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Sample records for mixture ii sedimentation

  1. Toxicity and photoactivation of PAH mixtures in marine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.; Ferraro, S.; Lamberson, J.; Cole, F.; Ozretich, R.; Boese, B.; Schults, D.; Behrenfeld, M.; Ankley, G.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity and toxicological photoactivation of mixtures of sediment-associated fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and acenaphthene were determined using standard 10 d sediment toxicity tests with the marine amphipod, Rhepoxynius abronius. The four PAHs were spiked into sediment in a concentration series of either single compounds or an equitoxic mixture. Spiked sediment was stored at 4 C for 28 d before testing. Toxicity tests were conducted under fluorescent lighting. Survivors after 10 d in PAH-contaminated sediment were exposed for 1 h to UV light in the absence of sediment and then tested for their ability to bury in clean sediment. The 10 d LC50s for single PAHs were 3.3, 2.2, 2.8, and 2.3 mg/g oc for fluoranthene, phenanthrene, pyrene, and acenaphthene, respectively. These LC50s were used to calculate the sum of toxic units ({Sigma}TU) of the four PAHs in the equitoxic mixture treatments. The {Sigma}TU LC50 was then calculated for the mixture treatments. If the toxicological interaction of the four PAHs in the mixture was additive, the {Sigma}TU LC50 should equal 1.0. The observed {Sigma}TU LC50 in the mixture was 1.55, indicating the interaction was slightly less than additive. UV enhancement of toxic effects of individual PAHs was correctly predicted by photophysical properties, i.e. pyrene and fluoranthene were photoactivated and phenanthrene and acenaphthene were not. UV effects in the mixture of four PAHs can be explained by the photoactivation of pyrene and fluoranthene alone.

  2. Consensus sediment quality guidelines for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    Sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been derived from a variety of laboratory, field, and theoretical foundations. They include the screening level concentration, effects ranges-low and -median, equilibrium partitioning concentrations, apparent effects threshold, {Sigma}PAH model, and threshold and probable effects levels. The resolution of controversial differences among the PAH SQGs lies in an understanding of the effects of mixtures. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons virtually always occur in field-collected sediment as a complex mixture of covarying compounds. When expressed as a mixture concentration, that is, total PAH (TPAH), the guidelines form three clusters that were intended in their original derivations to represent threshold (TEC = 290 {micro}g/g organic carbon [OC]), median (MEC = 1,800 {micro}g/g OC), and extreme (EEC = 10,000 {micro}g/g OC) effects concentrations. The TEC/MEC/EEC consensus guidelines provide a unifying synthesis of other SQGs, reflect causal rather than correlative effects, account for mixtures, and predict sediment toxicity and benthic community perturbations at sites of PAH contamination. The TEC offers the most useful SQG because PAH mixtures are unlikely to cause adverse effects on benthic ecosystems below the TEC.

  3. Adsorption Processes of Lead Ions on the Mixture Surface of Bentonite and Bottom Sediments.

    PubMed

    Hegedűsová, Alžbeta; Hegedűs, Ondrej; Tóth, Tomáš; Vollmannová, Alena; Andrejiová, Alena; Šlosár, Miroslav; Mezeyová, Ivana; Pernyeszi, Tímea

    2016-12-01

    The adsorption of contaminants plays an important role in the process of their elimination from a polluted environment. This work describes the issue of loading environment with lead Pb(II) and the resulting negative impact it has on plants and living organisms. It also focuses on bentonite as a natural adsorbent and on the adsorption process of Pb(II) ions on the mixture of bentonite and bottom sediment from the water reservoir in Kolíňany (SR). The equilibrium and kinetic experimental data were evaluated using Langmuir isotherm kinetic pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order rate equations the intraparticle and surface diffusion models. Langmuir isotherm model was successfully used to characterize the lead ions adsorption equilibrium on the mixture of bentonite and bottom sediment. The pseudo second-order model, the intraparticle and surface (film) diffusion models could be simultaneously fitted the experimental kinetic data.

  4. Comparing catchment sediment fingerprinting procedures using an auto-evaluation approach with virtual sample mixtures.

    PubMed

    Palazón, Leticia; Latorre, Borja; Gaspar, Leticia; Blake, William H; Smith, Hugh G; Navas, Ana

    2015-11-01

    Information on sediment sources in river catchments is required for effective sediment control strategies, to understand sediment, nutrient and pollutant transport, and for developing soil erosion management plans. Sediment fingerprinting procedures are employed to quantify sediment source contributions and have become a widely used tool. As fingerprinting procedures are naturally variable and locally dependant, there are different applications of the procedure. Here, the auto-evaluation of different fingerprinting procedures using virtual sample mixtures is proposed to support the selection of the fingerprinting procedure with the best capacity for source discrimination and apportionment. Surface samples from four land uses from a Central Spanish Pyrenean catchment were used i) as sources to generate the virtual sample mixtures and ii) to characterise the sources for the fingerprinting procedures. The auto-evaluation approach involved comparing fingerprinting procedures based on four optimum composite fingerprints selected by three statistical tests, three source characterisations (mean, median and corrected mean) and two types of objective functions for the mixing model. A total of 24 fingerprinting procedures were assessed by this new approach which were solved by Monte Carlo simulations and compared using the root mean squared error (RMSE) between known and assessed source ascriptions for the virtual sample mixtures. It was found that the source ascriptions with the highest accuracy were achieved using the corrected mean source characterisations for the composite fingerprints selected by the Kruskal Wallis H-test and principal components analysis. Based on the RMSE results, high goodness of fit (GOF) values were not always indicative of accurate source apportionment results, and care should be taken when using GOF to assess mixing model performance. The proposed approach to test different fingerprinting procedures using virtual sample mixtures provides an

  5. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Constable, Steven; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Smith, Megan M; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. Toward this goal, we built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. Here we report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. These results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  6. Effects of vegetation in mitigating the toxicity of pesticide mixtures in sediments of a wetland mesocosm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study assessed effects of a mixture of two pesticides, diazinon and permethrin, on 48-h sediment toxicity to Hyalella azteca in a constructed wetland mesocosm containing non-vegetated and vegetated sections. Sediment samples were collected at inflow, middle, and back points within each sectio...

  7. Mathematical model of the component mixture distribution in the molten cast iron during centrifugation (sedimentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikulov, R. A.; Kotlyar, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    For the development and management of the manufacturing processes of axisymmetric articles with compositional structure by centrifugal casting method [1,2,3,4] is necessary to create a generalized mathematical model of the dynamics of component mixture in the molten cast iron during centrifugation. In article. based on the analysis of the dynamics of two-component mixture at sedimentation, a method of successive approximations to determine the distribution of a multicomponent mixture by centrifugation in a parabolic crucible is developed.

  8. Evaluation of sediment capping with active barrier systems (ABS) using calcite/zeolite mixtures to simultaneously manage phosphorus and ammonium release.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianwei; Zhan, Yanhui; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency and mechanism of sediment capping with an active barrier system (ABS) using calcite/zeolite mixtures to simultaneously prevent phosphorus (P) and ammonium (NH(4)(+)) release from eutrophic lake sediments under anaerobic conditions was investigated through a series of batch and sediment incubation experiments. For this, natural calcite and various zeolites (natural, NaCl-pretreated and CaCl(2)-pretreated zeolites) were applied. Batch tests showed that the calcite was efficient for the removal of phosphate in aqueous solution and the zeolite was an efficient adsorbent for the removal of NH(4)(+) from aqueous solution. Sediment incubation experiments showed that the P and NH(4)(+) fluxes from the anaerobic sediments were significantly reduced by the ABS using the mixture of calcite and natural zeolite. Higher calcite dosage was found to be favorable for the prevention of P release from the sediments using the ABS. For controlling the P release from the sediments, the mixture of calcite and CaCl(2)-pretreated zeolite as a capping material was more efficient than that of calcite and natural zeolite, whereas the mixture of calcite and NaCl-pretreated zeolite was less efficient than that of calcite and natural zeolite. Batch and sediment incubation experiments proved that the zeolite as a component of the ABS using the mixture of calcite and CaCl(2)-pretreated zeolite has a dual function: (i) preventing NH(4)(+) release from the sediments; and (ii) supplying Ca(2+) through a Ca(2+)/NH(4)(+) exchange to improve the ability of the capping material to immobilize P release from the sediments.

  9. CHROMATOGRAPHIC ALTERATION OF A NONIONIC SURFACTANT MIXTURE DURING TRANSPORT IN DENSE NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUID CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT (R826650)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromatographic alteration of a nonionic surfactant mixture during transport through DNAPL-contaminated aquifer sediment may occur due to differential loss of oligomers to sediment and to dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL). These losses may significantly alter the solubilizing...

  10. Photoactivation and toxicity of mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds in marine sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.C.; Ferraro, S.P.; Lamberson, J.O.; Cole, F.A.; Ozretich, R.J.; Boese, B.L.; Schults, D.W.; Behrenfeld, M.; Ankley, G.T.

    1997-10-01

    The direct toxicity and photoinduced toxicity of sediment-associated acenaphthene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene were determined for the marine amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. The four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were spiked into sediment in a concentration series of either single compounds or as approximately equitoxic mixtures of all four compounds. Standard 10-d sediment toxicity tests were conducted under fluorescent lighting. After 10 d, survivors were exposed for 1 h to ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the absence of sediment and then tested for their ability to bury in uncontaminated sediment. The 10-d median lethal concentrations (LC50s) were 2.31 mg acenaphthene/g organic carbon (OC), 2.22 mg phenanthrene/g OC, 3.31 mg fluoranthene/g OC, and 2.81 mg pyrene/g OC. These LC50s were used to calculate the sum of toxic units ({Sigma}TU) of the four PAHs in the approximately equitoxic mixtures. The {Sigma}TU LC50 was then calculated for the mixture treatments. If the toxicologic interaction of a mixture of contaminants is additive, {Sigma}TU LC50 = 1.0. The observed LC50 (1.55 {Sigma}TU) was slightly, but significantly, greater than unity, indicating that the interaction of PAHs in the mixture was less than additive. Exposure to UV radiation enhanced the toxic effects of fluoranthene and pyrene, but did not affect the toxicity of acenaphthene and phenanthrene. Effects of UV radiation on the toxicity of the mixture of four PAHs could be explained by the photoactivation of fluoranthene and pyrene alone. These results are consistent with predictions based on photophysical properties of PAH compounds.

  11. Channel evolution after dam removal in a poorly sorted sediment mixture: Experiments and numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer-Boix, Carles; Martín-Vide, Juan P.; Parker, Gary

    2014-11-01

    Dam removal is commonly used for river restoration. However, there are still some uncertainties associated with dam removal, mainly related to the sediment transport rates released downstream from the deposit that had previously filled the impoundment. This research studies the physical response to dam removal in the antecedent deposit by answering the following questions: (a) how does an initial channel excavated into the deposit evolve, and (b) what is the time distribution of the material released during the early stages of the process. These goals are achieved by an experimental campaign using a poorly sorted mixture of sediment in the antecedent deposit. The research shows that for the given conditions of our experiments, the rate at which the sediment is released depends on the height of the removed dam, the water discharge and the maximum potential volume of sediment to be eroded. This investigation provides new insights of the width evolution when the sediment is composed of a poorly sorted mixture. This evolution is linked to the bed degradation rates: channel narrows during a rapid incisional phase, and subsequently widens when bed degradation rates decrease. Channel width changes propagate upstream as a convection-like perturbation associated with a kinematic wave starting at the location of the antecedent dam. These features are modeled through a new numerical model accounting for mixtures. More specifically, a set of equations has been derived for the variation of bed elevation, channel bottom width, and bed grain-size distribution, which when solved numerically, describe the observed channel processes.

  12. Sedimentation dynamics and equilibrium profiles in multicomponent mixtures of colloidal particles.

    PubMed

    Spruijt, E; Biesheuvel, P M

    2014-02-19

    In this paper we give a general theoretical framework that describes the sedimentation of multicomponent mixtures of particles with sizes ranging from molecules to macroscopic bodies. Both equilibrium sedimentation profiles and the dynamic process of settling, or its converse, creaming, are modeled. Equilibrium profiles are found to be in perfect agreement with experiments. Our model reconciles two apparently contradicting points of view about buoyancy, thereby resolving a long-lived paradox about the correct choice of the buoyant density. On the one hand, the buoyancy force follows necessarily from the suspension density, as it relates to the hydrostatic pressure gradient. On the other hand, sedimentation profiles of colloidal suspensions can be calculated directly using the fluid density as apparent buoyant density in colloidal systems in sedimentation-diffusion equilibrium (SDE) as a result of balancing gravitational and thermodynamic forces. Surprisingly, this balance also holds in multicomponent mixtures. This analysis resolves the ongoing debate of the correct choice of buoyant density (fluid or suspension): both approaches can be used in their own domain. We present calculations of equilibrium sedimentation profiles and dynamic sedimentation that show the consequences of these insights. In bidisperse mixtures of colloids, particles with a lower mass density than the homogeneous suspension will first cream and then settle, whereas particles with a suspension-matched mass density form transient, bimodal particle distributions during sedimentation, which disappear when equilibrium is reached. In all these cases, the centers of the distributions of the particles with the lowest mass density of the two, regardless of their actual mass, will be located in equilibrium above the so-called isopycnic point, a natural consequence of their hard-sphere interactions. We include these interactions using the Boublik-Mansoori-Carnahan-Starling-Leland (BMCSL) equation of

  13. The influence of grain size ratio upon the relative mobility in bimodal sediment mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudill, Ashley; Frey, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    The behaviour of grain mixtures varies from that of uniform grain, which has implications for bedload sediment transport in gravel-bed rivers. In particular, sediment mixtures act to modify the level of mobility within the bed, leading to aggradation or degradation, which has significant implications for river stability. Previous work has reported upon this change in mobility within bimodal mixtures; however we do not know how far grain size ratio influences these results. We hypothesise that there is a link between the change in levels of mobility and the grain size ratio due to varying amounts of infiltration, which controls the hiding/exposure function. This poster will present experimental results from an investigation designed to isolate the influence of grain size ratio upon the change in levels of mobility in bimodal sediment mixtures. This experimental investigation was undertaken using various sizes of spherical particles in a relatively narrow flume. Using this arrangement, we are able to observe effects at the particle scale in order to understand the individual and bulk grain behaviour.

  14. Glass polymorphism in glycerol-water mixtures: II. Experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas; Loerting, Thomas

    2016-04-28

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol-water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0-1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol-water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s(-1)-10 K h(-1)) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ(g). Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χg ≥ 0.20), ice (χ(g) ≤ 0.32), and/or "distorted ice" (0 < χ(g) ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χ(g) ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol-water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ(g) ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ(g) < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χ(g) ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χ(g) < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χ(g) ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χ(g) ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χ(g) ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol-water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex "phase" behavior

  15. Glass polymorphism in glycerol–water mixtures: II. Experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Bachler, Johannes; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Jahn, David A.; Wong, Jessina; Giovambattista, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of (i) pressure-induced transformations in glycerol–water mixtures at T = 77 K and P = 0–1.8 GPa, and (ii) heating-induced transformations of glycerol–water mixtures recovered at 1 atm and T = 77 K. Our samples are prepared by cooling the solutions at ambient pressure at various cooling rates (100 K s–1–10 K h–1) and for the whole range of glycerol mole fractions, χ g. Depending on concentration and cooling rates, cooling leads to samples containing amorphous ice (χ g ≥ 0.20), ice (χ g ≤ 0.32), and/or “distorted ice” (0 < χ g ≤ 0.38). Upon compression, we find that (a) fully vitrified samples at χ g ≥ 0.20 do not show glass polymorphism, in agreement with previous works; (b) samples containing ice show pressure-induced amorphization (PIA) leading to the formation of high-density amorphous ice (HDA). PIA of ice domains within the glycerol–water mixtures is shown to be possible only up to χ g ≈ 0.32 (T = 77 K). This is rather surprising since it has been known that at χ g < 0.38, cooling leads to phase-separated samples with ice and maximally freeze-concentrated solution of χ g ≈ 0.38. Accordingly, in the range 0.32 < χ g < 0.38, we suggest that the water domains freeze into an interfacial ice, i.e., a highly-distorted form of layered ice, which is unable to transform to HDA upon compression. Upon heating samples recovered at 1 atm, we observe a rich phase behavior. Differential scanning calorimetry indicates that only at χ g ≤ 0.15, the water domains within the sample exhibit polyamorphism, i.e., the HDA-to-LDA (low-density amorphous ice) transformation. At 0.15 < χ g ≤ 0.38, samples contain ice, interfacial ice, and/or HDA domains. All samples (χ g ≤ 0.38) show: the crystallization of amorphous ice domains, followed by the glass transition of the vitrified glycerol–water domains and, finally, the melting of ice at high temperatures. Our work exemplifies the complex

  16. Assessment of alcohol ethoxylate surfactants and fatty alcohols mixtures in river sediments and prospective risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Scott D; Sanderson, Hans; Waite, Scott W; Van Compernolle, Remi; Price, Bradford; Nielsen, Allen M; Evans, Alex; Decarvalho, Alvaro J; Hooton, Dennis J; Sherren, Andrew J

    2006-09-01

    A feasible and relatively readily available analytical method was adapted for the assessment of alcohol ethoxylates (AE) and fatty alcohols (FA) in sediments. This study illustrates the simultaneous measurement of 38 of 114 possible alcohol ethoxylate ethoxymers (AE) and fatty alcohols (FA) found in commercially important AE products. We predicted toxicity for all identified fractions, as well as the total mixture toxicity, relative to three exposure scenarios via sewage treatment plants (STP) for these widely used chemicals in consumer products and hence generate a preliminary environmental risk screening for AE and FA in sediments. The method is based on derivatization of solvent or solid-phase extracts with 2-fluoro-N-methylpyridinium p-toluenesulfonate (Pyr+). The derivatized extracts were analyzed with liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) operating in the positive ion electrospray mode. The extraction efficiency of AE and FA in three different sediments of varying composition was evaluated with spike-recovery studies, ranging from 64% to 80%. The detection limits for individual ethoxymers typically ranged from 1 to 5 ngg(-1)on a dry weight basis. The mean limit of detection (LOD) was 6 ngg(-1)and the median LOD was 3 ngg(-1). AE and FA in sediments were found to be stable for two weeks if preserved with 3% (v/v) formalin and stored at 4-6( composite function)C. Based on equilibrium partitioning, background concentrations of AE and FA were predicted to be below concentrations known to elicit chronically toxic effects. Total worst case mixture toxicities for all AE ethoxymers combined with FA were predicted to result in a risk quotient less than 0.6. Activated sludge treatment (STP) significantly reduced the release of total AE and FA by four-fold, suggesting that the total mixture risk quotient would be < 0.15 for sediment dependent organisms.

  17. Infiltration of fine sediment mixtures through poorly sorted immobile coarse beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez-González, Francisco

    2016-12-01

    Percolation of fine sediment is a common process in gravel bed rivers, which often exhibit extended and overlapping grain size distributions of the bed and the supplied fine sediment. Yet existing sediment infiltration theory assumes well-sorted fine material with smaller grain size than the bed pores, and as such, is not suitable for many situations encountered in gravel bed streams. Previous developments for infiltration of uniform material are here generalized to consider poorly sorted sediment mixtures. Governing equations and a numerical solution to model the vertical distribution of infiltrating sediment are presented. The equations are solved as a function of a trapping coefficient, dependent on the relative size of infiltrating fines in relation to bed material. A method is developed to generate equivalent grain size distributions to calculate the trapping coefficient, when grain sizes of the infiltrating and bed materials overlap. Moreover, a bed cutoff size is defined and computed with a semiempirical packing-porosity model, to distinguish particles smaller than the bed pores. Published experimental data are used to test the new model and calibrate the trapping coefficient. It is shown that this coefficient is highly sensible to the fine and coarse tails of fine and coarse materials grain size distributions. Accordingly, calibrated values of the coefficient are set as a function of a mean size ratio, computed from the geometric mean of the tails of the size distributions. Incorporating this relation, the model performed well in reproducing indirect observations of sediment infiltration from experiments reported in the literature.

  18. Polymer-Induced Depletion Interaction and Its Effect on Colloidal Sedimentation in Colloid-Polymer Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Penger

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the polymer-induced depletion attraction and its effect on colloidal sedimentation in colloid-polymer mixtures. We first report a small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of the depletion effect in a mixture of hard-sphere-like colloid and non-adsorbing polymer. Then we present results of our recent sedimentation measurements in the same colloid-polymer mixture. A key parameter in controlling the sedimentation of heavy colloidal particles is the interparticle potential U(tau), which is the work required to bring two colloidal particles from infinity to a distance tau under a give solvent condition. This potential is known to affect the average settling velocity of the particles and experimentally one needs to have a way to continuously vary U(tau) in order to test the theory. The interaction potential U(tau) can be altered by adding polymer molecules into the colloidal suspension. In a mixture of colloid and non-adsorbing polymer, the potential U(tau) can develop an attractive well because of the depletion effect, in that the polymer chains are expelled from the region between two colloidal particles when their surface separation becomes smaller than the size of the polymer chains. The exclusion of polymer molecules from the space between the colloidal particles leads to an unbalanced osmotic pressure difference pushing the colloidal particles together, which results in an effective attraction between the two colloidal particles. The polymer-induced depletion attraction controls the phase stability of many colloid-polymer mixtures, which are directly of interest to industry.

  19. Evidence for the Existence of Autotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria in Marine Coastal Sediment.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-10-15

    Nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms were described for the first time ca. 20 years ago. Most pure cultures of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers can oxidize Fe(II) only under mixotrophic conditions, i.e., when an organic cosubstrate is provided. A small number of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing cultures have been proposed to grow autotrophically, but unambiguous evidence for autotrophy has not always been provided. Thus, it is still unclear whether or to what extent Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction is an enzymatically catalyzed and energy-yielding autotrophic process or whether Fe(II) is abiotically oxidized by nitrite from heterotrophic nitrate reduction. The aim of the present study was to find evidence for the existence of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers in coastal marine sediments. Microcosm incubations showed that with increasing incubation times, the stoichiometric ratio of reduced nitrate/oxidized Fe(II) [NO3(-)reduced/Fe(II)oxidized] decreased, indicating a decreasing contribution of heterotrophic denitrification and/or an increasing contribution of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation over time. After incubations of sediment slurries for >10 weeks, nitrate-reducing activity ceased, although nitrate was still present. This suggests that heterotrophic nitrate reduction had ceased due to the depletion of readily available organic carbon. However, after the addition of Fe(II) to these batch incubation mixtures, the nitrate-reducing activity resumed, and Fe(II) was oxidized, indicating the activity of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. The concurrent reduction of (14)C-labeled bicarbonate concentrations unambiguously proved that autotrophic C fixation occurred during Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction. Our results clearly demonstrated that autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria were present in the investigated coastal marine sediments.

  20. An Extended Equation of State Modeling Method II. Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalabrin, G.; Marchi, P.; Stringari, P.; Richon, D.

    2006-09-01

    This work is the extension of previous work dedicated to pure fluids. The same method is extended to the representation of thermodynamic properties of a mixture through a fundamental equation of state in terms of the Helmholtz energy. The proposed technique exploits the extended corresponding-states concept of distorting the independent variables of a dedicated equation of state for a reference fluid using suitable scale factor functions to adapt the equation to experimental data of a target system. An existing equation of state for the target mixture is used instead of an equation for the reference fluid, completely avoiding the need for a reference fluid. In particular, a Soave-Redlich-Kwong cubic equation with van der Waals mixing rules is chosen. The scale factors, which are functions of temperature, density, and mole fraction of the target mixture, are expressed in the form of a multilayer feedforward neural network, whose coefficients are regressed by minimizing a suitable objective function involving different kinds of mixture thermodynamic data. As a preliminary test, the model is applied to five binary and two ternary haloalkane mixtures, using data generated from existing dedicated equations of state for the selected mixtures. The results show that the method is robust and straightforward for the effective development of a mixture- specific equation of state directly from experimental data.

  1. Reductive debromination of the commercial polybrominated biphenyl mixture firemaster BP6 by anaerobic microorganisms from sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, P.J.; Quensen, J.F. III; Tiedje, J.M.; Boyd, S.A. )

    1992-10-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms eluted from three sediments, one contaminated with polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and two contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls, were compared for their ability to debrominate the commercial PBB mixture Firemaster. These microorganisms were incubated with reduced anaerobic mineral medium and noncontaminated sediment amended with Firemaster. Firemaster averages six bromines per biphenyl molecule; four of the bromines are substituted in the meta or para position. The inocula from all three sources were able to debrominate the meta and para positions. Microorganisms from the Pine River (St. Louis, Mich.) contaminated with Firemaster, the Hudson River (Hudson Falls, N.Y.) contaminated with Aroclor 1242, and Silver Lake (Pittsfield, Mass.) contaminated with Aroclor 1260 removed 32, 12, and 3% of the meta plus para bromines, respectively, after 32 weeks of incubation. This suggests that previous environmental exposure to PBBs enhances the debromination capability of the sediment microbial community through selection for different strains of microorganisms. The Pine River inoculum removed an average of 1.25 bromines per biphenyl molecule during a 32-week incubation period, resulting in a mixture potentially more accessible to aerobic degradation processes. No ortho bromine removal was observed. However, when Firemaster was incubated with Hudson River microorganisms that had been repeatedly transferred on a pyruvate medium amended with Aroclor 1242, 17% of the meta and para bromines were removed after 16 weeks of incubation and additional debromination products, including 2-bromobiphenyl and biphenyl, were detected.

  2. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for phase separating fluid mixtures. II. Diffusion in a binary mixture.

    PubMed

    Thieulot, Cedric; Janssen, L P B M; Español, Pep

    2005-07-01

    A previously formulated smoothed particle hydrodynamics model for a phase separating mixture is tested for the case when viscous processes are negligible and only mass and energy diffusive processes take place. We restrict ourselves to the case of a binary mixture that can exhibit liquid-liquid phase separation. The thermodynamic consistency of the model is assessed and the potential of the model to study complex pattern formation in the presence of various thermal boundaries is illustrated.

  3. Reductive debromination of the commercial polybrominated biphenyl mixture firemaster BP6 by anaerobic microorganisms from sediments.

    PubMed

    Morris, P J; Quensen, J F; Tiedje, J M; Boyd, S A

    1992-10-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms eluted from three sediments, one contaminated with polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and two contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls, were compared for their ability to debrominate the commercial PBB mixture Firemaster. These microorganisms were incubated with reduced anaerobic mineral medium and noncontaminated sediment amended with Firemaster. Firemaster averages six bromines per biphenyl molecule; four of the bromines are substituted in the meta or para position. The inocula from all three sources were able to debrominate the meta and para positions. Microorganisms from the Pine River (St. Louis, Mich.) contaminated with Firemaster, the Hudson River (Hudson Falls, N.Y.) contaminated with Aroclor 1242, and Silver Lake (Pittsfield, Mass.) contaminated with Aroclor 1260 removed 32, 12, and 3% of the meta plus para bromines, respectively, after 32 weeks of incubation. This suggests that previous environmental exposure to PBBs enhances the debromination capability of the sediment microbial community through selection for different strains of microorganisms. The Pine River inoculum removed an average of 1.25 bromines per biphenyl molecule during a 32-week incubation period, resulting in a mixture potentially more accessible to aerobic degradation processes. No ortho bromine removal was observed. However, when Firemaster was incubated with Hudson River microorganisms that had been repeatedly transferred on a pyruvate medium amended with Aroclor 1242, 17% of the meta and para bromines were removed after 16 weeks of incubation and additional debromination products, including 2-bromobiphenyl and biphenyl, were detected. This suggests the possibility for ortho debromination, since all components of the Firemaster mixture have at least one ortho-substituted bromine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Electrical properties of methane hydrate + sediment mixtures: The σ of CH4 Hydrate + Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Du Frane, Wyatt L.; Stern, Laura A.; Constable, Steven; Weitemeyer, Karen A.; Smith, Megan M.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2015-07-30

    Knowledge of the electrical properties of multicomponent systems with gas hydrate, sediments, and pore water is needed to help relate electromagnetic (EM) measurements to specific gas hydrate concentration and distribution patterns in nature. We built a pressure cell capable of measuring in situ electrical properties of multicomponent systems such that the effects of individual components and mixing relations can be assessed. We first established the temperature-dependent electrical conductivity (σ) of pure, single-phase methane hydrate to be ~5 orders of magnitude lower than seawater, a substantial contrast that can help differentiate hydrate deposits from significantly more conductive water-saturated sediments in EM field surveys. We report σ measurements of two-component systems in which methane hydrate is mixed with variable amounts of quartz sand or glass beads. Sand by itself has low σ but is found to increase the overall σ of mixtures with well-connected methane hydrate. Alternatively, the overall σ decreases when sand concentrations are high enough to cause gas hydrate to be poorly connected, indicating that hydrate grains provide the primary conduction path. Our measurements suggest that impurities from sand induce chemical interactions and/or doping effects that result in higher electrical conductivity with lower temperature dependence. Finally, these results can be used in the modeling of massive or two-phase gas-hydrate-bearing systems devoid of conductive pore water. Further experiments that include a free water phase are the necessary next steps toward developing complex models relevant to most natural systems.

  5. Evaluating the suitability of Hydrobia ulvae as a test species for sediment metal toxicity testing applying a tissue residue approach to metal mixtures in laboratory and field exposures.

    PubMed

    Campana, Olivia; Rodríguez, Antonio; Blasco, Julián

    2013-05-01

    A major weakness in evaluating the suitability of a biomonitor organism is the poor ability to predict the variability of the bioavailability of metals from measured environmental concentrations. In this study, the intertidal gastropod Hydrobia ulvae was used to evaluate its suitability as a test organism for assessing sediment metal toxicity. Toxicity tests were run with sediments spiked with copper, cadmium and zinc applied both as single metal and as a mixture to investigate toxicological interactions evaluating different lethal and sublethal effects. Dose-response relationships were constructed based both on tissue residue approach and particulate metal concentrations. Because metal-spiked sediments used in routine toxicity tests often do not exhibit the same adsorption/desorption kinetics as the natural sediments, the laboratory results were compared to 10-d bioassays conducted with natural field sediments collected from the Guadalete estuary (SW Spain). Highly significant correlations between tissue residue concentrations and particulate metal concentrations were found for all metal-spiked or field-collected and demonstrated that: (i) H. ulvae readily accumulated copper and cadmium in response to contamination and (ii) dietary uptake was determined to be the most significant route of metal exposure. The comparison of the modeled tissue residue-response curve developed from the mixture tests was in good agreement with the results from the bioassay conducted with field sediments and strongly demonstrated that H. ulvae is also a suitable test organism for assessing copper sediment toxicity. In contrast, the dose-response curve expressed as a function of total particulate metal concentrations would fail in predicting effect, erroneously assessing higher metal toxicity.

  6. Geochemical dynamics of the Atlantis II Deep (Red Sea): II. Composition of metalliferous sediment pore waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anschutz, Pierre; Blanc, Gérard; Monnin, Christophe; Boulègue, Jacques

    2000-12-01

    The Atlantis II Deep is an axial depression of the Red Sea filled with highly saline brines and covered by layered metalliferous sediment. We report new data on the vertical distribution of major salts and trace metals dissolved in the pore waters of the metalliferous sediments. We have studied the chemical composition of interstitial waters of two sediment cores of the western (core 684) and southwestern (core 683) basins. The major dissolved elements are Na and Cl. Their concentrations are close to those of the brine overlying the sediment. The pore waters are undersaturated with respect to halite at the in situ conditions (62°C, 220 bars), but are saturated at the shipboard conditions (10°C, 1 bar). The salt and water contents of the bulk sediment show that core 683 contained halite in the solid fraction. A part of it precipitated after core collection, but most of it was present in situ. Thermodynamic calculations with a water-rock interaction model based on Pitzer's ion interaction approach reveal that equilibrium between the pore waters and anhydrite is achieved in sediment layers for which observations report the presence of this mineral. We used a transport model, which shows that molecular diffusion can smooth the profile of dissolved salt and partly erase the pore water record of past variations of salinity in the lower brine. For example, we calculated that the pore water record of modern variation of brine salinity is rapidly smoothed by molecular diffusion. The dissolved transition metals show large variations with depth in the interstitial waters. The profiles of core 683 reflect the possible advection of hydrothermal fluid within the sediment of the southwestern basin. The distribution of dissolved metals in core 684 is the result of diagenetic reactions, mainly the reduction of Mn-oxide with dissolved Fe(II), the recrystallization of primary oxide minerals, and the precipitation of authigenic Mn-carbonates.

  7. Quench and granulation of magma in sediment-water mixtures: 1st experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. D.; Zimanowski, B.; Buettner, R.; Sonder, I.

    2008-12-01

    When a magmatic melt encounters water, heat is transferred and in many cases the melt is fragmented to varying degrees by a range of processes. Explosive MFCI interactions result from extremely rapid heat transfer during fine fragmentation. Under other conditions, interactions extend from quiet steaming to non- explosive granulation. Among the many variables in natural environments inferred to play a role in determining the style of magma-water interaction is the presence of impurities, such as particulate sediment, in the water. This has been argued to be of particular significance for interactions within volcanic vents, where debris accumulates during the course of an eruption. A simple set of experiments was undertaken at the Physical Volcanology Lab in Wuerzburg, Germany, to investigate the effect of such particulate mixtures. Magma (~200 gm) was poured from a fixed height into a receptacle with pure water, and water with 10, 20, and 30 percent suspended mud. Thermocouple and force measurements were collected during and after each pour, and reveal that with increasing sediment concentrations, the rate of heat transfer from magma to coolant, and the intensity of thermal granulation, is progressively reduced. The scale of reduction is impressive; for water, virtually all heat transfer from magma to water is complete within a few seconds after the pour, whereas with 30 percent suspended clay this stretches to in excess of 10 minutes. The change reflects reduced fragmentation of the magma, reduced heat capacity of the coolant, and strongly reduced convection in the coolant. A separate pour into a liquefied sand-clay sediment (64 percent sediment by mass) produced similarly reduced heat transfer, but was accompanied by quiet but pervasive hydrodynamic fragmentation of the melt into centimetric glass spheres, many of which welded together within the sediment.

  8. Step heating of 40Ar/ 39Ar standard mineral mixtures: Investigation of a fine-grained bulk sediment provenance tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanLaningham, Sam; Mark, Darren F.

    2011-05-01

    Quantitative techniques that link sediments to their sources are needed to understand a range of tectonic, climate, and anthropogenic driven Earth surface processes. Many provenance techniques exist for sand-sized material but fewer are available for fine-grained sediment archives. In this respect, bulk 40Ar/ 39Ar ages from silt-sized sediment show potential, but many questions remain about the significance of a bulk sediment 40Ar/ 39Ar age. We interrogate bulk sediment 40Ar/ 39Ar ages by step heating mixtures of well-constrained 40Ar/ 39Ar mineral standards crushed to silt-sized. Silt-sized end member components Alder Creek Sanidine, Taylor Creek Sanidine and Heidelberg Biotite all yield plateau ages within uncertainty of their coarse-grained counterparts. High-resolution step heating (as many as 43 steps) of the mineral mixtures shows that biotite degasses first at lower temperatures compared to the two sanidines that degas generally in concert. Concordant age steps develop at both low and high temperatures and the transition from the isotope signal being dominated by one mineral phase to another is clearly observed. We show that age spectra for the mineral standard mixtures can be modeled and predicted for all mixtures by assuming a (simplistic) Gaussian distributed release of Ar, and by using the degassing maxima, variance, K concentration, and 40Ar/ 39Ar age of each monitor mineral. Thus, bulk sediment 40Ar/ 39Ar ages can be robust indicators of the average cooling/crystallization age of all contributing K-bearing minerals to a depositional center. Furthermore, we discuss the potential to deconvolve individual mineral age populations by model inversion. The application of this bulk sediment provenance technique should not be considered a replacement for single grain analyses. It should be applied to environments that do not provide sand-sized sediment archives (e.g., distal terrigenous sedimentary archives) when information about source changes through time

  9. PROCEDURES FOR DERIVING EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING SEDIMENT BENCHMARKS (ESBS) FOR THE PROTECTION OF BENTHIC ORGANISMS: METALS MIXTURES (CADMIUM, COPPER, LEAD, NICKEL, SILVER, AND ZINC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document describes procedures to derive concentrations of metal mixtures in sediment which are protective of the presence of benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it accounts for t...

  10. CRITICAL BODY RESIDUES FOR FRESHWATER AND SALTWATER AMPHIPODS EXPOSED TO SEDIMENT CONTAINING A MIXTURE OF HIGH KOW PAHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments were spiked with a mixture of 13 high log Kow (5.4-6.8) PAH compounds to determine critical body residues (CBR) in Hyalella azteca and Leptocheirus plumulosus. Hyalella were exposed for 28 d in a intermittent flow test and for 10 d in a static test to compare PAH uptake...

  11. Evidence for the Existence of Autotrophic Nitrate-Reducing Fe(II)-Oxidizing Bacteria in Marine Coastal Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Katja; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms were described for the first time ca. 20 years ago. Most pure cultures of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers can oxidize Fe(II) only under mixotrophic conditions, i.e., when an organic cosubstrate is provided. A small number of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing cultures have been proposed to grow autotrophically, but unambiguous evidence for autotrophy has not always been provided. Thus, it is still unclear whether or to what extent Fe(II) oxidation coupled to nitrate reduction is an enzymatically catalyzed and energy-yielding autotrophic process or whether Fe(II) is abiotically oxidized by nitrite from heterotrophic nitrate reduction. The aim of the present study was to find evidence for the existence of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers in coastal marine sediments. Microcosm incubations showed that with increasing incubation times, the stoichiometric ratio of reduced nitrate/oxidized Fe(II) [NO3−reduced/Fe(II)oxidized] decreased, indicating a decreasing contribution of heterotrophic denitrification and/or an increasing contribution of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation over time. After incubations of sediment slurries for >10 weeks, nitrate-reducing activity ceased, although nitrate was still present. This suggests that heterotrophic nitrate reduction had ceased due to the depletion of readily available organic carbon. However, after the addition of Fe(II) to these batch incubation mixtures, the nitrate-reducing activity resumed, and Fe(II) was oxidized, indicating the activity of autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. The concurrent reduction of 14C-labeled bicarbonate concentrations unambiguously proved that autotrophic C fixation occurred during Fe(II) oxidation and nitrate reduction. Our results clearly demonstrated that autotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria were present in the investigated coastal marine sediments. IMPORTANCE Twenty years after the

  12. Convection in binary fluid mixtures. II. Localized traveling waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barten, W.; Lücke, M.; Kamps, M.; Schmitz, R.

    1995-06-01

    Nonlinear, spatially localized structures of traveling convection rolls that are surrounded by quiescent fluid in horizontal layers of binary fluids heated from below are investigated in quantitative detail as a function of Rayleigh number for two different Soret coupling strengths (separation ratios) with Lewis and Prandtl numbers characterizing ethanol-water mixtures. A finite-difference method was used to solve the full hydrodynamic field equations numerically in a vertical cross section perpendicular to the roll axes subject to realistic horizontal and laterally periodic boundary conditions with different periodicity lengths. Structure and dynamics of these localized traveling waves (LTW's) are dominated by the concentration field. As in the spatially extended convective states that are investigated in an accompanying paper, the Soret-induced concentration variations strongly influence, via density changes, the buoyancy forces that drive convection. The spatiotemporal properties of this feedback mechanism, involving boundary layers and concentration plumes, show that LTW's are strongly nonlinear states. Light intensity distributions are determined that can be observed in side-view shadowgraphs done with horizontal light along the roll axes. Detailed analyses of all fields are made using color-coded isoplots, among others. In the frame comoving with their drift velocity, LTW's display a nontrivial spatiotemporal symmetry consisting of time translation by one-half an oscillation period combined with vertical reflection through the horizontal midplane of the layer. A time-averaged concentration current is driven by a phase difference between the waves of concentration and vertical velocity in the bulk of the LTW state. The associated large-scale concentration redistribution stabilizes the LTW and controls its drift velocity into the quiescent fluid by generating a buoyancy-reducing concentration ``barrier'' ahead of the leading LTW front. All considered LTW

  13. Tolerance and genetic relatedness of three meiobenthic copepod populations exposed to sediment-associated contaminant mixtures: Role of environmental history

    SciTech Connect

    Kovatch, C.E.; Schizas, N.V.; Chandler, G.T.; Coull, B.C.; Quattro, J.M.

    2000-04-01

    Meiobenthic copepod populations (Microarthridion littoral) were collected from three South Carolina, USA, estuaries having different pollution stress histories (i.e., pristine sediments, high polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon [PAH] sediments, high metals/moderate PAH sediments) and then assayed for survival and reproductive output in 14-d exposures to pristine and heavily PAH/metals-contaminated sediment mixture exhibited differential survival and reproductive outputs as a function of previous environmental histories and whether genetic relatedness among populations measured as DNA sequences of the mitochondrial gene, cytochrome apoenzyme b, were linked to copepod contaminant tolerance. Overall, adult survival and reproductive success in contaminated sediments were significantly reduced relative to controls for all three populations irrespective of environmental histories. Differential resistance to sediment-contaminant mixtures by the two copepod populations inhabiting the contaminated sites was not found, despite their previous exposures to mixed contaminants at {Sigma}PAH and {Sigma}Metal concentrations of 7,287 to 2,467 ng/g dry wt and 461 to 3,497 {micro}g/g, respectively. Significant genetic differentiation, however, was found between copepod populations from the control and the two contaminated sites. Generally, cross-population survival and reproductive outputs were not significantly different and could not be linked to genetic differentiation at the population level.

  14. Evaluation of an extraction method for a mixture of endocrine disrupters in sediment using chemical and in vitro biological analyses.

    PubMed

    Creusot, Nicolas; Dévier, Marie-Hélène; Budzinski, Hélène; Aït-Aïssa, Selim

    2016-06-01

    Aquatic sediments are contaminated by a wide diversity of organic pollutants such as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) which encompass a broad range of chemical classes having natural and anthropogenic origins. The use of in vitro bioassays is now widely accepted as an alternative method for their detection in complex samples. However, based on the diversity of EDC chemical properties, their common extraction is difficult and comprehensive validation of extraction methods for a bioanalysis purpose is still weakly documented. In this study, we compared the performance of several organic solvents, i.e., acetone, methanol, dichloromethane, heptane, dichloromethane/acetone (50:50, v/v), dichloromethane/methanol (50:50, v/v), heptane/acetone (50:50, v/v), and heptane/methanol (50:50, v/v), to extract a diversity of active chemicals from a spiked sediment matrix using pressurized liquid extraction. For this purpose, we defined a mixture of 12 EDCs with a wide range of polarity (2 < log Kow < 8) (i.e., estrone, 17β-estradiol, bisphenol A, o,p'DDT, 4-tert-octylphenol, fenofibrate, triphenyl phosphate, clotrimazole, PCB-126, 2,3,7,8 TCDD, benzo[k]fluoranthene, and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene). Working concentrations of each individual compound in the mixture were determined as equipotent concentrations on the basis of the concentration-addition (CA) model applied to in vitro estrogenic, dioxin-like, and pregnane X receptor (PXR)-like activities. Extraction efficiencies based on both chemical and biological analyses were assessed in triplicate in artificial blank sediment spiked with this mixture and in natural sediment contaminated by native EDCs. In both spiked and natural sediment, MeOH/DCM yields the best recovery while heptane was the least efficient solvent. Our study provided the validation of a sediment extraction methodology for EDC bioanalysis purposes, which can be used for comprehensive environmental contamination characterization.

  15. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of a mixture of heavy metals in Chironomus tentans (Diptera: Chironomidae) in synthetic sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Harrahy, E.A.; Clements, W.H.

    1997-02-01

    This research investigated toxicity and bioaccumulation of a mixture of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in Chironomus tentans in synthetic sediment, and compared predicted to measured steady-state bioaccumulation factors (BAFs). In a toxicity test, C. tentans were exposed to various dilutions of a base concentration (1.0 X) of a mixture of the four metals (5 {micro}g/g Cd. 10 {micro}g/g Cu. 70 {micro}g/g Pb, and 300 {micro}g/g Zn) in synthetic sediment. Mortality ranged from 17 to 100%. To measure bioaccumulation of the metals, C. tentans were exposed to 0.35 X the base concentration for a period of up to 14 d in two uptake tests. Bioaccumulation of all four metals increased over the 14-d uptake phases. Concentrations of metals in chironomids were significantly correlated with exposure time in the uptake phases. Only concentrations of copper approached background levels after 7 d depuration. Uptake rate coefficients and elimination rate constants were determined for each metal. Bioaccumulation factors were highest for Cd and lowest for Pb. With the exception of Pb, steady-state BAFs were within a factor of about two of those calculated using the first-order kinetic model. The high BAFs calculated may indicate greater bioavailability in synthetic sediment. Studies comparing toxicity and bioaccumulation of natural and synthetic sediments are necessary before the use of synthetic sediments is widely adopted.

  16. Phase Equilibria and Transition in Mixtures of a Homopolymer and a Block Copolymer. II.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-26

    AD-A124 929 PHASE EQUILIBRIA AND TRANSITION IN MIXTURES OF A In- NOMOPOLYMER AND’A BLOCK..(U) CINCINNATI UNJY ON DEPT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND...REPORT NO. 7 v2 L Phase Equilibria and Transition in Mixtures of a Homopolymer and a Block Copolymer II. The Phase Diagram by R. J. Roe and W. C. Zin...homopolymers as in our systems. The phase equilibria at temperatures above the "pseudo-triple point" BCD can be interpreted in terms of the free energy of

  17. The effect of biogenic Fe(II) on the stability and sorption of Co(II)EDTA 2- to goethite and a subsurface sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, John M.; Smith, Steven C.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2000-04-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted with suspensions of goethite (α-FeOOH) and a subsurface sediment to assess the influence of bacterial iron reduction on the fate of Co(II)EDTA 2-, a representative metal-ligand complex of intermediate stability (log K Co(II)EDTA = 17.97). The goethite was synthetic (ca. 55 m 2/g) and the sediment was a Pleistocene age, Fe(III) oxide-containing material from the Atlantic coastal plain (Milford). Shewanella alga strain BrY, a dissimilatory iron reducing bacterium (DIRB), was used to promote Fe(III) oxide reduction. Sorption isotherms and pH adsorption edges were measured for Co 2+, Fe 2+, Co(II)EDTA 2-, and Fe(II)EDTA 2- on the two sorbents in 0.001 mol/L Ca(ClO 4) 2 to aid in experiment interpretation. Anoxic suspensions of the sorbents in PIPES buffer at pH 6.5-7.0 were spiked with Co(II)EDTA 2- (10 -5 mol/L, 60Co and 14EDTA labeled), inoculated with BrY (1-6 × 10 8 organisms/mL), and the headspace filled with a N 2/H 2 gas mix. The experiments were conducted under non-growth conditions. The medium did not contain PO 43- (with one exception), trace elements, or vitamins. The tubes were incubated under anoxic conditions at 25°C for time periods in excess of 100 d. Replicate tubes were sacrificed and analyzed at desired time periods for pH, Fe(II) TOT, Fe (aq)2+, 60Co, and 14EDTA. Abiotic analogue experiments were conducted where Fe (aq)2+ was added in increasing concentration to Co(II)EDTA 2-/mineral suspensions to simulate the influence of bacterial Fe(II) evolution. The DIRB generated Fe(II) from both goethite and the Milford sediment that was strongly sorbed by mineral surfaces. Aqueous Fe 2+ increased during the experiment as surfaces became saturated; Fe (aq)2+ induced the dissociation of Co(II)EDTA 2- into a mixture of Co 2+, Co(II)EDTA 2-, and Fe(II)EDTA 2- (log K Fe(II)EDTA = 15.98). The extent of dissociation of Co(II)EDTA 2- was greater in the subsurface sediment because it sorbed Fe(II) less strongly than did

  18. PHOTOACTIVATION AND TOXICITY OF MIXTURES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON COMPOUNDS IN MARINE SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The direct toxicity and photoinduced toxicity of sediment-associated acenaphthene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene were determined for the marine amphipod Rhepoxynius abronius. The four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were spiked into sediment in a concentration se...

  19. Laboratory experiments on dam-break flow of water-sediment mixtures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dams induce sedimentation and store significant amounts of sediment as they age; therefore, dam failures often involve the release of sediment-laden water to the downstream floodplain. In particular, tailings dams, which are constructed to impound mining wastes, can cause devastating damage when the...

  20. Polychlorinated naphthalene congener profiles in background sediments compared to a degraded Halowax 1014 technical mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Jaernberg, U.G.; Asplund, L.T.; Egebaeck, A.L.; Jansson, B.; Unger, M.; Wideqvist, U.

    1999-01-01

    Polychlorinated naphthalenes were quantified in 10 lake and sea sediment samples from sites with no known present local pollution source. Levels ranged from 0.14 to 7.6 ng/g (dry weight). The chlorinated naphthalene (CN) congener profiles showed an increased relative abundance of 1,3,5,7- and 1,4,6,7-substituted congener profiles as compared to the reported CN congener profiles of technical PCN and PCB. Further, a dominance of 1,2,3,4,5,6,7-heptaCN over 1,2,3,4,5,6,8-heptaCN was found in all samples in contrast to the ratio reported for technical PCN and PCB products. Some samples showed traces of 2,3,6,7-substituted CN congeners, indicative of thermal sources, such as municipal waste incineration. These profiles were compared with the profiles obtained from a Halowax 1014 technical mixture subject to aerobic microbial degradation and sunlight photolysis. The aerobic microbial culture gave no alteration of the CN congener profile of over a 28-day period, whereas sunlight exposure of Halowax 1014 in methanol yielded a more low chlorinated CN congener profile. Furthermore, CN congeners with chlorines in 1,8-positions were more affected than those with 1,3,5,7- or 1,4,6,7-substitution. These results indicate that photolysis may explain the enhancement of the relative abundance of some of the 1,3,5,7- and 1,4,6,7-substituted CN congeners in the environment but not the heptaCN profile.

  1. Mercury methylation rates for geochemically relevant Hg(II) species in sediments.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Sofi; Skyllberg, Ulf; Nilsson, Mats B; Westlund, Per-Olof; Shchukarev, Andrey; Lundberg, Erik; Björn, Erik

    2012-11-06

    Monomethylmercury (MeHg) in fish from freshwater, estuarine, and marine environments is a major global environmental issue. Mercury levels in biota are mainly controlled by the methylation of inorganic mercuric mercury (Hg(II)) to MeHg in water, sediments, and soils. There is, however, a knowledge gap concerning the mechanisms and rates of methylation of specific geochemical Hg(II) species. Such information is crucial for a better understanding of variations in MeHg concentrations among ecosystems and, in particular, for predicting the outcome of currently proposed measures to mitigate mercury emissions and reduce MeHg concentrations in fish. To fill this knowledge gap we propose an experimental approach using Hg(II) isotope tracers, with defined and geochemically important adsorbed and solid Hg(II) forms in sediments, to study MeHg formation. We report Hg(II) methylation rate constants, k(m), in estuarine sediments which span over 2 orders of magnitude depending on chemical form of added tracer: metacinnabar (β-(201)HgS(s)) < cinnabar (α-(199)HgS(s)) < Hg(II) reacted with mackinawite (≡FeS-(202)Hg(II)) < Hg(II) bonded to natural organic matter (NOM-(196)Hg(II)) < a typical aqueous tracer ((198)Hg(NO(3))(2)(aq)). We conclude that a combination of thermodynamic and kinetic effects of Hg(II) solid-phase dissolution and surface desorption control the Hg(II) methylation rate in sediments and cause the large observed differences in k(m)-values. The selection of relevant solid-phase and surface-adsorbed Hg(II) tracers will therefore be crucial to achieving biogeochemically accurate estimates of ambient Hg(II) methylation rates.

  2. Variable Field Analytical Ultracentrifugation: II. Gravitational Sweep Sedimentation Velocity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia; Zhao, Huaying; Sandmaier, Julia; Alexander Liddle, J; Schuck, Peter

    2016-01-05

    Sedimentation velocity (SV) analytical ultracentrifugation is a classical biophysical technique for the determination of the size-distribution of macromolecules, macromolecular complexes, and nanoparticles. SV has traditionally been carried out at a constant rotor speed, which limits the range of sedimentation coefficients that can be detected in a single experiment. Recently we have introduced methods to implement experiments with variable rotor speeds, in combination with variable field solutions to the Lamm equation, with the application to expedite the approach to sedimentation equilibrium. Here, we describe the use of variable-field sedimentation analysis to increase the size-range covered in SV experiments by ∼100-fold with a quasi-continuous increase of rotor speed during the experiment. Such a gravitational-sweep sedimentation approach has previously been shown to be very effective in the study of nanoparticles with large size ranges. In the past, diffusion processes were not accounted for, thereby posing a lower limit of particle sizes and limiting the accuracy of the size distribution. In this work, we combine variable field solutions to the Lamm equation with diffusion-deconvoluted sedimentation coefficient distributions c(s), which further extend the macromolecular size range that can be observed in a single SV experiment while maintaining accuracy and resolution. In this way, approximately five orders of magnitude of sedimentation coefficients, or eight orders of magnitude of particle mass, can be probed in a single experiment. This can be useful, for example, in the study of proteins forming large assemblies, as in fibrillation process or capsid self-assembly, in studies of the interaction between very dissimilar-sized macromolecular species, or in the study of broadly distributed nanoparticles.

  3. ACUTE TOXICITY OF FIVE SEDIMENT-ASSOCIATED METALS, INDIVIDUALLY AND IN A MIXTURE, TO THE ESTUARINE MEIOBENTHIC HARPACTICOID COPEPOD AMPHIASCUS TENUIREMIS. (R825279)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The acute effects of many individual, seawater-solubilized metals on meiobenthic copepods and nematodes are well known. In sediments, however, metals most often occur as mixtures, and it is not known whether such mixtures exhibit simple additive toxicity to me...

  4. Abiotic U(VI) Reduction by Sorbed Fe(II) on Natural Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Patricia M.; Davis, James A.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Singer, David M.; Bargar, John R.; Williams, Kenneth H.

    2013-09-15

    Laboratory experiments were performed as a function of aqueous Fe(II) concentration to determine the uptake and oxidation of Fe(II), and Fe(II)-mediated abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aquifer sediments from the Rifle IFRC field site in Colorado, USA. Mössbauer analysis of the sediments spiked with aqueous 57Fe(II) showed that 57Fe(II) was oxidized on the mineral surfaces to 57Fe(III) and most likely formed a nano-particulate Fe(III)-oxide or ferrihydrite-like phase. The extent of 57Fe oxidation decreased with increasing 57Fe(II) uptake, such that 100 % was oxidized at 7.3 μmol/g Fe and 52 % at 39.6 μmol/g Fe, indicating that the sediments had a finite capacity for oxidation of Fe(II). Abiotic U(VI) reduction was observed by XANES spectroscopy only when the Fe(II) uptake was greater than approximately 20 μmol/g and surface-bound Fe(II) was present. The level of U(VI) reduction increased with increasing Fe(II)- loading above this level to a maximum of 18 and 36 % U(IV) at pH 7.2 (40.7 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (56.1 μmol/g Fe), respectively in the presence of 400 ppm CO2. Greater U(VI) reduction was observed in CO2 free systems [up to 44 and 54 % at pH 7.2 (17.3 μmol/g Fe) and 8.3 (54.8 μmol/g Fe), respectively] compared to 400 ppm CO2 systems, presumably due to differences in aqueous U(VI) speciation. While pH affects the amount of Fe(II) uptake onto the solid phase, with greater Fe(II) uptake at higher pH, similar amounts of U(VI) reduction were observed at pH 7.2 and 8.3 for a similar Fe(II) uptake. Thus, it appears that abiotic U(VI) reduction is controlled primarily by Fe(II) concentration and aqueous U(VI) speciation. The range of Fe(II) loadings tested in this study are within the range observed in bioreduced sediments, suggesting that Fe(II)-mediated abiotic U(VI) reduction may indeed play a role in field settings.

  5. Modeling of Copper(II), Cadmium(II), and Lead(II) Adsorption on Red Mud from Metal-EDTA Mixture Solutions.

    PubMed

    Güçlü; Apak

    2000-08-15

    The adsorption of toxic heavy metal cations, i.e., Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II), from metal-EDTA mixture solutions on a composite adsorbent having a heterogeneous surface, i.e., bauxite waste red mud, has been investigated and modeled with the aid of a modified surface complexation approach in respect to pH and complexant dependency of heavy metal adsorption. EDTA was selected as the modeling ligand in view of its wide usage as an anthropogenic chelating agent and abundance in natural waters. The adsorption experiments were conducted for metal salts (nitrates), metal-EDTA complexes alone, or in mixtures containing (metal+metal-EDTA). The adsorption equilibrium constants for the metal ions and metal-EDTA complexes were calculated. For all studied cases, the solid adsorbent phase concentrations of the adsorbed metal and metal-EDTA complexes were found by using the derived model equations with excellent compatibility of experimental and theoretically generated adsorption isotherms. The model was useful for metal and metal-EDTA mixture solutions either at their natural pH of equilibration with the sorbent, or after pH elevation with NaOH titration up to a certain pH. Thus adsorption of every single species (M(2+) or MY(2-)) or of possible mixtures (M(2+)+MY(2-)) at natural pH or after NaOH titration could be calculated by the use of simple quadratic model equations, once the initial concentrations of the corresponding species, i.e., [M(2+)](0) or [MY(2-)](0), were known. The compatibility of theoretical and experimental data pairs of adsorbed species concentrations was verified by means of nonlinear regression analysis. The findings of this study can be further developed so as to serve environmental risk assessment concerning the expansion of a heavy metal contaminant plume with groundwater move ment in soil consisting of hydrated-oxide type minerals. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  6. Developmental toxicity of PAH mixtures in fish early life stages. Part II: adverse effects in Japanese medaka.

    PubMed

    Le Bihanic, Florane; Clérandeau, Christelle; Le Menach, Karyn; Morin, Bénédicte; Budzinski, Hélène; Cousin, Xavier; Cachot, Jérôme

    2014-12-01

    In aquatic environments, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mostly occur as complex mixtures, for which risk assessment remains problematic. To better understand the effects of PAH mixture toxicity on fish early life stages, this study compared the developmental toxicity of three PAH complex mixtures. These mixtures were extracted from a PAH-contaminated sediment (Seine estuary, France) and two oils (Arabian Light and Erika). For each fraction, artificial sediment was spiked at three different environmental concentrations roughly equivalent to 0.5, 4, and 10 μg total PAH g(-1) dw. Japanese medaka embryos were incubated on these PAH-spiked sediments throughout their development, right up until hatching. Several endpoints were recorded at different developmental stages, including acute endpoints, morphological abnormalities, larvae locomotion, and genotoxicity (comet and micronucleus assays). The three PAH fractions delayed hatching, induced developmental abnormalities, disrupted larvae swimming activity, and damaged DNA at environmental concentrations. Differences in toxicity levels, likely related to differences in PAH proportions, were highlighted between fractions. The Arabian Light and Erika petrogenic fractions, containing a high proportion of alkylated PAHs and low molecular weight PAHs, were more toxic to Japanese medaka early life stages than the pyrolytic fraction. This was not supported by the toxic equivalency approach, which appeared unsuitable for assessing the toxicity of the three PAH fractions to fish early life stages. This study highlights the potential risks posed by environmental mixtures of alkylated and low molecular weight PAHs to early stages of fish development.

  7. Viruses-to-mobile genetic elements skew in the deep Atlantis II brine pool sediments

    PubMed Central

    Adel, Mustafa; Elbehery, Ali H. A.; Aziz, Sherry K.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Siam, Rania

    2016-01-01

    The central rift of the Red Sea has 25 brine pools with different physical and geochemical characteristics. Atlantis II (ATIID), Discovery Deeps (DD) and Chain Deep (CD) are characterized by high salinity, temperature and metal content. Several studies reported microbial communities in these brine pools, but few studies addressed the brine pool sediments. Therefore, sediment cores were collected from ATIID, DD, CD brine pools and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Sixteen different lithologic sediment sections were subjected to shotgun DNA pyrosequencing to generate 1.47 billion base pairs (1.47 × 109 bp). We generated sediment-specific reads and attempted to annotate all reads. We report the phylogenetic and biochemical uniqueness of the deepest ATIID sulfur-rich brine pool sediments. In contrary to all other sediment sections, bacteria dominate the deepest ATIID sulfur-rich brine pool sediments. This decrease in virus-to-bacteria ratio in selected sections and depth coincided with an overrepresentation of mobile genetic elements. Skewing in the composition of viruses-to-mobile genetic elements may uniquely contribute to the distinct microbial consortium in sediments in proximity to hydrothermally active vents of the Red Sea and possibly in their surroundings, through differential horizontal gene transfer. PMID:27596223

  8. Geochronology of Danube Delta sediments The PN-II-RU-TE-2012-3-0351 project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert-Csaba, Begy; Andra-Rada, Iurian; (Rusu) Oana Alexandra, Dumitru; Luminita, Preoteasa; Hedvig, Simon; Alida, Timar-Gabor; Szabolcs, Kelemen

    2014-05-01

    fluxes within the Danube Delta and over the associated Danubian continental shelf, using the radiometric method of 210Pb (210Po) and 137Cs. The detailed stratigraphical survey of the deltaic sediments will provide an accurate view of the sedimentation characteristics in the last ~100 years, including the impact of the hydrotechnical works built within the Danube basin on the sedimentation rates and on the deltaic continental shelf evolution. Another important aspect of the present project is featured by the combined application of three complex radiometric and nuclear tools: alpha spectrometry (210Po), gamma-spectrometry (210Pb, 137Cs, and 226Ra) and luminescence absolute method. Acknoledgement: The financial support from the grant of the Romanian National Authority for Scientific Research CNCS-UEFISCDI, PN-II-RU-TE-2012-3-0351 (2013-2015) is acknoledged.

  9. Low temperature hydrothermal maturation of organic matter in sediments from the Atlantis II Deep, Red Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoneit, Bernd R. T.; Grimalt, Joan O.; Hayes, J. M.; Hartman, Hyman

    1987-01-01

    Hydrocarbons and bulk organic matter of two sediment cores within the Atlantis II Deep are analyzed, and microbial inputs and minor terrestrial sources are found to represent the major sedimentary organic material. Results show that extensive acid-catalyzed reactions are occurring in the sediments, and the Atlantis II Deep is found to exhibit a lower degree of thermal maturation than other hydrothermal or intrusive systems. The lack of carbon number preference noted among the n-alkanes suggests that the organic matter of these sediments has undergone some degree of catagenesis, though yields of hydrocarbons are much lower than those found in other hydrothermal areas, probably due to the effect of lower temperature and poor source-rock characteristics.

  10. Biological validation of a sample preparation method for ER-CALUX bioanalysis of estrogenic activity in sediment using mixtures of xeno-estrogens.

    PubMed

    Houtman, Corine J; Van Houten, Yoni K; Leonards, Pim E G; Brouwer, Abraham; Lamoree, Marja H; Legler, Juliette

    2006-04-01

    The combined estrogenic effects of mixtures of environmental pollutants in the in vitro ER-CALUX (chemical activated luciferase gene expression) bioassaywere examined to biologically validate a sample preparation method for the analysis of estrogenic compounds in sediment. The method used accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and was validated with respect to recovery of biological response taking mixture effects into account. Four mixtures of three to six xenoestrogenic compounds (bisphenol A, 4-nonylphenol, (4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl)trichloroethane, (2,4'-dichlorodiphenyl)trichloroethane, dieldrin, 4-n-octylphenol, alpha-chlordane, dibutylphthalate, (4,4'-dichlorodiphenyl)dichloroethylene, and 2,4,5-trichlorobiphenyl) were prepared. Experimentally determined mixture effects were well described by the concept of concentration addition (CA), as expected for similarly acting compounds. Observed estradiol equivalence factors of the mixtures (on average 1.2 +/- 0.3) agreed very well with the value predicted according to CA. The sample preparation method was then applied to pure mixtures of standards and to sediment spiked with one of the mixtures. Recoveries of estrogenic compounds were estimated by determination of their mixture potencies in ER-CALUX and compared to the mixture effects predicted by CA. Recoveries of estrogenic activity were between 80 and 129%, indicating that the additive behavior of mixtures of xeno-estrogens is well conserved during sample preparation. Together with an average repeatability of 18.3%, low average limit of detection (2.6 +/- 1.8 pg of EEQ/ g), and coefficient of variance (3.5 +/- 3.3%),this demonstrated the suitability of the sample preparation method for the analysis of mixtures of (xeno-)estrogenic compounds in sediment with the ER-CALUX assay.

  11. The structures of the crystalline phase and columnar mesophase of rhodium (II) heptanoate and of its binary mixture with copper (II) heptanoate probed by EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inb-Elhaj, M.; Guillon, D.; Skoulios, A.; Maldivi, P.; Giroud-Godquin, A. M.; Marchon, J.-C.

    1992-12-01

    EXAFS was used to investigate the local structure of the polar spines of rhodium (II) soaps in the columnar liquid crystalline state. It was also used to ascertain the degree of blending of the cores in binary mixtures of rhodium (II) and copper (II) soaps. For the pure rhodium soaps, the columns are shown to result from the stacking of binuclear metal-metal bonded dirhodium tetracarboxylate units bonded to one another by apical ligation of the metal atom of each complex with one of the oxygen atoms of the adjacent molecule. Mixtures of rhodium (II) and copper (II) soaps give a hexagonal columnar mesophase in which pure rhodium and pure copper columns are randomly distributed.

  12. Quantifying Enhanced Microbial Dehalogenation Impacting the Fate and Transport of Organohalide Mixtures in Contaminated Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Dehalococcoides sp. strain CBDB1. These primers were tested against D. ethenogenes strain 195 and each amplified only the rdh gene for which it was designed... against weathered PCBs in the biostimulated environment. Rather, it was expected that the pathways of dechlorination of the different PCB congeners...sediments from Woods Pond and Silver Lake (Bedard and Quensen, 1995). In contrast, Adrian et al. (2009) reported the reductive dechlorination of

  13. Desorption of organochlorine pesticides from historically contaminated sediments into water-biofuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero-Diaz, M.; Demond, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Gasoline spills in surface waters generally volatilize due to their low miscibility and high volatility. However, biofuel blends may contain ethanol, a compound completely miscible in water. As hazardous components of gasoline are more soluble in ethanol than in water, the presence of ethanol increases the solubilization of these components, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), in surface water. Furthermore, many of these spills may occur in water bodies that have sediments that are historically contaminated with persistent organic contaminants such as organochlorine pesticides. High concentrations of ethanol in the water column, along with solubilized components of gasoline, may increase the desorption of organochlorine pesticides from the sediment. Thus spills of ethanol/gasoline fuel blends have the potential of increasing concentrations of hazardous compounds in rivers and lakes, resulting in increased risk for human and ecological exposure. Using UNIFAC to calculate activity coefficients, one can predict the enhancement of the solubility of pesticides in the aqueous phase as the ethanol fraction increases. Moreover, by predicting the solubility of pesticides in both the aqueous phase and an organic liquid phase, one can construct ternary phase diagrams that show the partitioning behavior of pesticides as a function of ethanol fraction. Such information is useful in estimating the amount of desorption from contaminated sediments that may occur in the presence of biofuel spills. In order to confirm the predicted values, experiments have been conducted to measure the impact of ethanol on the partitioning coefficients of pesticides.

  14. Nature and Reactivity of Sediment-Associated Spiked Fe(II) Toward Abiotic Uranium Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukkadapu, R.; Fox, P. M.; Davis, J.

    2011-12-01

    Uranium (U) is a priority contaminant at U.S. Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites. Mobility of U in contaminated aquifers is governed by a complex assortment of site-specific biogeochemical and hydrological properties, sediment Fe-mineralogy, and redox status. There is a particular interest in understanding factors governing U attenuation to Fe-mineralogy under natural conditions. Thus, the goal of this work is to investigate geochemical effects of Fe redox state on U mobility under conditions relevant to the Rifle aquifer, an UMTRA site. Particularly, the focus is to gain insights into the degree and mechanism of Fe(II) uptake by Rifle sediments that exhibit complex Fe-mineralogy composed of various Fe-oxides and Fe-containing clays and on the possibility of abiotic U(VI) reduction by adsorbed Fe(II) and secondary Fe(II) minerals. Earlier field studies where Fe(II)-amended groundwater was injected into the Rifle aquifer indicated: a) Fe(II) uptake by Rifle sediments is extensive and b) abiotic U(VI) reduction by Fe(II) may be important at pH 8.3. Batch reactions between Rifle sediment and 57Fe(II) (57Fe isotope is a Mossbauer sensitive nuclide with a natural abundance of 2%) under conditions relevant to the Rifle aquifer indicated that, depending on the solution conditions: a) a large fraction of the spiked 57Fe(II) (55-100%) is oxidized to 57Fe(III) on sediment surfaces and, at pH 7.2, the degree of oxidation decreased as Fe(II) loading increased; b) the 57Fe(II)-oxidation is coupled to the transformation of an intrinsic ferrihydrite-like mineral to a nanoparticulate, Fe(II)/57Fe(III)-like mineral phase, and c) increasing pH from 7.2 to 8.3 and including carbonate in the medium has little or no effect on percent oxidation or mineral transformation. Preliminary X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy studies suggested that 20-30% of abiotic U(VI) reduction occurred, both at pH 7.2 and 8.3, in the sediments

  15. Transformation of PBDE mixtures during sediment transport and resuspension in marine environments (Gulf of Lion, NW Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Joan A; Grimalt, Joan O; López, Jordi F; Durrieu de Madron, Xavier; Heussner, Serge; Canals, Miquel

    2012-09-01

    Polybromodiphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in superficial sediments from the Gulf of Lion were studied. They were largely predominated by BDE 209 (98.7% of all PBDEs) indicating that the main source of these pollutants was the commercial mixture deca-BDE. This compound and the less brominated BDE exhibited a southwestward decreasing concentration gradient following the dominant marine currents and bottom relief, e.g. the Mud Belt, the submarine canyons and the Open Continental Slope. All PBDEs exhibited statistically significant correlations confirming the common origin. However, a progressive transformation of the dumped BDE 209 was identified showing a depletion paralleled by increases of the less brominated BDEs (from 8.6% to 22%). These less brominated compounds were accumulated at about 100-140 km away from the Rhone prodelta, e.g., at the end of the submarine canyons, evidencing that these transformation compounds can be accumulated at long distances from the dumping sites in the marine system.

  16. Reduction of TcO4- by sediment-associated biogenic Fe(II)

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Kennedy, David W.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; McKinley, James P.; Heald, Steve M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Plymale, Andrew E.

    2004-08-01

    The potential for reduction of {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}{sub aq} to poorly soluble {sup 99}TcO{sub 2} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O{sub (s)} by biogenic sediment-associated Fe(II) was investigated with three Fe(III)-oxide containing subsurface materials and the dissimilatory metal-reducing subsurface bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. Two of the subsurface materials from the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford and Oak Ridge sites contained significant amounts of Mn(III,IV) oxides and net bioreduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) was not observed until essentially all of the hydroxylamine HCl-extractable Mn was reduced. In anoxic, unreduced sediment or where Mn oxide bioreduction was incomplete, exogenous biogenic TcO{sub 2} {center_dot} nH{sub 2}O{sub (s)} was slowly oxidized over a period of weeks. Subsurface materials that were bioreduced to varying degrees and then pasteurized to eliminate biological activity, reduced TcO{sub 4}{sup -}{sub (aq)} at rates that generally increased with increasing concentrations of 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II). Two of the sediments showed a common relationship between extractable Fe(II) concentration (in mM) and the first-order reduction rate (in h{sup -1}), whereas the third demonstrated a markedly different trend. A combination of chemical extractions and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy were used to characterize the Fe(III) and Fe(II) phases. There was little evidence of the formation of secondary Fe(II) biominerals as a result of bioreduction, suggesting that the reactive forms of Fe(II) were predominantly surface complexes of different forms. The reduction rates of Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup -} were slowest in the sediment that contained plentiful layer silicates (illite, vermiculite, and smectite), suggesting that Fe(II) sorption complexes on these phases were least reactive toward pertechnetate. These results suggest that the in situ microbial reduction of sediment-associated Fe(III), either naturally or via redox manipulation, may be

  17. Anaerobic microbial Fe(II) oxidation and Fe(III) reduction in coastal marine sediments controlled by organic carbon content.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Byrne, James M; Glombitza, Clemens; Schmidt, Caroline; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Coastal marine sediments contain varying concentrations of iron, oxygen, nitrate and organic carbon. It is unknown how organic carbon content influences the activity of nitrate-reducing and phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers and microbial Fe-redox cycling in such sediments. Therefore, microcosms were prepared with two coastal marine sediments (Kalø Vig and Norsminde Fjord at Aarhus Bay, Denmark) varying in TOC from 0.4 to 3.0 wt%. The microcosms were incubated under light/dark conditions with/without addition of nitrate and/or Fe(II). Although most probable number (MPN) counts of phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizers were five times lower in the low-TOC sediment, phototrophic Fe(II) oxidation rates were higher compared with the high-TOC sediment. Fe(III)-amended microcosms showed that this lower net Fe(II) oxidation in the high-TOC sediment is caused by concurrent bacterial Fe(III) reduction. In contrast, MPN counts of nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers and net rates of nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidation were comparable in low- and high-TOC sediments. However, the ratio of nitratereduced :iron(II)oxidized was higher in the high-TOC sediment, suggesting that a part of the nitrate was reduced by mixotrophic nitrate-reducing Fe(II)-oxidizers and chemoorganoheterotrophic nitrate-reducers. Our results demonstrate that dynamic microbial Fe cycling occurs in these sediments and that the extent of Fe cycling is dependent on organic carbon content.

  18. [Molluscacide activity of a mixture of 6-n-alkyl salicylic acids (anacardic acid) and 2 of its complexes with copper (II) and lead (II)].

    PubMed

    Mendes, N M; de Oliveira, A B; Guimarães, J E; Pereira, J P; Katz, N

    1990-01-01

    The molluscicide activity of hexanic extract from Anacardium occidentale L. (cashew) nut shell, of copper (II) complex, of lead (II) complex and anacardic acid has been compared in the laboratory in an attempt to obtain better stability than anacardic acid. This was obtained from the hexanic extract of the cashew nut shell by precipitation with lead (II) hydroxide or cupric sulfate plus sodium hydroxide or (II) cupric hydroxide followed by treatment of lead (II) complex with a diluted solution of sulfuric acid. Ten products of the mixture obtained were tested on adults snails of Biomphalaria glabrata at 1 to 10 ppm. The most active products were copper (II) complex, obtained by cupric sulfate plus sodium hydroxide, and anacardic acid (sodium hydroxide) which presented activity at 4 ppm. The anacardic acid's lead content was above the limits accepted by the United States standards.

  19. The Impact of Fe(II) on NO2- Isotopic Composition During Denitrification by Natural Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Etchevehere, D.; Wankel, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    The role of Fe(II) on Nitrite (NO2-) isotopic composition during denitrification was investigated in anaerobic, closed-system batch incubations of tidal marsh sediments. Fe(II) is often found in similar redox conditions and can rapidly reduce NO2- to N2 and/or nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, through a process called chemodenitrification. Microbial communities can also reduce nitrate (NO3-) to NO2- and eventually to N2O through the anaerobic process of biological denitrification. This study compared the impact on NO2- accumulation when Fe(III)-containing minerals ferrihydrite and goethite were added to natural sediments. The presence of dissolved Fe(II), presumably produced by microbial iron reduction, significantly limited the amount of NO2- accumulation, suggesting that Fe(II) may have chemically reduced NO2-. Changes in the δ15N of the intermediate NO2- pool in each bottle was measured, but the apparent isotope effects of NO2- reduction were indistinguishable among treatments, suggesting that the reaction of Fe(II) and NO2- imparts an isotope effect on the NO2- pool of a similar magnitude to that of biological NO2- reduction. The isotopic composition of N2O and its 15N site preference will be measured to determine if chemodenitrification truly occurred, and if so, the relative contributions to N2O production from biological denitrification and chemodenitrification will be determined.

  20. RESIS-II: An Updated Version of the Original Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, Katherine V.; Mixon, David M.; Sundquist, Eric T.; Stallard, Robert F.; Schwarz, Gregory E.; Stewart, David W.

    2009-01-01

    The Reservoir Sedimentation Survey Information System (RESIS) database, originally compiled by the Soil Conservation Service (now the Natural Resources Conservation Service) in collaboration with the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, is the most comprehensive compilation of data from reservoir sedimentation surveys throughout the conterminous United States (U.S.). The database is a cumulative historical archive that includes data from as early as 1755 and as late as 1993. The 1,823 reservoirs included in the database range in size from farm ponds to the largest U.S. reservoirs (such as Lake Mead). Results from 6,617 bathymetric surveys are available in the database. This Data Series provides an improved version of the original RESIS database, termed RESIS-II, and a report describing RESIS-II. The RESIS-II relational database is stored in Microsoft Access and includes more precise location coordinates for most of the reservoirs than the original database but excludes information on reservoir ownership. RESIS-II is anticipated to be a template for further improvements in the database.

  1. Isotopic studies of epigenetic features in metalliferous sediment, Atlantis II Deep, Red Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zierenberg, Robert A.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1988-01-01

    The unique depositional environment of the Atlantis II Deep brine pool in the Red Sea produces a stratiform metalliferous deposit of greater areal extent than deposits formed by buoyant-plume systems typical of the midocean ridges because of much more efficient metal entrapment. Isotopic analyses of strontium, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen from the metalliferous sediments indicate that three major sources contribute dissolved components to the hydrothermal system: seawater, Miocene evaporites, and rift-zone basalt. An areally restricted magnetite-hematite-pyroxene assemblage formed at high temperatures, possibly in response to hydrothermal convection initiated by intrusion of basalt into the metalliferous sediment. A correlation between smectite Fe/(Fe+Mg) ratios and oxygen isotope temperatures suggests that smectite is a potentially important chemical geothermometer, and confirms geochemical calculations indicating that Mg-rich smectite is more stable than Fe-rich smectite at elevated temperatures.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND AVAILABILITY OF EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING SEDIMENT GUIDELINES (ESGS) FOR NONIONIC ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS, METALS MIXTURES, AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON (PAH) MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Collaborative efforts between EPA's Office of Water and Office of Research and Development have resulted in the development of sediment guidelines based on equilibrium partitioning theory (EqP). The guidance available includes a technical support document, describing the derivat...

  3. Adsorption of tetracycline on soil and sediment: effects of pH and the presence of Cu(II).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheyun; Sun, Ke; Gao, Bo; Zhang, Guixiang; Liu, Xitao; Zhao, Ye

    2011-06-15

    Tetracycline (TC) is frequently detected in the environment, however, knowledge on the environmental fate and transport of TC is still limited. Batch adsorption experiments of TC by soil and sediment samples were conducted. The distribution of charge and electrostatic potential of individual atoms of various TC species in the aqueous solution were determined using MOPAC version 0.034 W program in ChemBio3D Ultra software. Most of the adsorption isotherms on the soil, river and marine sediments were well fitted with the Freundlich and Polanyi-Manes (PMM) models. The single point organic carbon (OC)-normalized adsorption distribution coefficients (K(OC)) and PMM saturated adsorption capacity (Q(OC)(0)) values of TC were associated with the mesopore volume and clay content to a greater extent, indicating the mesopore volume of the soil and sediments and their clay content possibly influenced the fate and transport of TC in the natural environment. The adsorption of TC on soil and sediments strongly depended on the pH and presence of Cu(II). The presence of Cu(II) facilitated TC adsorption on soil and sediments at low pH (pH<5), possibly due to the metallic complexation and surface-bridging mechanism by Cu(II) adsorption on soil and sediments. The cation exchange interaction, metallic complexation and Coulombic interaction of mechanisms for adsorption of TC to soils and sediments were further supported by quantum chemical calculation of various TC species in different pH.

  4. Mechanism of Hg(II) Immobilization in Sediments by Sulfate-Cement Amendment.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Susana; Vlassopoulos, Dimitri; O'Day, Peggy A

    2016-04-01

    Reactive amendments such as Portland and super-sulfate cements offer a promising technology for immobilizing metalloid contaminants such as mercury (Hg) in soils and sediments through sequestration in less bioavailable solid forms. Tidal marsh sediments were reacted with dissolved Hg(II) in synthetic seawater and fresh water solutions, treated with Portland cement and FeSO4 amendment, and aged for up to 90 days. Reacted solids were analyzed with bulk sequential extraction methods and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Hg LIII- and S K-edge. In amended sediments, XRD, SEM and sulfur K-edge XANES indicated formation of gypsum in seawater experiments or ettringite-type (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12(.)26H2O) phases in fresh water experiments, depending on the final solution pH (seawater ∼8.5; freshwater ∼10.5). Analysis of Hg EXAFS spectra showed Cl and Hg ligands in the first- and second-coordination shells at distances characteristic of a polynuclear chloromercury(II) salt, perhaps as a nanoparticulate phase, in both seawater and fresh water experiments. In addition to the chloromercury species, a smaller fraction (∼20-25%) of Hg was bonded to O atoms in fresh water sample spectra, suggesting the presence of a minor sorbed Hg fraction. In the absence of amendment treatment, Hg sorption and resistance to extraction can be accounted for by relatively strong binding by reduced S species present in the marsh sediment detected by S XANES. Thermodynamic calculations predict stable aqueous Hg-Cl species at seawater final pH, but higher final pH in fresh water favors aqueous Hg-hydroxide species. The difference in Hg coordination between aqueous and solid phases suggests that the initial Hg-Cl coordination was stabilized in the cement hydration products and did not re-equilibrate with the bulk solution with aging. Collectively, results suggest physical encapsulation of Hg as a polynuclear

  5. MarsSedEx I and II: Experimental investigation of gravity effects on sedimentation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, N. J.; Kuhn, B.; Gartmann, A.

    2014-12-01

    Sorting of sedimentary rocks is a proxy for the environmental conditions at the time of deposition, in particular the runoff that moved and deposited the material forming the rocks. Settling of sediment is strongly influenced by the gravity of a planetary body. As a consequence, sorting of a sedimentary rock varies with gravity for a given depth and velocity of surface runoff. Theoretical considerations for spheres indicate that sorting is less uniform on Mars than on Earth for runoff of identical depth. The effects of gravity on flow hydraulics limit the use of common, semi-empirical models developed to simulate particle settling in terrestrial environments, on Mars. Assessing sedimentation patterns on Mars, aimed at identifying strata potentially hosting traces of life, is potentially affected by such uncertainties. Using first-principle approaches, e.g. through Computational Fluid Dynamics, for calculating settling velocities on other planetary bodies requires a large effort and is limited by the values of boundary conditions, e.g. the shape of the particle. The degree of uncertainty resulting from the differences in gravity on Earth and Mars was therefore tested during three reduced-gravity flights, the MarsSedEx I and II missions, conducted in November 2012 and 2013. Nine types of sediment, ranging in size, shape and density were tested in custom-designed settling tubes during parabolas of Martian gravity lasting 20 to 25 seconds. Based on the observed settling velocities, the uncertainties of empirical relationships developed on Earth to assess particle settling on Mars are discussed. In addition, the potential effects of reduced gravity on patterns of erosion, transport and sorting of sediment, including the implications for identifying strata bearing traces of past life on are examined.

  6. Mixture Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.

    2007-12-01

    A mixture experiment involves combining two or more components in various proportions or amounts and then measuring one or more responses for the resulting end products. Other factors that affect the response(s), such as process variables and/or the total amount of the mixture, may also be studied in the experiment. A mixture experiment design specifies the combinations of mixture components and other experimental factors (if any) to be studied and the response variable(s) to be measured. Mixture experiment data analyses are then used to achieve the desired goals, which may include (i) understanding the effects of components and other factors on the response(s), (ii) identifying components and other factors with significant and nonsignificant effects on the response(s), (iii) developing models for predicting the response(s) as functions of the mixture components and any other factors, and (iv) developing end-products with desired values and uncertainties of the response(s). Given a mixture experiment problem, a practitioner must consider the possible approaches for designing the experiment and analyzing the data, and then select the approach best suited to the problem. Eight possible approaches include 1) component proportions, 2) mathematically independent variables, 3) slack variable, 4) mixture amount, 5) component amounts, 6) mixture process variable, 7) mixture of mixtures, and 8) multi-factor mixture. The article provides an overview of the mixture experiment designs, models, and data analyses for these approaches.

  7. Beat Cepheids as Probes of Stellar and Galactic Metallicity. II. Opacities with the AGS Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchler, J. Robert

    2008-06-01

    It is well known that the mere location of a beat Cepheid model in a period ratio versus period diagram (Petersen diagram) puts constraints on its metallicity Z. But these bounds are sensitive to the mixture of elements that are lumped into the parameter Z. In this short paper we update the previous results that were based on the Grevesse-Noels solar mixture to the recent, revised Asplund, Grevesse, & Sauval (AGS) solar mixture. We also examine the effect of the envelope depth on the accuracy of the computed pulsation periods. We find that for low-period Cepheids with high Z the customary approximation of envelope pulsation breaks down. It is necessary to compute stellar models that extend to the center and to include burning and composition inhomogeneities in the modeling. Fortunately, however, most beat Cepheids that have been observed so far seem to avoid that regime.

  8. Undergraduate experiment in critical phenomena. II. The coexistence curve of a binary fluid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngubane, S. B.; Jacobs, D. T.

    1986-06-01

    An undergraduate experiment is described that uses meniscus heights to determine the coexistence curve of a binary fluid mixture. The data can be obtained with a minimum of equipment and yield results that are easily interpreted by the theory also presented. Data taken on the binary liquid mixture methanol-isooctane are presented and analyzed. The critical temperature and composition were found to be (42.5±0.5) °C and (67.3±0.2)% by volume isooctane, respectively.

  9. Mycobacterial lipid II is composed of a complex mixture of modified muramyl and peptide moieties linked to decaprenyl phosphate.

    PubMed

    Mahapatra, Sebabrata; Yagi, Tetsuya; Belisle, John T; Espinosa, Benjamin J; Hill, Preston J; McNeil, Michael R; Brennan, Patrick J; Crick, Dean C

    2005-04-01

    Structural analysis of compounds identified as lipid I and II from Mycobacterium smegmatis demonstrated that the lipid moiety is decaprenyl phosphate; thus, M. smegmatis is the first bacterium reported to utilize a prenyl phosphate other than undecaprenyl phosphate as the lipid carrier involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. In addition, mass spectrometry showed that the muropeptides from lipid I are predominantly N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine-D-glutamate-meso-diaminopimelic acid-D-alanyl-D-alanine, whereas those isolated from lipid II form an unexpectedly complex mixture in which the muramyl residue and the pentapeptide are modified singly and in combination. The muramyl residue is present as N-acetylmuramic acid, N-glycolylmuramic acid, and muramic acid. The carboxylic functions of the peptide side-chains of lipid II showed three types of modification, with the dominant one being amidation. The preferred site for amidation is the free carboxyl group of the meso-diaminopimelic acid residue. Diamidated species were also observed. The carboxylic function of the terminal D-alanine of some molecules is methylated, as are all three carboxylic acid functions of other molecules. This study represents the first structural analysis of mycobacterial lipid I and II and the first report of extensive modifications of these molecules. The observation that lipid I was unmodified strongly suggests that the lipid II intermediates of M. smegmatis are substrates for a variety of enzymes that introduce modifications to the sugar and amino acid residues prior to the synthesis of peptidoglycan.

  10. Cell surface energy, contact angles and phase partition. II. Bacterial cells in biphasic aqueous mixtures.

    PubMed

    Gerson, D F; Akit, J

    1980-11-04

    Partition coefficients in biphasic mixtures of poly(ethylene glycol) and Dextran are compared to cell surface energies obtained from contact angles of each liquid phase on cell layers. Linear relationships are observed between these two independent measurements for a variety of bacterial cells. The results demonstrate the importance of interfacial phenomena and contact angles in the phase-partition process.

  11. Dissipation of a commercial mixture of polyoxyethylene amine surfactants in aquatic outdoor microcosms: Effect of water depth and sediment organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Gil, Jose Luis; Lissemore, Linda; Solomon, Keith; Hanson, Mark

    2016-04-15

    This study optimized existing analytical approaches and characterized the effect of sediment total organic carbon (0.05-2.05% TOC), and water depth (15, 30, and 90cm) on the fate of MON 0818, a commercial mixture of polyoxyethylene amine surfactants (POEAs), in outdoor microcosms. Mixtures of POEAs are commonly used as adjuvants in commercial herbicide formulations containing glyphosate. Until recently, analytical methods sensitive enough to monitor environmental concentrations of POEAs in aquatic systems were not available. After optimizing recently developed analytical methods, we found that the combined use of accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry provided a reliable approach for determining the concentration of sediment-adsorbed POEAs. The surfactant showed strong affinity for sediment materials, with low maximum recoveries by ASE of 52%. Under microcosm conditions, water depth or sediment characteristics did not significantly affect the water-column half-life of POEA, which ranged from 3.2 to 5.3h. Binding of POEAs to suspended solids was observed, which dissipated via one- or two-phase exponential decay; when two-phase decay occurred, fast phase half-life values ranged from 0.71 to 1.3h and slow-phase values ranged from 18 to 44h. Concentrations of POEA increased in sediment shortly after application and decreased over the study period with a half-life of 5.8 to 71d. The concentrations of POEAs in the sediment of the shallow (15cm) ponds dissipated following a two-phase exponential decay model with an initial fast-phase half-life of 1.1 to 8.9d and a slower second-phase half-life of 21d. Our results suggest that aquatic organisms are unlikely to be exposed to POEAs in aqueous phase for periods of more than a few hours following an over-water application, and that sediment is a significant sink for POEAs in aquatic systems.

  12. Effects of drilling fluids on soils and plants: II. Complete drilling fluid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.; Pesaran, P.

    1980-01-01

    Six typical drilling fluids (muds) and a drilling fluid base were mixed with six soils at ratios of 1:1 and 1:4 volumes of liquid mud/soil; these mixtures were tested for their effects on plant growth. Green beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and sweet corn (Zea mays var. succharata (Sturtev.) Bailey) in pots in the greenhouse grew normally in a few mixtures, but in most instances plants had reduced growth when compared to those growing in soil alone (controls). It was concluded that high levels of soluble salts or the high exchangeable sodium percentages were the primary causes of reduced plant growth. The high salt content in some fluids was mostly from added potassium chloride, sodium hydroxide, and sodium dichromate. Dispersion of mud-treated soils caused by high exchangeable sodium percentages occurred in these samples because of the sodium hydroxide and sodium dichromate added to typical muds.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy of methanol-hexane liquid mixtures. II. The strength of hydrogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2009-03-01

    The study by Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy at 27 °C of methanol (MeOH) and hexane mixtures is presented. In the 0-0.25 and 0.75-1.00 molar fractions, the mixtures form homogeneous solutions, whereas from 0.25 to 0.75, the mixtures are inhomogeneous forming two phases. These mixtures have the near 3300 cm-1 OH stretch band only slightly displaced throughout the whole concentration range indicating very little variation in the H-bonding condition. This result is very different from that of MeOH in CCl4 where the OH stretch bands are scattered in a wide frequency range. Factor analysis applied to the MeOH/hexane spectra gave seven principal factors (one hexane and six methanol factors) and retrieved their principal spectra and abundances. In the inhomogeneous region, the two phase volumes changed inversely with concentration, but their factor compositions are invariable at 1:3 and 3:1 molar ratios. Five of the six principal methanol factors have the O-H and the C-O stretch bands situated near, respectively, 3310 and 1025 cm-1 with little displacement in the whole concentration range. The sixth factor observed at 3654 cm-1 (full width at half height<40 cm-1) was assigned to free methanol OH by Max and Chapados [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 224512 (2008)]. This species concentration is very low but constant at around 0.01M in the methanol range of 0.5-2.5M. The main OH stretch bands (˜3300 cm-1) were simulated with six Gaussian components that were assigned to different hydrogen-bonding situations. These form reverse micelles at low methanol concentrations and micelles at high concentrations that persist in pure methanol. A very different state of affairs exists in MeOH in CCl4 where free OH groups are formed in almost all mixtures except in pure MeOH. Since hexane is a better model of a lipidic milieu than CCl4, the results for MeOH/hexane give a better representation of the fate of alcoholic OH groups in such a milieu.

  14. Mass spectrometric identification of cyclic polysulfides in sediment of the Eastern Gulf of Finland. II.

    PubMed

    Takhistov, Viatcheslav V; Khoroshko, Larisa O; Viktorovskii, Igor V; Lahtiperä, Mirja; Paasivirta, Jaakko

    2004-01-01

    Nine polysulfides, previously unknown as environmental organic pollutants, were analyzed from a sediment sample from the Eastern Gulf of Finland. The determinations were done by gas chromatography connected to low- and high-resolution mass spectrometers. The structure of the polysulfides was elucidated by determination of isotopic composition of abundant molecular and fragment ions by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), the interpretation of ion structures in low-resolution mass spectra (LMRS) using the thermochemical approach, the application of fragmentation rules and performing the ICLU simulation of abundance of ions in isotope clusters. Seven compounds were known in literature, but mass spectra were reported for only two of them, both recorded from mixture. Struture evaluation was successful for other substances, but not for the substance(s) in first eluting GC peak, where HRMS date were not obtained. Suggested structures of the cyclic compounds were (in the order of GC retention) 3,4-dithiacyclohexene, 1,2,3-trithiacyclohexane, 3,4,5- trithiacyclohexene, 1,2,4-trithiacyclohexane, cyclopropyl hydrodisulfide, 1,2-dithiole-3-thione and 1,2,3,4,5-penta- thiacyclo-octane. One acyclic congener identified was dimethyl tetrasulfide.

  15. {Sigma}PAH: A model to predict the toxicity of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures in field-collected sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, R.C.; Schults, D.W.; Ozretich, R.J.; Lamberson, J.O.; Cole, F.A.; Ferraro, S.P.; DeWitt, T.H.; Redmond, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    The {Sigma}PAH model estimates the probability of toxicity of PAH-contaminated sediments using a combination of equilibrium partitioning, WSAR, toxic unit, additivity, and concentration-response models. The sediment concentration of organic carbon and 13 PAH (polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon) compounds were measured. Interstitial water concentrations (PAH{sub iw}) of the 13 compounds were predicted by equilibrium partitioning. The 10-d LC50 of each compound in interstitial water (10-d LC50{sub iw}) was predicted by a QSAR regression of 10-d LC50{sub iw} (From spiked sediment tests) to K{sub ow}. Toxic unit concentrations of individual compounds (TU{sub i}) were predicted as PAH{sub iw}/10-d LC50{sub iw}. The total number of toxic units of the 13 compounds ({Sigma}TU{sub i}) was calculated assuming the additivity of toxic effects of PAHs. {Sigma}TU{sub i} was used to predict the probability of toxicity to marine and estuarine amphipods using a concentration-response model derived from spiked sediment toxicity tests. The {Sigma}PAH model was verified by comparing predicted and observed toxicity in field-collected sediment samples. There was 86.6% correspondence and no significant difference between predicted and observed toxicity at PAH-contaminated sites. Ecological-effect levels predicted by the {Sigma}PAH model correspond with several sediment-quality guidelines.

  16. A Gel Probe Equilibrium Sampler for Measuring Arsenic Porewater Profiles And Sorption Gradients in Sediments: Ii. Field Application to Haiwee Reservoir Sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.M.; Root, R.; O'Day, P.A.; Hering, J.G.

    2009-05-12

    Arsenic (As) geochemistry and sorption behavior were measured in As- and iron (Fe)-rich sediments of Haiwee Reservoir by deploying undoped (clear) polyacrylamide gels and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-doped gels in a gel probe equilibrium sampler, which is a novel technique for directly measuring the effects of porewater composition on As adsorption to Fe oxides phases in situ. Arsenic is deposited at the sediment surface as As(V) and is reduced to As(III) in the upper layers of the sediment (0-8 cm), but the reduction of As(V) does not cause mobilization into the porewater. Dissolved As and Fe concentrations increased at depth in the sediment column driven by the reductive dissolution of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and conversion to a mixed Fe(II, III) green rust-type phase. Adsorption of As and phosphorous (P) onto HFO-doped gels was inhibited at intermediate depths (10-20 cm), possibly due to dissolved organic or inorganic carbon, indicating that dissolved As concentrations were at least partially controlled by porewater composition rather than surface site availability. In sediments that had been recently exposed to air, the region of sorption inhibition was not observed, suggesting that prior exposure to air affected the extent of reductive dissolution, porewater chemistry, and As adsorption behavior. Arsenic adsorption onto the HFO-doped gels increased at depths >20 cm, and the extent of adsorption was most likely controlled by the competitive effects of dissolved phosphate. Sediment As adsorption capacity appeared to be controlled by changes in porewater composition and competitive effects at shallower depths, and by reductive dissolution and availability of sorption sites at greater burial depths.

  17. A gel probe equilibrium sampler for measuring arsenic porewater profiles and sorption gradients in sediments: II. Field application to Haiwee reservoir sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, K.M.; Root, R.; O'Day, P. A.; Hering, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Arsenic (As) geochemistry and sorption behavior were measured in As- and iron (Fe)-rich sediments of Haiwee Reservoir by deploying undoped (clear) polyacrylamide gels and hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-doped gels in a gel probe equilibrium sampler, which is a novel technique for directly measuring the effects of porewater composition on As adsorption to Fe oxides phases in situ. Arsenic is deposited at the sediment surface as As(V) and is reduced to As(III) in the upper layers of the sediment (0-8 cm), but the reduction of As(V) does not cause mobilization into the porewater. Dissolved As and Fe concentrations increased at depth in the sediment column driven by the reductive dissolution of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides and conversion to a mixed Fe(II, III) green rust-type phase. Adsorption of As and phosphorous (P) onto HFO-doped gels was inhibited at intermediate depths (10-20 cm), possibly due to dissolved organic or inorganic carbon, indicating that dissolved As concentrations were at least partially controlled by porewater composition rather than surface site availability. In sediments that had been recently exposed to air, the region of sorption inhibition was not observed, suggesting that prior exposure to air affected the extent of reductive dissolution, porewater chemistry, and As adsorption behavior. Arsenic adsorption onto the HFO-doped gels increased at depths >20 cm, and the extent of adsorption was most likely controlled by the competitive effects of dissolved phosphate. Sediment As adsorption capacity appeared to be controlled by changes in porewater composition and competitive effects at shallower depths, and by reductive dissolution and availability of sorption sites at greater burial depths. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  18. Recovery of methane from gas hydrates intercalated within natural sediments using CO(2) and a CO(2)/N(2) gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Koh, Dong-Yeun; Kang, Hyery; Kim, Dae-Ok; Park, Juwoon; Cha, Minjun; Lee, Huen

    2012-08-01

    The direct recovery of methane from massive methane hydrates (MHs), artificial MH-bearing clays, and natural MH-bearing sediments is demonstrated, using either CO(2) or a CO(2)/N(2) gas mixture (20 mol % of CO(2) and 80 mol % of N(2), reproducing flue gas from a power plant) for methane replacement in complex marine systems. Natural gas hydrates (NGHs) can be converted into CO(2) hydrate by a swapping mechanism. The overall process serves a dual purpose: it is a means of sustainable energy-source exploitation and greenhouse-gas sequestration. In particular, scant attention has been paid to the natural sediment clay portion in deep-sea gas hydrates, which is capable of storing a tremendous amount of NGH. The clay interlayer provides a unique chemical-physical environment for gas hydrates. Herein, for the first time, we pull out methane from intercalated methane hydrates in a clay interlayer using CO(2) and a CO(2)/N(2) gas mixture. The results of this study are expected to provide an essential physicochemical background required for large-scale NGH production under the seabed.

  19. Unique prokaryotic consortia in geochemically distinct sediments from Red Sea Atlantis II and discovery deep brine pools.

    PubMed

    Siam, Rania; Mustafa, Ghada A; Sharaf, Hazem; Moustafa, Ahmed; Ramadan, Adham R; Antunes, Andre; Bajic, Vladimir B; Stingl, Uli; Marsis, Nardine G R; Coolen, Marco J L; Sogin, Mitchell; Ferreira, Ari J S; Dorry, Hamza El

    2012-01-01

    The seafloor is a unique environment, which allows insights into how geochemical processes affect the diversity of biological life. Among its diverse ecosystems are deep-sea brine pools - water bodies characterized by a unique combination of extreme conditions. The 'polyextremophiles' that constitute the microbial assemblage of these deep hot brines have not been comprehensively studied. We report a comparative taxonomic analysis of the prokaryotic communities of the sediments directly below the Red Sea brine pools, namely, Atlantis II, Discovery, Chain Deep, and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Analyses of sediment samples and high-throughput pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified environmental 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rDNA) revealed that one sulfur (S)-rich Atlantis II and one nitrogen (N)-rich Discovery Deep section contained distinct microbial populations that differed from those found in the other sediment samples examined. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deferribacteres, and Euryarchaeota were the most abundant bacterial and archaeal phyla in both the S- and N-rich sections. Relative abundance-based hierarchical clustering of the 16S rDNA pyrotags assigned to major taxonomic groups allowed us to categorize the archaeal and bacterial communities into three major and distinct groups; group I was unique to the S-rich Atlantis II section (ATII-1), group II was characteristic for the N-rich Discovery sample (DD-1), and group III reflected the composition of the remaining sediments. Many of the groups detected in the S-rich Atlantis II section are likely to play a dominant role in the cycling of methane and sulfur due to their phylogenetic affiliations with bacteria and archaea involved in anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction.

  20. Unique Prokaryotic Consortia in Geochemically Distinct Sediments from Red Sea Atlantis II and Discovery Deep Brine Pools

    PubMed Central

    Siam, Rania; Mustafa, Ghada A.; Sharaf, Hazem; Moustafa, Ahmed; Ramadan, Adham R.; Antunes, Andre; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Stingl, Uli; Marsis, Nardine G. R.; Coolen, Marco J. L.; Sogin, Mitchell; Ferreira, Ari J. S.; Dorry, Hamza El

    2012-01-01

    The seafloor is a unique environment, which allows insights into how geochemical processes affect the diversity of biological life. Among its diverse ecosystems are deep-sea brine pools - water bodies characterized by a unique combination of extreme conditions. The ‘polyextremophiles’ that constitute the microbial assemblage of these deep hot brines have not been comprehensively studied. We report a comparative taxonomic analysis of the prokaryotic communities of the sediments directly below the Red Sea brine pools, namely, Atlantis II, Discovery, Chain Deep, and an adjacent brine-influenced site. Analyses of sediment samples and high-throughput pyrosequencing of PCR-amplified environmental 16S ribosomal RNA genes (16S rDNA) revealed that one sulfur (S)-rich Atlantis II and one nitrogen (N)-rich Discovery Deep section contained distinct microbial populations that differed from those found in the other sediment samples examined. Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Deferribacteres, and Euryarchaeota were the most abundant bacterial and archaeal phyla in both the S- and N-rich sections. Relative abundance-based hierarchical clustering of the 16S rDNA pyrotags assigned to major taxonomic groups allowed us to categorize the archaeal and bacterial communities into three major and distinct groups; group I was unique to the S-rich Atlantis II section (ATII-1), group II was characteristic for the N-rich Discovery sample (DD-1), and group III reflected the composition of the remaining sediments. Many of the groups detected in the S-rich Atlantis II section are likely to play a dominant role in the cycling of methane and sulfur due to their phylogenetic affiliations with bacteria and archaea involved in anaerobic methane oxidation and sulfate reduction. PMID:22916172

  1. SEDIMENT TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION EVALUATION (TIE)PHASE I,II,III GUIDANCE DOCUMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment contamination in the United States has been amply documented and, in order to comply with the 1972 Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency must address the issue of toxic sediments. Contaminated sediments from a number of freshwater and marine sites hav...

  2. PhosphorImager enhancement of sedimentation equilibrium-quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis: a highly sensitive technique for quantitation of equilibrium gradients of individual components in mixtures.

    PubMed

    Darawshe, S; Merezhinskaya, N; Minton, A P

    1995-07-20

    The technique called sedimentation equilibrium-quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (Darawshe et al. (1993) Anal. Biochem. 215, 236-242) has been extended to permit the quantitation and analysis of gradients of individual radiolabeled components in a mixture of radiolabeled solutes centrifuged to sedimentation equilibrium. Immediately following centrifugation, the contents of a sample tube are fractionated into aliquots corresponding to laminae of solution at different radial positions in the centrifuge. Following treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing buffer, a portion of each fraction is subjected to electrophoresis on a polyacrylamide gel. The gel is then incubated with a strong phosphor plate and subsequently scanned with a Molecular Dynamics PhosphorImage. The concentration of an individual radiolabeled component at a particular radial distance is proportional to the integrated intensity of the image of the radiolabeled band of that component in the fraction corresponding to that radial distance. Concentration gradients reconstructed in this fashion are interpreted in the context of conventional sedimentation equilibrium theory. The results of control experiments carried out with purified proteins of known molar mass and the measurement of the molar mass of a new, partially purified protein are reported.

  3. Strong Acid Mixture and Sequential Geochemical Arsenic Extractions in Surface Sediments from the Santa Maria La Reforma Coastal Lagoon, Mexico: A Bioavailability Assessment.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Hernández, José R; Green-Ruiz, Carlos

    2016-02-01

    Thirty-three sediment samples were collected from the Santa Maria La Reforma coastal lagoon and digested by way of a strong acid mixture and sequential arsenic (As)-extraction method to determine the arsenic (As) content and bioavailability. The As content was determined by atomic fluorescence spectrometry. In addition, grain-size analyses were performed, and organic carbon, carbonate, and iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) concentrations were determined. Fe and Mn determination was performed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A Pearson correlation matrix and As enrichment factors were calculated. Sediment concentrations from Santa Maria La Reforma ranged from 3.6 to 25 µg As g(-1) with an average of 13.4 ± 7.6 µg As g(-1). The highest values were observed in the northern (Playa Colorada), north-central (Mocorito River discharge zone), and southern zones ("El Tule" agricultural drain). Most samples were classified as exhibiting no or minor As enrichment and were lower than the threshold effect level (TEL; 7.24 µg g(-1)) for biota (MacDonald et al. in Ecotoxicology 5:253-278, 1996). Low bioavailable As values (<3 %) were measured in the majority of the sediment. The highest As percentages were associated with the oxyhydroxide fraction (F5). The results indicate that As bioavailability is negligible.

  4. Effects of a polybrominated biphenyl mixture in the rat and mouse. II. Lifetime study.

    PubMed

    Gupta, B N; McConnell, E E; Moore, J A; Haseman, J K

    1983-03-30

    This study was undertaken to characterize the long-term toxic and carcinogenic potential of a polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) mixture in rats and mice of both sexes. Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice were given 125 po doses of PBB over a 6-month period at 0 (control), 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, and 10.0 mg/kg body weight/day (5 days/week) and observed for an additional 23 months for rats and 24 months for mice (lifetime observation). The treatments (0.3 mg/kg or higher dosages) shortened the survival time in male rats whereas no such effect was observed in treated females. There was also evidence of shortened survival time in mice treated with 10.0 mg/kg PBB. As observed by uv light, hepatic porphyrin markedly increased at the 6-month observation, then tended to decrease, primarily in mice, following cessation of exposure. Significantly higher incidences of atypical hepatocellular foci, neoplastic nodules, hepatocellular carcinomas, and cholangiocarcinomas were observed in exposed rats. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma was also increased in both male (95%) and female (88%) mice (highest dose level) compared with control male (48%) and female (0%) mice. The incidence of hepatic neoplasms appeared to be dose dependent in both species. Liver tumors were observed primarily in those groups of animals to which PBB was given in doses sufficient to induce readily observable hepatic toxicity. Under the conditions of this experiment, polybrominated biphenyl mixture (Firemaster FF-1) was carcinogenic for Fischer 344 rats and B6C3F1 mice of both sexes. Lesions included neoplastic nodules, hepatocellular carcinomas, and cholangiocarcinomas in rats and hepatocellular carcinomas in mice. Other manifestations of toxicity included porphyrogenic effects and hepatotoxicity. A significantly higher incidence of chronic progressive nephropathy was observed in male rats of the 1.0, 3.0, and 10.0 mg/kg dosage groups when compared with control males. Gastric ulcers and hyperplastic

  5. Chronic dietary exposure to pyrolytic and petrogenic mixtures of PAHs causes physiological disruption in zebrafish--part II: behavior.

    PubMed

    Vignet, Caroline; Le Menach, Karyn; Lyphout, Laura; Guionnet, Tiphaine; Frère, Laura; Leguay, Didier; Budzinski, Hélène; Cousin, Xavier; Bégout, Marie-Laure

    2014-12-01

    In the last 10 years, behavior assessment has been developed as an indicator of neurotoxicity and an integrated indicator of physiological disruption. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) release into the environment has increased in recent decades resulting in high concentrations of these compounds in the sediment of contaminated areas. We evaluated the behavioral consequences of long-term chronic exposure to PAHs, by exposing zebrafish to diets spiked with three PAH fractions at environmentally relevant concentrations. Fish were exposed to these chemicals from their first meal (5 days postfertilization) until they became reproducing adults (at 6 months old). The fractions used were representative of PAHs of pyrolytic (PY) origin and of two oils differing in composition (a heavy fuel oil (HO) and a light crude oil (LO)). Several tests were carried out to evaluate circadian spontaneous swimming activity, responses to a challenge (photomotor response), exploratory tendencies, and anxiety levels. We found that dietary PAH exposure was associated with greater mobility, lower levels of exploratory activity, and higher levels of anxiety, particularly in fish exposed to the HO fraction and, to a lesser extent, the LO fraction. Finally, our results indicate that PAH mixtures of different compositions, representative of situations encountered in the wild, can induce behavioral disruptions resulting in poorer fish performance.

  6. The effect of biogenic Fe(II) on the stability and sorption of Co(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} to goethite and a subsurface sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M.; Smith, S.C.; Fredrickson, J.K.

    2000-04-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted with suspensions of goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and a subsurface sediment to assess the influence of bacterial iron reduction on the fate of Co(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}, a representative metal-ligand complex of intermediate stability (log K{sub Co(II)EDTA} = 17.97). The goethite was synthetic (ca. 55 m{sup 2}/g) and the sediment was a Pleistocene age, Fe(III) oxide-containing material from the Atlantic coastal plain (Milford). Shewanella alga strain BrY, a dissimulatory iron reducing bacterium (DIRB), was used to promote Fe(III) oxide reduction. Sorption isotherms and pH adsorption edges were measured for Co{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Co(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}, and Fe(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} on the two sorbents in 0.001 mol/L Ca(ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} to aid in experiment interpretation. It is concluded that cationic radionuclides such as {sup 60}Co or {sup 239/240}Pu, which may be mobilized from disposed wastes by complexation with EDTA{sup 4{minus}}, may become immobilized in groundwater zones where dissimilatory bacterial iron reduction is operative.

  7. Survey of Lake Ontario bottom sediment off Rochester, New York, to define the extent of jettisoned World War II material and its potential for sediment contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, Gregory; Kappel, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Military-type mat??riel was recovered from the bottom of Lake Ontario near Rochester, N.Y., during bottom-trawl, fish-stock surveys at depths of 75 to 180 feet each year from 1978 through 1996. The recovered mat??riel included many shell-detonator nose cones (2 inches in diameter by about 3.5 inches long); several electronic components; one corroded box of detonators; a corrugated container of mercury-filled capsules; and corroded batteries. Most of the recovered mat??riel has been identified as defective components of shell detonators (proximity-fuze assemblies) that were jettisoned in the lake to protect them from discovery during World War II. Side-scan SONAR, metal-detector, and ROV (remotely-operated-vehicle) surveys found no evidence of any large piles of mat??riel containing potentially hazardous, toxic, or polluting materials within the 17-square-mile study site. Many scattered magnetic anomalies were detected in this area, but chemical analysis of bottom sediment and of zebra- and quagga-mussel (Dreissena spp.) tissue indicate that the concentrations of mercury and other heavy metals are within the previously documented ranges for Lake Ontario sediment. The failure of ROV videos and of SCUBA-diver surveys and probes of the lake bottom to locate any debris indicates that most, if not all, of the debris is scattered and buried under a layer of fine-grained sediment and, possibly, mussels.

  8. Capturing Bioavailable Organic Contaminants for Phase II Whole Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Phase I of whole sediment TIEs, causes of toxicity to freshwater and marine organisms are characterized into broad toxicant classes including ammonia, metals and organic chemicals. In the whole sediment Phase I TIEs performed so far, organic chemicals have been shown to be t...

  9. A two-dimensional spectrum analysis for sedimentation velocity experiments of mixtures with heterogeneity in molecular weight and shape.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Emre; Cao, Weiming; Demeler, Borries

    2010-02-01

    We report a model-independent analysis approach for fitting sedimentation velocity data which permits simultaneous determination of shape and molecular weight distributions for mono- and polydisperse solutions of macromolecules. Our approach allows for heterogeneity in the frictional domain, providing a more faithful description of the experimental data for cases where frictional ratios are not identical for all components. Because of increased accuracy in the frictional properties of each component, our method also provides more reliable molecular weight distributions in the general case. The method is based on a fine grained two-dimensional grid search over s and f/f (0), where the grid is a linear combination of whole boundary models represented by finite element solutions of the Lamm equation with sedimentation and diffusion parameters corresponding to the grid points. A Monte Carlo approach is used to characterize confidence limits for the determined solutes. Computational algorithms addressing the very large memory needs for a fine grained search are discussed. The method is suitable for globally fitting multi-speed experiments, and constraints based on prior knowledge about the experimental system can be imposed. Time- and radially invariant noise can be eliminated. Serial and parallel implementations of the method are presented. We demonstrate with simulated and experimental data of known composition that our method provides superior accuracy and lower variance fits to experimental data compared to other methods in use today, and show that it can be used to identify modes of aggregation and slow polymerization.

  10. Settling velocities in batch sedimentation. [Mixtures containing one and two sizes of resin beads, 44 and 62. mu. m in diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, A.M.; Thompson, B.E.

    1982-10-01

    The sedimentation of mixtures containing one and two sizes of spherical particles (44 and 62 ..mu..m in diameter) was studied. Radioactive tracing with /sup 57/Co was used to measure the settling velocities. The ratio of the settling velocity U of uniformly sized particles to the velocity predicted to Stokes' law U/sub 0/ was correlated to an expression of the form U/U/sub 0/ = epsilon/sup ..cap alpha../, where epsilon is the liquid volume fraction and ..cap alpha.. is an empirical constant, determined experimentally to be 4.85. No effect of viscosity on the ratio U/U/sub 0/ was observed as the viscosity of the liquid medium was varied from 1x10/sup -3/ to 5x10/sup -3/ Pa.s. The settling velocities of particles in a bimodal mixture were fit by the same correlation; the ratio U/U/sub 0/ was independent of the concentrations of different-sized particles.

  11. An analysis of lethal and sublethal interactions among type I and type II pyrethroid pesticide mixtures using standard Hyalella azteca water column toxicity tests.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Krista Callinan; Deanovic, Linda; Werner, Inge; Stillway, Marie; Fong, Stephanie; Teh, Swee

    2016-10-01

    A novel 2-tiered analytical approach was used to characterize and quantify interactions between type I and type II pyrethroids in Hyalella azteca using standardized water column toxicity tests. Bifenthrin, permethrin, cyfluthrin, and lambda-cyhalothrin were tested in all possible binary combinations across 6 experiments. All mixtures were analyzed for 4-d lethality, and 2 of the 6 mixtures (permethrin-bifenthrin and permethrin-cyfluthrin) were tested for subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal effects on swimming motility and growth. Mixtures were initially analyzed for interactions using regression analyses, and subsequently compared with the additive models of concentration addition and independent action to further characterize mixture responses. Negative interactions (antagonistic) were significant in 2 of the 6 mixtures tested, including cyfluthrin-bifenthrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin, but only on the acute 4-d lethality endpoint. In both cases mixture responses fell between the additive models of concentration addition and independent action. All other mixtures were additive across 4-d lethality, and bifenthrin-permethrin and cyfluthrin-permethrin were also additive in terms of subchronic 10-d lethality and sublethal responses. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2542-2549. © 2016 SETAC.

  12. Sediment sources and their contribution along northern coast of the South China Sea: Evidence from clay minerals of surface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianguo; Yan, Wen; Chen, Zhong; Lu, Jun

    2012-09-01

    Clay minerals of surface sediment samples from nine bays/harbors along northern coast of the South China Sea (SCS) are used for sediment sources and contribution estimation in the study areas. Results reveal that sediments in the study bays/harbors seem to be a mixture of sediments from the Pearl, Hanjiang River and local islands/rivers, but their clay mineral assemblage is distinct from that of Luzon and Taiwan sediments, indicating that sediments are derived mainly from the neighboring sources through riverine input and partly from localized sediments. Due to input of local sediments in the northern SCS, sediments from both east of the Leizhou Peninsula (Area IV) and next to the Pearl River estuary (PRE, Area II) have high smectite percent. Affected by riverine input of the Pearl and Hanjiang Rivers, sediments in west of the PRE (Area III) and east of the PRE (Area I) have high illite (average 47%) and kaolinite (54%) percents, respectively. Sediment contributions of various major sources to the study areas are estimated as the following: (1) the Hanjiang River provide 95% and 84% sediments in Areas I and II, respectively, (2) the Pearl River supply 79% and 29% sediments in Areas III and IV, respectively and (3) local sediments contribute the rest and reach the maximum (˜71%) in Area IV.

  13. China's Yangtze estuary. II. Phosphorus and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tidal flat sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shiyuan; Gao, Xiaojiang; Liu, Min; Chen, Zhenlou

    2001-11-01

    Concentrations of phosphorus (P) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined in tidal flat sediments from the Yangtze estuary and Hangzhou Bay. The amount of total P in surface sediments ranges from 18.0 to 31.4 μmol g -1 along the southern coast. The spatial and temporal distribution of P in tidal flats is closely related to geomorphological location and contaminant input, especially in association with variations in hydrodynamic conditions. Speciation of P in sediments was extracted sequentially. Results show that calcium phases are dominant in the total P of tidal flat sediments, which is similar to marine sediments. The main diffusion of dissolved P is from overlying water to sediment in the coastal environment of the Yangtze estuary. Two sediment cores from the Baoshan (BS) and Donghai (DH) sites were extracted for PAH analysis. The total concentration of PAHs ranges from 0.061 to 7.618 μg g -1 at the BS site, and from 0.005 to 2.370 μg g -1 at the DH site. The distribution of total and individual PAHs in the sediment shows a subsurface maximum, following by decreased levels to the surface and with depth. The pattern of PAH abundance suggests that there has been significant petroleum contamination in the Yangtze estuary. A few individual PAHs, such as acenaphthalene and anthracene in surface samples of the two cores, are in excess of current sediment quality criteria in the Yangtze estuary. The present study suggests that anthropogenic activities enhance contaminant inputs to the estuary.

  14. Ferromanganese oxide deposits from the Central Pacific Ocean, II. Nodules and associated sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aplin, Andrew C.; Cronan, David S.

    1985-02-01

    Bulk chemical, mineralogical and selective leach analyses have been made on a suite of abyssal ferromanganese nodules and associated sediments from the S.W. equatorial Pacific Ocean. Compositional relations between nodules, sediment oxyhydroxides and nearby ferromanganese encrustations are drawn assuming that the crusts represent purely hydrogenetic ferromanganese material. Crusts, δMnO 2-rich nodules and sediment oxyhydroxides are compositionally similar and distinct from diagenetic todorokitebearing nodules. Compared to Fe-Mn crusts, sediment oxyhydroxides are however slightly enriched, relative to Mn and Ni, in Fe, Cu, Zn, Ti and Al, and depleted in Co and Pb, reflecting processes of non-hydrogenous element supply and diagenesis. δMnO 2 nodules exhibit compositions intermediate between Fe-Mn crusts and sediment oxyhydroxides and thus are considered to accrete oxides from both the water column and associated sediments. Deep ocean vertical element fluxes associated with large organic aggregates, biogenic calcite, silica and soft parts have been calculated for the study area. Fluxes associated with organic aggregates are one to three orders of magnitude greater than those associated with the other phases considered, are in good agreement with element accumulation rates in sediments, and are up to four orders of magnitude greater than element accumulation rates in nodules. Metal release from labile biogenic material in surface sediments can qualitatively explain the differences between the composition of Fe-Mn crusts and sediment oxyhydroxides. Todorokite-rich diagenetic nodules are confined to an eastwards widening equatorial wedge. It is proposed that todorokite precipitates directly from interstitial waters. Since the transition metal chemistry of interstitial waters is controlled dominantly by reactions involving the breakdown of organic carbon, the supply and degradation rate of organic material is a critical factor in the formation of diagenetic nodules. The

  15. Role of reef fauna in sediment transport and distribution - Studies from Tektite I and II

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clifton, H.E.

    1973-01-01

    1. Reef organisms may play a major role in the transport and distribution of sediment on the sea floor adjacent to coral reefs. 2. Some fish such as Malacanthus plumieri (Bloch) selectively transport and collect certain types of sediment (such as larger coral and shell fragments). 3. The random movement of crawling or burrowing organisms may cause a large amount of sediment to be shifted laterally on the sea floor. On slopes, a net downhill displacement may result. 4. The surface configuration and internal structure of the sediment is rapidly changed by faunal mixing. Ripple marks formed by waves or currents are obliterated by the activity of organisms in only a few weeks in the environment studied. Internal structure (bedding) near the sediment-water interface is similarly destroyed in a short period of time. 5. Larger clasts (including empty shells) on the sea floor tend to be buried by faunal undermining. The rate of burial depends primarily on the grain size of the substrate. 6. The random movement of fauna on the sea floor may produce a predominantly concave-up orientation of pelecypod shells and shell fragments on the sea floor - the opposite of that produced by the activity of waves or currents. ?? 1973 Biologischen Anstalt Helgoland.

  16. Carotenoid diagenesis in recent marine sediments. II. Degradation of fucoxanthin to loliolide

    SciTech Connect

    Repeta, D.J. )

    1989-03-01

    The quantitative distributions of loliolide and the major phytoplankton carotenoids: fucoxanthin, diadinochrome, diatoxanthin, and {beta}-carotene in two cores of anoxic marine sediment recovered from the Peru continental shelf are reported. The results demonstrate that the rapid degradation of carotenoids in sediments is not a result of their high degree of unsaturation as has been previously suggested. The authors predict that loliolide and isololiolide will inherit a specific stereochemistry from their carotenoid precursors, but that dihydroactinidiolide will be racemic. For every {mu}mole of fucoxanthin degraded in Peru sediments, 0.7-1.1 {mu}mole of loliolide is produced. Summation of fucoxanthin and loliolide at each subsurface horizon yields an estimate of the total deposition of fucoxanthin at t = 0. Throughout the 0-20 cm depth of our samples, this parameter is remarkably constant to {plus minus}16%. Individual horizons exhibit excursions which may reflect changes in surface productivity. Extrapolation of our measurements to deeper sediments may therefore be of some value in deciphering questions on environmental conditions of deposition and paleoproductivity.

  17. Coexistence of Microaerophilic, Nitrate-Reducing, and Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidizers and Fe(III) Reducers in Coastal Marine Sediment.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Katja; Nordhoff, Mark; Røy, Hans; Schmidt, Caroline; Behrens, Sebastian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker; Kappler, Andreas

    2015-12-18

    Iron is abundant in sediments, where it can be biogeochemically cycled between its divalent and trivalent redox states. The neutrophilic microbiological Fe cycle involves Fe(III)-reducing and three different physiological groups of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, i.e., microaerophilic, anoxygenic phototrophic, and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. However, it is unknown whether all three groups coexist in one habitat and how they are spatially distributed in relation to gradients of O2, light, nitrate, and Fe(II). We examined two coastal marine sediments in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, by cultivation and most probable number (MPN) studies for Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers and by quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays for microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. Our results demonstrate the coexistence of all three metabolic types of Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers. In qPCR, microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (Zetaproteobacteria) were present with up to 3.2 × 10(6) cells g dry sediment(-1). In MPNs, nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizers, and Fe(III) reducers reached cell numbers of up to 3.5 × 10(4), 3.1 × 10(2), and 4.4 × 10(4) g dry sediment(-1), respectively. O2 and light penetrated only a few millimeters, but the depth distribution of the different iron metabolizers did not correlate with the profile of O2, Fe(II), or light. Instead, abundances were homogeneous within the upper 3 cm of the sediment, probably due to wave-induced sediment reworking and bioturbation. In microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment cultures, strains belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria were identified. Photoferrotrophic enrichments contained strains related to Chlorobium and Rhodobacter; the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) enrichments contained strains related to Hoeflea and Denitromonas. This study shows the coexistence of all three types of Fe(II) oxidizers in two near-shore marine environments and the potential for competition and interrelationships between

  18. Predicting pesticide environmental risk in intensive agricultural areas. II: Screening level risk assessment of complex mixtures in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Verro, Roberto; Finizio, Antonio; Otto, Stefan; Vighi, Marco

    2009-01-15

    In a previous article, a procedure for assessing pesticide ecotoxicological risk for surface water was applied to all active ingredients in a pilot basin. This data set has been used to assess the composition of pesticide mixtures that are likely to be present in surface waters as a consequence of pesticide emissions from the crops grown within the basin (maize, soybean, sugar beet, and vineyard). Temporal evolution of the mixture composition has been evaluated as a function of the different contamination patterns (drift and runoff). Ecotoxicological risk has been assessed for the mixtures released by individual crops and from all the relevant crops cultivated in the basin. The different role of drift and runoff, as well as the temporal trends of exposure and risk are compared. Daphnia is the most affected among the three indicator organisms considered, particularly from drift mixtures after insecticide application on vineyard. The highest risk for algae occurs during runoff events in spring. In most risk events, one or a few chemicals are usually responsible for more than 80% of the toxic potency of the mixture. The CA model for predicting mixture response is assumed to be a reliable approach for assessing risk for ecologically relevant pesticide mixtures.

  19. Microbial production of isotopically light iron(II) in a modern chemically precipitated sediment and implications for isotopic variations in ancient rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangalos, G.E.; Beard, B.L.; Johnson, C.M.; Alpers, C.N.; Shelobolina, E.S.; Xu, H.; Konishi, H.; Roden, E.E.

    2012-01-01

    The inventories and Fe isotope composition of aqueous Fe(II) and solid-phase Fe compounds were quantified in neutral-pH, chemically precipitated sediments downstream of the Iron Mountain acid mine drainage site in northern California, USA. The sediments contain high concentrations of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides [Fe(III)am] that allow dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) to predominate over Fe–S interactions in Fe redox transformation, as indicated by the very low abundance of Cr(II)-extractable reduced inorganic sulfur compared with dilute HCl-extractable Fe. δ56Fe values for bulk HCl- and HF-extractable Fe were ≈ 0. These near-zero bulk δ56Fe values, together with the very low abundance of dissolved Fe in the overlying water column, suggest that the pyrite Fe source had near-zero δ56Fe values, and that complete oxidation of Fe(II) took place prior to deposition of the Fe(III) oxide-rich sediment. Sediment core analyses and incubation experiments demonstrated the production of millimolar quantities of isotopically light (δ56Fe ≈ -1.5 to -0.5‰) aqueous Fe(II) coupled to partial reduction of Fe(III)am by DIR. Trends in the Fe isotope composition of solid-associated Fe(II) and residual Fe(III)am are consistent with experiments with synthetic Fe(III) oxides, and collectively suggest an equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III)am of approximately -2‰. These Fe(III) oxide-rich sediments provide a model for early diagenetic processes that are likely to have taken place in Archean and Paleoproterozoic marine sediments that served as precursors for banded iron formations. Our results suggest pathways whereby DIR could have led to the formation of large quantities of low-δ56Fe minerals during BIF genesis.

  20. Microbial production of isotopically light iron(II) in a modern chemically precipitated sediment and implications for isotopic variations in ancient rocks.

    PubMed

    Tangalos, G E; Beard, B L; Johnson, C M; Alpers, C N; Shelobolina, E S; Xu, H; Konishi, H; Roden, E E

    2010-06-01

    The inventories and Fe isotope composition of aqueous Fe(II) and solid-phase Fe compounds were quantified in neutral-pH, chemically precipitated sediments downstream of the Iron Mountain acid mine drainage site in northern California, USA. The sediments contain high concentrations of amorphous Fe(III) oxyhydroxides [Fe(III)(am)] that allow dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR) to predominate over Fe-S interactions in Fe redox transformation, as indicated by the very low abundance of Cr(II)-extractable reduced inorganic sulfur compared with dilute HCl-extractable Fe. delta(56)Fe values for bulk HCl- and HF-extractable Fe were approximately 0. These near-zero bulk delta(56)Fe values, together with the very low abundance of dissolved Fe in the overlying water column, suggest that the pyrite Fe source had near-zero delta(56)Fe values, and that complete oxidation of Fe(II) took place prior to deposition of the Fe(III) oxide-rich sediment. Sediment core analyses and incubation experiments demonstrated the production of millimolar quantities of isotopically light (delta(56)Fe approximately -1.5 to -0.5 per thousand) aqueous Fe(II) coupled to partial reduction of Fe(III)(am) by DIR. Trends in the Fe isotope composition of solid-associated Fe(II) and residual Fe(III)(am) are consistent with experiments with synthetic Fe(III) oxides, and collectively suggest an equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation between aqueous Fe(II) and Fe(III)(am) of approximately -2 per thousand. These Fe(III) oxide-rich sediments provide a model for early diagenetic processes that are likely to have taken place in Archean and Paleoproterozoic marine sediments that served as precursors for banded iron formations. Our results suggest pathways whereby DIR could have led to the formation of large quantities of low-delta(56)Fe minerals during BIF genesis.

  1. High-precision measurements of wetland sediment elevation. II The rod surface elevation table

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C.; Perez, B.C.; Segura, B.; Holland, R.D.; Stelly, C.; Stephenson, G.; Hensel, P.

    2002-01-01

    A new high-precision device for measuring sediment elevation in emergent and shallow water wetland systems is described. The rod surface-elevation table (RSET) is a balanced, lightweight mechanical leveling device that attaches to both shallow ( 1 m in order to be stable. The pipe is driven to refusal but typically to a depth shallower than the rod bench mark because of greater surface resistance of the pipe. Thus, the RSET makes it possible to partition change in sediment elevation over shallower (e.g., the root zone) and deeper depths of the sediment profile than is possible with the SET. The confidence intervals for the height of an individual pin measured by two different operators with the RSET under laboratory conditions were A? 1.0 and A? 1.5 mm. Under field conditions, confidence intervals for the measured height of an individual pin ranged from A? 1.3 mm in a mangrove forest up to A? 4.3 mm in a salt marsh.

  2. Heterogeneous equilibrium between the condensed phase and vapor of aprotonic solvents and electrolytes based on them II. Solvent mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidym, I. L.; Gurevich, I. G.; Shchitnikov, V. K.; Dubasova, V. S.; Tumanov, B. I.

    1982-06-01

    Experimental results for the saturated vapor pressure of mixtures of organic solvents with electrolytes based on them are given, together with thermodynamic characteristics of the vaporization process calculated on this basis.

  3. Genotype and toxicity relationships among Hyalella azteca: II. Acute exposure to fluoranthene-contaminated sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Y.; Guttman, S.I.; Oris, J.T.; Huang, X.; Burton, G.A.

    2000-05-01

    This study examined the genotypic responses of Hyalella azteca to the toxicity of sediment contaminated by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fluoranthene. The authors monitored the time to death for 696 H. azteca exposed to ultraviolet light and sediment spiked with fluoranthene. The survival distribution functions within the genotypes at each of these variable allozyme loci (acid phosphatase [ACP*], glucose-6-phosphate isomerase [GPI*], and phosphoglucomutase [PGM*]) were compared using a long-rank test. Results showed significant differences among SDFs at all three loci. No association of heterozygosity with time to death was observed. The homozygote ACP*-CC was associated with decreased survivorship compared with ACP*-AA, ACP*-BB, and ACP*-AB. However, GPI*-AA was associated with increased survivorship compared with GPI*-BB, GPI*-CC, and GPI*-BC. Significant differences in resistance also were observed for PGM*-BB versus either PGM*-AC or PGM*-BC. These results indicate that differential resistance to PAH phototoxicity was genetically related, producing significant alteration in the frequencies of several genotypes in the population.

  4. Coexistence of Microaerophilic, Nitrate-Reducing, and Phototrophic Fe(II) Oxidizers and Fe(III) Reducers in Coastal Marine Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Laufer, Katja; Nordhoff, Mark; Røy, Hans; Schmidt, Caroline; Behrens, Sebastian; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    2015-01-01

    Iron is abundant in sediments, where it can be biogeochemically cycled between its divalent and trivalent redox states. The neutrophilic microbiological Fe cycle involves Fe(III)-reducing and three different physiological groups of Fe(II)-oxidizing microorganisms, i.e., microaerophilic, anoxygenic phototrophic, and nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers. However, it is unknown whether all three groups coexist in one habitat and how they are spatially distributed in relation to gradients of O2, light, nitrate, and Fe(II). We examined two coastal marine sediments in Aarhus Bay, Denmark, by cultivation and most probable number (MPN) studies for Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers and by quantitative-PCR (qPCR) assays for microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers. Our results demonstrate the coexistence of all three metabolic types of Fe(II) oxidizers and Fe(III) reducers. In qPCR, microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers (Zetaproteobacteria) were present with up to 3.2 × 106 cells g dry sediment−1. In MPNs, nitrate-reducing Fe(II) oxidizers, anoxygenic phototrophic Fe(II) oxidizers, and Fe(III) reducers reached cell numbers of up to 3.5 × 104, 3.1 × 102, and 4.4 × 104 g dry sediment−1, respectively. O2 and light penetrated only a few millimeters, but the depth distribution of the different iron metabolizers did not correlate with the profile of O2, Fe(II), or light. Instead, abundances were homogeneous within the upper 3 cm of the sediment, probably due to wave-induced sediment reworking and bioturbation. In microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing enrichment cultures, strains belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria were identified. Photoferrotrophic enrichments contained strains related to Chlorobium and Rhodobacter; the nitrate-reducing Fe(II) enrichments contained strains related to Hoeflea and Denitromonas. This study shows the coexistence of all three types of Fe(II) oxidizers in two near-shore marine environments and the potential for competition and interrelationships between them

  5. Sedimentation equilibria of ferrofluids: II. Experimental osmotic equations of state of magnetite colloids.

    PubMed

    Luigjes, Bob; Thies-Weesie, Dominique M E; Erné, Ben H; Philipse, Albert P

    2012-06-20

    The first experimental osmotic equation of state is reported for well-defined magnetic colloids that interact via a dipolar hard-sphere potential. The osmotic pressures are determined from the sedimentation equilibrium concentration profiles in ultrathin capillaries using a low-velocity analytical centrifuge, which is the subject of the accompanying paper I. The pressures of the magnetic colloids, measured accurately to values as low as a few pascals, obey Van 't Hoff's law at low concentrations, whereas at increasing colloid densities non-ideality appears in the form of a negative second virial coefficient. This virial coefficient corresponds to a dipolar coupling constant that agrees with the coupling constant obtained via independent magnetization measurements. The coupling constant manifests an attractive potential of mean force that is significant but yet not quite strong enough to induce dipolar chain formation. Our results disprove van der Waals-like phase behavior of dipolar particles for reasons that are explained.

  6. Palladium(II)‐Catalysed Aminocarbonylation of Terminal Alkynes for the Synthesis of 2‐Ynamides: Addressing the Challenges of Solvents and Gas Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, N. Louise; Brown, Clare L.; Irwin, Andrew A.; Cao, Qun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract 2‐Ynamides can be synthesised through PdII catalysed oxidative carbonylation, utilising low catalyst loadings. A variety of alkynes and amines can be used to afford 2‐ynamides in high yields, whilst overcoming the drawbacks associated with previous oxidative methods, which rely on dangerous solvents and gas mixtures. The use of [NBu4]I allows the utilisation of the industrially recommended solvent ethyl acetate. O2 can be used as the terminal oxidant, and the catalyst can operate under safer conditions with low O2 concentrations. PMID:27906507

  7. Palladium(II)-Catalysed Aminocarbonylation of Terminal Alkynes for the Synthesis of 2-Ynamides: Addressing the Challenges of Solvents and Gas Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Hughes, N Louise; Brown, Clare L; Irwin, Andrew A; Cao, Qun; Muldoon, Mark J

    2017-02-22

    2-Ynamides can be synthesised through Pd(II) catalysed oxidative carbonylation, utilising low catalyst loadings. A variety of alkynes and amines can be used to afford 2-ynamides in high yields, whilst overcoming the drawbacks associated with previous oxidative methods, which rely on dangerous solvents and gas mixtures. The use of [NBu4 ]I allows the utilisation of the industrially recommended solvent ethyl acetate. O2 can be used as the terminal oxidant, and the catalyst can operate under safer conditions with low O2 concentrations.

  8. The Quantitative Resolution of a Mixture of Group II Metal Ions by Thermometric Titration with EDTA. An Analytical Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Robert L.; Popham, Ronald E.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an experiment in thermometric titration used in an analytic chemistry-chemical instrumentation course, consisting of two titrations, one a mixture of calcium and magnesium, the other of calcium, magnesium, and barium ions. Provides equipment and solutions list/specifications, graphs, and discussion of results. (JM)

  9. Coastal circulation and sediment dynamics in Hanalei Bay, Kaua'i, Hawaii: Part II: tracking recent fluvial sedimentation; isotope stratigraphy obtained in Summer 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, Amy E.; Field, Michael E.; Bothner, Michael H.; Logan, Joshua B.; Casso, Michael A.; Baldwin, Sandra M.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2006-01-01

    Delivery and dispersal of fluvial sediment in Hanalei Bay, Kaua’i, Hawaii, have important implications for the health of local coral reefs. The reef community in Hanalei Bay represents a relatively healthy ecosystem. However, the reefs are periodically stressed by storm waves, and increases in sediment and dissolved substances from the Hanalei River have the potential to cause additional stress. Increased turbidity and sedimentation on corals during Hanalei River floods that occur in seasons of low wave energy, when sediment would not be readily remobilized and advected out of the bay, could affect the health and sustainability of coral reefs and the many associated species. Measurements of short-lived isotopes 7Be and 137Cs in sediment cores have been used to trace the thickness and distribution of terrestrial sediment in Hanalei Bay, in order to assess spatial and temporal patterns of sediment deposition and remobilization relative to coral-reef locations. A third isotope, 210Pb, derived primarily from seawater, provides additional information about recent sedimentary history. Isotope profiles and observations of sedimentary facies from cores collected at multiple locations in June 2005, and again in August 2005, indicate the presence of recent fluvial sediment and organic debris in the east part of the bay near the mouth of the Hanalei River. Away from the immediate vicinity of the river mouth, sediment in the uppermost 1 m below the sea floor had not retained a significant quantity of fluvial sediment within the eight months prior to either sampling effort. During the study interval in summer 2005 the Hanalei River had no major floods and there was relatively little sediment input to the bay. Sediment away from the river mouth was dominated by carbonate sand, although some terrestrial sediment was present in sub-sea-floor horizons. Sedimentary facies and isotope inventories throughout the bay showed substantial spatial heterogeneity. Sediment cores will be

  10. How to overcome inter-electrode variability and instability to quantify dissolved oxygen, Fe(II), mn(II), and S(−II) in undisturbed soils and sediments using voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although uniquely capable of measuring multiple redox constituents nearly simultaneously with no or minimal sample pretreatment, voltammetry is currently underutilized in characterizing redox conditions in aquatic and terrestrial systems. Investigation of undisturbed media such as pore water requires a solid-state electrode, and such electrodes can be difficult to fabricate reproducibly. An approach to determine the concentrations of electroactive constituents using indirectly calibrated electrodes has been developed, but the protocol for and accuracy of this approach—the pilot ion method—has not been documented in detail. Results A detailed procedure for testing electrode quality is provided, and the application and limitations of the pilot ion method have been documented. To quantify Fe(II) and Mn(II), subtraction of non-linear baseline functions from voltammetric signals produced better calibration curves than did linear baselines, enabled lower detection limits and reliable deconvolution of overlapping signals, and was successfully applied to sediment pore water signals. We observed that electrode sensitivities often vary by tens of percent, and that the sensitivity declines over time. The ratio of calibration slopes of Mn(II) to Fe(II) varied by no more than 11% from one Hg/Au electrode to another and Fe(II) concentrations predicted by the Mn(II) pilot ion were, on average, 13% different from their actual values. However, concentration predictions by the pilot ion method were worse for less than 15 μM Fe(II) (46% different on average). The ratio of calibration slopes of Mn(II) to S(−II) varied by almost 20% from one Hg/Au electrode to another, and S(−II) predicted concentrations were as much as 58% different from their actual values. These predictions of Fe(II) and S(−II) concentrations indicate that the accuracy of the pilot ion method depends on how independent calibration slope ratios are from the electrode used. At medium

  11. Tier II Analysis of Vadose Zone Sediments from UPRS 200-E-81 and 200-E-86

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, Michelle M.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2009-04-01

    The overall goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by Washington River Protection Solutions, are to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities; identify and evaluate the efficacy of interim measures; and aid, via collection of geochemical information and data, the future decisions that must be made by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regarding the near-term operations, future waste retrieval, and final closure activities for the single-shell tank waste management areas (WMAs). To meet the investigative goals of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, the Environmental Sciences Laboratory performed geochemical analyses on vadose zone sediments collected within Waste Management Area C. Tier one analyses of UPR-200-E-86, which includes direct push probe holes C5952, C5958 and C5960, were performed between 3/25/08 and 4/14/08. Preliminary results were presented to CH2M Hill Hanford Group on 6/5/08. As a result of the tier one investigations, further tier two analyses were requested. Tier two investigations include particle size and mineralogy analyses on samples collected between 80 to 120 feet below ground surface that were found to contain high concentrations of chloride and sulfate. Tier one analyses on sediments retrieved near UPR-200-E-81, direct push probe hole C6394, were performed between 6/20/08 and 7/22/08. Preliminary results of the tier one analyses were presented on 8/15/08. As a result of the tier one investigations, further tier two analyses were requested. Tier two analyses include determining whether U-236 exists in samples at approximately 42 feet below the ground surface. Confirmation of U-236 will determine whether the U-238 seen in the leaches performed on samples at that depth is a result of contamination and not from leaching natural uranium. Using the water and acid extract U-238 concentrations from the tier one analysis, equilibrium Kd values were requested to be calculated. Additional tier two analysis includes

  12. Partially hydrolyzed bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) as a porous Bioadsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous mixtures.

    PubMed

    OuYang, Xiao-kun; Jin, Ru-Na; Yang, Le-Ping; Wen, Zheng-Shun; Yang, Li-Ye; Wang, Yang-Guang; Wang, Chong-Yu

    2014-06-25

    A novel porous succinylated bioadsorbent was prepared by the partial enzymatic hydrolysis of bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) and its subsequent modification with succinic anhydride. Pb(II) removal from solutions that also contained sodium chloride and an amino acid was investigated using the bioadsorbent. Enzymatic hydrolysis increased the number of accessible hydroxyl groups and surface area of the raw bamboo, and created many pores within the material. The porous succinylated bioadsorbent exhibited high efficiency for Pb(II) binding. The sodium chloride content significantly decreased the Pb(II) adsorption capacity, whereas a minor effect was observed in the presence of arginine. The experimental data could be accurately described by a pseudo-second-order kinetics model, and the adsorption proceeded via an ion exchange mechanism. Even in a solution containing sodium chloride and arginine, the maximum adsorption capacity of Pb(II) by the porous succinylated bioadsorbent was 99.5 mg/g at 303 K.

  13. Modification of wheat starch with succinic acid/acetanhydride and azelaic acid/acetanhydride mixtures. II. Chemical and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Ačkar, Durđica; Subarić, Drago; Babić, Jurislav; Miličević, Borislav; Jozinović, Antun

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of modification with succinic acid/acetanhydride and azelaic acid/acetanhydride mixtures on chemical and physical properties of wheat starch. Starch was isolated from two wheat varieties and modified with mixtures of succinic acid and acetanhydride and azelaic acid and acetanhydride in 4, 6 and 8% (w/w). Total starch content, resistant starch content, degree of modification, changes in FT-IR spectra, colour, gel texture and freeze-thaw stability were determined. Results showed that resistant starch content increased by both investigated modifications, and degree of modification increased proportionally to amount of reagents used. FT-IR analysis of modified starches showed peak around 1,740 cm(-1), characteristic for carbonyl group of ester. Total colour difference caused by modifications was detectable by trained people. Adhesiveness significantly increased, while freeze-thaw stability decreased by both investigated modifications.

  14. Excess thermodynamic properties of chainlike mixtures. II. Self-associating systems: predictions from soft-SAFT and molecular simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blas, Felipe J.

    The excess thermodynamic behaviour of self-associating binary mixtures of chainlike molecules is studied using modified statistical associating fluid theory, the so-called soft-SAFT equation of state. The chainlike molecules are described as Lennard-Jones spherical segments tangentially bonded together. The associating Lennard-Jones chains are modelled considering additional embedded off-centre square-well bonding sites. This model, which accounts explicitly for the most important microscopic features of real non-associating and associating chainlike molecules, such as repulsive and attractive forces between chemical groups, the connectivity of the segments to form the chains and the specific interactions (association), is also solved using the Monte Carlo molecular simulation technique. Comparisons between theoretical predictions and simulation results for selected mixtures are made in order to assess the adequacy of the theory in predicting excess properties. Agreement between simulation and soft-SAFT predictions indicates that the theory is able to provide a good description of the major excess properties. The theory is used also to study the effect of the molecular parameters on the excess properties of self-associating binary mixtures, with particular emphasis on the effect of association (including the bonding energy and number of associating sites) and chain length. The thermodynamic behaviour of these systems is governed by a delicate interplay between two important effects: the bond breaking of the structure formed by the associating molecules and the interstitial accommodation of the non-associating chains within the branched multimeric structure of the associating fluid. The theory is able to explain qualitatively the most salient features of the excess properties in real systems, including positive, negative and sigmoidal shape behaviour. After an in depth analysis of the effect of the association and chain length, an application of soft-SAFT that

  15. Evaluation of the Polyethylene Reverse Sampler as a Dosing System in Marine Phase II Whole Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contaminated marine sediments can cause acute and chronic impairments to benthic organisms. Nonionic organic contaminants (NOCs) are often a primary cause of impairment. Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs) are used to identify chemicals causing toxicity in sediments. Ph...

  16. Boron isotope geochemistry during diagenesis. Part II. Applications to organic-rich sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Hervig, Richard L.; Hutcheon, Ian

    2001-06-01

    The measured clay-water isotope fractionation for boron was applied to natural organic-rich sediments undergoing illitization. Two field areas were chosen that show illitization occurring over a range of temperatures (80-500°C). Samples representing diagenetic temperatures of illitization (80-200°C) are from the Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin at 4 to 6-km depth in the Eocene Wilcox Fm and Jurassic Norphlet Fm. The higher temperatures of illitization (200-500°C) occur in a contact metamorphic aureole of the Cretaceous Pierre shale near Walsenburg, Colorado. Here the kinetics of the illitization reaction are more rapid than in a slowly subsiding sedimentary basin, but the chemical and mineralogical variations are minimized as complete illitization occurs over a small lateral distance in a single bentonite layer. These studies indicate that B-isotopes provide a more sensitive indicator of fluid variations in sedimentary basins than O-isotopes, and that B-isotope analyses of authigenic illite can be a valuable geochemical tracer of fluid/rock interactions. Boron isotope ratios in authigenic illite (pore filling) and muscovite (stylolites) from reservoir sandstones in the Gulf of Mexico are distinct from adjacent illitic mudstones, whereas the oxygen isotopic ratios show little variation. Fluids in equilibrium with the mudstones cannot precipitate the authigenic clays with higher δ 11B values measured in the hydrocarbon reservoirs. This suggests that the reservoir fluids were not in communication with the adjacent mudstone pore fluids but were introduced from another source area, perhaps carrying a B-isotopic label derived from the hydrocarbon source region. Authigenic illite formed in the Pierre shale meta-bentonite shows large isotopic fractionations of boron (20‰) during illitization at high temperatures. Incorporation of 500 ppm B in illite formed at 500°C shows that illite is a host for B even at metamorphic temperatures. By using the experimentally

  17. Fe(II)- and Sulfide-Facilitated Reduction of 99Tc(VII)O4- in Microbially Reduced Hyporheic Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; McKinley, James P.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.

    2014-07-01

    Redox-reactive, biogeochemical phases generated by reductive microbial activity in hyporheic zone sediments from a dynamic groundwater-river interaction zone were evaluated for their ability to reduce soluble pertechnetate [99Tc(VII)O4-] to less soluble Tc(IV). The sediments were bioreduced by indigenous microorganisms that were stimulated by organic substrate addition in synthetic groundwater with or without sulfate. In most treatments, 20 µmol L-1 initial aqueous Tc(VII) was reduced to near or below detection (3.82×10-9 mol L-1) over periods of days to months in suspensions of variable solids concentrations. Native sediments containing significant lithogenic Fe(II) in various phases were, in contrast, unreactive with Tc(VII). The reduction rates in the bioreduced sediments increased with increases in sediment mass, in proportion to weak acid-extractable Fe(II) and sediment-associated sulfide (AVS). The rate of Tc(VII) reduction was first order with respect to both aqueous Tc(VII) concentration and sediment mass, but correlations between specific reductant concentrations and reaction rate were not found. X-ray microprobe measurements revealed a strong correlation between Tc hot spots and Fe-containing mineral particles in the sediment. However, only a portion of Fe-containing particles were Tc-hosts. The Tc-hot spots displayed a chemical signature (by EDXRF) similar to pyroxene. The application of autoradiography and electron microprobe allowed further isolation of Tc-containing particles that were invariably found to be ca 100 µm aggregates of primary mineral material embedded within a fine-grained phyllosilicate matrix. EXAFS spectroscopy revealed that the Tc(IV) within these were a combination of a Tc(IV)O2-like phase and Tc(IV)-Fe surface clusters, with a significant fraction of a TcSx-like phase in sediments incubated with SO42-. AVS was implicated as a more selective reductant at low solids concentration even though its concentration was below that

  18. Development and Evaluation of Reverse Polyethylene Samplers for Marine Phase II Whole-Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine and estuarine sediments accumulate contaminants and act as a sink for a wide range of toxic chemicals. As a result, the sediments themselves can become a source of contamination. At sufficient levels, contaminated sediments can cause benthic impairments and toxicity to mar...

  19. Development and Evaluation of Polychaete Reverse Samplers for Marine Phase II Whole Sediment Toxicitiy Identification Evaluations (TIE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Marine and estuarine sediments accumulate contaminants and act as a sink for a wide range of toxic chemicals. As a result, the sediments themselves can become a source of contamination. At sufficient levels, contaminated sediments can cause benthic impairments and toxicity to m...

  20. Determination of tributyltin (TBT) in marine sediment using pressurised liquid extraction-gas chromatography-isotope dilution mass spectrometry (PLE-GC-IDMS) with a hexane-tropolone mixture.

    PubMed

    Konieczka, Piotr; Sejerøe-Olsen, Berit; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Schimmel, Heinz

    2007-06-01

    Extraction conditions for the determination of tributyltin (TBT) in sediment samples have been developed further. The analytical procedure is based on spiking with isotopically labelled analyte, pressurised liquid extraction (PLE) with a hexane/tropolone mixture, Grignard derivatization and quantification by GC-MS. It was applied to two unknown sediment samples as part of an intercomparison exercise of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM). The detection limit was approximately 1.5 ng/g TBT as Sn, while the repeatability and intermediate precision (as the coefficient of variation) were 1.9% and 3.2%, respectively. The expanded uncertainty was 6.2% (coverage factor k = 2), and the accuracy was confirmed by measurement of a certified reference material.

  1. Sources and timing of anthropogenic pollution in the Ensenada de San Simon (inner Ria de Vigo), Galicia, NW Spain: an application of mixture-modelling and nonlinear optimization to recent sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Richard J; Evans, Graham; Croudace, Ian W; Cundy, Andrew B

    2005-03-20

    The Ensenada de San Simon is the inner part of the Ria de Vigo, one of the major mesotidal rias of the Galician coast, NW Spain. The geochemistry of its bottom sediments can be accounted for in terms of both natural and anthropogenic sources. Mixture-modelling enables much of the Cr, Ni, V, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations of the bottom and subaqueous sediments to be explained by sediment input from the river systems and faecal matter from manmade mussel rafts. The compositions and relative contributions of additional, unknown, sources of anomalous heavy-metal concentrations are quantified using constrained nonlinear optimization. The pattern of metal enrichment is attributed to: material carried in solution and suspension in marine water entering the Ensenada from the polluted industrial areas of the adjacent Ria de Vigo; wind-borne urban dusts and/or vehicular emissions from the surrounding network of roads and a motorway road-bridge over the Estrecho de Rande; industrial and agricultural pollution from the R. Redondela; and waste from a former ceramics factory near the mouth of the combined R. Oitaben and R. Verdugo. Using (137)Cs dating, it is suggested that heavy metal build-up in the sediments since the late 1970s followed development of inshore fisheries and introduction of the mussel rafts (ca. 1960) and increasing industrialisation.

  2. Reduction of lead oxide (PbO2) and release of Pb(II) in mixtures of natural organic matter, free chlorine and monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Valentine, Richard L

    2009-05-15

    The primary focus of this paper is to elucidate the influence of mixtures of natural organic matter (NOM) and free chlorine and NOM and monochloramine on the reduction of PbO2 in drinking water. Parallel experiments using PbO2 particles of two different sizes (approximately 20 and approximately 200 nm) were conducted to explore the effects of particle size on this process. In the absence of NOM, reduction of PbO2 was observed in monochloramine solutions but not in free chlorine solutions. In the presence of NOM, significant Pb(II) formation was observed in disinfectant-free solutions. The release of Pb(II) was suppressed by the additional presence of free chlorine until the point in time when free chlorine was exhausted. Monochloramine also repressed Pb(II) formation in the presence of NOM but not as significantly as free chlorine. The presence of NOM and monochloramine does not necessarily act additively or synergistically due to complex interactions including reduction of PbO2 by NOM, monochloramine mediated reduction of PbO2, and oxidation of NOM by monochloramine. Higher surface area-normalized Pb(ll) formation was found in experiments using larger PbO2 particles. The high reactivity generally associated with nanoparticles was not observed in our study.

  3. Investigation of simultaneous biosorption of copper(II) and chromium(VI) on dried Chlorella vulgaris from binary metal mixtures: Application of multicomponent adsorption isotherms

    SciTech Connect

    Aksu, Z.; Acikel, U.; Kutsal, T.

    1999-02-01

    Although the biosorption of single metal ions to various kinds of microorganisms has been extensively studied and the adsorption isotherms have been developed for only the single metal ion situation, very little attention has been given to the bioremoval and expression of adsorption isotherms of multimetal ions systems. In this study the simultaneous biosorption of copper(II) and chromium(VI) to Chlorella vulgaris from a binary metal mixture was studied and compared with the single metal ion situation in a batch stirred system. The effects of pH and single- and dual-metal ion concentrations on the equilibrium uptakes were investigated. In previous studies the optimum biosorption pH had been determined as 4.0 for copper(II) and as 2.0 for chromium(VI). Multimetal ion biosorption studies were performed at these two pH values. It was observed that the equilibrium uptakes of copper(II) or chromium(VI) ions were changed due to the biosorption pH and the presence of other metal ions. Adsorption isotherms were developed for both single- and dual-metal ions systems at these two pH values, and expressed by the mono- and multicomponent Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models. Model parameters were estimated by nonlinear regression. It was seen that the adsorption equilibrium data fitted very well to the competitive Freundlich model in the concentration ranges studied.

  4. Watershed sediment source fingerprinting: a view under the hood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, H.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment source fingerprinting procedures involve the discrimination of sediment sources based on physical and chemical properties and estimation of the contributions from those sources to mixtures of fine-grained sediment transported within watersheds. Sources of sediment widely considered include agricultural land uses, channel banks and geological zones. There has been a tendency in the literature for sediment fingerprinting to be presented as a technique that can deliver accurate and precise information on source contributions to sediment across a range of environments. However, recent research indicates that such a view of sediment fingerprinting cannot presently be supported. Furthermore, many past papers lack transparency in data processing and presentation that prevents the critical assessment of results and hinders wider uptake of the technique. Therefore, this contribution aims to delve 'under the hood' of sediment fingerprinting to promote further discussion and debate over future research needs and method limitations. It draws on important developments from the last two years concerning the effect of (i) tracer selection, (ii) tracer behaviour during transport, (iii) corrections to tracer datasets and (iv) the choice of mixing model on predictions of sediment source contributions. Sediment fingerprinting has the potential to make a very significant contribution to the measurement of contemporary sediment sources in watersheds, but cannot be viewed as an 'off-the-shelf' technique for widespread application until important challenges have been addressed.

  5. Contaminants in stream sediments from seven United States metropolitan areas: part II--sediment toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella azteca and the midge Chironomus dilutus.

    PubMed

    Kemble, Nile E; Hardesty, Douglas K; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Kunz, James L; Sibley, Paul K; Calhoun, Daniel L; Gilliom, Robert J; Kuivila, Kathryn M; Nowell, Lisa H; Moran, Patrick W

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between sediment toxicity and sediment chemistry were evaluated for 98 samples collected from seven metropolitan study areas across the United States. Sediment-toxicity tests were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28 day exposures) and with the midge Chironomus dilutus (10 day exposures). Overall, 33 % of the samples were toxic to amphipods and 12 % of the samples were toxic to midge based on comparisons with reference conditions within each study area. Significant correlations were observed between toxicity end points and sediment concentrations of trace elements, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), or organochlorine (OC) pesticides; however, these correlations were typically weak, and contaminant concentrations were usually below sediment-toxicity thresholds. Concentrations of the pyrethroid bifenthrin exceeded an estimated threshold of 0.49 ng/g (at 1 % total organic carbon) in 14 % of the samples. Of the samples that exceeded this bifenthrin toxicity threshold, 79 % were toxic to amphipods compared with 25 % toxicity for the samples below this threshold. Application of mean probable effect concentration quotients (PECQs) based on measures of groups of contaminants (trace elements, total PAHs, total PCBs, OC pesticides, and pyrethroid pesticides [bifenthrin in particular]) improved the correct classification of samples as toxic or not toxic to amphipods compared with measures of individual groups of contaminants.

  6. A Bacillus sp. isolated from sediments of the Sarno River mouth, Gulf of Naples (Italy) produces a biofilm biosorbing Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Pepi, Milva; Borra, Marco; Tamburrino, Stella; Saggiomo, Maria; Viola, Alfio; Biffali, Elio; Balestra, Cecilia; Sprovieri, Mario; Casotti, Raffaella

    2016-08-15

    A Pb-resistant bacterial strain (named hereinafter Pb15) has been isolated from highly polluted marine sediments at the Sarno River mouth, Italy, using an enrichment culture to which Pb(II) 0.48mmoll(-1) were added. 16S rRNA gene sequencing (Sanger) allowed assignment of the isolate to the genus Bacillus, with Bacillus pumilus as the closest species. The isolate is resistant to Pb(II) with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 4.8mmoll(-1) and is also resistant to Cd(II) and Mn(II) with MIC of 2.22mmoll(-1) and 18.20mmoll(-1), respectively. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) showed that Pb inoculated in the growth medium is absorbed by the bacterial cells at removal efficiencies of 31.02% and 28.21% in the presence of 0.48mmoll(-1) or 1.20mmoll(-1) Pb(II), respectively. Strain Pb15 forms a brown and compact biofilm when grown in presence of Pb(II). Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) confirm that the biofilm contains Pb, suggesting an active biosorption of this metal by the bacterial cells, sequestering 14% of inoculated Pb as evidenced by microscopic analyses. Altogether, these observations support evidence that strain Pb15 has potentials for being used in bioremediation of its native polluted sediments, with engineering solutions to be found in order to eliminate the adsorbed Pb before replacement of sediments in situ.

  7. Optimization of colorimetric DET technique for the in situ, two-dimensional measurement of iron(II) distributions in sediment porewaters.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William W; Teasdale, Peter R; Welsh, David T; Panther, Jared G; Jolley, Dianne F

    2012-01-15

    The recently developed colorimetric diffusive equilibration in thin films (DET) technique for the in situ, high-resolution measurement of iron(II) in marine sediments is optimized to allow measurement of the higher iron concentrations typical of freshwater sediment porewaters. Computer imaging densitometry (CID) is used to analyze the retrieved samplers following exposure to ferrozine, a colorimetric reagent selective for iron(II). The effect of ferrozine concentration, image processing parameters and ionic strength are investigated to improve the applicability of this technique to a wider range of aquatic systems than reported in the first publications of this approach. The technique was optimized to allow detection of up to 2,000 μmol L(-1) iron(II), a four-fold increase on the previous upper detection limit of 500 μ mol L(-1). The CID processing of the scanned color image was also optimized to adjust the sensitivity of the assay as required; by processing the image with different color channel filters, the sensitivity of the assay can be optimized for lower concentrations (up to 100 μmol L(-1)) or higher concentrations (up to 2,000 μmol L(-1)) of iron(II), depending on the specific site characteristics. This process does not require separate sampling probes or even separate scans of the DET gels as the color filter and grayscale conversion is done post-image capture. The optimized technique is very simple to use and provides highly representative, high-resolution (1mm) two-dimensional distributions of iron(II) in sediment porewaters. The detection limit of the optimized technique was 4.1±0.3 μmol L(-1) iron(II) and relative standard deviations were less than 6%.

  8. Enhancement of iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide by thiocyanate and accumulation of iron(II)/thiocyanate/nitric oxide complex under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Takahama, Umeo; Hirota, Sachiko

    2012-01-13

    Iron(III) ingested as a food component or supplement for iron deficiencies can react with salivary SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+) and can be reduced to iron(II) by ascorbic acid in the stomach. Iron(II) generated in the stomach can react with salivary nitrite and SCN(-) to produce nitric oxide (NO) and FeSCN(+), respectively. The purpose of this investigation is to make clear the reactions among nitrite, SCN(-), iron ions, and ascorbic acid under conditions simulating the mixture of saliva and gastric juice. Iron(II)-dependent reduction of nitrite to NO was enhanced by SCN(-) in acidic buffer solutions, and the oxidation product of iron(II) reacted with SCN(-) to produce Fe(SCN)(2+). Almost all of the NO produced was autoxidized to N(2)O(3) under aerobic conditions. Iron(II)-dependent production of NO was also observed in acidified saliva. Under anaerobic conditions, NO transformed Fe(SCN)(2+) and FeSCN(+) to Fe(SCN)NO(+) in acidic buffer solutions. Fe(SCN)NO(+) was also formed under aerobic conditions when excess ascorbic acid was added to iron(II)/nitrite/SCN(-) systems in acidic buffer solutions and acidified saliva. The Fe(SCN)NO(+) formed was transformed to Fe(SCN)(2+) and iron(III) at pH 2.0 and pH 7.4, respectively, by O(2). Salivary glycoproteins could complex with iron(III) in the stomach preventing the formation of Fe(SCN)(2+). Ascorbic acid reduced iron(III) to iron(II) to react with nitrite and SCN(-) as described above. The above results suggest (i) that iron(II) can have toxic effects on the stomach through the formation of reactive nitrogen oxide species from NO when supplemented without ascorbic acid and through the formation of both reactive nitrogen oxide species and Fe(SCN)NO(+) when supplemented with ascorbic acid, and (ii) that the toxic effects of iron(III) seemed to be smaller than and similar to those of iron(II) when supplemented without and with ascorbic acid, respectively. Possible mechanisms that cause oxidative stress on the stomach

  9. Raman spectroscopic characterization of gas mixtures. II. Quantitative composition and pressure determination of the CO2-CH4 system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seitz, J.C.; Pasteris, J.D.; Chou, I.-Ming

    1996-01-01

    Raman spectral parameters were determined for the v1 band of CH4 and the v1 and 2v2 bands (Fermi diad) of CO2 in pure CO2 and CO2-CH4 mixtures at pressures up to 700 bars and room temperature. Peak position, area, height, and width were investigated as functions of pressure and composition. The peak positions of the CH4 and CO2 bands shift to lower relative wavenumbers as fluid pressure is increased. The peak position of the lower-wavenumber member of the Fermi diad for CO2 is sensitive to fluid composition, whereas the peak positions of the CH4 band and the upper Fermi diad member for CO2 are relatively insensitive in the CO2-CH4 system. The magnitude of the shifts in each of the three peak positions (as a function of pressure) is sufficient to be useful as a monitor of fluid pressure. The relative molar proportions in a CO2-CH4 mixture may be determined from the peak areas: the ratio of the peak areas of the CH4 band and the CO2 upper Fermi diad member is very sensitive to composition, whereas above about 100 bars, it is insensitive to pressure. Likewise, the peak height ratio is very sensitive to composition but also to fluid pressure. The individual peak widths of CO2 and CH4, as well as the ratios of the widths of the CH4 peak to the CO2 peaks are a sensitive function of pressure and, to a lesser extent, composition. Thus, upon determination of fluid composition, the peak width ratios may be used as a monitor of fluid pressure. The application of these spectral parameters to a suite of natural CO2-CH4 inclusions has yielded internally-consistent, quantitative determinations of the fluid composition and density.

  10. Proton/metal-ligand stability constants of complexes of Ni(II), Cu(II), and Co(II) with diethyl 4-(substituted-phenyl)-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate in 70% dioxane-water mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekade, Pradip V.; Bajaj, Sonal D.; Thool, Seemita

    2015-12-01

    Physico-chemical properties viz proton-ligand and metal-ligand stability constants of complexes of diethyl 4-(substituted-phenyl)-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylate with Ni(II), Cu(II), and Co(II) were determined in mixed solvents (70% dioxane). Presence of OH/NH group(s) in these compounds was confirmed at 0.1 M ionic strength in 70% dioxane-water mixture pH-metrically. It is observed that Ni(II), Cu(II), and Co(II) metal ions formed 1: 1 and 1: 2 complex with all the three ligands. The results show that the ratio of log K 1/log K 2 is positive in all cases. This implies that there is little or no steric hindrance to the addition of secondary molecules.

  11. Methodological considerations regarding the use of inorganic 197Hg(II) radiotracer to assess mercury methylation potential rates in lake sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perez, Catan S.; Guevara, S.R.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Magnavacca, C.; Cohen, I.M.; Arribere, M.

    2007-01-01

    Methodological considerations on the determination of benthic methyl-mercury (CH3Hg) production potentials were investigated on lake sediment, using 197Hg radiotracer. Three methods to arrest bacterial activity were compared: flash freezing, thermal sterilization, and ??-irradiation. Flash freezing showed similar CH3Hg recoveries as thermal sterilization, which was both 50% higher than the recoveries obtained with ??-ray irradiation. No additional radiolabel was recovered in kill-control samples after an additional 24 or 65 h of incubation, suggesting that all treatments were effective at arresting Hg(II)-methylating bacterial activity, and that the initial recoveries are likely due to non-methylated 197Hg(II) carry-over in the organic extraction and/or [197Hg]CH3Hg produced via abiotic reactions. Two CH3Hg extraction methods from sediment were compared: (a) direct extraction into toluene after sediment leaching with CuSO4 and HCl and (b) the same extraction with an additional back-extraction step to thiosulphate. Similar information was obtained with both methods, but the low efficiency observed and the extra work associated with the back-extraction procedure represent significant disadvantages, even tough the direct extraction involves higher Hg(II) carry over. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Speciation studies and toxicity assessment of complex heavy metal mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Bundy, K.J.; Mowat, F.

    1996-12-31

    The Microtox{trademark} bioassay and polarographic techniques were used together to identify specific oxidation states and toxicity of metals. The bioassay is based on light reduction by bioluminescent bacteria upon exposure to toxicants. In polarography, a mercury drop substrate`s potential is changed, and the substance of interest is electrochemically reduced. Reduction current is proportional to its concentration. The toxicity of solutions containing heavy metal pollutants was measured. Mercury was found to be most toxic with an acute one minute EC{sub 50} of 0.0162 mg/l. Cu(I) was least toxic. Speciation effects were observed; e.g., Cr(III) was less toxic than Cr(VI); Cu(II) was more toxic than Cu(I). Polarography (which is usually not used for multielement analysis) has been extended to Pb(II) and Cd(II) solution mixtures. Various mixtures were tested to determine if toxicity was predictable from that of individual components, or whether synergistic/antagonistic reactions occur. The resultant EC{sub 50} for a 50-50 As(V)/Cd(II) mixture was consistent with additive behavior; Pb(II)/Cd(II) and Pb(II)/Cu(I) mixtures exhibited antagonistic and synergistic interactions, respectively. Sediments soaked with Pb(II) and Cr(III) have been studied to determine the toxicity. For competitive sorption, the EC{sub 50} value is twice that for Cr(III) alone, presumably because preferential Cr(III) adsorption occurs, blocking Pb(II) adsorption to kaolin.

  13. Sediment contamination of residential streams in the metropolitan Kansas City area, USA: Part II. Whole-sediment toxicity to the amphipod Hyalella azteca.

    PubMed

    Tao, J; Ingersoll, C G; Kemble, N E; Dias, J R; Murowchick, J B; Welker, G; Huggins, D

    2010-10-01

    This is the second part of a study that evaluates the influence of nonpoint sources on the sediment quality of five adjacent streams within the metropolitan Kansas City area, central United States. Physical, chemical, and toxicity data (Hyalella azteca 28-day whole-sediment toxicity test) for 29 samples collected in 2003 were used for this evaluation, and the potential causes for the toxic effects were explored. The sediments exhibited a low to moderate toxicity, with five samples identified as toxic to H. azteca. Metals did not likely cause the toxicity based on low concentrations of metals in the pore water and elevated concentrations of acid volatile sulfide in the sediments. Although individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) frequently exceeded effect-based sediment quality guidelines [probable effect concentrations (PECs)], only four of the samples had a PEC quotient (PEC-Q) for total PAHs over 1.0 and only one of these four samples was identified as toxic. For the mean PEC-Q for organochlorine compounds (chlordane, dieldrin, sum DDEs), 4 of the 12 samples with a mean PEC-Q above 1.0 were toxic and 4 of the 8 samples with a mean PEC-Q above 3.0 were toxic. Additionally, four of eight samples were toxic, with a mean PEC-Q above 1.0 based on metals, PAHs, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorine pesticides. The increase in the incidence of toxicity with the increase in the mean PEC-Q based on organochlorine pesticides or based on metals, PAHs, PCBs, and organochlorine pesticides suggests that organochlorine pesticides might have contributed to the observed toxicity and that the use of a mean PEC-Q, rather than PEC-Qs for individual compounds, might be more informative in predicting toxic effects. Our study shows that stream sediments subject to predominant nonpoint sources contamination can be toxic and that many factors, including analysis of a full suite of PAHs and pesticides of both past and present urban applications and the origins of

  14. Sediment contamination of residential streams in the metropolitan kansas city area, USA: Part II. whole-sediment toxicity to the amphipod hyalella azteca

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tao, J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Kemble, N.E.; Dias, J.R.; Murowchick, J.B.; Welker, G.; Huggins, D.

    2010-01-01

    This is the second part of a study that evaluates the influence of nonpoint sources on the sediment quality of five adjacent streams within the metropolitan Kansas City area, central United States. Physical, chemical, and toxicity data (Hyalella azteca 28-day whole-sediment toxicity test) for 29 samples collected in 2003 were used for this evaluation, and the potential causes for the toxic effects were explored. The sediments exhibited a low to moderate toxicity, with five samples identified as toxic to H. azteca. Metals did not likely cause the toxicity based on low concentrations of metals in the pore water and elevated concentrations of acid volatile sulfide in the sediments. Although individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) frequently exceeded effect-based sediment quality guidelines [probable effect concentrations (PECs)], only four of the samples had a PEC quotient (PEC-Q) for total PAHs over 1.0 and only one of these four samples was identified as toxic. For the mean PEC-Q for organochlorine compounds (chlordane, dieldrin, sum DDEs), 4 of the 12 samples with a mean PEC-Q above 1.0 were toxic and 4 of the 8 samples with a mean PEC-Q above 3.0 were toxic. Additionally, four of eight samples were toxic, with a mean PEC-Q above 1.0 based on metals, PAHs, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organochlorine pesticides. The increase in the incidence of toxicity with the increase in the mean PEC-Q based on organochlorine pesticides or based on metals, PAHs, PCBs, and organochlorine pesticides suggests that organochlorine pesticides might have contributed to the observed toxicity and that the use of a mean PEC-Q, rather than PEC-Qs for individual compounds, might be more informative in predicting toxic effects. Our study shows that stream sediments subject to predominant nonpoint sources contamination can be toxic and that many factors, including analysis of a full suite of PAHs and pesticides of both past and present urban applications and the origins of

  15. INCIDENCE OF STRESS IN BENTHIC COMMUNITIES ALONG THE U.S. ATLANTIC AND GULF OF MEXICO COASTS WITHIN DIFFERENT RANGES OF SEDIMENT CONTAMINATION FROM CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synoptic data on concentrations of sediment-associated chemical contaminants and benthic macroinfaunal community structure were collected from 1,389 stations in estuaries along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts as part of the nationwide Environmental Monitoring and Asse...

  16. INCIDENCE OF STRESS IN BENTHIC COMMUNITIES ALONG U.S. ATLANTIC AND GULF OF MEXICO COASTS WITHIN DIFFERENT RANGES OF SEDIMENT CONTAMINATION FROM CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synoptic data on concentrations of sediment-associated chemical contaminants and benthic macroinfaunal community structure were collected from 1,389 stations in estuaries along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts as part of the nationwide Environmental Monitoring and Asse...

  17. Microaerophilic Fe(II)-Oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria Isolated from Low-Fe Marine Coastal Sediments: Physiology and Composition of Their Twisted Stalks.

    PubMed

    Laufer, K; Nordhoff, M; Halama, M; Martinez, R E; Obst, M; Nowak, M; Stryhanyuk, H; Richnow, H H; Kappler, A

    2017-04-15

    Microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers are commonly found in habitats containing elevated Fe(II) and low O2 concentrations and often produce characteristic Fe mineral structures, so-called twisted stalks or tubular sheaths. Isolates originating from freshwater habitats are all members of the Betaproteobacteria, while isolates from marine habitats belong almost exclusively to the Zetaproteobacteria So far, only a few isolates of marine microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers have been described, all of which are obligate microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers and have been thought to be restricted to Fe-rich systems. Here, we present two new isolates of marine microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria that originate from typical coastal marine sediments containing only low Fe concentrations (2 to 11 mg of total Fe/g of sediment [dry weight]; 70 to 100 μM dissolved Fe(2+) in the porewater). The two novel Zetaproteobacteria share characteristic physiological properties of the Zetaproteobacteria group, even though they come from low-Fe environments: the isolates are obligate microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers and, like most isolated Zetaproteobacteria, they produce twisted stalks. We found a low organic carbon content in the stalks (∼0.3 wt%), with mostly polysaccharides and saturated aliphatic chains (most likely lipids). The Fe minerals in the stalks were identified as lepidocrocite and possibly ferrihydrite. Immobilization experiments with Ni(2+) showed that the stalks can function as a sink for trace metals. Our findings show that obligate microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria group are not restricted to Fe-rich environments but can also be found in low-Fe marine environments, which increases their overall importance for the global biogeochemical Fe cycle.IMPORTANCE So far, only a few isolates of benthic marine microaerophilic Fe(II) oxidizers belonging to the Zetaproteobacteria exist, and most isolates were obtained from habitats containing

  18. Abundance, Distribution, and Activity of Fe(II)-Oxidizing and Fe(III)-Reducing Microorganisms in Hypersaline Sediments of Lake Kasin, Southern Russia

    PubMed Central

    Emmerich, Maren; Bhansali, Ankita; Lösekann-Behrens, Tina; Schröder, Christian; Kappler, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The extreme osmotic conditions prevailing in hypersaline environments result in decreasing metabolic diversity with increasing salinity. Various microbial metabolisms have been shown to occur even at high salinity, including photosynthesis as well as sulfate and nitrate reduction. However, information about anaerobic microbial iron metabolism in hypersaline environments is scarce. We studied the phylogenetic diversity, distribution, and metabolic activity of iron(II)-oxidizing and iron(III)-reducing Bacteria and Archaea in pH-neutral, iron-rich salt lake sediments (Lake Kasin, southern Russia; salinity, 348.6 g liter−1) using a combination of culture-dependent and -independent techniques. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries for Bacteria and Archaea revealed a microbial community composition typical for hypersaline sediments. Most-probable-number counts confirmed the presence of 4.26 × 102 to 8.32 × 103 iron(II)-oxidizing Bacteria and 4.16 × 102 to 2.13 × 103 iron(III)-reducing microorganisms per gram dry sediment. Microbial iron(III) reduction was detected in the presence of 5 M NaCl, extending the natural habitat boundaries for this important microbial process. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that 16S rRNA gene copy numbers of total Bacteria, total Archaea, and species dominating the iron(III)-reducing enrichment cultures (relatives of Halobaculum gomorrense, Desulfosporosinus lacus, and members of the Bacilli) were highest in an iron oxide-rich sediment layer. Combined with the presented geochemical and mineralogical data, our findings suggest the presence of an active microbial iron cycle at salt concentrations close to the solubility limit of NaCl. PMID:22504804

  19. Multielement chemical and statistical analyses from a uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment survey in and near the Elkhorn Mountains, Jefferson County, Montana; Part II, Stream sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Suits, V.J.; Wenrich, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-two stream-sediment samples, collected from an area south of Helena, Jefferson County, Montana, were sieved into two size fractions (50 ppm for the fine fraction) were encountered in samples from the Warm Springs Creek drainage area, along Prickly Pear Creek near Welmer and Golconda Creeks and along Muskrat Creek. All groups showed a significant correlation at the 99 percent confidence level (r between 0.73 and 0.77) between U and Th. Uranium was found to correlate significantly only with Th (as mentioned above) and with -Ni in the fine fraction of the volcanics group. U correlates significantly with -Al2O3, Ba, organic C, -K2O, -Sr and Y in both size fractions for the Boulder batholith. Correlations between U and each of several elements differ for the fine and coarse fractions of the Boulder batholith group, suggesting that the U distribution in these stream sediments is in large part controlled by grain size. Correlations were found between U and CaO, Cr, Fe203, -Na2O, Sc, -SiO2, TiO2, Yb and Zr in the coarse fraction but not in the fine fraction. U correlates weakly (to the 90% confidence level, crc<.37) with -Co and -Cu in the fine but not the coarse fraction. These results are compared to a previous study in the northern Absaroka mountains. Correlation coefficients between all other elements determined from these samples are also shown in Tables 12 to 15.

  20. Organic matter in sediment layers of an acidic mining lake as assessed by lipid analysis. Part II: Neutral lipids.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, Juergen; Koschorreck, Matthias; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2017-02-01

    Natural neutralization of acidic mining lakes is often limited by organic matter. The knowledge of the sources and degradability of organic matter is crucial for understanding alkalinity generation in these lakes. Sediments collected at different depths (surface sediment layer from 0 to 1 cm and deep sediment layer from 4 to 5cm) from an acidic mining lake were studied in order to characterize sedimentary organic matter based on neutral signature markers. Samples were exhaustively extracted, subjected to pre-chromatographic derivatizations and analyzed by GC/MS. Herein, molecular distributions of diagnostic alkanes/alkenes, terpenes/terpenoids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic alcohols and ketones, sterols, and hopanes/hopanoids were addressed. Characterization of the contribution of natural vs. anthropogenic sources to the sedimentary organic matter in these extreme environments was then possible based on these distributions. With the exception of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, combined concentrations across all marker classes proved higher in the surface sediment layer as compared to those in the deep sediment layer. Alkane and aliphatic alcohol distributions pointed to predominantly allochthonous over autochthonous contribution to sedimentary organic matter. Sterol patterns were dominated by phytosterols of terrestrial plants including stigmasterol and β-sitosterol. Hopanoid markers with the ββ-biohopanoid "biological" configuration were more abundant in the surface sediment layer, which pointed to higher bacterial activity. The pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons pointed to prevailing anthropogenic input. Pyrolytic makers were likely to due to atmospheric deposition from a nearby former coal combustion facility. The combined analysis of the array of biomarkers provided new insights into the sources and transformations of organic matter in lake sediments.

  1. Oil residues in Baltic sediment, mussel and fish. II. Study of the Finnish Archipelago 1979-81

    SciTech Connect

    Paasivirta, J.; Kaariainen, H.; Lahtipera, M.; Pellinen, J.; Sinkkonen, S.

    1982-01-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons and non-polar aromatic compounds have been analyzed after a spill of crude oil at Baltic Sea 1979 from drifting weathered oil glumps, sediment and sediment trap samples and bivalves at five areas of the Finnish Archipelago Sea. Mytilus and flounder muscles and flounder livers were analyzed 1980 and 1981 from three of the previous five areas. The glumps were shown to be weathered crude oil. Sediment trap samples on the visibly contaminated area contained higher amounts of oil residues and in different ratios than the bottom sediments at the same areas. Extra local aliphatic hydrocarbon pollution was detected from the sediment traps at the reference area. Bivalves contained high amounts of oil residues at visibly polluted but in some visibly non-polluted areas also 1979. Any significant decontamination was not detected at summer 1979 but next year the Mytilus samples contained only traces if any and 1981 no detectable levels of aromatic oil residues. Aliphatic hydrocarbon residues in flounders showed no regional differences and no significant change of levels between 1980 and 1981. In contrary, the aromatic oil residues decreased to the non-detectable level in flounder muscles and to a significantly lower level in flounder livers 1981 related to 1980. Linear correlations of the analysis results are discussed.

  2. Acid-base titrations by stepwise addition of equal volumes of titrant with special reference to automatic titrations-II Theory of titration of mixtures of acids, polyprotic acids, acids in mixture with weak bases, and ampholytes.

    PubMed

    Pehrsson, L; Ingman, F; Johansson, S

    A general method for evaluating titration data for mixtures of acids and for acids in mixture with weak bases is presented. Procedures are given that do not require absolute [H]-data, i.e., relative [H]-data may be used. In most cases a very rough calibration of the electrode system is enough. Further, for simple systems, very approximate values of the stability constants are sufficient. As examples, the titration of the following are treated in some detail: a mixture of two acids, a diprotic acid, an acid in presence of its conjugate base, and an ampholyte.

  3. Aquatic hazard assessment of MON 0818, a commercial mixture of alkylamine ethoxylates commonly used in glyphosate-containing herbicide formulations. Part 2: Roles of sediment, temperature, and capacity for recovery following a pulsed exposure.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Gil, Jose L; Prosser, Ryan; Hanta, Gregory; Poirier, David; Lissemore, Linda; Hanson, Mark; Solomon, Keith R

    2017-02-01

    A series of toxicity tests with MON 0818, a commercial surfactant mixture of polyoxyethylene tallow amines, were performed: 1) in the presence of sediment for benthic invertebrates and fish: 2) to examine the recovery capacity of Daphnia magna and 4 primary producers after a pulsed (24-h) exposure; and 3) to examine the potential effect of increased water temperature on toxicity of MON 0818 to 2 cold-water fishes. In the presence of sediment, no acute (24-h) mortality was observed for 3 of the 5 species up to 10 mg L(-1) . The median effective concentrations for the other 2 species were significantly greater than for water only tests. The EC50 at 15 °C for Salvelinus alpinus was statistically lower than that at 10 °C. Latent effects of a 24-h exposure (1 mg L(-1) ) were observed for Rhabdocelis subcapitata and Chlorella vulgaris, as indicated by delayed growth during recovery phase; however, both cultures were able to recover, as indicated by a lack of changes in maximum absolute growth rates. No significant effects of a 24-h exposure to MON 0818 were observed for Oophila sp. (1.5 mg L(-1) ) or Lemna minor (100 mg L(-1) ). Latent mortality after a 24-h exposure to 5 mg L(-1) was observed during the recovery phase for D. magna; however, reproduction endpoints on surviving individuals were not altered. The results indicate that quick dissipation of MON 0818 in the presence of sediment can reduce the effects on exposed organisms, and that full recovery from 24-h exposures to concentrations of MON 0818 equal to, or greater than, those expected in the environment is possible. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:512-521. © 2016 SETAC.

  4. From dihydrated iron(III) phosphate to monohydrated ammonium-iron(II) phosphate: Solvothermal reaction mediated by acetone-urea mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Alfonso, Belen F.; Pique, Carmen; Blanco, Jesus A.

    2012-12-15

    By reaction between synthetic phosphosiderite FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, urea (NH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO, and acetone (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO, we report a novel solvothermal synthesis of polycrystalline NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O. The preparation of other two individual phases, NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, is also described. The obtained product is a function of the reaction time and the N/P molar ratio in the reagent mixture, and the existence of structural memory in the dissolution-precipitation processes is discussed. Below 25 K, NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O behaves magnetically in a complex way, because both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic signals are superimposed, suggesting the existence of a canting of iron(II) magnetic moments. - Graphical abstract: Solvothermal synthesis of polycrystalline NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O is presented. The preparation of other two individual phases, NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(OH)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} as a function of the N/P molar ratio in the reagent mixture and the reaction time, is also described. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solvothermal synthesis of NH{sub 4}FePO{sub 4}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O from an Fe(III) phosphate: reduction process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of two intermediate metastable phases: phase diagram. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal decomposition in two steps: mass loss of both water and ammonia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic behaviour: AF+constant spontaneous magnetization.

  5. Organic geochemistry of sediments from the continental margin off southern New England, U.S.A.--Part II. Lipids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatesan, M. I.; Ruth, E.; Steinberg, S.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1987-01-01

    Organic geochemical measurements of the lipid fraction, comparing saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, fatty acids, alcohols and sterols, have been carried out on six sediments cores collected from the Atlantic shelf, slope and the rise areas to evaluate the cross-shelf transport of the organic carbon. The concentration of most of the organic compound classes studied is correlated with the total organic carbon, which decreases from the shelf through slope to the rise. Terrigenous carbon is recognizable even in the slope and rise sediments, but terrestrial influx decreases relative to marine generated lipids in the slope and rise organic matter. We estimate that approximately 50% of the shelf organic matter is exported to the slope. Data of sediment trap material collected at 1200 m from 1250 m water depth are discussed and compared with that of surface sediment from 1280 m water depth (slope). Fluxes for specific organic compound classes have been computed. The fluxes are of the same magnitude as for equatorial North Atlantic trap particulates at comparable water depth, studied by other investigations.

  6. Development of Surface Complexation Models of Cr(VI) Adsorption on Soils, Sediments and Model Mixtures of Kaolinite, Montmorillonite, γ-Alumina, Hydrous Manganese and Ferric Oxides and Goethite

    SciTech Connect

    Koretsky, Carla

    2013-11-29

    Hexavalent chromium is a highly toxic contaminant that has been introduced into aquifers and shallow sediments and soils via many anthropogenic activities. Hexavalent chromium contamination is a problem or potential problem in the shallow subsurface at several DOE sites, including Hanford, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Reservation (DOE, 2008). To accurately quantify the fate and transport of hexavalent chromium at DOE and other contaminated sites, robust geochemical models, capable of correctly predicting changes in chromium chemical form resulting from chemical reactions occurring in subsurface environments are needed. One important chemical reaction that may greatly impact the bioavailability and mobility of hexavalent chromium in the subsurface is chemical binding to the surfaces of particulates, termed adsorption or surface complexation. Quantitative thermodynamic surface complexation models have been derived that can correctly calculate hexavalent chromium adsorption on well-characterized materials over ranges in subsurface conditions, such pH and salinity. However, models have not yet been developed for hexavalent chromium adsorption on many important constituents of natural soils and sediments, such as clay minerals. Furthermore, most of the existing thermodynamic models have been developed for relatively simple, single solid systems and have rarely been tested for the complex mixtures of solids present in real sediments and soils. In this study, the adsorption of hexavalent chromium was measured as a function of pH (3-10), salinity (0.001 to 0.1 M NaNO3), and partial pressure of carbon dioxide(0-5%) on a suite of naturally-occurring solids including goethite (FeOOH), hydrous manganese oxide (MnOOH), hydrous ferric oxide (Fe(OH)3), γ-alumina (Al2O3), kaolinite (Al2Si2O5(OH)4), and montmorillonite (Na3(Al, Mg)2Si4O10(OH)2-nH2O). The results show that all of these materials can bind substantial quantities of

  7. Adsorption properties of biologically active derivatives of quaternary ammonium surfactants and their mixtures at aqueous/air interface II. Dynamics of adsorption, micelles dissociation and cytotoxicity of QDLS.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Monika; Prochaska, Krystyna; Olejnik, Anna; Rychlik, Joanna

    2014-07-01

    The main aim of our study was analysis of adsorption dynamics of mixtures containing quaternary derivatives of lysosomotropic substance (QDLS). Two types of equimolar mixtures were considered: the ones containing two derivatives of lysosomotropic substances (DMALM-12 and DMGM-12) as well as the catanionic mixtures i.e. the systems containing QDLS and DBSNa. Dynamic surface tension measurements of surfactant mixtures were made. The results suggested that the diffusivity of the mixed system could be treated as the average value of rates of diffusion of individual components, micelles and ion pairs, which are present in the mixtures studied. Moreover, an attempt was made to explain the influence of the presence of micelles in the mixtures on their adsorption dynamics. The compounds examined show interesting biological properties which can be useful, especially for drug delivery in medical treatment. In vitro cytotoxic activities of the mixtures studied towards human cancer cells were evaluated. Most of the mixtures showed a high antiproliferative potential, especially the ones containing DMALM-12. Each cancer cell line used demonstrated different sensitivity to the same dose of the mixtures tested.

  8. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure.

    PubMed

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Selck, Henriette

    2016-11-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched (65)Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms.

  9. Biodynamics of copper oxide nanoparticles and copper ions in an oligochaete - Part II: Subcellular distribution following sediment exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thit, Amalie; Ramskov, Tina; Croteau, Marie-Noele; Selck, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    The use and likely incidental release of metal nanoparticles (NPs) is steadily increasing. Despite the increasing amount of published literature on metal NP toxicity in the aquatic environment, very little is known about the biological fate of NPs after sediment exposures. Here, we compare the bioavailability and subcellular distribution of copper oxide (CuO) NPs and aqueous Cu (Cu-Aq) in the sediment-dwelling worm Lumbriculus variegatus. Ten days (d) sediment exposure resulted in marginal Cu bioaccumulation in L. variegatus for both forms of Cu. Bioaccumulation was detected because isotopically enriched 65Cu was used as a tracer. Neither burrowing behavior or survival was affected by the exposure. Once incorporated into tissue, Cu loss was negligible over 10 d of elimination in clean sediment (Cu elimination rate constants were not different from zero). With the exception of day 10, differences in bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution between Cu forms were either not detectable or marginal. After 10 d of exposure to Cu-Aq, the accumulated Cu was primarily partitioned in the subcellular fraction containing metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP, ≈40%) and cellular debris (CD, ≈30%). Cu concentrations in these fractions were significantly higher than in controls. For worms exposed to CuO NPs for 10 d, most of the accumulated Cu was partitioned in the CD fraction (≈40%), which was the only subcellular fraction where the Cu concentration was significantly higher than for the control group. Our results indicate that L. variegatus handle the two Cu forms differently. However, longer-term exposures are suggested in order to clearly highlight differences in the subcellular distribution of these two Cu forms.

  10. [Product development on the basis of cereal and leguminous flours to coeliac disease in children aged 6-24 months; II: properties of the mixtures].

    PubMed

    Cerezal Mezquita, P; Urtuvia Gatica, V; Ramírez Quintanilla, V; Arcos Zavala, R

    2011-01-01

    The nutritional formulations of high protein content, provided by a flour mixture from two Andean cultures, quinua (Chenopodium quinua Willd) and lupino (Lupinus albus L), with two traditional cereals, maize (Zea mays L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.), entailed to the preparation of a "sweet mixture" for the elaboration of "queques" and another "dessert mixture" flavoured with banana, that can be prepared with water or milk, constituted a good alternative as food supplement for the nutrition of children aged 6-24 months who suffer from celiac disease, since they contribute to the quality improvement of the protein, by essential amino acids compensation, they are of low cost and allow an increase in availability of products for gluten-intolerant children. Some physical, chemical, rheological, mechanical and fluidity properties, as well as the color of these mixtures for a period of conservation of 90 days were evaluated. At the end of the storage, the sweet mixture turned out to be of "little flow" and the dessert mixture changed from "little flow" to "easy flow". Viscosity for the dessert mixture, with its two types of dilutions, water and milk, presented a behavior of pseudoplastic fluid. It was possible to guess that the time of shelf life of the mixtures would be of 9 months before achieving the rancidity limit (10 mEq of oxigen/kg of fat, which would disqualify the product for consumption). The CIEL*a*b* color coordinates did not show significant differences keeping the colour in "a beige" tonality.

  11. Preferential Solvation of a Highly Medium Responsive Pentacyanoferrate(II) Complex in Binary Solvent Mixtures: Understanding the Role of Dielectric Enrichment and the Specificity of Solute-Solvent Interactions.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Raffaello

    2016-09-08

    In this work, the preferential solvation of an intensely solvatochromic ferrocyanide(II) dye involving a 4,4'-bipyridine-based ligand was examined in various binary solvent mixtures. Its solvatochromic behavior was rationalized in terms of specific and nonspecific solute-solvent interactions. An exceptional case of solvatochromic inversion was observed when going from alcohol/water to amide/water mixtures. These effects were quantified using Onsager's solvent polarity function. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the solvatochromism of the dye was determined using various solvatochromic parameters such as π* expressing the dipolarity/polarizability of solvents and α expressing the hydrogen-bond-donor acidity of solvents. This analysis was useful for the rationalization of the selective solvation phenomena occurring in the three types of alcohol/water and amide/water mixtures studied. Furthermore, two preferential solvation models were employed for the interpretation of the experimental spectral results in binary solvent mixtures, namely, the model of Suppan on dielectric enrichment [J. Chem. Soc. Faraday Trans. 1 1987, 83, 495-509] and the model of Bosch, Rosés, and co-workers [J. Chem. Soc., Perkin Trans. 2, 1995, 8, 1607-1615]. The first model successfully predicted the charge transfer energies of the dye in formamide/water and N-methylformamide/water mixtures, but in the case of MeOH/water mixtures, the prediction was less accurate because of the significant contribution of specific solute-solvent interactions in that case. The second model gave more insights for both specific solute-solvent as well as solvent-solvent interactions in the cybotactic region. The role of dielectric enrichment and specific interactions was discussed based on the findings.

  12. [Environmental evaluation near a fuel vendor within Parque Nacional Morrocoy, Venezuela. II: Water quality, sediments and biota].

    PubMed

    Rada, M; Losada, F

    2000-12-01

    This paper is the second part of a base line study carried out in the coastal region near a marine service station located in Morrocoy National Park, Venezuela. Results from a physical and chemical characterization of the water and sediments of four sites located around the service station are presented. The physical and chemical factors measured in water included: temperature, salinity, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, saturation percentage of dissolved oxygen, pH, total suspended solids, transparency, oil and grease, total residual petroleum hydrocarbon, vanadium and lead, total coliform bacteria, and the presence of coliform bacteria. The factors measured in sediments include: granulometry, organic material, total carbonates, vanadium, lead, oil and grease, and total hydrocarbons. In addition, the amount of vanadium and lead in sample tissue from three species which are abundant and widely distributed in each site was measured in order to evaluate the potential of these species as bio-indicators. The water in the area where this study was conducted is shallow, warm, and thermally homogeneous, with high salinity and normal pH and dissolved oxygen, and supersaturated with oxygen in certain hours in sites adjacent to abundant underwater vegetation. The water is moderately turbid with a tendency towards less dissolved oxygen with increased depth. The estimated values of NMP/100 ml of the coliform fecal organisms is within legal limits even though the total number of water coliforms measured in Site 2 was ten times higher than in Site 1. This increase is associated with the proximity of Site 2 to an outflow of pre-treated sewage. The values of TRPH in the water collected from each site were low and very close to the detection limit (0.8/ml). Vanadium was not found, while lead was detected in 11 of the 12 samples. Compared to the values measured for Site 1, which was the local reference, only one sample had a concentration of three times the maximum baseline

  13. 900-m high gas plumes rising from marine sediments containing structure II hydrates at Vestnesa Ridge, offshore W-Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew J.; Mienert, Jürgen; Bünz, Stefan; Greinert, Jens; Rasmussen, Tine L.

    2013-04-01

    We study an arctic sediment drift in ~1200 m water depth at Vestnesa Ridge, offshore western Svalbard. The ridge is spotted with pockmarks that range in size from a few meters to hundreds of meters in diameter and centimeters to tens of meters in height (e.g. Vogt et al., 1994). There is a strong negative-polarity seismic reflection below the ridge that is interpreted to record a negative impedance contrast marking the boundary between gas hydrate and water above and free gas and water below: it is the bottom-simulating reflector (BSR). Seismically transparent zones, interpreted as gas chimneys, extend from pockmarks at the seafloor to depths below the BSR (180-220 meters below the seafloor) (Bünz et al., 2012). Gas flares, gas hydrate, and methane-seep-specific biological communities (pogonphora and begiatoa bacterial mats) have been observed adjacent to pockmarks at the ridge (Bünz et al., 2012). We present new single-beam echosounding data that were acquired during 2010 and 2012 cruises on the R/V Helmer Hanssen at Vestnesa Ridge using a Simrad EK60 system that operates at frequencies of 18 and 38 kHz. During both cruises which lasted 3-5 days, we detected continuous bubble release from 4 separate pockmarks in 2010 and 6 separate pockmarks in 2012. There were no noticeable, short-term (hourly or daily) variations in the bubble release from the pockmarks, indicating that the venting from the pockmarks does not undergo rapid changes. Plumes from the pockmarks rise between 875 to 925m above the seafloor to a final water depth of 325 to 275m, respectively. This depth is in excellent agreement with the top of the hydrate stability zone (275 meters below sea level) for the gas composition of hydrate sampled at the ridge (96.31% C1; 3.36% C2; 0.21% C3; 0.11% IC4; 0.01% NC4). This suggests that hydrate skins are forming around the gas bubbles, inhibiting the dissolution of gas, and allowing the bubbles to rise to such great heights in the water column. Our results

  14. The adsorption of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and propanol mixtures with regard to wettability of polytetrafluoroethylene II. Adsorption at polytetrafluoroethylene-aqueous solution interface and wettability.

    PubMed

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2008-02-01

    Measurements of contact angles (theta) of aqueous solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and propanol mixtures at constant CTAB concentration equal to 1x10(-5), 1x10(-4), 6x10(-4) and 1x10(-3) M on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were carried out. The obtained results indicate that the wettability of PTFE by aqueous solutions of these mixtures depends on their composition and concentration. They also indicate that, contrary to Zisman, there is no linear relationship between cos theta and the surface tension (gamma(LV)), but a linear relationship exists between the adhesional (gamma(LV)cos theta) and surface tension of aqueous solutions of CTAB and propanol mixtures. Curve gamma(LV)cos theta vs gamma(LV) has a slope equal -1 suggesting that adsorption of CTAB and propanol mixtures and the orientation of their molecules at aqueous solution-air and PTFE-aqueous solution interfaces is the same. Extrapolating this curve to the value of gamma(LV)cos theta corresponding to theta=0, the value of the critical tension of PTFE wetting equal 23.4 mN/m was determined. This value was higher than that obtained from contact angles of n-alkanes on PTFE surface (20.24 mN/m). The difference between the critical surface tension values of wetting probably resulted from the fact that at cos theta=1 the PTFE-aqueous solution of CTAB and propanol mixture interface tension was not equal to zero. This tension was determined on the basis of the measured contact angles and Young equation. It appeared that the values of PTFE-aqueous solution of the CTAB and propanol mixtures interface tension can be satisfactorily determined by modified Szyszkowski equation only for solutions in which probably CTAB and propanol molecules are present in monomeric form. However, it appeared that using the equation of Miller et al., in which the possibility of aggregation of propanol molecules in the interface layer is taken into account, it is possible to describe the PTFE-solution interfacial tension

  15. Thermal plasma properties for Ar-Cu, Ar-Fe and Ar-Al mixtures used in welding plasmas processes: II. Transport coefficients at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressault, Y.; Murphy, A. B.; Teulet, Ph; Gleizes, A.; Schnick, M.

    2013-10-01

    This article is devoted to the calculation of thermodynamic properties (mass density, enthalpy and specific heat at constant pressure) and transport coefficients (viscosity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and combined diffusion coefficients) of mixtures of argon and aluminum, iron and copper vapour at atmospheric pressure. Data are presented for the temperature range 300 to 30 000 K, for different concentrations of the metal vapours. The dependence of the properties on metal vapour type and concentration are discussed. Mixtures of argon and metal vapour occur in the arc welding and in other plasma applications. Tabulations of the data are presented, and will be of use in computational modelling of such applications.

  16. Person Heterogeneity of the BDI-II-C and Its Effects on Dimensionality and Construct Validity: Using Mixture Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Pei-Chen; Huang, Tsai-Wei

    2010-01-01

    This study was to apply the mixed Rasch model to investigate person heterogeneity of Beck Depression Inventory-II-Chinese version (BDI-II-C) and its effects on dimensionality and construct validity. Person heterogeneity was reflected by two latent classes that differ qualitatively. Additionally, person heterogeneity adversely affected the…

  17. The coordination structure of the extracted nickel(ii) complex with a synergistic mixture containing dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid and 2-ethylhexyl 4-pyridinecarboxylate ester.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiyuan; Hu, Huiping; Zhu, Shan; Hu, Fang; Wang, Yongxi

    2017-01-24

    In this paper, a synergist complex of Ni(ii) with naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid (HNS) and n-hexyl 4-pyridinecarboxylate ester (L(I)), which are corresponding short chain analogues of active synergistic extractants dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (HDNNS) and 2-ethylhexyl 4-pyridinecarboxylate ester (4PC, L(II)), was prepared and characterized by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ((1)H-NMR), elemental analyses, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS) spectroscopic studies. Single crystals of the nickel synergist complex have been grown from a methanol/water (10/1) solution and analyzed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal structure of the nickel synergist complex shows that Ni(ii) is coordinated by four water molecules and two monodentate L(I) ligands and there is no direct interaction of the Ni(ii) with sulfonic oxygen atoms of naphthalene-2-sulfonic acid anions, while hydrogen-bonded interactions of the coordinated water molecules with sulfonic oxygen atoms of naphthalene-2-sulphate anions were observed. In addition, in order to provide parallels to solvent extraction, the extracted Ni(ii) complex with HDNNS and 4PC is also prepared and studied using FT-IR and ESI-MS technology. Compared with their corresponding free ligand, similar shifts assigned to the stretching vibration of the pyridine ring and S[double bond, length as m-dash]O in both the nickel synergist complex and the extracted Ni(ii) complex suggest that in the non-polar organic phase, Ni(ii) is also coordinated by L(II) ligands, while the sulfonic oxygen atoms of dinonylnaphthalene sulfonate anions not directly bonded to Ni(ii) form hydrogen bonds with water molecules (coordinated with Ni(ii) or/and solubilized in the non-polar organic phase). For the ESI-MS spectrum of the extracted Ni(ii) complex in non-polar organic phase, there exists a peak at m/z values of 1058.76, which indicates that the extracted Ni(ii) complex in the non

  18. Consequences of contaminant mixture on the dynamics and functional diversity of bacterioplankton in a southwestern Mediterranean coastal ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Pringault, Olivier; Lafabrie, Céline; Avezac, Murielle; Bancon-Montigny, Chrystelle; Carre, Claire; Chalghaf, Mohamed; Delpoux, Sophie; Duvivier, Adrien; Elbaz-Poulichet, Françoise; Gonzalez, Catherine; Got, Patrice; Leboulanger, Christophe; Spinelli, Sylvie; Hlaili, Asma Sakka; Bouvy, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Contamination of coastal environments is often due to a complex mixture of pollutants, sometimes in trace levels, that may have significant effects on diversity and function of organisms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term dynamics of bacterioplankton exposed to natural and artificial mixtures of contaminants. Bacterial communities from a southwestern Mediterranean ecosystem, lagoon and the bay (offshore) of Bizerte were exposed to i) elutriate from resuspension of contaminated sediment, and ii) an artificial mixture of metals and herbicides mimicking the contamination observed during sediment resuspension. Elutriate incubation as well as artificial spiking induced strong enrichments in nutrients (up to 18 times), metals (up to six times) and herbicides (up to 20 times) relative to the in situ concentrations in the offshore station, whereas the increases in contaminants were less marked in the lagoon station. In the offshore waters, the artificial mixture of pollutants provoked a strong inhibition of bacterial abundance, production and respiration and significant modifications of the potential functional diversity of bacterioplankton with a strong decrease of the carbohydrate utilization. In contrast, incubation with elutriate resulted in a stimulation of bacterial activities and abundances, suggesting that the toxic effects of pollutants were modified by the increase in nutrient and DOM concentrations due to the sediment resuspension. The effects of elutriate and the artificial mixture of pollutants on bacterial dynamics and the functional diversity were less marked in the lagoon waters, than in offshore waters, suggesting a relative tolerance of lagoon bacteria against contaminants.

  19. How to overcome inter-electrode variability and instability to quantify dissolved oxygen, Fe(II), mn(II), and S(−II) in undisturbed soils and sediments using voltammetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slowey, Aaron J.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions - Despite their intrinsic variability, Hg/Au electrodes fabricated by hand can be used to quantify O2, S(−II), Fe(II), and Mn(II) without calibrating every electrode for every constituent of interest. The pilot ion method can achieve accuracies to within 20% or less, provided that the underlying principle—the independence of slope ratios—is demonstrated for all voltammetric techniques used, and effects of the physicochemical properties of the system on voltammetric signals are addressed through baseline subtraction.

  20. Levels of 137Cs in muddy sediments on the seabed in the Bay of Cadiz (Spain). Part II. Model of vertical migration of (137)Cs.

    PubMed

    Ligero, R A; Barrera, M; Casas-Ruiz, M

    2005-01-01

    This second part of the study reports the development of a model to describe the vertical migration of the artificial radioisotope (137)Cs in the sediment column on the seabed of the Bay of Cadiz. The application of the model provides an overall picture of the process of sedimentation in the Inner Bay of Cadiz. The spatial distribution of the rate of sedimentation enables us to study the sources of sediments and the means by which the sediments have been transported. A method has been derived from the rate of sedimentation to perform the dating of the layers of sediment. The model describes the behaviour of (137)Cs in the area under study, taking into account the time of residence in the zones that are the source of accumulation, the origin of the sedimentary material, together with the diffusion of the radionuclide in the sediment of the seabed.

  1. Measurement of methyl mercury (I) and mercury (II) in fish tissues and sediments by HPLC-ICPMS and HPLC-HGAAS.

    PubMed

    Jagtap, Rajani; Krikowa, Frank; Maher, William; Foster, Simon; Ellwood, Michael

    2011-07-15

    A procedure for the extraction and determination of methyl mercury and mercury (II) in fish muscle tissues and sediment samples is presented. The procedure involves extraction with 5% (v/v) 2-mercaptoethanol, separation and determination of mercury species by HPLC-ICPMS using a Perkin-Elmer 3 μm C8 (33 mm×3 mm) column and a mobile phase 3 containing 0.5% (v/v) 2-mercaptoethanol and 5% (v/v) CH(3)OH (pH 5.5) at a flow rate 1.5 ml min(-1) and a temperature of 25°C. Calibration curves for methyl mercury (I) and mercury (II) standards were linear in the range of 0-100 μgl(-1) (r(2)=0.9990 and r(2)=0.9995 respectively). The lowest measurable mercury was 0.4 μgl(-1) which corresponds to 0.01 μgg(-1) in fish tissues and sediments. Methyl mercury concentrations measured in biological certified reference materials, NRCC DORM - 2 Dogfish muscle (4.4±0.8 μgg(-1)), NRCC Dolt - 3 Dogfish liver (1.55±0.09 μgg(-1)), NIST RM 50 Albacore Tuna (0.89±0.08 μgg(-1)) and IRMM IMEP-20 Tuna fish (3.6±0.6 μgg(-1)) were in agreement with the certified value (4.47±0.32μgg(-1), 1.59±0.12 μgg(-1), 0.87±0.03 μgg(-1), 4.24±0.27 μgg(-1) respectively). For the sediment reference material ERM CC 580, a methyl mercury concentration of 0.070±0.002 μgg(-1) was measured which corresponds to an extraction efficiency of 92±3% of certified values (0.076±0.04 μgg(-1)) but within the range of published values (0.040-0.084 μgg(-1); mean±s.d.: 0.073±0.05 μgg(-1), n=40) for this material. The extraction procedure for the fish tissues was also compared against an enzymatic extraction using Protease type XIV that has been previously published and similar results were obtained. The use of HPLC-HGAAS with a Phenomenox 5 μm Luna C18 (250 mm×4.6 mm) column and a mobile phase containing 0.06 moll(-1) ammonium acetate (Merck Pty Limited, Australia) in 5% (v/v) methanol and 0.1% (w/v) l-cysteine at 25°C was evaluated as a complementary alternative to HPLC-ICPMS for the measurement of

  2. Lagrangian Sediment Transport Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maderych, V.; Brovchenko, I.; Fenical, S.; Shepsis, V.

    2004-12-01

    A new two-dimensional Lagrangian sediment transport model was developed to simulate a wide-range of sediment transport processes, including sediment mobility under combined current and wave action, sediment transport and bed change under wave and currents effects, sediment transport patterns at nearshore coastal and offshore structures, and turbidity and sediment motion during dredging and dredged material placement. The Lagrangian technique was used to simulate transport of sediments, deposition, and re-suspension. The model can be applied to cohesive, non-cohesive, or mixed sediments. The sediment transport is simulated using bathymetry data, bed resistance characteristics, wave height and period, depth-averaged current velocity and bed material type, size and gradation, which vary throughout the model domain.The non-cohesive sediment transport model is based on a solution of two-dimensional mass conservation equations for the bed layer material and 2D equations for movement of sediment fractions either bed load or suspended load. The water column and bottom are divided into a set of layers: water layer, active layer, several active bed layers, and the bed layer. The model also takes into account the effects of armoring and changes in the bed composition. Cohesive sediments move entirely as suspended load in the water layer and sediment transport computations are based on a solution of the two-dimensional mass conservation equations for the bed layer material and two-dimensional equations for movement of sediment as suspended load. The water column and bed, as for non-cohesive sediments, was divided into a set of layers. Following the approach of Van Ledden (2002), the erosion of sediments made up of mud and sand mixtures is non-cohesive if the mud content is below a critical level. Above a critical mud content, the bed behaves cohesively. Deposition fluxes of mud and sand are independent. The sediment concentration in the water and active layer is represented by

  3. Assessment of heavy metals and arsenic contamination in the sediments of the Moulouya River and the Hassan II Dam downstream of the abandoned mine Zeïda (High Moulouya, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Azhari, Abdellah; Rhoujjati, Ali; EL Hachimi, Moulay Laârabi

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the sediment contamination level near the abandoned (PbZn) mine Zeïda, heavy metal concentrations were determined in sediment samples from the Moulouya River, the Ansegmir tributary and the Hassan II Dam located downstream of the abandoned mine. These samples were analysed for their geochemical properties: mineralogy by XRD, carbonate content, pH, particle size and the total concentrations of Pb, Zn, As and Cu elements by ICP-AES. The assessment of the sediment pollution extent was performed by using the multiple pollution indices: contamination factor (CF), pollution load index (PLI) and the geoaccumulation index (Igeo). The Highest CF values (>6) of Pb that have been observed downstream of the tailings promote a high Pb contamination in that specific area. The PLIs results showed that all stations, except for those upstream of the tailings and on the Hassan II Dam, have been found moderately to highly contaminated. The Igeo results confirmed the Pb high contamination but also the extreme As contamination. The potential ecological risk factor results and the comparison with the sediment quality guidelines revealed that the Pb and As levels are potentially toxic to the sediment-dwelling organisms. Based on the multivariate statistical analysis results and the spatial distribution of the sediment contamination level, the pollution of Pb and As have different sources. Pb contamination is located exclusively near and downstream of the tailings. These latter's may be considered as an important point source of Pb into the Moulouya River. The As contamination is derived from a larger scale input sources which can be related to anthropogenic and/or lithogenic effects.

  4. Sediment spiking for toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, M.H.; Norman, D.M.; Chapman, P.M.; Norman, D.M.; Quintino, V.M.

    1994-12-31

    Sediment toxicity testing integrates responses to sediment variables and hence does not directly indicate cause-and-effect. One tool for determining cause-and-effect is sediment spiking in which relatively uncontaminated sediment is amended with known amounts of contaminants, then tested for toxicity. Based on the concentration-response relationship(s), the relative toxicity of the spiked contaminants and their significance in sediment mixtures can be assessed. However, sediment spiking methods vary considerably. The present study details an appropriate methodology for amending sediments with a range of organic contaminant concentrations including different solvent schemes and an equilibration period. This methodology is described as appropriate because predicted and actual concentrations were similar, and responses in an acute 10-d amphipod test matched predictions and other data.

  5. Natural attenuation of arsenic by sediment sorption and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunkyung; O'Day, Peggy A; Hering, Janet G

    2009-06-15

    Arsenic sorption onto aquifer sediments was investigated in anaerobic laboratory batch and column uptake experiments and characterized by As, Fe, and Mn X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) to estimate the extent and mechanism of abiotic sorption and oxidation of As(III). Batch experiments at pH 6 showed that the amount of As(III) or As(V) sorption from synthetic background porewaterto sediments was similar as a function of total As concentration, but slightly more As(V) was sorbed than As(III) with increasing As concentrations. Column experiments with As(III) solutions in the absence and presence of dissolved Fe2+ showed more As uptake in the presence of Fe but also more Fe desorption during flushout with As-free solutions such that net As uptake was similar to, or less than that of, the Fe-free experiment. Fits to bulk Fe X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) spectra showed no change between unreacted and reacted sediments. Manganese XANES revealed small increases in absorption in the spectral region associated with Mn(II) after reaction, indicating sediment Mn reduction. However, XANES spectra showed that Mn is not present as Mn(IV)O2(s) but is probably substituted into other sediment minerals as a mixture of Mn(II,III). Quantitative analyses of As XANES spectra, which indicated mixtures of As(III) and As(V) after reaction with As(III) solutions, were used to estimate a fraction of As(V) in excess of native As(V) in the sediment (0.2 mmol kg(-1)) that corresponds to sorbed As(III) oxidized to As(V). The spectroscopic and solution data indicate that the aquifer sediments have a limited abiotic capacity to oxidize As(III), which did not exceed 30% of the total amount of As sorbed and was estimated in the range of 0.025-0.4 mmol kg-(-1) sediment. In the presence of dissolved Fe2+, the precipitation of Fe(III) hydrous oxide phases will be an effective mechanism for As scavenging only if there exists sufficient dissolved oxygen in groundwater to oxidize Fe

  6. Multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments with the amphipod Gammarus locusta: II. Organism and population-level endpoints.

    PubMed

    Costa, Filipe O; Neuparth, Teresa; Correia, Ana D; Costa, Maria Helena

    2005-07-01

    This study aimed to test the performance of the amphipod Gammarus locusta (L.) in chronic sediment toxicity tests. It constitutes part of a multi-level assessment of chronic toxicity of estuarine sediments, integrating organism and population-level endpoints with biochemical markers responses. Here we account for organism and population-level effects, while biomarker responses were reported in a companion article. Five moderately contaminated sediments from Sado and Tagus estuaries were tested, comprising 3 muddy and 2 sandy sediments. These sediments either did not show acute toxicity or were diluted with control sediment as much as required to remove acute toxicity. Subsequent chronic tests consisted of 28-day exposures with survival, individual growth and reproductive traits as endpoints. Two of the muddy sediments induced higher growth rates in the amphipods, and improved reproductive traits. This was understood to be a consequence of the amount of organic matter in the sediment, which was nutritionally beneficial to the amphipods, while concurrently decreasing contaminant bioavailability. Biomarker responses did not reveal toxicant-induced stress in amphipods exposed to these sediments. One of the sandy sediments was acutely toxic at 50% dilution, but in contrast stimulated amphipod growth when diluted 75%. This was presumed to be an indication of a hormetic response. Finally the two remaining contaminated sediments showed pronounced chronic toxicity, affecting survival and reproduction. The sex ratio of survivors was highly biased towards females, and offspring production was severely impaired. The particulars of the responses of this amphipod were examined, as well as strengths versus limitations of the sediment test. This study illustrates the utility of this chronic test for toxicity assessment of contaminated estuarine sediments, with potential application all along Atlantic Europe.

  7. Predicting bedforms and primary current stratification in cohesive mixtures of mud and sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, J.; Jaco, B.; Peakall, J.

    2015-12-01

    The use of sedimentary structures as indicators of flow and sediment morphodynamics in ancient sediments is essential for reconstruction of formative flow conditions generated in a wide range of grain sizes and sedimentary environments. Yet, the vast majority of past research has concerned bedforms generated in essentially cohesionless sediments that lack the presence of mud within the flow and within the sediment bed itself. However, most sedimentary environments possess fine-grained sediments, with recent work demonstrating how the presence of such fine sediment may substantially modify the fluid dynamics of such flows. It is thus increasingly evident that the influence of mud, and the presence of cohesive forces, is essential to permit a fuller interpretation and understanding of many modern and ancient sedimentary successions. In this paper, we summarize on the fluid dynamics of turbulence modulation generated by the presence of fine suspended sediment, and use this knowledge to propose a new extended bedform phase diagram for bedforms generated in mixtures of sand and mud under rapidly decelerated flows. This diagram provides a phase space using the variables of yield strength and grain mobility as the abscissa and ordinate axes, respectively, and defines the stability fields of a range of bedforms generated under flows that have modified fluid dynamics due to the presence of suspended sediment within the flow. We also show data on a range of bedforms generated in such flows, from laboratory experiments and examples from ancient sediments, including: i) heterolithic stratification, comprising alternating laminae or layers of sand and mud; ii) the preservation of low amplitude bed-waves, large current ripples, and bed scours with intrascour composite bedforms; iii) low angle cross-lamination and long lenses and streaks of sand and mud formed by bed-waves; iv) complex stacking of reverse bedforms, mud layers and low-angle cross-lamination on the upstream face of

  8. An exchange-Coulomb model potential energy surface for the Ne-CO interaction. II. Molecular beam scattering and bulk gas phenomena in Ne-CO mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dham, Ashok K; McBane, George C; McCourt, Frederick R W; Meath, William J

    2010-01-14

    Four potential energy surfaces are of current interest for the Ne-CO interaction. Two are high-level fully ab initio surfaces obtained a decade ago using symmetry-adapted perturbation theory and supermolecule coupled-cluster methods. The other two are very recent exchange-Coulomb (XC) model potential energy surfaces constructed by using ab initio Heitler-London interaction energies and literature long range dispersion and induction energies, followed by the determination of a small number of adjustable parameters to reproduce a selected subset of pure rotational transition frequencies for the (20)Ne-(12)C(16)O van der Waals cluster. Testing of the four potential energy surfaces against a wide range of available experimental microwave, millimeter-wave, and mid-infrared Ne-CO transition frequencies indicated that the XC potential energy surfaces gave results that were generally far superior to the earlier fully ab initio surfaces. In this paper, two XC model surfaces and the two fully ab initio surfaces are tested for their abilities to reproduce experiment for a wide range of nonspectroscopic Ne-CO gas mixture properties. The properties considered here are relative integral cross sections and the angle dependence of rotational state-to-state differential cross sections, rotational relaxation rate constants for CO(v=2) in Ne-CO mixtures at T=296 K, pressure broadening of two pure rotational lines and of the rovibrational lines in the CO fundamental and first overtone transitions at 300 K, and the temperature and, where appropriate, mole fraction dependencies of the interaction second virial coefficient, the binary diffusion coefficient, the interaction viscosity, the mixture shear viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients, and the thermal diffusion factor. The XC model potential energy surfaces give results that lie within or very nearly within the experimental uncertainties for all properties considered, while the coupled-cluster ab initio surface gives

  9. Nano sponge Mn₂O ₃ as a new adsorbent for the preconcentration of Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions in sea water, wastewater, rock, street sediment and catalytic converter samples prior to FAAS determinations.

    PubMed

    Yavuz, Emre; Tokalıoğlu, Serife; Sahan, Halil; Patat, Saban

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a nano sponge Mn2O3 adsorbent was synthesized and was used for the first time. Various parameters affecting the recovery values of Pd(II) and Rh(III) were examined. The tolerance limits (≥ 90 %) for both Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions were found to be 75,000 mg L(-1) Na(I), 75,000 mg L(-1) K(I), 50,000 mg L(-1) Mg(II) and 50,000 mg L(-1) Ca(II). A 30s contact time was enough for both adsorption and elution. A preconcentration factor of 100 was obtained by using 100mg of the nano sponge Mn2O3. The reusability of the adsorbent was 120 times. Adsorption capacities for Pd(II) and Rh(III) were found to be 42 and 6.2 mg g(-1), respectively. The detection limits were 1.0 µg L(-1) for Pd(II) and 0.37 µg L(-1) for Rh(III) and the relative standard deviations (RSD, %) were found to be ≤ 2.5%. The method was validated by analyzing the standard reference material, SRM 2556 (Used Auto Catalyst Pellets) and spiked real samples. The optimized method was applied for the preconcentration of Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions in water (sea water and wastewater), rock, street sediment and catalytic converter samples.

  10. Application of hierarchical Bayesian unmixing models in river sediment source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Will; Smith, Hugh; Navas, Ana; Bodé, Samuel; Goddard, Rupert; Zou Kuzyk, Zou; Lennard, Amy; Lobb, David; Owens, Phil; Palazon, Leticia; Petticrew, Ellen; Gaspar, Leticia; Stock, Brian; Boeckx, Pacsal; Semmens, Brice

    2016-04-01

    Fingerprinting and unmixing concepts are used widely across environmental disciplines for forensic evaluation of pollutant sources. In aquatic and marine systems, this includes tracking the source of organic and inorganic pollutants in water and linking problem sediment to soil erosion and land use sources. It is, however, the particular complexity of ecological systems that has driven creation of the most sophisticated mixing models, primarily to (i) evaluate diet composition in complex ecological food webs, (ii) inform population structure and (iii) explore animal movement. In the context of the new hierarchical Bayesian unmixing model, MIXSIAR, developed to characterise intra-population niche variation in ecological systems, we evaluate the linkage between ecological 'prey' and 'consumer' concepts and river basin sediment 'source' and sediment 'mixtures' to exemplify the value of ecological modelling tools to river basin science. Recent studies have outlined advantages presented by Bayesian unmixing approaches in handling complex source and mixture datasets while dealing appropriately with uncertainty in parameter probability distributions. MixSIAR is unique in that it allows individual fixed and random effects associated with mixture hierarchy, i.e. factors that might exert an influence on model outcome for mixture groups, to be explored within the source-receptor framework. This offers new and powerful ways of interpreting river basin apportionment data. In this contribution, key components of the model are evaluated in the context of common experimental designs for sediment fingerprinting studies namely simple, nested and distributed catchment sampling programmes. Illustrative examples using geochemical and compound specific stable isotope datasets are presented and used to discuss best practice with specific attention to (1) the tracer selection process, (2) incorporation of fixed effects relating to sample timeframe and sediment type in the modelling

  11. Speciation of copper(II) complexes in an ionic liquid based on choline chloride and in choline chloride/water mixtures.

    PubMed

    De Vreese, Peter; Brooks, Neil R; Van Hecke, Kristof; Van Meervelt, Luc; Matthijs, Edward; Binnemans, Koen; Van Deun, Rik

    2012-05-07

    A deep-eutectic solvent with the properties of an ionic liquid is formed when choline chloride is mixed with copper(II) chloride dihydrate in a 1:2 molar ratio. EXAFS and UV-vis-near-IR optical absorption spectroscopy have been used to compare the coordination sphere of the cupric ion in this ionic liquid with that of the cupric ion in solutions of 0.1 M of CuCl(2)·2H(2)O in solvents with varying molar ratios of choline chloride and water. The EXAFS data show that species with three chloride ions and one water molecule coordinated to the cupric ion as well as species with two chloride molecules and two water molecules coordinated to the cupric ion are present in the ionic liquid. On the other hand, a fully hydrated copper(II) ion is formed in an aqueous solution free of choline chloride, and the tetrachlorocuprate(II) complex forms in aqueous choline chloride solutions with more than 50 wt % of choline chloride. In solutions with between 0 and 50 wt % of choline chloride, mixed chloro-aquo complexes occur. Upon standing at room temperature, crystals of CuCl(2)·2H(2)O and of Cu(choline)Cl(3) formed in the ionic liquid. Cu(choline)Cl(3) is the first example of a choline cation coordinating to a transition-metal ion. Crystals of [choline](3)[CuCl(4)][Cl] and of [choline](4)[Cu(4)Cl(10)O] were also synthesized from molecular or ionic liquid solvents, and their crystal structures were determined.

  12. Influence of urban runoff, inappropriate waste disposal practices and World War II on the heavy metal status of sediments in the southern half of Saipan Lagoon, Saipan, CNMI.

    PubMed

    Denton, Gary R W; Emborski, Carmen A; Habana, Nathan C; Starmer, John A

    2014-04-15

    Heavy metals were examined in sediments from the southern half of Saipan Lagoon. These waters provided tactical access for US troops during WWII and were heavily shelled at the time. Mercury profiles in sediments were, to some extent, reflective of this event. Samples from the southern end of the lagoon, where an old post-war dumpsite once existed, were found to be substantially enriched with Pb, Cu and Zn. Further north, the lagoon was primarily impacted by urban runoff. Metal enrichment in sediments from this region was generally highest at storm drain outlets and attenuated seawards. Moderate enrichment was rarely exceeded for any element other than Hg beyond the 50 m mark. Sediment quality guidelines used to flag potentially adverse ecological health effects revealed no PEL exceedances. TEL exceedances for Pb and Cu were identified in sediments near the former dumpsite. The public health implications of the data are briefly addressed.

  13. Coastal sedimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubel, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Several important coastal sedimentation problems are identified. Application of existing or anticipated remote sensing techniques to examine these problems is considered. Specifically, coastal fine particle sediment systems, floods and hy hurricanes and sedimentation f of coastal systems, routes and rates of sediment transport on continental shelves, and dredging and dredged material disposal are discussed.

  14. Two-Phase Calorimetry. II. Studies on the Thermodynamics of Cesium and Strontium Extraction by Mixtures of H+CCD- and PEG-400 in FS-13

    SciTech Connect

    Zalupski, Peter R.; Herbst, R. S.; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Martin, L. R.; Peterman, D. R.; Nash, Ken L

    2010-01-01

    Thermochemical characterization of the partitioning of cesium and strontium from nitric acid solutions into mixtures of the acid form of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide (H+CCD-) and polyethylene glycol (PEG-400) in FS-13 diluent has been completed using isothermal titration microcalorimetry and radiotracer distribution methods. The phase transfer reaction for Cs+ is a straightforward (H+ for Cs+) cation exchange reaction. In contrast, the extraction of Sr2+ does not proceed in the absence of the co-solvent molecule PEG-400. This molecule is believed to facilitate the dehydration of the Sr2+ aquo cation to overcome its resistance to partitioning. The phase transfer reactions for both Cs+ and Sr2+ are enthalpy driven (exothermic), but partially compensated by an unfavorable entropy. The results of the calorimetry studies suggest that the PEG-400 functions as a stoichiometric phase transfer reagent rather than acting simply as a phase transfer catalyst or phase modifier. The calorimetry results also demonstrate that the extraction of Sr2+ is complex, including evidence for both the partitioning of Sr(NO3)+ and endothermic ion pairing interactions in the organic phase that contribute to the net enthalpic effect. The thermodynamics of the liquid-liquid distribution equilibria are discussed mainly considering the basic features of the ion solvation thermochemistry.

  15. Electroanalytical measurements of binary-analyte mixtures in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic: Uranium(III)- and Magnesium(II)-Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappleye, Devin; Newton, Matthew L.; Zhang, Chao; Simpson, Michael F.

    2017-04-01

    The electrochemical behavior of MgCl2 in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic was investigated to evaluate its suitability as a surrogate for PuCl3 in studies related to the eletrorefining of used nuclear fuel. The reduction of Mg2+ was found to be electrochemically reversible up to 300 mV s-1 at 773 K. The diffusion coefficient for Mg2+ was calculated to be 1.74 and 2.17 × 10-5 cm2 s-1 with and without U3+ present, respectively, at 773 K using cyclic voltammetry (CV). Upon comparison to literature data, the diffusion coefficient of Mg2+ differs by only 8.8% (with U3+ present) from that of Pu3+ and the difference in peak potentials was only 79 mV. Binary-analyte mixtures of UCl3 and MgCl2 in eutectic LiCl-KCl were further investigated using CV, normal pulse voltammetry (NPV), chronoamperometry (CA) and open-circuit potential (OCP) measurements for the purpose of comparing each technique's accuracy in measuring U3+ and Mg2+ concentrations. Of all the techniques tested, NPV resulted in the lowest error which was, on average, 11.4% and 9.81% for U3+ and Mg2+, respectively.

  16. Comparison of surface vacuum ultraviolet emissions with resonance level number densities. II. Rare-gas plasmas and Ar-molecular gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Boffard, John B. Lin, Chun C.; Wang, Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Culver, Cody; Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold

    2015-03-15

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emissions from excited plasma species can play a variety of roles in processing plasmas, including damaging the surface properties of materials used in semiconductor processing. Depending on their wavelength, VUV photons can easily transmit thin upper dielectric layers and affect the electrical characteristics of the devices. Despite their importance, measuring VUV fluxes is complicated by the fact that few materials transmit at VUV wavelengths, and both detectors and windows are easily damaged by plasma exposure. The authors have previously reported on measuring VUV fluxes in pure argon plasmas by monitoring the concentrations of Ar(3p{sup 5}4s) resonance atoms that produce the VUV emissions using noninvasive optical emission spectroscopy in the visible/near-infrared wavelength range [Boffard et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol., A 32, 021304 (2014)]. Here, the authors extend this technique to other rare-gases (Ne, Kr, and Xe) and argon-molecular gas plasmas (Ar/H{sub 2}, Ar/O{sub 2}, and Ar/N{sub 2}). Results of a model for VUV emissions that couples radiation trapping and the measured rare-gas resonance level densities are compared to measurements made with both a calibrated VUV photodiode and a sodium salicylate fluorescence detection scheme. In these more complicated gas mixtures, VUV emissions from a variety of sources beyond the principal resonance levels of the rare gases are found to contribute to the total VUV flux.

  17. PROCEDURES FOR DERIVING EQUILIBRIUM PARTITIONING BENCHMARKS (ESBS) FOR THE PROTECTION OF BENTHIC ORGANISM: PAH MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This equilibrium partitioning sediment benchmark (ESB) document describes procedures to derive concentrations of PAH mixtures in sediment which are protective of the presence of benthic organisms. The equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach was chosen because it accounts for t...

  18. Tracing sources of sediments during flood events by Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier-Transform (DRIFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulenard, J.; Legout, C.; Némery, J.; Bramorski, J.; Navratil, O.; Estèves, M.; Fanget, B.; Perrette, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The identification and the quantification of the source of the suspended sediment transported by a river is becoming an increasingly important requirement in sediment investigations. An increasing number of works used "fingerprinting" to identify and trace one or more distinctive characteristics of the source material that can be recognized in the final sediment. As sediment fingerprints are often a combination of two or more characteristics, fingerprinting frequently requires a multi-tracer, composite or multi-proxy approach. The most commonly used tracers are radionuclides (137Cs, unsupported 210Pb, 7Be), chemical extracts of reactive elements and total chemical analyses. However, current sediment fingerprinting techniques are very selective and they are not always practical for catchment area monitoring because of their high cost (time and money) and because of the complexity of the analyses required. As consequences such approach is rarely used to compute the sources of sediment during flood events. Hence, the challenge is to develop methods (experimental and instrumental) that can be applied to large numbers of samples, that involve minimal sample preparation and that provide an acceptable level of sediment source selectivity. In the framework of the STREAMS project aiming at understanding and modelling the sediment transport in mountainous areas (Bleone River, Southern French Alps), we study the potential use of a combination of Diffuse Reflectance Infra-red Fourier Transform (DRIFT) and multivariate analysis (Partial Least Squared) to quantify the main sources of suspended sediments during flood events. The objectives of this study were i) to identify the sediment sources areas in the Galabre sub-catchment (20 km²) for various rainstorm events and ii) to quantify the contribution of each sediment source in the suspended sediment flux at the outlet of the sub-catchment during floods. A set of 38 soil samples were collected on the Galabre sub-catchment in

  19. Selective fluorescence sensing of copper(II) and water via competing imine hydrolysis and alcohol oxidation pathways sensitive to water content in aqueous acetonitrile mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mariappan, Kadarkaraisamy; Alaparthi, Madhubabu; Caple, Gerald; Balasubramanian, Vinothini; Hoffman, Mariah M; Hudspeth, Mikaela; Sykes, Andrew G

    2014-03-17

    Addition of hydrazines to a 1,8-disubstituted anthraquinone macrocycle containing a polyether ring produces site-selective imination, where hydrazone formation produces the more sterically hindered adduct. Reduction of the remaining carbonyl group to a secondary alcohol followed by addition of copper(II) ion causes intense yellow fluorescence to occur, which is selective for this metal cation and allows this system to be used as a fluorescence sensor. In the presence of water, a green-fluorescent intermediate appears, which slowly decomposes to produce the original starting anthraquinone. The addition of a large amount of water radically changes the reaction pathway. In this case, oxidation of the secondary alcohol is kinetically faster than hydrolysis of the hydrazone, although the same anthraquinone product is ultimately produced. Stern-Volmer data suggest that dioxygen quenches the green emission through both dynamic and static mechanisms; the static ground-state effect is most likely due to association of oxygen with the copper-bound fluorescent intermediate.

  20. The Effect of mining and related activities on the sediment-trace element geochemistry of Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, U.S.A.; Part II, Subsurface sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Robbins, J.A.; Cook, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    During the summer of 1990, 12 gravity cores were collected in Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, at various depths and in a variety of depositional environments. All core subsamples were analyzed to determine bulk chemistry and selected subsamples were analyzed for trace-element partitioning and (137)Cs activity. The purpose of these analyses was to determine the trace-element concentrations and distributions in the sediment column and to try to establish a trace-element geochemical history of the lake in relation to mining and mining-related discharge operations in the area. Substantial portions of the near-surface sediments in Lake Coeur d'Alene are markedly enriched in Ag, As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Sb, and Zn, and somewhat enriched in Cu, Fe, and Mn. Variations in the thickness of the trace element- rich sediments suggest that the source of much of this material is the Coeur d'Alene River. Calculated estimates indicate that there are some 75 million metric tons of trace element-rich sediments currently on/in the lakebed. Estimated trace-element masses in excess of those caused by non-mining-related sources, range from a high of 468,000 metric tons of Pb to a low of 260 metric tons of Hg. The similarity between the trace element-rich surface and subsurface sediments as regards their: (1) location; (2) bulk chemistry; (3) interelement relationships; and (4) trace-element partitioning indicate that the sources and/or concentrating mechanisms causing the trace-element enrichment in the lake probably have been the same throughout their depositional history. Based on Mt. St. Helens' ash layer from the 1980 eruption, ages estimated from (137)Cs activity, and the presence of 80 discernible and presumably annual layers in a core collected near the Coeur d'Alene River delta, it appears that deposition rates for the trace element-rich sediments varied from 2.1 to 1.3 cm/yr. These data also indicate that the deposition of trace element-rich sediments began, at least in the Coeur d

  1. Contaminated Sediment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contaminated sediments are a significant problem in the Great Lakes basin. Persistent high concentrations of contaminants in the bottom sediments of rivers and harbors pose risks to aquatic organisms, wildlife, and humans.

  2. Aquatic Sediments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanville, W. D.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of aquatic sediments and its effect upon water quality, covering publications of 1976-77. This review includes: (1) sediment water interchange; (2) chemical and physical characterization; and (3) heavy water in sediments. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  3. Arctic deltaic lake sediments as recorders of fluvial organic matter deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonk, Jorien; Dickens, Angela; Giosan, Liviu; Zipper, Samuel; Galy, Valier; Holmes, Robert; Montlucon, Daniel; Kim, Bokyung; Hussain, Zainab; Eglinton, Timothy

    2016-08-01

    Arctic deltas are dynamic and vulnerable regions that play a key role in land-ocean interactions and the global carbon cycle. Delta lakes may provide valuable historical records of the quality and quantity of fluvial fluxes, parameters that are challenging to investigate in these remote regions. Here we study lakes from across the Mackenzie Delta, Arctic Canada, that receive fluvial sediments from the Mackenzie River when spring flood water levels rise above natural levees. We compare downcore lake sediments with suspended sediments collected during the spring flood, using bulk (% organic carbon, % total nitrogen, 13C, 14C) and molecular organic geochemistry (lignin, leaf waxes). High-resolution age models (137Cs, 210Pb) of downcore lake sediment records (n=11) along with lamina counting on high-resolution radiographs show sediment deposition frequencies ranging between annually to every 15 years. Down-core geochemical variability in a representative delta lake sediment core is consistent with historical variability in spring flood hydrology (variability in peak discharge, ice jamming, peak water levels). Comparison with earlier published Mackenzie River depth profiles shows that (i) lake sediments reflect the riverine surface suspended load, and (ii) hydrodynamic sorting patterns related to spring flood characteristics are reflected in the lake sediments. Bulk and molecular geochemistry of suspended particulate matter from the spring flood peak and lake sediments are relatively similar showing a mixture of modern higher-plant derived material, older terrestrial permafrost material, and old rock-derived material. This suggests that deltaic lake sedimentary records hold great promise as recorders of past (century-scale) riverine fluxes and may prove instrumental in shedding light on past behaviour of arctic rivers, as well as how they respond to a changing climate.

  4. Analysis of the contribution of sedimentation to bacterial mass transport in a parallel plate flow chamber: part II: use of fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J; van der Mei, Henny C; Norde, Willem; Krom, Bastiaan P; Sjollema, Jelmer

    2011-10-15

    Using a new phase-contrast microscopy-based method of analysis, sedimentation has recently been demonstrated to be the major mass transport mechanism of bacteria towards substratum surfaces in a parallel plate flow chamber (J. Li, H.J. Busscher, W. Norde, J. Sjollema, Colloid Surf. B. 84 (2011) 76). Here we describe a novel method for enumerating adhesion of fluorescent bacteria in a parallel plate flow chamber that allows direct imaging of the bacterial distribution along the length of the flow chamber, as caused by sedimentation. Imaging of fluorescence was done using macroscopic bio-optical imaging of the entire flow chamber, including top and bottom plates as well as of the flowing suspension in between. An algorithm is forwarded that allows to separate the fluorescence arising from the suspension and bottom plate and at the same time determines the single cell fluorescence from which the bacterial distribution over the entire bottom plate can be visualized. Enumeration of the numbers of bacteria adhering to the center of the glass bottom plate for a fluorescent Staphylococcus aureus strain was found to coincide with enumerations using phase-contrast microscopy. Moreover, due to the use of macroscopic bio-optical imaging, it was found that the number of adhering staphylococci increases linearly with distance from the inlet of the flow chamber, which could be explained from a simplified mass balance of convection, sedimentation and blocking near the bottom plate of the flow chamber.

  5. Microbial diversity in polluted harbor sediments II: Sulfate-reducing bacterial community assessment using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone library of dsrAB gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Song, Lin-sheng; Ki, Jang-Seu; Lau, Chun-Kwan; Li, Xiang-Dong; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are important regulators of a variety of processes in coastal marine sediments regarding organic matter turnover, biodegradation of pollutants, and sulfur and carbon cycles. Yet their community compositions have not been investigated in polluted harbor sediments. This study described the diversity and spatial variation of SRB communities in surface sediments in Victoria Harbor, Hong Kong. The spatial variation of SRB communities was described by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The results showed that the most diversified terminal restriction fragments were found at polluted sites. In addition, cluster analysis indicated that although the SRB communities were different at the two polluted sites, they were still more similar to each other than to the two more distant reference sites. Based on a dsrAB clone library constructed at a polluted site, diversified SRB were found, represented by 30 Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs). Upon comparisons among the SRB sequences detected from this study and those in the GenBank, five clades of SRB were found. Three clades belonged to the known families Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophobacteriaceae. The majority of sequenced clones, which distantly related to sequences in the GenBank, constituted the remaining two unclassified groups, suggesting unique SRB members related to the polluted harbor environment. Statistical analyses indicated that estimated SRB richness correlated with environment factors such as sulfur content, acid volatile sulfate, and redox potential.

  6. Determination of selected quaternary ammonium compounds by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. Part II. Application to sediment and sludge samples in Austria.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Carballo, Elena; González-Barreiro, Carmen; Sitka, Andrea; Kreuzinger, Norbert; Scharf, Sigrid; Gans, Oliver

    2007-03-01

    Soxhlet extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry detection (MS/MS) was used for the determination of selected quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) in solid samples. The method was applied for the determination of alkyl benzyl, dialkyl and trialkyl quaternary ammonium compounds in sediment and sludge samples in Austria. The overall method quantification limits range from 0.6 to 3 microg/kg for sediments and from 2 to 5 microg/kg for sewage sludges. Mean recoveries between 67% and 95% are achieved. In general sediments were especially contaminated by C12 chain benzalkonium chloride (BAC-C12) as well as by the long C-chain dialkyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC-C18) with a maximum concentration of 3.6 mg/kg and 2.1mg/kg, respectively. Maxima of 27 mg/kg for DDAC-C10, 25 mg/kg for BAC-C12 and 23 mg/kg for BAC-C14 were determined for sludge samples. The sums of the 12 selected target compounds range from 22 mg/kg to 103 mg/kg in the sludge samples.

  7. Evaluation of Concrete Mixtures for Use in Underwater Repairs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    Review ....... . of This Study Scope ••••••••••••••••••• PART II: EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM Phase I: Concrete Mixture Proportions ....... Phase I...to determine the combination of materials necessary to produce concrete with the desired properties. Significant correlations that exist between...Test Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... Phase II: Concrete Mixture Proportions Phase II: Test Procedures . . . . . . . ..... PART III

  8. Equilibrium passive sampling as a tool to study polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Baltic Sea sediment pore-water systems.

    PubMed

    Lang, Susann-Cathrin; Hursthouse, Andrew; Mayer, Philipp; Kötke, Danjiela; Hand, Ines; Schulz-Bull, Detlef; Witt, Gesine

    2015-12-15

    Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) was applied to provide the first large scale dataset of freely dissolved concentrations for 9 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Baltic Sea sediment cores. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coated glass fibers were used for ex-situ equilibrium sampling followed by automated thermal desorption and GC-MS analysis. From the PAH concentrations in the fiber coating we examined (i) spatially resolved freely dissolved PAH concentrations (Cfree); (ii) baseline toxicity potential on the basis of chemical activities (a); (iii) site specific mixture compositions; (iv) diffusion gradients at the sediment water interface and within the sediment cores and (v) site specific distribution ratios. Contamination levels were low in the northern Baltic Sea, moderate to elevated in the Baltic Proper and highest in the Gulf of Finland. Chemical activities were well below levels expected to cause narcosis to benthos organisms. The SPME method is a very sensitive tool that opens new possibilities for studying the PAHs at trace levels in marine environments.

  9. Human impact on the Middle and Late Holocene floodplain sediment characteristics along the River Rhine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkens, G.; Prins, M.; Toonen, W.

    2012-04-01

    The Rhine catchment has an extensive history of human land use. Deforestation to create arable land started as early as 6300 cal BP, at the onset of the Late Neolithic. This caused increased erosion and sediment production on the hillslopes in the upstream part of the fluvial system. Recent studies show that this human-induced erosion also increased the suspended load sedimentation rates in the Rhine trunk valley and delta from approximately 3000 years ago. Besides such changes in the quantity of fine sediment, it is hypothesised that human land use may also change the source of the sediment supplied to the fluvial system. Sediment released by erosion during agricultural practises may be different than the sediments that erode under conditions of forest cover. If this is true, the Late Holocene floodplain sediments have different characteristics in terms of grain size and texture than older floodplain deposits (Middle Holocene). To test this, we collected 15 cores from three large stretches along the trunk Rhine River: the Upper Rhine Graben, the Lower Rhine Valley, and the Rhine Delta. Using detailed palaeogeographic reconstructions of the area, the cores were carefully selected in order to (i) to obtain the longest possible record (preferably up to 5000 years), and (ii) to have a continuous sedimentation record as much as possible. Cores are taken from residual channels, and distal flood basin and plains, although very distal sites were avoided to minimise the amount of peat or soil formation. Individual age-depth models are derived from radiocarbon dates taken in the cores, correlation of the regional deposits with a known age, and by using groundwater models (in the delta). Grain size characteristics of the siliciclastic sediment fraction were analysed every 2-5 cm, which yielded a record of grain size variations of the floodplains depositions in time. Using the end-member modelling algorithm EMMA it was possible to distinguish different groups of sediment

  10. A feasibility study on Pd/Mg application in historically contaminated sediments and PCB spiked substrates.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shirish; Al-Abed, Souhail R; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2009-12-30

    A vast majority of literature on bimetals deals with aqueous contaminants, very little being on organics strongly adsorbed on sediments and hence very challenging to remediate. Having previously reported materials, mechanistic and parametric aspects of PCB dechlorination with Pd/Mg bimetals, here we evaluate their ability to dechlorinate (i) PCBs spiked in clean clays and sediments and (ii) historically contaminated aged sediments (Waukegan Harbor, WHS). It was determined that while water, as a medium, dechlorinated low surface area clays it was ineffective with high surface area clays and sediments. Dechlorination was governed by desorption of PCBs, hence addition of 10-25% ethanol improved dechlorination performance. Triton X-100, a surfactant, effectively desorbed PCBs from WHS but their dechlorination was not observed. Investigating possible causes, we found that while (i) Pd/Mg completely dechlorinated multi-component commercial PCB mixtures (i.e. complex PCB distribution in WHS did not limit Pd/Mg effectiveness) and (ii) active components in extraction media did not inhibit dechlorination, sulfide in WHS was poisoning Pd, compromising its activity.

  11. Mackinawite (FeS) Reduces Mercury(II) under Sulfidic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxicant of global concern that accumulates in organisms as methyl Hg. The production of methyl Hg by anaerobic bacteria may be limited in anoxic sediments by the sequestration of divalent Hg [Hg(II)] into a solid phase or by the formation of elemental Hg [Hg(0)]. We tested the hypothesis that nanocrystalline mackinawite (tetragonal FeS), which is abundant in sediments where Hg is methylated, both sorbs and reduces Hg(II). Mackinawite suspensions were equilibrated with dissolved Hg(II) in batch reactors. Examination of the solid phase using Hg LIII-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy showed that Hg(II) was indeed reduced in FeS suspensions. Measurement of purgeable Hg using cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS) from FeS suspensions and control solutions corroborated the production of Hg(0) that was observed spectroscopically. However, a fraction of the Hg(II) initially added to the suspensions remained in the divalent state, likely in the form of β-HgS-like clusters associated with the FeS surface or as a mixture of β-HgS and surface-associated species. Complexation by dissolved S(-II) in anoxic sediments hinders Hg(0) formation, but, by contrast, Hg(II)–S(-II) species are reduced in the presence of mackinawite, producing Hg(0) after only 1 h of reaction time. The results of our work support the idea that Hg(0) accounts for a significant fraction of the total Hg in wetland and estuarine sediments. PMID:25180562

  12. Crayfish and fish as bioturbators of streambed sediments: Assessing joint effects of species with different mechanistic abilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statzner, Bernhard; Sagnes, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Many studies illustrate that bioturbating animal species individually affect aquatic sediments through diverse mechanistic abilities, whereas assessments of joint effects of such species on sediments are relatively rare. Such joint effects have implications for real systems, in which different bioturbators coexist, but are difficult to predict for two reasons. First, they can be additive (being the sum of the individual effects of each species) or they can be positive or negative interactive (being greater or smaller than the sum of the individual effects). Second, if interactive, they can depend on biotic interactions that affect the bioturbating activities of the species and/or they can depend on physical interactions among bioturbator-induced sediment modifications. Using experimental streams, we assessed such joint effects on gravel-sand sediments for flow and sediment conditions preferred by barbel ( Barbus barbus) but also used by gudgeon ( Gobio gobio) and, in a second experiment, for flow and sediment conditions preferred by both male crayfish ( Orconectes limosus) and gudgeon. These species have different mechanistic abilities to affect gravel and/or sand in stream beds. In each experiment, we measured (i) the transport of gravel and sand at baseflow (during 12 experimental days); (ii) four sediment surface characteristics (after 12 d); and (iii) the critical shear stress ( τc) causing incipient gravel and sand motion during experimental floods (after 12 d). Gudgeon contributed differently to the joint effects in the two experiments, which related to its individual weight, prevailing baseflow shear stress, sediment particle weight, and sediment mixture (availability of surface sand). Overall, the species pairs had predominantly negative interactive joint effects on the sediment variables assessed by us. Both a literature survey and observations during the experiments provided no evidence for direct biotic interactions between barbel and gudgeon or

  13. I. Cognitive and instructional factors relating to students' development of personal models of chemical systems in the general chemistry laboratory II. Solvation in supercritical carbon dioxide/ethanol mixtures studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, Seth

    likely to appear in students' post-laboratory refined models. These discussions during the laboratory period are primarily prompted by factors external to the students or their laboratory groups such as questions posed by the instructor or laboratory materials. Part II. Solvation of polar molecules within non-polar supercritical carbon dioxide is often facilitated by the introduction of polar cosolvents as entrainers, which are believed to preferentially surround solute molecules. Molecular dynamics simulations of supercritical carbon dioxide/ethanol mixtures reveal that ethanol molecules form hydrogen-bonded aggregates of varying sizes and structures, with cyclic tetramers and pentamers being unusually prevalent. The dynamics of ethanol molecules within these mixtures at a range of thermodynamic conditions can largely be explained by differences in size and structure in these aggregates. Simulations that include solute molecules reveal enhancement of the polar cosolvent around hydrogen-bonding sites on the solute molecules, corroborating and helping to explain previously reported experimental trends in solute mobility.

  14. Alteration of organic matter during infaunal polychaete gut passage and links to sediment organic geochemistry. Part II: Fatty acids and aldoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulds, Clare; Middelburg, Jack J.; Cowie, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    The activities of sediment-dwelling fauna are known to influence the rates of and pathways through which organic matter is cycled in marine sediments, and thus to influence eventual organic carbon burial or decay. However, due to methodological constraints, the role of faunal gut passage in determining the subsequent composition and thus degradability of organic matter is relatively little studied. Previous studies of organic matter digestion by benthic fauna have been unable to detect uptake and retention of specific biochemicals in faunal tissues, and have been of durations too short to fit digestion into the context of longer-term sedimentary degradation processes. Therefore this study aimed to investigate the aldose and fatty acid compositional alterations occurring to organic matter during gut passage by the abundant and ubiquitous polychaetes Hediste diversicolor and Arenicola marina, and to link these to longer-term changes typically observed during organic matter decay. This aim was approached through microcosm experiments in which selected polychaetes were fed with 13C-labelled algal detritus, and organisms, sediments, and faecal pellets were sampled at three timepoints over ∼6 weeks. Samples were analysed for their 13C-labelled aldose and fatty acid contents using GC-MS and GC-IRMS. Compound-selective net accumulation of biochemicals in polychaete tissues was observed for both aldoses and fatty acids, and the patterns of this were taxon-specific. The dominant patterns included an overall loss of glucose and polyunsaturated fatty acids; and preferential preservation or production of arabinose, microbial compounds (rhamnose, fucose and microbial fatty acids), and animal-synthesised fatty acids. These patterns may have been driven by fatty acid essentiality, preferential metabolism of glucose, and A. marina grazing on bacteria. Fatty acid suites in sediments from faunated microcosms showed greater proportions of saturated fatty acids and bacterial markers

  15. Mathematical Model of Estuarial Sediment Transport.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-10-01

    NUMBERS» Contract No. ^Ar DACW39-75-C-0080 ^^ 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS Department of Civil Engineering...The original model, SEDIMENT I, was verified by comparison with measurements in a recirculating flume. The modified model, SEDIMENT II, developed for... organic matter from contiguous drainage areas, and waste materials. Clay minerals are hydrated aluminum silicates in a layer lattice crystal

  16. Investigation of natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon inputs in sediments using geochemical markers. II. Sao Sebastião, SP--Brazil.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Patricia Matheus; Bícego, Márcia Caruso

    2004-12-01

    The São Sebastião Channel, NE São Paulo State, Brazil, is an area of environmental interest of that state not only because of the tourism, but also because of the presence of the most important oil terminal of Brazil, the PETROBRAS Maritime Terminal (DTCS). Sediment samples were collected at 15 sites in the channel, extracted and analyzed by GC/FID and GC/MS for composition and levels of the following organic geochemical markers: aliphatic hydrocarbons (normal and isoprenoid alkanes), petroleum biomarkers, linear alkylbenzenes (LABs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The total concentrations varied from 0.04 to 8.53 micorg g(-1) for aliphatics, from 51.1 to 422.0 ng g(-1) for petroleum biomarkers, from 12.6 to 27.7 ng g(-1) for LABs and from 20.4 to 200.3 ng g(-1) for PAHs. The PETROBRAS Maritime Terminal (DTCS), Sao Sebastião Harbor and sewage outfalls along the area had clear influences on the geochemical marker concentrations, especially at locales in the central and north parts of the channel.

  17. Permissive tracts for sediment-hosted lead-zinc-silver deposits in Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 72): Chapter J1 in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Horton, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This report contains the USGS results of the PRISM-II Mauritania Minerals Project and is presented in cooperation with the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. The Report is composed of separate chapters consisting of multidisciplinary interpretive reports with accompanying plates on the geology, structure, geochronology, geophysics, hydrogeology, geochemistry, remote sensing (Landsat TM and ASTER), and SRTM and ASTER digital elevation models of Mauritania. The syntheses of these multidisciplinary data formed the basis for additional chapters containing interpretive reports on 12 different commodities and deposit types known to occur in Mauritania, accompanied by countrywide mineral resource potential maps of each commodity/deposit type. The commodities and deposit types represented include: (1) Ni, Cu, PGE, and Cr deposits hosted in ultramafic rocks; (2) orogenic, Carlin-like, and epithermal gold deposits; (3) polymetallic Pb-Zn-Cu vein deposits; (4) sediment-hosted Pb-Zn-Ag deposits of the SEDEX and Mississippi Valley-type; (5) sediment-hosted copper deposits; ( 6) volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits; (7) iron oxide copper-gold deposits; (8) uranium deposits; (9) Algoma-, Superior-, and oolitic-type iron deposits; (10) shoreline Ti-Zr placer deposits; (11) incompatible element deposits hosted in pegmatites, alkaline rocks, and carbonatites, and; (12) industrial mineral deposits. Additional chapters include the Mauritanian National Mineral Deposits Database are accompanied by an explanatory text and the Mauritania Minerals Project GIS that contains all of the interpretive layers created by USGS scientists. Raw data not in the public domain may be obtained from the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines in Nouakchott, Mauritania.

  18. Targeting sediment management strategies using sediment quantification and fingerprinting methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Phil; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2016-04-01

    Cost-effective sediment management is required to reduce excessive delivery of fine sediment due to intensive land uses such as agriculture, resulting in the degradation of aquatic ecosystems. Prioritising measures to mitigate dominant sediment sources is, however, challenging, as sediment loss risk is spatially and temporally variable between and within catchments. Fluctuations in sediment supply from potential sources result from variations in land uses resulting in increased erodibility where ground cover is low (e.g., cultivated, poached and compacted soils), and physical catchment characteristics controlling hydrological connectivity and transport pathways (surface and/or sub-surface). Sediment fingerprinting is an evidence-based management tool to identify sources of in-stream sediments at the catchment scale. Potential sediment sources are related to a river sediment sample, comprising a mixture of source sediments, using natural physico-chemical characteristics (or 'tracers'), and contributions are statistically un-mixed. Suspended sediment data were collected over two years at the outlet of three intensive agricultural catchments (approximately 10 km2) in Ireland. Dominant catchment characteristics were grassland on poorly-drained soils, arable on well-drained soils and arable on moderately-drained soils. High-resolution (10-min) calibrated turbidity-based suspended sediment and discharge data were combined to quantify yield. In-stream sediment samples (for fingerprinting analysis) were collected at six to twelve week intervals, using time-integrated sediment samplers. Potential sources, including stream channel banks, ditches, arable and grassland field topsoils, damaged road verges and tracks were sampled, oven-dried (<40oC) and sieved (125 microns). Soil and sediment samples were analysed for mineral magnetics, geochemistry and radionuclide tracers, particle size distribution and soil organic carbon. Tracer data were corrected to account for particle

  19. Determination of sediment provenance by unmixing the mineralogy of source-area sediments: The "SedUnMix" program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, John T.; Eberl, D.D.

    2012-01-01

    Along the margins of areas such as Greenland and Baffin Bay, sediment composition reflects a complex mixture of sources associated with the transport of sediment in sea ice, icebergs, melt-water and turbidite plumes. Similar situations arise in many contexts associated with sediment transport and with the mixing of sediments from different source areas. The question is: can contributions from discrete sediment (bedrock) sources be distinguished in a mixed sediment by using mineralogy, and, if so, how accurately? To solve this problem, four end-member source sediments were mixed in various proportions to form eleven artificial mixtures. Two of the end-member sediments are felsic, and the other two have more mafic compositions. End member and mixed sediment mineralogies were measured for the < 2. mm sediment fractions by quantitative X-ray diffraction (qXRD). The proportions of source sediments in the mixtures then were calculated using an Excel macro program named SedUnMix, and the results were evaluated to determine the robustness of the algorithm. The program permits the unmixing of up to six end members, each of which can be represented by up to 5 alternative compositions, so as to better simulate variability within each source region. The results indicate that we can track the relative percentages of the four end members in the mixtures. We recommend, prior to applying the technique to down-core or to other provenance problems, that a suite of known, artificial mixtures of sediments from probable source areas be prepared, scanned, analyzed for quantitative mineralogy, and then analyzed by SedUnMix to check the sensitivity of the method for each specific unmixing problem. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V..

  20. METHOD FOR TESTING THE AQUATIC TOXICITY OF SEDIMENT EXTRACTS FOR USE IN IDENTIFYING ORGANIC TOXICANTS IN SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biologically-directed fractionation techniques are a fundamental tool for identifying the cause of toxicity in environmental samples, but few are available for studying mixtures of organic chemicals in aquatic sediments. This paper describes a method for extracting organic chemic...

  1. Symmetric normal mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turmon, Michael

    2004-01-01

    We consider mixture density estimation under the symmetry constraint x = Az for an orthogonal matrix A. This distributional constraint implies a corresponding constraint on the mixture parameters. Focusing on the gaussian case, we derive an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm to enforce the constraint and show results for modeling of image feature vectors.

  2. On the abiotic formation of amino acids. I - HCN as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. II - Formation of HCN and amino acids from simulated mixtures of gases released from lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuasa, S.; Flory, D.; Basile, B.; Oro, J.

    1984-01-01

    Two studies on the abiotic formation of amino acids are presented. The first study demonstrates the role of hydrogen cyanide as a precursor of amino acids detected in extracts of lunar samples. The formation of several amino acids, including glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid, under conditions similar to those used for the analysis of lunar samples is demonstrated. The second study investigates the formation of hydrogen cyanide as well as amino acids from lunar-sample gas mixtures under electrical discharge conditions. These results extend the possibility of synthesis of amino acids to planetary bodies with primordial atmospheres less reducing than a mixture of methane, ammonia, hydrogen and water.

  3. Near azeotropic mixture substitute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention comprises a refrigerant mixture consisting of a first mole fraction of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (R134a) and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124); a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a) and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b); and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 (R124), CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 (R142b) and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 (R152a).

  4. Fluvial sediments a summary of source, transportation, deposition, and measurement of sediment discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colby, B.R.

    1963-01-01

    continuously at about the velocity of the flow, and even low flows can transport large amounts of fine sediment. Hence, the discharge of fine sediments, being largely dependent on the availability of fine sediment upstream rather than on the properties of the sediment and of the flow at a cross section, can seldom be computed from properties, other than concentrations based directly on samples, that can be observed at the cross section. Sediment particles continually change their positions in the flow; some fall to the streambed, and others are removed from the bed. Sediment deposits form locally or over large areas if the volume rate at which particles settle to the bed exceeds the volume rate at which particles are removed from the bed. In general, large particles are deposited more readily than small particles, whether the point of deposition is behind a rock, on a flood plain, within a stream channel, or at the entrance to a reservoir, a lake, or the ocean. Most samplers used for sediment observations collect a water-sediment mixture from the water surface to within a few tenths of a foot of the streambed. They thus sample most of the suspended sediment, especially if the flow is deep or if the sediment is mostly fine; but they exclude the bedload and some of the suspended sediment in a layer near the streambed where the suspended-sediment concentrations are highest. Measured sediment discharges are usually based on concentrations that are averages of several individual sediment samples for a cross section. If enough average concentrations for a cross section have been determined, the measured sediment discharge can be computed by interpolating sediment concentrations between sampling times. If only occasional samples were collected, an average relation between sediment discharge and flow can be used with a flow-duration curve to compute roughly the average or the total sediment discharges for any periods of time for which the flow-duration c

  5. Sediment Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment toxicity testing has become a fundamental component of regulatory frameworks for assessing the risks posed by contaminated sediments and for development of chemical sediment quality guidelines. Over the past two decades, sediment toxicity testing methods have advanced co...

  6. Oxygen isotope ratios (18O/16O) of hemicellulose-derived sugar biomarkers in plants, soils and sediments as paleoclimate proxy II: Insight from a climate transect study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthorn, Mario; Zech, Michael; Ruppenthal, Marc; Oelmann, Yvonne; Kahmen, Ansgar; Valle, Héctor Francisco del; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Glaser, Bruno

    2014-02-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18Oprec) is well known to be a valuable (paleo-)climate proxy. Paleosols and sediments and hemicelluloses therein have the potential to serve as archives recording the isotopic composition of paleoprecipitation. In a companion paper (Zech et al., 2014) we investigated δ18Ohemicellulose values of plants grown under different climatic conditions in a climate chamber experiment. Here we present results of compound-specific δ18O analyses of arabinose, fucose and xylose extracted from modern topsoils (n = 56) along a large humid-arid climate transect in Argentina in order to answer the question whether hemicellulose biomarkers in soils reflect δ18Oprec. The results from the field replications indicate that the homogeneity of topsoils with regard to δ18Ohemicellulose is very high for most of the 20 sampling sites. Standard deviations for the field replications are 1.5‰, 2.2‰ and 1.7‰, for arabinose, fucose and xylose, respectively. Furthermore, all three hemicellulose biomarkers reveal systematic and similar trends along the climate gradient. However, the δ18Ohemicellulose values (mean of the three sugars) do not correlate positively with δ18Oprec (r = -0.54, p < 0.014, n = 20). By using a Péclet-modified Craig-Gordon (PMCG) model it can be shown that the δ18Ohemicellulose values correlate highly significantly with modeled δ18Oleaf water values (r = 0.81, p < 0.001, n = 20). This finding suggests that hemicellulose biomarkers in (paleo-)soils do not simply reflect δ18Oprec but rather δ18Oprec altered by evaporative 18O enrichment of leaf water due to evapotranspiration. According to the modeling results, evaporative 18O enrichment of leaf water is relatively low (˜10‰) in the humid northern part of the Argentinian transect and much higher (up to 19‰) in the arid middle and southern part of the transect. Model sensitivity tests corroborate that changes in relative air humidity exert a dominant

  7. Interactions between microbial iron reduction and metal geochemistry: effect of redox cycling on transition metal speciation in iron bearing sediments.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D Craig; Picardal, Flynn F; Coby, Aaron J

    2006-03-15

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respectto Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a -3x increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by approximately 12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These

  8. Nitrogen cycling between sediment and the shallow-water column in the transition zone of the Potomac River and Estuary. II. The role of wind-driven resuspension and adsorbed ammonium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, N.S.

    1989-01-01

    During periods of sediment resuspension, desorption of ammonium from sediment solids can be the major pathway for enriching the water column with the ammonium that is produced by bacterial degradation of organic matter in the bottom material. This hyopthesis is based on a three-year study of diffusive flux in the transition zone of the Potomac River at a site 35 m from the Virginia shore where the average water-column depth is approximately 1 m over sandy sediment. A diffusion-controlled sampler was used to collect water samples at the interface between the water column and sediment and at several tens of centimeters into the sediment. Interstitial water concentration gradients showed that diffusive flux of ammonium from the sandy shallow-water sediments was approximately 1% of the diffusive flux of ammonium from the silty channel sediments in the same zone of the Potomac River. Organic nitrogen and bound or adsorbed ammonium were the predominant nitrogen forms in the sediment. Adsorbed ammonium concentrations ranged from nondetectable to 3??7 ??mol g-1 of sediment. Concentrations of adsorbed ammonium per gram of sediment were one to three orders of magnitude more than interstitial water ammonium concentrations. Desorption of ammonium from sediment solids appeared to be the controlling factor in the degree of water-column ammonium enrichment. In laboratory experiments that simulated sediment resuspension, 40-80% of the adsorbed ammonium predicted to desorb did so after approximately 30 min of mixing. Based on calculations for 1 m2 to a depth of 4 cm, one resuspenion event lasting minutes could mix more ammonium into the water column from desorption of ammonium from sediment solids than could be delivered to the water column by diffusive flux from shallow-water sediments in 10-1000 days and would be comparable to enrichment by ammonium diffusive flux for 5-50 days from channel sediments in the same river zone. ?? 1989.

  9. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels.

  10. Physical properties of sediment containing methane gas hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.

    2005-01-01

    A study conducted by the US Geological Survey (USGS) on the formation, behavior, and properties of mixtures of gas hydrate and sediment is presented. The results show that the properties of host material influence the type and quantity of hydrates formed. The presence of hydrate during mechanical shear tests affects the measured sediment pore pressure. Sediment shear strength may be increased more than 500 percent by intact hydrate, but greatly weakened if the hydrate dissociates.

  11. SEPARATION OF FLUID MIXTURES

    DOEpatents

    Lipscomb, R.; Craig, A.; Labrow, S.; Dunn, J.F.

    1958-10-28

    An apparatus is presented for separating gaseous mixtures by selectively freezing a constituent of the mixture and subsequently separating the frozen gas. The gas mixture is passed through a cylinder fltted with a cooling jacket, causing one gas to freeze on the walls of the cylinder. A set of scraper blades are provided in the interior of the cyllnder, and as the blades oscillate, the frozen gas is scraped to the bottom of the cylinder. Means are provided for the frozen material to pass into a heating chamber where it is vaporized and the product gas collected.

  12. Mechanical and chemical properties of composite materials made of dredged sediments in a fly-ash based geopolymer.

    PubMed

    Lirer, S; Liguori, B; Capasso, I; Flora, A; Caputo, D

    2017-04-15

    Dredging activity in harbours and channels produces huge quantities of sediments, generally considered as waste soil (WS) to be disposed: the management of such sediments is a great environmental problem for many countries worldwide. Among the recycling possibilities, the use of dredged sediments for the manufacture of geopolymer-based materials seems to be an interesting alternative to disposal, due to their low cost and easy availability. In order to analyse the possibility to use these geopolymer materials as building materials - for instance as precast construction elements in maritime projects - a multi-disciplinary research activity has been developed at the Federico II University of Napoli (Italy). Some experimental tests have been carried out on different geopolymeric specimens made by mixing sediments from Napoli 'harbour and industrial fly ashes produced by a power plant in the South of Italy. A siliceous sand was used for comparison as an inert reference material. Chemical, morphological and mechanical properties of different specimens have been studied by X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and finally unconfined compression tests. The experimental results highlight that the use of dredged sediments in combination with fly ash can lead to geopolymeric matrices with interesting mechanical performances. Some differences in the microstructure of the geocomposite built with the siliceous sand or the dredged materials were found. In terms of environmental impacts, on the basis of standard leaching tests and according to Italian thresholds, the adopted dredged mixtures satisfy the prescribed limit for inert or non hazardous waste.

  13. Devices, systems, and methods for conducting assays with improved sensitivity using sedimentation

    DOEpatents

    Schaff, Ulrich Y.; Koh, Chung-Yan; Sommer, Gregory J.

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, systems, and method for conducting assays using sedimentation. In one example, a method includes layering a mixture on a density medium, subjecting sedimentation particles in the mixture to sedimentation forces to cause the sedimentation particles to move to a detection area through a density medium, and detecting a target analyte in a detection region of the sedimentation channel. In some examples, the sedimentation particles and labeling agent may have like charges to reduce non-specific binding of labeling agent and sedimentation particles. In some examples, the density medium is provided with a separation layer for stabilizing the assay during storage and operation. In some examples, the sedimentation channel may be provided with a generally flat sedimentation chamber for dispersing the particle pellet over a larger surface area.

  14. Devices, systems, and methods for conducting assays with improved sensitivity using sedimentation

    DOEpatents

    Schaff, Ulrich Y; Koh, Chung-Yan; Sommer, Gregory J

    2015-02-24

    Embodiments of the present invention are directed toward devices, systems, and method for conducting assays using sedimentation. In one example, a method includes layering a mixture on a density medium, subjecting sedimentation particles in the mixture to sedimentation forces to cause the sedimentation particles to move to a detection area through a density medium, and detecting a target analyte in a detection region of the sedimentation channel. In some examples, the sedimentation particles and labeling agent may have like charges to reduce non-specific binding of labeling agent and sedimentation particles. In some examples, the density medium is provided with a separation layer for stabilizing the assay during storage and operation. In some examples, the sedimentation channel may be provided with a generally flat sedimentation chamber for dispersing the particle pellet over a larger surface area.

  15. Size of Suspended Sediment over Dunes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Samples of suspended sediment were collected at four elevations simultaneously over two-dimensional mobile dunes in two mixtures of 0.5 mm sand in a laboratory flume channel. A constant sampling position relative to the dunes was maintained by adjusting the translation rate of the sampling carriage...

  16. Toxic effect of metal cation binary mixtures to the seaweed Gracilaria domingensis (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luiz Fernando; Stevani, Cassius Vinicius; Zambotti-Villela, Leonardo; Yokoya, Nair Sumie; Colepicolo, Pio

    2014-01-01

    The macroalga Gracilaria domingensis is an important resource for the food, pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and biotechnology industries. G. domingensis is at a part of the food web foundation, providing nutrients and microelements to upper levels. As seaweed storage metals in the vacuoles, they are considered the main vectors to magnify these toxic elements. This work describes the evaluation of the toxicity of binary mixtures of available metal cations based on the growth rates of G. domingensis over a 48-h exposure. The interactive effects of each binary mixture were determined using a toxic unit (TU) concept that was the sum of the relative contribution of each toxicant and calculated using the ratio between the toxicant concentration and its endpoint. Mixtures of Cd(II)/Cu(II) and Zn(II)/Ca(II) demonstrated to be additive; Cu(II)/Zn(II), Cu(II)/Mg(II), Cu(II)/Ca(II), Zn(II)/Mg(II), and Ca(II)/Mg(II) mixtures were synergistic, and all interactions studied with Cd(II) were antagonistic. Hypotheses that explain the toxicity of binary mixtures at the molecular level are also suggested. These results represent the first effort to characterize the combined effect of available metal cations, based on the TU concept on seaweed in a total controlled medium. The results presented here are invaluable to the understanding of seaweed metal cation toxicity in the marine environment, the mechanism of toxicity action and how the tolerance of the organism.

  17. Carbonaceous materials water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Papalos, J.G.; Sinka, J.V.

    1985-04-30

    Particulate carbonaceous materials water mixtures are prepared by adding a condensate which is a condensation product of an aldehyde having from about 1 to about 7 carbon atoms, a benzene derivative such as benzene sulfonic acid, an alkyl benzene sulfonic acid having at least one alkyl group of from about 1 to about 20 carbon atoms and mixtures thereof, and optionally, and a naphthalene derivative such as naphthalene sulfonic acid, an alkyl naphthalene sulfonic acid having at least one alkyl group of from about 1 to about 12 carbon atoms and mixtures thereof. The condensate is added in an amount sufficient to reduce viscosity of the water mixture of carbonaceous materials, to stabilize carbonaceous materials in the water network and to improve pumpability. An acid form of the condensate or a salt may be added.

  18. Beyond the second virial coefficient: Sedimentation equilibrium in highly non-ideal solutions.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Germán; Minton, Allen P

    2011-05-01

    The general theory of sedimentation equilibrium (SE), applicable to mixtures of interacting sedimentable solutes at arbitrary concentration, is summarized. Practical techniques for the acquisition of SE data suitable for analysis are described. Experimental measurements and analyses of SE in concentrated protein solutions are reviewed. The method of non-ideal tracer sedimentation equilibrium (NITSE) is described. Experimental studies using NITSE to detect and quantitatively characterize intermolecular interactions in mixtures of dilute tracer species and concentrated proteins or polymers are reviewed.

  19. Oxic and Anoxic Regions of Subseafloor Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Hondt, S.; Pockalny, R. A.; Spivack, A. J.; Inagaki, F.; Murray, R. W.; Adhikari, R. R.; Gribsholt, B.; Kallmeyer, J.; McKinley, C. C.; Morono, Y.; Røy, H.; Sauvage, J.; Ziebis, W.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved oxygen content defines two broad categories of subseafloor sediment. In areas with high rates of microbial respiration, most of the sediment column is anoxic and active anaerobic microbial communities are present for hundreds of meters or more below the seafloor. In these regions, O2 and aerobic communities penetrate only millimeters to centimeters into the sediment from the sediment-water interface. In some areas of active fluid flow through the underlying basalt, O2 may also penetrate meters upward into the sediment from the basalt. In areas with low sedimentary respiration, O2 and aerobic communities penetrate tens of meters downward from the seafloor and may persist throughout the entire sediment column. IODP Expedition 329 showed that microbial cells and aerobic respiration persist through the entire sediment sequence (to depths of at least 75 meters below seafloor) in the South Pacific Gyre. Extrapolating from these results and a global relationship of O2 penetration depth to sedimentation rate and sediment thickness, we suggest that oxygen and aerobic communities occur throughout the entire sediment sequence in 15-44% of the Pacific and 9-37% of the global seafloor. Subduction of sediment from largely anoxic regions and subduction of sediment and basalt from fully oxic regions are respectively sources of reduced and oxidized material to the mantle. The balance between oxic and anoxic regions has presumably changed considerably throughout Earth history. Regions with largely anoxic sediment and regions with fully oxic sediment present fundamentally different opportunities for understanding of (i) paleoceanographic history and (ii) the nature of microbial life under extreme energy limitations.

  20. Condensate Mixtures and Tunneling

    SciTech Connect

    Timmermans, E.

    1998-09-14

    The experimental study of condensate mixtures is a particularly exciting application of the recently developed atomic-trap Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) technology: such multiple condensates represent the first laboratory systems of distinguishable boson superfluid mixtures. In addition, as the authors point out in this paper, the possibility of inter-condensate tunneling greatly enhances the richness of the condensate mixture physics. Not only does tunneling give rise to the oscillating particle currents between condensates of different chemical potentials, such as those studied extensively in the condensed matter Josephson junction experiments, it also affects the near-equilibrium dynamics and stability of the condensate mixtures. In particular, the stabilizing influence of tunneling with respect to spatial separation (phase separation) could be of considerable practical importance to the atomic trap systems. Furthermore, the creation of mixtures of atomic and molecular condensates could introduce a novel type of tunneling process, involving the conversion of a pair of atomic condensate bosons into a single molecular condensate boson. The static description of condensate mixtures with such type of pair tunneling suggests the possibility of observing dilute condensates with the liquid-like property of a self-determined density.

  1. Immobilization of cobalt by sulfate-reducing bacteria in subsurface sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krumholz, Lee R.; Elias, Dwayne A.; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the impact of sulfate-reduction on immobilization of metals in subsurface aquifers. Co 2+ was used as a model for heavy metals. Factors limiting sulfate-reduction dependent Co 2+ immobilization were tested on pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria, and in sediment columns from a landfill leachate contaminated aquifer. In the presence of 1 mM Co 2+ , the growth of pure cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria was not impacted. Cultures of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Desulfotomaculum gibsoniae , and Desulfomicrobium hypogeia removed greater than 99.99% of the soluble Co 2+ when CoCl 2 was used with no chelators. The above cultures and Desulfoarcula baarsi removed 98-99.94% of the soluble Co(II) when the metal was complexed with the model ligand nitrilotriacetate (Co-NTA). Factors controlling the rate of sulfate-reduction based Co 2+ precipitation were investigated in sediment-cobalt mixtures. Several electron donors were tested and all but toluene accelerated soluble Co 2+ loss. Ethanol and formate showed the greatest stimulation. All complex nitrogen sources tested slowed and decreased the extent of Co 2+ removal from solution relative to formate-amended sediment incubations. A range of pH values were tested (6.35-7.81), with the more alkaline incubations exhibiting the largest precipitation of Co 2+ . The immobilization of Co 2+ in sediments was also investigated with cores to monitor the flow of Co 2+ through undisturbed sediments. An increase in the amount of Co 2+ immobilized as CoS was observed as sulfate reduction activity was stimulated in flow through columns. Both pure culture and sediment incubation data indicate that stimulation of sulfate reduction is a viable strategy in the immobilization of contaminating metals in subsurface systems.

  2. Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

    2009-09-27

    Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

  3. Determining the Porosity and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity of Binary Mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Keller, Jason M.

    2011-02-14

    Gravels and coarse sands make up significant portions of some environmentally important sediments, while the hydraulic properties of the sediments are typically obtained in the laboratory using only the fine fraction (e.g., <2 mm or 4.75 mm). Researchers have found that the content of gravel has significant impacts on the hydraulic properties of the bulk soils. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure the porosity and the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures with different fractions of coarse and fine components. We proposed a mixing-coefficient model to estimate the porosity and a power-averaging method to determine the effective particle diameter and further to predict the saturated hydraulic conductivity of binary mixtures. The proposed methods could well estimate the porosity and saturated hydraulic conductivity of the binary mixtures for the full range of gravel contents and was successfully applied to two data sets in the literature.

  4. Identifying indicators of reactivity for chemical reductants in sediments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huichun; Weber, Eric J

    2013-07-02

    To conduct site-specific exposure assessments for contaminants containing reducible functional groups, it is imperative to know the identity and reactivity of chemical reductants in natural sediments and to associate their reactivity with easily measurable sediment properties. For this purpose the reactivity, as defined by pseudofirst order reduction rate constants for p-cyanonitrobenzene (pCNB), was measured in twenty-one natural sediments of different origins that were incubated to attain both anoxic (less reducing) and anaerobic (microbially reducing) conditions. The reactivity of the anoxic sediments increased with pH and an increasing amount of Fe(II) added. A good electron balance between pCNB reduction and Fe(II) consumption was observed for anaerobic sediments of high solids loading (50 g/L), but not when solids loading was 5 g/L. Based on cluster and regression analysis, pCNB reactivity in the anaerobic sediments correlates strongly with aqueous Fe(II) concentrations for sediments with low organic carbon (OC) content (<4.2%), but with dissolved OC concentrations (DOC) for the sediments with high OC content (>6.4%). These observations indicate surface-associated Fe(II) and reduced DOC are the predominant reductants in the anaerobic sediments, and that aqueous Fe(II) and DOC will serve as readily measurable indicators of pCNB reactivity in these systems.

  5. Mixture toxicity of the antiviral drug Tamiflu((R)) (oseltamivir ethylester) and its active metabolite oseltamivir acid.

    PubMed

    Escher, Beate I; Bramaz, Nadine; Lienert, Judit; Neuwoehner, Judith; Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2010-02-18

    Tamiflu (oseltamivir ethylester) is an antiviral agent for the treatment of influenza A and B. The pro-drug Tamiflu is converted in the human body to the pharmacologically active metabolite, oseltamivir acid, with a yield of 75%. Oseltamivir acid is indirectly photodegradable and slowly biodegradable in sewage works and sediment/water systems. A previous environmental risk assessment has concluded that there is no bioaccumulation potential of either of the compounds. However, little was known about the ecotoxicity of the metabolite. Ester hydrolysis typically reduces the hydrophobicity and thus the toxicity of a compound. In this case, a zwitterionic, but overall neutral species is formed from the charged parent compound. If the speciation and predicted partitioning into biological membranes is considered, the metabolite may have a relevant contribution to the overall toxicity. These theoretical considerations triggered a study to investigate the toxicity of oseltamivir acid (OA), alone and in binary mixtures with its parent compound oseltamivir ethylester (OE). OE and OA were found to be baseline toxicants in the bioluminescence inhibition test with Vibrio fischeri. Their mixture effect lay between predictions for concentration addition and independent action for the mixture ratio excreted in urine and nine additional mixture ratios of OE and OA. In contrast, OE was an order of magnitude more toxic than OA towards algae, with a more pronounced effect when the direct inhibition of photosystem II was used as toxicity endpoint opposed to the 24h growth rate endpoint. The binary mixtures in this assay yielded experimental mixture effects that agreed with predictions for independent action. This is consistent with the finding that OE exhibits slightly enhanced toxicity, while OA acts as baseline toxicant. Therefore, with respect to mixture classification, the two compounds can be considered as acting according to different modes of toxic action, although there are

  6. Repair, Evaluation, Maintenance, and Rehabilitation Research Program: Evaluation of Concrete Mixtures for Use in Underwater Repairs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    19. ABSTRACT (Continued). ,&The results of these tests were used to determine the combination of materials necessary to produce concrete with the...19 Phase I: Concrete Mixture Proportions..............................19 Phase I: Test Procedures...20 Phase II: Concrete Mixture Proportions.............................20 Phase II: Test Procedures..........................................21

  7. Sediment from Agricultural Constructed Wetland Immobilizes Soil Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Johanna; Uusitalo, Risto; Leppänen, Janette; Yli-Halla, Markku

    2017-03-01

    Phosphorus (P) losses from agricultural soils impair the quality of receiving surface waters by enhancing eutrophication. This study tested the potential of using sediment from agricultural constructed wetlands (CWs) to immobilize soil P using two soils differing in texture and soil test P (STP). A silty clay soil (SIC) with high STP (24 mg ammonium acetate-extractable P [P] L) and a sandy loam soil (SL) with excessive STP (210 mg P L) were incubated with increasing amounts of clayey CW sediment. The soil-sediment mixtures were studied with the quantity/intensity (Q/I) technique, using chemical extractions, and by exposing the mixtures to simulated rainfall. In both Q/I and simulated rainfall tests, P solubility steadily decreased with increasing sediment proportion in the mixtures. However, in chemical extractions this effect was observed only at high sediment addition rates (10 or 50% [v/v] sediment). At a practically feasible sediment addition rate of 5%, dissolved reactive P (DRP) in percolating water from simulated rainfall decreased by 55% in SIC and by 54% in SL ( < 0.001 in both cases). Particulate P (PP) also showed a decreasing trend with increasing sediment addition rate. Upon prolonged simulated rainfall, the decreasing effect of sediment on DRP and PP declined somewhat. The effects of sediment addition can be attributed partly to increased salt concentrations in the sediment, which have a short-term effect on P mobilization, but mostly to increased concentrations of Al and Fe (hydr)oxides, increasing long-term P sorption capacity. Adding CW sediment at a rate of up to 5% of surface soil volume to soils could provide an alternative to chemical treatment (e.g., with metal salts) for immobilizing P in small, high-risk P leaching areas, such as around drinking troughs in pastures.

  8. Sequestration of nonylphenol in sediment from Bohai Bay, North China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Fen; Hu, Jianying; Liu, Jinlin; Yang, Min; Wang, Fu; Wang, Hong

    2008-02-01

    The ubiquity of nonylphenol (NP) in aquatic environments has been well documented, and the long-term fate of NP in sediments is a concern from the viewpoint of risk assessment due to its endocrine-disrupting effects. This paper reports on the assessment of long-term fate of NP in marine sediments by determining extractable and nonextractable fractions of NP in surface sediments and a sediment core from Bohai Bay, North China. The extractable fraction was operationally defined as the fraction of NP that was extracted with a solvent mixture of methanol/methylene chloride, and the nonextractable fraction was the portion of NP that can be released from the sediments by alkaline hydrolyzing after the initial solvent extraction. The total concentrations (extractable and nonextractable) of NP were 3.4-34.3 ng/g dw in the surface sediments and 2.2-17.7 ng/g dw in the sediment core. Depending on the sedimentation time, the percentage of nonextractable NP relative to the total NP in the core ranged from 38 to 99%. Based on the relationship between the percentage of nonextractable NP in sediments and sedimentation time, the sequestration rate of NP in the sediment core from Bohai Bay was estimated to be 0.94% x a(-1). These results have important implications in understanding the geochemical fate of NP in sediments.

  9. Spectral characterization of coastal sediments using Field Spectral Libraries, Airborne Hyperspectral Images and Topographic LiDAR Data (FHyL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Ciro; Valentini, Emiliana; Taramelli, Andrea; Filipponi, Federico; Disperati, Leonardo

    2015-04-01

    Beach dune systems are important for coastal zone ecosystems as they provide natural sea defences that dissipate wave energy. Geomorphological models of this near-shore topography require site-specific sediment composition, grain size and moisture content as inputs. Hyperspectral, field radiometry and LiDAR remote sensing can be used as tools by providing synoptic maps of these properties. However, multi-remote sensing of near-shore beach images can only be interpreted if there are adequate bio-geophysical or empirical models for information extraction. Our aim was thus to model the effects of varying sediment properties on the reflectance in both field and laboratory conditions within the FHyL (Field Spectral Libraries, Airborne Hyperspectral Images and Topographic LiDAR) procedure, using a multisource dataset (airborne Hyperspectral - MIVIS and topographic LiDAR - Hawk-eye II and field radiometry). The methodology consisted of (i) acquisition of simultaneous multi-source datasets (airborne Hyperspectral - MIVIS and topographic LiDAR - Hawk-eye) (ii) hyperspectral measurements of sediment mixtures with varying physical characteristics (moisture, grain size and minerals) in field and laboratory conditions, (iii) determination and quantification of specific absorption features, and (iv) correlation between the absorption features and physical parameters cited above. Results showed the potential of hyperspectral signals to assess the effect of moisture, grain-size and mineral composition on sediment properties.

  10. A new oxidimetric reagent: potassium dichromate in a strong phosphoric acid medium--VII. Photometric titration of vanadium(IV) and of cerium(III) alone and in mixtures with iroN(II).

    PubMed

    Rao, G G; Rao, P K

    1967-01-01

    Vanadium(IV) can be accurately titrated with potassium dichromate in media containing phosphoric acid of 3-12M concentration: the change in absorption of vanadium(IV) is followed in the region 660 mmicro using a red filter. It is more convenient to carry out the titration in 3M phosphoric acid because at higher concentrations chloride, nitrate, cerium(III) and manganese(II) may interfere. Photoelcetric titration is more convenient than potentiometric because the former can be made in a 3M phosphoric acid medium, whereas the latter is possible only in 12M phosphoric acid. The simultaneous differential photometric titration of iron(II) and vanadium(IV) is also possible. Conditions have been found for the photometric titration of cerium(III) and of cerium(III) plus iron(II). The titration is carried out (at 450 mmicro or with a blue filter) in about 10.5M phosphoric acid. Application of the method to a cerium mineral is considered.

  11. Relationship of Bacterial Richness to Organic Degradation Rate and Sediment Age in Subseafloor Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Emily A.; Kirkpatrick, John B.; Pockalny, Robert; Sauvage, Justine; Spivack, Arthur J.; Murray, Richard W.; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Subseafloor sediment hosts a large, taxonomically rich, and metabolically diverse microbial ecosystem. However, the factors that control microbial diversity in subseafloor sediment have rarely been explored. Here, we show that bacterial richness varies with organic degradation rate and sediment age. At three open-ocean sites (in the Bering Sea and equatorial Pacific) and one continental margin site (Indian Ocean), richness decreases exponentially with increasing sediment depth. The rate of decrease in richness with increasing depth varies from site to site. The vertical succession of predominant terminal electron acceptors correlates with abundance-weighted community composition but does not drive the vertical decrease in richness. Vertical patterns of richness at the open-ocean sites closely match organic degradation rates; both properties are highest near the seafloor and decline together as sediment depth increases. This relationship suggests that (i) total catabolic activity and/or electron donor diversity exerts a primary influence on bacterial richness in marine sediment and (ii) many bacterial taxa that are poorly adapted for subseafloor sedimentary conditions are degraded in the geologically young sediment, where respiration rates are high. Richness consistently takes a few hundred thousand years to decline from near-seafloor values to much lower values in deep anoxic subseafloor sediment, regardless of sedimentation rate, predominant terminal electron acceptor, or oceanographic context. IMPORTANCE Subseafloor sediment provides a wonderful opportunity to investigate the drivers of microbial diversity in communities that may have been isolated for millions of years. Our paper shows the impact of in situ conditions on bacterial community structure in subseafloor sediment. Specifically, it shows that bacterial richness in subseafloor sediment declines exponentially with sediment age, and in parallel with organic-fueled oxidation rate. This result

  12. Check dams effects on sediment transport in steep slope flume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piton, Guillaume; Recking, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Depending on many influences (geology, relief, hydrology, land use, etc.) some mountainous watershed are prone to cause casualties and facilities damages. Large amounts of sediments episodically released by torrents are often the biggest problem in torrent related hazard mitigation. Series of transversal structures as check dams and ground sills are often used in the panel of risk mitigation technics. A large literature exits on check dams and it mainly concerns engineering design, e.g. toe scouring, stability stress diagram, changes in upper and lower reaches equilibrium slopes. Check dams in steep slope rivers constitute fixed points in the bed profile and prevent general bed incision. However their influence on sediment transport once they are filled is not yet clear. Two flume test campaigns, synthetize in Table 1, were performed to investigate this question: Table 1 : experiment plan Run (duration) Ref1 (50h)CD1a (30h)CD1b (30h)Ref2 (92h)CD2 (18h) Solid feeding discharge (g.s^-1) 44 44 44 60 60 Number of check dams none 1 3 none 2 A nearly 5-m-long, 10-cm-wide and 12%-steep flume was used. The water discharge was set to 0,55 l/s in all runs. A mixture of poorly sorted natural sediments with diameters between 0.8 and 40 mm was used. An open solid-discharge-feeding circuit kept the inlet sediment flux constant during all experiments. As both feeding rates did not present variation, changes in outlet solid discharge were assumed to be due to bed variations in the bed storage. We observed strong fluctuations of solid flux and slope in each reaches of all runs between: (i) steep aggradating armoured bed and (ii) less steep and finer bed releasing bedload sheets during erosion events and inducing bedload pulses. All experiments showed consistent results: transported volume associated with erosion event decreased with the length between two subsequent check dams. Solid transversal structures shorten the upstream erosion-propagation and avoid downstream change in the

  13. Regional Sediment Management Strategies for the Vicinity of St. Augustine Inlet, St. Johns County, Florida

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 6- 12 Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Program Regional Sediment Management Strategies for the Vicinity of St. Augustine...default. Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Program ERDC/CHL TR-16-12 July 2016 Regional Sediment Management Strategies for the Vicinity of St...Augustine Inlet RSM” ERDC/CHL TR-16-12 ii Abstract This report provides a description of Regional Sediment Management (RSM) investigations performed

  14. Using orthogonal design to determine optimal conditions for biodegradation of phenanthrene in mangrove sediment slurry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Au, Kwai Chi; Wong, Yuk Shan; Tam, Nora Fung Yee

    2010-04-15

    In the present paper, the effects of four factors, each at three levels, on biodegradation of phenanthrene, a 3-ring PAH, in contaminated mangrove sediment slurry were investigated using the orthogonal experimental design. The factors and levels were (i) sediment types (clay loam, clayey and sandy); (ii) different inoculums (Sphingomonas sp., a mixture of Sphingomonas sp. and Mycobacterium sp., and without inoculum); (iii) presence of other PAHs (fluorene, pyrene, and none); and (iv) different salinities (5, 15 and 25 ppt). Variance analysis based on the percentages of Phe biodegradation showed that the presence of other PAHs had little effect on phenanthrene biodegradation. The kinetics of phenanthrene biodegradation in all experiments was best fitted by the first order rate model. The highest first order rate constant, k value was 0.1172 h(-1) with 97% Phe degradation; while the lowest k value was 0.0004 and phenanthrene was not degraded throughout the 7-d experiment. The p values of k for the four factors followed the same trend as that for the biodegradation percentage. Difference analysis revealed that optimal phenanthrene biodegradation would take place in clay loam sediment slurry at low salinity (5 to 15 ppt) with the inoculation of both Sphingomonas sp. and Mycobacterium sp.

  15. Chemical procedure for extracting 129I, 60Fe and 26Al from marine sediments: Prospects for detection of a ˜2.8 My old supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitoussi, Caroline; Raisbeck, Grant M.

    2007-06-01

    For the past three years, we have been developing a procedure to measure carrier-free 129I/I in gram size quantities of marine sediments containing microgram quantities of iodine. Potential applications involve dating of old (>10 My) sediments and the detection of 129I (t1/2 = 15.7 My) from a purported supernova (SN) explosion ˜2.8 million years ago, that has been inferred from a 60Fe (t1/2 = 1.5 My) signal in a deep-sea ferromanganese crust [K. Knie, G. Korschinek, T. Faestermann, E.A. Dorfi, G. Rugel, A. Wallner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93 (2004) 171103]. The procedure consists in washing the sediment with a NH2OH · HCl HOAc mixture, extraction of iodine from the organic phase with TMAH, separation and purification using anion-exchange chromatography, and coprecipitation as AgI Ag2O. We realized the washing step, which extracts authigenic iron and aluminum, could also be used to measure 60Fe/56Fe and 26Al/27Al in this phase of the same sediment sample. We outline here the chemical procedures developed, and briefly comment on their possible application to the supernova problem. We also point out a large discrepancy between the theoretically calculated 129I/127I ratio in pre-anthropogenic marine sediments, and that derived from experimental measurements.

  16. Mineral potential for sediment-hosted copper deposits in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 75): Chapter K in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Giles, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Although mineral occurrence data and descriptive geological information are adequate to delineate areas favorable for sediment-hosted copper deposits, this review indicates that potential for this type of deposit in Mauritania is low.

  17. Prevalence Incidence Mixture Models

    Cancer.gov

    The R package and webtool fits Prevalence Incidence Mixture models to left-censored and irregularly interval-censored time to event data that is commonly found in screening cohorts assembled from electronic health records. Absolute and relative risk can be estimated for simple random sampling, stratified sampling, and two-phase stratified sampling. Non-parametric (absolute risks only), semi-parametric, weakly-parametric (using B-splines), and some fully parametric (such as the logistic-Weibull) models are supported.

  18. Manganese inhibition of microbial iron reduction in anaerobic sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1988-01-01

    Potential mechanisms for the lack of Fe(II) accumulation in Mn(IV)-containing anaerobic sediments were investigated. The addition of Mn(IV) to sediments in which Fe(II) reduction was the terminal electron-accepting process removed all the pore-water Fe(II), completely inhibited net Fe(III) reduction, and stimulated Mn(IV) reduction. Results demonstrate that preferential reduction of Mn(IV) by FE(III)-reducing bacteria cannot completely explain the lack of Fe(II) accumulation in anaerobic, Mn(IV)-containing sediments, and indicate that Mn(IV) oxidation of Fe(II) is the mechanism that ultimately prevents Fe(II) accumulation. -Authors

  19. Anisotropy of bituminous mixture in the linear viscoelastic domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Benedetto, Hervé; Sauzéat, Cédric; Clec'h, Pauline

    2016-08-01

    Some anisotropic properties in the linear viscoelastic domain of bituminous mixtures compacted with a French LPC wheel compactor are highlighted in this paper. Bituminous mixture is generally considered as isotropic even if the compaction process on road or in laboratory induces anisotropic properties. Tension-compression complex modulus tests have been performed on parallelepipedic specimens in two directions: (i) direction of compactor wheel movement (direction I, which is horizontal) and (ii) direction of compaction (direction II, which is vertical). These tests consist in measuring sinusoidal axial and lateral strains as well as sinusoidal axial stress, when sinusoidal axial loading is applied on the specimen. Different loading frequencies and temperatures are applied. Two complex moduli, EI ^{*} and E_{II}^{*}, and four complex Poisson's ratios, ν_{{II-I}}^{*}, ν_{{III-I}}^{*}, ν_{{I-II}}^{*} and ν_{{III-II}}^{*}, were obtained. The vertical direction appears softer than the other ones for the highest frequencies. There are very few differences between the two directions I and II for parameters concerning viscous effects (phase angles φ(EI) and φ(E_{II}), and shift factors). The four Poisson's ratios reveal anisotropic properties but rheological tensor can be considered as symmetric when considering very similar values obtained for the two measured parameters (I-II and II-I)

  20. Mercury-contaminated sediments affect amphipod feeding.

    PubMed

    Bundschuh, Mirco; Zubrod, Jochen P; Seitz, Frank; Newman, Michael C; Schulz, Ralf

    2011-04-01

    A 125-mile reach of the South River, Virginia, was contaminated with mercury during the first half of the 20th century. As increased concentrations of mercury have persisted, researchers have carefully studied its distribution in the river biota and estimated associated risks. The present study evaluated the influence of mercury on feeding rate and uptake by the amphipod Hyalella azteca. The test organisms were exposed for 7 days with leaf discs to reference and contaminated field sediment during the preliminary experiment and additionally to Sedimite (a commercial mercury-sequestering agent) amended sediments during the final experiment. The preliminary experiment demonstrated a decreased feeding rate (approximately 35%) of H. azteca in sediment from a contaminated site relative to sediment from a reference site. The test design of the final experiment took advantage of the knowledge gained in the preliminary experiment by increasing the number of replicates, which decreased the type II error rate. First, the results of the final experiment confirmed the results of the preliminary experiment by again demonstrating differences in the feeding rate of approximately 35% between reference and contaminated sediment. Second, the results indicated a lower feeding rate in reference sediment in the presence of Sedimite. Third, an opposite tendency, although not significant, was apparent for Sedimite-amended contaminated sediment. Thus, Sedimite appears to decrease sediment quality, whereas this conclusion is based on the feeding rate of H. azteca. However, Sedimite and its value as a mercury-sequestering agent requires further evaluation.

  1. Separation of copper from aqueous sulfate solutions by mixtures of Cyanex 301 and LIX 984N.

    PubMed

    Fouad, E A

    2009-07-30

    The extraction equilibria of copper(II) with Cyanex 301, LIX 984N, and their mixtures have been investigated. Extraction was studied as a function of organic phase composition, sulfuric acid concentration, pH, temperature, initial copper concentration, mixing speed, and aqueous/organic volume ratio. Considerable synergistic enhancement has been observed in the extraction of Cu(2+) with mixtures of Cyanex 301 and LIX 984N. The results demonstrate that copper ion is extracted as CuRL(2)H with synergistic mixture. The thermodynamic parameter, enthalpy change (Delta H) of Cyanex 301, LIX 984N, and their mixtures have been determined and the endothermic process has been found. The synergistic enhancement factor of copper(II) with mixtures is higher at more acidic solutions, which suggests that it is a promising synergistic extraction system for the separation of copper(II) from more acidic medium. HCl was found to be more efficient for copper stripping from loaded synergistic mixtures.

  2. Enhanced selective metal adsorption on optimised agroforestry waste mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Emilio; Ferreira, Laura; Sanromán, M Ángeles; Tavares, Teresa; Pazos, Marta

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this work is to ascertain the potentials of different agroforestry wastes to be used as biosorbents in the removal of a mixture of heavy metals. Fern (FE), rice husk (RI) and oak leaves (OA) presented the best removal percentages for Cu(II) and Ni(II), Mn(II) and Zn(II) and Cr(VI), respectively. The performance of a mixture of these three biosorbents was evaluated, and an improvement of 10% in the overall removal was obtained (19.25mg/g). The optimum mixture proportions were determined using simplex-centroid mixture design method (FE:OA:RI=50:13.7:36.3). The adsorption kinetics and isotherms of the optimised mixture were fit by the pseudo-first order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm. The adsorption mechanism was studied, and the effects of the carboxylic, hydroxyl and phenolic groups on metal-biomass binding were demonstrated. Finally, the recoveries of the metals using biomass were investigated, and cationic metal recoveries of 100% were achieved when acidic solutions were used.

  3. Phase behavior of the mixtures of poly(oxyethylene) (10) stearyl ether (Brij-76), 1-butanol, isooctane, and mixed polar solvents II. Water and ethylene glycol (EG) or tetraethylene glycol (TEG).

    PubMed

    Nandy, Debdurlav; Mitra, Rajib K; Paul, Bidyut K

    2007-06-01

    The phase diagrams of the pseudo-quaternary systems poly(oxyethylene) (10) stearyl ether (Brij-76)/1-butanol/isooctane/water (with equal amounts of oil and water in the presence of two nonaqueous polar solvents (NPS), ethylene glycol (EG), and tetraethylene glycol (TEG)), have been constructed at 30 degrees C. Regular fish-tail diagrams were obtained up to psi (weight fraction of EG or TEG in the mixture of polar solvents) equal to 0.5, confirming the establishment of hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB) of the systems. The maximum solubilization capacity passed through a minimum at psi=0.2. No HLB was obtained at higher psi. The usual fish-tail diagrams were also obtained in temperature-induced phase mapping at fixed W(1) (weight fraction of 1-butanol in total amphiphile). Solubilization capacity and HLB temperature (T(HLB)) decreased with increasing psi at a fixed W(1), the effect being more pronounced for TEG than EG. A correlation between HLB temperature (T(HLB)) and HLB number (N(HLB)) of mixed amphiphiles (Brij-76+Bu) in pseudo-quaternary systems (in the presence of water and partial substitution of water with both NPS) has been established. The novelty of the work with respect to possible applications has been discussed.

  4. Determining Relative Contributions of Eroded Landscape Sediment and Bank Sediment to the Suspended Load of Streams and Wetlands Using 7Be and 210Pbxs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C.; Matisoff, G.; Whiting, P.; Kuhnle, R.

    2005-12-01

    The naturally occurring radionuclides, 7Be and 210Pbxs, have been used individually as tracers of sediment particles throughout watersheds. However, use of the two radionuclides together enables eliciting information regarding the major contributors of fine sediment to the suspended load of a stream or wetland. We report on a study that uses these radionuclides to quantify the relative proportion of eroded surface soils, bank material and resuspended bed sediment in the fine suspended sediment load of the Goodwin Creek, MS, and Old Woman Creek, OH watersheds. The eroded surface soil has a unique radionuclide signature relative to the bed sediments in Old Woman Creek and the bank material along Goodwin Creek that allows for the quantification of the relative proportions of the different sediments in the sediment load. In Old Woman Creek, the different signatures are controlled by the differential decay of the two radionuclides. In Goodwin Creek, the different signatures are due to different erosion processes controlling the sediment delivery to streams, namely sheet erosion and bank collapse. The eroded surface soils will have higher activities of the 7Be and 210Pbxs than bed/bank sediments. The fine suspended sediment, which is a mixture of eroded surface soils and resuspended bed sediment or collapsed bank sediment, will have an intermediate radionuclide signature quantified in terms of the relative proportion from both sediments. A simple two-end member mixing model is used to determine the relative proportions of both sediments to the total fine sediment load.

  5. Impact of isostatic land uplift and artificial drainage on oxidation of brackish-water sediments rich in metastable iron sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boman, Anton; Fröjdö, Sören; Backlund, Krister; Åström, Mats E.

    2010-02-01

    This study examines the dynamics of sulfur and trace elements (As, Co, Mo, Ni, Ti and Zn) when brackish-water sediments, unusually rich in metastable iron sulfide (probably a mixture of mackinawite and greigite), are brought into the oxidation zone by postglacial isostatic land uplift and farmland drainage. When subaqueous sediments approach the sea level, metastable iron sulfide is oxidized in the upmost layers and pyrite preserved and even accumulated concomitantly trapping Co, Ni and Zn but not As and Mo. When the land uplift has brought the sediments above sea level and natural drainage thus is initiated, the pyrite is oxidized and Co, Ni and Zn are released and transported down the profile. If this setting remained undisturbed, the slightly oxidized sediment (unripe soil) would become covered by peat and thus protected from further oxidation and metal translocation. Often these sediments are, however, artificially drained resulting in extensive oxidation and fast soil-profile development. The soil is an acid sulfate (AS) soil, characterized by low pH (<4), extensive leaching of metals and an abundance of disseminated brownish Fe(III) precipitates. We suggest that the fast soil development is due to initial oxidation of metastable iron sulfide, followed by pyrite oxidation. Drain bottom sediment, which in terms of chemistry and S-isotopes resembled that of the surfacing sea bottom strata, acted during the sampling period as a sink for metals. The abundant preservation of metastable iron sulfide below the groundwater table, even long periods after uplift above the sea level, is a puzzling feature. We suggest that it is the net result of sulfur starvation, an abundance of Fe(II) and strongly reducing conditions.

  6. Rio Hondo Sediment Assessment Analysis Using SAM. Numerical Model Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    MISCELLANEOUS PAPER HL-91-1 M ~ RIO HONDO SEDIMENT ASSESSMENT ANALYSIS USING SAM Numerical Model Investigation AD-A238 572Ii 1 11byIll lil Nolan K...FUNDING NUMBERS Rio Hondo Sediment Assessment Analysis Using SAM; Numerical Model Investigation 6. AUTHOR(S) Nolan K. Raphelt Michael J. Trawle William A... Rio Hondo through Roswell, NM, was conducted. The investigation represented a sediment assessment level study conducted to test for potential

  7. Sedimentation Patterns of Rapidly Reversible Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The transport behavior of macromolecular mixtures with rapidly reversible complex formation is of great interest in the study of protein interactions by many different methods. Complicated transport patterns arise even for simple bimolecular reactions, when all species exhibit different migration velocities. Although partial differential equations are available to describe the spatial and temporal evolution of the interacting system given particular initial conditions, a general overview of the phase behavior of the systems in parameter space has not yet been reported. In the case of sedimentation of two-component mixtures, this study presents simple analytical solutions that solve the underlying equations in the diffusion-free limit previously subject to Gilbert-Jenkins theory. The new expressions describe, with high precision, the average sedimentation coefficients and composition of each boundary, which allow the examination of features of the whole parameter space at once, and may be used for experimental design and robust analysis of experimental boundary patterns to derive the stoichiometry and affinity of the complex. This study finds previously unrecognized features, including a phase transition between boundary patterns. The model reveals that the time-average velocities of all components in the reaction mixture must match—a condition that suggests an intuitive physical picture of an effective particle of the coupled cosedimentation of an interacting system. Adding to the existing numerical solutions of the relevant partial differential equations, the effective particle model provides physical insights into the relationships of the parameters that govern sedimentation patterns. PMID:20441765

  8. Binomial Gaussian mixture filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitoharju, Matti; Ali-Löytty, Simo; Piché, Robert

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present a novel method for approximating a normal distribution with a weighted sum of normal distributions. The approximation is used for splitting normally distributed components in a Gaussian mixture filter, such that components have smaller covariances and cause smaller linearization errors when nonlinear measurements are used for the state update. Our splitting method uses weights from the binomial distribution as component weights. The method preserves the mean and covariance of the original normal distribution, and in addition, the resulting probability density and cumulative distribution functions converge to the original normal distribution when the number of components is increased. Furthermore, an algorithm is presented to do the splitting such as to keep the linearization error below a given threshold with a minimum number of components. The accuracy of the estimate provided by the proposed method is evaluated in four simulated single-update cases and one time series tracking case. In these tests, it is found that the proposed method is more accurate than other Gaussian mixture filters found in the literature when the same number of components is used and that the proposed method is faster and more accurate than particle filters.

  9. Lipids of aquatic sediments, recent and ancient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eglinton, G.; Hajibrahim, S. K.; Maxwell, J. R.; Quirke, J. M. E.; Shaw, G. J.; Volkman, J. K.; Wardroper, A. M. K.

    1979-01-01

    Computerized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is now an essential tool in the analysis of the complex mixtures of lipids (geolipids) encountered in aquatic sediments, both 'recent' (less than 1 million years old) and ancient. The application of MS, and particularly GC-MS, has been instrumental in the rapid development of organic geochemistry and environmental organic chemistry in recent years. The techniques used have resulted in the identification of numerous compounds of a variety of types in sediments. Most attention has been concentrated on molecules of limited size, mainly below 500 molecular mass, and of limited functionality, for examples, hydrocarbons, fatty acids and alcohols. Examples from recent studies (at Bristol) of contemporary, 'recent' and ancient sediments are presented and discussed.

  10. Dissolved and particulate carbohydrates in contrasting marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdige, D. J.; Skoog, A.; Gardner, K.

    2000-03-01

    Dissolved and particulate carbohydrates were examined in contrasting Chesapeake Bay (estuarine) and mid-Atlantic shelf/slope break (continental margin) sediments. Particulate carbohydrates (PCHOs) represented ˜5-9% of the total sediment particulate organic carbon (POC), and PCHO remineralization appeared to be a similar fraction of total sediment carbon oxidation (or C ox). When these results are compared with results from other coastal sediments and a pelagic turbidite, PCHO remineralization (as a percentage of C ox) did not vary by more than a factor of ˜2-3 over a 3-4 order of magnitude range in C ox values. The causes of this are not well understood, but may be related to specific effects associated with the remineralization of highly altered organic matter mixtures under aerobic conditions. Dissolved carbohydrates (DCHOs) in these sediment pore waters ranged from ˜30 to 400 μM, increased with depth in a manner similar to total DOC, and represented ˜10 to 55% of pore water DOC. In Chesapeake Bay sediments this percentage decreased with sediment depth, while in these continental margin sediments it was constant (upper 30 cm). Of the DCHOs in these pore waters ˜30 to 50% could be identified as individual aldoses (monomeric neutral sugars), and total aldose yields (individual aldoses as a percentage of total DOC) were higher in these continental margin sediment pore waters (>9%) than they were in the estuarine sediment pore waters (<5%). A comparison of DCHO and PCHO concentrations in these sediments indicates that their concentrations are uncoupled, and that pore water DCHO concentrations are primarily controlled by sediment remineralization processes. Pore water DCHOs appeared to be preferentially found in the high molecular weight (HMW) DOC pool, and likely occur as some of the initial HMW intermediates produced and consumed during sediment POC remineralization. These results also support past suggestions about the differing controls on carbon

  11. Avoidance response of sediment living amphipods to zinc pyrithione as a measure of sediment toxicity.

    PubMed

    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin; Börjesson, Therese; Wiklund, Stig Johan

    2006-01-01

    An avoidance test was developed using non-cultured individuals of the sediment dwelling amphipod Monoporeia affinis. As test substance we used zinc pyrithione, an antifouling agent and a common shampoo ingredient. The toxicity to Daphnia and fish is well known but sediment toxicity of this very hydrophobic compound is less known. The preference of juvenile M. affinis was tested in jars, each including 12 petri dishes. In each replicate, half of the petri dishes contained sediment mixed with six concentrations ranging from 0 to 10microg zinc pyrithione per L sediment and half of the petri dishes contained the corresponding sediment-substance mixture plus an extra food addition. The amphipods significantly avoided petri dishes with the three highest concentrations of zinc pyrithione and the calculated EC(50) was 9.65microgL(-1) sediment. No difference in mortality was observed between concentrations. Using the avoidance behaviour in sediment toxicity testing is a simple and cost-effective screening for toxicants.

  12. Toxicological approaches to complex mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Mauderly, J L

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the role of toxicological studies in understanding the health effects of environmental exposures to mixtures. The approach taken is to review mixtures that have received the greatest emphasis from toxicology; major mixtures research programs; the toxicologist's view of mixtures and approaches to their study; and the complementary roles of toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological studies. Studies of tobacco smoke, engine exhaust, combustion products, and air pollutants comprise most of the past research on mixtures. Because of their great experimental control over subjects, exposures, and endpoints, toxicologists tend to consider a wider range of toxic interactions among mixture components and sequential exposures than is practical for human studies. The three fundamental experimental approaches used by toxicologists are integrative (studying the mixture as a whole), dissective (dissecting a mixture to determine causative constituents), and synthetic (studying interactions between agents in simple combinations). Toxicology provides information on potential hazards, mechanisms by which mixture constituents interact to cause effects, and exposure dose-effect relationships; but extrapolation from laboratory data to quantitative human health risks is problematic. Toxicological, clinical, and epidemiological approaches are complementary but are seldom coordinated. Fostering synergistic interactions among the disciplines in studying the risks from mixtures could be advantageous. PMID:7515806

  13. Heavy metals retention capacity of a non-conventional sorbent developed from a mixture of industrial and agricultural wastes.

    PubMed

    Agouborde, Lina; Navia, Rodrigo

    2009-08-15

    Zinc and copper removal from aqueous solutions using brine sediments (industrial residue), sawdust (agricultural residue) and the mixture of both materials has been researched through batch and column tests. Brine sediments were found to be mainly constituted by halite and calcite, while its main cations exchangeable were sodium, calcium, magnesium and potassium. In sawdust the main exchangeable cations detected were calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. FT-IR spectra of sawdust and brine sediment-sawdust mixture showed that brine sediments produced important changes in carboxylic, alcoholic and phenolic groups present in the sawdust. The maximum zinc adsorption capacity was found to be 4.85, 2.58 and 5.59 mg/g using an adsorbent/solution ratio of 1/40, for brine sediments, sawdust and the mixture, respectively. For copper, the maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 4.69, 2.31 and 4.33 mg/g, using adsorbent/solution ratios of 1/40, for brine sediments, sawdust and the mixture, respectively. Maximum copper adsorption capacity of the mixture, on the contrary to zinc adsorption, was lightly inferior to maximum adsorption capacity obtained in brine sediments. Adsorption isotherms data adjusted better to the Langmuir model. Additionally, columns reached the saturation point at 690 min for zinc and 360 min for copper. The main mechanism involved in the removal of both metals may be the ionic exchange between sodium and calcium ions present in brine sediments and H(+) present in functional groups of sawdust. The use of brine sediments, sawdust and their mixture, presents an interesting option both, for wastewater decontamination (as a possible non-conventional sorbent for the removal of heavy metals) and as a waste recycling option.

  14. Mixtures and Mineral Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumble, D.

    The monograph Mixtures and Mineral Reactions contains a large amount of information of value to mineralogists, petrologists, and geochemists. The first four chapters are a succinct account of the thermodynamic description of crystalline solutions. In these early chapters a comparison is made between different mathematical treatments of activitycomposition models, there is a discussion of the unmixing by exsolution of a single solution into two phases, and methods of computing phase equilibria in assemblages of different minerals are given. If the reader is perplexed by the discussion of standard states (cf. Figure 1.3), not to worry. That is a normal condition for anyone forced to choose between equivalent reference frames yet knowing, somewhere down the line, that the choice will ultimately make one's computational life more or less difficult.

  15. Prediction of bedload sediment transport for heterogeneous sediments in shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durafour, Marine; Jarno, Armelle; Le Bot, Sophie; Lafite, Robert; Marin, François

    2015-04-01

    Key words: Particle shape, in-situ measurements, bedload transport, heterogeneous sediments Bedload sediment transport in the coastal area is a dynamic process mainly influenced by the type of hydrodynamic forcings involved (current and/or waves), the flow properties (velocity, viscosity, depth) and sediment heterogeneity (particle size, density, shape). Although particle shape is recognized to be a significant factor in the hydrodynamic behavior of grains, this parameter is not currently implemented in bedload transport formulations: firstly because the mechanisms of initiation of motion according to particle shape are still not fully understood, and secondly due to the difficulties in defining common shape parameters. In March 2011, a large panel of in-situ instruments was deployed on two sites in the Eastern English Channel, during the sea campaign MESFLUX11. Samples of the sediment cover available for transport are collected, during a slack period, per 2cm thick strata by divers and by using a Shipeck grab. Bedload discharges along a tidal cycle are also collected with a Delft Nile Sampler (DNS; Gaweesh and Van Rijn, 1992, 1994) on both sites. The first one is characterized by a sandy bed with a low size dispersion, while the other study area implies graded sediments from fine sands to granules. A detailed analysis of the data is performed to follow the evolution of in-situ bedload fluxes on the seabed for a single current. In-situ measurements are compared to existing formulations according to a single fraction approach, using the median diameter of the mixture, and a fractionwise approach, involving a discretization of the grading curve. Results emphasize the interest to oscillate between these two methods according to the dispersion in size of the site considered. The need to apply a hiding/exposure coefficient (Egiazaroff, 1965) and a hindrance factor (Kleinhans and Van Rijn, 2002) for size heterogeneous sediments is also clearly highlighted. A really good

  16. Superfund: Contaminated Sediments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contaminated sediments are a significant environmental problem and contribute to the over 3,200 fish consumption advisories nationwide. The Superfund program cleans up sediment sites that present an unacceptable risk to human health or the environment.

  17. Indicators: Sediment Enzymes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sediment enzymes are proteins that are produced by microorganisms living in the sediment or soil. They are indicators of key ecosystem processes and can help determine which nutrients are affecting the biological community of a waterbody.

  18. Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Approach combining chemical manipulations and aquatic toxicity testing, generally with whole organisms, to systematically characterize, identify and confirm toxic substances causing toxicity in whole sediments and sediment interstitial waters. The approach is divided into thre...

  19. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  20. Trend analyses with river sediment rating curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment rating curves, which are fitted relationships between river discharge (Q) and suspended-sediment concentration (C), are commonly used to assess patterns and trends in river water quality. In many of these studies it is assumed that rating curves have a power-law form (i.e., C = aQb, where a and b are fitted parameters). Two fundamental questions about the utility of these techniques are assessed in this paper: (i) How well to the parameters, a and b, characterize trends in the data? (ii) Are trends in rating curves diagnostic of changes to river water or sediment discharge? As noted in previous research, the offset parameter, a, is not an independent variable for most rivers, but rather strongly dependent on b and Q. Here it is shown that a is a poor metric for trends in the vertical offset of a rating curve, and a new parameter, â, as determined by the discharge-normalized power function [C = â (Q/QGM)b], where QGM is the geometric mean of the Q values sampled, provides a better characterization of trends. However, these techniques must be applied carefully, because curvature in the relationship between log(Q) and log(C), which exists for many rivers, can produce false trends in â and b. Also, it is shown that trends in â and b are not uniquely diagnostic of river water or sediment supply conditions. For example, an increase in â can be caused by an increase in sediment supply, a decrease in water supply, or a combination of these conditions. Large changes in water and sediment supplies can occur without any change in the parameters, â and b. Thus, trend analyses using sediment rating curves must include additional assessments of the time-dependent rates and trends of river water, sediment concentrations, and sediment discharge.

  1. Thermal Diffusivity and Strength of Tidal Flat Sediments During a Tidal Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    saturated) were determined for each sediment type (i.e., kaolinite , quartz sand, bentonite, strontium carbonate and iron oxide). Because tidal...flat sediments are often distributed across grain size classes, mixtures of sand and clay (clay being either kaolinite or bentonite) were also

  2. Identifying and Quantifying Chemical Forms of Sediment-Bound Ferrous Iron.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, M.; Kent, D. B.; Bekins, B. A.; Cozzarelli, I.; Ng, G. H. C.

    2015-12-01

    Aqueous Fe(II) produced by dissimilatory iron reduction comprises only a small fraction of total biogenic Fe(II) within an aquifer. Most biogenic Fe(II) is bound to sediments on ion exchange sites; as surface complexes and, possibly, surface precipitates; or incorporated into solid phases (e.g., siderite, magnetite). Different chemical forms of sediment-bound Fe(II) have different reactivities (e.g., with dissolved oxygen) and their formation or destruction by sorption/desorption and precipitation/dissolution is coupled to different solutes (e.g., major cations, H+, carbonate). We are quantifying chemical forms of sediment-bound Fe(II) using previously published extractions, novel extractions, and experimental studies (e.g., Fe isotopic exchange). Sediments are from Bemidji, Minnesota, where biodegradation of hydrocarbons from a burst oil pipeline has driven extensive dissimilatory Fe(III) reduction, and sites potentially impacted by unconventional oil and gas development. Generally, minimal Fe(II) was mobilized from ion exchange sites (batch desorption with MgCl2 and repeated desorption with NH4Cl). A < 2mm sediment fraction from the iron-reducing zone at Bemidji had 1.8umol/g Fe(II) as surface complexes or carbonate phases (sodium acetate at pH 5) of which ca. 13% was present as surface complexes (FerroZine extractions). Total bioavailable Fe(III) and biogenic Fe(II) (HCl extractions) was 40-50 umole/g on both background and iron-reducing zone sediments . Approximately half of the HCl-extractable Fe from Fe-reducing zone sediments was Fe(II) whereas 12 - 15% of Fe extracted from background sediments was present as Fe(II). One-third to one-half of the total biogenic Fe(II) extracted from sediments collected from a Montana prairie pothole located downgradient from a produced-water disposal pit was present as surface-complexed Fe(II).

  3. Sedimentation coefficient distributions of large particles.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Peter

    2016-07-21

    The spatial and temporal evolution of concentration boundaries in sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation reports on the size distribution of particles with high hydrodynamic resolution. For large particles such as large protein complexes, fibrils, viral particles, or nanoparticles, sedimentation conditions usually allow migration from diffusion to be neglected relative to sedimentation. In this case, the shape of the sedimentation boundaries of polydisperse mixtures relates directly to the underlying size-distributions. Integral and derivative methods for calculating sedimentation coefficient distributions g*(s) of large particles from experimental boundary profiles have been developed previously, and are recapitulated here in a common theoretical framework. This leads to a previously unrecognized relationship between g*(s) and the time-derivative of concentration profiles. Of closed analytical form, it is analogous to the well-known Bridgman relationship for the radial derivative. It provides a quantitative description of the effect of substituting the time-derivative by scan differences with finite time intervals, which appears as a skewed box average of the true distribution. This helps to theoretically clarify the differences between results from time-derivative method and the approach of directly fitting the integral definition of g*(s) to the entirety of experimental boundary data.

  4. Surficial sediment distribution and the associated net sediment transport pattern retain-->in the Pearl River Estuary, South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Jinhai; Xiaomei, Ji; Hoitink, A. J. F.; van der Vegt, M.; Zhu, Yuliang

    2013-07-01

    Spatial variations in grain-size parameters contain information on sediment transport patterns. Therefore, in this study, 106 surficial sediment samples taken from the Pearl River Estuary (PRE), South China, were analyzed, to better understand the net sediment transport pattern in this region. The PRE is an area of fine-grained sediment and shows muddy patches with relatively coarse sediment in the north. The sorting coefficient of surficial sediment over the whole estuary is higher than 2, indicating a very poor sorting in this region. The relationship between the sand, silt and clay contents of the sediments was analyzed by a log-ratio analysis, and it was indicated that the selective deposition is a non-linear function of the sediment mixture composition. The net sediment transport pathways indicate four distinct characteristics of sediment transport over the PRE. The sediment is transported obviously southeastward in the upper part of the estuary due to the relatively stronger fluvial dynamics and northwestward in the lower part, due to the stronger tidal dynamics. However, in the central part of the PRE, the sediment transport vectors display a clockwise rotation trend and net deposition is taking place, as indicated by the convergence of the grain size trend. The trend vectors show that some of the sedimentary material is supplied from upper and lower parts of the estuary to this depocenter. This result is consistent with the residual current circulation pattern near Neilingding Island. The patterns of sediment transport reveal directions with the main areas of deposition and possible dispersal patterns in the PRE.

  5. Alternative method to trace sediment sources in a subtropical rural catchment of southern Brazil by using near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiecher, Tales; Caner, Laurent; Gomes Minella, Jean Paolo; Henrique Ciotti, Lucas; Antônio Bender, Marcos; dos Santos Rheinheimer, Danilo

    2014-05-01

    Conventional fingerprinting methods based on geochemical composition still require a time-consuming and critical preliminary sample preparation. Thus, fingerprinting characteristics that can be measured in a rapid and cheap way requiring a minimal sample preparation, such as spectroscopy methods, should be used. The present study aimed to evaluate the sediment sources contribution in a rural catchment by using conventional method based on geochemical composition and on an alternative method based on near-infrared spectroscopy. This study was carried out in a rural catchment with an area of 1,19 km2 located in southern Brazil. The sediment sources evaluated were crop fields (n=20), unpaved roads (n=10) and stream channels (n=10). Thirty suspended sediment samples were collected from eight significant storm runoff events between 2009 and 2011. Sources and sediment samples were dried at 50oC and sieved at 63 µm. The total concentration of Ag, As, B, Ba, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sr, Ti, Tl, V and Zn were estimated by ICP-OES after microwave assisted digestion with concentrated HNO3 and HCl. Total organic carbon (TOC) was estimated by wet oxidation with K2Cr2O7 and H2SO4. The near-infrared spectra scan range was 4000 to 10000 cm-1 at a resolution of 2 cm-1, with 100 co added scans per spectrum. The steps used in the conventional method were: i) tracer selection based on Kruskal-Wallis test, ii) selection of the best set of tracers using discriminant analyses and finally iii) the use of a mixed linear model to calculate the sediment sources contribution. The steps used in the alternative method were i) principal component analyses to reduce the number of variables, ii) discriminant analyses to determine the tracer potential of the near-infrared spectroscopy, and finally iii) the use of past least square based on 48 mixtures of the sediment sources in various weight proportions to calculate the sediment sources

  6. Interactions Between Microbial Iron Reduction and Metal Geochemistry: Effect of Redox Cycling on Transition Metal Speciation in Iron Bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    D. Craig Cooper; Flynn W. Picardal; Aaron J. Coby

    2006-02-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respect to Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a ~3× increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by ~12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These data suggest

  7. Extraction of sediment-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Rakowska, M I; Kupryianchyk, D; Grotenhuis, T; Rijnaarts, H H M; Koelmans, A A

    2013-02-01

    Addition of activated carbon (AC) to sediments has been proposed as a method to reduce ecotoxicological risks of sediment-bound contaminants. The present study explores the effectiveness of granular AC (GAC) in extracting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) from highly contaminated sediments. Four candidate GAC materials were screened in terms of PAH extraction efficiency using single-step 24-h GAC extractions, with traditional 24-h Tenax extraction as a reference. Subsequently, sorption of native PAHs to the best performing GAC 1240W (0.45-1.70 mm) was studied for sediment only and for GAC-sediment mixtures at different GAC-sediment weight ratios, using 76-µm polyoxymethylene (POM) passive samplers. Granular AC sorption parameters for PAHs were determined by subtracting the contribution of PAH sorption to sediment from PAH sorption to the GAC-sediment mixture. It appears that the binding of PAHs and the effectiveness of GAC to reduce sediment porewater concentrations were highly dependent on the GAC-sediment mixing ratio and hydrophobicity of the PAH. Despite the considerable fouling of GAC by organic matter and oil, 50 to 90% of the most available PAH was extracted by the GAC during a 28-d contact time, at a dose as low as 4%, which also is a feasible dose in field-scale applications aimed at cleaning the sediment by GAC addition and removal.

  8. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  9. The production and erosion of sediment cover on bedrock surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoey, T.; Hodge, R. A.; Maniatis, G.; Lepretre, E.

    2013-12-01

    different proportions of coarse and fine sediment. In both sets, grain entrainment was complicated by the influence of patches on local roughness and hence local shear stress. The distribution of grains within the original patches was more clustered than complete spatial randomness, and clustering increased with distance. Patches from the experiments with different mixtures followed similar patterns of erosion as discharge increased along with which maximum clustering occurred at progressively shorter distances. These results suggest a need to understand more fully the roles of sediment size distribution and spatial organisation on sediment mobility in such rivers.

  10. SORPTION OF NONIONIC SURFACTANT OLIGOMERS TO SEDIMENT AND PCE DNAPL: EFFECTS ON PCE DISTRIBUTION BETWEEN WATER AND SEDIMENT. (R826650)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction of surfactant mixtures to the subsurface for the purpose of
    surfactant-enhanced aquifer remediation requires consideration of the effects of
    surfactant sorption to sediment and nonaqueous phase liquids. These effects
    include alteration of the solubiliz...

  11. Mixture toxicity of flubendazole and fenbendazole to Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Puckowski, Alan; Stolte, Stefan; Wagil, Marta; Markiewicz, Marta; Łukaszewicz, Paulina; Stepnowski, Piotr; Białk-Bielińska, Anna

    2017-02-03

    Nowadays, residual amounts of many pharmaceuticals can be found in various environmental compartments including surface and ground waters, soils and sediments as well as biota. Even though they undergo degradability, their environmental discharge is relatively continuous, thus they may be regarded as quasi-persistent contaminants, and are also frequently regarded as emerging organic pollutants. Benzimidazoles, especially flubendazole (FLU) and fenbendazole (FEN), represent two anthelmintic drugs belonging to this group. Although their presence in environmental matrices has been reported, there is relatively little data concerning their (eco)toxicological impact. Furthermore, no data is available on their mixture toxicity. FLU and FEN have been found to have a strong impact on an environmentally important non-target organism - Daphnia magna. Moreover, these compounds are usually present in the environment as a part of pharmaceutical mixtures. Therefore, there is a need to evaluate their mixture toxicity, which was the main aim of this study. Single substance toxicity tests were carried out in parallel with mixture studies of FLU and FEN, with the application of two well established concepts of Concentration Addition (CA) and Independent Action (IA). As a result, both models (CA and IA) were found to underestimate the toxicity of mixtures, however CA yielded more accurate predictions.

  12. Bitumen II from the Paleoproterozoic Here’s Your Chance Pb/Zn/Ag deposit: Implications for the analysis of depositional environment and thermal maturity of hydrothermally-altered sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, Alex I.; Grice, Kliti; Jaraula, Caroline M. B.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2014-08-01

    The formation of sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) Pb/Zn deposits is linked to ocean euxinia, but recent evidence suggests that ferruginous conditions may have dominated the deep ocean during the Middle Proterozoic, a maximum period for SEDEX distribution. Biomarkers of sulfate-reducing and sulfide-oxidising bacteria are valuable indicators of euxinic conditions in such settings. Organic matter (OM) from SEDEX deposits is often affected by alteration and/or migration, but OM entrapped within the kerogen/mineral matrix (Bitumen II) may be less affected than the freely-extractable OM (Bitumen I). We analysed Bitumen II from the Paleoproterozoic Here’s Your Chance (HYC) Pb/Zn/Ag deposit to find evidence of euxinic conditions in the depositional environment. n-Alkane distributions in Bitumen II are markedly distinct from previously-reported Bitumen I. Bitumen II contains long-chain n-alkanes (up to C36 or C38) and a strong even-over-odd distribution in a number of samples, which are 4‰ to 7‰ depleted in 13C compared to n-alkanes in Bitumen I and verified as indigenous by comparison with δ13C of isolated kerogen. These features are interpreted as evidence of sulfate-reducing and sulfide-oxidising bacteria, confirming that HYC was deposited under euxinic conditions. Bitumen II has the potential to reveal information from OM that is degraded and/or overprinted in Bitumen I. Commonly-used methylphenanthrene maturity ratios give conflicting information as to the relative maturity of Bitumens I and II. Bitumen I contains a far higher proportion of methylated phenanthrenes than Bitumen II. As Bitumen II is sequestered within the kerogen/mineral matrix it may have restricted access to the ‘methyl pool’ of organic compounds that can donate methyl groups to aromatic hydrocarbons. Parameters that include both phenanthrene and methylphenanthrenes do not appear suitable to compare the maturity of Bitumens I and II; hence there is no clear evidence that Bitumen II is of

  13. Continuous automated sensing of streamflow density as a surrogate for suspended-sediment concentration sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Matthew C.; Figueroa Alamo, Carlos; Gray, John R.; Fletcher, William

    2001-01-01

    A newly refined technique for continuously and automatically sensing the density of a water-sediment mixture is being tested at a U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station in Puerto Rico. Originally developed to measure crude oil density, the double bubbler instrument measures fluid density by means of pressure transducers at two elevations in a vertical water column. By subtracting the density of water from the value measured for the density of the water-sediment mixture, the concentration of suspended sediment can be estimated. Preliminary tests of the double bubbler instrument show promise but are not yet conclusive.

  14. Statistical mixture modeling for cell subtype identification in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cliburn; Feng, Feng; Ottinger, Janet; Foster, David; West, Mike; Kepler, Thomas B

    2008-08-01

    Statistical mixture modeling provides an opportunity for automated identification and resolution of cell subtypes in flow cytometric data. The configuration of cells as represented by multiple markers simultaneously can be modeled arbitrarily well as a mixture of Gaussian distributions in the dimension of the number of markers. Cellular subtypes may be related to one or multiple components of such mixtures, and fitted mixture models can be evaluated in the full set of markers as an alternative, or adjunct, to traditional subjective gating methods that rely on choosing one or two dimensions. Four color flow data from human blood cells labeled with FITC-conjugated anti-CD3, PE-conjugated anti-CD8, PE-Cy5-conjugated anti-CD4, and APC-conjugated anti-CD19 Abs was acquired on a FACSCalibur. Cells from four murine cell lines, JAWS II, RAW 264.7, CTLL-2, and A20, were also stained with FITC-conjugated anti-CD11c, PE-conjugated anti-CD11b, PE-Cy5-conjugated anti-CD8a, and PE-Cy7-conjugated-CD45R/B220 Abs, respectively, and single color flow data were collected on an LSRII. The data were fitted with a mixture of multivariate Gaussians using standard Bayesian statistical approaches and Markov chain Monte Carlo computations. Statistical mixture models were able to identify and purify major cell subsets in human peripheral blood, using an automated process that can be generalized to an arbitrary number of markers. Validation against both traditional expert gating and synthetic mixtures of murine cell lines with known mixing proportions was also performed. This article describes the studies of statistical mixture modeling of flow cytometric data, and demonstrates their utility in examples with four-color flow data from human peripheral blood samples and synthetic mixtures of murine cell lines.

  15. What contributes to the combined effect of a complex mixture?

    PubMed

    Altenburger, Rolf; Walter, Helge; Grote, Matthias

    2004-12-01

    The effect of a mixture of 10 compounds, which have previously been identified in an effect-directed analysis as potentially relevant for a specific contaminated riverine sediment (Brack et al. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 1999, 37, 164), were investigated for the underlying joint effect. Components identified in an organic sediment extract included several PAHs (benzo[ghi]fluoranthene, benz[a]anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, 2-phenylnaphthalene, anthracene, and phenanthrene) plus prometryn, N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine, and parathion-methyl. Experiments were performed using a one-generation algal bioassay with the unicellular green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus as well as chlorophyll fluorescence quenching analysis to describe the effects of the components and mixtures thereof. Analysis of the mixture effects based on concentration-response modeling of the effect data reveals that indeed effect contributions of several components can be expected although the mixture ratio is not equitoxic and the individual components vary greatly with respect to biological effect. Comparing predicted and observed mixture effects, the combined effect may not be attributed to a joint narcotic effect of the mixture components. Evidently, some of the components act specifically and dissimilar and may therefore be best described in their combined effect by response addition while for others a similar mode of action seems plausible. Chlorophyll fluorescence quenching analysis supports to discriminate between prometryn, N-phenyl-2-naphthylamine, and PAHs. A joint model for calculating the combined effect using concentration addition for the suspected unspecifically acting components in algae (PAHs and parathion-methyl) and subsequently response addition for this group and the other components clearly improves the description of the observed combined effect. Allocation of effect contributions to specific components using toxic units or effect contributions lead to different judgments. The

  16. Sediment Budget and Sediment Fingerprinting as Management Strategies to Understand Sediment Contributions to Receiving Waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellis, A.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Gorman-Sanisaca, L.

    2015-12-01

    A sound understanding of the sediment sources contributing to the sediment flux and the overall sediment budget of a watershed is key to total maximum daily load (TMDL) management strategies that focus on reducing sediment and sediment-related nutrient loadings to streams. This understanding can be provided by performing complementary sediment-source fingerprinting and sediment-budgeting investigations. The sediment fingerprinting approach quantifies the relative proportion of the potential sediment sources and the delivery of sediment from these sources. Sediment budget approaches provide information on the magnitude and location of the fluxes and the links between sources, sinks, and sediment output. Sediment budget approaches can include field based, photogrammetric, GIS, and modeling approaches to identify the important sources, erosion, and storage areas of sediment within a watershed. Combining sediment budget and sediment fingerprinting approaches provides resource managers with information on where to target mitigation measures that reduce erosion, and sediment delivery. Many watersheds across the U.S. have or are soon implementing TMDL allocations to reduce sediment and nutrient loadings. Streambank erosion is typically not accounted for in statistical, empirical, and process-based models, yet it is a major source of sediment in many watersheds. We present several examples of sediment budget and sediment fingerprinting studies from the Chesapeake Bay watershed and the Driftless Area, Wisconsin where information on loading of streambank sediment has been used (successfully) to shape upland and stream corridor management practices.

  17. Use of long-chain alkylamines for preconcentration and determination of traces of molybdenum, tungsten and rhenium by atomic-absorption spectroscopy-II: molybdenum in soils, sediments and natural waters.

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Alexander, P W; Smythe, L E

    1976-03-01

    Molybdenum is extracted as the thiocyanate complex with the quaternary long-chain aliphatic amine Aliquat 336 in chloroform, followed by evaporation of the solvent, dissolution in MIBK, and atomic-absorption spectroscopy. The method is simple, rapid and sensitive, with few interference problems for the determination of the Mo content of soils and sediments in the range 0.1-1.0 ppm with a relative standard deviation better than 5% when 1-g samples are used. Quantitative extraction from large volumes of aqueous solution has also been confirmed, allowing the determination of Mo in natural waters in the ppM range.

  18. Some results on Gaussian mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgueiras, Miguel; Santos, Rui; Martins, João Paulo

    2014-10-01

    We investigate Gaussian mixtures with independent components, whose parameters are numerically estimated. A decomposition of a Gaussian mixture is presented when the components have a common variance. We introduce a shifted and scaled t-Student distribution as an approximation for the distribution of Gaussian mixtures when their components have a common mean and develop a hypothesis test for testing the equality of the components means. Finally, we analyse the fitness of the approximate model to the logarithmic daily returns of the Portuguese stock index PSI-20.

  19. The dirt on sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Loren M.; Euliss, Ned H. "Chip"

    2010-01-01

    In the wetland science field, sediment deposition is often thought of as being beneficial especially when one thinks of coastal estuarine systems. For example, sediments deposited from streams and rivers are necessary to naturally build and maintain tidal marshes. These sediments come from eroded upland soils in the interior of the continent. When these sediments are diverted from natural coastal deposition areas, such as occurs from river channelization, we lose marshes through subsidence as is happening throughout coastal Louisiana. However, the value of eroded soils is all a matter of hydrogeomorphic perspective.

  20. Enhanced availability of mercury bound to dissolved organic matter for methylation in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazrui, Nashaat M.; Jonsson, Sofi; Thota, Sravan; Zhao, Jing; Mason, Robert P.

    2016-12-01

    The forms of inorganic mercury (HgII) taken up and methylated by bacteria in sediments still remain largely unknown. From pure cultures studies, it has been suggested that dissolved organic matter (DOM) may facilitate the uptake either by acting as a shuttle molecule, transporting the HgII atom to divalent metal transporters, or by binding HgII and then being transported into the cell as a carbon source. Enhanced availability of Hg complexed to DOM has however not yet been demonstrated in natural systems. Here, we show that HgII complexed with DOM of marine origin was up to 2.7 times more available for methylation in sediments than HgII added as a dissolved inorganic complex (HgII(aq)). We argue that the DOM used to complex HgII directly facilitated the bacterial uptake of HgII whereas the inorganic dissolved HgII complex adsorbed to the sediment matrix before forming bioavailable dissolved HgII complexes. We further demonstrate that differences in net methylation in sediments with high and low organic carbon content may be explained by differences in the availability of carbon to stimulate the activity of Hg methylating bacteria rather than, as previously proposed, be due to differences in HgII binding capacities between sediments.

  1. Characterizing toxicity of metal-contaminated sediments from mining areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    of acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), termed simultaneously-extracted metals (SEM), are widely used to estimate the ‘potentially-bioavailable’ fraction of metals that is not bound to sulfides (i.e., SEM-AVS). Metal concentrations in pore water are widely considered to be direct measures of metal bioavailability, and predictions of toxicity based on pore-water metal concentrations may be further improved by modeling interactions of metals with other pore-water constituents using Biotic Ligand Models. Data from sediment toxicity tests and metal analyses has provided the basis for development of sediment quality guidelines, which estimate thresholds for toxicity of metals in sediments. Empirical guidelines such as Probable Effects Concentrations or (PECs) are based on associations between sediment metal concentrations and occurrence of toxic effects in large datasets. PECs do not model bioavailable metals, but they can be used to estimate the toxicity of metal mixtures using by calculation of probable effect quotients (PEQ = sediment metal concentration/PEC). In contrast, mechanistic guidelines, such as Equilibrium Partitioning Sediment Benchmarks (ESBs) attempt to predict both bioavailability and mixture toxicity. Application of these simple bioavailability models requires more extensive chemical characterization of sediments or pore water, compared to empirical guidelines, but may provide more reliable estimates of metal toxicity across a wide range of sediment types.

  2. Solid and aqueous mercury in remote river sediments (Litany River, French Guyana, South America)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlet, L.; Roman-Ross, G.; Spadini, L.; Rumbach, G.

    2003-05-01

    Mercury content in river sediments was investigated, in the Haut Maroni river basin (French Guyana, South America), around Antecume-Pata, a village where Wayanas Amerindians are contaminated with mercury. Solid sediment particulate total mercury content indicate a 100 to 150 ng/g Hg geochemical background level. Sediments act as an environmental archive: gold mining contaminated sediments have up to 400 ng/g total mercury. Pore waters from contaminated sediments are enriched in Fe(II) and Hg(II) by a factor 40 compared to uncontaminated sediment pore waters, due to more acute anoxie conditions. They act therefore as a major source of dissolved mercury in remote tropical aquatic ecosystems. Keywords: Mercury, sediment, DGT and DET techniques, pore water, gold mining.

  3. Sediment gravity flow—the conceptual problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Prabir

    2003-09-01

    The term sediment gravity flow was introduced to describe the major flow types involved in resedimentation processes and was defined as the flow of sediments or sediment-fluid mixture in which the interstitial fluid is driven by the grains moving under the action of gravity. Critical analysis of respective flow mechanism reveals that these flow types markedly depart from the definitive properties of a sediment gravity flow, and the possibility of natural existence of a sediment gravity flow sensu stricto appears doubtful. The flow types classified as sediment gravity flow are also different enough from each other to be considered under a single category based on flow mechanism, and a more general term, high-density flow, is proposed here as a rational alternative to designate them. Attempts made to classify these flows on the basis of rheologic properties also suffer from some serious limitations. Besides these basic problems, improper uses of different terminology cause problems in understanding these high-density flows. Critical review, however, leads to conclude that each of these flow types can be identified as a distinct segment of a continuous spectrum of high-density flows, and the process of transformation from one variety to the other often comes into existence. Even within a single flow, different parts may show distinct flow character developed through the process of flow transformation. An empirical relationship between these flow types thus can be established with reference to the grain/water ratio and grain composition, which broadly controls character and rheology of a specific variety or different parts of a composite flow. An attempt is made here to accommodate the high-density flows involved in resedimentation processes within a general classification of aqueous flows.

  4. Geochemistry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Columbia River and Washington coastal sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Prahl, F.G.

    1982-01-01

    A field investigation was conducted to determine the origins, dispersal pathways and fates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in a river-influenced coastal marine environment. The complex PAH mixtures found in Washington coastal sediments are derived from several land-based sources. PAH products from anthropogenic combustion processes and two natural PAH, retene and perylene, are the dominant components of these complex mixtures. A natural series of phenanthrene homologs and series of tetracyclic PAH geochemically analogous to retene are present as minor constituents. The three major PAH types in Washington coastal sediments are enriched in a narrow band of coarse silt sediment, extending northwestward from the river mouth to Quinault canyon. The natural phenanthrene series is preferentially advected offshore and deposited. These distributions are consistent with known PAH-particle associations and transport processes influencing sediment dispersal in this coastal environment. Dated sediment core records suggest this PAH dispersal pattern has persisted for at least the past century.

  5. Accurate mass replacement method for the sediment concentration measurement with a constant volume container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Yunyun; Chen, Tianqin; Yan, Jun; Lei, Tingwu

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of sediment concentration in water is of great importance in soil erosion research and soil and water loss monitoring systems. The traditional weighing method has long been the foundation of all the other measuring methods and instrument calibration. The development of a new method to replace the traditional oven-drying method is of interest in research and practice for the quick and efficient measurement of sediment concentration, especially field measurements. A new method is advanced in this study for accurately measuring the sediment concentration based on the accurate measurement of the mass of the sediment-water mixture in the confined constant volume container (CVC). A sediment-laden water sample is put into the CVC to determine its mass before the CVC is filled with water and weighed again for the total mass of the water and sediments in the container. The known volume of the CVC, the mass of sediment-laden water, and sediment particle density are used to calculate the mass of water, which is replaced by sediments, therefore sediment concentration of the sample is calculated. The influence of water temperature was corrected by measuring water density to determine the temperature of water before measurements were conducted. The CVC was used to eliminate the surface tension effect so as to obtain the accurate volume of water and sediment mixture. Experimental results showed that the method was capable of measuring the sediment concentration from 0.5 up to 1200 kg m‑3. A good liner relationship existed between the designed and measured sediment concentrations with all the coefficients of determination greater than 0.999 and the averaged relative error less than 0.2%. All of these seem to indicate that the new method is capable of measuring a full range of sediment concentration above 0.5 kg m‑3 to replace the traditional oven-drying method as a standard method for evaluating and calibrating other methods.

  6. Methanogenesis in subglacial sediments.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Eric S; Skidmore, Mark; Mitchell, Andrew C; Bakermans, Corien; Peters, John W

    2010-10-01

    Methanogenic archaea have a unique role in Earth's global carbon cycle as producers of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4 ). However, despite the fact that ice covers 11% of Earth's continental landmass, evidence for methanogenic activity in subglacial environments has yet to be clearly demonstrated. Here we present genetic, biochemical and geochemical evidence indicative of an active population of methanogens associated with subglacial sediments from Robertson Glacier (RG), Canadian Rockies. Porewater CH4 was quantified in two subglacial sediment cores at concentrations of 16 and 29 ppmv. Coenzyme M (CoM), a metabolic biomarker for methanogens, was detected at a concentration of 1.3 nmol g sediment(-1) corresponding to ∼3 × 10(3) active cells g sediment(-1) . Genetic characterization of communities associated with subglacial sediments indicated the presence of several archaeal 16S rRNA and methyl CoM reductase subunit A (mcrA) gene phylotypes, all of which were affiliated with the euryarchaeal order Methanosarcinales. Further, CH4 was produced at 9-51 fmol g dry weight sediment(-1)  h(-1) in enrichment cultures of RG sediments incubated at 4°C. Collectively, these findings have important implications for the global carbon cycle in light of recent estimates indicating that the Earth's subglacial biome ranges from 10(4) to 10(6)  km(3) sediment.

  7. ECG Beats Classification Using Mixture of Features

    PubMed Central

    Ari, Samit

    2014-01-01

    Classification of electrocardiogram (ECG) signals plays an important role in clinical diagnosis of heart disease. This paper proposes the design of an efficient system for classification of the normal beat (N), ventricular ectopic beat (V), supraventricular ectopic beat (S), fusion beat (F), and unknown beat (Q) using a mixture of features. In this paper, two different feature extraction methods are proposed for classification of ECG beats: (i) S-transform based features along with temporal features and (ii) mixture of ST and WT based features along with temporal features. The extracted feature set is independently classified using multilayer perceptron neural network (MLPNN). The performances are evaluated on several normal and abnormal ECG signals from 44 recordings of the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database. In this work, the performances of three feature extraction techniques with MLP-NN classifier are compared using five classes of ECG beat recommended by AAMI (Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation) standards. The average sensitivity performances of the proposed feature extraction technique for N, S, F, V, and Q are 95.70%, 78.05%, 49.60%, 89.68%, and 33.89%, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed feature extraction techniques show better performances compared to other existing features extraction techniques. PMID:27350985

  8. Pattern formation in granular binary mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clement; Rozier, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    We study numerically the formation and evolution of bed forms using a binary granular mixture. The two types of particles may have different dynamic properties and angle of repose. We associate these changes to two different grain sizes, the so-called coarse and thin particles. Our computation are based on a real-space cellular automaton that combines a model of sediment transport with a lattice-gas cellular automaton. Thus, we implement the permanent feedbacks between fluid flow and topography. Keeping constant the strength of the flow, we explore a parameter-space by varying the size of the coarse particles and their proportion within the bed. As a result of avalanches and sediment transport, we systematically find regions of segregation and stratification. In a vast majority of cases, we also observe the formation of an armoring layer mainly composed of coarse particles. Its depth is mainly controlled by the proportion of coarse grains and not by the size of these larger particles. When there is a larger proportion of thin particles, transverse dunes develop on the top of the armoring layer. As this proportion decreases, we may observe barchans or even no clear bed forms. We conclude that the main control parameter for dune pattern formation is the thin sediment availability. Finally, we discuss the processes responsible for the formation of the armoring layer and show how it controls the overall sediment transport.

  9. Newborn Rabbit Perception of 6-Odorant Mixtures Depends on Configural Processing and Number of Familiar Elements

    PubMed Central

    Romagny, Sébastien; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Coureaud, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    Perception of odors, i.e. usually of mixtures of odorants, is elemental (the odorants' odor qualities are perceived in the mixture) or configural (the odor quality of the mixture differs from the one of each odorant). In human adults, the Red Cordial (RC) mixture is a configurally-processed, 6-odorant mixture. It evokes a red cordial odor quality while none of the elements carries that odor. Interestingly, in newborn rabbits, the same RC mixture is weak configurally perceived: the newborns behaviorally respond to all the elements after conditioning to the whole mixture, but not to the mixture after conditioning to a single element. Thus, they perceive in the RC mixture both the odor quality of the RC configuration and the quality of each element. Here, we aimed to determine whether this perception is modulated by quantitative (number of elements) and/or qualitative bits of information (nature of elements) previously learned by the animals. Newborns were conditioned to RC sub-mixtures of different complexity and composition before behavioral testing to RC. Pups generalized their sucking-related response to RC after learning at least 4 odorants. In contrast, after conditioning to sub-mixtures of another 6-odorant mixture, the elementally perceived MV mixture, pups responded to MV after learning one or two odorants. The different generalization to RC and MV mixtures after learning some of their elements is discussed according to three hypotheses: i) the configural perception of RC sub-mixtures, ii) the ratio of familiar/unfamiliar individual information elementally and configurally perceived, iii) the perception of RC becoming purely elemental. The results allow the first hypothesis to be dismissed, while further experiments are required to distinguish between the remaining two. PMID:25248149

  10. Development of Sediment Quality Values for Puget Sound. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Everett Harbor A-138 Table A-8 Duwamish River II A-140 Figure A-i Locations of Commencement Bay stations sampled for benthic macroinvertebrates and sediment...As noted in "Recommended protocols for sampling and analyzing subtidal benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in Puget Sound" [Puget Sound Estuary...Example confidence limits for benthic AET determined for lead 102 v vt i ... I, TABLES Number Page 1 Approaches reviewed for establishing sediment quality

  11. Microtox assay of trinitrotoluene, diaminonitrotoluene, and dinitromethylaniline mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Hankenson, K.; Schaeffer, D.J. )

    1991-04-01

    Contamination of waste waters, soils, and sediments with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) from the operation of munitions manufacturing, loading, and assembling and packing facilities, is an environment hazard. Assessment of the risk to the environment from TNT contamination needs to consider whether the toxicity of these mixtures is additive or is described by more complex interactions. This research used the Microtox test to evaluate the toxicity of aqueous solutions of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene (DANT) and 2,6-dinitro-4-methylaniline (DNMA) along and as binary mixtures in 3{sup 2} factorial combinations. The Microtox test is an instrumented bioassay which measures the reduction in chemiluminescence when the marine bacterium Photobacterium phosphoreum is exposed to toxic chemical(s). The response is concentration dependent; the EC{sub 50} is the concentration of a compound which inhibits 50% of the bacterial bioluminescence.

  12. Reach specificity in sediment E. coli population turnover and interaction with waterborne populations.

    PubMed

    Piorkowski, Gregory; Jamieson, Rob; Bezanson, Greg; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth; Yost, Chris

    2014-10-15

    Sediment-borne Escherichia coli can elevate waterborne concentrations through sediment resuspension or hyporheic exchange. This study sought to correlate hydrological, sediment transport, and water quality variables with: (i) the temporal stability of sediment E. coli populations [concentrations, strain richness and similarity (Raup-Crick index)]; and (ii) the contribution of sediment E. coli to the water column as defined through a library-dependent microbial source tracking approach that matched waterborne E. coli isolates to sediment E. coli populations. Three monitoring locations differing in their hydrological characteristics and adjacent upland fecal sources (dairy operation, low-density residential, and tile-drained cultivated field) were investigated. Sediment E. coli population turnover was influenced by sediment transport at upstream, high-energy reaches, but not at the downstream low-energy reach. Sediment contributions to the water column averaged 13% and 18%, and fecal sources averaged 17% and 21% at the upstream sites adjacent to dairy operations and low-density residential areas, respectively. Waterborne E. coli at the downstream site had low matches to E. coli from reach sediments (1%), higher matches to the upstream sediments (27% and 12%), and an average of 14% matches to the tile drained field. The percentage of waterborne E. coli matching sediment-borne E. coli at each stream reach varied in correlations to hydrological and sediment transport variables, suggesting reach-specific differences in the role of sediment resuspension and hyporheic exchange on E. coli transport.

  13. Distinguishing internal and external sediment sources in a tidal freshwater wetland, the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Deijl, Eveline C.; van der Perk, Marcel; Kik, Nanda J.; Verschelling, Eelco; Middelkoop, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Many deltas across the globe suffer from drowning due to sea level rise or land subsidence in combination with sediment starvation. The process of drowning can be attenuated by enhancing sediment inputs or the sediment trapping efficiency of deltas. To examine the sediment budget of delta areas based on measurements of sediment deposition, it is essential to distinguish the sediment that has entered the area from upstream areas from sediment that has been redistributed within the area. This pilot study aims to explore the prospects to distinguish between external and internal sediment sources based on the geochemical composition of the sediment deposited. This study was carried out in the Kleine Noordwaard, which is part of the Brabantse Biesbosch, a former inland delta located in-between the Rhine and Meuse rivers in the south-western part of the Netherlands. A significant part of this area has been embanked and turned into polder areas in the early 19th century. In contrast to many tidal creeks and flats, the polder areas have not received inputs of severely contaminated river sediment between the 1930s and 1980s. A number of polders have recently or are currently being de-poldered again, i.e. converted from agricultural polder land into an inundated tidal freshwater wetland, in order to increase the conveyance capacity of the Rhine River during extreme discharge situations, thereby lowering the peak water levels upstream and to enhance the nature values of the area. The external and internal sediment sources of the sediment deposited in the Kleine Noordwaard could be discriminated based on the zinc (Zn) and rubidium (Rb) concentrations. These two elements exhibit a different linear relation for the more contaminated external sediment originating from the Rhine River and the less contaminated, internally redistributed sediment originating from the topsoil of the former polder area. The mixture proportion for each sediment sample could not be directly derived

  14. Disposal of dredged sediments in tropical soils: ecotoxicological evaluation based on bioassays with springtails and enchytraeids.

    PubMed

    Cesar, Ricardo; Natal-da-Luz, Tiago; Bidone, Edison; Castilhos, Zuleica; Polivanov, Helena; Sousa, José Paulo

    2015-02-01

    Metal reference values established in Brazilian legislation for terrestrial disposal of dredged sediments and soil quality were derived for temperate regions. To evaluate the adequacy of such metal reference values to tropical soils, the ecotoxicity of a dredged sediment (from the Guanabara bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) was investigated in two local soils (ferralsol and chernosol) by performing avoidance and reproduction tests using Folsomia candida and Enchytraeus crypticus. Test doses consisted of 0 %, 1.25 %, 2.5 %, 5, 10 %, and 20 %. Total and potentially bioavailable metal concentrations were determined in the test mixtures. Although the chernosol mixtures had the highest total metal concentrations, the influence of the expansive clay minerals (with high ability to adsorb metals) and the high contents of nutrients typical from this type of soils, seem to reduce the ecotoxicity. Collembolan avoidance behavior was the least sensitive endpoint. The lowest sediment doses increased the reproduction of F. candida in ferralsol mixtures. E. crypticus reproduction in the ferralsol mixtures were more pronounced at lower concentrations than in chernosol mixtures. Possibly the low nutrient content of the ferralsols, in connection with the addition of small amounts of sediment, created particular conditions that promoted reproduction of the test species. Data obtained in the ecotoxicological tests may support the establishment of a "safe" ecological dose of dredged sediments to be applied in tropical soils, supporting decision-makers in programs of environmental management.

  15. Mobility of maerl-siliciclastic mixtures: Impact of waves, currents and storm events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Siddhi; Duffy, Garret Patrick; Brown, Colin

    2017-04-01

    Maerl beds are free-living, non-geniculate coralline algae habitats which form biogenic reefs with high micro-scale complexity supporting a diversity and abundance of rare epifauna and epiflora. These habitats are highly mobile in shallow marine environments where substantial maerl beds co-exist with siliciclastic sediment, exemplified by our study site of Galway Bay. Coupled hydrodynamic-wave-sediment transport models have been used to explore the transport patterns of maerl-siliciclastic sediment during calm summer conditions and severe winter storms. The sediment distribution is strongly influenced by storm waves even in water depths greater than 100 m. Maerl is present at the periphery of wave-induced residual current gyres during storm conditions. A combined wave-current Sediment Mobility Index during storm conditions shows correlation with multibeam backscatter and surficial sediment distribution. A combined wave-current Mobilization Frequency Index during storm conditions acts as a physical surrogate for the presence of maerl-siliciclastic mixtures in Galway Bay. Both indices can provide useful integrated oceanographic and sediment information to complement coupled numerical hydrodynamic, sediment transport and erosion-deposition models.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of bound oils in estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, A. D.; Chudek, J. A.

    2003-04-01

    Whilst it has now been shown that the movement of oil residues in estuarine sediments can be ‘observed’, little has been done to determine the potential of MRI in elucidating the interactions between contaminants and sediment particles. This is of great importance in the assessment of the seriousness and longevity of oil pollution incidents, especially on beaches where oils and sediments interact. The NMR relaxation time T2 can be used as a measure of the viscosity of a liquid. Where the liquid is bound to a substrate T2 decreases inversely with the strength of the binding. Thus, by studying the change in T2 of an oil/sediment mixture with time, it is possible to observe changes in the interaction between the two. By using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to create maps of T2 over the area of a slice through the mixture, the distribution of T2 can be directly observed while, simultaneously, the movement and oil concentration gradients within the sample can also be measured. Sediment samples (Tay Estuary, Scotland; 56 26 709N; 03 02 743W) and known quantities of oil were allowed to mix in a 25 mm o.d. container during the course of the experiment. MRI measurements were made on a Bruker AVANCE 300 MHz spectrometer fitted with a Bruker microimaging accessory. The data was obtained using a standard spin-echo technique. Typically acquisitions took one hour and between forty eight and sixty contiguous measurements were made.

  17. Geophysical Detection of Biomineralization Within Selenium Contaminated Lake Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, M.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Slater, L.; Yee, N.

    2006-05-01

    Geophysical measurements during active selenite reduction were made on lake sediment from Belews Lake in North Carolina that was verified to contain indigenous cultures known to precipitate the metalloid selenium. The sediment was wet-packed into columns with a mixture of Ottawa sand (80% sand, 20% sediment) to facilitate flow through the sediment. Electrical geophysical measurements were continually monitored as a selenite medium flowed through the column. Electrical conductivity of the influent and outflow solutions was also monitored and outflow samples, taken twice a day, were used to determine the selenite concentrations reduced within the column. Within a few days of beginning the experiment, the sediment/sand mixture within the column exhibited widespread red discoloration, confirming the microbial reduction of selenite to elemental selenium within the column. The electrical formation factor exhibited a smooth increase in time that we attribute to the continual precipitation of selenium biominerals. The geophysical dataset provides a novel means to ascertain rates of biomineralization within the column; information that is difficult to extract from aqueous or solid phase chemistry. The geophysical data indicate that most of the microbial activity occurred within the first 5 days of the experiment.

  18. Bayesian Kernel Mixtures for Counts.

    PubMed

    Canale, Antonio; Dunson, David B

    2011-12-01

    Although Bayesian nonparametric mixture models for continuous data are well developed, there is a limited literature on related approaches for count data. A common strategy is to use a mixture of Poissons, which unfortunately is quite restrictive in not accounting for distributions having variance less than the mean. Other approaches include mixing multinomials, which requires finite support, and using a Dirichlet process prior with a Poisson base measure, which does not allow smooth deviations from the Poisson. As a broad class of alternative models, we propose to use nonparametric mixtures of rounded continuous kernels. An efficient Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, and a simulation study is performed to assess performance. Focusing on the rounded Gaussian case, we generalize the modeling framework to account for multivariate count data, joint modeling with continuous and categorical variables, and other complications. The methods are illustrated through applications to a developmental toxicity study and marketing data. This article has supplementary material online.

  19. Unrestricted Mixture Models for Class Identification in Growth Mixture Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Min; Hancock, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    Growth mixture modeling has gained much attention in applied and methodological social science research recently, but the selection of the number of latent classes for such models remains a challenging issue, especially when the assumption of proper model specification is violated. The current simulation study compared the performance of a linear…

  20. Dipole oscillations in fermionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Chiacchiera, S.; Macri, T.; Trombettoni, A.

    2010-03-15

    We study dipole oscillations in a general fermionic mixture. Starting from the Boltzmann equation, we classify the different solutions in the parameter space through the number of real eigenvalues of the small oscillations matrix. We discuss how this number can be computed using the Sturm algorithm and its relation with the properties of the Laplace transform of the experimental quantities. After considering two components in harmonic potentials having different trapping frequencies, we study dipole oscillations in three-component mixtures. Explicit computations are done for realistic experimental setups using the classical Boltzmann equation without intraspecies interactions. A brief discussion of the application of this classification to general collective oscillations is also presented.

  1. Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling

    PubMed Central

    van der Vaart, Arjan; Karplus, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We introduce the Gaussian-mixture umbrella sampling method (GAMUS), a biased molecular dynamics technique based on adaptive umbrella sampling that efficiently escapes free energy minima in multi-dimensional problems. The prior simulation data are reweighted with a maximum likelihood formulation, and the new approximate probability density is fit to a Gaussian-mixture model, augmented by information about the unsampled areas. The method can be used to identify free energy minima in multi-dimensional reaction coordinates. To illustrate GAMUS, we apply it to the alanine dipeptide (2D reaction coordinate) and tripeptide (4D reaction coordinate). PMID:19284746

  2. Studies of Particle Sedimentation by Novel Scattering Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Penger

    2000-01-01

    The four-year grant began May 1, 1996 (5-1-96 to 4-30-00, $100,000/year). We have finished 4 major research projects and published 10 papers during this grant period. An important aspect of this research has been the education of students at graduate and undergraduate levels. They have been fully involved in the research described below: 1. Polymer-induced depletion interaction in colloid-polymer mixtures. 2. Colloidal sedimentation in polymer solutions. 3. Velocity fluctuations in particle sedimentation. New laser light scattering techniques for velocity difference measurements.

  3. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  4. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  5. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  6. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  7. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  8. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  10. 16 CFR 1500.5 - Hazardous mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Hazardous mixtures. 1500.5 Section 1500.5... HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND ENFORCEMENT REGULATIONS § 1500.5 Hazardous mixtures. For a mixture of substances, the determination of whether the mixture is a “hazardous substance”...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 23.1147 Section 23.1147... Accessories § 23.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and each mixture control must have guards or must be shaped or arranged to prevent confusion...

  13. Legacy Sediments in U.S. River Environments: Atrazine and Aggradation to Zinc and Zoobenthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, E.

    2014-12-01

    Legacy sediments are those that are altered by human activities. Alterations include (i) human-caused aggradation (and subsequent erosion), such as sediment accumulating upstream from relict or contemporary dams, (ii) human-caused lack of continuing deposition that results in changing moisture and nutrient levels within existing sediments, such as on floodplains that no longer receive lateral or vertical accretion deposits because of levees, bank stabilization, and other channel engineering, and (iii) human-generated contaminants such as PCBs and pesticides that adsorb to fine sediment. Existing estimates of human alterations of river systems suggest that legacy sediments are ubiquitous. Only an estimated 2% of river miles in the United States are not affected by flow regulation that alters sediment transport, for example, and less than half of major river basins around the world are minimally altered by flow regulation. Combined with extensive but poorly documented reduction in floodplain sedimentation, as well as sediment contamination by diverse synthetic compounds, excess nutrients, and heavy metals, these national and global estimates suggest that legacy sediments now likely constitute a very abundant type of fluvial sediment. Because legacy sediments can alter river form and function for decades to centuries after the cessation of the human activity that created the legacy sediments, river management and restoration must be informed by accurate knowledge of the distribution and characteristics of legacy sediments. Geomorphologists can contribute understanding of sediment dynamics, including: the magnitude, frequency, and duration of flows that mobilize sediments with adsorbed contaminants; sites where erosion and deposition are most likely to occur under specified flow and sediment supply; residence time of sediments; and the influence of surface and subsurface water fluxes on sediment stability and geochemistry.

  14. Indices of benthic community tolerance in contaminated Great Lakes sediments: Relations with sediment contaminant concentrations, sediment toxicity, and the sediment quality triad

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, M.L.; Schmitt, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the toxic-units model developed by Wildhaber and Schmitt (1996) as a predictor of indices of mean tolerance to pollution (i.e., Lenat, 1993; Hilsenhoff, 1987) and other benthic community indices from Great Lakes sediments containing complex mixtures of environmental contaminants (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls - PCBs, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAHs, pesticides, chlorinated dioxins, and metals). Sediment toxic units were defined as the ratio of the estimated pore-water concentration of a contaminant to its chronic toxicity as estimated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) or other applicable standard. The total hazard of a sediment to aquatic life was assessed by summing toxic units for all contaminants quantified. Among the benthic community metrics evaluated, total toxic units were most closely correlated with Lenat's (1993) and Hilsenhoff's (1987) indices of community tolerance (T(L), and T(H), respectively); toxic units accounted for 42% (T(L)) and 53% (T(H)) of variability in community tolerance as measured by Ponar grabs. In contrast, taxonomic richness and Shannon-Wiener diversity were not correlated (P > 0.05) with toxic units. Substitution of order- or family-level identifications for lowest possible (mostly genus- or species-) level identifications in the calculation of T(L) and T(H) indices weakened the relationships with toxic units. Tolerance values based on order- and family-level identifications of benthos for artificial substrate samples were more strongly correlated with toxic units than tolerance values for benthos from Ponar grabs. The ability of the toxic-units model to predict the other two components (i.e., laboratory-measured sediment toxicity and benthic community composition) of the Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) may obviate the need for the SQT in some situations.

  15. Oribatid mite fossils from pre-Quaternary sediments in Slovenian caves II. Amiracarus pliocennatus n.gen., n.sp. (Microzetidae) from Pliocene, with comments on the other species of the genus.

    PubMed

    Miko, Ladislav; Mourek, Jan; Meleg, Ioana N; Moldovan, Oana T

    2013-01-01

    Amiracarus pliocennatus n. gen., n. sp. is described based on fossils found in Pliocene and Pleistocene clastic sediments in caves of the Slovenian Classical Karst (Kras). Diagnosis and relationships of the new genus are given and relationships within the extant species of the genus are discussed as well as variability and reliability of some characters, used for species differentiation. Amiracarus senensis (Bernini 1975) n. comb. is proposed as a type species of the new genus, and other four extant species are newly placed in Amiracarus n. gen.: A. abeloosi (Lions 1978) n. comb., A. discrepans (Mahunka 1966) n. comb., A. grootaerti (Wauthy &Ducarme 2011) n. comb. and A. similis (Subìas & Iturrondobeitia 1978) n. comb. Finding of a fossil individual of M. senensis Bernini 1975 in Ponicova Cave of South-West Carpathians in Romania is reported and a description of this individual is given. Relationships with the genus Miracarus Kunst 1959 are discussed and a new diagnosis of this genus is also given, along with the redescription of its type species, M. hurkai Kunst 1959.

  16. Use of vertical temperature gradients for prediction of tidal flat sediment characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miselis, Jennifer L.; Holland, K. Todd; Reed, Allen H.; Abelev, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Sediment characteristics largely govern tidal flat morphologic evolution; however, conventional methods of investigating spatial variability in lithology on tidal flats are difficult to employ in these highly dynamic regions. In response, a series of laboratory experiments was designed to investigate the use of temperature diffusion toward sediment characterization. A vertical thermistor array was used to quantify temperature gradients in simulated tidal flat sediments of varying compositions. Thermal conductivity estimates derived from these arrays were similar to measurements from a standard heated needle probe, which substantiates the thermistor methodology. While the thermal diffusivities of dry homogeneous sediments were similar, diffusivities for saturated homogeneous sediments ranged approximately one order of magnitude. The thermal diffusivity of saturated sand was five times the thermal diffusivity of saturated kaolin and more than eight times the thermal diffusivity of saturated bentonite. This suggests that vertical temperature gradients can be used for distinguishing homogeneous saturated sands from homogeneous saturated clays and perhaps even between homogeneous saturated clay types. However, experiments with more realistic tidal flat mixtures were less discriminating. Relationships between thermal diffusivity and percent fines for saturated mixtures varied depending upon clay composition, indicating that clay hydration and/or water content controls thermal gradients. Furthermore, existing models for the bulk conductivity of sediment mixtures were improved only through the use of calibrated estimates of homogeneous end-member conductivity and water content values. Our findings suggest that remotely sensed observations of water content and thermal diffusivity could only be used to qualitatively estimate tidal flat sediment characteristics.

  17. SEDIMENT GEOCHEMICAL MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Until recently, sediment geochemical models (diagenetic models) have been only able to explain sedimentary flux and concentration profiles for a few simplified geochemical cycles (e.g., nitrogen, carbon and sulfur). However with advances in numerical methods, increased accuracy ...

  18. Indicators: Sediment Mercury

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sediment mercury is mercury that has become embedded into the bottom substrates of aquatic ecosystems. Mercury is a common pollutant of aquatic ecosystems and it can have a substantial impact on both human and wildlife health.

  19. Indicators: Streambed Sediments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Streambed sediments are fine mineral deposits and silt located on the streambed. In excess amounts, they can fill in the habitat spaces between stream cobbles and rocks where aquatic organisms live and breed.

  20. Pattern formation in granular binary mixtures under shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.; Narteau, C.; Rozier, O.

    2012-12-01

    Polydisperse granular materials are ubiquitous in the field of geomorphology. Nevertheless, it remains a challenge to address the impact of segregation, stratification and mixing on landscape dynamics and sediment transport. Here, we study numerically the formation and evolution of bed forms using a binary granular mixture. The two types of particles may have different dynamic properties and angle of repose. We associate these changes to two different grain sizes, the so-called coarse and thin particles. Our computation are based on a real-space cellular automaton that combines a model of sediment transport with a lattice-gas cellular automaton. Thus, we implement the permanent feedbacks between fluid flow and topography. Keeping constant the strength of the flow, we explore a parameter-space by varying the size of the coarse particles and their proportion within the bed. As a result of avalanches and sediment transport, we systematically find regions of segregation and stratification. In a vast majority of cases, we also observe the formation of an armoring layer mainly composed of coarse particles. Its depth is mainly controlled by the proportion of coarse grains and not by the size of these larger particles. When there is a larger proportion of thin particles, transverse dunes develop on the top of the armoring layer. As this proportion decreases, we may observe barchans or even no clear bed forms. Not surprisingly, we conclude that the main control parameter for dune pattern formation is the thin sediment availability. Finally, we discuss the processes responsible for the formation of the armoring layer and show how it controls the overall sediment transport.

  1. Photobilirubin II.

    PubMed Central

    Bonnett, R; Buckley, D G; Hamzetash, D; Hawkes, G E; Ioannou, S; Stoll, M S

    1984-01-01

    An improved preparation of photobilirubin II in ammoniacal methanol is described. Evidence is presented which distinguishes between the two structures proposed earlier for photobilirubin II in favour of the cycloheptadienyl structure. Nuclear-Overhauser-enhancement measurements with bilirubin IX alpha and photobilirubin II in dimethyl sulphoxide are complicated by the occurrence of negative and zero effects. The partition coefficient of photobilirubin II between chloroform and phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) is 0.67. PMID:6743241

  2. Sediment source attribution from multiple land use systems with CSIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alewell, C.; Birkholz, A.; Meusburger, K.; Schindler Wildhaber, Y.; Mabit, L.

    2015-08-01

    As sediment loads impact freshwater systems and infrastructure, their origin in complex landscape systems is of crucial importance for optimization of catchment management. We differentiated sediment source contribution to a lowland river in Central Switzerland in using compound specific stable isotopes analysis (CSIA). We found a clear distinction of sediment sources originating from forest and agricultural land use. We suggest to generally reduce uncertainty of sediment source attribution, in (i) aiming for approaches with least possible data complexity to reduce analytical effort as well as refraining from undetected source attribution and/or tracer degradation obscured by complex high data demanding modelling approaches, (ii) to use compound content (in our case long chain fatty acid (FA)) rather than soil organic matter content when converting isotopic signature to soil contribution and (iii) to restrict evaluation to the long-chain FAs (C22:0 to C30:0) not to introduce errors due to aquatic contributions from algae and microorganisms. Results showed unambiguously that during base flow agricultural land contributed up to 65 % of the suspended sediments, while forest was the dominant sediment source during high flow, which indicates that during base and high flow conditions connectivity of sediment source areas with the river change. Our findings are the first results highlighting significant differences in compound specific stable isotope (CSSI) signature and quantification of sediment sources from land uses dominated by C3 plant cultivation.

  3. AMBIENT WATER, POREWATER, AND SEDIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment assessments may be performed for a variety of purposes; these include: dredging and dredged sediment disposal, for evaluations of sediments as a capping material, to determine sediment quality, to assess biological impairment and to assess the status of environment monit...

  4. Interlaminated ice-proximal glacimarine sediments in Muir Inlet, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mackiewicz, N.E.; Powell, R.D.; Carlson, P.R.; Molnia, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    Muir Inlet in Glacier Bay, Alaska, is a glacial fjord receiving a tremendous volume of sediment annually. The rate of sediment accumulation is greatest proximal to Muir Glacier (about 9 m yr-1) and decreases away from the glacier. The primary sediment sources are meltwater streams discharging at subglacial and ice-marginal positions to form overflows, interflows, and underflows (continuous turbidity currents). Overflows and interflows interact with diurnal tidal currents and their volume and sediment concentration varies diurnally and annually with meltwater discharge. These effects produce cyclic deposits of a thin fine-grained sand or silt lamina that grades normally to a thicker poorly to very poorly sorted mud lamina. This lamina couplet is termed a cyclopel. Underflows are suggested to occur in this glacimarine environment because of conditions unique to subglacial fluvial systems. Underflow deposits occur only in proximal positions (177 ??m) is ubiquitous, though low (<5% by weight), and occurs as isolated particles, frozen pellets, or as lenses that in cores may have a lamina appearance. Proximally, ice-rafted debris is difficult to identify because proximal sediment is often as coarse-grained. Deposited sediment may be reworked by tidal currents, and sediment gravity flows. Depositional processes operating in Muir Inlet produce interlaminated sand/silt/clay that characterizes sediment proximal to a glacier and fines seaward to mud. Sediment is classified into one of three sediment types: 1. (1) Type I sediment is very fine grained (mean 8.65-7.17 ??), low in sand (0.1-11.2%), and very poorly to poorly sorted. It is the dominant sediment type in Muir Inlet, and is transported by plumes and deposited by suspension settling. 2. (2) Type II sediment is fine- to coarse-grained (mean 6.70-3.12 ??), low to high in sand (5.1-86.6%), and very poorly to moderately sorted. It represents reworked sediment, proximal plume deposits, or coarse-grained laminae of cyclopels

  5. Suspended Sediment Under Waves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Vortex Ripples 98 Grain Size Variation with Elevation over Vortex Ripples 107 Concentration Profiles over Flat Beds il1 Concentration Profiles over...investigations. The clearest results are obtained in relation to the near bed sediment distributions. Over fully developed vortex ripples we find...with the details of the turbulence or the vortex motion. Nevertheless, the latter are very important for the understanding of sediment entrainment

  6. Taylor dispersion analysis of mixtures.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Hervé; Biron, Jean-Philippe; Martin, Michel

    2007-12-01

    Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) is a fast and simple method for determining hydrodynamic radii. In the case of sample mixtures, TDA, as the other nonseparative methods, leads to an average diffusion coefficient on the different molecules constituting the mixture. We set in this work the equations giving, on a consistent basis, the average values obtained by TDA with detectors with linear response functions. These equations confronted TDA experiments of sample mixtures containing different proportions of a small molecule and a polymer standard. Very good agreement between theory and experiment was obtained. In a second part of this work, on the basis of monomodal or bimodal molar mass distributions of polymers, the different average diffusion coefficients corresponding to TDA were compared to the z-average diffusion coefficient (D(z)) obtained from dynamic light scattering (DLS) experiments and to the weight average diffusion coefficient (D(w)). This latter value is sometimes considered as the most representative of the sample mixture. From these results, it appears that, for monomodal distribution and relatively low polydispersity (I = 1.15), the average diffusion coefficient generally derived from TDA is very close to Dw. However, for highly polydisperse samples (e.g., bimodal polydisperse distributions), important differences could be obtained (up to 35% between TDA and D(w)). In all the cases, the average diffusion coefficient obtained by TDA for a mass concentration detector was closer to the Dw value than the z-average obtained by DLS.

  7. Electrochemical signatures of multivitamin mixtures.

    PubMed

    Mohan, A M Vinu; Brunetti, Barbara; Bulbarello, Andrea; Wang, Joseph

    2015-11-21

    The ability of cyclic square wave voltammetry to identify distinct fingerprints of multiple vitamins, in a single voltammetric run, is demonstrated. This method represents an efficient alternative to more common techniques for fast screening of complex vitamin mixtures or commercial tablets due to its low cost, high speed and sensitivity.

  8. Genetic Analysis of Plant Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, B.

    1989-01-01

    Plant mixtures are difficult to analyze genetically because of possible interactions between neighboring plants (i.e., between plants in the same biological group). However, a genetic modeling scheme has been devised which, theoretically, can accommodate such interactions. This study was an attempt to put the theoretical modeling procedure to an experimental test. To this end an experimental procedure was devised that generated biological groups from a well defined base population. A cultural system was used which permitted growing plant mixtures in controlled environmental facilities. This allowed the experiment to be conducted over a wide range of temperature and nutrient conditions. Application of the theoretical gene model to the experimental data permitted identification of those classes of gene effects that were responsible for genetic variation exhibited by the mixtures. Adequacy of the genetic modeling description was corroborated by precise prediction of an independent genetic response. The genetic analyses also identified statistically significant temperature-and nutrient-dependent forms of heterosis. It was concluded that the study demonstrated the suitability of the theoretical group gene model for describing complexities inherent in plant mixtures. PMID:17246509

  9. Deposition and chemistry of bottom sediments in Cochiti Lake, north-central New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jennifer T.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    Bottom sediments were sampled at seven sites in Cochiti Lake in September 1996. Sediment cores penetrating the entire lacustrine sediment sequence were collected at one site near the dam. Surficial sediments were sampled at the near-dam site and six other sites located along the length of the reservoir. Analyses included grain size, major and trace elements, organochlorine compounds, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's), and radionuclides. Concentrations of trace elements, organic compounds, and radionuclides are similar to those in other Rio Grande reservoirs and are low compared to published sediment-quality guidelines. Most elements and compounds that were detected did not show trends in the age estimated sediment cores with the exception of a decreasing trend in total DDT concentrations from about 1980 to 1992. The mixture of PAH's suggests that the increase is caused by inputs of fuel-related PAH and not combustion- related PAH.

  10. Laboratory measurements of upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Witte, W. G.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    An effort to investigate the potential of remote sensing for monitoring nonpoint source pollution was conducted. Spectral reflectance characteristics for four types of soil sediments were measured for mixture concentrations between 4 and 173 ppm. For measurements at a spectral resolution of 32 mm, the spectral reflectances of Calvert, Ball, Jordan, and Feldspar soil sediments were distinctly different over the wavelength range from 400 to 980 nm at each concentration tested. At high concentrations, spectral differences between the various sediments could be detected by measurements with a spectral resolution of 160 nm. At a low concentration, only small differences were observed between the various sediments when measurements were made with 160 nm spectral resolution. Radiance levels generally varied in a nonlinear manner with sediment concentration; linearity occurred in special cases, depending on sediment type, concentration range, and wavelength.

  11. Planning Targets for Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On August 1, 2011, EPA provided planning targets for nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment for the Phase II Watershed Implementation Plans (WIPs) of the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. This page provides the letters containing those planning targets.

  12. Uphill diffusion in multicomponent mixtures.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-05-21

    Molecular diffusion is an omnipresent phenomena that is important in a wide variety of contexts in chemical, physical, and biological processes. In the majority of cases, the diffusion process can be adequately described by Fick's law that postulates a linear relationship between the flux of any species and its own concentration gradient. Most commonly, a component diffuses down the concentration gradient. The major objective of this review is to highlight a very wide variety of situations that cause the uphill transport of one constituent in the mixture. Uphill diffusion may occur in multicomponent mixtures in which the diffusion flux of any species is strongly coupled to that of its partner species. Such coupling effects often arise from strong thermodynamic non-idealities. For a quantitative description we need to use chemical potential gradients as driving forces. The transport of ionic species in aqueous solutions is coupled with its partner ions because of the electro-neutrality constraints; such constraints may accelerate or decelerate a specific ion. When uphill diffusion occurs, we observe transient overshoots during equilibration; the equilibration process follows serpentine trajectories in composition space. For mixtures of liquids, alloys, ceramics and glasses the serpentine trajectories could cause entry into meta-stable composition zones; such entry could result in phenomena such as spinodal decomposition, spontaneous emulsification, and the Ouzo effect. For distillation of multicomponent mixtures that form azeotropes, uphill diffusion may allow crossing of distillation boundaries that are normally forbidden. For mixture separations with microporous adsorbents, uphill diffusion can cause supra-equilibrium loadings to be achieved during transient uptake within crystals; this allows the possibility of over-riding adsorption equilibrium for achieving difficult separations.

  13. The role of sample height in the stacking diagram of colloidal mixtures under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geigenfeind, Thomas; de las Heras, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Bulk phase separation is responsible for the occurrence of stacks of different layers in sedimentation of colloidal mixtures. A recently proposed theory (de las Heras and Schmidt 2013 Soft Matter 9 8636) establishes a unique connection between the bulk phase behaviour and sedimentation-diffusion-equilibrium. The theory constructs a stacking diagram of all possible sequences of stacks under gravity in the limit of very high (infinite) sample heights. Here, we study the stacking diagrams of colloidal mixtures at finite sample height, h. We demonstrate that h plays a vital role in sedimentation-diffusion-equilibrium of colloidal mixtures. The region of the stacking diagram occupied by a given sequence of stacks depends on h. Hence, two samples with different heights but identical colloidal concentrations can develop different stacking sequences. In addition, the stacking diagrams for different heights can be qualitatively different since some stacking sequences occur only in a given interval of sample heights. We use the theory to investigate the stacking diagrams of both model bulk systems and mixtures of patchy particles that differ either by the number or by the types of patches.

  14. Strategies for Transferring Mixtures of Organic Contaminants from Aquatic Environments into Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Annika; Mayer, Philipp; Schäfer, Sabine; Witt, Gesine; Haase, Nora; Escher, Beate I

    2016-06-07

    Mixtures of organic contaminants are ubiquitous in the environment. Depending on their persistence and physicochemical properties, individual chemicals that make up the mixture partition and distribute within the environment and might then jointly elicit toxicological effects. For the assessment and monitoring of such mixtures, a variety of cell-based in vitro and low-complexity in vivo bioassays based on algae, daphnids or fish embryos are available. A very important and sometimes unrecognized challenge is how to combine sampling, extraction and dosing to transfer the mixtures from the environment into bioassays, while conserving (or re-establishing) their chemical composition at adjustable levels for concentration-effect assessment. This article outlines various strategies for quantifiable transfer from environmental samples including water, sediment, and biota into bioassays using total extraction or polymer-based passive sampling combined with either solvent spiking or passive dosing.

  15. Different sources of suspended sediment according to particle size determined by natural radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizugaki, S.; Ohtsuka, J.; Maruyama, M.; Hamamoto, S.; Murakami, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Extensive human activity and climate change have given great impacts on the sediment balance and connectivity between fluvial and coastal systems, causing sediment-related problems such as sedimentation in reservoir, coastal erosion and water pollution by prolonged turbid water. The dynamics of suspended sediment is one of the most important issues in watershed and coastal management. Suspended sediment load transported to ocean by a river commonly represents a mixture of sediments delivered from different locations and source types within the contributing catchment. In our previous study, we have found that the three natural radionuclides are available to discriminate the source areas of suspended sediment represented by six different bed rock type (sedimentary rock, accretionary sedimentary rock, accretionary basalt block, accretionary volcanic rock, plutonic rock and metamorphic rock), and that the contribution of each source areas to suspended sediment can be estimated (Mizugaki et al., 2012). To elucidate the sources of suspended sediment from mountain to coastal area, the fingerprinting was conducted using natural radionuclide tracers across a couple of adjacent watersheds, the Saru River and Mu River watersheds in central Hokkaido, northern Japan. We collected suspended sediments at outlets of the 13 sub-catchments (0.7-27.2 km2) and 12 stream channels with mid- to large-scaled watershed areas (17-1,333 km2), deposited sediments across a dam reservoir and coastal sediments, in total 389 samples. For collected sediment samples, grain size distributions were measured by laser-diffraction particle size analyzer. The specific surface areas of the samples were estimated using their grain size distribution and the spherical approximation of the particles in each class. For fingerprint the source of suspended sediment, three natural radionuclide activities, 212Pb, 228Ac and 40K, were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. Specific surface area of the sediment showed

  16. Mercury cycling in stream ecosystems. 2. Benthic methylmercury production and bed sediment - Pore water partitioning

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Lutz, M.A.; Brigham, M.E.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Aiken, G.R.; Orem, W.H.; Hall, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Mercury speciation, controls on methylmercury (MeHg) production, and bed sediment - pore water partitioning of total Hg (THg) and MeHg were examined in bed sediment from eight geochemically diverse streams where atmospheric deposition was the predominant Hg input. Across all streams, sediment THg concentrations were best described as a combined function of sediment percent fines (%fines; particles < 63 ??m) and organic content. MeHg concentrations were best described as a combined function of organic content and the activity of the Hg(II)-methylating microbial community and were comparable to MeHg concentrations in streams with Hg inputs from industrial and mining sources. Whole sediment tin-reducible inorganic reactive Hg (Hg(II)R) was used as a proxy measure for the Hg(II) pool available for microbial methylation. In conjunction with radiotracer-derived rate constants of 203Hg(II) methylation, Hg(II)R was used to calculate MeHg production potential rates and to explain the spatial variability in MeHg concentration. The %Hg(II)R (of THg) was low (2.1 ?? 5.7%) and was inversely related to both microbial sulfate reduction rates and sediment total reduced sulfur concentration. While sediment THg concentrations were higher in urban streams, %MeHg and %Hg(II)R were higher in nonurban streams. Sediment pore water distribution coefficients (log Kd's) for both THg and MeHg were inversely related to the log-transformed ratio of pore water dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to bed sediment %fines. The stream with the highest drainage basin wetland density also had the highest pore water DOC ?? 2009 American Chemical Society.

  17. Development and application of freshwater sediment-toxicity benchmarks for currently used pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowell, Lisa H.; Norman, Julia E.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Moran, Patrick W.

    2016-01-01

    Sediment-toxicity benchmarks are needed to interpret the biological significance of currently used pesticides detected in whole sediments. Two types of freshwater sediment benchmarks for pesticides were developed using spiked-sediment bioassay (SSB) data from the literature. These benchmarks can be used to interpret sediment-toxicity data or to assess the potential toxicity of pesticides in whole sediment. The Likely Effect Benchmark (LEB) defines a pesticide concentration in whole sediment above which there is a high probability of adverse effects on benthic invertebrates, and the Threshold Effect Benchmark (TEB) defines a concentration below which adverse effects are unlikely. For compounds without available SSBs, benchmarks were estimated using equilibrium partitioning (EqP). When a sediment sample contains a pesticide mixture, benchmark quotients can be summed for all detected pesticides to produce an indicator of potential toxicity for that mixture. Benchmarks were developed for 48 pesticide compounds using SSB data and 81 compounds using the EqP approach. In an example application, data for pesticides measured in sediment from 197 streams across the United States were evaluated using these benchmarks, and compared to measured toxicity from whole-sediment toxicity tests conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-d exposures) and the midge Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposures). Amphipod survival, weight, and biomass were significantly and inversely related to summed benchmark quotients, whereas midge survival, weight, and biomass showed no relationship to benchmarks. Samples with LEB exceedances were rare (n = 3), but all were toxic to amphipods (i.e., significantly different from control). Significant toxicity to amphipods was observed for 72% of samples exceeding one or more TEBs, compared to 18% of samples below all TEBs. Factors affecting toxicity below TEBs may include the presence of contaminants other than pesticides, physical

  18. Development and application of freshwater sediment-toxicity benchmarks for currently used pesticides.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Lisa H; Norman, Julia E; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Moran, Patrick W

    2016-04-15

    Sediment-toxicity benchmarks are needed to interpret the biological significance of currently used pesticides detected in whole sediments. Two types of freshwater sediment benchmarks for pesticides were developed using spiked-sediment bioassay (SSB) data from the literature. These benchmarks can be used to interpret sediment-toxicity data or to assess the potential toxicity of pesticides in whole sediment. The Likely Effect Benchmark (LEB) defines a pesticide concentration in whole sediment above which there is a high probability of adverse effects on benthic invertebrates, and the Threshold Effect Benchmark (TEB) defines a concentration below which adverse effects are unlikely. For compounds without available SSBs, benchmarks were estimated using equilibrium partitioning (EqP). When a sediment sample contains a pesticide mixture, benchmark quotients can be summed for all detected pesticides to produce an indicator of potential toxicity for that mixture. Benchmarks were developed for 48 pesticide compounds using SSB data and 81 compounds using the EqP approach. In an example application, data for pesticides measured in sediment from 197 streams across the United States were evaluated using these benchmarks, and compared to measured toxicity from whole-sediment toxicity tests conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca (28-d exposures) and the midge Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposures). Amphipod survival, weight, and biomass were significantly and inversely related to summed benchmark quotients, whereas midge survival, weight, and biomass showed no relationship to benchmarks. Samples with LEB exceedances were rare (n=3), but all were toxic to amphipods (i.e., significantly different from control). Significant toxicity to amphipods was observed for 72% of samples exceeding one or more TEBs, compared to 18% of samples below all TEBs. Factors affecting toxicity below TEBs may include the presence of contaminants other than pesticides, physical/chemical characteristics

  19. Contaminated sediment dynamics in peatland headwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuttleworth, Emma; Clay, Gareth; Evans, Martin; Hutchinson, Simon; Rothwell, James

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands are an important store of soil carbon, provide multiple ecosystem services, and when located in close proximity to urban and industrial areas, can also act as sinks of atmospherically deposited heavy metals. The near-surface layer of the blanket peats of the Peak District National Park, UK, is severely contaminated with high concentrations of anthropogenically derived, atmospherically deposited lead (Pb). These peats are severely degraded, and there is increasing concern that erosion is releasing considerable quantities of this legacy pollution into surface waters. Despite substantial research into Pb dynamics in peatlands formal description of the possible mechanisms of contaminated sediment mobilisation is limited. However, there is evidence to suggest that a substantial proportion of contaminated surface sediment may be redistributed elsewhere in the catchment. This study uses the Pb contamination stored near the peat's surface as a fingerprint to trace contaminated sediment dynamics and storage in three severely degraded headwater catchments. Erosion is exposing high concentrations of Pb on interfluve surfaces, and substantial amounts of reworked contaminated material are stored on other catchment surfaces (gully walls and floors). We propose a variety of mechanisms as controls of Pb release and storage on the different surfaces, including: (i) wind action on interfluves; (ii) the aspect of gully walls, and (iii) gully depth. Vegetation also plays an important role in retaining contaminated sediment on all surfaces.

  20. Oxygen microprofile in the prepared sediments and its implication for the sediment oxygen consuming process in a heavily polluted river of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhai, Wanying; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) microprofiles of prepared sediments from 24 sampling sites in the Fuyang River were measured using a gold amalgam microelectrode in this study. The measured microprofiles can be divided into four types. In type I profiles, DO kept constant in the overlying water and decreased smoothly in the pore water; in type II profile, DO showed fluctuation in the pore water; in type III profiles, DO showed peak in the SWI; in type IV profiles, DO decreased obviously in the overlying water. Type I profiles indicated the absence of benthic organisms and thus the degradation of the sediment habitat. Type II and III profiles indicated the activity of benthic animal and epipelic algae, which is common in the healthy aquatic sediment. Type IV profiles indicated that the excessive accumulation of pollutants in the sediment and thus the serious sediment pollution. There are nine sites showing type I profile, three sites showing type II profile, nine sites showing type III profile, and three sites showing type IV profile in the Fuyang River. The dominance of type I and appearance of type IV indicated that sediment oxygen consumption processes in the Fuyang River were strongly influenced by the sediment pollutants release and the vanish of benthic organisms. The pharmacy, metallurgy, and curriery industries may contribute to the sediment deterioration and thus to the occurrence of type I and type IV oxygen profiles in the Fuyang River.

  1. Phytoplankton and sediments in Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Affected both by terrestrial factors like agriculture, deforestation, and erosion, and by marine factors like salinity levels, ocean temperature and water pollution, coastal environments are the dynamic interface between land and sea. In this MODIS image from January 15, 2002, the Gulf of Mexico is awash in a mixture of phytoplankton and sediment. Tan-colored sediment is flowing out into the Gulf from the Mississippi River, whose floodplain cuts a pale, wide swath to the right of center in the image, and also from numerous smaller rivers along the Louisiana coast (center). Mixing with the sediment are the multi-colored blue and green swirls that reveal the presence of large populations of marine plants called phytoplankton. Phytoplankton populations bloom and then fade, and these cycles affect fish and mammals-including humans-higher up the food chain. Certain phytoplankton are toxic to both fish and humans, and coastal health departments must monitor ecosystems carefully, often restricting fishing or harvesting of shellfish until the blooms have subsided.

  2. Flume simulation of sedimentation in recirculating flow

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J.C. ); Rubin, D.M. ); Ikeda, H. )

    1990-05-01

    A 4-m-wide flume at the University of Tsukuba Environmental Research Center was used to simulate flow conditions near debris fans in bedrock gorges. Flow was constricted to 2 m by a semicircular obstruction. During the authors experiments (discharge = 600 L/sec; Froude number of constricted flow = 1) a zone of recirculating current extended 25-30 m downstream from the separation point at the constriction. The pattern and velocity of surface flow was determined using time-lapse photography; subsurface velocity was measured with a two-dimensional electromagnetic current meter. During 32-hr of run time, a fine, very coarse sand mixture was fed into the flow at a rate between 0.5-1 kg/sec. Oscillation ripples developed beneath the separation surface that bounds the recirculation zone, and upstream-migrating dunes and ripples developed within the recirculation zone upstream from the reattachment point. A mid-channel expansion bar was deposited downstream from the reattachment point. Sedimentation within the recirculation zone continued by vertical aggradation and by upstream migration of dunes and ripples. Sediments within the recirculation zone were areally sorted with the finest sediment deposited near the separation point. These patterns are consistent with field observations of bars along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

  3. Acoustic measuring techniques for suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, P.; Felix, D.; Storti, G.; Lattuada, M.; Fleckenstein, P.; Deschwanden, F.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals can be used in various ways for suspended sediment monitoring. One possibility which lends itself particularly well in the context of hydropower plants (HPPs), is to use installations for acoustic discharge measurement (ADM). Such installations already exist at waterways of many HPPs. Similar to certain turbidimeters, the attenuation of the forward scattered signal travelling through the water-sediment mixture is correlated with suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This correlation can be based on reference SSCs, e.g. from gravimetric analyses of bottle samples. Without the need of additional sensors and practically maintenance-free, this method is used successfully in the HPP Fieschertal to warn the HPP operator of high SSC to prevent excessive turbine abrasion. Acoustic methods and systems that allow for estimating both SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) are under development. The simultaneous determination of SSC and PSD is not possible using a single frequency. Therefore, multi-frequency approaches are investigated for generally scattered signals. When backscattered signals are used, a stronger frequency dependency can be exploited. However, the reliable simultaneous determination of particle size (and distribution) and concentration is still a major challenge due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and an ill- posed problem of estimating concentration and size from recorded signals. The optimal setup configuration (angles, frequencies) for such a system is not unique and further investigations are recommended.

  4. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  5. Non-Equilibrium Sediment Transport Modeling - Extensions and Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    located in the northern Mississippi, U.S.A. The watershed is about 202 ha, covered with cotton and soybean fields and wood area. The oxbow lake has a...stabilizing the bed against the impacts of surges and waves. In estuaries, reservoirs, lakes and rivers, cohesive and non-cohesive sediment mixtures...other test example was simulation of rainfall-runoff, soil erosion and transport, and contaminant transport in the Deep Hollow Lake watershed

  6. TIE of a PAH-contaminated sediment using reproductive responses and EROD induction in rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Brumley, C.M.; Kraak, G. van der; Munkittrick, K.R.

    1995-12-31

    PAH-contaminated sediments have been shown to cause a range of effects in fish. However, identifying the effective compounds can be time consuming and expensive. A toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) involves the analysis of mixtures by initially separating the mixture into toxic and non-toxic constituents. In this study, sediment was collected from Hamilton Harbor, Lake Ontario, and either extracted wet using methanol (MeOH) and dichloromethane (DCM), or freeze-dried and soxhlet extracted with MeOH and DCM. DCM extracts were solvent exchanged with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). Juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed through the water to wet, freeze-dried, or extracted sediment, or to the MeOH or DMSO extracts for 4 days. Fish were analyzed for hepatic EROD activity, and plasma DMSO extracts, but was unaffected in fish exposed to extracted sediment. Estradiol levels were increased in fish exposed to the wet sediment, but not in fish exposed to the freeze-dried or extracted sediment, nor either of the solvent extracts. The response of testosterone to wet, freeze-dried and extracted sediment was inconsistent. Results indicate that both of the extraction methods efficiently removed from the sediment the compounds responsible for the effects on EROD activity and estradiol levels. However, neither method retained in the solvent extracts the compounds causing the increases in estradiol levels. Work continues to refine the freeze-drying and extraction methods; extracts will then be further fractionated using HPLC to identify the compounds of concern.

  7. Influence of Iron Redox Transformations on Plutonium Sorption to Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Hixon, Amy E.; Hu, Yung-Jin; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Nitsche, Heino; Qafoku, Odeta; Powell, Brian A.

    2010-10-01

    Plutonium subsurface mobility is primarily controlled by its oxidation state, which in turn is loosely coupled to the oxidation state of iron in the system. Experiments were conducted to examine the effect of sediment iron mineral composition and oxidation state on plutonium sorption and oxidation state. A pH 6.3 vadose zone sediment containing iron oxides and iron-containing phyllosilicates was treated with various complexants (ammonium oxalate) and reductants (dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate) to selectively leach and/or reduce iron oxide and phyllosilicate phases. Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to identify initial iron mineral composition of the sediment and monitor dissolution and reduction of iron oxides. Sorption of Pu(V) was monitored over one week for each of six treated sediment fractions. Plutonium oxidation state speciation in the aqueous and solid phases was monitored using solvent extraction, coprecipitation, and XANES. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the sediment contained 25-30% hematite, 60-65% Al-goethite, and <10%Fe(III) in phyllosilicate; there was no detectable Fe(II). Upon reduction with a strong chemical reductant (dithionite-citrate buffer, DCB), much of the hematite and goethite disappeared and the Fe in the phyllosilicate reduced to Fe(II). The rate of sorption was found to correlate with the 1 fraction of Fe(II) remaining within each treated sediment phase. Pu(V) was the only oxidation state measured in the aqueous phase, irrespective of treatment, whereas Pu(IV) and much smaller amounts of Pu(V) and Pu(VI) were measured in the solid phase. Surface-mediated reduction of Pu(V) to Pu(IV) occurred in treated and untreated sediment samples; Pu(V) remained on untreated sediment surface for two days before reducing to Pu(IV). Similar to the sorption kinetics, the reduction rate was correlated with sediment Fe(II) concentration. The correlation between Fe(II) concentrations and Pu(V) reduction demonstrates the potential impact of changing

  8. Subglacial conduits in sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Much of the current understanding of subglacial hydrology is based on the R-channel type model, in which turbulent dissipation and melting causes a roughly semi-circular incision upwards into the ice. The prevalence of such R-channels beneath the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets is poorly known. Beneath sediment-based ice, distributed water flow may prevail, or some form of conduits may still form due to a combination of upwards melting as well as downwards erosion into the subglacial sediments (often referred to as a canal). This study examines the dynamics of such conduits, and implications for large-scale subglacial drainage. Although a relatively standard set of equations has developed to model the evolution and efficiency of R-channels, models of sediment-floored conduits are much less well established; previous models assume steady state, or make ad hoc assumptions about the balance of processes controlling the channel walls. In this study I suggest a (relatively) simple model analogous to that for an R-channel. The model requires consideration of the energy balance that results in melting of the ice roof, and also the erosion, deposition, and creep of the sediments. Implications for the evolution of large-scale drainage systems over subglacial sediment will be discussed, for subglacial floods in Antarctica, and for subglacial erosion and landform development.

  9. Influenza-Sediment Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusiak, A.; Block, K. A.; Katz, A.; Gottlieb, P.; Alimova, A.; Galarza, J.; Wei, H.; Steiner, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A typical water fowl can secrete 1012 influenza virions per day. Therefore it is not unexpected that influenza virions interact with sediments in the water column. The influence of sediments on avian influenza virions is not known. With the threat of avian influenza emerging into the human population, it is crucial to understand virus survivability and residence time in a body of water. Influenza and clay sediments are colloidal particles and thus aggregate as explained by DLVO (Derjaguin & Landau, Verwey & Overbeek) theory. Of great importance is an understanding of the types of particulate or macromolecular components that bind the virus particles, and whether the virus remains biologically active. We present results of hetero-aggregation and transmission electron microscopy experiments performed with influenza A/PR8/38. Influenza particles are suspended with sediment and minimal nutrients for several days, after which the components are evaluated to determine influenza concentration and survivability. Transmission electron microscopy results are reported on the influenza-sediment aggregates to elucidate structure and morphology of the components.

  10. Laboratory measurements of physical, chemical, and optical characteristics of Lake Chicot sediment waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Usry, J. W.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    Reflectance, chromaticity, diffuse attenuation, beam attenuation, and several other physical and chemical properties were measured for various water mixtures of lake bottom sediment. Mixture concentrations range from 5 ppm to 700 ppm by weight of total suspended solids in filtered deionized tap water. Upwelled reflectance is a nonlinear function of remote sensing wave lengths. Near-infrared wavelengths are useful for monitoring highly turbid waters with sediment concentrations above 100 ppm. It is found that both visible and near infrared wavelengths, beam attenuation correlates well with total suspended solids ranging over two orders of magnitude.

  11. Trends in the suspended-sediment yields of coastal rivers of northern California, 1955–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, J.A.; Madej, M.A.; Goñi, M. A.; Wheatcroft, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Time-dependencies of suspended-sediment discharge from six coastal watersheds of northern California – Smith River, Klamath River, Trinity River, Redwood Creek, Mad River, and Eel River – were evaluated using monitoring data from 1955 to 2010. Suspended-sediment concentrations revealed time-dependent hysteresis and multi-year trends. The multi-year trends had two primary patterns relative to river discharge: (i) increases in concentration resulting from both land clearing from logging and the flood of record during December 1964 (water year 1965), and (ii) continual decreases in concentration during the decades following this flood. Data from the Eel River revealed that changes in suspended-sediment concentrations occurred for all grain-size fractions, but were most pronounced for the sand fraction. Because of these changes, the use of bulk discharge-concentration relationships (i.e., “sediment rating curves”) without time-dependencies in these relationships resulted in substantial errors in sediment load estimates, including 2.5-fold over-prediction of Eel River sediment loads since 1979. We conclude that sediment discharge and sediment discharge relationships (such as sediment rating curves) from these coastal rivers have varied substantially with time in response to land use and climate. Thus, the use of historical river sediment data and sediment rating curves without considerations for time-dependent trends may result in significant errors in sediment yield estimates from the globally-important steep, small watersheds.

  12. Sediment impacts on marine sponges.

    PubMed

    Bell, James J; McGrath, Emily; Biggerstaff, Andrew; Bates, Tracey; Bennett, Holly; Marlow, Joseph; Shaffer, Megan

    2015-05-15

    Changes in sediment input to marine systems can influence benthic environments in many ways. Sponges are important components of benthic ecosystems world-wide and as sessile suspension feeders are likely to be impacted by changes in sediment levels. Despite this, little is known about how sponges respond to changes in settled and suspended sediment. Here we review the known impacts of sedimentation on sponges and their adaptive capabilities, whilst highlighting gaps in our understanding of sediment impacts on sponges. Although the literature clearly shows that sponges are influenced by sediment in a variety of ways, most studies confer that sponges are able to tolerate, and in some cases thrive, in sedimented environments. Critical gaps exist in our understanding of the physiological responses of sponges to sediment, adaptive mechanisms, tolerance limits, and the particularly the effect of sediment on early life history stages.

  13. Generalized Beta Mixtures of Gaussians.

    PubMed

    Armagan, Artin; Dunson, David B; Clyde, Merlise

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, a rich variety of shrinkage priors have been proposed that have great promise in addressing massive regression problems. In general, these new priors can be expressed as scale mixtures of normals, but have more complex forms and better properties than traditional Cauchy and double exponential priors. We first propose a new class of normal scale mixtures through a novel generalized beta distribution that encompasses many interesting priors as special cases. This encompassing framework should prove useful in comparing competing priors, considering properties and revealing close connections. We then develop a class of variational Bayes approximations through the new hierarchy presented that will scale more efficiently to the types of truly massive data sets that are now encountered routinely.

  14. MULTIVARIATE KERNEL PARTITION PROCESS MIXTURES

    PubMed Central

    Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures provide a useful approach for relaxing parametric assumptions. Discrete mixture models induce clusters, typically with the same cluster allocation for each parameter in multivariate cases. As a more flexible approach that facilitates sparse nonparametric modeling of multivariate random effects distributions, this article proposes a kernel partition process (KPP) in which the cluster allocation varies for different parameters. The KPP is shown to be the driving measure for a multivariate ordered Chinese restaurant process that induces a highly-flexible dependence structure in local clustering. This structure allows the relative locations of the random effects to inform the clustering process, with spatially-proximal random effects likely to be assigned the same cluster index. An exact block Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, avoiding truncation of the infinite measure. The methods are applied to hormone curve data, and a dependent KPP is proposed for classification from functional predictors. PMID:24478563

  15. Reductive dehalogenation of polybrominated and polychlorinated biphenyls by anaerobic microorganisms from sediment

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)and polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) are stable industrial chemicals that consist of complex mixtures considered to be highly recalcitrant to biological degradation in the environment. Reductive dehalogenation is the only known biodegradation process for the more highly halogenated PCB and PBB mixtures. Studies were undertaken to: (1) examine in situ reductive debromination in sediments of the Pine River Reservoir, (2) compare the ability of microorganisms from PCB-contaminated and PBB-contaminated sediments to debrominate the commercial PBB mixture, Firemaster, (3) examine factors which might enhance reductive dehalogenation in sediments, (4) evaluate the role of sediment for dechlorinating microorganisms. Sediments in the heavily contaminated region of the Pine River have undergone little or no debromination. Anaerobic microorganisms previously shown to dechlorinate PCB mixtures were unable to dechlorinate Aroclor 1242 in the presence of Pine River sediments located close to the PBB manufacturing site. Microorganisms downstream of the heaviest contamination were able to debrominate Firemaster. Microorganisms from the Pine River (contaminated with Firemaster), Hudson River (contaminated with Aroclor 1242) and Silver Lake (contaminated with Aroclor 1260), removed 32%, 12%, and 3% of the meta plus para bromines, respectively, after 32 weeks. The Pine River inoculum removed an average of 1.25 bromines from the biphenyl molecule. When Firemaster was incubated with Hudson River microorganisms, 17% of the meta and para bromines were removed after 16 weeks, and additional debromination products, 2-bromobiphenyl and biphenyl, were detected suggesting ortho debromination. A PCB enrichment culture was established using pyruvate as an electron donor and Aroclor 1242 as the electron acceptor. Three Michigan surface soils, Pine River sediments, and ashed sediment supported reductive dechlorination of Aroclor 1242 by Hudson River microorganisms.

  16. Unexpected toxic interactions in the freshwater amphipod Gammarus pulex (L.) exposed to binary copper and nickel mixtures.

    PubMed

    Charles, Jérémie; Crini, Grégorio; Degiorgi, François; Sancey, Bertrand; Morin-Crini, Nadia; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2014-01-01

    To document the toxicity of copper and nickel in binary mixtures, freshwater amphipods Gammarus pulex were exposed to the metals given independently or as mixtures. Toxicity to Cu alone was relatively high: 96-h LC10 and LC50 were found at 91 and 196 μg L(-1), respectively. Toxicity to Ni alone was very low, with 96-h LC10 and LC50 of 44,900 and 79,200 μg L(-1), respectively. Mixture toxicities were calculated from single toxicity data using conventional models. Modeled toxicity was then compared with the measured toxicity of the binary mixture. Two kinds of mixtures were tested. Type I mixtures were designed as combinations of Cu and Ni given at the same effect concentrations, when taken independently, to identify possible interactions between copper and nickel. In type II mixtures, Cu concentrations varied from 0 to 600 μg L(-1) while the nickel concentration was kept constant at 500 μg L(-1) to mimic conditions of industrial wastewater discharges. Ni and Cu showed synergic effects in type I mixtures while type II mixtures revealed antagonistic effects. Low doses of Ni reduced Cu toxicity towards G. pulex. These results show that even for simple binary mixtures of contaminants with known chemistry and toxicity, unexpected interactions between the contaminants may occur. This reduces the reliability of conventional additivity models.

  17. One-dimensional pore pressure diffusion of different grain-fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von der Thannen, Magdalena; Kaitna, Roland

    2015-04-01

    During the release and the flow of fully saturated debris, non-hydrostatic fluid pressure can build up and probably dissipate during the event. This excess fluid pressure has a strong influence on the flow and deposition behaviour of debris flows. Therefore, we investigate the influence of mixture composition on the dissipation of non-hydrostatic fluid pressures. For this we use a cylindrical pipe of acrylic glass with installed pore water pressure sensors in different heights and measure the evolution of the pore water pressure over time. Several mixtures with variable content of fine sediment (silt and clay) and variable content of coarse sediment (with fixed relative fractions of grains between 2 and 32 mm) are tested. For the fines two types of clay (smectite and kaolinite) and loam (Stoober Lehm) are used. The analysis is based on the one-dimensional consolidation theory which uses a diffusion coefficient D to model the decay of excess fluid pressure over time. Starting from artificially induced super-hydrostatic fluid pressures, we find dissipation coefficients ranging from 10-5 m²/s for liquid mixtures to 10-8 m²/s for viscous mixtures. The results for kaolinite and smectite are quite similar. For our limited number of mixtures the effect of fines content is more pronounced than the effect of different amounts of coarse particles.

  18. The Mark II Vertex Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.P.; Baggs, R.; Fujino, D.; Hayes, K.; Hoard, C.; Hower, N.; Hutchinson, D.; Jaros, J.A.; Koetke, D.; Kowalski, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    We have completed constructing and begun operating the Mark II Drift Chamber Vertex Detector. The chamber, based on a modified jet cell design, achieves 30 {mu}m spatial resolution and <1000 {mu}m track-pair resolution in pressurized CO{sub 2} gas mixtures. Special emphasis has been placed on controlling systematic errors including the use of novel construction techniques which permit accurate wire placement. Chamber performance has been studied with cosmic ray tracks collected with the chamber located both inside and outside the Mark II. Results on spatial resolution, average pulse shape, and some properties of CO{sub 2} mixtures are presented. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Temporal trends, congener patterns, and sources of octa-, nona-, and decabromodiphenyl ethers (PBDE) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCD) in Swiss lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Martin; Zennegg, Markus; Bogdal, Christian; Gerecke, Andreas C; Schmid, Peter; Heeb, Norbert V; Sturm, Michael; Vonmont, Heinz; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Giger, Walter

    2008-09-01

    With the recent ban of pentabromodiphenyl ether (technical PentaBDE) and octabromodiphenyl ether (technical OctaBDE) mixtures in the European Union (EU) and in parts of the United States, decabromodiphenyl ether (technical DecaBDE) remains as the only polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) based flame retardant available, today. The EU risk assessment report for DecaBDE identified a high level of uncertainty associated with the suitability of the current risk assessment approach for secondary poisoning by debromination of DecaBDE to toxic lower brominated diphenylethers. Addressing this still open question, we investigated concentrations and temporal trends of DecaBDE, NonaBDE, and OctaBDE congeners in the sediments of Greifensee, a small lake located in an urban area close to Zürich, Switzerland. PBDE appeared first in sediment layers corresponding to the mid 1970s. While total Tri-HeptaBDE (BDE-28, -47, -99, -100, -153, -154 and -183) concentrations leveled off in the mid 1990s to about 1.6 ng/g dw (dry weight), DecaBDE levels increased steadily to 7.4 ng/g dw in 2001 with a doubling time of 9 years. Hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCD) appeared in Greifensee sediments in the mid 1980s. They are an important class of flame retardants that are being used in increasing amounts, today. As was observed for DecaBDE, HBCD concentrations were continuously increasing to reach 2.5 ng/g dw in 2001. Next to DecaBDE, all 3 NonaBDE congeners (BDE-208, BDE-207, and BDE-206) and at least 7 out of the 12 possible OctaBDE congeners (BDE-202, BDE-201, BDE-197/204, BDE-198/203, BDE-196/200, BDE-205, and BDE-194) were detected in the sediments of Greifensee. Highest concentrations were found in the surface sediments with 7.2, 0.26, 0.14, and 1.6 ng/g dw for Deca-, Nona-, Octa-, and the sum of Tri-HeptaBDE, respectively. While DecaBDE and NonaBDE were found to increase rapidly, the increase of OctaBDE was slower. Congener patterns of Octa- and NonaBDE present in sediments of Greifensee did

  20. Pyrosequencing reveals bacteria carried in different wind-eroded sediments.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Terrence; Acosta-Martinez, Veronica; Calderón, Francisco J; Zobeck, Ted M; Baddock, Matthew; Van Pelt, R Scott; Senwo, Zachary; Dowd, Scot; Cox, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the microbial communities carried in wind-eroded sediments from various soil types and land management systems. The novel technique of pyrosequencing promises to expand our understanding of the microbial diversity of soils and eroded sediments because it can sequence 10 to 100 times more DNA fragments than previous techniques, providing enhanced exploration into what microbes are being lost from soil due to wind erosion. Our study evaluated the bacterial diversity of two types of wind-eroded sediments collected from three different organic-rich soils in Michigan using a portable field wind tunnel. The wind-eroded sediments evaluated were a coarse sized fraction with 66% of particles >106 μm (coarse eroded sediment) and a finer eroded sediment with 72% of particles <106 μm. Our findings suggested that (i) bacteria carried in the coarser sediment and fine dust were effective fingerprints of the source soil, although their distribution may vary depending on the soil characteristics because certain bacteria may be more protected in soil surfaces than others; (ii) coarser wind-eroded sediment showed higher bacterial diversity than fine dust in two of the three soils evaluated; and (iii) certain bacteria were more predominant in fine dust (, , and ) than coarse sediment ( and ), revealing different locations and niches of bacteria in soil, which, depending on wind erosion processes, can have important implications on the soil sustainability and functioning. Infrared spectroscopy showed that wind erosion preferentially removes particular kinds of C from the soil that are lost via fine dust. Our study shows that eroded sediments remove the active labile organic soil particulates containing key microorganisms involved in soil biogeochemical processes, which can have a negative impact on the quality and functioning of the source soil.

  1. Iron monosulfide accumulation and pyrite formation in eutrophic estuarine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraal, Peter; Burton, Edward D.; Bush, Richard T.

    2013-12-01

    This study investigates iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) cycling in sediments from the eutrophic Peel-Harvey Estuary in Western Australia, which is subject to localized accumulation of strongly reducing, organic- and sulfide-rich sediments. Sedimentary iron was mostly present in highly reactive form (on average 73% of total Fe) and showed extensive sulfidization even in surface sediments, despite being overlain by a well-mixed oxygenated water column. This indicates that, under eutrophic marine conditions, Fe sulfidization may be driven by reductive processes in the sediment without requiring oxygen depletion in the overlying waters. Strong enrichments in iron monosulfide (FeS > 300 μmol g-1) were observed in fine-grained sediment intervals up to 45 cm depth. This metastable Fe sulfide is commonly restricted to thin subsurface sediment intervals, below which pyrite (FeS2) dominates. Our findings suggest inhibition of the dissolution-precipitation processes that replace FeS with FeS2 in sediments. Rates of pyrite formation based on the FeS2 profiles were much lower than those predicted by applying commonly used kinetic equations for pyrite formation. Dissolved H2S was present at millimolar levels throughout the investigated sediment profiles. This may indicate that (i) pyrite formation via reaction between dissolved Fe (including Fe clusters) and H2S was limited by low availability of dissolved Fe or (ii) reaction kinetics of pyrite formation via the H2S pathway may be relatively slow in natural reducing sediments. We propose that rapid burial of the FeS under anoxic conditions in these organic-rich reducing sediments minimizes the potential for pyrite formation, possibly by preventing dissolution of FeS or by limiting the availability of oxidized sulfur species that are required for pyrite formation via the polysulfide pathway.

  2. Hydrocarbon pollutants shape bacterial community assembly of harbor sediments.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Marta; Mapelli, Francesca; Magagnini, Mirko; Chouaia, Bessem; Armeni, Monica; Marasco, Ramona; Crotti, Elena; Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara

    2016-03-15

    Petroleum pollution results in co-contamination by different classes of molecules, entailing the occurrence of marine sediments difficult to remediate, as in the case of the Ancona harbor (Mediterranean Sea, Italy). Autochthonous bioaugmentation (ABA), by exploiting the indigenous microbes of the environment to be treated, could represent a successful bioremediation strategy. In this perspective we aimed to i) identify the main drivers of the bacterial communities' richness in the sediments, ii) establish enrichment cultures with different hydrocarbon pollutants evaluating their effects on the bacterial communities' composition, and iii) obtain a collection of hydrocarbon degrading bacteria potentially exploitable in ABA. The correlation between the selection of different specialized bacterial populations and the type of pollutants was demonstrated by culture-independent analyses, and by establishing a collection of bacteria with different hydrocarbon degradation traits. Our observations indicate that pollution dictates the diversity of sediment bacterial communities and shapes the ABA potential in harbor sediments.

  3. Modification of chemical oxygen demand monitoring in the Yellow River, China, with a high content of sediments.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jinren; Sun, Liyiing; Sun, Weiling

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a modification of chemical oxygen demand (COD) monitoring giving a better indication of the pollution level compared with the conventional COD method for rivers with a high content of sediments. The correlation between the sediment organic carbon and COD was investigated using sediments sampled in the middle Yellow River, China. Partitioning of the sediment organic carbon between the water and sediment phases was also investigated using batch experiments, with the sediment concentration varying from 20 to 400 g/L. As a result, the COD modification equations are proposed for both turbid water (mixture of water and sediment) and supematant water (filtrate using a 0.45-microm membrane). The modified COD in turbid water and supernatant water could be 40 and 10% less than the monitored COD values, respectively. These results may have a significant influence on the assessment of water quality class in the Yellow River.

  4. Bivalve larvae testing of ocean and in-bay sediments using porewater and elutriates

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, D.; Targgart, L.

    1995-12-31

    Toxicity of marine sediments is commonly tested using bivalve larval tests. The tests are performed on elutriates, which are prepared by mixing the sediment sample with seawater, and allowing the mixture to settle. The supernatant is separated and tested. Test results appeared to vary depending on the grain-size of the sediments. A study was performed to compare the effects of sediment grain-size on elutriate and porewater toxicity using the bivalve larvae test. Sediments were sampled from two sites: one in San Francisco Bay and one off the coast of San Francisco in the open ocean. From each site, two areas were sampled, one that was potentially impacted by a point-source discharge and another that was free from any discharge impacts. The bay sediments were fine-grained, and the ocean sediments were coarse grained. Porewater from each sample was extracted by centrifugation, and elutriates were prepared using a 4:1 sediment: seawater ratio. Each of the porewater and elutriate samples were tested using the ASTM Standard Guide for Conducting Static Acute Toxicity Tests with Saltwater Bivalves. The results show differences in toxicity that appear to be related to sediment grain-size. The results of this study further imply that dredge material test results should be interpreted with caution when fine-grained sediments are tested. Normalization of the results to grain-size may be appropriate.

  5. A GIS approach to model sediment reduction susceptibility of mixed sand and gravel beaches.

    PubMed

    Eikaas, Hans S; Hemmingsen, Maree A

    2006-06-01

    The morphological form of mixed sand and gravel beaches is distinct, and the process/response system and complex dynamics of these beaches are not well understood. Process response models developed for pure sand or gravel beaches cannot be directly applied to these beaches. The Canterbury Bight coastline is apparently abundantly supplied with sediments from large rivers and coastal alluvial cliffs, but a large part of this coastline is experiencing long-term erosion. Sediment budget models provide little evidence to suggest sediments are stored within this system. Current sediment budget models inadequately quantify and account for the processes responsible for the patterns of erosion and accretion of this coastline. We outline a new method to extrapolate from laboratory experiments to the field using a geographical information system approach to model sediment reduction susceptibility for the Canterbury Bight. Sediment samples from ten representative sites were tumbled in a concrete mixer for an equivalent distance of 40 km. From the textural mixture and weight loss over 40 km tumbling, we applied regression techniques to generate a predictive equation for Sediment Reduction Susceptibility (SRS). We used Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW) to extrapolate the results from fifty-five sites with data on textural sediment composition to field locations with no data along the Canterbury Bight, creating a continuous sediment reductions susceptibility surface. Isolines of regular SRS intervals were then derived from the continuous surface to create a contour map of sediment reductions susceptibility for the Canterbury Bight. Results highlighted the variability in SRS along this coastline.

  6. Multiple sources of alkanes in Quaternary oceanic sediment of Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rapp, J.B.; Golan-Bac, M.; Hostettler, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Normal alkanes (n-C13n-C36), isoprenoid hydrocarbons (i-C15, i-C16, i-C18, i-C19, and i-C20) triterpanes (C27C32), and (C27C29) are present in low concentrations offshore Antarctica in near-surface, Quaternary sediment of the Wilkes Land continental margin and of the western Ross Sea. The distributions of these hydrocarbons are interpreted relative to possible sources and processes. The hydrocarbons appear to be mixtures of primary and recycled material from marine and terrigenous sources. The n-alkanes are most abundant and are characterized by two distinct populations, one of probable marine origin and the other likely from terrigenous, vascular plant sources. Because the continent of Antarctica today is devoid of higher plants, the plant-derived hydrocarbons in these offshore sediments probably came from wind-blown material and recycled Antarctic sediment that contains land-plant remains from an earlier period of time. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons are partially recycled and mainly of marine origin; the dominance of pristane over phytane suggests oxic paleoenvironmental conditions. Both modern and ancient triterpanes and steranes are present, and the distribution of these indicates a mixture of primary and recycled bacterial, algal, and possible higher-plant materials. Although the sampled sediments were deposited during the Quaternary, they apparently contain a significant component of hydrocarbons of pre-Quaternary age. ?? 1987.

  7. Remediation technologies for contaminated sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, L.M.

    1995-09-01

    Although soil and groundwater remediation has been conducted for many years, sediment remediation is still in its infancy. Regulatory agencies are now beginning to identify areas where contaminated sediments exist and evaluate their environmental impact. As these evaluations are completed, the projects must shift focus to how these sediments can be remediated. Also as the criteria for aquatic disposal of dredged sediments become more stringent, remediation technologies must be developed to address contaminated sediments generated by maintenance dredging.This report describes the various issues and possible technologies for sediment remediation.

  8. Chemistry of Tertiary sediments in the surroundings of the Ries impact structure and moldavite formation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žák, Karel; Skála, Roman; Řanda, Zdeněk; Mizera, Jiří; Heissig, Kurt; Ackerman, Lukáš; Ďurišová, Jana; Jonášová, Šárka; Kameník, Jan; Magna, Tomáš

    2016-04-01

    Moldavites, tektites of the Central European strewn field, have been traditionally linked with the Ries impact structure in Germany. They are supposed to be derived mainly from the near-surface sediments of the Upper Freshwater Molasse of Miocene age that probably covered the target area before the impact. Comparison of the chemical composition of moldavites with that of inferred source materials requires recalculation of the composition of sediments to their water-, organic carbon- and carbon dioxide-free residuum. This recalculation reflects the fact that these compounds were lost almost completely from the target materials during their transformation to moldavites. Strong depletions in concentrations of many elements in moldavites relative to the source sediments (e.g., Mo, Cu, Ag, Sb, As, Fe) contrast with enrichments of several elements in moldavites (e.g., Cs, Ba, K, Rb). These discrepancies can be generally solved using two different approaches, either by involvement of a component of specific chemical composition, or by considering elemental fractionation during tektite formation. The proposed conceptual model of moldavite formation combines both approaches and is based on several steps: (i) the parent mixture (Upper Freshwater Molasse sediments as the dominant source) contained also a minor admixture of organic matter and soils; (ii) the most energetic part of the ejected matter was converted to vapor (plasma) and another part produced melt directly upon decompression; (iii) following further adiabatic decompression, the expanding vapor phase disintegrated the melt into small melt droplets and some elements were partially lost from the melt because of their volatility, or because of the volatility of their compounds, such as carbonyls of Fe and other transition metals (e.g., Ni, Co, Mo, Cr, and Cu); (iv) large positively charged ions such as Cs+, Ba2+, K+, Rb+ from the plasma portion were enriched in the late-stage condensation spherules or condensed

  9. Sediment Interfaces: Ecotones on a Microbial Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchers, M. R.; Colwell, F. S.; D'Angelo, G.; Thurber, A. R.; Graw, M. F.

    2015-12-01

    Ecotones - transitions between different biomes - often support greater faunal diversity than the adjacent ecological systems. For subseafloor microorganisms, defined geological and chemical gradients have been shown to affect population sizes and community structure, but the role that sediment interfaces play is still unclear. Here, we test the hypothesis that zones of transition between two distinct sediment types increase microbial diversity and change community composition. Concurrently, we explore those factors that drive deep-subsurface microbial community structure (e.g., depth, interstitial water chemistry, methane concentrations, clay content). Samples from IODP Expedition 349 - South China Sea Tectonics - had interfaces of either ash/clay or turbidite/clay boundaries sampled , DNA extracted, and the 16S rRNA gene analyzed on an Illumina MiSeq platform. Initial analyses reveal that microbial communities in sediment samples are distinct from communities in drilling fluid, indicating that contamination is unlikely. In four of the eight complete interfaces currently analyzed we found an increase in diversity (based on the chao1 index), in certain cases doubling the diversity of the adjacent rock types. The pattern was not uniform across all interfaces. While some posit that ecotones provide a mixing of the two adjacent communities, we were surprised to find an abundance (mean = 392 OTUs) of unique microbial taxa within the ecotone itself when compared to adjacent sediment (mean=282 unique OTUs). Thus while diversity was not uniformly increased in ecotones, the interface led to divergent microbial communities that were not simply mixtures of those adjacent. We will discuss the ability of abiotic factors in explaining the among ecotone variance that we observed. Our investigation helps to characterize the factors that drive microbial community structure of the subseafloor while highlighting the need to focus on habitat heterogeneity at a scale pertinent to

  10. 11. MOVABLE BED SEDIMENTATION MODELS. AUTOMATIC SEDIMENT FEEDER DESIGNED AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. MOVABLE BED SEDIMENTATION MODELS. AUTOMATIC SEDIMENT FEEDER DESIGNED AND BUILT BY WES. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  11. Model Misspecification: Finite Mixture or Homogeneous?

    PubMed Central

    Tarpey, Thaddeus; Yun, Dong; Petkova, Eva

    2007-01-01

    A common problem in statistical modelling is to distinguish between finite mixture distribution and a homogeneous non-mixture distribution. Finite mixture models are widely used in practice and often mixtures of normal densities are indistinguishable from homogenous non-normal densities. This paper illustrates what happens when the EM algorithm for normal mixtures is applied to a distribution that is a homogeneous non-mixture distribution. In particular, a population-based EM algorithm for finite mixtures is introduced and applied directly to density functions instead of sample data. The population-based EM algorithm is used to find finite mixture approximations to common homogeneous distributions. An example regarding the nature of a placebo response in drug treated depressed subjects is used to illustrate ideas. PMID:18974843

  12. Variable mixture ratio performance through nitrogen augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beichel, R.; Obrien, C. J.; Bair, E. K.

    1988-01-01

    High/variable mixture ratio O2/H2 candidate engine cycles are examined for earth-to-orbit vehicle application. Engine performance and power balance information are presented for the candidate cycles relative to chamber pressure, bulk density, and mixture ratio. Included in the cycle screening are concepts where a third fluid (liquid nitrogen) is used to achieve a variable mixture ratio over the trajectory from liftoff to earth orbit. The third fluid cycles offer a very low risk, fully reusable, low operation cost alternative to high/variable mixture ratio bipropellant cycles. Variable mixture ratio engines with extendible nozzle are slightly lower performing than a single mixture ratio engine (MR = 7:1) with extendible nozzle. Dual expander engines (MR = 7:1) have slightly better performance than the single mixture ratio engine. Dual fuel dual expander engines offer a 16 percent improvement over the single mixture ratio engine.

  13. Geomorphological implications of engineering bed sediments by lotic animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statzner, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    these complications, these problems must be solved, as bioturbators such as crayfish and bioconsolidators such as silk-spinning caddisflies may locally modify (i) rates of transport of fluvial sediments over three orders of magnitude and (ii) frequencies of mass transport events over five orders of magnitude. The fastest way to identify promising subsequent research routes in this field would be through a variety of abundance manipulations of lotic organisms (animals and plants having different mechanistic sediment-engineering abilities) in real rivers in combination with a simple approach to assess the critical shear stress in situ for varying types of sediments. This would require joint research by fluvial geomorphologists, hydrologists, and ecologists.

  14. Toxicity of contaminated sediments in dilution series with control sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.K.; Landrum, P.F.; Burton, G.A.; Klaine, S.J.; Crecelius, E.A.; Byl, T.D.; Gossiaux, Duane C.; Tsymbal, V.N.; Cleveland, L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Sasson-Brickson, G.

    1993-01-01

    The use of dilutions has been the foundation of our approach for assessing contaminated water, and accordingly, it may be important to establish similar or parallel approaches for sediment dilutions. Test organism responses to dilution gradients can identify the degree of necessary sediment alteration to reduce the toxicity. Using whole sediment dilutions to represent the complex interactions of in situ sediments can identify the toxicity, but the selection of the appropriate diluent for the contaminated sediment may affect the results and conclusions drawn. Contaminated whole sediments were examined to evaluate the toxicity of dilutions of sediments with a diversity of test organisms. Dilutions of the contaminated sediments were prepared with differing diluents that varied in organic carbon content, particle size distribution, and volatile solids. Studies were conducted using four macroinvertebrates and a vascular, rooted plant. Responses by some test organisms followed a sigmoidal dose-response curve, but others followed a U-shaped curve. Initial dilutions reduced toxicity as expected, but further dilution resulted in an increase in toxicity. The type of diluent used was an important factor in assessing the sediment toxicity, because the control soil reduced toxicity more effectively than sand as a diluent of the same sediment. Using sediment chemical and physical characteristics as an indicator of sediment dilution may not be as useful as chemical analysis of contaminants, but warrants further investigation.

  15. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and, in the case of mixtures which are aqueous solutions or aqueous pastes, sodium benzoate in a... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of...

  16. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and, in the case of mixtures which are aqueous solutions or aqueous pastes, sodium benzoate in a... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  19. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  1. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  2. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  3. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  5. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  7. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  10. 40 CFR 721.9540 - Polysulfide mixture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polysulfide mixture. 721.9540 Section... Substances § 721.9540 Polysulfide mixture. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polysulfide mixture (PMN P-93-1043)...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  12. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of a mixture which contains no straight color listed in subpart C or D may be certified for use in food,...

  13. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of a mixture which contains no straight color listed in subpart C or D may be certified for use in food,...

  14. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  15. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Mixture controls. 25.1147 Section 25.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 25.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control. The controls must...

  17. 14 CFR 29.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 29.1147 Section 29.1147... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 29.1147 Mixture controls. (a) If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control, and the...

  18. 14 CFR 27.1147 - Mixture controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Mixture controls. 27.1147 Section 27.1147... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Powerplant Controls and Accessories § 27.1147 Mixture controls. If there are mixture controls, each engine must have a separate control and the controls must...

  19. 21 CFR 82.6 - Certifiable mixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Certifiable mixtures. 82.6 Section 82.6 Food and... PROVISIONALLY LISTED COLORS AND SPECIFICATIONS General Provisions § 82.6 Certifiable mixtures. (a) A batch of a mixture which contains no straight color listed in subpart C or D may be certified for use in food,...

  20. Ionic liquids for separation of olefin-paraffin mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Huang, Jing-Fang

    2014-07-15

    The invention is directed to an ionic liquid comprising (i) a cationic portion containing a complex of a silver (I) ion and one or more neutral ligands selected from organoamides, organoamines, olefins, and organonitriles, and (ii) an anionic portion having the chemical formula ##STR00001## wherein m and n are independently 0 or an integer of 1 or above, and p is 0 or 1, provided that when p is 0, the group --N--SO.sub.2--(CF.sub.2).sub.nCF.sub.3 subtended by p is replaced with an oxide atom connected to the shown sulfur atom. The invention is also directed to a method for separating an olefin from an olefin-paraffin mixture by passing the mixture through a layer of the ionic liquid described above.

  1. Ionic liquids for separation of olefin-paraffin mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Huang, Jing-Fang

    2013-09-17

    The invention is directed to an ionic liquid comprising (i) a cationic portion containing a complex of a silver (I) ion and one or more neutral ligands selected from organoamides, organoamines, olefins, and organonitriles, and (ii) an anionic portion having the chemical formula ##STR00001## wherein m and n are independently 0 or an integer of 1 or above, and p is 0 or 1, provided that when p is 0, the group --N--SO.sub.2--(CF.sub.2).sub.nCF.sub.3 subtended by p is replaced with an oxide atom connected to the shown sulfur atom. The invention is also directed to a method for separating an olefin from an olefin-paraffin mixture by passing the mixture through a layer of the ionic liquid described above.

  2. Responses of Hyalella azteca to a Pesticide-Nutrient Mixture in Vegetated and Non-vegetated Wetland Mesocosms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquatic vegetation has been shown to improve water quality by trapping and processing contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients and sediments. Currently there is little information regarding effects of pesticide and nutrient mixtures on aquatic biota in these systems and the influence aquatic vege...

  3. SULFIDE MINERALS IN SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation processes of metal sulfides in sediments, especially iron sulfides, have been the subjects of intense scientific research because of linkages to the global biogeochemical cycles of iron, sulfur, carbon, and oxygen. Transition metal sulfides (e.g., NiS, CuS, ZnS, Cd...

  4. PHYTOASSESSMENT OF ESTUARINE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most sediment quality assessments and quality guidelines are based on the laboratory response of single animal species and benthic animal community composition. The role of plants in this hazard assessment process is poorly understood despite the fact that plant-dominated habitat...

  5. Sediment and the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, Richard F.; Ongley, E. D.

    This symposium, held May 17-18 during the International Association of Hydrological Sciences Third Scientific Assembly, was organized and sponsored by the International Commission on Continental Erosion. The papers presented dealt with sediment problems and contaminants transport associated with both natural and disturbed environments. Topics discussed were divided into four general groups: sediment-associated transport of contaminants in nonpoint pollution; erosion control problems associated with mining, construction and waste disposal activities; time lag in sediment movement through drainage networks; and the modeling of runoff and sedimentation.Average attendance at each of the six sessions was about 50 persons. Of the 23 scheduled papers, 21 were presented by the authors; however, the two missing authors were replaced on the program by authors who had submitted abstracts but who did not complete their manuscripts in time for prepublication. Therefore 23 papers were presented and the program was complete. Participation by country was: Bolivia, 1; People's Republic of China, 2; Canada, 4; India, 2; Israel, 1; Netherlands, 2; United Kingdom, 1; and United States, 10.

  6. Assessment of potential biological activities and distributions of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in sediments of the west coast of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seungyeon; Hong, Seongjin; Kwon, Bong-Oh; Park, Jinsoon; Song, Sung Joon; Giesy, John P; Khim, Jong Seong

    2017-02-01

    The west coast of Korea has experienced environmental deterioration for more than half a century. In the present study, we specifically aimed to: i) evaluate potential toxicities of contaminants in sediments that cause effects mediated through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and estrogen receptor (ER); ii) determine spatio-temporal distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkylphenols (APs); and iii) identify causes of greater potencies of samples. From 2010 to 2014, sediments were collected from 12 major estuarine and coastal regions along the west coast of South Korea. In vitro cell bioassays were performed to determine AhR- and ER-mediated potencies using H4IIE-luc and MVLN cells, respectively. Fifteen PAHs and six APs in sediments were identified by GC/MSD. Results of bioassays generally showed a low-to-moderate degree of contamination, however, greater AhR- and ER-mediated potencies were measured at some locations. Concentrations of PAHs and APs varied among locations, which indicated that sources were independently affected by the surrounding environment (e.g., industrial complex and cities). Results of bioassays were generally well correlated with concentrations of putative causative chemicals. Benzo[k]fluoranthene, dibenz[a,h]anthracene, and benzo[b]fluoranthene were the major AhR agonists, explaining approximately 30% of the bioassay-derived benzo[a]pyrene equivalent concentration (BaP-EQ). Unknown AhR and ER agonists and potential mixture effects remain in question. Overall, the present study provides baseline information on chemical contaminations and potential toxicity of sediments in a fairly wide geographical region of the west coast of South Korea.

  7. Sediment delivery after a wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reneau, S.L.; Katzman, D.; Kuyumjian, G.A.; Lavine, A.; Malmon, D.V.

    2007-01-01

    We use a record of sedimentation a small reservoir within the Cerro Grande burn area, New Mexico, to document postfire delivery of ash, other fine-grained sediment carried in suspension within floods, and coarse-grained sediment transported as bedload over a five-year period. Ash content of sediment layers is estimated using fallout 137Cs as a tracer, and ash concentrations are shown to rapidly decrease through a series of moderate-intensity convective storms in the first rainy season after the fire. Over 90% of the ash was delivered to the reservoir in the first year, and ash concentrations in suspended sediment were negligible after the second year. Delivery of the remainder of the fine sediment also declined rapidly after the first year despite the occurrence of higher-intensity storms in the second year. Fine sediment loads after five years remained significantly above prefire averages. Deposition of coarse-grained sediment was irregular in time and was associated with transport by snowmelt runoff of sediment stored along the upstream channel during short-duration summer floods. Coarse sediment delivery in the first four years was strongly correlated with snowmelt volume, suggesting a transport-limited system with abundant available sediment. Transport rates of coarse sediment declined in the fifth year, consistent with a transition to a more stable channel as the accessible sediment supply was depleted and the channel bed coarsened. Maximum impacts from ash and other fine-grained sediment therefore occurred soon after the fire, whereas the downstream impacts from coarse-grained sediment were attenuated by the more gradual process of bedload sediment transport. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  8. Sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhaber, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bacterial sulfate reduction occurs in all marine sediments that contain organic matter. Aqueous sulfide (HS-, H2S), one of the initial products of bacterial sulfide reduction, is extremely reactive with iron bearing minerals: sulfur is fixed into sediments as iron sulfide (first FeS and then Fe2S2). A working definition is given of sulfur diagenesis in marine sediments. Controls and consequences of sulfate reduction rates in marine sediments are examined.

  9. Generating mixtures of spatial qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, G.; Torres-Ruiz, F. A.; Neves, Leonardo; Delgado, A.; Saavedra, C.; Pádua, S.

    2008-10-01

    In a recent letter [L. Neves, G. Lima, J.G. Aguirre Gómez, C.H. Monken, C. Saavedra, S. Pádua, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94 (2005) 100501], we presented a scheme for generating pure entangled states of spatial qudits ( D-dimensional quantum systems) by using the momentum transverse correlation of the parametric down-converted photons. In this work, we discuss a generalization of this process to enable the creation of mixed states. With the technique proposed we experimentally generated a mixture of two spatial qubits.

  10. Sediment Pond Removal and Enhanced Designs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sediment Pond Removal Considerations; Scheduling, Baseflow diversion, Dewatering provisions, Sediment handling, Potential to discharge sediment, Down‐gradient sediment control(s), Erosion control(s), Stream reconstruction, Riparian vegetation.

  11. Theoretical/numerical model for the transport of non-uniform suspended sediment in open channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Sanjeev K.; Bombardelli, Fabián A.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, we address the transport of multi-disperse suspended sediment mixtures in open channels, via the use of the two-fluid model. To that end, we extend previously developed frameworks for the dilute and non-dilute transport of suspended sediment. Within the scope of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, these modeling frameworks comprise mass and momentum equations for both phases (water and sediment). Here, we calculate the distribution of total volumetric concentration of sediment using two approaches: (1) by considering the mixture as represented by a single size; we call this approach Partial two-fluid model for uniform sediments (PTFMU); and (2) by combining the volumetric concentration of the sediment corresponding to several particle size classes; we call this approach Partial two-fluid model for non-uniform sediments (PTFMNU). In the second approach, we propose a methodology for the computation of the overall velocity of the disperse phase as a function of the velocities of each size class. k- ɛ type closures to account for the turbulence in the carrier phase (water) are applied. We also consider the coupling between the two phases through the drag force. Velocities of the carrier and disperse phases, and concentrations for each sediment class size are numerically solved by integrating the differential equations over control volumes. In order to validate our models, we compare numerical results to experimental data of Einstein and Chien [H.A. Einstein, N. Chien, Effects of heavy sediment concentration near the bed on velocity and sediment distribution, MRD sediment series report, University of California, Berkley, 1955] and Taggart et al. [W.C. Taggart, C.A. Yermoli, S. Montes, A. Ippen, Effects of sediment size and gradation on concentration profiles for turbulent flow, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1972]. Results of mean velocity of the carrier phase are in close agreement with the experimental data. For the prediction

  12. Sediment bioassays with oyster larvae

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P.M.; Morgan, J.D.

    1983-10-01

    Tests with naturally-occurring sediments are rare and sediment testing methodology is not standardized. The authors present a simple methodology for undertaking sediment bioassays with oyster larvae, and present data from a recent study to prove the utility of this method.

  13. Chesapeake Bay Sediment Flux Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    that influence sediment-water fluxes. Sediment oxygen demand and sediment-water fluxes of sulfide, ammonium , nitrate , phosphate, and silica are...32- C. Nitrate Source from the Overlying Water...39- D. Nitrate Source from Nitrification ................................................................................ -40- E . M odel A

  14. COLLECTION OF UNDISTURBED SURFACE SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Resource Council identified the need for a capability to collect undisturbed surface sediments. Surface sediments are an important source for most exposure of fish to polychlorinated biphenyls via direct uptake from water in contact with sediments. An innovative sedi...

  15. Geoacoustic model of surface sediments in the southwestern Ulleung basin, the East Sea of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Kim, D. C.; Lee, G. S.; Kim, S. P.; Bae, S. H.

    2012-04-01

    To realization of geoacoustic model in the southwestern Ulleung basin, the East Sea of Korea, eighty-two piston core samples and sixty-six box core samples were collected. Sediment texture (mean grain size and sand, silt, and clay contents), physical properties (porosity, water content, bulk density, and grain density), and acoustic properties (compressional wave velocity and attenuation) were measured using surface sediments below 40 cm from the surface. As the results, the study area is divided into five sub-areas based on acoustic property of sediments: (1) Area I is composed of muddy sediments that affected directly by the Nakdong River discharge. The velocity is almost 1490 m/s. (2) Area II is generally characterized by hemi-pelagic muds and partially mixed with intermittent sandy sediments originated from the outer shelf and upper slope. The velocity approximately ranges from 1490 to 1500 m/s. (3) Area III is comprised of muddy sand sediments that are corresponds to the boundary between recent sediments and relict sediments. The velocity ranges from 1500 to 1600 m/s. (4) Area IV is dominated by coarse-grained relict sediments. The velocity ranges from 1600 to 1700 m/s. And (5) Area V consists of very coarser sediments. The velocity is higher than 1700 m/s. The sediment velocity generally decreases with increasing porosity or decreasing mean grain size and bulk density.

  16. Effect of Cement on Emulsified Asphalt Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oruc, Seref; Celik, Fazil; Akpinar, M. Vefa

    2007-10-01

    Emulsified asphalt mixtures have environmental, economical, and logistical advantages over hot mixtures. However, they have attracted little attention as structural layers due to their inadequate performance and susceptibility to early life damage by rainfall. The objective of this article is to provide an improved insight into how the mechanical properties of emulsion mixtures may be improved and to determine the influence of cement on emulsified asphalt mixtures. Laboratory tests on strength, temperature susceptibility, water damage, creep and permanent deformation were implemented to evaluate the mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures. The test results showed that mechanical properties of emulsified asphalt mixtures have significantly improved with Portland cement addition. This experimental study suggested that cement modified asphalt emulsion mixtures might be an alternate way of a structural layer material in pavement.

  17. Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.

    2012-01-01

    The subject presentation, entitled, Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) Experiment, was presented at the International Space Station (ISS) Increment 33/34 Science Symposium. This presentation provides an overview of an international collaboration between NASA and CNES to study the behavior of a dilute aqueous solution of Na2SO4 (5% w) at near-critical conditions. The Supercritical Water Mixture (SCWM) investigation, serves as important precursor work for subsequent Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) experiments. The SCWM investigation will be performed in DECLICs High Temperature Insert (HTI) for the purpose of studying critical fluid phenomena at high temperatures and pressures. The HTI includes a completely sealed and integrated test cell (i.e., Sample Cell Unit SCU) that will contain approximately 0.3 ml of the aqueous test solution. During the sequence of tests, scheduled to be performed in FY13, temperatures and pressures will be elevated to critical conditions (i.e., Tc = 374C and Pc = 22 MPa) in order to observe salt precipitation, precipitate agglomeration and precipitate transport in the presence of a temperature gradient without the influences of gravitational forces. This presentation provides an overview of the motivation for this work, a description of the DECLIC HTI hardware, the proposed test sequences, and a brief discussion of the scientific research objectives.

  18. Effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on phytotoxicity of sediments contaminated by phenanthrene and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Song, Biao; Zeng, Guangming; Gong, Jilai; Zhang, Peng; Deng, Jiaqin; Deng, Canhui; Yan, Jin; Xu, Piao; Lai, Cui; Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Min

    2017-04-01

    To implement effective control and abatement programs for contaminants accumulating in sediments, strategies are needed for evaluating the quality of amended sediments. In this study, phytotoxicity of the sediments contaminated by cadmium and phenanthrene was evaluated after in situ remediation with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as adsorbents. Adsorption experiments and measurement of aqueous concentrations of the contaminants in overlying water were used to investigate the remediation effectiveness from physical and chemical aspects. The results indicated that MWCNTs showed a much better adsorption performance towards phenanthrene and Cd(II) compared with the sediments. The in situ remediation with MWCNTs could distinctly decrease the aqueous concentrations of phenanthrene and Cd(II) released from the sediments, reducing environmental risk towards overlying water. Influences of MWCNTs dose, MWCNTs diameter, and contact time on phtotoxicity of the contaminated sediments were studied. No significant inhibition of the amended sediments on germination of the test species was observed in the experiments, while the root growth was more sensitive than biomass production to the changes of contaminant concentrations. The analysis of Pearson correlation coefficients between evaluation indicators and associated remediation parameters suggested that phytotoxicity of sediments might inaccurately indicate the changes of pollutant content, but it was significant in reflecting the ecotoxicity of sediments after remediation.

  19. Thermally responsive aqueous silicate mixtures and use thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.H.; Vinson, E.F.

    1987-02-03

    A method is described of plugging or sealing a zone in a subterranean formation comprising: (a) contacting the zone with an aqueous silicate composition consisting essentially of (i) an aqueous solution containing an alkali metal silicate; and, (ii) a thermally responsive gelation activator selected from the group consisting of lactose, dextrose, fructose, galactose, mannose, mantose, xylose and mixtures thereof; and (b) activating the gelation activator in response to a thermal change in the composition within the formation whereby the silicate composition is caused to form a gel in the zone.

  20. Anomalous Sediment Mixing by Bioturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, K. R.; Aubeneau, A. F.; Xie, M.; Packman, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Bioturbation, the reworking of sediments by animals and plants, is the dominant mode of sediment mixing in low-energy environments, and plays an important role in sedimentary biogeochemical processes. Mixing resulting from bioturbation has historically been modeled as a diffusive process. However, diffusion models often do not provide a sufficient description of sediment mixing due to bioturbation. Stochastic models, such as the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model, provide more general descriptions of mixing behavior that are applicable even when regular diffusion assumptions are not met. Here we present results from an experimental investigation of anomalous sediment mixing by bioturbation in freshwater sediments. Clean and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments were collected from Lake DePue, a backwater lake of the Illinois River. The burrowing worm species Lumbriculus variegatus was introduced to homogenized Lake DePue sediments in aerated aquaria. We then introduced inert fine fluorescent particles to the sediment-water interface. Using time-lapse photography, we observed the mixing of the fluorescent particles into the sediment bed over a two-week period. We developed image analysis software to characterize the concentration distribution of the fluorescent particles as a function of sediment depth, and applied this to the time-series of images to evaluate sediment mixing. We fit a one-dimensional CTRW model to the depth profiles to evaluate the underlying statistical properties of the mixing behavior. This analysis suggests that the sediment mixing caused by L. variegatus burrowing is subdiffusive in time and superdiffusive in space. We also found that heavy metal contamination significantly reduces L. variegatus burrowing, causing increasingly anomalous sediment mixing. This result implies that there can be important feedbacks between sediment chemistry, organism behavior, and sediment mixing that are not considered in current environmental models.

  1. Influence of sediment storage on downstream delivery of contaminated sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malmon, D.V.; Reneau, S.L.; Dunne, T.; Katzman, D.; Drakos, P.G.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment storage in alluvial valleys can strongly modulate the downstream migration of sediment and associated contaminants through landscapes. Traditional methods for routing contaminated sediment through valleys focus on in-channel sediment transport but ignore the influence of sediment exchanges with temporary sediment storage reservoirs outside the channel, such as floodplains. In theory, probabilistic analysis of particle trajectories through valleys offers a useful strategy for quantifying the influence of sediment storage on the downstream movement of contaminated sediment. This paper describes a field application and test of this theory, using 137Cs as a sediment tracer over 45 years (1952-1997), downstream of a historical effluent outfall at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), New Mexico. The theory is parameterized using a sediment budget based on field data and an estimate of the 137Cs release history at the upstream boundary. The uncalibrated model reasonably replicates the approximate magnitude and spatial distribution of channel- and floodplain-stored 137Cs measured in an independent field study. Model runs quantify the role of sediment storage in the long-term migration of a pulse of contaminated sediment, quantify the downstream impact of upstream mitigation, and mathematically decompose the future 137Cs flux near the LANL property boundary to evaluate the relative contributions of various upstream contaminant sources. The fate of many sediment-bound contaminants is determined by the relative timescales of contaminant degradation and particle residence time in different types of sedimentary environments. The theory provides a viable approach for quantifying the long-term movement of contaminated sediment through valleys. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. A parameter model for dredge plume sediment source terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decrop, Boudewijn; De Mulder, Tom; Toorman, Erik; Sas, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The presented model allows for fast simulations of the near-field behaviour of overflow dredging plumes. Overflow dredging plumes occur when dredging vessels employ a dropshaft release system to discharge the excess sea water, which is pumped into the trailing suction hopper dredger (TSHD) along with the dredged sediments. The fine sediment fraction in the loaded water-sediment mixture does not fully settle before it reaches the overflow shaft. By consequence, the released water contains a fine sediment fraction of time-varying concentration. The sediment grain size is in the range of clays, silt and fine sand; the sediment concentration varies roughly between 10 and 200 g/l in most cases, peaking at even higher value with short duration. In order to assess the environmental impact of the increased turbidity caused by this release, plume dispersion predictions are often carried out. These predictions are usually executed with a large-scale model covering a complete coastal zone, bay, or estuary. A source term of fine sediments is implemented in the hydrodynamic model to simulate the fine sediment dispersion. The large-scale model mesh resolution and governing equations, however, do not allow to simulate the near-field plume behaviour in the vicinity of the ship hull and propellers. Moreover, in the near-field, these plumes are under influence of buoyancy forces and air bubbles. The initial distribution of sediments is therefore unknown and has to be based on crude assumptions at present. The initial (vertical) distribution of the sediment source is indeed of great influence on the final far-field plume dispersion results. In order to study this near-field behaviour, a highly-detailed computationally fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed. This model contains a realistic geometry of a dredging vessel, buoyancy effects, air bubbles and propeller action, and was validated earlier by comparing with field measurements. A CFD model requires significant simulation times

  3. Geochemistry of surface sediments in the southwestern East/Japan Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Hyun-Ju; Choi, Man Sik; Lee, Chang-Bok; Shin, Dong-Hyeok

    2007-03-01

    We analyzed 77 surface sediment samples collected in the southwestern East/Japan Sea from the Korea Strait through the Ulleung Basin and the Korea Plateau for grain size, calcium carbonate, organic carbon, and major (Na, Mg, Al, Fe, K, Ca, and Ti) and trace elements (P, Mn, Sr, Li, Sc, V, Cr, Co, Ni, Zn, Cu, and Pb). The chemical composition of the surface sediments was found to be highly variable spatially. Cluster analysis of surface sediment chemical compositions indicated five major geochemical sedimentary environments: basin, lower slope, coast and upper slope, inner shelf, and outer shelf. Continental-shelf sediments were rich in shell fragments and had relict and coarse-grained characteristics. Recent fine-grained sediments were only distributed in coastal, slope, and basin areas. Concentrations of Al, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, and Sc were highest in the coastal and upper slope areas and decreased with water depth. Elemental ratios using major and trace elements indicated that coastal and upper slope detrital sediments were mixtures of sediments derived from the Changjiang (Yangtze) and Nakdong Rivers. Although the concentrations of organic carbon, P, Mn, V, Co, Ni, Cu, and Pb increased with water depth, their distribution patterns indicated authigenic (V, Cu, and Pb) and diagenetic (Fe, P, Mn, Co, and Ni) origins. The distribution pattern with water depth suggested that the chemical composition of surface sediment was determined by sedimentologic and geochemical processes, such as the supply of detrital and biogenic materials, and authigenic and post-depositional diagenetic processes in sediments.

  4. Ancient plant DNA in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Parducci, Laura; Bennett, Keith D; Ficetola, Gentile Francesco; Alsos, Inger Greve; Suyama, Yoshihisa; Wood, Jamie R; Pedersen, Mikkel Winther

    2017-04-03

    Contents I. II. III. IV. V. VI. VII. VIII. IX. X. XI. References SUMMARY: Recent advances in sequencing technologies now permit the analyses of plant DNA from fossil samples (ancient plant DNA, plant aDNA), and thus enable the molecular reconstruction of palaeofloras. Hitherto, ancient frozen soils have proved excellent in preserving DNA molecules, and have thus been the most commonly used source of plant aDNA. However, DNA from soil mainly represents taxa growing a few metres from the sampling point. Lakes have larger catchment areas and recent studies have suggested that plant aDNA from lake sediments is a more powerful tool for palaeofloristic reconstruction. Furthermore, lakes can be found globally in nearly all environments, and are therefore not limited to perennially frozen areas. Here, we review the latest approaches and methods for the study of plant aDNA from lake sediments and discuss the progress made up to the present. We argue that aDNA analyses add new and additional perspectives for the study of ancient plant populations and, in time, will provide higher taxonomic resolution and more precise estimation of abundance. Despite this, key questions and challenges remain for such plant aDNA studies. Finally, we provide guidelines on technical issues, including lake selection, and we suggest directions for future research on plant aDNA studies in lake sediments.

  5. Studies for the stabilization of coal-oil mixtures. Final report, August 1978-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Botsaris, G.D.; Glazman, Y.M.; Adams-Viola, M.

    1981-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the stabilization of coal-oil mixtures (COM) was developed. Aggregation of the coal particles was determined to control both the sedimentation and rheological properties of the COM. Sedimentation stability of COM prepared with coal, 80% < 200 mesh, is achieved by particle aggregation, which leads to the formation of a network of particles throughout the oil. The wettability of coal powders was evaluated by the Pickering emulsion test and a spherical agglomeration test to assess its effect on the stability of various COM formulations. Sedimentation stability of hydrophilic coal-oil-water mixtures (COWM) involves the formation of water bridges between the coal particles, while less stabilization of oleophilic COWM is achieved by the formation of an emulsion. Anionic SAA were least sensitive to the coal type and enhanced the aggregation stability of the suspension. The effect of cationic SAA, nonionic SAA and polymer additives depended upon the specific chemical structure of the SAA, the water content of the COM and the type of coal. The sedimentation stability of ultrafine COM was not directly due to the fineness of the powder but due to the formation of a network of flocculated particles.

  6. Arsenic, chromium and mercury removal using mussel shell ash or a sludge/ashes waste mixture.

    PubMed

    Seco-Reigosa, Natalia; Peña-Rodríguez, Susana; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María J; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2013-04-01

    Different batches of valued mussel shell and waste mussel shell ash are characterised. Shell ash has pH > 12 and high electrical conductivities (between 16.01 and 27.27 dS m(-1)), while calcined shell shows pH values up to 10.7 and electrical conductivities between 1.19 and 3.55 dS m(-1). X-ray fluorescence, nitric acid digestion and water extractions show higher concentrations in shell ash for most parameters. Calcite is the dominant crystalline compound in this ash (95.6%), followed by aragonite. Adsorption/desorption trials were performed for mussel shell ash and for a waste mixture including shell ash, sewage sludge and wood ash, showing the following percentage adsorptions: Hg(II) >94%, As(V) >96% and Cr(VI) between 11 and 30% for shell ash; Hg(II) >98%, As(V) >88% and Cr(VI) between 30 and 88% for the waste mixture. Hg and As desorption was <5% for both shell ash and the waste mixture, while Cr desorption was between 92 and 45% for shell ash, and between 19 and 0% for the mixture. In view of that, mussel shell ash and the mixture including shell ash, sewage sludge and wood ash could be useful for Hg(II) and As(V) removal.

  7. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema

    James Barber

    2016-07-12

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  8. Geophysical Constraints on Sediment Dispersal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Elizabeth Anne Carruthers

    Geophysical and geological approaches were employed to understand sediment dispersal systems and their response to various forcing functions (i.e., sea level fluctuations, tectonic deformation, sediment supply, and climate change). Two end member marine environments were studied; one with high precipitation and sediment discharge (Gulf of Papua, Papua New Guinea) and the other with low precipitation and sediment discharge (Oceanside Littoral Cell). The high-sedimentation rate in the Gulf of Papua (GoP) yields high-fidelity records of Earth history. As part of the NSF Margins Source-to-Sink (S2S) program, we acquired CHIRP and core data across the GoP continental shelf that complemented onshore and offshore research in the region. CHIRP seismic data imaged three Holocene sedimentary lobes. The older Central lobe is downlapped by two younger lobes to the north and south. Sediment analysis showed that the older Central lobe has an elemental signature similar to the younger Northern lobe with both sourced from the Purari River watershed and lobe migration appears to be climatically controlled. The Southern lobe has elemental signatures more consistent with the Fly River watershed. Our results suggest the northern rivers began depositing sediments on the shelf during the Holocene sea level rise in the central region of the GoP and migrated abruptly north at ~2 kybp. Conversely, during the early Holocene transgression, sediments in the Fly drainage system were sequestered onshore infilling accommodation created in the large low-relief coastal plain during the sea level rise. Upon infilling the onshore accommodation, the Fly River delivered sediment to the ocean and formed the Southern lobe. Such differences in onshore storage capacity may introduce a lag between low-gradient rivers (Type I) with a large coastal plain versus high-gradient river systems (Type II) with small coastal plains. The second study site is in the sediment-starved Oceanside Littoral Cell (OCL) of

  9. Quantification of activated carbon contents in soils and sediments using chemothermal and wet oxidation methods.

    PubMed

    Brändli, Rahel C; Bergsli, Anders; Ghosh, Upal; Hartnik, Thomas; Breedveld, Gijs D; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2009-12-01

    Activated carbon (AC) strongly sorbs organic pollutants and can be used for remediation of soils and sediments. A method for AC quantification is essential to monitor AC (re)distribution. Since AC is black carbon (BC), two methods for BC quantification were tested for AC mixed in different soils and sediments: i) chemothermal oxidation (CTO) at a range of temperatures and ii) wet-chemical oxidation with a potassium dichromate/sulfuric acid solution. For three soils, the amount of AC was accurately determined by CTO at 375 degrees C. For two sediments, however, much of the AC disappeared during combustion at 375 degrees C, which could probably be explained by catalytic effects by sediment constituents. CTO at lower temperatures (325-350 degrees C) was a feasible alternative for one of the sediments. Wet oxidation effectively functioned for AC quantification in sediments, with almost complete AC recovery (81-92%) and low remaining amounts of native organic carbon (5-16%).

  10. Biogeochemistry of Intertidal Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jickells, T. D.; Rae, J. E.

    2005-07-01

    This authoritative volume includes contributions from a wide range of researchers of intertidal sediments. Individual chapters explore the underlying biogeochemical processes controlling the behavior of carbon, the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus, and contaminants such as toxic organics, trace metals and artificial radionuclides in intertidal environments. The biogeochemistry of these environments is critical to understanding their ecology and management. Each of the chapters includes a comprehensive review and the results of recent research. The contributors are active researchers in this diverse and ecologically important field. This text is mainly for researchers and managers working with intertidal sediments, but it will also serve as a valuable senior undergraduate and graduate reference text in environmental chemistry, environmental science, earth science, and oceanography.

  11. Microplastics in sediments: A review of techniques, occurrence and effects.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Devriese, Lisa; Galgani, François; Robbens, Johan; Janssen, Colin R

    2015-10-01

    Microplastics are omnipresent in the marine environment and sediments are hypothesized to be major sinks of these plastics. Here, over 100 articles spanning the last 50 year are reviewed with following objectives: (i) to evaluate current microplastic extraction techniques, (ii) to discuss the occurrence and worldwide distribution of microplastics in sediments, and (iii) to make a comprehensive assessment of the possible adverse effects of this type of pollution to marine organisms. Based on this review we propose future research needs and conclude that there is a clear need for a standardized techniques, unified reporting units and more realistic effect assessments.

  12. Varves in lake sediments - a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolitschka, Bernd; Francus, Pierre; Ojala, Antti E. K.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-06-01

    Downcore counting of laminations in varved sediments offers a direct and incremental dating technique for high-resolution climatic and environmental archives with at least annual and sometimes even seasonal resolution. The pioneering definition of varves by De Geer (1912) had been restricted to rhythmically deposited proglacial clays. One century later the meaning of 'varve' has been expanded to include all annually deposited laminae in terrestrial and marine settings. Under favourable basin configurations and environmental conditions, limnic varves are formed due to seasonality of depositional processes from the lake's water column and/or transport from the catchment area. Subsequent to deposition of topmost laminae, the physical preservation of the accumulating varved sequence requires the sustained absence of sediment mixing, for example via wave action or macrobenthic bioturbation. Individual (sub)laminae in varved lake sediments typically express contrasting colours, always differ in terms of their organic, chemical and/or mineralogical compositions, and often also differ with regard to grain-size. Various predominating climatic and depositional conditions may result in clastic, biogenic or endogenic (incl. evaporitic) varved sediments and their mixtures. To reliably establish a varve chronology, the annual character of laminations needs to be determined and verified in a multidisciplinary fashion. Sources and influences of possible errors in varve chronologies are best determined and constrained by repeated varve counts, and by including radioisotopes and correlation with historically documented events. A well-established varve chronology greatly enhances the scientific value of laminated limnic archives by securely anchoring the wealth of multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental information in the form of time-series for multidisciplinary investigations. Applications of varved records are discussed with special reference to advances since the 1980s. These span fields

  13. Sedimentation-related meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The sedimentation committee would like to provide information on several meetings that took place in October 1983.The second annual meeting of the American Geomorphological Field Group was organized by S. Wells and T. Gardner and held in Chaco Canyon, N. Mex., October 7-10. Field excursions included visits to instrumented watersheds in badland areas, examination of the Quaternary history of Chaco Canyon, and investigation of fluvial problems associated with uranium mine tailings disposal and coal reclamation.

  14. Formulated sediment for use in whole-sediment toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Kemble, N.E.; Dwyer, F.J.; Hardesty, D.K.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    1995-12-31

    A formulated control sediment was developed to provide consistent and acceptable biological endpoints for a variety of species used in whole sediment toxicity testing. In an attempt to develop such a sediment the authors conducted multiple tests to evaluate: (1) {alpha}-cellulose as an organic carbon source, (2) various TOC concentrations, (3) various grain sizes, (4) different food types, and (5) overlying waters. Studies were conducted with the amphipod Hyalella azteca the midges Chironomus riparius, Chironomus tentans and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus in 10 d exposures and H. azteca in 28 d exposures. Sediment from West Bearskin Lake Minnesota was used as a control sediment with each species in each test. Survival of test organisms in all of the 10-d experiments, with the exception of C. riparius, was above the acceptable levels for a control sediment. Survival in the formulated sediments also was not significantly different when compared to the control sediment. Amphipod survival in the 28-d exposures was low; however, the use of reconstituted water in combination with the formulated sediment may have been a problem. The authors are currently evaluating various types of overlying water with formulated sediments and sublethal endpoints in each of the exposures (i.e., growth, sexual maturation or head capsule width).

  15. Mixtures Research at NIEHS: An Evolving Program

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Cynthia V; Carlin, Danielle J; DeVito, Micheal J; Thompson, Claudia L; Walker, Nigel J

    2014-01-01

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has a rich history in evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. The types of mixtures assessed by the Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP) and the extramural community (through the Division of Extramural Research and Training (DERT)) have included a broad range of chemicals and toxicants, with each study having a unique set of questions and design considerations. Some examples of the types of mixtures studied include: groundwater contaminants, pesticides/fertilizers, dioxin-like chemicals (assessing the toxic equivalency approach), drug combinations, air pollution, metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, technical mixtures (e.g. pentachlorophenol, flame retardants), and mixed entities (e.g. herbals, asbestos). These endeavors have provided excellent data on the toxicity of specific mixtures and have been informative to the human health risk assessment process in general (e.g. providing data on low dose exposures to environmental chemicals). However, the mixtures research effort at NIEHS, to date, has been driven by test article nominations to the DNTP or by investigator-initiated research through DERT. Recently, the NIEHS has embarked upon an effort to coordinate mixtures research across both intramural and extramural divisions in order to maximize mixtures research results. A path forward for NIEHS mixtures research will be based on feedback from a Request for Information (RFI) designed to gather up-to-date views on the knowledge gaps and roadblocks to evaluating mixtures and performing cumulative risk assessment, and a workshop organized to bring together mixtures experts from risk assessment, exposure science, biology, epidemiology, and statistics. The future of mixtures research at NIEHS will include projects from nominations to DNTP, studies by extramural investigators, and collaborations across government agencies that address high-priority questions in the field of mixtures research

  16. Mixtures research at NIEHS: an evolving program.

    PubMed

    Rider, Cynthia V; Carlin, Danielle J; Devito, Micheal J; Thompson, Claudia L; Walker, Nigel J

    2013-11-16

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) has a rich history in evaluating the toxicity of mixtures. The types of mixtures assessed by the Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP) and the extramural community (through the Division of Extramural Research and Training, DERT) have included a broad range of chemicals and toxicants, with each study having a unique set of questions and design considerations. Some examples of the types of mixtures studied include: groundwater contaminants, pesticides/fertilizers, dioxin-like chemicals (assessing the toxic equivalency approach), drug combinations, air pollution, metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, technical mixtures (e.g., pentachlorophenol, flame retardants), and mixed entities (e.g., herbals, asbestos). These endeavors have provided excellent data on the toxicity of specific mixtures and have been informative to the human health risk assessment process in general (e.g., providing data on low dose exposures to environmental chemicals). However, the mixtures research effort at NIEHS, to date, has been driven by test article nominations to the DNTP or by investigator-initiated research through DERT. Recently, the NIEHS has embarked upon an effort to coordinate mixtures research across both intramural and extramural divisions in order to maximize mixtures research results. A path forward for NIEHS mixtures research will be based on feedback from a Request for Information (RFI) designed to gather up-to-date views on the knowledge gaps and roadblocks to evaluating mixtures and performing cumulative risk assessment, and a workshop organized to bring together mixtures experts from risk assessment, exposure science, biology, epidemiology, and statistics. The future of mixtures research at NIEHS will include projects from nominations to DNTP, studies by extramural investigators, and collaborations across government agencies that address high-priority questions in the field of mixtures research.

  17. Inclined, collisional sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzi, Diego; Fraccarollo, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    We apply the constitutive relations of kinetic theory of granular gases to the transport of cohesionless sediments driven by a gravitational liquid turbulent stream in steady uniform conditions. The sediment-laden flow forms self-equilibrated mechanisms of resistance at the bed surface, below which the sediments are at rest. This geo-physical process takes place quite often in streams at moderate slope and may be interpreted through tools common to fluid mechanics and particle physics. Taking into account the viscous dissipation of the fluctuation energy of the particles, and using approximate methods of integration of the governing differential equations, permit to obtain a set of simple formulas for predicting how depths and flow rates adjust to the angle of inclination of the bed, without requiring additional tuning parameters besides the particle and fluid properties. The agreement with laboratory experiments performed with either plastic cylinders or gravel in water is remarkable. We also provide quantitative criteria to determine the range of validity of the theory, i.e., the values of the Shields number and the angle of inclination of the bed for which the particle stresses can be mostly ascribed to collisional exchange of momentum.

  18. Magnetism of quaternary sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Friedrich

    Magnetism of Quaternary sediments was the topic of a well-attended symposium held during the 13th INQUA (International Union of Quaternary Research) congress in Beijing, China, August 2-9. More than 40 papers were delivered by scientists from Belgium, England, France, Germany, Japan, New Zealand, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United States, the Soviet Union, Yugoslavia, and other countries. The host country contributed to a productive session that was part of the first large scientific meeting to take place in Beijing after the June 4, 1989, upheaval.Nearly half of the studies focused on paleomagnetic and rock magnetic properties of loess in Alaska, Central Asia, China, and New Zealand. Magnetostratigraphic polarity dating was done at some sections in the western (Shaw et al.) and central Chinese loess plateau (Bai and Hus; Wang and Evans; Yue). The interpretation of the polarity pattern found in the western loess plateau still is not unambiguous. In the central part, certain polarity boundaries, such as the Brunhes/Matuyama (B/M) boundary, are found in slightly different stratigraphic positions (Hus et al.; Yue). In deep-sea sediments the lock-in depth of natural remanent magnetization (NRM) at the B/M boundary seems to be a linear function of sedimentation rate (de Menocal et al.). Although the magnetization process in the Chinese loess is not well understood, detailed records of polarity transitions have been reported for the B/M and the Jaramillo R→N transition (Ma et al.; Rolph).

  19. Interdiffusion in binary ionic mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Pollock, E.L.

    1987-08-15

    In this paper we present molecular-dynamics and kinetic-theory calculations of the interdiffusion coefficients in dense binary ionic mixtures for conditions appropriate to both astrophysical and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas. The diffusion coefficient is the product of a Green-Kubo integral and a thermodynamic prefactor. The molecular-dynamics and kinetic-theory estimates of the Green-Kubo portion agree very well, and it is found that this integral may also be well represented by the usual concentration-weighted sum of self-diffusion coefficients. In addition, the low-density limit of the thermodynamic prefactor is shown to represent an enhancement of the diffusion by the ''ambipolar'' electric field.

  20. Remobilisation of uranium from contaminated freshwater sediments by bioturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagauzère, S.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Viollier, E.; Stora, G.; Bonzom, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    Benthic macro-invertebrate bioturbation can influence the remobilisation of uranium (U) initially associated with freshwater sediments, resulting in a high release of this pollutant through the overlying water column. Given the potential negative effects on aquatic biocenosis and the global ecological risk, it appears crucial to improve our current knowledge concerning the biogeochemical behaviour of U in sediments. The present study aimed to assess the biogeochemical modifications induced by Tubifex tubifex (Annelida, Clitellata, Tubificidae) bioturbation within the sediment in order to explain such a release of U. To reach this goal, U distribution between solid and solute phases of a reconstructed benthic system (i.e. in mesocosms) inhabited or not by T. tubifex worms was assessed in a 12-day laboratory experiment. Thanks notably to fine-resolution (mm-scale) measurements (e.g. "diffusive equilibrium in thin-films" DET gel probes for porewater, bioaccumulation in worms) of U and main chemical species (iron, sulfate, nitrate and nitrite), this work (i) confirmed that the removal of bottom sediment particles to the surface through the digestive tract of worms greatly favoured oxidative loss of U in the water column, and (ii) demonstrated that both U contamination and bioturbation of T. tubifex substantially influenced major microbial-driven biogeochemical reactions in sediments (e.g. stimulation of denitrification, sulfate reduction and iron dissolutive reduction). This study provides the first demonstration of biogeochemical modifications induced by bioturbation in freshwater U-contaminated sediments.

  1. Remobilisation of uranium from contaminated freshwater sediments by bioturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagauzère, S.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Viollier, E.; Stora, G.; Bonzom, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that benthic macro-invertebrate bioturbation can influence the remobilization of uranium initially associated with freshwater sediments resulting in a high release of this pollutant through the overlying water column. Giving the potential negative effects on aquatic biocenosis and the global ecological risk, it appeared crucial to improve our current knowledge concerning the uranium biogeochemical behaviour in sediments. The present study aimed to assess the biogeochemical modifications induced by Tubifex tubifex (Annelida, Clitellata, Tubificidae) bioturbation within the sediment permitting to explain such a release of uranium. To reach this goal, uranium distribution between solid and solute phases of a reconstructed benthic system (i.e. in mesocosms) inhabited or not by T. tubifex worms was assessed in a 12 day laboratory experiment. Thanks notably to fine resolution (mm-scale) measurements (e.g. DET gels probes for porewater, bioaccumulation in worms) of uranium and main chemical species (iron, sulfate, nitrate, nitrite), this work permitted (i) to confirm that the removal of bottom sediment particles to the surface through the digestive tract of worms greatly favours the oxidative loss of uranium in the water column, and (ii) to demonstrate that both uranium contamination and bioturbation of T. tubifex substantially influence major microbial-driven biogeochemical reactions in sediments (e.g. stimulation of denitrification, sulfate-reduction and iron dissolutive reduction). This study provides the first demonstration of biogeochemical modifications induced by bioturbation in freshwater uranium-contaminated sediments.

  2. Sedimentology and geochemistry of surface sediments, outer continental shelf, southern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Dean, W.E.; Vallier, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Present-day sediment dynamics, combined with lowerings of sea level during the Pleistocene, have created a mixture of sediments on the outer continental shelf of the southern Bering Sea that was derived from the Alaskan Mainland, the Aleutian Islands, and the Pribilof ridge. Concentrations of finer-grained, higher-organic sediments in the region of the St. George basin have further modified regional distribution patterns of sediment composition. Q-mode factor analysis of 58 variables related to sediment size and composition - including content of major, minor, and trace elements, heavy and light minerals, and clay minerals - reveals three dominant associations of sediment: 1. (1) The most significant contribution, forming a coarse-grained sediment scattered over most of the shelf consists of felsic sediment derived from the generally quartz-rich rocks of the Alaskan mainland. This sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Si, Ba, Rb, quartz, garnet, epidote, metamorphic rock fragments, potassium feldspar, and illite. 2. (2) The next most important group, superimposed on the felsic group consists of andesitic sediment derived from the Aleutian Islands. This more mafic sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Na, Ca, Ti, Sr, V, Mn, Cu, Fe, Al, Co, Zn, Y, Yb, Ga, volcanic rock fragments, glass, clinopyroxene, smectite, and vermiculite. 3. (3) A local group of basaltic sediment, derived from rocks of the Pribilof Islands, is a subgroup of the Aleutian andesite group. Accumulation of fine-grained sediment in St. George basin has created a sediment group containing relatively high concentrations of C, S, U, Li, B, Zr, Ga, Hg, silt, and clay. Sediment of the Aleutian andesite group exhibits a strong gradient, or "plume", with concentrations decreasing away from Unimak Pass and toward St. George basin. The absence of present-day currents sufficient to move even clay-size material as well as the presence of Bering submarine canyon between the Aleutian

  3. PARIS II: Computer Aided Solvent Design for Pollution Prevention

    EPA Science Inventory

    This product is a summary of U.S. EPA researchers' work developing the solvent substitution software tool PARIS II (Program for Assisting the Replacement of Industrial Solvents, version 2.0). PARIS II finds less toxic solvents or solvent mixtures to replace more toxic solvents co...

  4. Recycling of harbor sediment as lightweight aggregate.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Ling; Yang, Jing-Chiang; Lin, Yong-Yang; Chuang, Shih-Yu; Wang, H Paul

    2008-01-01

    Sediment sampled from Taichung Harbor was mixed with local reservoir sediment at different weight ratios to prepare lightweight aggregate at 1050, 1100, and 1150 degrees C. A pressure of 3000 or 5000 psi was used to shape the powder mixtures into pellets before the heating processes. The results indicate that the leaching levels of trace metals from the lightweight aggregate samples are considerably reduced to levels less than Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration regulatory limits. Increasing final process temperature tends to reduce the bulk density and crushing intensity of lightweight aggregate with a concomitant increase in water sorption capability. Lightweight aggregate with the lowest bulk density, 0.49 g cm(-3) for the 5000 psi sample, was obtained with the heating process to 1150 degrees C. Based on the X-ray absorption near edge structure results, FeSO(4) decomposition with a concomitant release of SO(x) (x = 2,3) is suggested to play an important role for the bloating process in present study.

  5. Structural dynamics of microbial communities in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated tropical estuarine sediments undergoing simulated aerobic biotreatment.

    PubMed

    Obi, Chioma C; Adebusoye, Sunday A; Amund, Olukayode O; Ugoji, Esther O; Ilori, Mathew O; Hedman, Curtis J; Hickey, William J

    2017-02-11

    Coastal sediments contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) can be candidates for remediation via an approach like land farming. Land farming converts naturally anaerobic sediments to aerobic environments, and the response of microbial communities, in terms of community structure alterations and corresponding effects on biodegradative activities, is unknown. A key goal of this study was to determine if different sediments exhibited common patterns in microbial community responses that might serve as indicators of PAH biodegradation. Sediments from three stations in the Lagos Lagoon (Nigeria) were used in microcosms, which were spiked with a mixture of four PAH, then examined for PAH biodegradation and for shifts in microbial community structure by analysis of diversity in PAH degradation genes and Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. PAH biodegradation was similar in all sediments, yet each exhibited unique microbiological responses and there were no microbial indicators of PAH bioremediation common to all sediments.

  6. Beryllium Desorption from Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschi, V.; Willenbring, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Beryllium isotopes have provided a useful tool in the field of geochronology and geomorphology over the last 25 years. The amount of cosmogenic meteoric 10Be and native 9Be absorbed to soils often scales with the residence time and chemical weathering of sediments in a landscape, respectively. Thus, the concentrations in river sediment may be used to quantify the denudation of specific watersheds. When deposited in ocean sediment, these concentrations are thought to record the history of denudation on Earth over the last ~10 Ma. The use of both isotopes often relies on the premise of beryllium retention to sediment surfaces in order to preserve a landscape's erosion and weathering signature. Changes in setting, en route from the soil to fluvial system to the ocean, can cause beryllium desorption and may preclude some applications of the 10Be/9Be system. Four mechanisms were tested to determine the desorption potential of beryllium including a reduction in pH, an increase in ionic strength and complexation with soluble organic and inorganic species. These processes have the potential to mobilize beryllium into solution. For example, by both reducing the pH and increasing the ionic strength, competition for adsorption sites increases, potentially liberating beryllium from the sediment surface. In addition, organic and inorganic ligands can complex beryllium causing it to become mobilized. To determine which of these alterations influence beryllium desorption and to quantify the effect, we prepared separate solutions of beryllium bound to minerals and organic compounds and measured beryllium concentrations in solution before and after adjusting the pH, ionic strength, and changing inorganic and organic ligand concentrations. We conclude from our observations that overall, beryllium sorbed to organic compounds was more resistant to desorption relative to mineral-associated beryllium. Among the methods tested, a reduction in pH resulted in the greatest amount of

  7. An appraisal of the sediment yield in western Mediterranean river basins.

    PubMed

    Buendia, C; Herrero, A; Sabater, S; Batalla, R J

    2016-12-01

    The number of studies assessing soil erosion and sediment transport has increased with the aim of achieving sustainable land and water management. Mediterranean rivers have been the object of many of these studies due to their naturally high values of sediment fluxes and a higher vulnerability under future climate scenarios. In this context, we attempt to use empirical relationships to (i) further assess the relation between sediment yield and basin scale and (ii) provide an update on the main drivers controlling sediment yield in these particular river systems. For this purpose, sediment yield data (from reservoir sedimentation surveys and sediment transport records) was collected from >100 locations distributed across the western Mediterranean area, with basin areas ranging from 1 to 100,000km(2). Quantile Regression analysis was used to assess the correlation between basin area and sediment yield, while additional basin-scale descriptors were related to sediment yield by means of multiple regression analysis. Results showed the complexity in the relationship between basin scale and sediment yield, with changes in supply conditions with increasing area introducing uncertainties in the correlation. Despite the large scatter, analysis pointed towards the same direction and area appeared to be the main constrain for the maximum value of sediment yield that can be found at a specific basin scale. Results from the multiple regression indicated that variables representing basin's physiography, climate and land use were highly correlated with the basins' sediment yield. Also, a better model performance was obtained when using total sediment yield instead of specific values (per unit area). Validation showed model instability, potentially due to data limitations and the use of catchments with varying characteristics. Overall, despite providing some insights on the correlation between sediment yield and basin-scale characteristics, validation prevented direct

  8. Physical and geoacoustic properties of surface sediments in the southwestern Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S.; Kim, D. C.; Lee, G.; Kim, S. P.; Bae, S.

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the physical and geoacoustic properties of surface sediments in the southwestern Ulleung Basin, East Sea of Korea, eighty-two piston cores and sixty-six box cores were analyzed for sediment texture (grain size, sand, silt and clay contents), physical properties (porosity, water content, bulk density, grain density and shear strength), and acoustic properties (compressional wave velocity and attenuation). We conducted mapping the distribution of sediment texture, each physical properties, and compressional wave velocity. According to the distribution map of sediment texture, the inner shelf area is consists of fine-grained sediments that are interpreted as recent sediments deposited under the present environment condition. Ulleung Basin also dominated fine-grained sediments consist of hemi-pelagic mud. On the mid-shelf, fine materials are mixed with fine-grained sediments and relict coarse sediments. Some part of the relict sediments on the mid-shelf were continuously reworked under the present environmental conditions forming the palimpsest sediments. The outer shelf area is composed of very coarse-grained sediments that are considered relict sediments deposited during the last glacial periods when the sea level was lower than the present. Based on geoacoustic property analyzed from this study, the study area is divided into five different geoacoustic provinces: (1) Province I is composed of muddy sediments that are directly affected by the Nakdong River discharge (1486 m/s, 8.1Φ, 1.32 g/cm3, and 80 %), (2) Province II is generally characterized by hemi-pelagic muds and partially mixed with intermittent sandy sediments originated from the outer shelf and upper slope (1495 m/s, 8.4Φ, 1.27 g/cm3, and 82 %), (3) Province III is comprised of muddy sand sediments that are corresponding to the boundary between recent sediments and relict sediments (1539 m/s, 5.8Φ, 1.52 g/cm3, and 69 %), (4) Province IV is dominated by coarse-grained relict sediments

  9. Perceptual and imaginary mixtures in chemosensation.

    PubMed

    Schifferstein, H N

    1997-02-01

    D. Algom and W.S. Cain (1991) reported similar interaction patterns for perceived and imaginary mixtures of odorants. However, their experimental design did not allow sensitive statistical testing to demonstrate differences between conditions. Three experiments on 16 mixtures of sucrose-citric acid mixtures yielded significantly different interaction pattern for perceived and imaginary mixtures. Inconsistencies in the degrees of suppression in the imaginary condition suggested that participants did not base their responses on the inspection of a mental image but on incomplete implicit or explicit knowledge of sensory interactions. Participants knew the phenomenon of mixture suppression and knew that its effects were level dependent, but they were unable to predict the exact intensity of a mixture on the basis of the intensities of its unmixed components.

  10. Rapid determination of the equivalence volume in potentiometric acid-base titrations to a preset pH-II Standardizing a solution of a strong base, graphic location of equivalence volume, determination of stability constants of acids and titration of a mixture of two weak acids.

    PubMed

    Ivaska, A

    1974-06-01

    A newly proposed method of titrating weak acids with strong bases is applied to standardize a solution of a strong base, to graphic determination of equivalence volume of acetic acid with an error of 0.2%, to calculate the stability constants of hydroxylammonium ion, boric acid and hydrogen ascorbate ion and to analyse a mixture of acetic acid and ammonium ion with an error of 0.2-0.7%.

  11. Mixtures of Bosonic and Fermionic atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albus, Alexander

    2003-12-01

    The theory of atomic Boson-Fermion mixtures in the dilute limit beyond mean-field is considered in this thesis. Extending the formalism of quantum field theory we derived expressions for the quasi-particle excitation spectra, the ground state energy, and related quantities for a homogenous system to first order in the dilute gas parameter. In the framework of density functional theory we could carry over the previous results to inhomogeneous systems. We then determined to density distributions for various parameter values and identified three different phase regions: (i) a stable mixed regime, (ii) a phase separated regime, and (iii) a collapsed regime. We found a significant contribution of exchange-correlation effects in the latter case. Next, we determined the shift of the Bose-Einstein condensation temperature caused by Boson-Fermion interactions in a harmonic trap due to redistribution of the density profiles. We then considered Boson-Fermion mixtures in optical lattices. We calculated the criterion for stability against phase separation, identified the Mott-insulating and superfluid regimes both, analytically within a mean-field calculation, and numerically by virtue of a Gutzwiller Ansatz. We also found new frustrated ground states in the limit of very strong lattices. ----Anmerkung: Der Autor ist Träger des durch die Physikalische Gesellschaft zu Berlin vergebenen Carl-Ramsauer-Preises 2004 für die jeweils beste Dissertation der vier Universitäten Freie Universität Berlin, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Technische Universität Berlin und Universität Potsdam. Ziel der Arbeit war die systematische theoretische Behandlung von Gemischen aus bosonischen und fermionischen Atomen in einem Parameterbereich, der sich zur Beschreibung von aktuellen Experimenten mit ultra-kalten atomaren Gasen eignet. Zuerst wurde der Formalismus der Quantenfeldtheorie auf homogene, atomare Boson-Fermion Gemische erweitert, um grundlegende Größen wie Quasiteilchenspektren

  12. Toxicity of creosote water-soluble fractions generated from contaminated sediments to the bay mysid.

    PubMed

    Padma, T V; Hale, R C; Roberts, M H; Lipcius, R N

    1999-02-01

    Creosote, a globally used wood preservative, is a complex mixture consisting primarily of aromatic organic compounds (ACs). Creosote-derived ACs can persist for decades in aquatic sediments. Natural and anthropogenic activities may result in dissolution and resuspension of sediment-associated ACs. These processes were mimicked by generating a water-soluble fraction (WSF) from creosote-contaminated sediment (ERS) collected from a polluted site. The epibenthic mysid Mysidopsis bahia was exposed to five sublethal concentrations of WSF for 7 days. The WSF significantly decreased dry weight gain and proportion of gravid females (EC50=15 microgram/liter total identified ACs). Chemical analysis indicated that high-molecular-weight ACs (more than three aromatic rings) dominated the ERS, but were undetected in the WSF. Low-molecular-weight ACs (fewer than three aromatic rings) dominated the WSF. Compositional differences can thus result from fractionation processes and affect environmental fate and toxicity of the mixture.

  13. Laboratory upwelled radiance and reflectance spectra of Kerr reservoir sediment waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, W. G.; Whitlock, C. H.; Morris, W. D.; Gurganus, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    Reflectance, chromaticity, and several other physical and chemical properties were measured for various water mixtures of bottom sediments taken from two sites at Kerr Reservoir, Virginia. Mixture concentrations ranged from 5 to 1000 ppm by weight of total suspended solids (TSS) in filtered deionized tap water. The two sets of radiance and reflectance spectra obtained were similar in shape and magnitude for comparable values of TSS. Upwelled reflectance was observed to be a nonlinear function of TSS with the degree of curvature a function of wavelength. Sediment from the downstream site contained a greater amount of particulate organic carbon than from the upstream site. No strong conclusions can be made regarding the effects of this difference on the radiance and reflectance spectra. Near-infrared wavelengths appear useful for measuring highly turbid water with concentrations up to 1000 ppm or more. Chromaticity characteristics do not appear useful for monitoring sediment loads above 150 ppm.

  14. Thermal Analysis of Various Epoxy Mixtures.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    Dicyandiamide Thermal analysis Accelerator r20 ABSTRAC r (Continue on revre side If necesary and identif by. block riimeyp.) 4 4 (SEE REVERSE SIDE...mixed with Monuron. Also, three-component mixtures, epoxide + Dicy/Monuron, were prepared with dicyandiamide . The mixtures were cured by differential... dicyandiamide and Monuron, on the curing process, was simulated by the isothermal reaction of two mixtures. A type of reaction kinetics having the

  15. Sediment quality in the north coastal basin of Massachusetts, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, Robert F.; Ashman, Mary S.; Heath, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, completed a reconnaissance-level study of bottom-sediment quality in selected lakes, rivers, and estuaries in the North Coastal Basin of Massachusetts. Bottom-sediment grab samples were collected from 20 sites in the North River, Lake Quannapowitt, Saugus River, Mill River, Shute Brook, Sea Plane Basin, Pines River, and Bear Creek. The samples were tested for various types of potentially harmful contaminants? including 33 elements, 17 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), 22 organochlorine pesticides, and 7 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures (Aroclors)?to benthic organisms (bottom-dwelling) and humans. The results were compared among sampling sites, to background concentrations, and to concen-trations measured in other urban rivers, and sediment-quality guidelines were used to predict toxicity at the sampling sites to benthic organisms and humans. Because there are no standards for human toxicity for aquatic sediment, standards for contaminated upland soil were used. Contaminant concentrations measured in sediment collected from the North Coastal Basin generally were equal to or greater than concentrations in sediment from uncontaminated rivers throughout New England. Contaminants in North Coastal Basin sediment with elevated concentrations (above back-ground levels) included arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc, some of the PAHs, dichlorodiphenyltrichloro-ethane (DDT) and its metabolites, and dieldrin. No PCBs were measured above the detection limits. Measured concentrations of arsenic, chromium, and lead were also generally greater than those measured in other urban rivers throughout the conter-minous United States. With one exception (arsenic), local con-centrations measured in sediment samples collected from the North Coastal Basin were lower than concentrations measured in sediment collected from two of three urban rivers draining to Boston

  16. Aquatic toxicity of PAHs and PAH mixtures at saturation to benthic amphipods: linking toxic effects to chemical activity.

    PubMed

    Engraff, Maria; Solere, Clémentine; Smith, Kilian E C; Mayer, Philipp; Dahllöf, Ingela

    2011-04-01

    Organisms in marine sediments are usually exposed to mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), whereas risk assessment and management typically focus on the effects of single PAHs. This can lead to an underestimation of risk if the effects of single compounds are additive or synergistic. Because of the virtually infinite number of mixture-combinations, and the many different targeted organisms, it would be advantageous to have a model for the assessment of mixture effects. In this study we tested whether chemical activity, which drives the partitioning of PAHs into organisms, can be used to model the baseline toxicity of mixtures. Experiments were performed with two benthic amphipod species (Orchomonella pinguis and Corophium volutator), using passive dosing to control the external exposure of single PAHs and mixtures of three and four PAHs. The baseline toxicity of individual PAHs at water saturation generally increased with increasing chemical activity of the PAHs. For O. pinguis, the baseline toxicity of PAH mixtures was successfully described by the sum of chemical activities. Some compounds and mixtures showed a delayed expression of toxicity, highlighting the need to adjust the length of the experiment depending on the organism. On the other hand, some of the single compounds had a higher toxicity than expected, possibly due to the toxicity of PAH metabolites. We suggest that chemical activity of mixtures can, and should, be used in addition to toxicity data for single compounds in environmental risk assessment.

  17. Copper (II) ion adsorption from aqueous solution onto fatty hydroxamic acid - Immobilized zeolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhsinun, Sugita, Purwantiningsih; Purwaningsih, Henny

    2017-01-01

    Separation of Cu (II) ion from a mixture containing Zn (II) ion was conducted by solid-liquid extraction method through column chromatography. The column was filled with FHA-ZEO resin. This resin is the result of immobilized fatty hydroxamic acid (FHA) into activated natural zeolite (ZEO) involving as solid phase. Parameters becoming variable were resin mass to concentration ratio and pH of Cu (II) ion solution. The research result shows that optimum condition of Cu (II) ion adsorption was 1 gram resin mass FHA-ZEO to ion Cu (II) solution concentration of 100 ppm with pH value of 5. This Cu (II) ion separation from its mixture containing Zn (II) ion gives Cu(II) ion adsorption capacity of 162.39 mg/g FHA-ZEO in that optimum condition, 4 times higher than Zn (II) ion adsorption with Cu (II) ion recovery of 93,88%.

  18. Reactive and unreactive iron minerals hosting arsenic within seasonal wetland sediments of the Mekong Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuckey, J.; Schaefer, M.; Lezama, J.; Dittmar, J.; Fendorf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Millions of people in the deltaic regions of S/SE Asia regularly consume arsenic contaminated groundwater. Within the Mekong Delta of Cambodia, for example, arsenic persists within the groundwater despite being flushed by several pore volumes of recharge. The identity and reactivity of the minerals contributing to the persistence of arsenic in the deltaic aquifers remain elusive. Here we seek to define the molecular form of the arsenic and its host phases along defined flow paths in seasonally saturated wetlands: i) a grassland flooded for ~ 3 - 4 months of the year (Grassland) and ii) an abandoned river channel saturated for ~ 5 - 6 months (Oxbow). Sediment cores were retrieved by pounding aluminum cores into a fresh profile exposed by successive excavation. The cores were sealed with melted wax in the field and stored at 4 °C until processed. Depths of 0.2 to 6 m were sampled at the Grassland site and 0.2 to 4 m at the Oxbow site. Sediments were dried under 95%N2/5%H2 atmosphere. A 1 M HCl extraction dissolving the 'reactive' iron (predominantly poorly crystalline iron oxides) solubilized 3 - 7 % of the total iron in the Grassland site and 8 - 41 % in the Oxbow site. A citrate-bicarbonate-dithionite (CBD) extraction was performed to extract reducible iron (predominantly iron oxides), accounting for 35 - 50 % of the total iron in the Grassland site and 27 - 44 % in the Oxbow site. Correspondingly, least squares fitting of k3 - weighted chi(k) iron extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra showed that goethite and hematite together comprised 34 - 50 % of the iron mineralogy in the mineral sediments of the Grassland site and 24 - 38 % of those in the Oxbow site. The remaining iron minerals present were predominantly silicates. Iron EXAFS spectra were obtained for the post-CBD extracted sediments, theoretically containing only non-reducible iron. Least squares fitting of the bulk (pre-CBD extracted) sediments was performed a second time with the

  19. Determination of the Efficiency of Mixed-Acid Digestions of Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta Vazquez, Alejandra I.; Gill, Gary A.

    2007-01-01

    Mixed-acid digestion is a method often used for the determination of elemental analysis of sediment samples. It is crucial that efficiency details associated with the digestion method be well understood on an element by element basis. Battelle’s Marine Sciences Laboratory Standard Operating Procedure for Sediment Mixed-Acid Digestions was modified to identify conditions which produce optimal recovery of elements. The parameters that were adjusted for testing were mass of sediment, mixed-acid volume, mixed-acid composition and digestion time. Digestion involves treatment of the sediment sample with mixed-acid mixtures at 135º C ± 10º in a Teflon® digestion bomb. Typical analytical methods include Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma – Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Initial experiments involved determining the optimal ratio of acid volume to mass of sediment. Experiments were designed to identify the point at which insufficient acid was used to effectively digest a given mass of sediment. When the mass of sediment was varied between 0.2 and 1.0 gram using a 4 mL aqua regia acid mixture (3 mL hydrochloric acid and 1 mL nitric acid), there was no effect on the recovery of the elements Al, Ba, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, Ti, V, and Zn. The next experiments focused on a time study to resolve the shortest digestive time for optimal elemental recovery. Two masses of sediment were investigated, 0.25 and 0.7 g, again utilizing aqua regia digestion (4 mL). Maximum recovery was reached after 4 hours of digestion; additional digestion time released no or only minimal amounts of elements from the sediments. The final set of experiments was designed to identify optimal conditions for the total digestion of sediment using a mixture of hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and boric acid. These experiments were designed to determine the optimal volume of hydrofluoric acid

  20. Mercury contaminated sediment sites—An evaluation of remedial options

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, Paul M.; Chattopadhyay, Sandip

    2013-08-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally-occurring element that is ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Though efforts have been made in recent years to decrease Hg emissions, historically-emitted Hg can be retained in the sediments of aquatic bodies where they may be slowly converted to methylmercury (MeHg). Consequently, Hg in historically-contaminated sediments can result in high levels of significant exposure for aquatic species, wildlife and human populations consuming fish. Even if source control of contaminated wastewater is achievable, it may take a very long time, perhaps decades, for Hg-contaminated aquatic systems to reach relatively safe Hg levels in both water and surface sediment naturally. It may take even longer if Hg is present at higher concentration levels in deep sediment. Hg contaminated sediment results from previous releases or ongoing contributions from sources that are difficult to identify. Due to human activities or physical, chemical, or biological processes (e.g. hydrodynamic flows, bioturbation, molecular diffusion, and chemical transformation), the buried Hg can be remobilized into the overlying water. Hg speciation in the water column and sediments critically affect the reactivity (i.e. conversion of inorganic Hg(II) to MeHg), transport, and its exposure to living organisms. Also, geochemical conditions affect the activity of methylating bacteria and its availability for methylation. This review paper discusses remedial considerations (e.g. key chemical factors in fate and transport of Hg, source characterization and control, environmental management procedures, remediation options, modeling tools) and includes practical case studies for cleaning up Hg-contaminated sediment sites. -- Highlights: ► Managing mercury-contaminated sediment sites are challenging to remediate. ► Remediation technologies are making a difference in managing these sites. ► Partitioning plays a dominant role in the distribution of mercury species. ► Mathematical

  1. Near azeotropic mixture substitute for dichlorodifluoromethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A refrigerant and a process of formulating thereof that consists of a mixture of a first mole fraction of CH.sub.2 FCF.sub.3 and a second mole fraction of a component selected from the group consisting of a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 ; a mixture of CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3 and CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 ; and a mixture of CHClFCF.sub.3, CH.sub.3 CClF.sub.2 and CHF.sub.2 CH.sub.3.

  2. Cluster kinetics model for mixtures of glassformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenskelle, Lisa A.; McCoy, Benjamin J.

    2007-10-01

    For glassformers we propose a binary mixture relation for parameters in a cluster kinetics model previously shown to represent pure compound data for viscosity and dielectric relaxation as functions of either temperature or pressure. The model parameters are based on activation energies and activation volumes for cluster association-dissociation processes. With the mixture parameters, we calculated dielectric relaxation times and compared the results to experimental values for binary mixtures. Mixtures of sorbitol and glycerol (seven compositions), sorbitol and xylitol (three compositions), and polychloroepihydrin and polyvinylmethylether (three compositions) were studied.

  3. Dielectric gas mixtures containing sulfur hexafluoride

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, Chathan M.

    1979-01-01

    Electrically insulating gaseous media of unexpectedly high dielectric strength comprised of mixtures of two or more dielectric gases are disclosed wherein the dielectric strength of at least one gas in each mixture increases at less than a linear rate with increasing pressure and the mixture gases are present in such proportions that the sum of their electrical discharge voltages at their respective partial pressures exceeds the electrical discharge voltage of each individual gas at the same temperature and pressure as that of the mixture.

  4. Sedimentation of multicomponent viruses: evaluation of sedimentation coefficient ratios.

    PubMed

    Larcom, L L; Barnett, O W

    1978-01-01

    Ratios of the sedimentation coefficients for alfalfa mosaic virus components are shown to be independent of the virus concentration and the density of the solvent. Different numbers of components are observed in solvents of different density. This implies that in sedimentation velocity experiments an estimate of the number of components of a multicomponent virus should involve centrifugation in solvents of different density. For some viruses, estimates of the sedimentation coefficients of individual components can be obtained from the coefficient ratios observed in unfractionated solutions and the sedimentation coefficient of the most easily purified component.

  5. Heterojunctions of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; ...

    2015-03-18

    We report on the strain behavior of compound mixtures of model group II-VI semiconductors. We use the Stillinger-Weber Hamiltonian that we recently introduced, specifically developed to model binary mixtures of group II-VI compounds such as CdTe and CdSe. We also employ molecular dynamics simulations to examine the behavior of thin sheets of material, bilayers of CdTe and CdSe. The lattice mismatch between the two compounds leads to a strong bending of the entire sheet, with about a 0.5 to 1° deflection between neighboring planes. To further analyze bilayer bending, we introduce a simple one-dimensional model and use energy minimization tomore » find the angle of deflection. The analysis is equivalent to a least-squares straight line fit. We consider the effects of bilayers which are asymmetric with respect to the thickness of the CdTe and CdSe parts. We thus learn that the bending can be subdivided into four kinds depending on the compressive/tensile nature of each outer plane of the sheet. We use this approach to directly compare our findings with experimental results on the bending of CdTe/CdSe rods. To reduce the effects of the lattice mismatch we explore diffuse interfaces, where we mix (i.e. alloy) Te and Se, and estimate the strain response.« less

  6. Heterojunctions of model CdTe/CdSe mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    van Swol, Frank; Zhou, Xiaowang W.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Martin, James E.

    2015-03-18

    We report on the strain behavior of compound mixtures of model group II-VI semiconductors. We use the Stillinger-Weber Hamiltonian that we recently introduced, specifically developed to model binary mixtures of group II-VI compounds such as CdTe and CdSe. We also employ molecular dynamics simulations to examine the behavior of thin sheets of material, bilayers of CdTe and CdSe. The lattice mismatch between the two compounds leads to a strong bending of the entire sheet, with about a 0.5 to 1° deflection between neighboring planes. To further analyze bilayer bending, we introduce a simple one-dimensional model and use energy minimization to find the angle of deflection. The analysis is equivalent to a least-squares straight line fit. We consider the effects of bilayers which are asymmetric with respect to the thickness of the CdTe and CdSe parts. We thus learn that the bending can be subdivided into four kinds depending on the compressive/tensile nature of each outer plane of the sheet. We use this approach to directly compare our findings with experimental results on the bending of CdTe/CdSe rods. To reduce the effects of the lattice mismatch we explore diffuse interfaces, where we mix (i.e. alloy) Te and Se, and estimate the strain response.

  7. Metal-solid interactions controlling the bioavailability of mercury from sediments to clams and sipunculans.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Huan; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2006-06-15

    The bioavailability of sedimentary Hg(II) and methylmercury (MeHg) was quantified by measuring the assimilation efficiency (AE) in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the extraction of the gut juices from the sipunculan Sipunculus nudus. Three factors (Hg concentration in sediment, Hg sediment contact time, and organic content of sediments) were modified to examine metal-solid interactions in controlling Hg bioavailability. The Hg AEs in the clams were strongly correlated with the extraction from the sipunculan gut juices for both Hg species. The bioavailability of both Hg(II) and MeHg generally increased with increased sediment Hg concentration but decreased with sedimentmetal contact time and increasing organic content (except that MeHg was not influenced by organic content). Hg(II) speciation in sediments, quantified by sequential chemical extraction (SCE), was dependent on geochemical conditions and greatly controlled the mobility and bioavailability of Hg(II) in sediments. Most bioavailable Hg(II) originated from the strongly complexed phase (e.g., Hg bound up in Fe/Mn oxide, amorphous organosulfur, or mineral lattice), whereas Hg bound with the organocomplexed phase (Hg humic and Hg2Cl2) was not bioavailable. Hg bound with the other geochemical phases (water soluble, HgO, HgSO4, and HgS) contributed very little to the bioavailable Hg due to their low partitionings. Further, the amount of bioavailable Hg was inversely related to the particle reactivity of Hg with the sediments. Detailed analyses of metal-solid interactions provide a better understanding of how Hg in sediments can predict Hg concentration and therefore bioavailability in benthic invertebrates.

  8. The impact of catchment source group classification on the accuracy of sediment fingerprinting outputs.

    PubMed

    Pulley, Simon; Foster, Ian; Collins, Adrian L

    2016-05-05

    The objective classification of sediment source groups is at present an under-investigated aspect of source tracing studies, which has the potential to statistically improve discrimination between sediment sources and reduce uncertainty. This paper investigates this potential using three different source group classification schemes. The first classification scheme was simple surface and subsurface groupings (Scheme 1). The tracer signatures were then used in a two-step cluster analysis to identify the sediment source groupings naturally defined by the tracer signatures (Scheme 2). The cluster source groups were then modified by splitting each one into a surface and subsurface component to suit catchment management goals (Scheme 3). The schemes were tested using artificial mixtures of sediment source samples. Controlled corruptions were made to some of the mixtures to mimic the potential causes of tracer non-conservatism present when using tracers in natural fluvial environments. It was determined how accurately the known proportions of sediment sources in the mixtures were identified after unmixing modelling using the three classification schemes. The cluster analysis derived source groups (2) significantly increased tracer variability ratios (inter-/intra-source group variability) (up to 2122%, median 194%) compared to the surface and subsurface groupings (1). As a result, the composition of the artificial mixtures was identified an average of 9.8% more accurately on the 0-100% contribution scale. It was found that the cluster groups could be reclassified into a surface and subsurface component (3) with no significant increase in composite uncertainty (a 0.1% increase over Scheme 2). The far smaller effects of simulated tracer non-conservatism for the cluster analysis based schemes (2 and 3) was primarily attributed to the increased inter-group variability producing a far larger sediment source signal that the non-conservatism noise (1). Modified cluster analysis

  9. Experimental study of bentonite-soil mixtures as anti-seepage materials of constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Li, Zifu; Zhao, Xin; Li, Haihan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, mixtures of different kinds of bentonite and soil were used and tested in order to find a cheap alternative to current anti-seepage materials for constructed wetlands. The anti-seepage layer of constructed wetlands was simulated in the experimental study and the permeability coefficient of the mixed materials was determined in order to evaluate the anti-seepage effect of mixtures. The main results are as follows: (i) The minimum mass ratio of bentonite to soil is 10%; (ii) Within a certain range, the more compact and higher the wet density is, then the better anti-seepage effect is (under the condition of certain moisture content). The permeability coefficient of the mixed materials exponentially increased with the increase of wet density; (iii) At the wet density of 1.83 g/cm(3), corresponding with the optimum compactness, the mixture of natural sodium bentonite produced in Wyoming, USA and soil from Cangzhou, Hebei province showed the best anti-seepage performance; (iv) The impermeability of the mixture with smaller particle sizes of bentonite was far better than that with the bigger particle sizes; (v) The hydration effect of bentonite changed the structure of the mixture materials into a special structure that is similar to that of pure bentonite. The particles of the mixture became expanded under SEM investigation and the mixture became more compact, which could have the same or similar effect as pure bentonite for anti-seepage.

  10. Sediment toxicity in Savannah Harbor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Savannah Harbor, located near the mouth of the Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina, is impacted by industrial and municipal effluents. Potential release of contaminants stored in harbor sediments through dredging and shipping operations requires that contaminated areas be identified for proper management of the system and protection of wildlife resources. During 1991, Hyalella azteca were exposed in 10-d static-renewal toxicity tests to pore-water and solid-phase sediment samples collected from 26 sites within Savannah Harbor. Pore-water toxicity was more pronounced than that for solidphase sediment. Toxicity and reduced leaf consumption demonstrated impaired sediment quality at specific sites within Savannah Harbor and Back River. Factors responsible for the decreased sediment quality were ammonia, alkalinity, and metal concentrations (cadmium, chromium, lead, molybdenum, and nickel). Elevated concentrations of metals and toxicities in Back River sediments indicated impacts from adjacent dredge-spoil areas.

  11. Iron reduction in the sediments of a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tuccillo, M.E.; Cozzarelli, I.M.; Herman, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    Sediments sampled at a hydrocarbon-contaminated, glacial-outwash, sandy aquifer near Bemidji, Minnesota, were analyzed for sediment-associated Fe with several techniques. Extraction with 0.5 M HCl dissolved poorly crystalline Fe oxides and small amounts of Fe in crystalline Fe oxides, and extracted Fe from phyllosilicates. Use of Ti-citrate-EDTA-bicarbonate results in more complete removal of crystalline Fe oxides. The average HCl-extractable Fe(III) concentration in the sediments closest to the crude-oil contamination (16.2 ??mol/g) has been reduced by up to 30% from background values (23.8 ??mol/g) as a result of Fe(III) reduction in contaminated anoxic groundwater. Iron(II) concentrations are elevated in sediments within an anoxic plume in the aquifer. Iron(II) values under the oil body (19.2 ??mol/g) are as much as 4 times those in the background sediments (4.6 ??mol/g), indicating incorporation of reduced Fe in the contaminated sediments. A 70% increase in total extractable Fe at the anoxic/oxic transition zone indicates reoxidation and precipitation of Fe mobilized from sediment in the anoxic plume. Scanning electron microscopy detected authigenic ferroan calcite in the anoxic sediments and confirmed abundant Fe(III) oxyhydroxides at the anoxic/oxic boundary. The redox biogeochemistry of Fe in this system is coupled to contaminant degradation and is important in predicting processes of hydrocarbon degradation.

  12. Chemical induction of tumors in oysters by a mixture of aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons, amines and metals

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, G.R.; Pruell, R.J.; Malcolm, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    Tumors were induced in eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica) by a mixture of aromatic hydrocarbons, an aromatic amine, polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated hydrocarbons, a nitrosoamine and heavy metals. Kidney and enteric tumors developed in oysters following exposure to a mixture containing 3,4-benzopyrene, 1,2-benzanthracene, 2-aminofluorene, N-nitrosodiethylamine, technical chlordane, Aroclors 1242 and 1254, p,p'-DDE, cadmium (CdCl2), chromium (K2CrO4) and lead (Pb(NO3)2). 2-Aminofluorene and N-nitrosodiethylamine, not measured in Black Rock Harbor sediment, were both added at 0.6 and 6.0 micrograms/g dry sediment. A 3% prevalence of low-grade renal and gastrointestinal tumors developed after 30 days in oysters fed water-column suspended sediment particulate spiked with the mixture of chemicals. Disease progression was most advanced in enteric adenomas. Both types are comparable to those produced after 30 days in the same organs by chemically contaminated Black Rock Harbor sediment.

  13. Microplastics elutriation from sandy sediments: A granulometric approach.

    PubMed

    Kedzierski, Mikaël; Le Tilly, Véronique; Bourseau, Patrick; Bellegou, Hervé; César, Guy; Sire, Olivier; Bruzaud, Stéphane

    2016-06-15

    Although relatively easy to extract in the marine environment, microplastics are very difficult to recover when they are trapped in sediments. The elutriation column is one of the best tools currently available for extracting plastics from sediment, but with a high sand recovery yield. This study aims to address the following questions: (i) is it possible to use a sedimentological approach to limit the sand recovery? (ii) does the extraction velocity of the sand and plastic particles vary according to density and granulometry? (iii) what is the relative recovery efficiency obtained for dense polymer particles mixed with marine sand? Based on a new granulometric classification, different plastic particle-size fractions are defined. Their extraction velocities are experimentally determined on particles of sediment and different plastics (PA, PVC). The particle recovery experiments indicate that it is possible to extract >90% of dense plastic particles in cases of negligible sand recovery.

  14. Determination of Fe(II)Fe(II) ratio in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, E.W.

    1989-07-26

    The procedure was designed for the simple, rapid determination of the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio in glass samples. The procedure consists of the following steps: dissolution of the pulverized glass sample in a sulfuric-hydrofluoric acid mixture, containing ammonium vanadate, which preserves the Fe(II) content; addition of boric acid to destroy iron-fluoride complexes, making the iron available for color formation with Ferrozine; addition of pH 5 buffer and Ferrozine reagent to form the magenta-colored ferrous-Ferrozine complex, with measurement of the absorbance for the determination of Fe(II) content; and, addition of ascorbic acid to reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), with a second absorbance measurement that determines total Fe. Directions for the preparation of glass from non-radioactive sludge samples are provided. The analysis of this prepared glass for the Fe(II)/Fe(III) ratio is an indication of the ratio that would be in a plant batch of glass if made from this sludge.

  15. Sulfur-rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldhaber, M. B.

    2003-12-01

    Marine sediments with more than a few tenths of a percent of organic carbon, as well as organic-matter-bearing, nonmarine sediments with significant concentrations of sulfate in the depositional waters contain the mineral pyrite (FeS2). Pyrite, along with sulfur-bearing organic compounds, form indirectly through the metabolic activities of sulfate-reducing microorganisms. The geochemical transformations of sulfur in sediments leading to these products significantly impact the pathway of early sedimentary diagenesis, conditions for the localization of mineral deposits (Ohmoto and Goldhaber, 1997), the global cycling of sulfur and carbon, the abundance of oxygen in the Earth's atmosphere, and perhaps even the emergence of life on Earth (e.g., Russell and Hall, 1997). This chapter provides an overview of sedimentary-sulfur geochemistry from its microbial and abiologic pathways to the global consequences of these processes.The geochemistry of sulfur is complicated by its wide range of oxidation states (Table 1). Under oxidizing conditions (e.g., in the presence of atmospheric oxygen) sulfate, with sulfur in the +6 valence state, is the stable form of sulfur. Under reducing conditions (e.g., in the presence of H2), sulfide (S=-2 valent) is the stable oxidation state. However, a range of additional aqueous and solid-phase sulfur species exist with valences between these two end-members. What makes the study of sulfur geochemistry so exciting and challenging is that many of these intermediate-valent forms play key roles in sedimentary-sulfur transformations. Furthermore, many of these reactions are microbially mediated. As detailed below, these complex biogeochemical pathways are now yielding to research whose scope ranges from molecular to global level. Table 1. Forms of sulfur in marine sediments and their oxidation states Aqueous species or mineralFormulaOxidation state(s) of sulfur SulfideH2S(aq), HS-(aq)-2 Iron sulfideaFeS(s)-2 GreigiteFe3S4(s)-2, 0 PyriteFeS2(s)-2

  16. Unmixing Multi-Component Magnetic Mixtures in Geologic Materials Using First Order Reversal Curve Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lascu, I.; Harrison, R. J.; Li, Y.; Muraszko, J.; Channell, J. E. T.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Hodell, D. A.; Necula, C.; Panaiotu, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a magnetic unmixing method based on principal component analysis (PCA) of first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams. PCA provides an objective and robust statistical framework for unmixing, because it represents data variability as a linear combination of a limited number of principal components that are derived purely on the basis of natural variations contained within the dataset. For PCA we have resampled FORC distributions on grids that capture diagnostic signatures of magnetic domain states. Individual FORC diagrams were then recast as linear combinations of end-member (EM) FORC diagrams, located at user-defined positions in PCA space. The EM selection is guided by constraints derived from physical modeling, and is imposed by data scatter. To test our model, we have investigated temporal variations of two EMs in bulk North Atlantic sediment cores collected from the Rockall Trough and the Iberian Continental Margin. Sediments from these sites contain a mixture of magnetosomes and granulometrically distinct detrital magnetite. We have also quantified the spatial variation of three EM components in surficial sediments along the flow path of the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). These samples were separated into granulometric fractions, which also assisted in constraining EM definition. The unmixing model reveals systematic variations in EM relative abundance as a function of distance along NADW flow. Finally, we have applied PCA to the combined dataset of Rockall Trough and NADW sediments, which can be recast as a four-EM mixture, providing enhanced discrimination between components. Our method forms the foundation of a general solution to the problem of unmixing multi-component magnetic mixtures, a fundamental task of rock magnetic studies.

  17. Sediment Type Affects Competition between a Native and an Exotic Species in Coastal China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Li; Wang, Yong-Yang; An, Shu-Qing; Zhi, Ying-Biao; Lei, Guang-Chun; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Different types of sediments in salt marsh have different physical and chemical characters. Thus sediment type plays a role in plant competition and growth in salt marsh ecosystems. Spartina anglica populations have been increasingly confined to upper elevation gradients of clay, and the niche sediment has changed. Because the niches of S. anglica and the native species Scirpus triqueter overlap, we conducted a greenhouse experiment to test the hypothesis that plant competition has changed under different types of sediments. Biomass and asexual reproduction were analyzed, and inter- and intraspecific competition was measured by log response ratio for the two species in both monoculture and combination under three sediment types (sand, clay and mixture of sand and clay). For S. anglica, biomass, ramet number and rhizome length in combination declined significantly compared with those in monoculture, and the intensity of interspecific competition was significantly higher than that of intraspecific competition under all sediments. For S. triqueter, the intensities of intra- and interspecific competition were not significantly different. This indicates that S. triqueter