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Sample records for mixta-like transcriptional regulator

  1. MIXTA-like transcription factors and WAX INDUCER1/SHINE1 coordinately regulate cuticle development in Arabidopsis and Torenia fournieri.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yoshimi; Shikata, Masahito; Koyama, Tomotsugu; Ohtsubo, Norihiro; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2013-05-01

    The waxy plant cuticle protects cells from dehydration, repels pathogen attack, and prevents organ fusion during development. The transcription factor WAX INDUCER1/SHINE1 (WIN1/SHN1) regulates the biosynthesis of waxy substances in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we show that the MIXTA-like MYB transcription factors MYB106 and MYB16, which regulate epidermal cell morphology, also regulate cuticle development coordinately with WIN1/SHN1 in Arabidopsis and Torenia fournieri. Expression of a MYB106 chimeric repressor fusion (35S:MYB106-SRDX) and knockout/down of MYB106 and MYB16 induced cuticle deficiencies characterized by organ adhesion and reduction of epicuticular wax crystals and cutin nanoridges. A similar organ fusion phenotype was produced by expression of a WIN1/SHN1 chimeric repressor. Conversely, the dominant active form of MYB106 (35S:MYB106-VP16) induced ectopic production of cutin nanoridges and increased expression of WIN1/SHN1 and wax biosynthetic genes. Microarray experiments revealed that MYB106 and WIN1/SHN1 regulate similar sets of genes, predominantly those involved in wax and cutin biosynthesis. Furthermore, WIN1/SHN1 expression was induced by MYB106-VP16 and repressed by MYB106-SRDX. These results indicate that the regulatory cascade of MIXTA-like proteins and WIN1/SHN1 coordinately regulate cutin biosynthesis and wax accumulation. This study reveals an additional key aspect of MIXTA-like protein function and suggests a unique relationship between cuticle development and epidermal cell differentiation.

  2. The MIXTA-like transcription factor MYB16 is a major regulator of cuticle formation in vegetative organs.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Yoshimi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka

    2013-11-01

    Cuticle secreted on the surface of the epidermis of aerial organs protects plants from the external environment. We recently found that Arabidopsis MIXTA-like R2R3-MYB family members MYB16 and MYB106 regulate cuticle formation in reproductive organs and trichomes. However, the artificial miRNA (amiRNA)-mediated knockdown plants showed no clear phenotypic abnormality in vegetative tissues. In this study, we used RNA interference (RNAi) targeting MYB16 to produce plants with reduced expression of both MYB16 and MYB106. The rosette leaves of RNAi plants showed more severe permeable cuticle phenotypes than the myb106 mutants expressing the MYB16 amiRNA in the previous study. The RNAi plants also showed reduced expression of cuticle biosynthesis genes LACERATA and ECERIFERUM1. By contrast, expression of a gain-of-function MYB16 construct induced over-accumulation of waxy substances on leaves. These results suggest that MYB16 functions as a major regulator of cuticle formation in vegetative organs, in addition to its effect in reproductive organs and trichomes.

  3. The Tomato MIXTA-Like Transcription Factor Coordinates Fruit Epidermis Conical Cell Development and Cuticular Lipid Biosynthesis and Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lashbrooke, Justin; Adato, Avital; Lotan, Orfa; Alkan, Noam; Tsimbalist, Tatiana; Rechav, Katya; Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Widemann, Emilie; Grausem, Bernard; Pinot, Franck; Granell, Antonio; Costa, Fabrizio; Aharoni, Asaph

    2015-12-01

    The epidermis of aerial plant organs is the primary source of building blocks forming the outer surface cuticular layer. To examine the relationship between epidermal cell development and cuticle assembly in the context of fruit surface, we investigated the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MIXTA-like gene. MIXTA/MIXTA-like proteins, initially described in snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) petals, are known regulators of epidermal cell differentiation. Fruit of transgenically silenced SlMIXTA-like tomato plants displayed defects in patterning of conical epidermal cells. They also showed altered postharvest water loss and resistance to pathogens. Transcriptome and cuticular lipids profiling coupled with comprehensive microscopy revealed significant modifications to cuticle assembly and suggested SlMIXTA-like to regulate cutin biosynthesis. Candidate genes likely acting downstream of SlMIXTA-like included cytochrome P450s (CYPs) of the CYP77A and CYP86A subfamilies, LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE2, GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE SN-2-ACYLTRANSFERASE4, and the ATP-BINDING CASSETTE11 cuticular lipids transporter. As part of a larger regulatory network of epidermal cell patterning and L1-layer identity, we found that SlMIXTA-like acts downstream of SlSHINE3 and possibly cooperates with homeodomain Leu zipper IV transcription factors. Hence, SlMIXTA-like is a positive regulator of both cuticle and conical epidermal cell formation in tomato fruit, acting as a mediator of the tight association between fruit cutin polymer formation, cuticle assembly, and epidermal cell patterning.

  4. The Tomato MIXTA-Like Transcription Factor Coordinates Fruit Epidermis Conical Cell Development and Cuticular Lipid Biosynthesis and Assembly1

    PubMed Central

    Lotan, Orfa; Alkan, Noam; Tsimbalist, Tatiana; Rechav, Katya; Fernandez-Moreno, Josefina-Patricia; Widemann, Emilie; Grausem, Bernard; Pinot, Franck; Costa, Fabrizio; Aharoni, Asaph

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis of aerial plant organs is the primary source of building blocks forming the outer surface cuticular layer. To examine the relationship between epidermal cell development and cuticle assembly in the context of fruit surface, we investigated the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) MIXTA-like gene. MIXTA/MIXTA-like proteins, initially described in snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus) petals, are known regulators of epidermal cell differentiation. Fruit of transgenically silenced SlMIXTA-like tomato plants displayed defects in patterning of conical epidermal cells. They also showed altered postharvest water loss and resistance to pathogens. Transcriptome and cuticular lipids profiling coupled with comprehensive microscopy revealed significant modifications to cuticle assembly and suggested SlMIXTA-like to regulate cutin biosynthesis. Candidate genes likely acting downstream of SlMIXTA-like included cytochrome P450s (CYPs) of the CYP77A and CYP86A subfamilies, LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE2, GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE SN-2-ACYLTRANSFERASE4, and the ATP-BINDING CASSETTE11 cuticular lipids transporter. As part of a larger regulatory network of epidermal cell patterning and L1-layer identity, we found that SlMIXTA-like acts downstream of SlSHINE3 and possibly cooperates with homeodomain Leu zipper IV transcription factors. Hence, SlMIXTA-like is a positive regulator of both cuticle and conical epidermal cell formation in tomato fruit, acting as a mediator of the tight association between fruit cutin polymer formation, cuticle assembly, and epidermal cell patterning. PMID:26443676

  5. Promoters of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 genes of Artemisia annua direct reporter gene expression in glandular and non-glandular trichomes

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Sunita; Longchar, Bendangchuchang; Singh, Alka; Gupta, Vikrant

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report cloning and analysis of promoters of GLABRA2 (AaGL2) homolog and a MIXTA-Like (AaMIXTA-Like1) gene from Artemisia annua. The upstream regulatory regions of AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 showed the presence of several crucial cis-acting elements. Arabidopsis and A. annua seedlings were transiently transfected with the promoter-GUS constructs using a robust agro-infiltration method. Both AaGL2 and AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters showed GUS expression preferentially in Arabidopsis single-celled trichomes and glandular as well as T-shaped trichomes of A. annua. Transgenic Arabidopsis harboring constructs in which AaGL2 or AaMIXTA-Like1 promoters would control GFP expression, showed fluorescence emanating specifically from trichome cells. Our study provides a fast and efficient method to study trichome-specific expression, and 2 promoters that have potential for targeted metabolic engineering in plants. PMID:26340695

  6. Transcription Regulation in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Alexandra M.; Walker, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    The known diversity of metabolic strategies and physiological adaptations of archaeal species to extreme environments is extraordinary. Accurate and responsive mechanisms to ensure that gene expression patterns match the needs of the cell necessitate regulatory strategies that control the activities and output of the archaeal transcription apparatus. Archaea are reliant on a single RNA polymerase for all transcription, and many of the known regulatory mechanisms employed for archaeal transcription mimic strategies also employed for eukaryotic and bacterial species. Novel mechanisms of transcription regulation have become apparent by increasingly sophisticated in vivo and in vitro investigations of archaeal species. This review emphasizes recent progress in understanding archaeal transcription regulatory mechanisms and highlights insights gained from studies of the influence of archaeal chromatin on transcription. PMID:27137495

  7. Regulation of Transcript Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria lack subcellular compartments and harbor a single RNA polymerase that synthesizes both structural and protein-coding RNAs, which are cotranscriptionally processed by distinct pathways. Nascent rRNAs fold into elaborate secondary structures and associate with ribosomal proteins, whereas nascent mRNAs are translated by ribosomes. During elongation, nucleic acid signals and regulatory proteins modulate concurrent RNA-processing events, instruct RNA polymerase where to pause and terminate transcription, or act as roadblocks to the moving enzyme. Communications among complexes that carry out transcription, translation, repair, and other cellular processes ensure timely execution of the gene expression program and survival under conditions of stress. This network is maintained by auxiliary proteins that act as bridges between RNA polymerase, ribosome, and repair enzymes, blurring boundaries between separate information-processing steps and making assignments of unique regulatory functions meaningless. Understanding the regulation of transcript elongation thus requires genome-wide approaches, which confirm known and reveal new regulatory connections. PMID:26132790

  8. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  9. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-24

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  10. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics. PMID:28233824

  11. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  12. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription. PMID:25482231

  13. Informational Requirements for Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Patrick K.; Forder, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Transcription factors (TFs) regulate transcription by binding to specific sites in promoter regions. Information theory provides a useful mathematical framework to analyze the binding motifs associated with TFs but imposes several assumptions that limit their applicability to specific regulatory scenarios. Explicit simulations of the co-evolution of TFs and their binding motifs allow the study of the evolution of regulatory networks with a high degree of realism. In this work we analyze the impact of differential regulatory demands on the information content of TF-binding motifs by means of evolutionary simulations. We generalize a predictive index based on information theory, and we validate its applicability to regulatory scenarios in which the TF binds significantly to the genomic background. Our results show a logarithmic dependence of the evolved information content on the occupancy of target sites and indicate that TFs may actively exploit pseudo-sites to modulate their occupancy of target sites. In regulatory networks with differentially regulated targets, we observe that information content in TF-binding motifs is dictated primarily by the fraction of total probability mass that the TF assigns to its target sites, and we provide a predictive index to estimate the amount of information associated with arbitrarily complex regulatory systems. We observe that complex regulatory patterns can exert additional demands on evolved information content, but, given a total occupancy for target sites, we do not find conclusive evidence that this effect is because of the range of required binding affinities. PMID:24689750

  14. Transcriptional regulation of cuticle biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Borisjuk, Nikolai; Hrmova, Maria; Lopato, Sergiy

    2014-01-01

    Plant cuticle is the hydrophobic protection layer that covers aerial plant organs and plays a pivotal role during plant development and interactions of plants with the environment. The mechanical structure and chemical composition of cuticle lipids and other secondary metabolites vary considerably between plant species, and in response to environmental stimuli and stresses. As the cuticle plays an important role in responses of plants to major abiotic stresses such as drought and high salinity, close attention has been paid to molecular processes underlying the stress-induced biosynthesis of cuticle components. This review addresses the genetic networks responsible for cuticle formation and in particular highlights the role of transcription factors that regulate cuticle formation in response to abiotic stresses.

  15. Nickel-responsive transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Musiani, Francesco; Zambelli, Barbara; Bazzani, Micaela; Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Nickel is an essential micronutrient for a large number of living organisms, but it is also a toxic metal ion when it accumulates beyond the sustainable level as it may result if and when its cellular trafficking is not properly governed. Therefore, the homeostasis and metabolism of nickel is tightly regulated through metal-specific protein networks that respond to the available Ni(II) concentration. These are directed by specific nickel sensors, able to couple Ni(II) binding to a change in their DNA binding affinity and/or specificity, thus translating the cellular level of Ni(II) into a modification of the expression of the proteins devoted to modulating nickel uptake, efflux and cellular utilization. This review describes the Ni(II)-dependent transcriptional regulators discovered so far, focusing on their structural features, metal coordination modes and metal binding thermodynamics. Understanding these properties is essential to comprehend how these sensors correlate nickel availability to metal coordination and functional responses. A broad and comparative study, described here, reveals some general traits that characterize the binding stoichiometry and Ni(II) affinity of these metallo-sensors.

  16. Agouti regulates adipocyte transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, R L; Stephens, J M

    2001-04-01

    Agouti is a secreted paracrine factor that regulates pigmentation in hair follicle melanocytes. Several dominant mutations cause ectopic expression of agouti, resulting in a phenotype characterized by yellow fur, adult-onset obesity and diabetes, increased linear growth and skeletal mass, and increased susceptibility to tumors. Humans also produce agouti protein, but the highest levels of agouti in humans are found in adipose tissue. To mimic the human agouti expression pattern in mice, transgenic mice (aP2-agouti) that express agouti in adipose tissue were generated. The transgenic mice develop a mild form of obesity, and they are sensitized to the action of insulin. We correlated the levels of specific regulators of insulin signaling and adipocyte differentiation with these phenotypic changes in adipose tissue. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)1, STAT3, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma protein levels were elevated in the transgenic mice. Treatment of mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes recapitulated these effects. These data demonstrate that agouti has potent effects on adipose tissue. We hypothesize that agouti increases adiposity and promotes insulin sensitivity by acting directly on adipocytes via PPAR-gamma.

  17. Transcriptional Regulation by Hypoxia Inducible Factors

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Joaquín M.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular response to oxygen deprivation is governed largely by a family of transcription factors known as Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIFs). This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which HIFs regulate the transcriptional apparatus to enable the cellular and organismal response to hypoxia. We discuss here how the various HIF polypeptides, their post-translational modifications, binding partners and transcriptional cofactors affect RNA polymerase II activity to drive context-dependent transcriptional programs during hypoxia. PMID:24099156

  18. Differential regulation of a MYB transcription factor is correlated with transgenerational epigenetic inheritance of trichome density in Mimulus guttatus

    PubMed Central

    Scoville, Alison G.; Barnett, Laryssa L.; Bodbyl-Roels, Sarah; Kelly, John K.; Hileman, Lena C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Epigenetic inheritance, transgenerational transmission of traits not proximally determined by DNA sequence, has been linked to transmission of chromatin modifications and gene regulation, which are known to be sensitive to environmental factors. Mimulus guttatus increases trichome (plant hair) density in response to simulated herbivore damage. Increased density is expressed in progeny even if progeny do not experience damage. To better understand epigenetic inheritance of trichome production, we tested the hypothesis that candidate gene expression states are inherited in response to parental damage.Using M. guttatus recombinant inbred lines, offspring of leaf-damaged and control plants were raised without damage. Relative expression of candidate trichome development genes was measured in offspring. Line and parental damage effects on trichome density were measured. Associations between gene expression, trichome density, and response to parental damage were determined.We identified M. guttatus MYB MIXTA-like 8 as a possible negative regulator of trichome development. We found that parental leaf damage induces down-regulation of MYB MIXTA-like 8 in progeny, which is associated with epigenetically inherited increased trichome density.Our results link epigenetic transmission of an ecologically important trait with differential gene expression states – providing insight into a mechanism underlying environmentally induced ‘soft inheritance’. PMID:21352232

  19. Histone variants in plant transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danhua; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin based organization of eukaryotic genome plays a profound role in regulating gene transcription. Nucleosomes form the basic subunits of chromatin by packaging DNA with histone proteins, impeding the access of DNA to transcription factors and RNA polymerases. Exchange of histone variants in nucleosomes alters the properties of nucleosomes and thus modulates DNA exposure during transcriptional regulation. Growing evidence indicates the important function of histone variants in programming transcription during developmental transitions and stress response. Here we review how histone variants and their deposition machineries regulate the nucleosome stability and dynamics, and discuss the link between histone variants and transcriptional regulation in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  20. Regulating transcription traffic around DSBs.

    PubMed

    Plosky, Brian S

    2015-05-07

    If a double-strand break (DSB) occurs and either a DNA polymerase or RNA polymerase is coming along, how do we save the train? In this issue of Molecular Cell, Ui et al. (2015) describe a connection between an elongation factor and a repressive complex to prevent transcription in proximity to a DSB.

  1. Combinatorial Regulation in Yeast Transcription Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao

    2006-03-01

    Yeast has evolved a complex network to regulate its transcriptional program in response to changes in environment. It is quite common that in response to an external stimulus, several transcription factors will be activated and they work in combinations to control different subsets of genes in the genome. We are interested in how the promoters of genes are designed to integrate signals from multiple transcription factors and what are the functional and evolutionary constraints. To answer how, we have developed a number of computational algorithms to systematically map the binding sites and target genes of transcription factors using sequence and gene expression data. To analyze the functional constraints, we have employed mechanistic models to study the dynamic behavior of genes regulated by multiple factors. We have also developed methods to trace the evolution of transcriptional networks via comparative analysis of multiple species.

  2. Catching transcriptional regulation by thermostatistical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Till D.; Cheong, Alex; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is frequently regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Thermostatistical methods allow for a quantitative description of interactions between TFs, RNA polymerase and DNA, and their impact on the transcription rates. We illustrate three different scales of the thermostatistical approach: the microscale of TF molecules, the mesoscale of promoter energy levels and the macroscale of transcriptionally active and inactive cells in a cell population. We demonstrate versatility of combinatorial transcriptional activation by exemplifying logic functions, such as AND and OR gates. We discuss a metric for cell-to-cell transcriptional activation variability known as Fermi entropy. Suitability of thermostatistical modeling is illustrated by describing the experimental data on transcriptional induction of NFκB and the c-Fos protein.

  3. Mechanisms of mutational robustness in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Joshua L.; Wagner, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Robustness is the invariance of a phenotype in the face of environmental or genetic change. The phenotypes produced by transcriptional regulatory circuits are gene expression patterns that are to some extent robust to mutations. Here we review several causes of this robustness. They include robustness of individual transcription factor binding sites, homotypic clusters of such sites, redundant enhancers, transcription factors, redundant transcription factors, and the wiring of transcriptional regulatory circuits. Such robustness can either be an adaptation by itself, a byproduct of other adaptations, or the result of biophysical principles and non-adaptive forces of genome evolution. The potential consequences of such robustness include complex regulatory network topologies that arise through neutral evolution, as well as cryptic variation, i.e., genotypic divergence without phenotypic divergence. On the longest evolutionary timescales, the robustness of transcriptional regulation has helped shape life as we know it, by facilitating evolutionary innovations that helped organisms such as flowering plants and vertebrates diversify. PMID:26579194

  4. Identifying Novel Transcriptional Regulators with Circadian Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Sandra; Thakurela, Sudhir; Fournier, David; Hampel, Mareike Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    Organisms adapt their physiology and behavior to the 24-h day-night cycle to which they are exposed. On a cellular level, this is regulated by intrinsic transcriptional-translational feedback loops that are important for maintaining the circadian rhythm. These loops are organized by members of the core clock network, which further regulate transcription of downstream genes, resulting in their circadian expression. Despite progress in understanding circadian gene expression, only a few players involved in circadian transcriptional regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long noncoding RNAs, are known. Aiming to discover such genes, we performed a high-coverage transcriptome analysis of a circadian time course in murine fibroblast cells. In combination with a newly developed algorithm, we identified many transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long intergenic noncoding RNAs that are cyclically expressed. In addition, a number of these genes also showed circadian expression in mouse tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of one such factor, Zfp28, influenced the core clock network. Mathematical modeling was able to predict putative regulator-effector interactions between the identified circadian genes and may help for investigations into the gene regulatory networks underlying circadian rhythms. PMID:26644408

  5. Transcriptional Regulation and Macrophage Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hume, David A; Summers, Kim M; Rehli, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are professional phagocytes that occupy specific niches in every tissue of the body. Their survival, proliferation, and differentiation are controlled by signals from the macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor (CSF-1R) and its two ligands, CSF-1 and interleukin-34. In this review, we address the developmental and transcriptional relationships between hematopoietic progenitor cells, blood monocytes, and tissue macrophages as well as the distinctions from dendritic cells. A huge repertoire of receptors allows monocytes, tissue-resident macrophages, or pathology-associated macrophages to adapt to specific microenvironments. These processes create a broad spectrum of macrophages with different functions and individual effector capacities. The production of large transcriptomic data sets in mouse, human, and other species provides new insights into the mechanisms that underlie macrophage functional plasticity.

  6. Transcriptional regulation at the yeast nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Steglich, Babett; Sazer, Shelley; Ekwall, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The spatial organization of the genome inside the nucleus affects many nuclear processes, such as DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. In metazoans, the nuclear periphery harbors mainly repressed genes that associate with the nuclear lamina. This review discusses how peripheral positioning is connected to transcriptional regulation in yeasts. Tethering of reporter genes to the nuclear envelope was found to result in transcriptional silencing. Similarly, repression of the silent mating type loci and subtelomeric genes is influenced by their position close to the nuclear envelope. In contrast, active genes are bound by nucleoporins and inducible genes associate with the nuclear pore complex upon activation. Taken together, these results portray the nuclear envelope as a platform for transcriptional regulation, both through activation at nuclear pores and silencing at the nuclear envelope. PMID:24021962

  7. Transcriptional Regulation: It Takes a Village

    PubMed Central

    Panning, Barbara; Taatjes, Dylan J.

    2015-01-01

    A FASEB conference on “Transcriptional Regulation during Cell Growth, Differentiation and Development” met in June, 2008, just outside of Aspen in Snowmass Village, Colorado. The meeting covered a broad range of topics, including the structure of transcription factors (TFs), Preinitiation Complex (PIC) assembly, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) pausing, genome-wide patterns of histone modifications, and the role of TFs in development. PMID:18775322

  8. The evolution of transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, Gregory A.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Abouheif, Ehab; Balhoff, James P.; Pizer, Margaret; Rockman, Matthew V.; Romano, Laura A.

    2003-01-01

    Gene expression is central to the genotype-phenotype relationship in all organisms, and it is an important component of the genetic basis for evolutionary change in diverse aspects of phenotype. However, the evolution of transcriptional regulation remains understudied and poorly understood. Here we review the evolutionary dynamics of promoter, or cis-regulatory, sequences and the evolutionary mechanisms that shape them. Existing evidence indicates that populations harbor extensive genetic variation in promoter sequences, that a substantial fraction of this variation has consequences for both biochemical and organismal phenotype, and that some of this functional variation is sorted by selection. As with protein-coding sequences, rates and patterns of promoter sequence evolution differ considerably among loci and among clades for reasons that are not well understood. Studying the evolution of transcriptional regulation poses empirical and conceptual challenges beyond those typically encountered in analyses of coding sequence evolution: promoter organization is much less regular than that of coding sequences, and sequences required for the transcription of each locus reside at multiple other loci in the genome. Because of the strong context-dependence of transcriptional regulation, sequence inspection alone provides limited information about promoter function. Understanding the functional consequences of sequence differences among promoters generally requires biochemical and in vivo functional assays. Despite these challenges, important insights have already been gained into the evolution of transcriptional regulation, and the pace of discovery is accelerating.

  9. The regulation of transcriptional repression in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Cheong, Alex; Taylor, Cormac T

    2017-02-20

    A sufficient supply molecular oxygen is essential for the maintenance of physiologic metabolism and bioenergetic homeostasis for most metazoans. For this reason, mechanisms have evolved for eukaryotic cells to adapt to conditions where oxygen demand exceeds supply (hypoxia). These mechanisms rely on the modification of pre-existing proteins, translational arrest and transcriptional changes. The hypoxia inducible factor (HIF; a master regulator of gene induction in response to hypoxia) is responsible for the majority of induced gene expression in hypoxia. However, much less is known about the mechanism(s) responsible for gene repression, an essential part of the adaptive transcriptional response. Hypoxia-induced gene repression leads to a reduction in energy demanding processes and the redirection of limited energetic resources to essential housekeeping functions. Recent developments have underscored the importance of transcriptional repressors in cellular adaptation to hypoxia. To date, at least ten distinct transcriptional repressors have been reported to demonstrate sensitivity to hypoxia. Central among these is the Repressor Element-1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST), which regulates over 200 genes. In this review, written to honor the memory and outstanding scientific legacy of Lorenz Poellinger, we provide an overview of our existing knowledge with respect to transcriptional repressors and their target genes in hypoxia.

  10. The Regulation of Transcription in Memory Consolidation

    PubMed Central

    Alberini, Cristina M.; Kandel, Eric R.

    2015-01-01

    De novo transcription of DNA is a fundamental requirement for the formation of long-term memory. It is required during both consolidation and reconsolidation, the posttraining and postreactivation phases that change the state of the memory from a fragile into a stable and long-lasting form. Transcription generates both mRNAs that are translated into proteins, which are necessary for the growth of new synaptic connections, as well as noncoding RNA transcripts that have regulatory or effector roles in gene expression. The result is a cascade of events that ultimately leads to structural changes in the neurons that mediate long-term memory storage. The de novo transcription, critical for synaptic plasticity and memory formation, is orchestrated by chromatin and epigenetic modifications. The complexity of transcription regulation, its temporal progression, and the effectors produced all contribute to the flexibility and persistence of long-term memory formation. In this article, we provide an overview of the mechanisms contributing to this transcriptional regulation underlying long-term memory formation. PMID:25475090

  11. The regulation of transcription in memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Alberini, Cristina M; Kandel, Eric R

    2014-12-04

    De novo transcription of DNA is a fundamental requirement for the formation of long-term memory. It is required during both consolidation and reconsolidation, the posttraining and postreactivation phases that change the state of the memory from a fragile into a stable and long-lasting form. Transcription generates both mRNAs that are translated into proteins, which are necessary for the growth of new synaptic connections, as well as noncoding RNA transcripts that have regulatory or effector roles in gene expression. The result is a cascade of events that ultimately leads to structural changes in the neurons that mediate long-term memory storage. The de novo transcription, critical for synaptic plasticity and memory formation, is orchestrated by chromatin and epigenetic modifications. The complexity of transcription regulation, its temporal progression, and the effectors produced all contribute to the flexibility and persistence of long-term memory formation. In this article, we provide an overview of the mechanisms contributing to this transcriptional regulation underlying long-term memory formation.

  12. Transcriptional regulation by post-transcriptional modification--role of phosphorylation in Sp1 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Chu, Shijian

    2012-10-15

    Sp1 is a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor involved in the regulation of a large number of genes including housekeeping genes as well as actively regulated genes. Although Sp1 was discovered nearly three decades ago, its functional diversity is still not completely understood. One of the ways that make Sp1 versatile in transcriptional regulation is its post-transcriptional modification, which alters Sp1 structure in different cells and at different times. Compared to other types of modifications of the Sp1 protein, phosphorylation has been studied far more extensively. This review focuses on the inducers, pathways, enzymes, and biological effects of Sp1 phosphorylation. Recent data are beginning to reveal the biological significance and universal presence of Sp1 phosphorylation-related cell/molecular responses. Studies in this field provide a quick glance at how a simple chemical modification of a transcription factor could produce significant functional diversity of the protein.

  13. An overview on transcriptional regulators in Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Romero-Rodríguez, Alba; Robledo-Casados, Ivonne; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Streptomyces are Gram-positive microorganisms able to adapt and respond to different environmental conditions. It is the largest genus of Actinobacteria comprising over 900 species. During their lifetime, these microorganisms are able to differentiate, produce aerial mycelia and secondary metabolites. All of these processes are controlled by subtle and precise regulatory systems. Regulation at the transcriptional initiation level is probably the most common for metabolic adaptation in bacteria. In this mechanism, the major players are proteins named transcription factors (TFs), capable of binding DNA in order to repress or activate the transcription of specific genes. Some of the TFs exert their action just like activators or repressors, whereas others can function in both manners, depending on the target promoter. Generally, TFs achieve their effects by using one- or two-component systems, linking a specific type of environmental stimulus to a transcriptional response. After DNA sequencing, many streptomycetes have been found to have chromosomes ranging between 6 and 12Mb in size, with high GC content (around 70%). They encode for approximately 7000 to 10,000 genes, 50 to 100 pseudogenes and a large set (around 12% of the total chromosome) of regulatory genes, organized in networks, controlling gene expression in these bacteria. Among the sequenced streptomycetes reported up to now, the number of transcription factors ranges from 471 to 1101. Among these, 315 to 691 correspond to transcriptional regulators and 31 to 76 are sigma factors. The aim of this work is to give a state of the art overview on transcription factors in the genus Streptomyces.

  14. Switching on cilia: transcriptional networks regulating ciliogenesis.

    PubMed

    Choksi, Semil P; Lauter, Gilbert; Swoboda, Peter; Roy, Sudipto

    2014-04-01

    Cilia play many essential roles in fluid transport and cellular locomotion, and as sensory hubs for a variety of signal transduction pathways. Despite having a conserved basic morphology, cilia vary extensively in their shapes and sizes, ultrastructural details, numbers per cell, motility patterns and sensory capabilities. Emerging evidence indicates that this diversity, which is intimately linked to the different functions that cilia perform, is in large part programmed at the transcriptional level. Here, we review our understanding of the transcriptional control of ciliary biogenesis, highlighting the activities of FOXJ1 and the RFX family of transcriptional regulators. In addition, we examine how a number of signaling pathways, and lineage and cell fate determinants can induce and modulate ciliogenic programs to bring about the differentiation of distinct cilia types.

  15. TRANSFAC: transcriptional regulation, from patterns to profiles.

    PubMed

    Matys, V; Fricke, E; Geffers, R; Gössling, E; Haubrock, M; Hehl, R; Hornischer, K; Karas, D; Kel, A E; Kel-Margoulis, O V; Kloos, D-U; Land, S; Lewicki-Potapov, B; Michael, H; Münch, R; Reuter, I; Rotert, S; Saxel, H; Scheer, M; Thiele, S; Wingender, E

    2003-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on eukaryotic transcriptional regulation, comprising data on transcription factors, their target genes and regulatory binding sites, has been extended and further developed, both in number of entries and in the scope and structure of the collected data. Structured fields for expression patterns have been introduced for transcription factors from human and mouse, using the CYTOMER database on anatomical structures and developmental stages. The functionality of Match, a tool for matrix-based search of transcription factor binding sites, has been enhanced. For instance, the program now comes along with a number of tissue-(or state-)specific profiles and new profiles can be created and modified with Match Profiler. The GENE table was extended and gained in importance, containing amongst others links to LocusLink, RefSeq and OMIM now. Further, (direct) links between factor and target gene on one hand and between gene and encoded factor on the other hand were introduced. The TRANSFAC public release is available at http://www.gene-regulation.com. For yeast an additional release including the latest data was made available separately as TRANSFAC Saccharomyces Module (TSM) at http://transfac.gbf.de. For CYTOMER free download versions are available at http://www.biobase.de:8080/index.html.

  16. Epigenetic regulation of transcription in intermediate heterochromatin.

    PubMed

    Habu, Yoshiki; Mathieu, Olivier; Tariq, Muhammad; Probst, Aline V; Smathajitt, Chotika; Zhu, Tong; Paszkowski, Jerzy

    2006-12-01

    Constitutive heterochromatin is a compact, transcriptionally inert structure formed in gene-poor and repeat- and transposon-rich regions. In Arabidopsis, constitutive heterochromatin is characterized by hypermethylated DNA and histone H3 dimethylated at lysine (K) 9 (H3K9me2) together with depletion of histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me2). Here, we describe loci with intermediate properties of heterochromatin in which transcription downregulation is inherited in a manner similar to constitutive heterochromatin, although the loci are associated with opposing histone marks--H3K4me2 and H3K9me2. In the ddm1 (decrease in DNA methylation 1) mutants, their transcriptional activation is accompanied by the expected shift in the H3 modifications--depletion of H3K9me2 and enrichment in H3K4me2. In mom1 (Morpheus' molecule 1) mutants, however, a marked increase in transcription is not accompanied by detectable changes in the levels of H3K4me2 and H3K9me2. Therefore, transcriptional regulation in the intermediate heterochromatin involves two distinct epigenetic mechanisms. Interestingly, silent transgenic inserts seem to acquire properties characteristic of the intermediate heterochromatin.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Teng, Yingqi; Zeisberg, Michael; Kalluri, Raghu

    2007-02-01

    It has become increasingly obvious that the notion of a terminally differentiated cell is likely a simplified concept. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), during which epithelial cells assume a mesenchymal phenotype, is a key event occurring during normal development and pathological processes. Multiple extracellular stimuli and transcriptional regulators can trigger EMT, but how such distinct signaling pathways orchestrate the complex cellular events that facilitate EMT is not well understood. In this issue of the JCI, Venkov et al. report on their examination of fibroblasts resulting from EMT and describe a novel protein-DNA complex that is essential for transcription of fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP1) and sufficient to induce early EMT events (see the related article beginning on page 482). Collectively, their results suggest that this complex is an important regulator of the EMT transcriptome.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Yingqi; Zeisberg, Michael; Kalluri, Raghu

    2007-01-01

    It has become increasingly obvious that the notion of a terminally differentiated cell is likely a simplified concept. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), during which epithelial cells assume a mesenchymal phenotype, is a key event occurring during normal development and pathological processes. Multiple extracellular stimuli and transcriptional regulators can trigger EMT, but how such distinct signaling pathways orchestrate the complex cellular events that facilitate EMT is not well understood. In this issue of the JCI, Venkov et al. report on their examination of fibroblasts resulting from EMT and describe a novel protein-DNA complex that is essential for transcription of fibroblast-specific protein 1 (FSP1) and sufficient to induce early EMT events (see the related article beginning on page 482). Collectively, their results suggest that this complex is an important regulator of the EMT transcriptome. PMID:17273552

  19. Epigenetic regulation of transcription in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Aishwarya; Gajan, Ambikai; Pile, Lori A

    2012-01-01

    Post-translational modification of histones is a major mechanism of epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic transcription. Drosophila has proven to be an important model system for the study of histone modifying enzymes and the cross talk that occurs between the various modifications. Polytene chromosome analysis and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies have provided much insight into the location of marks and many of the enzymes that perform the catalytic reactions. Gene specific effects have been determined through study of flies carrying mutations in histone modifying enzymes. This review will highlight classic studies and present recent progress on both the localization data and mutant analyses. This information has been used to assign function to the marks and to the enzymes that place or remove them, critical for the process of transcriptional regulation.

  20. The Mediator complex and transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Poss, Zachary C; Ebmeier, Christopher C; Taatjes, Dylan J

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator complex is a multi-subunit assembly that appears to be required for regulating expression of most RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcripts, which include protein-coding and most non-coding RNA genes. Mediator and pol II function within the pre-initiation complex (PIC), which consists of Mediator, pol II, TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIID, TFIIE, TFIIF and TFIIH and is approximately 4.0 MDa in size. Mediator serves as a central scaffold within the PIC and helps regulate pol II activity in ways that remain poorly understood. Mediator is also generally targeted by sequence-specific, DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) that work to control gene expression programs in response to developmental or environmental cues. At a basic level, Mediator functions by relaying signals from TFs directly to the pol II enzyme, thereby facilitating TF-dependent regulation of gene expression. Thus, Mediator is essential for converting biological inputs (communicated by TFs) to physiological responses (via changes in gene expression). In this review, we summarize an expansive body of research on the Mediator complex, with an emphasis on yeast and mammalian complexes. We focus on the basics that underlie Mediator function, such as its structure and subunit composition, and describe its broad regulatory influence on gene expression, ranging from chromatin architecture to transcription initiation and elongation, to mRNA processing. We also describe factors that influence Mediator structure and activity, including TFs, non-coding RNAs and the CDK8 module.

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of ornithine decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Nowotarski, Shannon L.; Origanti, Sofia; Shantz, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Activity of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and intracellular levels of ODC protein are controlled very tightly. Numerous studies have described ODC regulation at the levels of transcription, translation and protein degradation in normal cells, and dysregulation of these processes in response to oncogenic stimuli. Although post-transcriptional regulation of ODC has been well-documented, the RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that interact with ODC mRNA and control synthesis of the ODC protein have not been defined. Using Ras-transformed rat intestinal epithelial cells (Ras12V cells) as a model, we have begun identifying the RBPs that associate with the ODC transcript. Binding of RBPs could potentially regulate ODC synthesis by either changing mRNA stability or rate of mRNA translation. Techniques for measuring RBP binding and translation initiation are described here. Targeting control of ODC translation or mRNA decay could be a valuable method of limiting polyamine accumulation and subsequent tumor development in a variety of cancers. PMID:21318880

  2. Semantic integration of data on transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Baitaluk, Michael; Ponomarenko, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Experimental and predicted data concerning gene transcriptional regulation are distributed among many heterogeneous sources. However, there are no resources to integrate these data automatically or to provide a ‘one-stop shop’ experience for users seeking information essential for deciphering and modeling gene regulatory networks. Results: IntegromeDB, a semantic graph-based ‘deep-web’ data integration system that automatically captures, integrates and manages publicly available data concerning transcriptional regulation, as well as other relevant biological information, is proposed in this article. The problems associated with data integration are addressed by ontology-driven data mapping, multiple data annotation and heterogeneous data querying, also enabling integration of the user's data. IntegromeDB integrates over 100 experimental and computational data sources relating to genomics, transcriptomics, genetics, and functional and interaction data concerning gene transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Availability: IntegromeDB is accessible through the integrated research environment BiologicalNetworks at http://www.BiologicalNetworks.org Contact: baitaluk@sdsc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20427517

  3. Opposing Transcriptional Mechanisms Regulate Toxoplasma Development

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Dong-Pyo; Radke, Joshua B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Toxoplasma biology that underlies human chronic infection is developmental conversion of the acute tachyzoite stage into the latent bradyzoite stage. We investigated the roles of two alkaline-stress-induced ApiAP2 transcription factors, AP2IV-3 and AP2IX-9, in bradyzoite development. These factors were expressed in two overlapping waves during bradyzoite development, with AP2IX-9 increasing expression earlier than AP2IV-3, which peaked as AP2IX-9 expression was declining. Disruption of the AP2IX-9 gene enhanced, while deletion of AP2IV-3 gene decreased, tissue cyst formation, demonstrating that these factors have opposite functions in bradyzoite development. Conversely, conditional overexpression of FKBP-modified AP2IX-9 or AP2IV-3 with the small molecule Shield 1 had a reciprocal effect on tissue cyst formation, confirming the conclusions of the knockout experiments. The AP2IX-9 repressor and AP2IV-3 activator tissue cyst phenotypes were borne out in gene expression studies that determined that many of the same bradyzoite genes were regulated in an opposite manner by these transcription factors. A common gene target was the canonical bradyzoite marker BAG1, and mechanistic experiments determined that, like AP2IX-9, AP2IV-3 regulates a BAG1 promoter-luciferase reporter and specifically binds the BAG1 promoter in parasite chromatin. Altogether, these results suggest that the AP2IX-9 transcriptional repressor and the AP2IV-3 transcriptional activator likely compete to control bradyzoite gene expression, which may permit Toxoplasma to better adapt to different tissue environments and select a suitable host cell for long-term survival of the dormant tissue cyst. IMPORTANCE Toxoplasma infections are lifelong because of the development of the bradyzoite tissue cyst, which is effectively invisible to the immune system. Despite the important clinical consequences of this developmental pathway, the molecular basis of the switch mechanisms that control tissue

  4. Transcriptional Regulation of TMP21 by NFAT

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background TMP21 is a member of the p24 cargo protein family, which is involved in protein transport between the Golgi apparatus and ER. Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder leading to dementia and deposition of amyloid β protein (Aβ) is the pathological feature of AD pathogenesis. Knockdown of TMP21 expression by siRNA causes a sharp increase in Aβ production; however the underlying mechanism by which TMP21 regulates Aβ generation is unknown, and human TMP21 gene expression regulation has not yet been studied. Results In this report we have cloned a 3.3-kb fragment upstream of the human TMP21 gene. The transcription start site (TSS) of the human TMP21 gene was identified. A series of nested deletions of the 5' flanking region of the human TMP21 gene were subcloned into the pGL3-basic luciferase reporter plasmid. We identified the -120 to +2 region as containing the minimal sequence necessary for TMP21 gene promoter activity. Gel shift assays revealed that the human TMP21 gene promoter contains NFAT response elements. Expression of NFAT increased TMP21 gene expression and inhibition of NFAT by siRNA reduced TMP21 gene expression. Conclusion NFAT plays a very important role in the regulation of human TMP21 gene expression. This study demonstrates that the human TMP21 gene expression is transcriptionally regulated by NFAT signaling. PMID:21375783

  5. Peroxide-Sensing Transcriptional Regulators in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2012-01-01

    The ability to maintain intracellular concentrations of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) within safe limits is essential for all aerobic life forms. In bacteria, as well as other organisms, ROS are produced during the normal course of aerobic metabolism, necessitating the constitutive expression of ROS scavenging systems. However, bacteria can also experience transient high-level exposure to ROS derived either from external sources, such as the host defense response, or as a secondary effect of other seemingly unrelated environmental stresses. Consequently, transcriptional regulators have evolved to sense the levels of ROS and coordinate the appropriate oxidative stress response. Three well-studied examples of these are the peroxide responsive regulators OxyR, PerR, and OhrR. OxyR and PerR are sensors of primarily H2O2, while OhrR senses organic peroxide (ROOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). OxyR and OhrR sense oxidants by means of the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine residues. In contrast, PerR senses H2O2 via the Fe-catalyzed oxidation of histidine residues. These transcription regulators also influence complex biological phenomena, such as biofilm formation, the evasion of host immune responses, and antibiotic resistance via the direct regulation of specific proteins. PMID:22797754

  6. Peroxide-sensing transcriptional regulators in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dubbs, James M; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2012-10-01

    The ability to maintain intracellular concentrations of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) within safe limits is essential for all aerobic life forms. In bacteria, as well as other organisms, ROS are produced during the normal course of aerobic metabolism, necessitating the constitutive expression of ROS scavenging systems. However, bacteria can also experience transient high-level exposure to ROS derived either from external sources, such as the host defense response, or as a secondary effect of other seemingly unrelated environmental stresses. Consequently, transcriptional regulators have evolved to sense the levels of ROS and coordinate the appropriate oxidative stress response. Three well-studied examples of these are the peroxide responsive regulators OxyR, PerR, and OhrR. OxyR and PerR are sensors of primarily H(2)O(2), while OhrR senses organic peroxide (ROOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). OxyR and OhrR sense oxidants by means of the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine residues. In contrast, PerR senses H(2)O(2) via the Fe-catalyzed oxidation of histidine residues. These transcription regulators also influence complex biological phenomena, such as biofilm formation, the evasion of host immune responses, and antibiotic resistance via the direct regulation of specific proteins.

  7. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5’ upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile. PMID:28005945

  8. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation.

    PubMed

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5' upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile.

  9. Information flow and optimization in transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Tkacik, Gasper; Callan, Curtis G; Bialek, William

    2008-08-26

    In the simplest view of transcriptional regulation, the expression of a gene is turned on or off by changes in the concentration of a transcription factor (TF). We use recent data on noise levels in gene expression to show that it should be possible to transmit much more than just one regulatory bit. Realizing this optimal information capacity would require that the dynamic range of TF concentrations used by the cell, the input/output relation of the regulatory module, and the noise in gene expression satisfy certain matching relations, which we derive. These results provide parameter-free, quantitative predictions connecting independently measurable quantities. Although we have considered only the simplified problem of a single gene responding to a single TF, we find that these predictions are in surprisingly good agreement with recent experiments on the Bicoid/Hunchback system in the early Drosophila embryo and that this system achieves approximately 90% of its theoretical maximum information transmission.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of cranial sensory placode development

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Sally A.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Cranial sensory placodes derive from discrete patches of the head ectoderm, and give rise to numerous sensory structures. During gastrulation, a specialized “neural border zone” forms around the neural plate in response to interactions between the neural and non-neural ectoderm and signals from adjacent mesodermal and/or endodermal tissues. This zone subsequently gives rise to two distinct precursor populations of the peripheral nervous system: the neural crest and the pre-placodal ectoderm (PPE). The PPE is a common field from which all cranial sensory placodes arise (adenohypophyseal, olfactory, lens, trigeminal, epibranchial, otic). Members of the Six family of transcription factors are major regulators of PPE specification, in partnership with co-factor proteins such as Eya. Six gene activity also maintains tissue boundaries between the PPE, neural crest and epidermis by repressing genes that specify the fates of those adjacent ectodermally-derived domains. As the embryo acquires anterior-posterior identity, the PPE becomes transcriptionally regionalized, and it subsequently subdivides into specific placodes with distinct developmental fates in response to signaling from adjacent tissues. Each placode is characterized by a unique transcriptional program that leads to the differentiation of highly specialized cells, such as neurosecretory cells, somatic sensory receptor cells, chemosensory neurons, peripheral glia and supporting cells. In this review, we summarize the transcriptional and signaling factors that regulate key steps of placode development, influence subsequent sensory neuron specification, and discuss what is known about mutations in some of the essential PPE genes that underlie human congenital syndromes. PMID:25662264

  11. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian selenoprotein expression

    PubMed Central

    Stoytcheva, Zoia R.; Berry, Marla J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Selenoproteins contain the twenty-first amino acid, selenocysteine, and are involved in cellular defenses against oxidative damage, important metabolic and developmental pathways, and responses to environmental challenges. Elucidating the mechanisms regulating selenoprotein expression at the transcriptional level is key to understanding how these mechanisms are called into play to respond to the changing environment. Methods This review summarizes published studies on transcriptional regulation of selenoprotein genes, focused primarily on genes whose encoded protein functions are at least partially understood. This is followed by in silico analysis of predicted regulatory elements in selenoprotein genes, including those in the aforementioned category as well as the genes whose functions are not known. Results Our findings reveal regulatory pathways common to many selenoprotein genes, including several involved in stress-responses. In addition, tissue-specific regulatory factors are implicated in regulating many selenoprotein genes. Conclusions These studies provide new insights into how selenoprotein genes respond to environmental and other challenges, and the roles these proteins play in allowing cells to adapt to these changes. General Significance Elucidating the regulatory mechanisms affecting selenoprotein expression is essential for understanding their roles in human diseases, and for developing diagnostic and potential therapeutic approaches to address dysregulation of members of this gene family. PMID:19465084

  12. Transcriptional regulation of plant phosphate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Muchhal, Umesh S.; Raghothama, K. G.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphorus is acquired by plant roots primarily via the high-affinity inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. The transcripts for Pi transporters are highly inducible upon Pi starvation, which also results in enhanced Pi uptake when Pi is resupplied. Using antibodies specific to one of the tomato Pi transporters (encoded by LePT1), we show that an increase in the LePT1 transcript under Pi starvation leads to a concurrent increase in the transporter protein, suggesting a transcriptional regulation for Pi acquisition. LePT1 protein accumulates rapidly in tomato roots in response to Pi starvation. The level of transporter protein accumulation depends on the Pi concentration in the medium, and it is reversible upon resupply of Pi. LePT1 protein accumulates all along the roots under Pi starvation and is localized primarily in the plasma membranes. These results clearly demonstrate that plants increase their capacity for Pi uptake during Pi starvation by synthesis of additional transporter molecules. PMID:10318976

  13. Sumoylation and transcription regulation at nuclear pores.

    PubMed

    Texari, Lorane; Stutz, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that besides promoters, enhancers, and epigenetic modifications, nuclear organization is another parameter contributing to optimal control of gene expression. Although differences between species exist, the influence of gene positioning on expression seems to be a conserved feature from yeast to Drosophila and mammals. The nuclear periphery is one of the nuclear compartments implicated in gene regulation. It consists of the nuclear envelope (NE) and the nuclear pore complexes (NPC), which have distinct roles in the control of gene expression. The NPC has recently been shown to tether proteins involved in the sumoylation pathway. Here, we will focus on the importance of gene positioning and NPC-linked sumoylation/desumoylation in transcription regulation. We will mainly discuss observations made in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae model system and highlight potential parallels in metazoan species.

  14. Forkhead transcription factors regulate mosquito reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Immo A.; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Munro, James B.; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Cruz, Josefa; Lee, Iris W.; Heraty, John M.; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    Forkhead box (Fox) genes encode a family of transcription factors defined by a ‘winged helix’ DNA-binding domain. In this study we aimed to identify Fox factors that are expressed within the fat body of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, and determine whether any of these are involved in the regulation of mosquito yolk protein gene expression. The Ae. aegypti genome contains eighteen loci that encode putative Fox factors. Our stringent cladistic analysis has profound implications for the use of Fox genes as phylogenetic markers. Twelve Ae. aegypti Fox genes are expressed within various tissues of adult females, six of which are expressed within the fat body. All six Fox genes expressed in the fat body displayed dynamic expression profiles following a blood meal. We knocked down the ’fat body Foxes’ through RNAi to determine whether these “knockdowns” hindered amino acid-induced vitellogenin gene expression. We also determined the effect of these knockdowns on the number of eggs deposited following a blood meal. Knockdown of FoxN1, FoxN2, FoxL, and FoxO, had a negative effect on amino acid- induced vitellogenin gene expression and resulted in significantly fewer eggs laid. Our analysis stresses the importance of Fox transcription factors in regulating mosquito reproduction. PMID:17681238

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of Mononuclear Phagocyte Development

    PubMed Central

    Tussiwand, Roxane; Gautier, Emmanuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes (MP) are a quite unique subset of hematopoietic cells, which comprise dendritic cells (DC), monocytes as well as monocyte-derived and tissue-resident macrophages. These cells are extremely diverse with regard to their origin, their phenotype as well as their function. Developmentally, DC and monocytes are constantly replenished from a bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor. The ontogeny of macrophages is more complex and is temporally linked and specified by the organ where they reside, occurring early during embryonic or perinatal life. The functional heterogeneity of MPs is certainly a consequence of the tissue of residence and also reflects the diverse ontogeny of the subsets. In this review, we will highlight the developmental pathways of murine MP, with a particular emphasis on the transcriptional factors that regulate their development and function. Finally, we will discuss and point out open questions in the field. PMID:26539196

  16. Method to determine transcriptional regulation pathways in organisms

    DOEpatents

    Gardner, Timothy S.; Collins, James J.; Hayete, Boris; Faith, Jeremiah

    2012-11-06

    The invention relates to computer-implemented methods and systems for identifying regulatory relationships between expressed regulating polypeptides and targets of the regulatory activities of such regulating polypeptides. More specifically, the invention provides a new method for identifying regulatory dependencies between biochemical species in a cell. In particular embodiments, provided are computer-implemented methods for identifying a regulatory interaction between a transcription factor and a gene target of the transcription factor, or between a transcription factor and a set of gene targets of the transcription factor. Further provided are genome-scale methods for predicting regulatory interactions between a set of transcription factors and a corresponding set of transcriptional target substrates thereof.

  17. Proteasome Regulation of ULBP1 Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James E.; Moore, Mikel B.; Presnell, Steven R.; Chan, Huei-Wei; Chalupny, N. Jan; Lutz, Charles T.

    2009-01-01

    Killer lymphocytes recognize stress-activated NKG2D ligands on tumors. We examined NKG2D ligand expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells and other cell lines. HNSCC cells typically expressed MHC class I chain-related gene A (MICA), MICB, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)2, and ULBP3, but they were uniformly negative for cell surface ULBP1 and ULBP4. We then studied how cancer treatments affected NKG2D ligand expression. NKG2D ligand expression was not changed by most cancer-relevant treatments. However, bortezomib and other proteasome inhibitor drugs with distinct mechanisms of action dramatically and specifically up-regulated HNSCC ULBP1 mRNA and cell surface protein. Proteasome inhibition also increased RNA for ULBP1 and other NKG2D ligands in nontransformed human keratinocytes. Proteasome inhibitor drugs increased ULBP1 transcription by acting at a site in the 522-bp ULBP1 promoter. Although the DNA damage response pathways mediated by ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) signaling had been reported to up-regulate NKG2D ligand expression, we found that ULBP1 up-regulation was not inhibited by caffeine and wortmannin, inhibitors of ATM/ATR signaling. ULBP1 expression in HNSCC cells was not increased by several ATM/ATR activating treatments, including bleomycin, cisplatin, aphidicolin, and hydroxyurea. Ionizing radiation caused ATM activation in HNSCC cells, but high-level ULBP1 expression was not induced by gamma radiation or UV radiation. Thus, ATM/ATR signaling was neither necessary nor sufficient for high-level ULBP1 expression in human HNSCC cell lines and could not account for the proteasome effect. The selective induction of ULBP1 expression by proteasome inhibitor drugs, along with variable NKG2D ligand expression by human tumor cells, indicates that NKG2D ligand genes are independently regulated. PMID:19414815

  18. Scaling factors: transcription factors regulating subcellular domains.

    PubMed

    Mills, Jason C; Taghert, Paul H

    2012-01-01

    Developing cells acquire mature fates in part by selective (i.e. qualitatively different) expression of a few cell-specific genes. However, all cells share the same basic repertoire of molecular and subcellular building blocks. Therefore, cells must also specialize according to quantitative differences in cell-specific distributions of those common molecular resources. Here we propose the novel hypothesis that evolutionarily-conserved transcription factors called scaling factors (SFs) regulate quantitative differences among mature cell types. SFs: (1) are induced during late stages of cell maturation; (2) are dedicated to specific subcellular domains; and, thus, (3) allow cells to emphasize specific subcellular features. We identify candidate SFs and discuss one in detail: MIST1 (BHLHA15, vertebrates)/DIMM (CG8667, Drosophila); professional secretory cells use this SF to scale up regulated secretion. Because cells use SFs to develop their mature properties and also to adapt them to ever-changing environmental conditions, SF aberrations likely contribute to diseases of adult onset.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation of the Pancreatic Islet: Implications for Islet Function

    PubMed Central

    Stitzel, Michael L.; Kycia, Ina; Kursawe, Romy; Ucar, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans contain multiple hormone-producing endocrine cells controlling glucose homeostasis. Transcription establishes and maintains islet cellular fates and identities. Genetic and environmental disruption of islet transcription triggers cellular dysfunction and disease. Early transcriptional regulation studies of specific islet genes, including insulin (INS) and the transcription factor PDX1, identified the first cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors governing islet function. Here, we review how human islet “omics” studies are reshaping our understanding of transcriptional regulation in islet (dys)function and diabetes. First, we highlight the expansion of islet transcript number, form, and function and of DNA transcriptional regulatory elements controlling their production. Next, we cover islet transcriptional effects of genetic and environmental perturbation. Finally, we discuss how these studies’ emerging insights should empower our diabetes research community to build mechanistic understanding of diabetes pathophysiology and to equip clinicians with tailored, precision medicine options to prevent and treat islet dysfunction and diabetes. PMID:26272056

  20. Transcriptional regulation of the uncoupling protein-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Villarroya, Francesc; Peyrou, Marion; Giralt, Marta

    2017-03-01

    Regulated transcription of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) gene, and subsequent UCP1 protein synthesis, is a hallmark of the acquisition of the differentiated, thermogenically competent status of brown and beige/brite adipocytes, as well as of the responsiveness of brown and beige/brite adipocytes to adaptive regulation of thermogenic activity. The 5' non-coding region of the UCP1 gene contains regulatory elements that confer tissue specificity, differentiation dependence, and neuro-hormonal regulation to UCP1 gene transcription. Two main regions-a distal enhancer and a proximal promoter region-mediate transcriptional regulation through interactions with a plethora of transcription factors, including nuclear hormone receptors and cAMP-responsive transcription factors. Co-regulators, such as PGC-1α, play a pivotal role in the concerted regulation of UCP1 gene transcription. Multiple interactions of transcription factors and co-regulators at the promoter region of the UCP1 gene result in local chromatin remodeling, leading to activation and increased accessibility of RNA polymerase II and subsequent gene transcription. Moreover, a commonly occurring A-to-G polymorphism in close proximity to the UCP1 gene enhancer influences the extent of UCP1 gene transcription. Notably, it has been reported that specific aspects of obesity and associated metabolic diseases are associated with human population variability at this site. On another front, the unique properties of the UCP1 promoter region have been exploited to develop brown adipose tissue-specific gene delivery tools for experimental purposes.

  1. Transcriptional Regulation of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) by MYC

    PubMed Central

    Khattar, Ekta; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2017-01-01

    Telomerase elongates telomeres and is crucial for maintaining genomic stability. While stem cells and cancer cells display high telomerase activity, normal somatic cells lack telomerase activity primarily due to transcriptional repression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic component of telomerase. Transcription factor binding, chromatin status as well as epigenetic modifications at the TERT promoter regulates TERT transcription. Myc is an important transcriptional regulator of TERT that directly controls its expression by promoter binding and associating with other transcription factors. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind regulation of TERT transcription by Myc. We also discuss future perspectives in investigating the regulation of Myc at TERT promoter during cancer development. PMID:28184371

  2. The Lrp family of transcription regulators in archaea.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Eveline; Charlier, Daniel

    2010-11-30

    Archaea possess a eukaryotic-type basal transcription apparatus that is regulated by bacteria-like transcription regulators. A universal and abundant family of transcription regulators are the bacterial/archaeal Lrp-like regulators. The Lrp family is one of the best studied regulator families in archaea, illustrated by investigations of proteins from the archaeal model organisms: Sulfolobus, Pyrococcus, Methanocaldococcus, and Halobacterium. These regulators are extremely versatile in their DNA-binding properties, response to effector molecules, and molecular regulatory mechanisms. Besides being involved in the regulation of the amino acid metabolism, they also regulate central metabolic processes. It appears that these regulatory proteins are also involved in large regulatory networks, because of hierarchical regulations and the possible combinatorial use of different Lrp-like proteins. Here, we discuss the recent developments in our understanding of this important class of regulators.

  3. Transcriptional regulation by Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) in pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Hassan, Hosni M

    2013-01-01

    In the ancient anaerobic environment, ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) was one of the first metal cofactors. Oxygenation of the ancient world challenged bacteria to acquire the insoluble ferric iron (Fe(3+)) and later to defend against reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the Fenton chemistry. To acquire Fe(3+), bacteria produce low-molecular weight compounds, known as siderophores, which have extremely high affinity for Fe(3+). However, during infection the host restricts iron from pathogens by producing iron- and siderophore-chelating proteins, by exporting iron from intracellular pathogen-containing compartments, and by limiting absorption of dietary iron. Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) is a transcription factor which utilizes Fe(2+) as a corepressor and represses siderophore synthesis in pathogens. Fur, directly or indirectly, controls expression of enzymes that protect against ROS damage. Thus, the challenges of iron homeostasis and defense against ROS are addressed via Fur. Although the role of Fur as a repressor is well-documented, emerging evidence demonstrates that Fur can function as an activator. Fur activation can occur through three distinct mechanisms (1) indirectly via small RNAs, (2) binding at cis regulatory elements that enhance recruitment of the RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and (3) functioning as an antirepressor by removing or blocking DNA binding of a repressor of transcription. In addition, Fur homologs control defense against peroxide stress (PerR) and control uptake of other metals such as zinc (Zur) and manganese (Mur) in pathogenic bacteria. Fur family members are important for virulence within bacterial pathogens since mutants of fur, perR, or zur exhibit reduced virulence within numerous animal and plant models of infection. This review focuses on the breadth of Fur regulation in pathogenic bacteria.

  4. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of human microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zifeng; Yao, Hong; Lin, Sheng; Zhu, Xiao; Shen, Zan; Lu, Gang; Poon, Wai Sang; Xie, Dan; Lin, Marie Chia-mi; Kung, Hsiang-fu

    2013-04-30

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of non-coding RNAs. They are involved in diverse biological functions. MiRNAs are precisely regulated in a tissue- and developmental-specific manner, but dysregulated in many human diseases, in particular cancers. Transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation, as well as genetic alterations, are the three major mechanisms controlling the spatial and temporal expression of miRNAs. Emerging evidence now indicates that transcriptional and epigenetic regulations play major roles in miRNA expression. This review summarizes the current knowledge and discusses the future challenges.

  5. Modulation of RNA polymerase assembly dynamics in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Stanislaw A.; Snyder, Sara K.; John, Sam; Grummt, Ingrid; Misteli, Tom

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of transcription factors with target genes is highly dynamic. Whether the dynamic nature of these interactions is merely an intrinsic property of transcriptions factors or serves a regulatory role is unknown. Here, we have used single cell fluorescence imaging combined with computational modeling and chromatin immunoprecipitation to analyze transcription complex dynamics in gene regulation during the cell cycle in living cells. We demonstrate a link between the dynamics of RNA polymerase I (RNA pol I) assembly and transcriptional output. We show that transcriptional upregulation is accompanied by prolonged retention of RNA pol I components at the promoter, resulting in longer promoter dwell time, and an increase in the steady state population of assembling polymerase. As a consequence, polymerase assembly efficiency, and ultimately, an rate of entry into processive elongation are elevated. Our results show that regulation of rDNA transcription in vivo occurs via modulation of the efficiency of transcription complex subunit capture and assembly. PMID:18498750

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Reinke, Valerie; Krause, Michael; Okkema, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Protein coding gene sequences are converted to mRNA by the highly regulated process of transcription. The precise temporal and spatial control of transcription for many genes is an essential part of development in metazoans. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying transcriptional control is essential to understanding cell fate determination during embryogenesis, post-embryonic development, many environmental interactions, and disease-related processes. Studies of transcriptional regulation in C. elegans exploit its genomic simplicity and physical characteristics to define regulatory events with single cell and minute time scale resolution. When combined with the genetics of the system, C. elegans offers a unique and powerful vantage point from which to study how chromatin-associated protein and their modifications interact with transcription factors and their binding sites to yield precise control of gene expression through transcriptional regulation. PMID:23801596

  7. Methylation of an intragenic alternative promoter regulates transcription of GARP.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Sonja; Söntgerath, Viktoria Sophie Apollonia; Leipe, Jan; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik; Skapenko, Alla

    2016-02-01

    Alternative promoter usage has been proposed as a mechanism regulating transcriptional and translational diversity in highly elaborated systems like the immune system in humans. Here, we report that transcription of human glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP) in regulatory CD4 T cells (Tregs) is tightly regulated by two alternative promoters. An intragenic promoter contains several CpGs and acts as a weak promoter that is demethylated and initiates transcription Treg-specifically. The strong up-stream promoter containing a CpG-island is, in contrast, fully demethylated throughout tissues. Transcriptional activity of the strong promoter was surprisingly down-regulated upon demethylation of the weak promoter. This demethylation-induced transcriptional attenuation regulated the magnitude of GARP expression and correlated with disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis. Treg-specific GARP transcription was initiated by synergistic interaction of forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) with nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and was underpinned by permissive chromatin remodeling caused by release of the H3K4 demethylase, PLU-1. Our findings describe a novel function of alternative promoters in regulating the extent of transcription. Moreover, since GARP functions as a transporter of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), a cytokine with broad pleiotropic traits, GARP transcriptional attenuation by alternative promoters might provide a mechanism regulating peripheral TGFβ to avoid unwanted harmful effects.

  8. Transcriptional Regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Transcription Factor Regulation and Function, Mechanisms of Initiation, and Roles of Activators and Coactivators

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Steven; Young, Elton T.

    2011-01-01

    Here we review recent advances in understanding the regulation of mRNA synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Many fundamental gene regulatory mechanisms have been conserved in all eukaryotes, and budding yeast has been at the forefront in the discovery and dissection of these conserved mechanisms. Topics covered include upstream activation sequence and promoter structure, transcription factor classification, and examples of regulated transcription factor activity. We also examine advances in understanding the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery, conserved coactivator complexes, transcription activation domains, and the cooperation of these factors in gene regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22084422

  9. Using targeted chromatin regulators to engineer combinatorial and spatial transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Keung, Albert J; Bashor, Caleb J; Kiriakov, Szilvia; Collins, James J; Khalil, Ahmad S

    2014-07-03

    The transcription of genomic information in eukaryotes is regulated in large part by chromatin. How a diverse array of chromatin regulator (CR) proteins with different functions and genomic localization patterns coordinates chromatin activity to control transcription remains unclear. Here, we take a synthetic biology approach to decipher the complexity of chromatin regulation by studying emergent transcriptional behaviors from engineered combinatorial, spatial, and temporal patterns of individual CRs. We fuse 223 yeast CRs to programmable zinc finger proteins. Site-specific and combinatorial recruitment of CRs to distinct intralocus locations reveals a range of transcriptional logic and behaviors, including synergistic activation, long-range and spatial regulation, and gene expression memory. Comparing these transcriptional behaviors with annotated CR complex and function terms provides design principles for the engineering of transcriptional regulation. This work presents a bottom-up approach to investigating chromatin-mediated transcriptional regulation and introduces chromatin-based components and systems for synthetic biology and cellular engineering.

  10. The transcriptional repressor Hes1 attenuates inflammation via regulating transcriptional elongation

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yingli; Coppo, Maddalena; He, Teng; Ning, Fei; Yu, Li; Kang, Lan; Zhang, Bin; Ju, Chanyang; Qiao, Yu; Zhao, Baohong; Gessler, Manfred; Rogatsky, Inez; Hu, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Most of the known regulatory mechanisms that curb inflammatory gene expression target pre-transcription initiation steps and evidence for regulation of inflammatory gene expression post initiation remains scarce. Here we show that transcription repressor hairy and enhancer of split 1 (Hes1) suppresses production of CXCL1, a chemokine crucial for recruiting neutrophils. Hes1 negatively regulates neutrophil recruitment in vivo in a manner that is dependent on macrophage-produced CXCL1 and attenuates severity of inflammatory arthritis. Mechanistically, inhibition of Cxcl1 expression by Hes1 does not involve modification of transcription initiation. Instead, Hes1 inhibits signal-induced recruitment of positive transcription elongation complex P-TEFb, thereby preventing phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II on serine-2 and productive elongation. Thus, our results identify Hes1 as a homeostatic suppressor of inflammatory responses which exerts its suppressive function by regulating transcription elongation. PMID:27322654

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of Tetrapyrrole Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Masuda, Tatsuru

    2016-01-01

    Biosynthesis of chlorophyll (Chl) involves many enzymatic reactions that share several first steps for biosynthesis of other tetrapyrroles such as heme, siroheme, and phycobilins. Chl allows photosynthetic organisms to capture light energy for photosynthesis but with simultaneous threat of photooxidative damage to cells. To prevent photodamage by Chl and its highly photoreactive intermediates, photosynthetic organisms have developed multiple levels of regulatory mechanisms to coordinate tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) with the formation of photosynthetic and photoprotective systems and to fine-tune the metabolic flow with the varying needs of Chl and other tetrapyrroles under various developmental and environmental conditions. Among a wide range of regulatory mechanisms of TPB, this review summarizes transcriptional regulation of TPB genes during plant development, with focusing on several transcription factors characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana. Key TPB genes are tightly coexpressed with other photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes and are induced by light, oscillate in a diurnal and circadian manner, are coordinated with developmental and nutritional status, and are strongly downregulated in response to arrested chloroplast biogenesis. LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 and PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTORs, which are positive and negative transcription factors with a wide range of light signaling, respectively, target many TPB genes for light and circadian regulation. GOLDEN2-LIKE transcription factors directly regulate key TPB genes to fine-tune the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus with chloroplast functionality. Some transcription factors such as FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3, REVEILLE1, and scarecrow-like transcription factors may directly regulate some specific TPB genes, whereas other factors such as GATA transcription factors are likely to regulate TPB genes in an indirect manner. Comprehensive transcriptional analyses of TPB genes and detailed characterization of

  12. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  13. Transcriptional master regulator analysis in breast cancer genetic networks.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Hugo; García-Herrera, Rodrigo; Espinal-Enríquez, Jesús; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    2015-12-01

    Gene regulatory networks account for the delicate mechanisms that control gene expression. Under certain circumstances, gene regulatory programs may give rise to amplification cascades. Such transcriptional cascades are events in which activation of key-responsive transcription factors called master regulators trigger a series of gene expression events. The action of transcriptional master regulators is then important for the establishment of certain programs like cell development and differentiation. However, such cascades have also been related with the onset and maintenance of cancer phenotypes. Here we present a systematic implementation of a series of algorithms aimed at the inference of a gene regulatory network and analysis of transcriptional master regulators in the context of primary breast cancer cells. Such studies were performed in a highly curated database of 880 microarray gene expression experiments on biopsy-captured tissue corresponding to primary breast cancer and healthy controls. Biological function and biochemical pathway enrichment analyses were also performed to study the role that the processes controlled - at the transcriptional level - by such master regulators may have in relation to primary breast cancer. We found that transcription factors such as AGTR2, ZNF132, TFDP3 and others are master regulators in this gene regulatory network. Sets of genes controlled by these regulators are involved in processes that are well-known hallmarks of cancer. This kind of analyses may help to understand the most upstream events in the development of phenotypes, in particular, those regarding cancer biology.

  14. Transcriptional coregulator RIP140: an essential regulator of physiology.

    PubMed

    Nautiyal, Jaya

    2017-04-01

    Transcriptional coregulators drive gene regulatory decisions in the transcriptional space. Although transcription factors including all nuclear receptors provide a docking platform for coregulators to bind, these proteins bring enzymatic capabilities to the gene regulatory sites. RIP140 is a transcriptional coregulator essential for several physiological processes, and aberrations in its function may lead to diseased states. Unlike several other coregulators that are known either for their coactivating or corepressing roles, in gene regulation, RIP140 is capable of acting both as a coactivator and a corepressor. The role of RIP140 in female reproductive axis and recent findings of its role in carcinogenesis and adipose biology have been summarised.

  15. Riboswitches in regulation of Rho-dependent transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Proshkin, Sergey; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny

    2014-10-01

    Riboswitches are RNA sensors of small metabolites and ions that regulate gene expression in response to environmental changes. In bacteria, the riboswitch sensor domain usually controls the formation of a strong RNA hairpin that either functions as a potent transcription terminator or sequesters a ribosome-binding site. A recent study demonstrated a novel mechanism by which a riboswitch controls Rho-dependent transcription termination. This riboswitch mechanism is likely a widespread mode of gene regulation that determines whether a protein effector is able to attenuate transcription. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Riboswitches.

  16. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages: recent advances and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription.

  17. Emerging roles for post-transcriptional regulation in circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chunghun; Allada, Ravi

    2013-11-01

    Circadian clocks temporally organize behavior and physiology across the 24-h day. Great progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of timekeeping, with a focus on transcriptional feedback networks that are post-translationally modulated. Yet emerging evidence indicates an important role for post-transcriptional regulation, from splicing, polyadenylation and mRNA stability to translation and non-coding functions exemplified by microRNAs. This level of regulation affects virtually all aspects of circadian systems, from the core timing mechanism and input pathways that synchronize clocks to the environment and output pathways that control overt rhythmicity. We hypothesize that post-transcriptional control confers on circadian clocks enhanced robustness as well as the ability to adapt to different environments. As much of what is known derives from nonneural cells or tissues, future work will be required to investigate the role of post-transcriptional regulation in neural clocks.

  18. Transcriptional regulation of mammalian miRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Schanen, Brian C.; Li, Xiaoman

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are members of a growing family of non-coding transcripts, 21-23 nucleotides long, which regulate a diverse collection of biological processes and various diseases by RNA-mediated gene-silencing mechanisms. While currently many studies focus on defining the regulatory functions of miRNAs, few are directed towards how miRNA genes are themselves transcriptionally regulated. Recent studies of miRNA transcription have elucidated RNA polymerase II as the major polymerase of miRNAs, however, little is known of the structural features of miRNA promoters, especially those of mammalian miRNAs. Here, we review the current literature regarding features conserved among miRNA promoters useful for their detection and the current novel methodologies available to enable researchers to advance our understanding of the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. PMID:20977933

  19. Transcriptional Regulation by Trithorax-Group Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kingston, Robert E.; Tamkun, John W.

    2014-01-01

    The trithorax group of genes (trxG) was identified in mutational screens that examined developmental phenotypes and suppression of Polycomb mutant phenotypes. The protein products of these genes are primarily involved in gene activation, although some can also have repressive effects. There is no central function for these proteins. Some move nucleosomes about on the genome in an ATP-dependent manner, some covalently modify histones such as methylating lysine 4 of histone H3, and some directly interact with the transcription machinery or are a part of that machinery. It is interesting to consider why these specific members of large families of functionally related proteins have strong developmental phenotypes. PMID:25274705

  20. Translin and Trax differentially regulate telomere-associated transcript homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Zafer; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Wakeman, Jane A.; McFarlane, Ramsay J.

    2016-01-01

    Translin and Trax proteins are highly conserved nucleic acid binding proteins that have been implicated in RNA regulation in a range of biological processes including tRNA processing, RNA interference, microRNA degradation during oncogenesis, spermatogenesis and neuronal regulation. Here, we explore the function of this paralogue pair of proteins in the fission yeast. Using transcript analysis we demonstrate a reciprocal mechanism for control of telomere-associated transcripts. Mutation of tfx1+ (Trax) elevates transcript levels from silenced sub-telomeric regions of the genome, but not other silenced regions, such as the peri-centromeric heterochromatin. In the case of some sub-telomeric transcripts, but not all, this elevation is dependent on the Trax paralogue, Tsn1 (Translin). In a reciprocal fashion, Tsn1 (Translin) serves to repress levels of transcripts (TERRAs) from the telomeric repeats, whereas Tfx1 serves to maintain these elevated levels. This reveals a novel mechanism for the regulation of telomeric transcripts. We extend this to demonstrate that human Translin and Trax also control telomere-associated transcript levels in human cells in a telomere-specific fashion. PMID:27183912

  1. Genetic Regulation of Transcriptional Variation in Natural Arabidopsis thaliana Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Yanjun; Shen, Xia; Forsberg, Simon K. G.; Carlborg, Örjan

    2016-01-01

    An increased knowledge of the genetic regulation of expression in Arabidopsis thaliana is likely to provide important insights about the basis of the plant’s extensive phenotypic variation. Here, we reanalyzed two publicly available datasets with genome-wide data on genetic and transcript variation in large collections of natural A. thaliana accessions. Transcripts from more than half of all genes were detected in the leaves of all accessions, and from nearly all annotated genes in at least one accession. Thousands of genes had high transcript levels in some accessions, but no transcripts at all in others, and this pattern was correlated with the genome-wide genotype. In total, 2669 eQTL were mapped in the largest population, and 717 of them were replicated in the other population. A total of 646 cis-eQTL-regulated genes that lacked detectable transcripts in some accessions was found, and for 159 of these we identified one, or several, common structural variants in the populations that were shown to be likely contributors to the lack of detectable RNA transcripts for these genes. This study thus provides new insights into the overall genetic regulation of global gene expression diversity in the leaf of natural A. thaliana accessions. Further, it also shows that strong cis-acting polymorphisms, many of which are likely to be structural variations, make important contributions to the transcriptional variation in the worldwide A. thaliana population. PMID:27226169

  2. Regulation of maternal transcript destabilization during egg activation in Drosophila.

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Wael; Houston, Simon A; Bashirullah, Arash; Cooperstock, Ramona L; Semotok, Jennifer L; Reed, Bruce H; Lipshitz, Howard D

    2003-01-01

    In animals, the transfer of developmental control from maternal RNAs and proteins to zygotically derived products occurs at the midblastula transition. This is accompanied by the destabilization of a subset of maternal transcripts. In Drosophila, maternal transcript destabilization occurs in the absence of fertilization and requires specific cis-acting instability elements. We show here that egg activation is necessary and sufficient to trigger transcript destabilization. We have identified 13 maternal-effect lethal loci that, when mutated, result in failure of maternal transcript degradation. All mutants identified are defective in one or more additional processes associated with egg activation. These include vitelline membrane reorganization, cortical microtubule depolymerization, translation of maternal mRNA, completion of meiosis, and chromosome condensation (the S-to-M transition) after meiosis. The least pleiotropic class of transcript destabilization mutants consists of three genes: pan gu, plutonium, and giant nuclei. These three genes regulate the S-to-M transition at the end of meiosis and are thought to be required for the maintenance of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity during this cell cycle transition. Consistent with a possible functional connection between this S-to-M transition and transcript destabilization, we show that in vitro-activated eggs, which exhibit aberrant postmeiotic chromosome condensation, fail to initiate transcript degradation. Several genetic tests exclude the possibility that reduction of CDK/cyclin complex activity per se is responsible for the failure to trigger transcript destabilization in these mutants. We propose that the trigger for transcript destabilization occurs coincidently with the S-to-M transition at the end of meiosis and that pan gu, plutonium, and giant nuclei regulate maternal transcript destabilization independent of their role in cell cycle regulation. PMID:12871909

  3. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of PPARγ expression during adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The nuclear receptor PPARγ is a master regulator of adipogenesis. PPARγ is highly expressed in adipose tissues and its expression is markedly induced during adipogenesis. In this review, we describe the current knowledge, as well as future directions, on transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of PPARγ expression during adipogenesis. Investigating the molecular mechanisms that control PPARγ expression during adipogenesis is critical for understanding the development of white and brown adipose tissues, as well as pathological conditions such as obesity and diabetes. The robust induction of PPARγ expression during adipogenesis also serves as an excellent model system for studying transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of cell-type-specific gene expression. PMID:24904744

  4. The bile acid sensor FXR regulates insulin transcription and secretion.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Mencarelli, Andrea; Vavassori, Piero; Brancaleone, Vincenzo; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2010-03-01

    Farnesoid X Receptor plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, cholesterol homeostasis and glucose metabolism. Here we investigated whether FXR is expressed by pancreatic beta-cells and regulates insulin signaling in pancreatic beta-cell line and human islets. We found that FXR activation induces positive regulatory effects on glucose-induced insulin transcription and secretion by genomic and non-genomic activities. Genomic effects of FXR activation relay on the induction of the glucose regulated transcription factor KLF11. Indeed, results from silencing experiments of KLF11 demonstrate that this transcription factor is essential for FXR activity on glucose-induced insulin gene transcription. In addition FXR regulates insulin secretion by non-genomic effects. Thus, activation of FXR in betaTC6 cells increases Akt phosphorylation and translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT2 at plasma membrane, increasing the glucose uptake by these cells. In vivo experiments on Non Obese Diabetic (NOD) mice demonstrated that FXR activation delays development of signs of diabetes, hyperglycemia and glycosuria, by enhancing insulin secretion and by stimulating glucose uptake by the liver. These data established that an FXR-KLF11 regulated pathway has an essential role in the regulation of insulin transcription and secretion induced by glucose.

  5. INITIATION AND REGULATION OF PARAMYXOVIRUS TRANSCRIPTION AND REPLICATION

    PubMed Central

    Noton, Sarah L.; Fearns, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The paramyxovirus family has a genome consisting of a single strand of negative sense RNA. This genome acts as a template for two distinct processes: transcription to generate subgenomic, capped and polyadenylated mRNAs, and genome replication. These viruses only encode one polymerase. Thus, an intriguing question is, how does the viral polymerase initiate and become committed to either transcription or replication? By answering this we can begin to understand how these two processes are regulated. In this review article, we present recent findings from studies on the paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, which show how its polymerase is able to initiate transcription and replication from a single promoter. We discuss how these findings apply to other paramyxoviruses. Then, we examine how trans-acting proteins and promoter secondary structure might serve to regulate transcription and replication during different phases of the paramyxovirus replication cycle. PMID:25683441

  6. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of Drosophila germline stem cells and their differentiating progeny.

    PubMed

    White-Cooper, Helen; Caporilli, Simona

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter we will concentrate on the transcriptional and translational regulations that govern the development and differentiation of male germline cells. Our focus will be on the processes that occur during differentiation, that distinguish the differentiating population of cells from their stem cell parents. We discuss how these defining features are established as cells transit from a stem cell character to that of a fully committed differentiating cell. The focus will be on how GSCs differentiate, via spermatogonia, to spermatocytes. We will achieve this by first describing the transcriptional activity in the differentiating spermatocytes, cataloguing the known transcriptional regulators in these cells and then investigating how the transcription programme is set up by processes in the progentior cells. This process is particularly interesting to study from a stem cell perspective as the male GSCs are unipotent, so lineage decisions in differentiating progeny of stem cells, which occurs in many other stem cell systems, do not impinge on the behaviour of these cells.

  7. Homeodomain transcription factors regulate BMP-2-induced osteoactivin transcription in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Singh, Maneet; Del Carpio-Cano, Fabiola E; Monroy, M Alexandra; Popoff, Steven N; Safadi, Fayez F

    2012-01-01

    Osteoactivin (OA) is required for the differentiation of osteoblast cells. OA expression is stimulated by bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). BMP-2 recruits homeodomain transcription factors Dlx3, Dlx5, and Msx2 to selectively activate or repress transcription of osteogenic genes and hence tightly regulate their transcription during osteoblast differentiation. Considering the key roles of Dlx3, Dlx5, and Msx2 in osteoblast differentiation, here we hypothesize that homeodomain proteins regulate BMP-2-induced OA transcription during osteoblast differentiation. Four classical homeodomain binding sites were identified in the proximal 0.96 kb region of rat OA promoter. Deletions and mutagenesis studies of the OA promoter region indicated that all four homeodomain binding sites are crucial for BMP-2-induced OA promoter activity. Simultaneous disruption of homeodomain binding sites at -852 and -843 of the transcription start site of OA gene significantly decreased the BMP-2-induced OA transcription and inhibited binding of Dlx3, Dlx5, and Msx2 proteins to the OA promoter. Dlx3 and Dlx5 proteins were found to activate the OA transcription, whereas, Msx2 suppressed BMP-2-induced OA transcription. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated that the OA promoter is predominantly occupied by Dlx3 and Dlx5 during the proliferation and matrix maturation stages of osteoblast differentiation, respectively. During the matrix mineralization stage, BMP-2 robustly enhanced the recruitment of Dlx5 and to a lesser extent of Dlx3 and Msx2 to the OA promoter region. Collectively, our results show that the BMP-2-induced OA transcription is differentially regulated by Dlx3, Dlx5, and Msx2 during osteoblast differentiation.

  8. Quantitative regulation of FLC via coordinated transcriptional initiation and elongation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhe; Ietswaart, Robert; Liu, Fuquan; Yang, Hongchun; Howard, Martin; Dean, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The basis of quantitative regulation of gene expression is still poorly understood. In Arabidopsis thaliana, quantitative variation in expression of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) influences the timing of flowering. In ambient temperatures, FLC expression is quantitatively modulated by a chromatin silencing mechanism involving alternative polyadenylation of antisense transcripts. Investigation of this mechanism unexpectedly showed that RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy changes at FLC did not reflect RNA fold changes. Mathematical modeling of these transcriptional dynamics predicted a tight coordination of transcriptional initiation and elongation. This prediction was validated by detailed measurements of total and chromatin-bound FLC intronic RNA, a methodology appropriate for analyzing elongation rate changes in a range of organisms. Transcription initiation was found to vary ∼25-fold with elongation rate varying ∼8- to 12-fold. Premature sense transcript termination contributed very little to expression differences. This quantitative variation in transcription was coincident with variation in H3K36me3 and H3K4me2 over the FLC gene body. We propose different chromatin states coordinately influence transcriptional initiation and elongation rates and that this coordination is likely to be a general feature of quantitative gene regulation in a chromatin context. PMID:26699513

  9. CRTR-1, a developmentally regulated transcriptional repressor related to the CP2 family of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Rodda, S; Sharma, S; Scherer, M; Chapman, G; Rathjen, P

    2001-02-02

    CP2-related proteins comprise a family of DNA-binding transcription factors that are generally activators of transcription and expressed ubiquitously. We reported a differential display polymerase chain reaction fragment, Psc2, which was expressed in a regulated fashion in mouse pluripotent cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report further characterization of the Psc2 cDNA and function. The Psc2 cDNA contained an open reading frame homologous to CP2 family proteins. Regions implicated in DNA binding and oligomeric complex formation, but not transcription activation, were conserved. Psc2 expression in vivo during embryogenesis and in the adult mouse demonstrated tight spatial and temporal regulation, with the highest levels of expression in the epithelial lining of distal convoluted tubules in embryonic and adult kidneys. Functional analysis demonstrated that PSC2 repressed transcription 2.5-15-fold when bound to a heterologous promoter in ES, 293T, and COS-1 cells. The N-terminal 52 amino acids of PSC2 were shown to be necessary and sufficient for this activity and did not share obvious homology with reported repressor motifs. These results represent the first report of a CP2 family member that is expressed in a developmentally regulated fashion in vivo and that acts as a direct repressor of transcription. Accordingly, the protein has been named CP2-Related Transcriptional Repressor-1 (CRTR-1).

  10. Navigating the transcriptional roadmap regulating plant secondary cell wall deposition

    PubMed Central

    Hussey, Steven G.; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Creux, Nicky M.; Myburg, Alexander A.

    2013-01-01

    The current status of lignocellulosic biomass as an invaluable resource in industry, agriculture, and health has spurred increased interest in understanding the transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall (SCW) biosynthesis. The last decade of research has revealed an extensive network of NAC, MYB and other families of transcription factors regulating Arabidopsis SCW biosynthesis, and numerous studies have explored SCW-related transcription factors in other dicots and monocots. Whilst the general structure of the Arabidopsis network has been a topic of several reviews, they have not comprehensively represented the detailed protein–DNA and protein–protein interactions described in the literature, and an understanding of network dynamics and functionality has not yet been achieved for SCW formation. Furthermore the methodologies employed in studies of SCW transcriptional regulation have not received much attention, especially in the case of non-model organisms. In this review, we have reconstructed the most exhaustive literature-based network representations to date of SCW transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis. We include a manipulable Cytoscape representation of the Arabidopsis SCW transcriptional network to aid in future studies, along with a list of supporting literature for each documented interaction. Amongst other topics, we discuss the various components of the network, its evolutionary conservation in plants, putative modules and dynamic mechanisms that may influence network function, and the approaches that have been employed in network inference. Future research should aim to better understand network function and its response to dynamic perturbations, whilst the development and application of genome-wide approaches such as ChIP-seq and systems genetics are in progress for the study of SCW transcriptional regulation in non-model organisms. PMID:24009617

  11. Transcriptional and Chromatin Regulation during Fasting - The Genomic Era.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Ido; Hager, Gordon L

    2015-12-01

    An elaborate metabolic response to fasting is orchestrated by the liver and is heavily reliant on transcriptional regulation. In response to hormones (glucagon, glucocorticoids) many transcription factors (TFs) are activated and regulate various genes involved in metabolic pathways aimed at restoring homeostasis: gluconeogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, ketogenesis, and amino acid shuttling. We summarize recent discoveries regarding fasting-related TFs with an emphasis on genome-wide binding patterns. Collectively, the findings we discuss reveal a large degree of cooperation between TFs during fasting that occurs at motif-rich DNA sites bound by a combination of TFs. These new findings implicate transcriptional and chromatin regulation as major determinants of the response to fasting and unravels the complex, multi-TF nature of this response.

  12. How the ubiquitin proteasome system regulates the regulators of transcription.

    PubMed

    Ee, Gary; Lehming, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system plays an important role in transcription. Monoubiquitination of activators is believed to aid their function, while the 26S proteasomal degradation of repressors is believed to restrict their function. What remains controversial is the question of whether the degradation of activators aids or restricts their function.

  13. Identification of transcriptional regulators in the mouse immune system.

    PubMed

    Jojic, Vladimir; Shay, Tal; Sylvia, Katelyn; Zuk, Or; Sun, Xin; Kang, Joonsoo; Regev, Aviv; Koller, Daphne; Best, Adam J; Knell, Jamie; Goldrath, Ananda; Joic, Vladimir; Koller, Daphne; Shay, Tal; Regev, Aviv; Cohen, Nadia; Brennan, Patrick; Brenner, Michael; Kim, Francis; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Wagers, Amy; Heng, Tracy; Ericson, Jeffrey; Rothamel, Katherine; Ortiz-Lopez, Adriana; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe; Bezman, Natalie A; Sun, Joseph C; Min-Oo, Gundula; Kim, Charlie C; Lanier, Lewis L; Miller, Jennifer; Brown, Brian; Merad, Miriam; Gautier, Emmanuel L; Jakubzick, Claudia; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Monach, Paul; Blair, David A; Dustin, Michael L; Shinton, Susan A; Hardy, Richard R; Laidlaw, David; Collins, Jim; Gazit, Roi; Rossi, Derrick J; Malhotra, Nidhi; Sylvia, Katelyn; Kang, Joonsoo; Kreslavsky, Taras; Fletcher, Anne; Elpek, Kutlu; Bellemarte-Pelletier, Angelique; Malhotra, Deepali; Turley, Shannon

    2013-06-01

    The differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells into cells of the immune system has been studied extensively in mammals, but the transcriptional circuitry that controls it is still only partially understood. Here, the Immunological Genome Project gene-expression profiles across mouse immune lineages allowed us to systematically analyze these circuits. To analyze this data set we developed Ontogenet, an algorithm for reconstructing lineage-specific regulation from gene-expression profiles across lineages. Using Ontogenet, we found differentiation stage-specific regulators of mouse hematopoiesis and identified many known hematopoietic regulators and 175 previously unknown candidate regulators, as well as their target genes and the cell types in which they act. Among the previously unknown regulators, we emphasize the role of ETV5 in the differentiation of γδ T cells. As the transcriptional programs of human and mouse cells are highly conserved, it is likely that many lessons learned from the mouse model apply to humans.

  14. Statins and transcriptional regulation: The FXR connection

    SciTech Connect

    Habeos, Ioannis; Ziros, Panos G.; Psyrogiannis, Agathoklis; Vagenakis, Apostolos G.; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G. . E-mail: papavas@med.upatras.gr

    2005-08-26

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor involved in lipoprotein as well as glucose metabolism. Statins are widely used hypolipidemic agents with many pleiotropic actions. It is known that statins affect other nuclear hormone receptors, but no reports are available on the effect of these drugs on FXR. Employing an animal model (Syrian hamsters), we hereby present evidence to demonstrate that Simvastatin, a broadly prescribed statin, decreases the expression of FXR at both the RNA and protein levels and down-regulates its DNA-binding activity. This novel property may have important implications on the mode statins influence on lipoprotein and carbohydrate homeostasis in the organism.

  15. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the ionizing radiation response by ATM and p53

    PubMed Central

    Venkata Narayanan, Ishwarya; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Bedi, Karan; Berg, Nathan; Ljungman, Emily A.; Francia, Sofia; Veloso, Artur; Magnuson, Brian; di Fagagna, Fabrizio d’Adda; Wilson, Thomas E.; Ljungman, Mats

    2017-01-01

    In response to ionizing radiation (IR), cells activate a DNA damage response (DDR) pathway to re-program gene expression. Previous studies using total cellular RNA analyses have shown that the stress kinase ATM and the transcription factor p53 are integral components required for induction of IR-induced gene expression. These studies did not distinguish between changes in RNA synthesis and RNA turnover and did not address the role of enhancer elements in DDR-mediated transcriptional regulation. To determine the contribution of synthesis and degradation of RNA and monitor the activity of enhancer elements following exposure to IR, we used the recently developed Bru-seq, BruChase-seq and BruUV-seq techniques. Our results show that ATM and p53 regulate both RNA synthesis and stability as well as enhancer element activity following exposure to IR. Importantly, many genes in the p53-signaling pathway were coordinately up-regulated by both increased synthesis and RNA stability while down-regulated genes were suppressed either by reduced synthesis or stability. Our study is the first of its kind that independently assessed the effects of ionizing radiation on transcription and post-transcriptional regulation in normal human cells. PMID:28256581

  16. Concentration- and chromosome-organization-dependent regulator unbinding from DNA for transcription regulation in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tai-Yen; Santiago, Ace George; Jung, Won; Krzemiński, Łukasz; Yang, Feng; Martell, Danya J.; Helmann, John D.; Chen, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Binding and unbinding of transcription regulators at operator sites constitute a primary mechanism for gene regulation. While many cellular factors are known to regulate their binding, little is known on how cells can modulate their unbinding for regulation. Using nanometer-precision single-molecule tracking, we study the unbinding kinetics from DNA of two metal-sensing transcription regulators in living Escherichia coli cells. We find that they show unusual concentration-dependent unbinding kinetics from chromosomal recognition sites in both their apo and holo forms. Unexpectedly, their unbinding kinetics further varies with the extent of chromosome condensation, and more surprisingly, varies in opposite ways for their apo-repressor versus holo-activator forms. These findings suggest likely broadly relevant mechanisms for facile switching between transcription activation and deactivation in vivo and in coordinating transcription regulation of resistance genes with the cell cycle. PMID:26145755

  17. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  18. Regulation of Specialized Metabolism by WRKY Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Schluttenhofer, Craig; Yuan, Ling

    2015-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are well known for regulating plant abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. However, much less is known about how WRKY TFs affect plant-specialized metabolism. Analysis of WRKY TFs regulating the production of specialized metabolites emphasizes the values of the family outside of traditionally accepted roles in stress tolerance. WRKYs with conserved roles across plant species seem to be essential in regulating specialized metabolism. Overall, the WRKY family plays an essential role in regulating the biosynthesis of important pharmaceutical, aromatherapy, biofuel, and industrial components, warranting considerable attention in the forthcoming years. PMID:25501946

  19. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  20. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin.

    PubMed

    Franks, Tobias M; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C N; Young, Janet M; Malik, Harmit S; Gage, Fred H; Hetzer, Martin W

    2016-05-15

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for "soluble Pom121") that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components.

  1. Evolution of a transcriptional regulator from a transmembrane nucleoporin

    PubMed Central

    Franks, Tobias M.; Benner, Chris; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Marchetto, Maria C.N.; Young, Janet M.; Malik, Harmit S.; Gage, Fred H.; Hetzer, Martin W.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) emerged as nuclear transport channels in eukaryotic cells ∼1.5 billion years ago. While the primary role of NPCs is to regulate nucleo–cytoplasmic transport, recent research suggests that certain NPC proteins have additionally acquired the role of affecting gene expression at the nuclear periphery and in the nucleoplasm in metazoans. Here we identify a widely expressed variant of the transmembrane nucleoporin (Nup) Pom121 (named sPom121, for “soluble Pom121”) that arose by genomic rearrangement before the divergence of hominoids. sPom121 lacks the nuclear membrane-anchoring domain and thus does not localize to the NPC. Instead, sPom121 colocalizes and interacts with nucleoplasmic Nup98, a previously identified transcriptional regulator, at gene promoters to control transcription of its target genes in human cells. Interestingly, sPom121 transcripts appear independently in several mammalian species, suggesting convergent innovation of Nup-mediated transcription regulation during mammalian evolution. Our findings implicate alternate transcription initiation as a mechanism to increase the functional diversity of NPC components. PMID:27198230

  2. Transcriptional regulators of Na,K-ATPase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqin; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic α-subunit, the β-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids, and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits has been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease. PMID:26579519

  3. Transcriptional regulation of human small nuclear RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Jawdekar, Gauri W.; Henry, R. William

    2009-01-01

    The products of human snRNA genes have been frequently described as performing housekeeping functions and their synthesis refractory to regulation. However, recent studies have emphasized that snRNA and other related non-coding RNA molecules control multiple facets of the central dogma, and their regulated expression is critical to cellular homeostasis during normal growth and in response to stress. Human snRNA genes contain compact and yet powerful promoters that are recognized by increasingly well-characterized transcription factors, thus providing a premier model system to study gene regulation. This review summarizes many recent advances deciphering the mechanism by which the transcription of human snRNA and related genes are regulated. PMID:18442490

  4. Combinatorial Gene Regulation through Kinetic Control of the Transcription Cycle.

    PubMed

    Scholes, Clarissa; DePace, Angela H; Sánchez, Álvaro

    2017-01-25

    Cells decide when, where, and to what level to express their genes by "computing" information from transcription factors (TFs) binding to regulatory DNA. How is the information contained in multiple TF-binding sites integrated to dictate the rate of transcription? The dominant conceptual and quantitative model is that TFs combinatorially recruit one another and RNA polymerase to the promoter by direct physical interactions. Here, we develop a quantitative framework to explore kinetic control, an alternative model in which combinatorial gene regulation can result from TFs working on different kinetic steps of the transcription cycle. Kinetic control can generate a wide range of analog and Boolean computations without requiring the input TFs to be simultaneously bound to regulatory DNA. We propose experiments that will illuminate the role of kinetic control in transcription and discuss implications for deciphering the cis-regulatory "code."

  5. Malleable machines take shape in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fuxreiter, Monika; Tompa, Peter; Simon, István; Uversky, Vladimir N; Hansen, Jeffrey C; Asturias, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptional control requires the spatially and temporally coordinated action of many macromolecular complexes. Chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, co-activators and components of the general transcription machinery, including RNA polymerases, often use structurally or stoichiometrically ill-defined regions for interactions that convey regulatory information in processes ranging from chromatin remodeling to mRNA processing. Determining the functional significance of intrinsically disordered protein regions and developing conceptual models of their action will help to illuminate their key role in transcription regulation. Complexes comprising disordered regions often display short recognition elements embedded in flexible and sequentially variable environments that can lead to structural and functional malleability. This provides versatility to recognize multiple targets having different structures, facilitate conformational rearrangements and physically communicate with many partners in response to environmental changes. All these features expand the capacities of ordered complexes and give rise to efficient regulatory mechanisms. PMID:19008886

  6. Dynamic Post-Transcriptional Regulation of HIV-1 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kula, Anna; Marcello, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a highly regulated process. Basal transcription of the integrated provirus generates early transcripts that encode for the viral products Tat and Rev. Tat promotes the elongation of RNA polymerase while Rev mediates the nuclear export of viral RNAs that contain the Rev-responsive RNA element (RRE). These RNAs are exported from the nucleus to allow expression of Gag-Pol and Env proteins and for the production of full-length genomic RNAs. A balance exists between completely processed mRNAs and RRE-containing RNAs. Rev functions as an adaptor that recruits cellular factors to re-direct singly spliced and unspliced viral RNAs to nuclear export. The aim of this review is to address the dynamic regulation of this post-transcriptional pathway in light of recent findings that implicate several novel cellular cofactors of Rev function. PMID:24832221

  7. Transcriptionally Regulated Cell Adhesion Network Dictates Distal Tip Cell Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ming-Ching; Kennedy, William P.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms that govern directional changes in cell migration are poorly understood. The migratory paths of two distal tip cells (DTC) determine the U-shape of the C. elegans hermaphroditic gonad. The morphogenesis of this organ provides a model system to identify genes necessary for the DTCs to execute two stereotyped turns. Results Using candidate genes for RNAi knockdown in a DTC-specific strain, we identified two transcriptional regulators required for DTC turning: cbp-1, the CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivator homologue, and let-607, a CREBH transcription factor homologue. Further screening of potential target genes uncovered a network of integrin adhesion-related genes that have roles in turning and are dependent on cbp-1 and let-607 for expression. These genes include src-1/Src kinase, tln-1/talin, pat-2/α integrin and nmy-2, a nonmuscle myosin heavy chain. Conclusions Transcriptional regulation by means of cbp-1 and let-607 is crucial for determining directional changes during DTC migration. These regulators coordinate a gene network that is necessary for integrin-mediated adhesion. Overall, these results suggest that directional changes in cell migration rely on the precise gene regulation of adhesion. PMID:24811939

  8. Post-transcriptional regulation of interferons and their signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Savan, Ram

    2014-05-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are low molecular weight cell-derived proteins that include the type I, II, and III IFN families. IFNs are critical for an optimal immune response during microbial infections while dysregulated expression can lead to autoimmune diseases. Given its role in disease, it is important to understand cellular mechanisms of IFN regulation. 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) have emerged as potent regulators of mRNA and protein dosage and are controlled through multiple regulatory elements including adenylate uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) and microRNA (miRNA) recognition elements. These AREs are targeted by RNA-binding proteins (ARE-BPs) for degradation and/or stabilization through an ARE-mediated decay process. miRNA are endogenous, single-stranded RNA molecules ~22 nucleotides in length that regulate mRNA translation through the miRNA-induced silencing complex. IFN transcripts, like other labile mRNAs, harbor AREs in their 3' UTRs that dictate the turnover of mRNA. This review is a survey of the literature related to IFN regulation by miRNA, ARE-BPs, and how these complexes interact dynamically on the 3' UTR. Additionally, downstream effects of these post-transcriptional regulators on the immune response will be discussed. Review topics include past studies, current understanding, and future challenges in the study of post-transcriptional regulation affecting IFN responses.

  9. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Interferons and Their Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are low molecular weight cell-derived proteins that include the type I, II, and III IFN families. IFNs are critical for an optimal immune response during microbial infections while dysregulated expression can lead to autoimmune diseases. Given its role in disease, it is important to understand cellular mechanisms of IFN regulation. 3′ untranslated regions (3′ UTRs) have emerged as potent regulators of mRNA and protein dosage and are controlled through multiple regulatory elements including adenylate uridylate (AU)-rich elements (AREs) and microRNA (miRNA) recognition elements. These AREs are targeted by RNA-binding proteins (ARE-BPs) for degradation and/or stabilization through an ARE-mediated decay process. miRNA are endogenous, single-stranded RNA molecules ∼22 nucleotides in length that regulate mRNA translation through the miRNA-induced silencing complex. IFN transcripts, like other labile mRNAs, harbor AREs in their 3′ UTRs that dictate the turnover of mRNA. This review is a survey of the literature related to IFN regulation by miRNA, ARE-BPs, and how these complexes interact dynamically on the 3′ UTR. Additionally, downstream effects of these post-transcriptional regulators on the immune response will be discussed. Review topics include past studies, current understanding, and future challenges in the study of post-transcriptional regulation affecting IFN responses. PMID:24702117

  10. Transcriptional Auto-Regulation of RUNX1 P1 Promoter.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Milka; Hinojosa, Marcela; Trombly, Daniel; Morin, Violeta; Stein, Janet; Stein, Gary; Javed, Amjad; Gutierrez, Soraya E

    2016-01-01

    RUNX1 a member of the family of runt related transcription factors (RUNX), is essential for hematopoiesis. The expression of RUNX1 gene is controlled by two promoters; the distal P1 promoter and the proximal P2 promoter. Several isoforms of RUNX1 mRNA are generated through the use of both promoters and alternative splicing. These isoforms not only differs in their temporal expression pattern but also exhibit differences in tissue specificity. The RUNX1 isoforms derived from P2 are expressed in a variety of tissues, but expression of P1-derived isoform is restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineage. However, the control of hematopoietic-cell specific expression is poorly understood. Here we report regulation of P1-derived RUNX1 mRNA by RUNX1 protein. In silico analysis of P1 promoter revealed presence of two evolutionary conserved RUNX motifs, 0.6kb upstream of the transcription start site, and three RUNX motifs within 170bp of the 5'UTR. Transcriptional contribution of these RUNX motifs was studied in myeloid and T-cells. RUNX1 genomic fragment containing all sites show very low basal activity in both cell types. Mutation or deletion of RUNX motifs in the UTR enhances basal activity of the RUNX1 promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that RUNX1 protein is recruited to these sites. Overexpression of RUNX1 in non-hematopoietic cells results in a dose dependent activation of the RUNX1 P1 promoter. We also demonstrate that RUNX1 protein regulates transcription of endogenous RUNX1 mRNA in T-cell. Finally we show that SCL transcription factor is recruited to regions containing RUNX motifs in the promoter and the UTR and regulates activity of the RUNX1 P1 promoter in vitro. Thus, multiple lines of evidence show that RUNX1 protein regulates its own gene transcription.

  11. BRCA1 transcriptionally regulates genes involved in breast tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Welcsh, Piri L.; Lee, Ming K.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Rachel M.; Black, Daniel J.; Mahadevappa, Mamatha; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; Warrington, Janet A.; King, Mary-Claire

    2002-01-01

    Loss of function of BRCA1 caused by inherited mutation and tissue-specific somatic mutation leads to breast and ovarian cancer. Nearly all BRCA1 germ-line mutations involve truncation or loss of the C-terminal BRCT transcriptional activation domain, suggesting that transcriptional regulation is a critical function of the wild-type gene. The purpose of this project was to determine whether there is a link between the role of BRCA1 in transcriptional regulation and its role in tumor suppression. We developed a cell line (in which BRCA1 can be induced) and used microarray analysis to compare transcription profiles of epithelial cells with low endogenous levels of BRCA1 vs. transcription profiles of cells with 2–4-fold higher induced levels of expression of BRCA1. At these levels of expression, BRCA1 did not induce apoptosis. Undirected cluster analysis of six paired experiments revealed 373 genes, the expression of which was altered significantly and consistently by BRCA1 induction. Expression of 62 genes was altered more than 2-fold. BRCA1-regulated genes associated with breast tumorigenesis included the estrogen-responsive genes MYC and cyclin D1, which are overexpressed in many breast tumors; STAT1 and JAK1, key components of the cytokine signal transduction pathway; the extracellular matrix protein laminin 3A; ID4, an inhibitor of DNA-binding transcriptional activators, which in turn negatively regulates BRCA1 expression; and the prohormone stanniocalcin, expression of which is lost in breast tumor cells. Coordinated expression of BRCA1 with ID4 and with stanniocalcin was confirmed in primary breast and ovarian tumors. PMID:12032322

  12. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  13. The fur transcription regulator and fur-regulated genes in Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 3502.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weibin; Ma, Junhua; Zang, Chengyuan; Song, Yingying; Liu, Peipei

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a spore-forming bacterium that can produce a very powerful neurotoxin that causes botulism. In this study, we have investigated the Fur transcription regulators in Clostridium botulinum and Fur-regulated genes in Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 3502. We found that gene loss may be the main cause leading to the different numbers of Fur transcription regulators in different Clostridium botulinum strains. Meanwhile, 46 operons were found to be regulated by the Fur transcription regulator in Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 3502, involved in several functional classifications, including iron acquisition, iron utilization, iron transport, and transcription regulator. Under an iron-restricted medium, we experimentally found that a Fur transcription regulator (CBO1372) and two operons (DedA, CBO2610-CBO2614 and ABC transporter, CBO0845-CBO0847) are shown to be differentially expressed in Clostridium botulinum A ATCC 3502. This study has provided-us novel insights into the diversity of Fur transcription regulators in different Clostridium botulinum strains and diversity of Fur-targeted genes, as well as a better understanding of the dynamic changes in iron restriction occurring in response to this stress.

  14. Dynamic equilibrium on DNA defines transcriptional regulation of a multidrug binding transcriptional repressor, LmrR.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Misaki; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-03-21

    LmrR is a multidrug binding transcriptional repressor that controls the expression of a major multidrug transporter, LmrCD, in Lactococcus lactis. Promiscuous compound ligations reduce the affinity of LmrR for the lmrCD operator by several fold to release the transcriptional repression; however, the affinity reduction is orders of magnitude smaller than that of typical transcriptional repressors. Here, we found that the transcriptional regulation of LmrR is achieved through an equilibrium between the operator-bound and non-specific DNA-adsorption states in vivo. The effective dissociation constant of LmrR for the lmrCD operator under the equilibrium is close to the endogenous concentration of LmrR, which allows a substantial reduction of LmrR occupancy upon compound ligations. Therefore, LmrR represents a dynamic type of transcriptional regulation of prokaryotic multidrug resistance systems, where the small affinity reduction induced by compounds is coupled to the functional relocalization of the repressor on the genomic DNA via nonspecific DNA adsorption.

  15. Circadian rhythms and post-transcriptional regulation in higher plants

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Andrés; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock of plants allows them to cope with daily changes in their environment. This is accomplished by the rhythmic regulation of gene expression, in a process that involves many regulatory steps. One of the key steps involved at the RNA level is post-transcriptional regulation, which ensures a correct control on the different amounts and types of mRNA that will ultimately define the current physiological state of the plant cell. Recent advances in the study of the processes of regulation of pre-mRNA processing, RNA turn-over and surveillance, regulation of translation, function of lncRNAs, biogenesis and function of small RNAs, and the development of bioinformatics tools have helped to vastly expand our understanding of how this regulatory step performs its role. In this work we review the current progress in circadian regulation at the post-transcriptional level research in plants. It is the continuous interaction of all the information flow control post-transcriptional processes that allow a plant to precisely time and predict daily environmental changes. PMID:26124767

  16. Post-transcriptional Regulation of Immunological Responses through Riboclustering

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Koelina; Giddaluru, Jeevan; August, Avery; Khan, Nooruddin

    2016-01-01

    Immunological programing of immune cells varies in response to changing environmental signals. This process is facilitated by modifiers that regulate the translational fate of mRNAs encoding various immune mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, which in turn determine the rapid activation, tolerance, and plasticity of the immune system. RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) recruited by the specific sequence elements in mRNA transcripts are one such modifiers. These RBPs form RBP–RNA complexes known as “riboclusters.” These riboclusters serve as RNA sorting machinery, where depending upon the composition of the ribocluster, translation, degradation, or storage of mRNA is controlled. Recent findings suggest that this regulation of mRNA homeostasis is critical for controlling the immune response. Here, we present the current knowledge of the ribocluster-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of immune mediators and highlight recent findings regarding their implications for the pathogenesis of acute or chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:27199986

  17. MOF Acetyl Transferase Regulates Transcription and Respiration in Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Aindrila; Seyfferth, Janine; Lucci, Jacopo; Gilsbach, Ralf; Preissl, Sebastian; Böttinger, Lena; Mårtensson, Christoph U; Panhale, Amol; Stehle, Thomas; Kretz, Oliver; Sahyoun, Abdullah H; Avilov, Sergiy; Eimer, Stefan; Hein, Lutz; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2016-10-20

    A functional crosstalk between epigenetic regulators and metabolic control could provide a mechanism to adapt cellular responses to environmental cues. We report that the well-known nuclear MYST family acetyl transferase MOF and a subset of its non-specific lethal complex partners reside in mitochondria. MOF regulates oxidative phosphorylation by controlling expression of respiratory genes from both nuclear and mtDNA in aerobically respiring cells. MOF binds mtDNA, and this binding is dependent on KANSL3. The mitochondrial pool of MOF, but not a catalytically deficient mutant, rescues respiratory and mtDNA transcriptional defects triggered by the absence of MOF. Mof conditional knockout has catastrophic consequences for tissues with high-energy consumption, triggering hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure in murine hearts; cardiomyocytes show severe mitochondrial degeneration and deregulation of mitochondrial nutrient metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation pathways. Thus, MOF is a dual-transcriptional regulator of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes connecting epigenetics and metabolism.

  18. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Luary C.; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation, and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins, and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches, and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24724055

  19. CpG islands and the regulation of transcription

    PubMed Central

    Deaton, Aimée M.; Bird, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate CpG islands (CGIs) are short interspersed DNA sequences that deviate significantly from the average genomic pattern by being GC-rich, CpG-rich, and predominantly nonmethylated. Most, perhaps all, CGIs are sites of transcription initiation, including thousands that are remote from currently annotated promoters. Shared DNA sequence features adapt CGIs for promoter function by destabilizing nucleosomes and attracting proteins that create a transcriptionally permissive chromatin state. Silencing of CGI promoters is achieved through dense CpG methylation or polycomb recruitment, again using their distinctive DNA sequence composition. CGIs are therefore generically equipped to influence local chromatin structure and simplify regulation of gene activity. PMID:21576262

  20. Direct transcriptional regulation of MDM2 by Fli-1.

    PubMed

    Truong, Amandine H L; Cervi, David; Lee, Jane; Ben-David, Yaacov

    2005-02-03

    The Ets transcription factor, Fli-1, has been shown to play a pivotal role in the induction and progression of Friend Murine Leukemia Virus (F-MuLV)-induced erythroleukemia, with its overexpression leading to erythroblast survival, proliferation, and inhibition of terminal differentiation. P53 inactivation is an additional genetic alteration that occurs in late-stage leukemic progression associated with in vivo and in vitro immortalization. Since p53 protein expression levels are low, to undetectable, in primary erythroleukemic cells that express elevated levels of Fli-1, we investigated the potential regulation of p53 by Fli-1. We assessed whether the overexpression of Fli-1 could partially regulate p53 via modulation of its well-established regulator, MDM2. In this paper, we demonstrate that the promoter of MDM2 contains a consensus binding site for Fli-1 that is bound by this transcription factor in vitro and in vivo, resulting in MDM2 transcriptional regulation. We further substantiate these observations in vivo by demonstrating a positive correlation in the expression of Fli-1 and MDM2, and a negative correlation with p53 in leukemic tissues obtained from mice with Friend Disease. These observations depict a significant function of Fli-1 overexpression in the indirect control of p53, evidently capable of leading to an increasingly aggressive erythroleukemic clone in vivo.

  1. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation with gene sequence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuqiang; Shen, Yanyan; Hu, Jinxing

    2015-12-01

    Quantitative models of gene regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. In this work, we have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence. The proposed model relies on a continuous time, differential equation description of transcriptional dynamics. The sequence features of the promoter are exploited to derive the binding affinity which is derived based on statistical molecular thermodynamics. Experimental results show that the proposed model can effectively identify the activity levels of transcription factors and the regulatory parameters. Comparing with the previous models, the proposed model can reveal more biological sense.

  2. Stochastic Proofreading Mechanism Alleviates Crosstalk in Transcriptional Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Humerez, Sarah A.; Rieckh, Georg; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-12-01

    Gene expression is controlled primarily by interactions between transcription factor proteins (TFs) and the regulatory DNA sequence, a process that can be captured well by thermodynamic models of regulation. These models, however, neglect regulatory crosstalk: the possibility that noncognate TFs could initiate transcription, with potentially disastrous effects for the cell. Here, we estimate the importance of crosstalk, suggest that its avoidance strongly constrains equilibrium models of TF binding, and propose an alternative nonequilibrium scheme that implements kinetic proofreading to suppress erroneous initiation. This proposal is consistent with the observed covalent modifications of the transcriptional apparatus and predicts increased noise in gene expression as a trade-off for improved specificity. Using information theory, we quantify this trade-off to find when optimal proofreading architectures are favored over their equilibrium counterparts. Such architectures exhibit significant super-Poisson noise at low expression in steady state.

  3. The Role of the Ubiquitously Expressed Transcription Factor Sp1 in Tissue-specific Transcriptional Regulation and in Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Leigh; Gilmour, Jane; Bonifer, Constanze

    2016-01-01

    Sp1 belongs to the 26 member strong Sp/KLF family of transcription factors. It is a paradigm for a ubiquitously expressed transcription factor and is involved in regulating the expression of genes associated with a wide range of cellular processes in mammalian cells. Sp1 can interact with a range of proteins, including other transcription factors, members of the transcription initiation complex and epigenetic regulators, enabling tight regulation of its target genes. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in Sp1-mediated transcriptional regulation, as well as how a ubiquitous transcription factor can be involved in establishing a tissue-specific pattern of gene expression and mechanisms by which its activity may be regulated. We also consider the role of Sp1 in human diseases, such as cancer. PMID:28018142

  4. Angiotensin II-regulated transcription regulatory genes in adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Romero, Damian G; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E

    2010-11-29

    Transcription regulatory genes are crucial modulators of cell physiology and metabolism whose intracellular levels are tightly controlled in response to extracellular stimuli. We previously reported a set of 29 transcription regulatory genes modulated by angiotensin II in H295R human adrenocortical cells and their roles in regulating the expression of the last and unique enzymes of the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid biosynthetic pathways, 11β-hydroxylase and aldosterone synthase, respectively, using gene expression reporter assays. To study the effect of this set of transcription regulatory genes on adrenal steroidogenesis, H295R cells were transfected by high-efficiency nucleofection and aldosterone and cortisol were measured in cell culture supernatants under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. BCL11B, BHLHB2, CITED2, ELL2, HMGA1, MAFF, NFIL3, PER1, SERTAD1, and VDR significantly stimulated aldosterone secretion, while EGR1, FOSB, and ZFP295 decreased aldosterone secretion. BTG2, HMGA1, MITF, NR4A1, and ZFP295 significantly increased cortisol secretion, while BCL11B, NFIL3, PER1, and SIX2 decreased cortisol secretion. We also report the effect of some of these regulators on the expression of endogenous aldosterone synthase and 11β-hydroxylase under basal and angiotensin II-stimulated conditions. In summary, this study reports for the first time the effects of a set of angiotensin II-modulated transcription regulatory genes on aldosterone and cortisol secretion and the expression levels of the last and unique enzymes of the mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid biosynthetic pathways. Abnormal regulation of mineralocorticoid or glucocorticoid secretion is involved in several pathophysiological conditions. These transcription regulatory genes may be involved in adrenal steroidogenesis pathologies; thus they merit additional study as potential candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  5. TRANSFAC and its module TRANSCompel: transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Matys, V; Kel-Margoulis, O V; Fricke, E; Liebich, I; Land, S; Barre-Dirrie, A; Reuter, I; Chekmenev, D; Krull, M; Hornischer, K; Voss, N; Stegmaier, P; Lewicki-Potapov, B; Saxel, H; Kel, A E; Wingender, E

    2006-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors, their binding sites, nucleotide distribution matrices and regulated genes as well as the complementing database TRANSCompel on composite elements have been further enhanced on various levels. A new web interface with different search options and integrated versions of Match and Patch provides increased functionality for TRANSFAC. The list of databases which are linked to the common GENE table of TRANSFAC and TRANSCompel has been extended by: Ensembl, UniGene, EntrezGene, HumanPSD and TRANSPRO. Standard gene names from HGNC, MGI and RGD, are included for human, mouse and rat genes, respectively. With the help of InterProScan, Pfam, SMART and PROSITE domains are assigned automatically to the protein sequences of the transcription factors. TRANSCompel contains now, in addition to the COMPEL table, a separate table for detailed information on the experimental EVIDENCE on which the composite elements are based. Finally, for TRANSFAC, in respect of data growth, in particular the gain of Drosophila transcription factor binding sites (by courtesy of the Drosophila DNase I footprint database) and of Arabidopsis factors (by courtesy of DATF, Database of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors) has to be stressed. The here described public releases, TRANSFAC 7.0 and TRANSCompel 7.0, are accessible under http://www.gene-regulation.com/pub/databases.html.

  6. TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION OF THE HUMAN KiSS1 GENE

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Johanna K.; Dietzel, Anja; Lomniczi, Alejandro; Loche, Alberto; Tefs, Katrin; Kiess, Wieland; Danne, Thomas; Ojeda, Sergio R.; Heger, Sabine

    2011-01-01

    Kisspeptin, the product of the KiSS1 gene, has emerged as a key component of the mechanism by which the hypothalamus controls puberty and reproductive development. It does so by stimulating the secretion of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH). Little is known about the transcriptional control of the KiSS1 gene. Here we show that a set of proteins postulated to be upstream components of a hypothalamic network involved in controlling female puberty regulates KiSS1 transcriptional activity. Using RACE-PCR we determined that transcription of KiSS1 mRNA is initiated at a single transcription start site (TSS) located 153–156 bp upstream of the ATG translation initiation codon. Promoter assays performed using 293 MSR cells showed that the KiSS1 promoter is activated by TTF1 and CUX1-p200, and repressed by EAP1, YY1, and CUX1-p110. EAP1 and CUX-110 were also repressive in GT1-7 cells. All four TFs are recruited in vivo to the KiSS1 promoter and are expressed in kisspeptin neurons. These results suggest that expression of the KiSS1 gene is regulated by trans-activators and repressors involved in the system-wide control of mammalian puberty. PMID:21672609

  7. Changing Faces of Transcriptional Regulation Reflected by Zic3

    PubMed Central

    Winata, Cecilia Lanny; Kondrychyn, Igor; Deddens, J.C.; Korzh, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The advent of genomics in the study of developmental mechanisms has brought a trove of information on gene datasets and regulation during development, where the Zic family of zinc-finger proteins plays an important role. Genomic analysis of the modes of action of Zic3 in pluripotent cells demonstrated its requirement for maintenance of stem cells pluripotency upon binding to the proximal regulatory regions (promoters) of genes associated with cell pluripotency (Nanog, Sox2, Oct4, etc.) as well as cell cycle, proliferation, oncogenesis and early embryogenesis. In contrast, during gastrulation and neurulation Zic3 acts by binding the distal regulatory regions (enhancers, etc) associated with control of gene transcription in the Nodal and Wnt signaling pathways, including genes that act to break body symmetry. This illustrates a general role of Zic3 as a transcriptional regulator that acts not only alone, but in many instances in conjunction with other transcription factors. The latter is done by binding to adjacent sites in the context of multi-transcription factor complexes associated with regulatory elements. PMID:26085810

  8. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-05

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases.

  9. Identification of Arabidopsis Transcriptional Regulators by Yeast One-Hybrid Screens Using a Transcription Factor ORFeome.

    PubMed

    Breton, Ghislain; Kay, Steve A; Pruneda-Paz, José L

    2016-01-01

    Genetic and molecular approaches revealed that the circadian clock network structure is comprised of several interlocked positive and negative transcriptional feedback loops. The network evolved to sense and integrate inputs from environmental cues to adjust daily rhythms in physiological processes. Compiling evidence indicates that part of this regulation happens at the transcriptional level through subtle adjustments in the expression of core clock genes. Thus, to better understand the network and identify the molecular mechanisms of clock input pathways, it is imperative to determine how core clock genes are regulated. For this purpose we developed reagents for an unbiased approach to identify transcription factors (TFs) interacting with the promoters of core clock genes. At the center of this approach lies the yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) assay in which a pool of proteins fused to the GAL4 transcriptional activation domain are tested for their ability to interact with a selected promoter fragment in yeast cells. Taking advantage of the fact that Arabidopsis TF genes are well annotated, we generated a comprehensive TF clone collection (TF ORFeome) and used it to replace the standard cDNA pool strategy traditionally used in Y1H screens. The use of this TF clone collection substantially accelerates the comprehensive discovery of promoter-specific DNA binding activities among all Arabidopsis TFs. Considering that this strategy can be extended to the study of the promoter interactome of any Arabidopsis gene, we developed a low throughput protocol that can be universally implemented to screen the ~2000 TF clone library.

  10. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  11. Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Thrombospondin-1 Expression: A Computational Model

    PubMed Central

    Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important physiological stress signal that drives angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels. Besides an increase in the production of pro-angiogenic signals such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia also stimulates the production of anti-angiogenic signals. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) is one of the anti-angiogenic factors whose synthesis is driven by hypoxia. Cellular synthesis of TSP-1 is tightly regulated by different intermediate biomolecules including proteins that interact with hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), transcription factors that are activated by receptor and intracellular signaling, and microRNAs which are small non-coding RNA molecules that function in post-transcriptional modification of gene expression. Here we present a computational model that describes the mechanistic interactions between intracellular biomolecules and cooperation between signaling pathways that together make up the complex network of TSP-1 regulation both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Assisted by the model, we conduct in silico experiments to compare the efficacy of different therapeutic strategies designed to modulate TSP-1 synthesis in conditions that simulate tumor and peripheral arterial disease microenvironment. We conclude that TSP-1 production in endothelial cells depends on not only the availability of certain growth factors but also the fine-tuned signaling cascades that are initiated by hypoxia. PMID:28045898

  12. Epigenetics regulates transcription and pathogenesis in the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Pachano, Tomas; Nievas, Yesica R; Lizarraga, Ayelen; Johnson, Patricia J; Strobl-Mazzulla, Pablo H; de Miguel, Natalia

    2017-01-05

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted parasite that colonizes the human urogenital tract. Infections range from asymptomatic to highly inflammatory, depending on the host and the parasite strain. Different T. vaginalis strains vary greatly in their adherence and cytolytic capacities. These phenotypic differences might be attributed to differentially expressed genes as a consequence of extra-genetic variation, such as epigenetic modifications. In this study, we explored the role of histone acetylation in regulating gene transcription and pathogenesis in T. vaginalis. Here, we show that histone 3 lysine acetylation (H3KAc) is enriched in nucleosomes positioned around the transcription start site of active genes (BAP1 and BAP2) in a highly adherent parasite strain; compared with the low acetylation abundance in contrast to that observed in a less-adherent strain that expresses these genes at low levels. Additionally, exposition of less-adherent strain with a specific histone deacetylases inhibitor, trichostatin A, upregulated the transcription of BAP1 and BAP2 genes in concomitance with an increase in H3KAc abundance and chromatin accessibility around their transcription start sites. Moreover, we demonstrated that the binding of initiator binding protein, the transcription factor responsible for the initiation of transcription of ~75% of known T. vaginalis genes, depends on the histone acetylation state around the metazoan-like initiator to which initiator binding protein binds. Finally, we found that trichostatin A treatment increased parasite aggregation and adherence to host cells. Our data demonstrated for the first time that H3KAc is a permissive histone modification that functions to mediate both transcription and pathogenesis of the parasite T. vaginalis.

  13. Histone methylation by the Drosophila epigenetic transcriptional regulator Ash1.

    PubMed

    Beisel, Christian; Imhof, Axel; Greene, Jaime; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Sauer, Frank

    2002-10-24

    The establishment and maintenance of mitotic and meiotic stable (epigenetic) transcription patterns is fundamental for cell determination and function. Epigenetic regulation of transcription is mediated by epigenetic activators and repressors, and may require the establishment, 'spreading' and maintenance of epigenetic signals. Although these signals remain unclear, it has been proposed that chromatin structure and consequently post-translational modification of histones may have an important role in epigenetic gene expression. Here we show that the epigenetic activator Ash1 (ref. 5) is a multi-catalytic histone methyl-transferase (HMTase) that methylates lysine residues 4 and 9 in H3 and 20 in H4. Transcriptional activation by Ash1 coincides with methylation of these three lysine residues at the promoter of Ash1 target genes. The methylation pattern placed by Ash1 may serve as a binding surface for a chromatin remodelling complex containing the epigenetic activator Brahma (Brm), an ATPase, and inhibits the interaction of epigenetic repressors with chromatin. Chromatin immunoprecipitation indicates that epigenetic activation of Ultrabithorax transcription in Drosophila coincides with trivalent methylation by Ash1 and recruitment of Brm. Thus, histone methylation by Ash1 may provide a specific signal for the establishment of epigenetic, active transcription patterns.

  14. Id1 regulates angiogenesis through transcriptional repression of thrombospondin-1.

    PubMed

    Volpert, Olga V; Pili, Roberto; Sikder, Hashmat A; Nelius, Thomas; Zaichuk, Tetiana; Morris, Chad; Shiflett, Clinton B; Devlin, Meghann K; Conant, Katherine; Alani, Rhoda M

    2002-12-01

    Id proteins are helix-loop-helix transcription factors that regulate tumor angiogenesis. In order to identify downstream effectors of Id1 involved in the regulation of angiogenesis, we performed PCR-select subtractive hybridization on wild-type and Id1 knockout mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). Here we demonstrate that thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis, is a target of transcriptional repression by Id1. We also show that Id1-null MEFs secrete an inhibitor of endothelial cell migration, which is completely inactivated by depletion of TSP-1. Furthermore, in vivo studies revealed decreased neovascularization in matrigel assays in Id1-null mice compared to their wild-type littermates. This decrease was completely reversed by a TSP-1 neutralizing antibody. We conclude that TSP-1 is a major target for Id1 effects on angiogenesis.

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of Carbohydrate Utilization Pathways in the Bifidobacterium Genus.

    PubMed

    Khoroshkin, Matvei S; Leyn, Semen A; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, which represent common commensals of mammalian gut, are believed to have positive effects on human health. The influence of certain non-digestible carbohydrates (and their use as so-called prebiotics) on growth and metabolic activity of bifidobacteria is of increasing interest; however, mechanisms of transcriptional control of carbohydrate metabolism are poorly understood in these species. We used a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and transcriptional regulons in 10 Bifidobacterium genomes. Analysis of regulatory gene regions revealed candidate DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 268 transcription factors from the LacI, ROK, DeoR, AraC, GntR, and TetR families that form 64 orthologous groups of regulators. Most of the reconstructed regulons are local and control specific catabolic pathways for host- and diet-derived glycans and monosaccharides. Mosaic distributions of many of these local regulators across Bifidobacterium species correlate with distribution of corresponding catabolic pathways. In contrast, the maltose, galactose, sucrose, and fructose regulons, as well as a novel global LacI-family regulator that is predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism and arabinose catabolism genes, are universally present in all 10 studied bifidobacteria. A novel group of TetR-family regulators presumably controls the glucoside and galactoside utilization pathways. Paralogs of the ribose repressor RbsR control the pyrimidine nucleoside utilization genes. Multiple paralogs of the maltose regulator MalR co-regulate large sets of genes involved in maltodextrin utilization. The inferred metabolic regulons provide new insights on diverse carbohydrate utilization networks in bifidobacteria that can be employed in metabolic modeling, phenotype prediction and the rational development of novel prebiotics.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Carbohydrate Utilization Pathways in the Bifidobacterium Genus

    PubMed Central

    Khoroshkin, Matvei S.; Leyn, Semen A.; Van Sinderen, Douwe; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacteria, which represent common commensals of mammalian gut, are believed to have positive effects on human health. The influence of certain non-digestible carbohydrates (and their use as so-called prebiotics) on growth and metabolic activity of bifidobacteria is of increasing interest; however, mechanisms of transcriptional control of carbohydrate metabolism are poorly understood in these species. We used a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct carbohydrate utilization pathways and transcriptional regulons in 10 Bifidobacterium genomes. Analysis of regulatory gene regions revealed candidate DNA motifs and reconstructed regulons for 268 transcription factors from the LacI, ROK, DeoR, AraC, GntR, and TetR families that form 64 orthologous groups of regulators. Most of the reconstructed regulons are local and control specific catabolic pathways for host- and diet-derived glycans and monosaccharides. Mosaic distributions of many of these local regulators across Bifidobacterium species correlate with distribution of corresponding catabolic pathways. In contrast, the maltose, galactose, sucrose, and fructose regulons, as well as a novel global LacI-family regulator that is predicted to control the central carbohydrate metabolism and arabinose catabolism genes, are universally present in all 10 studied bifidobacteria. A novel group of TetR-family regulators presumably controls the glucoside and galactoside utilization pathways. Paralogs of the ribose repressor RbsR control the pyrimidine nucleoside utilization genes. Multiple paralogs of the maltose regulator MalR co-regulate large sets of genes involved in maltodextrin utilization. The inferred metabolic regulons provide new insights on diverse carbohydrate utilization networks in bifidobacteria that can be employed in metabolic modeling, phenotype prediction and the rational development of novel prebiotics. PMID:26903998

  17. The expression and post-transcriptional regulation of FSTL1 transcripts in placental trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Mouillet, Jean-Francois; Mishima, Takuya; Paffaro, Andrea Mollica do Amarante; Parks, Tony W.; Ziegler, Judy A.; Chu, Tianjiao; Sadovsky, Yoel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Follistatin-like-1 (FSTL1) is a widely expressed secreted protein with diverse but poorly understood functions. Originally described as a pro-inflammatory molecule, it has recently been reported to play a role in signaling pathways that regulate development and homeostasis. Distinctively, FSTL1 harbors within its 3′-UTR the sequence encoding microRNA-198 (miR-198), shown to be inversely regulated relative to FSTL1 expression and to exhibit opposite actions on cellular processes such as cell migration. We sought to investigate the expression of FSTL1 and to assess its interplay with miR-198 in human trophoblasts. Methods We used a combination of northern blot analyses, quantitative PCR, small RNA sequencing, western blot and immunohistochemistry to characterize FSTL1 and miR-198 expression in placental trophoblasts. We also used reporter assays to examine the post-transcriptional regulation of FSTL1 and assess its putative regulation by miR-198. Results We detected the expression of FSTL1 transcript in both the human extravillous trophoblast line HTR-8/SVneo and in primary term human villous trophoblasts. We also found that the expression of FSTL1 was largely restricted to extravillous trophoblasts. Hypoxia enhanced the expression of FSTL1 protein in cultured primary villous trophoblasts. Interestingly, we did not detect any evidence for expression or function of mature miR-198 in human trophoblasts. Discussion Our data indicate that placental FSTL1 is expressed particularly in extravillous trophoblasts. We also found no evidence for placental expression of miR-198, or for its regulation of FSTL1, implying that the post-transcriptional regulation of FSTL1 by miR-198 is tissue specific. PMID:26386648

  18. Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators for Degradation Pathways of Aromatic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tropel, David; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2004-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in the release and introduction into the environment of a plethora of aromatic chemicals. The interest in discovering how bacteria are dealing with hazardous environmental pollutants has driven a large research community and has resulted in important biochemical, genetic, and physiological knowledge about the degradation capacities of microorganisms and their application in bioremediation, green chemistry, or production of pharmacy synthons. In addition, regulation of catabolic pathway expression has attracted the interest of numerous different groups, and several catabolic pathway regulators have been exemplary for understanding transcription control mechanisms. More recently, information about regulatory systems has been used to construct whole-cell living bioreporters that are used to measure the quality of the aqueous, soil, and air environment. The topic of biodegradation is relatively coherent, and this review presents a coherent overview of the regulatory systems involved in the transcriptional control of catabolic pathways. This review summarizes the different regulatory systems involved in biodegradation pathways of aromatic compounds linking them to other known protein families. Specific attention has been paid to describing the genetic organization of the regulatory genes, promoters, and target operon(s) and to discussing present knowledge about signaling molecules, DNA binding properties, and operator characteristics, and evidence from regulatory mutants. For each regulator family, this information is combined with recently obtained protein structural information to arrive at a possible mechanism of transcription activation. This demonstrates the diversity of control mechanisms existing in catabolic pathways. PMID:15353566

  19. Autopalmitoylation of TEAD Proteins Regulates Transcriptional Output of Hippo Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chan, PuiYee; Han, Xiao; Zheng, Baohui; DeRan, Michael; Yu, Jianzhong; Jarugumilli, Gopala K.; Deng, Hua; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian; Wu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors bind to the co-activator YAP/TAZ, and regulate the transcriptional output of Hippo pathway, playing critical roles in organ size control and tumorigenesis. Protein S-palmitoylation attaches fatty acid (palmitate) to cysteine residues, and regulates protein trafficking, membrane localization and signaling activities. Using activity-based chemical probes, we discovered that human TEADs possess intrinsic palmitoylating enzyme-like activities, and undergo autopalmitoylation at evolutionarily conserved cysteine residues under physiological conditions. We determined the crystal structures of lipid-bound TEADs, and found that the lipid chain of palmitate inserts into a conserved deep hydrophobic pocket. Strikingly, palmitoylation is required for TEAD’s binding to YAP/TAZ, but dispensable for the binding to Vgll4 tumor suppressor. In addition, palmitoylation does not alter TEAD’s localization. Moreover, TEAD palmitoylation-deficient mutants impaired TAZ-mediated muscle differentiation in vitro, and Yorkie-mediated tissue overgrowth in Drosophila in vivo. Our study directly linked autopalmitoylation to the transcriptional regulation of Hippo pathway. PMID:26900866

  20. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of transcription factor expression in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Young; Colinas, Juliette; Wang, Jean Y.; Mace, Daniel; Ohler, Uwe; Benfey, Philip N.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding how the expression of transcription factor (TF) genes is modulated is essential for reconstructing gene regulatory networks. There is increasing evidence that sequences other than upstream noncoding can contribute to modulating gene expression, but how frequently they do so remains unclear. Here, we investigated the regulation of TFs expressed in a tissue-enriched manner in Arabidopsis roots. For 61 TFs, we created GFP reporter constructs driven by each TF’s upstream noncoding sequence (including the 5′UTR) fused to the GFP reporter gene alone or together with the TF’s coding sequence. We compared the visually detectable GFP patterns with endogenous mRNA expression patterns, as defined by a genome-wide microarray root expression map. An automated image analysis method for quantifying GFP signals in different tissues was developed and used to validate our visual comparison method. From these combined analyses, we found that (i) the upstream noncoding sequence was sufficient to recapitulate the mRNA expression pattern for 80% (35/44) of the TFs, and (ii) 25% of the TFs undergo posttranscriptional regulation via microRNA-mediated mRNA degradation (2/24) or via intercellular protein movement (6/24). The results suggest that, for Arabidopsis TFs, upstream noncoding sequences are major contributors to mRNA expression pattern establishment, but modulation of transcription factor protein expression pattern after transcription is relatively frequent. This study provides a systematic overview of regulation of TF expression at a cellular level. PMID:16581911

  1. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  2. Transcriptional regulation of autophagy by an FXR/CREB axis

    PubMed Central

    Seok, Sunmi; Fu, Ting; Choi, Sung-E; Li, Yang; Zhu, Rong; Kumar, Subodh; Sun, Xiaoxiao; Yoon, Gyesoon; Kang, Yup; Zhong, Wenxuan; Ma, Jian; Kemper, Byron; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2014-01-01

    Lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components by autophagy is essential for cellular survival and homeostasis under nutrient-deprived conditions1–4. Acute regulation of autophagy by nutrient-sensing kinases is well defined3, 5–7, but longer-term transcriptional regulation is relatively unknown. Here we show that the fed-state sensing nuclear receptor FXR8, 9 and the fasting transcriptional activator CREB10, 11 coordinately regulate the hepatic autophagy gene network. Pharmacological activation of FXR repressed many autophagy genes and inhibited autophagy even in fasted mice and feeding-mediated inhibition of macroautophagy was attenuated in FXR-knockout mice. From mouse liver ChIP-seq data12–15, FXR and CREB binding peaks were detected at 178 and 112, respectively, of 230 autophagy-related genes, and 78 genes showed shared binding, mostly in their promoter regions. CREB promoted lipophagy, autophagic degradation of lipids16, under nutrient-deprived conditions, and FXR inhibited this response. Mechanistically, CREB upregulated autophagy genes, including Atg7, Ulk1, and Tfeb, by recruiting the coactivator CRTC2. After feeding or pharmacological activation, FXR trans-repressed these genes by disrupting the functional CREB/CRTC2 complex. This study identifies the novel FXR/CREB axis as a key physiological switch regulating autophagy, resulting in sustained nutrient regulation of autophagy during feeding/fasting cycles. PMID:25383523

  3. WRKY Transcription Factors: Molecular Regulation and Stress Responses in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Phukan, Ujjal J.; Jeena, Gajendra S.; Shukla, Rakesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants in their natural habitat have to face multiple stresses simultaneously. Evolutionary adaptation of developmental, physiological, and biochemical parameters give advantage over a single window of stress but not multiple. On the other hand transcription factors like WRKY can regulate diverse responses through a complicated network of genes. So molecular orchestration of WRKYs in plant may provide the most anticipated outcome of simultaneous multiple responses. Activation or repression through W-box and W-box like sequences is regulated at transcriptional, translational, and domain level. Because of the tight regulation involved in specific recognition and binding of WRKYs to downstream promoters, they have become promising candidate for crop improvement. Epigenetic, retrograde and proteasome mediated regulation enable WRKYs to attain the dynamic cellular homeostatic reprograming. Overexpression of several WRKYs face the paradox of having several beneficial affects but with some unwanted traits. These overexpression-associated undesirable phenotypes need to be identified and removed for proper growth, development and yeild. Taken together, we have highlighted the diverse regulation and multiple stress response of WRKYs in plants along with the future prospects in this field of research. PMID:27375634

  4. Transcriptional regulation of storage protein synthesis during dicotyledon seed filling.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Jérôme; Thompson, Richard D

    2008-09-01

    Seeds represent a major source of nutrients for human and animal livestock diets. The nutritive value of seeds is largely due to storage products which accumulate during a key phase of seed development, seed filling. In recent years, our understanding of the mechanisms regulating seed filling has advanced significantly due to the diversity of experimental approaches used. This review summarizes recent findings related to transcription factors that regulate seed storage protein accumulation. A framework for the regulation of storage protein synthesis is established which incorporates the events before, during and after seed storage protein synthesis. The transcriptional control of storage protein synthesis is accompanied by physiological and environmental controls, notably through the action of plant hormones and other intermediary metabolites. Finally, recent post-genomics analyses on different model plants have established the existence of a conserved seed filling process involving the master regulators (LEC1, LEC2, ABI3 and FUS3) but also revealed certain differences in fine regulation between plant families.

  5. Glucocorticoid regulation of transcription at an amplified, episomal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Ostrowski, M C; Richard-Foy, H; Wolford, R G; Berard, D S; Hager, G L

    1983-01-01

    The mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR) has been introduced into cultured murine cells, using the 69% transforming fragment of bovine papilloma virus type 1 (BPV). Transformed cells contain up to 200 copies of the chimeric molecules per diploid genome. The restriction endonuclease map of the acquired recombinants, as well as the physical structure of the DNA, indicates that the LTR-BPV molecules present in these cells occur exclusively as unintegrated, extrachromosomal episome. When a 72-base pair direct repeat "enhancer" element (derived from the Harvey sarcoma retrovirus) was included in the MMTV LTR-BPV chimeric plasmids, DNA acquired through transfection, with a single exception, was integrated or rearranged or both. The transcriptional potential of the episomal MMTV promoter present in these cells was tested in two ways. First, steady-state levels of MMTV-initiated RNA were measured by quantitative S1 mapping. Second, the relative number of transcription complexes initiated in vivo was determined by using a subnuclear fraction highly enriched for MMTV-BPV minichromosomes in an in vitro transcription extension assay. Both approaches showed that the MMTV LTR present in the episomal state was capable of supporting glucocorticoid hormone-regulated transcription. We have therefore demonstrated the hormone response for the first time in a totally defined primary sequence environment. Significant differences both in the basal level of MMTV-initiated transcription and in the extent of glucocorticoid induction were observed in individual cell lines with similar episomal copy numbers. These phenotypic variations suggest that epigenetic structure is an important component of the mechanism of regulation. Images PMID:6318079

  6. Transcriptional regulation of neurodevelopmental and metabolic pathways by NPAS3.

    PubMed

    Sha, L; MacIntyre, L; Machell, J A; Kelly, M P; Porteous, D J; Brandon, N J; Muir, W J; Blackwood, D H; Watson, D G; Clapcote, S J; Pickard, B S

    2012-03-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix PAS (Per, Arnt, Sim) domain transcription factor gene NPAS3 is a replicated genetic risk factor for psychiatric disorders. A knockout (KO) mouse model exhibits behavioral and adult neurogenesis deficits consistent with human illness. To define the location and mechanism of NPAS3 etiopathology, we combined immunofluorescent, transcriptomic and metabonomic approaches. Intense Npas3 immunoreactivity was observed in the hippocampal subgranular zone-the site of adult neurogenesis--but was restricted to maturing, rather than proliferating, neuronal precursor cells. Microarray analysis of a HEK293 cell line over-expressing NPAS3 showed that transcriptional targets varied according to circadian rhythm context and C-terminal deletion. The most highly up-regulated NPAS3 target gene, VGF, encodes secretory peptides with established roles in neurogenesis, depression and schizophrenia. VGF was just one of many NPAS3 target genes also regulated by the SOX family of transcription factors, suggesting an overlap in neurodevelopmental function. The parallel repression of multiple glycolysis genes by NPAS3 reveals a second role in the regulation of glucose metabolism. Comparison of wild-type and Npas3 KO metabolite composition using high-resolution mass spectrometry confirmed these transcriptional findings. KO brain tissue contained significantly altered levels of NAD(+), glycolysis metabolites (such as dihydroxyacetone phosphate and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate), pentose phosphate pathway components and Kreb's cycle intermediates (succinate and α-ketoglutarate). The dual neurodevelopmental and metabolic aspects of NPAS3 activity described here increase our understanding of mental illness etiology, and may provide a mechanism for innate and medication-induced susceptibility to diabetes commonly reported in psychiatric patients.

  7. Arac/XylS family of transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, M T; Schleif, R; Bairoch, A; Hofmann, K; Ramos, J L

    1997-01-01

    The ArC/XylS family of prokaryotic positive transcriptional regulators includes more than 100 proteins and polypeptides derived from open reading frames translated from DNA sequences. Members of this family are widely distributed and have been found in the gamma subgroup of the proteobacteria, low- and high-G + C-content gram-positive bacteria, and cyanobacteria. These proteins are defined by a profile that can be accessed from PROSITE PS01124. Members of the family are about 300 amino acids long and have three main regulatory functions in common: carbon metabolism, stress response, and pathogenesis. Multiple alignments of the proteins of the family define a conserved stretch of 99 amino acids usually located at the C-terminal region of the regulator and connected to a nonconserved region via a linker. The conserved stretch contains all the elements required to bind DNA target sequences and to activate transcription from cognate promoters. Secondary analysis of the conserved region suggests that it contains two potential alpha-helix-turn-alpha-helix DNA binding motifs. The first, and better-fitting motif is supported by biochemical data, whereas existing biochemical data neither support nor refute the proposal that the second region possesses this structure. The phylogenetic relationship suggests that members of the family have recruited the nonconserved domain(s) into a series of existing domains involved in DNA recognition and transcription stimulation and that this recruited domain governs the role that the regulator carries out. For some regulators, it has been demonstrated that the nonconserved region contains the dimerization domain. For the regulators involved in carbon metabolism, the effector binding determinants are also in this region. Most regulators belonging to the AraC/XylS family recognize multiple binding sites in the regulated promoters. One of the motifs usually overlaps or is adjacent to the -35 region of the cognate promoters. Footprinting

  8. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E.; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  9. Transcriptional regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels.

    PubMed

    González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Felix, Ricardo

    2017-03-31

    The transcriptional regulation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (CaV ) channels is an emerging research area that promises to improve our understanding of how many relevant physiological events are shaped in the central nervous system, the skeletal muscle, and other tissues. Interestingly, a picture of how transcription of CaV channel subunit genes is controlled is evolving with the identification of the promoter regions required for tissue-specific expression, and the identification of transcription factors that control their expression. These promoters share several characteristics that include multiple transcriptional start sites, lack of a TATA box, and the presence of elements conferring tissue-selective expression. Likewise, changes in CaV channel expression occur throughout development, following ischemia, seizures, or chronic drug administration. This review focuses on insights achieved regarding the control of CaV channel gene expression. To further understand the complexities of expression and to increase the possibilities of detecting CaV channel alterations causing human disease, a deeper knowledge on the structure of the 5' upstream regions of the genes encoding these remarkable proteins will be necessary. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Drosophila OVO regulates ovarian tumor transcription by binding unusually near the transcription start site.

    PubMed

    Lü, J; Oliver, B

    2001-05-01

    Evolutionarily conserved ovo loci encode developmentally regulated, sequence-specific, DNA-binding, C(2)H(2)-zinc-finger proteins required in the germline and epidermal cells of flies and mice. The direct targets of OVO activity are not known. Genetic experiments suggest that ovo acts in the same regulatory network as ovarian tumor (otu), but the relative position of these genes in the pathway is controversial. Three OVO-binding sites exist in a compact regulatory region that controls germline expression of the otu gene. Interestingly, the strongest OVO-binding site is very near the otu transcription start, where basal transcriptional complexes must function. Loss-of-function, gain-of-function and promoter swapping constructs demonstrate that OVO binding near the transcription start site is required for OVO-dependent otu transcription in vivo. These data unambiguously identify otu as a direct OVO target gene and raise the tantalizing possibility that an OVO site, at the location normally occupied by basal components, functions as part of a specialized core promoter.

  11. Redox regulation of FoxO transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Klotz, Lars-Oliver; Sánchez-Ramos, Cristina; Prieto-Arroyo, Ignacio; Urbánek, Pavel; Steinbrenner, Holger; Monsalve, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors of the forkhead box, class O (FoxO) family are important regulators of the cellular stress response and promote the cellular antioxidant defense. On one hand, FoxOs stimulate the transcription of genes coding for antioxidant proteins located in different subcellular compartments, such as in mitochondria (i.e. superoxide dismutase-2, peroxiredoxins 3 and 5) and peroxisomes (catalase), as well as for antioxidant proteins found extracellularly in plasma (e.g., selenoprotein P and ceruloplasmin). On the other hand, reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as other stressful stimuli that elicit the formation of ROS, may modulate FoxO activity at multiple levels, including posttranslational modifications of FoxOs (such as phosphorylation and acetylation), interaction with coregulators, alterations in FoxO subcellular localization, protein synthesis and stability. Moreover, transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of the expression of genes coding for FoxOs is sensitive to ROS. Here, we review these aspects of FoxO biology focusing on redox regulation of FoxO signaling, and with emphasis on the interplay between ROS and FoxOs under various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Of particular interest are the dual role played by FoxOs in cancer development and their key role in whole body nutrient homeostasis, modulating metabolic adaptations and/or disturbances in response to low vs. high nutrient intake. Examples discussed here include calorie restriction and starvation as well as adipogenesis, obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26184557

  12. Myogenic regulatory transcription factors regulate growth in rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tenente, Inês M; Hayes, Madeline N; Ignatius, Myron S; McCarthy, Karin; Yohe, Marielle; Sindiri, Sivasish; Gryder, Berkley; Oliveira, Mariana L; Ramakrishnan, Ashwin; Tang, Qin; Chen, Eleanor Y; Petur Nielsen, G; Khan, Javed; Langenau, David M

    2017-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a pediatric malignacy of muscle with myogenic regulatory transcription factors MYOD and MYF5 being expressed in this disease. Consensus in the field has been that expression of these factors likely reflects the target cell of transformation rather than being required for continued tumor growth. Here, we used a transgenic zebrafish model to show that Myf5 is sufficient to confer tumor-propagating potential to RMS cells and caused tumors to initiate earlier and have higher penetrance. Analysis of human RMS revealed that MYF5 and MYOD are mutually-exclusively expressed and each is required for sustained tumor growth. ChIP-seq and mechanistic studies in human RMS uncovered that MYF5 and MYOD bind common DNA regulatory elements to alter transcription of genes that regulate muscle development and cell cycle progression. Our data support unappreciated and dominant oncogenic roles for MYF5 and MYOD convergence on common transcriptional targets to regulate human RMS growth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19214.001 PMID:28080960

  13. TOR-dependent post-transcriptional regulation of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guowu; McQuiston, Travis; Bernard, Amélie; Park, Yoon-Dong; Qiu, Jin; Vural, Ali; Zhang, Nannan; Waterman, Scott R; Blewett, Nathan H; Myers, Timothy G; Maraia, Richard J; Kehrl, John H; Uzel, Gulbu; Klionsky, Daniel J; Williamson, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of autophagy is required to maintain cellular equilibrium and prevent disease. While extensive study of post-translational mechanisms has yielded important insights into autophagy induction, less is known about post-transcriptional mechanisms that could potentiate homeostatic control. In our study, we showed that the RNA-binding protein, Dhh1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Vad1 in the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is involved in recruitment and degradation of key autophagy mRNAs. In addition, phosphorylation of the decapping protein Dcp2 by the target of rapamycin (TOR), facilitates decapping and degradation of autophagy-related mRNAs, resulting in repression of autophagy under nutrient-replete conditions. The post-transcriptional regulatory process is conserved in both mouse and human cells and plays a role in autophagy-related modulation of the inflammasome product IL1B. These results were then applied to provide mechanistic insight into autoimmunity of a patient with a PIK3CD/p110δ gain-of-function mutation. These results thus identify an important new post-transcriptional mechanism of autophagy regulation that is highly conserved between yeast and mammals.

  14. Transport and transcriptional regulation of oil production in plants.

    PubMed

    Manan, Sehrish; Chen, Beibei; She, Guangbiao; Wan, Xiaochun; Zhao, Jian

    2016-08-23

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) serves as an energy reservoir and phospholipids as build blocks of biomembrane to support plant life. They also provide human with foods and nutrients. Multi-compartmentalized biosynthesis, trafficking or cross-membrane transport of lipid intermediates or precursors and their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent progress has aided our understanding of how fatty acids (FAs) and phospholipids are transported between the chloroplast, the cytoplasm, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and how the ins and outs of lipids take place in the peroxisome and other organelles for lipid metabolism and function. In addition, information regarding the transcriptional regulation network associated with FA and TAG biosynthesis has been further enriched. Recent breakthroughs made in lipid transport and transcriptional regulation has provided significant insights into our comprehensive understanding of plant lipid biology. This review attempts to highlight the recent progress made on lipid synthesis, transport, degradation, and their regulatory mechanisms. Metabolic engineering, based on these knowledge-powered technologies for production of edible oils or biofuels, is reviewed. The biotechnological application of metabolic enzymes, transcription factors and transporters, for oil production and composition improvement, are discussed in a broad context in order to provide a fresh scenario for researchers and to guide future research and applications.

  15. Beyond transcription factors: The role of chromatin modifying enzymes in regulating transcription required for memory

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Ruth M.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2008-01-01

    One of the alluring aspects of examining chromatin modifications in the role of modulating transcription required for long-term memory processes is that these modifications may provide transient and potentially stable epigenetic marks in the service of activating and/or maintaining transcriptional processes. These, in turn, may ultimately participate in the molecular mechanisms required for neuronal changes subserving long-lasting changes in behavior. As an epigenetic mechanism of transcriptional control, chromatin modification has been shown to participate in maintaining cellular memory (e.g., cell fate) and may underlie the strengthening and maintenance of synaptic connections required for long-term changes in behavior. Epigenetics has become central to several fields of neurobiology, where researchers have found that regulation of chromatin modification has a significant role in epilepsy, drug addiction, depression, neurodegenerative diseases, and memory. In this review, we will discuss the role of chromatin modifying enzymes in memory processes, as well as how recent studies in yeast genetics and cancer biology may impact the way we think about how chromatin modification and chromatin remodeling regulate neuronal function. PMID:18583646

  16. Transcriptional regulation of human thromboxane synthase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.D.; Baek, S.J.; Fleischer, T

    1994-09-01

    The human thromboxane synthase (TS) gene encodes a microsomal enzyme catalyzing the conversion of prostaglandin endoperoxide into thromboxane A{sub 2}(TxA{sub 2}), a potent inducer of vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation. A deficiency in platelet TS activity results in bleeding disorders, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains to be elucidated. Increased TxA{sub 2} has been associated with many pathophysiological conditions such as cardiovascular disease, pulmonary hypertension, pre-eclampsia, and thrombosis in sickle cell patients. Since the formation of TxA{sub 2} is dependent upon TS, the regulation of TS gene expression may presumably play a crucial role in vivo. Abrogation of the regulatory mechanism in TS gene expression might contribute, in part, to the above clinical manifestations. To gain insight into TS gene regulation, a 1.7 kb promoter of the human TS gene was cloned and sequenced. RNase protection assay and 5{prime} RACE protocols were used to map the transcription initiation site to nucleotide A, 30 bp downstream from a canonical TATA box. Several transcription factor binding sites, including AP-1, PU.1, and PEA3, were identified within this sequence. Transient expression studies in HL-60 cells transfected with constructs containing various lengths (0.2 to 5.5 kb) of the TS promoter/luciferase fusion gene indicated the presence of multiple repressor elements within the 5.5 kb TS promoter. However, a lineage-specific up-regulation of TS gene expression was observed in HL-60 cells induced by TPA to differentiate along the macrophage lineage. The increase in TS transcription was not detectable until 36 hr after addition of the inducer. These results suggest that expression of the human TS gene may be regulated by a mechanism involving repression and derepression of the TS promoter.

  17. Transcriptional regulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Condamine, Thomas; Mastio, Jérôme; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are a heterogeneous group of pathologically activated immature cells that play a major role in the negative regulation of the immune response in cancer, autoimmunity, many chronic infections, and inflammatory conditions, as well as in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, tumor cell invasion, and metastases. Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells is governed by a network of transcriptional regulators that could be combined into 2 partially overlapping groups: factors promoting myelopoiesis and preventing differentiation of mature myeloid cells and factors promoting pathologic activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In this review, we discuss the specific nature of these factors and their impact on myeloid-derived suppressor cell development. PMID:26337512

  18. Pervasive transcription constitutes a new level of eukaryotic genome regulation

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Julia; Morillon, Antonin

    2009-01-01

    During the past few years, it has become increasingly evident that the expression of eukaryotic genomes is far more complex than had been previously noted. The idea that the transcriptome is derived exclusively from protein-coding genes and some specific non-coding RNAs—such as snRNAs, snoRNAs, tRNAs or rRNAs—has been swept away by numerous studies indicating that RNA polymerase II can be found at almost any genomic location. Pervasive transcription is widespread and, far from being a futile process, has a crucial role in controlling gene expression and genomic plasticity. Here, we review recent findings that point to cryptic transcription as a fundamental component of the regulation of eukaryotic genomes. PMID:19680288

  19. Regulation of basophil and mast cell development by transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Haruka; Kurotaki, Daisuke; Tamura, Tomohiko

    2016-04-01

    Basophils and mast cells play important roles in host defense against parasitic infections and allergic responses. Several progenitor populations, either shared or specific, for basophils and/or mast cells have been identified, thus elucidating the developmental pathways of these cells. Multiple transcription factors essential for their development and the relationships between them have been also revealed. For example, IRF8 induces GATA2 expression to promote the generation of both basophils and mast cells. The STAT5-GATA2 axis induces C/EBPα and MITF expression, facilitating the differentiation into basophils and mast cells, respectively. In addition, C/EBPα and MITF mutually suppress each other's expression. This review provides an overview of recent advances in our understanding of how transcription factors regulate the development of basophils and mast cells.

  20. Transcriptional regulation of bone and joint remodeling by NFAT

    PubMed Central

    Sitara, Despina; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis and arthritis are highly prevalent diseases and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. These diseases result from aberrant tissue remodeling leading to weak, fracture-prone bones or painful, dysfunctional joints. The nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor family controls diverse biologic processes in vertebrates. Here, we review the scientific evidence that links NFAT-regulated gene transcription to bone and joint pathology. A particular emphasis is placed on the role of NFATs in bone resorption and formation by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, respectively. In addition, emerging data that connect NFATs with cartilage biology, angiogenesis, nociception, and neurogenic inflammation are explored. The goal of this article is to highlight the importance of tissue remodeling in musculoskeletal disease and situate NFAT-driven cellular responses within this context to inspire future research endeavors. PMID:20193006

  1. Transcriptional regulation of decreased protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, G.; Steffen, J. M.; Geoghegan, T. E.

    1989-01-01

    The regulatory role of transcriptional alterations in unloaded skeletal muscles was investigated by determining levels of total muscle RNA and mRNA fractions in soleus, gastrocnemius, and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats subjected to whole-body suspension for up to 7 days. After 7 days, total RNA and mRNA contents were lower in soleus and gastrocnemius, compared with controls, but the concentrations of both RNAs per g muscle were unaltered. Alpha-actin mRNA (assessed by dot hybridization) was significantly reduced in soleus after 1, 3, and 7 days of suspension and in gastrocnemius after 3 and 7 days, but was unchanged in EDL. Protein synthesis directed by RNA extracted from soleus and EDL indicated marked alteration in mRNAs coding for several small proteins. Results suggest that altered transcription and availability of specific mRNAs contribute significantly to the regulation of protein synthesis during skeletal muscle unloading.

  2. Dynamic Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulation of Human Epidermal Keratinocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cavazza, Alessia; Miccio, Annarita; Romano, Oriana; Petiti, Luca; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Peano, Clelia; Severgnini, Marco; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Bicciato, Silvio; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Human skin is maintained by the differentiation and maturation of interfollicular stem and progenitors cells. We used DeepCAGE, genome-wide profiling of histone modifications and retroviral integration analysis, to map transcripts, promoters, enhancers, and super-enhancers (SEs) in prospectively isolated keratinocytes and transit-amplifying progenitors, and retrospectively defined keratinocyte stem cells. We show that >95% of the active promoters are in common and differentially regulated in progenitors and differentiated keratinocytes, while approximately half of the enhancers and SEs are stage specific and account for most of the epigenetic changes occurring during differentiation. Transcription factor (TF) motif identification and correlation with TF binding site maps allowed the identification of TF circuitries acting on enhancers and SEs during differentiation. Overall, our study provides a broad, genome-wide description of chromatin dynamics and differential enhancer and promoter usage during epithelial differentiation, and describes a novel approach to identify active regulatory elements in rare stem cell populations. PMID:27050947

  3. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    PubMed

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes.

  4. Transcription factor FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Sang-Min; An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kim, Jung-Woong Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2015-08-07

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-mediated death. Although various therapeutic approaches are used for lung cancer treatment, these mainly target the tumor suppressor p53 transcription factor, which is involved in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. However, p53-targeted therapies have limited application in lung cancer, since p53 is found to be mutated in more than half of lung cancers. In this study, we propose tumor suppressor FOXA2 as an alternative target protein for therapies against lung cancer and reveal a possible FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network by identifying new target genes and binding partners of FOXA2 by using various screening techniques. The genes encoding Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2), nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 2 (NR0B2), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were identified as putative target genes of FOXA2. Additionally, the proteins including highly similar to heat shock protein HSP 90-beta (HSP90A), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1A variant (HSPA1A), histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and HDAC3 were identified as novel interacting partners of FOXA2. Moreover, we showed that FOXA2-dependent promoter activation of BAX and p21 genes is significantly reduced via physical interactions between the identified binding partners and FOXA2. These results provide opportunities to understand the FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulation network and novel therapeutic targets to modulate this network in p53-deficient lung cancer. - Highlights: • Identification of new target genes of FOXA2. • Identifications of novel interaction proteins of FOXA2. • Construction of FOXA2-centered transcriptional regulatory network in non-small cell lung cancer.

  5. The transcriptional regulation of the human CYP2C genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuping; Goldstein, Joyce A.

    2010-01-01

    In humans, four members of the CYP2C subfamily (CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, and CYP2C19) metabolize more than 20% of all therapeutic drugs as well as a number of endogenous compounds. The CYP2C enzymes are found predominantly in the liver, where they comprise ∼20% of the total cytochrome P450. A variety of xenobiotics such as phenobarbital, rifampicin, and hyperforin have been shown to induce the transcriptional expression of CYP2C genes in primary human hepatocytes and to increase the metabolism of CYP2C substrates in vivo in man. This induction can result in drug-drug interactions, drug tolerance, and therapeutic failure. Several drug-activated nuclear receptors including CAR, PXR, VDR, and GR recognize drug responsive elements within the 5′ flanking promoter region of CYP2C genes to mediate the transcriptional upregulation of these genes in response to xenobiotics and steroids. Other nuclear receptors and transcriptional factors including HNF4α, HNF3γ, C/EBPα and more recently RORs, have been reported to regulate the constitutive expression of CYP2C genes in liver. The maximum transcriptional induction of CYP2C genes appears to be achieved through a coordinative cross-talk between drug responsive nuclear receptors, hepatic factors, and coactivators. The transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of the expression of CYP2C genes in extrahepatic tissues has received less study, but these may be altered by perturbations from pathological conditions such as ischemia as well as some of the receptors mentioned above. PMID:19702536

  6. Role of CTCF Protein in Regulating FMR1 Locus Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Lanni, Stella; Goracci, Martina; Borrelli, Loredana; Mancano, Giorgia; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Moscato, Umberto; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene, through expansion and methylation of a CGG triplet repeat (methylated full mutation). An antisense transcript (FMR1-AS1), starting from both promoter and intron 2 of the FMR1 gene, was demonstrated in transcriptionally active alleles, but not in silent FXS alleles. Moreover, a DNA methylation boundary, which is lost in FXS, was recently identified upstream of the FMR1 gene. Several nuclear proteins bind to this region, like the insulator protein CTCF. Here we demonstrate for the first time that rare unmethylated full mutation (UFM) alleles present the same boundary described in wild type (WT) alleles and that CTCF binds to this region, as well as to the FMR1 gene promoter, exon 1 and intron 2 binding sites. Contrariwise, DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding to FXS alleles. Drug-induced CpGs demethylation does not restore this binding. CTCF knock-down experiments clearly established that CTCF does not act as insulator at the active FMR1 locus, despite the presence of a CGG expansion. CTCF depletion induces heterochromatinic histone configuration of the FMR1 locus and results in reduction of FMR1 transcription, which however is not accompanied by spreading of DNA methylation towards the FMR1 promoter. CTCF depletion is also associated with FMR1-AS1 mRNA reduction. Antisense RNA, like sense transcript, is upregulated in UFM and absent in FXS cells and its splicing is correlated to that of the FMR1-mRNA. We conclude that CTCF has a complex role in regulating FMR1 expression, probably through the organization of chromatin loops between sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory regions, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis. PMID:23874213

  7. Role of CTCF protein in regulating FMR1 locus transcription.

    PubMed

    Lanni, Stella; Goracci, Martina; Borrelli, Loredana; Mancano, Giorgia; Chiurazzi, Pietro; Moscato, Umberto; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Neri, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by epigenetic silencing of the FMR1 gene, through expansion and methylation of a CGG triplet repeat (methylated full mutation). An antisense transcript (FMR1-AS1), starting from both promoter and intron 2 of the FMR1 gene, was demonstrated in transcriptionally active alleles, but not in silent FXS alleles. Moreover, a DNA methylation boundary, which is lost in FXS, was recently identified upstream of the FMR1 gene. Several nuclear proteins bind to this region, like the insulator protein CTCF. Here we demonstrate for the first time that rare unmethylated full mutation (UFM) alleles present the same boundary described in wild type (WT) alleles and that CTCF binds to this region, as well as to the FMR1 gene promoter, exon 1 and intron 2 binding sites. Contrariwise, DNA methylation prevents CTCF binding to FXS alleles. Drug-induced CpGs demethylation does not restore this binding. CTCF knock-down experiments clearly established that CTCF does not act as insulator at the active FMR1 locus, despite the presence of a CGG expansion. CTCF depletion induces heterochromatinic histone configuration of the FMR1 locus and results in reduction of FMR1 transcription, which however is not accompanied by spreading of DNA methylation towards the FMR1 promoter. CTCF depletion is also associated with FMR1-AS1 mRNA reduction. Antisense RNA, like sense transcript, is upregulated in UFM and absent in FXS cells and its splicing is correlated to that of the FMR1-mRNA. We conclude that CTCF has a complex role in regulating FMR1 expression, probably through the organization of chromatin loops between sense/antisense transcriptional regulatory regions, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of IGF-I expression in skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Allen, D. L.; Haddad, F.; Baldwin, K. M.

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of transcription in the regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I expression in skeletal muscle. RT-PCR was used to determine endogenous expression of IGF-I pre-mRNA and mRNA in control (Con) and functionally overloaded (FO) rat plantaris. The transcriptional activities of five different-length IGF-I promoter fragments controlling transcription of a firefly luciferase (FLuc) reporter gene were tested in vitro by transfection of myoblasts or in vivo during FO by direct gene transfer into the plantaris. Increased endogenous IGF-I gene transcription during 7 days of plantaris FO was evidenced by an approximately 140-160% increase (P < 0.0001) in IGF-I pre-mRNA (a transcriptional marker). IGF-I mRNA expression also increased by approximately 90% (P < 0.0001), and it was correlated (R = 0.93; P < 0.0001) with the pre-mRNA increases. The three longest IGF-I exon 1 promoters induced reporter gene expression in proliferating C2C12 and L6E9 myoblasts. In differentiated L6E9 myotubes, promoter activity increased approximately two- to threefold over myoblasts. Overexpression of calcineurin and MyoD increased the activity of the -852/+192 promoter in C2C12 myotubes by approximately 5- and approximately 18-fold, respectively. However, FO did not induce these exogenous promoter fragments. Nevertheless, the present findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the IGF-I gene is transcriptionally regulated during muscle hypertrophy in vivo as evidenced by the induction of the endogenous IGF-I pre-mRNA during plantaris FO. The exon 1 promoter region of the IGF-I gene is sufficient to direct inducible expression in vitro; however, an in vivo response to FO may require elements outside the -852/+346 region of the exon 1 IGF-I promoter or features inherent to the endogenous IGF-I gene.

  9. Transcriptional networks that regulate muscle stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Punch, Vincent G; Jones, Andrew E; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2009-01-01

    Muscle stem cells comprise different populations of stem and progenitor cells found in embryonic and adult tissues. A number of signaling and transcriptional networks are responsible for specification and survival of these cell populations and regulation of their behavior during growth and regeneration. Muscle progenitor cells are mostly derived from the somites of developing embryos, while satellite cells are the progenitor cells responsible for the majority of postnatal growth and adult muscle regeneration. In resting muscle, these stem cells are quiescent, but reenter the cell cycle during their activation, whereby they undergo decisions to self-renew, proliferate, or differentiate and fuse into multinucleated myofibers to repair damaged muscle. Regulation of muscle stem cell activity is under the precise control of a number of extrinsic signaling pathways and active transcriptional networks that dictate their behavior, fate, and regenerative potential. Here, we review the networks responsible for these different aspects of muscle stem cell biology and discuss prevalent parallels between mechanisms regulating the activity of embryonic muscle progenitor cells and adult satellite cells.

  10. Inference of self-regulated transcriptional networks by comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Cornish, Joseph P; Matthews, Fialelei; Thomas, Julien R; Erill, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The assumption of basic properties, like self-regulation, in simple transcriptional regulatory networks can be exploited to infer regulatory motifs from the growing amounts of genomic and meta-genomic data. These motifs can in principle be used to elucidate the nature and scope of transcriptional networks through comparative genomics. Here we assess the feasibility of this approach using the SOS regulatory network of Gram-positive bacteria as a test case. Using experimentally validated data, we show that the known regulatory motif can be inferred through the assumption of self-regulation. Furthermore, the inferred motif provides a more robust search pattern for comparative genomics than the experimental motifs defined in reference organisms. We take advantage of this robustness to generate a functional map of the SOS response in Gram-positive bacteria. Our results reveal definite differences in the composition of the LexA regulon between Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, and confirm that regulation of cell-division inhibition is a widespread characteristic of this network among Gram-positive bacteria.

  11. Structural basis for the transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Darcie J.; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Subramanian, Chitra; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W.

    2010-11-09

    DesT is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the genes that control the unsaturated:saturated fatty acid ratio available for membrane lipid synthesis. DesT bound to unsaturated acyl-CoA has a high affinity for its cognate palindromic DNA-binding site, whereas DesT bound to saturated acyl-CoA does not bind this site. Structural analyses of the DesT-oleoyl-CoA-DNA and DesT-palmitoyl-CoA complexes reveal that acyl chain shape directly influences the packing of hydrophobic core residues within the DesT ligand-binding domain. These changes are propagated to the paired DNA-binding domains via conformational changes to modulate DNA binding. These structural interpretations are supported by the in vitro and in vivo characterization of site-directed mutants. The regulation of DesT by the unsaturated:saturated ratio of acyl chains rather than the concentration of a single ligand is a paradigm for understanding transcriptional regulation of membrane lipid homeostasis.

  12. The MYB107 Transcription Factor Positively Regulates Suberin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gou, Mingyue; Hou, Guichuan; Yang, Huijun; Zhang, Xuebin; Cai, Yuanheng; Kai, Guoyin; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2016-12-13

    Suberin, a lipophilic polymer deposited in the outer integument of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed coat, represents an essential sealing component controlling water and solute movement and protecting seed from pathogenic infection. Although many genes responsible for suberin synthesis are identified, the regulatory components controlling its biosynthesis have not been definitively determined. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis MYB107 transcription factor acts as a positive regulator controlling suberin biosynthetic gene expression in the seed coat. MYB107 coexpresses with suberin biosynthetic genes in a temporal manner during seed development. Disrupting MYB107 particularly suppresses the expression of genes involved in suberin but not cutin biosynthesis, lowers seed coat suberin accumulation, alters suberin lamellar structure, and consequently renders higher seed coat permeability and susceptibility to abiotic stresses. Furthermore, MYB107 directly binds to the promoters of suberin biosynthetic genes, verifying its primary role in regulating their expression. Identifying MYB107 as a positive regulator for seed coat suberin synthesis offers a basis for discovering the potential transcriptional network behind one of the most abundant lipid-based polymers in nature.

  13. Transcription factor TBX4 regulates myofibroblast accumulation and lung fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ting; Liang, Jiurong; Liu, Ningshan; Huan, Caijuan; Zhang, Yanli; Liu, Weijia; Kumar, Maya; Xiao, Rui; D’Armiento, Jeanine; Metzger, Daniel; Chambon, Pierre; Papaioannou, Virginia E.; Stripp, Barry R.; Jiang, Dianhua

    2016-01-01

    Progressive tissue fibrosis is a major cause of the morbidity and mortality associated with repeated epithelial injuries and accumulation of myofibroblasts. Successful treatment options are limited by an incomplete understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate myofibroblast accumulation. Here, we employed in vivo lineage tracing and real-time gene expression transgenic reporting methods to analyze the early embryonic transcription factor T-box gene 4 (TBX4), and determined that TBX4-lineage mesenchymal progenitors are the predominant source of myofibroblasts in injured adult lung. In a murine model, ablation of TBX4-expressing cells or disruption of TBX4 signaling attenuated lung fibrosis after bleomycin-induced injury. Furthermore, TBX4 regulated hyaluronan synthase 2 production to enable fibroblast invasion of matrix both in murine models and in fibroblasts from patients with severe pulmonary fibrosis. These data identify TBX4 as a mesenchymal transcription factor that drives accumulation of myofibroblasts and the development of lung fibrosis. Targeting TBX4 and downstream factors that regulate fibroblast invasiveness could lead to therapeutic approaches in lung fibrosis. PMID:27400124

  14. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in proteobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Leyn, Semen A.; Suvorova, Inna A.; Kholina, Tatiana D.; Sherstneva, Sofia S.; Novichkov, Pavel S.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2014-11-20

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ~200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific and genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.

  15. Comparative genomics of transcriptional regulation of methionine metabolism in proteobacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Leyn, Semen A.; Suvorova, Inna A.; Kholina, Tatiana D.; ...

    2014-11-20

    Methionine metabolism and uptake genes in Proteobacteria are controlled by a variety of RNA and DNA regulatory systems. We have applied comparative genomics to reconstruct regulons for three known transcription factors, MetJ, MetR, and SahR, and three known riboswitch motifs, SAH, SAM-SAH, and SAM_alpha, in ~200 genomes from 22 taxonomic groups of Proteobacteria. We also identified two novel regulons: a SahR-like transcription factor SamR controlling various methionine biosynthesis genes in the Xanthomonadales group, and a potential RNA regulatory element with terminator-antiterminator mechanism controlling the metX or metZ genes in beta-proteobacteria. For each analyzed regulator we identified the core, taxon-specific andmore » genome-specific regulon members. By analyzing the distribution of these regulators in bacterial genomes and by comparing their regulon contents we elucidated possible evolutionary scenarios for the regulation of the methionine metabolism genes in Proteobacteria.« less

  16. The MYB107 Transcription Factor Positively Regulates Suberin Biosynthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Gou, Mingyue; Hou, Guichuan; Yang, Huijun; ...

    2016-12-13

    Suberin, a lipophilic polymer deposited in the outer integument of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seed coat, represents an essential sealing component controlling water and solute movement and protecting seed from pathogenic infection. Although many genes responsible for suberin synthesis are identified, the regulatory components controlling its biosynthesis have not been definitively determined. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis MYB107 transcription factor acts as a positive regulator controlling suberin biosynthetic gene expression in the seed coat. MYB107 coexpresses with suberin biosynthetic genes in a temporal manner during seed development. Disrupting MYB107 particularly suppresses the expression of genes involved in suberin butmore » not cutin biosynthesis, lowers seed coat suberin accumulation, alters suberin lamellar structure, and consequently renders higher seed coat permeability and susceptibility to abiotic stresses. Furthermore, MYB107 directly binds to the promoters of suberin biosynthetic genes, verifying its primary role in regulating their expression. Identifying MYB107 as a positive regulator for seed coat suberin synthesis offers a basis for discovering the potential transcriptional network behind one of the most abundant lipid-based polymers in nature.« less

  17. Transcriptional and post-translational regulation of pannexins.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Andrew K J; Epp, Anna L; Nagarajan, Archana; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2017-03-07

    Pannexins are a 3-membered family of proteins that form large pore ion and metabolite channels in vertebrates. The impact of pannexins on vertebrate biology is intricately tied to where and when they are expressed, and how they are modified, once produced. The purpose of this review is therefore to outline our current understanding of transcriptional and post-translational regulation of pannexins. First, we briefly summarize their discovery and characteristics. Next, we describe several aspects of transcriptional regulation, including cell and tissue-specific expression, dynamic expression over development and disease, as well as new insights into the underlying molecular machinery involved. Following this, we delve into the role of post-translational modifications in the regulation of trafficking and channel properties, highlighting important work on glycosylation, phosphorylation, S-nitrosylation and proteolytic cleavage. Embedded throughout, we also highlight important knowledge gaps and avenues of future research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Gap Junction Proteins edited by Jean Claude Herve.

  18. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  19. Extensive Transcriptional Regulation of Chromatin Modifiers during Human Neurodevelopment

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Matthias K.; Zimmer, Bastian; Pöltl, Dominik; Broeg, Marc P.; Ivanova, Violeta; Gaspar, John A.; Sachinidis, Agapios; Wüllner, Ullrich

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, including histone modifications or chromatin remodeling are regulated by a large number of human genes. We developed a strategy to study the coordinate regulation of such genes, and to compare different cell populations or tissues. A set of 150 genes, comprising different classes of epigenetic modifiers was compiled. This new tool was used initially to characterize changes during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to central nervous system neuroectoderm progenitors (NEP). qPCR analysis showed that more than 60% of the examined transcripts were regulated, and >10% of them had a >5-fold increased expression. For comparison, we differentiated hESC to neural crest progenitors (NCP), a distinct peripheral nervous system progenitor population. Some epigenetic modifiers were regulated into the same direction in NEP and NCP, but also distinct differences were observed. For instance, the remodeling ATPase SMARCA2 was up-regulated >30-fold in NCP, while it remained unchanged in NEP; up-regulation of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler CHD7 was increased in NEP, while it was down-regulated in NCP. To compare the neural precursor profiles with those of mature neurons, we analyzed the epigenetic modifiers in human cortical tissue. This resulted in the identification of 30 regulations shared between all cell types, such as the histone methyltransferase SETD7. We also identified new markers for post-mitotic neurons, like the arginine methyl transferase PRMT8 and the methyl transferase EZH1. Our findings suggest a hitherto unexpected extent of regulation, and a cell type-dependent specificity of epigenetic modifiers in neurodifferentiation. PMID:22590590

  20. Identifying combinatorial regulation of transcription factors and binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mamoru; Hata, Naoya; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Futcher, Bruce; Zhang, Michael Q

    2004-01-01

    Background Combinatorial interaction of transcription factors (TFs) is important for gene regulation. Although various genomic datasets are relevant to this issue, each dataset provides relatively weak evidence on its own. Developing methods that can integrate different sequence, expression and localization data have become important. Results Here we use a novel method that integrates chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) data with microarray expression data and with combinatorial TF-motif analysis. We systematically identify combinations of transcription factors and of motifs. The various combinations of TFs involved multiple binding mechanisms. We reconstruct a new combinatorial regulatory map of the yeast cell cycle in which cell-cycle regulation can be drawn as a chain of extended TF modules. We find that the pairwise combination of a TF for an early cell-cycle phase and a TF for a later phase is often used to control gene expression at intermediate times. Thus the number of distinct times of gene expression is greater than the number of transcription factors. We also see that some TF modules control branch points (cell-cycle entry and exit), and in the presence of appropriate signals they can allow progress along alternative pathways. Conclusions Combining different data sources can increase statistical power as demonstrated by detecting TF interactions and composite TF-binding motifs. The original picture of a chain of simple cell-cycle regulators can be extended to a chain of composite regulatory modules: different modules may share a common TF component in the same pathway or a TF component cross-talking to other pathways. PMID:15287978

  1. The cell cycle rallies the transcription cycle: Cdc28/Cdk1 is a cell cycle-regulated transcriptional CDK.

    PubMed

    Chymkowitch, Pierre; Enserink, Jorrit M

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) Kin28, Bur1 and Ctk1 regulate basal transcription by phosphorylating the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II. However, very little is known about the involvement of the cell cycle CDK Cdc28 in the transcription process. We have recently shown that, upon cell cycle entry, Cdc28 kinase activity boosts transcription of a subset of genes by directly stimulating the basal transcription machinery. Here, we discuss the biological significance of this finding and give our view of the kinase-dependent role of Cdc28 in regulation of RNA polymerase II.

  2. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  3. Transcription by RNA polymerase III: insights into mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Turowski, Tomasz W.; Tollervey, David

    2016-01-01

    The highly abundant, small stable RNAs that are synthesized by RNA polymerase III (RNAPIII) have key functional roles, particularly in the protein synthesis apparatus. Their expression is metabolically demanding, and is therefore coupled to changing demands for protein synthesis during cell growth and division. Here, we review the regulatory mechanisms that control the levels of RNAPIII transcripts and discuss their potential physiological relevance. Recent analyses have revealed differential regulation of tRNA expression at all steps on its biogenesis, with significant deregulation of mature tRNAs in cancer cells. PMID:27911719

  4. Extensive Regulation of Diurnal Transcription and Metabolism by Glucocorticoids

    PubMed Central

    Schink, Andrea; Gobet, Cédric; Keime, Céline; Poschet, Gernot; Jost, Bernard; Dickmeis, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Altered daily patterns of hormone action are suspected to contribute to metabolic disease. It is poorly understood how the adrenal glucocorticoid hormones contribute to the coordination of daily global patterns of transcription and metabolism. Here, we examined diurnal metabolite and transcriptome patterns in a zebrafish glucocorticoid deficiency model by RNA-Seq, NMR spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-based methods. We observed dysregulation of metabolic pathways including glutaminolysis, the citrate and urea cycles and glyoxylate detoxification. Constant, non-rhythmic glucocorticoid treatment rescued many of these changes, with some notable exceptions among the amino acid related pathways. Surprisingly, the non-rhythmic glucocorticoid treatment rescued almost half of the entire dysregulated diurnal transcriptome patterns. A combination of E-box and glucocorticoid response elements is enriched in the rescued genes. This simple enhancer element combination is sufficient to drive rhythmic circadian reporter gene expression under non-rhythmic glucocorticoid exposure, revealing a permissive function for the hormones in glucocorticoid-dependent circadian transcription. Our work highlights metabolic pathways potentially contributing to morbidity in patients with glucocorticoid deficiency, even under glucocorticoid replacement therapy. Moreover, we provide mechanistic insight into the interaction between the circadian clock and glucocorticoids in the transcriptional regulation of metabolism. PMID:27941970

  5. Dynamic regulation of transcription factors by nucleosome remodeling.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Hada, Arjan; Sen, Payel; Olufemi, Lola; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Benjamin Y; Forth, Scott; McKnight, Jeffrey N; Patel, Ashok; Bowman, Gregory D; Bartholomew, Blaine; Wang, Michelle D

    2015-06-05

    The chromatin landscape and promoter architecture are dominated by the interplay of nucleosome and transcription factor (TF) binding to crucial DNA sequence elements. However, it remains unclear whether nucleosomes mobilized by chromatin remodelers can influence TFs that are already present on the DNA template. In this study, we investigated the interplay between nucleosome remodeling, by either yeast ISW1a or SWI/SNF, and a bound TF. We found that a TF serves as a major barrier to ISW1a remodeling, and acts as a boundary for nucleosome repositioning. In contrast, SWI/SNF was able to slide a nucleosome past a TF, with concurrent eviction of the TF from the DNA, and the TF did not significantly impact the nucleosome positioning. Our results provide direct evidence for a novel mechanism for both nucleosome positioning regulation by bound TFs and TF regulation via dynamic repositioning of nucleosomes.

  6. Zinc triggers a complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the metal homeostasis gene FRD3 in Arabidopsis relatives

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Polese, Catherine; Nouet, Cécile; Carnol, Monique; Bosman, Bernard; Krämer, Ute; Motte, Patrick; Hanikenne, Marc

    2015-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, FRD3 (FERRIC CHELATE REDUCTASE DEFECTIVE 3) plays a central role in metal homeostasis. FRD3 is among a set of metal homeostasis genes that are constitutively highly expressed in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis halleri, a zinc hyperaccumulating and hypertolerant species. Here, we examined the regulation of FRD3 by zinc in both species to shed light on the evolutionary processes underlying the evolution of hyperaccumulation in A. halleri. We combined gene expression studies with the use of β-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein reporter constructs to compare the expression profile and transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of FRD3 in both species. The AtFRD3 and AhFRD3 genes displayed a conserved expression profile. In A. thaliana, alternative transcription initiation sites from two promoters determined transcript variants that were differentially regulated by zinc supply in roots and shoots to favour the most highly translated variant under zinc-excess conditions. In A. halleri, a single transcript variant with higher transcript stability and enhanced translation has been maintained. The FRD3 gene thus undergoes complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation in Arabidopsis relatives. Our study reveals that a diverse set of mechanisms underlie increased gene dosage in the A. halleri lineage and illustrates how an environmental challenge can alter gene regulation. PMID:25900619

  7. Molecular basis of RNA polymerase promoter specificity switch revealed through studies of Thermus bacteriophage transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Minakhin, Leonid; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Lopatina, Anna; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation is the central point of gene expression regulation. Understanding of molecular mechanism of transcription regulation requires, ultimately, the structural understanding of consequences of transcription factors binding to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme of transcription. We recently determined a structure of a complex between transcription factor gp39 encoded by a Thermus bacteriophage and Thermus RNAP holoenzyme. In this addendum to the original publication, we highlight structural insights that explain the ability of gp39 to act as an RNAP specificity switch which inhibits transcription initiation from a major class of bacterial promoters, while allowing transcription from a minor promoter class to continue. PMID:25105059

  8. Glutamine Metabolism Regulates the Pluripotency Transcription Factor OCT4

    PubMed Central

    Marsboom, Glenn; Zhang, Guo-Fang; Pohl-Avila, Nicole; Zhang, Yanmin; Yuan, Yang; Kang, Hojin; Hao, Bo; Brunengraber, Henri; Malik, Asrar B.; Rehman, Jalees

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of pluripotency by cellular metabolism in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are not fully understood. We found that high levels of glutamine metabolism are essential to prevent degradation of OCT4, a key transcription factor regulating hESC pluripotency. Glutamine withdrawal depletes the endogenous anti-oxidant glutathione, which results in the oxidation of OCT4 cysteine residues required for its DNA binding and enhanced OCT4 degradation. The emergence of the OCT4lo cell population following glutamine withdrawal did not result in greater propensity for cell death. Instead, glutamine withdrawal during vascular differentiation of hESCs generated cells with greater angiogenic capacity, thus indicating that modulating glutamine metabolism enhances the differentiation and functional maturation of cells. These findings demonstrate that the pluripotency transcription factor OCT4 can serve as a metabolic-redox sensor in hESCs and that metabolic cues can act in concert with growth factor signaling to orchestrate stem cell differentiation. PMID:27346346

  9. Effects of the lifestyle habits in breast cancer transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Solis, Marco Allán; Maya-Nuñez, Guadalupe; Casas-González, Patricia; Olivares, Aleida; Aguilar-Rojas, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Through research carried out in the last 25 years about the breast cancer etiology, it has been possible to estimate that less than 10 % of patients who are diagnosed with the condition are carriers of some germline or somatic mutation. The clinical reports of breast cancer patients with healthy twins and the development of disease in women without high penetrance mutations detected, warn the participation more factors in the transformation process. The high incidence of mammary adenocarcinoma in the modern woman and the urgent need for new methods of prevention and early detection have demanded more information about the role that environment and lifestyle have on the transformation of mammary gland epithelial cells. Obesity, alcoholism and smoking are factors that have shown a close correlation with the risk of developing breast cancer. And although these conditions affect different cell regulation levels, the study of its effects in the mechanisms of transcriptional and epigenetic regulation is considered critical for a better understanding of the loss of identity of epithelial cells during carcinogenesis of this tissue. The main objective of this review was to establish the importance of changes occurring to transcriptional level in the mammary gland as a consequence of acute or chronic exposure to harmful products such as obesity-causing foods, ethanol and cigarette smoke components. At analyze the main studies related to topic, it has concluded that the understanding of effects caused by the lifestyle factors in performance of the transcriptional mechanisms that determine gene expression of the mammary gland epithelial cells, may help explain the development of this disease in women without genetic propensity and different phenotypic manifestations of this cancer type.

  10. sRNA roles in regulating transcriptional regulators: Lrp and SoxS regulation by sRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Jung; Gottesman, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of transcription factors contributes to regulatory circuits. We created translational reporter fusions for multiple central regulators in Escherichia coli and examined the effect of Hfq-dependent non-coding RNAs on these fusions. This approach yields an ‘RNA landscape,’ identifying Hfq-dependent sRNAs that regulate a given fusion. No significant sRNA regulation of crp or fnr was detected. hns was regulated only by DsrA, as previously reported. Lrp and SoxS were both found to be regulated post-transcriptionally. Lrp, ‘leucine-responsive regulatory protein,’ regulates genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and catabolism and other cellular functions. sRNAs DsrA, MicF and GcvB each independently downregulate the lrp translational fusion, confirming previous reports for MicF and GcvB. MicF and DsrA interact with an overlapping site early in the lrp ORF, while GcvB acts upstream at two independent sites in the long lrp leader. Surprisingly, GcvB was found to be responsible for significant downregulation of lrp after oxidative stress; MicF also contributed. SoxS, an activator of genes used to combat oxidative stress, is negatively regulated by sRNA MgrR. This study demonstrates that while not all global regulators are subject to sRNA regulation, post-transcriptional control by sRNAs allows multiple environmental signals to affect synthesis of the transcriptional regulator. PMID:27137887

  11. [Modulation of transcriptional regulation during bone and cartilage development and their disease].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Riko; Hata, Kenji; Takashima, Rikako; Yoshida, Michiko; Nakamura, Eriko; Kida, Junpei; Yagi, Hiroko

    2013-11-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies have identified transcription factors critical and specific for bone and cartilage development. More recent studies revealed the molecular mechanisms how these transcription factors regulate bone and cartilage development. Especially, we appreciate recent advances in molecular function of the complex assembled by these transcription factors and epigenetic regulation of them. Aging, inflammation, biological stress, and disorder of endocrine system induce several bone and/or cartilage diseases by affecting the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation. In this review, we would like to describe the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation during developmental and pathological stages. In addition, we discuss possible application of these information in regeneration of bone and cartilage.

  12. RFX2 Is a Major Transcriptional Regulator of Spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, W. Stephen; Baas, Dominique; Lemeille, Sylvain; Paschaki, Marie; Seguin-Estevez, Queralt; Barras, Emmanuèle; Ma, Wenli; Duteyrat, Jean-Luc; Morlé, Laurette

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis consists broadly of three phases: proliferation of diploid germ cells, meiosis, and finally extensive differentiation of the haploid cells into effective delivery vehicles for the paternal genome. Despite detailed characterization of many haploid developmental steps leading to sperm, only fragmentary information exists on the control of gene expression underlying these processes. Here we report that the RFX2 transcription factor is a master regulator of genes required for the haploid phase. A targeted mutation of Rfx2 was created in mice. Rfx2-/- mice are perfectly viable but show complete male sterility. Spermatogenesis appears to progress unperturbed through meiosis. However, haploid cells undergo a complete arrest in spermatid development just prior to spermatid elongation. Arrested cells show altered Golgi apparatus organization, leading to a deficit in the generation of a spreading acrosomal cap from proacrosomal vesicles. Arrested cells ultimately merge to form giant multinucleated cells released to the epididymis. Spermatids also completely fail to form the flagellar axoneme. RNA-Seq analysis and ChIP-Seq analysis identified 139 genes directly controlled by RFX2 during spermiogenesis. Gene ontology analysis revealed that genes required for cilium function are specifically enriched in down- and upregulated genes showing that RFX2 allows precise temporal expression of ciliary genes. Several genes required for cell adhesion and cytoskeleton remodeling are also downregulated. Comparison of RFX2-regulated genes with those controlled by other major transcriptional regulators of spermiogenesis showed that each controls independent gene sets. Altogether, these observations show that RFX2 plays a major and specific function in spermiogenesis. PMID:26162102

  13. Quantitative characterization of gene regulation by Rho dependent transcription termination.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Razika; Lee, Tiffany Y; Lim, Han N

    2015-08-01

    Rho factor dependent transcription termination (RTT) is common within the coding sequences of bacterial genes and it acts to couple transcription and translation levels. Despite the importance of RTT for gene regulation, its effects on mRNA and protein concentrations have not been quantitatively characterized. Here we demonstrate that the exogenous cfp gene encoding the cyan fluorescent protein can serve as a model for gene regulation by RTT. This was confirmed by showing that Psu and bicyclomycin decrease RTT and increase full length cfp mRNAs (but remarkably they have little effect on protein production). We then use cfp to characterize the relationship between its protein and full length mRNA concentrations when the translation initiation rate is varied by sequence modifications of the translation initiation region (TIR). These experiments reveal that the fold change in protein concentration (RP) and the fold change in full length mRNA concentration (Rm) have the relationship RP≈Rm(b), where b is a constant. The average value of b was determined from three separate data sets to be ~3.6. We demonstrate that the above power law function can predict how altering the translation initiation rate of a gene in an operon will affect the mRNA concentrations of downstream genes and specify a lower bound for the associated changes in protein concentrations. In summary, this study defines a simple phenomenological model to help program expression from single genes and operons that are regulated by RTT, and to guide molecular models of RTT.

  14. The transcriptional regulator Np20 is the zinc uptake regulator in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Matthew L; Farrow, John M; Farrow, John Matthew; Parrish, Whitney; Danell, Allison S; Pesci, Everett C

    2013-01-01

    Zinc is essential for all bacteria, but excess amounts of the metal can have toxic effects. To address this, bacteria have developed tightly regulated zinc uptake systems, such as the ZnuABC zinc transporter which is regulated by the Fur-like zinc uptake regulator (Zur). In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Zur protein has yet to be identified experimentally, however, sequence alignment revealed that the zinc-responsive transcriptional regulator Np20, encoded by np20 (PA5499), shares high sequence identity with Zur found in other bacteria. In this study, we set out to determine whether Np20 was functioning as Zur in P. aeruginosa. Using RT-PCR, we determined that np20 (hereafter known as zur) formed a polycistronic operon with znuC and znuB. Mutant strains, lacking the putative znuA, znuB, or znuC genes were found to grow poorly in zinc deplete conditions as compared to wild-type strain PAO1. Intracellular zinc concentrations in strain PAO-Zur (Δzur) were found to be higher than those for strain PAO1, further implicating the zur as the zinc uptake regulator. Reporter gene fusions and real time RT-PCR revealed that transcription of znuA was repressed in a zinc-dependent manner in strain PAO1, however zinc-dependent transcriptional repression was alleviated in strain PAO-Zur, suggesting that the P. aeruginosa Zur homolog (ZurPA) directly regulates expression of znuA. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays also revealed that recombinant ZurPA specifically binds to the promoter region of znuA and does not bind in the presence of the zinc chelator N,N',N-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN). Taken together, these data support the notion that Np20 is the P. aeruginosa Zur, which regulates the transcription of the genes encoding the high affinity ZnuABC zinc transport system.

  15. Transcriptional regulation analysis and the potential transcription regulator site in the extended KAP6.1 promoter in sheep.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zu; Cui, Kai; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Deng, Xuemei

    2014-09-01

    The high glycine/tyrosine type II keratin protein 6.1 (KAP6.1) is a member of the keratin-associated protein family, which is restricted to cells in hair follicles and is associated with fiber diameter and fiber curvature in Merino sheep. In this study, we obtained a series of progressive 5'-deletion fragments of the KAP6.1 gene promoter from ovine genomic DNA. The KAP6.1 5'-upstream region was fused to luciferase and transfected into sheep fetal fibroblast cells (sFFCs). We demonstrated that the sequence from -1,523 to -1 bp (taking the A of the initiator methionine ATG as the +1 nt position) gave rise to a higher luciferase activity comparing to the published region from -1,042 to -1 bp. Whereas, decreased transcriptional activity of the KAP6.1 promoter was observed when the sequence extended to -3,699 bp. To identify the DNA elements that are important for transcriptional activity, we performed structural analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Structural analysis of the KAP6.1 promoter showed that transcription factors NF-kappa-B, AP-1, and C/EBP-alpha synergistically activate KAP6.1 promoter, while POU2F1 might function as a strong negative regulator. The EMSA showed that NF-kappa-B element bound to the nuclear protein extracted from sFFCs. We conclude that NF-kappa-B binding site is an enhancer element of KAP6.1 promoter in vitro. The results are potentially useful for elucidating the regulator mechanisms of KAP6.1.

  16. Regulation of transcription factors on sexual dimorphism of fig wasps.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bao-Fa; Li, Yong-Xing; Jia, Ling-Yi; Niu, Li-Hua; Murphy, Robert W; Zhang, Peng; He, Shunmin; Huang, Da-Wei

    2015-06-02

    Fig wasps exhibit extreme intraspecific morphological divergence in the wings, compound eyes, antennae, body color, and size. Corresponding to this, behaviors and lifestyles between two sexes are also different: females can emerge from fig and fly to other fig tree to oviposit and pollinate, while males live inside fig for all their lifetime. Genetic regulation may drive these extreme intraspecific morphological and behavioral divergence. Transcription factors (TFs) involved in morphological development and physiological activity may exhibit sex-specific expressions. Herein, we detect 865 TFs by using genomic and transcriptomic data of the fig wasp Ceratosolen solmsi. Analyses of transcriptomic data indicated that up-regulated TFs in females show significant enrichment in development of the wing, eye and antenna in all stages, from larva to adult. Meanwhile, TFs related to the development of a variety of organs display sex-specific patterns of expression in the adults and these may contribute significantly to their sexual dimorphism. In addition, up-regulated TFs in adult males exhibit enrichment in genitalia development and circadian rhythm, which correspond with mating and protandry. This finding is consistent with their sex-specific behaviors. In conclusion, our results strongly indicate that TFs play important roles in the sexual dimorphism of fig wasps.

  17. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics analysis of transcriptional regulation kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Tovar, Hugo; Mejía, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Gene expression in eukaryotic cells is an extremely complex and interesting phenomenon whose dynamics are controlled by a large number of subtle physicochemical processes commonly described by means of gene regulatory networks. Such networks consist in a series of coupled chemical reactions, conformational changes, and other biomolecular processes involving the interaction of the DNA molecule itself with a number of proteins usually called transcription factors as well as enzymes and other components. The kinetics behind the functioning of such gene regulatory networks are largely unknown, though its description in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics has been discussed recently. In this work we will derive general kinetic equations for a gene regulatory network from a non-equilibrium thermodynamical description and discuss its use in understanding the free energy constrains imposed in the network structure. We also will discuss explicit expressions for the kinetics of a simple model of gene regulation and show that the kinetic role of mRNA decay during the RNA synthesis stage (or transcription) is somehow limited due to the comparatively low values of decay rates. At the level discussed here, this implies a decoupling of the kinetics of mRNA synthesis and degradation a fact that may become quite useful when modeling gene regulatory networks from experimental data on whole genome gene expression.

  18. Coordinated transcriptional regulation patterns associated with infertility phenotypes in men

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Peter J I; Furlong, Robert A; Conner, Sarah J; Kirkman‐Brown, Jackson; Afnan, Masoud; Barratt, Christopher; Griffin, Darren K; Affara, Nabeel A

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Microarray gene‐expression profiling is a powerful tool for global analysis of the transcriptional consequences of disease phenotypes. Understanding the genetic correlates of particular pathological states is important for more accurate diagnosis and screening of patients, and thus for suggesting appropriate avenues of treatment. As yet, there has been little research describing gene‐expression profiling of infertile and subfertile men, and thus the underlying transcriptional events involved in loss of spermatogenesis remain unclear. Here we present the results of an initial screen of 33 patients with differing spermatogenic phenotypes. Methods Oligonucleotide array expression profiling was performed on testis biopsies for 33 patients presenting for testicular sperm extraction. Significantly regulated genes were selected using a mixed model analysis of variance. Principle components analysis and hierarchical clustering were used to interpret the resulting dataset with reference to the patient history, clinical findings and histological composition of the biopsies. Results Striking patterns of coordinated gene expression were found. The most significant contains multiple germ cell‐specific genes and corresponds to the degree of successful spermatogenesis in each patient, whereas a second pattern corresponds to inflammatory activity within the testis. Smaller‐scale patterns were also observed, relating to unique features of the individual biopsies. PMID:17496197

  19. A Transcriptional Regulator Sll0794 Regulates Tolerance to Biofuel Ethanol in Photosynthetic Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhongdi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiangxin; Lu, Yinhua; Jiang, Weihong; Zhang, Weiwen

    2014-01-01

    To improve ethanol production directly from CO2 in photosynthetic cyanobacterial systems, one key issue that needs to be addressed is the low ethanol tolerance of cyanobacterial cells. Our previous proteomic and transcriptomic analyses found that several regulatory proteins were up-regulated by exogenous ethanol in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. In this study, through tolerance analysis of the gene disruption mutants of the up-regulated regulatory genes, we uncovered that one transcriptional regulator, Sll0794, was related directly to ethanol tolerance in Synechocystis. Using a quantitative iTRAQ-LC-MS/MS proteomics approach coupled with quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR), we further determined the possible regulatory network of Sll0794. The proteomic analysis showed that in the Δsll0794 mutant grown under ethanol stress a total of 54 and 87 unique proteins were down- and up-regulated, respectively. In addition, electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the Sll0794 transcriptional regulator was able to bind directly to the upstream regions of sll1514, slr1512, and slr1838, which encode a 16.6 kDa small heat shock protein, a putative sodium-dependent bicarbonate transporter and a carbon dioxide concentrating mechanism protein CcmK, respectively. The study provided a proteomic description of the putative ethanol-tolerance network regulated by the sll0794 gene, and revealed new insights on the ethanol-tolerance regulatory mechanism in Synechocystis. As the first regulatory protein discovered related to ethanol tolerance, the gene may serve as a valuable target for transcription machinery engineering to further improve ethanol tolerance in Synechocystis. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001266 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001266). PMID:25239498

  20. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of histone variant H2A.Z during sea urchin development.

    PubMed

    Hajdu, Mihai; Calle, Jasmine; Puno, Andrea; Haruna, Aminat; Arenas-Mena, César

    2016-12-01

    Histone variant H2A.Z promotes chromatin accessibility at transcriptional regulatory elements and is developmentally regulated in metazoans. We characterize the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of H2A.Z in the purple sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. H2A.Z depletion by antisense translation-blocking morpholino oligonucleotides during early development causes developmental collapse, in agreement with its previously demonstrated general role in transcriptional multipotency. During H2A.Z peak expression in 24-h embryos, endogenous H2A.Z 3' UTR sequences stabilize GFP mRNAs relative to those with SV40 3' UTR sequences, although the 3' UTR of H2A.Z does not determine the spatial distribution of H2A.Z transcripts during embryonic and postembryonic development. We elaborated an H2A.Z::GFP BAC reporter that reproduces embryonic H2A.Z expression. Genome-wide chromatin accessibility analysis using ATAC-seq revealed a cis-regulatory module (CRM) that, when deleted, causes a significant decline of the H2A.Z reporter expression. In addition, the mutation of a Sox transcription factor binding site motif and, more strongly, of a Myb motif cause significant decline of reporter gene expression. Our results suggest that an undetermined Myb-family transcription factor controls the transcriptional regulation of H2A.Z.

  1. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by mRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Roundtree, Ian A.; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of reversible mRNA methylation has opened a new realm of post-transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes. The identification and functional characterization of proteins that specifically recognize RNA N6-methyladenosine (m6A) unveiled it as a modification that cells utilize to accelerate mRNA metabolism and translation. N6-adenosine methylation directs mRNAs to distinct fates by grouping them for differential processing, translation and decay in processes such as cell differentiation, embryonic development and stress responses. Other mRNA modifications, including N1-methyladenosine (m1A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and pseudouridine, together with m6A form the epitranscriptome and collectively code a new layer of information that controls protein synthesis. PMID:27808276

  2. Calcineurin regulates phosphorylation status of transcription factor osterix.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hirohiko; Amorim, Bruna Rabelo; Wang, Jie; Yoshida, Kaya; Haneji, Tatsuji

    2009-02-06

    Osterix is an osteoblast-specific transcriptional factor that is essential for osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Calcineurin regulates bone formation through modulating osteoblast differentiation. However, post-translational modification of osterix such as phosphorylation and interactions between osterix and calcineurin remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that calcineurin interacted with osterix determined by immunoprecipitation assay and Western analysis. Immunocytochemical study also revealed that osterix and calcineurin were co-localized in nucleus. Deletion of calcineurin binding motif on osterix molecule disrupted osterix-calcineurin interaction. Phosphorylation status of osterix was augmented by treatment with phosphatase inhibitors, FK506 and calyculin A. In contrast, treatment of recombinant calcineurin reduced phosphorylation status of osterix. Our present study suggests that calcineurin has an important role in the function of osterix through its modification of phosphorylation.

  3. Disentangling the Many Layers of Eukaryotic Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lelli, Katherine M.; Slattery, Matthew; Mann, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes is an extremely complex process. In this review, we break down several critical steps, emphasizing new data and techniques that have expanded current gene regulatory models. We begin at the level of DNA sequence where cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) provide important regulatory information in the form of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. In this respect, CRMs function as instructional platforms for the assembly of gene regulatory complexes. We discuss multiple mechanisms controlling complex assembly, including cooperative DNA binding, combinatorial codes, and CRM architecture. The second section of this review places CRM assembly in the context of nucleosomes and condensed chromatin. We discuss how DNA accessibility and histone modifications contribute to TF function. Lastly, new advances in chromosomal mapping techniques have provided increased understanding of intra- and interchromosomal interactions. We discuss how these topological maps influence gene regulatory models. PMID:22934649

  4. Human Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Regulation through GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor Alpha (GABPa)

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Nowick, Katja; Piccini, Ilaria; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Querfurth, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of phenotypic differences between closely related species are likely caused by differences in gene regulation. While this has already been postulated over 30 years ago, only few examples of evolutionary changes in gene regulation have been verified. Here, we identified and investigated binding sites of the transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPa) aiming to discover cis-regulatory adaptations on the human lineage. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing experiments in a human cell line, we found 11,619 putative GABPa binding sites. Through sequence comparisons of the human GABPa binding regions with orthologous sequences from 34 mammals, we identified substitutions that have resulted in 224 putative human-specific GABPa binding sites. To experimentally assess the transcriptional impact of those substitutions, we selected four promoters for promoter-reporter gene assays using human and African green monkey cells. We compared the activities of wild-type promoters to mutated forms, where we have introduced one or more substitutions to mimic the ancestral state devoid of the GABPa consensus binding sequence. Similarly, we introduced the human-specific substitutions into chimpanzee and macaque promoter backgrounds. Our results demonstrate that the identified substitutions are functional, both in human and nonhuman promoters. In addition, we performed GABPa knock-down experiments and found 1,215 genes as strong candidates for primary targets. Further analyses of our data sets link GABPa to cognitive disorders, diabetes, KRAB zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF), and human-specific genes. Thus, we propose that differences in GABPa binding sites played important roles in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:26814189

  5. Different regulation of limb development by p63 transcript variants

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, Manabu; Taniguchi, Yuki; Mori, Daisuke; Yano, Fumiko; Ohba, Shinsuke; Chung, Ung-il; Shimogori, Tomomi; Mills, Alea A.; Tanaka, Sakae

    2017-01-01

    The apical ectodermal ridge (AER), located at the distal end of each limb bud, is a key signaling center which controls outgrowth and patterning of the proximal-distal axis of the limb through secretion of various molecules. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), particularly Fgf8 and Fgf4, are representative molecules produced by AER cells, and essential to maintain the AER and cell proliferation in the underlying mesenchyme, meanwhile Jag2-Notch pathway negatively regulates the AER and limb development. p63, a transcription factor of the p53 family, is expressed in the AER and indispensable for limb formation. However, the underlying mechanisms and specific roles of p63 variants are unknown. Here, we quantified the expression of p63 variants in mouse limbs from embryonic day (E) 10.5 to E12.5, and found that ΔNp63γ was strongly expressed in limbs at all stages, while TAp63γ expression was rapidly increased in the later stages. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of limb bud cells from reporter mouse embryos at E11.5 revealed that all variants were abundantly expressed in AER cells, and their expression was very low in mesenchymal cells. We then generated AER-specific p63 knockout mice by mating mice with a null and a flox allele of p63, and Msx2-Cre mice (Msx2-Cre;p63Δ/fl). Msx2-Cre;p63Δ/fl neonates showed limb malformation that was more obvious in distal elements. Expression of various AER-related genes was decreased in Msx2-Cre;p63Δ/fl limb buds and embryoid bodies formed by p63-knockdown induced pluripotent stem cells. Promoter analyses and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated Fgf8 and Fgf4 as transcriptional targets of ΔNp63γ, and Jag2 as that of TAp63γ. Furthermore, TAp63γ overexpression exacerbated the phenotype of Msx2-Cre;p63Δ/fl mice. These data indicate that ΔNp63 and TAp63 control limb development through transcriptional regulation of different target molecules with different roles in the AER. Our findings contribute to

  6. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of pst2 operon expression in Vibrio cholerae O1.

    PubMed

    da C Leite, Daniel M; Barbosa, Livia C; Mantuano, Nathalia; Goulart, Carolina L; Veríssimo da Costa, Giovani C; Bisch, Paulo M; von Krüger, Wanda M A

    2017-02-27

    One of the most abundant proteins in V. cholerae O1 cells grown under inorganic phosphate (Pi) limitation is PstS, the periplasmic Pi-binding component of the high-affinity Pi transport system Pst2 (PstSCAB), encoded in pst2 operon (pstS-pstC2-pstA2-pstB2). Besides its role in Pi uptake, Pst2 has been also associated with V. cholerae virulence. However, the mechanisms regulating pst2 expression and the non-stoichiometric production of the Pst2 components under Pi-limitation are unknown. A computational-experimental approach was used to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms behind pst2 expression in V. cholerae O1. Bioinformatics analysis of pst2 operon nucleotide sequence revealed start codons for pstS and pstC genes distinct from those originally annotated, a regulatory region upstream pstS containing potential PhoB-binding sites and a pstS-pstC intergenic region longer than predicted. Analysis of nucleotide sequence between pstS-pstC revealed inverted repeats able to form stem-loop structures followed by a potential RNAse E-cleavage site. Another putative RNase E recognition site was identified within the pstA-pstB intergenic sequence. In silico predictions of pst2 operon expression regulation were subsequently tested using cells grown under Pi limitation by promoter-lacZ fusion, gel electrophoresis mobility shift assay and quantitative RT-PCR. The experimental and in silico results matched very well and led us to propose a pst2 promoter sequence upstream of pstS gene distinct from the previously annotated. Furthermore, V. cholerae O1 pst2 operon transcription is PhoB-dependent and generates a polycistronic mRNA molecule that is rapidly processed into minor transcripts of distinct stabilities. The most stable was the pstS-encoding mRNA, which correlates with PstS higher levels relative to other Pst2 components in Pi-starved cells. The relatively higher stability of pstS and pstB transcripts seems to rely on the secondary structures at their 3' untranslated regions

  7. ATF2, a paradigm of the multifaceted regulation of transcription factors in biology and disease.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory; Ronai, Ze'ev; Lau, Eric

    2017-02-15

    Stringent transcriptional regulation is crucial for normal cellular biology and organismal development. Perturbations in the proper regulation of transcription factors can result in numerous pathologies, including cancer. Thus, understanding how transcription factors are regulated and how they are dysregulated in disease states is key to the therapeutic targeting of these factors and/or the pathways that they regulate. Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) has been studied in a number of developmental and pathological conditions. Recent findings have shed light on the transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulatory mechanisms that influence ATF2 function, and thus, the transcriptional programs coordinated by ATF2. Given our current knowledge of its multiple levels of regulation and function, ATF2 represents a paradigm for the mechanistic complexity that can regulate transcription factor function. Thus, increasing our understanding of the regulation and function of ATF2 will provide insights into fundamental regulatory mechanisms that influence how cells integrate extracellular and intracellular signals into a genomic response through transcription factors. Characterization of ATF2 dysfunction in the context of pathological conditions, particularly in cancer biology and response to therapy, will be important in understanding how pathways controlled by ATF2 or other transcription factors might be therapeutically exploited. In this review, we provide an overview of the currently known upstream regulators and downstream targets of ATF2.

  8. Regulation of Memory Formation by the Transcription Factor XBP1.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Gabriela; Vidal, René L; Mardones, Pablo; Serrano, Felipe G; Ardiles, Alvaro O; Wirth, Craig; Valdés, Pamela; Thielen, Peter; Schneider, Bernard L; Kerr, Bredford; Valdés, Jose L; Palacios, Adrian G; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Glimcher, Laurie H; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-02-16

    Contextual memory formation relies on the induction of new genes in the hippocampus. A polymorphism in the promoter of the transcription factor XBP1 was identified as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorders. XBP1 is a major regulator of the unfolded protein response (UPR), mediating adaptation to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Using a phenotypic screen, we uncovered an unexpected function of XBP1 in cognition and behavior. Mice lacking XBP1 in the nervous system showed specific impairment of contextual memory formation and long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas neuronal XBP1s overexpression improved performance in memory tasks. Gene expression analysis revealed that XBP1 regulates a group of memory-related genes, highlighting brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key component in memory consolidation. Overexpression of BDNF in the hippocampus reversed the XBP1-deficient phenotype. Our study revealed an unanticipated function of XBP1 in cognitive processes that is apparently unrelated to its role in ER stress.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of 15-lipoxygenase expression by promoter methylation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Xu, Dawei; Sjöberg, Jan; Forsell, Pontus; Björkholm, Magnus; Claesson, Hans-Erik

    2004-07-01

    15-Lipoxygenase type 1 (15-LO), a lipid-peroxidating enzyme implicated in physiological membrane remodeling and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis, is highly regulated and expressed in a tissue- and cell-type-specific fashion. It is known that interleukins (IL) 4 and 13 play important roles in transactivating the 15-LO gene. However, the fact that they only exert such effects on a few types of cells suggests additional mechanism(s) for the profile control of 15-LO expression. In the present study, we demonstrate that hyper- and hypomethylation of CpG islands in the 15-LO promoter region is intimately associated with the transcriptional repression and activation of the 15-LO gene, respectively. The 15-LO promoter was exclusively methylated in all examined cells incapable of expressing 15-LO (certain solid tumor and human lymphoma cell lines and human T lymphocytes) while unmethylated in 15-LO-competent cells (the human airway epithelial cell line A549 and human monocytes) where 15-LO expression is IL4-inducible. Inhibition of DNA methylation in L428 lymphoma cells restores IL4 inducibility to 15-LO expression. Consistent with this, the unmethylated 15-LO promoter reporter construct exhibited threefold higher activity in A549 cells compared to its methylated counterpart. Taken together, demethylation of the 15-LO promoter is a prerequisite for the gene transactivation, which contributes to tissue- and cell-type-specific regulation of 15-LO expression.

  10. Ribulokinase and transcriptional regulation of arabinose metabolism in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Leyn, Semen A; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Yang, Chen

    2012-03-01

    The transcription factor AraR controls utilization of L-arabinose in Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we combined a comparative genomic reconstruction of AraR regulons in nine Clostridium species with detailed experimental characterization of AraR-mediated regulation in Clostridium acetobutylicum. Based on the reconstructed AraR regulons, a novel ribulokinase, AraK, present in all analyzed Clostridium species was identified, which was a nonorthologous replacement of previously characterized ribulokinases. The predicted function of the araK gene was confirmed by inactivation of the araK gene in C. acetobutylicum and biochemical assays using purified recombinant AraK. In addition to the genes involved in arabinose utilization and arabinoside degradation, extension of the AraR regulon to the pentose phosphate pathway genes in several Clostridium species was revealed. The predicted AraR-binding sites in the C. acetobutylicum genome and the negative effect of L-arabinose on DNA-regulator complex formation were verified by in vitro binding assays. The predicted AraR-controlled genes in C. acetobutylicum were experimentally validated by testing gene expression patterns in both wild-type and araR-inactivated mutant strains during growth in the absence or presence of L-arabinose.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of the stress response by mTOR.

    PubMed

    Aramburu, Jose; Ortells, M Carmen; Tejedor, Sonia; Buxadé, Maria; López-Rodríguez, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    The kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation that integrates inputs from growth factor receptors, nutrient availability, intracellular ATP (adenosine 5'-triphosphate), and a variety of stressors. Since early works in the mid-1990s uncovered the role of mTOR in stimulating protein translation, this kinase has emerged as a rather multifaceted regulator of numerous processes. Whereas mTOR is generally activated by growth- and proliferation-stimulating signals, its activity can be reduced and even suppressed when cells are exposed to a variety of stress conditions. However, cells can also adapt to stress while maintaining their growth capacity and mTOR function. Despite knowledge accumulated on how stress represses mTOR, less is known about mTOR influencing stress responses. In this review, we discuss the capability of mTOR, in particular mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), to activate stress-responsive transcription factors, and we outline open questions for future investigation.

  12. Stochastic model of transcription factor-regulated gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Rajesh; Bose, Indrani

    2006-09-01

    We consider a stochastic model of transcription factor (TF)-regulated gene expression. The model describes two genes, gene A and gene B, which synthesize the TFs and the target gene proteins, respectively. We show through analytic calculations that the TF fluctuations have a significant effect on the distribution of the target gene protein levels when the mean TF level falls in the highest sensitive region of the dose-response curve. We further study the effect of reducing the copy number of gene A from two to one. The enhanced TF fluctuations yield results different from those in the deterministic case. The probability that the target gene protein level exceeds a threshold value is calculated with the knowledge of the probability density functions associated with the TF and target gene protein levels. Numerical simulation results for a more detailed stochastic model are shown to be in agreement with those obtained through analytic calculations. The relevance of these results in the context of the genetic disorder haploinsufficiency is pointed out. Some experimental observations on the haploinsufficiency of the tumour suppressor gene, Nkx 3.1, are explained with the help of the stochastic model of TF-regulated gene expression.

  13. Integration of the transcriptional networks regulating limb morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rabinowitz, Adam H; Vokes, Steven A

    2012-08-15

    The developing limb is one of the best described vertebrate systems for understanding how coordinated gene expression during embryogenesis leads to the structures present in the mature organism. This knowledge, derived from decades of research, is largely based upon gain- and loss-of-function experiments. These studies have provided limited information about how the key signaling pathways interact with each other and the downstream effectors of these pathways. We summarize our current understanding of known genetic interactions in the context of three temporally defined gene regulatory networks. These networks crystallize our current knowledge, depicting a dynamic process involving multiple feedback loops between the ectoderm and mesoderm. At the same time, they highlight the fact that many essential processes are still largely undescribed. Much of the dynamic transcriptional activity occurring during development is regulated by distal cis-regulatory elements. Modern genomic tools have provided new approaches for studying the function of cis-regulatory elements and we discuss the results of these studies in regard to understanding limb development. Ultimately, these genomic techniques will allow scientists to understand how multiple signaling pathways are integrated in space and time to drive gene expression and regulate the formation of the limb.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the Drosophila glial gene repo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bruce P; Jones, Bradley W

    2005-06-01

    reversed polarity (repo) is a putative target gene of glial cells missing (gcm), the primary regulator of glial cell fate in Drosophila. Transient expression of Gcm is followed by maintained expression of repo. Multiple Gcm binding sites are found in repo upstream DNA. However, while repo is expressed in Gcm positive glia, it is not expressed in Gcm positive hemocytes. These observations suggest factors in addition to Gcm are required for repo expression. Here we have undertaken an analysis of the cis-regulatory DNA elements of repo using lacZ reporter activity in transgenic embryos. We have found that a 4.2 kb DNA region upstream of the repo start site drives the wild-type repo expression pattern. We show that expression is dependent on multiple Gcm binding sites. By ectopically expressing Repo, we show that Repo can regulate its own enhancer. Finally, by systematically analyzing fragments of repo upstream DNA, we show that expression is dependent on multiple elements that are responsible for activity in subsets of glia, as well as repressing inappropriate expression in the epidermis. Our results suggest that Gcm acts synergistically with other factors to control repo transcription in glial cells.

  15. Intragenic DNA methylation in transcriptional regulation, normal differentiation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kulis, Marta; Queirós, Ana C; Beekman, Renée; Martín-Subero, José I

    2013-11-01

    Ever since the discovery of DNA methylation at cytosine residues, the role of this so called fifth base has been extensively studied and debated. Until recently, the majority of DNA methylation studies focused on the analysis of CpG islands associated to promoter regions. However, with the upcoming possibilities to study DNA methylation in a genome-wide context, this epigenetic mark can now be studied in an unbiased manner. As a result, recent studies have shown that not only promoters but also intragenic and intergenic regions are widely modulated during physiological processes and disease. In particular, it is becoming increasingly clear that DNA methylation in the gene body is not just a passive witness of gene transcription but it seems to be actively involved in multiple gene regulation processes. In this review we discuss the potential role of intragenic DNA methylation in alternative promoter usage, regulation of short and long non-coding RNAs, alternative RNA processing, as well as enhancer activity. Furthermore, we summarize how the intragenic DNA methylome is modified both during normal cell differentiation and neoplastic transformation.

  16. Xist and Tsix Transcription Dynamics Is Regulated by the X-to-Autosome Ratio and Semistable Transcriptional States

    PubMed Central

    Loos, Friedemann; Maduro, Cheryl; Loda, Agnese; Lehmann, Johannes; Kremers, Gert-Jan; ten Berge, Derk; Grootegoed, J. Anton

    2016-01-01

    In female mammals, X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a key process in the control of gene dosage compensation between X-linked genes and autosomes. Xist and Tsix, two overlapping antisense-transcribed noncoding genes, are central elements of the X inactivation center (Xic) regulating XCI. Xist upregulation results in the coating of the entire X chromosome by Xist RNA in cis, whereas Tsix transcription acts as a negative regulator of Xist. Here, we generated Xist and Tsix reporter mouse embryonic stem (ES) cell lines to study the genetic and dynamic regulation of these genes upon differentiation. Our results revealed mutually antagonistic roles for Tsix on Xist and vice versa and indicate the presence of semistable transcriptional states of the Xic locus predicting the outcome of XCI. These transcriptional states are instructed by the X-to-autosome ratio, directed by regulators of XCI, and can be modulated by tissue culture conditions. PMID:27528619

  17. Interaction of the RcsB Response Regulator with Auxiliary Transcription Regulators in Escherichia coli*

    PubMed Central

    Pannen, Derk; Fabisch, Maria; Gausling, Lisa; Schnetz, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The Rcs phosphorelay is a two-component signal transduction system that is induced by cell envelope stress. RcsB, the response regulator of this signaling system, is a pleiotropic transcription regulator, which is involved in the control of various stress responses, cell division, motility, and biofilm formation. RcsB regulates transcription either as a homodimer or together with auxiliary regulators, such as RcsA, BglJ, and GadE in Escherichia coli. In this study, we show that RcsB in addition forms heterodimers with MatA (also known as EcpR) and with DctR. Our data suggest that the MatA-dependent transcription regulation is mediated by the MatA-RcsB heterodimer and is independent of RcsB phosphorylation. Furthermore, we analyzed the relevance of amino acid residues of the active quintet of conserved residues, and of surface-exposed residues for activity of RcsB. The data suggest that the activity of the phosphorylation-dependent dimers, such as RcsA-RcsB and RcsB-RcsB, is affected by mutation of residues in the vicinity of the phosphorylation site, suggesting that a phosphorylation-induced structural change modulates their activity. In contrast, the phosphorylation-independent heterodimers BglJ-RcsB and MatA-RcsB are affected by only very few mutations. Heterodimerization of RcsB with various auxiliary regulators and their differential dependence on phosphorylation add an additional level of control to the Rcs system that is operating at the output level. PMID:26635367

  18. The transcription factor GATA-6 regulates pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    van Berlo, Jop H.; Elrod, John W.; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M.G.; York, Allen J.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Duncan, Stephen A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale The transcriptional code that programs maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy involves the zinc finger-containing DNA binding factor GATA-4. The highly related transcription factor GATA-6 is also expressed in the adult heart, although its role in controlling the hypertrophic program is unknown. Objective To determine the role of GATA-6 in cardiac hypertrophy and homeostasis. Methods and Results Here we performed a cardiomyocyte-specific conditional gene targeting approach for Gata6, as well as a transgenic approach to overexpress GATA-6 in the mouse heart. Deletion of Gata6-loxP with Nkx2.5-cre produced late embryonic lethality with heart defects, while deletion with β-myosin heavy chain-cre (βMHC-cre) produced viable adults with greater than 95% loss of GATA-6 protein in the heart. These later mice were subjected to pressure overload induced hypertrophy for 2 and 6 weeks, which showed a significant reduction in cardiac hypertrophy similar to that observed Gata4 heart-specific deleted mice. Gata6-deleted mice subjected to pressure overload also developed heart failure while control mice maintained proper cardiac function. Gata6-deleted mice also developed less cardiac hypertrophy following 2 weeks of angiotensin II/phenylephrine infusion. Controlled GATA-6 overexpression in the heart induced hypertrophy with aging and predisposed to greater hypertrophy with pressure overload stimulation. Combinatorial deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 from the adult heart resulted in dilated cardiomyopathy and lethality by 16 weeks of age. Mechanistically, deletion of Gata6 from the heart resulted in fundamental changes in the levels of key regulatory genes and myocyte differentiation-specific genes. Conclusions These results indicate that GATA-6 is both necessary and sufficient for regulating the cardiac hypertrophic response and differentiated gene expression, both alone and in coordination with GATA-4. PMID:20705924

  19. Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulations of the HLA-G Gene

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, Erick C.; Veiga-Castelli, Luciana C.; Yaghi, Layale; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-G has a relevant role in immune response regulation. The overall structure of the HLA-G coding region has been maintained during the evolution process, in which most of its variable sites are synonymous mutations or coincide with introns, preserving major functional HLA-G properties. The HLA-G promoter region is different from the classical class I promoters, mainly because (i) it lacks regulatory responsive elements for IFN-γ and NF-κB, (ii) the proximal promoter region (within 200 bases from the first translated ATG) does not mediate transactivation by the principal HLA class I transactivation mechanisms, and (iii) the presence of identified alternative regulatory elements (heat shock, progesterone and hypoxia-responsive elements) and unidentified responsive elements for IL-10, glucocorticoids, and other transcription factors is evident. At least three variable sites in the 3′ untranslated region have been studied that may influence HLA-G expression by modifying mRNA stability or microRNA binding sites, including the 14-base pair insertion/deletion, +3142C/G and +3187A/G polymorphisms. Other polymorphic sites have been described, but there are no functional studies on them. The HLA-G coding region polymorphisms might influence isoform production and at least two null alleles with premature stop codons have been described. We reviewed the structure of the HLA-G promoter region and its implication in transcriptional gene control, the structure of the HLA-G 3′UTR and the major actors of the posttranscriptional gene control, and, finally, the presence of regulatory elements in the coding region. PMID:24741620

  20. Regulation of photoreceptor gene transcription via a highly conserved transcriptional regulatory element by vsx gene products

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Comiskey, Daniel F.; Kelly, Lisa E.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The photoreceptor conserved element-1 (PCE-1) sequence is found in the transcriptional regulatory regions of many genes expressed in photoreceptors. The retinal homeobox (Rx or Rax) gene product functions by binding to PCE-1 sites. However, other transcriptional regulators have also been reported to bind to PCE-1. One of these, vsx2, is expressed in retinal progenitor and bipolar cells. The purpose of this study is to identify Xenopus laevis vsx gene products and characterize vsx gene product expression and function with respect to the PCE-1 site. Methods X. laevis vsx gene products were amplified with PCR. Expression patterns were determined with in situ hybridization using whole or sectioned X. laevis embryos and digoxigenin- or fluorescein-labeled antisense riboprobes. DNA binding characteristics of the vsx gene products were analyzed with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) using in vitro translated proteins and radiolabeled oligonucleotide probes. Gene transactivation assays were performed using luciferase-based reporters and in vitro transcribed effector gene products, injected into X. laevis embryos. Results We identified one vsx1 and two vsx2 gene products. The two vsx2 gene products are generated by alternate mRNA splicing. We verified that these gene products are expressed in the developing retina and that expression resolves into distinct cell types in the mature retina. Finally, we found that vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and that the two vsx2 isoforms have different gene transactivation activities. Conclusions vsx gene products are expressed in the developing and mature neural retina. vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and influence the expression of a rhodopsin promoter-luciferase reporter gene. The two isoforms of vsx have different gene transactivation activities in this reporter gene system. PMID:28003732

  1. Regulation of Transcriptional Bursting by a Naturally Oscillating Signal

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Adam M.; Chubb, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Transcription is highly stochastic, occurring in irregular bursts [1–3]. For temporal and spatial precision of gene expression, cells must somehow deal with this noisy behavior. To address how this is achieved, we investigated how transcriptional bursting is entrained by a naturally oscillating signal, by direct measurement of transcription together with signal dynamics in living cells. We identify a Dictyostelium gene showing rapid transcriptional oscillations with the same period as extracellular cAMP signaling waves. Bursting approaches antiphase to cAMP waves, with accelerating transcription cycles during differentiation. Although coupling between signal and transcription oscillations was clear at the population level, single-cell transcriptional bursts retained considerable heterogeneity, indicating that transcription is not governed solely by signaling frequency. Previous studies implied that burst heterogeneity reflects distinct chromatin states [4–6]. Here we show that heterogeneity is determined by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic cues and is maintained by a transcriptional persistence. Unusually for a persistent transcriptional behavior, the lifetime was only 20 min, with rapid randomization of transcriptional state by the response to oscillatory signaling. Linking transcription to rapid signaling oscillations allows reduction of gene expression heterogeneity by temporal averaging, providing a mechanism to generate precision in cell choices during development. PMID:24388853

  2. Genome wide analysis of human genes transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally regulated by the HTLV-I protein p30

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, John M; Ghorbel, Sofiane; Nicot, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is a human retrovirus that is etiologically linked to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive and fatal lymphoproliferative disease. The viral transactivator, Tax, is thought to play an important role during the initial stages of CD4+ T-cell immortalization by HTLV-1. Tax has been shown to activate transcription through CREB/ATF and NF-KB, and to alter numerous signaling pathways. These pleiotropic effects of Tax modify the expression of a wide array of cellular genes. Another viral protein encoded by HTLV-I, p30, has been shown to affect virus replication at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Little is currently known regarding the effect of p30 on the expression and nuclear export of cellular host mRNA transcripts. Identification of these RNA may reveal new targets and increase our understanding of HTLV-I pathogenesis. In this study, using primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we report a genome wide analysis of human genes transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally regulated by the HTLV-I protein p30. Results Using microarray analysis, we analyzed total and cytoplasmic cellular mRNA transcript levels isolated from PBMCs to assess the effect of p30 on cellular RNA transcript expression and their nuclear export. We report p30-dependent transcription resulting in the 2.5 fold up-regulation of 15 genes and the down-regulation of 65 human genes. We further tested nuclear export of cellular mRNA and found that p30 expression also resulted in a 2.5 fold post-transcriptional down-regulation of 90 genes and the up-regulation of 33 genes. Conclusion Overall, our study describes that expression of the HTLV-I protein p30 both positively and negatively alters the expression of cellular transcripts. Our study identifies for the first time the cellular genes for which nuclear export is affected by p30. These results suggest that p30 may possess a more global function with respect to m

  3. Transcriptional regulation of gilthead seabream bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 gene by bone- and cartilage-related transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Marques, Cátia L; Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent

    2016-01-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 belongs to the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of cytokines and growth factors. While it plays important roles in embryo morphogenesis and organogenesis, BMP2 is also critical to bone and cartilage formation. Protein structure and function have been remarkably conserved throughout evolution and BMP2 transcription has been proposed to be tightly regulated, although few data is available. In this work we report the cloning and functional analysis of gilthead seabream BMP2 promoter. As in other vertebrates, seabream BMP2 gene has a 5′ non-coding exon, a feature already present in DPP gene, the fruit fly ortholog of vertebrate BMP2 gene, and maintained throughout evolution. In silico analysis of seabream BMP2 promoter revealed several binding sites for bone and cartilage related transcription factors (TFs) and their functionality was evaluated using promoter-luciferase constructions and TF-expressing vectors. Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) was shown to negatively regulate BMP2 transcription and combination with the core binding factor β (CBFβ) further reduced transcriptional activity of the promoter. Although to a lesser extent, myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) had also a negative effect on the regulation of BMP2 gene transcription, when associated with SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9b). Finally, v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (ETS1) was able to slightly enhance BMP2 transcription. Data reported here provides new insights toward the better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of BMP2 gene in a bone and cartilage context.

  4. Regulation of microcin C51 operon expression: the role of global regulators of transcription.

    PubMed

    Fomenko, D; Veselovskii, A; Khmel, I

    2001-06-01

    Expression of the microcin C51 operon in Escherichia coli cells is regulated as a function of the phase of growth; it is stimulated during the decelerating phase of growth. Using single-copy P(mcc)-lac transcriptional fusion (the promoter region of the microcin C51 operon fused to a promoterless lac operon in lambda phage), we showed that transcription from the microcin operon promoter is dependent on sigma(s) (RpoS) factor. However, some level of P(mcc)-lac expression is possible in rpoS null mutants, indicating that another sigma factor might be involved in transcription of the microcin C51 operon. Overproduction of sigma70 decreased Pmcc-directed transcription, presumably as a result of competition of sigma factors for the limited amount of core RNA polymerase. The cyclic AMP-CRP complex was shown to stimulate transcription from Pmcc: the absence of CRP or cAMP in crp or cya mutant cells strongly decreased the level of P(mcc)-lac expression. The production of C51 microcin decreased or was absent in rpoS, crp and cya mutant cells. Leucine-responsive protein Lrp and histone-like protein H-NS repressed P(mcc)-lac expression in the exponential and decelerating phases of growth. In studies of P(mcc)-lac expression in double mutant cells, we showed that proteins CRP, Lrp and H-NS acted in rpoS-dependent and rpoS-independent ways in transcription of the microcin C51 operon. Mutation hns(-) resulted in an increase in P(mcc)-lac expression in crp, rpoS and lrp mutant cells, as in wild-type cells.

  5. A positive role for polycomb in transcriptional regulation via H4K20me1.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiangdong; Han, Zhijun; Chen, Hao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xia, Yuanxin; Pan, Chenyu; Fu, Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Han, Hui; Wu, Min; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Li, Lin; Wei, Gang; Zhao, Yun

    2016-05-01

    The highly conserved polycomb group (PcG) proteins maintain heritable transcription repression of the genes essential for development from fly to mammals. However, sporadic reports imply a potential role of PcGs in positive regulation of gene transcription, although systematic investigation of such function and the underlying mechanism has rarely been reported. Here, we report a Pc-mediated, H3K27me3-dependent positive transcriptional regulation of Senseless (Sens), a key transcription factor required for development. Mechanistic studies show that Pc regulates Sens expression by promoting H4K20me1 at the Sens locus. Further bioinformatic analysis at genome-wide level indicates that the existence of H4K20me1 acts as a selective mark for positive transcriptional regulation by Pc/H3K27me3. Both the intensities and specific patterns of Pc and H3K27me3 are important for the fates of target gene transcription. Moreover, binding of transcription factor Broad (Br), which physically interacts with Pc and positively regulates the transcription of Sens, is observed in Pc(+)H3K27me3(+)H4K20me1(+) genes, but not in Pc(+)H3K27me3(+)H4K20me1(-) genes. Taken together, our study reveals that, coupling with the transcription factor Br, Pc positively regulates transcription of Pc(+)H3K27me3(+)H4K20me1(+) genes in developing Drosophila wing disc.

  6. Transcriptional pausing at the translation start site operates as a critical checkpoint for riboswitch regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chauvier, Adrien; Picard-Jean, Frédéric; Berger-Dancause, Jean-Christophe; Bastet, Laurène; Naghdi, Mohammad Reza; Dubé, Audrey; Turcotte, Pierre; Perreault, Jonathan; Lafontaine, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    On the basis of nascent transcript sequencing, it has been postulated but never demonstrated that transcriptional pausing at translation start sites is important for gene regulation. Here we show that the Escherichia coli thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) thiC riboswitch contains a regulatory pause site in the translation initiation region that acts as a checkpoint for thiC expression. By biochemically probing nascent transcription complexes halted at defined positions, we find a narrow transcriptional window for metabolite binding, in which the downstream boundary is delimited by the checkpoint. We show that transcription complexes at the regulatory pause site favour the formation of a riboswitch intramolecular lock that strongly prevents TPP binding. In contrast, cotranscriptional metabolite binding increases RNA polymerase pausing and induces Rho-dependent transcription termination at the checkpoint. Early transcriptional pausing may provide a general mechanism, whereby transient transcriptional windows directly coordinate the sensing of environmental cues and bacterial mRNA regulation. PMID:28071751

  7. Transcriptional regulation of the peripheral nervous system in Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Joyce Tang, W; Chen, Jerry S; Zeller, Robert W

    2013-06-15

    The formation of the sensory organs and cells that make up the peripheral nervous system (PNS) relies on the activity of transcription factors encoded by proneural genes (PNGs). Although PNGs have been identified in the nervous systems of both vertebrates and invertebrates, the complexity of their interactions has complicated efforts to understand their function in the context of their underlying regulatory networks. To gain insight into the regulatory network of PNG activity in chordates, we investigated the roles played by PNG homologs in regulating PNS development of the invertebrate chordate Ciona intestinalis. We discovered that in Ciona, MyT1, Pou4, Atonal, and NeuroD-like are expressed in a sequential regulatory cascade in the developing epidermal sensory neurons (ESNs) of the PNS and act downstream of Notch signaling, which negatively regulates these genes and the number of ESNs along the tail midlines. Transgenic embryos mis-expressing any of these proneural genes in the epidermis produced ectopic midline ESNs. In transgenic embryos mis-expressing Pou4, and MyT1 to a lesser extent, numerous ESNs were produced outside of the embryonic midlines. In addition we found that the microRNA miR-124, which inhibits Notch signaling in ESNs, is activated downstream of all the proneural factors we tested, suggesting that these genes operate collectively in a regulatory network. Interestingly, these factors are encoded by the same genes that have recently been demonstrated to convert fibroblasts into neurons. Our findings suggest the ascidian PNS can serve as an in vivo model to study the underlying regulatory mechanisms that enable the conversion of cells into sensory neurons.

  8. Transcriptional regulation of mouse hypoglossal motor neuron somatotopic map formation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Wang, Jae Woong; Salin-Cantegrel, Adele; Dali, Rola; Stifani, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Somatic motor neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus innervate tongue muscles controlling vital functions such as chewing, swallowing and respiration. Formation of functional hypoglossal nerve circuits depends on the establishment of precise hypoglossal motor neuron maps correlating with specific tongue muscle innervations. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling mammalian hypoglossal motor neuron topographic map formation. Here we show that combinatorial expression of transcription factors Runx1, SCIP and FoxP1 defines separate mouse hypoglossal motor neuron groups with different topological, neurotransmitter and calcium-buffering phenotypes. Runx1 and SCIP are coexpressed in ventromedial hypoglossal motor neurons involved in control of tongue protrusion whereas FoxP1 is expressed in dorsomedial motor neurons associated with tongue retraction. Establishment of separate hypoglossal motor neuron maps depends in part on Runx1-mediated suppression of ventrolateral and dorsomedial motor neuron phenotypes and regulation of FoxP1 expression pattern. These findings suggest that combinatorial actions of Runx1, SCIP and FoxP1 are important for mouse hypoglossal nucleus somatotopic map formation.

  9. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Stranahan, Alexis M.; Martin, Bronwen; Chadwick, Wayne; Park, Sung-Soo; Wang, Liyun; Becker, Kevin G.; WoodIII, William H.; Zhang, Yongqing; Maudsley, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db) and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6) animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds. PMID:22934110

  10. Endothelial Gata5 transcription factor regulates blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Messaoudi, Smail; He, Ying; Gutsol, Alex; Wight, Andrew; Hébert, Richard L.; Vilmundarson, Ragnar O.; Makrigiannis, Andrew P.; Chalmers, John; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; McPherson, Ruth; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Nemer, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Despite its high prevalence and economic burden, the aetiology of human hypertension remains incompletely understood. Here we identify the transcription factor GATA5, as a new regulator of blood pressure (BP). GATA5 is expressed in microvascular endothelial cells and its genetic inactivation in mice (Gata5-null) leads to vascular endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Endothelial-specific inactivation of Gata5 mimics the hypertensive phenotype of the Gata5-null mice, suggestive of an important role for GATA5 in endothelial homeostasis. Transcriptomic analysis of human microvascular endothelial cells with GATA5 knockdown reveals that GATA5 affects several genes and pathways critical for proper endothelial function, such as PKA and nitric oxide pathways. Consistent with a role in human hypertension, we report genetic association of variants at the GATA5 locus with hypertension traits in two large independent cohorts. Our results unveil an unsuspected link between GATA5 and a prominent human condition, and provide a new animal model for hypertension. PMID:26617239

  11. Evolution of proline biosynthesis: enzymology, bioinformatics, genetics, and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Fichman, Yosef; Gerdes, Svetlana Y; Kovács, Hajnalka; Szabados, László; Zilberstein, Aviah; Csonka, Laszlo N

    2015-11-01

    Proline is not only an essential component of proteins but it also has important roles in adaptation to osmotic and dehydration stresses, redox control, and apoptosis. Here, we review pathways of proline biosynthesis in the three domains of life. Pathway reconstruction from genome data for hundreds of eubacterial and dozens of archaeal and eukaryotic organisms revealed evolutionary conservation and variations of this pathway across different taxa. In the most prevalent pathway of proline synthesis, glutamate is phosphorylated to γ-glutamyl phosphate by γ-glutamyl kinase, reduced to γ-glutamyl semialdehyde by γ-glutamyl phosphate reductase, cyclized spontaneously to Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate and reduced to proline by Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase. In higher plants and animals the first two steps are catalysed by a bi-functional Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase. Alternative pathways of proline formation use the initial steps of the arginine biosynthetic pathway to ornithine, which can be converted to Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate by ornithine aminotransferase and then reduced to proline or converted directly to proline by ornithine cyclodeaminase. In some organisms, the latter pathways contribute to or could be fully responsible for the synthesis of proline. The conservation of proline biosynthetic enzymes and significance of specific residues for catalytic activity and allosteric regulation are analysed on the basis of protein structural data, multiple sequence alignments, and mutant studies, providing novel insights into proline biosynthesis in organisms. We also discuss the transcriptional control of the proline biosynthetic genes in bacteria and plants.

  12. Production and transcriptional regulation of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in forage legumes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meiliang; Wei, Li; Sun, Zhanmin; Gao, Lihua; Meng, Yu; Tang, Yixiong; Wu, Yanmin

    2015-05-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PA), also known as condensed tannins, contribute to important forage legumes traits including disease resistance and forage quality. PA in forage plants has both positive and negative effects on feed digestibility and animal performance. The analytical methods and their applicability in measuring the contents of PA in forage plants are essential to studies on their nutritional effects. In spite of important breakthroughs in our understanding of the PA biosynthesis, important questions still remain to be answered such as the PA polymerization and transport. Recent advances in the understanding of transcription factor-mediated gene regulation mechanisms in anthocyanin and PA biosynthetic pathway in model plants suggest new approaches for the metabolic engineering of PA in forage plants. The present review will attempt to present the state-of-the-art of research in these areas and provide an update on the production and metabolic engineering of PA in forage plants. We hope that this will contribute to a better understanding of the ways in which PA production to manipulate the content of PA for beneficial effects in forage plants.

  13. Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cells by Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Pamela J.; Tjian, Robert

    1989-07-01

    The cloning of genes encoding mammalian DNA binding transcription factors for RNA polymerase II has provided the opportunity to analyze the structure and function of these proteins. This review summarizes recent studies that define structural domains for DNA binding and transcriptional activation functions in sequence-specific transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these factors may activate transcriptional initiation and by which they may be regulated to achieve differential gene expression are also discussed.

  14. MicroRNA-27a regulates basal transcription by targeting the p44 subunit of general transcription factor IIH

    PubMed Central

    Portal, Maximiliano M.

    2011-01-01

    General transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) is a complex RNA polymerase II basal transcription factor comprising 10 different polypeptides that display activities involved in transcription and DNA repair processes. Although biochemical studies have uncovered TFIIH importance, little is known about how the mRNAs that code for TFIIH subunits are regulated. Here it is shown that mRNAs encoding seven of the TFIIH subunits (p34, p44, p52, p62, XPB, CDK7, and p8) are regulated at the posttranscriptional level in a Dicer-dependent manner. Indeed, abolition of the miRNA pathway induces abnormal accumulation, stabilization, and translational activation of these seven mRNAs. Herein, miR-27a was identified as a key regulator of p44 mRNA. Moreover, miR-27a was shown to destabilize the p44 subunit of the TFIIH complex during the G2-M phase, thereby modulating the transcriptional shutdown observed during this transition. This work is unique in providing a demonstration of global transcriptional regulation through the action of a single miRNA. PMID:21558443

  15. Atrophy, hypertrophy, and hypoxemia induce transcriptional regulators of the ubiquitin proteasome system in the rat heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In skeletal muscle, transcript levels of proteins regulating the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) increase with atrophy and decrease with hypertrophy. Whether the same is true for heart muscle is not known. We set out to characterize the transcriptional profile of regulators of the UPS during atrop...

  16. Comparative studies of transcriptional regulation mechanisms in a group of eight gamma-proteobacterial genomes.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Vladimir; González, Abel D; Vasconcelos, Ana T; Huerta, Araceli M; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2005-11-18

    Experimental data on the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulation has enabled the construction of statistical models to predict new regulatory elements within its genome. Far less is known about the transcriptional regulatory elements in other gamma-proteobacteria with sequenced genomes, so it is of great interest to conduct comparative genomic studies oriented to extracting biologically relevant information about transcriptional regulation in these less studied organisms using the knowledge from E. coli. In this work, we use the information stored in the TRACTOR_DB database to conduct a comparative study on the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in eight gamma-proteobacteria and 38 regulons. We assess the conservation of transcription factors binding specificity across all the eight genomes and show a correlation between the conservation of a regulatory site and the structure of the transcription unit it regulates. We also find a marked conservation of site-promoter distances across the eight organisms and a correspondence of the statistical significance of co-occurrence of pairs of transcription factor binding sites in the regulatory regions, which is probably related to a conserved architecture of higher-order regulatory complexes in the organisms studied. The results obtained in this study using the information on transcriptional regulation in E. coli enable us to conclude that not only transcription factor-binding sites are conserved across related species but also several of the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms previously identified in E. coli.

  17. Plant Mediator complex and its critical functions in transcription regulation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan; Li, Ling; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-02-01

    The Mediator complex is an important component of the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. As an essential link between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, the Mediator complex transduces diverse signals to genes involved in different pathways. The plant Mediator complex was recently purified and comprises conserved and specific subunits. It functions in concert with transcription factors to modulate various responses. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the plant Mediator complex and its diverse roles in plant growth, development, defense, non-coding RNA production, response to abiotic stresses, flowering, genomic stability and metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the transcription factors interacting with the Mediator complex are also highlighted.

  18. The TrmB family: a versatile group of transcriptional regulators in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Gindner, Antonia; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Microbes are organisms which are well adapted to their habitat. Their survival depends on the regulation of gene expression levels in response to environmental signals. The most important step in regulation of gene expression takes place at the transcriptional level. This regulation is intriguing in Archaea because the eu-karyotic-like transcription apparatus is modulated by bacterial-like transcription regulators. The transcriptional regulator of mal operon (TrmB) family is well known as a very large group of regulators in Archaea with more than 250 members to date. One special feature of these regulators is that some of them can act as repressor, some as activator and others as both repressor and activator. This review gives a short updated overview of the TrmB family and their regulatory patterns in different Archaea as a lot of new data have been published on this topic since the last review from 2008.

  19. Studying Gene Expression: Database Searches and Promoter Fusions to Investigate Transcriptional Regulation in Bacteria†

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Vaz, Betsy M.; Makarevitch, Irina; Stensland, Shane

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory project was designed to illustrate how to search biological databases and utilize the information provided by these resources to investigate transcriptional regulation in Escherichia coli. The students searched several databases (NCBI Genomes, RegulonDB and EcoCyc) to learn about gene function, regulation, and the organization of transcriptional units. A fluorometer and GFP promoter fusions were used to obtain fluorescence data and measure changes in transcriptional activity. The class designed and performed experiments to investigate the regulation of genes necessary for biosynthesis of amino acids and how expression is affected by environmental signals and transcriptional regulators. Assessment data showed that this activity enhanced students’ knowledge of databases, reporter genes and transcriptional regulation. PMID:23653697

  20. The WRKY Transcription Factor WRKY71/EXB1 Controls Shoot Branching by Transcriptionally Regulating RAX Genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Dongshu; Zhang, Jinzhe; Wang, Xinlei; Han, Xiang; Wei, Baoye; Yu, Hao; Huang, Qingpei

    2015-01-01

    Plant shoot branching is pivotal for developmental plasticity and crop yield. The formation of branch meristems is regulated by several key transcription factors including REGULATOR OF AXILLARY MERISTEMS1 (RAX1), RAX2, and RAX3. However, the regulatory network of shoot branching is still largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of EXCESSIVE BRANCHES1 (EXB1), which affects axillary meristem (AM) initiation and bud activity. Overexpression of EXB1 in the gain-of-function mutant exb1-D leads to severe bushy and dwarf phenotypes, which result from excessive AM initiation and elevated bud activities. EXB1 encodes the WRKY transcription factor WRKY71, which has demonstrated transactivation activities. Disruption of WRKY71/EXB1 by chimeric repressor silencing technology leads to fewer branches, indicating that EXB1 plays important roles in the control of shoot branching. We demonstrate that EXB1 controls AM initiation by positively regulating the transcription of RAX1, RAX2, and RAX3. Disruption of the RAX genes partially rescues the branching phenotype caused by EXB1 overexpression. We further show that EXB1 also regulates auxin homeostasis in control of shoot branching. Our data demonstrate that EXB1 plays pivotal roles in shoot branching by regulating both transcription of RAX genes and auxin pathways. PMID:26578700

  1. Structural insights into NusG regulating transcription elongation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    NusG is an essential transcription factor that plays multiple key regulatory roles in transcription elongation, termination and coupling translation and transcription. The core role of NusG is to enhance transcription elongation and RNA polymerase processivity. Here, we present the structure of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase complexed with NusG. The structure shows that the NusG N-terminal domain (NGN) binds at the central cleft of RNA polymerase surrounded by the β' clamp helices, the β protrusion, and the β lobe domains to close the promoter DNA binding channel and constrain the β' clamp domain, but with an orientation that is different from the one observed in the archaeal β' clamp–Spt4/5 complex. The structure also allows us to construct a reliable model of the complete NusG-associated transcription elongation complex, suggesting that the NGN domain binds at the upstream fork junction of the transcription elongation complex, similar to σ2 in the transcription initiation complex, to stabilize the junction, and therefore enhances transcription processivity. PMID:27899640

  2. Global nucleosome distribution and the regulation of transcription in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ercan, Sevinc; Carrozza, Michael J; Workman, Jerry L

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies show that active regulatory regions of the yeast genome have a lower density of nucleosomes than other regions, and that there is an inverse correlation between nucleosome density and the transcription rate of a gene. This may be the result of transcription factors displacing nucleosomes. PMID:15461807

  3. Beyond Transcription Factors: The Role of Chromatin Modifying Enzymes in Regulating Transcription Required for Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Ruth M.; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2008-01-01

    One of the alluring aspects of examining chromatin modifications in the role of modulating transcription required for long-term memory processes is that these modifications may provide transient and potentially stable epigenetic marks in the service of activating and/or maintaining transcriptional processes. These, in turn, may ultimately…

  4. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, the gene most frequently mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Henson, Brian J; Zhu, Wan; Hardaway, Kelsey; Wetzel, Jaime L; Stefan, Mihaela; Albers, Kathryn M; Nicholls, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) comprise a group of neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by progressive spasticity of the lower extremities, due to axonal degeneration in the corticospinal motor tracts. HSPs are genetically heterogeneous and show autosomal dominant inheritance in ∼70-80% of cases, with additional cases being recessive or X-linked. The most common type of HSP is SPG4 with mutations in the SPAST gene, encoding spastin, which occurs in 40% of dominantly inherited cases and in ∼10% of sporadic cases. Both loss-of-function and dominant-negative mutation mechanisms have been described for SPG4, suggesting that precise or stoichiometric levels of spastin are necessary for biological function. Therefore, we hypothesized that regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of SPAST are important determinants of spastin biology, and if altered, could contribute to the development and progression of the disease. To examine the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of SPAST, we used molecular phylogenetic methods to identify conserved sequences for putative transcription factor binding sites and miRNA targeting motifs in the SPAST promoter and 3'-UTR, respectively. By a variety of molecular methods, we demonstrate that SPAST transcription is positively regulated by NRF1 and SOX11. Furthermore, we show that miR-96 and miR-182 negatively regulate SPAST by effects on mRNA stability and protein level. These transcriptional and miRNA regulatory mechanisms provide new functional targets for mutation screening and therapeutic targeting in HSP.

  5. Biogenesis of photosystem II complexes: transcriptional, translational, and posttranslational regulation

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The integral membrane proteins of photosystem II (PS II) reaction center complexes are encoded by chloroplast genomes. These proteins are absent from thylakoids of PS II mutants of algae and vascular plants as a result of either chloroplast or nuclear gene mutations. To resolve the molecular basis for the concurrent absence of the PS II polypeptides, protein synthesis rates and mRNA levels were measured in mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lack PS II. The analyses show that one nuclear gene product regulates the levels of transcripts from the chloroplast gene encoding the 51-kD chlorophyll a-binding polypeptide (polypeptide 5) but is not involved in the synthesis of other chloroplast mRNAs. Another nuclear product is specifically required for translation of mRNA encoding the 32-34-kD polypeptide, D1. The absence of either D1 or polypeptide 5 does not eliminate the synthesis and thylakoid insertion of two other integral membrane proteins of PS II, the chlorophyll a-binding polypeptide of 46 kD (polypeptide 6) and the 30-kD "D1-like" protein, D2. However, these two unassembled subunits cannot be properly processed and/or are degraded in the mutants even though they reside in the membrane. In addition, pulse labeling of the nuclear mutants and a chloroplast mutant that does not synthesize D1 mRNA indicates that synthesis of polypeptide 5 and D1 is coordinated at the translational level. A model is presented to explain how absence of one of the two proteins could lead to translational arrest of the other. PMID:3533953

  6. TransFind—predicting transcriptional regulators for gene sets

    PubMed Central

    Kiełbasa, Szymon M.; Klein, Holger; Roider, Helge G.; Vingron, Martin; Blüthgen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of putative transcription factor binding sites in promoter regions of coregulated genes allows to infer the transcription factors that underlie observed changes in gene expression. While such analyses constitute a central component of the in-silico characterization of transcriptional regulatory networks, there is still a lack of simple-to-use web servers able to combine state-of-the-art prediction methods with phylogenetic analysis and appropriate multiple testing corrected statistics, which returns the results within a short time. Having these aims in mind we developed TransFind, which is freely available at http://transfind.sys-bio.net/. PMID:20511592

  7. Transcription regulation by distal enhancers: who's in the loop?

    PubMed

    Stadhouders, Ralph; van den Heuvel, Anita; Kolovos, Petros; Jorna, Ruud; Leslie, Kris; Grosveld, Frank; Soler, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide chromatin profiling efforts have shown that enhancers are often located at large distances from gene promoters within the noncoding genome. Whereas enhancers can stimulate transcription initiation by communicating with promoters via chromatin looping mechanisms, we propose that enhancers may also stimulate transcription elongation by physical interactions with intronic elements. We review here recent findings derived from the study of the hematopoietic system.

  8. Demonstration of transcriptional regulation of specific genes by phytochrome action

    PubMed Central

    Silverthorne, Jane; Tobin, Elaine M.

    1984-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro transcription system that uses nuclei isolated from Lemna gibba G-3. The in vitro transcripts include sequences homologous to hybridization probes for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase [3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxy-lyase (dimerizing), EC 4.1.1.39], the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein, and rRNA. Light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein sequences are transcribed to a greater extent in nuclei isolated from plants grown in darkness with 2 min of red light every 8 hr than in nuclei isolated from dark-treated plants. Furthermore, the amount of these transcripts measured in plants given a single minute of red light after dark treatment is increased over the amount measured in dark-treated plants. The effect of red light is at least partially reversible by 10 min of far-red light given immediately after the red light pulse. Transcription of both rRNA and small subunit sequences is also stimulated by a single minute of red light as compared to dark-treated tissue. However, the relative magnitudes of the increases compared to the dark levels are smaller than the increase seen for the chlorophyll a/b-protein, possibly because of the higher level of transcription of these sequences in the dark. The effect of red light on the transcription of small subunit and rRNA sequences is also reversible by immediate treatment with 10 min of far-red light. Pulse chase studies of dark-treated nuclei for up to 110 min do not show substantial turnover of in vitro labeled small subunit and chlorophyll a/b-protein transcripts. We therefore conclude that phytochrome action has induced specific changes in transcription of these genes. Images PMID:16593420

  9. Transcriptional regulation of the FSH receptor: new perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Brian P.; Heckert, Leslie L.

    2013-01-01

    The cell-surface receptor for the gonadotropin follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is expressed exclusively on Sertoli cells of the testis and granulosa cells of the ovary. FSH signal transduction through its receptor (Fshr) is critical for the timing and maintenance of normal gametogenesis in the mammalian gonad. In the 13 years since the gene encoding Fshr was first cloned, the mechanisms controlling its transcription have been extensively examined, but a clear understanding of what drives its unique cell-specificity remains elusive. Current knowledge of basal Fshr transcription highlights the role of an E-box in the proximal promoter which is bound by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors upstream stimulatory factor 1 (Usf1) and Usf2. Recent studies utilizing knockout mice and chromatin immunoprecipitation validated the importance of Usf to Fshr transcription and demonstrated a sexually dimorphic requirement for the Usf proteins to maintain normal Fshr expression. Studies have also shown that the promoter region itself is insufficient for appropriate Fshr expression in transgenic mice, indicating Fshr transcription depends on regulatory elements that lie outside of the promoter. Identification of such elements has been propelled by recent availability of genome sequence data, which facilitated studies using comparative genomics, DNase I hypersensitivity mapping, and transgenic analysis with large fragments of DNA. This review will focus on the current understanding of transcriptional regulatory processes that control expression of rat Fshr, including recent advances from our laboratory. PMID:17084019

  10. Switching on sex: transcriptional regulation of the testis-determining gene Sry.

    PubMed

    Larney, Christian; Bailey, Timothy L; Koopman, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Mammalian sex determination hinges on the development of ovaries or testes, with testis fate being triggered by the expression of the transcription factor sex-determining region Y (Sry). Reduced or delayed Sry expression impairs testis development, highlighting the importance of its accurate spatiotemporal regulation and implying a potential role for SRY dysregulation in human intersex disorders. Several epigenetic modifiers, transcription factors and kinases are implicated in regulating Sry transcription, but it remains unclear whether or how this farrago of factors acts co-ordinately. Here we review our current understanding of Sry regulation and provide a model that assembles all known regulators into three modules, each converging on a single transcription factor that binds to the Sry promoter. We also discuss potential future avenues for discovering the cis-elements and trans-factors required for Sry regulation.

  11. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Cytokine Signaling by AU-Rich and GU-Rich Elements

    PubMed Central

    Bohjanen, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are necessary for cell communication to enable responses to external stimuli that are imperative for the survival and maintenance of homeostasis. Dysfunction of the cytokine network has detrimental effects on intra- and extracellular environments. Thus, it is critical that the expression of cytokines and the signals transmitted by cytokines to target cells are tightly regulated at numerous levels, including transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Here, we briefly summarize the role of AU-rich elements (AREs) in the regulation of cytokine gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and describe a role for GU-rich elements (GREs) in coordinating the regulation of cytokine signaling. GREs function as post-transcriptional regulators of proteins that control cellular activation, growth, and apoptosis. GREs and AREs work in concert to coordinate cytokine signal transduction pathways. The precise regulation of cytokine signaling is particularly important, because its dysregulation can lead to human diseases. PMID:24697201

  12. Dynamic regulation of eve stripe 2 expression reveals transcriptional bursts in living Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Bothma, Jacques P; Garcia, Hernan G; Esposito, Emilia; Schlissel, Gavin; Gregor, Thomas; Levine, Michael

    2014-07-22

    We present the use of recently developed live imaging methods to examine the dynamic regulation of even-skipped (eve) stripe 2 expression in the precellular Drosophila embryo. Nascent transcripts were visualized via MS2 RNA stem loops. The eve stripe 2 transgene exhibits a highly dynamic pattern of de novo transcription, beginning with a broad domain of expression during nuclear cycle 12 (nc12), and progressive refinement during nc13 and nc14. The mature stripe 2 pattern is surprisingly transient, constituting just ∼15 min of the ∼90-min period of expression. Nonetheless, this dynamic transcription profile faithfully predicts the limits of the mature stripe visualized by conventional in situ detection methods. Analysis of individual transcription foci reveals intermittent bursts of de novo transcription, with duration cycles of 4-10 min. We discuss a multistate model of transcription regulation and speculate on its role in the dynamic repression of the eve stripe 2 expression pattern during development.

  13. Genome-wide assessment of differential roles for p300 and CBP in transcription regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Yolande F. M.; Hestand, Matthew S.; Verlaan, Matty; Krabbendam, Elise; Ariyurek, Yavuz; van Galen, Michiel; van Dam, Hans; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Zantema, Alt; ′t Hoen, Peter A. C.

    2010-01-01

    Despite high levels of homology, transcription coactivators p300 and CREB binding protein (CBP) are both indispensable during embryogenesis. They are largely known to regulate the same genes. To identify genes preferentially regulated by p300 or CBP, we performed an extensive genome-wide survey using the ChIP-seq on cell-cycle synchronized cells. We found that 57% of the tags were within genes or proximal promoters, with an overall preference for binding to transcription start and end sites. The heterogeneous binding patterns possibly reflect the divergent roles of CBP and p300 in transcriptional regulation. Most of the 16 103 genes were bound by both CBP and p300. However, after stimulation 89 and 1944 genes were preferentially bound by CBP or p300, respectively. Target genes were found to be primarily involved in the regulation of metabolic and developmental processes, and transcription, with CBP showing a stronger preference than p300 for genes active in negative regulation of transcription. Analysis of transcription factor binding sites suggest that CBP and p300 have many partners in common, but AP-1 and Serum Response Factor (SRF) appear to be more prominent in CBP-specific sequences, whereas AP-2 and SP1 are enriched in p300-specific targets. Taken together, our findings further elucidate the distinct roles of coactivators p300 and CBP in transcriptional regulation. PMID:20435671

  14. Nicotine regulates cocaine-amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (Cart) in the mesocorticolimbic system.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Egemen; Gozen, Oguz; Ugur, Muzeyyen; Koylu, Ersin O; Kanit, Lutfiye; Balkan, Burcu

    2016-07-01

    Cocaine-and-Amphetamine Regulated Transcript (CART) mRNA and peptides are intensely expressed in the brain regions comprising mesocorticolimbic system. Studies suggest that CART peptides may have a role in the regulation of reward circuitry. The present study aimed to examine the effect of nicotine on CART expression in the mesocorticolimbic system. Three different doses of nicotine (0.2, 0.4, 0.6 mg/kg free base) were injected subcutaneously for 5 days, and on day 6, rats were decapitated following a challenge dose. CART mRNA and peptide levels in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc), dorsal striatum (DST), amygdala (AMG), lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), and ventral tegmental area (VTA) were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and Western Blot analysis, respectively. In the mPFC, 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg nicotine, decreased CART peptide levels whereas there was no effect on CART mRNA levels. In the VTA, a down-regulation of CART peptide expression was observed with 0.2 and 0.6 mg/kg nicotine. Conversely, 0.4 and 0.6 mg/kg nicotine increased CART mRNA levels in the AMG without affecting the CART peptide expression. Nicotine did not regulate CART mRNA or CART peptide expression in the NAc, DST, and LHA. We conclude that nicotine regulates CART expression in the mesocorticolimbic system and this regulation may play an important role in nicotine reward. Synapse 70:283-292, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Impact of ACTH Signaling on Transcriptional Regulation of Steroidogenic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Carmen; Lalli, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The trophic peptide hormone adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) stimulates steroid hormone biosynthesis evoking both a rapid, acute response and a long-term, chronic response, via the activation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The acute response is initiated by the mobilization of cholesterol from lipid stores and its delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane, a process that is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The chronic response results in the increased coordinated transcription of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes. ACTH binding to its cognate receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), stimulates adenylyl cyclase, thus inducing cAMP production, PKA activation, and phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors, which bind to target promoters and facilitate coactivator protein recruitment to direct steroidogenic gene transcription. This review provides a general view of the transcriptional control exerted by the ACTH/cAMP system on the expression of genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes in the adrenal cortex. Special emphasis will be given to the transcription factors required to mediate ACTH-dependent transcription of steroidogenic genes. PMID:27065945

  16. Regulation of cytokine gene transcription in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Holloway, A F; Rao, S; Shannon, M F

    2002-01-01

    The controlled expression of cytokine genes is an essential component of an immune response. The specific types of cytokines as well as the time and place of their production is important in generating an appropriate immune response to an infectious agent. Aberrant expression is associated with pathological conditions of the immune system such as autoimmunity, atopy and chronic inflammation. Cytokine gene transcription is generally induced in a cell-specific manner. Over the last 15 years, a large amount of information has been generated describing the transcriptional controls that are exerted on cytokine genes. Recently, efforts have been directed at understanding how these genes are transcribed in a chromatin context. This review will discuss the mechanisms by which cytokine genes become available for transcription in a cell-restricted manner as well as the mechanisms by which these genes sense their environment and activate high level transcription in a transient manner. Particular attention will be paid to the role of chromatin in allowing transcription factor access to appropriate genes.

  17. The role of abscisic acid in regulating cucumber fruit development and ripening and its transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Wang, Ya; Ji, Kai; Dai, Shengjie; Hu, Ying; Sun, Liang; Li, Qian; Chen, Pei; Sun, Yufei; Duan, Chaorui; Wu, Yan; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Dian; Guo, Yangdong; Leng, Ping

    2013-03-01

    Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), a kind of fruit usually harvested at the immature green stage, belongs to non-climacteric fruit. To investigate the contribution of abscisic acid (ABA) to cucumber fruit development and ripening, variation in ABA level was investigated and a peak in ABA level was found in pulp before fruit get fully ripe. To clarify this point further, exogenous ABA was applied to cucumber fruits at two different development stages. Results showed that ABA application at the turning stage promotes cucumber fruit ripening, while application at the immature green stage had inconspicuous effects. In addition, with the purpose of understanding the transcriptional regulation of ABA, two partial cDNAs of CsNCED1 and CsNCED2 encoding 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED), a key enzyme in ABA biosynthetic pathway; one partial cDNA of CsCYP707A1 for 8'-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in the oxidative catabolism of ABA and two partial cDNAs of CsBG1 and CsBG2 for β-glucosidase (BG) that hydrolyzes ABA glucose ester (ABA-GE) to release active ABA were cloned from cucumber. The DNA and deduced amino acid sequences of these obtained genes respectively showed high similarities to their homologous genes in other plants. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that ABA content may be regulated by its biosynthesis (CsNCEDs), catabolism (CsCYP707A1) and reactivation genes (CsBGs) at the transcriptional level during cucumber fruit development and ripening, in response to ABA application, dehydration and pollination, among which CsNCED1, CsCYP707A1 and CsBG1 were highly expressed in pulp and may play more important roles in regulating ABA metabolism.

  18. Regulation of competence and gene expression in Streptococcus mutans by the RcrR transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Burne, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An intimate linkage between the regulation of biofilm formation, stress tolerance and genetic competence exists in the dental caries pathogen Streptococcus mutans. The rcrRPQ genes encode ABC exporters (RcrPQ) and a MarR-family transcriptional repressor of the rcr operon (RcrR) play a dominant role in regulation of the development of genetic competence and connect competence with stress tolerance and (p)ppGpp production in S. mutans. Here we identify the target for efficient RcrR binding in the rcr promoter region using purified recombinant RcrR (rRcrR) protein in electrophoretic mobility shift assays and show that DNA fragments carrying mutations in the binding region were not bound as efficiently by rRcrR in vitro. Mutations in the RcrR binding site impacted expression from the rcrR promoter in vivo and elicited changes in transformation efficiency, competence gene expression, and growth inhibition by competence stimulating peptide; even when the changes in rcrRPQ transcription were minor. An additional mechanistic linkage of RcrR with competence and (p)ppGpp metabolism was identified by showing that the rRcrR protein could bind to the promoter regions of comX, comYA and relP, although the binding was not as efficient as to the rcrRPQ promoter under the conditions tested. Thus, tightly controlled autogenous regulation of the rcrRPQ operon by RcrR binding to specific target sites is essential for cellular homeostasis, and RcrR contributes to the integration of genetic competence, (p)ppGpp metabolism, and acid and oxidative stress tolerance in S. mutans through both direct and indirect mechanisms. PMID:25146832

  19. COMBINING PROTEIN AND mRNA QUANTIFICATION TO DECIPHER TRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Heng; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A.; Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie; Golding, Ido

    2015-01-01

    We combine immunofluorescence and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH), followed by automated image analysis, to quantify the concentration of nuclear transcription factors, number of transcription factors bound, and number of nascent mRNAs synthesized at individual gene loci. A theoretical model is used to decipher how transcription-factor binding modulates the stochastic kinetics of mRNA production. We demonstrate this approach by examining the regulation of hunchback in the early Drosophila embryo. PMID:26098021

  20. Mean-field vs. Stochastic Models for Transcriptional Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossey, Ralf; Giuraniuc, Claudiu

    2009-03-01

    We introduce a minimal model description for the dynamics of transcriptional regulatory networks. It is studied within a mean-field approximation, i.e., by deterministic ode's representing the reaction kinetics, and by stochastic simulations employing the Gillespie algorithm. We elucidate the different results both approaches can deliver, depending on the network under study, and in particular depending on the level of detail retained in the respective description. Two examples are addressed in detail: the repressilator, a transcriptional clock based on a three-gene network realized experimentally in E. coli, and a bistable two-gene circuit under external driving, a transcriptional network motif recently proposed to play a role in cellular development.

  1. Mean-field versus stochastic models for transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blossey, R.; Giuraniuc, C. V.

    2008-09-01

    We introduce a minimal model description for the dynamics of transcriptional regulatory networks. It is studied within a mean-field approximation, i.e., by deterministic ODE’s representing the reaction kinetics, and by stochastic simulations employing the Gillespie algorithm. We elucidate the different results that both approaches can deliver, depending on the network under study, and in particular depending on the level of detail retained in the respective description. Two examples are addressed in detail: The repressilator, a transcriptional clock based on a three-gene network realized experimentally in E. coli, and a bistable two-gene circuit under external driving, a transcriptional network motif recently proposed to play a role in cellular development.

  2. TRANSCRIPTION. Allosteric transcriptional regulation via changes in the overall topology of the core promoter.

    PubMed

    Philips, Steven J; Canalizo-Hernandez, Monica; Yildirim, Ilyas; Schatz, George C; Mondragón, Alfonso; O'Halloran, Thomas V

    2015-08-21

    Many transcriptional activators act at a distance from core promoter elements and work by recruiting RNA polymerase through protein-protein interactions. We show here how the prokaryotic regulatory protein CueR both represses and activates transcription by differentially modulating local DNA structure within the promoter. Structural studies reveal that the repressor state slightly bends the promoter DNA, precluding optimal RNA polymerase-promoter recognition. Upon binding a metal ion in the allosteric site, CueR switches into an activator conformation. It maintains all protein-DNA contacts but introduces torsional stresses that kink and undertwist the promoter, stabilizing an A-form DNA-like conformation. These factors switch on and off transcription by exerting dynamic control of DNA stereochemistry, reshaping the core promoter and making it a better or worse substrate for polymerase.

  3. Pathway-specific regulation revisited: cross-regulation of multiple disparate gene clusters by PAS-LuxR transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Cláudia M; Payero, Tamara D; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Barreales, Eva G; de Pedro, Antonio; Aparicio, Jesús F

    2015-06-01

    PAS-LuxR regulators are highly conserved proteins devoted to the control of antifungal production by binding to operators located in given promoters of polyene biosynthetic genes. The canonical operator of PimM, archetype of this class of regulators, has been used here to search for putative targets of orthologous protein PteF in the genome of Streptomyces avermitilis, finding 97 putative operators outside the pentaene filipin gene cluster (pte). The processes putatively affected included genetic information processing; energy, carbohydrate, and lipid metabolism; DNA replication and repair; morphological differentiation; secondary metabolite biosynthesis; and transcriptional regulation, among others. Seventeen of these operators were selected, and their binding to PimM DNA-binding domain was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Strikingly, the protein bound all predicted operators suggesting a direct control over targeted processes. As a proof of concept, we studied the biosynthesis of the ATP-synthase inhibitor oligomycin whose gene cluster included two operators. Regulator mutants showed a severe loss of oligomycin production, whereas gene complementation of the mutant restored phenotype, and gene duplication in the wild-type strain boosted oligomycin production. Comparative gene expression analyses in parental and mutant strains by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction of selected olm genes corroborated production results. These results demonstrate that PteF is able to cross-regulate the biosynthesis of two related secondary metabolites, filipin and oligomycin, but might be extended to all the processes indicated above. This study highlights the complexity of the network of interactions in which PAS-LuxR regulators are involved and opens new possibilities for the manipulation of metabolite production in Streptomycetes.

  4. A positive role for polycomb in transcriptional regulation via H4K20me1

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiangdong; Han, Zhijun; Chen, Hao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Xiaofeng; Xia, Yuanxin; Pan, Chenyu; Fu, Lin; Zhang, Shuo; Han, Hui; Wu, Min; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Li, Lin; Wei, Gang; Zhao, Yun

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved polycomb group (PcG) proteins maintain heritable transcription repression of the genes essential for development from fly to mammals. However, sporadic reports imply a potential role of PcGs in positive regulation of gene transcription, although systematic investigation of such function and the underlying mechanism has rarely been reported. Here, we report a Pc-mediated, H3K27me3-dependent positive transcriptional regulation of Senseless (Sens), a key transcription factor required for development. Mechanistic studies show that Pc regulates Sens expression by promoting H4K20me1 at the Sens locus. Further bioinformatic analysis at genome-wide level indicates that the existence of H4K20me1 acts as a selective mark for positive transcriptional regulation by Pc/H3K27me3. Both the intensities and specific patterns of Pc and H3K27me3 are important for the fates of target gene transcription. Moreover, binding of transcription factor Broad (Br), which physically interacts with Pc and positively regulates the transcription of Sens, is observed in Pc+H3K27me3+H4K20me1+ genes, but not in Pc+H3K27me3+H4K20me1− genes. Taken together, our study reveals that, coupling with the transcription factor Br, Pc positively regulates transcription of Pc+H3K27me3+H4K20me1+ genes in developing Drosophila wing disc. PMID:27002220

  5. Roles of NAC transcription factors in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants

    PubMed Central

    Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Sharoni, Akhter M.; Kikuchi, Shoshi

    2013-01-01

    NAC transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators in plants, and members of the NAC gene family have been suggested to play important roles in the regulation of the transcriptional reprogramming associated with plant stress responses. A phylogenetic analysis of NAC genes, with a focus on rice and Arabidopsis, was performed. Herein, we present an overview of the regulation of the stress responsive NAC SNAC/(IX) group of genes that are implicated in the resistance to different stresses. SNAC factors have important roles for the control of biotic and abiotic stresses tolerance and that their overexpression can improve stress tolerance via biotechnological approaches. We also review the recent progress in elucidating the roles of NAC transcription factors in plant biotic and abiotic stresses. Modification of the expression pattern of transcription factor genes and/or changes in their activity contribute to the elaboration of various signaling pathways and regulatory networks. However, a single NAC gene often responds to several stress factors, and their protein products may participate in the regulation of several seemingly disparate processes as negative or positive regulators. Additionally, the NAC proteins function via auto-regulation or cross-regulation is extensively found among NAC genes. These observations assist in the understanding of the complex mechanisms of signaling and transcriptional reprogramming controlled by NAC proteins. PMID:24058359

  6. Regulating RNA polymerase pausing and transcription elongation in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Irene M; Waterfall, Joshua J; Core, Leighton J; Munroe, Robert J; Schimenti, John; Lis, John T

    2011-04-01

    Transitions between pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells are executed by key transcription regulators. Comparative measurements of RNA polymerase distribution over the genome's primary transcription units in different cell states can identify the genes and steps in the transcription cycle that are regulated during such transitions. To identify the complete transcriptional profiles of RNA polymerases with high sensitivity and resolution, as well as the critical regulated steps upon which regulatory factors act, we used genome-wide nuclear run-on (GRO-seq) to map the density and orientation of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In both cell types, progression of a promoter-proximal, paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) into productive elongation is a rate-limiting step in transcription of ∼40% of mRNA-encoding genes. Importantly, quantitative comparisons between cell types reveal that transcription is controlled frequently at paused Pol II's entry into elongation. Furthermore, "bivalent" ESC genes (exhibiting both active and repressive histone modifications) bound by Polycomb group complexes PRC1 (Polycomb-repressive complex 1) and PRC2 show dramatically reduced levels of paused Pol II at promoters relative to an average gene. In contrast, bivalent promoters bound by only PRC2 allow Pol II pausing, but it is confined to extremely 5' proximal regions. Altogether, these findings identify rate-limiting targets for transcription regulation during cell differentiation.

  7. RNA-binding proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Van Assche, Elke; Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steenackers, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is a very important mechanism to control gene expression in changing environments. In the past decade, a lot of interest has been directed toward the role of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacterial post-transcriptional regulation. However, sRNAs are not the only molecules controlling gene expression at this level, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role as well. CsrA and Hfq are the two best studied bacterial proteins of this type, but recently, additional proteins involved in post-transcriptional control have been identified. This review focuses on the general working mechanisms of post-transcriptionally active RBPs, which include (i) adaptation of the susceptibility of mRNAs and sRNAs to RNases, (ii) modulating the accessibility of the ribosome binding site of mRNAs, (iii) recruiting and assisting in the interaction of mRNAs with other molecules and (iv) regulating transcription terminator/antiterminator formation, and gives an overview of both the well-studied and the newly identified proteins that are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory processes. Additionally, the post-transcriptional mechanisms by which the expression or the activity of these proteins is regulated, are described. For many of the newly identified proteins, however, mechanistic questions remain. Most likely, more post-transcriptionally active proteins will be identified in the future. PMID:25784899

  8. Modeling Writing Development: Contribution of Transcription and Self-Regulation to Portuguese Students' Text Generation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limpo, Teresa; Alves, Rui A.

    2013-01-01

    Writing is a complex activity that requires transcription and self-regulation. We used multiple-group structural equation modeling to test the contribution of transcription (handwriting and spelling), planning, revision, and self-efficacy to writing quality at 2 developmental points (Grades 4-6 vs. 7-9). In Grades 4-6, the model explained 76% of…

  9. The Transcriptional Cascade in the Heat Stress Response of Arabidopsis Is Strictly Regulated at the Level of Transcription Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Ohama, Naohiko; Kusakabe, Kazuya; Mizoi, Junya; Zhao, Huimei; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinya; Takahashi, Fuminori; Ishida, Tetsuya; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Group A1 heat shock transcription factors (HsfA1s) are the master regulators of the heat stress response (HSR) in plants. Upon heat shock, HsfA1s trigger a transcriptional cascade that is composed of many transcription factors. Despite the importance of HsfA1s and their downstream transcriptional cascade in the acquisition of thermotolerance in plants, the molecular basis of their activation remains poorly understood. Here, domain analysis of HsfA1d, one of several HsfA1s in Arabidopsis thaliana, demonstrated that the central region of HsfA1d is a key regulatory domain that represses HsfA1d transactivation activity through interaction with HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN70 (HSP70) and HSP90. We designated this region as the temperature-dependent repression (TDR) domain. We found that HSP70 dissociates from HsfA1d in response to heat shock and that the dissociation is likely regulated by an as yet unknown activation mechanism, such as HsfA1d phosphorylation. Overexpression of constitutively active HsfA1d that lacked the TDR domain induced expression of heat shock proteins in the absence of heat stress, thereby conferring potent thermotolerance on the overexpressors. However, transcriptome analysis of the overexpressors demonstrated that the constitutively active HsfA1d could not trigger the complete transcriptional cascade under normal conditions, thereby indicating that other factors are necessary to fully induce the HSR. These complex regulatory mechanisms related to the transcriptional cascade may enable plants to respond resiliently to various heat stress conditions.

  10. ULTRAPETALA trxG genes interact with KANADI transcription factor genes to regulate Aradopsis Gynoecium patterning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organ formation relies upon precise patterns of gene expression that are under tight spatial and temporal regulation. Transcription patterns are specified by several cellular processes during development, including chromatin remodeling, but little is known about how chromatin remodeling factors cont...

  11. GRLD-1 regulates cell-wide abundance of glutamate receptor through post-transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, George J.; Kang, Lijun; Kim, Julie E.; Maro, Géraldine S.; Xu, X. Z. Shawn; Shen, Kang

    2011-01-01

    AMPA receptors mediate most of the fast postsynaptic response at glutamatergic synapses. The abundance of AMPA receptors in neurons and at postsynaptic membranes is tightly regulated. Changes in synaptic AMPA receptor levels have been proposed to be a key regulatory event in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. While the local, synapse-specific regulation of AMPA receptors has been intensely studied, the global, cell-wide control is less well understood. Using a forward genetic approach, we identified Glutamate Receptor Level Decreased-1 (GRLD-1), a putative RNA-binding protein that is required for efficient production of GLR-1 in the AVE interneurons in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In grld-1 mutants, GLR-1 levels were drastically reduced. Consistently, both glutamate-induced currents in AVE and glr-1-dependent nose-touch avoidance behavior were defective in grld-1 mutants. We propose that this evolutionarily conserved family of proteins controls the abundance of GLR-1 by regulating glr-1 transcript splicing. PMID:21037582

  12. Genomic approaches to identifying transcriptional regulators of osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stains, Joseph P.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Recent microarray studies of mouse and human osteoblast differentiation in vitro have identified novel transcription factors that may be important in the establishment and maintenance of differentiation. These findings help unravel the pattern of gene-expression changes that underly the complex process of bone formation.

  13. Resveratrol regulates gene transcription via activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Thiel, Gerald; Rössler, Oliver G

    2017-03-01

    Resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenolic phytoalexin of grapes and other fruits and plants, is a common constituent of our diet and of dietary supplements. Many health-promoting benefits have been connected with resveratrol in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and diseases connected with aging. To explain the pleiotropic effects of resveratrol, the molecular targets of this compound have to be identified on the cellular level. Resveratrol induces intracellular signal transduction pathways which ultimately lead to changes in the gene expression pattern of the cells. Here, we review the effect of resveratrol on the activation of the stimulus-responsive transcription factors CREB, AP-1, Egr-1, Elk-1, and Nrf2. Following activation, these transcription factors induce transcription of delayed response genes. The gene products of these delayed response genes are ultimately responsible for the changes in the biochemistry and physiology of resveratrol-treated cells. The activation of stimulus-responsive transcription factors may explain many of the intracellular activities of resveratrol. However, results obtained in vitro may not easily be transferred to in vivo systems.

  14. Transcriptional programs regulated by both LEAFY and APETALA1 at the time of flower formation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Cara M; Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Wu, Miin-Feng; Wagner, Doris

    2015-09-01

    Two key regulators of the switch to flower formation and of flower patterning in Arabidopsis are the plant-specific helix-turn-helix transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) and the MADS box transcription factor APETALA1 (AP1). The interactions between these two transcriptional regulators are complex. AP1 is both a direct target of LFY and can act in parallel with LFY. Available genetic and molecular evidence suggests that LFY and AP1 together orchestrate the switch to flower formation and early events during flower morphogenesis by altering transcriptional programs. However, very little is known about target genes regulated by both transcription factors. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of public datasets to identify genes that are likely to be regulated by both LFY and AP1. Our analyses uncovered known and novel direct LFY and AP1 targets with a role in the control of onset of flower formation. It also identified additional families of proteins and regulatory pathways that may be under transcriptional control by both transcription factors. In particular, several of these genes are linked to response to hormones, to transport and to development. Finally, we show that the gibberellin catabolism enzyme ELA1, which was recently shown to be important for the timing of the switch to flower formation, is positively feedback-regulated by AP1. Our study contributes to the elucidation of the regulatory network that leads to formation of a vital plant organ system, the flower.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of the novobiocin biosynthetic gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Dangel, Volker; Härle, Johannes; Goerke, Christiane; Wolz, Christiane; Gust, Bertolt; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Heide, Lutz

    2009-12-01

    The aminocoumarin antibiotic novobiocin is a gyrase inhibitor formed by a Streptomyces strain. The biosynthetic gene cluster of novobiocin spans 23.4 kb and contains 20 coding sequences, among them the two regulatory genes novE and novG. We investigated the location of transcriptional promoters within this cluster by insertion of transcriptional terminator cassettes and RT-PCR analysis of the resulting mutants. The cluster was found to contain eight DNA regions with promoter activity. The regulatory protein NovG binds to a previously identified binding site within the promoter region located upstream of novH, but apparently not to any of the other seven promoters. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to compare the number of transcripts in a strain carrying an intact novobiocin cluster with strains carrying mutated clusters. Both in-frame deletion of the regulatory gene novG and insertion of a terminator cassette into the biosynthetic gene novH led to a strong reduction of the number of transcripts of the genes located between novH and novW. This suggested that these 16 biosynthetic genes form a single operon. Three internal promoters are located within this operon but appear to be of minor importance, if any, under our experimental conditions. Transcription of novG was found to depend on the presence of NovE, suggesting that the two regulatory genes, novE and novG, act in a cascade-like mechanism. The resistance gene gyrB(R), encoding an aminocoumarin-resistant gyrase B subunit, may initially be co-transcribed with the genes from novH to novW. However, when the gyrase inhibitor novobiocin accumulates in the cultures, gyrB(R) is transcribed from its own promoter. Previous work has suggested that this promoter is controlled by the superhelical density of chromosomal DNA.

  16. Feedback regulation of PRL secretion is mediated by the transcription factor, signal transducer, and activator of transcription 5b.

    PubMed

    Grattan, D R; Xu, J; McLachlan, M J; Kokay, I C; Bunn, S J; Hovey, R C; Davey, H W

    2001-09-01

    PRL secretion from the anterior pituitary gland is inhibited by dopamine produced in the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons of the hypothalamus. The activity of tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons is stimulated by PRL; thus, PRL regulates its own secretion by a negative feedback mechanism. PRL receptors are expressed on tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons, but the intracellular signaling pathway is not known. We have observed that mice with a disrupted signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b gene have grossly elevated serum PRL concentrations. Despite this hyperprolactinemia, mRNA levels and immunoreactivity of tyrosine hydroxylase, the key enzyme in dopamine synthesis, were significantly lower in the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons of these signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b-deficient mice. Concentrations of the dopamine metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the median eminence were also significantly lower in signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b-deficient mice than in wild-type mice. No changes were observed in nonhypothalamic dopaminergic neuronal populations, indicating that the effects were selective to tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons. These data indicate that in the absence of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b, PRL signal transduction in tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons is impaired, and they demonstrate that this transcription factor plays an obligatory and nonredundant role in mediating the negative feedback action of PRL on tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons.

  17. Akirin Links Twist-Regulated Transcription with the Brahma Chromatin Remodeling Complex during Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Scott J.; Aihara, Hitoshi; Gonzalez, Katie; Nibu, Yutaka; Baylies, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    The activities of developmentally critical transcription factors are regulated via interactions with cofactors. Such interactions influence transcription factor activity either directly through protein–protein interactions or indirectly by altering the local chromatin environment. Using a yeast double-interaction screen, we identified a highly conserved nuclear protein, Akirin, as a novel cofactor of the key Drosophila melanogaster mesoderm and muscle transcription factor Twist. We find that Akirin interacts genetically and physically with Twist to facilitate expression of some, but not all, Twist-regulated genes during embryonic myogenesis. akirin mutant embryos have muscle defects consistent with altered regulation of a subset of Twist-regulated genes. To regulate transcription, Akirin colocalizes and genetically interacts with subunits of the Brahma SWI/SNF-class chromatin remodeling complex. Our results suggest that, mechanistically, Akirin mediates a novel connection between Twist and a chromatin remodeling complex to facilitate changes in the chromatin environment, leading to the optimal expression of some Twist-regulated genes during Drosophila myogenesis. We propose that this Akirin-mediated link between transcription factors and the Brahma complex represents a novel paradigm for providing tissue and target specificity for transcription factor interactions with the chromatin remodeling machinery. PMID:22396663

  18. The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE)

    SciTech Connect

    Karen S. Browning; Marie Petrocek; Bonnie Bartel

    2006-06-01

    The 5th Symposium on Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Gene Expression (PTRoPGE) will be held June 8-12, 2005 at the University of Texas at Austin. Exciting new and ongoing discoveries show significant regulation of gene expression occurs after transcription. These post-transcriptional control events in plants range from subtle regulation of transcribed genes and phosphorylation, to the processes of gene regulation through small RNAs. This meeting will focus on the regulatory role of RNA, from transcription, through translation and finally degradation. The cross-disciplinary design of this meeting is necessary to encourage interactions between researchers that have a common interest in post-transcriptional gene expression in plants. By bringing together a diverse group of plant molecular biologist and biochemists at all careers stages from across the world, this meeting will bring about more rapid progress in understanding how plant genomes work and how genes are finely regulated by post-transcriptional processes to ultimately regulate cells.

  19. The PRR family of transcriptional regulators reflects the complexity and evolution of plant circadian clocks.

    PubMed

    Farré, Eva M; Liu, Tiffany

    2013-10-01

    Circadian clocks are internal time-keeping mechanisms that provide an adaptive advantage by enabling organisms to anticipate daily changes and orchestrate biological processes accordingly. Circadian regulated pseudo-response regulators are key components of transcription/translation circadian networks in green alga and plants. Recent studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that most of them act as transcriptional repressors and directly regulate output pathways suggesting a close relationship between the central oscillator and circadian regulated processes. Moreover, phylogenetic studies on this small gene family have shed light on the evolution of circadian clocks in the green lineage.

  20. Disorders of Transcriptional Regulation: An Emerging Category of Multiple Malformation Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    Some genetic disorders caused by mutations in genes encoding components of the transcriptional machinery as well as proteins involved in epigenetic modification of the genome share many overlapping features, such as facial dysmorphisms, growth problems and developmental delay/intellectual disability. As a basis for some shared phenotypic characteristics in these syndromes, a similar transcriptome disturbance, characterized by global transcriptional dysregulation, is believed to play a major role. In this review article, a general overview of gene transcription is provided, and the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying some disorders of transcriptional regulation, such as Rubinstein- Taybi, Coffin-Siris, Cornelia de Lange, and CHOPS syndromes, are discussed. PMID:27867341

  1. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    SciTech Connect

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  2. INO80-dependent regression of ecdysone-induced transcriptional responses regulates developmental timing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Sarah D; Ihry, Robert J; Gruetzmacher, Kelly M; Bashirullah, Arash

    2014-03-15

    Sequential pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone regulate the major developmental transitions in Drosophila, and the duration of each developmental stage is determined by the length of time between ecdysone pulses. Ecdysone regulates biological responses by directly initiating target gene transcription. In turn, these transcriptional responses are known to be self-limiting, with mechanisms in place to ensure regression of hormone-dependent transcription. However, the biological significance of these transcriptional repression mechanisms remains unclear. Here we show that the chromatin remodeling protein INO80 facilitates transcriptional repression of ecdysone-regulated genes during prepupal development. In ino80 mutant animals, inefficient repression of transcriptional responses to the late larval ecdysone pulse delays the onset of the subsequent prepupal ecdysone pulse, resulting in a significantly longer prepupal stage. Conversely, increased expression of ino80 is sufficient to shorten the prepupal stage by increasing the rate of transcriptional repression. Furthermore, we demonstrate that enhancing the rate of regression of the mid-prepupal competence factor βFTZ-F1 is sufficient to determine the timing of head eversion and thus the duration of prepupal development. Although ino80 is conserved from yeast to humans, this study represents the first characterization of a bona fide ino80 mutation in any metazoan, raising the possibility that the functions of ino80 in transcriptional repression and developmental timing are evolutionarily conserved.

  3. Transcriptional networks regulating the costamere, sarcomere, and other cytoskeletal structures in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Nelsa L; Naya, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    Structural abnormalities in striated muscle have been observed in numerous transcription factor gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes in animal and cell culture model systems, indicating that transcription is important in regulating the cytoarchitecture. While most characterized cytoarchitectural defects are largely indistinguishable by histological and ultrastructural criteria, analysis of dysregulated gene expression in each mutant phenotype has yielded valuable information regarding specific structural gene programs that may be uniquely controlled by each of these transcription factors. Linking the formation and maintenance of each subcellular structure or subset of proteins within a cytoskeletal compartment to an overlapping but distinct transcription factor cohort may enable striated muscle to control cytoarchitectural function in an efficient and specific manner. Here we summarize the available evidence that connects transcription factors, those with established roles in striated muscle such as MEF2 and SRF, as well as other non-muscle transcription factors, to the regulation of a defined cytoskeletal structure. The notion that genes encoding proteins localized to the same subcellular compartment are coordinately transcriptionally regulated may prompt rationally designed approaches that target specific transcription factor pathways to correct structural defects in muscle disease.

  4. Regulation of heterochromatin transcription by Snail1/LOXL2 during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Millanes-Romero, Alba; Herranz, Nicolás; Perrera, Valentina; Iturbide, Ane; Loubat-Casanovas, Jordina; Gil, Jesús; Jenuwein, Thomas; García de Herreros, Antonio; Peiró, Sandra

    2013-12-12

    Although heterochromatin is enriched with repressive traits, it is also actively transcribed, giving rise to large amounts of noncoding RNAs. Although these RNAs are responsible for the formation and maintenance of heterochromatin, little is known about how their transcription is regulated. Here, we show that the Snail1 transcription factor represses mouse pericentromeric transcription, acting through the H3K4 deaminase LOXL2. Since Snail1 plays a key role in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), we analyzed the regulation of heterochromatin transcription in this process. At the onset of EMT, one of the major structural heterochromatin proteins, HP1α, is transiently released from heterochromatin foci in a Snail1/LOXL2-dependent manner, concomitantly with a downregulation of major satellite transcription. Moreover, preventing the downregulation of major satellite transcripts compromised the migratory and invasive behavior of mesenchymal cells. We propose that Snail1 regulates heterochromatin transcription through LOXL2, thus creating the favorable transcriptional state necessary for completing EMT.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the bovine oxytocin receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Telgmann, Ralph; Bathgate, Ross A D; Jaeger, Stefanie; Tillmann, Gina; Ivell, Richard

    2003-03-01

    The oxytocin receptor (OTR) is expressed in the cow uterus at high levels at estrus and at term of pregnancy. This expression appears to be controlled mostly at the transcriptional level and correlates with increasing estrogen concentration and progesterone withdrawal. Approximately 3200 base pairs of the upstream region of the bovine OTR gene were cloned and analyzed using a combination of bioinformatic, electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA), and transfection analyses. Using nuclear proteins from high- and low-expressing tissues, EMSA indicated no significant quantitative or qualitative changes in specific DNA-protein binding, suggesting that transcription is probably controlled by signalling systems targeting constitutive factors. Using various cell types, including primary and immortalized ruminant endometrial epithelial cells, as hosts for transfection of promoter-reporter constructs showed that endogenous activity resided only in the longest, i.e., 3.2-kb, construct but not in those shorter than 1.0 kb. While estrogen appears to be important in vivo, no effect of estradiol was found on any construct directly; only when the longest 3.2-kb construct was used in combination with some cotransfected steroid receptor cofactors, e.g., SRC1e, was an estradiol-dependent effect observed. A putative interferon-responsive element (IRE) was found at approximately -2,400 from the transcription start site. This element was shown to bind mouse IRF1 and IRF2 as well as similar proteins from bovine endometrial and myometrial nuclear extracts. This element also responded to these factors when cotransfected into various cell types. The bovine equivalents to IRF1 and IRF2 were molecularly cloned from endometrial tissue and shown to be expressed in a temporal fashion, supporting the role of interferon-tau in maternal recognition of pregnancy. Of many factors tested or analyzed, these components of the IFN system are the only ones found to significantly influence the transcription

  6. Contribution of transcriptional regulation to natural variations in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenqiong J; Chang, Sherman H; Hudson, Matthew E; Kwan, Wai-King; Li, Jingqiu; Estes, Bram; Knoll, Daniel; Shi, Liang; Zhu, Tong

    2005-01-01

    Background Genetic control of gene transcription is a key component in genome evolution. To understand the transcriptional basis of natural variation, we have studied genome-wide variations in transcription and characterized the genetic variations in regulatory elements among Arabidopsis accessions. Results Among five accessions (Col-0, C24, Ler, WS-2, and NO-0) 7,508 probe sets with no detectable genomic sequence variations were identified on the basis of the comparative genomic hybridization to the Arabidopsis GeneChip microarray, and used for accession-specific transcriptome analysis. Two-way ANOVA analysis has identified 60 genes whose mRNA levels differed in different accession backgrounds in an organ-dependent manner. Most of these genes were involved in stress responses and late stages of plant development, such as seed development. Correlation analysis of expression patterns of these 7,508 genes between pairs of accessions identified a group of 65 highly plastic genes with distinct expression patterns in each accession. Conclusion Genes that show substantial genetic variation in mRNA level are those with functions in signal transduction, transcription and stress response, suggesting the existence of variations in the regulatory mechanisms for these genes among different accessions. This is in contrast to those genes with significant polymorphisms in the coding regions identified by genomic hybridization, which include genes encoding transposon-related proteins, kinases and disease-resistance proteins. While relatively fewer sequence variations were detected on average in the coding regions of these genes, a number of differences were identified from the upstream regions, several of which alter potential cis-regulatory elements. Our results suggest that nucleotide polymorphisms in regulatory elements of genes encoding controlling factors could be primary targets of natural selection and a driving force behind the evolution of Arabidopsis accessions. PMID

  7. Landscape of post-transcriptional gene regulation during hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Schwerk, Johannes; Jarret, Abigail P.; Joslyn, Rochelle C.; Savan, Ram

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a pivotal role in various gene regulatory networks including, but not limited to metabolism, embryogenesis and immune responses. Different mechanisms of post-transcriptional regulation, which can act individually, synergistically, or even in an antagonistic manner have been described. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is notorious for subverting host immune responses and indeed exploits several components of the host’s post-transcriptional regulatory machinery for its own benefit. At the same time, HCV replication is post-transcriptionally targeted by host cell components to blunt viral propagation. This review discusses the interplay of post-transcriptional mechanisms that affect host immune responses in the setting of HCV infection and highlights the sophisticated mechanisms both host and virus have evolved in the race for superiority. PMID:25890065

  8. RVX-208, an inhibitor of BET transcriptional regulators with selectivity for the second bromodomain

    PubMed Central

    Picaud, Sarah; Wells, Christopher; Felletar, Ildiko; Brotherton, Deborah; Martin, Sarah; Savitsky, Pavel; Diez-Dacal, Beatriz; Philpott, Martin; Bountra, Chas; Lingard, Hannah; Fedorov, Oleg; Müller, Susanne; Brennan, Paul E.; Knapp, Stefan; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2013-01-01

    Bromodomains have emerged as attractive candidates for the development of inhibitors targeting gene transcription. Inhibitors of the bromo and extraterminal (BET) family recently showed promising activity in diverse disease models. However, the pleiotropic nature of BET proteins regulating tissue-specific transcription has raised safety concerns and suggested that attempts should be made for domain-specific targeting. Here, we report that RVX-208, a compound currently in phase II clinical trials, is a BET bromodomain inhibitor specific for second bromodomains (BD2s). Cocrystal structures revealed binding modes of RVX-208 and its synthetic precursor, and fluorescent recovery after photobleaching demonstrated that RVX-208 displaces BET proteins from chromatin. However, gene-expression data showed that BD2 inhibition only modestly affects BET-dependent gene transcription. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of specific targeting within the BET family resulting in different transcriptional outcomes and highlight the importance of BD1 in transcriptional regulation. PMID:24248379

  9. RVX-208, an inhibitor of BET transcriptional regulators with selectivity for the second bromodomain.

    PubMed

    Picaud, Sarah; Wells, Christopher; Felletar, Ildiko; Brotherton, Deborah; Martin, Sarah; Savitsky, Pavel; Diez-Dacal, Beatriz; Philpott, Martin; Bountra, Chas; Lingard, Hannah; Fedorov, Oleg; Müller, Susanne; Brennan, Paul E; Knapp, Stefan; Filippakopoulos, Panagis

    2013-12-03

    Bromodomains have emerged as attractive candidates for the development of inhibitors targeting gene transcription. Inhibitors of the bromo and extraterminal (BET) family recently showed promising activity in diverse disease models. However, the pleiotropic nature of BET proteins regulating tissue-specific transcription has raised safety concerns and suggested that attempts should be made for domain-specific targeting. Here, we report that RVX-208, a compound currently in phase II clinical trials, is a BET bromodomain inhibitor specific for second bromodomains (BD2s). Cocrystal structures revealed binding modes of RVX-208 and its synthetic precursor, and fluorescent recovery after photobleaching demonstrated that RVX-208 displaces BET proteins from chromatin. However, gene-expression data showed that BD2 inhibition only modestly affects BET-dependent gene transcription. Our data demonstrate the feasibility of specific targeting within the BET family resulting in different transcriptional outcomes and highlight the importance of BD1 in transcriptional regulation.

  10. Transcriptional regulation of steroid hydroxylase genes by corticotropin.

    PubMed Central

    John, M E; John, M C; Boggaram, V; Simpson, E R; Waterman, M R

    1986-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal steroidogenic capacity in the adrenal cortex is the result of a cAMP-dependent response to the peptide hormone corticotropin (ACTH). The molecular mechanism of this action of ACTH has been examined by using five recombinant DNA clones specific for enzymes of the steroidogenic pathway (P-450scc, P-45011 beta, P-450C21, P-45017 alpha, and adrenodoxin). The presence of nuclear precursors in steady-state RNA samples derived from cultured bovine adrenocortical cells and moderate increases in the number of RNA chain initiations, as determined by in vitro nuclear run-off assays, indicate that ACTH controls the expression of the gene(s) for each of these proteins at the transcriptional level. The ACTH-mediated increase in accumulation of transcripts specific for steroid hydroxylases in nuclear RNA can be specifically blocked by inhibiting protein synthesis in bovine adrenocortical cell cultures. The steady-state concentrations of nuclear RNA for control genes show no decrease upon cycloheximide treatment. These studies suggest that a primary action of ACTH in the adrenal cortex is to activate (via cAMP) the synthesis of rapidly turning over protein factors that in turn mediate increased initiation of transcription of steroid hydroxylase genes. We propose that these protein factors impart specificity of induction to genes encoding components of this pathway in steroidogenic tissues. Images PMID:3014507

  11. Osterix represses adipogenesis by negatively regulating PPARγ transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Younho; Kim, Chae Yul; Cheong, Heesun; Lee, Kwang Youl

    2016-10-18

    Osterix is a novel bone-related transcription factor involved in osteoblast differentiation, and bone maturation. Because a reciprocal relationship exists between adipocyte and osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, we hypothesized that Osterix might have a role in adipogenesis. Ablation of Osterix enhanced adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells, whereas overexpression suppressed this process and inhibited the expression of adipogenic markers including CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Further studies indicated that Osterix significantly decreased PPARγ-induced transcriptional activity. Using co-immunoprecipitation and GST-pull down analysis, we found that Osterix directly interacts with PPARγ. The ligand-binding domain (LBD) of PPARγ was responsible for this interaction, which was followed by repression of PPARγ-induced transcriptional activity, even in the presence of rosiglitazone. Taken together, we identified the Osterix has an important regulatory role on PPARγ activity, which contributed to the mechanism of adipogenesis.

  12. Hepatocytes in collagen sandwich: evidence for transcriptional and translational regulation

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    The influence of extracellular matrix configuration on the tissue- specific function of cultured hepatocytes was investigated. Adult rat hepatocytes sandwiched between two layers of collagen gel were compared to cells cultured on a single layer of collagen gel for differences in the total RNA content, the level of albumin-specific mRNA, the rate of albumin gene transcription, and the rate of albumin mRNA translation. Adult hepatocytes in the sandwich system maintained the level of albumin mRNA similar to that found in the normal liver for at least six weeks, whereas the level of albumin mRNA declined rapidly in the single gel system. After one week of culture, hepatocytes in the single gel system could be induced to recover the high level of albumin mRNA and albumin production when a second layer of collagen gel was overlaid at that time. Furthermore, sandwiched hepatocytes maintained significantly higher transcriptional activity compared to cells in the single gel system. In addition to transcriptional control, the ultimate rate of albumin production was shown to depend on the rate of translation, which increased with culture time and reached a plateau in one to two weeks. This increase in translational activity over time in culture was observed in both the sandwich and the single gel systems and, thus, appeared to be independent of the configuration of extracellular matrix. PMID:1734019

  13. Retroviral transcriptional regulation and embryonic stem cells: war and peace.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Sharon; Goff, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    Retroviruses have evolved complex transcriptional enhancers and promoters that allow their replication in a wide range of tissue and cell types. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, however, characteristically suppress transcription of proviruses formed after infection by exogenous retroviruses and also of most members of the vast array of endogenous retroviruses in the genome. These cells have unusual profiles of transcribed genes and are poised to make rapid changes in those profiles upon induction of differentiation. Many of the transcription factors in ES cells control both host and retroviral genes coordinately, such that retroviral expression patterns can serve as markers of ES cell pluripotency. This overlap is not coincidental; retrovirus-derived regulatory sequences are often used to control cellular genes important for pluripotency. These sequences specify the temporal control and perhaps "noisy" control of cellular genes that direct proper cell gene expression in primitive cells and their differentiating progeny. The evidence suggests that the viral elements have been domesticated for host needs, reflecting the wide-ranging exploitation of any and all available DNA sequences in assembling regulatory networks.

  14. Retroviral Transcriptional Regulation and Embryonic Stem Cells: War and Peace

    PubMed Central

    Schlesinger, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Retroviruses have evolved complex transcriptional enhancers and promoters that allow their replication in a wide range of tissue and cell types. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, however, characteristically suppress transcription of proviruses formed after infection by exogenous retroviruses and also of most members of the vast array of endogenous retroviruses in the genome. These cells have unusual profiles of transcribed genes and are poised to make rapid changes in those profiles upon induction of differentiation. Many of the transcription factors in ES cells control both host and retroviral genes coordinately, such that retroviral expression patterns can serve as markers of ES cell pluripotency. This overlap is not coincidental; retrovirus-derived regulatory sequences are often used to control cellular genes important for pluripotency. These sequences specify the temporal control and perhaps “noisy” control of cellular genes that direct proper cell gene expression in primitive cells and their differentiating progeny. The evidence suggests that the viral elements have been domesticated for host needs, reflecting the wide-ranging exploitation of any and all available DNA sequences in assembling regulatory networks. PMID:25547290

  15. Transcriptional regulation of Bacillus subtilis citrate synthase genes.

    PubMed

    Jin, S; Sonenshein, A L

    1994-08-01

    The Bacillus subtilis citrate synthase genes citA and citZ were repressed during early exponential growth phase in nutrient broth medium and were induced as cells reached the end of exponential phase. Both genes were also induced by treatment of cells with the drug decoyinine. After induction, the steady-state level of citZ mRNA was about five times higher than that of citA mRNA. At least some of the citZ transcripts read through into the isocitrate dehydrogenase (citC) gene. Transcription from an apparent promoter site located near the 3' end of the citZ gene also contributed to expression of citC. In minimal medium, citA transcription was about 6-fold lower when glucose was the sole carbon source than it was when succinate was the carbon source. Expression of the citZ gene was repressed 2-fold by glucose and 10-fold when glucose and glutamate were present simultaneously. This latter synergistic repression is similar to the effect of glucose and glutamate on steady-state citrate synthase enzyme activity. CitR, a protein of the LysR family, appeared to be a repressor of citA but not of citZ.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of fucosyltransferase 1 gene expression in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Taniuchi, Fumiko; Higai, Koji; Tanaka, Tomomi; Azuma, Yutaro; Matsumoto, Kojiro

    2013-01-01

    The α 1,2-fucosyltransferase I (FUT1) enzyme is important for the biosynthesis of H antigens, Lewis B, and Lewis Y. In this study, we clarified the transcriptional regulation of FUT1 in the DLD-1 colon cancer cell line, which has high expression of Lewis B and Lewis Y antigens, expresses the FUT1 gene, and shows α 1,2-fucosyltransferase (FUT) activity. 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends revealed a FUT1 transcriptional start site -10 nucleotides upstream of the site registered at NM_000148 in the DataBase of Human Transcription Start Sites (DBTSS). Using the dual luciferase assay, FUT1 gene expression was shown to be regulated at the region -91 to -81 nt to the transcriptional start site, which contains the Elk-1 binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of this region revealed the Elk-1 binding site to be essential for FUT1 transcription. Furthermore, transfection of the dominant negative Elk-1 gene, and the chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIp) assay, supported Elk-1-dependent transcriptional regulation of FUT1 gene expression in DLD-1 cells. These results suggest that a defined region in the 5'-flanking region of FUT1 is critical for FUT1 transcription and that constitutive gene expression of FUT1 is regulated by Elk-1 in DLD-1 cells.

  17. FoxO1 deacetylation regulates thyroid hormone-induced transcription of key hepatic gluconeogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Zhou, Jin; Xie, Sherwin Ying; You, Seo-Hee; Gauthier, Karine; Yen, Paul Michael

    2013-10-18

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is a concerted process that integrates transcriptional regulation with hormonal signals. A major regulator is thyroid hormone (TH), which acts through its nuclear receptor (TR) to induce the expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic genes, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC). Forkhead transcription factor FoxO1 also is an important regulator of these genes; however, its functional interactions with TR are not known. Here, we report that TR-mediated transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in human hepatic cells and mouse liver was FoxO1-dependent and furthermore required FoxO1 deacetylation by the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, SirT1. siRNA knockdown of FoxO1 decreased, whereas overexpression of FoxO1 increased, TH-dependent transcriptional activation of PCK1 and G6PC in cultured hepatic cells. FoxO1 siRNA knockdown also decreased TH-mediated transcription in vivo. Additionally, TH was unable to induce FoxO1 deacetylation or hepatic PCK1 gene expression in TH receptor β-null (TRβ(-/-)) mice. Moreover, TH stimulated FoxO1 recruitment to the PCK1 and G6PC gene promoters in a SirT1-dependent manner. In summary, our results show that TH-dependent deacetylation of a second metabolically regulated transcription factor represents a novel mechanism for transcriptional integration of nuclear hormone action with cellular energy status.

  18. Understanding the role of chromatin remodeling in the regulation of circadian transcription in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, Rosanna S.; Lam, Vu H.; Chiu, Joanna C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circadian clocks enable organisms to anticipate daily changes in the environment and coordinate temporal rhythms in physiology and behavior with the 24-h day-night cycle. The robust cycling of circadian gene expression is critical for proper timekeeping, and is regulated by transcription factor binding, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment and elongation, and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Recently, it has become clear that dynamic alterations in chromatin landscape at the level of histone posttranslational modification and nucleosome density facilitate rhythms in transcription factor recruitment and RNAPII activity, and are essential for progression through activating and repressive phases of circadian transcription. Here, we discuss the characterization of the BRAHMA (BRM) chromatin-remodeling protein in Drosophila in the context of circadian clock regulation. By dissecting its catalytic vs. non-catalytic activities, we propose a model in which the non-catalytic activity of BRM functions to recruit repressive factors to limit the transcriptional output of CLOCK (CLK) during the active phase of circadian transcription, while the primary function of the ATP-dependent catalytic activity is to tune and prevent over-recruitment of negative regulators by increasing nucleosome density. Finally, we divulge ongoing efforts and investigative directions toward a deeper mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation of circadian gene expression at the chromatin level. PMID:26926115

  19. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Regulation and Chromosome Structural Arrangement by GalR in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhong; Trostel, Andrei; Lewis, Dale E. A.; Lee, Sang Jun; He, Ximiao; Stringer, Anne M.; Wade, Joseph T.; Schneider, Thomas D.; Durfee, Tim; Adhya, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    The regulatory protein, GalR, is known for controlling transcription of genes related to D-galactose metabolism in Escherichia coli. Here, using a combination of experimental and bioinformatic approaches, we identify novel GalR binding sites upstream of several genes whose function is not directly related to D-galactose metabolism. Moreover, we do not observe regulation of these genes by GalR under standard growth conditions. Thus, our data indicate a broader regulatory role for GalR, and suggest that regulation by GalR is modulated by other factors. Surprisingly, we detect regulation of 158 transcripts by GalR, with few regulated genes being associated with a nearby GalR binding site. Based on our earlier observation of long-range interactions between distally bound GalR dimers, we propose that GalR indirectly regulates the transcription of many genes by inducing large-scale restructuring of the chromosome. PMID:27900321

  20. Characterization of TRAP-mediated regulation of the B. subtilis trp operon using in vitro transcription and transcriptional reporter fusions in vivo.

    PubMed

    McAdams, Natalie M; Gollnick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon is regulated by an attenuation mechanism involving two alternative RNA secondary structures in the 5' leader region upstream of the structural genes. Regulation is accomplished, at least in part, by controlling which RNA structure forms during transcription of the operon. When intracellular tryptophan levels are high, the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) binds to the nascent trp mRNA to promote formation of a transcription terminator structure so as to induce transcription termination prior to the structural genes. In limiting tryptophan, TRAP does not bind, the alternative antiterminator RNA structure forms, and the operon is transcribed. Several in vitro and in vivo assays have been utilized to study TRAP-mediated regulation of both transcription and translation. Here, we describe using in vitro transcription attenuation assays and in vivo trp-lacZ fusions to examine TRAP-mediated regulation of the trp genes.

  1. Transcription factor Fli-1 positively regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-27 production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yuan, Ming; Ma, Xianwei; Jiang, Wei; Zhu, Lingxi; Wen, Mingyue; Xu, Jing; Liu, Qiuyan; An, Huazhang

    2016-03-01

    IL-27 is an important regulator of TLR4-activated innate immune. The mechanism by which IL-27 production is regulated in TLR4-activated innate immune remains largely unclear. Here we show that expression of transcription factor Fli-1 at protein level is increased in macrophages following LPS stimulation. Fli-1 overexpression increases LPS-activated IL-27 production in macrophages. Consistently, Fli-1 knockdown inhibits LPS-induced IL-27 production in macrophages. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay reveals that Fli-1 binds the promoter of IL-27 p28 subunit. Further experiments manifest that Fli-1 binds the region between -250 and -150 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site of p28 gene and increases p28 gene promoter-controlled transcription. These results demonstrate that Fli-1 positively regulates IL-27 production in TLR4-activated immune response by promoting transcription of IL-27 p28 gene.

  2. Transcription factor ICBP90 regulates the MIF promoter and immune susceptibility locus.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jie; Leng, Lin; Sauler, Maor; Fu, Weiling; Zheng, Junsong; Zhang, Yi; Du, Xin; Yu, Xiaoqing; Lee, Patty; Bucala, Richard

    2016-02-01

    The immunoregulatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is encoded in a functionally polymorphic locus that is linked to the susceptibility of autoimmune and infectious diseases. The MIF promoter contains a 4-nucleotide microsatellite polymorphism (-794 CATT) that repeats 5 to 8 times in the locus, with greater numbers of repeats associated with higher mRNA levels. Because there is no information about the transcriptional regulation of these common alleles, we used oligonucleotide affinity chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to identify nuclear proteins that interact with the -794 CATT5-8 site. An analysis of monocyte nuclear lysates revealed that the transcription factor ICBP90 (also known as UHRF1) is the major protein interacting with the MIF microsatellite. We found that ICBP90 is essential for MIF transcription from monocytes/macrophages, B and T lymphocytes, and synovial fibroblasts, and TLR-induced MIF transcription is regulated in an ICBP90- and -794 CATT5-8 length-dependent manner. Whole-genome transcription analysis of ICBP90 shRNA-treated rheumatoid synoviocytes uncovered a subset of proinflammatory and immune response genes that overlapped with those regulated by MIF shRNA. In addition, the expression levels of ICBP90 and MIF were correlated in joint synovia from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These findings identify ICBP90 as a key regulator of MIF transcription and provide functional insight into the regulation of the polymorphic MIF locus.

  3. Methoprene-tolerant 1 regulates gene transcription to maintain insect larval status.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wen-Li; Liu, Chun-Yan; Liu, Wen; Wang, Di; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2014-08-01

    Insect molting and metamorphosis are regulated by two hormones: 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH). The hormone 20E regulates gene transcription via the nuclear receptor EcR to promote metamorphosis, whereas JH regulates gene transcription via its intracellular receptor methoprene-tolerant (Met) to prevent larval-pupal transition. However, the function and mechanism of Met in various insect developments are not well understood. We propose that Met1 plays a key role in maintaining larval status not only by promoting JH-responsive gene transcription but also by repressing 20E-responsive gene transcription in the Lepidopteran insect Helicoverpa armigera. Met1 protein is increased during feeding stage and decreased during molting and metamorphic stages. Met1 is upregulated by JH III and a low concentration of 20E independently, but is downregulated by a high concentration of 20E. Knockdown of Met1 in larvae causes precocious pupation, decrease in JH pathway gene expression, and increase in 20E pathway gene expression. Met1 interacts with heat shock protein 90 and binds to JH response element to regulate Krüppel homolog 1 transcription in JH III induction. Met1 interacts with ultraspiracle protein 1 (USP1) to repress 20E transcription complex EcRB1/USP1 formation and binding to ecdysone response element. These data indicate that JH via Met1 regulates JH pathway gene expression and represses 20E pathway gene expression to maintain the larval status.

  4. Functional Interplay between CBP and PCAF in Acetylation and Regulation of Transcription Factor KLF13 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chao-Zhong; Keller, Kimberly; Chen, Yangchao; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2010-01-01

    The transcriptional co-activators CBP/p300 and PCAF participate in transcriptional activation by many factors. We have shown that both CBP/p300 and PCAF stimulate the transcriptional activation by KLF13, a member of the KLF/Sp1 family, either individually or cooperatively. Here we further investigated how CBP and PCAF acetylation regulate KLF13 activity, and how these two co-activators functionally interplay in the regulation of KLF13 activity. We found that CBP and PCAF acetylated KLF13 at specific lysine residues in the zinc finger domain of KLF13. The acetylation by CBP, however, resulted in disruption of KLF13 DNA binding. Although the acetyltransferase activity of CBP is not required for stimulating the DNA binding activity of all of the transcription factors that we have examined, the disruption of factor DNA binding by CBP acetylation is factor-specific. We further showed that PCAF and CBP act synergistically and antagonistically to regulate KLF13 DNA binding depending on the status of acetylation. PCAF blocked CBP acetylation and disruption of KLF13 DNA binding. Conversely, acetylation of KLF13 by CBP prevented PCAF stimulation of KLF13 DNA binding. PCAF blocked CBP disruption of KLF13 DNA binding by preventing CBP acetylation of KLF13. These results demonstrate that acetylation by CBP has distinct effects on transcription factor DNA binding, and that CBP and PCAF regulate each other functionally in their regulation of transcription factor DNA binding. PMID:12758070

  5. Tandemly repeated exons encode 81-base repeats in multiple, developmentally regulated Schistosoma mansoni transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, R E; Davis, A H; Carroll, S M; Rajkovic, A; Rottman, F M

    1988-01-01

    The adult Schistosoma mansoni cDNA clone 10-3 encodes an antigen that is recognized by sera from infected humans. We characterized multiple developmentally regulated transcripts homologous to the 10-3 cDNA and portions of the complex genomic loci encoding those transcripts. Transcripts of approximately 950, 870, and 780 nucleotides were expressed in adults, whereas only the 780-nucleotide transcript was observed in the larval stage. These transcripts were highly similar, containing variable numbers of identical direct tandem repeats of 81 bases. Although the sequence of the repeating elements and sequences 3' to them were identical in all the transcripts, sequences 5' of the repeating elements exhibited variations, including a 27-base insertion, alternative start sites for transcription, and alternate 5' exon usage. These transcripts appeared to be derived in part by the developmentally controlled alternative splicing of small exons and the use of alternative transcription initiation sites from the one or two complex loci of at least 40 kilobase pairs. Each 81-base repeat in the transcripts was encoded by three dispersed 27-base-pair exons. These 27-base-pair exons were contained within highly conserved, reiterated 3-kilobase-pair genomic tandem arrays. Images PMID:3211127

  6. Progressive lung cancer determined by expression profiling and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Han, Namshik; Dol, Zulkifli; Vasieva, Olga; Hyde, Russell; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Raji, Olaide; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Martinet, Yves; Sozzi, Gabriella; Risch, Angela; Montuenga, Luis M; Brass, Andy; Field, John K

    2012-07-01

    Clinically, our ability to predict disease outcome for patients with early stage lung cancer is currently poor. To address this issue, tumour specimens were collected at surgery from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients as part of the European Early Lung Cancer (EUELC) consortium. The patients were followed-up for three years post-surgery and patients who suffered progressive disease (PD, tumour recurrence, metastasis or a second primary) or remained disease-free (DF) during follow-up were identified. RNA from both tumour and adjacent-normal lung tissue was extracted from patients and subjected to microarray expression profiling. These samples included 36 adenocarcinomas and 23 squamous cell carcinomas from both PD and DF patients. The microarray data was subject to a series of systematic bioinformatics analyses at gene, network and transcription factor levels. The focus of these analyses was 2-fold: firstly to determine whether there were specific biomarkers capable of differentiating between PD and DF patients, and secondly, to identify molecular networks which may contribute to the progressive tumour phenotype. The experimental design and analyses performed permitted the clear differentiation between PD and DF patients using a set of biomarkers implicated in neuroendocrine signalling and allowed the inference of a set of transcription factors whose activity may differ according to disease outcome. Potential links between the biomarkers, the transcription factors and the genes p21/CDKN1A and Myc, which have previously been implicated in NSCLC development, were revealed by a combination of pathway analysis and microarray meta-analysis. These findings suggest that neuroendocrine-related genes, potentially driven through p21/CDKN1A and Myc, are closely linked to whether or not a NSCLC patient will have poor clinical outcome.

  7. Genomic Perspectives of Transcriptional Regulation in Forebrain Development

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Alex S.; Pattabiraman, Kartik; Visel, Axel; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2015-01-01

    The forebrain is the seat of higher order brain functions, and many human neuropsychiatric disorders are due to genetic defects affecting forebrain development, making it imperative to understand the underlying genetic circuitry. Recent progress now makes it possible to begin fully elucidating the genomic regulatory mechanisms that control forebrain gene expression. Herein, we discuss the current knowledge of how transcription factors drive gene expression programs through their interactions with cis-acting genomic elements, such as enhancers; how analyses of chromatin and DNA modifications provide insights into gene expression states; and how these approaches yield insights into the evolution of the human brain. PMID:25569346

  8. Regulation of Estrogen Receptor Transcription in Breast Carcinoma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    precisely utilizing gel shift competition with oligonucleotides containing mutations within the sequences from +182 to +201. These results are shown in...AP2y was identified based upon homology to the AP2oC transcription factor 34 Isolation of ERF-1 cDNA Two DNA oligonucleotide primers were prepared...24. Hunt, D.F., et al. Characterization of peptides bound to the class I MHC molecule HLA-A2.1 by mass spectrometry . Science 255, 1261-1263 (1992

  9. Differential regulation of mouse and human nephron progenitors by the Six family of transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Lori L.; Guo, Qiuyu; Lee, YoungJin; Tran, Tracy; Benazet, Jean-Denis; Whitney, Peter H.; Valouev, Anton; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Nephron endowment is determined by the self-renewal and induction of a nephron progenitor pool established at the onset of kidney development. In the mouse, the related transcriptional regulators Six1 and Six2 play non-overlapping roles in nephron progenitors. Transient Six1 activity prefigures, and is essential for, active nephrogenesis. By contrast, Six2 maintains later progenitor self-renewal from the onset of nephrogenesis. We compared the regulatory actions of Six2 in mouse and human nephron progenitors by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq). Surprisingly, SIX1 was identified as a SIX2 target unique to the human nephron progenitors. Furthermore, RNA-seq and immunostaining revealed overlapping SIX1 and SIX2 activity in 16 week human fetal nephron progenitors. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of human SIX1 and SIX2 ChIP-seq showed each factor targeted a similar set of cis-regulatory modules binding an identical target recognition motif. In contrast to the mouse where Six2 binds its own enhancers but does not interact with DNA around Six1, both human SIX1 and SIX2 bind homologous SIX2 enhancers and putative enhancers positioned around SIX1. Transgenic analysis of a putative human SIX1 enhancer in the mouse revealed a transient, mouse-like, pre-nephrogenic, Six1 regulatory pattern. Together, these data demonstrate a divergence in SIX-factor regulation between mouse and human nephron progenitors. In the human, an auto/cross-regulatory loop drives continued SIX1 and SIX2 expression during active nephrogenesis. By contrast, the mouse establishes only an auto-regulatory Six2 loop. These data suggest differential SIX-factor regulation might have contributed to species differences in nephron progenitor programs such as the duration of nephrogenesis and the final nephron count. PMID:26884396

  10. Up-regulation of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) in the rat nucleus accumbens after repeated electroconvulsive shock.

    PubMed

    Roh, Myoung-Sun; Cui, Feng Ji; Ahn, Yong Min; Kang, Ung Gu

    2009-10-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide regulates appetite, reward, and mood. CART expression is regulated via the protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, and electroconvulsive shock (ECS), an efficient antipsychotic and antidepressant measure, activates PKA-related signaling. Thus, we hypothesized that ECS may regulate the expression of CART. ECS given daily for five consecutive days increased CART mRNA and protein in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc), accompanied by an increase in CREB phosphorylation. Our results suggest that ECS-induced CART up-regulation might be associated with PKA-CREB signaling, but the causal direction remains to be elucidated in future studies.

  11. The transcription factor, the Cdk, its cyclin and their regulator: directing the transcriptional response to a nutritional signal.

    PubMed Central

    Hirst, K; Fisher, F; McAndrew, P C; Goding, C R

    1994-01-01

    The Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex prevents transcription of PHO5 by inhibiting the ability of the basic-helix-loop-helix transcription factor Pho4 to activate transcription in response to high phosphate conditions. In low phosphate the Pho80-Pho85 complex is inactivated and Pho4 is then able to activate the acid phosphatase gene PHO5. We show here that Pho4 and the homeobox protein Pho2 interact in vivo and act cooperatively to activate the PHO5 UAS, with interaction being regulated by the phosphate switch. In addition, we also demonstrate that an additional factor, Pho81, interacts in high phosphate with both the Pho80 cyclin and with Pho4. In low phosphate, Pho80 and Pho81 dissociate from Pho4, but retain the ability to interact with each other. The evidence presented here supports the idea that Pho81 acts as a phosphate-sensitive trigger that regulates the ability of the Pho80-Pho85 cyclin-cdk complex to bind Pho4, while DNA binding by Pho4 is dependent on the phosphate-sensitive interaction with Pho2. Images PMID:7957107

  12. Soy Glyceollins Regulate Transcript Abundance in the Female Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bamji, Sanaya F.; Page, Robert B.; Patel, Dharti; Sanders, Alexia; Alvarez, Alejandro R.; Gambrell, Caitlin; Naik, Kuntesh; Raghavan, Ashwin M.; Burow, Matthew E.; Boue, Stephen M.; Klinge, Carolyn M.; Ivanova, Margarita; Corbitt, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Glyceollins (Gly), produced by soy plants in response to stress, have anti-estrogenic activity in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. In addition to known anti-estrogenic effects, Gly exhibits mechanisms of action not involving estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. To date, effects of Gly on gene expression in the brain are unknown. For this study, we implanted 17-β estradiol (E2) or placebo slow-release pellets into ovariectomized CFW mice followed by 11 days of exposure to Gly or vehicle i.p. injections. We then performed a microarray on total RNA extracted from whole brain hemispheres and identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) by a 2 × 2 factorial ANOVA with an FDR = 0.20. In total, we identified 33 DEGs with a significant E2 main effect, 5 DEGs with a significant Gly main effect, 74 DEGs with significant Gly and E2 main effects (but no significant interaction term), and 167 DEGs with significant interaction terms. Clustering across all DEGs revealed that transcript abundances were similar between the E2+Gly and E2-only treatments. However, gene expression after Gly-only treatment was distinct from both of these treatments and was generally characterized by higher transcript abundance. Collectively, our results suggest that whether Gly acts in the brain through ER-dependent or ER-independent mechanisms depends on the target gene. PMID:25953511

  13. Secondary cell walls: biosynthesis, patterned deposition and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Secondary walls are mainly composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses (xylan and glucomannan) and lignin, and are deposited in some specialized cells, such as tracheary elements, fibers and other sclerenchymatous cells. Secondary walls provide strength to these cells, which lend mechanical support and protection to the plant body and, in the case of tracheary elements, enable them to function as conduits for transporting water. Formation of secondary walls is a complex process that requires the co-ordinated expression of secondary wall biosynthetic genes, biosynthesis and targeted secretion of secondary wall components, and patterned deposition and assembly of secondary walls. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of genes involved in secondary wall biosynthesis and deposition. Most of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of secondary wall components, including cellulose, xylan, glucomannan and lignin, have been identified and their co-ordinated activation has been shown to be mediated by a transcriptional network encompassing the secondary wall NAC and MYB master switches and their downstream transcription factors. It has been demonstrated that cortical microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins play important roles in the targeted secretion of cellulose synthase complexes, the oriented deposition of cellulose microfibrils and the patterned deposition of secondary walls. Further investigation of many secondary wall-associated genes with unknown functions will provide new insights into the mechanisms controlling the formation of secondary walls that constitute the bulk of plant biomass.

  14. Zinc regulates a key transcriptional pathway for epileptogenesis via metal-regulatory transcription factor 1

    PubMed Central

    van Loo, Karen M. J.; Schaub, Christina; Pitsch, Julika; Kulbida, Rebecca; Opitz, Thoralf; Ekstein, Dana; Dalal, Adam; Urbach, Horst; Beck, Heinz; Yaari, Yoel; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is the most common focal seizure disorder in adults. In many patients, transient brain insults, including status epilepticus (SE), are followed by a latent period of epileptogenesis, preceding the emergence of clinical seizures. In experimental animals, transcriptional upregulation of CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+-channels, resulting in an increased propensity for burst discharges of hippocampal neurons, is an important trigger for epileptogenesis. Here we provide evidence that the metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1) mediates the increase of CaV3.2 mRNA and intrinsic excitability consequent to a rise in intracellular Zn2+ that is associated with SE. Adeno-associated viral (rAAV) transfer of MTF1 into murine hippocampi leads to increased CaV3.2 mRNA. Conversely, rAAV-mediated expression of a dominant-negative MTF1 abolishes SE-induced CaV3.2 mRNA upregulation and attenuates epileptogenesis. Finally, data from resected human hippocampi surgically treated for pharmacoresistant TLE support the Zn2+-MTF1-CaV3.2 cascade, thus providing new vistas for preventing and treating TLE. PMID:26498180

  15. Systematic Analysis of Transcriptional and Post-transcriptional Regulation of Metabolism in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Mattia; Sauer, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Cells react to extracellular perturbations with complex and intertwined responses. Systematic identification of the regulatory mechanisms that control these responses is still a challenge and requires tailored analyses integrating different types of molecular data. Here we acquired time-resolved metabolomics measurements in yeast under salt and pheromone stimulation and developed a machine learning approach to explore regulatory associations between metabolism and signal transduction. Existing phosphoproteomics measurements under the same conditions and kinase-substrate regulatory interactions were used to in silico estimate the enzymatic activity of signalling kinases. Our approach identified informative associations between kinases and metabolic enzymes capable of predicting metabolic changes. We extended our analysis to two studies containing transcriptomics, phosphoproteomics and metabolomics measurements across a comprehensive panel of kinases/phosphatases knockouts and time-resolved perturbations to the nitrogen metabolism. Changes in activity of transcription factors, kinases and phosphatases were estimated in silico and these were capable of building predictive models to infer the metabolic adaptations of previously unseen conditions across different dynamic experiments. Time-resolved experiments were significantly more informative than genetic perturbations to infer metabolic adaptation. This difference may be due to the indirect nature of the associations and of general cellular states that can hinder the identification of causal relationships. This work provides a novel genome-scale integrative analysis to propose putative transcriptional and post-translational regulatory mechanisms of metabolic processes. PMID:28072816

  16. Autogenous Regulation of Splicing of the Transcript of a Yeast Ribosomal Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabeva, Mariana D.; Post-Beittenmiller, Martha A.; Warner, Jonathan R.

    1986-08-01

    The gene for a yeast ribosomal protein, RPL32, contains a single intron. The product of this gene appears to participate in feedback control of the splicing of the intron from the transcript. This autogenous regulation of splicing provides a striking analogy to the autogenous regulation of translation of ribosomal proteins in Escherichia coli.

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes during serum starvation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ojha, Sandeep; Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves all three RNA polymerases which are co-ordinately regulated to produce equimolar amounts of rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (RPs). Unlike model organisms where transcription of rRNA and RP genes slows down during stress, in E. histolytica rDNA transcription continues but pre-rRNA processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during serum starvation. To investigate the regulation of RP genes under stress we measured transcription of six selected RP genes from the small- and large-ribosomal subunits (RPS6, RPS3, RPS19, RPL5, RPL26, RPL30) representing the early-, mid-, and late-stages of ribosomal assembly. Transcripts of these genes persisted in growth-stressed cells. Expression of luciferase reporter under the control of two RP genes (RPS19 and RPL30) was studied during serum starvation and upon serum replenishment. Although luciferase transcript levels remained unchanged during starvation, luciferase activity steadily declined to 7.8% and 15% of control cells, respectively. After serum replenishment the activity increased to normal levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Mutations in the sequence -2 to -9 upstream of AUG in the RPL30 gene resulted in the phenotype expected of post-transcriptional regulation. Transcription of luciferase reporter was unaffected in this mutant, and luciferase activity did not decline during serum starvation, showing that this sequence is required to repress translation of RPL30 mRNA, and mutations in this region relieve repression. Our data show that during serum starvation E. histolytica blocks ribosome biogenesis post-transcriptionally by inhibiting pre-rRNA processing on the one hand, and the translation of RP mRNAs on the other.

  18. Model-driven mapping of transcriptional networks reveals the circuitry and dynamics of virulence regulation.

    PubMed

    Maier, Ezekiel J; Haynes, Brian C; Gish, Stacey R; Wang, Zhuo A; Skowyra, Michael L; Marulli, Alyssa L; Doering, Tamara L; Brent, Michael R

    2015-05-01

    Key steps in understanding a biological process include identifying genes that are involved and determining how they are regulated. We developed a novel method for identifying transcription factors (TFs) involved in a specific process and used it to map regulation of the key virulence factor of a deadly fungus-its capsule. The map, built from expression profiles of 41 TF mutants, includes 20 TFs not previously known to regulate virulence attributes. It also reveals a hierarchy comprising executive, midlevel, and "foreman" TFs. When grouped by temporal expression pattern, these TFs explain much of the transcriptional dynamics of capsule induction. Phenotypic analysis of TF deletion mutants revealed complex relationships among virulence factors and virulence in mice. These resources and analyses provide the first integrated, systems-level view of capsule regulation and biosynthesis. Our methods dramatically improve the efficiency with which transcriptional networks can be analyzed, making genomic approaches accessible to laboratories focused on specific physiological processes.

  19. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by Piwi proteins and piRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Toshiaki; Lin, Haifan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Piwi proteins and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are essential for gametogenesis, embryogenesis, and stem cell maintenance in animals. Piwi proteins act on transposon RNAs by cleaving the RNAs and by interacting with factors involved in RNA regulation. Additionally, piRNAs generated from transposons and psuedogenes can be used by Piwi proteins to regulate mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we discuss piRNA biogenesis, recent findings on post-transcriptional regulation of mRNAs by the piRNA pathway, and the potential importance of this post-transcriptional regulation for a variety of biological processes such as gametogenesis, developmental transitions, and sex determination. PMID:25280102

  20. Environmental Contaminants and microRNA Regulation: Transcription Factors as Regulators of Toxicant-Altered microRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sollome, James; Martin, Elizabeth; Sethupathy, Praveen; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding mRNA transcripts and inhibiting translation and/or inducing degradation of the associated transcripts. Expression levels of miRNAs have been shown to be altered in response to environmental toxicants, thus impacting cellular function and influencing disease risk. Transcription factors (TFs) are known to be altered in response to environmental toxicants and play a critical role in the regulation of miRNA expression. To date, environmentally-responsive TFs that are important for regulating miRNAs remain understudied. In a state-of-the-art analysis, we utilized in silico bioinformatic analysis to characterize potential transcriptional regulators of environmentally-responsive miRNAs. Using the miRStart database, genomic sequences of promoter regions for all available human miRNAs (n=847) were identified and promoter regions were defined as −1000/+500 base pairs from the transcription start site. Subsequently, the promoter region sequences of environmentally-responsive miRNAs (n=128) were analyzed using enrichment analysis to determine overrepresented TF binding sites (TFBS). While most (56/73) TFs differed across environmental contaminants, a set of 17 TFs was enriched for promoter binding among miRNAs responsive to numerous environmental contaminants. Of these, one TF was common to miRNAs altered by the majority of environmental contaminants, namely SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily A, member 3 (SMARCA3). These identified TFs represent candidate common transcriptional regulators of miRNAs perturbed by environmental toxicants. PMID:27292125

  1. A Chromatin-Focused siRNA Screen for Regulators of p53-Dependent Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sammons, Morgan A.; Zhu, Jiajun; Berger, Shelley L.

    2016-01-01

    The protein product of the Homo sapiens TP53 gene is a transcription factor (p53) that regulates the expression of genes critical for the response to DNA damage and tumor suppression, including genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism, and a number of other tumorigenesis-related pathways. Differential transcriptional regulation of these genes is believed to alter the balance between two p53-dependent cell fates: cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. A number of previously identified p53 cofactors covalently modify and alter the function of both the p53 protein and histone proteins. Both gain- and loss-of-function mutations in chromatin modifiers have been strongly implicated in cancer development; thus, we sought to identify novel chromatin regulatory proteins that affect p53-dependent transcription and the balance between the expression of pro-cell cycle arrest and proapoptotic genes. We utilized an siRNA library designed against predicted chromatin regulatory proteins, and identified known and novel chromatin-related factors that affect both global p53-dependent transcription and gene-specific regulators of p53 transcriptional activation. The results from this screen will serve as a comprehensive resource for those interested in further characterizing chromatin and epigenetic factors that regulate p53 transcription. PMID:27334938

  2. Involvement of the SIN4 global transcriptional regulator in the chromatin structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Y W; Stillman, D J

    1992-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced the SIN4 gene and determined that SIN4 is identical to TSF3, identified as a negative regulator of GAL1 gene transcription (S. Chen, R.W. West, Jr., S.L. Johnson, H. Gans, and J. Ma, submitted for publication). Yeast strains bearing a sin4 delta null mutation have been constructed and are temperature sensitive for growth and display defects in both negative and positive regulation of transcription. Transcription of the CTS1 gene is reduced in sin4 delta mutants, suggesting that Sin4 functions as a positive transcriptional regulator. Additionally, a Sin4-LexA fusion protein activates transcription from test promoters containing LexA binding sites. The sin4 delta mutant also shows phenotypes common to histone and spt mutants, including suppression of delta insertion mutations in the HIS4 and LYS2 promoters, expression of promoters lacking upstream activation sequence elements, and decreased superhelical density of circular DNA molecules. These results suggest that the sin4 delta mutation may alter the structure of chromatin, and these changes in chromatin structure may affect transcriptional regulation. Images PMID:1406639

  3. TGF-β signaling to chromatin: how Smads regulate transcription during self-renewal and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gaarenstroom, Tessa; Hill, Caroline S

    2014-08-01

    Ligands of the TGF-β superfamily (including the TGF-βs, Nodal and BMPs) play instructive roles during embryonic development. This is achieved by regulation of genes important for both maintaining pluripotency and germ layer specification and differentiation. Here we review how the TGF-β superfamily ligands signal to the chromatin to regulate transcription during development. The effectors of the pathway, the Smad transcription factors, are regulated in a combinatorial and spatiotemporal manner. This occurs via post-translational modifications affecting stability, localization and activity, as well as through interactions with other transcription factors and chromatin modifying enzymes, which occur on DNA. Expression profiling and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation have defined Smad target genes and binding sites on a genome-wide scale, which vary between cell types and differentiation stages. This has led to the insight that Smad-mediated transcriptional responses are influenced by the presence of master transcription factors, such as OCT4, SOX2 and NANOG in embryonic stem cells, interaction with other signal-induced factors, as well as by the general chromatin remodeling machinery. Interplay with transcriptional repressors and the polycomb group proteins also regulates the balance between expression of self-renewal and mesendoderm-specific genes in embryonic stem cells and during early development.

  4. eQTL Regulating Transcript Levels Associated with Diverse Biological Processes in Tomato1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Budke, Jessica M.; Rowland, Steven D.; Kumar, Ravi; Ichihashi, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Variation in gene expression, in addition to sequence polymorphisms, is known to influence developmental, physiological, and metabolic traits in plants. Genetic mapping populations have facilitated identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), the genetic determinants of variation in gene expression patterns. We used an introgression population developed from the wild desert-adapted Solanum pennellii and domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to identify the genetic basis of transcript level variation. We established the effect of each introgression on the transcriptome and identified approximately 7,200 eQTL regulating the steady-state transcript levels of 5,300 genes. Barnes-Hut t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding clustering identified 42 modules revealing novel associations between transcript level patterns and biological processes. The results showed a complex genetic architecture of global transcript abundance pattern in tomato. Several genetic hot spots regulating a large number of transcript level patterns relating to diverse biological processes such as plant defense and photosynthesis were identified. Important eQTL regulating transcript level patterns were related to leaf number and complexity as well as hypocotyl length. Genes associated with leaf development showed an inverse correlation with photosynthetic gene expression, but eQTL regulating genes associated with leaf development and photosynthesis were dispersed across the genome. This comprehensive eQTL analysis details the influence of these loci on plant phenotypes and will be a valuable community resource for investigations on the genetic effects of eQTL on phenotypic traits in tomato. PMID:27418589

  5. Regulation of Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 Transcription Factors by Neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    She, Hua; Mao, Zixu

    2011-01-01

    Various isoforms of myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) constitute a group of nuclear proteins found to play important roles in increasing types of cells. In neurons, MEF2s are required to regulate neuronal development, synaptic plasticity, as well as survival. MEF2s promote the survival of several types of neurons under different conditions. In cellular models, negative regulation of MEF2s by stress and toxic signals contributes to neuronal death. In contrast, enhancing MEF2 activity not only protects cultured primary neurons from death in vitro but also attenuates the loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta in a 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of Parkinson’s disease. In this work, the mechanisms of regulation of MEF2 function by several well-known neurotoxins and their implications in various neurodegenerative diseases are reviewed. PMID:21741404

  6. Activating transcription factor 3 regulates immune and metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek; Uhlirova, Mirka

    2012-10-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins.

  7. Transcriptional regulation by the Set7 lysine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Keating, Samuel T; El-Osta, Assam

    2013-04-01

    Posttranslational histone modifications define chromatin structure and function. In recent years, a number of studies have characterized many of the enzymatic activities and diverse regulatory components required for monomethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me1) and the expression of specific genes. The challenge now is to understand how this specific chemical modification is written and the Set7 methyltransferase has emerged as a key regulatory enzyme mediating methylation of lysine residues of histone and non-histone proteins. In this review, we comprehensively explore the regulatory proteins modified by Set7 and highlight mechanisms of specific co-recruitment of the enzyme to activating promoters. With a focus on signaling and transcriptional control in disease we discuss recent experimental data emphasizing specific components of diverse regulatory complexes that mediate chromatin modification and reinterpretation of Set7-mediated gene expression.

  8. DNA replication initiator Cdc6 also regulates ribosomal DNA transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shijiao; Xu, Xiaowei; Wang, Guopeng; Lu, Guoliang; Xie, Wenbing; Tao, Wei; Zhang, Hongyin; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2016-04-01

    RNA-polymerase-I-dependent ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription is fundamental to rRNA processing, ribosome assembly and protein synthesis. However, how this process is initiated during the cell cycle is not fully understood. By performing a proteomic analysis of transcription factors that bind RNA polymerase I during rDNA transcription initiation, we identified that the DNA replication initiator Cdc6 interacts with RNA polymerase I and its co-factors, and promotes rDNA transcription in G1 phase in an ATPase-activity-dependent manner. We further showed that Cdc6 is targeted to the nucleolus during late mitosis and G1 phase in a manner that is dependent on B23 (also known as nucleophosmin, NPM1), and preferentially binds to the rDNA promoter through its ATP-binding domain. Overexpression of Cdc6 increases rDNA transcription, whereas knockdown of Cdc6 results in a decreased association of both RNA polymerase I and the RNA polymerase I transcription factor RRN3 with rDNA, and a reduction of rDNA transcription. Furthermore, depletion of Cdc6 impairs the interaction between RRN3 and RNA polymerase I. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Cdc6 also serves as a regulator of rDNA transcription initiation, and indicate a mechanism by which initiation of rDNA transcription and DNA replication can be coordinated in cells.

  9. Live imaging of nascent RNA dynamics reveals distinct types of transcriptional pulse regulation

    PubMed Central

    Muramoto, Tetsuya; Cannon, Danielle; Gierliński, Marek; Corrigan, Adam; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Chubb, Jonathan R.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of genes can be discontinuous, occurring in pulses or bursts. It is not clear how properties of transcriptional pulses vary between different genes. We compared the pulsing of five housekeeping and five developmentally induced genes by direct imaging of single gene transcriptional events in individual living Dictyostelium cells. Each gene displayed its own transcriptional signature, differing in probability of firing and pulse duration, frequency, and intensity. In contrast to the prevailing view from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes that transcription displays binary behavior, strongly expressed housekeeping genes altered the magnitude of their transcriptional pulses during development. These nonbinary “tunable” responses may be better suited than stochastic switch behavior for housekeeping functions. Analysis of RNA synthesis kinetics using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching implied modulation of housekeeping-gene pulse strength occurs at the level of transcription initiation rather than elongation. In addition, disparities between single cell and population measures of transcript production suggested differences in RNA stability between gene classes. Analysis of stability using RNAseq revealed no major global differences in stability between developmental and housekeeping transcripts, although strongly induced RNAs showed unusually rapid decay, indicating tight regulation of expression. PMID:22529358

  10. Live imaging of nascent RNA dynamics reveals distinct types of transcriptional pulse regulation.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Tetsuya; Cannon, Danielle; Gierlinski, Marek; Corrigan, Adam; Barton, Geoffrey J; Chubb, Jonathan R

    2012-05-08

    Transcription of genes can be discontinuous, occurring in pulses or bursts. It is not clear how properties of transcriptional pulses vary between different genes. We compared the pulsing of five housekeeping and five developmentally induced genes by direct imaging of single gene transcriptional events in individual living Dictyostelium cells. Each gene displayed its own transcriptional signature, differing in probability of firing and pulse duration, frequency, and intensity. In contrast to the prevailing view from both prokaryotes and eukaryotes that transcription displays binary behavior, strongly expressed housekeeping genes altered the magnitude of their transcriptional pulses during development. These nonbinary "tunable" responses may be better suited than stochastic switch behavior for housekeeping functions. Analysis of RNA synthesis kinetics using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching implied modulation of housekeeping-gene pulse strength occurs at the level of transcription initiation rather than elongation. In addition, disparities between single cell and population measures of transcript production suggested differences in RNA stability between gene classes. Analysis of stability using RNAseq revealed no major global differences in stability between developmental and housekeeping transcripts, although strongly induced RNAs showed unusually rapid decay, indicating tight regulation of expression.

  11. Regulating expression of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, Roger N; Dai, Shunhong

    2010-06-14

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV), through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter (Dai et al., 2006., Dai et al., 2004., Yin et al., 1997). RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. It is equally as important to recognize that these proteins control plant development by regulating differentiation and/or function of the vascular tissues. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins will not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants. We have proposed characterize the function domains of RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 and explore the biological function of the transcription repressor RLP1.

  12. Acetylation of RNA polymerase II regulates growth-factor-induced gene transcription in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Sebastian; Herker, Eva; Itzen, Friederike; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Kaehlcke, Katrin; Cho, Sungyoo; Pollard, Katherine S; Capra, John A; Schnölzer, Martina; Cole, Philip A; Geyer, Matthias; Bruneau, Benoit G; Adelman, Karen; Ott, Melanie

    2013-11-07

    Lysine acetylation regulates transcription by targeting histones and nonhistone proteins. Here we report that the central regulator of transcription, RNA polymerase II, is subject to acetylation in mammalian cells. Acetylation occurs at eight lysines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest polymerase subunit and is mediated by p300/KAT3B. CTD acetylation is specifically enriched downstream of the transcription start sites of polymerase-occupied genes genome-wide, indicating a role in early stages of transcription initiation or elongation. Mutation of lysines or p300 inhibitor treatment causes the loss of epidermal growth-factor-induced expression of c-Fos and Egr2, immediate-early genes with promoter-proximally paused polymerases, but does not affect expression or polymerase occupancy at housekeeping genes. Our studies identify acetylation as a new modification of the mammalian RNA polymerase II required for the induction of growth factor response genes.

  13. Identification of sequences regulating the transcription of a Dictyostelium gene selectively expressed in prespore cells.

    PubMed Central

    Early, A E; Williams, J G

    1989-01-01

    There has been considerable debate about the relative contributions of transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms to the regulation of prespore gene expression in Dictyostelium. We have determined the DNA sequence upstream of D19, the Dictyostelium gene encoding PsA, a prespore-specific, cell surface protein of unknown function. Our analysis of gene fusions, in which D19 upstream sequences are placed adjacent to a heterologous reporter gene, indicates that transcriptional signals alone are sufficient for the correct temporal and cell-type specific expression of this gene. We also show that the 5' and 3' boundaries of the minimal sequences necessary for correct developmental regulation lie within the region 338 to 122 nucleotides upstream of the start site of transcription but that flanking sequences seem to be necessary for optimal expression. Images PMID:2550894

  14. REPTOR and REPTOR-BP regulate organismal metabolism and transcription downstream of TORC1

    PubMed Central

    Tiebe, Marcel; Lutz, Marilena; De La Garza, Adriana; Buechling, Tina; Boutros, Michael; Teleman, Aurelio A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY TORC1 regulates growth and metabolism in part by influencing transcriptional programs. We identify here REPTOR and REPTOR-BP as transcription factors downstream of TORC1, required for ~90% of the transcriptional induction that occurs upon TORC1 inhibition in Drosophila. Thus REPTOR and REPTOR-BP are major effectors of the transcriptional stress response induced upon TORC1 inhibition, analogous to the role of FOXO downstream of Akt. We find that when TORC1 is active, it phosphorylates REPTOR on Ser527 and Ser530, leading to REPTOR cytoplasmic retention. Upon TORC1 inhibition, REPTOR becomes dephosphorylated in a PP2A dependent manner, shuttles into the nucleus, joins its partner REPTOR-BP to bind target genes, and activates their transcription. In vivo functional analysis using knockout flies reveals that REPTOR and REPTOR-BP play critical roles in maintaining energy homeostasis and promoting animal survival upon nutrient restriction. PMID:25920570

  15. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effect of global regulators

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Michael Rex; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Syed, Mustafa H; Beliaev, Alexander S; Uberbacher, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TFs) that influence the expression of many genes. Global regulators, including CRP (cAMP Receptor Protein), ArcA, and FNR, can modulate the transcriptional activity of multiple operons. The similarity of a regulatory element s sequence to a TF s consensus binding site (BS) and the position of the regulatory element in an operon promoter are considered the most important determinants of this TF s regulatory influence. In this study we explore the hypothesis that the number of TFBS half-sites (where a half-site is one half of the palindromic BS consensus sequence, which we shall refer to as a binding motif or a BM) of a global regulator in an operon s promoter plays an important role in the operon s transcriptional regulation. We examine empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP regulon in Shewanella oneidenses MR 1 and Escherichia coli, and of the ArcA regulon in S. oneidenses MR 1. We compare the power of CRP BM counts and of full, symmetrical CRP TFBS characteristics, namely similarity to consensus and location, to predict CRP-induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full-length TFBS quality or location. Regression analysis indicates that IHF (Integration Host Factor) and ArcA have synergistic effects on CRP-induced gene transcription, positive and negative, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that the fine-tuning of bacterial transcriptional activity by CRP may involves not only the bending of the operon promoter, facilitated by CRP in cooperation with the histone-like protein IHF, but also the cumulative binding affinity of multiple weak BMs.

  16. A guide to integrating transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks using PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism).

    PubMed

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    The integration of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is a crucial step in the process of predicting metabolic behaviors that emerge from either genetic or environmental changes. Here, we present a guide to PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism), an automated method for the construction and simulation of integrated metabolic and transcriptional regulatory networks that enables large-scale phenotypic predictions for a wide range of model organisms.

  17. The E2F transcription factor family regulates CENH3 expression in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Heckmann, Stefan; Lermontova, Inna; Berckmans, Barbara; De Veylder, Lieven; Bäumlein, Helmut; Schubert, Ingo

    2011-11-01

    To elucidate the epigenetic maintenance mechanism for functional plant centromeres, we studied transcriptional regulation of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENH3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. We focused on the structure and activity of the CENH3 promoter (CENH3pro) and its regulation by E2F transcription factors. Use of CENH3pro::GUS reporter gene constructs showed that CENH3pro is active in dividing tissues, and that full expression in root meristems depends on intragenic regulatory elements within the second intron. Chromatin immunoprecipitation identified CENH3 as an E2F target gene. Transient co-expression of a CENH3pro::GUS reporter gene construct with various E2F transcription factors in A. thaliana protoplasts showed that E2Fa and E2Fb (preferentially with dimerization protein DPb) activate CENH3pro. Stable over-expression of E2Fa and E2Fb increased the CENH3 transcript level in planta, whereas over-expression of E2Fc decreased the CENH3 transcript level. Surprisingly, mutation of the two E2F binding sites of CENH3pro, in particular the more upstream one (E2F2), caused an increase in CENH3pro activity, indicating E2F-dependent transcriptional repression. CENH3pro repression may be triggered by the interplay of typical and atypical E2Fs in a cell cycle-dependent manner, and/or by interaction of typical E2Fs with retinoblastoma-related (RBR) protein. We speculate that E2Fs are involved in differential transcriptional regulation of CENH3 versus H3, as H3 promoters lack E2F binding motifs. E2F binding motifs are also present in human and Drosophila CENH3pro regions, thus cell cycle-dependent transcriptional regulation of CENH3 may be highly conserved.

  18. Transcription of minute virus of mice, an autonomous parvovirus, may be regulated by attenuation.

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Asher, E; Aloni, Y

    1984-01-01

    To characterize the transcriptional organization and regulation of minute virus of mice, an autonomous parvovirus, viral transcriptional complexes were isolated and cleaved with restriction enzymes. The in vivo preinitiated nascent RNA was elongated in vitro in the presence of [alpha-32P]UTP to generate runoff transcripts. The lengths of the runoff transcripts were analyzed by gel electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. On the basis of the map locations of the restriction sites and the lengths of the runoff transcripts, the in vivo initiation sites were determined. Two major initiation sites having similar activities were thus identified at residues 201 +/- 5 and 2005 +/- 5; both of them were preceded by a TATAA sequence. When uncleaved viral transcriptional complexes or isolated nuclei were incubated in vitro in the presence of [alpha-32P]UTP or [alpha-32P]CTP, they synthesized labeled RNA that, as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, contained a major band of 142 nucleotides. The RNA of the major band was mapped between the initiation site at residue 201 +/- 5 and residue 342. We noticed the potential of forming two mutually exclusive stem-and-loop structures in the 142-nucleotide RNA; one of them is followed by a string of uridylic acid residues typical of a procaryotic transcription termination signal. We propose that, as in the transcription of simian virus 40, RNA transcription in minute virus of mice may be regulated by attenuation and may involve eucaryotic polymerase B, which can respond to a transcription termination signal similar to that of the procaryotic polymerase. Images PMID:6090703

  19. Transcript profiling reveals complex auxin signalling pathway and transcription regulation involved in dedifferentiation and redifferentiation during somatic embryogenesis in cotton

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Somatic embryogenesis (SE), by which somatic cells of higher plants can dedifferentiate and reorganize into new plants, is a notable illustration of cell totipotency. However, the precise molecular mechanisms regulating SE remain unclear. To characterize the molecular events of this unique process, transcriptome analysis, in combination with biochemical and histological approaches, were conducted in cotton, a typical plant species in SE. Genome-wide profiling of gene expression allowed the identification of novel molecular markers characteristic of this developmental process. Results RNA-Seq was used to identify 5,076 differentially expressed genes during cotton SE. Expression profile and functional assignments of these genes indicated significant transcriptional complexity during this process, associated with morphological, histological changes and endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) alteration. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the genes were enriched for basic processes such as metabolic pathways and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Unigenes were abundant for the functions of protein binding and hydrolase activity. Transcription factor–encoding genes were found to be differentially regulated during SE. The complex pathways of auxin abundance, transport and response with differentially regulated genes revealed that the auxin-related transcripts belonged to IAA biosynthesis, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) metabolism, IAA conjugate metabolism, auxin transport, auxin-responsive protein/indoleacetic acid-induced protein (Aux/IAA), auxin response factor (ARF), small auxin-up RNA (SAUR), Aux/IAA degradation, and other auxin-related proteins, which allow an intricate system of auxin utilization to achieve multiple purposes in SE. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed on selected genes with different expression patterns and functional assignments were made to demonstrate the utility of RNA-Seq for gene expression profiles during cotton SE

  20. Transcriptional regulation of early T-cell development in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Wooseok; Taniuchi, Ichiro

    2016-03-01

    T-cell development occurs in multipotent progenitors arriving in the thymus, which provides a highly specialized microenvironment. Specification and sequential commitment processes to T cells begin in early thymic progenitors upon receiving thymus-specific environmental cues, resulting in the activation of the genetically programmed transcriptional cascade that includes turning on and off numerous transcription factors in a precise manner. Thus, early thymocyte differentiation has been an excellent model system to study cell differentiation processes. This review summarizes recent advances in our knowledge on thymic T-cell development from newly arrived multipotent T-cell progenitors to fully committed T-cell precursors, from the transcriptional regulation perspective.

  1. Extracellular Matrix-Regulated Gene Expression RequiresCooperation of SWI/SNF and Transcription Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ren; Spencer, Virginia A.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2006-05-25

    Extracellular cues play crucial roles in the transcriptional regulation of tissue-specific genes, but whether and how these signals lead to chromatin remodeling is not understood and subject to debate. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and mammary-specific genes as models, we show here that extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules and prolactin cooperate to induce histone acetylation and binding of transcription factors and the SWI/SNF complex to the {beta}- and ?-casein promoters. Introduction of a dominant negative Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF complex, significantly reduced both {beta}- and ?-casein expression, suggesting that SWI/SNF-dependent chromatin remodeling is required for transcription of mammary-specific genes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the ATPase activity of SWI/SNF is necessary for recruitment of RNA transcriptional machinery, but not for binding of transcription factors or for histone acetylation. Coimmunoprecipitation analyses showed that the SWI/SNF complex is associated with STAT5, C/EBP{beta}, and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Thus, ECM- and prolactin-regulated transcription of the mammary-specific casein genes requires the concerted action of chromatin remodeling enzymes and transcription factors.

  2. CTCF Regulates Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Latency Transcription by Nucleosome Displacement and RNA Polymerase Programming

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyosun; Sung, Gi-Ho

    2013-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has been implicated in various aspects of viral and host chromatin organization and transcriptional control. We showed previously that CTCF binds to a cluster of three sites in the first intron of the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) multicistronic latency-associated transcript that encodes latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA), viral cyclin (vCyclin), vFLIP, viral microRNAs, and kaposin. We show here that these CTCF binding sites regulate mRNA production, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) programming, and nucleosome organization of the KSHV latency transcript control region. We also show that KSHV bacmids lacking these CTCF binding sites have elevated and altered ratios of spliced latency transcripts. CTCF binding site mutations altered RNAPII and RNAPII-accessory factor interactions with the latency control region. CTCF binding sites were required for the in vitro recruitment of RNAPII to the latency control region, suggesting that direct interactions between CTCF and RNAPII contribute to transcription regulation. Histone modifications in the latency control region were also altered by mutations in the CTCF binding sites. Finally, we show that CTCF binding alters the regular phasing of nucleosomes in the latency gene transcript and intron, suggesting that nucleosome positioning can be an underlying biochemical mechanism of CTCF function. We propose that RNAPII interactions and nucleosome displacement serve as a biochemical basis for programming RNAPII in the KSHV transcriptional control region. PMID:23192870

  3. Screening of Transcription Factors Involved in Fetal Hemoglobin Regulation Using Phylogenetic Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Carrocini, Gisele Cristine; Venancio, Larissa Paola Rodrigues; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia Regina

    2015-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) is an important genetic modulator of the beta-hemoglobinopathies. The regulation of Hb F levels is influenced by transcription factors. We used phylogenetic footprinting to screen transcription factors that have binding sites in HBG1 and HBG2 genes’ noncoding regions in order to know the genetic determinants of the Hb F expression. Our analysis showed 354 conserved motifs in the noncoding regions of HBG1 gene and 231 motifs in the HBG2 gene between the analyzed species. Of these motifs, 13 showed relation to Hb F regulation: cell division cycle-5 (CDC5), myelo-blastosis viral oncogene homolog (c-MYB), transcription factor CP2 (TFCP2), GATA binding protein 1 (GATA-1), GATA binding protein 2 (GATA-2), nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2), nuclear transcription factor Y (NF-Y), runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX-1), T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (TAL-1), YY1 transcription factor (YY1), beta protein 1 (BP1), chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII), and paired box 1 (PAX-1). The last three motifs were conserved only in the noncoding regions of the HBG1 gene. The understanding of genetic elements involved in the maintenance of high Hb F levels may provide new efficient therapeutic strategies in the beta-hemoglobinopathies treatment, promoting reduction in clinical complications of these genetic disorders. PMID:26543346

  4. MOF maintains transcriptional programs regulating cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, B N; Bechtel-Walz, W; Lucci, J; Karpiuk, O; Hild, I; Hartleben, B; Vornweg, J; Helmstädter, M; Sahyoun, A H; Bhardwaj, V; Stehle, T; Diehl, S; Kretz, O; Voss, A K; Thomas, T; Manke, T; Huber, T B; Akhtar, A

    2016-05-01

    MOF (MYST1, KAT8) is the major H4K16 lysine acetyltransferase (KAT) in Drosophila and mammals and is essential for embryonic development. However, little is known regarding the role of MOF in specific cell lineages. Here we analyze the differential role of MOF in proliferating and terminally differentiated tissues at steady state and under stress conditions. In proliferating cells, MOF directly binds and maintains the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression. In contrast, MOF is dispensable for terminally differentiated, postmitotic glomerular podocytes under physiological conditions. However, in response to injury, MOF is absolutely critical for podocyte maintenance in vivo. Consistently, we detect defective nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi structures, as well as presence of multivesicular bodies in vivo in podocytes lacking Mof following injury. Undertaking genome-wide expression analysis of podocytes, we uncover several MOF-regulated pathways required for stress response. We find that MOF, along with the members of the non-specific lethal but not the male-specific lethal complex, directly binds to genes encoding the lysosome, endocytosis and vacuole pathways, which are known regulators of podocyte maintenance. Thus, our work identifies MOF as a key regulator of cellular stress response in glomerular podocytes.

  5. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G.; Zeef, Leo A. H.; Donaldson, Ian J.; Ashe, Hilary L.

    2016-01-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates. PMID:27379389

  6. Regulation of the BMP Signaling-Responsive Transcriptional Network in the Drosophila Embryo.

    PubMed

    Deignan, Lisa; Pinheiro, Marco T; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Saunders, Abbie; Wilcockson, Scott G; Zeef, Leo A H; Donaldson, Ian J; Ashe, Hilary L

    2016-07-01

    The BMP signaling pathway has a conserved role in dorsal-ventral axis patterning during embryonic development. In Drosophila, graded BMP signaling is transduced by the Mad transcription factor and opposed by the Brinker repressor. In this study, using the Drosophila embryo as a model, we combine RNA-seq with Mad and Brinker ChIP-seq to decipher the BMP-responsive transcriptional network underpinning differentiation of the dorsal ectoderm during dorsal-ventral axis patterning. We identify multiple new BMP target genes, including positive and negative regulators of EGF signaling. Manipulation of EGF signaling levels by loss- and gain-of-function studies reveals that EGF signaling negatively regulates embryonic BMP-responsive transcription. Therefore, the BMP gene network has a self-regulating property in that it establishes a balance between its activity and that of the antagonistic EGF signaling pathway to facilitate correct patterning. In terms of BMP-dependent transcription, we identify key roles for the Zelda and Zerknüllt transcription factors in establishing the resulting expression domain, and find widespread binding of insulator proteins to the Mad and Brinker-bound genomic regions. Analysis of embryos lacking the BEAF-32 insulator protein shows reduced transcription of a peak BMP target gene and a reduction in the number of amnioserosa cells, the fate specified by peak BMP signaling. We incorporate our findings into a model for Mad-dependent activation, and discuss its relevance to BMP signal interpretation in vertebrates.

  7. Regulation of gene expression by manipulating transcriptional repressor activity using a novel CoSRI technology.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yue; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W

    2016-12-20

    Targeted gene manipulation is a central strategy for studying gene function and identifying related biological processes. However, a methodology for manipulating the regulatory motifs of transcription factors is lacking as these factors commonly possess multiple motifs (eg. repression and activation motifs) which collaborate with each other to regulate multiple biological processes. We describe a novel approach designated Conserved Sequence-guided Repressor Inhibition (CoSRI) that can specifically reduce or abolish the repressive activities of transcription factors in vivo. The technology was evaluated using the chimeric MYB80-EAR transcription factor and subsequently the endogenous WUS transcription factor. The technology was employed to develop a reversible male sterility system applicable to hybrid seed production. In order to determine the capacity of the technology to regulate the activity of endogenous transcription factors, the WUS repressor was chosen. The WUS repression motif could be inhibited in vivo and the transformed plants exhibited the wus-1 phenotype. Consequently, the technology can be used to manipulate the activities of transcriptional repressor motifs regulating beneficial traits in crop plants and other eukaryotic organisms. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. The identification of a novel role for BRCA1 in regulating RNA polymerase I transcription

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Rebecca; D'Costa, Zenobia; Ray, Swagat; Gorski, Julia; Harkin, D. Paul; Mullan, Paul; Panov, Konstantin I.

    2016-01-01

    The unrestrained proliferation of cancer cells requires a high level of ribosome biogenesis. The first stage of ribosome biogenesis is the transcription of the large ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs); the structural and functional components of the ribosome. Transcription of rRNA is carried out by RNA polymerase I (Pol-I) and its associated holoenzyme complex. Here we report that BRCA1, a nuclear phosphoprotein, and a known tumour suppressor involved in variety of cellular processes such as DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control and ubiquitylation, is associated with rDNA repeats, in particular with the regulatory regions of the rRNA gene. We demonstrate that BRCA1 interacts directly with the basal Pol-I transcription factors; upstream binding factor (UBF), selectivity factor-1 (SL1) as well as interacting with RNA Pol-I itself. We show that in response to DNA damage, BRCA1 occupancy at the rDNA repeat is decreased and the observed BRCA1 interactions with the Pol-I transcription machinery are weakened. We propose, therefore, that there is a rDNA associated fraction of BRCA1 involved in DNA damage dependent regulation of Pol-I transcription, regulating the stability and formation of the Pol-I holoenzyme during initiation and/or elongation in response to DNA damage. PMID:27589844

  9. The mechanism of a formaldehyde-sensing transcriptional regulator

    PubMed Central

    Denby, Katie J.; Iwig, Jeffrey; Bisson, Claudine; Westwood, Jodie; Rolfe, Matthew D.; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Higgins, Khadine; Maroney, Michael J.; Baker, Patrick J.; Chivers, Peter T.; Green, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Most organisms are exposed to the genotoxic chemical formaldehyde, either from endogenous or environmental sources. Therefore, biology has evolved systems to perceive and detoxify formaldehyde. The frmRA(B) operon that is present in many bacteria represents one such system. The FrmR protein is a transcriptional repressor that is specifically inactivated in the presence of formaldehyde, permitting expression of the formaldehyde detoxification machinery (FrmA and FrmB, when the latter is present). The X-ray structure of the formaldehyde-treated Escherichia coli FrmR (EcFrmR) protein reveals the formation of methylene bridges that link adjacent Pro2 and Cys35 residues in the EcFrmR tetramer. Methylene bridge formation has profound effects on the pattern of surface charge of EcFrmR and combined with biochemical/biophysical data suggests a mechanistic model for formaldehyde-sensing and derepression of frmRA(B) expression in numerous bacterial species. PMID:27934966

  10. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of Iron Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; de Llanos, Rosa; Romero, Antonia María; Puig, Sergi

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms because it participates as a redox cofactor in a wide variety of biological processes. Recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have shown that in response to iron deficiency, an RNA-binding protein denoted Cth2 coordinates a global metabolic rearrangement that aims to optimize iron utilization. The Cth2 protein contains two Cx8Cx5Cx3H tandem zinc fingers (TZFs) that specifically bind to adenosine/uridine-rich elements within the 3′ untranslated region of many mRNAs to promote their degradation. The Cth2 protein shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Once inside the nucleus, Cth2 binds target mRNAs and stimulates alternative 3′ end processing. A Cth2/mRNA-containing complex is required for export to the cytoplasm, where the mRNA is degraded by the 5′ to 3′ degradation pathway. This post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism limits iron utilization in nonessential pathways and activates essential iron-dependent enzymes such as ribonucleotide reductase, which is required for DNA synthesis and repair. Recent findings indicate that the TZF-containing tristetraprolin protein also functions in modulating human iron homeostasis. Elevated iron concentrations can also be detrimental for cells. The Rnt1 RNase III exonuclease protects cells from excess iron by promoting the degradation of a subset of the Fe acquisition system when iron levels rise. PMID:23903042

  11. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Regulates Immune and Metabolic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Rynes, Jan; Donohoe, Colin D.; Frommolt, Peter; Brodesser, Susanne; Jindra, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Integration of metabolic and immune responses during animal development ensures energy balance, permitting both growth and defense. Disturbed homeostasis causes organ failure, growth retardation, and metabolic disorders. Here, we show that the Drosophila melanogaster activating transcription factor 3 (Atf3) safeguards metabolic and immune system homeostasis. Loss of Atf3 results in chronic inflammation and starvation responses mounted primarily by the larval gut epithelium, while the fat body suffers lipid overload, causing energy imbalance and death. Hyperactive proinflammatory and stress signaling through NF-κB/Relish, Jun N-terminal kinase, and FOXO in atf3 mutants deregulates genes important for immune defense, digestion, and lipid metabolism. Reducing the dose of either FOXO or Relish normalizes both lipid metabolism and gene expression in atf3 mutants. The function of Atf3 is conserved, as human ATF3 averts some of the Drosophila mutant phenotypes, improving their survival. The single Drosophila Atf3 may incorporate the diversified roles of two related mammalian proteins. PMID:22851689

  12. ETV1 positively regulates transcription of tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    Zynda, Evan; Jackson, Mark W; Bhattacharya, Partho; Kandel, Eugene S

    2013-01-01

    ETV1 (ETS variant 1) is a transcription factor from the ETS family and an oncogene in several types of human malignancies. Paradoxically, a predicted inactivating mutation in ETV1 was previously found in a clone of HT1080 cells with reduced activity of p53. We report that elevated expression of ETV1 makes p53-null tumor cells hypersensitive to restoration of said tumor suppressor. Furthermore, elevated levels of either wild-type ETV1 or its truncated derivative, dETV1, which mimics the product of an oncogenic rearrangement in certain tumors, results in increased expression of mRNA for p14ARF, a known activator of p53. Accordingly, expression of a luciferase reporter, which is driven by a putative ARF promoter, was elevated by concomitant expression of either ETV1 or dETV1. Our observations point to yet another example of a tumor suppressor gene being activated by a potentially oncogenic signal. A better understanding of the mechanisms that allow a cell to bypass such safeguards is needed in order to predict and prevent the development of an oncogene-tolerant state during cancer evolution. PMID:24157551

  13. SUMO modification regulates the transcriptional activity of FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Alm-Kristiansen, Anne Hege; Norman, Ingrid Louise; Matre, Vilborg; Gabrielsen, Odd Stokke

    2009-09-25

    FLASH is a huge multifunctional nuclear protein that has been linked to apoptotic signalling, transcriptional control and Cajal body function. To gain further insight into the functions of the FLASH protein, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screening with FLASH as bait and identified the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 as an interaction partner. The main interaction surface for Ubc9 was found in the C-terminal part of FLASH, which is also a target for sumoylation. We identified K1813 as the major sumoylation site in FLASH, being enhanced by the SUMO E3 ligases Pc2 and PIASy. Disruption of this SUMO-conjugation site did not change the speckled subnuclear localization of FLASH, but it caused a reduction in FLASH activity as measured in a Gal4-tethering assay. Interestingly, the SUMO-specific protease SENP1 activated FLASH in the same assay. Overall, our results point to a complex involvement of sumoylation in modulating the function of FLASH.

  14. The transcriptional coactivator TAZ regulates mesenchymal differentiation in malignant glioma.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Krishna P L; Salazar, Katrina L; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Wani, Khalida; Heathcock, Lindsey; Hollingsworth, Faith; James, Johanna D; Gumin, Joy; Diefes, Kristin L; Kim, Se Hoon; Turski, Alice; Azodi, Yasaman; Yang, Yuhui; Doucette, Tiffany; Colman, Howard; Sulman, Erik P; Lang, Frederick F; Rao, Ganesh; Copray, Sjef; Vaillant, Brian D; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2011-12-15

    Recent molecular classification of glioblastoma (GBM) has shown that patients with a mesenchymal (MES) gene expression signature exhibit poor overall survival and treatment resistance. Using regulatory network analysis of available expression microarray data sets of GBM, including The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identified the transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ), to be highly associated with the MES network. TAZ expression was lower in proneural (PN) GBMs and lower-grade gliomas, which correlated with CpG island hypermethylation of the TAZ promoter compared with MES GBMs. Silencing of TAZ in MES glioma stem cells (GSCs) decreased expression of MES markers, invasion, self-renewal, and tumor formation. Conversely, overexpression of TAZ in PN GSCs as well as murine neural stem cells (NSCs) induced MES marker expression and aberrant osteoblastic and chondrocytic differentiation in a TEAD-dependent fashion. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we show that TAZ is directly recruited to a majority of MES gene promoters in a complex with TEAD2. The coexpression of TAZ, but not a mutated form of TAZ that lacks TEAD binding, with platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B) resulted in high-grade tumors with MES features in a murine model of glioma. Our studies uncover a direct role for TAZ and TEAD in driving the MES differentiation of malignant glioma.

  15. Regulation of transcription by Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14-3-3 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Steensma, H. Yde; Teixeira de Mattos, M. Joost; van Heusden, G. Paul H.

    2004-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins form a family of highly conserved eukaryotic proteins involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, including signalling, apoptosis, cell-cycle control and transcriptional regulation. More than 150 binding partners have been found for these proteins. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two genes encoding 14-3-3 proteins, BMH1 and BMH2. A bmh1 bmh2 double mutant is unviable in most laboratory strains. Previously, we constructed a temperature-sensitive bmh2 mutant and showed that mutations in RTG3 and SIN4, both encoding transcriptional regulators, can suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype of this mutant, suggesting an inhibitory role of the 14-3-3 proteins in Rtg3-dependent transcription [van Heusden and Steensma (2001) Yeast 18, 1479–1491]. In the present paper, we report a genome-wide transcription analysis of a temperature-sensitive bmh2 mutant. Steady-state mRNA levels of 60 open reading frames were increased more than 2.0-fold in the bmh2 mutant, whereas those of 78 open reading frames were decreased more than 2.0-fold. In agreement with our genetic experiments, six genes known to be regulated by Rtg3 showed elevated mRNA levels in the mutant. In addition, several genes with other cellular functions, including those involved in gluconeogenesis, ergosterol biosynthesis and stress response, had altered mRNA levels in the mutant. Our data show that the yeast 14-3-3 proteins negatively regulate Rtg3-dependent transcription, stimulate the transcription of genes involved in ergosterol metabolism and in stress response and are involved in transcription regulation of multiple other genes. PMID:15142031

  16. Regulation of transcription by Saccharomyces cerevisiae 14-3-3 proteins.

    PubMed

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Steensma, H Yde; Teixeira De Mattos, M Joost; Van Heusden, G Paul H

    2004-09-15

    14-3-3 proteins form a family of highly conserved eukaryotic proteins involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, including signalling, apoptosis, cell-cycle control and transcriptional regulation. More than 150 binding partners have been found for these proteins. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has two genes encoding 14-3-3 proteins, BMH1 and BMH2. A bmh1 bmh2 double mutant is unviable in most laboratory strains. Previously, we constructed a temperature-sensitive bmh2 mutant and showed that mutations in RTG3 and SIN4, both encoding transcriptional regulators, can suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype of this mutant, suggesting an inhibitory role of the 14-3-3 proteins in Rtg3-dependent transcription [van Heusden and Steensma (2001) Yeast 18, 1479-1491]. In the present paper, we report a genome-wide transcription analysis of a temperature-sensitive bmh2 mutant. Steady-state mRNA levels of 60 open reading frames were increased more than 2.0-fold in the bmh2 mutant, whereas those of 78 open reading frames were decreased more than 2.0-fold. In agreement with our genetic experiments, six genes known to be regulated by Rtg3 showed elevated mRNA levels in the mutant. In addition, several genes with other cellular functions, including those involved in gluconeogenesis, ergosterol biosynthesis and stress response, had altered mRNA levels in the mutant. Our data show that the yeast 14-3-3 proteins negatively regulate Rtg3-dependent transcription, stimulate the transcription of genes involved in ergosterol metabolism and in stress response and are involved in transcription regulation of multiple other genes.

  17. Nutritional conditions regulate transcriptional activity of SF-1 by controlling sumoylation and ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jiwon; Yang, Dong Joo; Lee, Syann; Hammer, Gary D.; Kim, Ki Woo; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2016-01-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) is a transcription factor expressed in the ventral medial nucleus of the hypothalamus that regulates energy homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms of SF-1 in the control of energy balance are largely unknown. Here, we show that nutritional conditions, such as the presence or absence of serum, affect SF-1 action. Serum starvation significantly decreased hypothalamic SF-1 levels by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation, and sumoylation was required for this process. SF-1 transcriptional activity was also differentially regulated by nutritional status. Under normal conditions, the transcriptional activity of hypothalamic SF-1 was activated by SUMO, but this was attenuated during starvation. Taken together, these results indicate that sumoylation and ubiquitination play crucial roles in the regulation of SF-1 function and that these effects are dependent on nutritional conditions, further supporting the importance of SF-1 in the control of energy homeostasis. PMID:26750456

  18. Integrated pathway-based transcription regulation network mining and visualization based on gene expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Kibinge, Nelson; Ono, Naoaki; Horie, Masafumi; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Saito, Akira; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2016-06-01

    Conventionally, workflows examining transcription regulation networks from gene expression data involve distinct analytical steps. There is a need for pipelines that unify data mining and inference deduction into a singular framework to enhance interpretation and hypotheses generation. We propose a workflow that merges network construction with gene expression data mining focusing on regulation processes in the context of transcription factor driven gene regulation. The pipeline implements pathway-based modularization of expression profiles into functional units to improve biological interpretation. The integrated workflow was implemented as a web application software (TransReguloNet) with functions that enable pathway visualization and comparison of transcription factor activity between sample conditions defined in the experimental design. The pipeline merges differential expression, network construction, pathway-based abstraction, clustering and visualization. The framework was applied in analysis of actual expression datasets related to lung, breast and prostrate cancer.

  19. Transcriptional Regulation of Enhancers Active in Protodomains of the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Kartik; Golonzhka, Olga; Lindtner, Susan; Nord, Alex S.; Taher, Leila; Hoch, Renee; Silberberg, Shanni N.; Zhang, Dongji; Chen, Bin; Zeng, HongKui; Pennacchio, Len; Puelles, Luis; Visel, Axel; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Elucidating the genetic control of cerebral cortical (pallial) development is essential for understanding function, evolution, and disorders of the brain. Transcription factors (TFs) that embryonically regulate pallial regionalization are expressed in gradients, raising the question of how discrete domains are generated. We provide evidence that small enhancer elements active in protodomains integrate broad transcriptional information. CreERT2 and GFP expression from 14 different enhancer elements in stable transgenic mice allowed us to define the first comprehensive regional fate map of the pallium. We explored transcriptional mechanisms that control the activity of the enhancers using informatics, in vivo occupancy by TFs that regulate cortical patterning (CoupTFI, Pax6 and Pbx1), and analysis of enhancer activity in Pax6 mutants. Overall, the results provide novel insights into how broadly expressed patterning TFs regulate the activity of small enhancer elements that drive gene expression in pallial protodomains that fate map to distinct cortical regions. PMID:24814534

  20. Key regulators control distinct transcriptional programmes in blood progenitor and mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Nieto, Fernando J; Ng, Felicia S; Wilson, Nicola K; Hannah, Rebecca; Moignard, Victoria; Leal-Cervantes, Ana I; Jimenez-Madrid, Isabel; Diamanti, Evangelia; Wernisch, Lorenz; Göttgens, Berthold

    2014-01-01

    Despite major advances in the generation of genome-wide binding maps, the mechanisms by which transcription factors (TFs) regulate cell type identity have remained largely obscure. Through comparative analysis of 10 key haematopoietic TFs in both mast cells and blood progenitors, we demonstrate that the largely cell type-specific binding profiles are not opportunistic, but instead contribute to cell type-specific transcriptional control, because (i) mathematical modelling of differential binding of shared TFs can explain differential gene expression, (ii) consensus binding sites are important for cell type-specific binding and (iii) knock-down of blood stem cell regulators in mast cells reveals mast cell-specific genes as direct targets. Finally, we show that the known mast cell regulators Mitf and c-fos likely contribute to the global reorganisation of TF binding profiles. Taken together therefore, our study elucidates how key regulatory TFs contribute to transcriptional programmes in several distinct mammalian cell types. PMID:24760698

  1. Transcript profiling of the ruminant liver indicates a unique program of transcriptional regulation of ketogenic enzymes during food restriction.

    PubMed

    Doelman, John; Cao, Honghe; Purdie, Norman G; Kim, Julie J M; Swanson, Kendall C; Osborne, Vernon R; Tey, Jasper; Ali, Ayesha; Feng, Zeny; Karrow, Niel A; Cant, John P

    2012-09-01

    Ruminants absorb little glucose and rely on hepatic gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in the fed state to convert short-chain fatty acids produced during digestion into glucose and ketone bodies, respectively. In contrast to the non-ruminant response, fluxes through gluconeogenic and ketogenic pathways decrease during food restriction. Transcriptional regulation responsible for these unique food restriction responses has not been established. To determine the hepatic transcriptional response of ruminants to an acute drop in dietary nutrient supply, 102 yearling heifers were assigned to either ad libitum feeding or 24 h of food withdrawal in a randomized block design. Liver biopsies were obtained for microarray and quantitative real-time PCR analyses of gene expression. Plasma concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids were higher in food restricted heifers, while levels of β-hydroxybutyrate, triacylglycerol, and glucose were decreased. Despite a decline in substrate supply and a lower hepatic production of glucose, expression of the key gluconeogenic enzymes pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase was upregulated as in non-ruminants. Downregulation of cholesterolgenic genes and upregulation of fatty acid oxidative genes were consistent with SREBP-2 and PPARα control, respectively. Ketogenesis from short-chain fatty acids was downregulated, contrary to the non-ruminant response to food restriction. Short-chain fatty acids may exert transcriptional control in the ruminant liver similar to that demonstrated in the large intestine of non-ruminants.

  2. Protein kinase NII and the regulation of rDNA transcription in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Belenguer, P; Baldin, V; Mathieu, C; Prats, H; Bensaid, M; Bouche, G; Amalric, F

    1989-01-01

    Transcription of ribosomal RNA genes is generally accepted to correlate with cell growth. Using primary cultures of adult bovine aortic endothelial (ABAE) cells, we have shown that transcription of rDNA in confluent cells falls to 5% of the transcription level in growing cells. Protein kinase NII appears to be a limiting factor to promote rDNA transcription in isolated nuclei of confluent cells. Protein kinase NII was detected by immunocytochemistry in the cytoplasm, nuclei and nucleoli of growing cells while it was no longer present in nucleoli of confluent cells. The kinase activity, in isolated nuclei, was estimated by endogenous phosphorylation of a specific substrate, nucleolin. A 10% residual activity was present in confluent cell nuclei compared to growing cell nuclei. Concomitantly, the transcription 'in vitro' of rDNA in the corresponding nuclei was also highly reduced (by 85%). Addition of exogenous protein kinase NII to confluent cell nuclei induced a strong increase in the phosphorylation of specific proteins including nucleolin. In parallel, the transcription of rDNA was increased by a factor of 5, to nearly the level observed in nuclei prepared from growing cells. These data suggest that, in confluent cells, factors necessary for rDNA transcription machinery are present but inactive in the nucleolus and that the phosphorylation of one or several of these factors (nucleolin, topoisomerase I,...) by protein kinase NII is a key event in the regulation of rDNA transcription. Images PMID:2780290

  3. Sophisticated Regulation of Transcriptional Factors by the Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate: Sugar Phosphotransferase System.

    PubMed

    Galinier, Anne; Deutscher, Josef

    2017-03-24

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS) is a carbohydrate transport and phosphorylation system present in bacteria of all different phyla and in archaea. It is usually composed of three proteins or protein complexes, enzyme I, HPr, and enzyme II, which are phosphorylated at histidine or cysteine residues. However, in many bacteria, HPr can also be phosphorylated at a serine residue. The PTS not only functions as a carbohydrate transporter but also regulates numerous cellular processes either by phosphorylating its target proteins or by interacting with them in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. The target proteins can be catabolic enzymes, transporters, and signal transduction proteins but are most frequently transcriptional regulators. In this review, we will describe how PTS components interact with or phosphorylate proteins to regulate directly or indirectly the activity of transcriptional repressors, activators, or antiterminators. We will briefly summarize the well-studied mechanism of carbon catabolite repression in firmicutes, where the transcriptional regulator catabolite control protein A needs to interact with seryl-phosphorylated HPr in order to be functional. We will present new results related to transcriptional activators and antiterminators containing specific PTS regulation domains, which are the phosphorylation targets for three different types of PTS components. Moreover, we will discuss how the phosphorylation level of the PTS components precisely regulates the activity of target transcriptional regulators or antiterminators, with or without PTS regulation domain, and how the availability of PTS substrates and thus the metabolic status of the cell are connected with various cellular processes, such as biofilm formation or virulence of certain pathogens.

  4. De novo design of a synthetic riboswitch that regulates transcription termination

    PubMed Central

    Wachsmuth, Manja; Findeiß, Sven; Weissheimer, Nadine; Stadler, Peter F.; Mörl, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Riboswitches are regulatory RNA elements typically located in the 5′-untranslated region of certain mRNAs and control gene expression at the level of transcription or translation. These elements consist of a sensor and an adjacent actuator domain. The sensor usually is an aptamer that specifically interacts with a ligand. The actuator contains an intrinsic terminator or a ribosomal binding site for transcriptional or translational regulation, respectively. Ligand binding leads to structural rearrangements of the riboswitch and to presentation or masking of these regulatory elements. Based on this modular organization, riboswitches are an ideal target for constructing synthetic regulatory systems for gene expression. Although riboswitches for translational control have been designed successfully, attempts to construct synthetic elements regulating transcription have failed so far. Here, we present an in silico pipeline for the rational design of synthetic riboswitches that regulate gene expression at the transcriptional level. Using the well-characterized theophylline aptamer as sensor, we designed the actuator part as RNA sequences that can fold into functional intrinsic terminator structures. In the biochemical characterization, several of the designed constructs show ligand-dependent control of gene expression in Escherichia coli, demonstrating that it is possible to engineer riboswitches not only for translational but also for transcriptional regulation. PMID:23275562

  5. RABBIT EARS regulates the transcription of TCP4 during petal development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Yanzhi; Zhang, Yongxia; Wang, Weiyao; Irish, Vivian F; Huang, Tengbo

    2016-12-01

    Plant organ growth requires the proper transition from cell proliferation to cell expansion and differentiation. The CIN-TCP transcription factor gene TCP4 and its post-transcriptional regulator microRNA319 play a pivotal role in this process. In this study, we identified a pathway in which the product of the C2H2 zinc finger gene RABBIT EARS (RBE) regulates the transcription of TCP4 during Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) petal development. RBE directly represses TCP4 during the early stages of petal development; this contributes to the role of RBE in controlling the growth of petal primordia. We also found that the rbe-1 mutant strongly enhanced the petal phenotypes of tcp4soj6 and mir319a, two mutants with compromised miR319 regulation of TCP4 Our results show that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation function together to pattern the spatial and temporal expression of TCP4 This in turn controls petal size and shape in Arabidopsis.

  6. RABBIT EARS regulates the transcription of TCP4 during petal development in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wang, Yanzhi; Zhang, Yongxia; Wang, Weiyao; Irish, Vivian F.; Huang, Tengbo

    2016-01-01

    Plant organ growth requires the proper transition from cell proliferation to cell expansion and differentiation. The CIN-TCP transcription factor gene TCP4 and its post-transcriptional regulator microRNA319 play a pivotal role in this process. In this study, we identified a pathway in which the product of the C2H2 zinc finger gene RABBIT EARS (RBE) regulates the transcription of TCP4 during Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) petal development. RBE directly represses TCP4 during the early stages of petal development; this contributes to the role of RBE in controlling the growth of petal primordia. We also found that the rbe-1 mutant strongly enhanced the petal phenotypes of tcp4soj6 and mir319a, two mutants with compromised miR319 regulation of TCP4. Our results show that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation function together to pattern the spatial and temporal expression of TCP4. This in turn controls petal size and shape in Arabidopsis. PMID:27838638

  7. Transcriptional regulation of human RANK ligand gene expression by E2F1

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Yan; Sun Meng; Nadiminty, Nagalakshmi; Lou Wei; Pinder, Elaine; Gao, Allen C.

    2008-06-06

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) is a critical osteoclastogenic factor involved in the regulation of bone resorption, immune function, the development of mammary gland and cardiovascular system. To understand the transcriptional regulation of RANKL, we amplified and characterized a 1890 bp 5'-flanking sequence of human RANKL gene (-1782 bp to +108 bp relative to the transcription start site). Using a series of deletion mutations of the 1890 bp RANKL promoter, we identified a 72 bp region (-172 to -100 bp) mediating RANKL basal transcriptional activity. Sequence analysis revealed a putative E2F binding site within this 72 bp region in the human RANKL promoter. Overexpression of E2F1 increased RANKL promoter activity, while down-regulation of E2F1 expression by small interfering RNA decreased RANKL promoter activity. RT-PCR and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) further demonstrated that E2F1 induced the expression of RANKL. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSA) and antibody competition assays confirmed that E2F1 proteins bind to the consensus E2F binding site in the RANKL promoter. Mutation of the E2F consensus binding site in the RANKL promoter profoundly reduced the basal promoter activity and abolished the transcriptional modulation of RANKL by E2F1. These results suggest that E2F1 plays an important role in regulating RANKL transcription through binding to the E2F consensus binding site.

  8. Set7 mediated interactions regulate transcriptional networks in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tuano, Natasha K; Okabe, Jun; Ziemann, Mark; Cooper, Mark E; El-Osta, Assam

    2016-11-02

    Histone methylation by lysine methyltransferase enzymes regulate the expression of genes implicated in lineage specificity and cellular differentiation. While it is known that Set7 catalyzes mono-methylation of histone and non-histone proteins, the functional importance of this enzyme in stem cell differentiation remains poorly understood. We show Set7 expression is increased during mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation and is regulated by the pluripotency factors, Oct4 and Sox2. Transcriptional network analyses reveal smooth muscle (SM) associated genes are subject to Set7-mediated regulation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of Set7 activity confirms this regulation. We observe Set7-mediated modification of serum response factor (SRF) and mono-methylation of histone H4 lysine 4 (H3K4me1) regulate gene expression. We conclude the broad substrate specificity of Set7 serves to control key transcriptional networks in embryonic stem cells.

  9. Examination of post-transcriptional regulations in prokaryotes by integrative biology.

    PubMed

    Picard, Flora; Dressaire, Clémentine; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2009-11-01

    In cells, mRNA and protein levels are fine-regulated to adjust continuously to cellular needs. Recently, several large-scale studies in prokaryotes showed weak correlations between mRNA and protein abundances highlighting the significant importance of post-transcriptional regulations. Post-transcriptional regulations involve dynamic adaptation of mRNA and protein turnover and also modulation of the efficiency of mRNA translation into protein. mRNA and protein stabilities are function of both sequence determinants and decay processes. Translation efficiency is mainly dependent on ribosome synthesis and activity. Conciliation through an integrative biology approach of large-scale data obtained for each level of regulation is now required to better understand global cell response to different environmental growth conditions. In this review, we report mechanisms involved in mRNA and protein stability and translation regulation in prokaryotes, and their dependence on growth phase and environmental growth conditions is particularly highlighted.

  10. Direct link between metabolic regulation and the heat-shock response through the transcriptional regulator PGC-1α.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Neri; Roeder, Robert G

    2015-10-20

    In recent years an extensive effort has been made to elucidate the molecular pathways involved in metabolic signaling in health and disease. Here we show, surprisingly, that metabolic regulation and the heat-shock/stress response are directly linked. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a critical transcriptional coactivator of metabolic genes, acts as a direct transcriptional repressor of heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1), a key regulator of the heat-shock/stress response. Our findings reveal that heat-shock protein (HSP) gene expression is suppressed during fasting in mouse liver and in primary hepatocytes dependent on PGC-1α. HSF1 and PGC-1α associate physically and are colocalized on several HSP promoters. These observations are extended to several cancer cell lines in which PGC-1α is shown to repress the ability of HSF1 to activate gene-expression programs necessary for cancer survival. Our study reveals a surprising direct link between two major cellular transcriptional networks, highlighting a previously unrecognized facet of the activity of the central metabolic regulator PGC-1α beyond its well-established ability to boost metabolic genes via its interactions with nuclear hormone receptors and nuclear respiratory factors. Our data point to PGC-1α as a critical repressor of HSF1-mediated transcriptional programs, a finding with possible implications both for our understanding of the full scope of metabolically regulated target genes in vivo and, conceivably, for therapeutics.

  11. Direct link between metabolic regulation and the heat-shock response through the transcriptional regulator PGC-1α

    PubMed Central

    Minsky, Neri; Roeder, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years an extensive effort has been made to elucidate the molecular pathways involved in metabolic signaling in health and disease. Here we show, surprisingly, that metabolic regulation and the heat-shock/stress response are directly linked. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α), a critical transcriptional coactivator of metabolic genes, acts as a direct transcriptional repressor of heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1), a key regulator of the heat-shock/stress response. Our findings reveal that heat-shock protein (HSP) gene expression is suppressed during fasting in mouse liver and in primary hepatocytes dependent on PGC-1α. HSF1 and PGC-1α associate physically and are colocalized on several HSP promoters. These observations are extended to several cancer cell lines in which PGC-1α is shown to repress the ability of HSF1 to activate gene-expression programs necessary for cancer survival. Our study reveals a surprising direct link between two major cellular transcriptional networks, highlighting a previously unrecognized facet of the activity of the central metabolic regulator PGC-1α beyond its well-established ability to boost metabolic genes via its interactions with nuclear hormone receptors and nuclear respiratory factors. Our data point to PGC-1α as a critical repressor of HSF1-mediated transcriptional programs, a finding with possible implications both for our understanding of the full scope of metabolically regulated target genes in vivo and, conceivably, for therapeutics. PMID:26438876

  12. Systematic Genetic Screen for Transcriptional Regulators of the Candida albicans White-Opaque Switch.

    PubMed

    Lohse, Matthew B; Ene, Iuliana V; Craik, Veronica B; Hernday, Aaron D; Mancera, Eugenio; Morschhäuser, Joachim; Bennett, Richard J; Johnson, Alexander D

    2016-08-01

    The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans can reversibly switch between two cell types named "white" and "opaque," each of which is stable through many cell divisions. These two cell types differ in their ability to mate, their metabolic preferences and their interactions with the mammalian innate immune system. A highly interconnected network of eight transcriptional regulators has been shown to control switching between these two cell types. To identify additional regulators of the switch, we systematically and quantitatively measured white-opaque switching rates of 196 strains, each deleted for a specific transcriptional regulator. We identified 19 new regulators with at least a 10-fold effect on switching rates and an additional 14 new regulators with more subtle effects. To investigate how these regulators affect switching rates, we examined several criteria, including the binding of the eight known regulators of switching to the control region of each new regulatory gene, differential expression of the newly found genes between cell types, and the growth rate of each mutant strain. This study highlights the complexity of the transcriptional network that regulates the white-opaque switch and the extent to which switching is linked to a variety of metabolic processes, including respiration and carbon utilization. In addition to revealing specific insights, the information reported here provides a foundation to understand the highly complex coupling of white-opaque switching to cellular physiology.

  13. Motif co-regulation and co-operativity are common mechanisms in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Van Roey, Kim; Davey, Norman E

    2015-12-01

    A substantial portion of the regulatory interactions in the higher eukaryotic cell are mediated by simple sequence motifs in the regulatory segments of genes and (pre-)mRNAs, and in the intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. Although these regulatory modules are physicochemically distinct, they share an evolutionary plasticity that has facilitated a rapid growth of their use and resulted in their ubiquity in complex organisms. The ease of motif acquisition simplifies access to basal housekeeping functions, facilitates the co-regulation of multiple biomolecules allowing them to respond in a coordinated manner to changes in the cell state, and supports the integration of multiple signals for combinatorial decision-making. Consequently, motifs are indispensable for temporal, spatial, conditional and basal regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level. In this review, we highlight that many of the key regulatory pathways of the cell are recruited by motifs and that the ease of motif acquisition has resulted in large networks of co-regulated biomolecules. We discuss how co-operativity allows simple static motifs to perform the conditional regulation that underlies decision-making in higher eukaryotic biological systems. We observe that each gene and its products have a unique set of DNA, RNA or protein motifs that encode a regulatory program to define the logical circuitry that guides the life cycle of these biomolecules, from transcription to degradation. Finally, we contrast the regulatory properties of protein motifs and the regulatory elements of DNA and (pre-)mRNAs, advocating that co-regulation, co-operativity, and motif-driven regulatory programs are common mechanisms that emerge from the use of simple, evolutionarily plastic regulatory modules.

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of Aerobic Metabolism in Pichia pastoris Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Baizhi; Chen, Dai; Zong, Jie; Sun, Fei; Qu, Huixin; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the classical fermentation process in Pichia pastoris based on transcriptomics. We utilized methanol in pichia yeast cell as the focus of our study, based on two key steps: limiting carbon source replacement (from glycerol to methonal) and fermentative production of exogenous proteins. In the former, the core differential genes in co-expression net point to initiation of aerobic metabolism and generation of peroxisome. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) results showed that yeast gradually adapted methanol induction to increased cell volume, and decreased density, via large number of peroxisomes. In the fermentative production of exogenous proteins, the Gene Ontology (GO) mapping results show that PAS_chr2-1_0582 played a vital role in regulating aerobic metabolic drift. In order to confirm the above results, we disrupted PAS_chr2-1_0582 by homologous recombination. Alcohol consumption was equivalent to one fifth of the normal control, and fewer peroxisomes were observed in Δ0582 strain following methanol induction. In this study we determined the important core genes and GO terms regulating aerobic metabolic drift in Pichia, as well as developing new perspectives for the continued development within this field. PMID:27537181

  15. Complex transcriptional regulation of citrate metabolism in Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yonghui; Ohtani, Kaori; Yoshizawa, Satoko; Shimizu, Tohru

    2012-02-01

    A Gram-positive, spore-forming bacterium, Clostridium perfringens, possesses genes for citrate metabolism, which might play an important role in the utilization of citrate as a sole carbon source. In this study, we identified a chromosomal citCDEFX-mae-citS operon in C. perfringens strain 13, which is transcribed on three mRNAs of different sizes. Expression of the cit operon was significantly induced when 5 mM extracellular citrate was added to the growth medium. Most interestingly, three regulatory systems were found to be involved in the regulation of the expression of cit genes: 1) the two upstream divergent genes citG and citI; 2) two different two-component regulatory systems, CitA/CitB (TCS6 consisted of CPE0531/CPE0532) and TCS5 (CPE0518/CPE0519); and 3) the global two-component VirR/VirS-VR-RNA regulatory system known to regulate various genes for toxins and degradative enzymes. Our results suggest that in C. perfringens the citrate metabolism might be strictly controlled by a complex regulatory system.

  16. Transcriptional Regulators of the Trophoblast Lineage in Mammals with Hemochorial Placentation

    PubMed Central

    Knott, Jason G.; Paul, Soumen

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian reproduction is critically dependent on the trophoblast cell lineage, which assures proper establishment of maternal-fetal interactions during pregnancy. Specification of trophoblast cell lineage begins with the development of the trophectoderm (TE) in preimplantation embryos. Subsequently, other trophoblast cell types arise with progression of pregnancy. Studies with transgenic animal models as well as trophoblast stem/progenitor cells have implicated distinct transcriptional and epigenetic regulators in trophoblast lineage development. This review focuses on our current understanding of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms regulating specification, determination, maintenance and differentiation of trophoblast cells. PMID:25190503

  17. Recent Insights into Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are major regulators of insulin-like growth factor bioavailability and activity in metabolic signaling. Seven IGFBP family isoforms have been identified. Recent studies have shown that IGFBPs play a pivotal role in metabolic signaling and disease, including the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Although many studies have documented the various roles played by IGFBPs, transcriptional regulation of IGFBPs is not well understood. In this review, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms of IGFBP gene expression, and we summarize the findings of transcription factor activity in the IGFBP promoter region. PMID:28116872

  18. LIN-42, the Caenorhabditis elegans PERIOD homolog, negatively regulates microRNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Perales, Roberto; King, Dana M; Aguirre-Chen, Cristina; Hammell, Christopher M

    2014-07-01

    During C. elegans development, microRNAs (miRNAs) function as molecular switches that define temporal gene expression and cell lineage patterns in a dosage-dependent manner. It is critical, therefore, that the expression of miRNAs be tightly regulated so that target mRNA expression is properly controlled. The molecular mechanisms that function to optimize or control miRNA levels during development are unknown. Here we find that mutations in lin-42, the C. elegans homolog of the circadian-related period gene, suppress multiple dosage-dependent miRNA phenotypes including those involved in developmental timing and neuronal cell fate determination. Analysis of mature miRNA levels in lin-42 mutants indicates that lin-42 functions to attenuate miRNA expression. Through the analysis of transcriptional reporters, we show that the upstream cis-acting regulatory regions of several miRNA genes are sufficient to promote highly dynamic transcription that is coupled to the molting cycles of post-embryonic development. Immunoprecipitation of LIN-42 complexes indicates that LIN-42 binds the putative cis-regulatory regions of both non-coding and protein-coding genes and likely plays a role in regulating their transcription. Consistent with this hypothesis, analysis of miRNA transcriptional reporters in lin-42 mutants indicates that lin-42 regulates miRNA transcription. Surprisingly, strong loss-of-function mutations in lin-42 do not abolish the oscillatory expression patterns of lin-4 and let-7 transcription but lead to increased expression of these genes. We propose that lin-42 functions to negatively regulate the transcriptional output of multiple miRNAs and mRNAs and therefore coordinates the expression levels of genes that dictate temporal cell fate with other regulatory programs that promote rhythmic gene expression.

  19. Regulation of photoreceptor gene expression by Crx-associated transcription factor network

    PubMed Central

    Hennig, Anne K.; Peng, Guang-Hua; Chen, Shiming

    2008-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors in the mammalian retina are special types of neurons that are responsible for phototransduction, the first step of vision. Development and maintenance of photoreceptors require precisely regulated gene expression. This regulation is mediated by a network of photoreceptor transcription factors centered on Crx, an Otx-like homeodomain transcription factor. The cell type (subtype) specificity of this network is governed by factors that are preferentially expressed by rods or cones or both, including the rod-determining factors neural retina leucine zipper protein (Nrl) and the orphan nuclear receptor Nr2e3; and cone-determining factors, mostly nuclear receptor family members. The best-documented of these include thyroid hormone receptor β2 (Trβ2), retinoid related orphan receptor Rorβ, and retinoid X receptor Rxrγ. The appropriate function of this network also depends on general transcription factors and co-factors that are ubiquitously expressed, such as the Sp zinc finger transcription factors and STAGA coactivator complexes. These cell type-specific and general transcription regulators form complex interactomes; mutations that interfere with any of the interactions can cause photoreceptor development defects or degeneration. In this manuscript, we review recent progress on the roles of various photoreceptor transcription factors and interactions in photoreceptor subtype development. We also provide evidence of auto-, para-, and feedback regulation among these factors at the transcriptional level. These protein-protein and protein-promoter interactions provide precision and specificity in controlling photoreceptor subtype-specific gene expression, development and survival. Understanding these interactions may provide insights to more effective therapeutic interventions for photoreceptor diseases. PMID:17662965

  20. Transcriptional regulation of human Paraoxonase 1 by nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Ruiz, N; Murillo-González, F E; Rojas-García, A E; Mackness, Mike; Bernal-Hernández, Y Y; Barrón-Vivanco, B S; González-Arias, C A; Medina-Díaz, I M

    2017-02-20

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a calcium-dependent lactonase synthesized primarily in the liver and secreted into the plasma, where it is associates with high density lipoproteins (HDL). PON1 acts as antioxidant preventing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation, a process considered critical in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. Additionally, PON1 hydrolyzes and detoxifies some toxic metabolites of organophosphorus compounds (OPs). Thus, PON1 activity and expression levels are important for determining susceptibility to OPs intoxication and risk of developing diseases related to inflammation and oxidative stress. Increasing evidence has demonstrated the modulation of PON1 expression by many factors is due to interaction with nuclear receptors (NRs). Here, we briefly review the studies in this area and discuss the role of nuclear receptors in the regulation of PON1 expression, as well as how understanding these mechanisms may allow us to manipulate PON1 levels to improve drug efficacy and treat disease.

  1. Poly(C)-binding proteins as transcriptional regulators of gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hack Sun Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Song, Kyu Young; Law, P.-Y.; Wei, L.-N.; Loh, Horace H.

    2009-03-13

    Poly(C)-binding proteins (PCBPs) are generally known as RNA-binding proteins that interact in a sequence-specific fashion with single-stranded poly(C). They can be divided into two groups: hnRNP K and PCBP1-4. These proteins are involved mainly in various posttranscriptional regulations (e.g., mRNA stabilization or translational activation/silencing). In this review, we summarize and discuss how PCBPs act as transcriptional regulators by binding to specific elements in gene promoters that interact with the RNA polymerase II transcription machinery. Transcriptional regulation of PCBPs might itself be regulated by their localization within the cell. For example, activation by p21-activated kinase 1 induces increased nuclear retention of PCBP1, as well as increased promoter activity. PCBPs can function as a signal-dependent and coordinated regulator of transcription in eukaryotic cells. We address the molecular mechanisms by which PCBPs binding to single- and double-stranded DNA mediates gene expression.

  2. Extending the dynamic range of transcription factor action by translational regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Bialek, William; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-02-01

    A crucial step in the regulation of gene expression is binding of transcription factor (TF) proteins to regulatory sites along the DNA. But transcription factors act at nanomolar concentrations, and noise due to random arrival of these molecules at their binding sites can severely limit the precision of regulation. Recent work on the optimization of information flow through regulatory networks indicates that the lower end of the dynamic range of concentrations is simply inaccessible, overwhelmed by the impact of this noise. Motivated by the behavior of homeodomain proteins, such as the maternal morphogen Bicoid in the fruit fly embryo, we suggest a scheme in which transcription factors also act as indirect translational regulators, binding to the mRNA of other regulatory proteins. Intuitively, each mRNA molecule acts as an independent sensor of the input concentration, and averaging over these multiple sensors reduces the noise. We analyze information flow through this scheme and identify conditions under which it outperforms direct transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the dual role of homeodomain proteins is not just a historical accident, but a solution to a crucial physics problem in the regulation of gene expression.

  3. XAB2 functions in mitotic cell cycle progression via transcriptional regulation of CENPE

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shuai; Li, Na; Zhang, Qian; Li, Hui; Wei, Xinyue; Hao, Tian; Li, Yue; Azam, Sikandar; Liu, Caigang; Cheng, Wei; Jin, Bilian; Liu, Quentin; Li, Man; Lei, Haixin

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA)-binding protein 2 (XAB2) is a multi-functional protein that plays critical role in processes including transcription, transcription-coupled DNA repair, pre-mRNA splicing, homologous recombination and mRNA export. Microarray analysis on gene expression in XAB2 knockdown cells reveals that many genes with significant change in expression function in mitotic cell cycle regulation. Fluorescence-activated cell scanner analysis confirmed XAB2 depletion led to cell arrest in G2/M phase, mostly at prophase or prometaphase. Live cell imaging further disclosed that XAB2 knockdown induced severe mitotic defects including chromosome misalignment and defects in segregation, leading to mitotic arrest, mitotic catastrophe and subsequent cell death. Among top genes down-regulated by XAB2 depletion is mitotic motor protein centrosome-associated protein E (CENPE). Knockdown CENPE showed similar phenotypes to loss of XAB2, but CENPE knockdown followed by XAB2 depletion did not further enhance cell cycle arrest. Luciferase assay on CENPE promoter showed that overexpression of XAB2 increased luciferase activity, whereas XAB2 depletion resulted in striking reduction of luciferase activity. Further mapping revealed a region in CENPE promoter that is required for the transcriptional regulation by XAB2. Moreover, ChIP assay showed that XAB2 interacted with CENPE promoter. Together, these results support a novel function of XAB2 in mitotic cell cycle regulation, which is partially mediated by transcription regulation on CENPE. PMID:27735937

  4. Achieving large dynamic range control of gene expression with a compact RNA transcription-translation regulator.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Alexandra M; Lucks, Julius B

    2017-04-06

    RNA transcriptional regulators are emerging as versatile components for genetic network construction. However, these regulators suffer from incomplete repression in their OFF state, making their dynamic range less than that of their protein counterparts. This incomplete repression causes expression leak, which impedes the construction of larger synthetic regulatory networks as leak propagation can interfere with desired network function. To address this, we demonstrate how naturally derived antisense RNA-mediated transcriptional regulators can be configured to regulate both transcription and translation in a single compact RNA mechanism that functions in Escherichia coli. Using in vivo gene expression assays, we show that a combination of transcriptional termination and ribosome binding site sequestration increases repression from 85% to 98%, or activation from 10-fold to over 900-fold, in response to cognate antisense RNAs. We also show that orthogonal repressive versions of this mechanism can be created through engineering minimal antisense RNAs. Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this mechanism, we use it to reduce network leak in an RNA-only cascade. We anticipate these regulators will find broad use as synthetic biology moves beyond parts engineering to the design and construction of more sophisticated regulatory networks.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of dimethyl sulfoxide respiration in a haloarchaeon, Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Qi, Qiuzi; Ito, Yoshiyasu; Yoshimatsu, Katsuhiko; Fujiwara, Taketomo

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic euryarchaeon Haloferax volcanii can grow anaerobically by DMSO respiration. DMSO reductase was induced by DMSO respiration not only under anaerobic growth conditions but also in denitrifying cells of H. volcanii. Deletion of the dmsR gene, encoding a putative regulator for the DMSO reductase, resulted in the loss of anaerobic growth by DMSO respiration. Reporter experiments revealed that only the anaerobic condition was essential for transcription of the dmsEABCD genes encoding DMSO reductase and that transcription was enhanced threefold by supplementation of DMSO. In the ∆dmsR mutant, transcription of the dmsEABCD genes induced by the anaerobic condition was not enhanced by DMSO, suggesting that DmsR is a DMSO-responsive regulator. Transcriptions of the dmsR and mgd genes for Mo-bisMGD biosynthesis were regulated in the same manner as the dmsEABCD genes. These results suggest that the genetic regulation of DMSO respiration in H. volcanii is controlled by at least two systems: one is the DMSO-responsive DmsR, and the other is an unknown anaerobic regulator.

  6. Extending the dynamic range of transcription factor action by translational regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Thomas R.; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Bialek, William; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-01-01

    A crucial step in the regulation of gene expression is binding of transcription factor (TF) proteins to regulatory sites along the DNA. But transcription factors act at nanomolar concentrations, and noise due to random arrival of these molecules at their binding sites can severely limit the precision of regulation. Recent work on the optimization of information flow through regulatory networks indicates that the lower end of the dynamic range of concentrations is simply inaccessible, overwhelmed by the impact of this noise. Motivated by the behavior of homeodomain proteins, such as the maternal morphogen Bicoid in the fruit fly embryo, we suggest a scheme in which transcription factors also act as indirect translational regulators, binding to the mRNA of other regulatory proteins. Intuitively, each mRNA molecule acts as an independent sensor of the input concentration, and averaging over these multiple sensors reduces the noise. We analyze information flow through this scheme and identify conditions under which it outperforms direct transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the dual role of homeodomain proteins is not just a historical accident, but a solution to a crucial physics problem in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:26986359

  7. Extending the dynamic range of transcription factor action by translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, Thomas R; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Bialek, William; Tkačik, Gašper

    2016-02-01

    A crucial step in the regulation of gene expression is binding of transcription factor (TF) proteins to regulatory sites along the DNA. But transcription factors act at nanomolar concentrations, and noise due to random arrival of these molecules at their binding sites can severely limit the precision of regulation. Recent work on the optimization of information flow through regulatory networks indicates that the lower end of the dynamic range of concentrations is simply inaccessible, overwhelmed by the impact of this noise. Motivated by the behavior of homeodomain proteins, such as the maternal morphogen Bicoid in the fruit fly embryo, we suggest a scheme in which transcription factors also act as indirect translational regulators, binding to the mRNA of other regulatory proteins. Intuitively, each mRNA molecule acts as an independent sensor of the input concentration, and averaging over these multiple sensors reduces the noise. We analyze information flow through this scheme and identify conditions under which it outperforms direct transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the dual role of homeodomain proteins is not just a historical accident, but a solution to a crucial physics problem in the regulation of gene expression.

  8. Contribution of transcriptional and translational mechanisms to the recovery aspect of sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Rachalski, Adeline; Freyburger, Marlène; Mongrain, Valérie

    2014-03-01

    Sleep parallels brain functioning and mental health. Neuronal activity during wakefulness leads to a subsequent increase in sleep intensity as measured using electroencephalographic slow-wave activity (SWA; index of neuronal synchrony in the low-frequency range). Wakefulness, and particularly prolonged wakefulness, also drives important changes in brain gene expression and changes in protein regulation. The role of these two cellular mechanisms in sleep-wake regulation has typically been studied independently, and their exact contribution to SWA remains poorly defined. In this review, we highlight that many transcriptional pathways driven by sleep deprivation are associated to protein regulation. We first describe the relationship between cytokines, clock genes, and markers of sleep need with an emphasis on transcriptional processes. Observations regarding the role of protein metabolism in sleep-wake regulation are then depicted while presenting interconnections between transcriptional and translational responses driven by sleep loss. Lastly, a manner by which this integrated response can feed back on neuronal network activity to determine sleep intensity is proposed. Overall, the literature supports that a complex cross-talk between transcriptional and translational regulation during prolonged wakefulness drives the changes in sleep intensity as a function of the sleep/wake history.

  9. Identification of E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kwonseop; Oh, Minsoo; Ki, Hyunkyoung; Wang Tao; Bareiss, Sonja; Fini, M. Elizabeth.; Li Dawei; Lu Qun

    2008-05-02

    {delta}-Catenin is upregulated in human carcinomas. However, little is known about the potential transcriptional factors that regulate {delta}-catenin expression in cancer. Using a human {delta}-catenin reporter system, we have screened several nuclear signaling modulators to test whether they can affect {delta}-catenin transcription. Among {beta}-catenin/LEF-1, Notch1, and E2F1, E2F1 dramatically increased {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities while {beta}-catenin/LEF-1 induced only a marginal increase. Rb suppressed the upregulation of {delta}-catenin-luciferase activities induced by E2F1 but did not interact with {delta}-catenin. RT-PCR and Western blot analyses in 4 different prostate cancer cell lines revealed that regulation of {delta}-catenin expression is controlled mainly at the transcriptional level. Interestingly, the effects of E2F1 on {delta}-catenin expression were observed only in human cancer cells expressing abundant endogenous {delta}-catenin. These studies identify E2F1 as a positive transcriptional regulator for {delta}-catenin, but further suggest the presence of strong negative regulator(s) for {delta}-catenin in prostate cancer cells with minimal endogenous {delta}-catenin expression.

  10. Regulation of transcription of cell division genes in the Escherichia coli dcw cluster.

    PubMed

    Vicente, M; Gomez, M J; Ayala, J A

    1998-04-01

    The Escherichia coli dcw cluster contains cell division genes, such as the phylogenetically ubiquitous ftsZ, and genes involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. Transcription in the cluster proceeds in the same direction as the progress of the replication fork along the chromosome. Regulation is exerted at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. The absence of transcriptional termination signals may, in principle, allow extension of the transcripts initiated at the up-stream promoter (mraZ1p) even to the furthest down-stream gene (envA). Complementation tests suggest that they extend into ftsW in the central part of the cluster. In addition, the cluster contains other promoters individually regulated by cis- and trans-acting signals. Dissociation of the expression of the ftsZ gene, located after ftsQ and A near the 3' end of the cluster, from its natural regulatory signals leads to an alteration in the physiology of cell division. The complexities observed in the regulation of gene expression in the cluster may then have an important biological role. Among them, LexA-binding SOS boxes have been found at the 5' end of the cluster, preceding promoters which direct the expression of ftsI (coding for PBP3, the penicillin-binding protein involved in septum formation). A gearbox promoter, ftsQ1p, forms part of the signals regulating the transcription of ftsQ, A and Z. It is an inversely growth-dependent mechanism driven by RNA polymerase containing sigma s, the factor involved in the expression of stationary phase-specific genes. Although the dcw cluster is conserved to a different extent in a variety of bacteria, the regulation of gene expression, the presence or absence of individual genes, and even the essentiality of some of them, show variations in the phylogenetic scale which may reflect adaptation to specific life cycles.

  11. A core erythroid transcriptional network is repressed by a master regulator of myelo-lymphoid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wontakal, Sandeep N; Guo, Xingyi; Smith, Cameron; MacCarthy, Thomas; Bresnick, Emery H; Bergman, Aviv; Snyder, Michael P; Weissman, Sherman M; Zheng, Deyou; Skoultchi, Arthur I

    2012-03-06

    Two mechanisms that play important roles in cell fate decisions are control of a "core transcriptional network" and repression of alternative transcriptional programs by antagonizing transcription factors. Whether these two mechanisms operate together is not known. Here we report that GATA-1, SCL, and Klf1 form an erythroid core transcriptional network by co-occupying >300 genes. Importantly, we find that PU.1, a negative regulator of terminal erythroid differentiation, is a highly integrated component of this network. GATA-1, SCL, and Klf1 act to promote, whereas PU.1 represses expression of many of the core network genes. PU.1 also represses the genes encoding GATA-1, SCL, Klf1, and important GATA-1 cofactors. Conversely, in addition to repressing PU.1 expression, GATA-1 also binds to and represses >100 PU.1 myelo-lymphoid gene targets in erythroid progenitors. Mathematical modeling further supports that this dual mechanism of repressing both the opposing upstream activator and its downstream targets provides a synergistic, robust mechanism for lineage specification. Taken together, these results amalgamate two key developmental principles, namely, regulation of a core transcriptional network and repression of an alternative transcriptional program, thereby enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms that establish cellular identity.

  12. Transcription factor Runx3 regulates interleukin-15-dependent natural killer cell activation.

    PubMed

    Levanon, Ditsa; Negreanu, Varda; Lotem, Joseph; Bone, Karen Rae; Brenner, Ori; Leshkowitz, Dena; Groner, Yoram

    2014-03-01

    Natural killer cells belong to the family of innate lymphoid cells comprising the frontline defense against infected and transformed cells. Development and activation of natural killer cells is highly dependent on interleukin-15 signaling. However, very little is known about the transcription program driving this process. The transcription factor Runx3 is highly expressed in natural killer cells, but its function in these cells is largely unknown. We show that loss of Runx3 impaired interleukin-15-dependent accumulation of mature natural killer cells in vivo and under culture conditions and pregnant Runx3(-/-) mice completely lack the unique population of interleukin-15-dependent uterine natural killer cells. Combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and differential gene expression analysis of wild-type versus Runx3-deficient in vivo activated splenic natural killer cells revealed that Runx3 cooperates with ETS and T-box transcription factors to drive the interleukin-15-mediated transcription program during activation of these cells. Runx3 functions as a nuclear regulator during interleukin-15-dependent activation of natural killer cells by regulating the expression of genes involved in proliferation, maturation, and migration. Similar studies with additional transcription factors will allow the construction of a more detailed transcriptional network that controls natural killer cell development and function.

  13. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Esquerré, Thomas; Bouvier, Marie; Turlan, Catherine; Carpousis, Agamemnon J; Girbal, Laurence; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel

    2016-04-26

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype E. coli (MG1655) and isogenic mutant strains deficient in CsrA or CsrD activity demonstrating for the first time that CsrA and CsrD are global negative and positive regulators of transcription, respectively. The role of CsrA in transcription regulation may be indirect due to the 4.6-fold increase in csrD mRNA concentration in the CsrA deficient strain. Transcriptional action of CsrA and CsrD on a few genes was validated by transcriptional fusions. In addition to an effect on transcription, CsrA stabilizes thousands of mRNAs. This is the first demonstration that CsrA is a global positive regulator of mRNA stability. For one hundred genes, we predict that direct control of mRNA stability by CsrA might contribute to metabolic adaptation by regulating expression of genes involved in carbon metabolism and transport independently of transcriptional regulation.

  14. piRNA-directed cleavage of meiotic transcripts regulates spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goh, Wee Siong Sho; Falciatori, Ilaria; Tam, Oliver H; Burgess, Ralph; Meikar, Oliver; Kotaja, Noora; Hammell, Molly; Hannon, Gregory J

    2015-05-15

    MIWI catalytic activity is required for spermatogenesis, indicating that piRNA-guided cleavage is critical for germ cell development. To identify meiotic piRNA targets, we augmented the mouse piRNA repertoire by introducing a human meiotic piRNA cluster. This triggered a spermatogenesis defect by inappropriately targeting the piRNA machinery to mouse mRNAs essential for germ cell development. Analysis of such de novo targets revealed a signature for pachytene piRNA target recognition. This enabled identification of both transposable elements and meiotically expressed protein-coding genes as targets of native piRNAs. Cleavage of genic targets began at the pachytene stage and resulted in progressive repression through meiosis, driven at least in part via the ping-pong cycle. Our data support the idea that meiotic piRNA populations must be strongly selected to enable successful spermatogenesis, both driving the response away from essential genes and directing the pathway toward mRNA targets that are regulated by small RNAs in meiotic cells.

  15. Transcriptional regulator PRDM12 is essential for human pain perception.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Chun; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela; Matsukawa, Shinya; Zitzelsberger, Manuela; Themistocleous, Andreas C; Strom, Tim M; Samara, Chrysanthi; Moore, Adrian W; Cho, Lily Ting-Yin; Young, Gareth T; Weiss, Caecilia; Schabhüttl, Maria; Stucka, Rolf; Schmid, Annina B; Parman, Yesim; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Heinritz, Wolfram; Passarge, Eberhard; Watson, Rosemarie M; Hertz, Jens Michael; Moog, Ute; Baumgartner, Manuela; Valente, Enza Maria; Pereira, Diego; Restrepo, Carlos M; Katona, Istvan; Dusl, Marina; Stendel, Claudia; Wieland, Thomas; Stafford, Fay; Reimann, Frank; von Au, Katja; Finke, Christian; Willems, Patrick J; Nahorski, Michael S; Shaikh, Samiha S; Carvalho, Ofélia P; Nicholas, Adeline K; Karbani, Gulshan; McAleer, Maeve A; Cilio, Maria Roberta; McHugh, John C; Murphy, Sinead M; Irvine, Alan D; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Windhager, Reinhard; Weis, Joachim; Bergmann, Carsten; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Baets, Jonathan; De Jonghe, Peter; Reilly, Mary M; Kropatsch, Regina; Kurth, Ingo; Chrast, Roman; Michiue, Tatsuo; Bennett, David L H; Woods, C Geoffrey; Senderek, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Pain perception has evolved as a warning mechanism to alert organisms to tissue damage and dangerous environments. In humans, however, undesirable, excessive or chronic pain is a common and major societal burden for which available medical treatments are currently suboptimal. New therapeutic options have recently been derived from studies of individuals with congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP). Here we identified 10 different homozygous mutations in PRDM12 (encoding PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain-containing protein 12) in subjects with CIP from 11 families. Prdm proteins are a family of epigenetic regulators that control neural specification and neurogenesis. We determined that Prdm12 is expressed in nociceptors and their progenitors and participates in the development of sensory neurons in Xenopus embryos. Moreover, CIP-associated mutants abrogate the histone-modifying potential associated with wild-type Prdm12. Prdm12 emerges as a key factor in the orchestration of sensory neurogenesis and may hold promise as a target for new pain therapeutics.

  16. A novel bifunctional transcriptional regulator of riboflavin metabolism in Archaea.

    PubMed

    Rodionova, Irina A; Vetting, Matthew W; Li, Xiaoqing; Almo, Steven C; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

    2017-01-09

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is the precursor of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide, which are essential coenzymes in all free-living organisms. Riboflavin biosynthesis in many Bacteria but not in Archaea is controlled by FMN-responsive riboswitches. We identified a novel bifunctional riboflavin kinase/regulator (RbkR), which controls riboflavin biosynthesis and transport genes in major lineages of Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota. RbkR proteins are composed of the riboflavin kinase domain and a DNA-binding winged helix-turn-helix-like domain. Using comparative genomics, we predicted RbkR operator sites and reconstructed RbkR regulons in 94 archaeal genomes. While the identified RbkR operators showed significant variability between archaeal lineages, the conserved core of RbkR regulons includes riboflavin biosynthesis genes, known/predicted vitamin uptake transporters and the rbkR gene. The DNA motifs and CTP-dependent riboflavin kinase activity of two RbkR proteins were experimentally validated in vitro The DNA binding activity of RbkR was stimulated by CTP and suppressed by FMN, a product of riboflavin kinase. The crystallographic structure of RbkR from Thermoplasma acidophilum was determined in complex with CTP and its DNA operator revealing key residues for operator and ligand recognition. Overall, this study contributes to our understanding of metabolic and regulatory networks for vitamin homeostasis in Archaea.

  17. A systems-level approach to understanding transcriptional regulation by p53 during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Peipei; Treat, Michael D; van Breukelen, Frank

    2014-07-15

    Presumably to conserve energy, many mammals enter into hibernation during the winter. Homeostatic processes such as transcription and translation are virtually arrested. To further elucidate transcriptional regulation during hibernation, we studied the transcription factor p53. Here, we demonstrate that changes in liver mRNA and protein concentrations of known regulators of p53 are consistent with activation. p53 mRNA and protein concentrations are unrelated. Importantly, p53 protein concentration is increased ~2-fold during the interbout arousal that punctuates bouts of torpor. As a result, both the interbout arousal and the torpid state are characterized by high levels of nuclear-localized p53. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that p53 binds DNA during the winter. Furthermore, p53 recruits RNA polymerase II, as indicated by nuclear run-on data. However, and consistent with previous data indicating an arrest of transcriptional elongation during torpor, p53 'activity' does not result in expected changes in target gene transcripts. These data demonstrate the importance of using a systems level-approach in understanding a complex phenotype such as mammalian hibernation. Relying on interpretations of data that are based on steady-state regulation in other systems may be misleading in the context of non-steady-state conditions such as torpor.

  18. Global transcriptional repression in C. elegans germline precursors by regulated sequestration of TAF-4.

    PubMed

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Nishi, Yuichi; Robertson, Scott M; Lin, Rueyling

    2008-10-03

    In C. elegans, four asymmetric divisions, beginning with the zygote (P0), generate transcriptionally repressed germline blastomeres (P1-P4) and somatic sisters that become transcriptionally active. The protein PIE-1 represses transcription in the later germline blastomeres but not in the earlier germline blastomeres P0 and P1. We show here that OMA-1 and OMA-2, previously shown to regulate oocyte maturation, repress transcription in P0 and P1 by binding to and sequestering in the cytoplasm TAF-4, a component critical for assembly of TFIID and the pol II preinitiation complex. OMA-1/2 binding to TAF-4 is developmentally regulated, requiring phosphorylation by the DYRK kinase MBK-2, which is activated at meiosis II after fertilization. OMA-1/2 are normally degraded after the first mitosis, but ectopic expression of wild-type OMA-1 is sufficient to repress transcription in both somatic and later germline blastomeres. We propose that phosphorylation by MBK-2 serves as a developmental switch, converting OMA-1/2 from oocyte to embryo regulators.

  19. NLP is a novel transcription regulator involved in VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Mani Shankar; Kushwaha, Manish; Ersfeld, Klaus; Fullbrook, Alexander; Stanne, Tara M; Rudenko, Gloria

    2011-03-01

    Trypanosoma brucei mono-allelically expresses one of approximately 1500 variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes while multiplying in the mammalian bloodstream. The active VSG is transcribed by RNA polymerase I in one of approximately 15 telomeric VSG expression sites (ESs). T. brucei is unusual in controlling gene expression predominantly post-transcriptionally, and how ESs are mono-allelically controlled remains a mystery. Here we identify a novel transcription regulator, which resembles a nucleoplasmin-like protein (NLP) with an AT-hook motif. NLP is key for ES control in bloodstream form T. brucei, as NLP knockdown results in 45- to 65-fold derepression of the silent VSG221 ES. NLP is also involved in repression of transcription in the inactive VSG Basic Copy arrays, minichromosomes and procyclin loci. NLP is shown to be enriched on the 177- and 50-bp simple sequence repeats, the non-transcribed regions around rDNA and procyclin, and both active and silent ESs. Blocking NLP synthesis leads to downregulation of the active ES, indicating that NLP plays a role in regulating appropriate levels of transcription of ESs in both their active and silent state. Discovery of the unusual transcription regulator NLP provides new insight into the factors that are critical for ES control.

  20. The Leucine-rich Pentatricopeptide-Repeat Containing Protein Regulates Mitochondrial Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Sondheimer, Neal; Fang, Ji-Kang; Polyak, Erzsebet; Falk, Marni; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial function depends upon the coordinated expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Although the basal factors that carry out the process of mitochondrial transcription are known, the regulation of this process is incompletely understood. To further our understanding of mitochondrial gene regulation we identified proteins that bound to the previously described point of termination for the major mRNA-coding transcript H2. One was the leucine-rich pentatricopeptide-repeat containing protein (LRPPRC), which has been linked to the French-Canadian variant of Leigh syndrome. Cells with reduced expression of LRPPRC had a reduction in oxygen consumption. The expression of mitochondrial mRNA and tRNA was dependent upon LRPPRC levels, but reductions in LRPPRC did not affect the expression of mitochondrial rRNA. Reduction of LRPPRC levels interfered with mitochondrial transcription in vitro but did not affect the stability of mitochondrial mRNAs or alter the expression of nuclear genes responsible for mitochondrial transcription in vivo. These findings demonstrate the control of mitochondrial mRNA synthesis by a protein that has an established role in regulating nuclear transcription, and a link to mitochondrial disease. PMID:20677761

  1. Nitrogen-regulated transcription and enzyme activities in continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Raeven, L J; Boonstra, J; Verkleij, A J; Verrips, C T

    1995-05-01

    Variations in the transcription of nitrogen-regulated genes and in the activities of nitrogen-regulated enzymes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied by changing the carbon and nitrogen fluxes. S. cerevisiae was grown in continuous culture at various dilution rates (D) under nitrogen limitation with NH4Cl as sole nitrogen source. With an increase in D from 0.05 to 0.29 h-1, both the glucose and the ammonia flux increased sixfold. The activities of the two ammonia-incorporating enzymes, NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADPH-GDH) and glutamine synthetase (GS), encoded by GDH1 and GLN1, respectively, increased with increasing D, while the activity of the glutamate-degrading enzyme, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH), decreased. Surprisingly, no changes were observed in the transcription of GDH1 and GLN1; however increased D was accompanied by an increase in GAP1 transcription. At the metabolite level, the increase in the glucose and nitrogen flux did not result in changes in the intracellular 2-oxoglutarate, glutamate or glutamine concentrations. It is shown that growth on ammonia alone is not sufficient to cause repression of GAP1 and GLN1 transcription and that the regulation of GAP1 transcription and both NADPH-GDH and GS activity is not an on/off switch, but is gradually modulated in correlation with the ammonia concentration.

  2. Tissue-Specific and Genetic Regulation of Insulin Sensitivity-Associated Transcripts in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neeraj K.; Sajuthi, Satria P.; Chou, Jeff W.; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Demons, Jamehl; Rogers, Samantha; Ma, Lijun; Palmer, Nicholette D.; McWilliams, David R.; Beal, John; Comeau, Mary E.; Cherry, Kristina; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Menon, Lata; Kouba, Ethel; Davis, Donna; Burris, Marcie; Byerly, Sara J.; Easter, Linda; Bowden, Donald W.; Freedman, Barry I.; Langefeld, Carl D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Compared with European Americans, African Americans (AAs) are more insulin resistant, have a higher insulin secretion response to glucose, and develop type 2 diabetes more often. Molecular processes and/or genetic variations contributing to altered glucose homeostasis in high-risk AAs remain uncharacterized. Objective: Adipose and muscle transcript expression profiling and genotyping were performed in 260 AAs to identify genetic regulatory mechanisms associated with insulin sensitivity (SI). We hypothesized that: 1) transcription profiles would reveal tissue-specific modulation of physiologic pathways with SI, and 2) a subset of SI-associated transcripts would be controlled by DNA sequence variants as expression quantitative traits, and these variants in turn would be associated with SI. Design and Settings: The cross-sectional research study was performed in a clinical research unit. Participants: Unrelated nondiabetic AAs were recruited for the study. Main Outcome Measures: SI was measured by frequently sampled iv glucose tolerance test. Results: The expression levels of 2212 transcripts in adipose and 145 transcripts in muscle were associated with SI. Genes involved in eIF2, eIF4-p70S6K, and mTOR signaling were modulated with SI in both tissues. Genes involved in leukocyte extravasation signaling showed adipose-specific regulation, and genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation had discordant regulation between tissues. Intersecting cis-expression quantitative trait loci results with data from transcript-SI association analysis identified cis-regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms for 363 and 42 SI-associated transcripts in adipose and muscle, respectively. Cis-eSNPs for three SI-associated adipose transcripts, NINJ1, AGA, and CLEC10A were associated with SI. Abrogation of NINJ1 induction in THP1 macrophages modulated expression of genes in chemokine signaling, cell adhesion, and angiogenesis pathways. Conclusion: This study identified multiple

  3. Insights into the post-transcriptional regulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain

    PubMed Central

    Sirey, Tamara M.; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is central to the control of cellular homeostasis. There are significant gaps in our understanding of how the expression of the mitochondrial and nuclear genome-encoded components of the electron transport chain are co-ordinated, and how the assembly of the protein complexes that constitute the electron transport chain are regulated. Furthermore, the role post-transcriptional gene regulation may play in modulating these processes needs to be clarified. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the post-transcriptional gene regulation of the electron transport chain and highlights how noncoding RNAs may contribute significantly both to complex electron transport chain regulatory networks and to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27911731

  4. A-MYB (MYBL1) transcription factor is a master regulator of male meiosis.

    PubMed

    Bolcun-Filas, Ewelina; Bannister, Laura A; Barash, Alex; Schimenti, Kerry J; Hartford, Suzanne A; Eppig, John J; Handel, Mary Ann; Shen, Lishuang; Schimenti, John C

    2011-08-01

    The transcriptional regulation of mammalian meiosis is poorly characterized, owing to few genetic and ex vivo models. From a genetic screen, we identify the transcription factor MYBL1 as a male-specific master regulator of several crucial meiotic processes. Spermatocytes bearing a novel separation-of-function allele (Mybl1(repro9)) had subtle defects in autosome synapsis in pachynema, a high incidence of unsynapsed sex chromosomes, incomplete double-strand break repair on synapsed pachytene chromosomes and a lack of crossing over. MYBL1 protein appears in pachynema, and its mutation caused specific alterations in expression of diverse genes, including some translated postmeiotically. These data, coupled with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-chip) experiments and bioinformatic analysis of promoters, identified direct targets of MYBL1 regulation. The results reveal that MYBL1 is a master regulator of meiotic genes that are involved in multiple processes in spermatocytes, particularly those required for cell cycle progression through pachynema.

  5. The VQ Motif-Containing Protein Family of Plant-Specific Transcriptional Regulators1

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yanjun; Lin, Rongcheng

    2015-01-01

    The VQ motif-containing proteins (designated as VQ proteins) are a class of plant-specific proteins with a conserved and single short FxxhVQxhTG amino acid sequence motif. VQ proteins regulate diverse developmental processes, including responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, seed development, and photomorphogenesis. In this Update, we summarize and discuss recent advances in our understanding of the regulation and function of VQ proteins and the role of the VQ motif in mediating transcriptional regulation and protein-protein interactions in signaling pathways. Based on the accumulated evidence, we propose a general mechanism of action for the VQ protein family, which likely defines a novel class of transcriptional regulators specific to plants. PMID:26220951

  6. Regulation of Cell Fate Determination by Single-Repeat R3 MYB Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shucai; Chen, Jay

    2014-01-01

    MYB transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of plant growth and development. Among the large family of MYB transcription factors, single-repeat R3 MYB are characterized by their short sequence (<120 amino acids) consisting largely of the single MYB DNA-binding repeat. In the model plant Arabidopsis, R3 MYBs mediate lateral inhibition during epidermal patterning and are best characterized for their regulatory roles in trichome and root hair development. R3 MYBs act as negative regulators for trichome formation but as positive regulators for root hair development. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review on the role of R3 MYBs in the regulation of cell type specification in the model plant Arabidopsis.

  7. Lewis type 1 antigen synthase (beta3Gal-T5) is transcriptionally regulated by homeoproteins.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Soichiro; Kudo, Takashi; Nishihara, Shoko; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Togayachi, Akira; Furuya, Akiko; Shitara, Kenya; Kubota, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kitajima, Masaki; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2003-09-19

    The type 1 carbohydrate chain, Galbeta1-3GlcNAc, is synthesized by UDP-galactose:beta-N-acetylglucosamine beta1,3-galactosyltransferase (beta3Gal-T). Among six beta3Gal-Ts cloned to date, beta3Gal-T5 is an essential enzyme for the synthesis of type 1 chain in epithelium of digestive tracts or pancreatic tissue. It forms the type 1 structure on glycoproteins produced from such tissues. In the present study, we found that the transcriptional regulation of the beta3Gal-T5 gene is controlled by homeoproteins, i.e. members of caudal-related homeobox protein (Cdx) and hepatocyte nuclear factor (HNF) families. We found an important region (-151 to -121 from the transcription initiation site), named the beta3Gal-T5 control element (GCE), for the promoter activity. GCE contained the consensus sequences for members of the Cdx and HNF families. Mutations introduced into this sequence abolished the transcriptional activity. Four factors, Cdx1, Cdx2, HNF1alpha, and HNF1beta, could bind to GCE and transcriptionally activate the beta3Gal-T5 gene. Transcriptional regulation of the beta3Gal-T5 gene was consistent with that of members of the Cdx and HNF1 families in two in vivo systems. 1) During in vitro differentiation of Caco-2 cells, transcriptional up-regulation of beta3Gal-T5 was observed in correlation with the increase in transcripts for Cdx2 and HNF1alpha. 2) Both transcript and protein levels of beta3Gal-T5 were determined to be significantly reduced in colon cancer. This down-regulation was correlated with the decrease of Cdx1 and HNF1beta expression in cancer tissue. This is the first finding that a glycosyltransferase gene is transcriptionally regulated under the control of homeoproteins in a tissue-specific manner. beta3Gal-T5, controlled by the intestinal homeoproteins, may play an important role in the specific function of intestinal cells by modifying the carbohydrate structure of glycoproteins.

  8. Genome-Wide Association between Transcription Factor Expression and Chromatin Accessibility Reveals Regulators of Chromatin Accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Rueedi, Rico

    2017-01-01

    To better understand genome regulation, it is important to uncover the role of transcription factors in the process of chromatin structure establishment and maintenance. Here we present a data-driven approach to systematically characterise transcription factors that are relevant for this process. Our method uses a linear mixed modelling approach to combine datasets of transcription factor binding motif enrichments in open chromatin and gene expression across the same set of cell lines. Applying this approach to the ENCODE dataset, we confirm already known and imply numerous novel transcription factors that play a role in the establishment or maintenance of open chromatin. In particular, our approach rediscovers many factors that have been annotated as pioneer factors. PMID:28118358

  9. Genome-Wide Association between Transcription Factor Expression and Chromatin Accessibility Reveals Regulators of Chromatin Accessibility.

    PubMed

    Lamparter, David; Marbach, Daniel; Rueedi, Rico; Bergmann, Sven; Kutalik, Zoltán

    2017-01-01

    To better understand genome regulation, it is important to uncover the role of transcription factors in the process of chromatin structure establishment and maintenance. Here we present a data-driven approach to systematically characterise transcription factors that are relevant for this process. Our method uses a linear mixed modelling approach to combine datasets of transcription factor binding motif enrichments in open chromatin and gene expression across the same set of cell lines. Applying this approach to the ENCODE dataset, we confirm already known and imply numerous novel transcription factors that play a role in the establishment or maintenance of open chromatin. In particular, our approach rediscovers many factors that have been annotated as pioneer factors.

  10. Gene regulation by the act of long non-coding RNA transcription

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are proposed to be the largest transcript class in the mouse and human transcriptomes. Two important questions are whether all lncRNAs are functional and how they could exert a function. Several lncRNAs have been shown to function through their product, but this is not the only possible mode of action. In this review we focus on a role for the process of lncRNA transcription, independent of the lncRNA product, in regulating protein-coding-gene activity in cis. We discuss examples where lncRNA transcription leads to gene silencing or activation, and describe strategies to determine if the lncRNA product or its transcription causes the regulatory effect. PMID:23721193

  11. Nonsense surveillance regulates expression of diverse classes of mammalian transcripts and mutes genomic noise.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Joshua T; Sharifi, Neda A; Meyers, Jennifer L; Martinez-Murillo, Francisco; Dietz, Harry C

    2004-10-01

    Premature termination codons induce rapid transcript degradation in eukaryotic cells through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). This pathway can modulate phenotypes arising from nonsense or frameshift mutations, but little is known about the physiologic role of NMD in higher eukaryotes. To address this issue, we examined expression profiles in mammalian cells depleted of Rent1 (also called hUpf1), a factor essential for NMD. Upregulated transcripts included those with upstream open reading frames in the 5' untranslated region, alternative splicing that introduces nonsense codons or frameshifts, introns in the 3' untranslated region or selenocysteine codons. Transcripts derived from ancient transposons and endogenous retroviruses were also upregulated. These RNAs are unified by the presence of a spliced intron at least 50 nucleotides downstream of a termination codon, a context sufficient to initiate NMD. Consistent with direct regulation by NMD, representative upregulated transcripts decayed more slowly in cells deficient in NMD. In addition, inhibition of NMD induced by amino acid starvation upregulated transcripts that promote amino acid homeostasis. These results document that nonsense surveillance is a crucial post-transcriptional regulatory event that influences the expression of broad classes of physiologic transcripts, has been functionally incorporated into essential homeostatic mechanisms and suppresses expression of evolutionary remnants.

  12. Nuclear pore proteins regulate chromatin structure and transcriptional memory by a conserved mechanism.

    PubMed

    Light, William H; Brickner, Jason H

    2013-01-01

    Previous experience alters the rate of transcriptional induction of many genes in yeast and this phenomenon persists through several cell division cycles. This phenomenon is called epigenetic transcriptional memory. For the yeast gene INO1, transcriptional memory requires a physical interaction with the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and changes in the chromatin structure of the promoter. These changes lead to binding of a preinitiation form of RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII) to the INO1 promoter, bypassing the need to recruit RNAPII to the promoter during reactivation. In our recent study, we found that in human cells, hundreds of interferon-γ responsive genes exhibit a mechanistically similar form of transcriptional memory. Transcriptional memory requires a homologous nuclear pore protein in yeast and humans, which interacts with the promoters of genes that exhibit transcriptional memory and promotes both alteration of chromatin structure and binding of RNAPII. Whereas the interaction of yeast genes with nuclear pore proteins occurs at the NPC, the interaction of human genes with nuclear pore proteins occurs in the nucleoplasm. Thus, the interaction of nuclear pore proteins with genes plays an important and conserved role in affecting long-term epigenetic changes in transcriptional regulation.

  13. Combining classical trait and microarray data to dissect transcriptional regulation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Nettleton, Dan

    2008-03-01

    The selective transcriptional profiling approach involves selecting an optimal subset of individuals to microarray from a larger set of individuals for which relatively inexpensive quantitative trait and molecular marker data are available. The goal of the selection and subsequent analyses is to identify genes whose expression is associated with a quantitative trait or quantitative trait locus (QTL). In this paper, we applied the selective transcriptional profiling approach to data sets concerning flowering time and gene transcription levels of Arabidopsis recombinant inbred lines. Our results confirm that the selective transcriptional profiling approach can achieve much greater power for uncovering associations than standard approaches that ignore information from classical traits. In addition, we show that selective transcriptional profiling can achieve power similar to standard approaches at a fraction of the cost and effort. We also identified three groups of genes which show distinctive patterns with regard to gene expression levels, QTL genotype, and a classical trait. This study represents the first application of selective transcriptional profiling to real data and serves as a template for dissecting gene regulation networks related to a classical trait using the selective transcriptional profiling approach.

  14. Transcription factors that directly regulate the expression of CSLA9 encoding mannan synthase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Chan; Reca, Ida-Barbara; Kim, Yongsig; Park, Sunchung; Thomashow, Michael F; Keegstra, Kenneth; Han, Kyung-Hwan

    2014-03-01

    Mannans are hemicellulosic polysaccharides that have a structural role and serve as storage reserves during plant growth and development. Previous studies led to the conclusion that mannan synthase enzymes in several plant species are encoded by members of the cellulose synthase-like A (CSLA) gene family. Arabidopsis has nine members of the CSLA gene family. Earlier work has shown that CSLA9 is responsible for the majority of glucomannan synthesis in both primary and secondary cell walls of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. Little is known about how expression of the CLSA9 gene is regulated. Sequence analysis of the CSLA9 promoter region revealed the presence of multiple copies of a cis-regulatory motif (M46RE) recognized by transcription factor MYB46, leading to the hypothesis that MYB46 (At5g12870) is a direct regulator of the mannan synthase CLSA9. We obtained several lines of experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis. First, the expression of CSLA9 was substantially upregulated by MYB46 overexpression. Second, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was used to demonstrate the direct binding of MYB46 to the promoter of CSLA9 in vitro. This interaction was further confirmed in vivo by a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Finally, over-expression of MYB46 resulted in a significant increase in mannan content. Considering the multifaceted nature of MYB46-mediated transcriptional regulation of secondary wall biosynthesis, we reasoned that additional transcription factors are involved in the CSLA9 regulation. This hypothesis was tested by carrying out yeast-one hybrid screening, which identified ANAC041 and bZIP1 as direct regulators of CSLA9. Transcriptional activation assays and EMSA were used to confirm the yeast-one hybrid results. Taken together, we report that transcription factors ANAC041, bZIP1 and MYB46 directly regulate the expression of CSLA9.

  15. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rajesh K; Murray, Thomas V A; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M; Brewer, Alison C

    2016-01-22

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production.

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Rajesh K.; Murray, Thomas V. A.; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R.; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2016-01-01

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production. PMID:26620565

  17. Role of sp transcription factors in the regulation of cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Archer, Michael C

    2011-07-01

    Cancer cells exhibit altered metabolism characterized by the generation of adenosine triphosphate by glycolysis and generation of fatty acids by de novo synthesis. The majority of genes involved in these pathways have binding sites for specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors in their promoters. Studies showing that Sp transcription factors, particularly Sp1, are involved in the regulation in cancer cells of hexokinase, pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, fatty acid synthase, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α are reviewed. Glycolysis and lipogenesis in cancers are also known to be stimulated by the constitutive activation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Evidence is presented for the notion that Sp transcription factors may act in concert with Akt to regulate the abnormal metabolism of cancer cells.

  18. Developmental regulation of transcription initiation: more than just changing the actors.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ferenc; Zaucker, Andreas; Tora, Làszlò

    2010-10-01

    The traditional model of transcription initiation nucleated by the TFIID complex has suffered significant erosion in the last decade. The discovery of cell-specific paralogs of TFIID subunits and a variety of complexes that replace TFIID in transcription initiation of protein coding genes have been paralleled by the description of diverse core promoter sequences. These observations suggest an additional level of regulation of developmental and tissue-specific gene expression at the core promoter level. Recent work suggests that this regulation may function through specific roles of distinct TBP-type factors and TBP-associated factors (TAFs), however the picture emerging is still far from complete. Here we summarize the proposed models of transcription initiation by alternative initiation complexes in distinct stages of developmental specialization during vertebrate ontogeny.

  19. Metabolic regulation of SIRT1 transcription via a HIC1:CtBP corepressor complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Su-Yan; Fleuriel, Capucine; Leprince, Dominique; Rocheleau, Jonathan V.; Piston, David W.; Goodman, Richard H.

    2007-01-01

    The Sir2 histone deacetylases are important for gene regulation, metabolism, and longevity. A unique feature of these enzymes is their utilization of NAD+ as a cosubstrate, which has led to the suggestion that Sir2 activity reflects the cellular energy state. We show that SIRT1, a mammalian Sir2 homologue, is also controlled at the transcriptional level through a mechanism that is specific for this isoform. Treatment with the glycolytic blocker 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) decreases association of the redox sensor CtBP with HIC1, an inhibitor of SIRT1 transcription. We propose that the reduction in transcriptional repression mediated by HIC1, due to the decrease of CtBP binding, increases SIRT1 expression. This mechanism allows the specific regulation of SIRT1 in response to nutrient deprivation. PMID:17213307

  20. Integration of light and circadian signals that regulate chloroplast transcription by a nuclear-encoded sigma factor.

    PubMed

    Belbin, Fiona E; Noordally, Zeenat B; Wetherill, Sarah J; Atkins, Kelly A; Franklin, Keara A; Dodd, Antony N

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the signalling pathways that regulate chloroplast transcription in response to environmental signals. One mechanism controlling plastid transcription involves nuclear-encoded sigma subunits of plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase. Transcripts encoding the sigma factor SIG5 are regulated by light and the circadian clock. However, the extent to which a chloroplast target of SIG5 is regulated by light-induced changes in SIG5 expression is unknown. Moreover, the photoreceptor signalling pathways underlying the circadian regulation of chloroplast transcription by SIG5 are unidentified. We monitored the regulation of chloroplast transcription in photoreceptor and sigma factor mutants under controlled light regimes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We established that a chloroplast transcriptional response to light intensity was mediated by SIG5; a chloroplast transcriptional response to the relative proportions of red and far red light was regulated by SIG5 through phytochrome and photosynthetic signals; and the circadian regulation of chloroplast transcription by SIG5 was predominantly dependent on blue light and cryptochrome. Our experiments reveal the extensive integration of signals concerning the light environment by a single sigma factor to regulate chloroplast transcription. This may originate from an evolutionarily ancient mechanism that protects photosynthetic bacteria from high light stress, which subsequently became integrated with higher plant phototransduction networks.

  1. mosR, A Novel Transcriptional Regulator of Hypoxia and Virulence in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic tuberculosis represents a high-risk burden for one third of the world population. Previous microarray analysis of murine tuberculosis identified a novel transcriptional regulator encoded by rv0348 that could control the establishment of the chronic phase of tuberculosis. Disruption of the ...

  2. Transcriptional regulation of human novel gene SPATA12 promoter by AP-1 and HSF.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Lin, Yiting; Liu, Zhiwen; Zhang, Yunsheng; Rong, Zhuoxian; Liu, Xuanming

    2012-12-10

    Human SPATA12 is a spermatogenesis associated gene and is supposed to function as an inhibitor during male germ cell development. SPATA12 is specifically expressed in spermatocytes, spermatids, and spermatozoa of human testis. In order to understand the regulation mechanism of SPATA12 gene expression, we identified and characterized the SPATA12 gene core promoter region and transcription factor binding sites by using reporter gene assays. AP-1 is founded to be a potential transcriptional activator of SPATA12. The promoter activity of SPATA12 was drastically declined after AP-1 binding site mutation or deletion. We also demonstrated that AP-1 combined with Smad3/4 contributes to the transcriptional regulation of SPATA12 in response to TGF-β1. The expression of SPATA12 could be induced by TGF-β1 in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that AP-1 as an activator plays a role in the regulation of SPATA12 promoter. We have also shown that heat shock treatment could activate the expression of SPATA12 and transcription factor HSF binding sites in the SPATA12 promoter might be responsible for this heat-induction. These results suggested that AP-1 and HSF may play an important role in regulating SPATA12 promoter activity.

  3. Regulating expressin of cell and tissue-specific genes by modifying transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Beachy, R N; Dai, Shunhong

    2009-12-15

    Transcriptional regulation is the primary step to control gene expression, therefore function. Such regulation is achieved primarily via a combination of the activities of the promoter cis regulatory DNA elements and trans regulatory proteins that function through binding to these DNA elements. Our research supported by this program has led to the identification of rice bZIP transcription factors RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 that play key roles in regulating the activity of a vascular tissue specific promoter isolated from Rice Tungro Bacilliform Virus (RTBV) through their interactions with the Box II essential cis element located in the promoter. RF2a, RF2b and RLP1 possess multiple regulatory domains. Functional characterization reveals that those domains can activate or repress the activity of the RTBV promoter. Studies of transcriptional regulation of the RTBV promoter by this group of bZIP proteins not only provide insights about gene expression in the vascular tissue, but also insights about general mechanisms of transcription activation and repression. The knowledge gained from this research will also enable us to develop a well-described set of tools that can be used to control expression of multiple genes in transgenic plants and to improve biofuel feedstock.

  4. Prediction and testing of novel transcriptional networks regulating embryonic stem cell self-renewal and commitment.

    PubMed

    Walker, Emily; Ohishi, Minako; Davey, Ryan E; Zhang, Wen; Cassar, Paul A; Tanaka, Tetsuya S; Der, Sandy D; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Zandstra, Peter W; Stanford, William L

    2007-06-07

    Stem cell fate is governed by the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic positive and negative signals upon inherent transcriptional networks. To identify novel embryonic stem cell (ESC) regulators and assemble transcriptional networks controlling ESC fate, we performed temporal expression microarray analyses of ESCs after the initiation of commitment and integrated these data with known genome-wide transcription factor binding. Effects of forced under- or overexpression of predicted novel regulators, defined as differentially expressed genes with potential binding sites for known regulators of pluripotency, demonstrated greater than 90% correspondence with predicted function, as assessed by functional and high-content assays of self-renewal. We next assembled 43 theoretical transcriptional networks in ESCs, 82% (23 out of 28 tested) of which were supported by analysis of genome-wide expression in Oct4 knockdown cells. By using this integrative approach, we have formulated novel networks describing gene repression of key developmental regulators in undifferentiated ESCs and successfully predicted the outcomes of genetic manipulation of these networks.

  5. Mediator MED23 regulates basal transcription in vivo via an interaction with P-TEFb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Yao, Xiao; Huang, Yan; Hu, Xiangming; Liu, Runzhong; Hou, Dongming; Chen, Ruichuan; Wang, Gang

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator is a multi-subunit complex that transduces regulatory information from transcription regulators to the RNA polymerase II apparatus. Growing evidence suggests that Mediator plays roles in multiple stages of eukaryotic transcription, including elongation. However, the detailed mechanism by which Mediator regulates elongation remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that Mediator MED23 subunit controls a basal level of transcription by recruiting elongation factor P-TEFb, via an interaction with its CDK9 subunit. The mRNA level of Egr1, a MED23-controlled model gene, is reduced 4-5 fold in Med23 (-/-) ES cells under an unstimulated condition, but Med23-deficiency does not alter the occupancies of RNAP II, GTFs, Mediator complex, or activator ELK1 at the Egr1 promoter. Instead, Med23 depletion results in a significant decrease in P-TEFb and RNAP II (Ser2P) binding at the coding region, but no changes for several other elongation regulators, such as DSIF and NELF. ChIP-seq revealed that Med23-deficiency partially reduced the P-TEFb occupancy at a set of MED23-regulated gene promoters. Further, we demonstrate that MED23 interacts with CDK9 in vivo and in vitro. Collectively, these results provide the mechanistic insight into how Mediator promotes RNAP II into transcription elongation.

  6. The Maize Transcription Factor KNOTTED1 Directly Regulates the Gibberellin Catabolism Gene ga2ox1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ga2oxl mRNA level is elevated in immature leaves of dominant KNOX mutants and down-regulated in reproductive meristems of the null allele knl-el. KNl binds in vivo to an intron of ga2oxl through a cw-regulatory element containing two TGAC motifs. VP16-KN1 activates transcription inplanta from a chim...

  7. Differential Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Transcripts during the Consolidation of Fear Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ressler, Kerry J.; Rattiner, Lisa M.; Davis, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been implicated as a molecular mediator of learning and memory. The BDNF gene contains four differentially regulated promoters that generate four distinct mRNA transcripts, each containing a unique noncoding 5[prime]-exon and a common 3[prime]-coding exon. This study describes novel evidence for the…

  8. Regulation of transcription of the adenovirus EII promoter by gene products: Absence of sequence specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, R.E.; Kaufman, R.J.; Sharp, P.A.

    1984-10-01

    During adenovirus infection, the EII promoter is positively regulated by products of the EIa region. The authors have studied this regulation by fusing a DNA segment containing the adenovirus EII promoter to a dihydrofolate reductase cDNA segment. Expression of this hybrid gene is stimulated in trans when cell lines containing an integrated copy are either transfected with plasmids carrying the EIa region or infected with adenovirus. This suggests that EIa activity regulates transcription of the EII promoter in the absence of other viral proteins and that this stimulation can occur when the EII promoter is organized in cellular chromatin. Transcription from the EII promoter is initiated at two sites in cell lines lacking EIa activity. Introduction of the EIa region preferentially stimulated transcription from one of these two sites. A sensitive, stable cotransfection assay was used to test for specific EII sequences required for stimulation. EIa activity stimulates all mutaant promoters; the most extensive deletion retained only 18 base pairs of sequences upstream of the initiation site. They suggest that regulation of a promoter by the EIa region does not depend on the presence of a set of specific sequences, but instead reflects a characteristic of promoters that have been exogenously introduced into cells. Insertion of the 72-base-pair repeat of simian-virus 40 in cis enhances transcription from the EII promoter. The stimulatory effects of EIa activity and of the simian virus 40 sequence are additive and appear to differ mechanistically.

  9. Drosophila Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies Multiple Regulators of HIF–Dependent Transcription in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Dekanty, Andrés; Romero, Nuria M.; Bertolin, Agustina P.; Thomas, María G.; Leishman, Claudia C.; Perez-Perri, Joel I.; Boccaccio, Graciela L.; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are a family of evolutionary conserved alpha-beta heterodimeric transcription factors that induce a wide range of genes in response to low oxygen tension. Molecular mechanisms that mediate oxygen-dependent HIF regulation operate at the level of the alpha subunit, controlling protein stability, subcellular localization, and transcriptional coactivator recruitment. We have conducted an unbiased genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells aimed to the identification of genes required for HIF activity. After 3 rounds of selection, 30 genes emerged as critical HIF regulators in hypoxia, most of which had not been previously associated with HIF biology. The list of genes includes components of chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription elongation factors, and translational regulators. One remarkable hit was the argonaute 1 (ago1) gene, a central element of the microRNA (miRNA) translational silencing machinery. Further studies confirmed the physiological role of the miRNA machinery in HIF–dependent transcription. This study reveals the occurrence of novel mechanisms of HIF regulation, which might contribute to developing novel strategies for therapeutic intervention of HIF–related pathologies, including heart attack, cancer, and stroke. PMID:20585616

  10. Regulation of cel genes of C. cellulolyticum: identification of GlyR2, a transcriptional regulator regulating cel5D gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fendri, Imen; Abdou, Laetitia; Trotter, Valentine; Dedieu, Luc; Maamar, Hédia; Minton, Nigel P; Tardif, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Transcription and expression regulation of some individual cel genes (cel5A, cel5I, cel5D and cel44O) of Clostridium cellulolyticum were investigated. Unlike the cip-cel operon, these genes are transcribed as monocistronic units of transcription, except cel5D. The location of the transcription initiation sites was determined using RT-PCR and the mRNA 5'-end extremities were detected using primer extension experiments. Similarly to the cip-cel operon, cel5A and cel5I expressions are regulated by a carbon catabolite repression mechanism, whereas cel44O and cel5D expressions do not seem to be submitted to this regulation. The role of the putative transcriptional regulator GlyR2 in the regulation of cel5D expression was investigated. The recombinant protein GlyR2 was produced and was shown to bind in vitro to the cel5D and glyR2 promoter regions, suggesting that besides regulating its own expression, GlyR2 may regulate cel5D expression. To test this hypothesis in vivo, an insertional glyR2 mutant was generated and the effect of this disruption on cel5D expression was evaluated. Levels of cel5D mRNAs in the mutant were 16 fold lower than that of the wild-type strain suggesting that GlyR2 acts as an activator of cel5D expression.

  11. The update on transcriptional regulation of autophagy in normal and pathologic cells: A novel therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zili; Guo, Mei; Zhao, Shifeng; Xu, Wenxuan; Shao, Jiangjuan; Zhang, Feng; Wu, Li; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a genetically programmed, evolutionarily conserved catabolic process that occurs in response to stress. While short-lived proteins are degraded via the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway in higher eukaryotes, autophagy refers to intracellular pathway for development, differentiation, survival, and homeostasis through the lysosomal-dependent machinery, which regulates the synthesis, degradation, and recycling of long-lived proteins and even whole cytoplasmic organelles. The newly discovery shows that autophagy plays an important role in recycling nutrients upon starvation and maintaining cellular energy homeostasis. Recent basic and clinical investigations further demonstrate that autophagic abnormalities have been considered underlying reasons for lots of human diseases, including liver disease, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, neoplastic diseases, and cancers. Pharmacological modulation of autophagy might point to possible therapeutic strategies for combating a broad range of diseases. Regrettably, although the mechanisms underlying the regulation of autophagy have long been attracted extensive concern of numerous scholars and its acute regulation by nutrient-sensing signaling pathways is well described, the overview on longer-term transcriptional regulation of autophagy is still filled with confusion. This review summarizes current knowledge on transcriptional regulation of autophagy and expands our horizons on the autophagy repertoire. On the other hand, it also offers a glimpse into different strategies that have been used in experimental models to counteract excessive pathological autophagy via transcriptional regulation mechanism in the prevention and treatment of disease.

  12. Read-through transcripts in normal human lung parenchyma are down-regulated in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cotroneo, Chiara E.; Galvan, Antonella; Noci, Sara; Piazza, Rocco; Pirola, Alessandra; Spinelli, Roberta; Incarbone, Matteo; Palleschi, Alessandro; Rosso, Lorenzo; Santambrogio, Luigi; Dragani, Tommaso A.; Colombo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Read-through transcripts result from the continuous transcription of adjacent, similarly oriented genes, with the splicing out of the intergenic region. They have been found in several neoplastic and normal tissues, but their pathophysiological significance is unclear. We used high-throughput sequencing of cDNA fragments (RNA-Seq) to identify read-through transcripts in the non-involved lung tissue of 64 surgically treated lung adenocarcinoma patients. A total of 52 distinct read-through species was identified, with 24 patients having at least one read-through event, up to a maximum of 17 such transcripts in one patient. Sanger sequencing validated 28 of these transcripts and identified an additional 15, for a total of 43 distinct read-through events involving 35 gene pairs. Expression levels of 10 validated read-through transcripts were measured by quantitative PCR in pairs of matched non-involved lung tissue and lung adenocarcinoma tissue from 45 patients. Higher expression levels were observed in normal lung tissue than in the tumor counterpart, with median relative quantification ratios between normal and tumor varying from 1.90 to 7.78; the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon's signed-rank test for paired samples) for eight transcripts: ELAVL1–TIMM44, FAM162B–ZUFSP, IFNAR2–IL10RB, INMT–FAM188B, KIAA1841–C2orf74, NFATC3–PLA2G15, SIRPB1–SIRPD, and SHANK3–ACR. This report documents the presence of read-through transcripts in apparently normal lung tissue, with inter-individual differences in patterns and abundance. It also shows their down-regulation in tumors, suggesting that these chimeric transcripts may function as tumor suppressors in lung tissue. PMID:27058892

  13. Coordinate regulation of ribosomal component synthesis in Acanthamoeba castellanii: 5S RNA transcription is down regulated during encystment by alteration of TFIIIA activity.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, J L; Zwick, M G; Paule, M R

    1995-01-01

    Transcription of large rRNA precursor and 5S RNA were examined during encystment of Acanthamoeba castellanii. Both transcription units are down regulated almost coordinately during this process, though 5S RNA transcription is not as completely shut down as rRNA transcription. The protein components necessary for transcription of 5S RNA and tRNA were determined, and fractions containing transcription factors comparable to TFIIIA, TFIIIB, and TFIIIC, as well as RNA polymerase III and a 3'-end processing activity, were identified. Regulation of 5S RNA transcription could be recapitulated in vitro, and the activities of the required components were compared. In contrast to regulation of precursor rRNA, there is no apparent change during encystment in the activity of the polymerase dedicated to 5S RNA expression. Similarly, the transcriptional and promoter-binding activities of TFIIIC are not altered in parallel with 5S RNA regulation. TFIIIB transcriptional activity is unaltered in encysting cells. In contrast, both the transcriptional and DNA-binding activities of TFIIIA are strongly reduced in nuclear extracts from transcriptionally inactive cells. These results were analyzed in terms of mechanisms for coordinate regulation of rRNA and 5S RNA expression. PMID:7760828

  14. Dynamic Transcriptional Regulation of Fis in Salmonella During the Exponential Phase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Lei; Li, Ping; Hu, Yilang; Zhang, Wei; Tang, Bo

    2015-12-01

    Fis is one of the most important global regulators and has attracted extensive research attention. Many studies have focused on comparing the Fis global regulatory networks for exploring Fis function during different growth stages, such as the exponential and stationary stages. Although the Fis protein in bacteria is mainly expressed in the exponential phase, the dynamic transcriptional regulation of Fis during the exponential phase remains poorly understood. To address this question, we used RNA-seq technology to identify the Fis-regulated genes in the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium during the early exponential phase, and qRT-PCR was performed to validate the transcriptional data. A total of 1495 Fis-regulated genes were successfully identified, including 987 Fis-repressed genes and 508 Fis-activated genes. Comparing the results of this study with those of our previous study, we found that the transcriptional regulation of Fis was diverse during the early- and mid-exponential phases. The results also showed that the strong positive regulation of Fis on Salmonella pathogenicity island genes in the mid-exponential phase transitioned into insignificant effect in the early exponential phase. To validate these results, we performed a cell infection assay and found that Δfis only exhibited a 1.49-fold decreased capacity compared with the LT2 wild-type strain, indicating a large difference from the 6.31-fold decrease observed in the mid-exponential phase. Our results provide strong evidence for a need to thoroughly understand the dynamic transcriptional regulation of Fis in Salmonella during the exponential phase.

  15. Transcriptional regulation: effects of promoter proximal pausing on speed, synchrony and reliability.

    PubMed

    Boettiger, Alistair N; Ralph, Peter L; Evans, Steven N

    2011-05-01

    Recent whole genome polymerase binding assays in the Drosophila embryo have shown that a substantial proportion of uninduced genes have pre-assembled RNA polymerase-II transcription initiation complex (PIC) bound to their promoters. These constitute a subset of promoter proximally paused genes for which mRNA elongation instead of promoter access is regulated. This difference can be described as a rearrangement of the regulatory topology to control the downstream transcriptional process of elongation rather than the upstream transcriptional initiation event. It has been shown experimentally that genes with the former mode of regulation tend to induce faster and more synchronously, and that promoter-proximal pausing is observed mainly in metazoans, in accord with a posited impact on synchrony. However, it has not been shown whether or not it is the change in the regulated step per se that is causal. We investigate this question by proposing and analyzing a continuous-time Markov chain model of PIC assembly regulated at one of two steps: initial polymerase association with DNA, or release from a paused, transcribing state. Our analysis demonstrates that, over a wide range of physical parameters, increased speed and synchrony are functional consequences of elongation control. Further, we make new predictions about the effect of elongation regulation on the consistent control of total transcript number between cells. We also identify which elements in the transcription induction pathway are most sensitive to molecular noise and thus possibly the most evolutionarily constrained. Our methods produce symbolic expressions for quantities of interest with reasonable computational effort and they can be used to explore the interplay between interaction topology and molecular noise in a broader class of biochemical networks. We provide general-purpose code implementing these methods.

  16. Revealing natural antisense transcripts from Plasmodium vivax isolates: evidence of genome regulation in complicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, P A; Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Pakalapati, Deepak; Saxena, Vishal; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Chand, Bipin; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Kochar, Sanjay K; Sirohi, Parmendra; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2013-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most geographically widespread human malaria parasite causing approximately 130-435 million infections annually. It is an economic burden in many parts of the world and poses a public health challenge along with the other Plasmodium sp. The biology of this parasite is less studied and poorly understood, in spite of these facts. Emerging evidence of severe complications due to infections by this parasite provides an impetus to focus research on the same. Investigating the parasite directly from infected patients is the best way to study its biology and pathogenic mechanisms. Gene expression studies of this parasite directly obtained from the patients has provided evidence of gene regulation resulting in varying amount of transcript levels in the different blood stages. The mechanisms regulating gene expression in malaria parasites are not well understood. Discovery of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NATs) in Plasmodium falciparum has suggested that these might play an important role in regulating gene expression. We report here the genome-wide occurrence of NATs in P. vivax parasites from patients with differing clinical symptoms. A total of 1348 NATs against annotated gene loci have been detected using a custom designed microarray with strand specific probes. Majority of NATs identified from this study shows positive correlation with the expression pattern of the sense (S) transcript. Our data also shows condition specific expression patterns of varying S and antisense (AS) transcript levels. Genes with AS transcripts enrich to various biological processes. To our knowledge this is the first report on the presence of NATs from P. vivax obtained from infected patients with different disease complications. The data suggests differential regulation of gene expression in diverse clinical conditions, as shown by differing sense/antisense ratios and would lead to future detailed investigations of gene regulation.

  17. Identification and transcript profiles of citrus growth-regulating factor genes involved in the regulation of leaf and fruit development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Guo, Ling-Xia; Jin, Long-Fei; Liu, Yong-Zhong; Liu, Tao; Fan, Yu-Hua; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2016-10-01

    Growth-regulating factor (GRF) is an important protein in GA-mediated response, with key roles in plant growth and development. However, it is not known whether or how the GRF proteins in citrus to regulate organ size. In this study, nine citrus GRF genes (CsGRF1-9) were validated from the 'Anliu' sweet orange (AL, Citrus sinensis cv. Anliu) by PCR amplification. They all contain two conserved motifs (QLQ and WRC) and have 3-4 exons. The transcript levels of genes were detected by qRT-PCR. Transcript analysis showed that (1) CsGRF 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, and 9 expressed predominantly in young leaf, CsGRF 3 and 4 expressed predominantly in fruit immature juice sacs and CsGRF 8 expressed predominantly in root; (2) all citrus GRF genes had significantly higher expression in young leaves than mature leaf; (3) in juice sacs, the transcript levels of CsGRF1, 4, 5, 6, and 8 increased significantly while the transcript levels of CsGRF2, 3, 7, and 9 had no significant change from 80 DAF to 100 DAF. Besides, GA3 treatment did not affect the transcript levels of CsGRF5 and CsGRF6 but significantly increased the transcript levels of the other seven CsGRF genes in young leaves. These results suggested that all CsGRF genes involve in the leaf development, CsGRF1, 4, 5, 6, and 8 act developmentally whilst CsGRF2, 3, 7, and 9 play fundamental roles in fruit cell enlargement, which may be through GA pathway or GA-independent pathway.

  18. Functional diversification of ROK-family transcriptional regulators of sugar catabolism in the Thermotogae phylum

    PubMed Central

    Kazanov, Marat D.; Li, Xiaoqing; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2013-01-01

    Large and functionally heterogeneous families of transcription factors have complex evolutionary histories. What shapes specificities toward effectors and DNA sites in paralogous regulators is a fundamental question in biology. Bacteria from the deep-branching lineage Thermotogae possess multiple paralogs of the repressor, open reading frame, kinase (ROK) family regulators that are characterized by carbohydrate-sensing domains shared with sugar kinases. We applied an integrated genomic approach to study functions and specificities of regulators from this family. A comparative analysis of 11 Thermotogae genomes revealed novel mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the sugar utilization networks, DNA-binding motifs and specific functions. Reconstructed regulons for seven groups of ROK regulators were validated by DNA-binding assays using purified recombinant proteins from the model bacterium Thermotoga maritima. All tested regulators demonstrated specific binding to their predicted cognate DNA sites, and this binding was inhibited by specific effectors, mono- or disaccharides from their respective sugar catabolic pathways. By comparing ligand-binding domains of regulators with structurally characterized kinases from the ROK family, we elucidated signature amino acid residues determining sugar-ligand regulator specificity. Observed correlations between signature residues and the sugar-ligand specificities provide the framework for structure functional classification of the entire ROK family. PMID:23209028

  19. High-throughput Screening for Chemical Modulators of Post-transcriptionally Regulated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sidarovich, Viktoryia; Adami, Valentina; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation have a profound impact on genes expression. However, commonly adopted cell-based screening assays focus on transcriptional regulation, being essentially aimed at the identification of promoter-targeting molecules. As a result, post-transcriptional mechanisms are largely uncovered by gene expression targeted drug development. Here we describe a cell-based assay aimed at investigating the role of the 3' untranslated region (3’ UTR) in the modulation of the fate of its mRNA, and at identifying compounds able to modify it. The assay is based on the use of a luciferase reporter construct containing the 3’ UTR of a gene of interest stably integrated into a disease-relevant cell line. The protocol is divided into two parts, with the initial focus on the primary screening aimed at the identification of molecules affecting luciferase activity after 24 hr of treatment. The second part of the protocol describes the counter-screening necessary to discriminate compounds modulating luciferase activity specifically through the 3’ UTR. In addition to the detailed protocol and representative results, we provide important considerations about the assay development and the validation of the hit(s) on the endogenous target. The described cell-based reporter gene assay will allow scientists to identify molecules modulating protein levels via post-transcriptional mechanisms dependent on a 3’ UTR. PMID:25867708

  20. Versatile in vivo regulation of tumor phenotypes by dCas9-mediated transcriptional perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Christian J.; Bruno, Peter M.; Horlbeck, Max A.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Hemann, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted transcriptional regulation is a powerful tool to study genetic mediators of cellular behavior. Here, we show that catalytically dead Cas9 (dCas9) targeted to genomic regions upstream or downstream of the transcription start site allows for specific and sustainable gene-expression level alterations in tumor cells in vitro and in syngeneic immune-competent mouse models. We used this approach for a high-coverage pooled gene-activation screen in vivo and discovered previously unidentified modulators of tumor growth and therapeutic response. Moreover, by using dCas9 linked to an activation domain, we can either enhance or suppress target gene expression simply by changing the genetic location of dCas9 binding relative to the transcription start site. We demonstrate that these directed changes in gene-transcription levels occur with minimal off-target effects. Our findings highlight the use of dCas9-mediated transcriptional regulation as a versatile tool to reproducibly interrogate tumor phenotypes in vivo. PMID:27325776

  1. Topology and Control of the Cell-Cycle-Regulated Transcriptional Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Steven B.; Wittenberg, Curt

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 20% of the budding yeast genome is transcribed periodically during the cell division cycle. The precise temporal execution of this large transcriptional program is controlled by a large interacting network of transcriptional regulators, kinases, and ubiquitin ligases. Historically, this network has been viewed as a collection of four coregulated gene clusters that are associated with each phase of the cell cycle. Although the broad outlines of these gene clusters were described nearly 20 years ago, new technologies have enabled major advances in our understanding of the genes comprising those clusters, their regulation, and the complex regulatory interplay between clusters. More recently, advances are being made in understanding the roles of chromatin in the control of the transcriptional program. We are also beginning to discover important regulatory interactions between the cell-cycle transcriptional program and other cell-cycle regulatory mechanisms such as checkpoints and metabolic networks. Here we review recent advances and contemporary models of the transcriptional network and consider these models in the context of eukaryotic cell-cycle controls. PMID:24395825

  2. POSTAR: a platform for exploring post-transcriptional regulation coordinated by RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Boqin; Yang, Yu-Cheng T.; Huang, Yiming; Zhu, Yumin; Lu, Zhi John

    2017-01-01

    We present POSTAR (http://POSTAR.ncrnalab.org), a resource of POST-trAnscriptional Regulation coordinated by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Precise characterization of post-transcriptional regulatory maps has accelerated dramatically in the past few years. Based on new studies and resources, POSTAR supplies the largest collection of experimentally probed (∼23 million) and computationally predicted (approximately 117 million) RBP binding sites in the human and mouse transcriptomes. POSTAR annotates every transcript and its RBP binding sites using extensive information regarding various molecular regulatory events (e.g., splicing, editing, and modification), RNA secondary structures, disease-associated variants, and gene expression and function. Moreover, POSTAR provides a friendly, multi-mode, integrated search interface, which helps users to connect multiple RBP binding sites with post-transcriptional regulatory events, phenotypes, and diseases. Based on our platform, we were able to obtain novel insights into post-transcriptional regulation, such as the putative association between CPSF6 binding, RNA structural domains, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome SNPs. In summary, POSTAR represents an early effort to systematically annotate post-transcriptional regulatory maps and explore the putative roles of RBPs in human diseases. PMID:28053162

  3. The role of chromatin structure in regulating stress-induced transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Uffenbeck, Shannon R; Krebs, Jocelyn E

    2006-08-01

    All cells, whether free-living or part of a multicellular organism, must contend with a variety of environmental fluctuations that can be harmful or lethal to the cell. Cells exposed to different kinds of environmental stress rapidly alter gene transcription, resulting in the immediate downregulation of housekeeping genes, while crucial stress-responsive transcription is drastically increased. Common cis-acting elements within many stress-induced promoters, such as stress response elements and heat shock elements, allow for coordinated expression in response to many different stresses. However, specific promoter architectures, i.e., specific combinations of high- and low-affinity stress-responsive cis elements embedded in a particular chromatin environment, allow for unique expression patterns that are responsive to the individual type and degree of stress. The coordination of transcriptional stress responses and the role that chromatin structure plays in the regulation and kinetics of such responses is discussed. The interplay among global and gene-specific stress responses is illustrated using the constitutive and stress-induced transcriptional regulation of HSP82 as a model. This review also investigates evidence suggesting that stress-induced transcription is globally synchronized with the stress-induced repression of housekeeping gene via 2 distinct mechanisms of facilitating the binding of TATA-binding protein (TBP): TFIID and SAGA-mediated TBP binding.

  4. Transcriptional regulation is affected by subnuclear targeting of reporter plasmids to PML nuclear bodies.

    PubMed

    Block, Gregory J; Eskiw, Christopher H; Dellaire, Graham; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2006-12-01

    Whereas the PML protein has been reported to have both transcriptional coactivator and corepressor potential, the contribution of the PML nuclear body (PML NB) itself to transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that plasmid DNA artificially tethered to PML or the PML NB-targeting domain of Sp100 is preferentially localized to PML NBs. Using the tethering technique, we targeted a simian virus 40 promoter-driven luciferase reporter plasmid to PML NBs, resulting in the repression of the transgene transcriptional activity. Conversely, the tethering of a cytomegalovirus promoter-containing reporter plasmid resulted in activation. Targeting a minimal eukaryotic promoter did not affect its activity. The expression of targeted promoters could be modulated by altering the cellular concentration of PML NB components, including Sp100 and isoforms of the PML protein. Finally, we demonstrate that ICP0, the promiscuous herpes simplex virus transactivator, increases the level of transcriptional activation of plasmid DNA tethered to the PML NB. We conclude that when PML NB components are artificially tethered to reporter plasmids, the PML NB contributes to the regulation of the tethered DNA in a promoter-dependent manner. Our findings demonstrate that transient transcription assays are sensitive to the subnuclear localization of the transgene plasmid.

  5. Binding motifs in bacterial gene promoters modulate transcriptional effects of global regulators CRP and ArcA

    SciTech Connect

    Leuze, Mike; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Syed, Mustafa H.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2012-05-30

    Bacterial gene regulation involves transcription factors (TF) that bind to DNA recognition sequences in operon promoters. These recognition sequences, many of which are palindromic, are known as regulatory elements or transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Some TFs are global regulators that can modulate the expression of hundreds of genes. In this study we examine global regulator half-sites, where a half-site, which we shall call a binding motif (BM), is one half of a palindromic TFBS. We explore the hypothesis that the number of BMs plays an important role in transcriptional regulation, examining empirical data from transcriptional profiling of the CRP and ArcA regulons. We compare the power of BM counts and of full TFBS characteristics to predict induced transcriptional activity. We find that CRP BM counts have a nonlinear effect on CRP-dependent transcriptional activity and predict this activity better than full TFBS quality or location.

  6. TRIM45 negatively regulates NF-{kappa}B-mediated transcription and suppresses cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Mio; Sato, Tomonobu; Nukiwa, Ryota; Ariga, Tadashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B plays an important role in cell survival and carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRIM45 negatively regulates TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B-mediated transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRIM45 overexpression suppresses cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TRIM45 acts as a repressor for the NF-{kappa}B signal and regulates cell growth. -- Abstract: The NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway plays an important role in cell survival, immunity, inflammation, carcinogenesis, and organogenesis. Activation of NF-{kappa}B is regulated by several posttranslational modifications including phosphorylation, neddylation and ubiquitination. The NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway is activated by two distinct signaling mechanisms and is strictly modulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. It has been reported that overexpression of TRIM45, one of the TRIM family ubiquitin ligases, suppresses transcriptional activities of Elk-1 and AP-1, which are targets of the MAPK signaling pathway. In this study, we showed that TRIM45 also negatively regulates TNF{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B-mediated transcription by a luciferase reporter assay and that TRIM45 lacking a RING domain also has an activity to inhibit the NF-{kappa}B signal. Moreover, we found that TRIM45 overexpression suppresses cell growth. These findings suggest that TRIM45 acts as a repressor for the NF-{kappa}B signal and regulates cell growth.

  7. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention.

  8. The transcription factor MEF/ELF4 regulates the quiescence of primitive hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Lacorazza, H Daniel; Yamada, Takeshi; Liu, Yan; Miyata, Yasuhiko; Sivina, Mariela; Nunes, Juliana; Nimer, Stephen D

    2006-03-01

    The transcriptional circuitry that regulates the quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells is largely unknown. We report that the transcription factor known as MEF (or ELF4), which is targeted by the t(X;21)(q26;q22) in acute myelogenous leukemia, regulates the proliferation of primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells at steady state, controlling their quiescence. Mef null HSCs display increased residence in G0 with reduced 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in vivo and impaired cytokine-driven proliferation in vitro. Due to their increased HSC quiescence, Mef null mice are relatively resistant to the myelosuppressive effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, MEF plays an important role in the decision of stem/primitive progenitor cells to divide or remain quiescent by regulating their entry to the cell cycle.

  9. Nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Bicknell, Katrina; Brooks, Gavin; Kaiser, Pete; Chen Hongying; Dove, Brian K.; Hiscox, Julian A.; E-mail: j.a.hiscox@leeds.ac.uk

    2005-07-08

    Nucleolin is a multi-functional protein that is located to the nucleolus. In tissue culture cells, the stability of nucleolin is related to the proliferation status of the cell. During development, rat cardiomyocytes proliferate actively with increases in the mass of the heart being due to both hyperplasia and hypertrophy. The timing of this shift in the phenotype of the myocyte from one capable of undergoing hyperplasia to one that can grow only by hypertrophy occurs within 4 days of post-natal development. Thus, cardiomyocytes are an ideal model system in which to study the regulation of nucleolin during growth in vivo. Using Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR (TaqMan) we found that the amount of nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation during the development of the cardiomyocyte. However, in cells which had exited the cell cycle and were subsequently given a hypertrophic stimulus, nucleolin was regulated post-transcriptionally.

  10. The Plant Heat Stress Transcription Factors (HSFs): Structure, Regulation, and Function in Response to Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Meng; Liu, Jin-Hong; Ma, Xiao; Luo, De-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui; Lu, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as high temperature, salinity, and drought adversely affect the survival, growth, and reproduction of plants. Plants respond to such unfavorable changes through developmental, physiological, and biochemical ways, and these responses require expression of stress-responsive genes, which are regulated by a network of transcription factors (TFs), including heat stress transcription factors (HSFs). HSFs play a crucial role in plants response to several abiotic stresses by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes, such as heat shock proteins (Hsps). In this review, we describe the conserved structure of plant HSFs, the identification of HSF gene families from various plant species, their expression profiling under abiotic stress conditions, regulation at different levels and function in abiotic stresses. Despite plant HSFs share highly conserved structure, their remarkable diversification across plants reflects their numerous functions as well as their integration into the complex stress signaling and response networks, which can be employed in crop improvement strategies via biotechnological intervention. PMID:26904076

  11. Transcription factor Foxo1 is a negative regulator of natural killer cell maturation and function.

    PubMed

    Deng, Youcai; Kerdiles, Yann; Chu, Jianhong; Yuan, Shunzong; Wang, Youwei; Chen, Xilin; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Hughes, Tiffany; Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Zou, Xianghong; Liu, Chang-Gong; Freud, Aharon G; Li, Xiaohui; Caligiuri, Michael A; Vivier, Eric; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-03-17

    Little is known about the role of negative regulators in controlling natural killer (NK) cell development and effector functions. Foxo1 is a multifunctional transcription factor of the forkhead family. Using a mouse model of conditional deletion in NK cells, we found that Foxo1 negatively controlled NK cell differentiation and function. Immature NK cells expressed abundant Foxo1 and little Tbx21 relative to mature NK cells, but these two transcription factors reversed their expression as NK cells proceeded through development. Foxo1 promoted NK cell homing to lymph nodes by upregulating CD62L expression and inhibited late-stage maturation and effector functions by repressing Tbx21 expression. Loss of Foxo1 rescued the defect in late-stage NK cell maturation in heterozygous Tbx21(+/-) mice. Collectively, our data reveal a regulatory pathway by which the negative regulator Foxo1 and the positive regulator Tbx21 play opposing roles in controlling NK cell development and effector functions.

  12. CITA/NLRC5: A critical transcriptional regulator of MHC class I gene expression.

    PubMed

    Downs, Isaac; Vijayan, Saptha; Sidiq, Tabasum; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-07-08

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules play essential roles in the development and activation of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator) has been recognized as a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression, albeit knowledge about the regulatory mechanism of MHC class I gene expression had been limited. Recently identified MHC class I transactivator (CITA), or NLRC5, also belongs to the NLR protein family and constitutes a critical regulator for the transcriptional activation of MHC class I genes. In addition to MHC class I genes, CITA/NLRC5 induces the expression of β2 -microglobulin, TAP1 and LMP2, essential components of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, CITA/NLRC5 and CIITA are transcriptional regulators that orchestrate the concerted expression of critical components in the MHC class I and class II pathways, respectively. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):349-357, 2016.

  13. Bacillus subtilis δ Factor Functions as a Transcriptional Regulator by Facilitating the Open Complex Formation.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Ranjit Kumar; Sengupta, Shreya; Rudra, Paulami; Mukhopadhyay, Jayanta

    2016-01-15

    Most bacterial RNA polymerases (RNAP) contain five conserved subunits, viz. 2α, β, β', and ω. However, in many Gram-positive bacteria, especially in fermicutes, RNAP is associated with an additional factor, called δ. For over three decades since its identification, it had been thought that δ functioned as a subunit of RNAP to enhance the level of transcripts by recycling RNAP. In support of the previous observations, we also find that δ is involved in recycling of RNAP by releasing the RNA from the ternary complex. We further show that δ binds to RNA and is able to recycle RNAP when the length of the nascent RNA reaches a critical length. However, in this work we decipher a new function of δ. Performing biochemical and mutational analysis, we show that Bacillus subtilis δ binds to DNA immediately upstream of the promoter element at A-rich sequences on the abrB and rrnB1 promoters and facilitates open complex formation. As a result, δ facilitates RNAP to initiate transcription in the second scale, compared with minute scale in the absence of δ. Using transcription assay, we show that δ-mediated recycling of RNAP cannot be the sole reason for the enhancement of transcript yield. Our observation that δ does not bind to RNAP holo enzyme but is required to bind to DNA upstream of the -35 promoter element for transcription activation suggests that δ functions as a transcriptional regulator.

  14. Transcriptional regulation and DNA methylation in plastids during transitional conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, H; Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Akazawa, T

    1990-01-01

    During transitional conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts in ripening tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruits, transcripts for several plastid genes for photosynthesis decreased to undetectable levels. Run-on transcription of plastids indicated that transcriptional regulation operated as a predominant factor. We found that most of the genes in chloroplasts were actively transcribed in vitro by Escherichia coli and soluble plastid RNA polymerases, but some genes in chromoplasts seemed to be silent when assayed by the in vitro systems. The regulatory step, therefore, was ascribed to DNA templates. The analysis of modified base composition revealed the presence of methylated bases in chromoplast DNA, in which 5-methylcytosine was most abundant. The presence of 5-methylcytosine detected by isoschizomeric endonucleases and Southern hybridization was correlated with the undetectable transcription activity of each gene in the run-on assay and in vitro transcription experiments. It is thus concluded that the suppression of transcription mediated by DNA methylation is one of the mechanisms governing gene expression in plastids converting from chloroplasts to chromoplasts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2303026

  15. PLZF is a negative regulator of retinoic acid receptor transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Perrine J; Delmotte, Marie-Hélène; Formstecher, Pierre; Lefebvre, Philippe

    2003-09-06

    BACKGROUND: Retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are ligand-regulated transcription factors controlling cellular proliferation and differentiation. Receptor-interacting proteins such as corepressors and coactivators play a crucial role in specifying the overall transcriptional activity of the receptor in response to ligand treatment. Little is known however on how receptor activity is controlled by intermediary factors which interact with RARs in a ligand-independent manner. RESULTS: We have identified the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF), a transcriptional corepressor, to be a RAR-interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid assay. We confirmed this interaction by GST-pull down assays and show that the PLZF N-terminal zinc finger domain is necessary and sufficient for PLZF to bind RAR. The RAR ligand binding domain displayed the highest affinity for PLZF, but corepressor and coactivator binding interfaces did not contribute to PLZF recruitment. The interaction was ligand-independent and correlated to a decreased transcriptional activity of the RXR-RAR heterodimer upon overexpression of PLZF. A similar transcriptional interference could be observed with the estrogen receptor alpha and the glucocorticoid receptor. We further show that PLZF is likely to act by preventing RXR-RAR heterodimerization, both in-vitro and in intact cells. CONCLUSION: Thus RAR and PLZF interact physically and functionally. Intriguingly, these two transcription factors play a determining role in hematopoiesis and regionalization of the hindbrain and may, upon chromosomal translocation, form fusion proteins. Our observations therefore define a novel mechanism by which RARs activity may be controlled.

  16. Differential Regulation of ftsZ Transcription during Septation of Streptomyces griseus

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jangyul; Dharmatilake, Amitha J.; Jiang, Hao; Kendrick, Kathleen E.

    2001-01-01

    Streptomyces has been known to form two types of septa. The data in this research demonstrated that Streptomyces griseus forms another type of septum near the base of sporogenic hyphae (basal septum). To understand the regulation of the septation machinery in S. griseus, we investigated the expression of the ftsZ gene. S1 nuclease protection assays revealed that four ftsZ transcripts were differentially expressed during morphological differentiation. The vegetative transcript (emanating from Pveg) is present at a moderate level during vegetative growth, but is switched off within the first 2 h of sporulation. Two sporulation-specific transcripts predominantly accumulated, and the levels increased by approximately fivefold together shortly before sporulation septa begin to form. Consistently, the sporulation-specific transcripts were expressed much earlier and more abundantly in a group of nonsporulating mutants that form their sporulation septa prematurely. Promoter-probe studies with two different reporter systems confirmed the activities of the putative promoters identified from the 5′ end point of the transcripts. The levels and expression timing of promoter activities were consistent with the results of nuclease protection assays. The aseptate phenotype of the Pspo mutant indicated that the increased transcription from Pspo is required for sporulation septation, but not for vegetative or basal septum formation. PMID:11489862

  17. Transcriptional Regulation and the Diversification of Metabolism in Wine Yeast Strains

    PubMed Central

    Rossouw, Debra; Jacobson, Dan; Bauer, Florian F.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors and their binding sites have been proposed as primary targets of evolutionary adaptation because changes to single transcription factors can lead to far-reaching changes in gene expression patterns. Nevertheless, there is very little concrete evidence for such evolutionary changes. Industrial wine yeast strains, of the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are a geno- and phenotypically diverse group of organisms that have adapted to the ecological niches of industrial winemaking environments and have been selected to produce specific styles of wine. Variation in transcriptional regulation among wine yeast strains may be responsible for many of the observed differences and specific adaptations to different fermentative conditions in the context of commercial winemaking. We analyzed gene expression profiles of wine yeast strains to assess the impact of transcription factor expression on metabolic networks. The data provide new insights into the molecular basis of variations in gene expression in industrial strains and their consequent effects on metabolic networks important to wine fermentation. We show that the metabolic phenotype of a strain can be shifted in a relatively predictable manner by changing expression levels of individual transcription factors, opening opportunities to modify transcription networks to achieve desirable outcomes. PMID:22042577

  18. An NAC transcription factor controls ethylene-regulated cell expansion in flower petals.

    PubMed

    Pei, Haixia; Ma, Nan; Tian, Ji; Luo, Jing; Chen, Jiwei; Li, Jing; Zheng, Yi; Chen, Xiang; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping

    2013-10-01

    Cell expansion is crucial for plant growth. It is well known that the phytohormone ethylene functions in plant development as a key modulator of cell expansion. However, the role of ethylene in the regulation of this process remains unclear. In this study, 2,189 ethylene-responsive transcripts were identified in rose (Rosa hybrida) petals using transcriptome sequencing and microarray analysis. Among these transcripts, an NAC (for no apical meristem [NAM], Arabidopsis transcription activation factor [ATAF], and cup-shaped cotyledon [CUC])-domain transcription factor gene, RhNAC100, was rapidly and dramatically induced by ethylene in the petals. Interestingly, accumulation of the RhNAC100 transcript was modulated by ethylene via microRNA164-dependent posttranscriptional regulation. Overexpression of RhNAC100 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) substantially reduced the petal size by repressing petal cell expansion. By contrast, silencing of RhNAC100 in rose petals using virus-induced gene silencing significantly increased petal size and promoted cell expansion in the petal abaxial subepidermis (P < 0.05). Expression analysis showed that 22 out of the 29 cell expansion-related genes tested exhibited changes in expression in RhNAC100-silenced rose petals. Moreover, of those genes, one cellulose synthase and two aquaporin genes (Rosa hybrida Cellulose Synthase2 and R. hybrida Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Protein1;1/2;1) were identified as targets of RhNAC100. Our results suggest that ethylene regulates cell expansion by fine-tuning the microRNA164/RhNAC100 module and also provide new insights into the function of NAC transcription factors.

  19. DuOx2 Promoter Regulation by Hormones, Transcriptional Factors and the Coactivator TAZ.

    PubMed

    Cardoso-Weide, L C; Cardoso-Penha, R C; Costa, M W; Ferreira, A C F; Carvalho, D P; Santisteban, P S

    2015-03-01

    The production of H2O2, which is essential to thyroid hormone synthesis, involves two NADPH oxidases: dual oxidases 1 and 2 (DuOx1 and DuOx2). A functional study with human DuOx genes and their 5'-flanking regions showed that DuOx1 and -2 promoters are different from thyroid-specific gene promoters. Furthermore, their transcriptional activities are not restricted to thyroid cells. While regulation of Tg (thyroglobulin) and TPO (thyroperoxidase) expression have been extensively studied, DuOx2 promoter regulation by hormones and transcriptional factors need to be more explored. Herein we investigated the role of TSH, insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-