 (TORC2/3). Phosphorylated CRTCs are sequestered in the cytoplasm, but rapidly dephosphorylated and translocated into the nucleus following a stressful stimulus. As the stress response is attenuated by oxytocin (OT), we tested whether OT interferes with CRTC translocation and, thereby, Crf expression. OT (1 nmol, i.c.v.) delayed the stress-induced increase of nuclear CRTC3 and Crf hnRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus of male rats and mice, but did not affect either parameter in the absence of the stressor. The increase in Crf hnRNA levels at later time points was parallel to elevated nuclear CRTC2/3 levels. A direct effect of Thr4 Gly7-OT (TGOT) on CRTC3 translocation and Crf expression was found in rat primary hypothalamic neurons, amygdaloid (Ar-5), hypothalamic (H32), and human neuroblastoma (Be(2)M17) cell lines. CRTC3, but not CRCT2, knockdown using siRNA in Be(2)M17 cells prevented the effect of TGOT on Crf hnRNA levels. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation demonstrated that TGOT reduced CRTC3, but not CRTC2, binding to the Crf promoter after 10 min of forskolin stimulation. Together, the results indicate that OT modulates CRTC3 translocation, the binding of CRTC3 to the Crf promoter and, ultimately, transcription of the Crf gene. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neuropeptide oxytocin has been proposed to reduce hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation during stress. The underlying mechanisms are, however, elusive. In this study we show that activation of the oxytocin receptor in the paraventricular nucleus delays transcription of the gene encoding corticotropin releasing factor (Crf), the main regulator of the stress response. It does so by sequestering the coactivator of the transcription factor CREB, CRTC3, in the cytosol, resulting in reduced binding of CRTC3 to the Crf

  15. The transcriptional repressor Hes1 attenuates inflammation by regulating transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yingli; Coppo, Maddalena; He, Teng; Ning, Fei; Yu, Li; Kang, Lan; Zhang, Bin; Ju, Chanyang; Qiao, Yu; Zhao, Baohong; Gessler, Manfred; Rogatsky, Inez; Hu, Xiaoyu

    2016-08-01

    Most of the known regulatory mechanisms that curb inflammatory gene expression target pre-transcription-initiation steps, and evidence for post-initiation regulation of inflammatory gene expression remains scarce. We found that the transcriptional repressor Hes1 suppressed production of CXCL1, a chemokine that is crucial for recruiting neutrophils. Hes1 negatively regulated neutrophil recruitment in vivo in a manner that was dependent on macrophage-produced CXCL1, and it attenuated the severity of inflammatory arthritis. Mechanistically, inhibition of Cxcl1 expression by Hes1 did not involve modification of transcription initiation. Instead, Hes1 inhibited signal-induced recruitment of the positive transcription-elongation complex P-TEFb and thereby prevented phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II at Ser2 and productive elongation. Thus, our results identify Hes1 as a homeostatic suppressor of inflammatory responses that exerts its suppressive function by regulating transcription elongation.

  16. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  17. Express yourself: Transcriptional regulation of plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Garner, Christopher M; Kim, Sang Hee; Spears, Benjamin J; Gassmann, Walter

    2016-08-01

    The plant immune system is a complex network of components that function together to sense the presence and activity of potential biotic threats, and integrate these signals into an appropriate output, namely the transcription of genes that activate an immune response that is commensurate with the perceived threat. Given the variety of biotic threats a plant must face the immune response must be plastic, but because an immune response is costly to the plant in terms of energy expenditure and development it must also be under tight control. To meet these needs transcriptional control is exercised at multiple levels. In this article we will review some of the latest developments in understanding how the plant immune response is regulated at the level of transcription. New roles are being discovered for the long-studied WRKY and TGA transcription factor families, while additional critical defense functions are being attributed to TCPs and other transcription factors. Dynamically controlling access to DNA through post-translational modification of histones is emerging as an essential component of priming, maintaining, attenuating, and repressing transcription in response to biotic stress. Unsurprisingly, the plant's transcriptional response is targeted by pathogen effectors, and in turn resistance proteins stand guard over and participate in transcriptional regulation. Together, these multiple layers lead to the observed complexity of the plant transcriptional immune response, with different transcription factors or chromatin components playing a prominent role depending on the plant-pathogen interaction being studied. PMID:27174437

  18. Express yourself: Transcriptional regulation of plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Garner, Christopher M; Kim, Sang Hee; Spears, Benjamin J; Gassmann, Walter

    2016-08-01

    The plant immune system is a complex network of components that function together to sense the presence and activity of potential biotic threats, and integrate these signals into an appropriate output, namely the transcription of genes that activate an immune response that is commensurate with the perceived threat. Given the variety of biotic threats a plant must face the immune response must be plastic, but because an immune response is costly to the plant in terms of energy expenditure and development it must also be under tight control. To meet these needs transcriptional control is exercised at multiple levels. In this article we will review some of the latest developments in understanding how the plant immune response is regulated at the level of transcription. New roles are being discovered for the long-studied WRKY and TGA transcription factor families, while additional critical defense functions are being attributed to TCPs and other transcription factors. Dynamically controlling access to DNA through post-translational modification of histones is emerging as an essential component of priming, maintaining, attenuating, and repressing transcription in response to biotic stress. Unsurprisingly, the plant's transcriptional response is targeted by pathogen effectors, and in turn resistance proteins stand guard over and participate in transcriptional regulation. Together, these multiple layers lead to the observed complexity of the plant transcriptional immune response, with different transcription factors or chromatin components playing a prominent role depending on the plant-pathogen interaction being studied.

  19. Transcriptional Timers Regulating Mitosis in Early Drosophila Embryos.

    PubMed

    Momen-Roknabadi, Amir; Di Talia, Stefano; Wieschaus, Eric

    2016-09-13

    The development of an embryo requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of cellular processes. During Drosophila gastrulation, a precise temporal pattern of cell division is encoded through transcriptional regulation of cdc25(string) in 25 distinct mitotic domains. Using a genetic screen, we demonstrate that the same transcription factors that regulate the spatial pattern of cdc25(string) transcription encode its temporal activation. We identify buttonhead and empty spiracles as the major activators of cdc25(string) expression in mitotic domain 2. The effect of these activators is balanced through repression by hairy, sloppy paired 1, and huckebein. Within the mitotic domain, temporal precision of mitosis is robust and unaffected by changing dosage of rate-limiting transcriptional factors. However, precision can be disrupted by altering the levels of the two activators or two repressors. We propose that the additive and balanced action of activators and repressors is a general strategy for precise temporal regulation of cellular transitions during development. PMID:27626650

  20. Genome-wide transcription factor binding: beyond direct target regulation.

    PubMed

    MacQuarrie, Kyle L; Fong, Abraham P; Morse, Randall H; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2011-04-01

    The binding of transcription factors to specific DNA target sequences is the fundamental basis of gene regulatory networks. Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with DNA tiling arrays or high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, respectively) has been used in many recent studies that detail the binding sites of various transcription factors. Surprisingly, data from a variety of model organisms and tissues have demonstrated that transcription factors vary greatly in their number of genomic binding sites, and that binding events can significantly exceed the number of known or possible direct gene targets. Thus, current understanding of transcription factor function must expand to encompass what role, if any, binding might have outside of direct transcriptional target regulation. In this review, we discuss the biological significance of genome-wide binding of transcription factors and present models that can account for this phenomenon.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  2. Transcription factors of Lotus: regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis requires coordinated changes in transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Dale; Stranne, Maria; Mikkelsen, Lisbeth; Pakseresht, Nima; Welham, Tracey; Hiraka, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Sato, Shusei; Paquette, Suzanne; Wang, Trevor L; Martin, Cathie; Bailey, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Isoflavonoids are a class of phenylpropanoids made by legumes, and consumption of dietary isoflavonoids confers benefits to human health. Our aim is to understand the regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Many studies have shown the importance of transcription factors in regulating the transcription of one or more genes encoding enzymes in phenylpropanoid metabolism. In this study, we coupled bioinformatics and coexpression analysis to identify candidate genes encoding transcription factors involved in regulating isoflavonoid biosynthesis in Lotus (Lotus japonicus). Genes encoding proteins belonging to 39 of the main transcription factor families were examined by microarray analysis of RNA from leaf tissue that had been elicited with glutathione. Phylogenetic analyses of each transcription factor family were used to identify subgroups of proteins that were specific to L. japonicus or closely related to known regulators of the phenylpropanoid pathway in other species. R2R3MYB subgroup 2 genes showed increased expression after treatment with glutathione. One member of this subgroup, LjMYB14, was constitutively overexpressed in L. japonicus and induced the expression of at least 12 genes that encoded enzymes in the general phenylpropanoid and isoflavonoid pathways. A distinct set of six R2R3MYB subgroup 2-like genes was identified. We suggest that these subgroup 2 sister group proteins and those belonging to the main subgroup 2 have roles in inducing isoflavonoid biosynthesis. The induction of isoflavonoid production in L. japonicus also involves the coordinated down-regulation of competing biosynthetic pathways by changing the expression of other transcription factors. PMID:22529285

  3. Transcriptional Regulation by Trithorax-Group Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, Robert E.; Tamkun, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The trithorax group of genes (trxG) was identified in mutational screens that examined developmental phenotypes and suppression of Polycomb mutant phenotypes. The protein products of these genes are primarily involved in gene activation, although some can also have repressive effects. There is no central function for these proteins. Some move nucleosomes about on the genome in an ATP-dependent manner, some covalently modify histones such as methylating lysine 4 of histone H3, and some directly interact with the transcription machinery or are a part of that machinery. It is interesting to consider why these specific members of large families of functionally related proteins have strong developmental phenotypes. PMID:25274705

  4. Translin and Trax differentially regulate telomere-associated transcript homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Zafer; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Wakeman, Jane A.; McFarlane, Ramsay J.

    2016-01-01

    Translin and Trax proteins are highly conserved nucleic acid binding proteins that have been implicated in RNA regulation in a range of biological processes including tRNA processing, RNA interference, microRNA degradation during oncogenesis, spermatogenesis and neuronal regulation. Here, we explore the function of this paralogue pair of proteins in the fission yeast. Using transcript analysis we demonstrate a reciprocal mechanism for control of telomere-associated transcripts. Mutation of tfx1+ (Trax) elevates transcript levels from silenced sub-telomeric regions of the genome, but not other silenced regions, such as the peri-centromeric heterochromatin. In the case of some sub-telomeric transcripts, but not all, this elevation is dependent on the Trax paralogue, Tsn1 (Translin). In a reciprocal fashion, Tsn1 (Translin) serves to repress levels of transcripts (TERRAs) from the telomeric repeats, whereas Tfx1 serves to maintain these elevated levels. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of telomeric transcripts. We extend this to demonstrate that human Translin and Trax also control telomere-associated transcript levels in human cells in a telomere-specific fashion. PMID:27183912

  5. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Yanjun; Shen, Xia; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2016-01-01

    An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least one accession. Thousands of genes had high transcript levels in some accessions, but no transcripts at all in others, and this pattern was correlated with the genome-wide genotype. In total, 2669 eQTL were mapped in the largest population, and 717 of them were replicated in the other population. A total of 646 cis-eQTL-regulated genes that lacked detectable transcripts in some accessions was found, and for 159 of these we identified one, or several, common structural variants in the populations that were shown to be likely contributors to the lack of detectable RNA transcripts for these genes. This study thus provides new insights into the overall genetic regulation of global gene expression diversity in the leaf of natural A. thaliana accessions. Further, it also shows that strong cis-acting polymorphisms, many of which are likely to be structural variations, make important contributions to the transcriptional variation in the worldwide A. thaliana population. PMID:27226169

  6. Transcriptional control of human p53-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Riley, Todd; Sontag, Eduardo; Chen, Patricia; Levine, Arnold

    2008-05-01

    The p53 protein regulates the transcription of many different genes in response to a wide variety of stress signals. Following DNA damage, p53 regulates key processes, including DNA repair, cell-cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis, in order to suppress cancer. This Analysis article provides an overview of the current knowledge of p53-regulated genes in these pathways and others, and the mechanisms of their regulation. In addition, we present the most comprehensive list so far of human p53-regulated genes and their experimentally validated, functional binding sites that confer p53 regulation. PMID:18431400

  7. Regulation by transcription factors in bacteria: beyond description.

    PubMed

    Balleza, Enrique; López-Bojorquez, Lucia N; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Lozada-Chávez, Irma; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Encarnación, Sergio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Transcription is an essential step in gene expression and its understanding has been one of the major interests in molecular and cellular biology. By precisely tuning gene expression, transcriptional regulation determines the molecular machinery for developmental plasticity, homeostasis and adaptation. In this review, we transmit the main ideas or concepts behind regulation by transcription factors and give just enough examples to sustain these main ideas, thus avoiding a classical ennumeration of facts. We review recent concepts and developments: cis elements and trans regulatory factors, chromosome organization and structure, transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) and transcriptomics. We also summarize new important discoveries that will probably affect the direction of research in gene regulation: epigenetics and stochasticity in transcriptional regulation, synthetic circuits and plasticity and evolution of TRNs. Many of the new discoveries in gene regulation are not extensively tested with wetlab approaches. Consequently, we review this broad area in Inference of TRNs and Dynamical Models of TRNs. Finally, we have stepped backwards to trace the origins of these modern concepts, synthesizing their history in a timeline schema. PMID:19076632

  8. Regulation by transcription factors in bacteria: beyond description

    PubMed Central

    Balleza, Enrique; López-Bojorquez, Lucia N; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Lozada-Chávez, Irma; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Encarnación, Sergio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Transcription is an essential step in gene expression and its understanding has been one of the major interests in molecular and cellular biology. By precisely tuning gene expression, transcriptional regulation determines the molecular machinery for developmental plasticity, homeostasis and adaptation. In this review, we transmit the main ideas or concepts behind regulation by transcription factors and give just enough examples to sustain these main ideas, thus avoiding a classical ennumeration of facts. We review recent concepts and developments: cis elements and trans regulatory factors, chromosome organization and structure, transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) and transcriptomics. We also summarize new important discoveries that will probably affect the direction of research in gene regulation: epigenetics and stochasticity in transcriptional regulation, synthetic circuits and plasticity and evolution of TRNs. Many of the new discoveries in gene regulation are not extensively tested with wetlab approaches. Consequently, we review this broad area in Inference of TRNs and Dynamical Models of TRNs. Finally, we have stepped backwards to trace the origins of these modern concepts, synthesizing their history in a timeline schema. PMID:19076632

  9. The bile acid sensor FXR regulates insulin transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Vavassori, Piero; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, cholesterol homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we investigated whether FXR is expressed by pancreatic beta-cells and regulates insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cell line and human islets. We found that FXR activation induces positive regulatory effects on glucose-induced insulin transcription and secretion by genomic and non-genomic activities. Genomic effects of FXR activation relay on the induction of the glucose regulated transcription factor KLF11. Indeed, results from silencing experiments of KLF11 demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for FXR activity on glucose-induced insulin gene transcription. In addition FXR regulates insulin secretion by non-genomic effects. Thus, activation of FXR in betaTC6 cells increases Akt phosphorylation and translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT2 at plasma membrane, increasing the glucose uptake by these cells. In vivo experiments on Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mice demonstrated that FXR activation delays development of signs of diabetes, hyperglycemia and glycosuria, by enhancing insulin secretion and by stimulating glucose uptake by the liver. These data established that an FXR-KLF11 regulated pathway has an essential role in the regulation of insulin transcription and secretion induced by glucose.

  10. Initiation and regulation of paramyxovirus transcription and replication.

    PubMed

    Noton, Sarah L; Fearns, Rachel

    2015-05-01

    The paramyxovirus family has a genome consisting of a single strand of negative sense RNA. This genome acts as a template for two distinct processes: transcription to generate subgenomic, capped and polyadenylated mRNAs, and genome replication. These viruses only encode one polymerase. Thus, an intriguing question is, how does the viral polymerase initiate and become committed to either transcription or replication? By answering this we can begin to understand how these two processes are regulated. In this review article, we present recent findings from studies on the paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, which show how its polymerase is able to initiate transcription and replication from a single promoter. We discuss how these findings apply to other paramyxoviruses. Then, we examine how trans-acting proteins and promoter secondary structure might serve to regulate transcription and replication during different phases of the paramyxovirus replication cycle.

  11. Transcription is regulated by NusA:NusG interaction

    PubMed Central

    Strauß, Martin; Vitiello, Christal; Schweimer, Kristian; Gottesman, Max; Rösch, Paul; Knauer, Stefan H.

    2016-01-01

    NusA and NusG are major regulators of bacterial transcription elongation, which act either in concert or antagonistically. Both bind to RNA polymerase (RNAP), regulating pausing as well as intrinsic and Rho-dependent termination. Here, we demonstrate by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that the Escherichia coli NusG amino-terminal domain forms a complex with the acidic repeat domain 2 (AR2) of NusA. The interaction surface of either transcription factor overlaps with the respective binding site for RNAP. We show that NusA-AR2 is able to remove NusG from RNAP. Our in vivo and in vitro results suggest that interaction between NusA and NusG could play various regulatory roles during transcription, including recruitment of NusG to RNAP, resynchronization of transcription:translation coupling, and modulation of termination efficiency. PMID:27174929

  12. Quantitative regulation of FLC via coordinated transcriptional initiation and elongation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhe; Ietswaart, Robert; Liu, Fuquan; Yang, Hongchun; Howard, Martin; Dean, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The basis of quantitative regulation of gene expression is still poorly understood. In Arabidopsis thaliana, quantitative variation in expression of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) influences the timing of flowering. In ambient temperatures, FLC expression is quantitatively modulated by a chromatin silencing mechanism involving alternative polyadenylation of antisense transcripts. Investigation of this mechanism unexpectedly showed that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy changes at FLC did not reflect RNA fold changes. Mathematical modeling of these transcriptional dynamics predicted a tight coordination of transcriptional initiation and elongation. This prediction was validated by detailed measurements of total and chromatin-bound FLC intronic RNA, a methodology appropriate for analyzing elongation rate changes in a range of organisms. Transcription initiation was found to vary ∼25-fold with elongation rate varying ∼8- to 12-fold. Premature sense transcript termination contributed very little to expression differences. This quantitative variation in transcription was coincident with variation in H3K36me3 and H3K4me2 over the FLC gene body. We propose different chromatin states coordinately influence transcriptional initiation and elongation rates and that this coordination is likely to be a general feature of quantitative gene regulation in a chromatin context. PMID:26699513

  13. Functional evidence of post-transcriptional regulation by pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Muro, Enrique M; Mah, Nancy; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2011-11-01

    Pseudogenes have been mainly considered as functionless evolutionary relics since their discovery in 1977. However, multiple mechanisms of pseudogene functionality have been proposed both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. This review focuses on the role of pseudogenes as post-transcriptional regulators. Two lines of research have recently presented strong evidence of their potential function as post-transcriptional regulators of the corresponding parental genes from which they originate. First, pseudogene genomic sequences can encode siRNAs. Second, pseudogene transcripts can act as indirect post-transcriptional regulators decoying ncRNA, in particular miRNAs that target the parental gene. This has been demonstrated for PTEN and KRAS, two genes involved in tumorigenesis. The role of pseudogenes in disease has not been proven and seems to be the next research landmark. In this review, we chronicle the events following the initial discovery of the 'useless' pseudogene to its breakthrough as a functional molecule with hitherto unbeknownst potential to influence human disease.

  14. Navigating the transcriptional roadmap regulating plant secondary cell wall deposition

    PubMed Central

    Hussey, Steven G.; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Creux, Nicky M.; Myburg, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    The current status of lignocellulosic biomass as an invaluable resource in industry, agriculture, and health has spurred increased interest in understanding the transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall (SCW) biosynthesis. The last decade of research has revealed an extensive network of NAC, MYB and other families of transcription factors regulating Arabidopsis SCW biosynthesis, and numerous studies have explored SCW-related transcription factors in other dicots and monocots. Whilst the general structure of the Arabidopsis network has been a topic of several reviews, they have not comprehensively represented the detailed protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions described in the literature, and an understanding of network dynamics and functionality has not yet been achieved for SCW formation. Furthermore the methodologies employed in studies of SCW transcriptional regulation have not received much attention, especially in the case of non-model organisms. In this review, we have reconstructed the most exhaustive literature-based network representations to date of SCW transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis. We include a manipulable Cytoscape representation of the Arabidopsis SCW transcriptional network to aid in future studies, along with a list of supporting literature for each documented interaction. Amongst other topics, we discuss the various components of the network, its evolutionary conservation in plants, putative modules and dynamic mechanisms that may influence network function, and the approaches that have been employed in network inference. Future research should aim to better understand network function and its response to dynamic perturbations, whilst the development and application of genome-wide approaches such as ChIP-seq and systems genetics are in progress for the study of SCW transcriptional regulation in non-model organisms. PMID:24009617

  15. A synthetic oscillatory network of transcriptional regulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elowitz, Michael B.; Leibler, Stanislas

    2000-01-01

    Networks of interacting biomolecules carry out many essential functions in living cells, but the `design principles' underlying the functioning of such intracellular networks remain poorly understood, despite intensive efforts including quantitative analysis of relatively simple systems. Here we present a complementary approach to this problem: the design and construction of a synthetic network to implement a particular function. We used three transcriptional repressor systems that are not part of any natural biological clock to build an oscillating network, termed the repressilator, in Escherichia coli. The network periodically induces the synthesis of green fluorescent protein as a readout of its state in individual cells. The resulting oscillations, with typical periods of hours, are slower than the cell-division cycle, so the state of the oscillator has to be transmitted from generation to generation. This artificial clock displays noisy behaviour, possibly because of stochastic fluctuations of its components. Such `rational network design' may lead both to the engineering of new cellular behaviours and to an improved understanding of naturally occurring networks.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of dendritic cell diversity.

    PubMed

    Chopin, Michaël; Allan, Rhys S; Belz, Gabrielle T

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration, and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These findings open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle - identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man - now sets the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  17. How the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates the regulators of transcription.

    PubMed

    Ee, Gary; Lehming, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system plays an important role in transcription. Monoubiquitination of activators is believed to aid their function, while the 26S proteasomal degradation of repressors is believed to restrict their function. What remains controversial is the question of whether the degradation of activators aids or restricts their function.

  18. Transcriptional and Chromatin Regulation during Fasting - The Genomic Era.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ido; Hager, Gordon L

    2015-12-01

    An elaborate metabolic response to fasting is orchestrated by the liver and is heavily reliant on transcriptional regulation. In response to hormones (glucagon, glucocorticoids) many transcription factors (TFs) are activated and regulate various genes involved in metabolic pathways aimed at restoring homeostasis: gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis, and amino acid shuttling. We summarize recent discoveries regarding fasting-related TFs with an emphasis on genome-wide binding patterns. Collectively, the findings we discuss reveal a large degree of cooperation between TFs during fasting that occurs at motif-rich DNA sites bound by a combination of TFs. These new findings implicate transcriptional and chromatin regulation as major determinants of the response to fasting and unravels the complex, multi-TF nature of this response.

  19. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression in Yersinia Species

    PubMed Central

    Schiano, Chelsea A.; Lathem, Wyndham W.

    2012-01-01

    Proper regulation of gene expression is required by bacterial pathogens to respond to continually changing environmental conditions and the host response during the infectious process. While transcriptional regulation is perhaps the most well understood form of controlling gene expression, recent studies have demonstrated the importance of post-transcriptional mechanisms of gene regulation that allow for more refined management of the bacterial response to host conditions. Yersinia species of bacteria are known to use various forms of post-transcriptional regulation for control of many virulence-associated genes. These include regulation by cis- and trans-acting small non-coding RNAs, RNA-binding proteins, RNases, and thermoswitches. The effects of these and other regulatory mechanisms on Yersinia physiology can be profound and have been shown to influence type III secretion, motility, biofilm formation, host cell invasion, intracellular survival and replication, and more. In this review, we discuss these and other post-transcriptional mechanisms and their influence on virulence gene regulation, with a particular emphasis on how these processes influence the virulence of Yersinia in the host. PMID:23162797

  20. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of autophagy in aging.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Louis R; Kumsta, Caroline; Sandri, Marco; Ballabio, Andrea; Hansen, Malene

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a major intracellular degradation process recognized as playing a central role in cell survival and longevity. This multistep process is extensively regulated at several levels, including post-translationally through the action of conserved longevity factors such as the nutrient sensor TOR. More recently, transcriptional regulation of autophagy genes has emerged as an important mechanism for ensuring the somatic maintenance and homeostasis necessary for a long life span. Autophagy is increased in many long-lived model organisms and contributes significantly to their longevity. In turn, conserved transcription factors, particularly the helix-loop-helix transcription factor TFEB and the forkhead transcription factor FOXO, control the expression of many autophagy-related genes and are important for life-span extension. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the contribution of these transcription factors to macroautophagy regulation in the context of aging. We also review current research on epigenetic changes, such as histone modification by the deacetylase SIRT1, that influence autophagy-related gene expression and additionally affect aging. Understanding the molecular regulation of macroautophagy in relation to aging may offer new avenues for the treatment of age-related diseases.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of drought response: a tortuous network of transcriptional factors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Dhriti; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Drought is one of the leading factors responsible for the reduction in crop yield worldwide. Due to climate change, in future, more areas are going to be affected by drought and for prolonged periods. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the drought response is one of the major scientific concerns for improving crop yield. Plants deploy diverse strategies and mechanisms to respond and tolerate drought stress. Expression of numerous genes is modulated in different plants under drought stress that help them to optimize their growth and development. Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in plant response and tolerance by regulating the expression of many genes under drought stress. Transcription factors being the major regulator of gene expression play a crucial role in stress response. ABA regulates the expression of most of the target genes through ABA-responsive element (ABRE) binding protein/ABRE binding factor (AREB/ABF) transcription factors. Genes regulated by AREB/ABFs constitute a regulon termed as AREB/ABF regulon. In addition to this, drought responsive genes are also regulated by ABA-independent mechanisms. In ABA-independent regulation, dehydration-responsive element binding protein (DREB), NAM, ATAF, and CUC regulons play an important role by regulating many drought-responsive genes. Apart from these major regulons, MYB/MYC, WRKY, and nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factors are also involved in drought response and tolerance. Our understanding about transcriptional regulation of drought is still evolving. Recent reports have suggested the existence of crosstalk between different transcription factors operating under drought stress. In this article, we have reviewed various regulons working under drought stress and their crosstalk with each other. PMID:26579147

  2. Transcriptional regulation of drought response: a tortuous network of transcriptional factors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dhriti; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Drought is one of the leading factors responsible for the reduction in crop yield worldwide. Due to climate change, in future, more areas are going to be affected by drought and for prolonged periods. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the drought response is one of the major scientific concerns for improving crop yield. Plants deploy diverse strategies and mechanisms to respond and tolerate drought stress. Expression of numerous genes is modulated in different plants under drought stress that help them to optimize their growth and development. Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in plant response and tolerance by regulating the expression of many genes under drought stress. Transcription factors being the major regulator of gene expression play a crucial role in stress response. ABA regulates the expression of most of the target genes through ABA-responsive element (ABRE) binding protein/ABRE binding factor (AREB/ABF) transcription factors. Genes regulated by AREB/ABFs constitute a regulon termed as AREB/ABF regulon. In addition to this, drought responsive genes are also regulated by ABA-independent mechanisms. In ABA-independent regulation, dehydration-responsive element binding protein (DREB), NAM, ATAF, and CUC regulons play an important role by regulating many drought-responsive genes. Apart from these major regulons, MYB/MYC, WRKY, and nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factors are also involved in drought response and tolerance. Our understanding about transcriptional regulation of drought is still evolving. Recent reports have suggested the existence of crosstalk between different transcription factors operating under drought stress. In this article, we have reviewed various regulons working under drought stress and their crosstalk with each other. PMID:26579147

  3. Statins and transcriptional regulation: The FXR connection

    SciTech Connect

    Habeos, Ioannis; Ziros, Panos G.; Psyrogiannis, Agathoklis; Vagenakis, Apostolos G.; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G. . E-mail: papavas@med.upatras.gr

    2005-08-26

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor involved in lipoprotein as well as glucose metabolism. Statins are widely used hypolipidemic agents with many pleiotropic actions. It is known that statins affect other nuclear hormone receptors, but no reports are available on the effect of these drugs on FXR. Employing an animal model (Syrian hamsters), we hereby present evidence to demonstrate that Simvastatin, a broadly prescribed statin, decreases the expression of FXR at both the RNA and protein levels and down-regulates its DNA-binding activity. This novel property may have important implications on the mode statins influence on lipoprotein and carbohydrate homeostasis in the organism.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth R; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies. PMID:25790431

  5. Transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth R; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic chemokines contributes to ovarian cancer progression through the induction of tumor cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis, and metastasis. The substantial potential of these chemokines to facilitate the progression and metastasis of ovarian cancer underscores the need for their stringent transcriptional regulation. In this Review, we highlight the key mechanisms that regulate the transcription of pro-inflammatory chemokines in ovarian cancer cells, and that have important roles in controlling ovarian cancer progression. We further discuss the potential mechanisms underlying the increased chemokine expression in drug resistance, along with our perspective for future studies.

  6. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of chloroplast gene expression in Petunia hybrida.

    PubMed

    van Grinsven, M Q; Gielen, J J; Zethof, J L; Nijkamp, H J; Kool, A J

    1986-11-01

    To study the control of differential gene expression during plastid biogenesis in Petunia hybrida, we have investigated the in vivo translation and transcription of the rbc L gene, coding for the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (LSU), and the psa A gene, coding for P700 chlorophyll-a apoprotein (AP700). Differential expression of these plastid-encoded genes was studied in two developmentally different plastid systems, proplastid-like organelles from the green cell suspension AK2401 and mature chloroplasts from green leaves. In vivo translation of rbc L and psa A transcripts was analysed using specific antibodies. Specific transcript levels were analysed using internal fragments of the rbc L and psa A genes. A standardization procedure was used so that a direct correlation could be made between the amount of products and gene copy number. In Petunia hybrida the amount of LSU polypeptides present in both plastid types does not correspond to the amount of specific mRNA for the gene. Although the rbc L transcripts are present in both plastid types, the LSU protein is only present in green leaf plastids and not in cell culture plastids. In vitro translation of isolated rbc L transcripts give similar results, thereby suggesting that differences in the primary structure of the transcripts are responsible for the observed discrepancy. In contrast to this, the amount of AP700 polypeptides does correspond to the amount of the psa A transcripts. Therefore, our results indicate that the expression of chloroplast genes during plastid biogenesis takes place on at least two different levels: expression of the rbc L gene is regulated post-transcriptionally while expression of the psa A gene is regulated at the transcriptional level.

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  9. Transcriptional regulators of Na,K-ATPase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqin; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic α-subunit, the β-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids, and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits has been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease. PMID:26579519

  10. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Tobias M.; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Young, Janet M.; Malik, Harmit S.; Gage, Fred H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo–cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for “soluble Pom121”) that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components. PMID:27198230

  11. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin.

    PubMed

    Franks, Tobias M; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C N; Young, Janet M; Malik, Harmit S; Gage, Fred H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-05-15

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for "soluble Pom121") that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components. PMID:27198230

  12. Regulation of specialized metabolism by WRKY transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Schluttenhofer, Craig; Yuan, Ling

    2015-02-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are well known for regulating plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. However, much less is known about how WRKY TFs affect plant-specialized metabolism. Analysis of WRKY TFs regulating the production of specialized metabolites emphasizes the values of the family outside of traditionally accepted roles in stress tolerance. WRKYs with conserved roles across plant species seem to be essential in regulating specialized metabolism. Overall, the WRKY family plays an essential role in regulating the biosynthesis of important pharmaceutical, aromatherapy, biofuel, and industrial components, warranting considerable attention in the forthcoming years.

  13. Regulation of specialized metabolism by WRKY transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Schluttenhofer, Craig; Yuan, Ling

    2015-02-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are well known for regulating plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. However, much less is known about how WRKY TFs affect plant-specialized metabolism. Analysis of WRKY TFs regulating the production of specialized metabolites emphasizes the values of the family outside of traditionally accepted roles in stress tolerance. WRKYs with conserved roles across plant species seem to be essential in regulating specialized metabolism. Overall, the WRKY family plays an essential role in regulating the biosynthesis of important pharmaceutical, aromatherapy, biofuel, and industrial components, warranting considerable attention in the forthcoming years. PMID:25501946

  14. Stochastic models of gene expression and post-transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendar, Hodjat; Kulkarni, Rahul; Jia, Tao

    2011-10-01

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can give rise to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Correspondingly, there is considerable interest in understanding how different molecular mechanisms impact the 'noise' in gene expression. Of particular interest are post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involving genes called small RNAs, which control important processes such as development and cancer. We propose and analyze general stochastic models of gene expression and derive exact analytical expressions quantifying the noise in protein distributions [1]. Focusing on specific regulatory mechanisms, we analyze a general model for post-transcriptional regulation of stochastic gene expression [2]. The results obtained provide new insights into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the noise in gene expression. [4pt] [1] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett.,106, 058102 (2011) [0pt] [2] T. Jia and R. V. Kulkarni, Phys. Rev. Lett., 105, 018101 (2010)

  15. Non-Equilibrium Hyperbolic Transport in Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Correa-Rodríguez, María D.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we studied memory and irreversible transport phenomena in a non-equilibrium thermodynamical model for genomic transcriptional regulation. Transcriptional regulation possess an extremely complex phenomenology, and it is, of course, of foremost importance in organismal cell development and in the pathogenesis of complex diseases. A better understanding of the way in which these processes occur is mandatory to optimize the construction of gene regulatory networks, but also to connect these networks with multi-scale phenomena (e.g. metabolism, signalling pathways, etc.) under an integrative Systems Biology-like vision. In this paper we analyzed three simple mechanisms of genetic stimulation: an instant pulse, a periodic biochemical signal and a saturation process with sigmoidal kinetics and from these we derived the system's thermodynamical response, in the form of, for example, anomalous transcriptional bursts. PMID:21754990

  16. Transcriptionally Regulated Cell Adhesion Network Dictates Distal Tip Cell Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ming-Ching; Kennedy, William P.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms that govern directional changes in cell migration are poorly understood. The migratory paths of two distal tip cells (DTC) determine the U-shape of the C. elegans hermaphroditic gonad. The morphogenesis of this organ provides a model system to identify genes necessary for the DTCs to execute two stereotyped turns. Results Using candidate genes for RNAi knockdown in a DTC-specific strain, we identified two transcriptional regulators required for DTC turning: cbp-1, the CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivator homologue, and let-607, a CREBH transcription factor homologue. Further screening of potential target genes uncovered a network of integrin adhesion-related genes that have roles in turning and are dependent on cbp-1 and let-607 for expression. These genes include src-1/Src kinase, tln-1/talin, pat-2/α integrin and nmy-2, a nonmuscle myosin heavy chain. Conclusions Transcriptional regulation by means of cbp-1 and let-607 is crucial for determining directional changes during DTC migration. These regulators coordinate a gene network that is necessary for integrin-mediated adhesion. Overall, these results suggest that directional changes in cell migration rely on the precise gene regulation of adhesion. PMID:24811939

  17. Complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of an enzyme for Lipopolysaccharide modification

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyung; Six, David A.; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Raetz, Christian R.H.; Gottesman, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Summary The PhoQ/PhoP two-component system activates many genes for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification when cells are grown at low Mg2+ concentrations. An additional target of PhoQ and PhoP is MgrR, an Hfq-dependent small RNA that negatively regulates expression of eptB, also encoding a protein that carries out LPS modification. Examination of LPS confirmed that MgrR effectively silences EptB; the phosphoethanolamine modification associated with EptB is found in ΔmgrR::kan but not mgrR+ cells. Sigma E has been reported to positively regulate eptB, although the eptB promoter does not have the expected Sigma E recognition motifs. The effects of Sigma E and deletion of mgrR on levels of eptB mRNA were independent, and the same 5′ end was found in both cases. In vitro transcription and the behavior of transcriptional and translational fusions demonstrate that Sigma E acts directly at the level of transcription initiation for eptB, from the same start point as Sigma 70. The results suggest that when Sigma E is active, synthesis of eptB transcript outstrips MgrR-dependent degradation; presumably the modification of LPS is important under these conditions. Adding to the complexity of eptB regulation is a second sRNA, ArcZ, which also directly and negatively regulates eptB. PMID:23659637

  18. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Interferons and Their Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are low molecular weight cell-derived proteins that include the type I, II, and III IFN families. IFNs are critical for an optimal immune response during microbial infections while dysregulated expression can lead to autoimmune diseases. Given its role in disease, it is important to understand cellular mechanisms of IFN regulation. 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTRs) have emerged as potent regulators of mRNA and protein dosage and are controlled through multiple regulatory elements including adenylate uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) and microRNA (miRNA) recognition elements. These AREs are targeted by RNA-binding proteins (ARE-BPs) for degradation and/or stabilization through an ARE-mediated decay process. miRNA are endogenous, single-stranded RNA molecules ∼22 nucleotides in length that regulate mRNA translation through the miRNA-induced silencing complex. IFN transcripts, like other labile mRNAs, harbor AREs in their 3′ UTRs that dictate the turnover of mRNA. This review is a survey of the literature related to IFN regulation by miRNA, ARE-BPs, and how these complexes interact dynamically on the 3′ UTR. Additionally, downstream effects of these post-transcriptional regulators on the immune response will be discussed. Review topics include past studies, current understanding, and future challenges in the study of post-transcriptional regulation affecting IFN responses. PMID:24702117

  19. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  20. Lineage specific transcriptional regulation of DICER by MITF in melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Carmit; Khaled, Mehdi; Robinson, Kathleen C.; Veguilla, Rosa A.; Chen, Po-Hao; Yokoyama, Satoru; Makino, Eiichi; Lu, Jun; Larue, Lionel; Beermann, Friedrich; Chin, Lynda; Bosenberg, Marcus; Song, Jun. S.; Fisher, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary DICER is a central regulator of microRNA maturation. However little is known about mechanisms regulating its expression in development or disease. While profiling miRNA expression in differentiating melanocytes, two populations were observed: some upregulated at the pre-miRNA stage, and others upregulated as “mature” miRNAs (with stable pre-miRNA levels). Conversion of pre-miRNAs to fully processed miRNAs appeared to be dependent upon stimulation of DICER expression—an event found to occur via direct transcriptional targeting of DICER by the melanocyte master transcriptional regulator MITF. MITF binds and activates a conserved regulatory element upstream of DICER’s transcriptional start site upon melanocyte differentiation. Targeted KO of DICER is lethal to melanocytes, at least partly via DICER-dependent processing of the pre-miRNA-17~92 cluster thus targeting BIM, a known pro-apoptotic regulator of melanocyte survival. These observations highlight a central mechanism underlying miRNA regulation which could exist for other cell types during development. PMID:20550935

  1. Circadian rhythms and post-transcriptional regulation in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Romanowski, Andrés; Yanovsky, Marcelo J

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock of plants allows them to cope with daily changes in their environment. This is accomplished by the rhythmic regulation of gene expression, in a process that involves many regulatory steps. One of the key steps involved at the RNA level is post-transcriptional regulation, which ensures a correct control on the different amounts and types of mRNA that will ultimately define the current physiological state of the plant cell. Recent advances in the study of the processes of regulation of pre-mRNA processing, RNA turn-over and surveillance, regulation of translation, function of lncRNAs, biogenesis and function of small RNAs, and the development of bioinformatics tools have helped to vastly expand our understanding of how this regulatory step performs its role. In this work we review the current progress in circadian regulation at the post-transcriptional level research in plants. It is the continuous interaction of all the information flow control post-transcriptional processes that allow a plant to precisely time and predict daily environmental changes. PMID:26124767

  2. Mechanisms and Evolution of Control Logic in Prokaryotic Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Medema, Marnix H.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: A major part of organismal complexity and versatility of prokaryotes resides in their ability to fine-tune gene expression to adequately respond to internal and external stimuli. Evolution has been very innovative in creating intricate mechanisms by which different regulatory signals operate and interact at promoters to drive gene expression. The regulation of target gene expression by transcription factors (TFs) is governed by control logic brought about by the interaction of regulators with TF binding sites (TFBSs) in cis-regulatory regions. A factor that in large part determines the strength of the response of a target to a given TF is motif stringency, the extent to which the TFBS fits the optimal TFBS sequence for a given TF. Advances in high-throughput technologies and computational genomics allow reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in silico. To optimize the prediction of transcriptional regulatory networks, i.e., to separate direct regulation from indirect regulation, a thorough understanding of the control logic underlying the regulation of gene expression is required. This review summarizes the state of the art of the elements that determine the functionality of TFBSs by focusing on the molecular biological mechanisms and evolutionary origins of cis-regulatory regions. PMID:19721087

  3. Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Nucleotide Excision Repair Genes in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B.; Veloso, Artur; Ljungman, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death. PMID:26255935

  4. Nongenic transcription, gene regulation and action at a distance.

    PubMed

    Cook, Peter R

    2003-11-15

    In eukaryotes, motifs such as silencers, enhancers and locus control regions act over thousands of base pairs to regulate adjacent genes; insulators limit such effects, and barriers confine repressive heterochromatin to particular chromosomal segments. Recent results show that many of these motifs are nongenic transcription units, and two of them directly contact their targets lying further down the chromosome to loop the intervening DNA: the barriers (scs and scs') flanking the 87A7 heat-shock locus in the fly contact each other, and a locus control region touches the beta-globin gene in the mouse. I hypothesize that the act of transcription underlies the function of these regulators; active polymerizing complexes tend to cluster into 'factories' and this facilitates molecular contact between the transcribed regulator and its distant (and transcribed) target. PMID:14576342

  5. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP-RNA complexes known as "riboclusters." These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  6. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP–RNA complexes known as “riboclusters.” These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  7. Transcriptional regulation of protein complexes within and across species.

    PubMed

    Tan, Kai; Shlomi, Tomer; Feizi, Hoda; Ideker, Trey; Sharan, Roded

    2007-01-23

    Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments have defined large-scale protein-protein interaction networks for many model species. Separately, systematic chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have enabled the assembly of large networks of transcriptional regulatory interactions. To investigate the functional interplay between these two interaction types, we combined both within a probabilistic framework that models the cell as a network of transcription factors regulating protein complexes. This framework identified 72 putative coregulated complexes in yeast and allowed the prediction of 120 previously uncharacterized transcriptional interactions. Several predictions were tested by new microarray profiles, yielding a confirmation rate (58%) comparable with that of direct immunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, we extended our framework to a cross-species setting, identifying 24 coregulated complexes that were conserved between yeast and fly. Analyses of these conserved complexes revealed different conservation levels of their regulators and provided suggestive evidence that protein-protein interaction networks may evolve more slowly than transcriptional interaction networks. Our results demonstrate how multiple molecular interaction types can be integrated toward a global wiring diagram of the cell, and they provide insights into the evolutionary dynamics of protein complex regulation.

  8. Transcriptional regulation in yeast during diauxic shift and stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Galdieri, Luciano; Mehrotra, Swati; Yu, Sean; Vancura, Ales

    2010-12-01

    The preferred source of carbon and energy for yeast cells is glucose. When yeast cells are grown in liquid cultures, they metabolize glucose predominantly by glycolysis, releasing ethanol in the medium. When glucose becomes limiting, the cells enter diauxic shift characterized by decreased growth rate and by switching metabolism from glycolysis to aerobic utilization of ethanol. When ethanol is depleted from the medium, cells enter quiescent or stationary phase G(0). Cells in diauxic shift and stationary phase are stressed by the lack of nutrients and by accumulation of toxic metabolites, primarily from the oxidative metabolism, and are differentiated in ways that allow them to maintain viability for extended periods of time. The transition of yeast cells from exponential phase to quiescence is regulated by protein kinase A, TOR, Snf1p, and Rim15p pathways that signal changes in availability of nutrients, converge on transcriptional factors Msn2p, Msn4p, and Gis1p, and elicit extensive reprogramming of the transcription machinery. However, the events in transcriptional regulation during diauxic shift and quiescence are incompletely understood. Because cells from multicellular eukaryotic organisms spend most of their life in G(0) phase, understanding transcriptional regulation in quiescence will inform other fields, such as cancer, development, and aging.

  9. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST: role of PKC.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2004-10-01

    The Na+-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST plays a major role in the removal of glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Short-term, as well as long-term changes in transporter activity are triggered by glutamate. An important locus of regulation is the density of transporter molecules present at the plasma membrane. A substrate-dependent change in the translocation rate of the transporter molecules accounts for the short-term effect, whereas the long-term modulation apparently involves transcriptional regulation. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glial cells, we report here that glutamate receptors activation mediate a substantial reduction in the transcriptional activity of the chglast promoter through the Ca2+/diacylglicerol-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling cascade. Overexpression of constitutive active PKC isoforms of mimic the glutamate effect. Accordingly, increased levels of c-Jun or c-Fos, but not Jun-B, Jun-D or Fos-B, lower the chglast promoter activity. Serial deletions and electrophorectic mobility shift assays were used to define a specific region within the 5' proximal region of the chglast promoter, associated with transcriptional repression. A putative glutamate response element could be defined in the proximal promoter stretch more likely between nts -40 and -78. These results demonstrate that GLAST is under glutamate-dependent transcriptional control through PKC, and support the notion of a pivotal role of this neurotransmitter in the regulation of its own removal from the synaptic cleft, thereby modulating, mainly in the long term, glutamatergic transmission.

  10. Stochastic Proofreading Mechanism Alleviates Crosstalk in Transcriptional Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Humerez, Sarah A.; Rieckh, Georg; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-12-01

    Gene expression is controlled primarily by interactions between transcription factor proteins (TFs) and the regulatory DNA sequence, a process that can be captured well by thermodynamic models of regulation. These models, however, neglect regulatory crosstalk: the possibility that noncognate TFs could initiate transcription, with potentially disastrous effects for the cell. Here, we estimate the importance of crosstalk, suggest that its avoidance strongly constrains equilibrium models of TF binding, and propose an alternative nonequilibrium scheme that implements kinetic proofreading to suppress erroneous initiation. This proposal is consistent with the observed covalent modifications of the transcriptional apparatus and predicts increased noise in gene expression as a trade-off for improved specificity. Using information theory, we quantify this trade-off to find when optimal proofreading architectures are favored over their equilibrium counterparts. Such architectures exhibit significant super-Poisson noise at low expression in steady state.

  11. Stochastic Proofreading Mechanism Alleviates Crosstalk in Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Cepeda-Humerez, Sarah A; Rieckh, Georg; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-12-11

    Gene expression is controlled primarily by interactions between transcription factor proteins (TFs) and the regulatory DNA sequence, a process that can be captured well by thermodynamic models of regulation. These models, however, neglect regulatory crosstalk: the possibility that noncognate TFs could initiate transcription, with potentially disastrous effects for the cell. Here, we estimate the importance of crosstalk, suggest that its avoidance strongly constrains equilibrium models of TF binding, and propose an alternative nonequilibrium scheme that implements kinetic proofreading to suppress erroneous initiation. This proposal is consistent with the observed covalent modifications of the transcriptional apparatus and predicts increased noise in gene expression as a trade-off for improved specificity. Using information theory, we quantify this trade-off to find when optimal proofreading architectures are favored over their equilibrium counterparts. Such architectures exhibit significant super-Poisson noise at low expression in steady state. PMID:26705657

  12. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  13. Transcriptional profiling of XdrA, a new regulator of spa transcription in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    McCallum, N; Hinds, J; Ender, M; Berger-Bächi, B; Stutzmann Meier, P

    2010-10-01

    Transcription of spa, encoding the virulence factor protein A in Staphylococcus aureus, is tightly controlled by a complex regulatory network, ensuring its temporal expression over growth and at appropriate stages of the infection process. Transcriptomic profiling of XdrA, a DNA-binding protein that is conserved in all S. aureus genomes and shares similarity with the XRE family of helix-turn-helix, antitoxin-like proteins, revealed it to be a previously unidentified activator of spa transcription. To assess how XdrA fits into the complex web of spa regulation, a series of regulatory mutants were constructed; consisting of single, double, triple, and quadruple mutants lacking XdrA and/or the three key regulators previously shown to influence spa transcription directly (SarS, SarA, and RNAIII). A series of lacZ reporter gene fusions containing nested deletions of the spa promoter identified regions influenced by XdrA and the other three regulators. XdrA had almost as strong an activating effect on spa as SarS and acted on the same spa operator regions as SarS, or closely overlapping regions. All data from microarrays, Northern and Western blot analyses, and reporter gene fusion experiments indicated that XdrA is a major activator of spa expression that appears to act directly on the spa promoter and not through previously characterized regulators.

  14. Phenylacetic acid catabolism and its transcriptional regulation in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Kohl, Thomas A; Rückert, Christian; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Li, Ling-Hao; Ding, Jiu-Yuan; Kalinowski, Jörn; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2012-08-01

    The industrially important organism Corynebacterium glutamicum has been characterized in recent years for its robust ability to assimilate aromatic compounds. In this study, C. glutamicum strain AS 1.542 was investigated for its ability to catabolize phenylacetic acid (PAA). The paa genes were identified; they are organized as a continuous paa gene cluster. The type strain of C. glutamicum, ATCC 13032, is not able to catabolize PAA, but the recombinant strain ATCC 13032/pEC-K18mob2::paa gained the ability to grow on PAA. The paaR gene, encoding a TetR family transcription regulator, was studied in detail. Disruption of paaR in strain AS 1.542 resulted in transcriptional increases of all paa genes. Transcription start sites and putative promoter regions were determined. An imperfect palindromic motif (5'-ACTNACCGNNCGNNCGGTNAGT-3'; 22 bp) was identified in the upstream regions of paa genes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) demonstrated specific binding of PaaR to this motif, and phenylacetyl coenzyme A (PA-CoA) blocked binding. It was concluded that PaaR is the negative regulator of PAA degradation and that PA-CoA is the PaaR effector. In addition, GlxR binding sites were found, and binding to GlxR was confirmed. Therefore, PAA catabolism in C. glutamicum is regulated by the pathway-specific repressor PaaR, and also likely by the global transcription regulator GlxR. By comparative genomic analysis, we reconstructed orthologous PaaR regulons in 57 species, including species of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Flavobacteria, that carry PAA utilization genes and operate by conserved binding motifs, suggesting that PaaR-like regulation might commonly exist in these bacteria.

  15. Coordinated Evolution of Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation for Mitochondrial Functions in Yeast Strains

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaoxian; Li, Hongye; Gu, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    Evolution of gene regulation has been proposed to play an important role in environmental adaptation. Exploring mechanisms underlying coordinated evolutionary changes at various levels of gene regulation could shed new light on how organism adapt in nature. In this study, we focused on regulatory differences between a laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4742 and a pathogenic S. cerevisiae strain, YJM789. The two strains diverge in many features, including growth rate, morphology, high temperature tolerance, and pathogenicity. Our RNA-Seq and ribosomal footprint profiling data showed that gene expression differences are pervasive, and genes functioning in mitochondria are mostly divergent between the two strains at both transcriptional and translational levels. Combining functional genomics data from other yeast strains, we further demonstrated that significant divergence of expression for genes functioning in the electron transport chain (ETC) was likely caused by differential expression of a transcriptional factor, HAP4, and that post-transcriptional regulation mediated by an RNA-binding protein, PUF3, likely led to expression divergence for genes involved in mitochondrial translation. We also explored mito-nuclear interactions via mitochondrial DNA replacement between strains. Although the two mitochondrial genomes harbor substantial sequence divergence, neither growth nor gene expression were affected by mitochondrial DNA replacement in both fermentative and respiratory growth media, indicating compatible mitochondrial and nuclear genomes between these two strains in the tested conditions. Collectively, we used mitochondrial functions as an example to demonstrate for the first time that evolution at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels could lead to coordinated regulatory changes underlying strain specific functional variations. PMID:27077367

  16. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Regulation of Diurnal Transcription in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Frederick R.

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed global transcriptome changes during synchronized cell division in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle consists of a long G1 phase, followed by an S/M phase with multiple rapid, alternating rounds of DNA replication and segregation. We found that the S/M period is associated with strong induction of ∼2300 genes, many with conserved roles in DNA replication or cell division. Other genes, including many involved in photosynthesis, are reciprocally downregulated in S/M, suggesting a gene expression split correlating with the temporal separation between G1 and S/M. The Chlamydomonas cell cycle is synchronized by light-dark cycles, so in principle, these transcriptional changes could be directly responsive to light or to metabolic cues. Alternatively, cell-cycle-periodic transcription may be directly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases. To distinguish between these possibilities, we analyzed transcriptional profiles of mutants in the kinases CDKA and CDKB, as well as other mutants with distinct cell cycle blocks. Initial cell-cycle-periodic expression changes are largely CDK independent, but later regulation (induction and repression) is under differential control by CDKA and CDKB. Deviation from the wild-type transcriptional program in diverse cell cycle mutants will be an informative phenotype for further characterization of the Chlamydomonas cell cycle. PMID:26475866

  17. Changing Faces of Transcriptional Regulation Reflected by Zic3.

    PubMed

    Winata, Cecilia Lanny; Kondrychyn, Igor; Korzh, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    The advent of genomics in the study of developmental mechanisms has brought a trove of information on gene datasets and regulation during development, where the Zic family of zinc-finger proteins plays an important role. Genomic analysis of the modes of action of Zic3 in pluripotent cells demonstrated its requirement for maintenance of stem cells pluripotency upon binding to the proximal regulatory regions (promoters) of genes associated with cell pluripotency (Nanog, Sox2, Oct4, etc.) as well as cell cycle, proliferation, oncogenesis and early embryogenesis. In contrast, during gastrulation and neurulation Zic3 acts by binding the distal regulatory regions (enhancers, etc) associated with control of gene transcription in the Nodal and Wnt signaling pathways, including genes that act to break body symmetry. This illustrates a general role of Zic3 as a transcriptional regulator that acts not only alone, but in many instances in conjunction with other transcription factors. The latter is done by binding to adjacent sites in the context of multi-transcription factor complexes associated with regulatory elements.

  18. Transcriptional regulation using the Q system in transgenic zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Halpern, M E

    2016-01-01

    Methods to label cell populations selectively or to modify their gene expression are critical tools in the study of developmental or physiological processes in vivo. A variety of approaches have been applied to the zebrafish model, capitalizing on Tol2 transposition to generate transgenic lines with high efficiency. Here we describe the adoption of the Q system of Neurospora crassa, which includes the QF transcription factor and the upstream activating sequence (QUAS) to which it binds. These components function as a bipartite regulatory system similar to that of yeast Gal4/UAS, producing robust expression in transient assays of zebrafish embryos injected with plasmids and in stable transgenic lines. An important advantage, however, is that QUAS-regulated transgenes appear far less susceptible to transcriptional silencing even after seven generations. This chapter describes some of the Q system reagents that have been developed for zebrafish, as well as the use of the QF transcription factor for isolation of tissue-specific driver lines from gene/enhancer trap screens. Additional strategies successfully implemented in invertebrate models, such as a truncated QF transcription factor (QF2) or the reassembly of a split QF, are also discussed. The provided information, and available Gateway-based vectors, should enable those working with the zebrafish model to implement the Q system with minimal effort or to use it in combination with Gal4, Cre, or other regulatory systems for further refinement of transcriptional control. PMID:27443927

  19. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  20. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  1. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases.

  2. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation.

  3. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light–oxygen–voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na+-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na+ currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  4. Global transcriptional regulator TrmB family members in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minwook; Park, Soyoung; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2016-10-01

    Members of the TrmB family act as global transcriptional regulators for the activation or repression of sugar ABC transporters and central sugar metabolic pathways, including glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and other metabolic pathways, and also as chromosomal stabilizers in archaea. As a relatively newly classified transcriptional regulator family, there is limited experimental evidence for their role in Thermococcales, halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC1, and crenarchaea Sulfolobus strains, despite being one of the extending protein families in archaea. Recently, the protein structures of Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB and TrmBL2 were solved, and the transcriptomic data uncovered by microarray and ChIP-Seq were published. In the present review, recent evidence of the functional roles of TrmB family members in archaea is explained and extended to bacteria. PMID:27687225

  5. Global transcriptional regulator TrmB family members in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minwook; Park, Soyoung; Lee, Sung-Jae

    2016-10-01

    Members of the TrmB family act as global transcriptional regulators for the activation or repression of sugar ABC transporters and central sugar metabolic pathways, including glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and other metabolic pathways, and also as chromosomal stabilizers in archaea. As a relatively newly classified transcriptional regulator family, there is limited experimental evidence for their role in Thermococcales, halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC1, and crenarchaea Sulfolobus strains, despite being one of the extending protein families in archaea. Recently, the protein structures of Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB and TrmBL2 were solved, and the transcriptomic data uncovered by microarray and ChIP-Seq were published. In the present review, recent evidence of the functional roles of TrmB family members in archaea is explained and extended to bacteria.

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of Carbohydrate Utilization Pathways in the Bifidobacterium Genus.

    PubMed

    Khoroshkin, Matvei S; Leyn, Semen A; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, which represent common commensals of mammalian gut, are believed to have positive effects on human health. The influence of certain non-digestible carbohydrates (and their use as so-called prebiotics) on growth and metabolic activity of bifidobacteria is of increasing interest; however, mechanisms of transcriptional control of carbohydrate metabolism are poorly understood in these species. We used a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and transcriptional regulons in 10 Bifidobacterium genomes. Analysis of regulatory gene regions revealed candidate DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 268 transcription factors from the LacI, ROK, DeoR, AraC, GntR, and TetR families that form 64 orthologous groups of regulators. Most of the reconstructed regulons are local and control specific catabolic pathways for host- and diet-derived glycans and monosaccharides. Mosaic distributions of many of these local regulators across Bifidobacterium species correlate with distribution of corresponding catabolic pathways. In contrast, the maltose, galactose, sucrose, and fructose regulons, as well as a novel global LacI-family regulator that is predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism and arabinose catabolism genes, are universally present in all 10 studied bifidobacteria. A novel group of TetR-family regulators presumably controls the glucoside and galactoside utilization pathways. Paralogs of the ribose repressor RbsR control the pyrimidine nucleoside utilization genes. Multiple paralogs of the maltose regulator MalR co-regulate large sets of genes involved in maltodextrin utilization. The inferred metabolic regulons provide new insights on diverse carbohydrate utilization networks in bifidobacteria that can be employed in metabolic modeling, phenotype prediction and the rational development of novel prebiotics.

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of Carbohydrate Utilization Pathways in the Bifidobacterium Genus

    PubMed Central

    Khoroshkin, Matvei S.; Leyn, Semen A.; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, which represent common commensals of mammalian gut, are believed to have positive effects on human health. The influence of certain non-digestible carbohydrates (and their use as so-called prebiotics) on growth and metabolic activity of bifidobacteria is of increasing interest; however, mechanisms of transcriptional control of carbohydrate metabolism are poorly understood in these species. We used a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and transcriptional regulons in 10 Bifidobacterium genomes. Analysis of regulatory gene regions revealed candidate DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 268 transcription factors from the LacI, ROK, DeoR, AraC, GntR, and TetR families that form 64 orthologous groups of regulators. Most of the reconstructed regulons are local and control specific catabolic pathways for host- and diet-derived glycans and monosaccharides. Mosaic distributions of many of these local regulators across Bifidobacterium species correlate with distribution of corresponding catabolic pathways. In contrast, the maltose, galactose, sucrose, and fructose regulons, as well as a novel global LacI-family regulator that is predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism and arabinose catabolism genes, are universally present in all 10 studied bifidobacteria. A novel group of TetR-family regulators presumably controls the glucoside and galactoside utilization pathways. Paralogs of the ribose repressor RbsR control the pyrimidine nucleoside utilization genes. Multiple paralogs of the maltose regulator MalR co-regulate large sets of genes involved in maltodextrin utilization. The inferred metabolic regulons provide new insights on diverse carbohydrate utilization networks in bifidobacteria that can be employed in metabolic modeling, phenotype prediction and the rational development of novel prebiotics. PMID:26903998

  8. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  9. The transcription factor Zeb2 regulates signaling in mast cells.

    PubMed

    Barbu, Emilia Alina; Zhang, Juan; Berenstein, Elsa H; Groves, Jacqueline R; Parks, Lauren M; Siraganian, Reuben P

    2012-06-15

    Mast cell activation results in the release of stored and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators. We found that Zeb2 (also named Sip1, Zfhx1b), a zinc finger transcription factor, regulates both early and late mast cell responses. Transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced Zeb2 expression and resulted in decreased FcεRI-mediated degranulation, with a parallel reduction in receptor-induced activation of NFAT and NF-κB transcription factors, but an enhanced response to the LPS-mediated activation of NF-κB. There was variable and less of a decrease in the Ag-mediated release of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-13, and CCL-4. This suggests that low Zeb2 expression differentially regulates signaling pathways in mast cells. Multiple phosphorylation events were impaired that affected molecules both at early and late events in the signaling pathway. The Zeb2 siRNA-treated mast cells had altered cell cycle progression, as well as decreased expression of several molecules including cell surface FcεRI and its β subunit, Gab2, phospholipase-Cγ1, and phospholipase-Cγ2, all of which are required for receptor-induced signal transduction. The results indicate that the transcription factor Zeb2 controls the expression of molecules thereby regulating signaling in mast cells.

  10. Autopalmitoylation of TEAD Proteins Regulates Transcriptional Output of Hippo Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chan, PuiYee; Han, Xiao; Zheng, Baohui; DeRan, Michael; Yu, Jianzhong; Jarugumilli, Gopala K.; Deng, Hua; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian; Wu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors bind to the co-activator YAP/TAZ, and regulate the transcriptional output of Hippo pathway, playing critical roles in organ size control and tumorigenesis. Protein S-palmitoylation attaches fatty acid (palmitate) to cysteine residues, and regulates protein trafficking, membrane localization and signaling activities. Using activity-based chemical probes, we discovered that human TEADs possess intrinsic palmitoylating enzyme-like activities, and undergo autopalmitoylation at evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues under physiological conditions. We determined the crystal structures of lipid-bound TEADs, and found that the lipid chain of palmitate inserts into a conserved deep hydrophobic pocket. Strikingly, palmitoylation is required for TEAD’s binding to YAP/TAZ, but dispensable for the binding to Vgll4 tumor suppressor. In addition, palmitoylation does not alter TEAD’s localization. Moreover, TEAD palmitoylation-deficient mutants impaired TAZ-mediated muscle differentiation in vitro, and Yorkie-mediated tissue overgrowth in Drosophila in vivo. Our study directly linked autopalmitoylation to the transcriptional regulation of Hippo pathway. PMID:26900866

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of the Streptococcus salivarius 57.I Urease Operon

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Ywan M.; Weaver, Cheryl A.; Mendelsohn, David R.; Burne, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The Streptococcus salivarius 57.I ure cluster was organized as an operon, beginning with ureI, followed by ureABC (structural genes) and ureEFGD (accessory genes). Northern analyses revealed transcripts encompassing structural genes and transcripts containing the entire operon. A ς70-like promoter could be mapped 5′ to ureI (PureI) by primer extension analysis. The intensity of the signal increased when cells were grown at an acidic pH and was further enhanced by excess carbohydrate. To determine the function(s) of two inverted repeats located 5′ to PureI, transcriptional fusions of the full-length promoter region (PureI), or a deletion derivative (PureIΔ100), and a promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene were constructed and integrated into the chromosome to generate strains PureICAT and PureIΔ100CAT, respectively. CAT specific activities of PureICAT were repressed at pH 7.0 and induced at pH 5.5 and by excess carbohydrate. In PureIΔ100CAT, CAT activity was 60-fold higher than in PureICAT at pH 7.0 and pH induction was nearly eliminated, indicating that expression was negatively regulated. Thus, it was concluded that PureI was the predominant, regulated promoter and that regulation was governed by a mechanism differing markedly from other known mechanisms for bacterial urease expression. PMID:9791132

  12. Role of Sam68 in post-transcriptional gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2013-11-28

    The STAR family of proteins links signaling pathways to various aspects of post-transcriptional regulation and processing of RNAs. Sam68 belongs to this class of heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein particle K (hnRNP K) homology (KH) single domain-containing family of RNA-binding proteins that also contains some domains predicted to bind critical components in signal transduction pathways. In response to phosphorylation and other post-transcriptional modifications, Sam68 has been shown to have the ability to link signal transduction pathways to downstream effects regulating RNA metabolism, including transcription, alternative splicing or RNA transport. In addition to its function as a docking protein in some signaling pathways, this prototypic STAR protein has been identified to have a nuclear localization and to take part in the formation of both nuclear and cytosolic multi-molecular complexes such as Sam68 nuclear bodies and stress granules. Coupling with other proteins and RNA targets, Sam68 may play a role in the regulation of differential expression and mRNA processing and translation according to internal and external signals, thus mediating important physiological functions, such as cell death, proliferation or cell differentiation.

  13. Role of Sam68 in Post-Transcriptional Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Flora; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    The STAR family of proteins links signaling pathways to various aspects of post-transcriptional regulation and processing of RNAs. Sam68 belongs to this class of heteronuclear ribonucleoprotein particle K (hnRNP K) homology (KH) single domain-containing family of RNA-binding proteins that also contains some domains predicted to bind critical components in signal transduction pathways. In response to phosphorylation and other post-transcriptional modifications, Sam68 has been shown to have the ability to link signal transduction pathways to downstream effects regulating RNA metabolism, including transcription, alternative splicing or RNA transport. In addition to its function as a docking protein in some signaling pathways, this prototypic STAR protein has been identified to have a nuclear localization and to take part in the formation of both nuclear and cytosolic multi-molecular complexes such as Sam68 nuclear bodies and stress granules. Coupling with other proteins and RNA targets, Sam68 may play a role in the regulation of differential expression and mRNA processing and translation according to internal and external signals, thus mediating important physiological functions, such as cell death, proliferation or cell differentiation. PMID:24287914

  14. Transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally regulated microRNAs in heat stress response in barley

    PubMed Central

    Kruszka, Katarzyna; Pacak, Andrzej; Swida-Barteczka, Aleksandra; Nuc, Przemyslaw; Alaba, Sylwia; Wroblewska, Zuzanna; Karlowski, Wojciech; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress is one of the major abiotic factors that can induce severe plant damage, leading to a decrease in crop plant productivity. Despite barley being a cereal of great economic importance, few data are available concerning its thermotolerance mechanisms. In this work microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in heat stress response in barley were investigated. The level of selected barley mature miRNAs was examined by hybridization. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to monitor the changes in the expression profiles of primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) precursors, as well as novel and conserved target genes during heat stress. The miRNA-mediated cleavage sites in the target transcripts were confirmed by degradome analysis and the 5’ RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) approach. Four barley miRNAs (miR160a, 166a, 167h, and 5175a) were found which are heat stress up-regulated at the level of both mature miRNAs and precursor pri-miRNAs. Moreover, the splicing of introns hosting miR160a and miR5175a is also heat induced. The results demonstrate transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of heat-responsive miRNAs in barley. The observed induction of miRNA expression is correlated with the down-regulation of the expression level of their experimentally identified new and conservative target genes. PMID:25183744

  15. Transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally regulated microRNAs in heat stress response in barley.

    PubMed

    Kruszka, Katarzyna; Pacak, Andrzej; Swida-Barteczka, Aleksandra; Nuc, Przemyslaw; Alaba, Sylwia; Wroblewska, Zuzanna; Karlowski, Wojciech; Jarmolowski, Artur; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia

    2014-11-01

    Heat stress is one of the major abiotic factors that can induce severe plant damage, leading to a decrease in crop plant productivity. Despite barley being a cereal of great economic importance, few data are available concerning its thermotolerance mechanisms. In this work microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in heat stress response in barley were investigated. The level of selected barley mature miRNAs was examined by hybridization. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to monitor the changes in the expression profiles of primary miRNA (pri-miRNA) precursors, as well as novel and conserved target genes during heat stress. The miRNA-mediated cleavage sites in the target transcripts were confirmed by degradome analysis and the 5' RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) approach. Four barley miRNAs (miR160a, 166a, 167h, and 5175a) were found which are heat stress up-regulated at the level of both mature miRNAs and precursor pri-miRNAs. Moreover, the splicing of introns hosting miR160a and miR5175a is also heat induced. The results demonstrate transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of heat-responsive miRNAs in barley. The observed induction of miRNA expression is correlated with the down-regulation of the expression level of their experimentally identified new and conservative target genes.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of secretory capacity by bZip transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    FOX, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of specialized secretory organs expand their secretory pathways to accommodate the increased protein load necessary for their function. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the Golgi apparatus and the secretory vesicles, expand not only the membrane components but also the protein machinery required for increased protein production and transport. Increased protein load causes an ER stress response akin to the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). Recent work has implicated several bZip transcription factors in the regulation of protein components of the early secretory pathway necessary to alleviate this stress. Here, we highlight eight bZip transcription factors in regulating secretory pathway component genes. These include components of the three canonical branches of the UPR–ATF4, XBP1, and ATF6, as well as the five members of the Creb3 family of transcription factors. We review findings from both invertebrate and vertebrate model systems suggesting that all of these proteins increase secretory capacity in response to increased protein load. Finally, we propose that the Creb3 family of factors may have a dual role in secretory cell differentiation by also regulating the pathways necessary for cell cycle exit during terminal differentiation. PMID:25821458

  17. Harnessing the master transcriptional repressor REST to reciprocally regulate neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nesti, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis begins in embryonic development and continues at a reduced rate into adulthood in vertebrate species, yet the signaling cascades regulating this process remain poorly understood. Plasma membrane-initiated signaling cascades regulate neurogenesis via downstream pathways including components of the transcriptional machinery. A nuclear factor that temporally regulates neurogenesis by repressing neuronal differentiation is the repressor element 1 (RE1) silencing transcription (REST) factor. We have recently discovered a regulatory site on REST that serves as a molecular switch for neuronal differentiation. Specifically, C-terminal domain small phosphatase 1, CTDSP1, present in non-neuronal cells, maintains REST activity by dephosphorylating this site. Reciprocally, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ERK, activated by growth factor signaling in neural progenitors, and peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1, decrease REST activity through phosphorylation-dependent degradation. Our findings further resolve the mechanism for temporal regulation of REST and terminal neuronal differentiation. They also provide new potential therapeutic targets to enhance neuronal regeneration after injury. PMID:27535341

  18. WRKY Transcription Factors: Molecular Regulation and Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Phukan, Ujjal J.; Jeena, Gajendra S.; Shukla, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants in their natural habitat have to face multiple stresses simultaneously. Evolutionary adaptation of developmental, physiological, and biochemical parameters give advantage over a single window of stress but not multiple. On the other hand transcription factors like WRKY can regulate diverse responses through a complicated network of genes. So molecular orchestration of WRKYs in plant may provide the most anticipated outcome of simultaneous multiple responses. Activation or repression through W-box and W-box like sequences is regulated at transcriptional, translational, and domain level. Because of the tight regulation involved in specific recognition and binding of WRKYs to downstream promoters, they have become promising candidate for crop improvement. Epigenetic, retrograde and proteasome mediated regulation enable WRKYs to attain the dynamic cellular homeostatic reprograming. Overexpression of several WRKYs face the paradox of having several beneficial affects but with some unwanted traits. These overexpression-associated undesirable phenotypes need to be identified and removed for proper growth, development and yeild. Taken together, we have highlighted the diverse regulation and multiple stress response of WRKYs in plants along with the future prospects in this field of research. PMID:27375634

  19. Asymmetric Regulation of Peripheral Genes by Two Transcriptional Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Ru; Suzuki, Takahiro; Nishimura, Hajime; Kishima, Mami; Maeda, Shiori; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory network (TRN) reconstitution and deconstruction occur simultaneously during reprogramming; however, it remains unclear how the starting and targeting TRNs regulate the induction and suppression of peripheral genes. Here we analyzed the regulation using direct cell reprogramming from human dermal fibroblasts to monocytes as the platform. We simultaneously deconstructed fibroblastic TRN and reconstituted monocytic TRN; monocytic and fibroblastic gene expression were analyzed in comparison with that of fibroblastic TRN deconstruction only or monocytic TRN reconstitution only. Global gene expression analysis showed cross-regulation of TRNs. Detailed analysis revealed that knocking down fibroblastic TRN positively affected half of the upregulated monocytic genes, indicating that intrinsic fibroblastic TRN interfered with the expression of induced genes. In contrast, reconstitution of monocytic TRN showed neutral effects on the majority of fibroblastic gene downregulation. This study provides an explicit example that demonstrates how two networks together regulate gene expression during cell reprogramming processes and contributes to the elaborate exploration of TRNs. PMID:27483142

  20. Transcriptional regulation of genes related to progesterone production.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Tetsuya; Ishikane, Shin; Kawabe, Shinya; Umezawa, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormones are synthesized from cholesterol in various tissues, mainly in the adrenal glands and gonads. Because these lipid-soluble steroid hormones immediately diffuse through the cells in which they are produced, their secretion directly reflects the activity of the genes related to their production. Progesterone is important not only for luteinization and maintenance of pregnancy, but also as a substrate for most other steroids. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), cytochrome P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerase (3β-HSD) are well-known proteins essential for progesterone production. In addition to them, glutathione S-transferase A1-1 and A3-3 are shown to exert Δ(5)-Δ(4) isomerization activity to produce progesterone in a cooperative fashion with 3β-HSD. 5-Aminolevulinic acid synthase 1, ferredoxin 1, and ferredoxin reductase also play a role in steroidogenesis as accessory factors. Members of the nuclear receptor 5A (NR5A) family (steroidogenic factor 1 and liver receptor homolog 1) play a crucial role in the transcriptional regulation of these genes. The NR5A family activates these genes by binding to NR5A responsive elements present within their promoter regions, as well as to the elements far from their promoters. In addition, various NR5A-interacting proteins including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (DAX-1), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins (C/EBP) are involved in the transcription of NR5A target genes and regulate the transcription either positively or negatively under both basal and tropic hormone-stimulated conditions. In this review, we describe the transcriptional regulation of genes related to progesterone production. PMID:26135521

  1. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase gene by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, S; Faucon Biguet, N; Mallet, J

    1990-01-01

    The role played by protein kinase C (PKC) in TH gene regulation was investigated at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels using PC12 cells. The cells were treated with the phorbol ester TPA, which not only activates PKC but also causes down-regulation. PKC levels were monitored by [3H]PDBU binding assay and by using an anti-PKC antibody that detected intact PKC (79 kd) as well as its catalytic and regulatory domains. The [3H]PDBU binding to the membrane-associated PKC increased within 15-30 min of TPA treatment; thereafter total cellular [3H]PDBU binding decreased to a minimum of 20% of the control at 8 h. The rate of decrease in binding was greater than the decrease in the intensity of the staining of PKC holo enzyme visualized by anti-PKC antibody. TH mRNA levels, measured over the same time period, rose within 15 min of TPA treatment to peak at 4 h and subsequently declined below control level, paralleling the depletion of PKC. If cells depleted of PKC were reincubated in the normal medium, a recovery in PKC level was seen and, in parallel, TH mRNA levels increased to above control level. Furthermore, if down-regulation of PKC was prevented by incubating the cells with the protease inhibitor leupeptin, a decrease beyond control level in TH mRNA was not observed. TPA rapidly induced TH gene transcription; a maximal increase of two-fold was observed at 15 min, but the transcriptional rate then declined although it did not decrease beyond control values after 8 and 24 h of TPA treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Fig.2 Fig.3 Fig.6 PMID:1976513

  2. Phosphorylation Regulates Functions of ZEB1 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Llorens, M Candelaria; Lorenzatti, Guadalupe; Cavallo, Natalia L; Vaglienti, Maria V; Perrone, Ana P; Carenbauer, Anne L; Darling, Douglas S; Cabanillas, Ana M

    2016-10-01

    ZEB1 transcription factor is important in both development and disease, including many TGFβ-induced responses, and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by which many tumors undergo metastasis. ZEB1 is differentially phosphorylated in different cell types; however the role of phosphorylation in ZEB1 activity is unknown. Luciferase reporter studies and electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) show that a decrease in phosphorylation of ZEB1 increases both DNA-binding and transcriptional repression of ZEB1 target genes. Functional analysis of ZEB1 phosphorylation site mutants near the second zinc finger domain (termed ZD2) show that increased phosphorylation (due to either PMA plus ionomycin, or IGF-1) can inhibit transcriptional repression by either a ZEB1-ZD2 domain clone, or full-length ZEB1. This approach identifies phosphosites that have a substantial effect regulating the transcriptional and DNA-binding activity of ZEB1. Immunoprecipitation with anti-ZEB1 antibodies followed by western analysis with a phospho-Threonine-Proline-specific antibody indicates that the ERK consensus site at Thr-867 is phosphorylated in ZEB1. In addition to disrupting in vitro DNA-binding measured by EMSA, IGF-1-induced MEK/ERK phosphorylation is sufficient to disrupt nuclear localization of GFP-ZEB1 fusion clones. These data suggest that phosphorylation of ZEB1 integrates TGFβ signaling with other signaling pathways such as IGF-1. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2205-2217, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26868487

  3. Phosphorylation Regulates Functions of ZEB1 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Llorens, M Candelaria; Lorenzatti, Guadalupe; Cavallo, Natalia L; Vaglienti, Maria V; Perrone, Ana P; Carenbauer, Anne L; Darling, Douglas S; Cabanillas, Ana M

    2016-10-01

    ZEB1 transcription factor is important in both development and disease, including many TGFβ-induced responses, and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) by which many tumors undergo metastasis. ZEB1 is differentially phosphorylated in different cell types; however the role of phosphorylation in ZEB1 activity is unknown. Luciferase reporter studies and electrophoresis mobility shift assays (EMSA) show that a decrease in phosphorylation of ZEB1 increases both DNA-binding and transcriptional repression of ZEB1 target genes. Functional analysis of ZEB1 phosphorylation site mutants near the second zinc finger domain (termed ZD2) show that increased phosphorylation (due to either PMA plus ionomycin, or IGF-1) can inhibit transcriptional repression by either a ZEB1-ZD2 domain clone, or full-length ZEB1. This approach identifies phosphosites that have a substantial effect regulating the transcriptional and DNA-binding activity of ZEB1. Immunoprecipitation with anti-ZEB1 antibodies followed by western analysis with a phospho-Threonine-Proline-specific antibody indicates that the ERK consensus site at Thr-867 is phosphorylated in ZEB1. In addition to disrupting in vitro DNA-binding measured by EMSA, IGF-1-induced MEK/ERK phosphorylation is sufficient to disrupt nuclear localization of GFP-ZEB1 fusion clones. These data suggest that phosphorylation of ZEB1 integrates TGFβ signaling with other signaling pathways such as IGF-1. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2205-2217, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Signaling and transcriptional regulation in osteoblast commitment and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Yang, Shuying; Shao, Jianzhong; Li, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The major event that triggers osteogenesis is the transition of mesenchymal stem cells into bone forming, differentiating osteoblast cells. Osteoblast differentiation is the primary component of bone formation, exemplified by the synthesis, deposition and mineralization of extracellular matrix. Although not well understood, osteoblast differentiation from mesenchymal stem cells is a well-orchestrated process. Recent advances in molecular and genetic studies using gene targeting in mouse enable a better understanding of the multiple factors and signaling networks that control the differentiation process at a molecular level. Osteoblast commitment and differentiation are controlled by complex activities involving signal transduction and transcriptional regulation of gene expression. We review Wnt signaling pathway and Runx2 regulation network, which are critical for osteoblast differentiation. Many other factors and signaling pathways have been implicated in regulation of osteoblast differentiation in a network manner, such as the factors Osterix, ATF4, and SATB2 and the TGF-beta, Hedgehog, FGF, ephrin, and sympathetic signaling pathways. This review summarizes the recent advances in the studies of signaling transduction pathways and transcriptional regulation of osteoblast cell lineage commitment and differentiation. The knowledge of osteoblast commitment and differentiation should be applied towards the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic alternatives for human bone diseases. PMID:17485283

  5. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos.

    PubMed

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R; Peters, Antoine H F M; Gurdon, John B; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  6. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E.; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  7. Model-based redesign of global transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Javier; Rodrigo, Guillermo; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to the design or redesign of biological systems. In particular, one possible goal could be the rewiring of the transcription regulation network by exchanging the endogenous promoters. To achieve this objective, we have adapted current methods to the inference of a model based on ordinary differential equations that is able to predict the network response after a major change in its topology. Our procedure utilizes microarray data for training. We have experimentally validated our inferred global regulatory model in Escherichia coli by predicting transcriptomic profiles under new perturbations. We have also tested our methodology in silico by providing accurate predictions of the underlying networks from expression data generated with artificial genomes. In addition, we have shown the predictive power of our methodology by obtaining the gene profile in experimental redesigns of the E. coli genome, where rewiring the transcriptional network by means of knockouts of master regulators or by upregulating transcription factors controlled by different promoters. Our approach is compatible with most network inference methods, allowing to explore computationally future genome-wide redesign experiments in synthetic biology. PMID:19188257

  8. TOR-dependent post-transcriptional regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guowu; McQuiston, Travis; Bernard, Amélie; Park, Yoon-Dong; Qiu, Jin; Vural, Ali; Zhang, Nannan; Waterman, Scott R; Blewett, Nathan H; Myers, Timothy G; Maraia, Richard J; Kehrl, John H; Uzel, Gulbu; Klionsky, Daniel J; Williamson, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of autophagy is required to maintain cellular equilibrium and prevent disease. While extensive study of post-translational mechanisms has yielded important insights into autophagy induction, less is known about post-transcriptional mechanisms that could potentiate homeostatic control. In our study, we showed that the RNA-binding protein, Dhh1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Vad1 in the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is involved in recruitment and degradation of key autophagy mRNAs. In addition, phosphorylation of the decapping protein Dcp2 by the target of rapamycin (TOR), facilitates decapping and degradation of autophagy-related mRNAs, resulting in repression of autophagy under nutrient-replete conditions. The post-transcriptional regulatory process is conserved in both mouse and human cells and plays a role in autophagy-related modulation of the inflammasome product IL1B. These results were then applied to provide mechanistic insight into autoimmunity of a patient with a PIK3CD/p110δ gain-of-function mutation. These results thus identify an important new post-transcriptional mechanism of autophagy regulation that is highly conserved between yeast and mammals.

  9. In Silico Detection of Sequence Variations Modifying Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Malin C; Engström, Pär G; Lithwick, Stuart; Arenillas, David; Eriksson, Per; Lenhard, Boris; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Odeberg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Identification of functional genetic variation associated with increased susceptibility to complex diseases can elucidate genes and underlying biochemical mechanisms linked to disease onset and progression. For genes linked to genetic diseases, most identified causal mutations alter an encoded protein sequence. Technological advances for measuring RNA abundance suggest that a significant number of undiscovered causal mutations may alter the regulation of gene transcription. However, it remains a challenge to separate causal genetic variations from linked neutral variations. Here we present an in silico driven approach to identify possible genetic variation in regulatory sequences. The approach combines phylogenetic footprinting and transcription factor binding site prediction to identify variation in candidate cis-regulatory elements. The bioinformatics approach has been tested on a set of SNPs that are reported to have a regulatory function, as well as background SNPs. In the absence of additional information about an analyzed gene, the poor specificity of binding site prediction is prohibitive to its application. However, when additional data is available that can give guidance on which transcription factor is involved in the regulation of the gene, the in silico binding site prediction improves the selection of candidate regulatory polymorphisms for further analyses. The bioinformatics software generated for the analysis has been implemented as a Web-based application system entitled RAVEN (regulatory analysis of variation in enhancers). The RAVEN system is available at http://www.cisreg.ca for all researchers interested in the detection and characterization of regulatory sequence variation. PMID:18208319

  10. Redox regulation of FoxO transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Lars-Oliver; Sánchez-Ramos, Cristina; Prieto-Arroyo, Ignacio; Urbánek, Pavel; Steinbrenner, Holger; Monsalve, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors of the forkhead box, class O (FoxO) family are important regulators of the cellular stress response and promote the cellular antioxidant defense. On one hand, FoxOs stimulate the transcription of genes coding for antioxidant proteins located in different subcellular compartments, such as in mitochondria (i.e. superoxide dismutase-2, peroxiredoxins 3 and 5) and peroxisomes (catalase), as well as for antioxidant proteins found extracellularly in plasma (e.g., selenoprotein P and ceruloplasmin). On the other hand, reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as other stressful stimuli that elicit the formation of ROS, may modulate FoxO activity at multiple levels, including posttranslational modifications of FoxOs (such as phosphorylation and acetylation), interaction with coregulators, alterations in FoxO subcellular localization, protein synthesis and stability. Moreover, transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of the expression of genes coding for FoxOs is sensitive to ROS. Here, we review these aspects of FoxO biology focusing on redox regulation of FoxO signaling, and with emphasis on the interplay between ROS and FoxOs under various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Of particular interest are the dual role played by FoxOs in cancer development and their key role in whole body nutrient homeostasis, modulating metabolic adaptations and/or disturbances in response to low vs. high nutrient intake. Examples discussed here include calorie restriction and starvation as well as adipogenesis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26184557

  11. Patterns and regulation of ribosomal RNA transcription in Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Borrelia burgdorferi contains one 16S and two tandem sets of 23S-5S ribosomal (r) RNA genes whose patterns of transcription and regulation are unknown but are likely to be critical for survival and persistence in its hosts. Results RT-PCR of B. burgdorferi N40 and B31 revealed three rRNA region transcripts: 16S rRNA-alanine transfer RNA (tRNAAla); tRNAIle; and both sets of 23S-5S rRNA. At 34°C, there were no differences in growth rate or in accumulation of total protein, DNA and RNA in B31 cultured in Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly (BSK)-H whether rabbit serum was present or not. At 23°C, B31 grew more slowly in serum-containing BSK-H than at 34°C. DNA per cell was higher in cells in exponential as compared to stationary phase at either temperature; protein per cell was similar at both temperatures in both phases. Similar amounts of rRNA were produced in exponential phase at both temperatures, and rRNA was down-regulated in stationary phase at either temperature. Interestingly, a relBbu deletion mutant unable to generate (p)ppGpp did not down-regulate rRNA at transition to stationary phase in serum-containing BSK-H at 34°C, similar to the relaxed phenotype of E. coli relA mutants. Conclusions We conclude that rRNA transcription in B. burgdorferi is complex and regulated both by growth phase and by the stringent response but not by temperature-modulated growth rate. PMID:21251259

  12. Transcriptional regulation of human thromboxane synthase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.D.; Baek, S.J.; Fleischer, T

    1994-09-01

    The human thromboxane synthase (TS) gene encodes a microsomal enzyme catalyzing the conversion of prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A{sub 2}(TxA{sub 2}), a potent inducer of vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. A deficiency in platelet TS activity results in bleeding disorders, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Increased TxA{sub 2} has been associated with many pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis in sickle cell patients. Since the formation of TxA{sub 2} is dependent upon TS, the regulation of TS gene expression may presumably play a crucial role in vivo. Abrogation of the regulatory mechanism in TS gene expression might contribute, in part, to the above clinical manifestations. To gain insight into TS gene regulation, a 1.7 kb promoter of the human TS gene was cloned and sequenced. RNase protection assay and 5{prime} RACE protocols were used to map the transcription initiation site to nucleotide A, 30 bp downstream from a canonical TATA box. Several transcription factor binding sites, including AP-1, PU.1, and PEA3, were identified within this sequence. Transient expression studies in HL-60 cells transfected with constructs containing various lengths (0.2 to 5.5 kb) of the TS promoter/luciferase fusion gene indicated the presence of multiple repressor elements within the 5.5 kb TS promoter. However, a lineage-specific up-regulation of TS gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells induced by TPA to differentiate along the macrophage lineage. The increase in TS transcription was not detectable until 36 hr after addition of the inducer. These results suggest that expression of the human TS gene may be regulated by a mechanism involving repression and derepression of the TS promoter.

  13. Transcription Regulation and Membrane Stress Management in Enterobacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Jovanovic, Goran; McDonald, Christopher; Ces, Oscar; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Transcription regulation in a temporal and conditional manner underpins the lifecycle of enterobacterial pathogens. Upon exposure to a wide array of environmental cues, these pathogens modulate their gene expression via the RNA polymerase and associated sigma factors. Different sigma factors, either involved in general 'house-keeping' or specific responses, guide the RNA polymerase to their cognate promoter DNAs. The major alternative sigma54 factor when activated helps pathogens manage stresses and proliferate in their ecological niches. In this chapter, we review the function and regulation of the sigma54-dependent Phage shock protein (Psp) system-a major stress response when Gram-negative pathogens encounter damages to their inner membranes. We discuss the recent development on mechanisms of gene regulation, signal transduction and stress mitigation in light of different biophysical and biochemical approaches.

  14. Transcription Regulation and Membrane Stress Management in Enterobacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Jovanovic, Goran; McDonald, Christopher; Ces, Oscar; Zhang, Xiaodong; Buck, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Transcription regulation in a temporal and conditional manner underpins the lifecycle of enterobacterial pathogens. Upon exposure to a wide array of environmental cues, these pathogens modulate their gene expression via the RNA polymerase and associated sigma factors. Different sigma factors, either involved in general 'house-keeping' or specific responses, guide the RNA polymerase to their cognate promoter DNAs. The major alternative sigma54 factor when activated helps pathogens manage stresses and proliferate in their ecological niches. In this chapter, we review the function and regulation of the sigma54-dependent Phage shock protein (Psp) system-a major stress response when Gram-negative pathogens encounter damages to their inner membranes. We discuss the recent development on mechanisms of gene regulation, signal transduction and stress mitigation in light of different biophysical and biochemical approaches. PMID:27193545

  15. Regulation of mammalian transcription and splicing by Nuclear RNAi.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Roya; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Corey, David R

    2016-01-29

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known as a mechanism for controlling mammalian mRNA translation in the cytoplasm, but what would be the consequences if it also functions in cell nuclei? Although RNAi has also been found in nuclei of plants, yeast, and other organisms, there has been relatively little progress towards understanding the potential involvement of mammalian RNAi factors in nuclear processes including transcription and splicing. This review summarizes evidence for mammalian RNAi factors in cell nuclei and mechanisms that might contribute to the control of gene expression. When RNAi factors bind small RNAs, they form ribonucleoprotein complexes that can be selective for target sequences within different classes of nuclear RNA substrates. The versatility of nuclear RNAi may supply a previously underappreciated layer of regulation to transcription, splicing, and other nuclear processes.

  16. Regulating IL-9 transcription in T helper cells

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Narayanan B.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    T helper cells are critical for the development of immunity to infections and inflammatory disease. The acquisition of specific cytokine-secreting profiles, primed by the cytokine microenvironment, is required for effector function of Th cells. The most recent addition to the growing list of effector subsets are Th9 cells that secrete IL-9. In this article we propose a model for the transcriptional regulation of the Il9 gene in IL-9-expressing T cells and the relatedness of this subset to other Th phenotypes. We suggest that transcription factors restricted to certain Th subsets, and common among several subsets, may play a role in the plasticity of Th9 cells. PMID:21371941

  17. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcriptional Regulation: TFIIH and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Compe, Emmanuel; Egly, Jean-Marc

    2016-06-01

    Transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is a multiprotein complex involved in both transcription and DNA repair, revealing a striking functional link between these two processes. Some of its subunits also belong to complexes involved in other cellular processes, such as chromosome segregation and cell cycle regulation, emphasizing the multitasking capabilities of this factor. This review aims to depict the structure of TFIIH and to dissect the roles of its subunits in different cellular mechanisms. Our understanding of the biochemistry of TFIIH has greatly benefited from studies focused on diseases related to TFIIH mutations. We address the etiology of these disorders and underline the fact that TFIIH can be considered a promising target for therapeutic strategies. PMID:27294439

  18. Regulation of mammalian transcription and splicing by Nuclear RNAi

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Roya; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Corey, David R.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is well known as a mechanism for controlling mammalian mRNA translation in the cytoplasm, but what would be the consequences if it also functions in cell nuclei? Although RNAi has also been found in nuclei of plants, yeast, and other organisms, there has been relatively little progress towards understanding the potential involvement of mammalian RNAi factors in nuclear processes including transcription and splicing. This review summarizes evidence for mammalian RNAi factors in cell nuclei and mechanisms that might contribute to the control of gene expression. When RNAi factors bind small RNAs, they form ribonucleoprotein complexes that can be selective for target sequences within different classes of nuclear RNA substrates. The versatility of nuclear RNAi may supply a previously underappreciated layer of regulation to transcription, splicing, and other nuclear processes. PMID:26612865

  19. Dynamic Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation of Human Epidermal Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Alessia; Miccio, Annarita; Romano, Oriana; Petiti, Luca; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Bicciato, Silvio; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human skin is maintained by the differentiation and maturation of interfollicular stem and progenitors cells. We used DeepCAGE, genome-wide profiling of histone modifications and retroviral integration analysis, to map transcripts, promoters, enhancers, and super-enhancers (SEs) in prospectively isolated keratinocytes and transit-amplifying progenitors, and retrospectively defined keratinocyte stem cells. We show that >95% of the active promoters are in common and differentially regulated in progenitors and differentiated keratinocytes, while approximately half of the enhancers and SEs are stage specific and account for most of the epigenetic changes occurring during differentiation. Transcription factor (TF) motif identification and correlation with TF binding site maps allowed the identification of TF circuitries acting on enhancers and SEs during differentiation. Overall, our study provides a broad, genome-wide description of chromatin dynamics and differential enhancer and promoter usage during epithelial differentiation, and describes a novel approach to identify active regulatory elements in rare stem cell populations. PMID:27050947

  20. Transcriptional regulator Id2 mediates CD8+ T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Cannarile, Michael A; Lind, Nicholas A; Rivera, Richard; Sheridan, Alison D; Camfield, Kristin A; Wu, Bei Bei; Cheung, Kitty P; Ding, Zhaoqing; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2006-12-01

    Transcriptional programs that initiate and sustain the proliferation, differentiation and survival of CD8(+) T cells during immune responses are not completely understood. Here we show that inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (Id2), an antagonist of E protein transcription factors, was upregulated in CD8(+) T cells during infection and that expression of Id2 was maintained in memory CD8(+) T cells. Although Id2-deficient naive CD8(+) T cells recognized antigen and proliferated normally early after infection, effector CD8(+) T cells did not accumulate because the cells were highly susceptible to apoptosis. Id2-deficient CD8(+) T cells responding to infection had changes in the expression of genes that influence survival and had altered memory formation. Our data emphasize the importance of Id2 in regulating gene expression by CD8(+) T cells and the magnitude of effector responses, suggesting a mechanism involving Id protein- and E protein-mediated survival and differentiation of mature T cells.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of decreased protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, G.; Steffen, J. M.; Geoghegan, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory role of transcriptional alterations in unloaded skeletal muscles was investigated by determining levels of total muscle RNA and mRNA fractions in soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats subjected to whole-body suspension for up to 7 days. After 7 days, total RNA and mRNA contents were lower in soleus and gastrocnemius, compared with controls, but the concentrations of both RNAs per g muscle were unaltered. Alpha-actin mRNA (assessed by dot hybridization) was significantly reduced in soleus after 1, 3, and 7 days of suspension and in gastrocnemius after 3 and 7 days, but was unchanged in EDL. Protein synthesis directed by RNA extracted from soleus and EDL indicated marked alteration in mRNAs coding for several small proteins. Results suggest that altered transcription and availability of specific mRNAs contribute significantly to the regulation of protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading.

  2. Concentration and Length Dependence of DNA Looping in Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lin; Garcia, Hernan G.; Blumberg, Seth; Towles, Kevin B.; Beausang, John F.; Nelson, Philip C.; Phillips, Rob

    2009-01-01

    In many cases, transcriptional regulation involves the binding of transcription factors at sites on the DNA that are not immediately adjacent to the promoter of interest. This action at a distance is often mediated by the formation of DNA loops: Binding at two or more sites on the DNA results in the formation of a loop, which can bring the transcription factor into the immediate neighborhood of the relevant promoter. These processes are important in settings ranging from the historic bacterial examples (bacterial metabolism and the lytic-lysogeny decision in bacteriophage), to the modern concept of gene regulation to regulatory processes central to pattern formation during development of multicellular organisms. Though there have been a variety of insights into the combinatorial aspects of transcriptional control, the mechanism of DNA looping as an agent of combinatorial control in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes remains unclear. We use single-molecule techniques to dissect DNA looping in the lac operon. In particular, we measure the propensity for DNA looping by the Lac repressor as a function of the concentration of repressor protein and as a function of the distance between repressor binding sites. As with earlier single-molecule studies, we find (at least) two distinct looped states and demonstrate that the presence of these two states depends both upon the concentration of repressor protein and the distance between the two repressor binding sites. We find that loops form even at interoperator spacings considerably shorter than the DNA persistence length, without the intervention of any other proteins to prebend the DNA. The concentration measurements also permit us to use a simple statistical mechanical model of DNA loop formation to determine the free energy of DNA looping, or equivalently, the for looping. PMID:19479049

  3. ROMA: an in vitro approach to defining target genes for transcription regulators

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Shawn R.; Eiamphungporn, Warawan; Helmann, John D.

    2009-01-01

    We describe an in vitro transcription-based method called ROMA (run-off transcription-microarray analysis) for the genome-wide analysis of transcription regulated by sigma factors and other transcriptional regulators. ROMA uses purified RNA polymerase with and without a regulatory protein to monitor products of transcription from a genomic DNA template. Transcribed RNA is converted to cDNA and hybridized to gene arrays allowing for the identification of genes that are specifically activated by the regulator. We discuss the use of ROMA to define sigma factor regulons in Bacillus subtilis and its broad application to defining regulons for other transcriptional regulators in various species. PMID:18948201

  4. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of IGF-I expression in skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Allen, D. L.; Haddad, F.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of transcription in the regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I expression in skeletal muscle. RT-PCR was used to determine endogenous expression of IGF-I pre-mRNA and mRNA in control (Con) and functionally overloaded (FO) rat plantaris. The transcriptional activities of five different-length IGF-I promoter fragments controlling transcription of a firefly luciferase (FLuc) reporter gene were tested in vitro by transfection of myoblasts or in vivo during FO by direct gene transfer into the plantaris. Increased endogenous IGF-I gene transcription during 7 days of plantaris FO was evidenced by an approximately 140-160% increase (P < 0.0001) in IGF-I pre-mRNA (a transcriptional marker). IGF-I mRNA expression also increased by approximately 90% (P < 0.0001), and it was correlated (R = 0.93; P < 0.0001) with the pre-mRNA increases. The three longest IGF-I exon 1 promoters induced reporter gene expression in proliferating C2C12 and L6E9 myoblasts. In differentiated L6E9 myotubes, promoter activity increased approximately two- to threefold over myoblasts. Overexpression of calcineurin and MyoD increased the activity of the -852/+192 promoter in C2C12 myotubes by approximately 5- and approximately 18-fold, respectively. However, FO did not induce these exogenous promoter fragments. Nevertheless, the present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the IGF-I gene is transcriptionally regulated during muscle hypertrophy in vivo as evidenced by the induction of the endogenous IGF-I pre-mRNA during plantaris FO. The exon 1 promoter region of the IGF-I gene is sufficient to direct inducible expression in vitro; however, an in vivo response to FO may require elements outside the -852/+346 region of the exon 1 IGF-I promoter or features inherent to the endogenous IGF-I gene.

  6. Crystal structure of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional regulator Rv0302.

    PubMed

    Chou, Tsung-Han; Delmar, Jared A; Wright, Catherine C; Kumar, Nitin; Radhakrishnan, Abhijith; Doh, Julia K; Licon, Meredith H; Bolla, Jani Reddy; Lei, Hsiang-Ting; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Su, Chih-Chia; Purdy, Georgiana E; Yu, Edward W

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a pathogenic bacterial species, which is neither Gram positive nor Gram negative. It has a unique cell wall, making it difficult to kill and conferring resistance to antibiotics that disrupt cell wall biosynthesis. Thus, the mycobacterial cell wall is critical to the virulence of these pathogens. Recent work shows that the mycobacterial membrane protein large (MmpL) family of transporters contributes to cell wall biosynthesis by exporting fatty acids and lipidic elements of the cell wall. The expression of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis MmpL proteins is controlled by a complicated regulatory network system. Here we report crystallographic structures of two forms of the TetR-family transcriptional regulator Rv0302, which participates in regulating the expression of MmpL proteins. The structures reveal a dimeric, two-domain molecule with architecture consistent with the TetR family of regulators. Comparison of the two Rv0302 crystal structures suggests that the conformational changes leading to derepression may be due to a rigid body rotational motion within the dimer interface of the regulator. Using fluorescence polarization and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrate the recognition of promoter and intragenic regions of multiple mmpL genes by this protein. In addition, our isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility shift experiments indicate that fatty acids may be the natural ligand of this regulator. Taken together, these experiments provide new perspectives on the regulation of the MmpL family of transporters. PMID:26362239

  7. Structural basis for the transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Darcie J.; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Subramanian, Chitra; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.

    2010-11-09

    DesT is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the genes that control the unsaturated:saturated fatty acid ratio available for membrane lipid synthesis. DesT bound to unsaturated acyl-CoA has a high affinity for its cognate palindromic DNA-binding site, whereas DesT bound to saturated acyl-CoA does not bind this site. Structural analyses of the DesT-oleoyl-CoA-DNA and DesT-palmitoyl-CoA complexes reveal that acyl chain shape directly influences the packing of hydrophobic core residues within the DesT ligand-binding domain. These changes are propagated to the paired DNA-binding domains via conformational changes to modulate DNA binding. These structural interpretations are supported by the in vitro and in vivo characterization of site-directed mutants. The regulation of DesT by the unsaturated:saturated ratio of acyl chains rather than the concentration of a single ligand is a paradigm for understanding transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis.

  8. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in Proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Leyn, Semen A; Suvorova, Inna A; Kholina, Tatiana D; Sherstneva, Sofia S; Novichkov, Pavel S; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2014-01-01

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ∼ 200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria. PMID:25411846

  9. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in proteobacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Leyn, Semen A.; Suvorova, Inna A.; Kholina, Tatiana D.; Sherstneva, Sofia S.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2014-11-20

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ~200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific andmore » genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.« less

  10. A WRKY Transcription Factor Regulates Fe Translocation under Fe Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing Ying; Li, Chun Xiao; Sun, Li; Ren, Jiang Yuan; Li, Gui Xin; Ding, Zhong Jie; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2016-07-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency affects plant growth and development, leading to reduction of crop yields and quality. Although the regulation of Fe uptake under Fe deficiency has been well studied in the past decade, the regulatory mechanism of Fe translocation inside the plants remains unknown. Here, we show that a WRKY transcription factor WRKY46 is involved in response to Fe deficiency. Lack of WRKY46 (wrky46-1 and wrky46-2 loss-of-function mutants) significantly affects Fe translocation from root to shoot and thus causes obvious chlorosis on the new leaves under Fe deficiency. Gene expression analysis reveals that expression of a nodulin-like gene (VACUOLAR IRON TRANSPORTER1-LIKE1 [VITL1]) is dramatically increased in wrky46-1 mutant. VITL1 expression is inhibited by Fe deficiency, while the expression of WRKY46 is induced in the root stele. Moreover, down-regulation of VITL1 expression can restore the chlorosis phenotype on wrky46-1 under Fe deficiency. Further yeast one-hybrid and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that WRKY46 is capable of binding to the specific W-boxes present in the VITL1 promoter. In summary, our results demonstrate that WRKY46 plays an important role in the control of root-to-shoot Fe translocation under Fe deficiency condition via direct regulation of VITL1 transcript levels. PMID:27208259

  11. Transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin genes in chicken bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang In; Jang, Hyun June; Jeon, Mi-hyang; Lee, Mi Ock; Kim, Jeom Sun; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Byun, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of vertebrate-specific immune molecules with an evolutionarily conserved gene structure. We analyzed the expression patterns of cathelicidin genes (CAMP, CATH3, and CATHB1) in chicken bone marrow cells (BMCs) and chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). We found that CAMP and CATHB1 were significantly up-regulated in BMCs, whereas the expression of CATH3 did not differ significantly between BMCs and CEFs. To study the mechanism underlying the up-regulation of cathelicidin genes in BMCs, we predicted the transcription factors (TFs) that bind to the 5'-flanking regions of cathelicidin genes. CEBPA, EBF1, HES1, MSX1, and ZIC3 were up-regulated in BMCs compared to CEFs. Subsequently, when a siRNA-mediated knockdown assay was performed for MSX1, the expression of CAMP and CATHB1 was decreased in BMCs. We also showed that the transcriptional activity of the CAMP promoter was decreased by mutation of the MSX1-binding sites present within the 5'-flanking region of CAMP. These results increase our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling cathelicidin genes in BMCs.

  12. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in proteobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Leyn, Semen A.; Suvorova, Inna A.; Kholina, Tatiana D.; Sherstneva, Sofia S.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2014-11-20

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ~200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.

  13. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  14. The cell cycle rallies the transcription cycle: Cdc28/Cdk1 is a cell cycle-regulated transcriptional CDK.

    PubMed

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Enserink, Jorrit M

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) Kin28, Bur1 and Ctk1 regulate basal transcription by phosphorylating the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II. However, very little is known about the involvement of the cell cycle CDK Cdc28 in the transcription process. We have recently shown that, upon cell cycle entry, Cdc28 kinase activity boosts transcription of a subset of genes by directly stimulating the basal transcription machinery. Here, we discuss the biological significance of this finding and give our view of the kinase-dependent role of Cdc28 in regulation of RNA polymerase II.

  15. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  16. The molecular clock regulates circadian transcription of tissue factor gene.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohkura, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and mortality. We found that the circadian expression of TF mRNA, which peaked at the day to night transition (activity onset), was damped in the liver of Clock mutant mice. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type or Clock mutant mice showed that CLOCK is involved in transcription of the TF gene. Furthermore, the results of real-time luciferase reporter experiments revealed that the circadian expression of TF mRNA is regulated by clock molecules through a cell-autonomous mechanism via an E-box element located in the promoter region.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of muscle fatty acid-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, J O; Neufer, P D; Farrar, R P; Veerkamp, J H; Dohm, G L

    1994-01-01

    Heart fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) is present in a wide variety of tissues but is found in the highest concentration in cardiac and red skeletal muscle. It has been proposed that the expression of H-FABP correlates directly with the fatty acid-oxidative capacity of the tissue. In the present study, the expression of H-FABP was measured in red and white skeletal muscle under two conditions in which fatty acid utilization is known to be increased: streptozotocin-induced diabetes and fasting. Protein concentration, mRNA concentration and transcription rate were measured under both conditions. The level of both protein and mRNA increased approximately 2-fold under each condition. The transcription rate was higher in red skeletal muscle than in white muscle, was increased 2-fold during fasting, but was unchanged by streptozotocin-induced diabetes. In addition to supporting the hypothesis that H-FABP is induced during conditions of increased fatty acid utilization, these findings demonstrate that the regulation of H-FABP expression may or may not be at the level of transcription depending on the stimulus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8141774

  18. Macromolecular Crowding as a Regulator of Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Hiroaki; Putzel, Gregory Garbès; Backman, Vadim; Szleifer, Igal

    2014-01-01

    Studies of macromolecular crowding have shown its important effects on molecular transport and interactions in living cells. Less clear is the effect of crowding when its influence is incorporated into a complex network of interactions. Here, we explore the effects of crowding in the cell nucleus on a model of gene transcription as a network of reactions involving transcription factors, RNA polymerases, and DNA binding sites for these proteins. The novelty of our approach is that we determine the effects of crowding on the rates of these reactions using Brownian dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, allowing us to integrate molecular-scale information, such as the shapes and sizes of each molecular species, into the rate equations of the model. The steady-state cytoplasmic mRNA concentration shows several regimes with qualitatively different dependences on the volume fraction, ϕ, of crowding agents in the nucleus, including a broad range of parameter values where it depends nonmonotonically on ϕ, with maximum mRNA production occurring at a physiologically relevant value. The extent of this crowding dependence can be modulated by a variety of means, suggesting that the transcriptional output of a gene can be regulated jointly by the local level of macromolecular crowding in the nucleus, together with the local concentrations of polymerases and DNA-binding proteins, as well as other properties of the gene’s physical environment. PMID:24739179

  19. Zinc triggers a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the metal homeostasis gene FRD3 in Arabidopsis relatives

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Polese, Catherine; Nouet, Cécile; Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Krämer, Ute; Motte, Patrick; Hanikenne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, FRD3 (FERRIC CHELATE REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE 3) plays a central role in metal homeostasis. FRD3 is among a set of metal homeostasis genes that are constitutively highly expressed in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis halleri, a zinc hyperaccumulating and hypertolerant species. Here, we examined the regulation of FRD3 by zinc in both species to shed light on the evolutionary processes underlying the evolution of hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. We combined gene expression studies with the use of β-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein reporter constructs to compare the expression profile and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of FRD3 in both species. The AtFRD3 and AhFRD3 genes displayed a conserved expression profile. In A. thaliana, alternative transcription initiation sites from two promoters determined transcript variants that were differentially regulated by zinc supply in roots and shoots to favour the most highly translated variant under zinc-excess conditions. In A. halleri, a single transcript variant with higher transcript stability and enhanced translation has been maintained. The FRD3 gene thus undergoes complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis relatives. Our study reveals that a diverse set of mechanisms underlie increased gene dosage in the A. halleri lineage and illustrates how an environmental challenge can alter gene regulation. PMID:25900619

  20. Transcriptional regulation through glutamate receptors: Involvement of tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    López-Bayghen, Esther; Aguirre, Adán; Ortega, Arturo

    2003-12-01

    Glutamate receptors play a key role in neuronal plasticity, learning and memory, and in several neuropathologies. Short-term and long-term changes in synaptic efficacy are triggered by glutamate. Although an enhanced glutamate-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation has been described in several systems, its role in membrane-to-nuclei signaling is unclear. Taking advantage of the fact that the gene encoding the chick kainate-binding protein undergoes a glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation via an activator protein-1 (AP-1) site, we evaluated the involvement of tyrosine kinases in this process. We describe here the participation of receptor and non-receptor tyrosine kinases in the signaling cascade triggered by glutamate. Our results suggest that in Bergmann glia cells, glutamate receptors transactivate receptor tyrosine kinases, favoring the idea of a complex network of signals activated by this excitatory neurotransmitter that results in regulation of gene expression.

  1. Dynamic regulation of transcription factors by nucleosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Hada, Arjan; Sen, Payel; Olufemi, Lola; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin Y; Forth, Scott; McKnight, Jeffrey N; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D; Bartholomew, Blaine; Wang, Michelle D

    2015-06-05

    The chromatin landscape and promoter architecture are dominated by the interplay of nucleosome and transcription factor (TF) binding to crucial DNA sequence elements. However, it remains unclear whether nucleosomes mobilized by chromatin remodelers can influence TFs that are already present on the DNA template. In this study, we investigated the interplay between nucleosome remodeling, by either yeast ISW1a or SWI/SNF, and a bound TF. We found that a TF serves as a major barrier to ISW1a remodeling, and acts as a boundary for nucleosome repositioning. In contrast, SWI/SNF was able to slide a nucleosome past a TF, with concurrent eviction of the TF from the DNA, and the TF did not significantly impact the nucleosome positioning. Our results provide direct evidence for a novel mechanism for both nucleosome positioning regulation by bound TFs and TF regulation via dynamic repositioning of nucleosomes.

  2. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid regulation of gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Clarke, S D; Jump, D B

    1994-01-01

    We have known for nearly 30 years that dietary polyenoic (n-6) and (n-3) fatty acids potentially inhibit hepatic fatty acid biosynthesis. The teleological explanation for this unique action of PUFAs resides in their ability to suppress the synthesis of (n-9) fatty acids. By inhibiting fatty acid biosynthesis, dietary PUFAs reduce the availability of substrate for delta 9 desaturase (7, 22, 34, 36) and in turn reduce the availability of (n-9) fatty acids for incorporation into plasma membranes. In this way, essential biological processes dependent on essential fatty acids (e.g. reproduction and trans-dermal water loss) continue to operate normally. Therefore, if essential fatty acid intake did not regulate (n-9) fatty acid synthesis, the survival of the organism would be threatened. During the past 20 years, we have gradually elucidated the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which dietary PUFAs modulate fatty acid biosynthesis and (n-9) fatty acid availability. Central to this mechanism has been our ability to determine that dietary PUFAs regulate the transcription of genes coding for lipogenic enzymes (12, 40). The potential mechanisms by which PUFAs govern gene transcription are numerous, and it is unlikely that any one mechanism can fully elucidate the nuclear actions of PUFA. The difficulty in providing a unifying hypothesis at this time stems from: (a) the many metabolic routes taken by PUFAs upon entering the hepatocyte (Figure 1); and (b) the lack of identity of a specific PUFA-regulated trans-acting factor. However, the studies described above indicate that macronutrients, like PUFA, are not only utilized as fuel and structural components of cells, but also serve as important mediators of gene expression (12, 14, 40). As regulators of gene expression, PUFAs (or metabolites) are thought to affect the activity of transcription factors, which in turn target key cis-linked elements associated with specific genes. Whether this targeting involves DNA

  3. Osteogenic transcription factors and proto-oncogene regulate bone sialoprotein gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Takai, Hideki; Mezawa, Masaru; Choe, Jin; Nakayama, Yohei; Ogata, Yorimasa

    2013-09-01

    Runt homeodomain protein 2 (Runx2), distalless 5 (Dlx5) and Smad1 are transcription factors that play critical roles in controlling the differentiation of osteoblasts and mineralization of bone. Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase, Src, is an enzyme encoded by the Src gene. The normal cellular gene is called cellular-Src (c-Src). Bone sialoprotein (BSP), a protein implicated in the initial mineralization of newly formed bone, is an early phenotypic marker of differentiated osteoblasts. In this study, we used overexpression plasmids with Runx2, Dlx5, Smad1 or c-Src inserts to search for the effects of these transcription factors and proto-oncogene on BSP gene expression using rat osteoblast-like ROS 17/2.8. When we used Runx2, Dlx5 or c-Src overexpression plasmids for the transfection, BSP and Runx2 mRNA levels were increased in ROS 17/2.8 cells. However, overexpression of Smad1 did not induce BSP and Runx2 mRNA. Transient transfection analyses were performed using chimeric constructs of the rat BSP gene promoter linked to a luciferase reporter gene. Transfection of ROS 17/2.8 cells with Runx2, Dlx5 or c-Src overexpression plasmid increased the luciferase activities of the constructs, pLUC3 (-116 to +60), pLUC4 (-425 to +60) and pLUC5 (-801 to +60). However, Smad1 overexpression had no effect on the luciferase activities. These results demonstrate that overexpression of Runx2, Dlx5 or c-Src stimulates BSP transcription, and suggest that Runx2, Dlx5 and c-Src might be crucial transcriptional regulators of mineralization and bone formation.

  4. Molecular basis of RNA polymerase promoter specificity switch revealed through studies of Thermus bacteriophage transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Minakhin, Leonid; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Lopatina, Anna; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation is the central point of gene expression regulation. Understanding of molecular mechanism of transcription regulation requires, ultimately, the structural understanding of consequences of transcription factors binding to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme of transcription. We recently determined a structure of a complex between transcription factor gp39 encoded by a Thermus bacteriophage and Thermus RNAP holoenzyme. In this addendum to the original publication, we highlight structural insights that explain the ability of gp39 to act as an RNAP specificity switch which inhibits transcription initiation from a major class of bacterial promoters, while allowing transcription from a minor promoter class to continue. PMID:25105059

  5. Regulation of His4 Expression by the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Sin4 Transcriptional Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Y. W.; Stillman, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    The yeast SIN4 gene functions in the transcriptional activation and repression of diverse yeast genes. Previous experiments suggest a sin4 mutation affects chromatin structure and thus alters transcriptional regulation. In this report we show that SIN4 is required for full expression of the HIS4, Ty1, and MATα genes, in addition to the previously described SIN4-dependence of CTS1 expression. All of these genes contain within their promoters a binding site for the Rap1p transcriptional regulator. However, SIN4 does not play a direct role either in transcriptional activation or repression by Rap1p. The HIS4 gene can be activated by either of two pathways, the basal or the inducible pathway, and experiments are described that show that a sin4 mutation affects both pathways. It was shown previously that mutation of the Rap1p binding site in the HIS4 promoter causes a similar effect on HIS4 expression and that this promoter mutation also causes a change in chromatin structure. The SNF2/SWI2 gene is also required for full HIS4 expression, and we show that a sin4 snf2 double mutant is not synergistic compared to either single mutant. We show that nucleosomes are positioned at the HIS4 promoter and that this positioning is disrupted in a snf2 mutant but not in a sin4 mutant. These findings suggest that SIN4 plays a distinct role in transcriptional regulation. PMID:7635278

  6. Glutamine Metabolism Regulates the Pluripotency Transcription Factor OCT4

    PubMed Central

    Marsboom, Glenn; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Pohl-Avila, Nicole; Zhang, Yanmin; Yuan, Yang; Kang, Hojin; Hao, Bo; Brunengraber, Henri; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of pluripotency by cellular metabolism in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are not fully understood. We found that high levels of glutamine metabolism are essential to prevent degradation of OCT4, a key transcription factor regulating hESC pluripotency. Glutamine withdrawal depletes the endogenous anti-oxidant glutathione, which results in the oxidation of OCT4 cysteine residues required for its DNA binding and enhanced OCT4 degradation. The emergence of the OCT4lo cell population following glutamine withdrawal did not result in greater propensity for cell death. Instead, glutamine withdrawal during vascular differentiation of hESCs generated cells with greater angiogenic capacity, thus indicating that modulating glutamine metabolism enhances the differentiation and functional maturation of cells. These findings demonstrate that the pluripotency transcription factor OCT4 can serve as a metabolic-redox sensor in hESCs and that metabolic cues can act in concert with growth factor signaling to orchestrate stem cell differentiation. PMID:27346346

  7. Glucocorticoid regulation of transcription at an amplified, episomal promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrowski, M.C.; Richard-Foy, H.; Wolford, R.G.; Berard, D.S.; Hager, G.L.

    1983-11-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR) has been introduced into cultured murine cells, using the 69% transforming fragment of bovine papiloma virus type 1 (BVP). Transformed cells contain up to 200 copies of the chimeric molecules per diploid genome. The restriction endonuclease map of the acquired recombinants, as well as the physical structure of the DNA, indicates that the LTR-BVP molecules present in these cells occur exclusively as unintegrated, extrachromosomal episome. When a 72-base pair direct repeat ''enhancer'' element (derived from the Harvey sarcoma retrovirus) was included in the MMTV LTR-BPV chimeric plasmids, DNA acquired through transfection, with a single exception, was integrated or rearranged or both. Two approaches showed that the MMTV LTR present in the episomal state was capable of supporting glucocorticoid hormone-regulated transcription. The authors have therefore demonstrated the hormone response for the first time in a totally defined primary sequence environment. Significant differences both in the basal level of MMTV-initiated transcription and in the extend of glucocorticoid induction were observed in individual cell lines with similar episomal copy numbers. These phenotypic variations suggest that epigenetic structure is an important component of the mechanism of regulation.

  8. Dynamic Regulation of AP-1 Transcriptional Complexes Directs Trophoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Lindsey N.; Rumi, M. A. Karim; Roby, Katherine F.

    2015-01-01

    Placentation is a process that establishes the maternal-fetal interface and is required for successful pregnancy. The epithelial component of the placenta consists of trophoblast cells, which possess the capacity for multilineage differentiation and are responsible for placenta-specific functions. FOS-like antigen 1 (FOSL1), a component of AP-1 transcription factor complexes, contributes to the regulation of placental development. FOSL1 expression is restricted to trophoblast giant cells and invasive trophoblast cells. In the present study, we characterized the FOSL1 regulatory pathway in rat trophoblast cells. Transcriptome profiling in control and FOSL1 knockdown cells identified FOSL1-dependent gene sets linked to endocrine and invasive functions. FOSL1 was shown to occupy AP-1 binding sites within these gene loci, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Complementary in vivo experiments using trophoblast-specific lentiviral delivery of FOSL1 short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) provided in vivo validation of FOSL1 targets. FOSL1 actions require a dimerization partner. Coimmunoprecipitation, coimmunolocalization, and ChIP analyses showed that FOSL1 interacts with JUNB and, to a lesser extent, JUN in differentiating trophoblast cells. Knockdown of FOSL1 and JUNB expression inhibited both endocrine and invasive properties of trophoblast cells. In summary, FOSL1 recruits JUNB to form AP-1 transcriptional complexes that specifically regulate the endocrine and invasive trophoblast phenotypes. PMID:26149388

  9. Effects of the lifestyle habits in breast cancer transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Solis, Marco Allán; Maya-Nuñez, Guadalupe; Casas-González, Patricia; Olivares, Aleida; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Through research carried out in the last 25 years about the breast cancer etiology, it has been possible to estimate that less than 10 % of patients who are diagnosed with the condition are carriers of some germline or somatic mutation. The clinical reports of breast cancer patients with healthy twins and the development of disease in women without high penetrance mutations detected, warn the participation more factors in the transformation process. The high incidence of mammary adenocarcinoma in the modern woman and the urgent need for new methods of prevention and early detection have demanded more information about the role that environment and lifestyle have on the transformation of mammary gland epithelial cells. Obesity, alcoholism and smoking are factors that have shown a close correlation with the risk of developing breast cancer. And although these conditions affect different cell regulation levels, the study of its effects in the mechanisms of transcriptional and epigenetic regulation is considered critical for a better understanding of the loss of identity of epithelial cells during carcinogenesis of this tissue. The main objective of this review was to establish the importance of changes occurring to transcriptional level in the mammary gland as a consequence of acute or chronic exposure to harmful products such as obesity-causing foods, ethanol and cigarette smoke components. At analyze the main studies related to topic, it has concluded that the understanding of effects caused by the lifestyle factors in performance of the transcriptional mechanisms that determine gene expression of the mammary gland epithelial cells, may help explain the development of this disease in women without genetic propensity and different phenotypic manifestations of this cancer type.

  10. Mitochondrial transcription factor A regulates mitochondrial transcription initiation, DNA packaging, and genome copy number.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Christopher T; Kolesar, Jill E; Kaufman, Brett A

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA, mtTF1, TFAM) is an essential protein that binds mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with and without sequence specificity to regulate both mitochondrial transcription initiation and mtDNA copy number. The abundance of mtDNA generally reflects TFAM protein levels; however, the precise mechanism(s) by which this occurs remains a matter of debate. Data suggest that the usage of mitochondrial promoters is regulated by TFAM dosage, allowing TFAM to affect both gene expression and RNA priming for first strand mtDNA replication. Additionally, TFAM has a non-specific DNA binding activity that is both cooperative and high affinity. TFAM can compact plasmid DNA in vitro, suggesting a structural role for the non-specific DNA binding activity in genome packaging. This review summarizes TFAM-mtDNA interactions and describes an emerging view of TFAM as a multipurpose coordinator of mtDNA transactions, with direct consequences for the maintenance of gene expression and genome copy number. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Gene Expression. PMID:22465614

  11. Controlled transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes by a novel transcription factor derived from Escherichia coli purine repressor.

    PubMed

    Yeon, Eun-Hee; Noh, Ju-Young; Kim, Jong-Min; Lee, Min-Young; Yoon, Sarah; Park, Sang-Kyu; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Kyung-Sup

    2004-06-25

    Unlike the DNA-binding domains (DBD) of most eukaryotic transcription factors, Escherichia coli LacI family transcription factors are unable to bind to specific target DNA sequences without a cofactor-binding domain. In the present study, we reconstructed a novel DBD designated as PurHG, which binds constitutively to a 16bp purine repressor operator, by fusion of the purine repressor (PurR) DBD (residues 1-57) and the GAL4 dimerization domain (DD, residues 42-148). Binding of PurHG to DNA requires the dimerization and a hinge helix of PurR DBD. When the PurHG was expressed as a fusion protein in a form of a transcription activator (PurAD) or an artificial nuclear receptor (PurAPR or PurAER) responding to ligand, such as RU486 or beta-estradiol, it could regulate the expression of the reporter genes in NIH3T3 cells. The prerequisite region of the GAL4 DD for DNA-binding was amino acid residues from 42 to 98 in the form of PurAD, while the amino acid residues from 42 to 75 were sufficient for ligand-dependent regulation in the form of PurAPR. These results suggest that the dimerization function of the progesterone ligand-binding domain could be substituted for region 76-98 of the GAL4 DD. In summary, the fusion of the PurR DBD and the GAL4 DD generates fully active DNA-binding protein, PurHG, in vitro and in vivo, and these results provide the direct evidence of structural predictions that the proximate positioning of PurR hinge helical regions is critical for DNA-binding.

  12. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer.

  13. Differential regulation of oligodendrocyte markers by glucocorticoids: Post-transcriptional regulation of both proteolipid protein and myelin basic protein and transcriptional regulation of glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Cole, R.; Chiappelli, F.; De Vellis, J. )

    1989-09-01

    During neonatal development glucocorticoids potentiate oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelinogenesis by regulating the expression of myelin basic protein, proteolipid protein, and glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase. The actual locus at which hydrocortisone exerts its developmental influence on glial physiology is, however, not well understood. Gycerol phosphate dehydrogenase is glucocorticoid-inducible in oligodendrocytes at all stages of development both in vivo and in vitro. In newborn rat cerebral cultures, between 9 and 15 days in vitro, a 2- to 3-fold increase in myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein mRNA levels occurs in oligodendrocytes within 12 hr of hydrocortisone treatment. Immunostaining demonstrates that this increase in mRNAs is followed by a 2- to 3-fold increase in the protein levels within 24 hr. In vitro transcription assays performed with oligodendrocyte nuclei show an 11-fold increase in the transcriptional activity of glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase in response to hydrocortisone but no increase in transcription of myelin basic protein or proteolipid protein. These results indicate that during early myelinogeneis, glucocorticoids influence the expression of key oligodendroglial markers by different processes: The expression of glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase is regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas the expression of myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein is modulated via a different, yet uncharacterized, mechanism involving post-transcriptional regulation.

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of Endothelial Arginase 2 by HDAC2

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Deepesh; Sikka, Gautam; Bergman, Yehudit; Kim, Jae Hyung; Ryoo, Sungwoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Arginase 2 is a critical target in atherosclerosis as it controls endothelial NO, proliferation, fibrosis, and inflammation. Regulators of Arg2 transcription in the endothelium have not been characterized. The goal of the current study is to determine the role of specific HDACs in the regulation of endothelial Arg2 transcription and endothelial function. Approach and Results The HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA) increased levels of Arg2 mRNA, protein, and activity in both HAEC and mouse aortic rings. These changes occurred with both time- and dose-dependent patterns, and resulted in Arg2-dependent endothelial dysfunction. TSA and the atherogenic stimulus OxLDL enhanced the activity of common promoter regions of Arg2. HDAC inhibition with TSA also decreased endothelial NO and these effects were blunted by arginase inhibition. Non-selective class I HDAC inhibitors enhanced Arg2 expression, while the only selective inhibitor that increased Arg2 expression was mocetinostat (MGCD) – a selective inhibitor of HDACs 1 and 2. Additionally, mouse aortic rings pre-incubated with MGCD exhibited dysfunctional relaxation. Overexpression of HDAC2 (but not HDAC 1, 3 or 8) cDNA in HAEC suppressed Arg2 expression in a concentration-dependent manner, and siRNA knockdown of HDAC2 enhanced Arg2 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated direct binding of HDAC2 to the Arg2 promoter, and HDAC2 overexpression in HAEC blocked OxLDL-mediated activation of the Arg2 promoter. Finally, overexpression of HDAC2 blocked OxLDL-mediated vascular dysfunction. Conclusions HDAC2 is a critical regulator of Arg2 expression and thereby endothelial NO and endothelial function. Overexpression or activation of HDAC2 represents a novel therapy for endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. PMID:24833798

  15. Transcriptional regulation of the carbohydrate utilization network in Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Tarasova, Yekaterina; Portnoy, Vasiliy A.; Zengler, Karsten; Osterman, Andrei L.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperthermophilic bacteria from the Thermotogales lineage can produce hydrogen by fermenting a wide range of carbohydrates. Previous experimental studies identified a large fraction of genes committed to carbohydrate degradation and utilization in the model bacterium Thermotoga maritima. Knowledge of these genes enabled comprehensive reconstruction of biochemical pathways comprising the carbohydrate utilization network. However, transcriptional factors (TFs) and regulatory mechanisms driving this network remained largely unknown. Here, we used an integrated approach based on comparative analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data for the reconstruction of the carbohydrate utilization regulatory networks in 11 Thermotogales genomes. We identified DNA-binding motifs and regulons for 19 orthologous TFs in the Thermotogales. The inferred regulatory network in T. maritima contains 181 genes encoding TFs, sugar catabolic enzymes and ABC-family transporters. In contrast to many previously described bacteria, a transcriptional regulation strategy of Thermotoga does not employ global regulatory factors. The reconstructed regulatory network in T. maritima was validated by gene expression profiling on a panel of mono- and disaccharides and by in vitro DNA-binding assays. The observed upregulation of genes involved in catabolism of pectin, trehalose, cellobiose, arabinose, rhamnose, xylose, glucose, galactose, and ribose showed a strong correlation with the UxaR, TreR, BglR, CelR, AraR, RhaR, XylR, GluR, GalR, and RbsR regulons. Ultimately, this study elucidated the transcriptional regulatory network and mechanisms controlling expression of carbohydrate utilization genes in T. maritima. In addition to improving the functional annotations of associated transporters and catabolic enzymes, this research provides novel insights into the evolution of regulatory networks in Thermotogales. PMID:23986752

  16. Regulation of transcription factors on sexual dimorphism of fig wasps.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-Fa; Li, Yong-Xing; Jia, Ling-Yi; Niu, Li-Hua; Murphy, Robert W; Zhang, Peng; He, Shunmin; Huang, Da-Wei

    2015-06-02

    Fig wasps exhibit extreme intraspecific morphological divergence in the wings, compound eyes, antennae, body color, and size. Corresponding to this, behaviors and lifestyles between two sexes are also different: females can emerge from fig and fly to other fig tree to oviposit and pollinate, while males live inside fig for all their lifetime. Genetic regulation may drive these extreme intraspecific morphological and behavioral divergence. Transcription factors (TFs) involved in morphological development and physiological activity may exhibit sex-specific expressions. Herein, we detect 865 TFs by using genomic and transcriptomic data of the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi. Analyses of transcriptomic data indicated that up-regulated TFs in females show significant enrichment in development of the wing, eye and antenna in all stages, from larva to adult. Meanwhile, TFs related to the development of a variety of organs display sex-specific patterns of expression in the adults and these may contribute significantly to their sexual dimorphism. In addition, up-regulated TFs in adult males exhibit enrichment in genitalia development and circadian rhythm, which correspond with mating and protandry. This finding is consistent with their sex-specific behaviors. In conclusion, our results strongly indicate that TFs play important roles in the sexual dimorphism of fig wasps.

  17. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) transcription factor regulates megakaryocytic polyploidization

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; T. Papoutsakis, Eleftherios

    2012-01-01

    Summary We propose that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a novel transcriptional regulator of megakaryopoietic polyploidization. Functional evidence was obtained that AHR impacts in vivo megakaryocytic differentiation and maturation; compared to wild-type mice, AHR-null mice had lower platelet counts, fewer numbers of newly synthesized platelets, increased bleeding times and lower-ploidy megakaryocytes (Mks). AHR mRNA increased 3·6-fold during ex vivo megakaryocytic differentiation, but reduced or remained constant during parallel isogenic granulocytic or erythroid differentiation. We interrogated the role of AHR in megakaryopoiesis using a validated Mk model of megakaryopoiesis, the human megakaryoblastic leukaemia CHRF cell line. Upon CHRF Mk differentiation, AHR mRNA and protein levels increased, AHR protein shifted from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and AHR binding to its consensus DNA binding sequence increased. Protein and mRNA levels of the AHR transcriptional target HES1 also increased. Mk differentiation of CHRF cells where AHR or HES1 was knocked-down using RNAi resulted in lower ploidy distributions and cells that were incapable of reaching ploidy classes ≥16n. AHR knockdown also resulted in increased DNA synthesis of lower ploidy cells, without impacting apoptosis. Together, these data support a role for AHR in Mk polyploidization and in vivo platelet function, and warrant further detailed investigations. PMID:21226706

  18. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics analysis of transcriptional regulation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Tovar, Hugo; Mejía, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotic cells is an extremely complex and interesting phenomenon whose dynamics are controlled by a large number of subtle physicochemical processes commonly described by means of gene regulatory networks. Such networks consist in a series of coupled chemical reactions, conformational changes, and other biomolecular processes involving the interaction of the DNA molecule itself with a number of proteins usually called transcription factors as well as enzymes and other components. The kinetics behind the functioning of such gene regulatory networks are largely unknown, though its description in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics has been discussed recently. In this work we will derive general kinetic equations for a gene regulatory network from a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description and discuss its use in understanding the free energy constrains imposed in the network structure. We also will discuss explicit expressions for the kinetics of a simple model of gene regulation and show that the kinetic role of mRNA decay during the RNA synthesis stage (or transcription) is somehow limited due to the comparatively low values of decay rates. At the level discussed here, this implies a decoupling of the kinetics of mRNA synthesis and degradation a fact that may become quite useful when modeling gene regulatory networks from experimental data on whole genome gene expression.

  19. Disentangling the many layers of eukaryotic transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Katherine M; Slattery, Matthew; Mann, Richard S

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes is an extremely complex process. In this review, we break down several critical steps, emphasizing new data and techniques that have expanded current gene regulatory models. We begin at the level of DNA sequence where cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) provide important regulatory information in the form of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. In this respect, CRMs function as instructional platforms for the assembly of gene regulatory complexes. We discuss multiple mechanisms controlling complex assembly, including cooperative DNA binding, combinatorial codes, and CRM architecture. The second section of this review places CRM assembly in the context of nucleosomes and condensed chromatin. We discuss how DNA accessibility and histone modifications contribute to TF function. Lastly, new advances in chromosomal mapping techniques have provided increased understanding of intra- and interchromosomal interactions. We discuss how these topological maps influence gene regulatory models.

  20. Transcriptional profiling of the epigenetic regulator Smchd1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruijie; Chen, Kelan; Jansz, Natasha; Blewitt, Marnie E.; Ritchie, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    Smchd1 is an epigenetic repressor with important functions in healthy cellular processes and disease. To elucidate its role in transcriptional regulation, we performed two independent genome-wide RNA-sequencing studies comparing wild-type and Smchd1 null samples in neural stem cells and lymphoma cell lines. Using an R-based analysis pipeline that accommodates observational and sample-specific weights in the linear modeling, we identify key genes dysregulated by Smchd1 deletion such as clustered protocadherins in the neural stem cells and imprinted genes in both experiments. Here we provide a detailed description of this analysis, from quality control to read mapping and differential expression analysis. These data sets are publicly available from the Gene Expression Omnibus database (accession numbers GSE64099 and GSE65747). PMID:26981392

  1. Human Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Regulation through GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor Alpha (GABPa)

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Nowick, Katja; Piccini, Ilaria; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Querfurth, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of phenotypic differences between closely related species are likely caused by differences in gene regulation. While this has already been postulated over 30 years ago, only few examples of evolutionary changes in gene regulation have been verified. Here, we identified and investigated binding sites of the transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPa) aiming to discover cis-regulatory adaptations on the human lineage. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing experiments in a human cell line, we found 11,619 putative GABPa binding sites. Through sequence comparisons of the human GABPa binding regions with orthologous sequences from 34 mammals, we identified substitutions that have resulted in 224 putative human-specific GABPa binding sites. To experimentally assess the transcriptional impact of those substitutions, we selected four promoters for promoter-reporter gene assays using human and African green monkey cells. We compared the activities of wild-type promoters to mutated forms, where we have introduced one or more substitutions to mimic the ancestral state devoid of the GABPa consensus binding sequence. Similarly, we introduced the human-specific substitutions into chimpanzee and macaque promoter backgrounds. Our results demonstrate that the identified substitutions are functional, both in human and nonhuman promoters. In addition, we performed GABPa knock-down experiments and found 1,215 genes as strong candidates for primary targets. Further analyses of our data sets link GABPa to cognitive disorders, diabetes, KRAB zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF), and human-specific genes. Thus, we propose that differences in GABPa binding sites played important roles in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:26814189

  2. Regulation of transcription and activity of Rhizobium etli glutaminase A.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Saquero, Alejandro; Calderón-Flores, Arturo; Díaz-Villaseñor, Andrea; Du Pont, Gisela; Durán, Socorro

    2004-08-01

    The present study determines the regulatory mechanisms that operate on Rhizobium etli glutaminase A. glsA gene expression levels were evaluated under several metabolic conditions by fusions of the glsA gene promoter and the transcriptional reporter cassette uidA2-aad. glsA expression was directly correlated to the glutaminase A activity found under the tested growth conditions, reaching its maximum level in the presence of glutamine and during exponential growth phase. Glutamine induces glsA expression. The influence of allosteric metabolites on glutaminase A activity was also determined. The purified enzyme was inhibited by 2-oxoglutarate and pyruvate, whereas oxaloacetate and glyoxylate modulate it positively. Glutaminase A is not inhibited by glutamate and is activated by ammonium. Glutaminase A participates in an ATP-consuming cycle where glutamine is continually degraded and resynthesized by glutamine synthetase (GS). GS and glutaminase A activities appear simultaneously during bacterial growth under different metabolic conditions and their control mechanisms are not reciprocal. Slight overproduction in glutaminase A expression causes a reduction in growth yield and a dramatic decrease in bacterial growth. We propose a model for regulation of glutaminase A, and discuss its contribution to glutamine cycle regulation. PMID:15279892

  3. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Gabriela; Vidal, René L; Mardones, Pablo; Serrano, Felipe G; Ardiles, Alvaro O; Wirth, Craig; Valdés, Pamela; Thielen, Peter; Schneider, Bernard L; Kerr, Bredford; Valdés, Jose L; Palacios, Adrian G; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Glimcher, Laurie H; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-02-16

    Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress.

  4. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Gabriela; Vidal, René L; Mardones, Pablo; Serrano, Felipe G; Ardiles, Alvaro O; Wirth, Craig; Valdés, Pamela; Thielen, Peter; Schneider, Bernard L; Kerr, Bredford; Valdés, Jose L; Palacios, Adrian G; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Glimcher, Laurie H; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-02-16

    Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress. PMID:26854229

  5. Regulated nuclear export of the homeodomain transcription factor Prospero.

    PubMed

    Demidenko, Z; Badenhorst, P; Jones, T; Bi, X; Mortin, M A

    2001-04-01

    Subcellular distribution of the Prospero protein is dynamically regulated during Drosophila embryonic nervous system development. Prospero is first detected in neuroblasts where it becomes cortically localized and tethered by the adapter protein, Miranda. After division, Prospero enters the nucleus of daughter ganglion mother cells where it functions as a transcription factor. We have isolated a mutation that removes the C-terminal 30 amino acids from the highly conserved 100 amino acid Prospero domain. Molecular dissection of the homeo- and Prospero domains, and expression of chimeric Prospero proteins in mammalian and insect cultured cells indicates that Prospero contains a nuclear export signal that is masked by the Prospero domain. Nuclear export of Prospero, which is sensitive to the drug leptomycin B, is mediated by Exportin. Mutation of the nuclear export signal-mask in Drosophila embryos prevents Prospero nuclear localization in ganglion mother cells. We propose that a combination of cortical tethering and regulated nuclear export controls Prospero subcellular distribution and function in all higher eukaryotes. PMID:11262236

  6. Ribulokinase and transcriptional regulation of arabinose metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Leyn, Semen A; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Yang, Chen

    2012-03-01

    The transcription factor AraR controls utilization of L-arabinose in Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of AraR regulons in nine Clostridium species with detailed experimental characterization of AraR-mediated regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Based on the reconstructed AraR regulons, a novel ribulokinase, AraK, present in all analyzed Clostridium species was identified, which was a nonorthologous replacement of previously characterized ribulokinases. The predicted function of the araK gene was confirmed by inactivation of the araK gene in C. acetobutylicum and biochemical assays using purified recombinant AraK. In addition to the genes involved in arabinose utilization and arabinoside degradation, extension of the AraR regulon to the pentose phosphate pathway genes in several Clostridium species was revealed. The predicted AraR-binding sites in the C. acetobutylicum genome and the negative effect of L-arabinose on DNA-regulator complex formation were verified by in vitro binding assays. The predicted AraR-controlled genes in C. acetobutylicum were experimentally validated by testing gene expression patterns in both wild-type and araR-inactivated mutant strains during growth in the absence or presence of L-arabinose.

  7. Xist and Tsix Transcription Dynamics Is Regulated by the X-to-Autosome Ratio and Semistable Transcriptional States

    PubMed Central

    Loos, Friedemann; Maduro, Cheryl; Loda, Agnese; Lehmann, Johannes; Kremers, Gert-Jan; ten Berge, Derk; Grootegoed, J. Anton

    2016-01-01

    In female mammals, X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a key process in the control of gene dosage compensation between X-linked genes and autosomes. Xist and Tsix, two overlapping antisense-transcribed noncoding genes, are central elements of the X inactivation center (Xic) regulating XCI. Xist upregulation results in the coating of the entire X chromosome by Xist RNA in cis, whereas Tsix transcription acts as a negative regulator of Xist. Here, we generated Xist and Tsix reporter mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell lines to study the genetic and dynamic regulation of these genes upon differentiation. Our results revealed mutually antagonistic roles for Tsix on Xist and vice versa and indicate the presence of semistable transcriptional states of the Xic locus predicting the outcome of XCI. These transcriptional states are instructed by the X-to-autosome ratio, directed by regulators of XCI, and can be modulated by tissue culture conditions. PMID:27528619

  8. NF-Y transcriptionally regulates the Drosophila p53 gene.

    PubMed

    Tue, Nguyen Trong; Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2011-02-15

    The p53 protein is important in multicellular organisms, where it regulates the cell cycle and thus functions as a tumor suppressor that contributes to preventing cancer. However, molecular regulation of p53 gene expression is not fully understood. NF-YA is a subunit of the NF-Y trimeric complex, a transcription factor that binds to CCAAT motifs in the promoter regions of a variety of genes playing key roles in cell cycle regulation. We have identified four potential Drosophila NF-Y (dNF-Y)-binding sites located in the 5'-flanking region of the Drosophila p53 (dmp53) gene. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using anti-dNF-YA antibodies confirmed that dNF-YA binds specifically to the genomic region containing CCAAT boxes in the dmp53 gene promoter in vivo. Furthermore, the thorax disclosed phenotype of dNF-YA knockdown flies can be enhanced by dmp53 mutation. In addition, the level of dmp53 mRNA was found to be decreased in the dNF-YA knockdown cells and transient expression of the luciferase gene revealed that wild-type dmp53 gene promoter activity is much stronger than mutated promoter activity in S2 cells. The requirement of CCAAT boxes for dmp53 promoter activity was further confirmed by expression of EGFP in various tissues from transgenic flies carrying wild-type and CCAAT box-mutated versions of dmp53 promoter-GFP fusion genes. These results taken together indicate that dNF-Y is necessary for dmp53 gene promoter activity.

  9. The transcription factor GATA-6 regulates pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Berlo, Jop H.; Elrod, John W.; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M.G.; York, Allen J.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The transcriptional code that programs maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy involves the zinc finger-containing DNA binding factor GATA-4. The highly related transcription factor GATA-6 is also expressed in the adult heart, although its role in controlling the hypertrophic program is unknown. Objective To determine the role of GATA-6 in cardiac hypertrophy and homeostasis. Methods and Results Here we performed a cardiomyocyte-specific conditional gene targeting approach for Gata6, as well as a transgenic approach to overexpress GATA-6 in the mouse heart. Deletion of Gata6-loxP with Nkx2.5-cre produced late embryonic lethality with heart defects, while deletion with β-myosin heavy chain-cre (βMHC-cre) produced viable adults with greater than 95% loss of GATA-6 protein in the heart. These later mice were subjected to pressure overload induced hypertrophy for 2 and 6 weeks, which showed a significant reduction in cardiac hypertrophy similar to that observed Gata4 heart-specific deleted mice. Gata6-deleted mice subjected to pressure overload also developed heart failure while control mice maintained proper cardiac function. Gata6-deleted mice also developed less cardiac hypertrophy following 2 weeks of angiotensin II/phenylephrine infusion. Controlled GATA-6 overexpression in the heart induced hypertrophy with aging and predisposed to greater hypertrophy with pressure overload stimulation. Combinatorial deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 from the adult heart resulted in dilated cardiomyopathy and lethality by 16 weeks of age. Mechanistically, deletion of Gata6 from the heart resulted in fundamental changes in the levels of key regulatory genes and myocyte differentiation-specific genes. Conclusions These results indicate that GATA-6 is both necessary and sufficient for regulating the cardiac hypertrophic response and differentiated gene expression, both alone and in coordination with GATA-4. PMID:20705924

  10. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulations of the HLA-G Gene

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Erick C.; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C.; Yaghi, Layale; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G has a relevant role in immune response regulation. The overall structure of the HLA-G coding region has been maintained during the evolution process, in which most of its variable sites are synonymous mutations or coincide with introns, preserving major functional HLA-G properties. The HLA-G promoter region is different from the classical class I promoters, mainly because (i) it lacks regulatory responsive elements for IFN-γ and NF-κB, (ii) the proximal promoter region (within 200 bases from the first translated ATG) does not mediate transactivation by the principal HLA class I transactivation mechanisms, and (iii) the presence of identified alternative regulatory elements (heat shock, progesterone and hypoxia-responsive elements) and unidentified responsive elements for IL-10, glucocorticoids, and other transcription factors is evident. At least three variable sites in the 3′ untranslated region have been studied that may influence HLA-G expression by modifying mRNA stability or microRNA binding sites, including the 14-base pair insertion/deletion, +3142C/G and +3187A/G polymorphisms. Other polymorphic sites have been described, but there are no functional studies on them. The HLA-G coding region polymorphisms might influence isoform production and at least two null alleles with premature stop codons have been described. We reviewed the structure of the HLA-G promoter region and its implication in transcriptional gene control, the structure of the HLA-G 3′UTR and the major actors of the posttranscriptional gene control, and, finally, the presence of regulatory elements in the coding region. PMID:24741620

  11. The Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXK2 Promotes AP-1-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zongling; Donaldson, Ian J.; Liu, Jingru; Hayes, Andrew; Zeef, Leo A. H.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional control circuitry in eukaryotic cells is complex and is orchestrated by combinatorially acting transcription factors. Forkhead transcription factors often function in concert with heterotypic transcription factors to specify distinct transcriptional programs. Here, we demonstrate that FOXK2 participates in combinatorial transcriptional control with the AP-1 transcription factor. FOXK2 binding regions are widespread throughout the genome and are often coassociated with AP-1 binding motifs. FOXK2 acts to promote AP-1-dependent gene expression changes in response to activation of the AP-1 pathway. In this context, FOXK2 is required for the efficient recruitment of AP-1 to chromatin. Thus, we have uncovered an important new molecular mechanism that controls AP-1-dependent gene expression. PMID:22083952

  12. Transcriptional regulation of gilthead seabream bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 gene by bone- and cartilage-related transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Marques, Cátia L; Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent

    2016-01-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 belongs to the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of cytokines and growth factors. While it plays important roles in embryo morphogenesis and organogenesis, BMP2 is also critical to bone and cartilage formation. Protein structure and function have been remarkably conserved throughout evolution and BMP2 transcription has been proposed to be tightly regulated, although few data is available. In this work we report the cloning and functional analysis of gilthead seabream BMP2 promoter. As in other vertebrates, seabream BMP2 gene has a 5′ non-coding exon, a feature already present in DPP gene, the fruit fly ortholog of vertebrate BMP2 gene, and maintained throughout evolution. In silico analysis of seabream BMP2 promoter revealed several binding sites for bone and cartilage related transcription factors (TFs) and their functionality was evaluated using promoter-luciferase constructions and TF-expressing vectors. Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) was shown to negatively regulate BMP2 transcription and combination with the core binding factor β (CBFβ) further reduced transcriptional activity of the promoter. Although to a lesser extent, myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) had also a negative effect on the regulation of BMP2 gene transcription, when associated with SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9b). Finally, v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (ETS1) was able to slightly enhance BMP2 transcription. Data reported here provides new insights toward the better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of BMP2 gene in a bone and cartilage context. PMID:26456102

  13. Adhesive interactions regulate transcriptional diversity in malignant B cells.

    PubMed

    Nadav-Dagan, Liat; Shay, Tal; Dezorella, Nili; Naparstek, Elizabeth; Domany, Eytan; Katz, Ben-Zion; Geiger, Benjamin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic profiling of B-cell malignancies is rapidly expanding, providing important information on the tumorigenic potential, response to treatment, and clinical outcome of these diseases. However, the relative contributions of inherent gene expression versus microenvironmental effects are poorly understood. The regulation of gene expression programs by means of adhesive interactions was studied here in ARH-77 human malignant B-cell variants, derived from the same cell line by selective adhesion to a fibronectin matrix. The populations included cells that adhere to fibronectin and are highly tumorigenic (designated "type A" cells) and cells that fail to adhere to fibronectin and fail to develop tumors in vivo ("type F" cells). To identify genes directly affected by cell adhesion to fibronectin, type A cells deprived of an adhesive substrate (designated "AF cells") were also examined. Bioinformatic analyses revealed a remarkable correlation between cell adhesion and both B-cell differentiation state and the expression of multiple myeloma (MM)-associated genes. The highly adherent type A cells expressed higher levels of NFkappaB-regulated genes, many of them associated with MM. Moreover, we found that the transcription of several MM-related proto-oncogenes is stimulated by adhesion to fibronectin. In contrast, type F cells, which display poor adhesive and tumorigenic properties, expressed genes associated with higher levels of B-cell differentiation. Our findings indicate that B-cell differentiation, as manifested by gene expression profiles, is attenuated by cell adhesion to fibronectin, leading to upregulation of specific genes known to be associated with the pathogenesis of MM.

  14. Transcription antitermination regulation of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa amidase operon.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, S A; Wachira, S J; Norman, R A; Pearl, L H; Drew, R E

    1996-01-01

    In vivo titration experiments have demonstrated a direct interaction between the Pseudomonas aeruginosa transcription antiterminator, AmiR, and the mRNA leader sequence of the amidase operon. A region of 39 nucleotides has been identified which is sufficient to partially titrate out the AmiR available for antitermination. Site-directed mutagenesis has shown that the leader open reading frame has no role in the antitermination reaction, and has identified two critical elements at the 5' and 3' ends of the proposed AmiR binding site which are independently essential for antitermination. A T7 promoter/RNA polymerase-driven system shows AmiR-mediated antitermination, demonstrating a lack of promoter/polymerase specificity. Using the operon negative regulator, AmiC, immobilized on a solid support and gel filtration chromatography, an AmiC-AmiR complex has been identified and isolated. Complex stability and molecular weight assayed by gel filtration alter depending on the type of amide bound to AmiC. AmiC-AmiR-anti-inducer is a stable dimer-dimer complex and the addition of the inducer, acetamide, causes a conformational change which alters the complex stability and either this new configuration or dissociated AmiR interacts with the leader mRNA to cause antitermination. Images PMID:8918468

  15. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Martin, Bronwen; Chadwick, Wayne; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Becker, Kevin G.; WoodIII, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Maudsley, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db) and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6) animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds. PMID:22934110

  16. Transcriptional regulation of cytokine function in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Deborah; Damera, Gautam; Sukkar, Maria B.; Tliba, Omar

    2009-01-01

    The immuno-modulatory properties of airway smooth muscle have become of increasing importance in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation and structural remodeling of the airway wall in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). ASM cells respond to many cytokines, growth factors and lipid mediators to produce a wide array of immuno-modulatory molecules which may in turn orchestrate and perpetuate the disease process in asthma and COPD. Despite numerous studies of the cellular effects of cytokines on cultured ASM, few have identified intracellular signaling pathways by which cytokines modulate or induce these cellular responses. In this review we provide an overview of the transcriptional mechanisms as well as intracellular signaling pathways regulating cytokine functions in ASM cells. The recent discovery of toll-like receptors in ASM cells represents a significant development in our understanding of the immuno-modulatory capabilities of ASM cells. Thus, we also review emerging evidence of the inflammatory response to toll-like receptor activation in ASM cells. PMID:19393330

  17. Myelin inhibits oligodendroglial maturation and regulates oligodendrocytic transcription factor expression.

    PubMed

    Plemel, Jason R; Manesh, Sohrab B; Sparling, Joseph S; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2013-09-01

    Myelin loss is a hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS) and promoting central nervous system myelin repair has become a major therapeutic target. Despite the presence of oligodendrocytes precursors cells (OPCs) in chronic lesions of MS, remyelination often fails. The mechanism underlying this failure of remyelination remains unknown, but it is hypothesized that environmental cues act to inhibit the maturation/differentiation of oligodendroglia, preventing remyelination. The rate of CNS remyelination is correlated to the speed of phagocytosis of myelin debris, which is present following demyelination and trauma. Thus, myelin debris could inhibit CNS remyelination. Here, we demonstrate that OPCs cultured on myelin were robustly inhibited in their maturation, as characterized by the decreased expression of immature and mature oligodendrocytes markers, the impaired production of myelin gene products, as well as their stalled morphological complexity relative to OPCs cultured on a control substrate. OPCs in contact with myelin stopped proliferating and decreased the expression of OPC markers to a comparable degree as cells grown on a control substrate. The expression of two transcription factors known to prevent OPC differentiation and maturation were increased in cells that were in contact with myelin: inhibitor of differentiation family (ID) members 2 and 4. Overexpression of ID2 and ID4 in OPCs was previously reported to decrease the percentage of cells expressing mature oligodendrocyte markers. However, knockdown of ID2 and/or ID4 in OPCs did not increase oligodendroglial maturation on or off of myelin, suggesting that contact with myelin regulates additional regulatory elements.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of bialaphos biosynthesis in Streptomyces hygroscopicus.

    PubMed Central

    Anzai, H; Murakami, T; Imai, S; Satoh, A; Nagaoka, K; Thompson, C J

    1987-01-01

    A DNA sequence (brpA) which regulates the expression of the genes of the bialaphos biosynthesis pathway (bap) in Streptomyces hygroscopicus was identified and characterized. A newly isolated nonproducing mutant (NP57) had a pleiotropic defect involving at least 6 of the 13 known bap genes; only the step 6 conversion could be detected. NP57 was more sensitive to bialaphos than its parent and had depressed levels of the demethylphosphinothricin acetyltransferase activity (step 10 in the pathway) which confers bialaphos resistance. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of extracts of this mutant showed that it lacked proteins corresponding to steps 5 and 10. NP57 lacked mRNAs for steps 5, 10, and 13. Bialaphos productivity of NP57 was restored by transformation with a plasmid containing a 5.9-kilobase DNA fragment which was adjacent to the structural gene cluster. Subcloning experiments showed that a 1.3-kilobase fragment from this primary clone restored all the defects of NP57. We conclude that brpA can activate the transcription of the bialaphos resistance gene as well as at least six other bap structural genes. Images PMID:3611020

  19. Endothelial Gata5 transcription factor regulates blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Messaoudi, Smail; He, Ying; Gutsol, Alex; Wight, Andrew; Hébert, Richard L.; Vilmundarson, Ragnar O.; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.; Chalmers, John; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; McPherson, Ruth; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Nemer, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Despite its high prevalence and economic burden, the aetiology of human hypertension remains incompletely understood. Here we identify the transcription factor GATA5, as a new regulator of blood pressure (BP). GATA5 is expressed in microvascular endothelial cells and its genetic inactivation in mice (Gata5-null) leads to vascular endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Endothelial-specific inactivation of Gata5 mimics the hypertensive phenotype of the Gata5-null mice, suggestive of an important role for GATA5 in endothelial homeostasis. Transcriptomic analysis of human microvascular endothelial cells with GATA5 knockdown reveals that GATA5 affects several genes and pathways critical for proper endothelial function, such as PKA and nitric oxide pathways. Consistent with a role in human hypertension, we report genetic association of variants at the GATA5 locus with hypertension traits in two large independent cohorts. Our results unveil an unsuspected link between GATA5 and a prominent human condition, and provide a new animal model for hypertension. PMID:26617239

  20. Analysis of the transcriptional promoter which regulates the latency-related transcript of bovine herpesvirus 1.

    PubMed

    Jones, C; Delhon, G; Bratanich, A; Kutish, G; Rock, D

    1990-03-01

    As a transcriptional promoter in primary cultures of sensory ganglionic neurons, DNA sequences near the 5' terminus of the latency-related (LR) gene of bovine herpesvirus 1 were at least 10 times more efficient than the simian virus 40 early promoter-enhancer. In contrast, as a promoter in bovine, rodent, or monkey cells, the LR promoter was approximately six times less efficient than the simian virus 40 early promoter-enhancer. The LR promoter had strict orientation preferences in neurons and all other mammalian cell lines tested. Removal of a 146-base-pair XhoI fragment from the LR promoter resulted in stimulation of LR promoter activity in bovine cells but not rabbit neurons, monkey fibroblasts, or rodent cells. LR promoter activity in bovine cells is stimulated by bovine herpesvirus 1 lytic infection, suggesting that viral gene products or virus-induced factors positively regulate the expression of the LR gene. A synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, repressed LR promoter activity in bovine cells. These results imply that a variety of factors can influence the expression of the LR gene during latent infections of neurons as well as during the lytic infection cycle.

  1. Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cells by Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Pamela J.; Tjian, Robert

    1989-07-01

    The cloning of genes encoding mammalian DNA binding transcription factors for RNA polymerase II has provided the opportunity to analyze the structure and function of these proteins. This review summarizes recent studies that define structural domains for DNA binding and transcriptional activation functions in sequence-specific transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these factors may activate transcriptional initiation and by which they may be regulated to achieve differential gene expression are also discussed.

  2. Atrophy, hypertrophy, and hypoxemia induce transcriptional regulators of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the rat heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In skeletal muscle, transcript levels of proteins regulating the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) increase with atrophy and decrease with hypertrophy. Whether the same is true for heart muscle is not known. We set out to characterize the transcriptional profile of regulators of the UPS during atrop...

  3. Plant Mediator complex and its critical functions in transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Li, Ling; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-02-01

    The Mediator complex is an important component of the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. As an essential link between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, the Mediator complex transduces diverse signals to genes involved in different pathways. The plant Mediator complex was recently purified and comprises conserved and specific subunits. It functions in concert with transcription factors to modulate various responses. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the plant Mediator complex and its diverse roles in plant growth, development, defense, non-coding RNA production, response to abiotic stresses, flowering, genomic stability and metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the transcription factors interacting with the Mediator complex are also highlighted.

  4. The TrmB family: a versatile group of transcriptional regulators in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Gindner, Antonia; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Microbes are organisms which are well adapted to their habitat. Their survival depends on the regulation of gene expression levels in response to environmental signals. The most important step in regulation of gene expression takes place at the transcriptional level. This regulation is intriguing in Archaea because the eu-karyotic-like transcription apparatus is modulated by bacterial-like transcription regulators. The transcriptional regulator of mal operon (TrmB) family is well known as a very large group of regulators in Archaea with more than 250 members to date. One special feature of these regulators is that some of them can act as repressor, some as activator and others as both repressor and activator. This review gives a short updated overview of the TrmB family and their regulatory patterns in different Archaea as a lot of new data have been published on this topic since the last review from 2008.

  5. Beyond Transcription Factors: The Role of Chromatin Modifying Enzymes in Regulating Transcription Required for Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Ruth M.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2008-01-01

    One of the alluring aspects of examining chromatin modifications in the role of modulating transcription required for long-term memory processes is that these modifications may provide transient and potentially stable epigenetic marks in the service of activating and/or maintaining transcriptional processes. These, in turn, may ultimately…

  6. The multifunctional transcription factor Rap1: a regulator of yeast physiology.

    PubMed

    Azad, Gajendra Kumar; Tomar, Raghuvir Singh

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is a fundamental process that is tightly regulated by transcription factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Transcription factors have DNA-binding domains, some of which are sequence specific, and are found throughout the eukaryotic kingdom. Recent studies have revealed the molecular mechanisms by which transcription factors perform their functions. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rap1 (ScRap1) can either activate or repress transcription. This bimodal transcriptional activity has led to the widespread study of the mode of action of ScRap1. This review summarizes current knowledge about yeast ScRap1, including its structure, mechanisms of transcription regulation, and biological functions, and the future directions in the field.

  7. Forkhead transcription factor foxe1 regulates chondrogenesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nakada, Chisako; Iida, Atsumi; Tabata, Yoko; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2009-12-15

    Forkhead transcription factor (Fox) e1 is a causative gene for Bamforth-Lazarus syndrome, which is characterized by hypothyroidism and cleft palate. Applying degenerate polymerase chain reaction using primers specific for the conserved forkhead domain, we identified zebrafish foxe1 (foxe1). Foxe1 is expressed in the thyroid, pharynx, and pharyngeal skeleton during development; strongly expressed in the gill and weakly expressed in the brain, eye, and heart in adult zebrafish. A loss of function of foxe1 by morpholino antisense oligo (MO) exhibited abnormal craniofacial development, shortening of Meckel's cartilage and the ceratohyals, and suppressed chondrycytic proliferation. However, at 27 hr post fertilization, the foxe1 MO-injected embryos showed normal dlx2, hoxa2, and hoxb2 expression, suggesting that the initial steps of pharyngeal skeletal development, including neural crest migration and specification of the pharyngeal arch occurred normally. In contrast, at 2 dpf, a severe reduction in the expression of sox9a, colIIaI, and runx2b, which play roles in chondrocytic proliferation and differentiation, was observed. Interestingly, fgfr2 was strongly upregulated in the branchial arches of the foxe1 MO-injected embryos. Unlike Foxe1-null mice, normal thyroid development in terms of morphology and thyroid-specific marker expression was observed in foxe1 MO-injected zebrafish embryos. Taken together, our results indicate that Foxe1 plays an important role in chondrogenesis during development of the pharyngeal skeleton in zebrafish, probably through regulation of fgfr2 expression. Furthermore, the roles reported for FOXE1 in mammalian thyroid development may have been acquired during evolution.

  8. Analyzing phosphorylation-dependent regulation of subcellular localization and transcriptional activity of transcriptional coactivator NT-PGC-1α.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ji Suk; Gettys, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) is a nuclear transcriptional coactivator that regulates the genes involved in energy metabolism. Recent evidence has been provided that alternative splicing of PPARGC1A gene produces a functional but predominantly cytosolic isoform of PGC-1α (NT-PGC-1α). We have demonstrated that transcriptional coactivation capacity of NT-PGC-1α is directly correlated with its nuclear localization in a PKA phosphorylation-dependent manner. In this chapter, we describe quantitative imaging analysis methods that are developed to measure the relative fluorescence intensity of the protein of interest in the nucleus and cytoplasm in a single cell and the frequency distribution of nuclear/cytoplasmic intensity ratios in the population of cells, respectively. This chapter also describes transient cotransfection and dual-luciferase reporter gene assay that examine the ability of coactivators to activate the transcriptional activity of transcription factors.

  9. Tor Signaling Regulates Transcription of Amino Acid Permeases through a GATA Transcription Factor Gaf1 in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Ma, Ning; Liu, Qingbin; Qi, Yao; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Furuyashiki, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    In the fission yeast, two Tor isoforms, Tor1 and Tor2, oppositely regulate gene expression of amino acid permeases. To elucidate the transcriptional machinery for these regulations, here we have employed the cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE), a method of analyzing expression profiles and identifying transcriptional start sites (TSSs). The loss of Tor1 decreased, and Tor2 inhibition by its temperature sensitive mutation increased, mRNA expression of isp5+, per1+, put4+ and SPBPB2B2.01. In contrast, the loss of Tor1 increased, and Tor2 inhibition decreased, the expression of cat1+. These changes were confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. These opposite effects by the loss of Tor1 and Tor2 inhibition appeared to occur evenly across multiple TSSs for the respective genes. The motif discovery analysis based on the CAGE results identified the GATA motifs as a potential cis-regulatory element for Tor-mediated regulation. In the luciferase reporter assay, the loss of Tor1 reduced, and Tor2 inhibition and nitrogen depletion increased, the activity of isp5+ promoter as well as that of a GATAAG reporter. One of the GATAAG motifs in isp5+ promoter was critical for its transcriptional activity, and a GATA transcription factor Gaf1 was critical for the activities of isp5+ promoter and the GATAAG reporter. Furthermore, Tor2 inhibition and nitrogen depletion induced nuclear localization of Gaf1 from the cytosol and its dephosphorylation. These results suggest that Tor2 inhibition, which is known to be induced by nitrogen depletion, promotes nuclear localization of Gaf1, thereby inducing isp5+ transcription through Gaf1 binding to the GATAAG motif in its promoter. Since Gaf1 was also critical for transcription of per1+ and put4+, Tor-Gaf1 signaling may coordinate transcription of multiple amino acid permeases according to nutrient availability.

  10. Tor Signaling Regulates Transcription of Amino Acid Permeases through a GATA Transcription Factor Gaf1 in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingbin; Qi, Yao; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Furuyashiki, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    In the fission yeast, two Tor isoforms, Tor1 and Tor2, oppositely regulate gene expression of amino acid permeases. To elucidate the transcriptional machinery for these regulations, here we have employed the cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE), a method of analyzing expression profiles and identifying transcriptional start sites (TSSs). The loss of Tor1 decreased, and Tor2 inhibition by its temperature sensitive mutation increased, mRNA expression of isp5+, per1+, put4+ and SPBPB2B2.01. In contrast, the loss of Tor1 increased, and Tor2 inhibition decreased, the expression of cat1+. These changes were confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. These opposite effects by the loss of Tor1 and Tor2 inhibition appeared to occur evenly across multiple TSSs for the respective genes. The motif discovery analysis based on the CAGE results identified the GATA motifs as a potential cis-regulatory element for Tor-mediated regulation. In the luciferase reporter assay, the loss of Tor1 reduced, and Tor2 inhibition and nitrogen depletion increased, the activity of isp5+ promoter as well as that of a GATAAG reporter. One of the GATAAG motifs in isp5+ promoter was critical for its transcriptional activity, and a GATA transcription factor Gaf1 was critical for the activities of isp5+ promoter and the GATAAG reporter. Furthermore, Tor2 inhibition and nitrogen depletion induced nuclear localization of Gaf1 from the cytosol and its dephosphorylation. These results suggest that Tor2 inhibition, which is known to be induced by nitrogen depletion, promotes nuclear localization of Gaf1, thereby inducing isp5+ transcription through Gaf1 binding to the GATAAG motif in its promoter. Since Gaf1 was also critical for transcription of per1+ and put4+, Tor-Gaf1 signaling may coordinate transcription of multiple amino acid permeases according to nutrient availability. PMID:26689777

  11. A Nonlinear Discrete Dynamical Model for Transcriptional Regulation: Construction and Properties

    PubMed Central

    Goutsias, John; Kim, Seungchan

    2004-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation is a fundamental mechanism of living cells, which allows them to determine their actions and properties, by selectively choosing which proteins to express and by dynamically controlling the amounts of those proteins. In this article, we revisit the problem of mathematically modeling transcriptional regulation. First, we adopt a biologically motivated continuous model for gene transcription and mRNA translation, based on first-order rate equations, coupled with a set of nonlinear equations that model cis-regulation. Then, we view the processes of transcription and translation as being discrete, which, together with the need to use computational techniques for large-scale analysis and simulation, motivates us to model transcriptional regulation by means of a nonlinear discrete dynamical system. Classical arguments from chemical kinetics allow us to specify the nonlinearities underlying cis-regulation and to include both activators and repressors as well as the notion of regulatory modules in our formulation. We show that the steady-state behavior of the proposed discrete dynamical system is identical to that of the continuous model. We discuss several aspects of our model, related to homeostatic and epigenetic regulation as well as to Boolean networks, and elaborate on their significance. Simulations of transcriptional regulation of a hypothetical metabolic pathway illustrate several properties of our model, and demonstrate that a nonlinear discrete dynamical system may be effectively used to model transcriptional regulation in a biologically relevant way. PMID:15041638

  12. Transcription elongation regulator 1 (TCERG1) regulates competent RNA polymerase II-mediated elongation of HIV-1 transcription and facilitates efficient viral replication

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Control of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) release from pausing has been proposed as a checkpoint mechanism to ensure optimal RNAPII activity, especially in large, highly regulated genes. HIV-1 gene expression is highly regulated at the level of elongation, which includes transcriptional pausing that is mediated by both viral and cellular factors. Here, we present evidence for a specific role of the elongation-related factor TCERG1 in regulating the extent of HIV-1 elongation and viral replication in vivo. Results We show that TCERG1 depletion diminishes the basal and viral Tat-activated transcription from the HIV-1 LTR. In support of a role for an elongation mechanism in the transcriptional control of HIV-1, we found that TCERG1 modifies the levels of pre-mRNAs generated at distal regions of HIV-1. Most importantly, TCERG1 directly affects the elongation rate of RNAPII transcription in vivo. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that TCERG1 regulates HIV-1 transcription by increasing the rate of RNAPII elongation through the phosphorylation of serine 2 within the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNAPII and suggest a mechanism for the involvement of TCERG1 in relieving pausing. Finally, we show that TCERG1 is required for HIV-1 replication. Conclusions Our study reveals that TCERG1 regulates HIV-1 transcriptional elongation by increasing the elongation rate of RNAPII and phosphorylation of Ser 2 within the CTD. Based on our data, we propose a general mechanism for TCERG1 acting on genes that are regulated at the level of elongation by increasing the rate of RNAPII transcription through the phosphorylation of Ser2. In the case of HIV-1, our evidence provides the basis for further investigation of TCERG1 as a potential therapeutic target for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication PMID:24165037

  13. TransFind--predicting transcriptional regulators for gene sets.

    PubMed

    Kiełbasa, Szymon M; Klein, Holger; Roider, Helge G; Vingron, Martin; Blüthgen, Nils

    2010-07-01

    The analysis of putative transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of coregulated genes allows to infer the transcription factors that underlie observed changes in gene expression. While such analyses constitute a central component of the in-silico characterization of transcriptional regulatory networks, there is still a lack of simple-to-use web servers able to combine state-of-the-art prediction methods with phylogenetic analysis and appropriate multiple testing corrected statistics, which returns the results within a short time. Having these aims in mind we developed TransFind, which is freely available at http://transfind.sys-bio.net/.

  14. A Genome-wide Screen for Neurospora crassa Transcription Factors Regulating Glycogen Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rodrigo Duarte; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Luchessi, Augusto Ducati; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors play a key role in transcription regulation as they recognize and directly bind to defined sites in promoter regions of target genes, and thus modulate differential expression. The overall process is extremely dynamic, as they have to move through the nucleus and transiently bind to chromatin in order to regulate gene transcription. To identify transcription factors that affect glycogen accumulation in Neurospora crassa, we performed a systematic screen of a deletion strains set generated by the Neurospora Knockout Project and available at the Fungal Genetics Stock Center. In a wild-type strain of N. crassa, glycogen content reaches a maximal level at the end of the exponential growth phase, but upon heat stress the glycogen content rapidly drops. The gene encoding glycogen synthase (gsn) is transcriptionally down-regulated when the mycelium is exposed to the same stress condition. We identified 17 deleted strains having glycogen accumulation profiles different from that of the wild-type strain under both normal growth and heat stress conditions. Most of the transcription factors identified were annotated as hypothetical protein, however some of them, such as the PacC, XlnR, and NIT2 proteins, were biochemically well-characterized either in N. crassa or in other fungi. The identification of some of the transcription factors was coincident with the presence of DNA-binding motifs specific for the transcription factors in the gsn 5′-flanking region, and some of these DNA-binding motifs were demonstrated to be functional by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) experiments. Strains knocked-out in these transcription factors presented impairment in the regulation of gsn expression, suggesting that the transcription factors regulate glycogen accumulation by directly regulating gsn gene expression. Five selected mutant strains showed defects in cell cycle progression, and two transcription factors were light-regulated. The results indicate

  15. p53 negatively regulates Aurora A via both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chun-Chi; Yang, Tsung-Ying; Yu, Chang-Tze Ricky; Phan, Liem; Ivan, Cristina; Sood, Anil K.; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Lee, Mong-Hong

    2012-01-01

    p53 plays an important role in mitotic checkpoint, but what its role is remains enigmatic. Aurora A is a Ser/Thr kinase involved in correcting progression of mitosis. Here, we show that p53 is a negative regulator for Aurora A. We found that p53 deficiency leads to Aurora A elevation. Ectopic expression of p53 or DNA damage-induced expression of p53 can suppress the expression of Aurora A. Mechanistic studies show that p53 is a negative regulator for Aurora A expression through both transcriptional and posttranslational regulation. p53 knockdown in cancer cells reduces the level of p21, which, in turn, increases the activity of CDK2 followed by induction of Rb1 hyperphosphorylation and its dissociation with transcriptional factor E2F3. E2F3 can bind to Aurora A gene promoter, potentiating Aurora A gene expression and p53 deficiency, enhancing the binding of E2F3 on Aurora A promoter. Also, p53 deficiency leads to decelerating Aurora A’s turnover rate, due to the fact that p53 deficiency causes the downregulation of Fbw7α, a component of E3 ligase of Aurora A. Consistently, p53 knockdown-mediated Aurora A elevation is mitigated when Fbw7α is ectopically expressed. Thus, p53-mediated Aurora A degradation requires Fbw7α expression. Significantly, inverse correlation between p53 and Aurora A elevation is translated into the deregulation of centrosome amplification. p53 knockdown leads to high percentages of cells with abnormal amplification of centrosome. These data suggest that p53 is an important negative regulator of Aurora A, and that loss of p53 in many types of cancer could lead to abnormal elevation of Aurora A and dysregulated mitosis, which provides a growth advantage for cancer cells. PMID:22894933

  16. Transcription regulation by distal enhancers: who's in the loop?

    PubMed

    Stadhouders, Ralph; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Jorna, Ruud; Leslie, Kris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide chromatin profiling efforts have shown that enhancers are often located at large distances from gene promoters within the noncoding genome. Whereas enhancers can stimulate transcription initiation by communicating with promoters via chromatin looping mechanisms, we propose that enhancers may also stimulate transcription elongation by physical interactions with intronic elements. We review here recent findings derived from the study of the hematopoietic system.

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of transcript abundance by a conserved member of the tristetraprolin family in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Melissa L.; Washington, Onica L.; Hicks, Stephanie N.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Hartooni, Nairi; Wilson, Gerald M.; Zucconi, Beth E.; Huang, Weichun; Li, Leping; Fargo, David C.; Blackshear, Perry J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of CCCH tandem zinc finger proteins bind to AU-rich regions in target mRNAs, leading to their deadenylation and decay. Family members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae influence iron metabolism, whereas the single protein expressed in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zfs1, regulates cell–cell interactions. In the human pathogen Candida albicans, deep sequencing of mutants lacking the orthologous protein, Zfs1, revealed significant increases (> 1.5-fold) in 156 transcripts. Of these, 113 (72%) contained at least one predicted TTP family member binding site in their 3′UTR, compared with only 3 of 56 (5%) down-regulated transcripts. The zfs1Δ/Δ mutant was resistant to 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, perhaps because of increased expression of the potential target transcript encoded by HIS3. Sequences of the proteins encoded by the putative Zfs1 targets were highly conserved among other species within the fungal CTG clade, while the predicted Zfs1 binding sites in these mRNAs often ‘disappeared’ with increasing evolutionary distance from the parental species. C. albicans Zfs1 bound to the ideal mammalian TTP binding site with high affinity, and Zfs1 was associated with target transcripts after co-immunoprecipitation. Thus, the biochemical activities of these proteins in fungi are highly conserved, but Zfs1-like proteins may target different transcripts in each species. PMID:25524641

  18. Impacts of Pretranscriptional DNA Methylation, Transcriptional Transcription Factor, and Posttranscriptional microRNA Regulations on Protein Evolutionary Rate

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Trees-Juen; Chiang, Tai-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is largely regulated by DNA methylation, transcription factor (TF), and microRNA (miRNA) before, during, and after transcription, respectively. Although the evolutionary effects of TF/miRNA regulations have been widely studied, evolutionary analysis of simultaneously accounting for DNA methylation, TF, and miRNA regulations and whether promoter methylation and gene body (coding regions) methylation have different effects on the rate of gene evolution remain uninvestigated. Here, we compared human–macaque and human–mouse protein evolutionary rates against experimentally determined single base-resolution DNA methylation data, revealing that promoter methylation level is positively correlated with protein evolutionary rates but negatively correlated with TF/miRNA regulations, whereas the opposite was observed for gene body methylation level. Our results showed that the relative importance of these regulatory factors in determining the rate of mammalian protein evolution is as follows: Promoter methylation ≈ miRNA regulation > gene body methylation > TF regulation, and further indicated that promoter methylation and miRNA regulation have a significant dependent effect on protein evolutionary rates. Although the mechanisms underlying cooperation between DNA methylation and TFs/miRNAs in gene regulation remain unclear, our study helps to not only illuminate the impact of these regulatory factors on mammalian protein evolution but also their intricate interaction within gene regulatory networks. PMID:24923326

  19. The sequence-specific transcription factor c-Jun targets Cockayne syndrome protein B to regulate transcription and chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Lake, Robert J; Boetefuer, Erica L; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Jeong, Jieun; Choi, Inchan; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome is an inherited premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological defects, and mutations in the gene encoding the CSB protein account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome cases. Accumulating evidence suggests that CSB functions in transcription regulation, in addition to its roles in DNA repair, and those defects in this transcriptional activity might contribute to the clinical features of Cockayne syndrome. Transcription profiling studies have so far uncovered CSB-dependent effects on gene expression; however, the direct targets of CSB's transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report the first comprehensive analysis of CSB genomic occupancy during replicative cell growth. We found that CSB occupancy sites display a high correlation to regions with epigenetic features of promoters and enhancers. Furthermore, we found that CSB occupancy is enriched at sites containing the TPA-response element. Consistent with this binding site preference, we show that CSB and the transcription factor c-Jun can be found in the same protein-DNA complex, suggesting that c-Jun can target CSB to specific genomic regions. In support of this notion, we observed decreased CSB occupancy of TPA-response elements when c-Jun levels were diminished. By modulating CSB abundance, we found that CSB can influence the expression of nearby genes and impact nucleosome positioning in the vicinity of its binding site. These results indicate that CSB can be targeted to specific genomic loci by sequence-specific transcription factors to regulate transcription and local chromatin structure. Additionally, comparison of CSB occupancy sites with the MSigDB Pathways database suggests that CSB might function in peroxisome proliferation, EGF receptor transactivation, G protein signaling and NF-κB activation, shedding new light on the possible causes and mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  20. Switching on sex: transcriptional regulation of the testis-determining gene Sry

    PubMed Central

    Larney, Christian; Bailey, Timothy L.; Koopman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian sex determination hinges on the development of ovaries or testes, with testis fate being triggered by the expression of the transcription factor sex-determining region Y (Sry). Reduced or delayed Sry expression impairs testis development, highlighting the importance of its accurate spatiotemporal regulation and implying a potential role for SRY dysregulation in human intersex disorders. Several epigenetic modifiers, transcription factors and kinases are implicated in regulating Sry transcription, but it remains unclear whether or how this farrago of factors acts co-ordinately. Here we review our current understanding of Sry regulation and provide a model that assembles all known regulators into three modules, each converging on a single transcription factor that binds to the Sry promoter. We also discuss potential future avenues for discovering the cis-elements and trans-factors required for Sry regulation. PMID:24866114

  1. O-GlcNAc modification of Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors negatively regulates their transcriptional activities.

    PubMed

    Ha, Changhoon; Lim, Kihong

    2015-11-13

    The addition of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on serine or threonine modifies a myriad of proteins and regulates their function, stability and localization. O-GlcNAc modification is common among chromosome-associated proteins, such as transcription factors, suggesting its extensive involvement in gene expression regulation. In this study, we demonstrate the O-GlcNAc status of the Sp family members of transcription factors and the functional impact on their transcriptional activities. We highlight the presence of O-GlcNAc residues in Sp3 and Sp4, but not Sp2, as demonstrated by their enrichment in GlcNAc positive protein fractions and by detection of O-GlcNAc residues on Sp3 and Sp4 co-expressed in Escherichia coli together with O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) using an O-GlcNAc-specific antibody. Deletion mutants of Sp3 and Sp4 indicate that the majority of O-GlcNAc sites reside in their N-terminal transactivation domain. Overall, using reporter gene assays and co-immunoprecipitations, we demonstrate a functional inhibitory role of O-GlcNAc modifications in Sp3 and Sp4 transcription factors. Thereby, our study strengthens the current notion that O-GlcNAc modification is an important regulator of protein interactome.

  2. Transcriptional profiling of CcpE-regulated genes in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Han; Ding, Yue; Lan, Lefu

    2015-09-01

    The transcriptional regulator CcpE is an important citrate-sensing regulator that modulates metabolic state, virulence factor expression, and bacterial virulence of Staphylococcus aureus (Ding et al., 2014 [1]). In this article, we report detailed methods for genome-wide transcriptional profiling of CcpE-regulated genes generated for the research article "Metabolic sensor governing bacterial virulence in Staphylococcus aureus" (Ding et al., 2014 [1]). All transcriptional profiling data was deposited to Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database under accession number GSE57260. PMID:26484245

  3. The FUR (ferric uptake regulator) superfamily: diversity and versatility of key transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Fillat, María F

    2014-03-15

    Control of metal homeostasis is essential for life in all kingdoms. In most prokaryotic organisms the FUR (ferric uptake regulator) family of transcriptional regulators is involved in the regulation of iron and zinc metabolism through control by Fur and Zur proteins. A third member of this family, the peroxide-stress response PerR, is present in most Gram-positives, establishing a tight functional interaction with the global regulator Fur. These proteins play a pivotal role for microbial survival under adverse conditions and in the expression of virulence in most pathogens. In this paper we present the current state of the art in the knowledge of the FUR family, including those members only present in more reduced numbers of bacteria, namely Mur, Nur and Irr. The huge amount of work done in the two last decades shows that FUR proteins present considerable diversity in their regulatory mechanisms and interesting structural differences. However, much work needs to be done to obtain a more complete picture of this family, especially in connection with the roles of some members as gas and redox sensors as well as to fully characterize their participation in bacterial adaptative responses.

  4. Serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylation regulates DNA binding of bacterial transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Aida; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of bacterial transcriptional regulators (TRs) belonging to the family of two-component systems (TCSs) is a well-established mechanism for regulating gene expression. Recent evidence points to the fact that reversible phosphorylation of bacterial TRs on other types of residue, i.e. serine, threonine, tyrosine and cysteine, is also quite common. The phosphorylation of the ester type (phospho-serine/threonine/tyrosine) is more stable than the aspartate phosphorylation of TCSs. The kinases which catalyse these phosphorylation events (Hanks-type serine/threonine protein kinases and bacterial protein tyrosine kinases) are also much more promiscuous than the TCS kinases, i.e. each of them can phosphorylate several substrate proteins. As a consequence, the dynamics and topology of the signal transduction networks depending on these kinases differ significantly from the TCSs. Here, we present an overview of different classes of bacterial TR phosphorylated and regulated by serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. Particular attention is given to examples when serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases interact with TCSs, phosphorylating either the histidine kinases or the response regulators. We argue that these promiscuous kinases connect several signal transduction pathways and serve the role of signal integration. PMID:26220449

  5. Dynamic regulation of eve stripe 2 expression reveals transcriptional bursts in living Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Bothma, Jacques P; Garcia, Hernan G; Esposito, Emilia; Schlissel, Gavin; Gregor, Thomas; Levine, Michael

    2014-07-22

    We present the use of recently developed live imaging methods to examine the dynamic regulation of even-skipped (eve) stripe 2 expression in the precellular Drosophila embryo. Nascent transcripts were visualized via MS2 RNA stem loops. The eve stripe 2 transgene exhibits a highly dynamic pattern of de novo transcription, beginning with a broad domain of expression during nuclear cycle 12 (nc12), and progressive refinement during nc13 and nc14. The mature stripe 2 pattern is surprisingly transient, constituting just ∼15 min of the ∼90-min period of expression. Nonetheless, this dynamic transcription profile faithfully predicts the limits of the mature stripe visualized by conventional in situ detection methods. Analysis of individual transcription foci reveals intermittent bursts of de novo transcription, with duration cycles of 4-10 min. We discuss a multistate model of transcription regulation and speculate on its role in the dynamic repression of the eve stripe 2 expression pattern during development.

  6. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of RNA polymerase II basal transcription activity.

    PubMed Central

    Yonaha, M; Chibazakura, T; Kitajima, S; Yasukochi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Regulation of transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II) in eukaryotic cells requires both basal and regulatory transcription factors. In this report we have investigated in vitro pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle by using nuclear extracts from synchronized HeLa cells. It is shown that pol II basal transcription activity is low in the S and G2 phases and high in early G1 phase and TFIID is the rate limiting component of pol II basal transcription activity during the cell cycle. Further analyses reveal that TFIID exists as a less active form in the S and G2 phases and nuclear extracts from S and G2 phase cells contain a heat-sensitive repressor(s) of TATA box binding protein (TBP). These results suggest that pol II basal transcription activity is regulated by a qualitative change in the TFIID complex, which could involve repression of TBP, during the cell cycle. Images PMID:7479063

  7. Impact of ACTH Signaling on Transcriptional Regulation of Steroidogenic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Carmen; Lalli, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The trophic peptide hormone adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) stimulates steroid hormone biosynthesis evoking both a rapid, acute response and a long-term, chronic response, via the activation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The acute response is initiated by the mobilization of cholesterol from lipid stores and its delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane, a process that is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The chronic response results in the increased coordinated transcription of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes. ACTH binding to its cognate receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), stimulates adenylyl cyclase, thus inducing cAMP production, PKA activation, and phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors, which bind to target promoters and facilitate coactivator protein recruitment to direct steroidogenic gene transcription. This review provides a general view of the transcriptional control exerted by the ACTH/cAMP system on the expression of genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes in the adrenal cortex. Special emphasis will be given to the transcription factors required to mediate ACTH-dependent transcription of steroidogenic genes. PMID:27065945

  8. The anorexigenic peptide cocaine-and-amphetamine-regulated transcript modulates rem-sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Díaz, M; Domínguez Martín, E; Pérez Morales, M; Ruiz-Contreras, A E; Navarro, L; Prospéro-García, O

    2009-12-01

    It is known that the sleep-waking cycle is modulated by several molecules that may also regulate food intake, among them several neuropeptides. The cocaine-and-amphetamine-regulated transcript has been studied in relation to food ingestion, but it seems to have several other functions that may include sleep regulation. In this context, we studied the effect of the intracerebroventricular administration of the cocaine-and-amphetamine-regulated transcript (0.15, 0.3, 0.6, 0.9nmol) on the sleep-waking cycle (12-h recordings), as well as its effect on food intake in rats. Additionally, we analyzed the neuronal activity as measured by c-Fos expression induced by the cocaine-and-amphetamine-regulated transcript in neurons of nuclei involved in the regulation of sleep and feeding behavior. Our main finding is that 0.3nmol of the cocaine-and-amphetamine-regulated transcript increases rapid-eye-movement sleep. In addition, our results further support that this neuropeptide triggers satiety; c-Fos expression suggested that the cocaine-and-amphetamine-regulated transcript activates specific hypothalamic nuclei without affecting other brain structures known to be involved in sleep regulation. These data further support the notion that a few neuropeptides are involved in the regulation of both the sleep-waking and the hunger-satiety cycles.

  9. Regulation of competence and gene expression in Streptococcus mutans by the RcrR transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Burne, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An intimate linkage between the regulation of biofilm formation, stress tolerance and genetic competence exists in the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. The rcrRPQ genes encode ABC exporters (RcrPQ) and a MarR-family transcriptional repressor of the rcr operon (RcrR) play a dominant role in regulation of the development of genetic competence and connect competence with stress tolerance and (p)ppGpp production in S. mutans. Here we identify the target for efficient RcrR binding in the rcr promoter region using purified recombinant RcrR (rRcrR) protein in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and show that DNA fragments carrying mutations in the binding region were not bound as efficiently by rRcrR in vitro. Mutations in the RcrR binding site impacted expression from the rcrR promoter in vivo and elicited changes in transformation efficiency, competence gene expression, and growth inhibition by competence stimulating peptide; even when the changes in rcrRPQ transcription were minor. An additional mechanistic linkage of RcrR with competence and (p)ppGpp metabolism was identified by showing that the rRcrR protein could bind to the promoter regions of comX, comYA and relP, although the binding was not as efficient as to the rcrRPQ promoter under the conditions tested. Thus, tightly controlled autogenous regulation of the rcrRPQ operon by RcrR binding to specific target sites is essential for cellular homeostasis, and RcrR contributes to the integration of genetic competence, (p)ppGpp metabolism, and acid and oxidative stress tolerance in S. mutans through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:25146832

  10. The role of abscisic acid in regulating cucumber fruit development and ripening and its transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Wang, Ya; Ji, Kai; Dai, Shengjie; Hu, Ying; Sun, Liang; Li, Qian; Chen, Pei; Sun, Yufei; Duan, Chaorui; Wu, Yan; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Dian; Guo, Yangdong; Leng, Ping

    2013-03-01

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), a kind of fruit usually harvested at the immature green stage, belongs to non-climacteric fruit. To investigate the contribution of abscisic acid (ABA) to cucumber fruit development and ripening, variation in ABA level was investigated and a peak in ABA level was found in pulp before fruit get fully ripe. To clarify this point further, exogenous ABA was applied to cucumber fruits at two different development stages. Results showed that ABA application at the turning stage promotes cucumber fruit ripening, while application at the immature green stage had inconspicuous effects. In addition, with the purpose of understanding the transcriptional regulation of ABA, two partial cDNAs of CsNCED1 and CsNCED2 encoding 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a key enzyme in ABA biosynthetic pathway; one partial cDNA of CsCYP707A1 for 8'-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in the oxidative catabolism of ABA and two partial cDNAs of CsBG1 and CsBG2 for β-glucosidase (BG) that hydrolyzes ABA glucose ester (ABA-GE) to release active ABA were cloned from cucumber. The DNA and deduced amino acid sequences of these obtained genes respectively showed high similarities to their homologous genes in other plants. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ABA content may be regulated by its biosynthesis (CsNCEDs), catabolism (CsCYP707A1) and reactivation genes (CsBGs) at the transcriptional level during cucumber fruit development and ripening, in response to ABA application, dehydration and pollination, among which CsNCED1, CsCYP707A1 and CsBG1 were highly expressed in pulp and may play more important roles in regulating ABA metabolism.

  11. NanoScript: A Nanoparticle-Based Artificial Transcription Factor for Effective Gene Regulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) proteins are master regulators of transcriptional activity and gene expression. TF-based gene regulation is a promising approach for many biological applications; however, several limitations hinder the full potential of TFs. Herein, we developed an artificial, nanoparticle-based transcription factor, termed NanoScript, which is designed to mimic the structure and function of TFs. NanoScript was constructed by tethering functional peptides and small molecules called synthetic transcription factors, which mimic the individual TF domains, onto gold nanoparticles. We demonstrate that NanoScript localizes within the nucleus and initiates transcription of a reporter plasmid by over 15-fold. Moreover, NanoScript can effectively transcribe targeted genes on endogenous DNA in a nonviral manner. Because NanoScript is a functional replica of TF proteins and a tunable gene-regulating platform, it has great potential for various stem cell applications. PMID:25133310

  12. A positive role for polycomb in transcriptional regulation via H4K20me1

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiangdong; Han, Zhijun; Chen, Hao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xia, Yuanxin; Pan, Chenyu; Fu, Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Han, Hui; Wu, Min; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Li, Lin; Wei, Gang; Zhao, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved polycomb group (PcG) proteins maintain heritable transcription repression of the genes essential for development from fly to mammals. However, sporadic reports imply a potential role of PcGs in positive regulation of gene transcription, although systematic investigation of such function and the underlying mechanism has rarely been reported. Here, we report a Pc-mediated, H3K27me3-dependent positive transcriptional regulation of Senseless (Sens), a key transcription factor required for development. Mechanistic studies show that Pc regulates Sens expression by promoting H4K20me1 at the Sens locus. Further bioinformatic analysis at genome-wide level indicates that the existence of H4K20me1 acts as a selective mark for positive transcriptional regulation by Pc/H3K27me3. Both the intensities and specific patterns of Pc and H3K27me3 are important for the fates of target gene transcription. Moreover, binding of transcription factor Broad (Br), which physically interacts with Pc and positively regulates the transcription of Sens, is observed in Pc+H3K27me3+H4K20me1+ genes, but not in Pc+H3K27me3+H4K20me1− genes. Taken together, our study reveals that, coupling with the transcription factor Br, Pc positively regulates transcription of Pc+H3K27me3+H4K20me1+ genes in developing Drosophila wing disc. PMID:27002220

  13. Modeling Writing Development: Contribution of Transcription and Self-Regulation to Portuguese Students' Text Generation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limpo, Teresa; Alves, Rui A.

    2013-01-01

    Writing is a complex activity that requires transcription and self-regulation. We used multiple-group structural equation modeling to test the contribution of transcription (handwriting and spelling), planning, revision, and self-efficacy to writing quality at 2 developmental points (Grades 4-6 vs. 7-9). In Grades 4-6, the model explained 76% of…

  14. Genomic clustering and co-regulation of transcriptional networks in the pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genes for the production of a broad range of fungal secondary metabolites are frequently colinear. The prevalence of such gene clusters was systematically examined across the genome of the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. The topological structure of transcriptional networks was also examined to investigate control mechanisms for mycotoxin biosynthesis and other processes. Results The genes associated with transcriptional processes were identified, and the genomic location of transcription-associated proteins (TAPs) analyzed in conjunction with the locations of genes exhibiting similar expression patterns. Highly conserved TAPs reside in regions of chromosomes with very low or no recombination, contrasting with putative regulator genes. Co-expression group profiles were used to define positionally clustered genes and a number of members of these clusters encode proteins participating in secondary metabolism. Gene expression profiles suggest there is an abundance of condition-specific transcriptional regulation. Analysis of the promoter regions of co-expressed genes showed enrichment for conserved DNA-sequence motifs. Potential global transcription factors recognising these motifs contain distinct sets of DNA-binding domains (DBDs) from those present in local regulators. Conclusions Proteins associated with basal transcriptional functions are encoded by genes enriched in regions of the genome with low recombination. Systematic searches revealed dispersed and compact clusters of co-expressed genes, often containing a transcription factor, and typically containing genes involved in biosynthetic pathways. Transcriptional networks exhibit a layered structure in which the position in the hierarchy of a regulator is closely linked to the DBD structural class. PMID:23805903

  15. The transcriptional regulator network of human inflammatory macrophages is defined by open chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Susanne V; Krebs, Wolfgang; Ulas, Thomas; Xue, Jia; Baßler, Kevin; Günther, Patrick; Hardt, Anna-Lena; Schultze, Hartmut; Sander, Jil; Klee, Kathrin; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Beyer, Marc; Schultze, Joachim L

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of inflammatory macrophages from monocytes is characterized by an orderly integration of epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms guided by lineage-determining transcription factors such as PU.1. Further activation of macrophages leads to a stimulus- or microenvironment-specific signal integration with subsequent transcriptional control established by the action of tissue- or signal-associated transcription factors. Here, we assess four histone modifications during human macrophage activation and integrate this information with the gene expression data from 28 different macrophage activation conditions in combination with GM-CSF. Bioinformatically, for inflammatory macrophages we define a unique network of transcriptional and epigenetic regulators (TRs), which was characterized by accessible promoters independent of the activation signal. In contrast to the general accessibility of promoters of TRs, mRNA expression of central TRs belonging to the TR network displayed stimulus-specific expression patterns, indicating a second level of transcriptional regulation beyond epigenetic chromatin changes. In contrast, stringent integration of epigenetic and transcriptional regulation was observed in networks of TRs established from somatic tissues and tissue macrophages. In these networks, clusters of TRs with permissive histone marks were associated with high gene expression whereas clusters with repressive chromatin marks were associated with absent gene expression. Collectively, these results support that macrophage activation during inflammation in contrast to lineage determination is mainly regulated transcriptionally by a pre-defined TR network. PMID:26729620

  16. The transcriptional regulator network of human inflammatory macrophages is defined by open chromatin.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne V; Krebs, Wolfgang; Ulas, Thomas; Xue, Jia; Baßler, Kevin; Günther, Patrick; Hardt, Anna-Lena; Schultze, Hartmut; Sander, Jil; Klee, Kathrin; Theis, Heidi; Kraut, Michael; Beyer, Marc; Schultze, Joachim L

    2016-02-01

    Differentiation of inflammatory macrophages from monocytes is characterized by an orderly integration of epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms guided by lineage-determining transcription factors such as PU.1. Further activation of macrophages leads to a stimulus- or microenvironment-specific signal integration with subsequent transcriptional control established by the action of tissue- or signal-associated transcription factors. Here, we assess four histone modifications during human macrophage activation and integrate this information with the gene expression data from 28 different macrophage activation conditions in combination with GM-CSF. Bioinformatically, for inflammatory macrophages we define a unique network of transcriptional and epigenetic regulators (TRs), which was characterized by accessible promoters independent of the activation signal. In contrast to the general accessibility of promoters of TRs, mRNA expression of central TRs belonging to the TR network displayed stimulus-specific expression patterns, indicating a second level of transcriptional regulation beyond epigenetic chromatin changes. In contrast, stringent integration of epigenetic and transcriptional regulation was observed in networks of TRs established from somatic tissues and tissue macrophages. In these networks, clusters of TRs with permissive histone marks were associated with high gene expression whereas clusters with repressive chromatin marks were associated with absent gene expression. Collectively, these results support that macrophage activation during inflammation in contrast to lineage determination is mainly regulated transcriptionally by a pre-defined TR network.

  17. Regulating RNA polymerase pausing and transcription elongation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Irene M; Waterfall, Joshua J; Core, Leighton J; Munroe, Robert J; Schimenti, John; Lis, John T

    2011-04-01

    Transitions between pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells are executed by key transcription regulators. Comparative measurements of RNA polymerase distribution over the genome's primary transcription units in different cell states can identify the genes and steps in the transcription cycle that are regulated during such transitions. To identify the complete transcriptional profiles of RNA polymerases with high sensitivity and resolution, as well as the critical regulated steps upon which regulatory factors act, we used genome-wide nuclear run-on (GRO-seq) to map the density and orientation of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In both cell types, progression of a promoter-proximal, paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) into productive elongation is a rate-limiting step in transcription of ∼40% of mRNA-encoding genes. Importantly, quantitative comparisons between cell types reveal that transcription is controlled frequently at paused Pol II's entry into elongation. Furthermore, "bivalent" ESC genes (exhibiting both active and repressive histone modifications) bound by Polycomb group complexes PRC1 (Polycomb-repressive complex 1) and PRC2 show dramatically reduced levels of paused Pol II at promoters relative to an average gene. In contrast, bivalent promoters bound by only PRC2 allow Pol II pausing, but it is confined to extremely 5' proximal regions. Altogether, these findings identify rate-limiting targets for transcription regulation during cell differentiation.

  18. Transcription factor NF-Y is a functional regulator of the transcription of core clock gene Bmal1.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jun; Zhou, Yongchun; Lai, Hao; Lei, Shi; Chi, Lisa H; Mo, Xianwei

    2013-11-01

    The circadian clock enables organisms to adjust to daily environmental changes and synchronize multiple molecular, biochemical, physiological, and behavioral processes accordingly. In mammalian clock work, Bmal1 is the most important core clock gene, which works with another core clock gene Clock to drive the expression of other clock genes and clock-controlled genes. However, the regulation of Bmal1 has not been fully understood. This work was aimed at identifying the positive regulator(s) of Bmal1 transcription. A series of 5' deletion reporter constructs was generated, and binding site mutations of mouse Bmal1 promoter fragments were cloned into pGL3-basic and pGL3(R2.1)-basic plasmids and transfected into NIH 3T3 cells. Luciferase activity was either measured 48 h after transfection or recorded for 4 days after serum shock. DNA affinity precipitation assay was used to detect the transcription factors binding to Bmal1 promoter. Small interfering RNA against nuclear factor Y, subunit A (NF-YA) and dominant negative NF-YA were employed to study the role of NF-Y in Bmal1 transcription regulation. Deletion and mutation analyses identified two clusters of CCAAT/GC-boxes at the proximal region of Bmal1 promoter as the activating cis-elements. Bmal1 promoter activity was up-regulated by NF-Y and/or Sp1 and repressed by dominant negative NF-YA or siRNA against NF-YA. The activation of Bmal1 promoter activity by NF-Y and Sp1 was inhibited by Rev-Erbα. DNA affinity precipitation assay showed that NF-Y and Sp1 bound to the two CCAAT/GC clusters of Bmal1 promoter. These results indicate that NF-Y is a functional activator of Bmal1 transcription and it cooperates with Sp1 and Rev-Erbα to generate the daily cycle of Bmal1 expression.

  19. Long noncoding RNA linc00598 regulates CCND2 transcription and modulates the G1 checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Oh-Seok; Chae, Yun-Cheol; Jung, Hyeonsoo; Park, Soon Cheol; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kook, Hyun; Seo, SangBeom

    2016-01-01

    Data derived from genomic and transcriptomic analyses have revealed that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in the transcriptional regulation of various genes. Recent studies have identified the mechanism underlying this function. To date, a variety of noncoding transcripts have been reported to function in conjunction with epigenetic regulator proteins. In this study, we investigated the function of linc00598, which is transcribed by a genomic sequence on chromosome 13, downstream of FoxO1 and upstream of COG6. Microarray analysis showed that linc00598 regulates the transcription of specific target genes, including those for cell cycle regulators. We discovered that linc00598 regulates CCND2 transcription through modulation of the transcriptional regulatory effect of FoxO1 on the CCND2 promoter. Moreover, we observed that knockdown of linc00598 induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibited proliferation. These data indicate that linc00598 plays an important role in cell cycle regulation and proliferation through its ability to regulate the transcription of CCND2. PMID:27572135

  20. Long noncoding RNA linc00598 regulates CCND2 transcription and modulates the G1 checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Oh-Seok; Chae, Yun-Cheol; Jung, Hyeonsoo; Park, Soon Cheol; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kook, Hyun; Seo, SangBeom

    2016-01-01

    Data derived from genomic and transcriptomic analyses have revealed that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important roles in the transcriptional regulation of various genes. Recent studies have identified the mechanism underlying this function. To date, a variety of noncoding transcripts have been reported to function in conjunction with epigenetic regulator proteins. In this study, we investigated the function of linc00598, which is transcribed by a genomic sequence on chromosome 13, downstream of FoxO1 and upstream of COG6. Microarray analysis showed that linc00598 regulates the transcription of specific target genes, including those for cell cycle regulators. We discovered that linc00598 regulates CCND2 transcription through modulation of the transcriptional regulatory effect of FoxO1 on the CCND2 promoter. Moreover, we observed that knockdown of linc00598 induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and inhibited proliferation. These data indicate that linc00598 plays an important role in cell cycle regulation and proliferation through its ability to regulate the transcription of CCND2. PMID:27572135

  1. Roles of NAC transcription factors in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Sharoni, Akhter M.; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2013-01-01

    NAC transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants, and members of the NAC gene family have been suggested to play important roles in the regulation of the transcriptional reprogramming associated with plant stress responses. A phylogenetic analysis of NAC genes, with a focus on rice and Arabidopsis, was performed. Herein, we present an overview of the regulation of the stress responsive NAC SNAC/(IX) group of genes that are implicated in the resistance to different stresses. SNAC factors have important roles for the control of biotic and abiotic stresses tolerance and that their overexpression can improve stress tolerance via biotechnological approaches. We also review the recent progress in elucidating the roles of NAC transcription factors in plant biotic and abiotic stresses. Modification of the expression pattern of transcription factor genes and/or changes in their activity contribute to the elaboration of various signaling pathways and regulatory networks. However, a single NAC gene often responds to several stress factors, and their protein products may participate in the regulation of several seemingly disparate processes as negative or positive regulators. Additionally, the NAC proteins function via auto-regulation or cross-regulation is extensively found among NAC genes. These observations assist in the understanding of the complex mechanisms of signaling and transcriptional reprogramming controlled by NAC proteins. PMID:24058359

  2. Synergistic transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of ESC characteristics by core pluripotency transcription factors in protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Li, Leijie; Zhang, Liangcai; Liu, Guiyou; Feng, Rennan; Jiang, Yongshuai; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Shihua; Liao, Mingzhi; Hua, Jinlian

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism that maintains the pluripotency of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is not well understood but may be reflected in complex biological networks. However, there have been few studies on the effects of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation during the development of ESCs from the perspective of computational systems biology. In this study, we analyzed the topological properties of the "core" pluripotency transcription factors (TFs) OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG in protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs). Further, we identified synergistic interactions between these TFs and microRNAs (miRNAs) in PPINs during ESC development. Results show that there were significant differences in centrality characters between TF-targets and non-TF-targets in PPINs. We also found that there was consistent regulation of multiple "core" pluripotency TFs. Based on the analysis of shortest path length, we found that the module properties were not only within the targets regulated by common or multiple "core" pluripotency TFs but also between the groups of targets regulated by different TFs. Finally, we identified synergistic regulation of these TFs and miRNAs. In summary, the synergistic effects of "core" pluripotency TFs and miRNAs were analyzed using computational methods in both human and mouse PPINs. PMID:25171496

  3. The Transcriptional Cascade in the Heat Stress Response of Arabidopsis Is Strictly Regulated at the Level of Transcription Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Ohama, Naohiko; Kusakabe, Kazuya; Mizoi, Junya; Zhao, Huimei; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinya; Takahashi, Fuminori; Ishida, Tetsuya; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Group A1 heat shock transcription factors (HsfA1s) are the master regulators of the heat stress response (HSR) in plants. Upon heat shock, HsfA1s trigger a transcriptional cascade that is composed of many transcription factors. Despite the importance of HsfA1s and their downstream transcriptional cascade in the acquisition of thermotolerance in plants, the molecular basis of their activation remains poorly understood. Here, domain analysis of HsfA1d, one of several HsfA1s in Arabidopsis thaliana, demonstrated that the central region of HsfA1d is a key regulatory domain that represses HsfA1d transactivation activity through interaction with HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN70 (HSP70) and HSP90. We designated this region as the temperature-dependent repression (TDR) domain. We found that HSP70 dissociates from HsfA1d in response to heat shock and that the dissociation is likely regulated by an as yet unknown activation mechanism, such as HsfA1d phosphorylation. Overexpression of constitutively active HsfA1d that lacked the TDR domain induced expression of heat shock proteins in the absence of heat stress, thereby conferring potent thermotolerance on the overexpressors. However, transcriptome analysis of the overexpressors demonstrated that the constitutively active HsfA1d could not trigger the complete transcriptional cascade under normal conditions, thereby indicating that other factors are necessary to fully induce the HSR. These complex regulatory mechanisms related to the transcriptional cascade may enable plants to respond resiliently to various heat stress conditions. PMID:26715648

  4. Genomic approaches to identifying transcriptional regulators of osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stains, Joseph P.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Recent microarray studies of mouse and human osteoblast differentiation in vitro have identified novel transcription factors that may be important in the establishment and maintenance of differentiation. These findings help unravel the pattern of gene-expression changes that underly the complex process of bone formation.

  5. Selective autophagic receptor p62 regulates the abundance of transcriptional coregulator ARIP4 during nutrient starvation

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Megumi; Isogai, Shin; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Tochio, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Ogawa, Hidesato

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional coregulators contribute to several processes involving nuclear receptor transcriptional regulation. The transcriptional coregulator androgen receptor-interacting protein 4 (ARIP4) interacts with nuclear receptors and regulates their transcriptional activity. In this study, we identified p62 as a major interacting protein partner for ARIP4 in the nucleus. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis demonstrated that ARIP4 interacts directly with the ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain of p62. ARIP4 and ubiquitin both bind to similar amino acid residues within UBA domains; therefore, these proteins may possess a similar surface structure at their UBA-binding interfaces. We also found that p62 is required for the regulation of ARIP4 protein levels under nutrient starvation conditions. We propose that p62 is a novel binding partner for ARIP4, and that its binding regulates the cellular protein level of ARIP4 under conditions of metabolic stress. PMID:26412716

  6. ULTRAPETALA trxG genes interact with KANADI transcription factor genes to regulate Aradopsis Gynoecium patterning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organ formation relies upon precise patterns of gene expression that are under tight spatial and temporal regulation. Transcription patterns are specified by several cellular processes during development, including chromatin remodeling, but little is known about how chromatin remodeling factors cont...

  7. Transcriptional programs regulated by both LEAFY and APETALA1 at the time of flower formation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Cara M; Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Wu, Miin-Feng; Wagner, Doris

    2015-09-01

    Two key regulators of the switch to flower formation and of flower patterning in Arabidopsis are the plant-specific helix-turn-helix transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) and the MADS box transcription factor APETALA1 (AP1). The interactions between these two transcriptional regulators are complex. AP1 is both a direct target of LFY and can act in parallel with LFY. Available genetic and molecular evidence suggests that LFY and AP1 together orchestrate the switch to flower formation and early events during flower morphogenesis by altering transcriptional programs. However, very little is known about target genes regulated by both transcription factors. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of public datasets to identify genes that are likely to be regulated by both LFY and AP1. Our analyses uncovered known and novel direct LFY and AP1 targets with a role in the control of onset of flower formation. It also identified additional families of proteins and regulatory pathways that may be under transcriptional control by both transcription factors. In particular, several of these genes are linked to response to hormones, to transport and to development. Finally, we show that the gibberellin catabolism enzyme ELA1, which was recently shown to be important for the timing of the switch to flower formation, is positively feedback-regulated by AP1. Our study contributes to the elucidation of the regulatory network that leads to formation of a vital plant organ system, the flower.

  8. Histone chaperones Nap1 and Vps75 regulate histone acetylation during transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Yu-Ming; Kowalska, Anna K; Grabowska, Kamila; Przybyt, Katarzyna; Cichewicz, Magda A; Del Rosario, Brian C; Pemberton, Lucy F

    2013-04-01

    Histone chaperones function in chromatin assembly and disassembly, suggesting they have important regulatory roles in transcription elongation. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Nap1 and Vps75 are structurally related, evolutionarily conserved histone chaperones. We showed that Nap1 genetically interacts with several transcription elongation factors and that both Nap1 and Vps75 interact with the RNA polymerase II kinase, CTK1. Loss of NAP1 or VPS75 suppressed cryptic transcription within the open reading frame (ORF) observed when strains are deleted for the kinase CTK1. Loss of the histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 also suppressed ctk1-dependent cryptic transcription. Vps75 regulates Rtt109 function, suggesting that they function together in this process. Histone H3 K9 was found to be the important lysine that is acetylated by Rtt109 during ctk1-dependent cryptic transcription. We showed that both Vps75 and Nap1 regulate the relative level of H3 K9 acetylation in the STE11 ORF. This supports a model in which Nap1, like Vps75, directly regulates Rtt109 activity or regulates the assembly of acetylated chromatin. Although Nap1 and Vps75 share many similarities, due to their distinct interactions with SET2, Nap1 and Vps75 may also play separate roles during transcription elongation. This work sheds further light on the importance of histone chaperones as general regulators of transcription elongation. PMID:23401858

  9. Core human mitochondrial transcription apparatus is a regulated two-component system in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shutt, Timothy E; Lodeiro, Maria F; Cotney, Justin; Cameron, Craig E; Shadel, Gerald S

    2010-07-01

    The core human mitochondrial transcription apparatus is currently regarded as an obligate three-component system comprising the bacteriophage T7-related mitochondrial RNA polymerase, the rRNA methyltransferase-related transcription factor, h-mtTFB2, and the high mobility group box transcription/DNA-packaging factor, h-mtTFA/TFAM. Using a faithful recombinant human mitochondrial transcription system from Escherichia coli, we demonstrate that specific initiation from the mtDNA promoters, LSP and HSP1, only requires mitochondrial RNA polymerase and h-mtTFB2 in vitro. When h-mtTFA is added to these basal components, LSP exhibits a much lower threshold for activation and a larger amplitude response than HSP1. In addition, when LSP and HSP1 are together on the same transcription template, h-mtTFA-independent transcription from HSP1 and h-mtTFA-dependent transcription from both promoters is enhanced and a higher concentration of h-mtTFA is required to stimulate HSP1. Promoter competition experiments revealed that, in addition to LSP competing transcription components away from HSP1, additional cis-acting signals are involved in these aspects of promoter regulation. Based on these results, we speculate that the human mitochondrial transcription system may have evolved to differentially regulate transcription initiation and transcription-primed mtDNA replication in response to the amount of h-mtTFA associated with nucleoids, which could begin to explain the heterogeneity of nucleoid structure and activity in vivo. Furthermore, this study sheds new light on the evolution of mitochondrial transcription components by showing that the human system is a regulated two-component system in vitro, and thus more akin to that of budding yeast than thought previously.

  10. Core human mitochondrial transcription apparatus is a regulated two-component system in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shutt, Timothy E.; Lodeiro, Maria F.; Cotney, Justin; Cameron, Craig E.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2010-01-01

    The core human mitochondrial transcription apparatus is currently regarded as an obligate three-component system comprising the bacteriophage T7-related mitochondrial RNA polymerase, the rRNA methyltransferase-related transcription factor, h-mtTFB2, and the high mobility group box transcription/DNA-packaging factor, h-mtTFA/TFAM. Using a faithful recombinant human mitochondrial transcription system from Escherichia coli, we demonstrate that specific initiation from the mtDNA promoters, LSP and HSP1, only requires mitochondrial RNA polymerase and h-mtTFB2 in vitro. When h-mtTFA is added to these basal components, LSP exhibits a much lower threshold for activation and a larger amplitude response than HSP1. In addition, when LSP and HSP1 are together on the same transcription template, h-mtTFA-independent transcription from HSP1 and h-mtTFA-dependent transcription from both promoters is enhanced and a higher concentration of h-mtTFA is required to stimulate HSP1. Promoter competition experiments revealed that, in addition to LSP competing transcription components away from HSP1, additional cis-acting signals are involved in these aspects of promoter regulation. Based on these results, we speculate that the human mitochondrial transcription system may have evolved to differentially regulate transcription initiation and transcription-primed mtDNA replication in response to the amount of h-mtTFA associated with nucleoids, which could begin to explain the heterogeneity of nucleoid structure and activity in vivo. Furthermore, this study sheds new light on the evolution of mitochondrial transcription components by showing that the human system is a regulated two-component system in vitro, and thus more akin to that of budding yeast than thought previously. PMID:20562347

  11. How to control self-digestion: transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuchen; Yao, Zhiyuan; Klionsky, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy), literally defined as a type of self-eating, is a dynamic cellular process in which cytoplasm is sequestered within a unique compartment termed the phagophore. Upon completion, the phagophore matures into a double-membrane autophagosome that fuses with the lysosome or vacuole, allowing degradation of the cargo. Nonselective autophagy is primarily a cytoprotective response to various types of stress; however, the process can also be highly selective. Autophagy is involved in various aspects of cell physiology, and its dysregulation is associated with a range of diseases. The regulation of autophagy is complex, and the process must be properly modulated to maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review, we focus on the current state of knowledge concerning transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulation of autophagy in yeast and mammals. PMID:25759175

  12. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

  13. E2F transcription factor 1 regulates cellular and organismal senescence by inhibiting Forkhead box O transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Peng, Shengyi; Tao, Li; Ruan, Haihe; Yang, Yanglu; Li, Tie-Mei; Adams, Ursula; Meng, Songshu; Bi, Xiaolin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2014-12-01

    E2F1 and FOXO3 are two transcription factors that have been shown to participate in cellular senescence. Previous report reveals that E2F1 enhanced cellular senescence in human fibroblast cells, while FOXO transcription factors play against senescence by regulation reactive oxygen species scavenging proteins. However, their functional interplay has been unclear. Here we use E2F1 knock-out murine Embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), knockdown RNAi constructs, and ectopic expression of E2F1 to show that it functions by negatively regulating FOXO3. E2F1 attenuates FOXO3-mediated expression of MnSOD and Catalase without affecting FOXO3 protein stability, subcellular localization, or phosphorylation by Akt. We mapped the interaction between E2F1 and FOXO3 to a region including the DNA binding domain of E2F1 and the C-terminal transcription-activation domain of FOXO3. We propose that E2F1 inhibits FOXO3-dependent transcription by directly binding FOXO3 in the nucleus and preventing activation of its target genes. Moreover, knockdown of the Caenorhabditis elegans E2F1 ortholog efl-1 significantly extends lifespan in a manner that requires the activity of the C. elegans FOXO gene daf-16. We conclude that there is an evolutionarily conserved signaling connection between E2F1 and FOXO3, which regulates cellular senescence and aging by regulating the activity of FOXO3. We speculate that drugs and/or therapies that inhibit this physical interaction might be good candidates for reducing cellular senescence and increasing longevity.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of OCT4 by the ETS transcription factor ESE-1 in NCCIT human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Won; Do, Hyun-Jin; Ha, Woo Tae; Han, Mi-Hee; Yang, Heung-Mo; Lee, Soo-Hong; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Hwan

    2014-07-25

    The epithelium-specific ETS transcription factor-1 (ESE-1) is physiologically important in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Recently, OCT4, a transcription factor involved in stem cell pluripotency, has been implicated in tumorigenesis. In this study, we invested the molecular mechanism by which ESE-1 regulates transcription of OCT4 in NCCIT human embryonic carcinoma cells. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that OCT4 levels were high in undifferentiated NCCIT cells but significantly decreased upon retinoic acid-mediated differentiation, concomitant with up-regulation of ESE-1 expression. OCT4 mRNA level rose following shRNA-mediated knockdown of ESE-1, but declined when ESE-1 was overexpressed, suggesting that the expression levels of OCT4 and ESE-1 may be coordinated in an opposite manner. Promoter-reporter assays revealed that induced OCT4 promoter activity in NCCIT cells was significantly down-regulated by ESE-1 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of ESE-1 on OCT4 promoter activity was relieved by co-expression of an ESE-1 mutant lacking the transactivation domain, but not by mutants lacking other domains. Serial deletion and site-directed mutagenesis of the OCT4 promoter revealed that a potential ETS binding site (EBS) is present in the conserved region 2 (CR2). ESE-1 interacted with the EBS element in CR2 and enrichment of CR2 significantly increased upon RA-mediated differentiation of NCCIT cells, suggesting that this binding is likely to be involved in ESE-1-mediated repression of OCT4 promoter activity upon differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study reveal the molecular details of the mechanism by which the oncogenic factor ESE-1 regulates expression of the stem cell transcription factor OCT4 in pluripotent NCCIT cells.

  15. E2F transcription factor 1 regulates cellular and organismal senescence by inhibiting Forkhead box O transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qi; Peng, Shengyi; Tao, Li; Ruan, Haihe; Yang, Yanglu; Li, Tie-Mei; Adams, Ursula; Meng, Songshu; Bi, Xiaolin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2014-12-01

    E2F1 and FOXO3 are two transcription factors that have been shown to participate in cellular senescence. Previous report reveals that E2F1 enhanced cellular senescence in human fibroblast cells, while FOXO transcription factors play against senescence by regulation reactive oxygen species scavenging proteins. However, their functional interplay has been unclear. Here we use E2F1 knock-out murine Embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), knockdown RNAi constructs, and ectopic expression of E2F1 to show that it functions by negatively regulating FOXO3. E2F1 attenuates FOXO3-mediated expression of MnSOD and Catalase without affecting FOXO3 protein stability, subcellular localization, or phosphorylation by Akt. We mapped the interaction between E2F1 and FOXO3 to a region including the DNA binding domain of E2F1 and the C-terminal transcription-activation domain of FOXO3. We propose that E2F1 inhibits FOXO3-dependent transcription by directly binding FOXO3 in the nucleus and preventing activation of its target genes. Moreover, knockdown of the Caenorhabditis elegans E2F1 ortholog efl-1 significantly extends lifespan in a manner that requires the activity of the C. elegans FOXO gene daf-16. We conclude that there is an evolutionarily conserved signaling connection between E2F1 and FOXO3, which regulates cellular senescence and aging by regulating the activity of FOXO3. We speculate that drugs and/or therapies that inhibit this physical interaction might be good candidates for reducing cellular senescence and increasing longevity. PMID:25344604

  16. E2F Transcription Factor 1 Regulates Cellular and Organismal Senescence by Inhibiting Forkhead Box O Transcription Factors*

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Peng, Shengyi; Tao, Li; Ruan, Haihe; Yang, Yanglu; Li, Tie-Mei; Adams, Ursula; Meng, Songshu; Bi, Xiaolin; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2014-01-01

    E2F1 and FOXO3 are two transcription factors that have been shown to participate in cellular senescence. Previous report reveals that E2F1 enhanced cellular senescence in human fibroblast cells, while FOXO transcription factors play against senescence by regulation reactive oxygen species scavenging proteins. However, their functional interplay has been unclear. Here we use E2F1 knock-out murine Embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), knockdown RNAi constructs, and ectopic expression of E2F1 to show that it functions by negatively regulating FOXO3. E2F1 attenuates FOXO3-mediated expression of MnSOD and Catalase without affecting FOXO3 protein stability, subcellular localization, or phosphorylation by Akt. We mapped the interaction between E2F1 and FOXO3 to a region including the DNA binding domain of E2F1 and the C-terminal transcription-activation domain of FOXO3. We propose that E2F1 inhibits FOXO3-dependent transcription by directly binding FOXO3 in the nucleus and preventing activation of its target genes. Moreover, knockdown of the Caenorhabditis elegans E2F1 ortholog efl-1 significantly extends lifespan in a manner that requires the activity of the C. elegans FOXO gene daf-16. We conclude that there is an evolutionarily conserved signaling connection between E2F1 and FOXO3, which regulates cellular senescence and aging by regulating the activity of FOXO3. We speculate that drugs and/or therapies that inhibit this physical interaction might be good candidates for reducing cellular senescence and increasing longevity. PMID:25344604

  17. Multiple MAPK cascades regulate the transcription of IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kahana-Edwin, Smadar; Stark, Michal; Kassir, Yona

    2013-01-01

    The choice between alternative developmental pathways is primarily controlled at the level of transcription. Induction of meiosis in budding yeasts in response to nutrient levels provides a system to investigate the molecular basis of cellular decision-making. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, entry into meiosis depends on multiple signals converging upon IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis. Here we studied the regulation of the cis-acting regulatory element Upstream Activation Signal (UAS)ru, which resides within the IME1 promoter. Guided by our previous data acquired using a powerful high-throughput screening system, here we provide evidence that UASru is regulated by multiple stimuli that trigger distinct signal transduction pathways as follows: (i) The glucose signal inhibited UASru activity through the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, targeting the transcription factors (TFs), Com2 and Sko1; (ii) high osmolarity activated UASru through the Hog1/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and its corresponding TF Sko1; (iii) elevated temperature increased the activity of UASru through the cell wall integrity pathway and the TFs Swi4/Mpk1 and Swi4/Mlp1; (iv) the nitrogen source repressed UASru activity through Sum1; and (v) the absence of a nitrogen source was detected and transmitted to UASru by the Kss1 and Fus3 MAPK pathways through their respective downstream TFs, Ste12/Tec1 and Ste12/Ste12 as well as by their regulators Dig1/2. These signaling events were specific to UASru; they did not affect the mating and filamentation response elements that are regulated by MAPK pathways. The complex regulation of UASru through all the known vegetative MAPK pathways is unique to S. cerevisiae and is specific for IME1, likely because it is the master regulator of gametogenesis. PMID:24236068

  18. Multiple MAPK Cascades Regulate the Transcription of IME1, the Master Transcriptional Activator of Meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kahana-Edwin, Smadar; Stark, Michal; Kassir, Yona

    2013-01-01

    The choice between alternative developmental pathways is primarily controlled at the level of transcription. Induction of meiosis in budding yeasts in response to nutrient levels provides a system to investigate the molecular basis of cellular decision-making. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, entry into meiosis depends on multiple signals converging upon IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis. Here we studied the regulation of the cis-acting regulatory element Upstream Activation Signal (UAS)ru, which resides within the IME1 promoter. Guided by our previous data acquired using a powerful high-throughput screening system, here we provide evidence that UASru is regulated by multiple stimuli that trigger distinct signal transduction pathways as follows: (i) The glucose signal inhibited UASru activity through the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, targeting the transcription factors (TFs), Com2 and Sko1; (ii) high osmolarity activated UASru through the Hog1/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and its corresponding TF Sko1; (iii) elevated temperature increased the activity of UASru through the cell wall integrity pathway and the TFs Swi4/Mpk1 and Swi4/Mlp1; (iv) the nitrogen source repressed UASru activity through Sum1; and (v) the absence of a nitrogen source was detected and transmitted to UASru by the Kss1 and Fus3 MAPK pathways through their respective downstream TFs, Ste12/Tec1 and Ste12/Ste12 as well as by their regulators Dig1/2. These signaling events were specific to UASru; they did not affect the mating and filamentation response elements that are regulated by MAPK pathways. The complex regulation of UASru through all the known vegetative MAPK pathways is unique to S. cerevisiae and is specific for IME1, likely because it is the master regulator of gametogenesis. PMID:24236068

  19. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    SciTech Connect

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  20. CHAPERONE-MEDIATED CHROMATIN ASSEMBLY AND TRANSCRIPTION REGULATION IN XENOPUS LAEVIS

    PubMed Central

    Onikubo, Takashi; Shechter, David

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin is the complex of DNA and histone proteins that is the physiological form of the eukaryotic genome. Chromatin is generally repressive for transcription, especially so during early metazoan development when maternal factors are explicitly in control of new zygotic gene expression. In the important model organism Xenopus laevis, maturing oocytes are transcriptionally active with reduced rates of chromatin assembly, while laid eggs and fertilized embryos have robust rates of chromatin assembly and are transcriptionally repressed. As the DNA-to-cytoplasmic ratio decreases approaching the mid-blastula transition (MBT) and the onset of zygotic transcription activation (ZGA), the chromatin assembly process changes with the concomitant reduction in maternal chromatin components. Chromatin assembly is mediated in part by histone chaperones that store maternal histones and release them into new zygotic chromatin. Here, we review literature on chromatin and transcription in frog embryos and cell-free extracts and highlight key insights demonstrating the roles of maternal and zygotic histone deposition and their relationship with transcriptional regulation. We explore the central historical and recent literature on the use of Xenopus embryos and the key contributions provided by experiments in cell-free oocyte and egg extracts for the interplay between histone chaperones, chromatin assembly, and transcriptional regulation. Ongoing and future studies in Xenopus cell free extracts will likely contribute essential new insights into the interplay between chromatin assembly and transcriptional regulation. PMID:27759155

  1. Regulation of heterochromatin transcription by Snail1/LOXL2 during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Millanes-Romero, Alba; Herranz, Nicolás; Perrera, Valentina; Iturbide, Ane; Loubat-Casanovas, Jordina; Gil, Jesús; Jenuwein, Thomas; García de Herreros, Antonio; Peiró, Sandra

    2013-12-12

    Although heterochromatin is enriched with repressive traits, it is also actively transcribed, giving rise to large amounts of noncoding RNAs. Although these RNAs are responsible for the formation and maintenance of heterochromatin, little is known about how their transcription is regulated. Here, we show that the Snail1 transcription factor represses mouse pericentromeric transcription, acting through the H3K4 deaminase LOXL2. Since Snail1 plays a key role in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), we analyzed the regulation of heterochromatin transcription in this process. At the onset of EMT, one of the major structural heterochromatin proteins, HP1α, is transiently released from heterochromatin foci in a Snail1/LOXL2-dependent manner, concomitantly with a downregulation of major satellite transcription. Moreover, preventing the downregulation of major satellite transcripts compromised the migratory and invasive behavior of mesenchymal cells. We propose that Snail1 regulates heterochromatin transcription through LOXL2, thus creating the favorable transcriptional state necessary for completing EMT.

  2. Pleiohomeotic Interacts with the Core Transcription Elongation Factor Spt5 to Regulate Gene Expression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Barbara H.

    2013-01-01

    The early elongation checkpoint regulated by Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb) is a critical control point for the expression of many genes. Spt5 interacts directly with RNA polymerase II and has an essential role in establishing this checkpoint, and also for further transcript elongation. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila Spt5 interacts both physically and genetically with the Polycomb Group (PcG) protein Pleiohomeotic (Pho), and the majority of Pho binding sites overlap with Spt5 binding sites across the genome in S2 cells. Our results indicate that Pho can interact with Spt5 to regulate transcription elongation in a gene specific manner. PMID:23894613

  3. Coupling transcriptional and post-transcriptional miRNA regulation in the control of cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Shalgi, Reut; Brosh, Ran; Oren, Moshe; Pilpel, Yitzhak; Rotter, Varda

    2009-01-01

    miRNAs function as a critical regulatory layer in development, differentiation, and the maintenance of cell fate. Depletion of miRNAs from embryonic stem cells impairs their differentiation capacity. Total elimination of miRNAs leads to premature senescence in normal cells and tissues through activation of the DNA-damage checkpoint, whereas ablation of miRNAs in cancer cell lines results in an opposite effect, enhancing their tumorigenic potential. Here we compile evidence from the literature that point at miRNAs as key players in the maintenance of genomic integrity and proper cell fate. There is an apparent gap between our understanding of the subtle way by which miRNAs modulate protein levels, and their profound impact on cell fate. We propose that examining miRNAs in the context of the regulatory transcriptional and post-transcriptional networks they are embedded in may provide a broader view of their role in controlling cell fate. PMID:20157565

  4. Evolution of transcription-regulating proteins: caveat lector!

    PubMed

    Arst, H N; Holden, D W; Caddick, M X

    1997-07-11

    The paper of Hawkins et al. [Gene 146 (1994) 145-158] reports incorrect descriptions of mutant phenotypes, omits mention of the absence of a highly relevant glutamine-binding site and contains sequence alignments which might mislead the reader. Extensive sequence analysis reveals as untenable a central hypothesis of the paper concerning a possible evolutionary relationship between anthranilate synthetases and the transcription factors mediating nitrogen metabolite repression in fungi. PMID:9253382

  5. Discovery of transcription factors and other candidate regulators of neural crest development

    PubMed Central

    Adams, MS; Gammill, LS; Bronner-Fraser, M

    2011-01-01

    Neural crest cells migrate long distances and form divergent derivatives in vertebrate embryos. Despite previous efforts to identify genes upregulated in neural crest populations, transcription factors have proved to be elusive due to relatively low expression levels and often transient expression. We screened newly induced neural crest cells for early target genes with the aim of identifying transcriptional regulators and other developmentally important genes. This yielded numerous candidate regulators, including fourteen transcription factors, many of which were not previously associated with neural crest development. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed upregulation of several transcription factors in newly induced neural crest populations in vitro. In a secondary screen by in situ hybridization, we verified the expression of >100 genes in the neural crest. We note that several of the transcription factors and other genes from the screen are expressed in other migratory cell populations and have been implicated in diverse forms of cancer. PMID:18351660

  6. Interplay between transcriptional control and chromatin regulation in the oligodendrocyte lineage

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Marylens; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The recent years have been characterized by a surge of studies on the role of transcription factors and histone modifications in regulating the progression of progenitors into oligodendrocytes. This review summarizes this body of evidence and presents an integrated view of transcriptional networks and epigenetic regulators defining proliferating progenitors and their differentiation along the oligodendrocyte lineage. We suggest that transcription factors in proliferating progenitors have direct access to DNA, due to predominantly euchromatic nuclei. As progenitors differentiate, however, transcriptional competence is modulated by the formation of heterochromatin, which modifies the association of DNA with nucleosomal histones and renders the access of transcription factor dependent on the activity of epigenetic modulators. These concepts are delineated within the context of development and the potential functional implications are discussed. PMID:25970296

  7. Osterix represses adipogenesis by negatively regulating PPARγ transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Younho; Kim, Chae Yul; Cheong, Heesun; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2016-01-01

    Osterix is a novel bone-related transcription factor involved in osteoblast differentiation, and bone maturation. Because a reciprocal relationship exists between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, we hypothesized that Osterix might have a role in adipogenesis. Ablation of Osterix enhanced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells, whereas overexpression suppressed this process and inhibited the expression of adipogenic markers including CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Further studies indicated that Osterix significantly decreased PPARγ-induced transcriptional activity. Using co-immunoprecipitation and GST-pull down analysis, we found that Osterix directly interacts with PPARγ. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of PPARγ was responsible for this interaction, which was followed by repression of PPARγ-induced transcriptional activity, even in the presence of rosiglitazone. Taken together, we identified the Osterix has an important regulatory role on PPARγ activity, which contributed to the mechanism of adipogenesis. PMID:27752121

  8. [Immunoglobulin genes in lymphoid cells and regulation of their transcription].

    PubMed

    Stepchenko, A G; Urakov, D N; Luchina, N N; Deev, S M; Polianovskiĭ, O L

    1990-01-01

    The hybridoma genomes contain polyploid sets of immunoglobulin genes. We have shown, that the hybridoma PTF-02 genome contains three genes of heavy chains and two genes of light chains. The genes responsible for antibody synthesis were cloned and their structure were determined. Investigation of the kappa gene transcription and its fragments which contain regulatory sequences revealed a nuclear factor. The latter interacts with the octanucleotide localized at the promoter region of the kappa gene. The purified factor activates the transcription of the kappa gene in a heterologous cell-free system. Together with the tissue-specific factor there is also an universal factor interacting with the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interact with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. We have shown an additional factor in lymphoid cells interacting with the protein which binds to the octanucleotide sequence. As a result, there is a family of factors which interact with ATTTGCAT sequence. One major factor (m.w. 60 +/- 2 kDa) is an obligatory component for the initiation of immunoglobulin genes transcription.

  9. Post-transcriptional regulation of the chicken thymidine kinase gene.

    PubMed

    Groudine, M; Casimir, C

    1984-02-10

    In attempting to understand the molecular basis of the control of chicken thymidine kinase (cTK) gene expression, we have examined the steady state cTK RNA content, and the patterns of DNA methylation, chromatin structure and endogenous nuclear runoff transcription of this gene in dividing and non-dividing cells. Our results reveal that the steady state level of cTK poly A+ RNA is correlated with the divisional activity of normal avian cells and tissues. However, no differences in the pattern of Hpa II site methylation or chromatin structure are found among cells containing high or undetectable levels of steady state cTK RNA. In addition, no differences in cTK transcription as assayed by nuclear runoff experiments are detectable in isolated nuclei derived from dividing or non-dividing cells containing high or low levels of steady state cTK RNA. These results suggest that the principal control of chicken thymidine kinase gene expression is post-transcriptional in nature.

  10. Retroviral Transcriptional Regulation and Embryonic Stem Cells: War and Peace

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses have evolved complex transcriptional enhancers and promoters that allow their replication in a wide range of tissue and cell types. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, however, characteristically suppress transcription of proviruses formed after infection by exogenous retroviruses and also of most members of the vast array of endogenous retroviruses in the genome. These cells have unusual profiles of transcribed genes and are poised to make rapid changes in those profiles upon induction of differentiation. Many of the transcription factors in ES cells control both host and retroviral genes coordinately, such that retroviral expression patterns can serve as markers of ES cell pluripotency. This overlap is not coincidental; retrovirus-derived regulatory sequences are often used to control cellular genes important for pluripotency. These sequences specify the temporal control and perhaps “noisy” control of cellular genes that direct proper cell gene expression in primitive cells and their differentiating progeny. The evidence suggests that the viral elements have been domesticated for host needs, reflecting the wide-ranging exploitation of any and all available DNA sequences in assembling regulatory networks. PMID:25547290

  11. Expression and regulation of the Msx1 natural antisense transcript during development.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Amélie E; Pibouin, Laurence; Vi-Fane, Brigitte; Thomas, Bethan L; Macdougall, Mary; Choudhury, Anuradha; Robert, Benoît; Sharpe, Paul T; Berdal, Ariane; Lezot, Frédéric

    2005-01-01

    Bidirectional transcription, leading to the expression of an antisense (AS) RNA partially complementary to the protein coding sense (S) RNA, is an emerging subject in mammals and has been associated with various processes such as RNA interference, imprinting and transcription inhibition. Homeobox genes do not escape this bidirectional transcription, raising the possibility that such AS transcription occurs during embryonic development and may be involved in the complexity of regulation of homeobox gene expression. According to the importance of the Msx1 homeobox gene function in craniofacial development, especially in tooth development, the expression and regulation of its recently identified AS transcripts were investigated in vivo in mouse from E9.5 embryo to newborn, and compared with the S transcript and the encoded protein expression pattern and regulation. The spatial and temporal expression patterns of S, AS transcripts and protein are consistent with a role of AS RNA in the regulation of Msx1 expression in timely controlled developmental sites. Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions were shown to control the spatial organization of S and also AS RNA expression during early patterning of incisors and molars in the odontogenic mesenchyme. To conclude, this study clearly identifies the Msx1 AS RNA involvement during tooth development and evidences a new degree of complexity in craniofacial developmental biology: the implication of endogenous AS RNAs.

  12. Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 Is a Dual Regulator of Cardiac Transcription Factor Function*

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Erin L.; Benham, Ashley; Soibam, Benjamin; Stashi, Erin; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Entman, Mark L.; Schwartz, Robert J.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the potential role of steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2) as a co-regulator in the transcription of critical molecules modulating cardiac function and metabolism in normal and stressed hearts. The present study seeks to extend the previous information by demonstrating SRC-2 fulfills this role by serving as a critical coactivator for the transcription and activity of critical transcription factors known to control cardiac growth and metabolism as well as in their downstream signaling. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the mechanism by which SRC-2 acts in normal and stressed hearts and allows further investigation of the transcriptional modifications mediating different types and degrees of cardiac stress. Moreover, the genetic manipulation of SRC-2 in this study is specific for the heart and thereby eliminating potential indirect effects of SRC-2 deletion in other organs. We have shown that SRC-2 is critical to transcriptional control modulated by MEF2, GATA-4, and Tbx5, thereby enhancing gene expression associated with cardiac growth. Additionally, we describe SRC-2 as a novel regulator of PPARα expression, thus controlling critical steps in metabolic gene expression. We conclude that through regulation of cardiac transcription factor expression and activity, SRC-2 is a critical transcriptional regulator of genes important for cardiac growth, structure, and metabolism, three of the main pathways altered during the cardiac stress response. PMID:24811170

  13. Steroid receptor coactivator-2 is a dual regulator of cardiac transcription factor function.

    PubMed

    Reineke, Erin L; Benham, Ashley; Soibam, Benjamin; Stashi, Erin; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Entman, Mark L; Schwartz, Robert J; O'Malley, Bert W

    2014-06-20

    We have previously demonstrated the potential role of steroid receptor coactivator-2 (SRC-2) as a co-regulator in the transcription of critical molecules modulating cardiac function and metabolism in normal and stressed hearts. The present study seeks to extend the previous information by demonstrating SRC-2 fulfills this role by serving as a critical coactivator for the transcription and activity of critical transcription factors known to control cardiac growth and metabolism as well as in their downstream signaling. This knowledge broadens our understanding of the mechanism by which SRC-2 acts in normal and stressed hearts and allows further investigation of the transcriptional modifications mediating different types and degrees of cardiac stress. Moreover, the genetic manipulation of SRC-2 in this study is specific for the heart and thereby eliminating potential indirect effects of SRC-2 deletion in other organs. We have shown that SRC-2 is critical to transcriptional control modulated by MEF2, GATA-4, and Tbx5, thereby enhancing gene expression associated with cardiac growth. Additionally, we describe SRC-2 as a novel regulator of PPARα expression, thus controlling critical steps in metabolic gene expression. We conclude that through regulation of cardiac transcription factor expression and activity, SRC-2 is a critical transcriptional regulator of genes important for cardiac growth, structure, and metabolism, three of the main pathways altered during the cardiac stress response. PMID:24811170

  14. FoxO1 Deacetylation Regulates Thyroid Hormone-induced Transcription of Key Hepatic Gluconeogenic Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD+-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ−/−) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status. PMID:23995837

  15. Characterization of TRAP-mediated regulation of the B. subtilis trp operon using in vitro transcription and transcriptional reporter fusions in vivo.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Natalie M; Gollnick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon is regulated by an attenuation mechanism involving two alternative RNA secondary structures in the 5' leader region upstream of the structural genes. Regulation is accomplished, at least in part, by controlling which RNA structure forms during transcription of the operon. When intracellular tryptophan levels are high, the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) binds to the nascent trp mRNA to promote formation of a transcription terminator structure so as to induce transcription termination prior to the structural genes. In limiting tryptophan, TRAP does not bind, the alternative antiterminator RNA structure forms, and the operon is transcribed. Several in vitro and in vivo assays have been utilized to study TRAP-mediated regulation of both transcription and translation. Here, we describe using in vitro transcription attenuation assays and in vivo trp-lacZ fusions to examine TRAP-mediated regulation of the trp genes. PMID:25579595

  16. General organisational principles of the transcriptional regulation system: a tree or a circle?

    PubMed

    Muskhelishvili, Georgi; Sobetzko, Patrick; Geertz, Marcel; Berger, Michael

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances of systemic approaches to gene expression and cellular metabolism provide unforeseen opportunities for relating and integrating extensive datasets describing the transcriptional regulation system as a whole. However, due to the multifaceted nature of the phenomenon, these datasets often contain logically distinct types of information determined by underlying approach and adopted methodology of data analysis. Consequently, to integrate the datasets comprising information on the states of chromatin structure, transcriptional regulatory network and cellular metabolism, a novel methodology enabling interconversion of logically distinct types of information is required. Here we provide a holistic conceptual framework for analysis of global transcriptional regulation as a system coordinated by structural coupling between the transcription machinery and DNA topology, acting as interdependent sensors and determinants of metabolic functions. In this operationally closed system any transition in physiological state represents an emergent property determined by shifts in structural coupling, whereas genetic regulation acts as a genuine device converting one logical type of information into the other.

  17. Circuit-wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Regulating Depression Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S; Walker, Deena M; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J; Heller, Elizabeth A; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-Min; Stein, Jason L; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A; Scobie, Kimberly N; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation, and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery.

  18. RNA remodeling by bacterial global regulator CsrA promotes Rho-dependent transcription termination

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Bossi, Nara; Schwartz, Annie; Guillemardet, Benoit; D’Heygère, François; Bossi, Lionello; Boudvillain, Marc

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding protein CsrA is a key regulator of a variety of cellular processes in bacteria, including carbon and stationary phase metabolism, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and virulence gene expression in pathogens. CsrA binds to bipartite sequence elements at or near the ribosome loading site in messenger RNA (mRNA), most often inhibiting translation initiation. Here we describe an alternative novel mechanism through which CsrA achieves negative regulation. We show that CsrA binding to the upstream portion of the 5′ untranslated region of Escherichia coli pgaA mRNA—encoding a polysaccharide adhesin export protein—unfolds a secondary structure that sequesters an entry site for transcription termination factor Rho, resulting in the premature stop of transcription. These findings establish a new paradigm for bacterial gene regulation in which remodeling of the nascent transcript by a regulatory protein promotes Rho-dependent transcription attenuation. PMID:24888591

  19. Circuit-wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Regulating Depression Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bagot, Rosemary C; Cates, Hannah M; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Lorsch, Zachary S; Walker, Deena M; Wang, Junshi; Huang, Xiaojie; Schlüter, Oliver M; Maze, Ian; Peña, Catherine J; Heller, Elizabeth A; Issler, Orna; Wang, Minghui; Song, Won-Min; Stein, Jason L; Liu, Xiaochuan; Doyle, Marie A; Scobie, Kimberly N; Sun, Hao Sheng; Neve, Rachael L; Geschwind, Daniel; Dong, Yan; Shen, Li; Zhang, Bin; Nestler, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Depression is a complex, heterogeneous disorder and a leading contributor to the global burden of disease. Most previous research has focused on individual brain regions and genes contributing to depression. However, emerging evidence in humans and animal models suggests that dysregulated circuit function and gene expression across multiple brain regions drive depressive phenotypes. Here, we performed RNA sequencing on four brain regions from control animals and those susceptible or resilient to chronic social defeat stress at multiple time points. We employed an integrative network biology approach to identify transcriptional networks and key driver genes that regulate susceptibility to depressive-like symptoms. Further, we validated in vivo several key drivers and their associated transcriptional networks that regulate depression susceptibility and confirmed their functional significance at the levels of gene transcription, synaptic regulation, and behavior. Our study reveals novel transcriptional networks that control stress susceptibility and offers fundamentally new leads for antidepressant drug discovery. PMID:27181059

  20. Transcription factor ICBP90 regulates the MIF promoter and immune susceptibility locus.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Leng, Lin; Sauler, Maor; Fu, Weiling; Zheng, Junsong; Zhang, Yi; Du, Xin; Yu, Xiaoqing; Lee, Patty; Bucala, Richard

    2016-02-01

    The immunoregulatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus that is linked to the susceptibility of autoimmune and infectious diseases. The MIF promoter contains a 4-nucleotide microsatellite polymorphism (-794 CATT) that repeats 5 to 8 times in the locus, with greater numbers of repeats associated with higher mRNA levels. Because there is no information about the transcriptional regulation of these common alleles, we used oligonucleotide affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify nuclear proteins that interact with the -794 CATT5-8 site. An analysis of monocyte nuclear lysates revealed that the transcription factor ICBP90 (also known as UHRF1) is the major protein interacting with the MIF microsatellite. We found that ICBP90 is essential for MIF transcription from monocytes/macrophages, B and T lymphocytes, and synovial fibroblasts, and TLR-induced MIF transcription is regulated in an ICBP90- and -794 CATT5-8 length-dependent manner. Whole-genome transcription analysis of ICBP90 shRNA-treated rheumatoid synoviocytes uncovered a subset of proinflammatory and immune response genes that overlapped with those regulated by MIF shRNA. In addition, the expression levels of ICBP90 and MIF were correlated in joint synovia from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings identify ICBP90 as a key regulator of MIF transcription and provide functional insight into the regulation of the polymorphic MIF locus.

  1. Transcription factor ICBP90 regulates the MIF promoter and immune susceptibility locus

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jie; Leng, Lin; Sauler, Maor; Fu, Weiling; Zheng, Junsong; Zhang, Yi; Du, Xin; Yu, Xiaoqing; Lee, Patty; Bucala, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The immunoregulatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus that is linked to the susceptibility of autoimmune and infectious diseases. The MIF promoter contains a 4-nucleotide microsatellite polymorphism (–794 CATT) that repeats 5 to 8 times in the locus, with greater numbers of repeats associated with higher mRNA levels. Because there is no information about the transcriptional regulation of these common alleles, we used oligonucleotide affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry to identify nuclear proteins that interact with the –794 CATT5–8 site. An analysis of monocyte nuclear lysates revealed that the transcription factor ICBP90 (also known as UHRF1) is the major protein interacting with the MIF microsatellite. We found that ICBP90 is essential for MIF transcription from monocytes/macrophages, B and T lymphocytes, and synovial fibroblasts, and TLR-induced MIF transcription is regulated in an ICBP90- and –794 CATT5–8 length–dependent manner. Whole-genome transcription analysis of ICBP90 shRNA–treated rheumatoid synoviocytes uncovered a subset of proinflammatory and immune response genes that overlapped with those regulated by MIF shRNA. In addition, the expression levels of ICBP90 and MIF were correlated in joint synovia from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings identify ICBP90 as a key regulator of MIF transcription and provide functional insight into the regulation of the polymorphic MIF locus. PMID:26752645

  2. Ste12 and Mcm1 regulate cell cycle-dependent transcription of FAR1.

    PubMed Central

    Oehlen, L J; McKinney, J D; Cross, F R

    1996-01-01

    The transcripts of many genes involved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating were found to fluctuate during the cell cycle. In the absence of a functional Ste12 transcription factor, both the levels and the cell cycle pattern of expression of these genes were affected. FUS1 and AGA1 levels, which are maximally expressed only in G1-phase cells, were strongly reduced in ste12- cells. The cell cycle transcription pattern for FAR1 was changed in ste12- cells: the gene was still significantly expressed in G2/M, but transcript levels were strongly reduced in G1 phase, resulting in a lack of Far1 protein accumulation. G2/M transcription of FAR1 was dependent on the transcription factor Mcm1, and expression of a gene with Mcm1 fused to a strong transcriptional activation domain resulted in increased levels of FAR1 transcription. The pattern of cell cycle-regulated transcription of FAR1 could involve combinatorial control of Ste12 and Mcm1. Forced G1 expression of FAR1 from the GAL1 promoter resorted the ability to arrest in response to pheromone in ste12-cells. This indicates that transcription of FAR1 in the G1 phase is essential for accumulation of the protein and for pheromone-induced cell cycle arrest. PMID:8649392

  3. Regulation of Transcription by SMU.1349, a TetR Family Regulator, in Streptococcus mutans▿†

    PubMed Central

    Chattoraj, Partho; Mohapatra, Saswat Sourav; Rao, J. L. Uma Maheswar; Biswas, Indranil

    2011-01-01

    The TetR family of transcriptional regulators is ubiquitous in bacteria, where it plays an important role in bacterial gene expression. Streptococcus mutans, a Gram-positive pathogen considered to be the primary etiological agent in the formation of dental caries, encodes at least 18 TetR regulators. Here we characterized one such TetR regulator, SMU.1349, encoded by the TnSmu2 operon, which appeared to be acquired by the organism via horizontal gene transfer. SMU.1349 is transcribed divergently from the rest of the genes encoded by the operon. By the use of a transcriptional reporter system and semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), we demonstrated that SMU.1349 activates the transcription of several genes that are encoded within the TnSmu2 operon. Gel mobility shift and DNase I footprinting assays with purified SMU.1349 protein demonstrated binding to the intergenic region between SMU.1349 and the TnSmu2 operon; therefore, SMU.1349 is directly involved in gene transcription. Using purified S. mutans RpoD and Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, we also demonstrated in an in vitro transcription assay that SMU.1349 could activate transcription from the TnSmu2 operon promoter. Furthermore, we showed that SMU.1349 could also repress transcription from its own promoter by binding to the intergenic region, suggesting that SMU.1349 acts as both an activator and a repressor. Thus, unlike most of the TetR family proteins, which generally function as transcriptional repressors, SMU.1349 is unique in that it can function as both. PMID:21965566

  4. Transcriptional Regulation oa Endothelial Cell And Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Park, Changwon; Kim, Tae Min; Malik, Asrar B.

    2013-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of the vascular system is critical for embryonic development and postnatal life. Defects in endothelial cell development and vessel formation and function lead to embryonic lethality and are important in the etiology of vascular diseases. Here we review the underlying molecular mechanisms of endothelial cell differentiation, plasticity, and the development of the vasculature. This review focuses on the interplay among transcription factors and signaling molecules that specify the differentiation of vascular endothelial cells. We also discuss recent progress on reprogramming of somatic cells towards distinct endothelial cell lineages and its promise in regenerative vascular medicine. PMID:23661712

  5. Differential regulation of mouse and human nephron progenitors by the Six family of transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Lori L; Guo, Qiuyu; Lee, YoungJin; Tran, Tracy; Benazet, Jean-Denis; Whitney, Peter H; Valouev, Anton; McMahon, Andrew P

    2016-02-15

    Nephron endowment is determined by the self-renewal and induction of a nephron progenitor pool established at the onset of kidney development. In the mouse, the related transcriptional regulators Six1 and Six2 play non-overlapping roles in nephron progenitors. Transient Six1 activity prefigures, and is essential for, active nephrogenesis. By contrast, Six2 maintains later progenitor self-renewal from the onset of nephrogenesis. We compared the regulatory actions of Six2 in mouse and human nephron progenitors by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq). Surprisingly, SIX1 was identified as a SIX2 target unique to the human nephron progenitors. Furthermore, RNA-seq and immunostaining revealed overlapping SIX1 and SIX2 activity in 16 week human fetal nephron progenitors. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of human SIX1 and SIX2 ChIP-seq showed each factor targeted a similar set of cis-regulatory modules binding an identical target recognition motif. In contrast to the mouse where Six2 binds its own enhancers but does not interact with DNA around Six1, both human SIX1 and SIX2 bind homologous SIX2 enhancers and putative enhancers positioned around SIX1. Transgenic analysis of a putative human SIX1 enhancer in the mouse revealed a transient, mouse-like, pre-nephrogenic, Six1 regulatory pattern. Together, these data demonstrate a divergence in SIX-factor regulation between mouse and human nephron progenitors. In the human, an auto/cross-regulatory loop drives continued SIX1 and SIX2 expression during active nephrogenesis. By contrast, the mouse establishes only an auto-regulatory Six2 loop. These data suggest differential SIX-factor regulation might have contributed to species differences in nephron progenitor programs such as the duration of nephrogenesis and the final nephron count.

  6. Genes regulated by AoXlnR, the xylanolytic and cellulolytic transcriptional regulator, in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yuji; Sano, Motoaki; Kanamaru, Kyoko; Ko, Taro; Takeuchi, Michio; Kato, Masashi; Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2009-11-01

    XlnR is a Zn(II)2Cys6 transcriptional activator of xylanolytic and cellulolytic genes in Aspergillus. Overexpression of the aoxlnR gene in Aspergillus oryzae (A. oryzae xlnR gene) resulted in elevated xylanolytic and cellulolytic activities in the culture supernatant, in which nearly 40 secreted proteins were detected by two-dimensional electrophoresis. DNA microarray analysis to identify the transcriptional targets of AoXlnR led to the identification of 75 genes that showed more than fivefold increase in their expression in the AoXlnR overproducer than in the disruptant. Of these, 32 genes were predicted to encode a glycoside hydrolase, highlighting the biotechnological importance of AoXlnR in biomass degradation. The 75 genes included the genes previously identified as AoXlnR targets (xynF1, xynF3, xynG2, xylA, celA, celB, celC, and celD). Thirty-six genes were predicted to be extracellular, which was consistent with the number of proteins secreted, and 61 genes possessed putative XlnR-binding sites (5'-GGCTAA-3', 5'-GGCTAG-3', and 5'-GGCTGA-3') in their promoter regions. Functional annotation of the genes revealed that AoXlnR regulated the expression of hydrolytic genes for degradation of beta-1,4-xylan, arabinoxylan, cellulose, and xyloglucan and of catabolic genes for the conversion of D-xylose to xylulose-5-phosphate. In addition, genes encoding glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase and L-arabinitol-4- dehydrogenase involved in D-glucose and L-arabinose catabolism also appeared to be targets of AoXlnR.

  7. Mutational analysis of the redox-sensitive transcriptional regulator OxyR: regions important for oxidation and transcriptional activation.

    PubMed Central

    Kullik, I; Toledano, M B; Tartaglia, L A; Storz, G

    1995-01-01

    OxyR is a redox-sensitive transcriptional regulator of the LysR family which activates the expression of genes important for the defense against hydrogen peroxide in Escherichia coli and Samonella typhimurium. OxyR is sensitive to oxidation and reduction, and only oxidized OxyR is able to activate transcription of its target genes. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that one cysteine residue (C-199) is critical for the redox sensitivity of OxyR, and a C-199-->S mutation appears to lock the OxyR protein in the reduced form. We also used a random mutagenesis approach to isolate eight constitutively active mutants. All of the mutations are located in the C-terminal half of the protein, and four of the mutations map near the critical C-199 residue. In vivo as well as in vitro transcription experiments showed that the constitutive mutant proteins were able to activate transcription under both oxidizing and reducing conditions, and DNase I footprints showed that this activation is due to the ability of the mutant proteins to induce cooperative binding of RNA polymerase. Unexpectedly, RNA polymerase was also found to reciprocally affect OxyR binding. PMID:7868602

  8. Regulation of transcription factors by nitric oxide in neurons and in neural-derived tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a diffusible molecule acting as an intercellular and intracellular messenger in many tissues, plays multiple roles in the nervous system. In addition to regulating proliferation, survival and differentiation of neurons, NO is also involved in synaptic activity, neural plasticity and memory formation. Long-lasting effects of NO, a simple and unstable molecule, occur through regulation of transcription factors and modulation of gene expression. cAMP-response-element-binding (CREB) protein is an important transcription factor that regulates the expression of several genes involved in survival and neuroprotection as well as in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Nitric oxide promotes survival and differentiation of neural cells, both activating through cGMP signaling CREB phosphorylation-dependent transcriptional activity and promoting S-nitrosylation of nuclear proteins that favor CREB binding to its promoters on target genes. Among oncogenic transcription factors, N-Myc is important in neurogenesis and in regulating proliferation of neural-derived tumor cells, such as neuroblastomas and medulloblastomas. Nitric oxide negatively regulates the proliferation of neuronal precursors, as well as the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells, by downregulating N-Myc expression through cGMP signaling. Other oncogenic transcription factors, such as c-fos and c-jun, zinc-finger transcription factors, such as egr-1, and NF-kappaB are regulated by NO signaling in cGMP-dependent way or through nitrosative conformational changes. The present survey of how NO signaling influences neural cells through regulation of transcription factors allows us to predict that better knowledge of these interactions will provide a better understanding of the physiological role of NO in the nervous system in order to conceive novel therapies for neural-derived tumors.

  9. Regulation of transcription factors by nitric oxide in neurons and in neural-derived tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a diffusible molecule acting as an intercellular and intracellular messenger in many tissues, plays multiple roles in the nervous system. In addition to regulating proliferation, survival and differentiation of neurons, NO is also involved in synaptic activity, neural plasticity and memory formation. Long-lasting effects of NO, a simple and unstable molecule, occur through regulation of transcription factors and modulation of gene expression. cAMP-response-element-binding (CREB) protein is an important transcription factor that regulates the expression of several genes involved in survival and neuroprotection as well as in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Nitric oxide promotes survival and differentiation of neural cells, both activating through cGMP signaling CREB phosphorylation-dependent transcriptional activity and promoting S-nitrosylation of nuclear proteins that favor CREB binding to its promoters on target genes. Among oncogenic transcription factors, N-Myc is important in neurogenesis and in regulating proliferation of neural-derived tumor cells, such as neuroblastomas and medulloblastomas. Nitric oxide negatively regulates the proliferation of neuronal precursors, as well as the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells, by downregulating N-Myc expression through cGMP signaling. Other oncogenic transcription factors, such as c-fos and c-jun, zinc-finger transcription factors, such as egr-1, and NF-kappaB are regulated by NO signaling in cGMP-dependent way or through nitrosative conformational changes. The present survey of how NO signaling influences neural cells through regulation of transcription factors allows us to predict that better knowledge of these interactions will provide a better understanding of the physiological role of NO in the nervous system in order to conceive novel therapies for neural-derived tumors. PMID:18308460

  10. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis, patterned deposition and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Secondary walls are mainly composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses (xylan and glucomannan) and lignin, and are deposited in some specialized cells, such as tracheary elements, fibers and other sclerenchymatous cells. Secondary walls provide strength to these cells, which lend mechanical support and protection to the plant body and, in the case of tracheary elements, enable them to function as conduits for transporting water. Formation of secondary walls is a complex process that requires the co-ordinated expression of secondary wall biosynthetic genes, biosynthesis and targeted secretion of secondary wall components, and patterned deposition and assembly of secondary walls. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of genes involved in secondary wall biosynthesis and deposition. Most of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary wall components, including cellulose, xylan, glucomannan and lignin, have been identified and their co-ordinated activation has been shown to be mediated by a transcriptional network encompassing the secondary wall NAC and MYB master switches and their downstream transcription factors. It has been demonstrated that cortical microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins play important roles in the targeted secretion of cellulose synthase complexes, the oriented deposition of cellulose microfibrils and the patterned deposition of secondary walls. Further investigation of many secondary wall-associated genes with unknown functions will provide new insights into the mechanisms controlling the formation of secondary walls that constitute the bulk of plant biomass.

  11. CCAT: Combinatorial Code Analysis Tool for transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Peng; Singh, Mona

    2014-01-01

    Combinatorial interplay among transcription factors (TFs) is an important mechanism by which transcriptional regulatory specificity is achieved. However, despite the increasing number of TFs for which either binding specificities or genome-wide occupancy data are known, knowledge about cooperativity between TFs remains limited. To address this, we developed a computational framework for predicting genome-wide co-binding between TFs (CCAT, Combinatorial Code Analysis Tool), and applied it to Drosophila melanogaster to uncover cooperativity among TFs during embryo development. Using publicly available TF binding specificity data and DNaseI chromatin accessibility data, we first predicted genome-wide binding sites for 324 TFs across five stages of D. melanogaster embryo development. We then applied CCAT in each of these developmental stages, and identified from 19 to 58 pairs of TFs in each stage whose predicted binding sites are significantly co-localized. We found that nearby binding sites for pairs of TFs predicted to cooperate were enriched in regions bound in relevant ChIP experiments, and were more evolutionarily conserved than other pairs. Further, we found that TFs tend to be co-localized with other TFs in a dynamic manner across developmental stages. All generated data as well as source code for our front-to-end pipeline are available at http://cat.princeton.edu. PMID:24366875

  12. Membrane estrogen receptors: genomic actions and post transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Julie; Sebastian, K S; Devassy, Sony; Priyadarsini, Lakshmi; Farook, Mohamed Febin; Shameem, A; Mathew, Deepa; Sreeja, S; Thampan, Raghava Varman

    2006-02-26

    The primary cellular location of the nuclear estrogen receptor II (nER II) is the plasma membrane. A number of reports that have appeared in the recent past indicate that plasma membrane localized estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) also exists. Whether the membrane localized ERalpha represents the receptor that binds to the estrogen responsive element (ERE) remains to be known. The mechanisms that underlie the internalization of nER II (non-activated estrogen receptor, deglycosylated) have been identified to a certain extent. The question remains: is the primary location of the ERalpha also the plasma membrane? If that is the case, it will be a challenging task to identify the molecular events that underlie the plasma membrane-to-nucleus movement of ERalpha. The internalization mechanisms for the two 66kDa plasma membrane ERs, following hormone binding, appear to be distinct and without any overlaps. Interestingly, while the major gene regulatory role for ERalpha appears to be at the level of transcription, the nER II has its major functional role in post transcriptional mechanisms. The endoplasmic reticulum associated anchor protein-55 (ap55) that was recently reported from the author's laboratory needs a closer look. It is a high affinity estrogen binding protein that anchors the estrogen receptor activation factor (E-RAF) in an estrogen-mediated event. It will be interesting to examine whether ap55 bears any structural similarity with either ERalpha or ERbeta. PMID:16423448

  13. The transcription factor, the Cdk, its cyclin and their regulator: directing the transcriptional response to a nutritional signal.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, K; Fisher, F; McAndrew, P C; Goding, C R

    1994-01-01

    The Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex prevents transcription of PHO5 by inhibiting the ability of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor Pho4 to activate transcription in response to high phosphate conditions. In low phosphate the Pho80-Pho85 complex is inactivated and Pho4 is then able to activate the acid phosphatase gene PHO5. We show here that Pho4 and the homeobox protein Pho2 interact in vivo and act cooperatively to activate the PHO5 UAS, with interaction being regulated by the phosphate switch. In addition, we also demonstrate that an additional factor, Pho81, interacts in high phosphate with both the Pho80 cyclin and with Pho4. In low phosphate, Pho80 and Pho81 dissociate from Pho4, but retain the ability to interact with each other. The evidence presented here supports the idea that Pho81 acts as a phosphate-sensitive trigger that regulates the ability of the Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex to bind Pho4, while DNA binding by Pho4 is dependent on the phosphate-sensitive interaction with Pho2. Images PMID:7957107

  14. Promoter-like sequences regulating transcriptional activity in neurexin and neuroligin genes.

    PubMed

    Runkel, Fabian; Rohlmann, Astrid; Reissner, Carsten; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Missler, Markus

    2013-10-01

    Synapse function requires the cell-adhesion molecules neurexins (Nrxn) and neuroligins (Nlgn). Although these molecules are essential for neurotransmission and prefer distinct isoform combinations for interaction, little is known about their transcriptional regulation. Here, we started to explore this important aspect because expression of Nrxn1-3 and Nlgn1-3 genes is altered in mice lacking the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein2 (MeCP2). Since MeCP2 can bind to methylated CpG-dinucleotides and Nrxn/Nlgn contain CpG-islands, we tested genomic sequences for transcriptional activity in reporter gene assays. We found that their influence on transcription are differentially activating or inhibiting. As we observed an activity difference between heterologous and neuronal cell lines for distinct Nrxn1 and Nlgn2 sequences, we dissected their putative promoter regions. In both genes, we identify regions in exon1 that can induce transcription, in addition to the alternative transcriptional start points in exon2. While the 5'-regions of Nrxn1 and Nlgn2 contain two CpG-rich elements that show distinct methylation frequency and binding to MeCP2, other regions may act independently of this transcriptional regulator. These data provide first insights into regulatory sequences of Nrxn and Nlgn genes that may represent an important aspect of their function at synapses in health and disease.

  15. Zinc regulates a key transcriptional pathway for epileptogenesis via metal-regulatory transcription factor 1

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Karen M. J.; Schaub, Christina; Pitsch, Julika; Kulbida, Rebecca; Opitz, Thoralf; Ekstein, Dana; Dalal, Adam; Urbach, Horst; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common focal seizure disorder in adults. In many patients, transient brain insults, including status epilepticus (SE), are followed by a latent period of epileptogenesis, preceding the emergence of clinical seizures. In experimental animals, transcriptional upregulation of CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+-channels, resulting in an increased propensity for burst discharges of hippocampal neurons, is an important trigger for epileptogenesis. Here we provide evidence that the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1) mediates the increase of CaV3.2 mRNA and intrinsic excitability consequent to a rise in intracellular Zn2+ that is associated with SE. Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) transfer of MTF1 into murine hippocampi leads to increased CaV3.2 mRNA. Conversely, rAAV-mediated expression of a dominant-negative MTF1 abolishes SE-induced CaV3.2 mRNA upregulation and attenuates epileptogenesis. Finally, data from resected human hippocampi surgically treated for pharmacoresistant TLE support the Zn2+-MTF1-CaV3.2 cascade, thus providing new vistas for preventing and treating TLE. PMID:26498180

  16. Describing a Transcription Factor Dependent Regulation of the MicroRNA Transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Rozovski, Uri; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Calin, George; Harris, David; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhiming; Keating, Michael J; Estrov, Zeev

    2016-01-01

    While the transcription regulation of protein coding genes was extensively studied, little is known on how transcription factors are involved in transcription of non-coding RNAs, specifically of microRNAs. Here, we propose a strategy to study the potential role of transcription factor in regulating transcription of microRNAs using publically available data, computational resources and high throughput data. We use the H3K4me3 epigenetic signature to identify microRNA promoters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-sequencing data from the ENCODE project to identify microRNA promoters that are enriched with transcription factor binding sites. By transfecting cells of interest with shRNA targeting a transcription factor of interest and subjecting the cells to microRNA array, we study the effect of this transcription factor on the microRNA transcriptome. As an illustrative example we use our study on the effect of STAT3 on the microRNA transcriptome of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. PMID:27341356

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes during serum starvation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ojha, Sandeep; Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves all three RNA polymerases which are co-ordinately regulated to produce equimolar amounts of rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (RPs). Unlike model organisms where transcription of rRNA and RP genes slows down during stress, in E. histolytica rDNA transcription continues but pre-rRNA processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during serum starvation. To investigate the regulation of RP genes under stress we measured transcription of six selected RP genes from the small- and large-ribosomal subunits (RPS6, RPS3, RPS19, RPL5, RPL26, RPL30) representing the early-, mid-, and late-stages of ribosomal assembly. Transcripts of these genes persisted in growth-stressed cells. Expression of luciferase reporter under the control of two RP genes (RPS19 and RPL30) was studied during serum starvation and upon serum replenishment. Although luciferase transcript levels remained unchanged during starvation, luciferase activity steadily declined to 7.8% and 15% of control cells, respectively. After serum replenishment the activity increased to normal levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Mutations in the sequence -2 to -9 upstream of AUG in the RPL30 gene resulted in the phenotype expected of post-transcriptional regulation. Transcription of luciferase reporter was unaffected in this mutant, and luciferase activity did not decline during serum starvation, showing that this sequence is required to repress translation of RPL30 mRNA, and mutations in this region relieve repression. Our data show that during serum starvation E. histolytica blocks ribosome biogenesis post-transcriptionally by inhibiting pre-rRNA processing on the one hand, and the translation of RP mRNAs on the other.

  18. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation by Pho23 Modulates the Frequency of Autophagosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Meiyan; He, Ding; Backues, Steven K.; Freeberg, Mallory A.; Liu, Xu; Kim, John K.; Klionsky, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Autophagy as a conserved lysosomal/vacuolar degradation and recycling pathway is important in normal development and physiology, and defects in this process are linked to many kinds of disease. Because too much or too little autophagy can be detrimental, the process must be tightly regulated both temporally and in magnitude. Two parameters that affect this regulation are the size and the number of autophagosomes; however, although we know that the amount of Atg8 affects the size of autophagosomes, the mechanism for regulating their number has not been elucidated. The transcriptional induction and repression of the autophagy-related (ATG) genes is one crucial aspect of autophagy regulation, but the transcriptional regulators that modulate autophagy are not well characterized. Results We detected increased expression levels of ATG genes, and elevated autophagy activity, in cells lacking the transcriptional regulator Pho23. Using transmission electron microscopy, we found that PHO23 null mutant cells contain significantly more autophagosomes than the wild-type. By RNA sequencing transcriptome profiling, we identified ATG9 as one of the key targets of Pho23, and our studies with strains expressing modulated levels of Atg9 show that the amount of this protein directly correlates with the frequency of autophagosome formation and the level of autophagy activity. Conclusions Our results identified Pho23 as a master transcriptional repressor for autophagy that regulates the frequency of autophagosome formation through its negative regulation of ATG9. PMID:24881874

  20. Deciphering the Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning the Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression by Master Transcriptional Regulators in Arabidopsis Seed.

    PubMed

    Baud, Sébastien; Kelemen, Zsolt; Thévenin, Johanne; Boulard, Céline; Blanchet, Sandrine; To, Alexandra; Payre, Manon; Berger, Nathalie; Effroy-Cuzzi, Delphine; Franco-Zorrilla, Jose Manuel; Godoy, Marta; Solano, Roberto; Thevenon, Emmanuel; Parcy, François; Lepiniec, Loïc; Dubreucq, Bertrand

    2016-06-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), transcriptional control of seed maturation involves three related regulators with a B3 domain, namely LEAFY COTYLEDON2 (LEC2), ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3), and FUSCA3 (ABI3/FUS3/LEC2 [AFLs]). Although genetic analyses have demonstrated partially overlapping functions of these regulators, the underlying molecular mechanisms remained elusive. The results presented here confirmed that the three proteins bind RY DNA elements (with a 5'-CATG-3' core sequence) but with different specificities for flanking nucleotides. In planta as in the moss Physcomitrella patens protoplasts, the presence of RY-like (RYL) elements is necessary but not sufficient for the regulation of the OLEOSIN1 (OLE1) promoter by the B3 AFLs. G box-like domains, located in the vicinity of the RYL elements, also are required for proper activation of the promoter, suggesting that several proteins are involved. Consistent with this idea, LEC2 and ABI3 showed synergistic effects on the activation of the OLE1 promoter. What is more, LEC1 (a homolog of the NF-YB subunit of the CCAAT-binding complex) further enhanced the activation of this target promoter in the presence of LEC2 and ABI3. Finally, recombinant LEC1 and LEC2 proteins produced in Arabidopsis protoplasts could form a ternary complex with NF-YC2 in vitro, providing a molecular explanation for their functional interactions. Taken together, these results allow us to propose a molecular model for the transcriptional regulation of seed genes by the L-AFL proteins, based on the formation of regulatory multiprotein complexes between NF-YBs, which carry a specific aspartate-55 residue, and B3 transcription factors. PMID:27208266

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by Piwi proteins and piRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Lin, Haifan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Piwi proteins and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are essential for gametogenesis, embryogenesis, and stem cell maintenance in animals. Piwi proteins act on transposon RNAs by cleaving the RNAs and by interacting with factors involved in RNA regulation. Additionally, piRNAs generated from transposons and psuedogenes can be used by Piwi proteins to regulate mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we discuss piRNA biogenesis, recent findings on post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs by the piRNA pathway, and the potential importance of this post-transcriptional regulation for a variety of biological processes such as gametogenesis, developmental transitions, and sex determination. PMID:25280102

  2. A novel transcript is up-regulated by fasting in the hypothalamus and enhances insulin signalling.

    PubMed

    Chai, B; Li, J-Y; Fritze, D; Zhang, W; Xia, Z; Mulholland, M W

    2013-03-01

    A transcript of unknown function, regulated by fasting and feeding, was identified by microarray analysis. The transcript is up-regulated in the fasting state. An 1168-bp cDNA was cloned from rat hypothalamus and sequenced. This sequence is consistent with adipogenesis down-regulating transcript 3 (AGD3) (also known as human OCC-1) mRNA. A protein sequence identical to AGD3 was determined by mass spectrometry. In the rat brain, AGD3 mRNA is distributed in the arcuate nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamus, amygdaloid nuclei, hippocampus, and somatic cortex. Double in situ hybridisation showed that AGD3 mRNA is co-localised with pro-opiomelanocortin and neuropeptide Y in arcuate nucleus neurones. AGD3 binds with insulin receptor substrate 4 and increases insulin-stimulated phospho-Akt and regulates AMP-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin downstream target S6 kinase phosphorylation.

  3. Phosphorylation of trihelix transcriptional repressor ASR3 by MAP KINASE4 negatively regulates Arabidopsis immunity.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Xiao; Cheng, Cheng; Chen, Sixue; Cheng, Yanbing; Yuan, Joshua S; Jiang, Daohong; He, Ping; Shan, Libo

    2015-03-01

    Proper control of immune-related gene expression is crucial for the host to launch an effective defense response. Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) induces rapid and profound transcriptional reprogramming via unclear mechanisms. Here, we show that ASR3 (ARABIDOPSIS SH4-RELATED3) functions as a transcriptional repressor and plays a negative role in regulating pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) in Arabidopsis thaliana. ASR3 belongs to a plant-specific trihelix transcription factor family for which functional studies are lacking. MAMP treatments induce rapid phosphorylation of ASR3 at threonine 189 via MPK4, a mitogen-activated protein kinase that negatively regulates PTI responses downstream of multiple MAMP receptors. ASR3 possesses transcriptional repressor activity via its ERF-associated amphiphilic repression motifs and negatively regulates a large subset of flg22-induced genes. Phosphorylation of ASR3 by MPK4 enhances its DNA binding activity to suppress gene expression. Importantly, the asr3 mutant shows enhanced disease resistance to virulent bacterial pathogen infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing the wild-type or phospho-mimetic form of ASR3 exhibit compromised PTI responses. Our studies reveal a function of the trihelix transcription factors in plant innate immunity and provide evidence that ASR3 functions as a transcriptional repressor regulated by MAMP-activated MPK4 to fine-tune plant immune gene expression.

  4. Circadian genomics reveal a role for post-transcriptional regulation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Shihoko; Green, Carla B

    2015-01-20

    To maintain daily cycles, the circadian clock must tightly regulate the rhythms of thousands of mRNAs and proteins with the correct period, phase, and amplitude to ultimately drive the wide range of rhythmic biological processes. Recent genomic approaches have revolutionized our view of circadian gene expression and highlighted the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in driving mRNA rhythmicity. Even after transcripts are made from DNA, subsequent processing and regulatory steps determine when, where, and how much protein will be generated. These post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms can add flexibility to overall gene expression and alter protein levels rapidly without requiring transcript synthesis and are therefore beneficial for cells; however, the extent to which circadian post-transcriptional mechanisms contribute to rhythmic profiles throughout the genome and the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. In this review, we will summarize how circadian genomics have revealed new insights into rhythmic post-transcriptional regulation in mammals and discuss potential implications of such regulation in controlling many circadian-driven physiologies.

  5. eQTL Regulating Transcript Levels Associated with Diverse Biological Processes in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Aashish; Budke, Jessica M; Rowland, Steven D; Chitwood, Daniel H; Kumar, Ravi; Carriedo, Leonela; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Zumstein, Kristina; Maloof, Julin N; Sinha, Neelima R

    2016-09-01

    Variation in gene expression, in addition to sequence polymorphisms, is known to influence developmental, physiological, and metabolic traits in plants. Genetic mapping populations have facilitated identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), the genetic determinants of variation in gene expression patterns. We used an introgression population developed from the wild desert-adapted Solanum pennellii and domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to identify the genetic basis of transcript level variation. We established the effect of each introgression on the transcriptome and identified approximately 7,200 eQTL regulating the steady-state transcript levels of 5,300 genes. Barnes-Hut t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding clustering identified 42 modules revealing novel associations between transcript level patterns and biological processes. The results showed a complex genetic architecture of global transcript abundance pattern in tomato. Several genetic hot spots regulating a large number of transcript level patterns relating to diverse biological processes such as plant defense and photosynthesis were identified. Important eQTL regulating transcript level patterns were related to leaf number and complexity as well as hypocotyl length. Genes associated with leaf development showed an inverse correlation with photosynthetic gene expression, but eQTL regulating genes associated with leaf development and photosynthesis were dispersed across the genome. This comprehensive eQTL analysis details the influence of these loci on plant phenotypes and will be a valuable community resource for investigations on the genetic effects of eQTL on phenotypic traits in tomato. PMID:27418589

  6. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Morgan A.; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L.

    2016-01-01

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription. PMID:27334938

  7. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription.

    PubMed

    Sammons, Morgan A; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L

    2016-08-09

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription.

  8. eQTL Regulating Transcript Levels Associated with Diverse Biological Processes in Tomato1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Budke, Jessica M.; Rowland, Steven D.; Kumar, Ravi; Ichihashi, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Variation in gene expression, in addition to sequence polymorphisms, is known to influence developmental, physiological, and metabolic traits in plants. Genetic mapping populations have facilitated identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), the genetic determinants of variation in gene expression patterns. We used an introgression population developed from the wild desert-adapted Solanum pennellii and domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to identify the genetic basis of transcript level variation. We established the effect of each introgression on the transcriptome and identified approximately 7,200 eQTL regulating the steady-state transcript levels of 5,300 genes. Barnes-Hut t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding clustering identified 42 modules revealing novel associations between transcript level patterns and biological processes. The results showed a complex genetic architecture of global transcript abundance pattern in tomato. Several genetic hot spots regulating a large number of transcript level patterns relating to diverse biological processes such as plant defense and photosynthesis were identified. Important eQTL regulating transcript level patterns were related to leaf number and complexity as well as hypocotyl length. Genes associated with leaf development showed an inverse correlation with photosynthetic gene expression, but eQTL regulating genes associated with leaf development and photosynthesis were dispersed across the genome. This comprehensive eQTL analysis details the influence of these loci on plant phenotypes and will be a valuable community resource for investigations on the genetic effects of eQTL on phenotypic traits in tomato. PMID:27418589

  9. A bHLH transcription factor regulates iron intake under Fe deficiency in chrysanthemum

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency can represent a serious constraint on crop growth and productivity. A number of members of the bHLH transcription factor family are known to be involved in the plant Fe deficiency response. Plants have evolved two distinct uptake strategies when challenged by Fe deficiency: dicotyledonous and non-graminaceous species rely mostly on a reduction strategy regulated by bHLH transcription factors, whereas rice relies on a chelation strategy, also regulated by bHLH transcription factors. CmbHLH1, a bHLH transcription factor which is localized within the nucleus, was isolated from chrysanthemum. Its transcription was up-regulated both by Fe deficiency and by the exogenous application of abscisic acid. The roots of transgenic chrysanthemum plants in which CmbHLH1 was up-regulated were better able than those of the wild type chrysanthemum cultivar to acidify their immediate external environment by enhancing the transcription of the H+-ATPase encoding gene CmHA. However, there was no effect of the transgene on the efficiency of uptake of either manganese or zinc. Here, Chrysanthemum CmbHLH1 contributed to Fe uptake via H+-ATPase mediated acidification of the rhizosphere. ABA may be positively involved in the process. PMID:25341738

  10. Sp100A promotes chromatin decondensation at a cytomegalovirus-promoter–regulated transcription site

    PubMed Central

    Newhart, Alyshia; Negorev, Dmitri G.; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Yang, Tian; Maul, Gerd G.; Janicki, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs)/nuclear domain 10s (ND10s) are nuclear structures that contain many transcriptional and chromatin regulatory factors. One of these, Sp100, is expressed from a single-copy gene and spliced into four isoforms (A, B, C, and HMG), which differentially regulate transcription. Here we evaluate Sp100 function in single cells using an inducible cytomegalovirus-promoter–regulated transgene, visualized as a chromatinized transcription site. Sp100A is the isoform most strongly recruited to the transgene array, and it significantly increases chromatin decondensation. However, Sp100A cannot overcome Daxx- and α-thalassemia mental retardation, X-linked (ATRX)–mediated transcriptional repression, which indicates that PML-NB/ND10 factors function within a regulatory hierarchy. Sp100A increases and Sp100B, which contains a SAND domain, decreases acetyl-lysine regulatory factor levels at activated sites, suggesting that Sp100 isoforms differentially regulate transcription by modulating lysine acetylation. In contrast to Daxx, ATRX, and PML, Sp100 is recruited to activated arrays in cells expressing the herpes simplex virus type 1 E3 ubiquitin ligase, ICP0, which degrades all Sp100 isoforms except unsumoylated Sp100A. The recruitment Sp100A(K297R), which cannot be sumoylated, further suggests that sumoylation plays an important role in regulating Sp100 isoform levels at transcription sites. This study provides insight into the ways in which viruses may modulate Sp100 to promote their replication cycles. PMID:23485562

  11. Circadian Genomics Reveal a Role for Post-transcriptional Regulation in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To maintain daily cycles, the circadian clock must tightly regulate the rhythms of thousands of mRNAs and proteins with the correct period, phase, and amplitude to ultimately drive the wide range of rhythmic biological processes. Recent genomic approaches have revolutionized our view of circadian gene expression and highlighted the importance of post-transcriptional regulation in driving mRNA rhythmicity. Even after transcripts are made from DNA, subsequent processing and regulatory steps determine when, where, and how much protein will be generated. These post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms can add flexibility to overall gene expression and alter protein levels rapidly without requiring transcript synthesis and are therefore beneficial for cells; however, the extent to which circadian post-transcriptional mechanisms contribute to rhythmic profiles throughout the genome and the mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. In this review, we will summarize how circadian genomics have revealed new insights into rhythmic post-transcriptional regulation in mammals and discuss potential implications of such regulation in controlling many circadian-driven physiologies. PMID:25303020

  12. Arabidopsis TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA2 is directly regulated by R2R3 MYB transcription factors and is involved in regulation of GLABRA2 transcription in epidermal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Tetsuya; Hattori, Sayoko; Sano, Ryosuke; Inoue, Kayoko; Shirano, Yumiko; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Shibata, Daisuke; Sato, Shusei; Kato, Tomohiko; Tabata, Satoshi; Okada, Kiyotaka; Wada, Takuji

    2007-08-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA2 (TTG2) encodes a WRKY transcription factor and is expressed in young leaves, trichomes, seed coats, and root hairless cells. An examination of several trichome and root hair mutants indicates that MYB and bHLH genes regulate TTG2 expression. Two MYB binding sites in the TTG2 5' regulatory region act as cis regulatory elements and as direct targets of R2R3 MYB transcription factors such as WEREWOLF, GLABRA1, and TRANSPARENT TESTA2. Mutations in TTG2 cause phenotypic defects in trichome development and seed color pigmentation. Transgenic plants expressing a chimeric repressor version of the TTG2 protein (TTG2:SRDX) showed defects in trichome formation, anthocyanin accumulation, seed color pigmentation, and differentiation of root hairless cells. GLABRA2 (GL2) expression was markedly reduced in roots of ProTTG2:TTG2:SRDX transgenic plants, suggesting that TTG2 is involved in the regulation of GL2 expression, although GL2 expression in the ttg2 mutant was similar to that in the wild type. Our analysis suggests a new step in a regulatory cascade of epidermal differentiation, in which complexes containing R2R3 MYB and bHLH transcription factors regulate the expression of TTG2, which then regulates GL2 expression with complexes containing R2R3 MYB and bHLH in the differentiation of trichomes and root hairless cells.

  13. Biophysics and bioinformatics of transcription regulation in bacteria and bacteriophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, Marko

    2005-11-01

    Due to rapid accumulation of biological data, bioinformatics has become a very important branch of biological research. In this thesis, we develop novel bioinformatic approaches and aid design of biological experiments by using ideas and methods from statistical physics. Identification of transcription factor binding sites within the regulatory segments of genomic DNA is an important step towards understanding of the regulatory circuits that control expression of genes. We propose a novel, biophysics based algorithm, for the supervised detection of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. The method classifies potential binding sites by explicitly estimating the sequence-specific binding energy and the chemical potential of a given TF. In contrast with the widely used information theory based weight matrix method, our approach correctly incorporates saturation in the transcription factor/DNA binding probability. This results in a significant reduction in the number of expected false positives, and in the explicit appearance---and determination---of a binding threshold. The new method was used to identify likely genomic binding sites for the Escherichia coli TFs, and to examine the relationship between TF binding specificity and degree of pleiotropy (number of regulatory targets). We next address how parameters of protein-DNA interactions can be obtained from data on protein binding to random oligos under controlled conditions (SELEX experiment data). We show that 'robust' generation of an appropriate data set is achieved by a suitable modification of the standard SELEX procedure, and propose a novel bioinformatic algorithm for analysis of such data. Finally, we use quantitative data analysis, bioinformatic methods and kinetic modeling to analyze gene expression strategies of bacterial viruses. We study bacteriophage Xp10 that infects rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae. Xp10 is an unusual bacteriophage, which has morphology and genome organization that most closely

  14. Transcriptional Regulators Compete with Nucleosomes Post-replication.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Srinivas; Henikoff, Steven

    2016-04-21

    Every nucleosome across the genome must be disrupted and reformed when the replication fork passes, but how chromatin organization is re-established following replication is unknown. To address this problem, we have developed Mapping In vivo Nascent Chromatin with EdU and sequencing (MINCE-seq) to characterize the genome-wide location of nucleosomes and other chromatin proteins behind replication forks at high temporal and spatial resolution. We find that the characteristic chromatin landscape at Drosophila promoters and enhancers is lost upon replication. The most conspicuous changes are at promoters that have high levels of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) stalling and DNA accessibility and show specific enrichment for the BRM remodeler. Enhancer chromatin is also disrupted during replication, suggesting a role for transcription factor (TF) competition in nucleosome re-establishment. Thus, the characteristic nucleosome landscape emerges from a uniformly packaged genome by the action of TFs, RNAPII, and remodelers minutes after replication fork passage. PMID:27062929

  15. Transcriptional regulation of repressor synthesis in mycobacteriophage L5.

    PubMed

    Nesbit, C E; Levin, M E; Donnelly-Wu, M K; Hatfull, G F

    1995-09-01

    Mycobacteriophage L5 is a temperate phage of the mycobacteria that forms stable lysogens in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Lysogeny is maintained by the putative repressor, the gene 71 product, which also mediates immunity to superinfection. We show here that there are three promoters located upstream of gene 71 which are active in an L5 lysogen but which do not require any phage-encoded proteins. In early lytic growth, gene 71 is also transcribed from a promoter, Pleft, located at the right end of the genome and which appears to be a target of gp71 regulation. A model is given for the regulation of L5 life cycles. PMID:8594325

  16. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  17. Biosynthesis of milk fat, protein, and lactose: roles of transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Johan S; Lohakare, Jayant; Bionaz, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    The demand for high-quality milk is increasing worldwide. The efficiency of milk synthesis can be improved by taking advantage of the accumulated knowledge of the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of genes coding for proteins involved in the synthesis of fat, protein, and lactose in the mammary gland. Research in this area is relatively new, but data accumulated in the last 10 years provide a relatively clear picture. Milk fat synthesis appears to be regulated, at least in bovines, by an interactive network between SREBP1, PPARγ, and LXRα, with a potential role for other transcription factors, such as Spot14, ChREBP, and Sp1. Milk protein synthesis is highly regulated by insulin, amino acids, and amino acid transporters via transcriptional and posttranscriptional routes, with the insulin-mTOR pathway playing a central role. The transcriptional regulation of lactose synthesis is still poorly understood, but it is clear that glucose transporters play an important role. They can also cooperatively interact with amino acid transporters and the mTOR pathway. Recent data indicate the possibility of nutrigenomic interventions to increase milk fat synthesis by feeding long-chain fatty acids and milk protein synthesis by feeding amino acids. We propose a transcriptional network model to account for all available findings. This model encompasses a complex network of proteins that control milk synthesis with a cross talk between milk fat, protein, and lactose regulation, with mTOR functioning as a central hub.

  18. Sumoylation of Sir2 differentially regulates transcriptional silencing in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Abdul; Abraham, Neethu Maria; Goyal, Siddharth; Jamir, Imlitoshi; Priyakumar, U. Deva; Mishra, Krishnaveni

    2015-01-01

    Silent information regulator 2 (Sir2), the founding member of the conserved sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, regulates several physiological processes including genome stability, gene silencing, metabolism and life span in yeast. Within the nucleus, Sir2 is associated with telomere clusters in the nuclear periphery and rDNA in the nucleolus and regulates gene silencing at these genomic sites. How distribution of Sir2 between telomere and rDNA is regulated is not known. Here we show that Sir2 is sumoylated and this modification modulates the intra-nuclear distribution of Sir2. We identify Siz2 as the key SUMO ligase and show that multiple lysines in Sir2 are subject to this sumoylation activity. Mutating K215 alone counteracts the inhibitory effect of Siz2 on telomeric silencing. SUMO modification of Sir2 impairs interaction with Sir4 but not Net1 and, furthermore, SUMO modified Sir2 shows predominant nucleolar localization. Our findings demonstrate that sumoylation of Sir2 modulates distribution between telomeres and rDNA and this is likely to have implications for Sir2 function in other loci as well. PMID:26319015

  19. Nitrogen Fixation and Molecular Oxygen: Comparative Genomic Reconstruction of Transcription Regulation in Alphaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tsoy, Olga V.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics approach for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis.

  20. Acetylation of RNA Polymerase II Regulates Growth-Factor-Induced Gene Transcription in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Sebastian; Herker, Eva; Itzen, Friederike; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Gilchrist, Daniel A.; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Cho, Sungyoo; Pollard, Katherine S.; Capra, John A.; Schnölzer, Martina; Cole, Philip A.; Geyer, Matthias; Bruneau, Benoit G.; Adelman, Karen; Ott, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lysine acetylation regulates transcription by targeting histones and nonhistone proteins. Here we report that the central regulator of transcription, RNA polymerase II, is subject to acetylation in mammalian cells. Acetylation occurs at eight lysines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest polymerase subunit and is mediated by p300/KAT3B. CTD acetylation is specifically enriched downstream of the transcription start sites of polymerase-occupied genes genome-wide, indicating a role in early stages of transcription initiation or elongation. Mutation of lysines or p300 inhibitor treatment causes the loss of epidermal growth-factor-induced expression of c-Fos and Egr2, immediate-early genes with promoter-proximally paused polymerases, but does not affect expression or polymerase occupancy at housekeeping genes. Our studies identify acetylation as a new modification of the mammalian RNA polymerase II required for the induction of growth factor response genes. PMID:24207025

  1. Nitrogen Fixation and Molecular Oxygen: Comparative Genomic Reconstruction of Transcription Regulation in Alphaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Tsoy, Olga V; Ravcheev, Dmitry A; Čuklina, Jelena; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2016-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation plays a crucial role in the nitrogen cycle. An ability to fix atmospheric nitrogen, reducing it to ammonium, was described for multiple species of Bacteria and Archaea. The transcriptional regulatory network for nitrogen fixation was extensively studied in several representatives of the class Alphaproteobacteria. This regulatory network includes the activator of nitrogen fixation NifA, working in tandem with the alternative sigma-factor RpoN as well as oxygen-responsive regulatory systems, one-component regulators FnrN/FixK and two-component system FixLJ. Here we used a comparative genomics approach for in silico study of the transcriptional regulatory network in 50 genomes of Alphaproteobacteria. We extended the known regulons and proposed the scenario for the evolution of the nitrogen fixation transcriptional network. The reconstructed network substantially expands the existing knowledge of transcriptional regulation in nitrogen-fixing microorganisms and can be used for genetic experiments, metabolic reconstruction, and evolutionary analysis.

  2. The transcription factor GFI1 negatively regulates NLRP3 inflammasome activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liuluan; Meng, Qingcai; Liang, Shuntao; Ma, Yaluan; Li, Rui; Li, Guoli; Zeng, Hui

    2014-11-28

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion downstream of Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation is tightly controlled at the transcriptional and post-translational levels. NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in the maturation of pro-IL-1β, with NLRP3 expression identified as the limiting factor for inflammasome activation. Previously, we had demonstrated that the zinc-finger protein GFI1 inhibits pro-IL-1β transcription. Here, we show that GFI1 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion in macrophages. GFI1 suppressed Nlrp3 transcription via two mechanisms: (1) by binding to the Gli-responsive element 1 (GRE1) in the Nlrp3 promoter; and (2) by antagonizing the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity. Thus, GFI1 negatively regulates TLR-mediated IL-1β production at both transcriptional and post-translational levels.

  3. A distance difference matrix approach to identifying transcription factors that regulate differential gene expression

    PubMed Central

    De Bleser, Pieter; Hooghe, Bart; Vlieghe, Dominique; van Roy, Frans

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a method that considers target genes of a transcription factor, and searches for transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of secondary factors responsible for differential responses among these targets. Based on the distance difference matrix concept, the method simultaneously integrates statistical overrepresentation and co-occurrence of TFBSs. Our approach is validated on datasets of differentially regulated human genes and is shown to be highly effective in detecting TFBSs responsible for the observed differential gene expression. PMID:17504544

  4. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effect of global regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Michael Rex; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Syed, Mustafa H; Beliaev, Alexander S; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TFs) that influence the expression of many genes. Global regulators, including CRP (cAMP Receptor Protein), ArcA, and FNR, can modulate the transcriptional activity of multiple operons. The similarity of a regulatory element s sequence to a TF s consensus binding site (BS) and the position of the regulatory element in an operon promoter are considered the most important determinants of this TF s regulatory influence. In this study we explore the hypothesis that the number of TFBS half-sites (where a half-site is one half of the palindromic BS consensus sequence, which we shall refer to as a binding motif or a BM) of a global regulator in an operon s promoter plays an important role in the operon s transcriptional regulation. We examine empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP regulon in Shewanella oneidenses MR 1 and Escherichia coli, and of the ArcA regulon in S. oneidenses MR 1. We compare the power of CRP BM counts and of full, symmetrical CRP TFBS characteristics, namely similarity to consensus and location, to predict CRP-induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full-length TFBS quality or location. Regression analysis indicates that IHF (Integration Host Factor) and ArcA have synergistic effects on CRP-induced gene transcription, positive and negative, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that the fine-tuning of bacterial transcriptional activity by CRP may involves not only the bending of the operon promoter, facilitated by CRP in cooperation with the histone-like protein IHF, but also the cumulative binding affinity of multiple weak BMs.

  5. A guide to integrating transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks using PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism).

    PubMed

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    The integration of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is a crucial step in the process of predicting metabolic behaviors that emerge from either genetic or environmental changes. Here, we present a guide to PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism), an automated method for the construction and simulation of integrated metabolic and transcriptional regulatory networks that enables large-scale phenotypic predictions for a wide range of model organisms.

  6. Transcription Factor Tfe3 Directly Regulates Pgc-1alpha in Muscle.

    PubMed

    Salma, Nunciada; Song, Jun S; Arany, Zoltan; Fisher, David E

    2015-10-01

    The microphthalmia (MiT) family of transcription factors is an important mediator of metabolism. Family members Mitf and Tfeb directly regulate the expression of the master regulator of metabolism, peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (Pgc-1alpha), in melanomas and in the liver, respectively. Pgc-1alpha is enriched in tissues with high oxidative capacity and plays an important role in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and cellular metabolism. In skeletal muscle, Pgc-1alpha affects many aspects of muscle functionally such as endurance, fiber-type switching, and insulin sensitivity. Tfe3 also regulates muscle metabolic genes that enhance insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. Tfe3 has not yet been shown to regulate Pgc-1alpha expression. Our results reported here show that Tfe3 directly regulates Pgc-1alpha expression in myotubes. Tfe3 ectopic expression induces Pgc-1alpha, and Tfe3 silencing suppresses Pgc-1alpha expression. This regulation is direct, as shown by Tfe3's binding to E-boxes on the Pgc-1alpha proximal promoter. We conclude that Tfe3 is a critical transcription factor that regulates Pgc-1alpha gene expression in myotubes. Since Pgc-1alpha coactivates numerous biological programs in diverse tissues, the regulation of its expression by upstream transcription factors such Tfe3 implies potential opportunities for the treatment of diseases where modulation of Pgc-1alpha expression may have important clinical outcomes.

  7. Simian virus 40 T antigen can regulate p53-mediated transcription independent of binding p53.

    PubMed Central

    Rushton, J J; Jiang, D; Srinivasan, A; Pipas, J M; Robbins, P D

    1997-01-01

    A simian virus 40 (SV40) T-antigen mutant containing only the N-terminal 136 amino acids, able to bind to Rb and p300 but not p53, partially inhibited p53-mediated transcription without affecting the ability of p53 to bind DNA. These results suggest that SV40 T antigen can regulate p53-mediated transcription either directly through protein-protein association or indirectly through interaction with factors which may function to confer p53-mediated transcription. PMID:9188637

  8. Transcription-independent functions of MYC: regulation of translation and DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael D.; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2013-01-01

    MYC is a potent oncogene that drives unrestrained cell growth and proliferation. Shortly after its discovery as an oncogene, the MYC protein was recognized as a sequence-specific transcription factor. Since that time, MYC oncogene research has focused on the mechanism of MYC-induced transcription and on the identification of MYC transcriptional target genes. Recently, MYC was shown to control protein expression through mRNA translation and to directly regulate DNA replication, thus initiating exciting new areas of oncogene research. PMID:18698328

  9. Transcriptional regulation of early T-cell development in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Wooseok; Taniuchi, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    T-cell development occurs in multipotent progenitors arriving in the thymus, which provides a highly specialized microenvironment. Specification and sequential commitment processes to T cells begin in early thymic progenitors upon receiving thymus-specific environmental cues, resulting in the activation of the genetically programmed transcriptional cascade that includes turning on and off numerous transcription factors in a precise manner. Thus, early thymocyte differentiation has been an excellent model system to study cell differentiation processes. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge on thymic T-cell development from newly arrived multipotent T-cell progenitors to fully committed T-cell precursors, from the transcriptional regulation perspective. PMID:26763078

  10. Transcriptional regulation of early T-cell development in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Wooseok; Taniuchi, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    T-cell development occurs in multipotent progenitors arriving in the thymus, which provides a highly specialized microenvironment. Specification and sequential commitment processes to T cells begin in early thymic progenitors upon receiving thymus-specific environmental cues, resulting in the activation of the genetically programmed transcriptional cascade that includes turning on and off numerous transcription factors in a precise manner. Thus, early thymocyte differentiation has been an excellent model system to study cell differentiation processes. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge on thymic T-cell development from newly arrived multipotent T-cell progenitors to fully committed T-cell precursors, from the transcriptional regulation perspective.

  11. Regulation of RE1 protein silencing transcription factor (REST) expression by HIP1 protein interactor (HIPPI).

    PubMed

    Datta, Moumita; Bhattacharyya, Nitai P

    2011-09-30

    Earlier we have shown that the proapoptotic protein HIPPI (huntingtin interacting protein 1 (HIP1) protein interactor) along with its molecular partner HIP1 could regulate transcription of the caspase-1 gene. Here we report that RE1-silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) is a new transcriptional target of HIPPI. HIPPI could bind to the promoter of REST and increased its expression in neuronal as well as non-neuronal cells. Such activation of REST down-regulated expression of REST target genes, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or proenkephalin (PENK). The ability of HIPPI to activate REST gene transcription was dependent on HIP1, the nuclear transporter of HIPPI. Using a Huntington disease cell model, we have demonstrated that feeble interaction of HIP1 with mutant huntingtin protein resulted in increased nuclear accumulation of HIPPI and HIP1, leading to higher occupancy of HIPPI at the REST promoter, triggering its transcriptional activation and consequent repression of REST target genes. This novel transcription regulatory mechanism of REST by HIPPI may contribute to the deregulation of transcription observed in the cell model of Huntington disease. PMID:21832040

  12. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  13. Regulation of estrogen-dependent transcription by the LIM cofactors CLIM and RLIM in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Steven A; Güngör, Cenap; Prenzel, Tanja; Riethdorf, Sabine; Riethdorf, Lutz; Taniguchi-Ishigaki, Naoko; Rau, Thomas; Tursun, Baris; Furlow, J David; Sauter, Guido; Scheffner, Martin; Pantel, Klaus; Gannon, Frank; Bach, Ingolf

    2009-01-01

    Mammary oncogenesis is profoundly influenced by signaling pathways controlled by estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha). Although it is known that ERalpha exerts its oncogenic effect by stimulating the proliferation of many human breast cancers through the activation of target genes, our knowledge of the underlying transcriptional mechanisms remains limited. Our published work has shown that the in vivo activity of LIM homeodomain transcription factors (LIM-HD) is critically regulated by cofactors of LIM-HD proteins (CLIM) and the ubiquitin ligase RING finger LIM domain-interacting protein (RLIM). Here, we identify CLIM and RLIM as novel ERalpha cofactors that colocalize and interact with ERalpha in primary human breast tumors. We show that both cofactors associate with estrogen-responsive promoters and regulate the expression of endogenous ERalpha target genes in breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, our results indicate opposing functions of LIM cofactors for ERalpha and LIM-HDs: whereas CLIM enhances transcriptional activity of LIM-HDs, it inhibits transcriptional activation mediated by ERalpha on most target genes in vivo. In turn, the ubiquitin ligase RLIM inhibits transcriptional activity of LIM-HDs but enhances transcriptional activation of endogenous ERalpha target genes. Results from a human breast cancer tissue microarray of 1,335 patients revealed a highly significant correlation of elevated CLIM levels to ER/progesterone receptor positivity and poor differentiation of tumors. Combined, these results indicate that LIM cofactors CLIM and RLIM regulate the biological activity of ERalpha during the development of human breast cancer.

  14. NFAT5 regulates transcription of the mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiki, Tsukasa; Udono, Miyako; Kotake, Yojiro; Yamashita, Makiko; Shirahata, Sanetaka; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2010-12-10

    We aimed to clarify the transcription-regulation mechanisms of the mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (mTERT). First, we searched for the promoter region required for transcriptional activation of mTERT and identified an enhancer cis-element (named mTERT-EE) located between - 200 and - 179 bp of the mouse TERT gene (mTERT). EMSA results suggested that nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) member proteins bind to mTERT-EE. We then identified NFAT5 as the factor binding to mTERT-EE and found that it activates the transcription of the mTERT core promoter. The results that siRNA directed against NFAT5 significantly reduced mTERT expression and mTERT core promoter activity and that the expressions of NFAT5 and mTERT were well correlated in various mouse tissues except liver suggest that NFAT5 dominantly and directly regulates mTERT expression. To clarify their functionality further, we investigated the effect of hypertonic stress, a known stimulus affecting the expression and transcriptional activity of NFAT5, on mTERT expression. The result indicated that hypertonic stress activates mTERT transcription via the activation and recruitment of NFAT5 to the mTERT promoter. These results provide useful information about the transcription-regulation mechanisms of mTERT.

  15. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G.; Zeef, Leo A. H.; Donaldson, Ian J.; Ashe, Hilary L.

    2016-01-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates. PMID:27379389

  16. Identification of Candidate Transcriptional Regulators of Epidermal Transfer Cell Development in Vicia faba Cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Arun-Chinnappa, Kiruba S.; McCurdy, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer cells (TCs) are anatomically-specialized cells formed at apoplasmic-symplasmic bottlenecks in nutrient transport pathways in plants. TCs form invaginated wall ingrowths which provide a scaffold to amplify plasma membrane surface area and thus increase the density of nutrient transporters required to achieve enhanced nutrient flow across these bottlenecks. Despite their importance to nutrient transport in plants, little is known of the transcriptional regulation of wall ingrowth formation. Here, we used RNA-Seq to identify transcription factors putatively involved in regulating epidermal TC development in cotyledons of Vicia faba. Comparing cotyledons cultured for 0, 3, 9, and 24 h to induce trans-differentiation of epidermal TCs identified 43 transcription factors that showed either epidermal-specific or epidermal–enhanced expression, and 10 that showed epidermal-specific down regulation. Members of the WRKY and ethylene-responsive families were prominent in the cohort of transcription factors showing epidermal-specific or epidermal–enhanced expression, consistent with the initiation of TC development often representing a response to stress. Members of the MYB family were also prominent in these categories, including orthologs of MYB genes involved in localized secondary wall deposition in Arabidopsis thaliana. Among the group of transcription factors showing down regulation were various homeobox genes and members of the MADs-box and zinc-finger families of poorly defined functions. Collectively, this study identified several transcription factors showing expression characteristics and orthologous functions that indicate likely participation in transcriptional regulation of epidermal TC development in V. faba cotyledons. PMID:27252730

  17. Identification of Candidate Transcriptional Regulators of Epidermal Transfer Cell Development in Vicia faba Cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Arun-Chinnappa, Kiruba S; McCurdy, David W

    2016-01-01

    Transfer cells (TCs) are anatomically-specialized cells formed at apoplasmic-symplasmic bottlenecks in nutrient transport pathways in plants. TCs form invaginated wall ingrowths which provide a scaffold to amplify plasma membrane surface area and thus increase the density of nutrient transporters required to achieve enhanced nutrient flow across these bottlenecks. Despite their importance to nutrient transport in plants, little is known of the transcriptional regulation of wall ingrowth formation. Here, we used RNA-Seq to identify transcription factors putatively involved in regulating epidermal TC development in cotyledons of Vicia faba. Comparing cotyledons cultured for 0, 3, 9, and 24 h to induce trans-differentiation of epidermal TCs identified 43 transcription factors that showed either epidermal-specific or epidermal-enhanced expression, and 10 that showed epidermal-specific down regulation. Members of the WRKY and ethylene-responsive families were prominent in the cohort of transcription factors showing epidermal-specific or epidermal-enhanced expression, consistent with the initiation of TC development often representing a response to stress. Members of the MYB family were also prominent in these categories, including orthologs of MYB genes involved in localized secondary wall deposition in Arabidopsis thaliana. Among the group of transcription factors showing down regulation were various homeobox genes and members of the MADs-box and zinc-finger families of poorly defined functions. Collectively, this study identified several transcription factors showing expression characteristics and orthologous functions that indicate likely participation in transcriptional regulation of epidermal TC development in V. faba cotyledons. PMID:27252730

  18. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-05-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes. PMID:26387537

  19. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-01-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes. PMID:26387537

  20. MEF2 transcription factors: developmental regulators and emerging cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Julia R.; Marra, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    The MEF2 transcription factors have roles in muscle, cardiac, skeletal, vascular, neural, blood and immune system cell development through their effects on cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, shape and metabolism. Altered MEF2 activity plays a role in human diseases and has recently been implicated in the development of several cancer types. In particular, MEF2B, the most divergent and least studied protein of the MEF2 family, has a role unique from its paralogs in non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The use of genome-scale technologies has enabled comprehensive MEF2 target gene sets to be identified, contributing to our understanding of MEF2 proteins as nodes in complex regulatory networks. This review surveys the molecular interactions of MEF2 proteins and their effects on cellular and organismal phenotypes. We include a discussion of the emerging roles of MEF2 proteins as oncogenes and tumor suppressors of cancer. Throughout this article we highlight similarities and differences between the MEF2 family proteins, including a focus on functions of MEF2B. PMID:26506234

  1. Blue-light-regulated transcription factor, Aureochrome, in photosynthetic stramenopiles.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    During the course of evolution through various endosymbiotic processes, diverse photosynthetic eukaryotes acquired blue light (BL) responses that do not use photosynthetic pathways. Photosynthetic stramenopiles, which have red algae-derived chloroplasts through secondary symbiosis, are principal primary producers in aquatic environments, and play important roles in ecosystems and aquaculture. Through secondary symbiosis, these taxa acquired BL responses, such as phototropism, chloroplast photo-relocation movement, and photomorphogenesis similar to those which green plants acquired through primary symbiosis. Photosynthetic stramenopile BL receptors were undefined until the discovery in 2007, of a new type of BL receptor, the aureochrome (AUREO), from the photosynthetic stramenopile alga, Vaucheria. AUREO has a bZIP domain and a LOV domain, and thus BL-responsive transcription factor. AUREO orthologs are only conserved in photosynthetic stramenopiles, such as brown algae, diatoms, and red tide algae. Here, a brief review is presented of the role of AUREOs as photoreceptors for these diverse BL responses and their biochemical properties in photosynthetic stramenopiles.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of the Arabidopsis thaliana chalcone synthase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Feinbaum, R.L.; Ausubel, F.M.

    1988-05-01

    The authors cloned an Arabiodpsis thaliana chalcone synthase (CHS) gene on the basis of cross-hybridization with a Petroselinum hortense CHS cDNA clone. The protein sequence deduced from the A. thaliana CHS DNA sequence is at least 85% homologous to the CHS sequences from P. hortense, Antirrhinum majus, and Petunia hybrida. Southern blot analysis indicated that CHS is a single-copy gene in A. thaliana. High-intensity light treatment of A. thaliana plants for 24 h caused a 50-fold increase in CHS enzyme activity and an accumulation of visibly detectable levels of anthocyanin pigments in the vegetative structures of these plants. A corresponding increase in the steady-state level of CHS mRNA was detected after high-intensity light treatment for the same period of time. The accumulation of CHS mRNA in response to high-intensity light was due, at least in part, to an increased rate of transcription of the CHS gene as demonstrated by nuclear runoff experiment.

  3. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Regulates Immune and Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D.; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins. PMID:22851689

  4. The transcriptional coactivator TAZ regulates mesenchymal differentiation in malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Krishna P L; Salazar, Katrina L; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Wani, Khalida; Heathcock, Lindsey; Hollingsworth, Faith; James, Johanna D; Gumin, Joy; Diefes, Kristin L; Kim, Se Hoon; Turski, Alice; Azodi, Yasaman; Yang, Yuhui; Doucette, Tiffany; Colman, Howard; Sulman, Erik P; Lang, Frederick F; Rao, Ganesh; Copray, Sjef; Vaillant, Brian D; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2011-12-15

    Recent molecular classification of glioblastoma (GBM) has shown that patients with a mesenchymal (MES) gene expression signature exhibit poor overall survival and treatment resistance. Using regulatory network analysis of available expression microarray data sets of GBM, including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identified the transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), to be highly associated with the MES network. TAZ expression was lower in proneural (PN) GBMs and lower-grade gliomas, which correlated with CpG island hypermethylation of the TAZ promoter compared with MES GBMs. Silencing of TAZ in MES glioma stem cells (GSCs) decreased expression of MES markers, invasion, self-renewal, and tumor formation. Conversely, overexpression of TAZ in PN GSCs as well as murine neural stem cells (NSCs) induced MES marker expression and aberrant osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation in a TEAD-dependent fashion. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we show that TAZ is directly recruited to a majority of MES gene promoters in a complex with TEAD2. The coexpression of TAZ, but not a mutated form of TAZ that lacks TEAD binding, with platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) resulted in high-grade tumors with MES features in a murine model of glioma. Our studies uncover a direct role for TAZ and TEAD in driving the MES differentiation of malignant glioma.

  5. Nutritional conditions regulate transcriptional activity of SF-1 by controlling sumoylation and ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiwon; Yang, Dong Joo; Lee, Syann; Hammer, Gary D.; Kim, Ki Woo; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a transcription factor expressed in the ventral medial nucleus of the hypothalamus that regulates energy homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms of SF-1 in the control of energy balance are largely unknown. Here, we show that nutritional conditions, such as the presence or absence of serum, affect SF-1 action. Serum starvation significantly decreased hypothalamic SF-1 levels by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation, and sumoylation was required for this process. SF-1 transcriptional activity was also differentially regulated by nutritional status. Under normal conditions, the transcriptional activity of hypothalamic SF-1 was activated by SUMO, but this was attenuated during starvation. Taken together, these results indicate that sumoylation and ubiquitination play crucial roles in the regulation of SF-1 function and that these effects are dependent on nutritional conditions, further supporting the importance of SF-1 in the control of energy homeostasis. PMID:26750456

  6. Different plant hormones regulate similar processes through largely nonoverlapping transcriptional responses.

    PubMed

    Nemhauser, Jennifer L; Hong, Fangxin; Chory, Joanne

    2006-08-11

    Small-molecule hormones govern every aspect of the biology of plants. Many processes, such as growth, are regulated in similar ways by multiple hormones, and recent studies have revealed extensive crosstalk among different hormonal signaling pathways. These results have led to the proposal that a common set of signaling components may integrate inputs from multiple hormones to regulate growth. In this study, we tested this proposal by asking whether different hormones converge on a common set of transcriptional targets in Arabidopsis seedlings. Using publicly available microarray data, we analyzed the transcriptional effects of seven hormones, including abscisic acid, gibberellin, auxin, ethylene, cytokinin, brassinosteroid, and jasmonate. A high-sensitivity analysis revealed a surprisingly low number of common target genes. Instead, different hormones appear to regulate distinct members of protein families. We conclude that there is not a core transcriptional growth-regulatory module in young Arabidopsis seedlings.

  7. Key regulators control distinct transcriptional programmes in blood progenitor and mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Nieto, Fernando J; Ng, Felicia S; Wilson, Nicola K; Hannah, Rebecca; Moignard, Victoria; Leal-Cervantes, Ana I; Jimenez-Madrid, Isabel; Diamanti, Evangelia; Wernisch, Lorenz; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-01-01

    Despite major advances in the generation of genome-wide binding maps, the mechanisms by which transcription factors (TFs) regulate cell type identity have remained largely obscure. Through comparative analysis of 10 key haematopoietic TFs in both mast cells and blood progenitors, we demonstrate that the largely cell type-specific binding profiles are not opportunistic, but instead contribute to cell type-specific transcriptional control, because (i) mathematical modelling of differential binding of shared TFs can explain differential gene expression, (ii) consensus binding sites are important for cell type-specific binding and (iii) knock-down of blood stem cell regulators in mast cells reveals mast cell-specific genes as direct targets. Finally, we show that the known mast cell regulators Mitf and c-fos likely contribute to the global reorganisation of TF binding profiles. Taken together therefore, our study elucidates how key regulatory TFs contribute to transcriptional programmes in several distinct mammalian cell types. PMID:24760698

  8. A novel transcript is up-regulated by fasting in the hypothalamus and enhances insulin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Biaoxin; Li, Ji-Yao; Fritze, Danielle; Zhang, Weizhen; Xia, Zefeng; Mulholland, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    A transcript of unknown function, regulated by fasting and feeding, was identified by microarray analysis. The transcript is up-regulated in the fasting state. An 1168 base-pair cDNA was cloned from rat hypothalamus and sequenced. This sequence is consistent with adipogenesis downregulating transcript 3 (AGD3) (also known as human OCC-1) mRNA. A protein sequence identical to AGD3 was determined by mass spectrometry. In rat brain, AGD3 mRNA is distributed in arcuate nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamus, amygdaloid nuclei, paraventricular nucleus (PVN), hippocampus, and somatic cortex. Double in situ hybridization showed that AGD3 mRNA is co-localized with pro-opiomelanocortin and neuropeptide Y in arcuate nucleus neurons. AGD3 binds with insulin receptor substrate 4 and increases insulin-stimulated phospho-AKT and regulates AMPK and mTOR downstream target S6 kinase phosphorylation. PMID:22935015

  9. Transcript-specific translational regulation in the unfolded protein response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Payne, Tom; Hanfrey, Colin; Bishop, Amy L; Michael, Anthony J; Avery, Simon V; Archer, David B

    2008-02-20

    Accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes stress and induces the unfolded protein response (UPR). Genome-wide analysis of translational regulation in response to the UPR-inducing agent dithiothreitol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is reported. Microarray analysis, confirmed using qRT-PCR, identified transcript-specific translational regulation. Transcripts with functions in ribosomal biogenesis and assembly were translationally repressed. In contrast, mRNAs from known UPR genes, encoding the UPR transcription factor Hac1p, the ER-oxidoreductase Ero1p and the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) protein Der1p, were enriched in polysomal fractions, indicating translational up-regulation. Splicing of HAC1 mRNA is shown to be required for efficient ribosomal loading.

  10. Integration of the Transcription Factor-Regulated and Epigenetic Mechanisms in the Control of Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal differentiation program is regulated at several levels including signaling pathways, lineage-specific transcription factors, and epigenetic regulators that establish well-coordinated process of terminal differentiation resulting in formation of the epidermal barrier. The epigenetic regulatory machinery operates at several levels including modulation of covalent DNA/histone modifications, as well as through higher-order chromatin remodeling to establish long-range topological interactions between the genes and their enhancer elements. Epigenetic regulators exhibit both activating and repressive effects on chromatin in keratinocytes (KCs): whereas some of them promote terminal differentiation, the others stimulate proliferation of progenitor cells, as well as inhibit premature activation of terminal differentiation-associated genes. Transcription factor-regulated and epigenetic mechanisms are highly connected, and the p63 transcription factor has an important role in the higher-order chromatin remodeling of the KC-specific gene loci via direct control of the genome organizer Satb1 and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler Brg1. However, additional efforts are required to fully understand the complexity of interactions between distinct transcription factors and epigenetic regulators in the control of KC differentiation. Further understanding of these interactions and their alterations in different pathological skin conditions will help to progress toward the development of novel approaches for the treatment of skin disorders by targeting epigenetic regulators and modulating chromatin organization in KCs. PMID:26551942

  11. Transcript profiling of the ruminant liver indicates a unique program of transcriptional regulation of ketogenic enzymes during food restriction.

    PubMed

    Doelman, John; Cao, Honghe; Purdie, Norman G; Kim, Julie J M; Swanson, Kendall C; Osborne, Vernon R; Tey, Jasper; Ali, Ayesha; Feng, Zeny; Karrow, Niel A; Cant, John P

    2012-09-01

    Ruminants absorb little glucose and rely on hepatic gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in the fed state to convert short-chain fatty acids produced during digestion into glucose and ketone bodies, respectively. In contrast to the non-ruminant response, fluxes through gluconeogenic and ketogenic pathways decrease during food restriction. Transcriptional regulation responsible for these unique food restriction responses has not been established. To determine the hepatic transcriptional response of ruminants to an acute drop in dietary nutrient supply, 102 yearling heifers were assigned to either ad libitum feeding or 24 h of food withdrawal in a randomized block design. Liver biopsies were obtained for microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses of gene expression. Plasma concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids were higher in food restricted heifers, while levels of β-hydroxybutyrate, triacylglycerol, and glucose were decreased. Despite a decline in substrate supply and a lower hepatic production of glucose, expression of the key gluconeogenic enzymes pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase was upregulated as in non-ruminants. Downregulation of cholesterolgenic genes and upregulation of fatty acid oxidative genes were consistent with SREBP-2 and PPARα control, respectively. Ketogenesis from short-chain fatty acids was downregulated, contrary to the non-ruminant response to food restriction. Short-chain fatty acids may exert transcriptional control in the ruminant liver similar to that demonstrated in the large intestine of non-ruminants.

  12. Mitochondrial Lon protease regulates mitochondrial DNA copy number and transcription by selective degradation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM).

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Yuichi; Goto, Yu-ichi; Kaguni, Laurie S

    2010-10-26

    Lon is the major protease in the mitochondrial matrix in eukaryotes, and is well conserved among species. Although a role for Lon in mitochondrial biogenesis has been proposed, the mechanistic basis is unclear. Here, we demonstrate a role for Lon in mtDNA metabolism. An RNA interference (RNAi) construct was designed that reduces Lon to less than 10% of its normal level in Drosophila Schneider cells. RNAi knockdown of Lon results in increased abundance of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and mtDNA copy number. In a corollary manner, overexpression of Lon reduces TFAM levels and mtDNA copy number. Notably, induction of mtDNA depletion in Lon knockdown cells does not result in degradation of TFAM, thereby causing a dramatic increase in the TFAMmtDNA ratio. The increased TFAMmtDNA ratio in turn causes inhibition of mitochondrial transcription. We conclude that Lon regulates mitochondrial transcription by stabilizing the mitochondrial TFAMmtDNA ratio via selective degradation of TFAM.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of human RANK ligand gene expression by E2F1

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yan; Sun Meng; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou Wei; Pinder, Elaine; Gao, Allen C.

    2008-06-06

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) is a critical osteoclastogenic factor involved in the regulation of bone resorption, immune function, the development of mammary gland and cardiovascular system. To understand the transcriptional regulation of RANKL, we amplified and characterized a 1890 bp 5'-flanking sequence of human RANKL gene (-1782 bp to +108 bp relative to the transcription start site). Using a series of deletion mutations of the 1890 bp RANKL promoter, we identified a 72 bp region (-172 to -100 bp) mediating RANKL basal transcriptional activity. Sequence analysis revealed a putative E2F binding site within this 72 bp region in the human RANKL promoter. Overexpression of E2F1 increased RANKL promoter activity, while down-regulation of E2F1 expression by small interfering RNA decreased RANKL promoter activity. RT-PCR and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) further demonstrated that E2F1 induced the expression of RANKL. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSA) and antibody competition assays confirmed that E2F1 proteins bind to the consensus E2F binding site in the RANKL promoter. Mutation of the E2F consensus binding site in the RANKL promoter profoundly reduced the basal promoter activity and abolished the transcriptional modulation of RANKL by E2F1. These results suggest that E2F1 plays an important role in regulating RANKL transcription through binding to the E2F consensus binding site.

  14. De novo design of a synthetic riboswitch that regulates transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Wachsmuth, Manja; Findeiß, Sven; Weissheimer, Nadine; Stadler, Peter F; Mörl, Mario

    2013-02-01

    Riboswitches are regulatory RNA elements typically located in the 5'-untranslated region of certain mRNAs and control gene expression at the level of transcription or translation. These elements consist of a sensor and an adjacent actuator domain. The sensor usually is an aptamer that specifically interacts with a ligand. The actuator contains an intrinsic terminator or a ribosomal binding site for transcriptional or translational regulation, respectively. Ligand binding leads to structural rearrangements of the riboswitch and to presentation or masking of these regulatory elements. Based on this modular organization, riboswitches are an ideal target for constructing synthetic regulatory systems for gene expression. Although riboswitches for translational control have been designed successfully, attempts to construct synthetic elements regulating transcription have failed so far. Here, we present an in silico pipeline for the rational design of synthetic riboswitches that regulate gene expression at the transcriptional level. Using the well-characterized theophylline aptamer as sensor, we designed the actuator part as RNA sequences that can fold into functional intrinsic terminator structures. In the biochemical characterization, several of the designed constructs show ligand-dependent control of gene expression in Escherichia coli, demonstrating that it is possible to engineer riboswitches not only for translational but also for transcriptional regulation. PMID:23275562

  15. Motif co-regulation and co-operativity are common mechanisms in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Van Roey, Kim; Davey, Norman E

    2015-01-01

    A substantial portion of the regulatory interactions in the higher eukaryotic cell are mediated by simple sequence motifs in the regulatory segments of genes and (pre-)mRNAs, and in the intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. Although these regulatory modules are physicochemically distinct, they share an evolutionary plasticity that has facilitated a rapid growth of their use and resulted in their ubiquity in complex organisms. The ease of motif acquisition simplifies access to basal housekeeping functions, facilitates the co-regulation of multiple biomolecules allowing them to respond in a coordinated manner to changes in the cell state, and supports the integration of multiple signals for combinatorial decision-making. Consequently, motifs are indispensable for temporal, spatial, conditional and basal regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level. In this review, we highlight that many of the key regulatory pathways of the cell are recruited by motifs and that the ease of motif acquisition has resulted in large networks of co-regulated biomolecules. We discuss how co-operativity allows simple static motifs to perform the conditional regulation that underlies decision-making in higher eukaryotic biological systems. We observe that each gene and its products have a unique set of DNA, RNA or protein motifs that encode a regulatory program to define the logical circuitry that guides the life cycle of these biomolecules, from transcription to degradation. Finally, we contrast the regulatory properties of protein motifs and the regulatory elements of DNA and (pre-)mRNAs, advocating that co-regulation, co-operativity, and motif-driven regulatory programs are common mechanisms that emerge from the use of simple, evolutionarily plastic regulatory modules. PMID:26626130

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Aerobic Metabolism in Pichia pastoris Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Baizhi; Chen, Dai; Zong, Jie; Sun, Fei; Qu, Huixin; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the classical fermentation process in Pichia pastoris based on transcriptomics. We utilized methanol in pichia yeast cell as the focus of our study, based on two key steps: limiting carbon source replacement (from glycerol to methonal) and fermentative production of exogenous proteins. In the former, the core differential genes in co-expression net point to initiation of aerobic metabolism and generation of peroxisome. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) results showed that yeast gradually adapted methanol induction to increased cell volume, and decreased density, via large number of peroxisomes. In the fermentative production of exogenous proteins, the Gene Ontology (GO) mapping results show that PAS_chr2-1_0582 played a vital role in regulating aerobic metabolic drift. In order to confirm the above results, we disrupted PAS_chr2-1_0582 by homologous recombination. Alcohol consumption was equivalent to one fifth of the normal control, and fewer peroxisomes were observed in Δ0582 strain following methanol induction. In this study we determined the important core genes and GO terms regulating aerobic metabolic drift in Pichia, as well as developing new perspectives for the continued development within this field. PMID:27537181

  17. Transcriptional regulation of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase by liver X receptors.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Junichi; Song, Ching; Ko, Andrew L; Liao, Shutsung

    2003-09-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily that are involved in cholesterol and lipid metabolism. In addition to liver, the brain is another site where LXRs may control cholesterol homeostasis. In the brain, the regulation of cholesterol homeostasis is independent from other parts of the body, and its disturbance is associated with neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. We have used PCR-based suppressive subtractive cloning to identify new LXR target genes in brain cells. In this report, we show that farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS) is a new target gene for LXR in astrocytes and neurons. Farnesyl pyrophosphate is an obligate intermediate for de novo cholesterol synthesis and a substrate for protein farnesylation. Stimulation of FPPS mRNA synthesis by an LXR agonist, Hypocholamide, was observed in several cell lines from the central nervous system. We identified a single putative direct repeat 4 (DR4) LXR response element in the FPPS promoter. In a reporter gene assay, LXR transactivated a reporter gene bearing a truncated FPPS promoter containing this DR4 cis-element but not if the DR4 element was mutated. Using gel-mobility shift assay, we further demonstrated the direct interaction between the LXR/retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimer and the response element. Taken together, our results indicate that LXRs directly regulate FPPS gene expression, and thus may play a role in modulating cholesterol synthesis in the brain. PMID:12957674

  18. Transcriptional Regulation of Aerobic Metabolism in Pichia pastoris Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Baizhi; Chen, Dai; Zong, Jie; Sun, Fei; Qu, Huixin; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the classical fermentation process in Pichia pastoris based on transcriptomics. We utilized methanol in pichia yeast cell as the focus of our study, based on two key steps: limiting carbon source replacement (from glycerol to methonal) and fermentative production of exogenous proteins. In the former, the core differential genes in co-expression net point to initiation of aerobic metabolism and generation of peroxisome. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) results showed that yeast gradually adapted methanol induction to increased cell volume, and decreased density, via large number of peroxisomes. In the fermentative production of exogenous proteins, the Gene Ontology (GO) mapping results show that PAS_chr2-1_0582 played a vital role in regulating aerobic metabolic drift. In order to confirm the above results, we disrupted PAS_chr2-1_0582 by homologous recombination. Alcohol consumption was equivalent to one fifth of the normal control, and fewer peroxisomes were observed in Δ0582 strain following methanol induction. In this study we determined the important core genes and GO terms regulating aerobic metabolic drift in Pichia, as well as developing new perspectives for the continued development within this field. PMID:27537181

  19. Cloning of a novel insulin-regulated ghrelin transcript in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Seim, Inge; Lubik, Amy A; Lehman, Melanie L; Tomlinson, Nadine; Whiteside, Eliza J; Herington, Adrian C; Nelson, Colleen C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2013-04-01

    Ghrelin is a multifunctional hormone, with roles in stimulating appetite and regulating energy balance, insulin secretion and glucose homoeostasis. The ghrelin gene locus (GHRL) is highly complex and gives rise to a range of novel transcripts derived from alternative first exons and internally spliced exons. The wild-type transcript encodes a 117 amino acid preprohormone that is processed to yield the 28 amino acid peptide ghrelin. Here, we identified insulin-responsive transcription corresponding to cryptic exons in intron 2 of the human ghrelin gene. A transcript, termed in2c-ghrelin (intron 2-cryptic), was cloned from the testis and the LNCaP prostate cancer cell line. This transcript may encode an 83 amino acid preproghrelin isoform that codes for ghrelin, but not obestatin. It is expressed in a limited number of normal tissues and in tumours of the prostate, testis, breast and ovary. Finally, we confirmed that in2c-ghrelin transcript expression, as well as the recently described in1-ghrelin transcript, is significantly upregulated by insulin in cultured prostate cancer cells. Metabolic syndrome and hyperinsulinaemia have been associated with prostate cancer risk and progression. This may be particularly significant after androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer, which induces hyperinsulinaemia, and this could contribute to castrate-resistant prostate cancer growth. We have previously demonstrated that ghrelin stimulates prostate cancer cell line proliferation in vitro. This study is the first description of insulin regulation of a ghrelin transcript in cancer and should provide further impetus for studies into the expression, regulation and function of ghrelin gene products.

  20. Mutations in Transcriptional Regulators Allow Selective Engineering of Signal Integration Logic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial cells monitor their environment by sensing a set of signals. Typically, these environmental signals affect promoter activities by altering the activity of transcription regulatory proteins. Promoters are often regulated by more than one regulatory protein, and in these cases the relevant signals are integrated by certain logic. In this work, we study how single amino acid substitutions in a regulatory protein (GalR) affect transcriptional regulation and signal integration logic at a set of engineered promoters. Our results suggest that point mutations in regulatory genes allow independent evolution of regulatory logic at different promoters. PMID:24961691

  1. HIPK2: a versatile switchboard regulating the transcription machinery and cell death.

    PubMed

    Calzado, Marco A; Renner, Florian; Roscic, Ana; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2007-01-15

    Homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is an evolutionary conserved serine/threonine kinase that regulates gene expression by phosphorylation of transcription factors and accessory components of the transcription machinery. HIPK2 is activated in response to DNA-damaging agents or morphogenic signals and accordingly HIPK2-guided gene expression programs trigger differentiation and development or alternatively apoptosis. The kinase contributes to the regulation of remarkably diverse pathways such as p53 activation or Wnt signaling. Here we discuss recent findings from biochemical and functional experiments that allow a deeper understanding of the pleiotropic effects mediated by HIPK2.

  2. Transcription Factor ADS-4 Regulates Adaptive Responses and Resistance to Antifungal Azole Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kangji; Zhang, Zhenying; Chen, Xi; Sun, Xianyun

    2015-01-01

    Azoles are commonly used as antifungal drugs or pesticides to control fungal infections in medicine and agriculture. Fungi adapt to azole stress by rapidly activating the transcription of a number of genes, and transcriptional increases in some azole-responsive genes can elevate azole resistance. The regulatory mechanisms that control transcriptional responses to azole stress in filamentous fungi are not well understood. This study identified a bZIP transcription factor, ADS-4 (antifungal drug sensitive-4), as a new regulator of adaptive responses and resistance to antifungal azoles. Transcription of ads-4 in Neurospora crassa cells increased when they were subjected to ketoconazole treatment, whereas the deletion of ads-4 resulted in hypersensitivity to ketoconazole and fluconazole. In contrast, the overexpression of ads-4 increased resistance to fluconazole and ketoconazole in N. crassa. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis, followed by quantitative reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR confirmation, showed that ADS-4 positively regulated the transcriptional responses of at least six genes to ketoconazole stress in N. crassa. The gene products of four ADS-4-regulated genes are known contributors to azole resistance, including the major efflux pump CDR4 (Pdr5p ortholog), an ABC multidrug transporter (NcAbcB), sterol C-22 desaturase (ERG5), and a lipid transporter (NcRTA2) that is involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance. Deletion of the ads-4-homologous gene Afads-4 in Aspergillus fumigatus caused hypersensitivity to itraconazole and ketoconazole, which suggested that ADS-4 is a functionally conserved regulator of adaptive responses to azoles. This study provides important information on a new azole resistance factor that could be targeted by a new range of antifungal pesticides and drugs. PMID:26100701

  3. Genome structure and transcriptional regulation of human coronavirus NL63

    PubMed Central

    Pyrc, Krzysztof; Jebbink, Maarten F; Berkhout, Ben; van der Hoek, Lia

    2004-01-01

    Background Two human coronaviruses are known since the 1960s: HCoV-229E and HCoV-OC43. SARS-CoV was discovered in the early spring of 2003, followed by the identification of HCoV-NL63, the fourth member of the coronaviridae family that infects humans. In this study, we describe the genome structure and the transcription strategy of HCoV-NL63 by experimental analysis of the viral subgenomic mRNAs. Results The genome of HCoV-NL63 has the following gene order: 1a-1b-S-ORF3-E-M-N. The GC content of the HCoV-NL63 genome is extremely low (34%) compared to other coronaviruses, and we therefore performed additional analysis of the nucleotide composition. Overall, the RNA genome is very low in C and high in U, and this is also reflected in the codon usage. Inspection of the nucleotide composition along the genome indicates that the C-count increases significantly in the last one-third of the genome at the expense of U and G. We document the production of subgenomic (sg) mRNAs coding for the S, ORF3, E, M and N proteins. We did not detect any additional sg mRNA. Furthermore, we sequenced the 5' end of all sg mRNAs, confirming the presence of an identical leader sequence in each sg mRNA. Northern blot analysis indicated that the expression level among the sg mRNAs differs significantly, with the sg mRNA encoding nucleocapsid (N) being the most abundant. Conclusions The presented data give insight into the viral evolution and mutational patterns in coronaviral genome. Furthermore our data show that HCoV-NL63 employs the discontinuous replication strategy with generation of subgenomic mRNAs during the (-) strand synthesis. Because HCoV-NL63 has a low pathogenicity and is able to grow easily in cell culture, this virus can be a powerful tool to study SARS coronavirus pathogenesis. PMID:15548333

  4. Transcriptional regulation of dimethyl sulfoxide respiration in a haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qiuzi; Ito, Yoshiyasu; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Fujiwara, Taketomo

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii can grow anaerobically by DMSO respiration. DMSO reductase was induced by DMSO respiration not only under anaerobic growth conditions but also in denitrifying cells of H. volcanii. Deletion of the dmsR gene, encoding a putative regulator for the DMSO reductase, resulted in the loss of anaerobic growth by DMSO respiration. Reporter experiments revealed that only the anaerobic condition was essential for transcription of the dmsEABCD genes encoding DMSO reductase and that transcription was enhanced threefold by supplementation of DMSO. In the ∆dmsR mutant, transcription of the dmsEABCD genes induced by the anaerobic condition was not enhanced by DMSO, suggesting that DmsR is a DMSO-responsive regulator. Transcriptions of the dmsR and mgd genes for Mo-bisMGD biosynthesis were regulated in the same manner as the dmsEABCD genes. These results suggest that the genetic regulation of DMSO respiration in H. volcanii is controlled by at least two systems: one is the DMSO-responsive DmsR, and the other is an unknown anaerobic regulator.

  5. Identification of E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwonseop; Oh, Minsoo; Ki, Hyunkyoung; Wang Tao; Bareiss, Sonja; Fini, M. Elizabeth.; Li Dawei; Lu Qun

    2008-05-02

    {delta}-Catenin is upregulated in human carcinomas. However, little is known about the potential transcriptional factors that regulate {delta}-catenin expression in cancer. Using a human {delta}-catenin reporter system, we have screened several nuclear signaling modulators to test whether they can affect {delta}-catenin transcription. Among {beta}-catenin/LEF-1, Notch1, and E2F1, E2F1 dramatically increased {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities while {beta}-catenin/LEF-1 induced only a marginal increase. Rb suppressed the upregulation of {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities induced by E2F1 but did not interact with {delta}-catenin. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses in 4 different prostate cancer cell lines revealed that regulation of {delta}-catenin expression is controlled mainly at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, the effects of E2F1 on {delta}-catenin expression were observed only in human cancer cells expressing abundant endogenous {delta}-catenin. These studies identify E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin, but further suggest the presence of strong negative regulator(s) for {delta}-catenin in prostate cancer cells with minimal endogenous {delta}-catenin expression.

  6. Extending the dynamic range of transcription factor action by translational regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Bialek, William; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-02-01

    A crucial step in the regulation of gene expression is binding of transcription factor (TF) proteins to regulatory sites along the DNA. But transcription factors act at nanomolar concentrations, and noise due to random arrival of these molecules at their binding sites can severely limit the precision of regulation. Recent work on the optimization of information flow through regulatory networks indicates that the lower end of the dynamic range of concentrations is simply inaccessible, overwhelmed by the impact of this noise. Motivated by the behavior of homeodomain proteins, such as the maternal morphogen Bicoid in the fruit fly embryo, we suggest a scheme in which transcription factors also act as indirect translational regulators, binding to the mRNA of other regulatory proteins. Intuitively, each mRNA molecule acts as an independent sensor of the input concentration, and averaging over these multiple sensors reduces the noise. We analyze information flow through this scheme and identify conditions under which it outperforms direct transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the dual role of homeodomain proteins is not just a historical accident, but a solution to a crucial physics problem in the regulation of gene expression.

  7. Weighted enrichment method for prediction of transcription regulators from transcriptome and global chromatin immunoprecipitation data

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Eiryo; Nakaoka, Shinji; Ohta, Tazro; Kitano, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Predicting responsible transcription regulators on the basis of transcriptome data is one of the most promising computational approaches to understanding cellular processes and characteristics. Here, we present a novel method employing vast amounts of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experimental data to address this issue. Global high-throughput ChIP data was collected to construct a comprehensive database, containing 8 578 738 binding interactions of 454 transcription regulators. To incorporate information about heterogeneous frequencies of transcription factor (TF)-binding events, we developed a flexible framework for gene set analysis employing the weighted t-test procedure, namely weighted parametric gene set analysis (wPGSA). Using transcriptome data as an input, wPGSA predicts the activities of transcription regulators responsible for observed gene expression. Validation of wPGSA with published transcriptome data, including that from over-expressed TFs, showed that the method can predict activities of various TFs, regardless of cell type and conditions, with results totally consistent with biological observations. We also applied wPGSA to other published transcriptome data and identified potential key regulators of cell reprogramming and influenza virus pathogenesis, generating compelling hypotheses regarding underlying regulatory mechanisms. This flexible framework will contribute to uncovering the dynamic and robust architectures of biological regulation, by incorporating high-throughput experimental data in the form of weights. PMID:27131787

  8. Extensive DNA-binding specificity divergence of a conserved transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher R.; Tuch, Brian B.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2011-01-01

    The DNA sequence recognized by a transcription regulator can be conserved across large evolutionary distances. For example, it is known that many homologous regulators in yeasts and mammals can recognize the same (or closely related) DNA sequences. In contrast to this paradigm, we describe a case in which the DNA-binding specificity of a transcription regulator has changed so extensively (and over a much smaller evolutionary distance) that its cis-regulatory sequence appears unrelated in different species. Bioinformatic, genetic, and biochemical approaches were used to document and analyze a major change in the DNA-binding specificity of Matα1, a regulator of cell-type specification in ascomycete fungi. Despite this change, Matα1 controls the same core set of genes in the hemiascomycetes because its DNA recognition site has evolved with it, preserving the protein-DNA interaction but significantly changing its molecular details. Matα1 and its recognition sequence diverged most dramatically in the common ancestor of the CTG-clade (Candida albicans, Candida lusitaniae, and related species), apparently without the aid of a gene duplication event. Our findings suggest that DNA-binding specificity divergence between orthologous transcription regulators may be more prevalent than previously thought and that seemingly unrelated cis-regulatory sequences can nonetheless be homologous. These findings have important implications for understanding transcriptional network evolution and for the bioinformatic analysis of regulatory circuits. PMID:21498688

  9. Analysis of TGFβ1 and IL-10 transcriptional regulation in CTCL cells by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Pei; Kim, Myra; Vancurova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The immunosuppressive cytokines transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) regulate a variety of biological processes including differentiation, proliferation, tissue repair, tumorigenesis, inflammation, and host defense. Aberrant expression of TGFβ1 and IL-10 has been associated with many types of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, as well as with many types of cancer and leukemia. Patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) have high levels of malignant CD4+ T cells expressing IL-10 and TGFβ1 that suppress the immune system and diminish the antitumor responses. The transcriptional regulation of TGFβ1 and IL-10 expression is orchestrated by several transcription factors, including NFκB. However, while the transcriptional regulation of pro-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic genes by NFκB has been studied extensively, much less is known about the NFκB regulation of immunosuppressive genes. In this chapter, we describe a protocol that uses chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to analyze the transcriptional regulation of TGFβ1 and IL-10 by measuring recruitment of NFκB p65, p50, c-Rel, Rel-B, and p52 subunits to TGFβ1 and IL-10 promoters in human CTCL Hut-78 cells. PMID:24908319

  10. Transcriptional regulation of dimethyl sulfoxide respiration in a haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qiuzi; Ito, Yoshiyasu; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Fujiwara, Taketomo

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii can grow anaerobically by DMSO respiration. DMSO reductase was induced by DMSO respiration not only under anaerobic growth conditions but also in denitrifying cells of H. volcanii. Deletion of the dmsR gene, encoding a putative regulator for the DMSO reductase, resulted in the loss of anaerobic growth by DMSO respiration. Reporter experiments revealed that only the anaerobic condition was essential for transcription of the dmsEABCD genes encoding DMSO reductase and that transcription was enhanced threefold by supplementation of DMSO. In the ∆dmsR mutant, transcription of the dmsEABCD genes induced by the anaerobic condition was not enhanced by DMSO, suggesting that DmsR is a DMSO-responsive regulator. Transcriptions of the dmsR and mgd genes for Mo-bisMGD biosynthesis were regulated in the same manner as the dmsEABCD genes. These results suggest that the genetic regulation of DMSO respiration in H. volcanii is controlled by at least two systems: one is the DMSO-responsive DmsR, and the other is an unknown anaerobic regulator. PMID:26507955

  11. Poly(C)-binding proteins as transcriptional regulators of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hack Sun Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Song, Kyu Young; Law, P.-Y.; Wei, L.-N.; Loh, Horace H.

    2009-03-13

    Poly(C)-binding proteins (PCBPs) are generally known as RNA-binding proteins that interact in a sequence-specific fashion with single-stranded poly(C). They can be divided into two groups: hnRNP K and PCBP1-4. These proteins are involved mainly in various posttranscriptional regulations (e.g., mRNA stabilization or translational activation/silencing). In this review, we summarize and discuss how PCBPs act as transcriptional regulators by binding to specific elements in gene promoters that interact with the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery. Transcriptional regulation of PCBPs might itself be regulated by their localization within the cell. For example, activation by p21-activated kinase 1 induces increased nuclear retention of PCBP1, as well as increased promoter activity. PCBPs can function as a signal-dependent and coordinated regulator of transcription in eukaryotic cells. We address the molecular mechanisms by which PCBPs binding to single- and double-stranded DNA mediates gene expression.

  12. Analysis of TGFβ1 and IL-10 transcriptional regulation in CTCL cells by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Pei; Kim, Myra; Vancurova, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    The immunosuppressive cytokines transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) regulate a variety of biological processes including differentiation, proliferation, tissue repair, tumorigenesis, inflammation, and host defense. Aberrant expression of TGFβ1 and IL-10 has been associated with many types of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, as well as with many types of cancer and leukemia. Patients with cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) have high levels of malignant CD4+ T cells expressing IL-10 and TGFβ1 that suppress the immune system and diminish the antitumor responses. The transcriptional regulation of TGFβ1 and IL-10 expression is orchestrated by several transcription factors, including NFκB. However, while the transcriptional regulation of pro-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic genes by NFκB has been studied extensively, much less is known about the NFκB regulation of immunosuppressive genes. In this chapter, we describe a protocol that uses chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to analyze the transcriptional regulation of TGFβ1 and IL-10 by measuring recruitment of NFκB p65, p50, c-Rel, Rel-B, and p52 subunits to TGFβ1 and IL-10 promoters in human CTCL Hut-78 cells.

  13. Regulation of transcription of cell division genes in the Escherichia coli dcw cluster.

    PubMed

    Vicente, M; Gomez, M J; Ayala, J A

    1998-04-01

    The Escherichia coli dcw cluster contains cell division genes, such as the phylogenetically ubiquitous ftsZ, and genes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Transcription in the cluster proceeds in the same direction as the progress of the replication fork along the chromosome. Regulation is exerted at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The absence of transcriptional termination signals may, in principle, allow extension of the transcripts initiated at the up-stream promoter (mraZ1p) even to the furthest down-stream gene (envA). Complementation tests suggest that they extend into ftsW in the central part of the cluster. In addition, the cluster contains other promoters individually regulated by cis- and trans-acting signals. Dissociation of the expression of the ftsZ gene, located after ftsQ and A near the 3' end of the cluster, from its natural regulatory signals leads to an alteration in the physiology of cell division. The complexities observed in the regulation of gene expression in the cluster may then have an important biological role. Among them, LexA-binding SOS boxes have been found at the 5' end of the cluster, preceding promoters which direct the expression of ftsI (coding for PBP3, the penicillin-binding protein involved in septum formation). A gearbox promoter, ftsQ1p, forms part of the signals regulating the transcription of ftsQ, A and Z. It is an inversely growth-dependent mechanism driven by RNA polymerase containing sigma s, the factor involved in the expression of stationary phase-specific genes. Although the dcw cluster is conserved to a different extent in a variety of bacteria, the regulation of gene expression, the presence or absence of individual genes, and even the essentiality of some of them, show variations in the phylogenetic scale which may reflect adaptation to specific life cycles.

  14. Characterization of the 5'-flanking region and regulation of transcription of human BAFF-R gene.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hongxiang; Wang, Yueguo; Wu, Xinhua; Wang, Huiming; Pu, Jiang; Ding, Weifeng; Wang, Mei; Shen, Xianjuan; Cong, Hui; Zhang, Lurong; Zhang, Mei; Ju, Shaoqing

    2010-03-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is critical for maintaining the development and homeostasis of B cells. Overexpression of BAFF is associated with autoimmune diseases and malignant B lymphoma. BAFF receptor (BAFF-R) was found to be a specific receptor of BAFF. It not only plays a significant role in splenic B-cell maturation but also works as a major mediator in BAFF-dependent costimulatory response in peripheral B and T cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that BAFF-R is related to several diseases; however, the molecular mechanism of BAFF-R genic transcription has not been clearly defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional regulation of the BAFF-R gene. This study was designed to clone and characterize the 5'-regulatory region of the human BAFF-R gene and determine the mechanisms involved in its transcriptional regulation. In addition, the effects of interferon (IFN)-gamma and BAY11-7082 (inhibitor of nuclear factor [NF]-kappaB) on the expression and promoter activity of BAFF-R were examined. The results showed that the sequence between -1420 and +261 could be a core promoter region, and -1562 and -1420 bp harbored a transcriptive silencer. IFN-gamma promoted BAFF-R promoter activity and upregulated BAFF-R mRNA expression. BAY11-7082 (inhibitor of NF-kappaB) exhibited an inhibitory effect on BAFF-R promoter activity and downregulated BAFF-R mRNA expression. Our data provided novel evidence to clarify the mechanism of transcriptional regulation of BAFF-R and illustrated that IFN-gamma and NF-kappaB pathway were involved in regulating BAFF-R expression. Thus some BAFF-R-related diseases might be cured by blocking transcriptional regulation of BAFF-R and reducing its expression.

  15. Conserved Units of Co-Expression in Bacterial Genomes: An Evolutionary Insight into Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Junier, Ivan; Rivoire, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide measurements of transcriptional activity in bacteria indicate that the transcription of successive genes is strongly correlated beyond the scale of operons. Here, we analyze hundreds of bacterial genomes to identify supra-operonic segments of genes that are proximal in a large number of genomes. We show that these synteny segments correspond to genomic units of strong transcriptional co-expression. Structurally, the segments contain operons with specific relative orientations (co-directional or divergent) and nucleoid-associated proteins are found to bind at their boundaries. Functionally, operons inside a same segment are highly co-expressed even in the apparent absence of regulatory factors at their promoter regions. Remote operons along DNA can also be co-expressed if their corresponding segments share a transcriptional or sigma factor, without requiring these factors to bind directly to the promoters of the operons. As evidence that these results apply across the bacterial kingdom, we demonstrate them both in the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli and in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The underlying process that we propose involves only RNA-polymerases and DNA: it implies that the transcription of an operon mechanically enhances the transcription of adjacent operons. In support of a primary role of this regulation by facilitated co-transcription, we show that the transcription en bloc of successive operons as a result of transcriptional read-through is strongly and specifically enhanced in synteny segments. Finally, our analysis indicates that facilitated co-transcription may be evolutionary primitive and may apply beyond bacteria. PMID:27195891

  16. Glutamate-dependent transcriptional regulation of GLAST/EAAT1: a role for YY1.

    PubMed

    Rosas, Sandra; Vargas, Miguel A; López-Bayghen, Esther; Ortega, Arturo

    2007-05-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the vertebrate brain and its extracellular levels are tightly regulated to prevent excitotoxic effects. The Na(+)-dependent glutamate/aspartate transporter GLAST/EAAT1 is regulated in the short and in the long term by glutamate. A receptors-independent change in its membrane translocation rate, accounts for an acute modulation in GLAST/EAAT1 transport. In contrast, activation of the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate subtype of glutamate receptors represses the transcription of the chick glast gene. A glutamate responsive element has been mapped to the promoter region of this gene containing a bonafide binding site for the transcription factor Ying-Yang 1. Using cultured chick cerebellar Bergmann glia cells, glutamate elicited a time and dose-dependent increase in Ying-Yang 1 DNA binding consistent with the negative response generated in a reporter gene construct controlled for Ying-Yang 1. Over-expression of this transcription factor leads to a substantial reduction in GLAST/EAAT1 transporter uptake and an important decrease in mRNA levels, all associated with the transcriptional repression of the chick glast promoter activity. These results provide evidence for an involvement of Ying-Yang 1 in the transcriptional response to glutamate in glial cells and favor the notion of a relevant role of this factor in GLAST/EAAT1 transcriptional control.

  17. Transcription factor Runx3 regulates interleukin-15-dependent natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Levanon, Ditsa; Negreanu, Varda; Lotem, Joseph; Bone, Karen Rae; Brenner, Ori; Leshkowitz, Dena; Groner, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer cells belong to the family of innate lymphoid cells comprising the frontline defense against infected and transformed cells. Development and activation of natural killer cells is highly dependent on interleukin-15 signaling. However, very little is known about the transcription program driving this process. The transcription factor Runx3 is highly expressed in natural killer cells, but its function in these cells is largely unknown. We show that loss of Runx3 impaired interleukin-15-dependent accumulation of mature natural killer cells in vivo and under culture conditions and pregnant Runx3(-/-) mice completely lack the unique population of interleukin-15-dependent uterine natural killer cells. Combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of wild-type versus Runx3-deficient in vivo activated splenic natural killer cells revealed that Runx3 cooperates with ETS and T-box transcription factors to drive the interleukin-15-mediated transcription program during activation of these cells. Runx3 functions as a nuclear regulator during interleukin-15-dependent activation of natural killer cells by regulating the expression of genes involved in proliferation, maturation, and migration. Similar studies with additional transcription factors will allow the construction of a more detailed transcriptional network that controls natural killer cell development and function.

  18. Oxidative Stress-Related Transcription Factors in the Regulation of Secondary Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Yong; Roze, Ludmila V.; Linz, John E.

    2013-01-01

    There is extensive and unequivocal evidence that secondary metabolism in filamentous fungi and plants is associated with oxidative stress. In support of this idea, transcription factors related to oxidative stress response in yeast, plants, and fungi have been shown to participate in controlling secondary metabolism. Aflatoxin biosynthesis, one model of secondary metabolism, has been demonstrated to be triggered and intensified by reactive oxygen species buildup. An oxidative stress-related bZIP transcription factor AtfB is a key player in coordinate expression of antioxidant genes and genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Recent findings from our laboratory provide strong support for a regulatory network comprised of at least four transcription factors that bind in a highly coordinated and timely manner to promoters of the target genes and regulate their expression. In this review, we will focus on transcription factors involved in co-regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis with oxidative stress response in aspergilli, and we will discuss the relationship of known oxidative stress-associated transcription factors and secondary metabolism in other organisms. We will also talk about transcription factors that are involved in oxidative stress response, but have not yet been demonstrated to be affiliated with secondary metabolism. The data support the notion that secondary metabolism provides a secondary line of defense in cellular response to oxidative stress. PMID:23598564

  19. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  20. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation. PMID:27112822

  1. A systems-level approach to understanding transcriptional regulation by p53 during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Peipei; Treat, Michael D; van Breukelen, Frank

    2014-07-15

    Presumably to conserve energy, many mammals enter into hibernation during the winter. Homeostatic processes such as transcription and translation are virtually arrested. To further elucidate transcriptional regulation during hibernation, we studied the transcription factor p53. Here, we demonstrate that changes in liver mRNA and protein concentrations of known regulators of p53 are consistent with activation. p53 mRNA and protein concentrations are unrelated. Importantly, p53 protein concentration is increased ~2-fold during the interbout arousal that punctuates bouts of torpor. As a result, both the interbout arousal and the torpid state are characterized by high levels of nuclear-localized p53. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that p53 binds DNA during the winter. Furthermore, p53 recruits RNA polymerase II, as indicated by nuclear run-on data. However, and consistent with previous data indicating an arrest of transcriptional elongation during torpor, p53 'activity' does not result in expected changes in target gene transcripts. These data demonstrate the importance of using a systems level-approach in understanding a complex phenotype such as mammalian hibernation. Relying on interpretations of data that are based on steady-state regulation in other systems may be misleading in the context of non-steady-state conditions such as torpor.

  2. NAC-MYB-based transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis in land plants

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Yoshimi; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Endo, Hitoshi; Rejab, Nur Ardiyana; Ohtani, Misato

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells biosynthesize primary cell walls (PCW) in all cells and produce secondary cell walls (SCWs) in specific cell types that conduct water and/or provide mechanical support, such as xylem vessels and fibers. The characteristic mechanical stiffness, chemical recalcitrance, and hydrophobic nature of SCWs result from the organization of SCW-specific biopolymers, i.e., highly ordered cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Synthesis of these SCW-specific biopolymers requires SCW-specific enzymes that are regulated by SCW-specific transcription factors. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the transcriptional regulation of SCW formation in plant cells. Advances in research on SCW biosynthesis during the past decade have expanded our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of SCW formation, particularly the functions of the NAC and MYB transcription factors. Focusing on the NAC-MYB-based transcriptional network, we discuss the regulatory systems that evolved in land plants to modify the cell wall to serve as a key component of structures that conduct water and provide mechanical support. PMID:25999964

  3. The Leucine-rich Pentatricopeptide-Repeat Containing Protein Regulates Mitochondrial Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sondheimer, Neal; Fang, Ji-Kang; Polyak, Erzsebet; Falk, Marni; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial function depends upon the coordinated expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Although the basal factors that carry out the process of mitochondrial transcription are known, the regulation of this process is incompletely understood. To further our understanding of mitochondrial gene regulation we identified proteins that bound to the previously described point of termination for the major mRNA-coding transcript H2. One was the leucine-rich pentatricopeptide-repeat containing protein (LRPPRC), which has been linked to the French-Canadian variant of Leigh syndrome. Cells with reduced expression of LRPPRC had a reduction in oxygen consumption. The expression of mitochondrial mRNA and tRNA was dependent upon LRPPRC levels, but reductions in LRPPRC did not affect the expression of mitochondrial rRNA. Reduction of LRPPRC levels interfered with mitochondrial transcription in vitro but did not affect the stability of mitochondrial mRNAs or alter the expression of nuclear genes responsible for mitochondrial transcription in vivo. These findings demonstrate the control of mitochondrial mRNA synthesis by a protein that has an established role in regulating nuclear transcription, and a link to mitochondrial disease. PMID:20677761

  4. NLP is a novel transcription regulator involved in VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Kushwaha, Manish; Ersfeld, Klaus; Fullbrook, Alexander; Stanne, Tara M; Rudenko, Gloria

    2011-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei mono-allelically expresses one of approximately 1500 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes while multiplying in the mammalian bloodstream. The active VSG is transcribed by RNA polymerase I in one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs). T. brucei is unusual in controlling gene expression predominantly post-transcriptionally, and how ESs are mono-allelically controlled remains a mystery. Here we identify a novel transcription regulator, which resembles a nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP) with an AT-hook motif. NLP is key for ES control in bloodstream form T. brucei, as NLP knockdown results in 45- to 65-fold derepression of the silent VSG221 ES. NLP is also involved in repression of transcription in the inactive VSG Basic Copy arrays, minichromosomes and procyclin loci. NLP is shown to be enriched on the 177- and 50-bp simple sequence repeats, the non-transcribed regions around rDNA and procyclin, and both active and silent ESs. Blocking NLP synthesis leads to downregulation of the active ES, indicating that NLP plays a role in regulating appropriate levels of transcription of ESs in both their active and silent state. Discovery of the unusual transcription regulator NLP provides new insight into the factors that are critical for ES control.

  5. DNA methylation-mediated transcription factors regulate Piwil1 expression during chicken spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    QIU, Lingling; XU, Lu; CHANG, Guobin; GUO, Qixin; LIU, Xiangping; BI, Yulin; ZHANG, Yu; WANG, Hongzhi; WANG, Kehua; LU, Wei; REN, Lichen; ZHU, Pengfei; WU, Yun; ZHANG, Yang; XU, Qi; CHEN, Guohong

    2016-01-01

    The P-element induced wimpy testis (Piwi) protein family is responsible for initiating spermatogenesis and maintaining the integrity of germ cells and stem cells, but little is known regarding its transcriptional regulation in poultry. Here, we characterized the methylation status of the Piwil1 promoter in five different spermatogenic cell lines using direct bisulfite pyrosequencing and determined that methylation correlates negatively with germ cell type-specific expression patterns of piwil1. We demonstrated that methylation of the −148 CpG site, which is the predicted binding site for the transcription factors TCF3 and NRF1, was differentially methylated in different spermatogenic cells. This site was completely methylated in PGCs (primordial germ cells), but was unmethylated in round spermatids. A similar result was obtained in the region from +121 to +139 CpG sites of the Piwil1 promoter CpG island, which was predicted to contain SOX2 binding sites. In addition, demethylation assays further demonstrated that DNA methylation indeed regulates Piwil1 expression during chicken spermatogenesis. Combined with transcription factor binding site prediction, we speculate that methylation influences the recruitment of corresponding transcription factors. Collectively, we show the negative correlation between promoter methylation and piwil1 expression and that the spatiotemporal expression of chicken Piwil1 from the PGC stage to the round spermatid stage is influenced by methylation-mediated transcription factor regulation. PMID:27108736

  6. Regulation of the human LAT gene by the Elf-1 transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Finco, Timothy S; Justice-Healy, Geri E; Patel, Shivani J; Hamilton, Victoria E

    2006-01-01

    Background The LAT gene encodes an intracellular adaptor protein that links cell-surface receptor engagement to numerous downstream signalling events, and thereby plays an integral role in the function of cell types that express the gene, including T cells, mast cells, natural killer cells, and platelets. To date, the mechanisms responsible for the transcriptional regulation of this gene have not been investigated. Results In this study we have mapped the transcriptional start sites for the human LAT gene and localized the 5' and 3' boundaries of the proximal promoter. We find that the promoter contains both positive and negative regulatory regions, and that two binding sites for the Ets family of transcription factors have a strong, positive effect on gene expression. Each site binds the Ets family member Elf-1, and overexpression of Elf-1 augments LAT promoter activity. The promoter also contains a Runx binding site adjacent to one of the Ets sites. This site, which is shown to bind Runx-1, has an inhibitory effect on gene expression. Finally, data is also presented indicating that the identified promoter may regulate cell-type specific expression. Conclusion Collectively, these results provide the first insights into the transcriptional regulation of the LAT gene, including the discovery that the Ets transcription factor Elf-1 may play a central role in its expression. PMID:16464244

  7. Transcriptional regulation is insufficient to explain substrate-induced flux changes in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chubukov, Victor; Uhr, Markus; Le Chat, Ludovic; Kleijn, Roelco J; Jules, Matthieu; Link, Hannes; Aymerich, Stephane; Stelling, Jörg; Sauer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    One of the key ways in which microbes are thought to regulate their metabolism is by modulating the availability of enzymes through transcriptional regulation. However, the limited success of efforts to manipulate metabolic fluxes by rewiring the transcriptional network has cast doubt on the idea that transcript abundance controls metabolic fluxes. In this study, we investigate control of metabolic flux in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis by quantifying fluxes, transcripts, and metabolites in eight metabolic states enforced by different environmental conditions. We find that most enzymes whose flux switches between on and off states, such as those involved in substrate uptake, exhibit large corresponding transcriptional changes. However, for the majority of enzymes in central metabolism, enzyme concentrations were insufficient to explain the observed fluxes—only for a number of reactions in the tricarboxylic acid cycle were enzyme changes approximately proportional to flux changes. Surprisingly, substrate changes revealed by metabolomics were also insufficient to explain observed fluxes, leaving a large role for allosteric regulation and enzyme modification in the control of metabolic fluxes. PMID:24281055

  8. Transcription factor KLF4 regulates microRNA-544 that targets YWHAZ in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Langyong; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Xiaolong; Mo, Wenjuan; Yu, Yao; Lu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The deregulation of microRNAs has been demonstrated in various tumor processes. Here, we report that microRNA-544 (miR-544) is decreased in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervical tissues. To identify the mechanisms involved in miR-544 deregulation, we studied the regulation of miR-544 expression at the transcriptional level. We first identified the transcriptional start site of miR-544 by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends and subsequently determined the miR-544 promoter. We discovered that the transcription factor Krueppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is involved in the transcriptional regulation of miR-544 through interaction with the miR-544 promoter. In addition, we found that miR-544 directly targets the YWHAZ oncogene and functions as a tumor suppressor in cervical cancer cells. miR-544 is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in a manner associated with YWHAZ downregulation. In summary, our findings demonstrate that KLF4 upregulates miR-544 transcription by activating the miR-544 promoter and that miR-544 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting YWHAZ. Therefore, miR-544 may be a potential novel therapeutic target and prognostic marker for cervical cancer.

  9. Transcription factor KLF4 regulates microRNA-544 that targets YWHAZ in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Langyong; Zhang, Yan; Deng, Xiaolong; Mo, Wenjuan; Yu, Yao; Lu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    The deregulation of microRNAs has been demonstrated in various tumor processes. Here, we report that microRNA-544 (miR-544) is decreased in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal cervical tissues. To identify the mechanisms involved in miR-544 deregulation, we studied the regulation of miR-544 expression at the transcriptional level. We first identified the transcriptional start site of miR-544 by 5’ rapid amplification of cDNA ends and subsequently determined the miR-544 promoter. We discovered that the transcription factor Krueppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is involved in the transcriptional regulation of miR-544 through interaction with the miR-544 promoter. In addition, we found that miR-544 directly targets the YWHAZ oncogene and functions as a tumor suppressor in cervical cancer cells. miR-544 is involved in cell cycle regulation and suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion in a manner associated with YWHAZ downregulation. In summary, our findings demonstrate that KLF4 upregulates miR-544 transcription by activating the miR-544 promoter and that miR-544 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting YWHAZ. Therefore, miR-544 may be a potential novel therapeutic target and prognostic marker for cervical cancer. PMID:26269755

  10. Fluorescence monitoring of riboswitch transcription regulation using a dual molecular beacon assay.

    PubMed

    Chinnappan, Raja; Dubé, Audrey; Lemay, Jean-François; Lafontaine, Daniel A

    2013-05-01

    Riboswitches are mRNA elements that specifically bind cellular metabolites and control gene expression by modifying their structure. As riboswitches often control essential genes in pathogenic bacteria, riboswitches have been proposed as new targets for antibiotics. High-throughput screening provides a powerful approach to identify riboswitch ligand analogs that could act as powerful antibacterial drugs. Biochemical assays have already been used to find riboswitch-binding analogs, but those methods do take into account the transcriptional context for riboswitch regulation. As the importance of co-transcriptional ligand binding has been shown for several riboswitches, it is vital to develop an assay that screens riboswitch-binding analogs during the transcriptional process. Here, we describe the development of a dual molecular beacon system monitoring the transcriptional regulation activity of the Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch. This system relies on two molecular beacons that enable the monitoring of transcription efficiency, as well as the regulatory activity of the riboswitch. Different analogs were tested using our system, and a good correlation was observed between riboswitch activity and reported metabolite affinities. This method is specific, reliable and could be applied at the high-throughput level for the identification of new potential antibiotics targeting any riboswitch-regulating gene expression at the mRNA level.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of adipocyte hormone-sensitive lipase by glucose.

    PubMed

    Smih, Fatima; Rouet, Philippe; Lucas, Stéphanie; Mairal, Aline; Sengenes, Coralie; Lafontan, Max; Vaulont, Sophie; Casado, Marta; Langin, Dominique

    2002-02-01

    Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mobilization of fatty acids from adipose tissue, thus determining the supply of energy substrates in the body. HSL mRNA was positively regulated by glucose in human adipocytes. Pools of stably transfected 3T3-F442A adipocytes were generated with human adipocyte HSL promoter fragments from -2,400/+38 to -31/+38 bp linked to the luciferase gene. A glucose-responsive region was mapped within the proximal promoter (-137 bp). Electromobility shift assays showed that upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1 and USF2 and Sp1 and Sp3 bound to a consensus E-box and two GC-boxes in the -137-bp region. Cotransfection of the -137/+38 construct with USF1 and USF2 expression vectors produced enhanced luciferase activity. Moreover, HSL mRNA levels were decreased in USF1- and USF2-deficient mice. Site-directed mutagenesis of the HSL promoter showed that the GC-boxes, although contributing to basal promoter activity, were dispensable for glucose responsiveness. Mutation of the E-box led to decreased promoter activity and suppression of the glucose response. Analogs and metabolites were used to determine the signal metabolite of the glucose response. The signal is generated downstream of glucose-6-phosphate in the glycolytic pathway before the triose phosphate step. PMID:11812735

  12. Transcriptional regulator PRDM12 is essential for human pain perception.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Chun; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Matsukawa, Shinya; Zitzelsberger, Manuela; Themistocleous, Andreas C; Strom, Tim M; Samara, Chrysanthi; Moore, Adrian W; Cho, Lily Ting-Yin; Young, Gareth T; Weiss, Caecilia; Schabhüttl, Maria; Stucka, Rolf; Schmid, Annina B; Parman, Yesim; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Heinritz, Wolfram; Passarge, Eberhard; Watson, Rosemarie M; Hertz, Jens Michael; Moog, Ute; Baumgartner, Manuela; Valente, Enza Maria; Pereira, Diego; Restrepo, Carlos M; Katona, Istvan; Dusl, Marina; Stendel, Claudia; Wieland, Thomas; Stafford, Fay; Reimann, Frank; von Au, Katja; Finke, Christian; Willems, Patrick J; Nahorski, Michael S; Shaikh, Samiha S; Carvalho, Ofélia P; Nicholas, Adeline K; Karbani, Gulshan; McAleer, Maeve A; Cilio, Maria Roberta; McHugh, John C; Murphy, Sinead M; Irvine, Alan D; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Windhager, Reinhard; Weis, Joachim; Bergmann, Carsten; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Baets, Jonathan; De Jonghe, Peter; Reilly, Mary M; Kropatsch, Regina; Kurth, Ingo; Chrast, Roman; Michiue, Tatsuo; Bennett, David L H; Woods, C Geoffrey; Senderek, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Pain perception has evolved as a warning mechanism to alert organisms to tissue damage and dangerous environments. In humans, however, undesirable, excessive or chronic pain is a common and major societal burden for which available medical treatments are currently suboptimal. New therapeutic options have recently been derived from studies of individuals with congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP). Here we identified 10 different homozygous mutations in PRDM12 (encoding PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain-containing protein 12) in subjects with CIP from 11 families. Prdm proteins are a family of epigenetic regulators that control neural specification and neurogenesis. We determined that Prdm12 is expressed in nociceptors and their progenitors and participates in the development of sensory neurons in Xenopus embryos. Moreover, CIP-associated mutants abrogate the histone-modifying potential associated with wild-type Prdm12. Prdm12 emerges as a key factor in the orchestration of sensory neurogenesis and may hold promise as a target for new pain therapeutics.

  13. Transcriptional regulator PRDM12 is essential for human pain perception.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Chun; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Matsukawa, Shinya; Zitzelsberger, Manuela; Themistocleous, Andreas C; Strom, Tim M; Samara, Chrysanthi; Moore, Adrian W; Cho, Lily Ting-Yin; Young, Gareth T; Weiss, Caecilia; Schabhüttl, Maria; Stucka, Rolf; Schmid, Annina B; Parman, Yesim; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Heinritz, Wolfram; Passarge, Eberhard; Watson, Rosemarie M; Hertz, Jens Michael; Moog, Ute; Baumgartner, Manuela; Valente, Enza Maria; Pereira, Diego; Restrepo, Carlos M; Katona, Istvan; Dusl, Marina; Stendel, Claudia; Wieland, Thomas; Stafford, Fay; Reimann, Frank; von Au, Katja; Finke, Christian; Willems, Patrick J; Nahorski, Michael S; Shaikh, Samiha S; Carvalho, Ofélia P; Nicholas, Adeline K; Karbani, Gulshan; McAleer, Maeve A; Cilio, Maria Roberta; McHugh, John C; Murphy, Sinead M; Irvine, Alan D; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Windhager, Reinhard; Weis, Joachim; Bergmann, Carsten; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Baets, Jonathan; De Jonghe, Peter; Reilly, Mary M; Kropatsch, Regina; Kurth, Ingo; Chrast, Roman; Michiue, Tatsuo; Bennett, David L H; Woods, C Geoffrey; Senderek, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Pain perception has evolved as a warning mechanism to alert organisms to tissue damage and dangerous environments. In humans, however, undesirable, excessive or chronic pain is a common and major societal burden for which available medical treatments are currently suboptimal. New therapeutic options have recently been derived from studies of individuals with congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP). Here we identified 10 different homozygous mutations in PRDM12 (encoding PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain-containing protein 12) in subjects with CIP from 11 families. Prdm proteins are a family of epigenetic regulators that control neural specification and neurogenesis. We determined that Prdm12 is expressed in nociceptors and their progenitors and participates in the development of sensory neurons in Xenopus embryos. Moreover, CIP-associated mutants abrogate the histone-modifying potential associated with wild-type Prdm12. Prdm12 emerges as a key factor in the orchestration of sensory neurogenesis and may hold promise as a target for new pain therapeutics. PMID:26005867

  14. FBXO3 Protein Promotes Ubiquitylation and Transcriptional Activity of AIRE (Autoimmune Regulator).

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Zumer, Kristina; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B Matija

    2016-08-19

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a transcription factor which is expressed in medullary thymic epithelial cells. It directs the expression of otherwise tissue-specific antigens, which leads to the elimination of autoreactive T cells during development. AIRE is modified post-translationally by phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. In this report we connected these modifications. AIRE, which is phosphorylated on two specific residues near its N terminus, then binds to the F-box protein 3 (FBXO3) E3 ubiquitin ligase. In turn, this SCF(FBXO3) (SKP1-CUL1-F box) complex ubiquitylates AIRE, increases its binding to the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), and potentiates its transcriptional activity. Because P-TEFb is required for the transition from initiation to elongation of transcription, this interaction ensures proper expression of AIRE-responsive tissue-specific antigens in the thymus.

  15. Regulation of Cell Fate Determination by Single-Repeat R3 MYB Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jay

    2014-01-01

    MYB transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Among the large family of MYB transcription factors, single-repeat R3 MYB are characterized by their short sequence (<120 amino acids) consisting largely of the single MYB DNA-binding repeat. In the model plant Arabidopsis, R3 MYBs mediate lateral inhibition during epidermal patterning and are best characterized for their regulatory roles in trichome and root hair development. R3 MYBs act as negative regulators for trichome formation but as positive regulators for root hair development. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of R3 MYBs in the regulation of cell type specification in the model plant Arabidopsis.

  16. Regulation of cell fate determination by single-repeat R3 MYB transcription factors in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-01-01

    MYB transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Among the large family of MYB transcription factors, single-repeat R3 MYBs are characterized by their short sequence (<120 amino acids) consisting largely of the single MYB DNA-binding repeat. In the model plant Arabidopsis, R3 MYBs mediate lateral inhibition during epidermal patterning and are best characterized for their regulatory roles in trichome and root hair development. R3 MYBs act as negative regulators for trichome formation but as positive regulators for root hair development. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of R3 MYBs in the regulation of cell type specification in the model plant Arabidopsis. PMID:24782874

  17. The VQ Motif-Containing Protein Family of Plant-Specific Transcriptional Regulators1

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanjun; Lin, Rongcheng

    2015-01-01

    The VQ motif-containing proteins (designated as VQ proteins) are a class of plant-specific proteins with a conserved and single short FxxhVQxhTG amino acid sequence motif. VQ proteins regulate diverse developmental processes, including responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, seed development, and photomorphogenesis. In this Update, we summarize and discuss recent advances in our understanding of the regulation and function of VQ proteins and the role of the VQ motif in mediating transcriptional regulation and protein-protein interactions in signaling pathways. Based on the accumulated evidence, we propose a general mechanism of action for the VQ protein family, which likely defines a novel class of transcriptional regulators specific to plants. PMID:26220951

  18. Yeast calcineurin regulates nuclear localization of the Crz1p transcription factor through dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Stathopoulos-Gerontides, Angelike; Guo, Jim Jun; Cyert, Martha S.

    1999-01-01

    Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin dependent protein phosphatase, regulates Ca2+-dependent processes in a wide variety of cells. In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, calcineurin effects Ca2+-dependent changes in gene expression through regulation of the Crz1p transcription factor. We show here that calcineurin dephosphorylates Crz1p and that this results in translocation of Crz1p to the nucleus. We identify a region of Crz1p that is required for calcineurin-dependent regulation of its phosphorylation, localization, and activity, and show that this region has significant sequence simlarity to a portion of NF-AT, a family of mammalian transcription factors whose localization is also regulated by calcineurin. Thus, the mechanism of Ca2+/calcineurin-dependent signaling shows remarkable conservation between yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:10197980

  19. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Rajesh K.; Murray, Thomas V. A.; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R.; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2016-01-01

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production. PMID:26620565

  20. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rajesh K; Murray, Thomas V A; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M; Brewer, Alison C

    2016-01-22

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production.

  1. Stochastic analysis of bistability in coherent mixed feedback loops combining transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzan, Mor; Shimoni, Yishai; Rosolio, Oded; Margalit, Hanah; Biham, Ofer

    2015-05-01

    Mixed feedback loops combining transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations are common in cellular regulatory networks. They consist of two genes, encoding a transcription factor and a small noncoding RNA (sRNA), which mutually regulate each other's expression. We present a theoretical and numerical study of coherent mixed feedback loops of this type, in which both regulations are negative. Under suitable conditions, these feedback loops are expected to exhibit bistability, namely, two stable states, one dominated by the transcriptional repressor and the other dominated by the sRNA. We use deterministic methods based on rate equation models, in order to identify the range of parameters in which bistability takes place. However, the deterministic models do not account for the finite lifetimes of the bistable states and the spontaneous, fluctuation-driven transitions between them. Therefore, we use stochastic methods to calculate the average lifetimes of the two states. It is found that these lifetimes strongly depend on rate coefficients such as the transcription rates of the transcriptional repressor and the sRNA. In particular, we show that the fraction of time the system spends in the sRNA-dominated state follows a monotonically decreasing sigmoid function of the transcriptional repressor transcription rate. The biological relevance of these results is discussed in the context of such mixed feedback loops in Escherichia coli. It is shown that the fluctuation-driven transitions and the dependence of some rate coefficients on the biological conditions enable the cells to switch to the state which is better suited for the existing conditions and to remain in that state as long as these conditions persist.

  2. Genome-Wide Epigenetic Regulation of Gene Transcription in Maize Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Zhenguang; Guo, Wenzhu; Chen, Rumei; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Jun; Lang, Zhihong; Fan, Yunliu; Zhao, Jiuran; Zhang, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic regulation is well recognized for its importance in gene expression in organisms. DNA methylation, an important epigenetic mark, has received enormous attention in recent years as it’s a key player in many biological processes. It remains unclear how DNA methylation contributes to gene transcription regulation in maize seeds. Here, we take advantage of recent technologies to examine the genome-wide association of DNA methylation with transcription of four types of DNA sequences, including protein-coding genes, pseudogenes, transposable elements, and repeats in maize embryo and endosperm, respectively. Results The methylation in CG, CHG and CHH contexts plays different roles in the control of gene expression. Methylation around the transcription start sites and transcription stop regions of protein-coding genes is negatively correlated, but in gene bodies positively correlated, to gene expression level. The upstream regions of protein-coding genes are enriched with 24-nt siRNAs and contain high levels of CHH methylation, which is correlated to gene expression level. The analysis of sequence content within CG, CHG, or CHH contexts reveals that only CHH methylation is affected by its local sequences, which is different from Arabidopsis. Conclusions In summary, we conclude that methylation-regulated transcription varies with the types of DNA sequences, sequence contexts or parts of a specific gene in maize seeds and differs from that in other plant species. Our study helps people better understand from a genome-wide viewpoint that how transcriptional expression is controlled by DNA methylation, one of the important factors influencing transcription, and how the methylation is associated with small RNAs. PMID:26469520

  3. The regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) expression during skeletal muscle cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Collu-Marchese, Melania; Shuen, Michael; Pauly, Marion; Saleem, Ayesha; Hood, David A

    2015-01-01

    The ATP demand required for muscle development is accommodated by elevations in mitochondrial biogenesis, through the co-ordinated activities of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The most important transcriptional activator of the mitochondrial genome is mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam); however, the regulation of Tfam expression during muscle differentiation is not known. Thus, we measured Tfam mRNA levels, mRNA stability, protein expression and localization and Tfam transcription during the progression of muscle differentiation. Parallel 2-fold increases in Tfam protein and mRNA were observed, corresponding with 2-3-fold increases in mitochondrial content. Transcriptional activity of a 2051 bp promoter increased during this differentiation period and this was accompanied by a 3-fold greater Tfam mRNA stabilization. Interestingly, truncations of the promoter at 1706 bp, 978 bp and 393 bp promoter all exhibited 2-3-fold higher transcriptional activity than the 2051 bp construct, indicating the presence of negative regulatory elements within the distal 350 bp of the promoter. Activation of AMP kinase augmented Tfam transcription within the proximal promoter, suggesting the presence of binding sites for transcription factors that are responsive to cellular energy state. During differentiation, the accumulating Tfam protein was progressively distributed to the mitochondrial matrix where it augmented the expression of mtDNA and COX (cytochrome c oxidase) subunit I, an mtDNA gene product. Our data suggest that, during muscle differentiation, Tfam protein levels are regulated by the availability of Tfam mRNA, which is controlled by both transcription and mRNA stability. Changes in energy state and Tfam localization also affect Tfam expression and action in differentiating myotubes.

  4. The regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) expression during skeletal muscle cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Collu-Marchese, Melania; Shuen, Michael; Pauly, Marion; Saleem, Ayesha; Hood, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP demand required for muscle development is accommodated by elevations in mitochondrial biogenesis, through the co-ordinated activities of the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. The most important transcriptional activator of the mitochondrial genome is mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam); however, the regulation of Tfam expression during muscle differentiation is not known. Thus, we measured Tfam mRNA levels, mRNA stability, protein expression and localization and Tfam transcription during the progression of muscle differentiation. Parallel 2-fold increases in Tfam protein and mRNA were observed, corresponding with 2–3-fold increases in mitochondrial content. Transcriptional activity of a 2051 bp promoter increased during this differentiation period and this was accompanied by a 3-fold greater Tfam mRNA stabilization. Interestingly, truncations of the promoter at 1706 bp, 978 bp and 393 bp promoter all exhibited 2–3-fold higher transcriptional activity than the 2051 bp construct, indicating the presence of negative regulatory elements within the distal 350 bp of the promoter. Activation of AMP kinase augmented Tfam transcription within the proximal promoter, suggesting the presence of binding sites for transcription factors that are responsive to cellular energy state. During differentiation, the accumulating Tfam protein was progressively distributed to the mitochondrial matrix where it augmented the expression of mtDNA and COX (cytochrome c oxidase) subunit I, an mtDNA gene product. Our data suggest that, during muscle differentiation, Tfam protein levels are regulated by the availability of Tfam mRNA, which is controlled by both transcription and mRNA stability. Changes in energy state and Tfam localization also affect Tfam expression and action in differentiating myotubes. PMID:26182383

  5. Interactions of cellular proteins involved in the transcriptional regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J A; Wu, F K; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1987-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a human retrovirus which is the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To study the cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of this virus, we performed DNase I footprinting of the viral LTR using partially purified HeLa cell extracts. Five regions of the viral LTR appear critical for DNA binding of cellular proteins. These include the negative regulatory, enhancer, SP1, TATA and untranslated regions. Deletion mutagenesis of these binding domains has significant effects on the basal level of transcription and the ability to be induced by the viral tat protein. Mutations of either the negative regulatory or untranslated regions affect factor binding to the enhancer region. In addition, oligonucleotides complementary to several of the binding domains specifically compete for factor binding. These results suggest that interactions between several distinct cellular proteins are required for HIV transcriptional regulation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. PMID:3428273

  6. GSK3beta is a negative regulator of the transcriptional coactivator MAML1.

    PubMed

    Saint Just Ribeiro, Mariana; Hansson, Magnus L; Lindberg, Mikael J; Popko-Scibor, Anita E; Wallberg, Annika E

    2009-11-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) is involved in several cellular signaling systems through regulation of the activity of diverse transcription factors such as Notch, p53 and beta-catenin. Mastermind-like 1 (MAML1) was originally identified as a Notch coactivator, but has also been reported to function as a transcriptional coregulator of p53, beta-catenin and MEF2C. In this report, we show that active GSK3beta directly interacts with the MAML1 N-terminus and decreases MAML1 transcriptional activity, suggesting that GSK3beta might target a coactivator in its regulation of gene expression. We have previously shown that MAML1 increases global acetylation of histones, and here we show that the GSK3 inhibitor SB41, further enhances MAML1-dependent histone acetylation in cells. Finally, MAML1 translocates GSK3beta to nuclear bodies; this function requires full-length MAML1 protein.

  7. Interactions of cellular proteins involved in the transcriptional regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J A; Wu, F K; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R B

    1987-12-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a human retrovirus which is the etiologic agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. To study the cellular factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of this virus, we performed DNase I footprinting of the viral LTR using partially purified HeLa cell extracts. Five regions of the viral LTR appear critical for DNA binding of cellular proteins. These include the negative regulatory, enhancer, SP1, TATA and untranslated regions. Deletion mutagenesis of these binding domains has significant effects on the basal level of transcription and the ability to be induced by the viral tat protein. Mutations of either the negative regulatory or untranslated regions affect factor binding to the enhancer region. In addition, oligonucleotides complementary to several of the binding domains specifically compete for factor binding. These results suggest that interactions between several distinct cellular proteins are required for HIV transcriptional regulation.

  8. Mediator MED23 regulates basal transcription in vivo via an interaction with P-TEFb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Xiao; Huang, Yan; Hu, Xiangming; Liu, Runzhong; Hou, Dongming; Chen, Ruichuan; Wang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator is a multi-subunit complex that transduces regulatory information from transcription regulators to the RNA polymerase II apparatus. Growing evidence suggests that Mediator plays roles in multiple stages of eukaryotic transcription, including elongation. However, the detailed mechanism by which Mediator regulates elongation remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that Mediator MED23 subunit controls a basal level of transcription by recruiting elongation factor P-TEFb, via an interaction with its CDK9 subunit. The mRNA level of Egr1, a MED23-controlled model gene, is reduced 4-5 fold in Med23 (-/-) ES cells under an unstimulated condition, but Med23-deficiency does not alter the occupancies of RNAP II, GTFs, Mediator complex, or activator ELK1 at the Egr1 promoter. Instead, Med23 depletion results in a significant decrease in P-TEFb and RNAP II (Ser2P) binding at the coding region, but no changes for several other elongation regulators, such as DSIF and NELF. ChIP-seq revealed that Med23-deficiency partially reduced the P-TEFb occupancy at a set of MED23-regulated gene promoters. Further, we demonstrate that MED23 interacts with CDK9 in vivo and in vitro. Collectively, these results provide the mechanistic insight into how Mediator promotes RNAP II into transcription elongation.

  9. Regulation of transcription of the adenovirus EII promoter by gene products: Absence of sequence specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, R.E.; Kaufman, R.J.; Sharp, P.A.

    1984-10-01

    During adenovirus infection, the EII promoter is positively regulated by products of the EIa region. The authors have studied this regulation by fusing a DNA segment containing the adenovirus EII promoter to a dihydrofolate reductase cDNA segment. Expression of this hybrid gene is stimulated in trans when cell lines containing an integrated copy are either transfected with plasmids carrying the EIa region or infected with adenovirus. This suggests that EIa activity regulates transcription of the EII promoter in the absence of other viral proteins and that this stimulation can occur when the EII promoter is organized in cellular chromatin. Transcription from the EII promoter is initiated at two sites in cell lines lacking EIa activity. Introduction of the EIa region preferentially stimulated transcription from one of these two sites. A sensitive, stable cotransfection assay was used to test for specific EII sequences required for stimulation. EIa activity stimulates all mutaant promoters; the most extensive deletion retained only 18 base pairs of sequences upstream of the initiation site. They suggest that regulation of a promoter by the EIa region does not depend on the presence of a set of specific sequences, but instead reflects a characteristic of promoters that have been exogenously introduced into cells. Insertion of the 72-base-pair repeat of simian-virus 40 in cis enhances transcription from the EII promoter. The stimulatory effects of EIa activity and of the simian virus 40 sequence are additive and appear to differ mechanistically.

  10. Regulation of IL-17 in autoimmune diseases by transcriptional factors and microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Deena; Ansar Ahmed, S.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, IL-17A (IL-17), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, has received intense attention of researchers and clinicians alike with documented effects in inflammation and autoimmune diseases. IL-17 mobilizes, recruits and activates different cells to increase inflammation. Although protective in infections, overproduction of IL-17 promotes inflammation in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, among others. Regulating IL-17 levels or action by using IL-17-blocking antibodies or IL-17R antagonist has shown to attenuate experimental autoimmune diseases. It is now known that in addition to IL-17-specific transcription factor, RORγt, several other transcription factors and select microRNAs (miRNA) regulate IL-17. Given that miRNAs are dysregulated in autoimmune diseases, a better understanding of transcriptional factors and miRNA regulation of IL-17 expression and function will be essential for devising potential new therapies. In this review, we will overview IL-17 induction and function in relation to autoimmune diseases. In addition, current findings on transcriptional regulation of IL-17 induction and plausible interplay between IL-17 and miRNA in autoimmune diseases are highlighted. PMID:26236331

  11. Differential Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Transcripts during the Consolidation of Fear Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ressler, Kerry J.; Rattiner, Lisa M.; Davis, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated as a molecular mediator of learning and memory. The BDNF gene contains four differentially regulated promoters that generate four distinct mRNA transcripts, each containing a unique noncoding 5[prime]-exon and a common 3[prime]-coding exon. This study describes novel evidence for the…

  12. Drosophila Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Multiple Regulators of HIF–Dependent Transcription in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dekanty, Andrés; Romero, Nuria M.; Bertolin, Agustina P.; Thomas, María G.; Leishman, Claudia C.; Perez-Perri, Joel I.; Boccaccio, Graciela L.; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of evolutionary conserved alpha-beta heterodimeric transcription factors that induce a wide range of genes in response to low oxygen tension. Molecular mechanisms that mediate oxygen-dependent HIF regulation operate at the level of the alpha subunit, controlling protein stability, subcellular localization, and transcriptional coactivator recruitment. We have conducted an unbiased genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells aimed to the identification of genes required for HIF activity. After 3 rounds of selection, 30 genes emerged as critical HIF regulators in hypoxia, most of which had not been previously associated with HIF biology. The list of genes includes components of chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription elongation factors, and translational regulators. One remarkable hit was the argonaute 1 (ago1) gene, a central element of the microRNA (miRNA) translational silencing machinery. Further studies confirmed the physiological role of the miRNA machinery in HIF–dependent transcription. This study reveals the occurrence of novel mechanisms of HIF regulation, which might contribute to developing novel strategies for therapeutic intervention of HIF–related pathologies, including heart attack, cancer, and stroke. PMID:20585616

  13. Transcriptional regulator-mediated activation of adaptation genes triggers CRISPR de novo spacer acquisition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Li, Yingjun; Wang, Xiaodi; Ye, Qing; Li, Huan; Liang, Yunxiang; She, Qunxin; Peng, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of de novo spacer sequences confers CRISPR-Cas with a memory to defend against invading genetic elements. However, the mechanism of regulation of CRISPR spacer acquisition remains unknown. Here we examine the transcriptional regulation of the conserved spacer acquisition genes in Type I-A of Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. Csa3a, a MarR-like transcription factor encoded by the gene located adjacent to csa1, cas1, cas2 and cas4 cluster, but on the reverse strand, was demonstrated to specifically bind to the csa1 and cas1 promoters with the imperfect palindromic sequence. Importantly, it was demonstrated that the transcription level of csa1, cas1, cas2 and cas4 was significantly enhanced in a csa3a-overexpression strain and, moreover, the Csa1 and Cas1 protein levels were increased in this strain. Furthermore, we demonstrated the hyperactive uptake of unique spacers within both CRISPR loci in the presence of the csa3a overexpression vector. The spacer acquisition process is dependent on the CCN PAM sequence and protospacer selection is random and non-directional. These results suggested a regulation mechanism of CRISPR spacer acquisition where a single transcriptional regulator senses the presence of an invading element and then activates spacer acquisition gene expression which leads to de novo spacer uptake from the invading element.

  14. Regulating expressin of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R N; Dai, Shunhong

    2009-12-15

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Our research supported by this program has led to the identification of rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 that play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV) through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter. RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants and to improve biofuel feedstock.

  15. A Myb transcription factor regulates genes of the phenylalanine pathway in maritime pine.

    PubMed

    Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Pascual, M Belen; Cánovas, Francisco M; Avila, Concepción

    2013-06-01

    During the life cycles of conifer trees, such as maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), large quantities of carbon skeletons are irreversibly immobilized in the wood. In energetic terms this is an expensive process, in which carbon from photosynthesis is channelled through the shikimate pathway for the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. This crucial metabolic pathway is finely regulated, primarily through transcriptional control, and because phenylalanine is the precursor for phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, the precise regulation of phenylalanine synthesis and use should occur simultaneously. The promoters of three genes encoding the enzymes prephenate aminotransferase (PAT), phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and glutamine synthetase (GS1b) contain AC elements involved in the transcriptional activation mediated by R2R3-Myb factors. We have examined the capacity of the R2R3-Myb transcription factors Myb1, Myb4 and Myb8 to co-regulate the expression of PAT, PAL and GS1b. Only Myb8 was able to activate the transcription of the three genes. Moreover, the expression of this transcription factor is higher in lignified tissues, in which a high demand for phenylpropanoids exits. In a gain-of-function experiment, we have shown that Myb8 can specifically bind a well-conserved eight-nucleotide-long AC-II element in the promoter regions of PAT, PAL and GS1b, thereby activating their expression. Our results show that Myb8 regulates the expression of these genes involved in phenylalanine metabolism, which is required for channelling photosynthetic carbon to promote wood formation. The co-localization of PAT, PAL, GS1b and MYB8 transcripts in vascular cells further supports this conclusion.

  16. Transcription Factor Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor-1β Regulates Renal Cholesterol Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Aboudehen, Karam; Kim, Min Soo; Mitsche, Matthew; Garland, Kristina; Anderson, Norma; Noureddine, Lama; Pontoglio, Marco; Patel, Vishal; Xie, Yang; DeBose-Boyd, Russell; Igarashi, Peter

    2016-08-01

    HNF-1β is a tissue-specific transcription factor that is expressed in the kidney and other epithelial organs. Humans with mutations in HNF-1β develop kidney cysts, and HNF-1β regulates the transcription of several cystic disease genes. However, the complete spectrum of HNF-1β-regulated genes and pathways is not known. Here, using chromatin immunoprecipitation/next generation sequencing and gene expression profiling, we identified 1545 protein-coding genes that are directly regulated by HNF-1β in murine kidney epithelial cells. Pathway analysis predicted that HNF-1β regulates cholesterol metabolism. Expression of dominant negative mutant HNF-1β or kidney-specific inactivation of HNF-1β decreased the expression of genes that are essential for cholesterol synthesis, including sterol regulatory element binding factor 2 (Srebf2) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (Hmgcr). HNF-1β mutant cells also expressed lower levels of cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates and had a lower rate of cholesterol synthesis than control cells. Additionally, depletion of cholesterol in the culture medium mitigated the inhibitory effects of mutant HNF-1β on the proteins encoded by Srebf2 and Hmgcr, and HNF-1β directly controlled the renal epithelial expression of proprotein convertase subtilisin-like kexin type 9, a key regulator of cholesterol uptake. These findings reveal a novel role of HNF-1β in a transcriptional network that regulates intrarenal cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26712526

  17. Read-through transcripts in normal human lung parenchyma are down-regulated in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cotroneo, Chiara E.; Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara; Piazza, Rocco; Pirola, Alessandra; Spinelli, Roberta; Incarbone, Matteo; Palleschi, Alessandro; Rosso, Lorenzo; Santambrogio, Luigi; Dragani, Tommaso A.; Colombo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Read-through transcripts result from the continuous transcription of adjacent, similarly oriented genes, with the splicing out of the intergenic region. They have been found in several neoplastic and normal tissues, but their pathophysiological significance is unclear. We used high-throughput sequencing of cDNA fragments (RNA-Seq) to identify read-through transcripts in the non-involved lung tissue of 64 surgically treated lung adenocarcinoma patients. A total of 52 distinct read-through species was identified, with 24 patients having at least one read-through event, up to a maximum of 17 such transcripts in one patient. Sanger sequencing validated 28 of these transcripts and identified an additional 15, for a total of 43 distinct read-through events involving 35 gene pairs. Expression levels of 10 validated read-through transcripts were measured by quantitative PCR in pairs of matched non-involved lung tissue and lung adenocarcinoma tissue from 45 patients. Higher expression levels were observed in normal lung tissue than in the tumor counterpart, with median relative quantification ratios between normal and tumor varying from 1.90 to 7.78; the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon's signed-rank test for paired samples) for eight transcripts: ELAVL1–TIMM44, FAM162B–ZUFSP, IFNAR2–IL10RB, INMT–FAM188B, KIAA1841–C2orf74, NFATC3–PLA2G15, SIRPB1–SIRPD, and SHANK3–ACR. This report documents the presence of read-through transcripts in apparently normal lung tissue, with inter-individual differences in patterns and abundance. It also shows their down-regulation in tumors, suggesting that these chimeric transcripts may function as tumor suppressors in lung tissue. PMID:27058892

  18. Bioinformatics analysis of transcriptional regulation of circadian genes in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The circadian clock is a critical regulator of biological functions controlling behavioral, physiological and biochemical processes. Because the liver is the primary regulator of metabolites within the mammalian body and the disruption of circadian rhythms in liver is associated with severe illness, circadian regulators would play a strong role in maintaining liver function. However, the regulatory structure that governs circadian dynamics within the liver at a transcriptional level remains unknown. To explore this aspect, we analyzed hepatic transcriptional dynamics in Sprague-Dawley rats over a period of 24 hours to assess the genome-wide responses. Results Using an unsupervised consensus clustering method, we identified four major gene expression clusters, corresponding to central carbon and nitrogen metabolism, membrane integrity, immune function, and DNA repair, all of which have dynamics which suggest regulation in a circadian manner. With the assumption that transcription factors (TFs) that are differentially expressed and contain CLOCK:BMAL1 binding sites on their proximal promoters are likely to be clock-controlled TFs, we were able to use promoter analysis to putatively identify additional clock-controlled TFs besides PARF and RORA families. These TFs are both functionally and temporally related to the clusters they regulate. Furthermore, we also identified significant sets of clock TFs that are potentially transcriptional regulators of gene clusters. Conclusions All together, we were able to propose a regulatory structure for circadian regulation which represents alternative paths for circadian control of different functions within the liver. Our prediction has been affirmed by functional and temporal analyses which are able to extend for similar studies. PMID:24666587

  19. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis by Shade Relies on Specific Subsets of Antagonistic Transcription Factors and Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Toledo-Ortiz, Gabriela; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Cifuentes-Esquivel, Nicolas; Halliday, Karen J; Martinez-García, Jaime F; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Carotenoids are photosynthetic pigments essential for the protection against excess light. During deetiolation, their production is regulated by a dynamic repression-activation module formed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) and LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5). These transcription factors directly and oppositely control the expression of the gene encoding PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY), the first and main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. Antagonistic modules also regulate the responses of deetiolated plants to vegetation proximity and shade (i.e. to the perception of far-red light-enriched light filtered through or reflected from neighboring plants). These responses, aimed to adapt to eventual shading from plant competitors, include a reduced accumulation of carotenoids. Here, we show that PIF1 and related photolabile PIFs (but not photostable PIF7) promote the shade-triggered decrease in carotenoid accumulation. While HY5 does not appear to be required for this process, other known PIF antagonists were found to modulate the expression of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PSY gene and the biosynthesis of carotenoids early after exposure to shade. In particular, PHYTOCHROME-RAPIDLY REGULATED1, a transcriptional cofactor that prevents the binding of true transcription factors to their target promoters, was found to interact with PIF1 and hence directly induce PSY expression. By contrast, a change in the levels of the transcriptional cofactor LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR RED1, which also binds to PIF1 and other PIFs to regulate shade-related elongation responses, did not impact PSY expression or carotenoid accumulation. Our data suggest that the fine-regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in response to shade relies on specific modules of antagonistic transcriptional factors and cofactors.

  20. Molecular interplay between RNA polymerase and two transcriptional regulators in promoter switch.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Ana; Salas, Margarita

    2004-02-13

    Transcription regulation relies in the molecular interplay between the RNA polymerase (RNAP) and regulatory factors. Phage phi29 promoters A2c, A2b and A3 are coordinately regulated by the transcriptional regulator protein p4 and the histone-like protein p6. This study shows that protein p4 binds simultaneously to four sites: sites 1 and 2 located between promoters A2c and A2b and sites 3 and 4 between promoters A2b and A3, placed in such a way that bound p4 is equidistant from promoters A2c and A2b and one helix turn further upstream from promoter A3. The p4 molecules bound to sites 1 and 3 reorganise the binding of protein p6, giving rise to the nucleoprotein complex responsible for the switch from early to late transcription. We identify the positioning of the alphaCTD-RNAP domain at these promoters, and demonstrate that the domains are crucial for promoter A2b recognition and required for full activity of promoter A2c. Since binding of RNAP overlaps with p4 and p6 binding, repression of the early transcription relies on the synergy of the regulators able to antagonize the stable binding of the RNAP through competition for the same target, while activation of late transcription is carried out through the stabilization of the RNAP by the p4/p6 nucleoprotein complex. The control of promoters A2c and A2b by feed-back regulation is discussed.

  1. Revealing natural antisense transcripts from Plasmodium vivax isolates: evidence of genome regulation in complicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, P A; Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Pakalapati, Deepak; Saxena, Vishal; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Chand, Bipin; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Kochar, Sanjay K; Sirohi, Parmendra; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2013-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most geographically widespread human malaria parasite causing approximately 130-435 million infections annually. It is an economic burden in many parts of the world and poses a public health challenge along with the other Plasmodium sp. The biology of this parasite is less studied and poorly understood, in spite of these facts. Emerging evidence of severe complications due to infections by this parasite provides an impetus to focus research on the same. Investigating the parasite directly from infected patients is the best way to study its biology and pathogenic mechanisms. Gene expression studies of this parasite directly obtained from the patients has provided evidence of gene regulation resulting in varying amount of transcript levels in the different blood stages. The mechanisms regulating gene expression in malaria parasites are not well understood. Discovery of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NATs) in Plasmodium falciparum has suggested that these might play an important role in regulating gene expression. We report here the genome-wide occurrence of NATs in P. vivax parasites from patients with differing clinical symptoms. A total of 1348 NATs against annotated gene loci have been detected using a custom designed microarray with strand specific probes. Majority of NATs identified from this study shows positive correlation with the expression pattern of the sense (S) transcript. Our data also shows condition specific expression patterns of varying S and antisense (AS) transcript levels. Genes with AS transcripts enrich to various biological processes. To our knowledge this is the first report on the presence of NATs from P. vivax obtained from infected patients with different disease complications. The data suggests differential regulation of gene expression in diverse clinical conditions, as shown by differing sense/antisense ratios and would lead to future detailed investigations of gene regulation.

  2. Identification and transcript profiles of citrus growth-regulating factor genes involved in the regulation of leaf and fruit development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Guo, Ling-Xia; Jin, Long-Fei; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Liu, Tao; Fan, Yu-Hua; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2016-10-01

    Growth-regulating factor (GRF) is an important protein in GA-mediated response, with key roles in plant growth and development. However, it is not known whether or how the GRF proteins in citrus to regulate organ size. In this study, nine citrus GRF genes (CsGRF1-9) were validated from the 'Anliu' sweet orange (AL, Citrus sinensis cv. Anliu) by PCR amplification. They all contain two conserved motifs (QLQ and WRC) and have 3-4 exons. The transcript levels of genes were detected by qRT-PCR. Transcript analysis showed that (1) CsGRF 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 9 expressed predominantly in young leaf, CsGRF 3 and 4 expressed predominantly in fruit immature juice sacs and CsGRF 8 expressed predominantly in root; (2) all citrus GRF genes had significantly higher expression in young leaves than mature leaf; (3) in juice sacs, the transcript levels of CsGRF1, 4, 5, 6, and 8 increased significantly while the transcript levels of CsGRF2, 3, 7, and 9 had no significant change from 80 DAF to 100 DAF. Besides, GA3 treatment did not affect the transcript levels of CsGRF5 and CsGRF6 but significantly increased the transcript levels of the other seven CsGRF genes in young leaves. These results suggested that all CsGRF genes involve in the leaf development, CsGRF1, 4, 5, 6, and 8 act developmentally whilst CsGRF2, 3, 7, and 9 play fundamental roles in fruit cell enlargement, which may be through GA pathway or GA-independent pathway.

  3. Differences in expression, actions and cocaine regulation of two isoforms for the brain transcriptional regulator NAC1.

    PubMed

    Korutla, L; Wang, P J; Lewis, D M; Neustadter, J H; Stromberg, M F; Mackler, S A

    2002-01-01

    BTB/POZ proteins can influence the cell cycle and contribute to oncogenesis. Many family members are present in the mammalian CNS. Previous work demonstrated elevated NAC1 mRNA levels in the rat nucleus accumbens in response to cocaine. NAC1 acts like other BTB/POZ proteins that regulate transcription but is unusual because of the absence of identifiable DNA binding domains. cDNAs were isolated encoding two NAC1 isoforms differing by only 27 amino acids (the longer isoform contains 514 amino acids). The mRNAs for both isoforms were simultaneously expressed throughout the rat brain and peripheral tissues. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the mRNA of the longer isoform was more abundant than the mRNA of the shorter isoform. Western blot analysis demonstrated a similar unequal distribution between the isoforms in the CNS. The longer isoform was the more abundant of the two NAC1 proteins and the ratio between them differed throughout the rat brain. The shorter isoform was not detected in most of the examined peripheral tissues, suggesting differences from the CNS in post-transcriptional processing. Both isoforms repressed transcription in H293T cells using a Gal4-luciferase reporter system. However, the shorter isoform did not repress transcription as effectively as the longer isoform. Transfection of different ratios for both isoforms, in order to replicate the relative amounts observed throughout the CNS, supported an interaction between the isoforms. The net effect on transcriptional repression was determined by the ratio of the two NAC1 isoforms. Each isoform exhibited the subnuclear localization that is characteristic of many BTB/POZ proteins. A rapid and transient increase in the level of the shorter isoform occurred in the nucleus accumbens 2 h following a single i.p. cocaine injection. We conclude that the two isoforms of NAC1 may differentially affect neuronal functions, including the regulation of

  4. Identification and transcript profiles of citrus growth-regulating factor genes involved in the regulation of leaf and fruit development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Guo, Ling-Xia; Jin, Long-Fei; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Liu, Tao; Fan, Yu-Hua; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2016-10-01

    Growth-regulating factor (GRF) is an important protein in GA-mediated response, with key roles in plant growth and development. However, it is not known whether or how the GRF proteins in citrus to regulate organ size. In this study, nine citrus GRF genes (CsGRF1-9) were validated from the 'Anliu' sweet orange (AL, Citrus sinensis cv. Anliu) by PCR amplification. They all contain two conserved motifs (QLQ and WRC) and have 3-4 exons. The transcript levels of genes were detected by qRT-PCR. Transcript analysis showed that (1) CsGRF 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 9 expressed predominantly in young leaf, CsGRF 3 and 4 expressed predominantly in fruit immature juice sacs and CsGRF 8 expressed predominantly in root; (2) all citrus GRF genes had significantly higher expression in young leaves than mature leaf; (3) in juice sacs, the transcript levels of CsGRF1, 4, 5, 6, and 8 increased significantly while the transcript levels of CsGRF2, 3, 7, and 9 had no significant change from 80 DAF to 100 DAF. Besides, GA3 treatment did not affect the transcript levels of CsGRF5 and CsGRF6 but significantly increased the transcript levels of the other seven CsGRF genes in young leaves. These results suggested that all CsGRF genes involve in the leaf development, CsGRF1, 4, 5, 6, and 8 act developmentally whilst CsGRF2, 3, 7, and 9 play fundamental roles in fruit cell enlargement, which may be through GA pathway or GA-independent pathway. PMID:27491940

  5. DNA dynamics play a role as a basal transcription factor in the positioning and regulation of gene transcription initiation

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Boian S.; Gelev, Vladimir; Yoo, Sang Wook; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Fukuyo, Yayoi; Bishop, Alan R.; Rasmussen, Kim Ø.; Usheva, Anny

    2010-01-01

    We assess the role of DNA breathing dynamics as a determinant of promoter strength and transcription start site (TSS) location. We compare DNA Langevin dynamic profiles of representative gene promoters, calculated with the extended non-linear PBD model of DNA with experimental data on transcription factor binding and transcriptional activity. Our results demonstrate that DNA dynamic activity at the TSS can be suppressed by mutations that do not affect basal transcription factor binding–DNA contacts. We use this effect to establish the separate contributions of transcription factor binding and DNA dynamics to transcriptional activity. Our results argue against a purely ‘transcription factor-centric’ view of transcription initiation, suggesting that both DNA dynamics and transcription factor binding are necessary conditions for transcription initiation. PMID:20019064

  6. Sarcosine Catabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Transcriptionally Regulated by SouR

    PubMed Central

    Willsey, Graham G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sarcosine (N-methylglycine) is present in many environments inhabited by pseudomonads and is likely most often encountered as an intermediate in the metabolism of choline, carnitine, creatine, and glyphosate. While the enzymology of sarcosine metabolism has been relatively well studied in bacteria, the regulatory mechanisms governing catabolism have remained largely unknown. We previously determined that the sarcosine-catabolic (sox) operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is induced by the AraC family regulator GbdR in response to glycine betaine and dimethylglycine. However, induction of these genes was still observed in response to sarcosine in a gbdR deletion mutant, indicating that an independent sarcosine-responsive transcription factor also acted at this locus. Our goal in this study was to identify and characterize this regulator. Using a transposon-based genetic screen, we identified PA4184, or SouR (sarcosine oxidation and utilization regulator), as the sarcosine-responsive regulator of the sox operon, with tight induction specificity for sarcosine. The souR gene is required for appreciable growth on sarcosine as a carbon and nitrogen source. We also characterized the transcriptome response to sarcosine governed by SouR using microarray analyses and performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays to identify promoters directly regulated by the transcription factor. Finally, we characterized PA3630, or GfnR (glutathione-dependent formaldehyde neutralization regulator), as the regulator of the glutathione-dependent formaldehyde detoxification system in P. aeruginosa that is expressed in response to formaldehyde released during the catabolism of sarcosine. This study expands our understanding of sarcosine metabolic regulation in bacteria through the identification and characterization of the first known sarcosine-responsive transcriptional regulator. IMPORTANCE The Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome encodes many diverse metabolic pathways, yet the specific

  7. TORC1 Regulates Developmental Responses to Nitrogen Stress via Regulation of the GATA Transcription Factor Gaf1

    PubMed Central

    Laor, Dana; Cohen, Adiel; Kupiec, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The TOR (target of rapamycin [sirolimus]) is a universally conserved kinase that couples nutrient availability to cell growth. TOR complex 1 (TORC1) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe positively regulates growth in response to nitrogen availability while suppressing cellular responses to nitrogen stress. Here we report the identification of the GATA transcription factor Gaf1 as a positive regulator of the nitrogen stress-induced gene isp7+, via three canonical GATA motifs. We show that under nitrogen-rich conditions, TORC1 positively regulates the phosphorylation and cytoplasmic retention of Gaf1 via the PP2A-like phosphatase Ppe1. Under nitrogen stress conditions when TORC1 is inactivated, Gaf1 becomes dephosphorylated and enters the nucleus. Gaf1 was recently shown to negatively regulate the transcription induction of ste11+, a major regulator of sexual development. Our findings support a model of a two-faceted role of Gaf1 during nitrogen stress. Gaf1 positively regulates genes that are induced early in the response to nitrogen stress, while inhibiting later responses, such as sexual development. Taking these results together, we identify Gaf1 as a novel target for TORC1 signaling and a step-like mechanism to modulate the nitrogen stress response. PMID:26152587

  8. Topology and Control of the Cell-Cycle-Regulated Transcriptional Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Steven B.; Wittenberg, Curt

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 20% of the budding yeast genome is transcribed periodically during the cell division cycle. The precise temporal execution of this large transcriptional program is controlled by a large interacting network of transcriptional regulators, kinases, and ubiquitin ligases. Historically, this network has been viewed as a collection of four coregulated gene clusters that are associated with each phase of the cell cycle. Although the broad outlines of these gene clusters were described nearly 20 years ago, new technologies have enabled major advances in our understanding of the genes comprising those clusters, their regulation, and the complex regulatory interplay between clusters. More recently, advances are being made in understanding the roles of chromatin in the control of the transcriptional program. We are also beginning to discover important regulatory interactions between the cell-cycle transcriptional program and other cell-cycle regulatory mechanisms such as checkpoints and metabolic networks. Here we review recent advances and contemporary models of the transcriptional network and consider these models in the context of eukaryotic cell-cycle controls. PMID:24395825

  9. Clustered Transcription Factor Genes Regulate Nicotine Biosynthesis in Tobacco[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tsubasa; Kajikawa, Masataka; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) synthesizes nicotine and related pyridine alkaloids in the root, and their synthesis increases upon herbivory on the leaf via a jasmonate-mediated signaling cascade. Regulatory NIC loci that positively regulate nicotine biosynthesis have been genetically identified, and their mutant alleles have been used to breed low-nicotine tobacco varieties. Here, we report that the NIC2 locus, originally called locus B, comprises clustered transcription factor genes of an ethylene response factor (ERF) subfamily; in the nic2 mutant, at least seven ERF genes are deleted altogether. Overexpression, suppression, and dominant repression experiments using transgenic tobacco roots showed both functional redundancy and divergence among the NIC2-locus ERF genes. These transcription factors recognized a GCC-box element in the promoter of a nicotine pathway gene and specifically activated all known structural genes in the pathway. The NIC2-locus ERF genes are expressed in the root and upregulated by jasmonate with kinetics that are distinct among the members. Thus, gene duplication events generated a cluster of highly homologous transcription factor genes with transcriptional and functional diversity. The NIC2-locus ERFs are close homologs of ORCA3, a jasmonate-responsive transcriptional activator of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus, indicating that the NIC2/ORCA3 ERF subfamily was recruited independently to regulate jasmonate-inducible secondary metabolism in distinct plant lineages. PMID:20959558

  10. Regulation of Human RNA Polymerase III Transcription by DNMT1 and DNMT3a DNA Methyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Tharakeswari; Gjidoda, Alison; Hovde, Stacy L.; Henry, R. William

    2012-01-01

    The human small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and small cytoplasmic RNA (scRNA) gene families encode diverse non-coding RNAs that influence cellular growth and division. Many snRNA and scRNA genes are related via their compact and yet powerful promoters that support RNA polymerase III transcription. We have utilized the human U6 snRNA gene family to examine the mechanism for regulated transcription of these potent transcription units. Analysis of nine U6 family members showed enriched CpG density within the promoters of actively transcribed loci relative to inert genes, implying a relationship between gene potency and DNA methylation. Indeed, both pharmacological inhibition of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and the forced diminution of DNMT-1, DNMT-3a, and DNMT-3b by siRNA targeting resulted in increased U6 levels in asynchronously growing MCF7 adenocarcinoma cells. In vitro transcription assays further showed that template methylation impedes U6 transcription by RNA polymerase III. Both DNMT-1 and DNMT-3a were detected at the U6-1 locus by chromatin immunoprecipitation directly linking these factors to RNA polymerase III regulation. Despite this association, the endogenous U6-1 locus was not substantially methylated in actively growing cells. However, both DNMT occupancy and low frequency methylation were correlated with increased Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) expression, suggesting that the RB status can influence specific epigenetic marks. PMID:22219193

  11. Regulation of CAPRICE transcription by MYB proteins for root epidermis differentiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Koshino-Kimura, Yoshihiro; Wada, Takuji; Tachibana, Tatsuhiko; Tsugeki, Ryuji; Ishiguro, Sumie; Okada, Kiyotaka

    2005-06-01

    Epidermal cell differentiation in Arabidopsis root is studied as a model system for understanding cell fate specification. Two types of MYB-related transcription factors are involved in this cell differentiation. One of these, CAPRICE (CPC), encoding an R3-type MYB protein, is a positive regulator of hair cell differentiation and is preferentially transcribed in hairless cells. We analyzed the regulatory mechanism of CPC transcription. Deletion analyses of the CPC promoter revealed that hairless cell-specific transcription of the CPC gene required a 69 bp sequence, and a tandem repeat of this region was sufficient for its expression in epidermis. This region includes two MYB-binding sites, and the epidermis-specific transcription of CPC was abolished when base substitutions were introduced in these sites. We showed by gel mobility shift experiments and by yeast one-hybrid assay that WEREWOLF (WER), which is an R2R3-type MYB protein, directly binds to this region. We showed that WER also binds to the GL2 promoter region, indicating that WER directly regulates CPC and GL2 transcription by binding to their promoter regions.

  12. Binding Motifs in Bacterial Gene Promoters Modulate Transcriptional Effects of Global Regulators CRP and ArcA

    PubMed Central

    Leuze, Michael R.; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Syed, Mustafa H.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Uberbacher, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TF) that bind to DNA recognition sequences in operon promoters. These recognition sequences, many of which are palindromic, are known as regulatory elements or transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Some TFs are global regulators that can modulate the expression of hundreds of genes. In this study we examine global regulator half-sites, where a half-site, which we shall call a binding motif (BM), is one half of a palindromic TFBS. We explore the hypothesis that the number of BMs plays an important role in transcriptional regulation, examining empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP and ArcA regulons. We compare the power of BM counts and of full TFBS characteristics to predict induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full TFBS quality or location. PMID:22701314

  13. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effects of global regulators CRP and ArcA

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Mike; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Syed, Mustafa H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2012-05-30

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TF) that bind to DNA recognition sequences in operon promoters. These recognition sequences, many of which are palindromic, are known as regulatory elements or transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Some TFs are global regulators that can modulate the expression of hundreds of genes. In this study we examine global regulator half-sites, where a half-site, which we shall call a binding motif (BM), is one half of a palindromic TFBS. We explore the hypothesis that the number of BMs plays an important role in transcriptional regulation, examining empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP and ArcA regulons. We compare the power of BM counts and of full TFBS characteristics to predict induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full TFBS quality or location.

  14. Intragenic motifs regulate the transcriptional complexity of Pkhd1/PKHD1

    PubMed Central

    Boddu, Ravindra; Yang, Chaozhe; O’Connor, Amber K.; Hendrickson, Robert Curtis; Boone, Braden; Cui, Xiangqin; Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel; Igarashi, Peter; Onuchic, Luiz F.; Germino, Gregory G.

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) results from mutations in the human PKHD1 gene. Both this gene, and its mouse ortholog, Pkhd1, are primarily expressed in renal and biliary ductal structures. The mouse protein product, fibrocystin/polyductin complex (FPC), is a 445-kDa protein encoded by a 67-exon transcript that spans >500 kb of genomic DNA. In the current study, we observed multiple alternatively spliced Pkhd1 transcripts that varied in size and exon composition in embryonic mouse kidney, liver, and placenta samples, as well as among adult mouse pancreas, brain, heart, lung, testes, liver, and kidney. Using reverse transcription PCR and RNASeq, we identified 22 novel Pkhd1 kidney transcripts with unique exon junctions. Various mechanisms of alternative splicing were observed, including exon skipping, use of alternate acceptor/donor splice sites, and inclusion of novel exons. Bioinformatic analyses identified, and exon-trapping minigene experiments validated, consensus binding sites for serine/arginine-rich proteins that modulate alternative splicing. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we examined the functional importance of selected splice enhancers. In addition, we demonstrated that many of the novel transcripts were polysome bound, thus likely translated. Finally, we determined that the human PKHD1 R760H missense variant alters a splice enhancer motif that disrupts exon splicing in vitro and is predicted to truncate the protein. Taken together, these data provide evidence of the complex transcriptional regulation of Pkhd1/PKHD1 and identified motifs that regulate its splicing. Our studies indicate that Pkhd1/PKHD1 transcription is modulated, in part by intragenic factors, suggesting that aberrant PKHD1 splicing represents an unappreciated pathogenic mechanism in ARPKD. PMID:24984783

  15. Transcriptional coactivator p300 regulates glucose-induced gene expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shali; Feng, Biao; George, Biju; Chakrabarti, Rana; Chen, Megan; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2010-01-01

    Sustained hyperglycemia in diabetes causes alteration of a large number of transcription factors and mRNA transcripts, leading to tissue damage. We investigated whether p300, a transcriptional coactivator with histone acetyl transferase activity, regulates glucose-induced activation of transcription factors and subsequent upregulation of vasoactive factors and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were incubated in varied glucose concentrations and were studied after p300 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection, p300 overexpression, or incubation with the p300 inhibitor curcumin. Histone H2AX phosphorylation and lysine acetylation were examined for oxidative DNA damage and p300 activation. Screening for transcription factors was performed with the Luminex system. Alterations of selected transcription factors were validated. mRNA expression of p300, endothelin-1 (ET-1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and fibronectin (FN) and its splice variant EDB(+)FN and FN protein production were analyzed. HUVECs in 25 mmol/l glucose showed increased p300 production accompanied by increased binding of p300 to ET-1 and FN promoters, augmented histone acetylation, H2AX phosphorylation, activation of multiple transcription factors, and increased mRNA expression of vasoactive factors and ECM proteins. p300 overexpression showed a glucose-like effect on the mRNA expression of ET-1, VEGF, and FN. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated p300 blockade or chemical inhibitor of p300 prevented such glucose-induced changes. Similar mRNA upregulation was also seen in the organ culture of vascular tissues, which was prevented by p300 siRNA transfection. Data from these studies suggest that glucose-induced p300 upregulation is an important upstream epigenetic mechanism regulating gene expression of vasoactive factors and ECM proteins in endothelial cells and is a potential therapeutic target for diabetic complications.

  16. Characterization of the ROK-family transcriptional regulator RokA of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39.

    PubMed

    Shafeeq, Sulman; Kloosterman, Tomas G; Rajendran, Vijayanand; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2012-12-01

    The Gram-positive human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae possesses an unusually high number of gene clusters specific for carbohydrate utilization. This provides it with the ability to use a wide array of sugars, which may aid during infection and survival in different environmental conditions present in the host. In this study, the regulatory mechanism of transcription of a gene cluster, SPD0424-8, putatively encoding a cellobiose/lactose-specific phosphotransferase system is investigated. We demonstrate that this gene cluster is transcribed as one transcriptional unit directed by the promoter of the SPD0424 gene. Upstream of SPD0424, a gene was identified encoding a ROK-family transcriptional regulator (RokA: SPD0423). DNA microarray and transcriptional reporter analyses with a rokA mutant revealed that RokA acts as a transcriptional repressor of the SPD0424-8 operon. Furthermore, we identified a 25 bp AT-rich DNA operator site (5'-TATATTTAATTTATAAAAAATAAAA-3') in the promoter region of SPD0424, which was validated by promoter truncation studies, DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility-shift assays. We tested a large range of different sugars for their effect on the expression of the SPD0424-8 operon, but only moderate variation in expression was observed in the conditions applied. Therefore, a co-factor for RokA-mediated transcriptional control could not be identified. PMID:23082033

  17. Transcriptional Regulation and the Diversification of Metabolism in Wine Yeast Strains

    PubMed Central

    Rossouw, Debra; Jacobson, Dan; Bauer, Florian F.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors and their binding sites have been proposed as primary targets of evolutionary adaptation because changes to single transcription factors can lead to far-reaching changes in gene expression patterns. Nevertheless, there is very little concrete evidence for such evolutionary changes. Industrial wine yeast strains, of the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are a geno- and phenotypically diverse group of organisms that have adapted to the ecological niches of industrial winemaking environments and have been selected to produce specific styles of wine. Variation in transcriptional regulation among wine yeast strains may be responsible for many of the observed differences and specific adaptations to different fermentative conditions in the context of commercial winemaking. We analyzed gene expression profiles of wine yeast strains to assess the impact of transcription factor expression on metabolic networks. The data provide new insights into the molecular basis of variations in gene expression in industrial strains and their consequent effects on metabolic networks important to wine fermentation. We show that the metabolic phenotype of a strain can be shifted in a relatively predictable manner by changing expression levels of individual transcription factors, opening opportunities to modify transcription networks to achieve desirable outcomes. PMID:22042577

  18. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-09-01

    BACKGROUND: Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. RESULTS: We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. CONCLUSION: Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled.

  19. Bacillus subtilis δ Factor Functions as a Transcriptional Regulator by Facilitating the Open Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Sengupta, Shreya; Rudra, Paulami; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2016-01-15

    Most bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAP) contain five conserved subunits, viz. 2α, β, β', and ω. However, in many Gram-positive bacteria, especially in fermicutes, RNAP is associated with an additional factor, called δ. For over three decades since its identification, it had been thought that δ functioned as a subunit of RNAP to enhance the level of transcripts by recycling RNAP. In support of the previous observations, we also find that δ is involved in recycling of RNAP by releasing the RNA from the ternary complex. We further show that δ binds to RNA and is able to recycle RNAP when the length of the nascent RNA reaches a critical length. However, in this work we decipher a new function of δ. Performing biochemical and mutational analysis, we show that Bacillus subtilis δ binds to DNA immediately upstream of the promoter element at A-rich sequences on the abrB and rrnB1 promoters and facilitates open complex formation. As a result, δ facilitates RNAP to initiate transcription in the second scale, compared with minute scale in the absence of δ. Using transcription assay, we show that δ-mediated recycling of RNAP cannot be the sole reason for the enhancement of transcript yield. Our observation that δ does not bind to RNAP holo enzyme but is required to bind to DNA upstream of the -35 promoter element for transcription activation suggests that δ functions as a transcriptional regulator.

  20. Lineage-specific transcriptional regulation of DICER by MITF in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Carmit; Khaled, Mehdi; Robinson, Kathleen C; Veguilla, Rosa A; Chen, Po-Hao; Yokoyama, Satoru; Makino, Eiichi; Lu, Jun; Larue, Lionel; Beermann, Friedrich; Chin, Lynda; Bosenberg, Marcus; Song, Jun S; Fisher, David E

    2010-06-11

    DICER is a central regulator of microRNA maturation. However, little is known about mechanisms regulating its expression in development or disease. While profiling miRNA expression in differentiating melanocytes, two populations were observed: some upregulated at the pre-miRNA stage, and others upregulated as mature miRNAs (with stable pre-miRNA levels). Conversion of pre-miRNAs to fully processed miRNAs appeared to be dependent upon stimulation of DICER expression--an event found to occur via direct transcriptional targeting of DICER by the melanocyte master transcriptional regulator MITF. MITF binds and activates a conserved regulatory element upstream of DICER's transcriptional start site upon melanocyte differentiation. Targeted KO of DICER is lethal to melanocytes, at least partly via DICER-dependent processing of the pre-miRNA-17 approximately 92 cluster thus targeting BIM, a known proapoptotic regulator of melanocyte survival. These observations highlight a central mechanism underlying lineage-specific miRNA regulation which could exist for other cell types during development. PMID:20550935

  1. Regulation of Virulence of Entamoeba histolytica by the URE3-BP Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Carol A; Moore, Ellyn S; Zhang, Yan; Bousquet, Christina B; Lannigan, Joanne A; Mann, Barbara J; Petri, William A

    2010-05-18

    It is not understood why only some infections with Entamoeba histolytica result in disease. The calcium-regulated transcription factor upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP) was initially identified by virtue of its role in regulating the expression of two amebic virulence genes, the Gal/GalNac lectin and ferredoxin. Here we tested whether this transcription factor has a broader role in regulating virulence. A comparison of in vivo to in vitro parasite gene expression demonstrated that 39% of in vivo regulated transcripts contained the URE3 motif recognized by URE3-BP, compared to 23% of all promoters (P < 0.0001). Amebae induced to express a dominant positive mutant form of URE3-BP had an increase in an elongated morphology (30% +/- 6% versus 14% +/- 5%; P = 0.001), a 2-fold competitive advantage at invading the intestinal epithelium (P = 0.017), and a 3-fold increase in liver abscess size (0.1 +/- 0.1 g versus 0.036 +/- 0.1 g; P = 0.03). These results support a role for URE3-BP in virulence regulation.

  2. TRIM45 negatively regulates NF-{kappa}B-mediated transcription and suppresses cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Mio; Sato, Tomonobu; Nukiwa, Ryota; Ariga, Tadashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B plays an important role in cell survival and carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRIM45 negatively regulates TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B-mediated transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRIM45 overexpression suppresses cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRIM45 acts as a repressor for the NF-{kappa}B signal and regulates cell growth. -- Abstract: The NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway plays an important role in cell survival, immunity, inflammation, carcinogenesis, and organogenesis. Activation of NF-{kappa}B is regulated by several posttranslational modifications including phosphorylation, neddylation and ubiquitination. The NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway is activated by two distinct signaling mechanisms and is strictly modulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. It has been reported that overexpression of TRIM45, one of the TRIM family ubiquitin ligases, suppresses transcriptional activities of Elk-1 and AP-1, which are targets of the MAPK signaling pathway. In this study, we showed that TRIM45 also negatively regulates TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B-mediated transcription by a luciferase reporter assay and that TRIM45 lacking a RING domain also has an activity to inhibit the NF-{kappa}B signal. Moreover, we found that TRIM45 overexpression suppresses cell growth. These findings suggest that TRIM45 acts as a repressor for the NF-{kappa}B signal and regulates cell growth.

  3. Transcription factors and microRNA-co-regulated genes in gastric cancer invasion in ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yue; Wang, Jihan; Xin, Zhuoyuan; Duan, Zipeng; Wang, Guoqing; Li, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression abnormally modulates gene expression in cells and can contribute to tumorigenesis in humans. This study identified functionally relevant differentially expressed genes using the transcription factors and miRNA-co-regulated network analysis for gastric cancer. The TF-miRNA co-regulatory network was constructed based on data obtained from cDNA microarray and miRNA expression profiling of gastric cancer tissues. The network along with their co-regulated genes was analyzed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database (TRED). We found eighteen (17 up-regulated and 1 down-regulated) differentially expressed genes that were co-regulated by transcription factors and miRNAs. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that these genes were part of the extracellular matrix-receptor interaction and focal adhesion signaling pathways. In addition, qRT- PCR and Western blot data showed an increase in COL1A1 and decrease in NCAM1 mRNA and protein levels in gastric cancer tissues. Thus, these data provided the first evidence to illustrate that altered gene network was associated with gastric cancer invasion. Further study with a large sample size and more functional experiments is needed to confirm these data and contribute to diagnostic and treatment strategies for gastric cancer.

  4. Transcription Factors and microRNA-Co-Regulated Genes in Gastric Cancer Invasion in Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yue; Wang, Jihan; Xin, Zhuoyuan; Duan, Zipeng; Wang, Guoqing; Li, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression abnormally modulates gene expression in cells and can contribute to tumorigenesis in humans. This study identified functionally relevant differentially expressed genes using the transcription factors and miRNA-co-regulated network analysis for gastric cancer. The TF-miRNA co-regulatory network was constructed based on data obtained from cDNA microarray and miRNA expression profiling of gastric cancer tissues. The network along with their co-regulated genes was analyzed using Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID) and Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database (TRED). We found eighteen (17 up-regulated and 1 down-regulated) differentially expressed genes that were co-regulated by transcription factors and miRNAs. KEGG pathway analysis revealed that these genes were part of the extracellular matrix-receptor interaction and focal adhesion signaling pathways. In addition, qRT- PCR and Western blot data showed an increase in COL1A1 and decrease in NCAM1 mRNA and protein levels in gastric cancer tissues. Thus, these data provided the first evidence to illustrate that altered gene network was associated with gastric cancer invasion. Further study with a large sample size and more functional experiments is needed to confirm these data and contribute to diagnostic and treatment strategies for gastric cancer. PMID:25860484

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the Chlamydia heat shock stress response in an intracellular infection

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Brett R.; Tan, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacteria encode heat shock proteins that aid in survival during stressful growth conditions. In addition, the major heat shock proteins of the intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis have been associated with immune pathology and disease. We developed a ChIP-qPCR method to study the regulation of chlamydial heat shock gene regulation during an intracellular infection. This approach allowed us to show that chlamydial heat shock genes are regulated by the transcription factor HrcA within an infected cell, providing validation for previous in vitro findings. Induction of chlamydial heat shock gene expression by elevated temperature was due to loss of HrcA binding to heat shock promoters, supporting a mechanism of derepression. This heat shock response was rapid, while recovery of HrcA binding and return to non-stress transcript levels occurred more slowly. We also found that control of heat shock gene expression was differentially regulated over the course of the intracellular Chlamydia infection. There was evidence of HrcA-mediated regulation of heat shock genes throughout the chlamydial developmental cycle but the level of repression was lower at early times. This is the first study of Chlamydia-infected cells showing the effect of an environmental signal on transcription factor-DNA binding and target gene expression in the bacterium. PMID:26075961

  6. The Transcription Factor DLX3 Regulates the Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Follicle Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Viale-Bouroncle, Sandra; Felthaus, Oliver; Schmalz, Gottfried; Brockhoff, Gero; Reichert, Torsten E

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor DLX3 plays a decisive role in bone development of vertebrates. In neural-crest derived stem cells from the dental follicle (DFCs), DLX3 is differentially expressed during osteogenic differentiation, while other osteogenic transcription factors such as DLX5 or RUNX2 are not highly induced. DLX3 has therefore a decisive role in the differentiation of DFCs, but its actual biological effects and regulation are unknown. This study investigated the DLX3-regulated processes in DFCs. After DLX3 overexpression, DFCs acquired a spindle-like cell shape with reorganized actin filaments. Here, marker genes for cell morphology, proliferation, apoptosis, and osteogenic differentiation were significantly regulated as shown in a microarray analysis. Further experiments showed that DFCs viability is directly influenced by the expression of DLX3, for example, the amount of apoptotic cells was increased after DLX3 silencing. This transcription factor stimulates the osteogenic differentiation of DFCs and regulates the BMP/SMAD1-pathway. Interestingly, BMP2 did highly induce DLX3 and reverse the inhibitory effect of DLX3 silencing in osteogenic differentiation. However, after DLX3 overexpression in DFCs, a BMP2 supplementation did not improve the expression of DLX3 and the osteogenic differentiation. In conclusion, DLX3 influences cell viability and regulates osteogenic differentiation of DFCs via a BMP2-dependent pathway and a feedback control. PMID:22107079

  7. Interplay Between Transcription Factors and MicroRNAs Regulating Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transitions in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaller, Markus; Hermeking, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) represents a morphogenetic program involved in developmental processes such as gastrulation and neural crest formation. The EMT program is co-opted by epithelial tumor cells and endows them with features necessary for spreading to distant sites, such as invasion, migration, apoptosis resistance and stemness. Thereby, EMT facilitates metastasis formation and therapy resistance. A growing number of transcription factors has been implicated in the regulation of EMT. These include EMT-inducing transcription factors (EMT-TFs), the most prominent being SNAIL, SLUG, ZEB1, ZEB2 and TWIST, and negative regulators of EMT, such as p53. Furthermore, a growing number of microRNAs, such as members of the miR-200 and miR-34 family, have been characterized as negative regulators of EMT. EMT-TFs and microRNAs, such as ZEB1/2 and miR-200 or SNAIL and miR-34, are often engaged in double-negative feedback loops forming bistable switches controlling the transitions from epithelial to the mesenchymal cell states. Within this chapter, we will provide a comprehensive overview over the transcription factors and microRNAs that have been implicated in the regulation of EMT in colorectal cancer. Furthermore, we will highlight the regulatory connections between EMT-TFs and miRNAs to illustrate common principles of their interaction that regulate EMTs. PMID:27573895

  8. DuOx2 Promoter Regulation by Hormones, Transcriptional Factors and the Coactivator TAZ.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Weide, L C; Cardoso-Penha, R C; Costa, M W; Ferreira, A C F; Carvalho, D P; Santisteban, P S

    2015-03-01

    The production of H2O2, which is essential to thyroid hormone synthesis, involves two NADPH oxidases: dual oxidases 1 and 2 (DuOx1 and DuOx2). A functional study with human DuOx genes and their 5'-flanking regions showed that DuOx1 and -2 promoters are different from thyroid-specific gene promoters. Furthermore, their transcriptional activities are not restricted to thyroid cells. While regulation of Tg (thyroglobulin) and TPO (thyroperoxidase) expression have been extensively studied, DuOx2 promoter regulation by hormones and transcriptional factors need to be more explored. Herein we investigated the role of TSH, insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), as well as the cAMP effect on DuOx2 promoter (ptx41) activity in transfected rat thyroid cell lines (PCCL3). We also assessed DuOx2 promoter activity in the presence of transcriptional factors crucial to thyroid development such as TTF-1 (thyroid transcription factor 1), PAX8, CREB, DREAM, Nkx2.5 and the coactivator TAZ in HeLa and HEK 293T-transfected cells. Our results show that TSH and forskolin, which increase cAMP in thyroid cells, stimulated DuOx2 promoter activity. IGF-1 led to pronounced stimulation, while insulin induction was not statistically different from DuOx2 promoter basal activity. All transcriptional factors selected for this work and coactivator TAZ, except DREAM, stimulated DuOx2 promoter activity. Moreover, Nkx2.5 and TAZ synergistically increased DuOx2 promoter activity. In conclusion, we show that DuOx2 expression is regulated by hormones and transcription factors involved in thyroid organogenesis and carcinogenesis, reinforcing the importance of the control of H2O2 generation in the thyroid. PMID:25960956

  9. FUsed in Sarcoma Is a Novel Regulator of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Sanjit Kumar; Zhang, Jiayu; Gal, Jozsef; Xu, Yong; Miao, Lu; Lynn, Bert C.; Zhu, Haining; Kasarskis, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: FUsed in sarcoma (FUS) is a multifunctional DNA/RNA-binding protein that possesses diverse roles, such as RNA splicing, RNA transport, DNA repair, translation, and transcription. The network of enzymes and processes regulated by FUS is far from being fully described. In this study, we have focused on the mechanisms of FUS-regulated manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) gene transcription. Results: Here we demonstrate that FUS is a component of the transcription complex that regulates the expression of MnSOD. Overexpression of FUS increased MnSOD expression in a dose-dependent manner and knockdown of FUS by siRNA led to the inhibition of MnSOD gene transcription. Reporter analyses, chromatin immunoprecipit