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Sample records for mlh3 missense mutations

  1. Genetic analysis of mlh3 mutations reveals interactions between crossover promoting factors during meiosis in baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Sonntag Brown, Megan; Lim, Elisha; Chen, Cheng; Nishant, K T; Alani, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Crossing over between homologous chromosomes occurs during the prophase of meiosis I and is critical for chromosome segregation. In baker's yeast, two heterodimeric complexes, Msh4-Msh5 and Mlh1-Mlh3, act in meiosis to promote interference-dependent crossing over. Mlh1-Mlh3 also plays a role in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) by interacting with Msh2-Msh3 to repair insertion and deletion mutations. Mlh3 contains an ATP-binding domain that is highly conserved among MLH proteins. To explore roles for Mlh3 in meiosis and MMR, we performed a structure-function analysis of eight mlh3 ATPase mutants. In contrast to previous work, our data suggest that ATP hydrolysis by both Mlh1 and Mlh3 is important for both meiotic and MMR functions. In meiotic assays, these mutants showed a roughly linear relationship between spore viability and genetic map distance. To further understand the relationship between crossing over and meiotic viability, we analyzed crossing over on four chromosomes of varying lengths in mlh3Δ mms4Δ strains and observed strong decreases (6- to 17-fold) in crossing over in all intervals. Curiously, mlh3Δ mms4Δ double mutants displayed spore viability levels that were greater than observed in mms4Δ strains that show modest defects in crossing over. The viability in double mutants also appeared greater than would be expected for strains that show such severe defects in crossing over. Together, these observations provide insights for how Mlh1-Mlh3 acts in crossover resolution and MMR and for how chromosome segregation in Meiosis I can occur in the absence of crossing over.

  2. Localization of MLH3 at the Centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Roesner, Lennart M.; Mielke, Christian; Faehnrich, Silke; Merkhoffer, Yvonne; Dittmar, Kurt E. J.; Drexler, Hans G.; Dirks, Wilhelm G.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes are commonly associated with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). MLH1 protein heterodimerizes with PMS2, PMS1, and MLH3 to form MutLα, MutLβ, and MutLγ, respectively. We reported recently stable expression of GFP-linked MLH3 in human cell lines. Monitoring these cell lines during the cell cycle using live cell imaging combined with confocal microscopy, we detected accumulation of MLH3 at the centrosomes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) revealed high mobility and fast exchange rates at the centrosomes as it has been reported for other DNA repair proteins. MLH3 may have a role in combination with other repair proteins in the control of centrosome numbers. PMID:25116689

  3. Analyzing Effects of Naturally Occurring Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Miteva, Maria A.; Wang, Lin; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Single-point mutation in genome, for example, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) or rare genetic mutation, is the change of a single nucleotide for another in the genome sequence. Some of them will produce an amino acid substitution in the corresponding protein sequence (missense mutations); others will not. This paper focuses on genetic mutations resulting in a change in the amino acid sequence of the corresponding protein and how to assess their effects on protein wild-type characteristics. The existing methods and approaches for predicting the effects of mutation on protein stability, structure, and dynamics are outlined and discussed with respect to their underlying principles. Available resources, either as stand-alone applications or webservers, are pointed out as well. It is emphasized that understanding the molecular mechanisms behind these effects due to these missense mutations is of critical importance for detecting disease-causing mutations. The paper provides several examples of the application of 3D structure-based methods to model the effects of protein stability and protein-protein interactions caused by missense mutations as well. PMID:22577471

  4. Comparison of predicted and actual consequences of missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Miosge, Lisa A; Field, Matthew A; Sontani, Yovina; Cho, Vicky; Johnson, Simon; Palkova, Anna; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Liang, Rong; Zhang, Yafei; Lyon, Stephen; Beutler, Bruce; Whittle, Belinda; Bertram, Edward M; Enders, Anselm; Goodnow, Christopher C; Andrews, T Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Each person's genome sequence has thousands of missense variants. Practical interpretation of their functional significance must rely on computational inferences in the absence of exhaustive experimental measurements. Here we analyzed the efficacy of these inferences in 33 de novo missense mutations revealed by sequencing in first-generation progeny of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-treated mice, involving 23 essential immune system genes. PolyPhen2, SIFT, MutationAssessor, Panther, CADD, and Condel were used to predict each mutation's functional importance, whereas the actual effect was measured by breeding and testing homozygotes for the expected in vivo loss-of-function phenotype. Only 20% of mutations predicted to be deleterious by PolyPhen2 (and 15% by CADD) showed a discernible phenotype in individual homozygotes. Half of all possible missense mutations in the same 23 immune genes were predicted to be deleterious, and most of these appear to become subject to purifying selection because few persist between separate mouse substrains, rodents, or primates. Because defects in immune genes could be phenotypically masked in vivo by compensation and environment, we compared inferences by the same tools with the in vitro phenotype of all 2,314 possible missense variants in TP53; 42% of mutations predicted by PolyPhen2 to be deleterious (and 45% by CADD) had little measurable consequence for TP53-promoted transcription. We conclude that for de novo or low-frequency missense mutations found by genome sequencing, half those inferred as deleterious correspond to nearly neutral mutations that have little impact on the clinical phenotype of individual cases but will nevertheless become subject to purifying selection.

  5. Comparison of predicted and actual consequences of missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Miosge, Lisa A; Field, Matthew A; Sontani, Yovina; Cho, Vicky; Johnson, Simon; Palkova, Anna; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Liang, Rong; Zhang, Yafei; Lyon, Stephen; Beutler, Bruce; Whittle, Belinda; Bertram, Edward M; Enders, Anselm; Goodnow, Christopher C; Andrews, T Daniel

    2015-09-15

    Each person's genome sequence has thousands of missense variants. Practical interpretation of their functional significance must rely on computational inferences in the absence of exhaustive experimental measurements. Here we analyzed the efficacy of these inferences in 33 de novo missense mutations revealed by sequencing in first-generation progeny of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-treated mice, involving 23 essential immune system genes. PolyPhen2, SIFT, MutationAssessor, Panther, CADD, and Condel were used to predict each mutation's functional importance, whereas the actual effect was measured by breeding and testing homozygotes for the expected in vivo loss-of-function phenotype. Only 20% of mutations predicted to be deleterious by PolyPhen2 (and 15% by CADD) showed a discernible phenotype in individual homozygotes. Half of all possible missense mutations in the same 23 immune genes were predicted to be deleterious, and most of these appear to become subject to purifying selection because few persist between separate mouse substrains, rodents, or primates. Because defects in immune genes could be phenotypically masked in vivo by compensation and environment, we compared inferences by the same tools with the in vitro phenotype of all 2,314 possible missense variants in TP53; 42% of mutations predicted by PolyPhen2 to be deleterious (and 45% by CADD) had little measurable consequence for TP53-promoted transcription. We conclude that for de novo or low-frequency missense mutations found by genome sequencing, half those inferred as deleterious correspond to nearly neutral mutations that have little impact on the clinical phenotype of individual cases but will nevertheless become subject to purifying selection. PMID:26269570

  6. Comparison of predicted and actual consequences of missense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Miosge, Lisa A.; Field, Matthew A.; Sontani, Yovina; Cho, Vicky; Johnson, Simon; Palkova, Anna; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Liang, Rong; Zhang, Yafei; Lyon, Stephen; Beutler, Bruce; Whittle, Belinda; Bertram, Edward M.; Enders, Anselm; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Andrews, T. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Each person’s genome sequence has thousands of missense variants. Practical interpretation of their functional significance must rely on computational inferences in the absence of exhaustive experimental measurements. Here we analyzed the efficacy of these inferences in 33 de novo missense mutations revealed by sequencing in first-generation progeny of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea–treated mice, involving 23 essential immune system genes. PolyPhen2, SIFT, MutationAssessor, Panther, CADD, and Condel were used to predict each mutation’s functional importance, whereas the actual effect was measured by breeding and testing homozygotes for the expected in vivo loss-of-function phenotype. Only 20% of mutations predicted to be deleterious by PolyPhen2 (and 15% by CADD) showed a discernible phenotype in individual homozygotes. Half of all possible missense mutations in the same 23 immune genes were predicted to be deleterious, and most of these appear to become subject to purifying selection because few persist between separate mouse substrains, rodents, or primates. Because defects in immune genes could be phenotypically masked in vivo by compensation and environment, we compared inferences by the same tools with the in vitro phenotype of all 2,314 possible missense variants in TP53; 42% of mutations predicted by PolyPhen2 to be deleterious (and 45% by CADD) had little measurable consequence for TP53-promoted transcription. We conclude that for de novo or low-frequency missense mutations found by genome sequencing, half those inferred as deleterious correspond to nearly neutral mutations that have little impact on the clinical phenotype of individual cases but will nevertheless become subject to purifying selection. PMID:26269570

  7. Driver Missense Mutation Identification Using Feature Selection and Model Fusion.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Ahmed T; Meng, Tao; Chen, Shu-Ching; Iyengar, S S; Iyengar, Puneeth; Yordy, John; Shyu, Mei-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Driver mutations propel oncogenesis and occur much less frequently than passenger mutations. The need for automatic and accurate identification of driver mutations has increased dramatically with the exponential growth of mutation data. Current computational solutions to identify driver mutations rely on sequence homology. Here we construct a machine learning-based framework that does not rely on sequence homology or domain knowledge to predict driver missense mutations. A windowing approach to represent the local environment of the sequence around the mutation point as a mutation sample is applied, followed by extraction of three sequence-level features from each sample. After selecting the most significant features, the support vector machine and multimodal fusion strategies are employed to give final predictions. The proposed framework achieves relatively high performance and outperforms current state-of-the-art algorithms. The ease of deploying the proposed framework and the relatively accurate performance make this solution applicable to large-scale mutation data analyses. PMID:26402258

  8. Comprehensive assessment of cancer missense mutation clustering in protein structures

    PubMed Central

    Kamburov, Atanas; Lawrence, Michael S.; Polak, Paz; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Lage, Kasper; Golub, Todd R.; Lander, Eric S.; Getz, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale tumor sequencing projects enabled the identification of many new cancer gene candidates through computational approaches. Here, we describe a general method to detect cancer genes based on significant 3D clustering of mutations relative to the structure of the encoded protein products. The approach can also be used to search for proteins with an enrichment of mutations at binding interfaces with a protein, nucleic acid, or small molecule partner. We applied this approach to systematically analyze the PanCancer compendium of somatic mutations from 4,742 tumors relative to all known 3D structures of human proteins in the Protein Data Bank. We detected significant 3D clustering of missense mutations in several previously known oncoproteins including HRAS, EGFR, and PIK3CA. Although clustering of missense mutations is often regarded as a hallmark of oncoproteins, we observed that a number of tumor suppressors, including FBXW7, VHL, and STK11, also showed such clustering. Beside these known cases, we also identified significant 3D clustering of missense mutations in NUF2, which encodes a component of the kinetochore, that could affect chromosome segregation and lead to aneuploidy. Analysis of interaction interfaces revealed enrichment of mutations in the interfaces between FBXW7-CCNE1, HRAS-RASA1, CUL4B-CAND1, OGT-HCFC1, PPP2R1A-PPP2R5C/PPP2R2A, DICER1-Mg2+, MAX-DNA, SRSF2-RNA, and others. Together, our results indicate that systematic consideration of 3D structure can assist in the identification of cancer genes and in the understanding of the functional role of their mutations. PMID:26392535

  9. Missense dopamine transporter mutations associate with adult parkinsonism and ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Freja H.; Skjørringe, Tina; Yasmeen, Saiqa; Arends, Natascha V.; Sahai, Michelle A.; Erreger, Kevin; Andreassen, Thorvald F.; Holy, Marion; Hamilton, Peter J.; Neergheen, Viruna; Karlsborg, Merete; Newman, Amy H.; Pope, Simon; Heales, Simon J.R.; Friberg, Lars; Law, Ian; Pinborg, Lars H.; Sitte, Harald H.; Loland, Claus; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel; Galli, Aurelio; Hjermind, Lena E.; Møller, Lisbeth B.; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Parkinsonism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are widespread brain disorders that involve disturbances of dopaminergic signaling. The sodium-coupled dopamine transporter (DAT) controls dopamine homeostasis, but its contribution to disease remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed a cohort of patients with atypical movement disorder and identified 2 DAT coding variants, DAT-Ile312Phe and a presumed de novo mutant DAT-Asp421Asn, in an adult male with early-onset parkinsonism and ADHD. According to DAT single-photon emission computed tomography (DAT-SPECT) scans and a fluoro-deoxy-glucose-PET/MRI (FDG-PET/MRI) scan, the patient suffered from progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration. In heterologous cells, both DAT variants exhibited markedly reduced dopamine uptake capacity but preserved membrane targeting, consistent with impaired catalytic activity. Computational simulations and uptake experiments suggested that the disrupted function of the DAT-Asp421Asn mutant is the result of compromised sodium binding, in agreement with Asp421 coordinating sodium at the second sodium site. For DAT-Asp421Asn, substrate efflux experiments revealed a constitutive, anomalous efflux of dopamine, and electrophysiological analyses identified a large cation leak that might further perturb dopaminergic neurotransmission. Our results link specific DAT missense mutations to neurodegenerative early-onset parkinsonism. Moreover, the neuropsychiatric comorbidity provides additional support for the idea that DAT missense mutations are an ADHD risk factor and suggests that complex DAT genotype and phenotype correlations contribute to different dopaminergic pathologies. PMID:24911152

  10. Murine Brca1: sequence and significance for human missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Sharan, S K; Wims, M; Bradley, A

    1995-12-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a mouse homologue of the human breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA1. The predicted mouse Brca1 protein is composed of 1812 amino acids. The murine protein is 60% identical and 72% similar to the human BRCA1 protein. Two regions of high homology have been identified between the two proteins. First is the Cys3-His-Cys4 type zinc-finger domain that is identical between the two proteins. The second region is defined by 115 amino acids near the carboxyl end of the Brca1 protein that is 83% identical to human BRCA1 sequence. Seven of eight amino acids involved in human missense mutations that are associated with the disease were found to be conserved between the two species. In contrast, most of the amino acids that are involved in polymorphic variations were not conserved. We therefore propose that the interspecies conservation of predicted amino acid sequences can be used as an additional criterion to determine the significance of human missense mutations.

  11. Missense Mutations in Fumarate Hydratase in Multiple Cutaneous and Uterine Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alam, N. Afrina; Olpin, Simon; Rowan, Andrew; Kelsell, David; Leigh, Irene M.; Tomlinson, Ian P. M.; Weaver, Todd

    2005-01-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in fumarate hydratase (FH) predispose to the multiple cutaneous and uterine leiomyomatosis syndrome (MCUL), which, when co-existing with renal cancer, is also known as hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer. Twenty-seven distinct missense mutations represent 68% of FH mutations reported in MCUL. Here we show that FH missense mutations significantly occurred in fully conserved residues and in residues functioning in the FH A-site, B-site, or subunit-interacting region. Of 24 distinct missense mutations, 13 (54%) occurred in the substrate-binding A-site, 4 (17%) in the substrate-binding B-site, and 7 (29%) in the subunit-interacting region. Clustering of missense mutations suggested the presence of possible mutational hotspots. FH functional assay of lymphoblastoid cell lines from 23 individuals with heterozygous FH missense mutations showed that A-site mutants had significantly less residual activity than B-site mutants, supporting data from Escherichia coli that the A-site is the main catalytic site. Missense FH mutations predisposing to renal cancer had no unusual features, and identical mutations were found in families without renal cancer, suggesting a role for genetic or environmental factors in renal cancer development in MCUL. That all missense FH mutations associating with MCUL/hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer showed diminished FH enzymatic activity suggests that the tumor suppressor role of fumarate hydratase may relate to its enzymatic function. PMID:16237213

  12. Atypical Progeroid Syndrome due to Heterozygous Missense LMNA Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Subramanyam, Lalitha; Agarwal, Anil K.; Simha, Vinaya; Levine, Benjamin; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Novelli, Giuseppe; Crow, Yanick

    2009-01-01

    Context: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and mandibuloacral dysplasia are well-recognized allelic autosomal dominant and recessive progeroid disorders, respectively, due to mutations in lamin A/C (LMNA) gene. Heterozygous LMNA mutations have also been reported in a small number of patients with a less well-characterized atypical progeroid syndrome (APS). Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the underlying genetic and molecular basis of the phenotype of patients presenting with APS. Results: We report 11 patients with APS from nine families, many with novel heterozygous missense LMNA mutations, such as, P4R, E111K, D136H, E159K, and C588R. These and previously reported patients now reveal a spectrum of clinical features including progeroid manifestations such as short stature, beaked nose, premature graying, partial alopecia, high-pitched voice, skin atrophy over the hands and feet, partial and generalized lipodystrophy with metabolic complications, and skeletal anomalies such as mandibular hypoplasia and mild acroosteolysis. Skin fibroblasts from these patients when assessed for lamin A/C expression using epifluorescence microscopy revealed variable nuclear morphological abnormalities similar to those observed in patients with HGPS. However, these nuclear abnormalities in APS patients could not be rescued with 48 h treatment with farnesyl transferase inhibitors, geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitors or trichostatin-A, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Immunoblots of cell lysates from fibroblasts did not reveal prelamin A accumulation in any of these patients. Conclusions: APS patients have a few overlapping but some distinct clinical features as compared with HGPS and mandibuloacral dysplasia. The pathogenesis of clinical manifestations in APS patients seems not to be related to accumulation of mutant farnesylated prelamin A. PMID:19875478

  13. FAS Haploinsufficiency Caused by Extracellular Missense Mutations Underlying Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Bielke, María Gabriela Simesen; Perez, Laura; Yancoski, Judith; Oliveira, João Bosco; Danielian, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the FAS gene are the most common cause of Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS), and the majority of them affect the intracellular domain of FAS protein, particularly the region termed death domain. However, approximately one third of these mutations affect the extracellular region of FAS and most are stop codons, with very few missense changes having been described to date. We previously described 7 patients with a FAS missense extracellular mutation, C107Y, two in homozygozity and 5 in heterozygosity. We investigated here the mechanistic effects of this mutation and observed that the homozygous patients did not show any FAS surface expression, while the heterozygous patients had diminished receptor expression. Aiming to understand why a missense mutation was abolishing receptor expression, we analyzed intracellular FAS protein trafficking using fluorescent fusion proteins of wild type FAS, two missense extracellular mutants (FAS-C107Y and FAS-C104Y) and one missense change localized in the intracellular region, FAS-D260E. The FAS-C107Y and FAS-C104Y mutants failed to reach the cell surface, being retained at the endoplasmic reticulum, unlike the WT or the FAS-D260E which were clearly expressed at the plasma membrane. These results support haploinsufficiency as the underlying mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of ALPS caused by extracellular FAS missense mutations. PMID:26563159

  14. HER2 missense mutations have distinct effects on oncogenic signaling and migration

    PubMed Central

    Zabransky, Daniel J.; Yankaskas, Christopher L.; Cochran, Rory L.; Wong, Hong Yuen; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Red Brewer, Monica; Rosen, D. Marc; Dalton, W. Brian; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Cravero, Karen; Button, Berry; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Cidado, Justin; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather A.; Manto, Kristen M.; Bose, Ron; Lauring, Josh; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) missense mutations have been reported in human cancers. These mutations occur primarily in the absence of HER2 gene amplification such that most HER2-mutant tumors are classified as “negative” by FISH or immunohistochemistry assays. It remains unclear whether nonamplified HER2 missense mutations are oncogenic and whether they are targets for HER2-directed therapies that are currently approved for the treatment of HER2 gene-amplified breast cancers. Here we functionally characterize HER2 kinase and extracellular domain mutations through gene editing of the endogenous loci in HER2 nonamplified human breast epithelial cells. In in vitro and in vivo assays, the majority of HER2 missense mutations do not impart detectable oncogenic changes. However, the HER2 V777L mutation increased biochemical pathway activation and, in the context of a PIK3CA mutation, enhanced migratory features in vitro. However, the V777L mutation did not alter in vivo tumorigenicity or sensitivity to HER2-directed therapies in proliferation assays. Our results suggest the oncogenicity and potential targeting of HER2 missense mutations should be considered in the context of cooperating genetic alterations and provide previously unidentified insights into functional analysis of HER2 mutations and strategies to target them. PMID:26508629

  15. Cancer Missense Mutations Alter Binding Properties of Proteins and Their Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hafumi; Tyagi, Manoj; Teng, Shaolei; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Alexov, Emil; Wuchty, Stefan; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have shown that missense mutations might play an important role in carcinogenesis. However, the extent to which cancer mutations might affect biomolecular interactions remains unclear. Here, we map glioblastoma missense mutations on the human protein interactome, model the structures of affected protein complexes and decipher the effect of mutations on protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid and protein-ion binding interfaces. Although some missense mutations over-stabilize protein complexes, we found that the overall effect of mutations is destabilizing, mostly affecting the electrostatic component of binding energy. We also showed that mutations on interfaces resulted in more drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties than mutations occurring outside the interfaces. Analysis of glioblastoma mutations on interfaces allowed us to stratify cancer-related interactions, identify potential driver genes, and propose two dozen additional cancer biomarkers, including those specific to functions of the nervous system. Such an analysis also offered insight into the molecular mechanism of the phenotypic outcomes of mutations, including effects on complex stability, activity, binding and turnover rate. As a result of mutated protein and gene network analysis, we observed that interactions of proteins with mutations mapped on interfaces had higher bottleneck properties compared to interactions with mutations elsewhere on the protein or unaffected interactions. Such observations suggest that genes with mutations directly affecting protein binding properties are preferably located in central network positions and may influence critical nodes and edges in signal transduction networks. PMID:23799087

  16. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Kotecha, Udhaya H.; Movva, Sireesha; Sharma, Deepak; Verma, Jyotsna; Puri, Ratna Dua; Verma, Ishwar Chander

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1). We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E) substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT) in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein. PMID:25222778

  17. Proteins linked to autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive disorders harbor characteristic rare missense mutation distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Turner, Tychele N; Douville, Christopher; Kim, Dewey; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Karchin, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    The role of rare missense variants in disease causation remains difficult to interpret. We explore whether the clustering pattern of rare missense variants (MAF < 0.01) in a protein is associated with mode of inheritance. Mutations in genes associated with autosomal dominant (AD) conditions are known to result in either loss or gain of function, whereas mutations in genes associated with autosomal recessive (AR) conditions invariably result in loss-of-function. Loss-of-function mutations tend to be distributed uniformly along protein sequence, whereas gain-of-function mutations tend to localize to key regions. It has not previously been ascertained whether these patterns hold in general for rare missense mutations. We consider the extent to which rare missense variants are located within annotated protein domains and whether they form clusters, using a new unbiased method called CLUstering by Mutation Position. These approaches quantified a significant difference in clustering between AD and AR diseases. Proteins linked to AD diseases exhibited more clustering of rare missense mutations than those linked to AR diseases (Wilcoxon P = 5.7 × 10(-4), permutation P = 8.4 × 10(-4)). Rare missense mutation in proteins linked to either AD or AR diseases was more clustered than controls (1000G) (Wilcoxon P = 2.8 × 10(-15) for AD and P = 4.5 × 10(-4) for AR, permutation P = 3.1 × 10(-12) for AD and P = 0.03 for AR). The differences in clustering patterns persisted even after removal of the most prominent genes. Testing for such non-random patterns may reveal novel aspects of disease etiology in large sample studies. PMID:26246501

  18. Missense mutations cluster within the carboxyl-terminal region of DAX-1 and impair transcriptional repression.

    PubMed

    Achermann, J C; Ito, M; Silverman, B L; Habiby, R L; Pang, S; Rosler, A; Jameson, J L

    2001-07-01

    DAX-1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that plays a key role in the development and function of the adrenal gland and hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. Mutations in the gene encoding DAX-1 result in X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC). Affected boys typically present with primary adrenal failure in infancy or childhood and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism at the time of puberty. The majority of DAX1 mutations described to date are nonsense or frameshift mutations that result in premature truncation of the DAX-1 protein and loss of DAX-1 repressor function. Relatively few missense mutations in DAX1 have been reported. Here, we describe missense mutations in three additional families with X-linked AHC. When combined with previous reports, the DAX1 missense mutations appear to cluster within restricted regions of the putative ligand-binding domain of DAX-1 and affect amino acids that are evolutionarily conserved, suggesting that these regions correspond to critical functional domains. Transcription assays, using a variety of artificial and native target genes, were performed to assess the effects of these mutations on the function of DAX-1. All DAX-1 missense mutant constructs showed marked loss of repressor function, with the exception of I439S, a mutation previously shown to be associated with delayed-onset adrenal failure and incomplete hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. These data indicate that most DAX1 missense mutations associated with classic AHC exhibit marked loss of function. The locations of these mutations thereby identify important functional domains in the carboxyl-terminus of the protein.

  19. Functional Characterization and Categorization of Missense Mutations that Cause Methylmalonyl‐CoA Mutase (MUT) Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Forny, Patrick; Froese, D. Sean; Suormala, Terttu

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methylmalonyl‐CoA mutase (MUT) is an essential enzyme in propionate catabolism that requires adenosylcobalamin as a cofactor. Almost 250 inherited mutations in the MUT gene are known to cause the devastating disorder methylmalonic aciduria; however, the mechanism of dysfunction of these mutations, more than half of which are missense changes, has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we examined 23 patient missense mutations covering a spectrum of exonic/structural regions, clinical phenotypes, and ethnic populations in order to determine their influence on protein stability, using two recombinant expression systems and a thermostability assay, and enzymatic function by measuring MUT activity and affinity for its cofactor and substrate. Our data stratify MUT missense mutations into categories of biochemical defects, including (1) reduced protein level due to misfolding, (2) increased thermolability, (3) impaired enzyme activity, and (4) reduced cofactor response in substrate turnover. We further demonstrate the stabilization of wild‐type and thermolabile mutants by chemical chaperones in vitro and in bacterial cells. This in‐depth mutation study illustrates the tools available for MUT enzyme characterization, guides future categorization of further missense mutations, and supports the development of alternative, chaperone‐based therapy for patients not responding to current treatment. PMID:25125334

  20. A patient with a novel homozygous missense mutation in FTO and concomitant nonsense mutation in CETP

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Ahmet Okay; Tüysüz, Beyhan; Coşkun, Süleyman; Quon, Jennifer; Harmanci, Akdes Serin; Baranoski, Jacob F.; Baran, Burçin; Erson-Omay, E. Zeynep; Henegariu, Octavian; Mane, Shrikant M.; Bilgüvar, Kaya; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO) has previously been associated with a variety of diseases and conditions, notably obesity, acute coronary syndrome and metabolic syndrome. Reports describing mutations in FTO as well as FTO animal models have further demonstrated a role for FTO in the development of the brain and other organs. Here, we describe a patient born of consanguineous union who presented with microcephaly, developmental delay, behavioral abnormalities, dysmorphic facial features, hypotonia, and other various phenotypic abnormalities. Whole exome sequencing revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation in FTO and a nonsense mutation in the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). Exome CNV analysis revealed no disease causing large duplications or deletions within coding regions. Patient’s, her parents’ and non-related control’ fibroblasts were analyzed for morphologic defects, abnormal proliferation, apoptosis and transcriptome profile. We have shown that FTO is located in nucleus of cells from each tested samples. Western blot analysis demonstrated no changes in patient FTO. Q-PCR analysis revealed slightly decreased levels of FTO expression in patient cells compared to controls. No morphological or proliferation differences between the patient and control fibroblasts were observed. There is still much to be learned about the molecular mechanisms by which mutations in FTO contribute to such severe phenotypes. PMID:26740239

  1. Defective roles of ATP7B missense mutations in cellular copper tolerance and copper excretion.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Dong, Yi; Ni, Wang; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2015-07-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a hereditary disorder of copper metabolism resulting from mutations within ATP7B. Clinical investigations showed that ATP7B missense mutations cause a wide variety of symptoms in WD patients, which implies that those mutations might affect ATP7B function in a number of ways and each would have deleterious consequences on normal copper distribution and lead to WD. Nonetheless, it is still unknown about the influences of those mutations on ATP7B function of increasing copper excretion and enhancing cellular copper tolerance. Here we established the stable expression cell lines of wild-type (WT) ATP7B and its four missense mutants (R778L, R919G, T935M and P992L), tested cellular copper tolerance and copper excretion using those cell lines, and also observed cellular distribution of WT ATP7B proteins and those mutants in transiently transfected cells. We found that extrinsic expressing WT ATP7B reduced CuCl2-induced copper accumulation and enhanced cellular copper tolerance by accelerating copper excretion, which was selectively compromised by R778L and P992L mutations. Further investigation showed that R778L mutation disrupted the subcellular localization and trafficking of ATP7B proteins, whereas P992L mutation only affected the trafficking of ATP7B. This indicates that ATP7B missense mutants have distinct effects on cellular copper tolerance.

  2. In silico investigation of molecular effects caused by missense mutations in creatine transporter protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Schwatz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-03-01

    Creatine transporter (CT) protein, which is encoded by SLC6A8 gene, is essential for taking up the creatine in the cell, which in turn plays a key role in the spatial and temporal maintenance of energy in skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. It was shown that some missense mutations in CT cause mental retardation, while others are harmless non-synonymous single nucleoside polymorphism (nsSNP). Currently fifteen missense mutations in CT are known, among which twelve are disease-causing. Sequence analysis reveals that there is no clear trend distinguishing disease-causing from harmless missense mutations. Because of that, we built 3D model of the CT using highly homologous template and use the model to investigate the effects of mutations of CT stability and hydrogen bond network. It is demonstrated that disease-causing mutations affect the folding free energy and ionization states of titratable group in much greater extend as compared with harmless mutations. Supported by grants from NLM, NIH, grant numbers 1R03LM009748 and 1R03LM009748-S1.

  3. Gene Coexpression Analyses Differentiate Networks Associated with Diverse Cancers Harboring TP53 Missense or Null Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oros Klein, Kathleen; Oualkacha, Karim; Lafond, Marie-Hélène; Bhatnagar, Sahir; Tonin, Patricia N.; Greenwood, Celia M. T.

    2016-01-01

    In a variety of solid cancers, missense mutations in the well-established TP53 tumor suppressor gene may lead to the presence of a partially-functioning protein molecule, whereas mutations affecting the protein encoding reading frame, often referred to as null mutations, result in the absence of p53 protein. Both types of mutations have been observed in the same cancer type. As the resulting tumor biology may be quite different between these two groups, we used RNA-sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) from four different cancers with poor prognosis, namely ovarian, breast, lung and skin cancers, to compare the patterns of coexpression of genes in tumors grouped according to their TP53 missense or null mutation status. We used Weighted Gene Coexpression Network analysis (WGCNA) and a new test statistic built on differences between groups in the measures of gene connectivity. For each cancer, our analysis identified a set of genes showing differential coexpression patterns between the TP53 missense- and null mutation-carrying groups that was robust to the choice of the tuning parameter in WGCNA. After comparing these sets of genes across the four cancers, one gene (KIR3DL2) consistently showed differential coexpression patterns between the null and missense groups. KIR3DL2 is known to play an important role in regulating the immune response, which is consistent with our observation that this gene's strongly-correlated partners implicated many immune-related pathways. Examining mutation-type-related changes in correlations between sets of genes may provide new insight into tumor biology. PMID:27536319

  4. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: description of two novel homozygous missense mutations causing divergent clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guiu, Isabel; Antón, Ana I; García-Barberá, Nuria; Navarro-Fernández, José; Martínez, Constantino; Fuster, Jose L; Couselo, Jose M; Ortuño, Francisco J; Vicente, Vicente; Rivera, Jose; Lozano, Maria L

    2014-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease resulting from mutations in the LYST/CHS1 gene, which encodes for a 429 kDa protein, CHS1/LYST, that regulates vesicle trafficking and determines the size of lysosomes and other organelles. To date, 60 different mutations have been characterized, and a reasonably straightforward phenotype-genotype correlation has been suggested. We describe two patients on opposite ends of the CHS clinical spectrum with novel missense mutations. We characterized these patients in terms of their mutations, protein localization and expression, mRNA stability, and electrostatic potential. Patient 1 is the first report of a severe early-onset CHS with a homozygous missense mutation (c.11362 G>A, p.G3725R) in the LYST/CHS1 gene. This molecular change results in a reduction at the CHS1 protein level, not due to an mRNA effect, but maybe a consequence of both, a change in the structure of the protein and most likely attributable to the remarkable serious perturbation in the electrostatic potential. Patient 2, who exhibited the adolescence form of the disease, was found to be homozygous for a novel missense mutation c.961 T>C, p.C258R, which seemed to have minor effect on the structure of the CHS1/LYST protein. Reexamining accepted premises of missense mutant alleles being reported among patients with clinically mild forms of the disorder should be carried out, and attempts to link genotype and clinical phenotype require identifying the actual molecular effect of the mutation. Early and accurate diagnosis of the severity of the disease is extremely important to early differentiate patients who would benefit from premature enrollment into a transplantation protocol.

  5. Homozygous missense and nonsense mutations in BMPR1B cause acromesomelic chondrodysplasia-type Grebe.

    PubMed

    Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Deichsel, Alexandra; Wille, Ulrike; Kakar, Naseebullah; Koll, Randi; Bassir, Christian; Ahmad, Jamil; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Mundlos, Stefan; Kubisch, Christian; Borck, Guntram; Klopocki, Eva; Mueller, Thomas D; Doelken, Sandra C; Seemann, Petra

    2014-06-01

    Acromesomelic chondrodysplasias (ACDs) are characterized by disproportionate shortening of the appendicular skeleton, predominantly affecting the middle (forearms and forelegs) and distal segments (hands and feet). Here, we present two consanguineous families with missense (c.157T>C, p.(C53R)) or nonsense (c.657G>A, p.(W219*)) mutations in BMPR1B. Homozygous affected individuals show clinical and radiographic findings consistent with ACD-type Grebe. Functional analysis of the missense mutation C53R revealed that the mutated receptor was partially located at the cell membrane. In contrast to the wild-type receptor, C53R mutation hindered the activation of the receptor by its ligand GDF5, as shown by reporter gene assay. Further, overexpression of the C53R mutation in an in vitro chondrogenesis assay showed no effect on cell differentiation, indicating a loss of function. The nonsense mutation (c.657G>A, p.(W219*)) introduces a premature stop codon, which is predicted to be subject to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, causing reduced protein translation of the mutant allele. A loss-of-function effect of both mutations causing recessive ACD-type Grebe is further supported by the mild brachydactyly or even non-penetrance of these mutations observed in the heterozygous parents. In contrast, dominant-negative BMPR1B mutations described previously are associated with autosomal-dominant brachydactyly-type A2. PMID:24129431

  6. Novel MBTPS2 missense mutation causes a keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans phenotype: mutation update and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Wang, Y; Cheng, R; Ni, C; Liang, J; Li, M; Yao, Z

    2016-10-01

    Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an X-linked condition characterized by keratotic follicular papules and progressive alopecia, which is caused by mutations in the MBTPS2 gene. We carried out a genetic study on a child who was suspected clinically to have KFSD. Sanger sequencing was performed to detect mutations in the entire coding region of MBTPS2. A novel missense mutation (c.599C>T) was identified in the patient, confirming a diagnosis of KFSD. We reviewed related cases with MBTPS2 mutations for evidence of genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:27663151

  7. Missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy-chain gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Shoichi; Matsuoka, Rumiko; Hirayama, Kenji; Sakurai, Hisanao

    1995-09-11

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy occurs as an autosomal dominant familial disorder or as a sporadic disease without familial involvement. We describe a missense mutation of the {beta}-cardiac myosin heavy chain (MHC) gene, a G to T transversion (741 Gly{r_arrow}Trp) identified by direct sequencing of exon 20 in four individuals affected with familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Three individuals with sporadic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, whose parents are clinically and genetically unaffected, had sequence variations of exon 34 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion, 1658 Asp{r_arrow}Asp, resulting in FokI site polymorphism), of intron 33 of the {alpha}-cardiac MHC gene (a G to A and an A to T transversion), and also of intron 14 of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene (a C to T transversion in a patient with Noonan syndrome). Including our case, 30 missense mutations of the {beta}-cardiac MHC gene in 49 families have been reported thus far worldwide. Almost all are located in the region of the gene coding for the globular head of the molecule, and only one mutation was found in both Caucasian and Japanese families. Missense mutations of the {Beta}-cardiac MHC gene in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy may therefore differ according to race. 29 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A missense mutation in PMEL17 is associated with the Silver coat color in the horse

    PubMed Central

    Brunberg, Emma; Andersson, Leif; Cothran, Gus; Sandberg, Kaj; Mikko, Sofia; Lindgren, Gabriella

    2006-01-01

    Background The Silver coat color, also called Silver dapple, in the horse is characterized by dilution of the black pigment in the hair. This phenotype shows an autosomal dominant inheritance. The effect of the mutation is most visible in the long hairs of the mane and tail, which are diluted to a mixture of white and gray hairs. Herein we describe the identification of the responsible gene and a missense mutation associated with the Silver phenotype. Results Segregation data on the Silver locus (Z) were obtained within one half-sib family that consisted of a heterozygous Silver colored stallion with 34 offspring and their 29 non-Silver dams. We typed 41 genetic markers well spread over the horse genome, including one single microsatellite marker (TKY284) close to the candidate gene PMEL17 on horse chromosome 6 (ECA6q23). Significant linkage was found between the Silver phenotype and TKY284 (θ = 0, z = 9.0). DNA sequencing of PMEL17 in Silver and non-Silver horses revealed a missense mutation in exon 11 changing the second amino acid in the cytoplasmic region from arginine to cysteine (Arg618Cys). This mutation showed complete association with the Silver phenotype across multiple horse breeds, and was not found among non-Silver horses with one clear exception; a chestnut colored individual that had several Silver offspring when mated to different non-Silver stallions also carried the exon 11 mutation. In total, 64 Silver horses from six breeds and 85 non-Silver horses from 14 breeds were tested for the exon 11 mutation. One additional mutation located in intron 9, only 759 bases from the missense mutation, also showed complete association with the Silver phenotype. However, as one could expect to find several non-causative mutations completely associated with the Silver mutation, we argue that the missense mutation is more likely to be causative. Conclusion The present study shows that PMEL17 causes the Silver coat color in the horse and enable genetic testing for

  9. A Novel AXIN2 Missense Mutation Is Associated with Non-Syndromic Oligodontia

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yuan; Feng, Hailan

    2015-01-01

    Oligodontia is defined as the congenital absence of six or more permanent teeth, excluding the third molars. Oligodontia may contribute to masticatory dysfunction, speech alteration, aesthetic problems and malocclusion. Numerous gene mutations have been association with oligodontia. In the present study, we identified a de novo AXIN2 missense mutation (c.314T>G) in a Chinese individual with non-syndromic oligodontia. This mutation results in the substitution of Val at residue 105 for Gly (p.Val105Gly); residue 105 is located in the highly conserved regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) domain of the AXIN2 protein. This is the first report indicating that a mutation in the RGS domain of AXIN2 is responsible for non-syndromic oligodontia. Our study supports the relationship between AXIN2 mutation and non-syndromic oligodontia and extends the mutation spectrum of the AXIN2 gene. PMID:26406231

  10. A novel missense mutation in the connexin30 causes nonsyndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Hung; Liu, Yu-Fan; Su, Ching-Chyuan; Su, Mao-Chang; Li, Shuan-Yow; Yang, Jiann-Jou

    2011-01-01

    Dysfunctional gap junctions caused by GJB2 (CX26) and GJB6 (CX30) mutations are implicated in nearly half of nonsyndromic hearing loss cases. A recent study identified a heterozygous mutation, c.119C>T (p.A40V), in the GJB6 gene of patients with nonsyndromic hearing loss. However, the functional role of the mutation in hearing loss remains unclear. In this study, analyses of cell biology indicated that a p.A40V missense mutation of CX30 causes CX30 protein accumulation in the Golgi body rather than in the cytoplasmic membrane. The tet-on protein expression system was used for further study of mutant proteins in CX30 and CX30A40V co-expressions and in CX26 and CX30A40V co-expressions. The p.A40V missense mutation exerted a dominant negative effect on both normal CX30 and CX26, which impaired gap junction formation. Moreover, computer-assisted modeling suggested that this p.A40V mutation affects the intra molecular interaction in the hydrophobic core of Trp44, which significantly alters the efficiency of gap junction formation. These findings suggest that the p.A40V mutation in CX30 causes autosomal-dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss. These data provide a novel molecular explanation for the role of GJB6 in hearing loss.

  11. Crystalline cataract caused by a heterozygous missense mutation in γD-crystallin (CRYGD)

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Caroline; Nihalani, Bharti R.; Engle, Elizabeth C.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe phenotypic characteristics of two pedigrees manifesting early onset crystalline cataract with mutations in the γD-crystallin gene (CRYGD). Methods A detailed medical history was obtained from two Caucasian pedigrees manifesting autosomal dominant congenital cataracts. Genomic DNA was extracted from saliva (DNA Genotek). Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) based genome analysis of the larger pedigree revealed linkage to an 8.2 MB region on chromosome 2q33-q35 which encompassed the crystallin-gamma gene cluster (CRYG). Exons and flanking introns of CRYGA, CRYGB, CRYGC and CRYGD were amplified and sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Results A morphologically unique cataract with extensive refractile “crystals” scattered throughout the nucleus and perinuclear cortex was found in the probands from both pedigrees. A heterozygous C→A mutation was identified at position 109 of the coding sequence (R36S of the processed protein) in exon 2 of CRYGD and this missense mutation was found to cosegregate with the disease in the larger family; this mutation was then identified in affected individuals of pedigree 2 as well. Conclusions The heterozygous 109C→A CRYGD missense mutation is associated with a distinct crystalline cataract in two US Caucasian pedigrees. This confirms crystalline cataract formation with this mutation, as previously reported in sporadic childhood case from the Czech Republic and in members of a Chinese family. PMID:22219628

  12. Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta Caused by Missense Mutations in SPARC

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Londono, Roberto; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Majewski, Jacek; Tétreault, Martine; Nadaf, Javad; Kannu, Peter; Sochett, Etienne; Howard, Andrew; Stimec, Jennifer; Dupuis, Lucie; Roschger, Paul; Klaushofer, Klaus; Palomo, Telma; Ouellet, Jean; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Mort, John S.; Moffatt, Pierre; Boudko, Sergei; Bächinger, Hans-Peter; Rauch, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein, acidic, cysteine-rich (SPARC) is a glycoprotein that binds to collagen type I and other proteins in the extracellular matrix. Using whole-exome sequencing to identify the molecular defect in two unrelated girls with severe bone fragility and a clinical diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta type IV, we identified two homozygous variants in SPARC (GenBank: NM_003118.3; c.497G>A [p.Arg166His] in individual 1; c.787G>A [p.Glu263Lys] in individual 2). Published modeling and site-directed mutagenesis studies had previously shown that the residues substituted by these mutations form an intramolecular salt bridge in SPARC and are essential for the binding of SPARC to collagen type I. The amount of SPARC secreted by skin fibroblasts was reduced in individual 1 but appeared normal in individual 2. The migration of collagen type I alpha chains produced by these fibroblasts was mildly delayed on SDS-PAGE gel, suggesting some overmodification of collagen during triple helical formation. Pulse-chase experiments showed that collagen type I secretion was mildly delayed in skin fibroblasts from both individuals. Analysis of an iliac bone sample from individual 2 showed that trabecular bone was hypermineralized on the material level. In conclusion, these observations show that homozygous mutations in SPARC can give rise to severe bone fragility in humans. PMID:26027498

  13. Mutational analysis of a histone deacetylase in Drosophila melanogaster: missense mutations suppress gene silencing associated with position effect variegation.

    PubMed Central

    Mottus, R; Sobel, R E; Grigliatti, T A

    2000-01-01

    For many years it has been noted that there is a correlation between acetylation of histones and an increase in transcriptional activity. One prediction, based on this correlation, is that hypomorphic or null mutations in histone deacetylase genes should lead to increased levels of histone acetylation and result in increased levels of transcription. It was therefore surprising when it was reported, in both yeast and fruit flies, that mutations that reduced or eliminated a histone deacetylase resulted in transcriptional silencing of genes subject to telomeric and heterochromatic position effect variegation (PEV). Here we report the first mutational analysis of a histone deacetylase in a multicellular eukaryote by examining six new mutations in HDAC1 of Drosophila melanogaster. We observed a suite of phenotypes accompanying the mutations consistent with the notion that HDAC1 acts as a global transcriptional regulator. However, in contrast to recent findings, here we report that specific missense mutations in the structural gene of HDAC1 suppress the silencing of genes subject to PEV. We propose that the missense mutations reported here are acting as antimorphic mutations that "poison" the deacetylase complex and propose a model that accounts for the various phenotypes associated with lesions in the deacetylase locus. PMID:10655219

  14. Theoretical prediction of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis missense mutation effects on Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase structural stability

    SciTech Connect

    Potier, M.; Tu, Y.

    1994-09-01

    Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) deficiency is associated with the progressive paralytic disorder familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). Fifteen missense mutations in the SOD gene were identified in several patients. These mutations may prevent correct promoter folding or hamper homodimer formation necessary for SOD activity. To understand the effect of the missense mutations on SOD structure and function, we used a theoretical analysis of structural effects based on two predictive methods using the modeled tertiary structure of human SOD. The first method uses the TORSO program which optimizes amino acid side-chains repacking in both wild-type and mutant SODs and calculates protein internal packing energy. The second method uses a hydrophobicity scale of the amino acid residues and considers both solvent accessibility and hydrophobic nature of residue substitutions to compute a stabilization energy change ({delta}E). These predictive methods have been tested in 187 single and multiple missense mutants of 8 proteins (T4 lysozyme, human carbonic anhydrase II, chymotrypsin inhibitor 2, f1 gene V protein, barnase, {lambda}-repressor, chicken and human lysozymes) with experimentally determined thermostability. The overall prediction accuracy with these proteins was 88%. Analysis of FALS missense mutations {delta}E predicts that 14 of 15 mutations destabilize the SOD structure. The other missense mutation is located at the homodimer interface and may hinder dimer formation. This approach is applicable to any protein with known tertiary structure to predict missense mutation effects on protein stability.

  15. Comprehensive functional annotation of 18 missense mutations found in suspected hemochromatosis type 4 patients.

    PubMed

    Callebaut, Isabelle; Joubrel, Rozenn; Pissard, Serge; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Gérolami, Victoria; Ged, Cécile; Cadet, Estelle; Cartault, François; Ka, Chandran; Gourlaouen, Isabelle; Gourhant, Lénaick; Oudin, Claire; Goossens, Michel; Grandchamp, Bernard; De Verneuil, Hubert; Rochette, Jacques; Férec, Claude; Le Gac, Gérald

    2014-09-01

    Hemochromatosis type 4 is a rare form of primary iron overload transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait caused by mutations in the gene encoding the iron transport protein ferroportin 1 (SLC40A1). SLC40A1 mutations fall into two functional categories (loss- versus gain-of-function) underlying two distinct clinical entities (hemochromatosis type 4A versus type 4B). However, the vast majority of SLC40A1 mutations are rare missense variations, with only a few showing strong evidence of causality. The present study reports the results of an integrated approach collecting genetic and phenotypic data from 44 suspected hemochromatosis type 4 patients, with comprehensive structural and functional annotations. Causality was demonstrated for 10 missense variants, showing a clear dichotomy between the two hemochromatosis type 4 subtypes. Two subgroups of loss-of-function mutations were distinguished: one impairing cell-surface expression and one altering only iron egress. Additionally, a new gain-of-function mutation was identified, and the degradation of ferroportin on hepcidin binding was shown to probably depend on the integrity of a large extracellular loop outside of the hepcidin-binding domain. Eight further missense variations, on the other hand, were shown to have no discernible effects at either protein or RNA level; these were found in apparently isolated patients and were associated with a less severe phenotype. The present findings illustrate the importance of combining in silico and biochemical approaches to fully distinguish pathogenic SLC40A1 mutations from benign variants. This has profound implications for patient management.

  16. A Novel Missense Mutation in POMT1 Modulates the Severe Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype Associated with POMT1 Nonsense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie E.; Conta, Jessie H.; Winder, Thomas L.; Willer, Tobias; Eskuri, Jamie M.; Haas, Richard; Patterson, Kathleen; Campbell, Kevin P.; Moore, Steven A.; Gospe, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in POMT1 lead to a group of neuromuscular conditions ranging in severity from Walker-Warburg syndrome to limb girdle muscular dystrophy. We report two male siblings, ages 19 and 14, and an unrelated 6-year old female with early onset muscular dystrophy and intellectual disability with minimal structural brain anomalies and no ocular abnormalities. Compound heterozygous mutations in POMT1 were identified including a previously reported nonsense mutation (c.2167dupG; p.Asp723Glyfs*8) associated with Walker-Warburg syndrome and a novel missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 protein (c.1958C>T; p.Pro653Leu). This novel variant reduces the phenotypic severity compared to patients with homozygous c.2167dupG mutations or compound heterozygous patients with a c.2167dupG mutation and a wide range of other mutant POMT1 alleles. PMID:24491487

  17. Missense mutations in TENM4, a regulator of axon guidance and central myelination, cause essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Hor, Hyun; Francescatto, Ludmila; Bartesaghi, Luca; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Kousi, Maria; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Jiménez-Jiménez, Felix J.; Gironell, Alexandre; Clarimón, Jordi; Drechsel, Oliver; Agúndez, José A. G.; Kenzelmann Broz, Daniela; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Lleó, Alberto; Coria, Francisco; García-Martin, Elena; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martí, Maria J.; Kulisevsky, Jaume; Hor, Charlotte N.; Ossowski, Stephan; Chrast, Roman; Katsanis, Nicholas; Pastor, Pau; Estivill, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is a common movement disorder with an estimated prevalence of 5% of the population aged over 65 years. In spite of intensive efforts, the genetic architecture of ET remains unknown. We used a combination of whole-exome sequencing and targeted resequencing in three ET families. In vitro and in vivo experiments in oligodendrocyte precursor cells and zebrafish were performed to test our findings. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a missense mutation in TENM4 segregating in an autosomal-dominant fashion in an ET family. Subsequent targeted resequencing of TENM4 led to the discovery of two novel missense mutations. Not only did these two mutations segregate with ET in two additional families, but we also observed significant over transmission of pathogenic TENM4 alleles across the three families. Consistent with a dominant mode of inheritance, in vitro analysis in oligodendrocyte precursor cells showed that mutant proteins mislocalize. Finally, expression of human mRNA harboring any of three patient mutations in zebrafish embryos induced defects in axon guidance, confirming a dominant-negative mode of action for these mutations. Our genetic and functional data, which is corroborated by the existence of a Tenm4 knockout mouse displaying an ET phenotype, implicates TENM4 in ET. Together with previous studies of TENM4 in model organisms, our studies intimate that processes regulating myelination in the central nervous system and axon guidance might be significant contributors to the genetic burden of this disorder. PMID:26188006

  18. Missense mutation (E150K) of rhodopsin in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, U.; Oehlmann, R.; Gal, A.

    1994-09-01

    Missense or nonsense mutations of the rhodopsin gene have been implied in the pathogenesis of at least 3 different traits; autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP), congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB), and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP). For the latter, a single patient has been reported with a nonsense mutation at codon 249 on both alleles. Heterozygous carriers of missense mutations of rhodopsin develop either adRP or CSNB depending on the particular amino acid substitution. Four of the 9 siblings from a consanguineous marriage in southern India were reported the have arRP. Mutational screening and sequencing of the rhodopsin gene revealed a G-to-A transition of the first nucleotide at codon 150 in exon II, which alters glutamate to lysine. The E150K mutation was present in the 4 patients in homozygous form, whereas the parents and 2 of the siblings were heterozygotes. Two-point analysis produced a Zmax=3.46 at theta=0.00. Two unaffected siblings who are heterozygotes for the E150K mutation underwent a thorough ophthalmological and psychophysical examination. No clinical abnormalities were found although these individuals were over forty, whereas the onset of RP in their affected siblings was in the second decade. Collectively, both the genetic and clinical findings strongly suggest that the E150K mutation of rhodopsin is recessive in this family. Glu150 forms part of the CD cytoplasmic loop of rhodopsin, which has been implicated in the binding and activation of transducin. We speculate that E150K leads to RP because the mutant protein may be incapable of activating transducin. It is tempting to speculate that, in addition to mutations in the genes for rhodopsin and the {beta}-subunit of PDE, mutations in the genes for transducin may also result in arRP.

  19. MECP2 missense mutations outside the canonical MBD and TRD domains in males with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Failla, Pinella; Di Marco, Chiara; Grozeva, Detelina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Spiga, Ottavia; Mari, Francesca; Meloni, Ilaria; Raymond, Lucy; Renieri, Alessandra; Romano, Corrado; Ariani, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a nuclear protein highly expressed in neurons that is involved in transcriptional modulation and chromatin remodeling. Mutations in MECP2 in females are associated with Rett syndrome, a neurological disorder characterized by a normal neonatal period, followed by the arrest of development and regression of acquired skills. Although it was initially thought that MECP2 pathogenic mutations in males were not compatible with life, starting from 1999 about 60 male patients have been identified and their phenotype varies from severe neonatal encephalopathy to mild intellectual disability. Targeted Next Generation Sequencing of a panel of intellectual disability related genes was performed on two unrelated male patients, and two missense variants in MECP2 were identified (p.Gly185Val and p.Arg167Trp). These variants lie outside the canonical MBD and TRD domains, where the pathogenicity of missense variants is more difficult to establish. In both families, variants were found in all affected siblings and were inherited from the asymptomatic mother, showing skewed X-chromosome inactivation. We report here the first missense variant located in AT-hook domain 1 and we underline the importance of MECP2 substitutions outside the canonical MeCP2 domains in X-linked intellectual disability. PMID:26490184

  20. Extending the mutation spectrum for Galloway-Mowat syndrome to include homozygous missense mutations in the WDR73 gene.

    PubMed

    Rosti, Rasim O; Dikoglu, Esra; Zaki, Maha S; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Makhseed, Nawal; Sese, Jordan C; Musaev, Damir; Rosti, Basak; Harbert, Mary J; Jones, Marilyn C; Vaux, Keith K; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-04-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder classically described as the combination of microcephaly and nephrotic syndrome. Recently, homozygous truncating mutations in WDR73 (WD repeat domain 73) were described in two of 31 unrelated families with Galloway-Mowat syndrome which was followed by a report of two sibs in an Egyptian consanguineous family. In this report, seven affecteds from four families showing biallelic missense mutations in WDR73 were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed to follow a recessive model of inheritance. Three-dimensional modeling predicted conformational alterations as a result of the mutation, supporting pathogenicity. An additional 13 families with microcephaly and renal phenotype were negative for WDR73 mutations. Missense mutations in the WDR73 gene are reported for the first time in Galloway-Mowat syndrome. A detailed phenotypic comparison of all reported WDR73-linked Galloway-Mowat syndrome patients with WDR73 negative patients showed that WDR73 mutations are limited to those with classical Galloway-Mowat syndrome features, in addition to cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, brain stem hypoplasia, occasional coarse face, late-onset and mostly slow progressive nephrotic syndrome, and frequent epilepsy. PMID:27001912

  1. Extending the Mutation Spectrum for Galloway–Mowat Syndrome to Include Homozygous Missense Mutations in the WDR73 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rosti, Rasim O.; Dikoglu, Esra; Zaki, Maha S.; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Makhseed, Nawal; Sese, Jordan C.; Musaev, Damir; Rosti, Basak; Harbert, Mary J.; Jones, Marilyn C.; Vaux, Keith K.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    Galloway–Mowat syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder classically described as the combination of microcephaly and nephrotic syndrome. Recently, homozygous truncating mutations in WDR73 (WD repeat domain 73) were described in two of 31 unrelated families with Galloway–Mowat syndrome which was followed by a report of two sibs in an Egyptian consanguineous family. In this report, seven affecteds from four families showing biallelic missense mutations in WDR73 were identified by exome sequencing and confirmed to follow a recessive model of inheritance. Three-dimensional modeling predicted conformational alterations as a result of the mutation, supporting pathogenicity. An additional 13 families with microcephaly and renal phenotype were negative for WDR73 mutations. Missense mutations in the WDR73 gene are reported for the first time in Galloway–Mowat syndrome. A detailed phenotypic comparison of all reported WDR73-linked Galloway–Mowat syndrome patients with WDR73 negative patients showed that WDR73 mutations are limited to those with classical Galloway–Mowat syndrome features, in addition to cerebellar atrophy, thin corpus callosum, brain stem hypoplasia, occasional coarse face, late-onset and mostly slow progressive nephrotic syndrome, and frequent epilepsy. PMID:27001912

  2. A missense mutation in PAX9 in a family with distinct phenotype of oligodontia.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Halonen, Katri; Pirinen, Sinikka; Thesleff, Irma; Arte, Sirpa; Nieminen, Pekka

    2003-11-01

    Mutations in PAX9 have been described for families in which inherited oligodontia characteristically involves permanent molars. Our study analysed one large family with dominantly inherited oligodontia clinically and genetically. In addition to permanent molars, some teeth were congenitally missing in the premolar, canine, and incisor regions. Measurements of tooth size revealed the reduced size of the proband's and his father's deciduous and permanent teeth. This phenotype is distinct from oligodontia phenotypes associated with mutations in PAX9. Sequencing of the PAX9 gene revealed a missense mutation in the beginning of the paired domain of the molecule, an arginine-to-tryptophan amino-acid change occurring in a position absolutely conserved in all sequenced paired box genes. A mutation of the homologous arginine of PAX6 has been shown to affect the target DNA specificity of PAX6. We suggest that a similar mechanism explains these distinct oligodontia phenotypes. PMID:14571272

  3. A Novel Missense Mutation in CLCN1 Gene in a Family with Autosomal Recessive Congenital Myotonia

    PubMed Central

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Fardaei, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Congenital recessive myotonia is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which codes for the main skeletal muscle chloride channel ClC-1. More than 120 mutations have been found in this gene. The main feature of this disorder is muscle membrane hyperexcitability. Here, we report a 59-year male patient suffering from congenital myotonia. He had transient generalized myotonia, which started in early childhood. We analyzed CLCN1 sequence in this patient and other members of his family. We found a new missense mutation in CLCN1 gene (c.1886T>C, p.Leu629Pro). Co-segregation of this mutation with the disease was demonstrated by direct sequencing of the fragment in affected as well as unaffected members of this family. In addition, in silico analyses predicted that this nucleotide change would impair the protein function. Thus, this new nucleotide variation can be used for prenatal diagnosis in this family. PMID:27582597

  4. A Novel Missense Mutation in CLCN1 Gene in a Family with Autosomal Recessive Congenital Myotonia.

    PubMed

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Fardaei, Majid

    2016-09-01

    Congenital recessive myotonia is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which codes for the main skeletal muscle chloride channel ClC-1. More than 120 mutations have been found in this gene. The main feature of this disorder is muscle membrane hyperexcitability. Here, we report a 59-year male patient suffering from congenital myotonia. He had transient generalized myotonia, which started in early childhood. We analyzed CLCN1 sequence in this patient and other members of his family. We found a new missense mutation in CLCN1 gene (c.1886T>C, p.Leu629Pro). Co-segregation of this mutation with the disease was demonstrated by direct sequencing of the fragment in affected as well as unaffected members of this family. In addition, in silico analyses predicted that this nucleotide change would impair the protein function. Thus, this new nucleotide variation can be used for prenatal diagnosis in this family. PMID:27582597

  5. A missense mutation in PAX9 in a family with distinct phenotype of oligodontia.

    PubMed

    Lammi, Laura; Halonen, Katri; Pirinen, Sinikka; Thesleff, Irma; Arte, Sirpa; Nieminen, Pekka

    2003-11-01

    Mutations in PAX9 have been described for families in which inherited oligodontia characteristically involves permanent molars. Our study analysed one large family with dominantly inherited oligodontia clinically and genetically. In addition to permanent molars, some teeth were congenitally missing in the premolar, canine, and incisor regions. Measurements of tooth size revealed the reduced size of the proband's and his father's deciduous and permanent teeth. This phenotype is distinct from oligodontia phenotypes associated with mutations in PAX9. Sequencing of the PAX9 gene revealed a missense mutation in the beginning of the paired domain of the molecule, an arginine-to-tryptophan amino-acid change occurring in a position absolutely conserved in all sequenced paired box genes. A mutation of the homologous arginine of PAX6 has been shown to affect the target DNA specificity of PAX6. We suggest that a similar mechanism explains these distinct oligodontia phenotypes.

  6. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Harboring an Activating KRAS K117N Missense Mutation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Vignesh; Margolskee, Elizabeth; Kluk, Michael; Giorgadze, Tamara; Orazi, Attilio

    2016-09-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) or sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy is a rare histiocytic proliferation that is generally considered to be reactive with a benign clinical course. The etiology of RDD is very poorly understood. Recent studies have shown frequent BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, and PIK3CA activating mutations in several histiocytic neoplasms highlighting the emerging importance of the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Here we report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease involving the submandibular salivary gland with a KRAS K117N missense mutation discovered by next-generation sequencing. These results suggest that at least a subset of RDD cases may be clonal processes. Further mutational studies on this rare histiocytic disease should be undertaken to better characterize its pathogenesis as well as open up potential avenues for therapy.

  7. A novel AMH missense mutation in a patient with persistent Müllerian duct syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Zwan, Y G; Brüggenwirth, H T; Drop, S L S; Wolffenbuttel, K P; Madern, G C; Looijenga, L H J; Visser, J A

    2012-01-01

    Persistent Müllerian duct syndrome (PMDS) is characterized by the presence of a uterus, fallopian tubes, and the upper part of the vagina in phenotypic normal male patients. Here, we report a patient diagnosed with PMDS with a novel homozygous missense mutation in the anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) gene (single nucleotide insertion (C) at position 208 (c.208dup, p.Leu70fs)) leading to a frameshift and the introduction of a premature stop codon. Biopsy of both gonads revealed that germ cells were present in an irregular distribution. However, the absence of OCT3/4, PLAP and c-KIT expression indicated physiological maturation. PMID:22797409

  8. A novel missense mutation in Van der Woude syndrome: usefulness of fingernail DNA for genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, N; Shimozato, K; Natsume, N; Niikawa, N; Yoshiura, K

    2006-12-01

    Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal-dominant oral facial disorder. To find a gene mutation in a Japanese family using fingernail DNA samples, we performed this study. We hypothesized that a gene mutation in IRF6 might be involved in VWS, and that fingernail DNA samples may be valuable for detecting such mutations. Linkage and haplotype analyses of the family mapped the disease locus to the 1q32-q41 region. Mutation analysis with an improved extraction method for fingernail DNA detected a novel missense mutation (1046A>T, E349V) in exon 7 of IRF6 in all the affected members of the family. Since the E349V change may disturb the hydrophobic core and affect regulatory activity of IRF6, it is most likely that the mutation is causative for VWS in this family. Fingernail DNA is thus useful for linkage and mutation analyses, since the fingernail can be easily obtained non-invasively, sent through the mail, and stored for a long period. We emphasize here the usefulness of fingernail DNA for the genetic analysis of a disease. PMID:17122170

  9. Missense mutations in the growth hormone receptor dimerization region in Laron syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M.A.; Francke, U. |; Geffner, M.E.; Bersch, N.

    1994-09-01

    Laron syndrome (LS) is an autosomal recessively inherited condition characterized by insensitivity to endogenous and exogenous GH. Affected individuals have severe episodes and other characteristic features. GH receptor gene mutations are present in all affected individuals in whom molecular studies have been reported. The GH receptor is a plasma membrane-spanning protein in which the extracellular domain binds circulating GH and the intracellular domain interacts with the JAK-2 kinase and possibly other intracellular signaling molecules. GH receptor dimerization occurs on GH binding and is thought to be required for normal signal transduction. We have studied the GH receptor genes of four unrelated individuals affected with LS from the United States, Italy, Saudi Arabia, and India. We have identified four different missense mutations that alter consecutive amino acids 152 to 155 in or near the dimerization domain of the GH receptor. One of these mutations, D152H, has been reported previously in Asian LS patients and, in in vitro studies, the mutant receptor was unable to dimerize. This report increases to over 20 the number of different GH receptor gene mutations that have been reported in LS patients and defines the first apparent mutational {open_quotes}hotspot{close_quotes} region in this gene. This cluster of mutations in patients with classic LS phenotype provides additional in vivo evidence that receptor dimerization plays an important role in signaling GH`s growth promoting and metabolic effects. Further in vitro studies of the mutations in this region are in progress.

  10. In silico prediction of tumor antigens derived from functional missense mutations of the cancer gene census

    PubMed Central

    Khalili, Jahan S.; Hanson, Russell W.; Szallasi, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    Antigen-specific immune responses against peptides derived from missense gene mutations have been identified in multiple cancers. The application of personalized peptide vaccines based on the tumor mutation repertoire of each cancer patient is a near-term clinical reality. These peptides can be identified for pre-validation by leveraging the results of massive gene sequencing efforts in cancer. In this study, we utilized NetMHC 3.2 to predict nanomolar peptide binding affinity to 57 human HLA-A and B alleles. All peptides were derived from 5,685 missense mutations in 312 genes annotated as functionally relevant in the Cancer Genome Project. Of the 26,672,189 potential 8–11 mer peptide-HLA pairs evaluated, 0.4% (127,800) display binding affinities < 50 nM, predicting high affinity interactions. These peptides can be segregated into two groups based on the binding affinity to HLA proteins relative to germline-encoded sequences: peptides for which both the mutant and wild-type forms are high affinity binders, and peptides for which only the mutant form is a high affinity binder. Current evidence directs the attention to mutations that increase HLA binding affinity, as compared with cognate wild-type peptide sequences, as these potentially are more relevant for vaccine development from a clinical perspective. Our analysis generated a database including all predicted HLA binding peptides and the corresponding change in binding affinity as a result of point mutations. Our study constitutes a broad foundation for the development of personalized peptide vaccines that hone-in on functionally relevant targets in multiple cancers in individuals with diverse HLA haplotypes. PMID:23243591

  11. Genetic and structure-function studies of missense mutations in human endothelial lipase.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi, Hamid; Tempczyk-Russell, Anna; Haubold, Kurt; Santorico, Stephanie A; Shokati, Touraj; Christians, Uwe; Churchill, Mair E A

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) plays a pivotal role in HDL metabolism. We sought to characterize EL and its interaction with HDL as well as its natural variants genetically, functionally and structurally. We screened our biethnic population sample (n = 802) for selected missense mutations (n = 5) and identified T111I as the only common variant. Multiple linear regression analyses in Hispanic subjects revealed an unexpected association between T111I and elevated LDL-C (p-value = 0.012) and total cholesterol (p-value = 0.004). We examined lipase activity of selected missense mutants (n = 10) and found different impacts on EL function, ranging from normal to complete loss of activity. EL-HDL lipidomic analyses indicated that EL has a defined remodeling of HDL without exhaustion of the substrate and a distinct and preference for several fatty acids that are lipid mediators and known for their potent pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. Structural studies using homology modeling revealed a novel α/β motif in the C-domain, unique to EL. The EL dimer was found to have the flexibility to expand and to bind various sizes of HDL particles. The likely impact of the all known missense mutations (n = 18) on the structure of EL was examined using molecular modeling and the impact they may have on EL lipase activity using a novel structure-function slope based on their structural free energy differences. The results of this multidisciplinary approach delineated the impact of EL and its variants on HDL. Moreover, the results suggested EL to have the capacity to modulate vascular health through its role in fatty acid-based signaling pathways. PMID:23536757

  12. Truncating and missense mutations in IGHMBP2 cause Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 2.

    PubMed

    Cottenie, Ellen; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Bansagi, Boglarka; Zimon, Magdalena; Horga, Alejandro; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Saveri, Paola; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Baets, Jonathan; Bartsakoulia, Marina; Ploski, Rafal; Teterycz, Pawel; Nikolic, Milos; Quinlivan, Ros; Laura, Matilde; Sweeney, Mary G; Taroni, Franco; Lunn, Michael P; Moroni, Isabella; Gonzalez, Michael; Hanna, Michael G; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chabrol, Elodie; Franke, Andre; von Au, Katja; Schilhabel, Markus; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena; Brandner, Sebastian; Lim, Siew Choo; Song, Haiwei; Choi, Byung-Ok; Horvath, Rita; Chung, Ki-Wha; Zuchner, Stephan; Pareyson, Davide; Harms, Matthew; Reilly, Mary M; Houlden, Henry

    2014-11-01

    Using a combination of exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we investigated an English family with two affected siblings in their 40s with recessive Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Compound heterozygous mutations in the immunoglobulin-helicase-μ-binding protein 2 (IGHMBP2) gene were identified. Further sequencing revealed a total of 11 CMT2 families with recessively inherited IGHMBP2 gene mutations. IGHMBP2 mutations usually lead to spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1), where most infants die before 1 year of age. The individuals with CMT2 described here, have slowly progressive weakness, wasting and sensory loss, with an axonal neuropathy typical of CMT2, but no significant respiratory compromise. Segregating IGHMBP2 mutations in CMT2 were mainly loss-of-function nonsense in the 5' region of the gene in combination with a truncating frameshift, missense, or homozygous frameshift mutations in the last exon. Mutations in CMT2 were predicted to be less aggressive as compared to those in SMARD1, and fibroblast and lymphoblast studies indicate that the IGHMBP2 protein levels are significantly higher in CMT2 than SMARD1, but lower than controls, suggesting that the clinical phenotype differences are related to the IGHMBP2 protein levels.

  13. Truncating and Missense Mutations in IGHMBP2 Cause Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Cottenie, Ellen; Kochanski, Andrzej; Jordanova, Albena; Bansagi, Boglarka; Zimon, Magdalena; Horga, Alejandro; Jaunmuktane, Zane; Saveri, Paola; Rasic, Vedrana Milic; Baets, Jonathan; Bartsakoulia, Marina; Ploski, Rafal; Teterycz, Pawel; Nikolic, Milos; Quinlivan, Ros; Laura, Matilde; Sweeney, Mary G.; Taroni, Franco; Lunn, Michael P.; Moroni, Isabella; Gonzalez, Michael; Hanna, Michael G.; Bettencourt, Conceicao; Chabrol, Elodie; Franke, Andre; von Au, Katja; Schilhabel, Markus; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena; Brandner, Sebastian; Lim, Siew Choo; Song, Haiwei; Choi, Byung-Ok; Horvath, Rita; Chung, Ki-Wha; Zuchner, Stephan; Pareyson, Davide; Harms, Matthew; Reilly, Mary M.; Houlden, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Using a combination of exome sequencing and linkage analysis, we investigated an English family with two affected siblings in their 40s with recessive Charcot-Marie Tooth disease type 2 (CMT2). Compound heterozygous mutations in the immunoglobulin-helicase-μ-binding protein 2 (IGHMBP2) gene were identified. Further sequencing revealed a total of 11 CMT2 families with recessively inherited IGHMBP2 gene mutations. IGHMBP2 mutations usually lead to spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1), where most infants die before 1 year of age. The individuals with CMT2 described here, have slowly progressive weakness, wasting and sensory loss, with an axonal neuropathy typical of CMT2, but no significant respiratory compromise. Segregating IGHMBP2 mutations in CMT2 were mainly loss-of-function nonsense in the 5′ region of the gene in combination with a truncating frameshift, missense, or homozygous frameshift mutations in the last exon. Mutations in CMT2 were predicted to be less aggressive as compared to those in SMARD1, and fibroblast and lymphoblast studies indicate that the IGHMBP2 protein levels are significantly higher in CMT2 than SMARD1, but lower than controls, suggesting that the clinical phenotype differences are related to the IGHMBP2 protein levels. PMID:25439726

  14. Missense mutation of the cholecystokinin B receptor gene: Lack of association with panic disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Tadafumi; Wang, Zhe Wu; Crowe, R.R.; Zoega, T.

    1996-07-26

    Cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK{sub 4}) is known to induce panic attacks in patients with panic disorder at a lower dose than in normal controls. Therefore, the cholecystokinin B (CCK{sub B}) receptor gene is a candidate gene for panic disorder. We searched for mutations in the CCK{sub B} gene in 22 probands of panic disorder pedigrees, using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Two polymorphisms were detected. A polymorphism in an intron (2491 C{yields}A) between exons 4 and 5 was observed in 10 of 22 probands. A missense mutation in the extracellular loop of exon 2 (1550 G{yields}A, Val{sup 125}{yields}Ile) was found in only one proband. This mutation was also examined in additional 34 unrelated patients with panic disorder and 112 controls. The prevalence rate of this mutation was 8.8% in patients with panic disorder (3/34) and 4.4% in controls (5/112). The mutation did not segregate with panic disorder in two families where this could be tested. These results suggest no pathophysiological significance of this mutation in panic disorder. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Effect of BET Missense Mutations on Bromodomain Function, Inhibitor Binding and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Lori, Laura; Pasquo, Alessandra; Lori, Clorinda; Petrosino, Maria; Chiaraluce, Roberta; Tallant, Cynthia; Knapp, Stefan; Consalvi, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    Lysine acetylation is an important epigenetic mark regulating gene transcription and chromatin structure. Acetylated lysine residues are specifically recognized by bromodomains, small protein interaction modules that read these modification in a sequence and acetylation dependent way regulating the recruitment of transcriptional regulators and chromatin remodelling enzymes to acetylated sites in chromatin. Recent studies revealed that bromodomains are highly druggable protein interaction domains resulting in the development of a large number of bromodomain inhibitors. BET bromodomain inhibitors received a lot of attention in the oncology field resulting in the rapid translation of early BET bromodomain inhibitors into clinical studies. Here we investigated the effects of mutations present as polymorphism or found in cancer on BET bromodomain function and stability and the influence of these mutants on inhibitor binding. We found that most BET missense mutations localize to peripheral residues in the two terminal helices. Crystal structures showed that the three dimensional structure is not compromised by these mutations but mutations located in close proximity to the acetyl-lysine binding site modulate acetyl-lysine and inhibitor binding. Most mutations affect significantly protein stability and tertiary structure in solution, suggesting new interactions and an alternative network of protein-protein interconnection as a consequence of single amino acid substitution. To our knowledge this is the first report studying the effect of mutations on bromodomain function and inhibitor binding. PMID:27403962

  16. A missense mutation in the beta-2 integrin gene (ITGB2) causes canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kijas, J M; Bauer, T R; Gäfvert, S; Marklund, S; Trowald-Wigh, G; Johannisson, A; Hedhammar, A; Binns, M; Juneja, R K; Hickstein, D D; Andersson, L

    1999-10-01

    Canine leukocyte adhesion deficiency (CLAD) is a fatal immunodeficiency disease found in Irish setters. The clinical manifestations of CLAD are very similar to LAD in humans and BLAD in cattle, which are both caused by mutations in ITGB2 encoding the leukocyte integrin beta-2 subunit (CD18). Sequence analysis of the ITGB2 coding sequence from a CLAD dog and a healthy control revealed a single missense mutation, Cys36Ser. This cysteine residue is conserved among all beta integrins, and the mutation most likely disrupts a disulfide bond. The mutation showed a complete association with CLAD in Irish setters and was not found in a sample of dogs from other breeds. The causative nature of this mutation was confirmed by transduction experiments using retroviral vectors and human LAD EBV B-cells. The normal canine CD18 formed heterodimers with the human CD11 subunit, whereas gene transfer of the mutant CD18 resulted in very low levels of CD11/CD18 expression. The identification of the causative mutation for CLAD now makes it possible to identify carrier animals with a simple diagnostic DNA test, and it forms the basis for using CLAD as a large animal model for the development and evaluation of clinical treatments for human LAD. PMID:10512685

  17. A Novel Functional Missense Mutation p.T219A in Type 1 Gaucher's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin-Yu; Liu, Fei; Du, Si-Chen; Jiang, Sha-Yi; Wang, Hui-Jun; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Wei; Ma, Duan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gaucher's disease (GD) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of acid β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosidase [GBA]) that results in the accumulation of glucocerebroside within macrophages. Many mutations have been reported to be associated with this disorder. This study aimed to discover more mutations and provide data for the genetic pattern of the gene, which will help the development of quick and accurate genetic diagnostic tools for this disease. Methods: Genomic DNA was obtained from peripheral blood leukocytes of the patient and Sanger sequencing is used to sequence GBA gene. Sequence alignments of mammalian β-GBA (GCase) and three-dimensional protein structure prediction of the mutation were made. A construct of this mutant and its compound heterozygous counterpart were used to measure GCase in vitro. Results: GCase is relatively conserved at p.T219A. This novel mutation differs from its wild-type in structure. Moreover, it also causes a reduction in GCase enzyme activity. Conclusion: This novel mutation (c.655A>G, p.T219A) is a pathogenic missense mutation, which contributes to GD. PMID:27098793

  18. Novel missense mutations in red/green opsin genes in congenital color-vision deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Hisao; Kuwayama, Shigeki; Imai, Hiroo; Tanabe, Shoko; Oda, Sanae; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Wada, Akimori; Shichida, Yoshinori; Yamade, Shinichi

    2002-06-01

    The DNAs from 217 Japanese males with congenital red/green color-vision deficiencies were analyzed. Twenty-three subjects had the normal genotype of a single red gene, followed by a green gene. Four of the 23 were from the 69 protan subject group and 19 of the 23 were from the 148 deutan subject group. Three of the 23 subjects had missense mutations. The mutation Asn94Lys (AAC-->AAA) occurred in the single green gene of a deutan subject (A155). The Arg330Gln (CGA-->CAA) mutation was detected in both green genes of another deutan subject (A164). The Gly338Glu (GGG-->GAG) mutation occurred in the single red gene of a protan subject (A89). Both normal and mutant opsins were expressed in cultured COS-7 cells and visual pigments were regenerated with 11-cis-retinal. The normal red and green opsins showed absorbance spectra with lambda(max) of 560 and 530 nm, respectively, but the three mutant opsins had altered spectra. The mutations in Asn94Lys and Gly338Glu resulted in no absorbance and the Arg330Gln mutation gave a low absorbance spectrum with a lambda(max) of 530 nm. Therefore these three mutant opsins are likely to be affected in the folding process, resulting in a loss of function as a visual pigment. PMID:12051694

  19. Novel missense mutations in red/green opsin genes in congenital color-vision deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Hisao; Kuwayama, Shigeki; Imai, Hiroo; Tanabe, Shoko; Oda, Sanae; Nishida, Yasuhiro; Wada, Akimori; Shichida, Yoshinori; Yamade, Shinichi

    2002-06-01

    The DNAs from 217 Japanese males with congenital red/green color-vision deficiencies were analyzed. Twenty-three subjects had the normal genotype of a single red gene, followed by a green gene. Four of the 23 were from the 69 protan subject group and 19 of the 23 were from the 148 deutan subject group. Three of the 23 subjects had missense mutations. The mutation Asn94Lys (AAC-->AAA) occurred in the single green gene of a deutan subject (A155). The Arg330Gln (CGA-->CAA) mutation was detected in both green genes of another deutan subject (A164). The Gly338Glu (GGG-->GAG) mutation occurred in the single red gene of a protan subject (A89). Both normal and mutant opsins were expressed in cultured COS-7 cells and visual pigments were regenerated with 11-cis-retinal. The normal red and green opsins showed absorbance spectra with lambda(max) of 560 and 530 nm, respectively, but the three mutant opsins had altered spectra. The mutations in Asn94Lys and Gly338Glu resulted in no absorbance and the Arg330Gln mutation gave a low absorbance spectrum with a lambda(max) of 530 nm. Therefore these three mutant opsins are likely to be affected in the folding process, resulting in a loss of function as a visual pigment.

  20. Identification of D179H, a novel missense GJB2 mutation in a western Sicily family.

    PubMed

    Bartolotta, Caterina; Salvago, Pietro; Cocuzza, Salvatore; Fabiano, Carmelo; Sammarco, Pietro; Martines, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to describe a novel missense mutation (p.D179H) found in a Western Sicily family and to examine the genetic and audiologic profiles of all family members by performing a GJB2 and GJB6 mutations analysis and a complete audiologic assessment. The proband was a 3-month-old infant with a congenital profound sensorineural hearing loss; direct sequencing of the GJB2 revealed the presence of a c.35delG mutation in the heterozygous state and a heterozygous G>C transition at nucleotide 535 in trans; this novel mutation, called p.D179H, resulted in an aspartic acid to histidine change at codon 179. It was also evidenced in the heterozygous state in two members of this family, both with normal hearing. No GJB6 mutations were evidenced in all subjects studied. Considering the genotypic and phenotypic analysis of all family members, we suggest, differently from the p.D179 N mutation previously reported, a recessive mode of inheritance. Functional studies on p.D179H have to be performed to confirm our hypothesis.

  1. Rational Manual and Automated Scoring Thresholds for the Immunohistochemical Detection of TP53 Missense Mutations in Human Breast Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Midkiff, Bentley R; Conway, Kathleen; Millikan, Robert C; Geradts, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    Missense mutations in TP53 are common in human breast cancer, have been associated with worse prognosis, and may predict therapy effect. TP53 missense mutations are associated with aberrant accumulation of p53 protein in tumor cell nuclei. Previous studies have used relatively arbitrary cutoffs to characterize breast tumors as positive for p53 staining by immunohistochemical assays. This study aimed to objectively determine optimal thresholds for p53 positivity by manual and automated scoring methods using whole tissue sections from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. p53-immunostained slides were available for 564 breast tumors previously assayed for TP53 mutations. Average nuclear p53 staining intensity was manually scored as negative, borderline, weak, moderate, or strong and percentage of positive tumor cells was estimated. Automated p53 signal intensity was measured using the Aperio nuclear v9 algorithm combined with the Genie histology pattern recognition tool and tuned to achieve optimal nuclear segmentation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine optimal cutoffs for average staining intensity and percent cells positive to distinguish between tumors with and without a missense mutation. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated a threshold of moderate average nuclear staining intensity as a good surrogate for TP53 missense mutations in both manual (area under the curve=0.87) and automated (area under the curve=0.84) scoring systems. Both manual and automated immunohistochemical scoring methods predicted missense mutations in breast carcinomas with high accuracy. Validation of the automated intensity scoring threshold suggests a role for such algorithms in detecting TP53 missense mutations in high throughput studies.

  2. Noncatalytic PTEN missense mutation predisposes to organ-selective cancer development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Caserta, Enrico; Egriboz, Onur; Wang, Hui; Martin, Chelsea; Koivisto, Christopher; Pecót, Thierry; Kladney, Raleigh D.; Shen, Changxian; Shim, Kang-Sup; Pham, Thac; Karikomi, Matthew K.; Mauntel, Melissa J.; Majumder, Sarmila; Cuitino, Maria C.; Tang, Xing; Srivastava, Arunima; Yu, Lianbo; Wallace, Julie; Mo, Xiaokui; Park, Morag; Fernandez, Soledad A.; Pilarski, Robert; La Perle, Krista M.D.; Rosol, Thomas J.; Coppola, Vincenzo; Castrillon, Diego H.; Timmers, Cynthia; Cohn, David E.; O'Malley, David M.; Backes, Floor; Suarez, Adrian A.; Goodfellow, Paul; Chamberlin, Helen M.; Macrae, Erin R.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Leone, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of phosphatase and tensin homology deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is linked to increased PI3K–AKT signaling, enhanced organismal growth, and cancer development. Here we generated and analyzed Pten knock-in mice harboring a C2 domain missense mutation at phenylalanine 341 (PtenFV), found in human cancer. Despite having reduced levels of PTEN protein, homozygous PtenFV/FV embryos have intact AKT signaling, develop normally, and are carried to term. Heterozygous PtenFV/+ mice develop carcinoma in the thymus, stomach, adrenal medulla, and mammary gland but not in other organs typically sensitive to Pten deficiency, including the thyroid, prostate, and uterus. Progression to carcinoma in sensitive organs ensues in the absence of overt AKT activation. Carcinoma in the uterus, a cancer-resistant organ, requires a second clonal event associated with the spontaneous activation of AKT and downstream signaling. In summary, this PTEN noncatalytic missense mutation exposes a core tumor suppressor function distinct from inhibition of canonical AKT signaling that predisposes to organ-selective cancer development in vivo. PMID:26302789

  3. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility.

    PubMed

    Comyn, Sophie A; Young, Barry P; Loewen, Christopher J; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-07-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  4. Prefoldin Promotes Proteasomal Degradation of Cytosolic Proteins with Missense Mutations by Maintaining Substrate Solubility

    PubMed Central

    Young, Barry P.; Loewen, Christopher J.; Mayor, Thibault

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins challenge the ability of cells to maintain protein homeostasis and can accumulate into toxic protein aggregates. As a consequence, cells have adopted a number of protein quality control pathways to prevent protein aggregation, promote protein folding, and target terminally misfolded proteins for degradation. In this study, we employed a thermosensitive allele of the yeast Guk1 guanylate kinase as a model misfolded protein to investigate degradative protein quality control pathways. We performed a flow cytometry based screen to identify factors that promote proteasomal degradation of proteins misfolded as the result of missense mutations. In addition to the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ubr1, we identified the prefoldin chaperone subunit Gim3 as an important quality control factor. Whereas the absence of GIM3 did not impair proteasomal function or the ubiquitination of the model substrate, it led to the accumulation of the poorly soluble model substrate in cellular inclusions that was accompanied by delayed degradation. We found that Gim3 interacted with the Guk1 mutant allele and propose that prefoldin promotes the degradation of the unstable model substrate by maintaining the solubility of the misfolded protein. We also demonstrated that in addition to the Guk1 mutant, prefoldin can stabilize other misfolded cytosolic proteins containing missense mutations. PMID:27448207

  5. A novel COL11A1 missense mutation in siblings with non-ocular Stickler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Atsumi; Morita, Kei-ichi; Naruto, Takuya; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kashimada, Kenichi; Enomoto, Keisuke; Morio, Tomohiro; Harada, Hiroyuki; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Stickler syndrome (STL) is an autosomal, dominantly inherited, clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous connective tissue disorder characterized by ocular, auditory, orofacial and skeletal abnormalities. We conducted targeted resequencing using a next-generation sequencer for molecular diagnosis of a 2-year-old girl who was clinically suspected of having STL with Pierre Robin sequence. We detected a novel heterozygous missense mutation, NM_001854.3:n.4838G>A [NM_001854.3 (COL11A1_v001):c.4520G>A], in COL11A1, resulting in a Gly to Asp substitution at position 1507 [NM_001854.3(COL11A1_i001)] within one of the collagen-like domains of the triple helical region. The same mutation was detected in her 4-year-old brother with cleft palate and high-frequency sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:27081569

  6. TULP1 Missense Mutations Induces the Endoplasmic Reticulum Unfolded Protein Response Stress Complex (ER-UPR).

    PubMed

    Lobo, Glenn P; Ebke, Lindsey A; Au, Adrian; Hagstrom, Stephanie A

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the TULP1 gene are associated with early-onset retinitis pigmentosa (RP); however, the molecular mechanisms related to the deleterious effects of TULP1 mutations remains unknown. Several studies have shown that misfolded proteins secondary to genetic mutations can accumulate within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), causing activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) complex followed by cellular apoptosis. We hypothesize that TULP1 mutations produce misfolded protein products that accumulate in the ER and induce cellular apoptosis via the UPR. To test our hypothesis, we first performed three in-silico analyses of TULP1 missense mutations (I459K, R420P and F491L), which predicted misfolded protein products. Subsequently, the three mutant TULP1-GFP constructs and wild-type (wt) TULP1-GFP were transiently transfected into hTERT-RPE-1 cells. Staining of cells using ER tracker followed by confocal microscopy showed wt-TULP1 localized predominantly to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. In contrast, all three mutant TULP1 proteins revealed cytoplasmic punctate staining which co-localized with the ER. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cells expressing mutant TULP1 proteins revealed induction of downstream targets of the ER-UPR complex, including BiP/GPR-78, phosphorylated-PERK (Thr980) and CHOP. Our in-vitro analyses suggest that mutant TULP1 proteins are misfolded and accumulate within the ER leading to induction of the UPR stress response complex. PMID:26427415

  7. Missense variations in the cystic fibrosis gene: Heteroduplex formation in the F508C mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, M. Jr.; Ladanyi, L.; Buerger, J.; Reis, A. )

    1992-11-01

    Kobayashi et al. (1990) have described missense variations in the conserved region of exon 10 of the cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator gene. In their paper, two [Delta]F508/F508C compound heterozygous individuals were reported. Clinical and epithelial physiological studies in both cases were normal, suggesting that the substitution of cysteine for phenylalanine at position 508, the F508C mutation, is benign. However, Kerem et al. reported a patient with this substitution who had typical symptoms of CF. In routine [Delta]F508 mutation screening by visualization of the 3-bp deletion on a 12% polyacrylamide gel the authors detected an abnormal heteroduplex in the father of a CF patient of German origin. Subsequent direct sequencing of the PCR product confirmed that this clinically normal father is a compound heterozygote for the [Delta]F508/F508C mutations. This heteroduplex is slightly different from the usual heteroduplex in [Delta]F508/F508C heteroduplex was not published, it is likely that similar cases can be overseen during the widely performed [Delta]F508 mutation screening by PAGE. Detection of more cases, such as the one presented here, together with careful, standardized clinical examination of the proband, would be valuable to verify the nature of this mutation. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  8. A Missense Mutation in HK1 Leads to Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Yandong; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Li; Lyubasyuk, Vera; Wang, Keqing; Xu, Mingchu; Li, Yumei; Wu, Frances; Wen, Cindy; Bernstein, Paul S.; Lin, Danni; Zhu, Susanna; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease with over 60 causative genes known to date. Nevertheless, approximately 40% of RP cases remain genetically unsolved, suggesting that many novel disease-causing genes are yet to be identified. In this study, we aimed to identify the causative mutation for a large autosomal dominant RP (adRP) family with negative results from known retinal disease gene screening. Methods. Linkage analysis followed by whole-exome sequencing was performed. Stringent variant filtering and prioritization was carried out to identify the causative mutation. Results. Linkage analysis identified a minimal disease region of 8 Mb on chromosome 10 with a peak parametric logarithm (base 10) of odds (LOD) score of 3.500. Further whole-exome sequencing identified a heterozygous missense mutation (NM_000188.2:c.2539G>A, p.E847K) in hexokinase 1 (HK1) that segregated with the disease phenotype in the family. Biochemical assays showed that the E847K mutation does not affect hexokinase enzymatic activity or the protein stability, suggesting that the mutation may impact other uncharacterized function or result in a gain of function of HK1. Conclusions. Here, we identified HK1 as a novel causative gene for adRP. This is the first report that associates the glucose metabolic pathway with human retinal degenerative disease, suggesting a potential new disease mechanism. PMID:25316723

  9. A rational free energy-based approach to understanding and targeting disease-causing missense mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Witham, Shawn; Petukh, Marharita; Moroy, Gautier; Miteva, Maria; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Background and significance Intellectual disability is a condition characterized by significant limitations in cognitive abilities and social/behavioral adaptive skills and is an important reason for pediatric, neurologic, and genetic referrals. Approximately 10% of protein-encoding genes on the X chromosome are implicated in intellectual disability, and the corresponding intellectual disability is termed X-linked ID (XLID). Although few mutations and a small number of families have been identified and XLID is rare, collectively the impact of XLID is significant because patients usually are unable to fully participate in society. Objective To reveal the molecular mechanisms of various intellectual disabilities and to suggest small molecules which by binding to the malfunctioning protein can reduce unwanted effects. Methods Using various in silico methods we reveal the molecular mechanism of XLID in cases involving proteins with known 3D structure. The 3D structures were used to predict the effect of disease-causing missense mutations on the folding free energy, conformational dynamics, hydrogen bond network and, if appropriate, protein-protein binding free energy. Results It is shown that the vast majority of XLID mutation sites are outside the active pocket and are accessible from the water phase, thus providing the opportunity to alter their effect by binding appropriate small molecules in the vicinity of the mutation site. Conclusions This observation is used to demonstrate, computationally and experimentally, that a particular condition, Snyder-Robinson syndrome caused by the G56S spermine synthase mutation, might be ameliorated by small molecule binding. PMID:23408511

  10. A Missense Mutation in Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein as a Cause of Familial Narcolepsy with Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Hor, Hyun; Bartesaghi, Luca; Kutalik, Zoltán; Vicário, José L.; de Andrés, Clara; Pfister, Corinne; Lammers, Gert J.; Guex, Nicolas; Chrast, Roman; Tafti, Mehdi; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Familial narcolepsy accounts for less than 10% of all narcolepsy cases. However, documented multiplex families are very rare and causative mutations have not been identified to date. To identify a causative mutation in familial narcolepsy, we performed linkage analysis in the largest ever reported family, which has 12 affected members, and sequenced coding regions of the genome (exome sequencing) of three affected members with narcolepsy and cataplexy. We successfully mapped a candidate locus on chromosomal region 6p22.1 (LOD score = 3.85) by linkage analysis. Exome sequencing identified a missense mutation in the second exon of MOG within the linkage region. A c.398C>G mutation was present in all affected family members but absent in unaffected members and 775 unrelated control subjects. Transient expression of mutant myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in mouse oligodendrocytes showed abnormal subcellular localization, suggesting an altered function of the mutant MOG. MOG has recently been linked to various neuropsychiatric disorders and is considered as a key autoantigen in multiple sclerosis and in its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalitis. Our finding of a pathogenic MOG mutation highlights a major role for myelin and oligodendrocytes in narcolepsy and further emphasizes glial involvement in neurodegeneration and neurobehavioral disorders. PMID:21907016

  11. Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1: Identification of nonsense, missense and splicesite mutations of the FAH gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ploos van Amstel, J.K.; Royers, J.F.M.; Kol, M.A.

    1994-09-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is an autosomal recessive disease due to deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetase (FAH). The FAH gene has a length of 35 kb and contains 14 exons that encode an mRNA of 1400 nt. To get more insight into the molecular basis of the disorder, probands of nine unrelated HT1 families were screened for abnormalities in the FAH gene using PCR. SSCP analysis and direct sequencing of the amplified exons revealed 7 different mutations. Three mutations involve splice consensus sites viz. IVS6-1(g-a)(identified 4x), IVS7-1(del g)(2x) and IVS12+5(g-a)(7x). Analysis of the FAH mRNA by RT-PCR for the effect of these mutations showed a 1 nt frameshift for IVS7-1 and the skipping of exon 12 for IVS12+5. The IVS6-1 transition results in three different mRNAs: all three transcripts missed the first 5 nt of exon 7; one transcript showed in addition a 13 nt deletion in exon 8. Two nonsense mutations were identified viz. E357X(1x) and E364X (2x); both mutations result in a reduced level of FAH mRNA. One missense mutation has been found C193R(1x). A silent mutation N232N(1x) was detected in association with the skipping of exon 8. The data reveal a founder effect for several of the FAH mutations. Furthermore, they indicated the molecular heterogeneity of HT1.

  12. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10−4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10−3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10−8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  13. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders. PMID:26340537

  14. Functional Impact of 14 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Causing Missense Mutations of Human α7 Nicotinic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qinhui; Du, Yingjie; Zhang, Jianliang; Xu, Xiaojun; Xue, Fenqin; Guo, Cong; Huang, Yao; Lukas, Ronald J.; Chang, Yongchang

    2015-01-01

    The α7nicotinic receptor (nAChR) is a major subtype of the nAChRs in the central nervous system, and the receptor plays an important role in brain function. In the dbSNP database, there are 55 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that cause missense mutations of the human α7nAChR in the coding region. In this study, we tested the impact of 14 SNPs that cause missense mutations in the agonist binding site or the coupling region between binding site and channel gate on the receptor function. The wild type or mutant receptors were expressed or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the agonist-induced currents were tested using two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results demonstrated that 6 mutants were nonfunctional, 4 mutants had reduced current expression, and 1 mutants altered ACh and nicotine efficacy in the opposite direction, and one additional mutant had slightly reduced agonist sensitivity. Interestingly, the function of most of these nonfunctional mutants could be rescued by α7nAChR positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 and agonist-PAM 4BP-TQS. Finally, when coexpressed with the wild type, the nonfunctional mutants could also influence the receptor function. These changes of the receptor properties by the mutations could potentially have an impact on the physiological function of the α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic synaptic transmission and anti-inflammatory effects in the human SNP carriers. Rescuing the nonfunctional mutants could provide a novel way to treat the related disorders. PMID:26340537

  15. A Missense Mutation in CASK Causes FG Syndrome in an Italian Family

    PubMed Central

    Piluso, Giulio; D'Amico, Francesca; Saccone, Valentina; Bismuto, Ettore; Rotundo, Ida Luisa; Di Domenico, Marina; Aurino, Stefania; Schwartz, Charles E.; Neri, Giovanni; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    First described in 1974, FG syndrome (FGS) is an X-linked multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation (MCA/MR) disorder, characterized by high clinical variability and genetic heterogeneity. Five loci (FGS1-5) have so far been linked to this phenotype on the X chromosome, but only one gene, MED12, has been identified to date. Mutations in this gene account for a restricted number of FGS patients with a more distinctive phenotype, referred to as the Opitz-Kaveggia phenotype. We report here that a p.R28L (c.83G→T) missense mutation in CASK causes FGS phenotype in an Italian family previously mapped to Xp11.4-p11.3 (FGS4). The identified missense mutation cosegregates with the phenotype in this family and is absent in 1000 control X chromosomes of the same ethnic origin. An extensive analysis of CASK protein functions as well as structural and dynamic studies performed by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation did not reveal significant alterations induced by the p.R28L substitution. However, we observed a partial skipping of the exon 2 of CASK, presumably a consequence of improper recognition of exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs) induced by the c.83G→T transversion. CASK is a multidomain scaffold protein highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) with specific localization to the synapses, where it forms large signaling complexes regulating neurotransmission. We suggest that the observed phenotype is most likely a consequence of an altered CASK expression profile during embryogenesis, brain development, and differentiation. PMID:19200522

  16. A missense mutation in Fgfr1 causes ear and skull defects in hush puppy mice.

    PubMed

    Calvert, Jennifer A; Dedos, Skarlatos G; Hawker, Kelvin; Fleming, Michelle; Lewis, Morag A; Steel, Karen P

    2011-06-01

    The hush puppy mouse mutant has been shown previously to have skull and outer, middle, and inner ear defects, and an increase in hearing threshold. The fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (Fgfr1) gene is located in the region of chromosome 8 containing the mutation. Sequencing of the gene in hush puppy heterozygotes revealed a missense mutation in the kinase domain of the protein (W691R). Homozygotes were found to die during development, at approximately embryonic day 8.5, and displayed a phenotype similar to null mutants. Reverse transcription PCR indicated a decrease in Fgfr1 transcript in heterozygotes and homozygotes. Generation of a construct containing the mutation allowed the function of the mutated receptor to be studied. Immunocytochemistry showed that the mutant receptor protein was present at the cell membrane, suggesting normal expression and trafficking. Measurements of changes in intracellular calcium concentration showed that the mutated receptor could not activate the IP(3) pathway, in contrast to the wild-type receptor, nor could it initiate activation of the Ras/MAP kinase pathway. Thus, the hush puppy mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 appears to cause a loss of receptor function. The mutant protein appears to have a dominant negative effect, which could be due to it dimerising with the wild-type protein and inhibiting its activity, thus further reducing the levels of functional protein. A dominant modifier, Mhspy, which reduces the effect of the hush puppy mutation on pinna and stapes development, has been mapped to the distal end of chromosome 7 and may show imprinting.

  17. Two families with novel missense mutations in COL4A1: When diagnosis can be missed.

    PubMed

    Giorgio, Elisa; Vaula, Giovanna; Bosco, Giovanni; Giacone, Sara; Mancini, Cecilia; Calcia, Alessandro; Cavalieri, Simona; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Rigault De Longrais, Roberta; Leombruni, Sabrina; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Cerrato, Paolo; Brusco, Alfredo; Brussino, Alessandro

    2015-05-15

    Mutations in COL4A1, encoding one of the six collagen type IV proteins, cover a wide spectrum of autosomal dominant overlapping phenotypes including porencephaly, small-vessel disease and hemorrhagic stroke, leukoencephalopathy, hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramp (HANAC) syndrome, and Walker-Warburg syndrome. Over 50 mutations are known, mainly being missense changes. Intra- and inter-familial variability has been reported. We studied two Italian families in which the proband had a clinical diagnosis of COL4A1-related disorder. We found two novel mutations (c.1249G>C; p.Gly417Arg and c.2662G>C; p.Gly888Arg). Both involved highly conserved amino acids and were predicted as being deleterious by bioinformatics tools. The c.1249G>C (p.Gly417Arg) segregated in four subjects with variable neurological phenotypes, namely leukoencephalopathy with muscle symptoms, brain small-vessel disease, and mild infantile encephalopathy. A fourth case was a carrier of the mutation without any neurological symptoms and an MRI with a specific white matter anomaly. The c.2662G>C (p.Gly888Arg) mutation was de novo in the proband. After a temporary motor impairment at age 14, the subject complained of mild imbalance at age 30, during the third trimester of her twin pregnancy, when an anomaly of the left brain hemisphere was documented in one fetus. Both her male dizygotic twins presented a severe motor delay, early convulsions, and leukoencephalopathy, and were carriers of the mutation. In summary, we confirm that high intra-familial variability of COL4A1 mutations with very mild phenotypes, the apparent incomplete penetrance, and de novo changes may become a "dilemma" for clinicians and genetic counselors. PMID:25873210

  18. Compound heterozygosity for nonsense ans missense mutations in the LAMB3 gene in nonlethal junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    McGarth, J A; Christiano, A M; Pulkkinen, L; Eady, R A; Uitto, J

    1996-05-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding laminin 5 (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) have been delineated in the autosomal recessive blistering skin disorder, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, particularly in the lethal (Herlitz) variant. In this study, we searched for mutations in these genes in two patients with nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa using polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DA, followed by heteroduplex analysis and direct automated nucleotide sequencing. Both patients were found to be compound heterozygotes for the same nonsense mutation on one LAMB3 allele, and different missense mutations on the other LAMB3 allele. The combination of a nonsense and a missense mutation in the LAMB3 gene appears to be important in determining the milder clinical phenotype in some cases of the nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa involving abnormalities in laminin 5. PMID:8618058

  19. Compound heterozygosity for nonsense and missense mutations in the LAMB3 gene in nonlethal junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Christiano, A M; Pulkkinen, L; Eady, R A; Uitto, J

    1996-04-01

    Mutations in the genes encoding laminin 5 (LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2) have been delineated in the autosomal recessive blistering skin disorder, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, particularly in the lethal (Herlitz) variant. In this study, we searched for mutations in these genes in two patients with nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa using polymerase chain reaction amplification of genomic DNA, followed by heteroduplex analysis and direct automated nucleotide sequencing. Both patients were found to be compound heterozygotes for the same nonsense mutation on one LAMB3 allele, and different missense mutations on the other LAMB3 allele. The combination of nonsense and a missense mutation in the LAMB3 gene appears to be important in determining the milder clinical phenotype in some cases of the nonlethal forms of junctional epidermolysis bullosa involving abnormalities in laminin 5. PMID:8618020

  20. First missense mutation in the SOST gene causing sclerosteosis by loss of sclerostin function.

    PubMed

    Piters, Elke; Culha, Cavit; Moester, Martiene; Van Bezooijen, Rutger; Adriaensen, Dirk; Mueller, Thomas; Weidauer, Stella; Jennes, Karen; de Freitas, Fenna; Löwik, Clemens; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Van Hul, Wim; Papapoulos, Socrates

    2010-07-01

    Sclerosteosis is a rare bone dysplasia characterized by greatly increased bone mass, especially of the long bones and the skull. Patients are tall, show facial asymmetry and often have syndactyly. Clinical complications are due to entrapment of cranial nerves. The disease is thought to be due to loss-of-function mutations in the SOST gene. The SOST gene product, sclerostin, is secreted by osteocytes and transported to the bone surface where it inhibits osteoblastic bone formation by antagonizing Wnt signaling. In a small Turkish family with sclerosteosis, we identified a missense mutation (c.499T>C; p.Cys167Arg) in exon 2 of the SOST gene. This type of mutation has not been previously reported and using different functional approaches, we show that it has a devastating effect on the biological function of sclerostin. The affected cysteine is the last cysteine residue of the cystine-knot motif and loss of this residue leads to retention of the mutant protein in the ER, possibly as a consequence of impaired folding. Together with a significant reduced ability to bind to LRP5 and inhibit Wnt signaling, the p.Cys167Arg mutation leads to a complete loss of function of sclerostin and thus to the characteristic sclerosteosis phenotype.

  1. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations

    DOE PAGES

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2016-02-18

    Here, predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods: We identified major events inmore » NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism s fitness. As a result, removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. In conclusion, the results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.« less

  2. Biased signaling through G-protein-coupled PROKR2 receptors harboring missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Sbai, Oualid; Monnier, Carine; Dodé, Catherine; Pin, Jean-Philippe; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Rondard, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Various missense mutations in the gene coding for prokineticin receptor 2 (PROKR2), a G-protein-coupled receptor, have been identified in patients with Kallmann syndrome. However, the functional consequences of these mutations on the different signaling pathways of this receptor have not been studied. We first showed that the wild-type PROKR2 can activate different G-protein subtypes (Gq, Gs, and Gi/o) and recruit β-arrestins in transfected HEK-293 cells. We then examined, for each of these signaling pathways, the effects of 9 mutations that did not significantly impair cell surface targeting or ligand binding of the receptor. Four mutant receptors showing defective Gq signaling (R85C, R85H, R164Q, and V331M) could still recruit β-arrestins on ligand activation, which may cause biased signaling in vivo. Conversely, the R80C receptor could activate the 3 types of G proteins but could not recruit β-arrestins. Finally, the R268C receptor could recruit β-arrestins and activate the Gq and Gs signaling pathways but could not activate the Gi/o signaling pathway. Our results validate the concept that mutations in the genes encoding membrane receptors can bias downstream signaling in various ways, possibly leading to pathogenic and, perhaps in some cases, protective (e.g., R268C) effects.

  3. Establishing Precise Evolutionary History of a Gene Improves Predicting Disease Causing Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are likely benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, while inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and moreover are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism’s fitness. Results Removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. Conclusion The results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well. PMID:26890452

  4. A novel missense mutation of the GRK1 gene in Oguchi disease

    PubMed Central

    Teke, Mehmet Yasin; Citirik, Mehmet; Kabacam, Serkan; Demircan, Suleyman; Alikasifoglu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Oguchi disease is a rare form of congenital stationary night blindness with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. The presence of S-antigen (SAG) and G-protein-dependent receptor kinase 1 (GRK1) mutations were investigated in the family members with Oguchi disease. All exons of the SAG and GRK1 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The patients were shown to have characteristic clinical features of Oguchi disease. Gene analysis determined a novel GRK1 mutation c.923T>C, which caused Oguchi disease in all siblings. This mutation, was demonstrated by amino acid alignment analysis to be in a phylogenetically conserved region and resulted in an amino acid change from leucine to proline at position 308. Thus, the present study reports a novel missense mutation of GRK1 in the affected members of a consanguineous Turkish family. Homozygosity at position 308, which resides in the catalytic domain of the GRK1 gene, is the cause of Oguchi disease in this Turkish family. PMID:27511724

  5. A novel missense mutation of the GRK1 gene in Oguchi disease.

    PubMed

    Teke, Mehmet Yasin; Citirik, Mehmet; Kabacam, Serkan; Demircan, Suleyman; Alikasifoglu, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    Oguchi disease is a rare form of congenital stationary night blindness with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. The presence of S‑antigen (SAG) and G‑protein‑dependent receptor kinase 1 (GRK1) mutations were investigated in the family members with Oguchi disease. All exons of the SAG and GRK1 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. The patients were shown to have characteristic clinical features of Oguchi disease. Gene analysis determined a novel GRK1 mutation c.923T>C, which caused Oguchi disease in all siblings. This mutation, was demonstrated by amino acid alignment analysis to be in a phylogenetically conserved region and resulted in an amino acid change from leucine to proline at position 308. Thus, the present study reports a novel missense mutation of GRK1 in the affected members of a consanguineous Turkish family. Homozygosity at position 308, which resides in the catalytic domain of the GRK1 gene, is the cause of Oguchi disease in this Turkish family. PMID:27511724

  6. A novel AVPR2 missense mutation in a Chinese boy with severe inherited nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lingli; Li, Wen; Tang, Weilin; Lu, Guangxin

    2011-01-01

    Inherited nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is characterized by renal resistance to arginine vasopressin (AVP). The most common cause is mutations in the AVP receptor 2 (AVPR2) gene at Xq28. Severe complications of NDI are rare but can occur after severe dehydration without treatment. A 7-year-old boy presented with short stature and severe intellectual disability other than polyuria and polydipsia. The karyotype was normal. Direct sequencing revealed a novel missense mutation c.506T > C (p.L169P) in AVPR2 in the patient. His mother was heterozygous for the mutation. The mutation was absent in 103 unrelated healthy males and predicted to be consistently pathogenic by several prediction methods, including Polyphen, SIFT, PMut, PhD-SNP, SNPs3D, PANTHER, and MEMPACK. Awareness of the primary signs of NDI, polyuria, and polydipsia would facilitate early diagnosis and treatment to prevent its severe complications. Also, molecular analysis will provide a rapid and definitive diagnosis and facilitate genetic counseling for family planning. PMID:22145481

  7. Exome sequencing identified a missense mutation of EPS8L3 in Marie Unna hereditary hypotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Guo, Bi-Rong; Cai, Li-Qiong; Jiang, Tao; Sun, Liang-Dan; Cui, Yong; Hu, Jing-Chu; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Gang; Tang, Xian-Fa; Sun, Guang-Qing; Tang, Hua-Yang; Liu, Yuan; Li, Min; Li, Qi-Bin; Cheng, Hui; Gao, Min; Li, Ping; Yang, Xu; Zuo, Xian-Bo; Zheng, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Pei-Guang; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun; Liu, Jian-Jun; Yang, Sen; Li, Ying-Rui; Zhang, Xue-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Background Marie Unna hereditary hypotrichosis (MUHH) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by coarse, wiry, twisted hair developed in early childhood and subsequent progressive hair loss. MUHH is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. No gene in 1p21.1–1q21.3 region responsible for MUHH has been identified. Methods Exome sequencing was performed on two affected subjects, who had normal vertex hair and modest alopecia, and one unaffected individual from a four-generation MUHH family of which our previous linkage study mapped the MUHH locus on chromosome 1p21.1–1q21.3. Results We identified a missense mutation in EPS8L3 (NM_024526.3: exon2: c.22G->A:p.Ala8Thr) within 1p21.1–1q21.3. Sanger sequencing confirmed the cosegregation of this mutation with the disease phenotype in the family by demonstrating the presence of the heterozygous mutation in all the eight affected and absence in all the seven unaffected individuals. This mutation was found to be absent in 676 unrelated healthy controls and 781 patients of other disease from another unpublished project of our group. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that EPS8L3 is a causative gene for MUHH, which was helpful for advancing us on understanding of the pathogenesis of MUHH. Our study also has further demonstrated the effectiveness of combining exome sequencing with linkage information for identifying Mendelian disease genes. PMID:23099647

  8. Identification of novel missense mutations of GDF9 in Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Binbin; Zhou, Sirui; Wang, Jing; Liu, Jingjing; Ni, Feng; Yan, Jinting; Mu, Yuan; Cao, Yunxia; Ma, Xu

    2010-09-01

    The gene for growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) is expressed in human oocytes and has an important function in regulating early follicle growth and fertility. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the common defects that causes ovary dysfunction and is linked to aberrant processes in folliculogenesis. Previous studies have discovered several mutations in the screening of GDF9 in premature ovarian failure but none in PCOS. This current study focused on the mutational analysis of the coding region of GDF9 among 216 Chinese PCOS patients. Of the 10 different variants found in this study, five novel missense mutations in GDF9 were discovered namely c.15C>G, c.118T>G, c.133A>G, c.1025A>T and c.1275C>A. The above-mentioned mutations indicate GDF9 may be potentially associated with PCOS patients. As far as is known, this study is the first to provide evidence for such an association.

  9. Achromatopsia caused by novel missense mutations in the CNGA3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-Teng; Huang, Hui; Chen, Yan-Hua; Dong, Li-Jie; Li, Xiao-Rong; Zhang, Xiao-Min

    2015-01-01

    AIM To identify the genetic defects in a Chinese family with achromatopsia. METHODS A 2.5-year-old boy, who displayed nystagmus, photophobia, and hyperopia since early infancy, was clinically evaluated. To further confirm and localize the causative mutations in this family, targeted region capture and next-generation sequencing of candidate genes, such as CNGA3, CNGB3, GNAT2, PDE6C, and PDE6H were performed using a custom-made capture array. RESULTS Slit-lamp examination showed no specific findings in the anterior segments. The optic discs and maculae were normal on fundoscopy. The unaffected family members reported no ocular complaints. Clinical signs and symptoms were consistent with a clinical impression of autosomal recessive achromatopsia. The results of sequence analysis revealed two novel missense mutations in CNGA3, c.633T>A (p.D211E) and c.1006G>T (p.V336F), with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. CONCLUSION Genetic analysis of a Chinese family confirmed the clinical diagnosis of achromatopsia. Two novel mutations were identified in CNGA3, which extended the mutation spectrum of this disorder. PMID:26558200

  10. Biochemical and structural analysis of missense mutations in N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase causing mucopolysaccharidosis IVA phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Sukegawa, K; Nakamura, H; Kato, Z; Tomatsu, S; Montaño, A M; Fukao, T; Toietta, G; Tortora, P; Orii, T; Kondo, N

    2000-05-22

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; OMIM#253000), a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of N -acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), has variable clinical phenotypes. To date we have identified 65 missense mutations in the GALNS gene from MPS IVA patients, but the correlation between genotype and phenotype has remained unclear. We studied 17 missense mutations using biochemical approaches and 32 missense mutations, using structural analyses. Fifteen missense mutations and two newly engineered active site mutations (C79S, C79T) were characterized by transient expression analysis. Mutant proteins, except for C79S and C79T, were destabilized and detected as insoluble precursor forms while the C79S and C79T mutants were of a soluble mature size. Mutants found in the severe phenotype had no activity. Mutants found in the mild phenotype had a considerable residual activity (1.3-13.3% of wild-type GALNS activity). Sulfatases, including GALNS, are members of a highly conserved gene family sharing an extensive sequence homology. Thus, a tertiary structural model of human GALNS was constructed from the X-ray crystal structure of N -acetylgalacto-samine-4-sulfatase and arylsulfatase A, using homology modeling, and 32 missense mutations were investigated. Consequently, we propose that there are at least three different reasons for the severe phenotype: (i) destruction of the hydrophobic core or modification of the packing; (ii) removal of a salt bridge to destabilize the entire conformation; (iii) modification of the active site. In contrast, mild mutations were mostly located on the surface of the GALNS protein. These studies shed further light on the genotype-phenotype correlation of MPS IVA and structure-function relationship in the sulfatase family. PMID:10814710

  11. Concomitant partial exon skipping by a unique missense mutation of RPS6KA3 causes Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    PubMed

    Labonne, Jonathan D J; Chung, Min Ji; Jones, Julie R; Anand, Priya; Wenzel, Wolfgang; Iacoboni, Daniela; Layman, Lawrence C; Kim, Hyung-Goo

    2016-01-01

    Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is an X-linked semi-dominant disorder characterized by diverse phenotypes including intellectual disability, facial and digital anomalies. Loss-of-function mutations in the Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinase Polypeptide 3 (RPS6KA3) gene have been shown to be responsible for CLS. Among the large number of mutations, however, no exonic mutation causing exon skipping has been described. Here, we report a male patient with CLS having a novel mutation at the 3' end of an exon at a splice donor junction. Interestingly, this nucleotide change causes both a novel missense mutation and partial exon skipping leading to a truncated transcript. These two transcripts were identified by cDNA sequencing of RT-PCR products. In the carrier mother, we found only wildtype transcripts suggesting skewed X-inactivation. Methylation studies confirmed X-inactivation was skewed moderately, but not completely, which is consistent with her mild phenotype. Western blot showed that the mutant RSK2 protein in the patient is expressed at similar levels relative to his mother. Protein modeling demonstrated that the missense mutation is damaging and may alter binding to ATP molecules. This is the first report of exon skipping from an exonic mutation of RPS6KA3, demonstrating that a missense mutation and concomitant disruption of normal splicing contribute to the manifestation of CLS. PMID:26297997

  12. A missense mutation in the 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase FVT1 as candidate causal mutation for bovine spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Stefan; Medugorac, Ivica; Röther, Susanne; Strässer, Katja; Förster, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The bovine form of the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) shows striking similarity to the human form of the disease. It has, however, been mapped to a genomic region not harboring the bovine orthologue of the SMN gene, mutation of which causes human SMA. After refinement of the mapping results we analyzed positional and functional candidate genes. One of three candidate genes, FVT1, encoding 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, which catalyzes a crucial step in the glycosphingolipid metabolism, showed a G-to-A missense mutation that changes Ala-175 to Thr. The identified mutation is limited to SMA-affected animals and carriers and always appears in context of the founder haplotype. The Ala variant found in healthy animals showed the expected 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase activity in an in vitro enzyme assay. Importantly, the Thr variant found in SMA animals showed no detectable activity. Surprisingly, in an in vivo assay the mutated gene complements the growth defect of a homologous yeast knockout strain as well as the healthy variant. This finding explains the viability of affected newborn calves and the later neuron-specific onset of the disease, which might be due to the high sensitivity of these neurons to changes in housekeeping functions. Taken together, the described mutation in FVT1 is a strong candidate for causality of SMA in cattle. This result provides an animal model for understanding the underlying mechanisms of the development of SMA and will allow efficient selection against the disease in cattle. PMID:17420465

  13. WDR62 missense mutation in a consanguineous family with primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Bacino, Carlos A; Arriola, Luis A; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Bonnen, Penelope E

    2012-03-01

    We report on a consanguineous couple with two affected sons who presented with primary microcephaly and moderate to severe intellectual disabilities. A SNP array uncovered two overlapping regions of copy-neutral absence of heterozygosity (AOH) in both sibs. This led to sequencing of WDR62, a gene that codes for a spindle pole protein recently identified as a cause of primary microcephaly. A homozygous missense mutation in WDR62, p.E400K, was found in both boys and segregated with the condition in this family. WDR62 is one of seven genes responsible for autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH), and appears to be one of the most frequently involved in MCPH following ASPM. Studies of ASPM and WDR62 should perhaps be pursued in all cases of primary microcephaly with or without gross brain malformations.

  14. Hypomyelinating leukodystrophy-associated missense mutation in HSPD1 blunts mitochondrial dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Eguchi, Takahiro; Kawahara, Kazuko; Hasegawa, Nanami; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Tanoue, Akito; Tamura, Hiroomi; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-07-03

    Myelin-forming glial cells undergo dynamic morphological changes in order to produce mature myelin sheaths with multiple layers. In the central nervous system (CNS), oligodendrocytes differentiate to insulate neuronal axons with myelin sheaths. Myelin sheaths play a key role in homeostasis of the nervous system, but their related disorders lead not only to dismyelination and repeated demyelination but also to severe neuropathies. Hereditary hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HLDs) are a group of such diseases affecting oligodendrocytes and are often caused by missense mutations of the respective responsible genes. Despite increasing identification of gene mutations through advanced nucleotide sequencing technology, studies on the relationships between gene mutations and their effects on cellular and subcellular aberrance have not followed at the same rapid pace. In this study, we report that an HLD4-associated (Asp-29-to-Gly) mutant of mitochondrial heat shock 60-kDa protein 1 (HSPD1) causes short-length morphologies and increases the numbers of mitochondria due to their aberrant fission and fusion cycles. In experiments using a fluorescent dye probe, this mutation decreases the mitochondrial membrane potential. Also, mitochondria accumulate in perinuclear regions. HLD4-associated HSPD1 mutant blunts mitochondrial dynamics, probably resulting in oligodendrocyte malfunction. This study constitutes a first finding concerning the relationship between disease-associated HSPD1 mutation and mitochondrial dynamics, which may be similar to the relationship between another disease-associated HSPD1 mutation (MitCHAP-60 disease) and aberrant mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • The HLD4 mutant of HSPD1 decreases mitochondrial fission frequency. • The HLD4 mutant decreases mitochondrial fusion frequency. • Mitochondria harboring the HLD4 mutant exhibit slow motility. • The HLD4 mutant of HSPD1 decreases mitochondrial membrane potential. • HLD4-related diseases may

  15. Congenital myopathy caused by a novel missense mutation in the CFL2 gene.

    PubMed

    Ockeloen, C W; Gilhuis, H J; Pfundt, R; Kamsteeg, E J; Agrawal, P B; Beggs, A H; Dara Hama-Amin, A; Diekstra, A; Knoers, N V A M; Lammens, M; van Alfen, N

    2012-07-01

    Nemaline myopathy and myofibrillar myopathy are heterogeneous myopathies that both comprise early-onset forms. We present two sisters from a consanguineous Iraqi Kurdish family with predominant axial and limb girdle weakness. Muscle biopsies showed features of both nemaline myopathy and myofibrillar myopathy. We performed homozygosity mapping in both siblings using an Affymetrix 250K Nspl SNP array. One of the overlapping homozygous regions harbored the gene CFL2. Because a mutation in CFL2 was identified in a family with nemaline myopathy, we performed sequence analysis of the gene and a novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 2 (c.19G>A, p.Val7Met) of CFL2 was identified in both siblings. CFL2 encodes the protein cofilin-2, which plays an important role in regulation of sarcomeric actin filaments. To our knowledge, this is the second family in which a mutation in CFL2 causes an autosomal recessive form of congenital myopathy with features of both nemaline and myofibrillar myopathy. Given the clinical variability and the multitude of histological features of congenital myopathies, CFL2 sequence analysis should be considered in patients presenting with an autosomal recessive form of congenital myopathy. PMID:22560515

  16. Missense mutations in the perforin (PRF1) gene as a cause of hereditary cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Mohammed S; Gilmour, Kimberly C; House, Imran G; Layton, Mark; Panoskaltsis, Nicki; Sohal, Mamta; Trapani, Joseph A; Voskoboinik, Ilia

    2016-07-01

    Perforin, a pore-forming toxin released from secretory granules of NK cells and CTLs, is essential for their cytotoxic activity against infected or cancerous target cells. Bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in the perforin gene are invariably associated with a fatal immunoregulatory disorder, familial haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis type 2 (FHL2), in infants. More recently, it has also been recognized that partial loss of perforin function can cause disease in later life, including delayed onset FHL2 and haematological malignancies. Herein, we report a family in which a wide range of systemic inflammatory and neoplastic manifestations have occurred across three generations. We found that disease was linked to two missense perforin gene mutations (encoding A91V, R410W) that cause protein misfolding and partial loss of activity. These cases link the partial loss of perforin function with some solid tumors that are known to be controlled by the immune system, as well as haematological cancers. Our findings also demonstrate that perforin gene mutations can contribute to hereditary cancer predisposition. PMID:27622035

  17. A COLQ Missense Mutation in Sphynx and Devon Rex Cats with Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, Marie; Hitte, Christophe; Bossé, Philippe; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Thomas, Anne; Martignat, Lionel; Blot, Stéphane; Tiret, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    An autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, fatigability and variable electromyographic or muscular histopathological features has been described in the two related Sphynx and Devon Rex cat breeds (Felis catus). Collection of data from two affected Sphynx cats and their relatives pointed out a single disease candidate region on feline chromosome C2, identified following a genome-wide SNP-based homozygosity mapping strategy. In that region, we further identified COLQ (collagen-like tail subunit of asymmetric acetylcholinesterase) as a good candidate gene, since COLQ mutations were identified in affected humans and dogs with endplate acetylcholinesterase deficiency leading to a synaptic form of congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). A homozygous c.1190G>A missense variant located in exon 15 of COLQ, leading to a C397Y substitution, was identified in the two affected cats. C397 is a highly-conserved residue from the C-terminal domain of the protein; its mutation was previously shown to produce CMS in humans, and here we confirmed in an affected Sphynx cat that it induces a loss of acetylcholinesterase clustering at the neuromuscular junction. Segregation of the c.1190G>A variant was 100% consistent with the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of the disorder in our cat pedigree; in addition, an affected, unrelated Devon Rex cat recruited thereafter was also homozygous for the variant. Genotyping of a panel of 333 cats from 14 breeds failed to identify a single carrier in non-Sphynx and non-Devon Rex cats. Finally, the percentage of healthy carriers in a European subpanel of 81 genotyped Sphynx cats was estimated to be low (3.7%) and 14 control Devon Rex cats were genotyped as wild-type individuals. Altogether, these results strongly support that the neuromuscular disorder reported in Sphynx and Devon Rex breeds is a CMS caused by a unique c.1190G>A missense mutation, presumably transmitted through a founder effect, which

  18. A COLQ Missense Mutation in Sphynx and Devon Rex Cats with Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abitbol, Marie; Hitte, Christophe; Bossé, Philippe; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Thomas, Anne; Martignat, Lionel; Blot, Stéphane; Tiret, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    An autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by skeletal muscle weakness, fatigability and variable electromyographic or muscular histopathological features has been described in the two related Sphynx and Devon Rex cat breeds (Felis catus). Collection of data from two affected Sphynx cats and their relatives pointed out a single disease candidate region on feline chromosome C2, identified following a genome-wide SNP-based homozygosity mapping strategy. In that region, we further identified COLQ (collagen-like tail subunit of asymmetric acetylcholinesterase) as a good candidate gene, since COLQ mutations were identified in affected humans and dogs with endplate acetylcholinesterase deficiency leading to a synaptic form of congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). A homozygous c.1190G>A missense variant located in exon 15 of COLQ, leading to a C397Y substitution, was identified in the two affected cats. C397 is a highly-conserved residue from the C-terminal domain of the protein; its mutation was previously shown to produce CMS in humans, and here we confirmed in an affected Sphynx cat that it induces a loss of acetylcholinesterase clustering at the neuromuscular junction. Segregation of the c.1190G>A variant was 100% consistent with the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance of the disorder in our cat pedigree; in addition, an affected, unrelated Devon Rex cat recruited thereafter was also homozygous for the variant. Genotyping of a panel of 333 cats from 14 breeds failed to identify a single carrier in non-Sphynx and non-Devon Rex cats. Finally, the percentage of healthy carriers in a European subpanel of 81 genotyped Sphynx cats was estimated to be low (3.7%) and 14 control Devon Rex cats were genotyped as wild-type individuals. Altogether, these results strongly support that the neuromuscular disorder reported in Sphynx and Devon Rex breeds is a CMS caused by a unique c.1190G>A missense mutation, presumably transmitted through a founder effect, which

  19. A missense mutation in kynurenine aminotransferase-1 in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kwok, John B J; Kapoor, Ranjna; Gotoda, Takanari; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko; Iizuka, Yoko; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Isaacs, Kim E; Kushwaha, Virag V; Church, W Bret; Schofield, Peter R; Kapoor, Vimal

    2002-09-27

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are the most extensively used animal model for genetic hypertension, increased stroke damage, and insulin resistance syndromes; however, the identification of target genes has proved difficult. SHR show elevated sympathetic nerve activity, and stimulation of the central blood pressure control centers with glutamate or nicotine results in exaggerated blood pressure responses, effects that appear to be genetically determined. Kynurenic acid, a competitive glutamate antagonist and a non-competitive nicotinic antagonist, can be synthesized in the brain by the enzyme kynurenine aminotransferase-1 (KAT-1). We have previously shown that KAT-1 activity is significantly reduced in SHR compared with normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). Here we show that KAT-1 contains a missense mutation, E61G, in all the strains of SHR examined but not in any of the WKY or outbred strains. Previous studies on F2 rats from a cross of stroke-prone SHR and WKY have shown a suggestive level of linkage between elevated blood pressure and the KAT-1 locus on chromosome 3. In addition, the mutant enzyme expressed in Escherichia coli displays altered kinetics. This mutation may explain the enhanced sensitivity to glutamate and nicotine seen in SHR that may be related to an underlying mechanism of hypertension and increased sensitivity to stroke. PMID:12145272

  20. A missense mutation in ITGB6 causes pitted hypomineralized amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Brookes, Steven J; Shore, Roger C; Smith, Claire E L; Abi Farraj, Layal; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-04-15

    We identified a family in which pitted hypomineralized amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) with premature enamel failure segregated in an autosomal recessive fashion. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a missense mutation (c.586C>A, p.P196T) in the I-domain of integrin-β6 (ITGB6), which is consistently predicted to be pathogenic by all available programmes and is the only variant that segregates with the disease phenotype. Furthermore, a recent study revealed that mice lacking a functional allele of Itgb6 display a hypomaturation AI phenotype. Phenotypic characterization of affected human teeth in this study showed areas of abnormal prismatic organization, areas of low mineral density and severe abnormal surface pitting in the tooth's coronal portion. We suggest that the pathogenesis of this form of AI may be due to ineffective ligand binding of ITGB6 resulting in either compromised cell-matrix interaction or compromised ITGB6 activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) impacting indirectly on ameloblast-ameloblast interactions and proteolytic processing of extracellular matrix proteins via MMP20. This study adds to the list of genes mutated in AI and further highlights the importance of cell-matrix interactions during enamel formation.

  1. A new missense mutation in the BCKDHB gene causes the classic form of maple syrup urine disease (MSUD).

    PubMed

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Goodarzi, Hamedreza; Fardaei, Majid

    2015-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB, DBT and DLD genes, which encode the E1α, E1β, E2 and E3 subunits of the branched chain α ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, respectively. This complex is involved in the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids. In this study, we analyzed the DNA sequences of BCKDHA and BCKDHB genes in an infant who suffered from MSUD and died at the age of 6 months. We found a new missense mutation in exon 5 of BCKDHB gene (c.508C>T). The heterozygosity of the parents for the mentioned nucleotide change was confirmed by direct sequence analysis of the corresponding segment. Another missense mutation has been found in the same codon previously and shown by in silico analyses to be deleterious. This report provides further evidence that this amino acid change can cause classic MSUD.

  2. A new missense mutation in the BCKDHB gene causes the classic form of maple syrup urine disease (MSUD).

    PubMed

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Goodarzi, Hamedreza; Fardaei, Majid

    2015-05-01

    Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by mutations in the BCKDHA, BCKDHB, DBT and DLD genes, which encode the E1α, E1β, E2 and E3 subunits of the branched chain α ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, respectively. This complex is involved in the metabolism of branched-chain amino acids. In this study, we analyzed the DNA sequences of BCKDHA and BCKDHB genes in an infant who suffered from MSUD and died at the age of 6 months. We found a new missense mutation in exon 5 of BCKDHB gene (c.508C>T). The heterozygosity of the parents for the mentioned nucleotide change was confirmed by direct sequence analysis of the corresponding segment. Another missense mutation has been found in the same codon previously and shown by in silico analyses to be deleterious. This report provides further evidence that this amino acid change can cause classic MSUD. PMID:25381949

  3. Whole-exome sequencing identifies a somatic missense mutation of NBN in clear cell sarcoma of the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Jia, Zhen; Mao, Fengbiao; Shi, Yueyi; Bu, Rong Fa; Zhang, Baorong

    2016-06-01

    Clear cell sarcoma (CCS) is a rare, low-grade carcinoma commonly located in the distal extremities of young adults involving tendons and aponeuroses. CCS is characterized by its poor prognosis due to late diagnosis, multiple local recurrence, propensity to late metastases, and a high rate of tumor-related mortality. The genetic cause for CCS is thought to be EWSR1 gene translocation. However, CCS lacking a translocation may have other, as yet uncharacterized, genetic mutations that can cause the same pathological effect. A combination of whole‑exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing of cancer tissue and venous blood from a patient diagnosed with CCS of the salivary gland revealed a somatic missense mutation, c.1061C>T (p.P354L), in exon 9 of the Nibrin gene (NBN). This somatic missense mutation led to the conversion of proline to leucine (p.P354L), resulting in deleterious effects for the NBN protein. Multiple-sequence alignments showed that codon 354, where the mutation (c.1061C>T) occurs, is located within a phylogenetically conserved region. In conclusion, we here report a somatic missense mutation c.1061C>T (p.P354L) in the NBN gene in a patient with CCS lacking an EWSR1-ATF1 fusion. Our findings broaden the genotypic spectrum of CCS and provide new molecular insight that should prove useful in the future clinical genetic diagnosis of CCS. PMID:27109316

  4. Genetic and epigenetic characterization of low-grade gliomas reveals frequent methylation of the MLH3 gene.

    PubMed

    Lhotska, Halka; Zemanova, Zuzana; Cechova, Hana; Ransdorfova, Sarka; Lizcova, Libuse; Kramar, Filip; Krejcik, Zdenek; Svobodova, Karla; Bystricka, Dagmar; Hrabal, Petr; Dohnalova, Alena; Michalova, Kyra

    2015-11-01

    Diffuse astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas (WHO grade II) are the most common histological subtypes of low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Several molecular and epigenetic markers have been identified that predict tumor progression. Our aim was in detail to investigate the genetic and epigenetic background of LGGs and to identify new markers that might play a role in tumor behavior. Twenty-three patients with oligodendroglioma or oligoastrocytoma (LGO) and 22 patients with diffuse astrocytoma (LGA) were investigated using several molecular-cytogenetic and molecular methods to assess their copy number variations, mutational status and level of promoter methylation. The most frequent findings were a 1p/19q codeletion in 83% of LGO and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) of 17p in 72% of LGA. Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 or 2 (IDH1/IDH2) genes were detected in 96% of LGO and 91% of LGA. The O-6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter was methylated in 83% of LGO and 59% of LGA. MutL homolog 3 (MLH3) promoter methylation was observed in 61% of LGO and 27% of LGA. Methylation of the MGMT promoter, 1p/19q codeletion, mutated IDH1, and CN-LOH of 17p were the most frequent genetic aberrations in LGGs. The findings were more diverse in LGA than in LGO. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time description of methylation of the MLH3 gene promoter in LGGs. Further studies are required to determine the role of the methylated MLH3 promoter and the other aberrations detected.

  5. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I.

    PubMed

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N; Schoeb, Trenton R; Messiaen, Ludwine M; Bedwell, David M; Zinn, Kurt R; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H; Korf, Bruce R; Kesterson, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1(Arg681*) and missense NF1(Gly848Arg) mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1(Gly848Arg) mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1(Arg681*) mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1(Arg681*) allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf1(4F/Arg681*); DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1. PMID:27482814

  6. Mice with missense and nonsense NF1 mutations display divergent phenotypes compared with human neurofibromatosis type I

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kairong; Turner, Ashley N.; Chen, Min; Brosius, Stephanie N.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Messiaen, Ludwine M.; Bedwell, David M.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Gutmann, David H.; Korf, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common genetic disorder characterized by the occurrence of nerve sheath tumors and considerable clinical heterogeneity. Some translational studies have been limited by the lack of animal models available for assessing patient-specific mutations. In order to test therapeutic approaches that might restore function to the mutated gene or gene product, we developed mice harboring NF1 patient-specific mutations including a nonsense mutation (c.2041C>T; p.Arg681*) and a missense mutation (c.2542G>C; p.Gly848Arg). The latter is associated with the development of multiple plexiform neurofibromas along spinal nerve roots. We demonstrate that the human nonsense NF1Arg681* and missense NF1Gly848Arg mutations have different effects on neurofibromin expression in the mouse and each recapitulates unique aspects of the NF1 phenotype, depending upon the genetic context when assessed in the homozygous state or when paired with a conditional knockout allele. Whereas the missense Nf1Gly848Arg mutation fails to produce an overt phenotype in the mouse, animals homozygous for the nonsense Nf1Arg681* mutation are not viable. Mice with one Nf1Arg681* allele in combination with a conditional floxed Nf1 allele and the DhhCre transgene (Nf14F/Arg681*; DhhCre) display disorganized nonmyelinating axons and neurofibromas along the spinal column, which leads to compression of the spinal cord and paralysis. This model will be valuable for preclinical testing of novel nonsense suppression therapies using drugs to target in-frame point mutations that create premature termination codons in individuals with NF1. PMID:27482814

  7. A Novel Missense Mutation in ADAMTS10 in Norwegian Elkhound Primary Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahonen, Saija J.; Kaukonen, Maria; Nussdorfer, Forrest D.; Harman, Christine D.; Komáromy, András M.; Lohi, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Primary glaucoma is one of the most common causes of irreversible blindness both in humans and in dogs. Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy affecting the retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve, and elevated intraocular pressure is commonly associated with the disease. Glaucoma is broadly classified into primary open angle (POAG), primary closed angle (PCAG) and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG). Human glaucomas are genetically heterogeneous and multiple loci have been identified. Glaucoma affects several dog breeds but only three loci and one gene have been implicated so far. We have investigated the genetics of primary glaucoma in the Norwegian Elkhound (NE). We established a small pedigree around the affected NEs collected from Finland, US and UK and performed a genome-wide association study with 9 cases and 8 controls to map the glaucoma gene to 750 kb region on canine chromosome 20 (praw = 4.93×10−6, pgenome = 0.025). The associated region contains a previously identified glaucoma gene, ADAMTS10, which was subjected to mutation screening in the coding regions. A fully segregating missense mutation (p.A387T) in exon 9 was found in 14 cases and 572 unaffected NEs (pFisher = 3.5×10−27) with a high carrier frequency (25.3%). The mutation interrupts a highly conserved residue in the metalloprotease domain of ADAMTS10, likely affecting its functional capacity. Our study identifies the genetic cause of primary glaucoma in NEs and enables the development of a genetic test for breeding purposes. This study establishes also a new spontaneous canine model for glaucoma research to study the ADAMTS10 biology in optical neuropathy. PMID:25372548

  8. A signal peptide missense mutation associated with nicotine dependence alters α2*-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function.

    PubMed

    Dash, Bhagirathi; Lukas, Ronald J; Li, Ming D

    2014-04-01

    A cytosine to thymidine (C → T) missense mutation in the signal peptide (SP) sequence (rs2472553) of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α2 subunit produces a threonine-to-isoleucine substitution (T22I) often associated with nicotine dependence (ND). We assessed effects on function of α2*-nAChR ('*'indicates presence of additional subunits) of this mutation, which could alter SP cleavage, RNA/protein secondary structure, and/or efficiency of transcription, translation, subunit assembly, receptor trafficking or cell surface expression. Two-electrode voltage clamp analyses indicate peak current responses to ACh or nicotine are decreased 2.8-5.8-fold for putative low sensitivity (LS; 10:1 ratio of α:β subunit cRNAs injected) α2β2- or α2β4-nAChR and increased for putative high sensitivity (HS; 1:10 α:β subunit ratio) α2β2- (5.7-15-fold) or α2β4- (1.9-2.2-fold) nAChR as a result of the mutation. Agonist potencies are decreased 1.6-4-fold for putative LS or HS α2(T22I)β2-nAChR or for either α2*-nAChR subtype formed in the presence of equal amounts of subunit cRNA, slightly decreased for LS α2(T22I)β4-nAChR, but increased 1.4-2.4-fold for HS α2(T22I)β4-nAChR relative to receptors containing wild-type α2 subunits. These effects suggest that the α2 subunit SP mutation generally favors formation of LS receptor isoforms. We hypothesize that lower sensitivity of human α2*-nAChR to nicotine could contribute to increased susceptibility to ND. To our knowledge this is the first report of a SP mutation having a functional effect in a member of cys-loop family of ligand-gated ion channels.

  9. The genetic basis of "Scarsdale Gourmet Diet" variegate porphyria: a missense mutation in the protoporphyrinogen oxidase gene.

    PubMed

    Frank, J; Poh-Fitzpatrick, M B; King, L E; Christiano, A M

    1998-08-01

    The porphyrias are disorders of porphyrin or porphyrin-precursor metabolism that result from inherited or acquired aberrations in the control of the porphyrin-heme biosynthetic pathway. Variegate porphyria (VP), one of the acute hepatic porphyrias, is characterized by a partial reduction in the activity of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO), and recently, mutations in the PPO gene on chromosome 1q22-23 have been described. Our purpose was to identify the underlying genetic lesion in a severely affected patient with VP and to detect the silent mutation carriers in her family. The disease in this patient was precipitated by carbohydrate restriction as outlined in the "Scarsdale Gourmet Diet". Our mutation detection and confirmation strategy included PCR, automated sequencing, and restriction enzyme digestion. We identified a missense mutation in the patient and five family members. The mutation consisted of a previously unreported C-to-T transition in exon 5 of the PPO gene, resulting in the substitution of arginine by cysteine, designated R152C. This arginine residue is evolutionarily highly conserved in humans, mice, bacteria, yeast, and plants, indicating the importance of this residue in PPO. Our study established that a missense mutation in the PPO gene was the underlying mutation in this patient with VP and explained the occurrence of the phenotype in this family.

  10. Predicting Functional Effect of Human Missense Mutations Using PolyPhen-2

    PubMed Central

    Adzhubei, Ivan; Jordan, Daniel M.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2015-01-01

    PolyPhen-2 (Polymorphism Phenotyping v2), available as software and via a Web server, predicts the possible impact of amino acid substitutions on the stability and function of human proteins using structural and comparative evolutionary considerations. It performs functional annotation of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), maps coding SNPs to gene transcripts, extracts protein sequence annotations and structural attributes, and builds conservation profiles. It then estimates the probability of the missense mutation being damaging based on a combination of all these properties. PolyPhen-2 features include a high-quality multiple protein sequence alignment pipeline and a prediction method employing machine-learning classification. The software also integrates the UCSC Genome Browser’s human genome annotations and MultiZ multiple alignments of vertebrate genomes with the human genome. PolyPhen-2 is capable of analyzing large volumes of data produced by next-generation sequencing projects, thanks to built-in support for high-performance computing environments like Grid Engine and Platform LSF. PMID:23315928

  11. Missense mutation in the PTEN promoter of a patient with hemifacial hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Kiyomi; Eng, Charis; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Reinisch, John; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke; Walker, John; Cheung, Craig; Robey, Pamela G; Yen, Stephen L-K

    2015-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms involved in the asymmetric facial overgrowth syndrome, hemifacial hyperplasia (HFH), are not well understood. This study was conducted to compare primary cell cultures from hyperplastic and normal HFH bone for cellular and molecular differences. Primary cultures developed from biopsies of a patient with isolated HFH showed a twofold difference in cell size and cell number between hyperplastic and normal bone. Microarray data suggested a 40% suppression of PTEN (phosphatase-tensin homolog) transcripts. Sequencing of the PTEN gene and promoter identified novel C/G missense mutation (position −1053) in the regulatory region of the PTEN promoter. Western blots of downstream pathway components showed an increase in PKBa/Akt1 phosphorylation and TOR (target of rapamcyin) signal. Sirolimus, an inhibitor of TOR, when added to overgrowth cells reversed the cell size, cell number and total protein differences between hyperplastic and normal cells. In cases of facial overgrowth, which involve PTEN/Akt/TOR dysregulation, sirolimus could be used for limiting cell overgrowth. PMID:26229595

  12. A missense mutation in melanocortin 1 receptor is associated with the red coat colour in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Abitbol, M; Legrand, R; Tiret, L

    2014-12-01

    The seven donkey breeds recognised by the French studbook are characterised by few coat colours: black, bay and grey. Normand bay donkeys seldom give birth to red foals, a colour more commonly seen and recognised in American miniature donkeys. Red resembles the equine chestnut colour, previously attributed to a mutation in the melanocortin 1 receptor gene (MC1R). We used a panel of 124 donkeys to identify a recessive missense c.629T>C variant in MC1R that showed a perfect association with the red coat colour. This variant leads to a methionine to threonine substitution at position 210 in the protein. We showed that methionine 210 is highly conserved among vertebrate melanocortin receptors. Previous in silico and in vitro analyses predicted this residue to lie within a functional site. Our in vivo results emphasised the pivotal role played by this residue, the alteration of which yielded a phenotype fully compatible with a loss of function of MC1R. We thus propose to name the c.629T>C allele in donkeys the e allele, which further enlarges the panel of recessive MC1R loss-of-function alleles described in animals and humans.

  13. Missense mutations in the adhalin gene linked to autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Roberds, S.L.; Anderson, R.D.; Lim, L.E.

    1994-09-01

    Adhalin, the 50-kDa dystrophin-associated glycoprotein, is deficient in skeletal muscle of patients having severe childhood autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy (SCARMD). In several North African families, SCARMD has been linked to markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome l3q, but SCARMD has been excluded from linkage to this locus in other families. To determine whether the adhalin gene might be involved in SCARMD, human adhalin cDNA and large portions of the adhalin gene were cloned. Adhalin is a transmembrane glycoprotein with an extracellular domain bearing limited homology to domains of entactin and nerve growth factor receptor, suggesting that adhalin may serve as a receptor for an extracellular matrix protein. The adhalin gene was mapped to chromosome 17q12-q21.33, excluding the gene from involvement in 13q-linked SCARMD. A polymorphic microsatellite was identified within intron 6 of the adhalin gene, and one allelic variant of this marker cosegregated with the disease phenotype in a large French family with a lod score of 3.61 at 0 recombination. Adhalin is undetectable in skeletal muscle from affected members of this family. Missense mutations were identified within the adhalin gene that might cause SCARMD in this family. Thus, genetic defects in at least two components, dystrophin and adhalin, of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex can independently cause muscular dystrophies.

  14. Mechanism of two novel human GJC3 missense mutations in causing non-syndromic hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Su, Ching-Chyuan; Li, Shuan-Yow; Yen, Yung-Chang; Nian, Jhih-Hao; Liang, Wei-Guang; Yang, Jiann-Jou

    2013-06-01

    Connexins (CXs), as a component of gap junction channel, are homologous four transmembrane-domain proteins, with numerous studies confirming their auditory functions. Among a cohort of patients having incurred non-syndromic hearing loss, we identified two novel missense mutations, p.R15G and p.L23H, in the GJC3 gene encoding CX30.2/CX31.3, as causally related to hearing loss in previous study. However, the functional alteration of CX30.2/CX31.3 caused by the mutant GJC3 gene remains unknown. In this study, we compared the intracellular distribution of mutant CX30.2/CX31.3 (p.R15G and p.L23H) with the wild-type (WT) protein in HeLa cells and the effect of the mutant protein had on those cells. Analytical results indicated that p.R15G and p.L23H mutant exhibited continuous staining along apposed cell membranes in the fluorescent localization assay, which is the same with the WT. Moreover, ATP release (hemichannel function) is less in HeLa cells carrying mutant GJC3 genes than those of WT expressing cells. We believe that although p.R15G and p.L23H mutants do not decrease the trafficking of CX proteins, mutations in GJC3 genes result in a loss of hemichannel function of CX30.2/CX31.3 protein, possibly causing hearing loss. Results of this study provide a novel molecular explanation for the role of GJC3 in hearing loss.

  15. Absence of missense mutations in activated c-myc genes in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Hayward, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequences of two independent DNA clones which contained the activated c-myc genes from avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas. Neither of these c-myce genes contained missense mutations. This strongly supports the notion that the c-myc photo-oncogene in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas can be oncogenically activated by altered expression of the gene without a change in the primary structure of the gene product.

  16. Missense and silent mutations in COL2A1 result in Stickler syndrome but via different molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Richards, Allan J; Laidlaw, Maureen; Meredith, Sarah P; Shankar, Pallavi; Poulson, Arabella V; Scott, John D; Snead, Martin P

    2007-06-01

    Stickler syndrome due to mutations in COL2A1 is usually the result of premature termination codons and nonsense mediated decay resulting in haploinsufficiency of type II collagen. Here we present two missense mutations and one apparently silent mutation that each result in Stickler syndrome, but via different molecular mechanisms. One alters the translation initiating ATG codon. The second mutation is a unique glycine substitution in the minor collagen helix of the procollagen. To our knowledge a glycine substitution has not previously been reported in this region of fibrillar procollagens. The third mutation appears to be a silent change altering a GGC codon to GGT both for glycine, but use of a splicing reporter assay demonstrates that it results in missplicing and a shift in the reading frame.

  17. In Silico and In Vitro Investigations of the Mutability of Disease-Causing Missense Mutation Sites in Spermine Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Norris, Joy; Schwartz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Background Spermine synthase (SMS) is a key enzyme controlling the concentration of spermidine and spermine in the cell. The importance of SMS is manifested by the fact that single missense mutations were found to cause Snyder-Robinson Syndrome (SRS). At the same time, currently there are no non-synonymous single nucleoside polymorphisms, nsSNPs (harmless mutations), found in SMS, which may imply that the SMS does not tolerate amino acid substitutions, i.e. is not mutable. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the mutability of the SMS, we carried out in silico analysis and in vitro experiments of the effects of amino acid substitutions at the missense mutation sites (G56, V132 and I150) that have been shown to cause SRS. Our investigation showed that the mutation sites have different degree of mutability depending on their structural micro-environment and involvement in the function and structural integrity of the SMS. It was found that the I150 site does not tolerate any mutation, while V132, despite its key position at the interface of SMS dimer, is quite mutable. The G56 site is in the middle of the spectra, but still quite sensitive to charge residue replacement. Conclusions/Significance The performed analysis showed that mutability depends on the detail of the structural and functional factors and cannot be predicted based on conservation of wild type properties alone. Also, harmless nsSNPs can be expected to occur even at sites at which missense mutations were found to cause diseases. PMID:21647366

  18. Expanding the phenotype of mutations in DICER1: mosaic missense mutations in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1 cause GLOW syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Steven; Lee, Hane; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Kempert, Pamela; Ischander, Mariam; Teitell, Michael A; Nelson, Stanley F; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2015-01-01

    Background Constitutional DICER1 mutations have been associated with pleuropulmonary blastoma, cystic nephroma, Sertoli-Leydig tumours and multinodular goitres, while somatic DICER1 mutations have been reported in additional tumour types. Here we report a novel syndrome termed GLOW, an acronym for its core phenotypic findings, which include Global developmental delay, Lung cysts, Overgrowth and Wilms tumour caused by mutations in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1. Methods and results We performed whole exome sequencing on peripheral mononuclear blood cells of an affected proband and identified a de novo missense mutation in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1. We confirmed an additional de novo missense mutation in the same domain of an unrelated case by Sanger sequencing. These missense mutations in the RNase IIIb domain of DICER1 are suspected to affect one of four metal binding sites located within this domain. Pyrosequencing was used to determine the relative abundance of mutant alleles in various tissue types. The relative mutation abundance is highest in Wilms tumour and unaffected kidney samples when compared with blood, confirming that the mutation is mosaic. Finally, we performed bioinformatic analysis of microRNAs expressed in murine cells carrying specific Dicer1 RNase IIIb domain metal binding site-associated mutations. We have identified a subset of 3p microRNAs that are overexpressed whose target genes are over-represented in mTOR, MAPK and TGF-β signalling pathways. Conclusions We propose that mutations affecting the metal binding sites of the DICER1 RNase IIIb domain alter the balance of 3p and 5p microRNAs leading to deregulation of these growth signalling pathways, causing a novel human overgrowth syndrome. PMID:24676357

  19. A missense mutation in the ZFHX1B gene associated with an atypical Mowat-Wilson syndrome phenotype.

    PubMed

    Heinritz, Wolfram; Zweier, Christiane; Froster, Ursula G; Strenge, Sibylle; Kujat, Annegret; Syrbe, Steffen; Rauch, Anita; Schuster, Volker

    2006-06-01

    Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a rare mental retardation-multiple congenital anomalies syndrome associated with typical facial dysmorphism. Patients can show a variety of other anomalies like short stature, microcephaly, Hirschsprung disease, malformations of the brain, seizures, congenital heart defects and urogenital anomalies. Mutations leading to haploinsufficiency of the ZFHX1B gene have been described as the underlying cause of this condition. We report on the clinical findings in a 2(1/2)-year-old boy with some aspects out of the MWS-spectrum in addition to unusual anomalies and a novel missense mutation in the ZFHX1B gene. PMID:16688751

  20. Brugada syndrome with a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene: A case report from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sayeed, Md. Zahidus; Salam, Md. Abdus; Haque, Md. Zahirul; Islam, A.K.M. Monwarul

    2014-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia that follows autosomal dominant transmission and can cause sudden death. We report a case of Brugada syndrome in a 55-year-old male patient presented with recurrent palpitation, atypical chest pain and presyncope. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 Brugada. Gene analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene with a genetic variation of D785N and a nucleotide change at 2353G-A. One of his children also had the same mutation. To our knowledge this is the first genetically proved case of Brugada syndrome in Bangladesh. PMID:24581105

  1. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Missense Mutations in Collagen: Structural consequences of a glycine to alanine replacement at a highly charged site

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianxi; Cheng, Haiming; Silva, Teresita; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Glycine is required as every third residue in the collagen triple-helix, and a missense mutation leading to the replacement of even one Gly in the repeating (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n sequence by a larger residue leads to a pathological condition. Gly to Ala missense mutations are highly underrepresented in osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and other collagen diseases, suggesting that the smallest replacement residue Ala might cause the least structural perturbation and mildest clinical consequences. The relatively small number of Gly to Ala mutation sites that do lead to OI must have some unusual features, such as greater structural disruption due to local sequence environment or location at a biologically important site. Here, peptides are used to model a severe OI case where a Gly to Ala mutation is found within a highly stabilizing Lys-Gly-Asp sequence environment. NMR, CD and DSC studies indicate this Gly to Ala replacement leads to a substantial loss in triple-helix stability and non-equivalence of the Ala residues in the three chains such that only one of the three Ala residues is capable of form a good backbone hydrogen bond. Examination of reported OI Gly to Ala mutations suggests preferential location at known collagen binding sites, and we propose that structural defects due to Ala replacements may lead to pathology when interfering with interactions. PMID:22054507

  2. Novel WT1 Missense Mutations in Han Chinese Women with Premature Ovarian Failure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huidan; Li, Guangyu; Zhang, Jun; Gao, Fei; Li, Weiping; Qin, Yingying; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-09-11

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a heterogeneous disease. Though dozens of candidate genes have been identified for the genetic etiology of POF, it is largely unexplained in majority of patients. Recently, Wt1(+/R394W) mice was found to present POF-like phenotype, which indicates that WT1 might be a plausible candidate gene for non-syndromic POF. The coding region of WT1 gene was screened in 384 patients with POF and 6 novel variations were identified, including two missense mutations (p. Pro126Ser in exon1 and p. Arg370His in exon7) and four intronic variants (c.647-27C > T, c.647-13G > C, c.647-13G > A in intron1 and c.950 + 14T > C in intron 4). In vitro experiments showed that both mutant p. Pro126Ser and p. Arg370His repressed the expression of Amh and Cdh1, and induced the expression of Fshr and Cyp19 in mRNA level (P < 0.05). The expression changes of AMH, FSHR, CYP19 and CDH1 were confirmed by western blot. These genes (AMH, FSHR, CYP19 and CDH1) are required for granular cells (GCs) proliferation, differentiation and oocyte-GCs interaction. The novel mutant p. P126S and p. R370H in the WT1 gene potentially impaired GCs differentiation and oocyte-GCs interaction, which might result in loss of follicles prematurely. Therefore, WT1 is a plausible causal gene for POF.

  3. Novel WT1 Missense Mutations in Han Chinese Women with Premature Ovarian Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huidan; Li, Guangyu; Zhang, Jun; Gao, Fei; Li, Weiping; Qin, Yingying; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a heterogeneous disease. Though dozens of candidate genes have been identified for the genetic etiology of POF, it is largely unexplained in majority of patients. Recently, Wt1+/R394W mice was found to present POF-like phenotype, which indicates that WT1 might be a plausible candidate gene for non-syndromic POF. The coding region of WT1 gene was screened in 384 patients with POF and 6 novel variations were identified, including two missense mutations (p. Pro126Ser in exon1 and p. Arg370His in exon7) and four intronic variants (c.647-27C > T, c.647-13G > C, c.647-13G > A in intron1 and c.950 + 14T > C in intron 4). In vitro experiments showed that both mutant p. Pro126Ser and p. Arg370His repressed the expression of Amh and Cdh1, and induced the expression of Fshr and Cyp19 in mRNA level (P < 0.05). The expression changes of AMH, FSHR, CYP19 and CDH1 were confirmed by western blot. These genes (AMH, FSHR, CYP19 and CDH1) are required for granular cells (GCs) proliferation, differentiation and oocyte-GCs interaction. The novel mutant p. P126S and p. R370H in the WT1 gene potentially impaired GCs differentiation and oocyte-GCs interaction, which might result in loss of follicles prematurely. Therefore, WT1 is a plausible causal gene for POF. PMID:26358501

  4. Increased Missense Mutation Burden of Fatty Acid Metabolism Related Genes in Nunavik Inuit Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sirui; Xiong, Lan; Xie, Pingxing; Ambalavanan, Amirthagowri; Bourassa, Cynthia V.; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Spiegelman, Dan; Turcotte Gauthier, Maude; Henrion, Edouard; Diallo, Ousmane; Dion, Patrick A.; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nunavik Inuit (northern Quebec, Canada) reside along the arctic coastline where for generations their daily energy intake has mainly been derived from animal fat. Given this particular diet it has been hypothesized that natural selection would lead to population specific allele frequency differences and unique variants in genes related to fatty acid metabolism. A group of genes, namely CPT1A, CPT1B, CPT1C, CPT2, CRAT and CROT, encode for three carnitine acyltransferases that are important for the oxidation of fatty acids, a critical step in their metabolism. Methods Exome sequencing and SNP array genotyping were used to examine the genetic variations in the six genes encoding for the carnitine acyltransferases in 113 Nunavik Inuit individuals. Results Altogether ten missense variants were found in genes CPT1A, CPT1B, CPT1C, CPT2 and CRAT, including three novel variants and one Inuit specific variant CPT1A p.P479L (rs80356779). The latter has the highest frequency (0.955) compared to other Inuit populations. We found that by comparison to Asians or Europeans, the Nunavik Inuit have an increased mutation burden in CPT1A, CPT2 and CRAT; there is also a high level of population differentiation based on carnitine acyltransferase gene variations between Nunavik Inuit and Asians. Conclusion The increased number and frequency of deleterious variants in these fatty acid metabolism genes in Nunavik Inuit may be the result of genetic adaptation to their diet and/or the extremely cold climate. In addition, the identification of these variants may help to understand some of the specific health risks of Nunavik Inuit. PMID:26010953

  5. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA: Identification of a common missense mutation I113F in the N-Acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Tomatsu, Shunji; Fukuda, Seiji; Rezvi, Maruf

    1995-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS). The recent isolation and characterization of cDNA and genomic sequences encoding GALNS has facilitated identification of the molecular lesions that cause MPS IVA. We identified a common missense mutation among Caucasian MPS IVA patients. The mutation was originally detected by SSCP, and successive sequencing revealed an A{yields}T transversion at nt 393. This substitution altered the isoleucine at position 113 to phenylalanine (I113F) in the 622 amino acid GALNS protein and was associated with a severe phenotype in a homozygote. Compound heterogzygotes with one I113F-allele mutation have a wide range of clinical phenotypes. Transfection experiments in GALNS-deficient fibroblasts revealed that the mutation drastically reduces the enzyme activity of GALNS. Allele-specific oligonucleotide or SSCP analysis indicated that this mutation accounted for 22.5% (9/40) of unrelated MPS IVA chromosomes from 23 Caucasian patients, including 6 consanguineous cases. Of interest, the I1e 113{yields}Phe substitution occurred in only Caucasian MPS IVA patients and in none of the GALNS alleles of 20 Japanese patients. These findings identify a frequent missense mutation among MPS IVA patients of Caucasian ancestry that results in severe MPS IVA when homoallelic, and will facilitate molecular diagnosis of most such patients and identification of heterozygous carriers. In addition to this common mutation, 10 different point mutations and 2 small deletions were detected, suggesting allelic heterogeneity in GALNS gene. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Parkinson-causing α-synuclein missense mutations shift native tetramers to monomers as a mechanism for disease initiation

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Ulf; Newman, Andrew J.; Soldner, Frank; Luth, Eric S.; Kim, Nora C.; von Saucken, Victoria E.; Sanderson, John B.; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Bartels, Tim; Selkoe, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    β-Sheet-rich α-synuclein (αS) aggregates characterize Parkinson's disease (PD). αS was long believed to be a natively unfolded monomer, but recent work suggests it also occurs in α-helix-rich tetramers. Crosslinking traps principally tetrameric αS in intact normal neurons, but not after cell lysis, suggesting a dynamic equilibrium. Here we show that freshly biopsied normal human brain contains abundant αS tetramers. The PD-causing mutation A53T decreases tetramers in mouse brain. Neurons derived from an A53T patient have decreased tetramers. Neurons expressing E46K do also, and adding 1-2 E46K-like mutations into the canonical αS repeat motifs (KTKEGV) further reduces tetramers, decreases αS solubility and induces neurotoxicity and round inclusions. The other three fPD missense mutations likewise decrease tetramer:monomer ratios. The destabilization of physiological tetramers by PD-causing missense mutations and the neurotoxicity and inclusions induced by markedly decreasing tetramers suggest that decreased α-helical tetramers and increased unfolded monomers initiate pathogenesis. Tetramer-stabilizing compounds should prevent this. PMID:26076669

  7. CRIPT exonic deletion and a novel missense mutation in a female with short stature, dysmorphic features, microcephaly, and pigmentary abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Magalie S; Niu, Zhiyv; Bi, Weimin; Zhu, Wenmiao; Miloslavskaya, Irene; Chiang, Theodore; Streff, Haley; Seavitt, John R; Murray, Stephen A; Eng, Christine; Chan, Audrey; Yang, Yaping; Lalani, Seema R

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in CRIPT encoding cysteine-rich PDZ domain-binding protein are rare, and to date have been reported in only two patients with autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism and distinctive facies. Here, we describe a female with biallelic mutations in CRIPT presenting with postnatal growth retardation, global developmental delay, and dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, high forehead, and sparse hair and eyebrows. Additional clinical features included high myopia, admixed hyper- and hypopigmented macules primarily on the face, arms, and legs, and syndactyly of 4-5 toes bilaterally. Using whole exome sequencing (WES) and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA), we detected a c.8G>A (p.C3Y) missense variant in exon 1 of the CRIPT gene inherited from the mother and a 1,331 bp deletion encompassing exon 1, inherited from the father. The c.8G>A (p.C3Y) missense variant in CRIPT was apparently homozygous in the proband due to the exon 1 deletion. Our findings illustrate the clinical utility of combining WES with copy number variant (CNV) analysis to provide a molecular diagnosis to patients with rare Mendelian disorders. Our findings also illustrate the clinical spectrum of CRIPT related mutations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27250922

  8. A novel SMARCAL1 missense mutation that affects splicing in a severely affected Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia patient.

    PubMed

    Barraza-García, Jimena; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Belinchón, Alberta; Fernández-Camblor, Carlota; Valenciano-Fuente, Blanca; Lapunzina, Pablo; Heath, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Schimke immunoosseous dysplasia (SIOD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by skeletal dysplasia, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, renal failure and immunodeficiency. In this work, we report the molecular studies undertaken in a severely affected SIOD patient that died at six years old due to nephropathy. The patient was screened for mutations using a targeted skeletal dysplasias panel. A homozygous novel missense mutation was identified, c.1615C > G (p.[Leu539Val]) that was predicted as mildly pathogenic by in silico pathogenicity prediction tools. However, splicing prediction software suggested that this variant may create a new splicing donor site in exon 9, which was subsequently confirmed using a minigene assay in HEK293 cells. Thus, the splicing alteration, c.1615C > G; r.1615c > g, 1615_1644del; (p.[Leu539_Ile548del]), results in the loss of 10 amino acids of the HARP-ATPase catalytic domain and the RPA-binding domain. Several studies have demonstrated a weak genotype-phenotype correlation among such patients. Thus, the molecular characterization has helped us to understand why a predicted weakly pathogenic missense mutation results in severe SIOD and should be considered in similar scenarios. PMID:27282802

  9. The original Lujan syndrome family has a novel missense mutation (p.N1007S) in the MED12 gene

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Charles E; Tarpey, Patrick S; Lubs, Herbert A; Verloes, Alain; May, Melanie M; Risheg, Hiba; Friez, Michael J; Futreal, P Andrew; Edkins, Sarah; Teague, Jon; Briault, Sylvain; Skinner, Cindy; Bauer‐Carlin, Astrid; Simensen, Richard J; Joseph, Sumy M; Jones, Julie R; Gecz, Josef; Stratton, Michael R; Raymond, F Lucy; Stevenson, Roger E

    2007-01-01

    A novel missense mutation in the mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 12 (MED12) gene has been found in the original family with Lujan syndrome and in a second family (K9359) that was initially considered to have Opitz–Kaveggia (FG) syndrome. A different missense mutation in the MED12 gene has been reported previously in the original family with FG syndrome and in five other families with compatible clinical findings. Neither sequence alteration has been found in over 1400 control X chromosomes. Lujan (Lujan–Fryns) syndrome is characterised by tall stature with asthenic habitus, macrocephaly, a tall narrow face, maxillary hypoplasia, a high narrow palate with dental crowding, a small or receding chin, long hands with hyperextensible digits, hypernasal speech, hypotonia, mild‐to‐moderate mental retardation, behavioural aberrations and dysgenesis of the corpus callosum. Although Lujan syndrome has not been previously considered to be in the differential diagnosis of FG syndrome, there are some overlapping clinical manifestations. Specifically, these are dysgenesis of the corpus callosum, macrocephaly/relative macrocephaly, a tall forehead, hypotonia, mental retardation and behavioural disturbances. Thus, it seems that these two X‐linked mental retardation syndromes are allelic, with mutations in the MED12 gene. PMID:17369503

  10. [Resistance to acenocoumarol revealing a missense mutation of the vitamin K epoxyde reductase VKORC1: a case report].

    PubMed

    Mboup, M C; Dia, K; Ba, D M; Fall, P D

    2015-02-01

    A significant proportion of the interindividual variability of the response to vitamin K antagonist (VKA) treatment has been associated with genetic factors. Genetic variations affecting the vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1) are associated with hypersensitivity or rarely with resistance to VKA. We report the case of a black women patient who presents a resistance to acenocoumarol. Despite the use of high doses of acenocoumarol (114 mg/week) for the treatment of recurrent pulmonary embolism, the International Normalized Ratio was below the therapeutic target. This resistance to acenocoumarol was confirmed by the identification of a missense mutation Val66Met of the vitamin K epoxide reductase. PMID:24095214

  11. Identification of Two Missense Mutations of ERCC6 in Three Chinese Sisters with Cockayne Syndrome by Whole Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lili; Fei, Lingna; Tang, Wei; Tian, Yujiao; Geng, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, the primary manifestations of which are poor growth and neurologic abnormality. Mutations of the ERCC6 and ERCC8 genes are the predominant cause of Cockayne syndrome, and the ERCC6 gene mutation is present in approximately 65% of cases. The present report describes a case of Cockayne syndrome in a Chinese family, with the patients carrying two missense mutations (c.1595A>G, p.Asp532Gly and c.1607T>G, p.Leu536Trp) in the ERCC6 gene in an apparently compound heterozygote status, especially, p.Asp532Gly has never been reported. The compound heterozygote mutation was found in three patients in the family using whole exome sequencing. The patients’ father and mother carried a heterozygous allele at different locations of the ERCC6 gene, which was confirmed by Sanger DNA sequencing. The two mutations are both located in the highly conserved motif I of ATP-binding helicase and are considered “Damaging,” “Probably Damaging,” “Disease Causing,” and “Conserved”, indicating the role of DNA damage in the pathogenetic process of the disease. The results not only enrich the ERCC6 mutations database, but also indicate that whole exome sequencing will be a powerful tool for discovering the disease causing mutations in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25463447

  12. Molecular Evolution of the Tissue-nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase Allows Prediction and Validation of Missense Mutations Responsible for Hypophosphatasia*

    PubMed Central

    Silvent, Jérémie; Gasse, Barbara; Mornet, Etienne; Sire, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    ALPL encodes the tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP), which removes phosphate groups from various substrates. Its function is essential for bone and tooth mineralization. In humans, ALPL mutations lead to hypophosphatasia, a genetic disorder characterized by defective bone and/or tooth mineralization. To date, 275 ALPL mutations have been reported to cause hypophosphatasia, of which 204 were simple missense mutations. Molecular evolutionary analysis has proved to be an efficient method to highlight residues important for the protein function and to predict or validate sensitive positions for genetic disease. Here we analyzed 58 mammalian TNSALP to identify amino acids unchanged, or only substituted by residues sharing similar properties, through 220 millions years of mammalian evolution. We found 469 sensitive positions of the 524 residues of human TNSALP, which indicates a highly constrained protein. Any substitution occurring at one of these positions is predicted to lead to hypophosphatasia. We tested the 204 missense mutations resulting in hypophosphatasia against our predictive chart, and validated 99% of them. Most sensitive positions were located in functionally important regions of TNSALP (active site, homodimeric interface, crown domain, calcium site, …). However, some important positions are located in regions, the structure and/or biological function of which are still unknown. Our chart of sensitive positions in human TNSALP (i) enables to validate or invalidate at low cost any ALPL mutation, which would be suspected to be responsible for hypophosphatasia, by contrast with time consuming and expensive functional tests, and (ii) displays higher predictive power than in silico models of prediction. PMID:25023282

  13. Assessing the pathogenic potential of human Nephronophthisis disease-associated NPHP-4 missense mutations in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Masyukova, Svetlana V; Winkelbauer, Marlene E; Williams, Corey L; Pieczynski, Jay N; Yoder, Bradley K

    2011-08-01

    A spectrum of complex oligogenic disorders called the ciliopathies have been connected to dysfunction of cilia. Among the ciliopathies are Nephronophthisis (NPHP), characterized by cystic kidney disease and retinal degeneration, and Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS), a gestational lethal condition with skeletal abnormalities, cystic kidneys and CNS malformation. Mutations in multiple genes have been identified in NPHP and MKS patients, and an unexpected finding has been that mutations within the same gene can cause either disorder. Further, there is minimal genotype-phenotype correlation and despite recessive inheritance, numerous patients were identified as having a single heterozygous mutation. This has made it difficult to determine the significance of these mutations on disease pathogenesis and led to the hypothesis that clinical presentation in an individual will be determined by genetic interactions between mutations in multiple cilia-related genes. Here we utilize Caenorhabditis elegans and cilia-associated behavioral and morphologic assays to evaluate the pathogenic potential of eight previously reported human NPHP4 missense mutations. We assess the impact of these mutations on C. elegans NPHP-4 function, localization and evaluate potential interactions with mutations in MKS complex genes, mksr-2 and mksr-1. Six out of eight nphp-4 mutations analyzed alter ciliary function, and three of these modify the severity of the phenotypes caused by disruption of mksr-2 and mksr-1. Collectively, our studies demonstrate the utility of C. elegans as a tool to assess the pathogenicity of mutations in ciliopathy genes and provide insights into the complex genetic interactions contributing to the diversity of phenotypes associated with cilia disorders.

  14. A Case of Inflammatory Generalized Type of Peeling Skin Syndrome Possibly Caused by a Homozygous Missense Mutation of CDSN.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Masaki; Maeda, Tatsuo; Tsunoda, Takahiko; Mitsuhashi, Yoshihiko; Tsuboi, Ryoji

    2014-09-01

    A 54-year-old Japanese woman had repetitive superficial skin peeling and ensuing erythematous changes in the sites since infancy. Her parents had a consanguineous marriage, and she was the only individual affected in her family tree. The erythematous changes seemed to worsen in the summer. Histologically, hyperkeratosis and splitting of the epidermis within the stratum corneum was noted, and electron microscopy revealed shedding of corneal cells in the horny layer and normal-looking corneodesmosomes. Gene analysis revealed a homozygous missense mutation at c.1358G>A in CDSN. Electron microscopic examination of the length and number of corneodesmosomes revealed statistically significant shortness and sparsity in the affected individual (mean ± SD 386.2 ± 149.5 nm) compared with that of an age- and site-matched control (406.6 ± 182.3 nm). We speculate that this size shrinkage of corneodesmosomes might be the result of a missense mutation of CDSN and that this could be one of the factors contributing to the pathological process of skin peeling.

  15. Identification of a De Novo Heterozygous Missense FLNB Mutation in Lethal Atelosteogenesis Type I by Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ga Won; Lee, Mi-Na; Jung, Ji Mi; Hong, Seong Yeon; Kim, Young Nam; Sin, Jong Beom

    2014-01-01

    Background Atelosteogenesis type I (AO-I) is a rare lethal skeletal dysplastic disorder characterized by severe short-limbed dwarfism and dislocated hips, knees, and elbows. AO-I is caused by mutations in the filamin B (FLNB) gene; however, several other genes can cause AO-like lethal skeletal dysplasias. Methods In order to screen all possible genes associated with AO-like lethal skeletal dysplasias simultaneously, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a female newborn having clinical features of AO-I. Results Exome sequencing identified a novel missense variant (c.517G>A; p.Ala173Thr) in exon 2 of the FLNB gene in the patient. Sanger sequencing validated this variant, and genetic analysis of the patient's parents suggested a de novo occurrence of the variant. Conclusions This study shows that exome sequencing can be a useful tool for the identification of causative mutations in lethal skeletal dysplasia patients. PMID:24624349

  16. A Common Disease-Associated Missense Mutation in Alpha-Sarcoglycan Fails to Cause Muscular Dystrophy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Piccolo, Federica; Garringer, Keith W.; Moore, Steven A.; Sweezer, Eileen; Yang, Baoli; Campbell, Kevin P.

    2009-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D (LGMD2D) is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the α-sarcoglycan gene. An R77C substitution is the most prevalent cause of the disease, leading to disruption of the sarcoglycan-sarcospan complex. To model this common mutation, we generated knock-in mice with an H77C substitution in α-sarcoglycan. The floxed neomycin (Neo)-cassette retained at the targeted H77C α-sarcoglycan locus caused a loss of α-sarcoglycan expression, resulting in muscular dystrophy in homozygotes, whereas Cre-mediated deletion of the floxed Neo-cassette led to recovered H77C α-sarcoglycan expression. Contrary to expectations, mice homozygous for the H77C-encoding allele expressed both this mutant α-sarcoglycan and the other components of the sarcoglycan-sarcospan complex in striated muscle, and did not develop muscular dystrophy. Accordingly, conditional rescued expression of the H77C protein in striated muscle of the α-sarcoglycan-deficient mice prevented the disease. Adding to the case that the behavior of mutant α-sarcoglycan is different between humans and mice, mutant human R77C α-sarcoglycan restored the expression of the sarcoglycan-sarcospan complex when introduced by adenoviral vector into the skeletal muscle of previously created α-sarcoglycan null mice. These findings indicate that the α-sarcoglycan with the most frequent missense mutation in LGMD2D is correctly processed, is transported to the sarcolemma, and is fully functional in mouse muscle. Our study presents an unexpected difference in the behavior of a missense-mutated protein in mice versus human patients, and emphasizes the need to understand species-specific protein quality control systems. PMID:18252746

  17. DNA analysis of an uncommon missense mutation in a Gaucher disease patient of Jewish-Polish-Russian descent

    SciTech Connect

    Choy, F.Y.M.; Wei, C.; Applegarth, D.A.; McGillivray, B.C.

    1994-06-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal lipid storage disease. It results from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity and is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Three clinical forms of Gaucher disease have been described: type 1, non-neuronopathic; type 2, acute neuronopathic; and type 3, subacute neuronopathic. We have sequenced the full length cDNA of the glucocerebrosidase gene and identified an uncommon mutation in nucleotide position 1604 (genoma DNA nucleotide position 6683) from a Gaucher disease patient of Jewish-Polish-Russian descent with type 1 Gaucher disease. It is a G{yields}A transition in exon 11 that results in {sup 496}Arg{yields}{sup 496}His of glucocerebrosidase. This missense mutation is present in the heterozygous form and creates a new cleavage site for the endonuclease HphI. We have developed a simple method to detect the presence of this mutation by using HphI restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA or cDNA. The mutation in the other Gaucher allele of this patient is an A{yields}G transition at cDNA nucleotide position 1226 which creates an XhoI cleavage site after PCR mismatch amplification. The presence of this mutation was also confirmed by sequence analysis. Based on previous reports that mutation 1226 is present only in type 1 Gaucher disease and the observation that there is no neurological involvement in this patient, we conclude that our patient with the 1226/1604 genotype is diagnosed as having type 1 Gaucher disease. Since it was also postulated that mutation 1226 in the homozygous form will usually result in a good prognosis, we speculate that the orthopedic complications and the unusual presence of glomerulosclerosis in this patient may be attributable to the mutation at nucleotide 1604. This speculation will require a description of more patients with this mutation for confirmation. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  18. A critical functional missense mutation (H173R) in the bovine PROP1 gene significantly affects growth traits in cattle.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chuanying; Wu, Chongyang; Jia, Wenchao; Xu, Yao; Lei, Chuzhao; Hu, Shenrong; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong

    2013-12-01

    The PROP1 protein, encoded by the prophet of Pit-1 (PROP1) gene, exhibits both DNA-binding and transcriptional activation abilities. Its expression leads to the ontogenesis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and pituitary hormone. The missense mutation H173R in PROP1 may result in deficiencies of GH, PRL, TSH, and Pit-1, thereby affecting growth traits. The objective of this study was to characterize the H173R mutation within the PROP1 gene and examine its associations with growth traits in cattle. Accordingly, the H173R mutation was genotyped in 1207 cows belonging to five Chinese native breeds. Three genotypes were identified among the specimens, with genotype AA being the major one. Consequently, the "G" allele was the minor allele. Association testing revealed that the H173R mutation was significantly associated with body weight, average daily weight gain and physical parameters in the analyzed breeds. Interestingly, the cows with genotype AG and/or AA had superior growth traits compared with those expressing the GG genotype, in all tested breeds. These findings revealed that the "A" allele had positive effects on growth traits, which was consistent with the increasing binding ability and enhanced activation capacity associated with the bovine isoform PROP1-173H, representing the "A" allele. Therefore, the H173R mutation can be considered as a DNA marker for selecting individuals with superior growth traits, thereby contributing to research on breeding and genetics in the beef industry.

  19. Functional characterisation of a natural androgen receptor missense mutation (N771H) causing human androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cai, J; Cai, L-Q; Hong, Y; Zhu, Y-S

    2012-05-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked disorder due to mutations of androgen receptor (AR) gene. Various AR mutations have been identified, and the characterisation of these mutations greatly facilitates our understanding of AR structure-function. In this study, we have analysed an AR missense mutation (N771H) identified in patients with AIS. Functional analysis of the mutant AR was performed by in vitro mutagenesis-cotransfection assays. Compared to the wild-type AR, the dose-response curve of dihydrotestosterone-induced transactivation activity in the mutant AR was greatly shifted to the right and significantly decreased. However, the maximal efficacy of transactivation activity in the mutant AR was similar to that of the wild type. Receptor binding assay indicated that the mutant AR had an approximately 2.5-fold lower binding affinity to dihydrotestosterone compared to the wild type. Western blot analysis showed that the size and the expression level of mutant AR in transfected cells were comparable to the wild type. These data underscore the importance of asparagine at amino acid position 771 of human AR in normal ligand binding and normal receptor function, and a mutation at this position results in androgen insensitivity in affected subjects.

  20. Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy in Tunisia is caused by a founder missense mutation of the ALDH7A1 gene.

    PubMed

    Tlili, Abdelaziz; Hamida Hentati, Nadia; Chaabane, Rim; Gargouri, Abdellatif; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2013-04-15

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by seizures and therapeutic response to pharmacological dose of pyridoxine. Mutations in the ALDH7A1 gene, encoding α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (α-AASA) dehydrogenase (antiquitin), have been reported to cause PDE in most patients. In this study molecular analysis of seven PDE Tunisian patients revealed a common missense c.1364T>C mutation in the ALDH7A1 gene. The identification of a cluster of PDE pedigrees carrying the c.1364T>C mutation in a specific area raises the question of the origin of this mutation from a common ancestor. We carried out a genotype-based analysis by way of genotyping a new generated microsatellite marker within the ALDH7A1 gene. Genotype reconstruction of all affected pedigree members indicate that all c.1364T>C mutation carriers harbored the same allele, indicating a common ancestor. The finding of a founder effect in a rare disease is essential for the genetic diagnosis and the genetic counseling of affected PDE pedigrees in Tunisia.

  1. Truncation and microdeletion of EVC/EVC2 with missense mutation of EFCAB7 in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tran Quynh Nhu; Saitoh, Makiko; Trinh, Huu Tung; Doan, Nguyen Minh Thien; Mizuno, Yoko; Seki, Masafumi; Sato, Yusuke; Ogawa, Seishi; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is a ciliopathy with cardiac anomalies, disproportionate short stature, polydactyly, dystrophic nails and oral defects. To obtain further insight into the genetics of EvC, we screened EVC/EVC2 mutations in eight Vietnamese EvC patients. All the patients had a congenital heart defect with atypical oral and/or skeletal abnormalities. One had compound heterozygous EVC2 mutations: a novel mutation c.769G > T-p.E177X in exon 6 inherited from father and another previously reported c.2476C > T-p.R826X mutation in exon 14 inherited from mother. The EVC2 mRNA expression level was significantly lower in the patient and her parents compared to controls. Another case had a novel heterozygous EVC mutation (c.1717C > G-p.S572X) in exon 12, inherited from his father. Of note, the mother without any EVC mutation on Sanger sequencing showed a lower expression level of EVC mRNA compared with controls. SNP array analysis revealed that the patient and mother had a heterozygous 16.4 kb deletion in EVC. This patient also had a heterozygous novel variant in exon 9 of EFCAB7 (c.1171 T > C-p.Y391H), inherited from his father. The atypical cardiac phenotype of this patient and the father suggested that EFCAB7 may modify the phenotype by interacting with EVC. In conclusion, we detected two novel nonsense mutations and a partial deletion of EVC/EVC2 in two Vietnamese families with EvC. Moreover, we found in one family a missense mutation of EFCAB7, a possible modifier gene in EvC and its related disorders.

  2. Heteroallelic missense mutations of the galactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) gene in a mild form of Morquio disease (MPS IVA)

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, D.E.C.; Gordon, B.A.; Rupar, C.A.

    1996-06-28

    Morquio disease (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) activity. Patients commonly present in early infancy with growth failure, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, corneal opacification, and keratan sulfaturia, but milder forms have been described. We report on a patient who grew normally until age 5 years. Her keratan sulfaturia was not detected until adolescence, and she now has changes restricted largely to the axial skeleton. She has experienced only mildly impaired vision. At age 22, thin-layer chromatography of purified glycosaminoglycans showed some keratan sulfaturia. GALNS activity in fibroblast homogenate supernatants was 20 {plus_minus} 5% of controls (as compared to 5 {plus_minus} 3% of controls in severe MPS IVA, P <.003). Kinetic analysis of residual fibroblast GALNS activity in patient and parents revealed decreased K{sub m} and increased V{sub max} in the mother and daughter, but not in the father, compatible with compound heterozygosity. GALNS exons were amplified from patient genomic DNA and screened by SSCP. Two missense mutations, a C to T transition at position 335 (predicting R94C) and a T to G transversion at position 344 (predicting F97V), were found on sequencing an abnormally migrating exon 3 amplicon. Digestion of the amplicon with FokI and AccI restriction enzymes (specific for the R94C and F97V mutations, respectively) confirmed heterozygosity. In fibroblast transfection experiments, heterozygous R94C and F97V mutants independently expressed as severe and mile GALNS deficiency, respectively. We interpret these findings to indicate that our patient bears heteroallelic GALNS missense mutations, leading to GALNS deficiency and mild MPS IVA. Our findings expand the clinical and biochemical phenotype of MPS IVA, but full delineation of the genotype-phenotype relationship requires further study of native and transfected mutant cell lines. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Structural Characterization of Missense Mutations Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry: A Case Study of the Parkinson's-Related Protein, DJ-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Nissan, Gili; Chotiner, Almog; Tarnavsky, Mark; Sharon, Michal

    2016-06-01

    Missense mutations that lead to the expression of mutant proteins carrying single amino acid substitutions are the cause of numerous diseases. Unlike gene lesions, insertions, deletions, nonsense mutations, or modified RNA splicing, which affect the length of a polypeptide, or determine whether a polypeptide is translated at all, missense mutations exert more subtle effects on protein structure, which are often difficult to evaluate. Here, we took advantage of the spectral resolution afforded by the EMR Orbitrap platform, to generate a mass spectrometry-based approach relying on simultaneous measurements of the wild-type protein and the missense variants. This approach not only considerably shortens the analysis time due to the concurrent acquisition but, more importantly, enables direct comparisons between the wild-type protein and the variants, allowing identification of even subtle structural changes. We demonstrate our approach using the Parkinson's-associated protein, DJ-1. Together with the wild-type protein, we examined two missense mutants, DJ-1A104T and DJ-1D149A, which lead to early-onset familial Parkinson's disease. Gas-phase, thermal, and chemical stability assays indicate clear alterations in the conformational stability of the two mutants: the structural stability of DJ-1D149A is reduced, whereas that of DJ-1A104T is enhanced. Overall, we anticipate that the methodology presented here will be applicable to numerous other missense mutants, promoting the structural investigations of multiple variants of the same protein.

  4. Characterization of Pathogenic Human MSH2 Missense Mutations Using Yeast as a Model System: A Laboratory Course in Molecular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Gammie, Alison E.; Erdeniz, Naz

    2004-01-01

    This work describes the project for an advanced undergraduate laboratory course in cell and molecular biology. One objective of the course is to teach students a variety of cellular and molecular techniques while conducting original research. A second objective is to provide instruction in science writing and data presentation by requiring comprehensive laboratory reports modeled on the primary literature. The project for the course focuses on a gene, MSH2, implicated in the most common form of inherited colorectal cancer. Msh2 is important for maintaining the fidelity of genetic material where it functions as an important component of the DNA mismatch repair machinery. The goal of the project has two parts. The first part is to create mapped missense mutation listed in the human databases in the cognate yeast MSH2 gene and to assay for defects in DNA mismatch repair. The second part of the course is directed towards understanding in what way are the variant proteins defective for mismatch repair. Protein levels are analyzed to determine if the missense alleles display decreased expression. Furthermore, the students establish whether the Msh2p variants are properly localized to the nucleus using indirect immunofluorescence and whether the altered proteins have lost their ability to interact with other subunits of the MMR complex by creating recombinant DNA molecules and employing the yeast 2-hybrid assay. PMID:22039344

  5. Evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance in SPG3A caused by homozygosity for a novel ATL1 missense mutation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tahir Naeem; Klar, Joakim; Tariq, Muhammad; Anjum Baig, Shehla; Malik, Naveed Altaf; Yousaf, Raja; Baig, Shahid Mahmood; Dahl, Niklas

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. Autosomal dominant and ‘pure' forms of HSP account for ∼80% of cases in Western societies of whom 10% carry atlastin-1 (ATL1) gene mutations. We report on a large consanguineous family segregating six members with early onset HSP. The pedigree was compatible with both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance. Whole-exome sequencing and segregation analysis revealed a homozygous novel missense variant c.353G>A, p.(Arg118Gln) in ATL1 in all six affected family members. Seven heterozygous carriers, five females and two males, showed no clinical signs of HSP with the exception of sub-clinically reduced vibration sensation in one adult female. Our combined findings show that homozygosity for the ATL1 missense variant remains the only plausible cause of HSP, whereas heterozygous carriers are asymptomatic. This apparent autosomal recessive inheritance adds to the clinical complexity of spastic paraplegia 3A and calls for caution using directed genetic screening in HSP. PMID:24473461

  6. De novo missense mutations in the NAA10 gene cause severe non-syndromic developmental delay in males and females

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Bernt; Støve, Svein I; Endele, Sabine; Myklebust, Line M; Hoyer, Juliane; Sticht, Heinrich; Azzarello-Burri, Silvia; Rauch, Anita; Arnesen, Thomas; Reis, André

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies revealed the power of whole-exome sequencing to identify mutations in sporadic cases with non-syndromic intellectual disability. We now identified de novo missense variants in NAA10 in two unrelated individuals, a boy and a girl, with severe global developmental delay but without any major dysmorphism by trio whole-exome sequencing. Both de novo variants were predicted to be deleterious, and we excluded other variants in this gene. This X-linked gene encodes N-alpha-acetyltransferase 10, the catalytic subunit of the NatA complex involved in multiple cellular processes. A single hypomorphic missense variant p.(Ser37Pro) was previously associated with Ogden syndrome in eight affected males from two different families. This rare disorder is characterized by a highly recognizable phenotype, global developmental delay and results in death during infancy. In an attempt to explain the discrepant phenotype, we used in vitro N-terminal acetylation assays which suggested that the severity of the phenotype correlates with the remaining catalytic activity. The variant in the Ogden syndrome patients exhibited a lower activity than the one seen in the boy with intellectual disability, while the variant in the girl was the most severe exhibiting only residual activity in the acetylation assays used. We propose that N-terminal acetyltransferase deficiency is clinically heterogeneous with the overall catalytic activity determining the phenotypic severity. PMID:25099252

  7. De novo missense mutations in the NAA10 gene cause severe non-syndromic developmental delay in males and females.

    PubMed

    Popp, Bernt; Støve, Svein I; Endele, Sabine; Myklebust, Line M; Hoyer, Juliane; Sticht, Heinrich; Azzarello-Burri, Silvia; Rauch, Anita; Arnesen, Thomas; Reis, André

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies revealed the power of whole-exome sequencing to identify mutations in sporadic cases with non-syndromic intellectual disability. We now identified de novo missense variants in NAA10 in two unrelated individuals, a boy and a girl, with severe global developmental delay but without any major dysmorphism by trio whole-exome sequencing. Both de novo variants were predicted to be deleterious, and we excluded other variants in this gene. This X-linked gene encodes N-alpha-acetyltransferase 10, the catalytic subunit of the NatA complex involved in multiple cellular processes. A single hypomorphic missense variant p.(Ser37Pro) was previously associated with Ogden syndrome in eight affected males from two different families. This rare disorder is characterized by a highly recognizable phenotype, global developmental delay and results in death during infancy. In an attempt to explain the discrepant phenotype, we used in vitro N-terminal acetylation assays which suggested that the severity of the phenotype correlates with the remaining catalytic activity. The variant in the Ogden syndrome patients exhibited a lower activity than the one seen in the boy with intellectual disability, while the variant in the girl was the most severe exhibiting only residual activity in the acetylation assays used. We propose that N-terminal acetyltransferase deficiency is clinically heterogeneous with the overall catalytic activity determining the phenotypic severity.

  8. The Contribution of Missense Mutations in Core and Rim Residues of Protein-Protein Interfaces to Human Disease.

    PubMed

    David, Alessia; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2015-08-28

    Missense mutations at protein-protein interaction sites, called interfaces, are important contributors to human disease. Interfaces are non-uniform surface areas characterized by two main regions, "core" and "rim", which differ in terms of evolutionary conservation and physicochemical properties. Moreover, within interfaces, only a small subset of residues ("hot spots") is crucial for the binding free energy of the protein-protein complex. We performed a large-scale structural analysis of human single amino acid variations (SAVs) and demonstrated that disease-causing mutations are preferentially located within the interface core, as opposed to the rim (p<0.01). In contrast, the interface rim is significantly enriched in polymorphisms, similar to the remaining non-interacting surface. Energetic hot spots tend to be enriched in disease-causing mutations compared to non-hot spots (p=0.05), regardless of their occurrence in core or rim residues. For individual amino acids, the frequency of substitution into a polymorphism or disease-causing mutation differed to other amino acids and was related to its structural location, as was the type of physicochemical change introduced by the SAV. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the different distribution and properties of disease-causing SAVs and polymorphisms within different structural regions and in relation to the energetic contribution of amino acid in protein-protein interfaces, thus highlighting the importance of a structural system biology approach for predicting the effect of SAVs. PMID:26173036

  9. Functional Analysis of a De Novo GRIN2A Missense Mutation Associated with Early-onset Epileptic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hongjie; Hansen, Kasper B.; Zhang, Jing; Pierson, Tyler Mark; Markello, Thomas C.; Fuentes Fajardo, Karin V.; Holloman, Conisha M.; Golas, Gretchen; Adams, David R.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Gahl, William A.; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDAR), ligand-gated ion channels, play important roles in various neurological disorders, including epilepsy. Here we show the functional analysis of a de novo missense mutation (L812M) in a gene encoding NMDAR subunit GluN2A (GRIN2A). The mutation, identified in a patient with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy and profound developmental delay, is located in the linker region between the ligand-binding and transmembrane domains. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that the mutation enhances agonist potency, decreases sensitivity to negative modulators including magnesium, protons and zinc, prolongs the synaptic response time course, and increases single channel open probability. The functional changes of this amino acid apply to all other NMDAR subunits, suggesting an important role of this residue on the function of NMDARs. Taken together, these data suggest that the L812M mutation causes over-activation of NMDARs and drives neuronal hyperexcitability. We hypothesize that this mechanism underlies the patient’s epileptic phenotype as well as cerebral atrophy. PMID:24504326

  10. Microphthalmia in Texel sheep is associated with a missense mutation in the paired-like homeodomain 3 (PITX3) gene.

    PubMed

    Becker, Doreen; Tetens, Jens; Brunner, Adrian; Bürstel, Daniela; Ganter, Martin; Kijas, James; Drögemüller, Cord

    2010-01-13

    Microphthalmia in sheep is an autosomal recessive inherited congenital anomaly found within the Texel breed. It is characterized by extremely small or absent eyes and affected lambs are absolutely blind. For the first time, we use a genome-wide ovine SNP array for positional cloning of a Mendelian trait in sheep. Genotyping 23 cases and 23 controls using Illumina's OvineSNP50 BeadChip allowed us to localize the causative mutation for microphthalmia to a 2.4 Mb interval on sheep chromosome 22 by association and homozygosity mapping. The PITX3 gene is located within this interval and encodes a homeodomain-containing transcription factor involved in vertebrate lens formation. An abnormal development of the lens vesicle was shown to be the primary event in ovine microphthalmia. Therefore, we considered PITX3 a positional and functional candidate gene. An ovine BAC clone was sequenced, and after full-length cDNA cloning the PITX3 gene was annotated. Here we show that the ovine microphthalmia phenotype is perfectly associated with a missense mutation (c.338G>C, p.R113P) in the evolutionary conserved homeodomain of PITX3. Selection against this candidate causative mutation can now be used to eliminate microphthalmia from Texel sheep in production systems. Furthermore, the identification of a naturally occurring PITX3 mutation offers the opportunity to use the Texel as a genetically characterized large animal model for human microphthalmia.

  11. Novel missense mutation in the GALNS gene in an affected patient with severe form of mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA.

    PubMed

    Seyedhassani, Seyed Mohammad; Hashemi-Gorji, Feyzollah; Yavari, Mahdieh; Mirfakhraie, Reza

    2015-10-23

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA), also known as Morquio A, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS), which causes major skeletal and connective tissue abnormalities and affects multiple organ systems. In this study, one MPS IVA patient with a severe form from consanguine large Iranian family has been investigated. To find a mutation, all of the 14 exons and intron-exon junctions of GALNS gene were sequenced. Sequencing results were analyzed using bioinformatic analysis in order to predict probable pathogenic effect of the variant. One novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 5, c.542A>G (p.Y181C), was found in the proband. That was predicted as being probably pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis. Segregation and familial study confirmed this pathogenic mutation. In conclusion, we have identified the novel mutation responsible for MPS IVA in an Iranian patient to assist in the diagnosis, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis of the affected families.

  12. Identification of a Novel Missense FBN2 Mutation in a Chinese Family with Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly Using Exome Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hao; Lu, Qian; Xu, Hongbo; Deng, Xiong; Yuan, Lamei; Yang, Zhijian; Guo, Yi; Lin, Qiongfen; Xiao, Jingjing; Guan, Liping; Song, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA, OMIM 121050), also known as Beals-Hecht syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue. CCA is characterized by arachnodactyly, dolichostenomelia, pectus deformities, kyphoscoliosis, congenital contractures and a crumpled appearance of the helix of the ear. The aim of this study is to identify the genetic cause of a 4-generation Chinese family of Tujia ethnicity with congenital contractural arachnodactyly by exome sequencing. The clinical features of patients in this family are consistent with CCA. A novel missense mutation, c.3769T>C (p.C1257R), in the fibrillin 2 gene (FBN2) was identified responsible for the genetic cause of our family with CCA. The p.C1257R mutation occurs in the 19th calcium-binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domain. The amino acid residue cysteine in this domain is conserved among different species. Our findings suggest that exome sequencing is a powerful tool to discover mutation(s) in CCA. Our results may also provide new insights into the cause and diagnosis of CCA, and may have implications for genetic counseling and clinical management. PMID:27196565

  13. Identification of a Novel Missense FBN2 Mutation in a Chinese Family with Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly Using Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hao; Lu, Qian; Xu, Hongbo; Deng, Xiong; Yuan, Lamei; Yang, Zhijian; Guo, Yi; Lin, Qiongfen; Xiao, Jingjing; Guan, Liping; Song, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA, OMIM 121050), also known as Beals-Hecht syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder of connective tissue. CCA is characterized by arachnodactyly, dolichostenomelia, pectus deformities, kyphoscoliosis, congenital contractures and a crumpled appearance of the helix of the ear. The aim of this study is to identify the genetic cause of a 4-generation Chinese family of Tujia ethnicity with congenital contractural arachnodactyly by exome sequencing. The clinical features of patients in this family are consistent with CCA. A novel missense mutation, c.3769T>C (p.C1257R), in the fibrillin 2 gene (FBN2) was identified responsible for the genetic cause of our family with CCA. The p.C1257R mutation occurs in the 19th calcium-binding epidermal growth factor-like (cbEGF) domain. The amino acid residue cysteine in this domain is conserved among different species. Our findings suggest that exome sequencing is a powerful tool to discover mutation(s) in CCA. Our results may also provide new insights into the cause and diagnosis of CCA, and may have implications for genetic counseling and clinical management. PMID:27196565

  14. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, vascular type: a novel missense mutation in the COL3A1 gene.

    PubMed

    Masuno, Mitsuo; Watanabe, Atsushi; Naing, Banyar Than; Shimada, Takashi; Fujimoto, Wataru; Ninomiya, Shinsuke; Ueda, Yasunori; Kadota, Kazushige; Kotaka, Tatsuya; Kondo, Eisei; Yamanouchi, Yasuko; Inoue, Mika; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Kuroki, Yoshikazu

    2012-12-01

    We report a 34-year-old Japanese female with the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. She had thin translucent skin, extensive bruising, toe joint hypermobility, left lower extremity varicose veins, and chronic wrist, knee and ankle joint pain. She also had dizziness caused by autonomic dysfunction. Magnetic resonance angiography showed tortuous vertebral and basilar arteries, mild left carotid canal bulging, and right anterior tibial artery hypoplasia. Electron microscopic examinations of a skin biopsy revealed extremely dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum in dermal fibroblasts and wide variability of individual collagen fibril diameters. A molecular analysis using a conventional total RNA method and a high-resolution melting curve analysis using genomic DNA revealed a novel missense mutation within exon 48 of the COL3A1 gene, c.3428G>A, leading to p.Gly1143Glu. PMID:23181496

  15. A MECP2 missense mutation within the MBD domain in a Brazilian male with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Campos, Mário; Pestana, Cristiane Pinheiro; dos Santos, Adriana Vaz; Ponchel, Frederique; Churchman, Sarah; Abdalla-Carvalho, Cláudia Bueno; dos Santos, Jussara Mendonça; dos Santos, Flavia Lima; Gikovate, Carla Gruber; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia Barros; Pimentel, Márcia Mattos Gonçalves

    2011-11-01

    Point mutations and genomic rearrangements in the MECP2 gene are the major cause of Rett syndrome (RTT), a pervasive developmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females. MECP2 mutations were also identified in patients with autism without RTT. In this study, we present a mutational and gene dosage analysis of the MECP2 in a cohort of 60 Brazilian males with autistic features but not RTT. No duplication or deletion was identified. Sequencing analysis, however, revealed four MECP2 sequence variations. Three of them were previously discussed as non disease causing mutations and one mutation (p.T160S) was novel. It affects a highly conserved amino acid located within the MBD domain, a region of the protein involved in specific recognition and interaction with methylated CpG dinucleotides. The p.T160S variation was not found in the control sample. This mutation may represent a potential genetic factor for autistic phenotype and should be object of further studies.

  16. Cenani-Lenz syndrome restricted to limb and kidney anomalies associated with a novel LRP4 missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahir Naeem; Klar, J; Ali, Zafar; Khan, F; Baig, S M; Dahl, N

    2013-07-01

    Cenani-Lenz syndrome (CLS) is a rare autosomal recessive developmental disorder of the limbs. The disorder is characterized by complete syndactyly with metacarpal fusions and/or oligodactyly sometimes accompanied by radioulnar synostosis. The clinical expression is variable and kidney agenesis/hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphism and teeth abnormalities are frequent features as well as lower limb involvement. CLS was recently associated with mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (LRP4) gene and dysregulated canonical WNT signaling. We have identified a large consanguineous Pakistani pedigree with 9 members affected by CLS. The affected individuals present with a consistent expression of the syndrome restricted to the limbs and kidneys. Symptoms from the lower limb are mild or absent and there were no radioulnar synostosis or craniofacial involvement. Genetic analysis using autozygosity mapping and sequencing revealed homozygosity for a novel missense mutation c.2858T > C (p.L953P) in the LRP4 gene. The mutation is located in a region encoding the highly conserved low-density lipoprotein receptor repeat class B domain of LRP4. Our findings add to the genotype-phenotype correlations in CLS and support kidney anomalies as a frequent associated feature.

  17. Testicular dysgenesis/regression without campomelic dysplasia in patients carrying missense mutations and upstream deletion of SOX9.

    PubMed

    Katoh-Fukui, Yuko; Igarashi, Maki; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Horikawa, Reiko; Nagai, Toshiro; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Suzuki, Erina; Miyado, Mami; Hata, Kenichiro; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Hayashi, Keiko; Matsubara, Yoichi; Baba, Takashi; Morohashi, Ken-Ichirou; Igarashi, Arisa; Ogata, Tsutomu; Takada, Shuji; Fukami, Maki

    2015-11-01

    SOX9 haploinsufficiency underlies campomelic dysplasia (CD) with or without testicular dysgenesis. Current understanding of the phenotypic variability and mutation spectrum of SOX9 abnormalities remains fragmentary. Here, we report three patients with hitherto unreported SOX9 abnormalities. These patients were identified through molecular analysis of 33 patients with 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD). Patients 1-3 manifested testicular dysgenesis or regression without CD. Patients 1 and 2 carried probable damaging mutations p.Arg394Gly and p.Arg437Cys, respectively, in the SOX9 C-terminal domain but not in other known 46,XY DSD causative genes. These substitutions were absent from ~120,000 alleles in the exome database. These mutations retained normal transactivating activity for the Col2a1 enhancer, but showed impaired activity for the Amh promoter. Patient 3 harbored a maternally inherited ~491 kb SOX9 upstream deletion that encompassed the known 32.5 kb XY sex reversal region. Breakpoints of the deletion resided within nonrepeat sequences and were accompanied by a short-nucleotide insertion. The results imply that testicular dysgenesis and regression without skeletal dysplasia may be rare manifestations of SOX9 abnormalities. Furthermore, our data broaden pathogenic SOX9 abnormalities to include C-terminal missense substitutions which lead to target-gene-specific protein dysfunction, and enhancer-containing upstream microdeletions mediated by nonhomologous end-joining. PMID:26740947

  18. A Y328C missense mutation in spermine synthase causes a mild form of Snyder–Robinson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Norris, Joy; Kalscheuer, Vera; Wood, Tim; Wang, Lin; Schwartz, Charles; Alexov, Emil; Van Esch, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    Snyder–Robinson syndrome (SRS, OMIM: 309583) is an X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) syndrome, characterized by a collection of clinical features including facial asymmetry, marfanoid habitus, hypertonia, osteoporosis and unsteady gait. It is caused by a significant decrease or loss of spermine synthase (SMS) activity. Here, we report a new missense mutation, p.Y328C (c.1084A>G), in SMS in a family with XLID. The affected males available for evaluation had mild ID, speech and global delay, an asthenic build, short stature with long fingers and mild kyphosis. The spermine/spermidine ratio in lymphoblasts was 0.53, significantly reduced compared with normal (1.87 average). Activity analysis of SMS in the index patient failed to detect any activity above background. In silico modeling demonstrated that the Y328C mutation has a significant effect on SMS stability, resulting in decreased folding free energy and larger structural fluctuations compared with those of wild-type SMS. The loss of activity was attributed to the increase in conformational dynamics in the mutant which affects the active site geometry, rather than preventing dimer formation. Taken together, the biochemical and in silico studies confirm the p.Y328C mutation in SMS is responsible for the patients having a mild form of SRS and reveal yet another molecular mechanism resulting in a non-functional SMS causing SRS. PMID:23696453

  19. Neonatal diabetes in an infant of diabetic mother: same novel INS missense mutation in the mother and her offspring.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Mehmet Adnan; Kurtoglu, Selim; Bastug, Osman; Korkmaz, Levent; Daar, Ghaniya; Memur, Seyma; Halis, Hulya; Günes, Tamer; Hussain, Khalid; Ellard, Sian

    2014-07-01

    Neonatal diabetes is defined as an uncontrolled hyperglycemic state occurring within the first 6 months of life. It is a rare disease with an incidence of 1 to 90,000-250,000. It is usually a disease of genetic origin in which insulin gene mutations play the main role in the disease process. A baby, born to a mother who had previously been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus at 14 months of age, had a high blood sugar level within the first few hours after birth and was subsequently diagnosed as having neonatal diabetes mellitus. Baby and mother were identified as having a novel heterozygous insulin missense mutation, p.C109R. Difficulties occurred in both follow-up and feeding of the baby. Without the addition of the mother's milk, an appropriate calorie milk formula and isophane insulin were used for the baby during follow-up. Multiple mechanisms are responsible in the pathogenesis of neonatal diabetes mellitus. Insulin gene mutations are one of the factors in the development of neonatal diabetes mellitus. If a resistant hyperglycemic state persists for a long time among babies, especially in those with intrauterine growth retardation whose mothers are diabetic, the baby concerned should be followed-up carefully for the development of neonatal diabetes mellitus. PMID:24566359

  20. Missense mutations in β-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (B3GNT1) cause Walker–Warburg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Buysse, Karen; Riemersma, Moniek; Powell, Gareth; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Chitayat, David; Roscioli, Tony; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; van den Elzen, Christa; van Beusekom, Ellen; Blaser, Susan; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Halliday, William; Wright, Gavin J.; Stemple, Derek L.; Lin, Yung-Yao; Lefeber, Dirk J.; van Bokhoven, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Several known or putative glycosyltransferases are required for the synthesis of laminin-binding glycans on alpha-dystroglycan (αDG), including POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, LARGE, Fukutin, FKRP, ISPD and GTDC2. Mutations in these glycosyltransferase genes result in defective αDG glycosylation and reduced ligand binding by αDG causing a clinically heterogeneous group of congenital muscular dystrophies, commonly referred to as dystroglycanopathies. The most severe clinical form, Walker–Warburg syndrome (WWS), is characterized by congenital muscular dystrophy and severe neurological and ophthalmological defects. Here, we report two homozygous missense mutations in the β-1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (B3GNT1) gene in a family affected with WWS. Functional studies confirmed the pathogenicity of the mutations. First, expression of wild-type but not mutant B3GNT1 in human prostate cancer (PC3) cells led to increased levels of αDG glycosylation. Second, morpholino knockdown of the zebrafish b3gnt1 orthologue caused characteristic muscular defects and reduced αDG glycosylation. These functional studies identify an important role of B3GNT1 in the synthesis of the uncharacterized laminin-binding glycan of αDG and implicate B3GNT1 as a novel causative gene for WWS. PMID:23359570

  1. Two missense mutations of the IRF6 gene in two Japanese families with popliteal pterygium syndrome.

    PubMed

    Matsuzawa, Noriko; Kondo, Shinji; Shimozato, Kazuo; Nagao, Toru; Nakano, Motoi; Tsuda, Masayoshi; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Niikawa, Norio; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro

    2010-09-01

    Mutations in the interferon regulatory factor 6 gene (IRF6) cause either popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) or Van der Woude syndrome (VWS), allelic autosomal dominant orofacial clefting conditions. To further investigate the IRF6 mutation profile in PPS, we performed mutation analysis of patients from two unrelated Japanese families with PPS and identified mutations in IRF6: c.251G>T (R84L) and c.1271C>T (S424L). We also found R84L, which together with previous reports on R84 mutations, provided another line of evidence that both syndromes could result from the same mutation probably under an influence of a modifier gene(s). This supports the idea that the R84 residue in the DNA binding domain of IRF6 is a mutational hot spot for PPS. A luciferase assay of the S424L protein in the other family demonstrated that the mutation decreased the IRF6 transcriptional activity significantly to 6% of that of the wild-type. This finding suggests that the C-terminus region of IRF6 could have an important function in phosphorylation or protein interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of mutations observed in Japanese PPS patients. PMID:20803643

  2. Missense mutation in the Chlamydomonas chloroplast gene that encodes the Rubisco large subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Spreitzer, R.J.; Brown, T.; Chen, Zhixiang; Zhang, Donghong; Al-Abed, S.R. )

    1988-04-01

    The 69-12Q mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii lacks ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity, but retains holoenzyme protein. It results from a mutation in the chloroplast large-subunit gene that causes an isoleucine-for-threonine substitution at amino-acid residue 173. Considering that lysine-175 is involved in catalysis, it appears that mutations cluster at the active site.

  3. A Novel Missense Mutation of GATA4 in a Chinese Family with Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Sun; Fu, Qihua; Sun, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most prevalent type of birth defect in human, with high morbidity in infant. Several genes essential for heart development have been identified. GATA4 is a pivotal transcription factor that can regulate the cardiac development. Many GATA4 mutations have been identified in patients with different types of CHD. Aims In this study, the NKX2-5, HAND1 and GATA4 coding regions were sequenced in a family spanning three generations in which seven patients had CHD. Disease-causing potential variation in this family was evaluated by bioinformatics programs and the transcriptional activity of mutant protein was analyzed by the dual luciferase reporter assay. Results A novel GATA4 mutation, c.C931T (p.R311W), was identified and co-segregated with the affected patients in this family. The bioinformatics programs predicted this heterozygous mutation to be deleterious and the cross-species alignment of GATA4 sequences showed that the mutation occurred within a highly conserved amino acid. Even though it resided in the nuclear localization signal domain, the mutant protein didn’t alter its intracellular distribution. Nevertheless, further luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that the p.R311W mutation reduced the ability of GATA4 to activate its downstream target gene. Conclusions Our study identified a novel mutation in GATA4 that likely contributed to the CHD in this family. This finding expanded the spectrum of GATA4 mutations and underscored the pathogenic correlation between GATA4 mutations and CHD. PMID:27391137

  4. Naturally occurring HCA1 missense mutations result in loss of function: potential impact on lipid deposition

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Jamie R.; Lane, Jacqueline M.; Beinborn, Martin; Kopin, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    The hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptor (HCA1) is a G protein-coupled receptor that is highly expressed on adipocytes and considered a potential target for the treatment of dyslipidemia. In the current study, we investigated the pharmacological properties of naturally occurring variants in this receptor (H43Q, A110V, S172L, and D253H). After transient expression of these receptors into human embryonic kidney 293 cells, basal and ligand-induced signaling were assessed using luciferase reporter gene assays. The A110V, S172L, and D253 variants showed reduced basal activity; the S172L mutant displayed a decrease in potency to the endogenous ligand l-lactate. Both the S172L and D253H variants also showed impaired cell surface expression, which may in part explain the reduced activity of these receptors. The impact of a loss in HCA1 function on lipid accumulation was investigated in the adipocyte cell line, OP9. In these cells, endogenous HCA1 transcript levels rapidly increased and reached maximal levels 3 days after the addition of differentiation media. Knockdown of HCA1 using siRNA resulted in an increase in lipid accumulation as assessed by quantification of Nile Red staining and TLC analysis. Our data suggest that lipid homeostasis may be altered in carriers of selected HCA1 missense variants. PMID:23268337

  5. A missense mutation in the second transmembrane segment of the luteinizing hormone receptor causes familial male-limited precocious puberty

    SciTech Connect

    Kraaij, R.; Post, M.; Grootegoed, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    Patients with familial male-limited precocious puberty present with early onset of puberty. Several missense mutations in the LH receptor gene that cause amino acid substitutions in the sixth transmembrane segment of the receptor protein have been shown to be a cause of the disorder. We have identified a novel LH receptor gene mutation in a patient with familial male-limited precocious puberty that results in a threonine for methionine substitution at position 398 in the second transmembrane segment of the receptor protein. In vitro expression in human embryonic kidney 293 cells of this LH receptor mutant and two previously described LH receptor mutants showed that cAMP production in the absence of hormone was elevated up to 25-fold compared to the basal level of the wild-type receptor. The ED{sub 50} values of hormone-induced cAMP production was relatively low for mutant receptors. We also produced receptors containing amino acid substitutions in both the second and sixth transmembrane segments. For these double mutants, basal receptor activities were similar to the basal activities observed in single mutants, whereas hormone-induced receptor activation was almost completely abolished. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  6. [A young boy with elevated aminotransferases in physical examination--Two novel missense mutations associated with Wilson's disease were found].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yu; Deng, Si-Yan; Wan, Chao-Min

    2015-07-01

    A 3-year-old boy had abnormal liver function, which was found in physical examination, for 5 months before admission. He had no symptoms such as anorexia, poor appetite, and jaundice, had normal growth and development, and showed no hepatosplenomegaly. Laboratory examination revealed significantly reduced ceruloplasmin (35 mg/L), as well as negative hepatotropic virus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus. There were normal muscle enzymes, blood glucose, and blood ammonia and negative liver-specific autoantibodies. The boy had negative K-F ring and normal 24-hour urine copper (0.56 μmol/L). The ATP7B gene testing for the boy, his sister, and their parents detected two novel missense mutations in the boy and his sister, i.e., compound heterozygous mutations in exon 7 (c.2075T>C, p.L692P) and exon 13 (c.3044T>C, p.L1015P), which were inherited from their father and mother, respectively. Wilson's disease was confirmed by genetic diagnosis in the boy and his sister. The boy and his sister were given a low-copper diet. The boy was administered with penicillamine for decoppering and zinc supplement against copper uptake. His sister received zinc supplement alone because no clinical symptoms were observed. The boy showed normal liver function in the reexamination after 3 months of treatment.

  7. Proxy Molecular Diagnosis from Whole-Exome Sequencing Reveals Papillon-Lefevre Syndrome Caused by a Missense Mutation in CTSC

    PubMed Central

    Erzurumluoglu, A. Mesut; Alsaadi, Muslim M.; Rodriguez, Santiago; Alotaibi, Tahani S.; Guthrie, Philip A. I.; Lewis, Sian; Ginwalla, Aasiya; Gaunt, Tom R.; Alharbi, Khalid K.; Alsaif, Fahad M.; Alsaadi, Basma M.; Day, Ian N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by severe early onset periodontitis and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. A previously reported missense mutation in the CTSC gene (NM_001814.4:c.899G>A:p.(G300D)) was identified in a homozygous state in two siblings diagnosed with PLS in a consanguineous family of Arabic ancestry. The variant was initially identified in a heterozygous state in a PLS unaffected sibling whose whole exome had been sequenced as part of a previous Primary ciliary dyskinesia study. Using this information, a proxy molecular diagnosis was made on the PLS affected siblings after consent was given to study this second disorder found to be segregating within the family. The prevalence of the mutation was then assayed in the local population using a representative sample of 256 unrelated individuals. The variant was absent in all subjects indicating that the variant is rare in Saudi Arabia. This family study illustrates how whole-exome sequencing can generate findings and inferences beyond its primary goal. PMID:25799584

  8. A missense mutation in KCTD17 causes autosomal dominant myoclonus-dystonia.

    PubMed

    Mencacci, Niccolo E; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H R; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M P; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W

    2015-06-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%-50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  9. A Missense Mutation in KCTD17 Causes Autosomal Dominant Myoclonus-Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Rubio-Agusti, Ignacio; Zdebik, Anselm; Asmus, Friedrich; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Ryten, Mina; Plagnol, Vincent; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Bandres-Ciga, Sara; Bettencourt, Conceição; Forabosco, Paola; Hughes, Deborah; Soutar, Marc M.P.; Peall, Kathryn; Morris, Huw R.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Tekman, Mehmet; Stanescu, Horia C.; Kleta, Robert; Carecchio, Miryam; Zorzi, Giovanna; Nardocci, Nardo; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lohmann, Ebba; Weissbach, Anne; Klein, Christine; Hardy, John; Pittman, Alan M.; Foltynie, Thomas; Abramov, Andrey Y.; Gasser, Thomas; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Myoclonus-dystonia (M-D) is a rare movement disorder characterized by a combination of non-epileptic myoclonic jerks and dystonia. SGCE mutations represent a major cause for familial M-D being responsible for 30%–50% of cases. After excluding SGCE mutations, we identified through a combination of linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) as the only segregating variant in a dominant British pedigree with seven subjects affected by M-D. A subsequent screening in a cohort of M-D cases without mutations in SGCE revealed the same KCTD17 variant in a German family. The clinical presentation of the KCTD17-mutated cases was distinct from the phenotype usually observed in M-D due to SGCE mutations. All cases initially presented with mild myoclonus affecting the upper limbs. Dystonia showed a progressive course, with increasing severity of symptoms and spreading from the cranio-cervical region to other sites. KCTD17 is abundantly expressed in all brain regions with the highest expression in the putamen. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis, based on mRNA expression profile of brain samples from neuropathologically healthy individuals, showed that KCTD17 is part of a putamen gene network, which is significantly enriched for dystonia genes. Functional annotation of the network showed an over-representation of genes involved in post-synaptic dopaminergic transmission. Functional studies in mutation bearing fibroblasts demonstrated abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum-dependent calcium signaling. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the KCTD17 c.434 G>A p.(Arg145His) mutation causes autosomal dominant M-D. Further functional studies are warranted to further characterize the nature of KCTD17 contribution to the molecular pathogenesis of M-D. PMID:25983243

  10. One missense mutation in exon 2 of the PAX5 gene in Iran.

    PubMed

    Yazdanparast, S; Khatami, S R; Galehdari, H; Jaseb, K

    2015-01-01

    The PAX5 gene, which encodes the B-cell specific activator protein, is one of the most important factors in determination of B-cell development. This gene is the main target of somatic mutations in acute B lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). For example, point mutations, deletions, as well as other gene rearrangements may lead to several forms of B-cell malignancy. In this study, we obtained 50 blood samples from patients diagnosed with ALL, and screened for PAX5 mutations using sequencing in exons 1, 2 and 3. We found a heterozygous germline variant, c.113G>A (p.Arg38His), which affects the paired domain of PAX5. It seems that this mutation is pathogenic, but is recessive. Our findings suggest that this mutation in a single allele of the PAX5 gene is not sufficient to cause disease, and it is possible that other alleles are also involved in the onset of B-ALL. PMID:26782422

  11. Two novel SRY missense mutations reducing DNA binding identified in XY females and their mosaic fathers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt-Ney, M.; Scherer, G.; Thiele, H.; KaltwaBer, P.; Bardoni, B.; Cisternino, M.

    1995-04-01

    Two novel mutations in the sex-determining gene SRY were identified by screening DNA from 30 sex-reversed XY females by using the SSCP assay. Both point mutations lead to an amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding high-mobility-group domain of the SRY protein. The first mutation, changing a serine at position 91 to glycine, was found in a sporadic case. The second mutation, leading to replacement of a highly conserved proline at position 125 with leucine, is shared by three members of the same family, two sisters and a half sister having the same father. The mutant SRY proteins showed reduced DNA-binding ability in a gel-shift assay. Analysis of lymphocyte DNA from the respective fathers revealed that they carry both the wild-type and the mutant version of the SRY gene. The fact that both fathers transmitted the mutant SRY copy to their offspring implies that they are mosaic for the SRY gene in testis as well as in blood, as a result of a mutation during early embryonic development. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Combination of Whole Genome Sequencing, Linkage, and Functional Studies Implicates a Missense Mutation in Titin as a Cause of Autosomal Dominant Cardiomyopathy With Features of Left Ventricular Noncompaction

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Robert; de Villiers, Carin P.; Hooper, Charlotte; Ormondroyd, Liz; Pagnamenta, Alistair; Lise, Stefano; Salatino, Silvia; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Taylor, Jenny C.; Thomson, Kate L.; Arnold, Linda; Chatziefthimiou, Spyros D.; Konarev, Petr V.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Ehler, Elisabeth; Ghisleni, Andrea; Gautel, Mathias; Blair, Edward; Watkins, Hugh

    2016-01-01

    Background— High throughput next-generation sequencing techniques have made whole genome sequencing accessible in clinical practice; however, the abundance of variation in the human genomes makes the identification of a disease-causing mutation on a background of benign rare variants challenging. Methods and Results— Here we combine whole genome sequencing with linkage analysis in a 3-generation family affected by cardiomyopathy with features of autosomal dominant left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy. A missense mutation in the giant protein titin is the only plausible disease-causing variant that segregates with disease among the 7 surviving affected individuals, with interrogation of the entire genome excluding other potential causes. This A178D missense mutation, affecting a conserved residue in the second immunoglobulin-like domain of titin, was introduced in a bacterially expressed recombinant protein fragment and biophysically characterized in comparison to its wild-type counterpart. Multiple experiments, including size exclusion chromatography, small-angle x ray scattering, and circular dichroism spectroscopy suggest partial unfolding and domain destabilization in the presence of the mutation. Moreover, binding experiments in mammalian cells show that the mutation markedly impairs binding to the titin ligand telethonin. Conclusions— Here we present genetic and functional evidence implicating the novel A178D missense mutation in titin as the cause of a highly penetrant familial cardiomyopathy with features of left ventricular noncompaction. This expands the spectrum of titin’s roles in cardiomyopathies. It furthermore highlights that rare titin missense variants, currently often ignored or left uninterpreted, should be considered to be relevant for cardiomyopathies and can be identified by the approach presented here. PMID:27625337

  13. Missense mutations in desmin associated with familial cardiac and skeletal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, L G; Park, K Y; Cervenáková, L; Gorokhova, S; Lee, H S; Vasconcelos, O; Nagle, J W; Semino-Mora, C; Sivakumar, K; Dalakas, M C

    1998-08-01

    Desmin-related myopathy (OMIM 601419) is a familial disorder characterized by skeletal muscle weakness associated with cardiac conduction blocks, arrhythmias and restrictive heart failure, and by intracytoplasmic accumulation of desmin-reactive deposits in cardiac and skeletal muscle cells. The underlying molecular mechanisms are unknown. Involvement of the desmin gene (DES) has been excluded in three families diagnosed with desmin-related myopathy. We report two new families with desmin-related cardioskeletal myopathy associated with mutations in the highly conserved carboxy-terminal end of the desmin rod domain. A heterozygous A337P mutation was identified in a family with an adult-onset skeletal myopathy and mild cardiac involvement. Compound heterozygosity for two other mutations, A360P and N393I, was detected in a second family characterized by childhood-onset aggressive course of cardiac and skeletal myopathy.

  14. A rare missense mutation in CHRNA4 associates with smoking behavior and its consequences.

    PubMed

    Thorgeirsson, T E; Steinberg, S; Reginsson, G W; Bjornsdottir, G; Rafnar, T; Jonsdottir, I; Helgadottir, A; Gretarsdottir, S; Helgadottir, H; Jonsson, S; Matthiasson, S E; Gislason, T; Tyrfingsson, T; Gudbjartsson, T; Isaksson, H J; Hardardottir, H; Sigvaldason, A; Kiemeney, L A; Haugen, A; Zienolddiny, S; Wolf, H J; Franklin, W A; Panadero, A; Mayordomo, J I; Hall, I P; Rönmark, E; Lundbäck, B; Dirksen, A; Ashraf, H; Pedersen, J H; Masson, G; Sulem, P; Thorsteinsdottir, U; Gudbjartsson, D F; Stefansson, K

    2016-05-01

    Using Icelandic whole-genome sequence data and an imputation approach we searched for rare sequence variants in CHRNA4 and tested them for association with nicotine dependence. We show that carriers of a rare missense variant (allele frequency=0.24%) within CHRNA4, encoding an R336C substitution, have greater risk of nicotine addiction than non-carriers as assessed by the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (P=1.2 × 10(-4)). The variant also confers risk of several serious smoking-related diseases previously shown to be associated with the D398N substitution in CHRNA5. We observed odds ratios (ORs) of 1.7-2.3 for lung cancer (LC; P=4.0 × 10(-4)), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; P=9.3 × 10(-4)), peripheral artery disease (PAD; P=0.090) and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs; P=0.12), and the variant associates strongly with the early-onset forms of LC (OR=4.49, P=2.2 × 10(-4)), COPD (OR=3.22, P=2.9 × 10(-4)), PAD (OR=3.47, P=9.2 × 10(-3)) and AAA (OR=6.44, P=6.3 × 10(-3)). Joint analysis of the four smoking-related diseases reveals significant association (P=6.8 × 10(-5)), particularly for early-onset cases (P=2.1 × 10(-7)). Our results are in agreement with functional studies showing that the human α4β2 isoform of the channel containing R336C has less sensitivity for its agonists than the wild-type form following nicotine incubation. PMID:26952864

  15. A rare missense mutation in CHRNA4 associates with smoking behavior and its consequences.

    PubMed

    Thorgeirsson, T E; Steinberg, S; Reginsson, G W; Bjornsdottir, G; Rafnar, T; Jonsdottir, I; Helgadottir, A; Gretarsdottir, S; Helgadottir, H; Jonsson, S; Matthiasson, S E; Gislason, T; Tyrfingsson, T; Gudbjartsson, T; Isaksson, H J; Hardardottir, H; Sigvaldason, A; Kiemeney, L A; Haugen, A; Zienolddiny, S; Wolf, H J; Franklin, W A; Panadero, A; Mayordomo, J I; Hall, I P; Rönmark, E; Lundbäck, B; Dirksen, A; Ashraf, H; Pedersen, J H; Masson, G; Sulem, P; Thorsteinsdottir, U; Gudbjartsson, D F; Stefansson, K

    2016-05-01

    Using Icelandic whole-genome sequence data and an imputation approach we searched for rare sequence variants in CHRNA4 and tested them for association with nicotine dependence. We show that carriers of a rare missense variant (allele frequency=0.24%) within CHRNA4, encoding an R336C substitution, have greater risk of nicotine addiction than non-carriers as assessed by the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (P=1.2 × 10(-4)). The variant also confers risk of several serious smoking-related diseases previously shown to be associated with the D398N substitution in CHRNA5. We observed odds ratios (ORs) of 1.7-2.3 for lung cancer (LC; P=4.0 × 10(-4)), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; P=9.3 × 10(-4)), peripheral artery disease (PAD; P=0.090) and abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs; P=0.12), and the variant associates strongly with the early-onset forms of LC (OR=4.49, P=2.2 × 10(-4)), COPD (OR=3.22, P=2.9 × 10(-4)), PAD (OR=3.47, P=9.2 × 10(-3)) and AAA (OR=6.44, P=6.3 × 10(-3)). Joint analysis of the four smoking-related diseases reveals significant association (P=6.8 × 10(-5)), particularly for early-onset cases (P=2.1 × 10(-7)). Our results are in agreement with functional studies showing that the human α4β2 isoform of the channel containing R336C has less sensitivity for its agonists than the wild-type form following nicotine incubation.

  16. Copy number variation and missense mutations of the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) gene in goat breeds with different coat colors.

    PubMed

    Fontanesi, L; Beretti, F; Riggio, V; Gómez González, E; Dall'Olio, S; Davoli, R; Russo, V; Portolano, B

    2009-01-01

    In goats, classical genetic studies reported a large number of alleles at the Agouti locus with effects on coat color and pattern distribution. From these early studies, the dominant A(Wt) (white/tan) allele was suggested to cause the white color of the Saanen breed. Here, we sequenced the coding region of the goat ASIP gene in 6 goat breeds (Girgentana, Maltese, Derivata di Siria, Murciano-Granadina, Camosciata delle Alpi, and Saanen), with different coat colors and patterns. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified, 3 of which caused missense mutations in conserved positions of the cysteine-rich carboxy-terminal domain of the protein (p.Ala96Gly, p.Cys126Gly, and p.Val128Gly). Allele and genotype frequencies suggested that these mutations are not associated or not completely associated with coat color in the investigated goat breeds. Moreover, genotyping and sequencing results, deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, as well as allele copy number evaluation from semiquantitative fluorescent multiplex PCR, indicated the presence of copy number variation (CNV) in all investigated breeds. To confirm the presence of CNV and evaluate its extension, we applied a bovine-goat cross-species array comparative genome hybridization (aCGH) experiment using a custom tiling array based on bovine chromosome 13. aCGH results obtained for 8 goat DNA samples confirmed the presence of CNV affecting a region of less that 100 kb including the ASIP and AHCY genes. In Girgentana and Saanen breeds, this CNV might cause the A(Wt) allele, as already suggested for a similar structural mutation in sheep affecting the ASIP and AHCY genes, providing evidence for a recurrent interspecies CNV. However, other mechanisms may also be involved in determining coat color in these 2 breeds.

  17. Novel Missense Mutation A789V in IQSEC2 Underlies X-Linked Intellectual Disability in the MRX78 Family

    PubMed Central

    Kalscheuer, Vera M.; James, Victoria M.; Himelright, Miranda L.; Long, Philip; Oegema, Renske; Jensen, Corinna; Bienek, Melanie; Hu, Hao; Haas, Stefan A.; Topf, Maya; Hoogeboom, A. Jeannette M.; Harvey, Kirsten; Walikonis, Randall; Harvey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Disease gene discovery in neurodevelopmental disorders, including X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) has recently been accelerated by next-generation DNA sequencing approaches. To date, more than 100 human X chromosome genes involved in neuronal signaling pathways and networks implicated in cognitive function have been identified. Despite these advances, the mutations underlying disease in a large number of XLID families remained unresolved. We report the resolution of MRX78, a large family with six affected males and seven affected females, showing X-linked inheritance. Although a previous linkage study had mapped the locus to the short arm of chromosome X (Xp11.4-p11.23), this region contained too many candidate genes to be analyzed using conventional approaches. However, our X-chromosome exome resequencing, bioinformatics analysis and inheritance testing revealed a missense mutation (c.C2366T, p.A789V) in IQSEC2, encoding a neuronal GDP-GTP exchange factor for Arf family GTPases (ArfGEF) previously implicated in XLID. Molecular modeling of IQSEC2 revealed that the A789V substitution results in the insertion of a larger side-chain into a hydrophobic pocket in the catalytic Sec7 domain of IQSEC2. The A789V change is predicted to result in numerous clashes with adjacent amino acids and disruption of local folding of the Sec7 domain. Consistent with this finding, functional assays revealed that recombinant IQSEC2A789V was not able to catalyze GDP-GTP exchange on Arf6 as efficiently as wild-type IQSEC2. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the A789V mutation in IQSEC2 is the underlying cause of XLID in the MRX78 family. PMID:26793055

  18. Slitrk Missense Mutations Associated with Neuropsychiatric Disorders Distinctively Impair Slitrk Trafficking and Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyeyeon; Han, Kyung Ah; Won, Seoung Youn; Kim, Ho Min; Lee, Young-Ho; Ko, Jaewon; Um, Ji Won

    2016-01-01

    Slit- and Trk-like (Slitrks) are a six-member family of synapse organizers that control excitatory and inhibitory synapse formation by forming trans-synaptic adhesions with LAR receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Intriguingly, genetic mutations of Slitrks have been associated with a multitude of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, nothing is known about the neuronal and synaptic consequences of these mutations. Here, we report the structural and functional effects on synapses of various rare de novo mutations identified in patients with schizophrenia or Tourette syndrome. A number of single amino acid substitutions in Slitrk1 (N400I or T418S) or Slitrk4 (V206I or I578V) reduced their surface expression levels. These substitutions impaired glycosylation of Slitrks expressed in HEK293T cells, caused retention of Slitrks in the endoplasmic reticulum and cis-Golgi compartment in COS-7 cells and neurons, and abolished Slitrk binding to PTPδ. Furthermore, these substitutions eliminated the synapse-inducing activity of Slitrks, abolishing their functional effects on synapse density in cultured neurons. Strikingly, a valine-to-methionine mutation in Slitrk2 (V89M) compromised synapse formation activity in cultured neuron, without affecting surface transport, expression, or synapse-inducing activity in coculture assays. Similar deleterious effects were observed upon introduction of the corresponding valine-to-methionine mutation into Slitrk1 (V85M), suggesting that this conserved valine residue plays a key role in maintaining the synaptic functions of Slitrks. Collectively, these data indicate that inactivation of distinct cellular mechanisms caused by specific Slitrk dysfunctions may underlie Slitrk-associated neuropsychiatric disorders in humans, and provide a robust cellular readout for the development of knowledge-based therapies. PMID:27812321

  19. A COLQ missense mutation in Labrador Retrievers having congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rinz, Caitlin J; Levine, Jonathan; Minor, Katie M; Humphries, Hammon D; Lara, Renee; Starr-Moss, Alison N; Guo, Ling T; Williams, D Colette; Shelton, G Diane; Clark, Leigh Anne

    2014-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by skeletal muscle weakness caused by disruption of signal transmission across the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). CMSs are rarely encountered in veterinary medicine, and causative mutations have only been identified in Old Danish Pointing Dogs and Brahman cattle to date. Herein, we characterize a novel CMS in 2 Labrador Retriever littermates with an early onset of marked generalized muscle weakness. Because the sire and dam share 2 recent common ancestors, CMS is likely the result of recessive alleles inherited identical by descent (IBD). Genome-wide SNP profiles generated from the Illumina HD array for 9 nuclear family members were used to determine genomic inheritance patterns in chromosomal regions encompassing 18 functional candidate genes. SNP haplotypes spanning 3 genes were consistent with autosomal recessive transmission, and microsatellite data showed that only the segment encompassing COLQ was inherited IBD. COLQ encodes the collagenous tail of acetylcholinesterase, the enzyme responsible for termination of signal transduction in the NMJ. Sequences from COLQ revealed a variant in exon 14 (c.1010T>C) that results in the substitution of a conserved amino acid (I337T) within the C-terminal domain. Both affected puppies were homozygous for this variant, and 16 relatives were heterozygous, while 288 unrelated Labrador Retrievers and 112 dogs of other breeds were wild-type. A recent study in which 2 human CMS patients were found to be homozygous for an identical COLQ mutation (c.1010T>C; I337T) provides further evidence that this mutation is pathogenic. This report describes the first COLQ mutation in canine CMS and demonstrates the utility of SNP profiles from nuclear family members for the identification of private mutations. PMID:25166616

  20. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Dragileva, Ella; Kirby, Andrew; Lloret, Alejandro; Lopez, Edith; St Claire, Jason; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Hou, Caixia; Holloway, Kim; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Cohen, Paula E; Li, Guo-Min; Pearson, Christopher E; Daly, Mark J; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-10-01

    The Huntington's disease gene (HTT) CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111) mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111) ) than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111) ). Linkage mapping in (B6x129).Hdh(Q111) F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR) gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111) mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111) somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3) complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3). The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest that MLH1

  1. Two novel missense mutations in the myelin protein zero gene causes Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 and Déjérine-Sottas syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) phenotype caused by mutation in the myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene varies considerably, from early onset and severe forms to late onset and milder forms. The mechanism is not well understood. The myelin protein zero (P0) mediates adhesion in the spiral wraps of the Schwann cell's myelin sheath. The crystalline structure of the extracellular domain of the myelin protein zero (P0ex) is known, while the transmembrane and intracellular structure is unknown. Findings One novel missense mutation caused a milder late onset CMT type 2, while the second missense mutation caused a severe early onset phenotype compatible with Déjérine-Sottas syndrome. Conclusions The phenotypic variation caused by different missense mutations in the MPZ gene is likely caused by different conformational changes of the MPZ protein which affects the functional tetramers. Severe changes of the MPZ protein cause dysfunctional tetramers and predominantly uncompacted myelin, i.e. the severe phenotypes congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy and Déjérine-Sottas syndrome, while milder changes cause the phenotypes CMT type 1 and 2. PMID:20385006

  2. Cystic fibrosis mice carrying the missense mutation G551D replicate human genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, S J; Alton, E W; Smith, S N; Lunn, D P; Farley, R; Lovelock, P K; Thomson, S A; Hume, D A; Lamb, D; Porteous, D J; Dorin, J R; Wainwright, B J

    1996-01-01

    We have generated a mouse carrying the human G551D mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) by a one-step gene targeting procedure. These mutant mice show cystic fibrosis pathology but have a reduced risk of fatal intestinal blockage compared with 'null' mutants, in keeping with the reduced incidence of meconium ileus in G551D patients. The G551D mutant mice show greatly reduced CFTR-related chloride transport, displaying activity intermediate between that of cftr(mlUNC) replacement ('null') and cftr(mlHGU) insertional (residual activity) mutants and equivalent to approximately 4% of wild-type CFTR activity. The long-term survival of these animals should provide an excellent model with which to study cystic fibrosis, and they illustrate the value of mouse models carrying relevant mutations for examining genotype-phenotype correlations. Images PMID:8605891

  3. Novel GNB1 missense mutation in a patient with generalized dystonia, hypotonia, and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Steinrücke, Sofia; Lohmann, Katja; Domingo, Aloysius; Rolfs, Arndt; Bäumer, Tobias; Spiegler, Juliane; Hartmann, Corinna; Münchau, Alexander

    2016-10-01

    Recently, exome sequencing has extended our knowledge of genetic causes of developmental delay through identification of de novo, germline mutations in the guanine nucleotide-binding protein, beta 1 (GNB1) in 13 patients with neurodevelopmental disability and a wide range of additional symptoms and signs including hypotonia in 11 and seizures in 10 of the patients. Limb/arm dystonia was found in 2 patients.(1). PMID:27668284

  4. Keratin 12 missense mutation induces the unfolded protein response and apoptosis in Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Edwin H.A.; Courtney, David G.; Atkinson, Sarah D.; Moore, Johnny E.; Mairs, Laura; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Schiroli, Davide; Maurizi, Eleonora; Cole, Christian; Hickerson, Robyn P.; James, John; Murgatroyd, Helen; Smith, Frances J.D.; MacEwen, Carrie; Enghild, Jan J.; Nesbit, M. Andrew; Leslie Pedrioli, Deena M.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Moore, C.B. Tara

    2016-01-01

    Meesmann epithelial corneal dystrophy (MECD) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder caused by dominant-negative mutations within the KRT3 or KRT12 genes, which encode the cytoskeletal protein keratins K3 and K12, respectively. To investigate the pathomechanism of this disease, we generated and phenotypically characterized a novel knock-in humanized mouse model carrying the severe, MECD-associated, K12-Leu132Pro mutation. Although no overt changes in corneal opacity were detected by slit-lamp examination, the corneas of homozygous mutant mice exhibited histological and ultrastructural epithelial cell fragility phenotypes. An altered keratin expression profile was observed in the cornea of mutant mice, confirmed by western blot, RNA-seq and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mass spectrometry (MS) and immunohistochemistry demonstrated a similarly altered keratin profile in corneal tissue from a K12-Leu132Pro MECD patient. The K12-Leu132Pro mutation results in cytoplasmic keratin aggregates. RNA-seq analysis revealed increased chaperone gene expression, and apoptotic unfolded protein response (UPR) markers, CHOP and Caspase 12, were also increased in the MECD mice. Corneal epithelial cell apoptosis was increased 17-fold in the mutant cornea, compared with the wild-type (P < 0.001). This elevation of UPR marker expression was also observed in the human MECD cornea. This is the first reporting of a mouse model for MECD that recapitulates the human disease and is a valuable resource in understanding the pathomechanism of the disease. Although the most severe phenotype is observed in the homozygous mice, this model will still provide a test-bed for therapies not only for corneal dystrophies but also for other keratinopathies caused by similar mutations. PMID:26758872

  5. Congenital bovine spinal dysmyelination is caused by a missense mutation in the SPAST gene

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Peter H.; Agerholm, Jørgen S.; Bendixen, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Bovine spinal dysmyelination (BSD) is a recessive congenital neurodegenerative disease in cattle (Bos taurus) characterized by pathological changes of the myelin sheaths in the spinal cord. The occurrence of BSD is a longstanding problem in the American Brown Swiss (ABS) breed and in several European cattle breeds upgraded with ABS. Here, we show that the disease locus on bovine chromosome 11 harbors the SPAST gene that, when mutated, is responsible for the human disorder hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). Initially, SPAST encoding Spastin was considered a less likely candidate gene for BSD since the modes of inheritance as well as the time of onset and severity of symptoms differ widely between HSP and BSD. However, sequence analysis of the bovine SPAST gene in affected animals identified a R560Q substitution at a position in the ATPase domain of the Spastin protein that is invariant from insects to mammals. Interestingly, three different mutations in human SPAST gene at the equivalent position are known to cause HSP. To explore this observation further, we genotyped more than 3,100 animals of various cattle breeds and found that the glutamine allele exclusively occurred in breeds upgraded with ABS. Furthermore, all confirmed BSD carriers were heterozygous, while all affected calves were homozygous for the glutamine allele consistent with recessive transmission of the underlying mutation and complete penetrance in the homozygous state. Subsequent analysis of recombinant Spastin in vitro showed that the R560Q substitution severely impaired the ATPase activity, demonstrating a causal relationship between the SPAST mutation and BSD. PMID:19714378

  6. Novel IRF6 mutations in Japanese patients with Van der Woude syndrome: two missense mutations (R45Q and P396S) and a 17-kb deletion.

    PubMed

    Kayano, Shuji; Kure, Shigeo; Suzuki, Yoichi; Kanno, Kiyoshi; Aoki, Yoko; Kondo, Shinji; Schutte, Brian C; Murray, Jeffrey C; Yamada, Atsushi; Matsubara, Yoichi

    2003-01-01

    Three Japanese families with Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) were screened for mutations in the interferon regulatory factor 6 gene (IRF6) by sequencing its entire coding region. Two novel missense mutations, R45Q in exon 3 and P396S in exon 9, were identified in families 1 and 2, respectively. In family 3, no causative base change was found by the sequencing analysis, but a deletion involving exons 4-9 was suggested by multiplex PCR analysis. To confirm the deletion and to determine its 5'- and 3'-boundaries, we amplified a DNA fragment containing a heterozygous polymorphic site in exon 2 by using a 5'-upstream forward PCR primer and eight different reverse primers located 3'-downstream of exon 2. The amplified product was subjected to nested PCR to generate a DNA fragment containing the polymorphic site. When a reverse primer located within the deletion was used for the first PCR amplification, only the nondeletion allele was detected after the second PCR. Repeated analyses with eight different reverse primers allowed us to map the boundaries of the deletion, and subsequently a heterozygous 17,162-bp deletion involving exons 4-9 was identified. Since IRF6 mutations in a significant portion of VWS patients remain undetected by conventional sequencing analysis, it may be important to search for a large deletion in those patients. Our simple methods to identify deletions and to determine the boundaries of a deletion would facilitate the identification of such patients.

  7. Novel missense mutation in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of HERG causes long QT syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Satler, C.A.; Walsh, E.P.; Vesely, M.R.

    1996-10-02

    Autosomal-dominant long QT syndrome (LQT) is an inherited disorder, predisposing affected individuals to sudden death from tachyarrhythmias. To identify the gene(s) responsible for LQT, we identified and characterized an LQT family consisting of 48 individuals. DNA was screened with 150 microsatellite polymorphic markers encompassing approximately 70% of the genome. We found evidence for linkage of the LQT phenotype to chromosome 7(q35-36). Marker D7S636 yielded a maximum lod score of 6.93 at a recombination fraction ({theta}) of 0.00. Haplotype analysis further localized the LQT gene within a 6-2-cM interval. HERG encodes a potassium channel which has been mapped to this region. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analyses demonstrated aberrant bands that were unique to all affected individuals. DNA sequencing of the aberrant bands demonstrated a G to A substitution in all affected patients; this point mutation results in the substitution of a highly conserved valine residue with a methionine (V822M) in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of this potassium channel. The cosegregation of this distinct mutation with LQT demonstrates that HERG is the LQT gene in this pedigree. Furthermore, the location and character of this mutation suggests that the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain of the potassium channel encoded by HERG plays an important role in normal cardiac repolarization and may decrease susceptibility to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. 38 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Functional and structural impact of the most prevalent missense mutations in classic galactosemia

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ana I; Trabuco, Matilde; Ramos, Ruben; Silva, Maria João; Tavares de Almeida, Isabel; Leandro, Paula; Rivera, Isabel; Vicente, João B

    2014-01-01

    Galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) is a key enzyme in galactose metabolism, particularly important in the neonatal period due to ingestion of galactose-containing milk. GALT deficiency results in the genetic disorder classic galactosemia, whose pathophysiology is still not fully elucidated. Whereas classic galactosemia has been hypothesized to result from GALT misfolding, a thorough functional–structural characterization of GALT most prevalent variants was still lacking, hampering the development of alternative therapeutic approaches. The aim of this study was to investigate the structural–functional effects of nine GALT mutations, four of which account for the vast majority of the mutations identified in galactosemic patients. Several methodologies were employed to evaluate the mutations' impact on GALT function, on the protein secondary and tertiary structures, and on the aggregation propensity. The major structural effect concerns disturbed propensity for aggregation, particularly striking for the p.Q188R variant, resulting from the most frequent (∼60%) allele at a worldwide scale. The absence of major effects at the secondary and tertiary structure levels suggests that the disturbed aggregation results from subtle perturbations causing a higher and/or longer exposure of hydrophobic residues in the variants as compared to WT GALT. The results herein described indicate a possible benefit from introducing proteostasis regulators and/or chemical/pharmacological chaperones to prevent the accumulation of protein aggregates, in new avenues of therapeutic research for classic galactosemia. PMID:25614870

  9. A Missense Mutation in Canine CLN6 in an Australian Shepherd with Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Martin L.; Farias, Fabiana H.; Sanders, Douglas N.; Zeng, Rong; Khan, Shahnawaz; Johnson, Gary S.; O'Brien, Dennis P.

    2011-01-01

    The childhood neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are inherited neurodegenerative diseases that are progressive and ultimately fatal. An Australian Shepherd that exhibited a progressive neurological disorder with signs similar to human NCL was evaluated. The cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and retina were found to contain massive accumulations of autofluorescent inclusions characteristic of the NCLs. Nucleotide sequence analysis of DNA from the affected dog identified a T to C variant (c.829T>C) in exon 7 of CLN6. Mutations in the human ortholog underlie a late-infantile form of NCL in humans. The T-to-C transition results in a tryptophan to arginine amino acid change in the predicted protein sequence. Tryptophans occur at homologous positions in the CLN6 proteins from all 13 other vertebrates evaluated. The c.829T>C transition is a strong candidate for the causative mutation in this NCL-affected dog. Dogs with this mutation could serve as a model for the analogous human disorder. PMID:21234413

  10. Novel amyloid precursor protein gene missense mutation (D678N) in probable familial Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Wakutani, Y; Watanabe, K; Adachi, Y; Wada-Isoe, K; Urakami, K; Ninomiya, H; Saido, T; Hashimoto, T; Iwatsubo, T; Nakashima, K

    2004-01-01

    Subject: The proband was a women of 72. Symptoms of dementia that fulfilled the criteria for probable Alzheimer's disease appeared at about 60 years of age, and slowly worsened over more than 10 years without evident cerebrovascular complications, either clinically or neuroradiologically. Methods: Polymerase chain reaction single strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) analysis followed by sequence analysis was used to examine genomic DNA of the proband for mutations in the APP gene exons 16 and 17. Results: Analysis of the APP exon 16 in the proband showed a GAC to AAC nucleotide substitution in codon 678 of the APP gene, causing an amino acid substitution of Asp to Asn (D678N). Heterozygosity of the APP D678N mutation was found in the proband and in the demented elder sister. Conclusions: The production and accumulation of mutated Abeta (Asn7-Abeta) or the misfunction of D678N mutant APP may have pathogenic properties for the development of Alzheimer's disease in this pedigree. PMID:15201367

  11. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Mutation in HES7 Associated with Short Tails in Asian Domestic Cats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Sun, Xin; Hu, Xue-Song; Zhuang, Yan; Liu, Yue-Chen; Meng, Hao; Miao, Lin; Yu, He; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats exhibit abundant variations in tail morphology and serve as an excellent model to study the development and evolution of vertebrate tails. Cats with shortened and kinked tails were first recorded in the Malayan archipelago by Charles Darwin in 1868 and remain quite common today in Southeast and East Asia. To elucidate the genetic basis of short tails in Asian cats, we built a pedigree of 13 cats segregating at the trait with a founder from southern China and performed linkage mapping based on whole genome sequencing data from the pedigree. The short-tailed trait was mapped to a 5.6 Mb region of Chr E1, within which the substitution c. 5T > C in the somite segmentation-related gene HES7 was identified as the causal mutation resulting in a missense change (p.V2A). Validation in 245 unrelated cats confirmed the correlation between HES7-c. 5T > C and Chinese short-tailed feral cats as well as the Japanese Bobtail breed, indicating a common genetic basis of the two. In addition, some of our sampled kinked-tailed cats could not be explained by either HES7 or the Manx-related T-box, suggesting at least three independent events in the evolution of domestic cats giving rise to short-tailed traits. PMID:27560986

  12. Acquisition of chemoresistance to gemcitabine is induced by a loss-of-function missense mutation of DCK.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tomohiro; Saiki, Yuriko; Kudo, Chiharu; Hirayama, Akiyoshi; Mizuguchi, Yasuhiko; Fujiwara, Sho; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Sunamura, Makoto; Matsumura, Nobutoshi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Horii, Akira

    2015-09-01

    The anti-tumor activity of gemcitabine (GEM) has been clinically proven in several solid tumors, including pancreatic cancer, biliary tract cancer, urinary bladder cancer, and non-small cell lung cancer. However, problems remain with issues such as acquisition of chemoresistance against GEM. GEM is activated after phosphorylation by deoxycytidine kinase (DCK) inside of the cell; thus, DCK inactivation is one of the important mechanisms for acquisition of GEM resistance. We previously investigated the DCK gene in multiple GEM resistant cancer cell lines and identified frequent inactivating mutations. In this study, we identified two crucial genetic alteration in DCK. (1) A total deletion of DCK in RTGBC1-TKB, an acquired GEM resistant cell line derived from a gall bladder cancer cell line TGBC1-TKB. (2) An E197K missense alteration of DCK in MKN28, a gastric cancer cell line; its acquired GEM resistant cancer cell line, RMKN28, showed a loss of the normal E197 allele. We introduced either normal DCK or altered DCK_E197K into RMKN28 and proved that only the introduction of normal DCK restored GEM sensitivity. Furthermore, we analyzed 104 healthy volunteers and found that none of them carried the same base substitution observed in MKN28. These results strongly suggest that (1) the E197K alteration in DCK causes inactivation of DCK, and that (2) loss of the normal E197 allele is the crucial mechanism in acquisition of GEM resistance in RMKN28. PMID:26196746

  13. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Mutation in HES7 Associated with Short Tails in Asian Domestic Cats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiao; Sun, Xin; Hu, Xue-Song; Zhuang, Yan; Liu, Yue-Chen; Meng, Hao; Miao, Lin; Yu, He; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats exhibit abundant variations in tail morphology and serve as an excellent model to study the development and evolution of vertebrate tails. Cats with shortened and kinked tails were first recorded in the Malayan archipelago by Charles Darwin in 1868 and remain quite common today in Southeast and East Asia. To elucidate the genetic basis of short tails in Asian cats, we built a pedigree of 13 cats segregating at the trait with a founder from southern China and performed linkage mapping based on whole genome sequencing data from the pedigree. The short-tailed trait was mapped to a 5.6 Mb region of Chr E1, within which the substitution c. 5T > C in the somite segmentation-related gene HES7 was identified as the causal mutation resulting in a missense change (p.V2A). Validation in 245 unrelated cats confirmed the correlation between HES7-c. 5T > C and Chinese short-tailed feral cats as well as the Japanese Bobtail breed, indicating a common genetic basis of the two. In addition, some of our sampled kinked-tailed cats could not be explained by either HES7 or the Manx-related T-box, suggesting at least three independent events in the evolution of domestic cats giving rise to short-tailed traits. PMID:27560986

  14. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Mutation in HES7 Associated with Short Tails in Asian Domestic Cats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Sun, Xin; Hu, Xue-Song; Zhuang, Yan; Liu, Yue-Chen; Meng, Hao; Miao, Lin; Yu, He; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats exhibit abundant variations in tail morphology and serve as an excellent model to study the development and evolution of vertebrate tails. Cats with shortened and kinked tails were first recorded in the Malayan archipelago by Charles Darwin in 1868 and remain quite common today in Southeast and East Asia. To elucidate the genetic basis of short tails in Asian cats, we built a pedigree of 13 cats segregating at the trait with a founder from southern China and performed linkage mapping based on whole genome sequencing data from the pedigree. The short-tailed trait was mapped to a 5.6 Mb region of Chr E1, within which the substitution c. 5T > C in the somite segmentation-related gene HES7 was identified as the causal mutation resulting in a missense change (p.V2A). Validation in 245 unrelated cats confirmed the correlation between HES7-c. 5T > C and Chinese short-tailed feral cats as well as the Japanese Bobtail breed, indicating a common genetic basis of the two. In addition, some of our sampled kinked-tailed cats could not be explained by either HES7 or the Manx-related T-box, suggesting at least three independent events in the evolution of domestic cats giving rise to short-tailed traits.

  15. Missense mutation in the ATPase, aminophospholipid transporter protein ATP8A2 is associated with cerebellar atrophy and quadrupedal locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Emre Onat, Onur; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Bilguvar, Kaya; Nazli Basak, Ayse; Topaloglu, Haluk; Tan, Meliha; Tan, Uner; Gunel, Murat; Ozcelik, Tayfun

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia, mental retardation and dysequilibrium syndrome is a rare and heterogeneous condition. We investigated a consanguineous family from Turkey with four affected individuals exhibiting the condition. Homozygosity mapping revealed that several shared homozygous regions, including chromosome 13q12. Targeted next-generation sequencing of an affected individual followed by segregation analysis, population screening and prediction approaches revealed a novel missense variant, p.I376M, in ATP8A2. The mutation lies in a highly conserved C-terminal transmembrane region of E1 E2 ATPase domain. The ATP8A2 gene is mainly expressed in brain and development, in particular cerebellum. Interestingly, an unrelated individual has been identified, in whom mental retardation and severe hypotonia is associated with a de novo t(10;13) balanced translocation resulting with the disruption of ATP8A2. These findings suggest that ATP8A2 is involved in the development of the cerebro-cerebellar structures required for posture and gait in humans. PMID:22892528

  16. Erythrocytic Iron Deficiency Enhances Susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi Infection in Mice Carrying a Missense Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Lelliott, Patrick M.; McMorran, Brendan J.; Foote, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of iron deficiency in areas of high malaria transmission is complicated by evidence which suggests that iron deficiency anemia protects against malaria, while iron supplementation increases malaria risk. Iron deficiency anemia results in an array of pathologies, including reduced systemic iron bioavailability and abnormal erythrocyte physiology; however, the mechanisms by which these pathologies influence malaria infection are not well defined. In the present study, the response to malaria infection was examined in a mutant mouse line, TfrcMRI24910, identified during an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen. This line carries a missense mutation in the gene for transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Heterozygous mice exhibited reduced erythrocyte volume and density, a phenotype consistent with dietary iron deficiency anemia. However, unlike the case in dietary deficiency, the erythrocyte half-life, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and intraerythrocytic ferritin content were unchanged. Systemic iron bioavailability was also unchanged, indicating that this mutation results in erythrocytic iron deficiency without significantly altering overall iron homeostasis. When infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi adami, mice displayed increased parasitemia and succumbed to infection more quickly than their wild-type littermates. Transfusion of fluorescently labeled erythrocytes into malaria parasite-infected mice demonstrated an erythrocyte-autonomous enhanced survival of parasites within mutant erythrocytes. Together, these results indicate that TFR1 deficiency alters erythrocyte physiology in a way that is similar to dietary iron deficiency anemia, albeit to a lesser degree, and that this promotes intraerythrocytic parasite survival and an increased susceptibility to malaria in mice. These findings may have implications for the management of iron deficiency in the context of malaria. PMID:26303393

  17. Erythrocytic Iron Deficiency Enhances Susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi Infection in Mice Carrying a Missense Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Lelliott, Patrick M; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of iron deficiency in areas of high malaria transmission is complicated by evidence which suggests that iron deficiency anemia protects against malaria, while iron supplementation increases malaria risk. Iron deficiency anemia results in an array of pathologies, including reduced systemic iron bioavailability and abnormal erythrocyte physiology; however, the mechanisms by which these pathologies influence malaria infection are not well defined. In the present study, the response to malaria infection was examined in a mutant mouse line, Tfrc(MRI24910), identified during an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen. This line carries a missense mutation in the gene for transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Heterozygous mice exhibited reduced erythrocyte volume and density, a phenotype consistent with dietary iron deficiency anemia. However, unlike the case in dietary deficiency, the erythrocyte half-life, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and intraerythrocytic ferritin content were unchanged. Systemic iron bioavailability was also unchanged, indicating that this mutation results in erythrocytic iron deficiency without significantly altering overall iron homeostasis. When infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi adami, mice displayed increased parasitemia and succumbed to infection more quickly than their wild-type littermates. Transfusion of fluorescently labeled erythrocytes into malaria parasite-infected mice demonstrated an erythrocyte-autonomous enhanced survival of parasites within mutant erythrocytes. Together, these results indicate that TFR1 deficiency alters erythrocyte physiology in a way that is similar to dietary iron deficiency anemia, albeit to a lesser degree, and that this promotes intraerythrocytic parasite survival and an increased susceptibility to malaria in mice. These findings may have implications for the management of iron deficiency in the context of malaria.

  18. The functional consequences of mis-sense mutations affecting an intra-molecular salt bridge in arylsulphatase A.

    PubMed Central

    Schestag, Frank; Yaghootfam, Afshin; Habetha, Matthias; Poeppel, Peter; Dietz, Frank; Klein, Roger A; Zlotogora, Joel; Gieselmann, Volkmar

    2002-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of arylsulphatase A. We describe the functional consequences of three mis-sense mutations in the arylsulphatase A gene (Asp-335-Val, Arg-370-Trp and Arg-370-Gln), affecting an apparent intramolecular Asp-335 to Arg-370 salt bridge, and interpret the effects and clinical consequences on the basis of the three-dimensional structure of arylsulphatase A. Asp-335-Val and Arg-370-Trp substitutions each cause a complete loss of enzyme activity and are associated with the most severe form of the human disease, whereas the Arg-370-Gln-substituted enzyme retains some residual activity, being found in a patient suffering from the milder juvenile form of the disease. Detailed analysis reveals that formation of the apparent salt bridge depends critically on the presence of aspartic acid and arginine residues at positions 335 and 370, respectively. Substitution by various other amino acids, including glutamic acid and lysine, affects enzyme function severely. Biosynthesis and immunoprecipitation studies indicate that the Asp-335-Val substitution affects folding of arylsulphatase A more severely than either the Arg-370-Trp or Arg-370-Gln substitutions. In vitro mutagenesis data show that clinical severity correlates with the space occupied by residue 370. The combination with structural data suggests that the bulky tryptophan residue broadens the cleft held together by the apparent salt bridge, whereas the smaller glutamine residue still allows the cleft to close, yielding a less severely affected enzyme. The position of residue 370 in the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme provides a plausible explanation for the differing severities in loss of enzyme function caused by the mutations and thus the clinical phenotype. PMID:12086582

  19. Critical Diamond-Blackfan anemia due to ribosomal protein S19 missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Ozono, Shuichi; Mitsuo, Miho; Noguchi, Maiko; Nakagawa, Shin-Ichiro; Ueda, Koichiro; Inada, Hiroko; Ohga, Shouichi; Ito, Etsuro

    2016-09-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by pure erythrocyte aplasia, and approximately 70% of patients carry mutations in the genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RP). Here, we report the case of a male infant with DBA who presented with anemic crisis (hemoglobin [Hb] concentration 1.5 g/dL) at 58 days after birth. On admission, the infant was pale and had tachypnea, but recovered with intensive care, including red blood cell transfusions, and prednisolone. Based on the clinical diagnosis of DBA, the father of the infant had cyclosporine-A-dependent anemia. On analysis of RP genes when the infant was 6 months old, both the infant and the father, but not the mother, were found to harbor a mutation of RPS19 (c.167G > C, p. R56P). Therefore, genetic background search and early neonatal health check-ups are recommended for families with a history of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:27601194

  20. Critical Diamond-Blackfan anemia due to ribosomal protein S19 missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Ozono, Shuichi; Mitsuo, Miho; Noguchi, Maiko; Nakagawa, Shin-Ichiro; Ueda, Koichiro; Inada, Hiroko; Ohga, Shouichi; Ito, Etsuro

    2016-09-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by pure erythrocyte aplasia, and approximately 70% of patients carry mutations in the genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RP). Here, we report the case of a male infant with DBA who presented with anemic crisis (hemoglobin [Hb] concentration 1.5 g/dL) at 58 days after birth. On admission, the infant was pale and had tachypnea, but recovered with intensive care, including red blood cell transfusions, and prednisolone. Based on the clinical diagnosis of DBA, the father of the infant had cyclosporine-A-dependent anemia. On analysis of RP genes when the infant was 6 months old, both the infant and the father, but not the mother, were found to harbor a mutation of RPS19 (c.167G > C, p. R56P). Therefore, genetic background search and early neonatal health check-ups are recommended for families with a history of inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

  1. Rapid Proteasomal Degradation of Mutant Proteins Is the Primary Mechanism Leading to Tumorigenesis in Patients With Missense AIP Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C.; Martucci, Federico; Morgan, Rhodri M. L.; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Tilley, Daniel; Ramos-Guajardo, Nancy; Iacovazzo, Donato; D'Acquisto, Fulvio; Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Context: The pathogenic effect of mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene (AIPmuts) in pituitary adenomas is incompletely understood. We have identified the primary mechanism of loss of function for missense AIPmuts. Objective: This study sought to analyze the mechanism/speed of protein turnover of wild-type and missense AIP variants, correlating protein half-life with clinical parameters. Design and Setting: Half-life and protein–protein interaction experiments and cross-sectional analysis of AIPmut positive patients' data were performed in a clinical academic research institution. Patients: Data were obtained from our cohort of pituitary adenoma patients and literature-reported cases. Interventions: Protein turnover of endogenous AIP in two cell lines and fifteen AIP variants overexpressed in HEK293 cells was analyzed via cycloheximide chase and proteasome inhibition. Glutathione-S-transferase pull-down and quantitative mass spectrometry identified proteins involved in AIP degradation; results were confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and gene knockdown. Relevant clinical data was collected. Main Outcome Measures: Half-life of wild-type and mutant AIP proteins and its correlation with clinical parameters. Results: Endogenous AIP half-life was similar in HEK293 and lymphoblastoid cells (43.5 and 32.7 h). AIP variants were divided into stable proteins (median, 77.7 h; interquartile range [IQR], 60.7–92.9 h), and those with short (median, 27 h; IQR, 21.6–28.7 h) or very short (median, 7.7 h; IQR, 5.6–10.5 h) half-life; proteasomal inhibition rescued the rapid degradation of mutant proteins. The experimental half-life significantly correlated with age at diagnosis of acromegaly/gigantism (r = 0.411; P = .002). The FBXO3-containing SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex was identified as the E3 ubiquitin-ligase recognizing AIP. Conclusions: AIP is a stable protein, driven to ubiquitination by the SKP1–CUL1–F-box protein complex

  2. A missense mutation in domain III in HSPG2 in Schwartz-Jampel syndrome compromises secretion of perlecan into the extracellular space.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Satoshi; Ito, Mikako; Nakata, Tomohiko; Noguchi, Yoichiro; Okuno, Tatsuya; Ohkawara, Bisei; Masuda, Akio; Goto, Tomohide; Adachi, Masanori; Osaka, Hitoshi; Nonaka, Risa; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Ohno, Kinji

    2015-08-01

    Schwartz-Jampel syndrome (SJS) type 1 is characterized by short stature, myotonia, and chondrodysplasia, and is caused by partial loss-of-function mutations in HSPG2 encoding perlecan. Six missense mutations have been reported in SJS to date and only one has been characterized using a recombinant protein. We report an 11-year-old Japanese boy with SJS, who shows "rigid" walking with less flexion of knees/ankles and protruded mouth. His intelligence is normal. We identified by whole genome resequencing a heterozygous missense p.Leu1088Pro in domain III-2 and a heterozygous nonsense p.Gln3061Ter in domain IV of perlecan. Expression studies revealed that p.Leu1088Pro markedly reduces the cellular expression of domain III-2 and almost nullifies its secretion into the culture medium. As five of the seven missense mutations in SJS affect domain III of perlecan, domain III is likely to be essential for secretion of perlecan into the extracellular space.

  3. A missense mutation in domain III in HSPG2 in Schwartz-Jampel syndrome compromises secretion of perlecan into the extracellular space.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Satoshi; Ito, Mikako; Nakata, Tomohiko; Noguchi, Yoichiro; Okuno, Tatsuya; Ohkawara, Bisei; Masuda, Akio; Goto, Tomohide; Adachi, Masanori; Osaka, Hitoshi; Nonaka, Risa; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Ohno, Kinji

    2015-08-01

    Schwartz-Jampel syndrome (SJS) type 1 is characterized by short stature, myotonia, and chondrodysplasia, and is caused by partial loss-of-function mutations in HSPG2 encoding perlecan. Six missense mutations have been reported in SJS to date and only one has been characterized using a recombinant protein. We report an 11-year-old Japanese boy with SJS, who shows "rigid" walking with less flexion of knees/ankles and protruded mouth. His intelligence is normal. We identified by whole genome resequencing a heterozygous missense p.Leu1088Pro in domain III-2 and a heterozygous nonsense p.Gln3061Ter in domain IV of perlecan. Expression studies revealed that p.Leu1088Pro markedly reduces the cellular expression of domain III-2 and almost nullifies its secretion into the culture medium. As five of the seven missense mutations in SJS affect domain III of perlecan, domain III is likely to be essential for secretion of perlecan into the extracellular space. PMID:26031903

  4. Identification of a missense mutation and several polymorphisms in the proenkephalin A gene of schizophrenic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mikesell, M.J.; Sommer, S.S.; McMurray, C.T.

    1996-09-20

    Schizophrenia is a complex and severe disorder of unknown cause and pathophysiology. In this study, we examined the opioid hypothesis for schizophrenia at the molecular level, focusing on the dopamine-regulated proenkephalin A gene (chromosome 8q11.23-q12). We have screened 150 schizophrenic patients for sequence variations within the promoter region, entire coding sequence, and 3{prime}-untranslated region. We find one sequence change in a conserved amino acid that may be of functional significance. This mutation was found in a single schizophrenia patient but not in controls. Although several new, race-specific polymorphisms were identified, all other sequence changes appeared to be common polymorphisms, unlikely to contribute to the etiology of schizophrenia. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. A missense mutation in the Ca-sensing receptor gene causes familial autosomal dominant hypoparathyroidism

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Y.M.; Finegold, D.N.; Armitage, M.M.

    1994-09-01

    A large family was identified in which hypoparathyroidism was observed to segregate as an autosomal dominant trait in 3 generations. Linkage analysis using short tandem repeat polymorphisms linked the disease phenotype to chromosomal region 3q13. This region contains a newly identified Ca-sensing receptor (PCAR1) gene. This receptor regulates the secretion of parathyroid hormone from parathyroid cells in response to extracellular ionized Ca concentration ([Ca{sup +2}]). PCR-based single stranded conformational analysis of exonic sequences of the PCAR1 gene revealed an abnormal conformer in exon 3 in affected individuals. Direct sequencing of the amplification product from an affected and an unaffected family member showed an A {yields} G transition at nucleotide 770 of the PCAR1 gene [numbering based on the bovine sequence (Genbank accession number S67307)]. This substitution created a Msp1 restriction site which cosegregated with hypoparathyroidism in this family. This substitution was not observed in unaffected family members, unrelated spouses, or unrelated population controls. This substitution is predicted to result in the replacement of a glutamine residue at amino acid 246 by an arginine residue. The Ca-sensing receptor appears to be a member of the family of seven membrane spanning G-protein linked receptors. The extracellular location of this amino acid substitution appears to produce a gain of function mutation increasing the receptor sensitivity to [Ca{sup +2}] and decreasing the calcium {open_quotes}set point{close_quotes}. This is in contrast to the loss of function mutations observed in the PCAR1 gene in pedigrees with familial hypercalcemic hypocalciuria.

  6. A case of Kallmann syndrome carrying a missense mutation in alternatively spliced exon 8A encoding the immunoglobulin-like domain IIIb of fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kiyonori; Miura, Shoko; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Seminara, Stephanie; Hamaguchi, Daisuke; Niikawa, Norio; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2010-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) is one of the causative genes for Kallmann syndrome (KS), which is characterized by isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with anosmia/hyposmia. The third immunoglobulin-like domain (D3) of FGFR1 has the isoforms FGFR1-IIIb and FGFR1-IIIc, which are generated by alternative splicing of exons 8A and 8B, respectively. To date, the only mutations to have been identified in D3 of FGFR1 are in exon 8B. We performed mutation analysis of FGFR1 in a 23-year-old female patient with KS and found a missense mutation (c.1072C>T) in exon 8A of FGFR1. The c.1072C>T mutation was not detected in her family members or in 220 normal Japanese and 100 Caucasian female controls. No mutation in other KS genes, KS 1, prokineticin-2, prokineticin receptor-2 and FGF-8 was detected in the affected patient or in her family members. Therefore, this is the first case of KS carrying a de novo missense mutation in FGFR1 exon 8A, suggesting that isoform FGFR1-IIIb, as well as isoform FGFR1-IIIc, plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of KS. PMID:20139426

  7. A missense mutation in CHS1, a TIR-NB protein, induces chilling sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuancong; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Shuhua

    2013-08-01

    Low temperature is an environmental factor that affects plant growth and development and plant-pathogen interactions. How temperature regulates plant defense responses is not well understood. In this study, we characterized chilling-sensitive mutant 1 (chs1), and functionally analyzed the role of the CHS1 gene in plant responses to chilling stress. The chs1 mutant displayed a chilling-sensitive phenotype, and also displayed defense-associated phenotypes, including extensive cell death, the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and salicylic acid, and an increased expression of PR genes: these phenotypes indicated that the mutation in chs1 activates the defense responses under chilling stress. A map-based cloning analysis revealed that CHS1 encodes a TIR-NB-type protein. The chilling sensitivity of chs1 was fully rescued by pad4 and eds1, but not by ndr1. The overexpression of the TIR and NB domains can suppress the chs1-conferred phenotypes. Interestingly, the stability of the CHS1 protein was positively regulated by low temperatures independently of the 26S proteasome pathway. This study revealed the role of a TIR-NB-type gene in plant growth and cell death under chilling stress, and suggests that temperature modulates the stability of the TIR-NB protein in Arabidopsis.

  8. Cervical artery dissections and type A aortic dissection in a family with a novel missense COL3A1 mutation of vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makrygiannis, Georgios; Loeys, Bart; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2015-11-01

    Cervical artery dissection (CeAD) is a rare condition. One of the causes is the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS). A novel missense mutation in COL3A1 was found in a young patient with CeAD as the single manifestation of vEDS. This is a heterozygous c.953G > A mutation in exon 14, disrupting the normal Gly-X-Y repeats of type III procollagen, by converting glycine to aspartic acid.

  9. Cervical artery dissections and type A aortic dissection in a family with a novel missense COL3A1 mutation of vascular type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makrygiannis, Georgios; Loeys, Bart; Defraigne, Jean-Olivier; Sakalihasan, Natzi

    2015-11-01

    Cervical artery dissection (CeAD) is a rare condition. One of the causes is the vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS). A novel missense mutation in COL3A1 was found in a young patient with CeAD as the single manifestation of vEDS. This is a heterozygous c.953G > A mutation in exon 14, disrupting the normal Gly-X-Y repeats of type III procollagen, by converting glycine to aspartic acid. PMID:26497932

  10. [Primary hypoaldosteronism and moderate bilateral deafness in a child with a homozygous missense mutation (Thr318Met) in the CYP11B2 gene].

    PubMed

    Rubio-Cabezas, O; Regueras, L; Muñoz-Calvo, M T; Bartolomé, M; Pozo, J; Argente, J

    2010-07-01

    Isolated congenital hypoaldosteronism is a rare disorder that presents as chronic salt-wasting syndrome during infancy. Aldosterone synthase deficiency due to mutations in CYP11B2 is the underlying cause in most cases. Apart from the classical electrolyte disturbances (hyponatremia and hyperkalemia), no other extra-adrenal features have been described to date. We report a male child with congenital hypoaldosteronism due to a homozygous missense mutation (Thr318Met) in CYP11B2 who also presented with unexplained sensorineural hearing loss.

  11. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L; Destree, Anne; Duat-Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W; Hernández-Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K; Powell, Cynthia M; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan-like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1-patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi-exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss-of-function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype-phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients. PMID:26178382

  12. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype–Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary‐Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic‐Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P.; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W.; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben‐Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G.; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L.; Destree, Anne; Duat‐Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M.; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W.; Hernández‐Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano‐Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K.; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin‐Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K.; Powell, Cynthia M.; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P.; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C.; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype–phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café‐au‐lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan‐like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1‐patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi‐exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss‐of‐function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype–phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients. PMID:26178382

  13. High Incidence of Noonan Syndrome Features Including Short Stature and Pulmonic Stenosis in Patients carrying NF1 Missense Mutations Affecting p.Arg1809: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Rojnueangnit, Kitiwan; Xie, Jing; Gomes, Alicia; Sharp, Angela; Callens, Tom; Chen, Yunjia; Liu, Ying; Cochran, Meagan; Abbott, Mary-Alice; Atkin, Joan; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barnett, Christopher P; Crenshaw, Melissa; Bartholomew, Dennis W; Basel, Lina; Bellus, Gary; Ben-Shachar, Shay; Bialer, Martin G; Bick, David; Blumberg, Bruce; Cortes, Fanny; David, Karen L; Destree, Anne; Duat-Rodriguez, Anna; Earl, Dawn; Escobar, Luis; Eswara, Marthanda; Ezquieta, Begona; Frayling, Ian M; Frydman, Moshe; Gardner, Kathy; Gripp, Karen W; Hernández-Chico, Concepcion; Heyrman, Kurt; Ibrahim, Jennifer; Janssens, Sandra; Keena, Beth A; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Leppig, Kathy; McDonald, Marie; Misra, Vinod K; Mulbury, Jennifer; Narayanan, Vinodh; Orenstein, Naama; Galvin-Parton, Patricia; Pedro, Helio; Pivnick, Eniko K; Powell, Cynthia M; Randolph, Linda; Raskin, Salmo; Rosell, Jordi; Rubin, Karol; Seashore, Margretta; Schaaf, Christian P; Scheuerle, Angela; Schultz, Meredith; Schorry, Elizabeth; Schnur, Rhonda; Siqveland, Elizabeth; Tkachuk, Amanda; Tonsgard, James; Upadhyaya, Meena; Verma, Ishwar C; Wallace, Stephanie; Williams, Charles; Zackai, Elaine; Zonana, Jonathan; Lazaro, Conxi; Claes, Kathleen; Korf, Bruce; Martin, Yolanda; Legius, Eric; Messiaen, Ludwine

    2015-11-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most frequent genetic disorders, affecting 1:3,000 worldwide. Identification of genotype-phenotype correlations is challenging because of the wide range clinical variability, the progressive nature of the disorder, and extreme diversity of the mutational spectrum. We report 136 individuals with a distinct phenotype carrying one of five different NF1 missense mutations affecting p.Arg1809. Patients presented with multiple café-au-lait macules (CALM) with or without freckling and Lisch nodules, but no externally visible plexiform neurofibromas or clear cutaneous neurofibromas were found. About 25% of the individuals had Noonan-like features. Pulmonic stenosis and short stature were significantly more prevalent compared with classic cohorts (P < 0.0001). Developmental delays and/or learning disabilities were reported in over 50% of patients. Melanocytes cultured from a CALM in a segmental NF1-patient showed two different somatic NF1 mutations, p.Arg1809Cys and a multi-exon deletion, providing genetic evidence that p.Arg1809Cys is a loss-of-function mutation in the melanocytes and causes a pigmentary phenotype. Constitutional missense mutations at p.Arg1809 affect 1.23% of unrelated NF1 probands in the UAB cohort, therefore this specific NF1 genotype-phenotype correlation will affect counseling and management of a significant number of patients.

  14. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) rapidly identified a critical missense mutation (P236T) of bovine ACADVL gene affecting growth traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sihuan; Dang, Yonglong; Zhang, Qingfeng; Qin, Qiaomei; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2015-04-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain (ACADVL), encoding ACADVL protein, targets the inner mitochondrial membrane where it catalyzes the first step of the mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway and plays an important role in body metabolism and oxidation of long chain fatty acid releasing energy. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) is an easy-to-operate, rapid, inexpensive, and exact method for SNP genotyping. Herein, T-ARMS-PCR was carried out to detect a critical missense mutation (AC_000176:g.2885C>A; Pro236Thr) within the ACADVL gene in 644 individuals from two cattle breeds. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the T-ARMS-PCR at this locus, the genotype of the sampled individuals was also identified by PCR-RFLP. The concordance between these two methods was 98.76%. Statistical analysis showed that the bovine ACADVL gene had a significant effect on chest width (P<0.05), chest depth (P<0.05), and hip width (P<0.05) in the Qinchuan breed. The cattle with AA genotype had superior growth traits compared to cattle with AC and/or CC genotypes. The "A" allele had positive effects on growth traits. Therefore, T-ARMS-PCR can replace PCR-RFLP for rapid genotyping of this mutation, which could be used as a DNA marker for selecting individuals with superior growth traits in the Qinchuan breed. These findings contribute to breeding and genetics in beef cattle industry.

  15. Gaucher disease with prenatal onset and perinatal death due to compound heterozygosity for the missense R131C and null Rec Nci I GBA mutations.

    PubMed

    Goebl, April; Ferrier, Raechel A; Ferreira, Patrick; Pinto-Rojas, Alfredo; Matshes, Evan; Choy, Francis Y M

    2011-01-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GBA, E.C.3.2.1.45). Three clinical forms of Gaucher disease have been described: type 1, nonneuronopathic; type 2, acute neuronopathic; and type 3, subacute neuronopathic (OMIM 230800, 230900, 231000). Over the past decade, recognition of a distinct, perinatal lethal form of Gaucher disease (PLGD) has led researchers and clinicians to evaluate Gaucher disease in the differential diagnosis of congenital ichthyosis and nonimmune hydrops fetalis. To date, more than 30 cases of PLGD have been genotyped and reported. It has been observed that homozygosity for recombinant GBA alleles, which are fundamentally null alleles, leads to early lethality, usually in utero or during the 1st few days of life, whereas genotypes involving a recombinant allele and a missense mutation may be less detrimental. Here, we report a case of Gaucher disease with prenatal onset and death within hours of birth, likely due to compound heterozygosity for the GBA Rec Nci I null allele and a R131C missense mutation. In view of the patient's severe clinical course, and based on reviews of other PLGD cases, we postulate that a missense mutation that abruptly disrupts the structure/function of GBA, in combination with a null allele, may result in early lethality in patients with PLGD. We also speculate that R131C is an extremely severe mutation that has occurred more than once in different populations and, in either the homozygous form or heterozygous with another severe mutation, will result in a poor prognosis.

  16. CACNA1H missense mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis alter Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel activity and reticular thalamic neuron firing.

    PubMed

    Rzhepetskyy, Yuriy; Lazniewska, Joanna; Blesneac, Iulia; Pamphlett, Roger; Weiss, Norbert

    2016-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord. In a recent study by Steinberg and colleagues, 2 recessive missense mutations were identified in the Cav3.2 T-type calcium channel gene (CACNA1H), in a family with an affected proband (early onset, long duration ALS) and 2 unaffected parents. We have introduced and functionally characterized these mutations using transiently expressed human Cav3.2 channels in tsA-201 cells. Both of these mutations produced mild but significant changes on T-type channel activity that are consistent with a loss of channel function. Computer modeling in thalamic reticular neurons suggested that these mutations result in decreased neuronal excitability of thalamic structures. Taken together, these findings implicate CACNA1H as a susceptibility gene in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  17. A missense mutation in ALDH1A3 causes isolated microphthalmia/anophthalmia in nine individuals from an inbred Muslim kindred.

    PubMed

    Mory, Adi; Ruiz, Francesc X; Dagan, Efrat; Yakovtseva, Evgenia A; Kurolap, Alina; Parés, Xavier; Farrés, Jaume; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth

    2014-03-01

    Nine affected individuals with isolated anophthalmia/microphthalmia from a large Muslim-inbred kindred were investigated. Assuming autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance, whole-genome linkage analysis, on DNA samples from four affected individuals, was undertaken. Homozygosity mapping techniques were employed and a 1.5-Mbp region, homozygous in all affected individuals, was delineated. The region contained nine genes, one of which, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1A3), was a clear candidate. This gene seems to encode a key enzyme in the formation of a retinoic-acid gradient along the dorsoventral axis during an early eye development and the development of the olfactory system. Sanger sequence analysis revealed a missense mutation, causing a substitution of valine (Val) to methionine (Met) at position 71. Analyzing the p.Val71Met missense mutation using standard open access software (MutationTaster online, PolyPhen, SIFT/PROVEAN) predicts this variant to be damaging. Enzymatic activity, studied in vitro, showed no changes between the mutated and the wild-type ALDH1A3 protein.

  18. Sporadic infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by missense mutations of the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Masayuki; Ohba, Chihiro; Iai, Mizue; Hirabayashi, Shinichi; Osaka, Hitoshi; Hiraide, Takuya; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor type 1 gene (ITPR1) have been identified in families with early-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 29 (SCA29) and late-onset SCA15, but have not been found in sporadic infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia. We examined if mutations of ITPR1 are also involved in sporadic infantile-onset SCA. Sixty patients with childhood-onset cerebellar atrophy of unknown etiology and their families were examined by whole-exome sequencing. We found de novo heterozygous ITPR1 missense mutations in four unrelated patients with sporadic infantile-onset, nonprogressive cerebellar ataxia. Patients displayed nystagmus, tremor, and hypotonia from very early infancy. Nonprogressive ataxia, motor delay, and mild cognitive deficits were common clinical findings. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed slowly progressive cerebellar atrophy. ITPR1 missense mutations cause infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia. ITPR1-related SCA includes sporadic infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia as well as SCA15 and SCA29.

  19. A novel missense mutation in CACNA1A evaluated by in silico protein modeling is associated with non-episodic spinocerebellar ataxia with slow progression.

    PubMed

    Bürk, Katrin; Kaiser, Frank J; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Schöls, Ludger; Kreuz, Friedmar R; Wieland, Thomas; Strom, Tim M; Büttner, Thomas; Hollstein, Ronja; Braunholz, Diana; Plaschke, Jens; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Zühlke, Christine

    2014-04-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6), episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) and familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1) are allelic disorders of the gene CACNA1A encoding the P/Q subunit of a voltage gated calcium channel. While SCA6 is related to repeat expansions affecting the C-terminal part of the protein, EA2 and FHM phenotypes are usually associated with nonsense and missense mutations leading to impaired channel properties. In three unrelated families with dominant cerebellar ataxia, symptoms cosegregated with CACNA1A missense mutations of evolutionary highly conserved amino acids (exchanges p.E668K, p.R583Q and p.D302N). To evaluate pathogenic effects, in silico, protein modeling analyses were performed which indicate structural alterations of the novel mutation p.E668K within the homologous domain 2 affecting CACNA1A protein function. The phenotype is characterised by a very slowly progressive ataxia, while ataxic episodes or migraine are uncommon. These findings enlarge the phenotypic spectrum of CACNA1A mutations.

  20. Variants of the D{sub 5} dopamine receptor gene found in patients with schizophrenia: Identification of a nonsense mutation and multiple missense changes

    SciTech Connect

    Sobell, J.L.; Lind, T.J.; Sommer, S.S.

    1994-09-01

    To determine whether mutations in the D{sub 5} dopamine receptor (D{sub 5}DR) gene are associated with schizophrenia, the gene was examined in 78 unrelated schizophrenic individuals. After amplification by the polymerase chain reaction, products were examined by dideoxy fingerprinting (ddF), a highly sensitive screening method related to single strand conformational polymorphism analysis. All samples with unusual ddF patterns were sequenced to precisely identify the sequence change. In the 156 D{sub 5}DR alleles examined, nine sequence changes were identified. Four of the nine did not affect protein structure; of these, three were silent changes and one was a transition in the 3{prime} untranslated region. The remaining five sequence changes result in protein alterations: of these, one is a missense change in a non-conserved amino acid, 3 are missense changes in amino acids that are conserved in some dopamine D{sub 5} receptors and the last is a nonsense mutation. To investigate whether the nonsense mutation was associated with schizophrenia, 400 additional schizophrenic cases of western European descent and 1914 ethnically-similar controls were screened for the change. One additional schizophrenic carrier was identified and verified by direct genomic sequencing (allele frequency: .0013), but eight carriers also were found and confirmed among the non-schizophrenics (allele frequency: .0021)(p>.25). The gene was re-examined in all newly identified carriers of the nonsense mutation by direct sequencing and/or ddF in search of additional mutations. None were identified. Family studies also were conducted to investigate possible cosegregation of the mutation with other neuropsychiatric diseases, but this was not demonstrated. Thus, the mutation does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia nor does an initial analysis suggest cosegregation with other neuropsychiatric disorders or symptom complexes.

  1. Missense and silent tau gene mutations cause frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-chromosome 17 type, by affecting multiple alternative RNA splicing regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, I; Poorkaj, P; Hong, M; Nochlin, D; Lee, V M; Bird, T D; Schellenberg, G D

    1999-05-11

    Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism, chromosome 17 type (FTDP-17) is caused by mutations in the tau gene, and the signature lesions of FTDP-17 are filamentous tau inclusions. Tau mutations may be pathogenic either by altering protein function or gene regulation. Here we show that missense, silent, and intronic tau mutations can increase or decrease splicing of tau exon 10 (E10) by acting on 3 different cis-acting regulatory elements. These elements include an exon splicing enhancer that can either be strengthened (mutation N279(K)) or destroyed (mutation Delta280(K)), resulting in either constitutive E10 inclusion or the exclusion of E10 from tau transcripts. E10 contains a second regulatory element that is an exon splicing silencer, the function of which is abolished by a silent FTDP-17 mutation (L284(L)), resulting in excess E10 inclusion. A third element inhibiting E10 splicing is contained in the intronic sequences directly flanking the 5' splice site of E10 and intronic FTDP-17 mutations in this element enhance E10 inclusion. Thus, tau mutations cause FTDP-17 by multiple pathological mechanisms, which may explain the phenotypic heterogeneity observed in FTDP-17, as exemplified by an unusual family described here with tau pathology as well as amyloid and neuritic plaques.

  2. General method for fine mapping of the Escherichia coli K-12 lamB gene: localization of missense mutations affecting bacteriophage lambda adsorption.

    PubMed Central

    Hofnung, M; Lepouce, E; Braun-Breton, C

    1981-01-01

    lamB is the structural gene for the bacteriophage lambda receptor, a multifunctional protein located in the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12. We present a method for deletion mapping of any lamB mutations with a recognizable pheno-type. This method involves a transducing phage constructed by in vitro recombination which can also be used for complementation, deoxyribonucleic acid sequence, and in vitro protein synthesis studies with the mutated lamB gene. Using this method, we mapped 18 lamB missense mutations which confer resistance to phage lambda h+ (wild-type host range). The main results were the following. (i) None of the 18 mutations was located in the first 4 deletion intervals out of the 11 of the genetic map. (ii) These mutations were clustered according to their phenotype as follows. (a) Class I mutations, which allow growth of lambda h and lambda hh* (one-step and two-step host range mutants of lambda, respectively), were located in three regions--three in interval V, four in interval VIII-IX, and three in interval X-XI. Only the last three mutations still allowed growth of phage K10 which also uses the lambda receptor, and two of them still allowed reversible binding of lambda h+. (b) All seven class II mutations allowed only growth of lambda hh* and mapped in interval V. These results are discussed in the frame of a genetic approach to the functional topology of the lambda receptor. PMID:6458595

  3. Paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, writer's cramp, migraine with aura and absence epilepsy in twin brothers with a novel SLC2A1 missense mutation.

    PubMed

    Urbizu, Aintzane; Cuenca-León, Ester; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Gratacòs, Margarida; Conill, Joan; Redecillas, Susana; Roig-Quilis, Manuel; Macaya, Alfons

    2010-08-15

    We report two monochorionic twins that progressively developed, between ages 5 and 10, a combination of episodic neurological disorders including paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia, migraine without or with aura, absence seizures and writer's cramp. CSF/serum glucose ratio was moderately decreased in both patients. Mutational analysis of SLC2A1 gene identified a de novo heterozygous missense mutation in exon 4. This novel mutation has been previously showed to disrupt glucose transport in vitro. Both patients showed immediate and near-complete response to ketogenic diet. This clinical observation suggests that a high index of suspicion for GLUT1 deficiency syndrome is warranted in evaluating patients with multiple neurological paroxysmal events.

  4. A missense mutation in ALDH18A1, encoding Delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), causes an autosomal recessive neurocutaneous syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bicknell, Louise S; Pitt, James; Aftimos, Salim; Ramadas, Ram; Maw, Marion A; Robertson, Stephen P

    2008-10-01

    There are several rare syndromes combining wrinkled, redundant skin and neurological abnormalities. Although phenotypic overlap between conditions has suggested that some might be allelic to one another, the aetiology for many of them remains unknown. A consanguineous New Zealand Maori family has been characterised that segregates an autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder (joint dislocations, lax skin) associated with neurological abnormalities (severe global developmental delay, choreoathetosis) without metabolic abnormalities in four affected children. A genome-screen performed under a hypothesis of homozygosity by descent for an ancestral mutation, identified a locus at 10q23 (Z = 3.63). One gene within the candidate interval, ALDH18A1, encoding Delta1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), was considered a plausible disease gene since a missense mutation had previously been shown to cause progressive neurodegeneration, cataracts, skin laxity, joint dislocations and metabolic derangement in a consanguineous Algerian family. A missense mutation, 2350C>T, was identified in ALDH18A1, which predicts the substitution H784Y. H784 is invariant across all phyla and lies within a previously unrecognised, conserved C-terminal motif in P5CS. In an in vivo assay of flux through this metabolic pathway using dermal fibroblasts obtained from an affected individual, proline and ornithine biosynthetic activity of P5CS was not affected by the H784Y substitution. These data suggest that P5CS may possess additional uncharacterised functions that affect connective tissue and central nervous system function.

  5. Molecular basis of recessive congenital methemoglobinemia, types I and II: Exon skipping and three novel missense mutations in the NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase (diaphorase 1) gene.

    PubMed

    Kugler, W; Pekrun, A; Laspe, P; Erdlenbruch, B; Lakomek, M

    2001-04-01

    Hereditary methemoglobinemia due to reduced nicotin amide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-cytochrome b5 reductase (b5r) deficiency is classified into an erythrocyte type (I) and a generalized type (II). We investigated the b5r gene of three unrelated patients with types I and II and found four novel mutations. The patient with type I was homozygous for a c.535 G-->A exchange in exon 6 (A179T). The patients with type II were found to be homozygous for a c.757 G-->A transition in exon 9 (V253M) and compound heterozygous for two mutations, respectively. One allele presented a c.379 A-->G transition (M127V). The second allele carried a sequence difference at the invariant 3' splice-acceptor dinucleotide of intron 4 (IVS4-2A-->G) resulting in skipping of exon 5. To characterize a possible effect of this mutation on RNA metabolism, poly(A)(+) RNA was analyzed by RT-PCR and sequencing. The results show that RNA is made from the allele harboring the 3'-splice site mutation. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed a complete absence of immunologically detectable b5r in skin fibroblasts of this patient. The compound heterozygosity for the splice site and the missense mutations apparently caused hereditary methemoglobinemia type II in this patient. Hum Mutat 17:348, 2001. PMID:11295830

  6. A Novel Missense Mutation in the Second Extracellular Domain of GJB2, p.Ser183Phe, Causes a Syndrome of Focal Palmoplantar Keratoderma with Deafness

    PubMed Central

    de Zwart-Storm, Eugene A.; van Geel, Michel; van Neer, Pierre A.F.A.; Steijlen, Peter M.; Martin, Patricia E.; van Steensel, Maurice A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Gap junctions, which consist of connexins, are intercellular channels that mediate rapid intercellular communication. In the skin, connexins are involved in the regulation of epidermal growth and differentiation. GJB2 encodes connexin26, which is an important skin-expressed gap junction protein. Mutations in GJB2 cause a wide variety of unique disorders, but despite extensive research, their mechanisms of action are poorly understood. The identification of novel diseases caused by mutations in GJB2 may help to illuminate the genotype-phenotype correlation and elucidate the function of different regions of the protein. Here, we report the first account of a family with a GJB2 missense mutation in the second extracellular domain (p.Ser183Phe) that causes skin abnormalities in addition to sensorineural hearing loss. Using fluorescent connexin26-EGFP fusion proteins, we showed that the mutation induces a partial protein transport defect that cannot be rescued by wild-type protein. Dye-transfer experiments using a parachute assay revealed channel functionality. Although p.Ser183Phe affects the second extracellular domain, mutations in the first extracellular domain also lead to focal palmoplantar keratoderma and likewise perturb protein transport in a dominant-negative manner. Therefore, we hypothesize that focal palmoplantar keratoderma in gap junction skin disease may be specifically associated with connexin trafficking defects as well as with mutations affecting its extracellular domains, thus broadening the spectrum of GJB2-associated diseases. PMID:18787097

  7. Hepatic Fibrinogen Storage Disease in a Patient with Hypofibrinogenemia: Report of a Case with a Missense Mutation of the FGA Gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Venick, Robert; Bhuta, Sunita; Li, Xinmin; Wang, Hanlin L

    2015-11-01

    We report a 9-year-old patient with abnormal liver tests found incidentally during routine bloodwork as part of a preoperative evaluation for excision of a benign cyst. A liver biopsy demonstrated hepatocytes to have pale and expanded cytoplasm that contained multiple vague globular eosinophilic inclusions. Electron microscopy showed fingerprint-like structures in the dilated cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, characteristic of fibrinogen. Whole exome sequencing identified a heterozygous missense mutation at codon 35 of the fibrinogen α (FGA) gene. No mutation was identified in the β or γ chains. His plasma fibrinogen levels were found to be decreased to 85 mg/dL (normal range 215-464). His family history was pertinent for his mother and maternal grandfather with hypofibrinogenemia. He had not had any significant bleeding episodes except for minor bruising over the shins. This case illustrates a rare etiology of storage disease that causes abnormal liver function tests. PMID:26676819

  8. Investigation of the atypical FBXW7 mutation spectrum in human tumours by conditional expression of a heterozygous propellor tip missense allele in the mouse intestines

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Hayley; Lewis, Annabelle; Behrens, Axel; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Objective FBXW7 encodes the substrate recognition component of a ubiquitin ligase that degrades targets such as Notch1, c-Jun, c-Myc and cyclin E. FBXW7 mutations occur in several tumour types, including colorectal cancers. The FBXW7 mutation spectrum in cancers is unusual. Some tumours have biallelic loss of function mutations but most have monoallelic missense mutations involving specific arginine residues at β-propellor tips involved in substrate recognition. Design FBXW7 functional studies have generally used null systems. In order to analyse the most common mutations in human tumours, we created a Fbxw7fl(R482Q)/+ mouse and conditionally expressed this mutation in the intestines using Vill-Cre. We compared these mice with heterozygous null (Fbxw7+/−) mutants. Results A few sizeable intestinal adenomas occurred in approximately 30% of R482Q/+ and Fbxw7+/− mice at age >300 days. Breeding the R482Q allele onto Apc mutant backgrounds led to accelerated morbidity and increased polyp numbers and size. Within the small bowel, polyp distribution was shifted proximally. Elevated levels of two particular Fbxw7 substrates, Klf5 and Tgif1, were found in normal intestine and adenomas of R482Q/+, R482Q/R482Q and Fbxw7−/− mice, but not Fbxw7+/− animals. On the Apc mutant background, Fbxw7+/− mutants had a phenotype intermediate between Fbxw7 wild-type and R482Q/+ mice. Conclusions Heterozygous Fbxw7 propellor tip (R482Q) mutations promote intestinal tumorigenesis on an Apc mutant background. Klf5 and Tgif1 are strong candidates for mediating this effect. Although heterozygous null Fbxw7 mutations also promote tumour growth, these have a weaker effect than R482Q. These findings explain the FBXW7 mutation spectrum found in human cancers, and emphasise the need for animal models faithfully to reflect human disease. PMID:23676439

  9. Overexpression of recombinant human antiquitin in E. coli: partial enzyme activity in selected ALDH7A1 missense mutations associated with pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Coulter-Mackie, Marion B; Tiebout, Sylvia; van Karnebeek, Clara; Stockler, Sylvia

    2014-04-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset seizures responsive to pyridoxine and caused by a defect in the α-aminoadipic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (antiquitin) gene (ALDH7A1). We selected four PDE-associated missense ALDH7A1 mutations, p.V367F, p.F410L, p.Q425R, and p.C450S, generated them in a recombinant human antiquitin cDNA with expression in E. coli at either 30°C or 37°C. One mutation, p.C450S, demonstrated substantial activity after expression at both temperatures, potentially contributing to milder biochemical and clinical phenotypes. The p.Q425R mutation yielded no activity at either temperature. The other two mutations yielded significant enzymatic activity at 30°C and markedly reduced activity at 37°C. For these latter three mutations, the markedly reduced or absent enzymatic activity resulting from expression at 37°C may be consistent with pathogenicity.

  10. The molecular defect in type IIB von Willebrand disease. Identification of four potential missense mutations within the putative GpIb binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, K A; Nichols, W C; Bruck, M E; Bahou, W F; Shapiro, A D; Bowie, E J; Gralnick, H R; Ginsburg, D

    1991-01-01

    Type IIB von Willebrand Disease (vWD) is characterized by the selective loss of large von Willebrand Factor (vWF) multimers from plasma, presumably due to their increased reactivity with platelets and subsequent clearance from the circulation. Using the PCR, one of a panel of four potential missense mutations was identified in each of the 14 patients studied from 11 unrelated families. None of these substitutions was encountered in a large panel of normal DNAs. These changes all represent C----T transitions at CpG dinucleotides, proposed "hot spots" for mutation in the human genome. The four resulting amino acid substitutions, Arg543----Trp, Arg545----Cys, Val553----Met, and Arg578----Gln, are all clustered within the GpIb binding domain of vWF. Disruption of this latter functional domain may explain the pathogenesis of Type IIB vWD. By sequence polymorphism analysis, the Arg543----Trp substitution was shown to have occurred as at least two independent mutational events. This latter observation, along with the identification of mutations in all 14 patients studied and their localization to the GpIb binding domain, all strongly suggest that these substitutions represent the authentic defects responsible for Type IIB vWD. This panel of mutations may provide a useful diagnostic tool for the majority of patients with Type IIB vWD. Images PMID:1672694

  11. Functional analysis of rod monochromacy-associated missense mutations in the CNGA3 subunit of the cone photoreceptor cGMP-gated channel.

    PubMed

    Muraki-Oda, Sanae; Toyoda, Futoshi; Okada, Akira; Tanabe, Shoko; Yamade, Shinichi; Ueyama, Hisao; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Ohji, Masahito

    2007-10-12

    Thirty-nine missense mutations, which had been identified in rod monochromacy or related disorders, in the CNGA3 subunit of cone photoreceptor cGMP-gated channels were analyzed. HEK293 cells were transfected with cDNA of the human CNGA3 subunit harboring each of these mutations in an expression vector. Patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that 32 of the 39 mutants did not show cGMP-activated current, suggesting that these 32 mutations cause a loss of function of the channels. From the remaining 7 mutants that showed cGMP-activated current, two mutations in the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, T565M or E593K, were further studied. The half-maximal activating concentration (K(1/2)) for cGMP in the homomeric CNGA3-T565M channels (160microM) was 17.8-fold higher than that of the homomeric wild-type CNGA3 channels (9.0microM). Conversely, the K(1/2) for cGMP in the homomeric CNGA3-E593K channels (3.0microM) was 3-fold lower than that of the homomeric wild-type CNGA3 channels. These results suggest that the T565M and E593K mutations alter the apparent affinity for cGMP of the channels to cause cone dysfunction, resulting in rod monochromacy. PMID:17693388

  12. The combination of new missense mutation with [A(TA)7TAA] dinucleotide repeat in UGT1A1 gene promoter causes Gilbert's syndrome.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Rosalia; Rinaldi, Carmela; Donato, Luigi; Nicocia, Giacomo; Sidoti, Antonina

    2015-01-01

    Gilbert's syndrome is a benign form of unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by reduction of hepatic activity of bilirubin glucuronosyltranferase. The most common genotype of Gilbert's syndrome is the homozygous polymorphism [A(TA)7TAA] in the promoter of the gene for UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1), which results in a decrease in UGT1A1 activity. However, individuals with normal bilirubin levels and no clinical symptoms of Gilbert's syndrome may also present this in a homozygous condition. By direct sequencing, we performed UGT1A1 gene analysis on a 31-year-old man with Gilbert's syndrome and homozygous for [A(TA)7TAA], and on his parents. Two UGT1A1 mutations were identified. Both mutations were inherited from each of the two parents, both with normal levels of bilirubin. One of the two mutations, c.993 (p.Q331H), is a missense mutation and is predicted to have a deleterious effect on protein functionality. Given the importance for clinicians to consider the Gilbert genotype in cases with unexplained indirect hyperbilirubinemia, the case we report may add a new variant to the spectrum of mutations of Gilbert's syndrome. PMID:25887876

  13. Molecular characterization of minor gene rearrangements in Finnish patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: identification of two common missense mutations (Gly823-->Asp and Leu380-->His) and eight rare mutations of the LDL receptor gene.

    PubMed Central

    Koivisto, U M; Viikari, J S; Kontula, K

    1995-01-01

    Two deletions of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene were previously shown to account for about two thirds of all mutations causing familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Finland. We screened the DNA samples from a cohort representing the remaining 30% of Finnish heterozygous FH patients by amplifying all the 18 exons of the receptor gene by PCR and searching for DNA variations with the SSCP technique. Ten novel mutations were identified, comprising two nonsense and seven missense mutations as well as one frameshift mutation caused by a 13-bp deletion. A single nucleotide change, substituting adenine for guanidine at position 2533 and resulting in an amino acid change of glycine to aspartic acid at codon 823, was found in DNA samples from 14 unrelated FH probands. This mutation (FH-Turku) affects the sequence encoding the putative basolateral sorting signal of the LDL receptor protein; however, the exact functional consequences of this mutation are yet to be examined. The FH-Turku gene and another point mutation (Leu380-->His or FH-Pori) together account for approximately 8% of the FH-causing genes in Finland and are particularly common among FH patients from the southwestern part of the country (combined, 30%). Primer-introduced restriction analysis was applied for convenient assay of the FH-Turku and FH-Pori point mutations. In conclusion, this paper demonstrates the unique genetic background of FH in Finland and describes a commonly occurring FH gene with a missense mutation closest to the C terminus thus far reported. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:7573037

  14. A Missense Mutation of the Gene Encoding Synaptic Vesicle Glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) Confers Seizure Susceptibility by Disrupting Amygdalar Synaptic GABA Release

    PubMed Central

    Tokudome, Kentaro; Okumura, Takahiro; Terada, Ryo; Shimizu, Saki; Kunisawa, Naofumi; Mashimo, Tomoji; Serikawa, Tadao; Sasa, Masashi; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) is specifically expressed in the membranes of synaptic vesicles and modulates action potential-dependent neurotransmitter release. To explore the role of SV2A in the pathogenesis of epileptic disorders, we recently generated a novel rat model (Sv2aL174Q rat) carrying a missense mutation of the Sv2a gene and showed that the Sv2aL174Q rats were hypersensitive to kindling development (Tokudome et al., 2016). Here, we further conducted behavioral and neurochemical studies to clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the seizure vulnerability in Sv2aL174Q rats. Sv2aL174Q rats were highly susceptible to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, yielding a significantly higher seizure scores and seizure incidence than the control animals. Brain mapping analysis of Fos expression, a biological marker of neural excitation, revealed that the seizure threshold level of PTZ region-specifically elevated Fos expression in the amygdala in Sv2aL174Q rats. In vivo microdialysis study showed that the Sv2aL174Q mutation preferentially reduced high K+ (depolarization)-evoked GABA release, but not glutamate release, in the amygdala. In addition, specific control of GABA release by SV2A was supported by its predominant expression in GABAergic neurons, which were co-stained with antibodies against SV2A and glutamate decarboxylase 1. The present results suggest that dysfunction of SV2A by the missense mutation elevates seizure susceptibility in rats by preferentially disrupting synaptic GABA release in the amygdala, illustrating the crucial role of amygdalar SV2A-GABAergic system in epileptogenesis. PMID:27471467

  15. A Missense Mutation of the Gene Encoding Synaptic Vesicle Glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) Confers Seizure Susceptibility by Disrupting Amygdalar Synaptic GABA Release.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Kentaro; Okumura, Takahiro; Terada, Ryo; Shimizu, Saki; Kunisawa, Naofumi; Mashimo, Tomoji; Serikawa, Tadao; Sasa, Masashi; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A (SV2A) is specifically expressed in the membranes of synaptic vesicles and modulates action potential-dependent neurotransmitter release. To explore the role of SV2A in the pathogenesis of epileptic disorders, we recently generated a novel rat model (Sv2a(L174Q) rat) carrying a missense mutation of the Sv2a gene and showed that the Sv2a(L174Q) rats were hypersensitive to kindling development (Tokudome et al., 2016). Here, we further conducted behavioral and neurochemical studies to clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the seizure vulnerability in Sv2a(L174Q) rats. Sv2a(L174Q) rats were highly susceptible to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, yielding a significantly higher seizure scores and seizure incidence than the control animals. Brain mapping analysis of Fos expression, a biological marker of neural excitation, revealed that the seizure threshold level of PTZ region-specifically elevated Fos expression in the amygdala in Sv2a(L174Q) rats. In vivo microdialysis study showed that the Sv2a(L174Q) mutation preferentially reduced high K(+) (depolarization)-evoked GABA release, but not glutamate release, in the amygdala. In addition, specific control of GABA release by SV2A was supported by its predominant expression in GABAergic neurons, which were co-stained with antibodies against SV2A and glutamate decarboxylase 1. The present results suggest that dysfunction of SV2A by the missense mutation elevates seizure susceptibility in rats by preferentially disrupting synaptic GABA release in the amygdala, illustrating the crucial role of amygdalar SV2A-GABAergic system in epileptogenesis. PMID:27471467

  16. A novel missense RAG-1 mutation results in T-B-NK+ SCID in Athabascan-speaking Dine Indians from the Canadian Northwest Territories.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zheng; Yannone, Steven M; Dunn, Elizabeth; Cowan, Morton J

    2009-02-01

    DNA double-strand repair factors in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway resolve DNA double-strand breaks introduced by the recombination-activating gene (RAG) proteins during V(D)J recombination of T and B lymphocyte receptor genes. Defective NHEJ and subsequent failure of V(D)J recombination leads to severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). We originally linked T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID in Athabascan-speaking Native Americans in the Southwestern US and Northwest Territories of Canada to chromosome 10. However, despite a common ancestry, the null mutation in the Artemis gene that we found to be causal in the SCID among the Navajo and Apache Indians was not present in the Dine Indians in the Northwest Territories. We now report a novel homozygous missense mutation (R776W) in RAG-1 in three children with T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID from two related families of Athabascan-speaking Dine Indians in the Canadian Northwest Territories. As expected, we found no increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation in patient fibroblasts. The impaired activity of this RAG-1 mutant in V(D)J recombination was confirmed by the EGFP-based V(D)J recombination assays. Overexpression of wild type RAG-1 in patient fibroblasts complemented V(D)J recombination, with recovery of both coding and signal joint formation. Our results indicate that the novel R776W missense mutation in RAG-1 is causal in the T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID phenotype in Athabascan-speaking Dine Indians from the Canadian Northwest Territories. PMID:18701881

  17. A missense mutation in desmin tail domain linked to human dilated cardiomyopathy promotes cleavage of the head domain and abolishes its Z-disc localization

    PubMed Central

    Mavroidis, Manolis; Panagopoulou, Panagiota; Kostavasili, Ioanna; Weisleder, Noah; Capetanaki, Yassemi

    2008-01-01

    A missense mutation (Ile 451 to Met) at the tail domain of the muscle-specific intermediate filament protein desmin has been suggested to be a genetic cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. The Ile451Met mutation is located inside a conserved motif in the desmin tail domain, believed to have a potential role in the lateral packing of type III intermediate filaments. Nevertheless, the role of the type III intermediate filament tail domain remains elusive. To further study the role of this domain in the function of cardiomyocytes and in the development of cardiomyopathy, we generated transgenic mice expressing the mutant desmin(I451M) in the cardiac tissue. Analysis of hearts from transgenic animals revealed that mutant desmin loses its Z-disc localization but it can still associate with the intercalated discs, which, however, have an altered architecture, resembling other examples of dilated cardiomyoplathy. This is the first report demonstrating a critical role of the desmin head and tail domains in the formation of the IF scaffold around Z discs. It is further suggested that in cardiomyocytes, an interplay between desmin tail and head domains is taking place, which potentially protects the amino terminus of desmin from specific proteases. The fact that the association with intercalated discs seems unchanged suggests that this association must take place through the desmin tail, in contrast to the head domain that is most possibly involved in the Z-disc binding.—Mavroidis, M., Panagopoulou, P., Kostavasili, I., Weisleder, N., Capetanaki, Y. A missense mutation in desmin tail domain linked to human dilated cardiomyopathy promotes cleavage of the head domain and abolishes its Z-disc localization. PMID:18539904

  18. Novel ATRX gene damaging missense mutation c.6740A>C segregates with profound to severe intellectual deficiency without alpha thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Bouazzi, Habib; Thakur, Seema; Trujillo, Carlos; Alwasiyah, Mohammad Khalid; Munnich, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: ATRX is a recessive X-linked intellectual deficiency (X-LID) gene causing predominately alpha-thalassaemia with a wide and clinically heterogeneous spectrum of intellectual deficiency syndromes. Although alpha-thalassaemia is commonly present, some patients do not express this sign despite the ATRX gene being altered. Most pathological mutations have been localized in two different major domains, the helicase and the plant homeo-domain (PHD)-like domain. In this study we examined a family of three males having an X-linked mental deficiency and developmental delay, and tried to establish a genetic diagnosis while discussing and comparing the phenotype of our patients to those reported in the literature. Methods: Three related males with intellectual deficiency underwent clinical investigations. We performed a karyotype analysis, CGH-array, linkage study, and X-exome sequencing in the index case to identify the genetic origin of this disorder. The X-inactivation study was carried out in the mother and Sanger sequencing was achieved in all family members to confirm the mutation. Results: A novel ATRX gene missense mutation (p.His2247Pro) was identified in a family of two uncles and their nephew manifesting intellectual deficiency and specific facial features without alpha-thalassaemia. The mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. It segregated with the pathological phenotype. The mother and her two daughters were found to be heterozygous. Interpretation & conclusions: The novel mutation c.6740A>C was identified within the ATRX gene helicase domain and confirmed by Sanger sequencing in the three affected males as well as in the mother and her two daughters. This mutation was predicted to be damaging and deleterious. The novel mutation segregated with the phenotype without alpha-thalassaemia and with non-skewed X chromosome. PMID:26997013

  19. Missense mutations that cause Van der Woude syndrome and popliteal pterygium syndrome affect the DNA-binding and transcriptional activation functions of IRF6.

    PubMed

    Little, Hayley J; Rorick, Nicholas K; Su, Ling-I; Baldock, Clair; Malhotra, Saimon; Jowitt, Tom; Gakhar, Lokesh; Subramanian, Ramaswamy; Schutte, Brian C; Dixon, Michael J; Shore, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) are common disorders that occur either as part of a syndrome, where structures other than the lip and palate are affected, or in the absence of other anomalies. Van der Woude syndrome (VWS) and popliteal pterygium syndrome (PPS) are autosomal dominant disorders characterized by combinations of cleft lip, CLP, lip pits, skin-folds, syndactyly and oral adhesions which arise as the result of mutations in interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6). IRF6 belongs to a family of transcription factors that share a highly conserved N-terminal, DNA-binding domain and a less well-conserved protein-binding domain. To date, mutation analyses have suggested a broad genotype-phenotype correlation in which missense and nonsense mutations occurring throughout IRF6 may cause VWS; in contrast, PPS-causing mutations are highly associated with the DNA-binding domain, and appear to preferentially affect residues that are predicted to interact directly with the DNA. Nevertheless, this genotype-phenotype correlation is based on the analysis of structural models rather than on the investigation of the DNA-binding properties of IRF6. Moreover, the effects of mutations in the protein interaction domain have not been analysed. In the current investigation, we have determined the sequence to which IRF6 binds and used this sequence to analyse the effect of VWS- and PPS-associated mutations in the DNA-binding domain of IRF6. In addition, we have demonstrated that IRF6 functions as a co-operative transcriptional activator and that mutations in the protein interaction domain of IRF6 disrupt this activity. PMID:19036739

  20. A Spontaneous Missense Mutation in Branched Chain Keto Acid Dehydrogenase Kinase in the Rat Affects Both the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems.

    PubMed

    Zigler, J Samuel; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Wright, Megan; Klise, Andrew; Sundin, Olof; Broman, Karl W; Hejtmancik, Fielding; Huang, Hao; Patek, Bonnie; Sergeev, Yuri; Hose, Stacey; Brayton, Cory; Xaiodong, Jiao; Vasquez, David; Maragakis, Nicholas; Mori, Susumu; Goldman, David; Hoke, Ahmet; Sinha, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    A novel mutation, causing a phenotype we named frogleg because its most obvious characteristic is a severe splaying of the hind limbs, arose spontaneously in a colony of Sprague-Dawley rats. Frogleg is a complex phenotype that includes abnormalities in hind limb function, reduced brain weight with dilated ventricles and infertility. Using micro-satellite markers spanning the entire rat genome, the mutation was mapped to a region of rat chromosome 1 between D1Rat131 and D1Rat287. Analysis of whole genome sequencing data within the linkage interval, identified a missense mutation in the branched-chain alpha-keto dehydrogenase kinase (Bckdk) gene. The protein encoded by Bckdk is an integral part of an enzyme complex located in the mitochondrial matrix of many tissues which regulates the levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine and valine. BCAAs are essential amino acids (not synthesized by the body), and circulating levels must be tightly regulated; levels that are too high or too low are both deleterious. BCKDK phosphorylates Ser293 of the E1α subunit of the BCKDH protein, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the catabolism of the BCAAs, inhibiting BCKDH and thereby, limiting breakdown of the BCAAs. In contrast, when Ser293 is not phosphorylated, BCKDH activity is unchecked and the levels of the BCAAs will decrease dramatically. The mutation is located within the kinase domain of Bckdk and is predicted to be damaging. Consistent with this, we show that in rats homozygous for the mutation, phosphorylation of BCKDH in the brain is markedly decreased relative to wild type or heterozygous littermates. Further, circulating levels of the BCAAs are reduced by 70-80% in animals homozygous for the mutation. The frogleg phenotype shares important characteristics with a previously described Bckdk knockout mouse and with human subjects with Bckdk mutations. In addition, we report novel data regarding peripheral neuropathy of the hind limbs

  1. A Spontaneous Missense Mutation in Branched Chain Keto Acid Dehydrogenase Kinase in the Rat Affects Both the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zigler, J. Samuel; Hodgkinson, Colin A.; Wright, Megan; Klise, Andrew; Broman, Karl W.; Huang, Hao; Patek, Bonnie; Sergeev, Yuri; Hose, Stacey; Xaiodong, Jiao; Vasquez, David; Maragakis, Nicholas; Mori, Susumu; Goldman, David; Sinha, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    A novel mutation, causing a phenotype we named frogleg because its most obvious characteristic is a severe splaying of the hind limbs, arose spontaneously in a colony of Sprague-Dawley rats. Frogleg is a complex phenotype that includes abnormalities in hind limb function, reduced brain weight with dilated ventricles and infertility. Using micro-satellite markers spanning the entire rat genome, the mutation was mapped to a region of rat chromosome 1 between D1Rat131 and D1Rat287. Analysis of whole genome sequencing data within the linkage interval, identified a missense mutation in the branched-chain alpha-keto dehydrogenase kinase (Bckdk) gene. The protein encoded by Bckdk is an integral part of an enzyme complex located in the mitochondrial matrix of many tissues which regulates the levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine and valine. BCAAs are essential amino acids (not synthesized by the body), and circulating levels must be tightly regulated; levels that are too high or too low are both deleterious. BCKDK phosphorylates Ser293 of the E1α subunit of the BCKDH protein, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the catabolism of the BCAAs, inhibiting BCKDH and thereby, limiting breakdown of the BCAAs. In contrast, when Ser293 is not phosphorylated, BCKDH activity is unchecked and the levels of the BCAAs will decrease dramatically. The mutation is located within the kinase domain of Bckdk and is predicted to be damaging. Consistent with this, we show that in rats homozygous for the mutation, phosphorylation of BCKDH in the brain is markedly decreased relative to wild type or heterozygous littermates. Further, circulating levels of the BCAAs are reduced by 70–80% in animals homozygous for the mutation. The frogleg phenotype shares important characteristics with a previously described Bckdk knockout mouse and with human subjects with Bckdk mutations. In addition, we report novel data regarding peripheral neuropathy of the hind limbs

  2. A Spontaneous Missense Mutation in Branched Chain Keto Acid Dehydrogenase Kinase in the Rat Affects Both the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems.

    PubMed

    Zigler, J Samuel; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Wright, Megan; Klise, Andrew; Sundin, Olof; Broman, Karl W; Hejtmancik, Fielding; Huang, Hao; Patek, Bonnie; Sergeev, Yuri; Hose, Stacey; Brayton, Cory; Xaiodong, Jiao; Vasquez, David; Maragakis, Nicholas; Mori, Susumu; Goldman, David; Hoke, Ahmet; Sinha, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    A novel mutation, causing a phenotype we named frogleg because its most obvious characteristic is a severe splaying of the hind limbs, arose spontaneously in a colony of Sprague-Dawley rats. Frogleg is a complex phenotype that includes abnormalities in hind limb function, reduced brain weight with dilated ventricles and infertility. Using micro-satellite markers spanning the entire rat genome, the mutation was mapped to a region of rat chromosome 1 between D1Rat131 and D1Rat287. Analysis of whole genome sequencing data within the linkage interval, identified a missense mutation in the branched-chain alpha-keto dehydrogenase kinase (Bckdk) gene. The protein encoded by Bckdk is an integral part of an enzyme complex located in the mitochondrial matrix of many tissues which regulates the levels of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), leucine, isoleucine and valine. BCAAs are essential amino acids (not synthesized by the body), and circulating levels must be tightly regulated; levels that are too high or too low are both deleterious. BCKDK phosphorylates Ser293 of the E1α subunit of the BCKDH protein, which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the catabolism of the BCAAs, inhibiting BCKDH and thereby, limiting breakdown of the BCAAs. In contrast, when Ser293 is not phosphorylated, BCKDH activity is unchecked and the levels of the BCAAs will decrease dramatically. The mutation is located within the kinase domain of Bckdk and is predicted to be damaging. Consistent with this, we show that in rats homozygous for the mutation, phosphorylation of BCKDH in the brain is markedly decreased relative to wild type or heterozygous littermates. Further, circulating levels of the BCAAs are reduced by 70-80% in animals homozygous for the mutation. The frogleg phenotype shares important characteristics with a previously described Bckdk knockout mouse and with human subjects with Bckdk mutations. In addition, we report novel data regarding peripheral neuropathy of the hind limbs.

  3. Genomic strategy identifies a missense mutation in WD-repeat domain 65 (WDR65) in an individual with Van der Woude syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Nicholas K; Kinoshita, Akira; Weirather, Jason L; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; de Lima, Renata L L Ferreira; Dunnwald, Martine; Shanske, Alan L; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Koillinen, Hannele; Kere, Juha; Mansilla, Maria A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Goudy, Steve L; Schutte, Brian C

    2011-06-01

    Genetic variation in the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) causes and contributes risk for oral clefting disorders. We hypothesized that genes regulated by IRF6 are also involved in oral clefting disorders. We used five criteria to identify potential IRF6 target genes; differential gene expression in skin taken from wild-type and Irf6-deficient murine embryos, localization to the Van der Woude syndrome 2 (VWS2) locus at 1p36-1p32, overlapping expression with Irf6, presence of a conserved predicted-binding site in the promoter region, and a mutant murine phenotype that was similar to the Irf6 mutant mouse. Previously, we observed altered expression for 573 genes; 13 were located in the murine region syntenic to the VWS2 locus. Two of these genes, Wdr65 and Stratifin, met 4 of 5 criteria. Wdr65 was a novel gene that encoded a predicted protein of 1,250 amino acids with two WD domains. As potential targets for Irf6 regulation, we hypothesized that disease-causing mutations will be found in WDR65 and Stratifin in individuals with VWS or VWS-like syndromes. We identified a potentially etiologic missense mutation in WDR65 in a person with VWS who does not have an exonic mutation in IRF6. The expression and mutation data were consistent with the hypothesis that WDR65 was a novel gene involved in oral clefting. PMID:21574244

  4. A missense mutation in the PISA domain of HsSAS-6 causes autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in a large consanguineous Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muzammil A; Rupp, Verena M; Orpinell, Meritxell; Hussain, Muhammad S; Altmüller, Janine; Steinmetz, Michel O; Enzinger, Christian; Thiele, Holger; Höhne, Wolfgang; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Baig, Shahid M; Ansar, Muhammad; Nürnberg, Peter; Vincent, John B; Speicher, Michael R; Gönczy, Pierre; Windpassinger, Christian

    2014-11-15

    Asymmetric cell division is essential for normal human brain development. Mutations in several genes encoding centrosomal proteins that participate in accurate cell division have been reported to cause autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH). By homozygosity mapping including three affected individuals from a consanguineous MCPH family from Pakistan, we delineated a critical region of 18.53 Mb on Chromosome 1p21.3-1p13.1. This region contains the gene encoding HsSAS-6, a centrosomal protein primordial for seeding the formation of new centrioles during the cell cycle. Both next-generation and Sanger sequencing revealed a homozygous c.185T>C missense mutation in the HsSAS-6 gene, resulting in a p.Ile62Thr substitution within a highly conserved region of the PISA domain of HsSAS-6. This variant is neither present in any single-nucleotide polymorphism or exome sequencing databases nor in a Pakistani control cohort. Experiments in tissue culture cells revealed that the Ile62Thr mutant of HsSAS-6 is substantially less efficient than the wild-type protein in sustaining centriole formation. Together, our findings demonstrate a dramatic impact of the mutation p.Ile62Thr on HsSAS-6 function and add this component to the list of genes mutated in primary microcephaly.

  5. A Missense Mutation in CLIC2 Associated with Intellectual Disability is Predicted by In Silico Modeling to Affect Protein Stability and Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Witham, Shawn; Takano, Kyoko; Schwartz, Charles; Alexov, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale next generation resequencing of X chromosome genes identified a missense mutation in the CLIC2 gene on Xq28 in a male with X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) and not found in healthy individuals. At the same time, numerous nsSNPs (nonsynonomous SNP) have been reported in the CLIC2 gene in healthy individuals indicating that the CLIC2 protein can tolerate amino acid substitutions and be fully functional. To test the possibility that p.H101Q is a disease-causing mutation, we performed in silico simulations to calculate the effects of the p.H101Q mutation on CLIC2 stability, dynamics and ionization states while comparing the effects obtained for presumably harmless nsSNPs. It was found that p.H101Q, in contrast with other nsSNPs, (a) lessens the flexibility of the joint loop which is important for the normal function of CLIC2, (b) makes the overall 3D structure of CLIC2 more stable and thus reduces the possibility of the large conformational change expected to occur when CLIC2 moves from a soluble to membrane form and (c) removes the positively charged residue, H101, which may be important for the membrane association of CLIC2. The results of in silico modeling, in conjunction with the polymorphism analysis, suggest that p.H101Q may be a disease-causing mutation, the first one suggested in the CLIC family. PMID:21630357

  6. Evolution- and structure-based computational strategy reveals the impact of deleterious missense mutations on MODY 2 (maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 2).

    PubMed

    George, Doss C Priya; Chakraborty, Chiranjib; Haneef, S A Syed; Nagasundaram, Nagarajan; Chen, Luonan; Zhu, Hailong

    2014-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the central glycolytic enzyme glucokinase (GCK) can result in an autosomal dominant inherited disease, namely maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 2 (MODY 2). MODY 2 is characterised by early onset: it usually appears before 25 years of age and presents as a mild form of hyperglycaemia. In recent years, the number of known GCK mutations has markedly increased. As a result, interpreting which mutations cause a disease or confer susceptibility to a disease and characterising these deleterious mutations can be a difficult task in large-scale analyses and may be impossible when using a structural perspective. The laborious and time-consuming nature of the experimental analysis led us to attempt to develop a cost-effective computational pipeline for diabetic research that is based on the fundamentals of protein biophysics and that facilitates our understanding of the relationship between phenotypic effects and evolutionary processes. In this study, we investigate missense mutations in the GCK gene by using a wide array of evolution- and structure-based computational methods, such as SIFT, PolyPhen2, PhD-SNP, SNAP, SNPs&GO, fathmm, and Align GVGD. Based on the computational prediction scores obtained using these methods, three mutations, namely E70K, A188T, and W257R, were identified as highly deleterious on the basis of their effects on protein structure and function. Using the evolutionary conservation predictors Consurf and Scorecons, we further demonstrated that most of the predicted deleterious mutations, including E70K, A188T, and W257R, occur in highly conserved regions of GCK. The effects of the mutations on protein stability were computed using PoPMusic 2.1, I-mutant 3.0, and Dmutant. We also conducted molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis through in silico modelling to investigate the conformational differences between the native and the mutant proteins and found that the identified deleterious mutations alter the stability

  7. Structure of the human glucokinase gene and identification of a missense mutation in a Japanese patient with early-onset non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    SciTech Connect

    Sakura, Hiroshi; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ueno, Hirohisa; Yazaki, Yoshio; Kadowaki, Takashi ); Kadowaki, Hiroko; Simokawa, Kotaro; Akanuma, Yasuo ); Koda, Naoya; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu )

    1992-12-01

    Glucokinase is thought to play a glucose-sensor role in the pancreas, and abnormalities in its structure, function, and regulation can induce diabetes. The authors isolated the human glucokinase gene, and determined its genomic structure including exon-intron boundaries. Structure of the glucokinase gene in human was very similar to that in rat. Then, by screening Japanese diabetic patients using polymerase chain reaction - single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and direct-sequencing strategies, they identified a missense mutation substituting ariginine (AGG) for glycine (GGG) at position 261 in exon 7 of the glucokinase gene in a patient with early-onset non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM). 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. A novel missense mutation in the C2C domain of otoferlin causes profound hearing impairment in an Omani family with auditory neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wardy, Nadia M.; Al-Kindi, Mohammed N.; Al-Khabouri, Mazin J.; Tamimi, Yahya; van Camp, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify genetic defects in an Omani family diagnosed with deafness. Methods: A cross-sectional association study was conducted at the Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sultan Qaboos University, Al-Khoud, Oman and the Centre of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium between August 2010 and September 2014. Microsatellites markers for nine non-syndromic genes were used to genotype the defective locus using the extracted DNA from family members. Sanger sequencing method was used to identify the disease causative mutation. Eazy linkage 5.05 was used to calculate the logarithm of odds score. Lasergene suite was used to detect the mutation position, and Phyre2, SMART, Rasmol, and GOR IV were used to predict the effects of the defect on protein structure and function. Results: The disease was linked to markers located on chromosome-2 and covering the OTOF (DFNB9) gene. A novel missense mutation that changed nucleotide C to G at position c.1469 and consequently the amino acid Proline to Arginine (P490R) on exon 15 was detected. Protein modeling analysis revealed the impact of the mutation on protein structure and the relevant C2C domain. The mutation seems to create a new protein isoform homologous to the complement component C1q. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the mutation found in C2C domain of the OTOF gene is likely to cause deafness in the studied family reflecting the importance of C2 domains of otoferlin in hearing loss. PMID:27652356

  9. A novel FBN1 missense mutation (p.C102Y) associated with ectopia lentis syndrome in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yi; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Ya-Nan; Li, Jin-Yu; Yu, Yin-Hui; Lai, Kai-Ran; Yao, Ke

    2015-01-01

    AIM To characterize the disease-causing mutations in a Chinese family with ectopia lentis syndrome (ELS). METHODS Patients and their family members were given complete physical, ophthalmic, and cardiovascular examinations. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from the peripheral blood of the pedigree members and 100 healthy controls. Mutation screening was performed in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene by bi-directional sequencing of the amplified products. The mutation was analyzed using two bioinformatics methods. RESULTS A novel heterozygous c.305G>A mutation in exon 3 of FBN1 was detected. As a result of this change, a highly conserved cysteine residue was replaced by a tyrosine residue (p.C102Y). Another mutation was found in the same exon (c.303T>C), which did not change the amino acid sequence. Both mutations were discovered in each affected individual, but not in the unaffected family members, or in 100 ethnically matched controls. A bioinformatics analysis predicted that mutation p.C102Y would affect protein function. CONCLUSION In the first epidermal growth factor-like module, we identified a novel FBN1 mutation (p.C102Y), which caused ELS in the family. Our study presented a unique phenotype, including some distinct ophthalmic findings, such as hypoplasia of the iris and anisometropia. Our results expanded the mutation spectrum of FBN1 and enriched the overall knowledge of genotype-phenotype correlations due to FBN1 mutations. PMID:26558191

  10. A novel missense KIT mutation causing piebaldism in one Chinese family associated with café-au-lait macules and intertriginous freckling.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wei-Xue; Xiao, Xue-Min; Wu, Jian-Bing; Ma, Yi-Ping; Ge, Yi-Ping; Li, Qi; Mao, Qiu-Xia; Li, Cheng-Rang

    2015-01-01

    Piebaldism is a rare autosomal dominant genodermatosis, manifesting as congenital and stable depigmentation of the skin and white forelock. It has been found to be associated with mutations in the KIT or SLUG genes. We report a Chinese piebaldism family including a 28-year-old woman and her 3-year-old son with characteristics of white patches and forelock associated with numerous brown macules and patches. Genomic DNA samples of the proband and her son were extracted from their peripheral blood. One hundred unrelated healthy individuals were used as controls. All coding regions of KIT, SLUG, and NF1 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using exon flanking intronic primers and Sanger sequencings were performed. DNA sequencing revealed heterozygous missense c.2431T>G mutation in exon 17 of the KIT gene in the proband and the affected son. No potentially pathogenic variant was identified in SLUG or NF1 genes. The nucleotide substitution was not found in 100 unrelated control individuals. This study reveals a novel KIT mutation in piebaldism, and it further supports that café-au-lait macules and intertriginous freckling of piebaldism are parts of pigmented anomaly in piebaldism, which does not necessarily represent coexistence of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).

  11. SM2PH-db: an interactive system for the integrated analysis of phenotypic consequences of missense mutations in proteins involved in human genetic diseases.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Anne; Garnier, Nicolas; Gagnière, Nicolas; Nguyen, Hoan; Albou, Laurent-Philippe; Biancalana, Valérie; Bettler, Emmanuel; Deléage, Gilbert; Lecompte, Odile; Muller, Jean; Moras, Dino; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Toursel, Thierry; Moulinier, Luc; Poch, Olivier

    2010-02-01

    Understanding how genetic alterations affect gene products at the molecular level represents a first step in the elucidation of the complex relationships between genotypic and phenotypic variations, and is thus a major challenge in the postgenomic era. Here, we present SM2PH-db (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/sm2ph), a new database designed to investigate structural and functional impacts of missense mutations and their phenotypic effects in the context of human genetic diseases. A wealth of up-to-date interconnected information is provided for each of the 2,249 disease-related entry proteins (August 2009), including data retrieved from biological databases and data generated from a Sequence-Structure-Evolution Inference in Systems-based approach, such as multiple alignments, three-dimensional structural models, and multidimensional (physicochemical, functional, structural, and evolutionary) characterizations of mutations. SM2PH-db provides a robust infrastructure associated with interactive analysis tools supporting in-depth study and interpretation of the molecular consequences of mutations, with the more long-term goal of elucidating the chain of events leading from a molecular defect to its pathology. The entire content of SM2PH-db is regularly and automatically updated thanks to a computational grid data federation facilities provided in the context of the Decrypthon program.

  12. 250K SNP array karyotyping identifies acquired uniparental disomy and homozygous mutations, including novel missense substitutions of c-Cbl, in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, Andrew J.; Gondek, Lukasz P.; O’Keefe, Christine L.; Makishima, Hideki; Rataul, Manjot S.; Szpurka, Hadrian; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Wang, Xiao Fei; McDevitt, Michael A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.

    2009-01-01

    Two types of acquired loss of heterozygosity are possible in cancer: deletions and copy-neutral uniparental disomy (UPD). Conventionally, copy number losses are identified using metaphase cytogenetics while detection of UPD is accomplished by microsatellite and copy number analysis and as such, is not often used clinically. Recently, introduction of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays have allowed for the systematic and sensitive detection of UPD in hematological malignancies and other cancers. In this study, we have applied 250K SNP array technology to detect previously cryptic chromosomal changes, particularly UPD, in a cohort of 301 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), overlap MDS/myeloproliferative disorders (MPD), MPD, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We show that UPD is a common chromosomal defect in myeloid malignancies, particularly in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML; 48%) and MDS/MPD-unclassifiable (38%). Furthermore, we demonstrate that mapping minimally overlapping segmental UPD regions can help target the search for both known and unknown pathogenic mutations, including newly identified missense mutations in the proto-oncogene c-Cbl in 7/12 patients with UPD11q. Acquired mutations of c-Cbl E3 ubiquitin ligase may explain the pathogenesis of a clonal process in a subset of MDS/MPD, including CMML. PMID:19074904

  13. The missense Thr211Pro mutation in the factor X activation peptide of a bleeding patient causes molecular defect in the clotting cascade.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiulan; Shen, Yiping; Yang, Likui; Wang, Xuefeng; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2013-07-01

    Factor X (FX) is a vitamin K-dependent coagulation zymogen, which upon activation to factor Xa assembles into the prothrombinase complex to activate prothrombin to thrombin. FX can be activated by either factor VIIa-tissue factor or factor IXa-factor VIIIa in extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, respectively. In this study, we identified a bleeding patient with moderate FX deficiency who exhibits a clotting defect only in the intrinsic pathway. Exome sequencing revealed that the patient carries a novel homozygous missense mutation that results in substitution of Thr211 with Pro in the activation peptide of FX. Thr211 is the site of an O-linked glycosylation in the activation peptide of FX. We postulated that the lack of this post-translational modification specifically impacts the activation of FX by intrinsic Xase, thereby impairing thrombin generation in the subject. To test this hypothesis, we expressed both wild-type FX and FX containing this mutation in mammalian cells and following the purification of the zymogens to homogeneity characterized their properties in both purified and plasma-based assay systems. Analysis of the results suggests that Thr211 to Pro substitution renders the FX mutant a poor substrate for both physiological activators, however, at physiological concentration of the substrate, the clotting defect manifest itself only in the intrinsic pathway, thus explaining the bleeding phenotype for the patient carrying this mutation. PMID:23677006

  14. A heparin binding site Arg79Cys missense mutation in the SERPINC1 gene in a Korean patient with hereditary antithrombin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jong-Ha; Maeng, Ho-Young; Kim, Hee-Jin; Lee, Kyung-A; Choi, Jong-Rak; Song, Jaewoo

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of heparin binding site Arg79Cys mutation in the gene encoding antithrombin, SERPINC1, in a Korean patient with hereditary antithrombin (AT) deficiency. The patient was a 34-year-old Korean man who presented with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in his right leg without precipitating factors. On outpatient evaluation, coagulation tests without anticoagulation revealed a decreased AT III activity level at 48%, but normal AT III antigen level at 103%, indicating type II AT deficiency. Family studies revealed that his father (62 years of age) had decreased AT activity (48%) but had normal AT antigen levels (116%), indicating that the proband had a paternally inherited type II AT deficiency. Direct sequencing of the SERPINC1 gene in the patient and his father revealed a heterozygotic missense mutation, a cytosine to thymine substitution at nucleotide position 235 in exon 2 of the SERPINC1 gene (p.Arg79Cys). To our knowledge, this is the first report of Arg79Cys heterozygote mutation in family members with venous thromboembolism.

  15. A Missense Mutation in a Highly Conserved Region of CASQ2 Is Associated with Autosomal Recessive Catecholamine-Induced Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia in Bedouin Families from Israel

    PubMed Central

    Lahat, Hadas; Pras, Elon; Olender, Tsviya; Avidan, Nili; Ben-Asher, Edna; Man, Orna; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Khoury, Asad; Lorber, Avraham; Goldman, Boleslaw; Lancet, Doron; Eldar, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Catecholamine-induced polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PVT) is characterized by episodes of syncope, seizures, or sudden death, in response to physical activity or emotional stress. Two modes of inheritance have been described: autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive. Mutations in the ryanodine receptor 2 gene (RYR2), which encodes a cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+-release channel, were recently shown to cause the autosomal dominant form of the disease. In the present report, we describe a missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the calsequestrin 2 gene (CASQ2) as the potential cause of the autosomal recessive form. The CASQ2 protein serves as the major Ca2+ reservoir within the SR of cardiac myocytes and is part of a protein complex that contains the ryanodine receptor. The mutation, which is in full segregation in seven Bedouin families affected by the disorder, converts a negatively charged aspartic acid into a positively charged histidine, in a highly negatively charged domain, and is likely to exert its deleterious effect by disrupting Ca2+ binding. PMID:11704930

  16. The albinism of the feral Asinara white donkeys (Equus asinus) is determined by a missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene deduced protein.

    PubMed

    Utzeri, V J; Bertolini, F; Ribani, A; Schiavo, G; Dall'Olio, S; Fontanesi, L

    2016-02-01

    A feral donkey population (Equus asinus), living in the Asinara National Park (an island north-west of Sardinia, Italy), includes a unique white albino donkey subpopulation or colour morph that is a major attraction of this park. Disrupting mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene are known to cause recessive albinisms in humans (oculocutaneous albinism Type 1; OCA1) and other species. In this study, we analysed the donkey TYR gene as a strong candidate to identify the causative mutation of the albinism of these donkeys. The TYR gene was sequenced from 13 donkeys (seven Asinara white albino and six coloured animals). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. A missense mutation (c.604C>G; p.His202Asp) in a highly conserved amino acid position (even across kingdoms), which disrupts the first copper-binding site (CuA) of functional protein, was identified in the homozygous condition (G/G or D/D) in all Asinara white albino donkeys and in the albino son of a trio (the grey parents had genotype C/G or H/D), supporting the recessive mode of inheritance of this mutation. Genotyping 82 donkeys confirmed that Asinara albino donkeys had genotype G/G whereas all other coloured donkeys had genotype C/C or C/G. Across-population association between the c.604C>G genotypes and the albino coat colour was highly significant (P = 6.17E-18). The identification of the causative mutation of the albinism in the Asinara white donkeys might open new perspectives to study the dynamics of this putative deleterious allele in a feral population and to manage this interesting animal genetic resource. PMID:26763160

  17. A missense mutation in the endothelin-B receptor gene is associated with Lethal White Foal Syndrome: an equine version of Hirschsprung disease.

    PubMed

    Metallinos, D L; Bowling, A T; Rine, J

    1998-06-01

    Lethal White Foal Syndrome is a disease associated with horse breeds that register white coat spotting patterns. Breedings between particular spotted horses, generally described as frame overo, produce some foals that, in contrast to their parents, are all white or nearly all white and die shortly after birth of severe intestinal blockage. These foals have aganglionosis characterized by a lack of submucosal and myenteric ganglia from the distal small intestine to the large intestine, similar to human Hirschsprung Disease. Some sporadic and familial cases of Hirschsprung Disease are due to mutations in the endothelin B receptor gene (EDNRB). In this study, we investigate the role of EDNRB in Lethal White Foal Syndrome. A cDNA for the wild-type horse endothelin-B receptor gene was cloned and sequenced. In three unrelated lethal white foals, the EDNRB gene contained a 2-bp nucleotide change leading to a missense mutation (I118K) in the first transmembrane domain of the receptor, a highly conserved region of this protein among different species. Seven additional unrelated lethal white foal samples were found to be homozygous for this mutation. No other homozygotes were identified in 138 samples analyzed, suggesting that homozygosity was restricted to lethal white foals. All (40/40) horses with the frame overo pattern (a distinct coat color pattern that is a subset of overo horses) that were tested were heterozygous for this allele, defining a heterozygous coat color phenotype for this mutation. Horses with tobiano markings included some carriers, indicating that tobiano is epistatic to frame overo. In addition, horses were identified that were carriers but had no recognized overo coat pattern phenotype, demonstrating the variable penetrance of the mutation. The test for this mutant allele can be utilized in all breeds where heterozygous animals may be unknowingly bred to each other including the Paint Horse, Pinto horse, Quarter Horse, Miniature Horse, and Thoroughbred.

  18. The albinism of the feral Asinara white donkeys (Equus asinus) is determined by a missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene deduced protein.

    PubMed

    Utzeri, V J; Bertolini, F; Ribani, A; Schiavo, G; Dall'Olio, S; Fontanesi, L

    2016-02-01

    A feral donkey population (Equus asinus), living in the Asinara National Park (an island north-west of Sardinia, Italy), includes a unique white albino donkey subpopulation or colour morph that is a major attraction of this park. Disrupting mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene are known to cause recessive albinisms in humans (oculocutaneous albinism Type 1; OCA1) and other species. In this study, we analysed the donkey TYR gene as a strong candidate to identify the causative mutation of the albinism of these donkeys. The TYR gene was sequenced from 13 donkeys (seven Asinara white albino and six coloured animals). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. A missense mutation (c.604C>G; p.His202Asp) in a highly conserved amino acid position (even across kingdoms), which disrupts the first copper-binding site (CuA) of functional protein, was identified in the homozygous condition (G/G or D/D) in all Asinara white albino donkeys and in the albino son of a trio (the grey parents had genotype C/G or H/D), supporting the recessive mode of inheritance of this mutation. Genotyping 82 donkeys confirmed that Asinara albino donkeys had genotype G/G whereas all other coloured donkeys had genotype C/C or C/G. Across-population association between the c.604C>G genotypes and the albino coat colour was highly significant (P = 6.17E-18). The identification of the causative mutation of the albinism in the Asinara white donkeys might open new perspectives to study the dynamics of this putative deleterious allele in a feral population and to manage this interesting animal genetic resource.

  19. A Missense Mutation in the Human Cytochrome b5 Gene causes 46,XY Disorder of Sex Development due to True Isolated 17,20 Lyase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak, Jan; Randell, Tabitha; Dhir, Vivek; Patel, Pushpa; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Taylor, Norman F.; Krone, Nils

    2012-01-01

    Context: Isolated 17,20 lyase deficiency is commonly defined by apparently normal 17α-hydroxylase activity but severely reduced 17,20 lyase activity of the bifunctional enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzyme 17A1 (CYP17A1), resulting in sex steroid deficiency but normal glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid reserve. Cytochrome b5 (CYB5A) is thought to selectively enhance 17,20 lyase activity by facilitating the allosteric interaction of CYP17A1 with its electron donor P450 oxidoreductase (POR). Objective: We investigated a large consanguineous family including three siblings with 46,XY disorder of sex development (DSD) presenting with isolated 17,20 lyase deficiency. Design: We investigated the clinical and biochemical phenotype, conducted genetic analyses, and functionally characterized the identified CYB5A mutation in cell-based CYP17A1 coexpression assays. Results: All three siblings presented with 46,XY DSD, sex steroid deficiency, normal mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids, and a urine steroid metabolome suggestive of isolated 17,20 lyase deficiency. CYP17A1 and POR sequences were normal, but we detected a homozygous CYB5A missense mutation (g.28,400A→T; p.H44L). Functional in vitro analysis revealed normal CYP17A1 17α-hydroxylase activity but severely impaired 17,20 lyase activity. In silico analysis suggested the disruption of CYB5A heme binding by p.H44L. Conclusion: We have identified the first human CYB5A missense mutation as the cause of isolated 17,20 lyase deficiency in three individuals with 46,XY DSD. Detailed review of previously reported cases with apparently isolated 17,20 lyase deficiency due to mutant CYP17A1 and POR reveals impaired 17α-hydroxylase activity as assessed by steroid metabolome analysis and short cosyntropin testing. This suggests that truly isolated 17,20 lyase deficiency is observed only in individuals with inactivating CYB5A mutations. PMID:22170710

  20. A missense mutation (G1506E) in the adhesion G domain of laminin-5 causes mild junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Scaturro, Maria; Posteraro, Patrizia; Mastrogiacomo, Alessandro; Zaccaria, Maria Letizia; De Luca, Naomi; Mazzanti, Cinzia; Zambruno, Giovanna; Castiglia, Daniele

    2003-09-12

    Laminin-5 is the major adhesion ligand for epithelial cells. Mutations in the genes encoding laminin-5 cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), a recessive inherited disease characterized by extensive epithelial-mesenchymal disadhesion. We describe a JEB patient compound heterozygote for two novel mutations in the gene (LAMA3) encoding the laminin alpha3 chain. The maternal mutation (1644delG) generates mRNA transcripts that undergo nonsense-mediated decay. The paternal mutation results in the Gly1506-->Glu substitution (G1506E) within the C-terminal globular region of the alpha3 chain (G domain). Mutation G1506E affects the proper folding of the fourth module of the G domain and results in the retention of most of the mutated polypeptide within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, scant amounts of the mutated laminin-5 are secreted, undergo physiologic extracellular maturation, and correctly localize within the cutaneous basement membrane zone in patient's skin. Our findings represent the first demonstration of an ER-retained mutant laminin-5 leading to a mild JEB phenotype. PMID:12943669

  1. Convergent Evolution of Head Crests in Two Domesticated Columbids Is Associated with Different Missense Mutations in EphB2

    PubMed Central

    Vickrey, Anna I.; Domyan, Eric T.; Horvath, Martin P.; Shapiro, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Head crests are important display structures in wild bird species and are also common in domesticated lineages. Many breeds of domestic rock pigeon (Columba livia) have crests of reversed occipital feathers, and this recessive trait is associated with a nonsynonymous coding mutation in the intracellular kinase domain of EphB2 (Ephrin receptor B2). The domestic ringneck dove (Streptopelia risoria) also has a recessive crested morph with reversed occipital feathers, and interspecific crosses between crested doves and pigeons produce crested offspring, suggesting a similar genetic basis for this trait in both species. We therefore investigated EphB2 as a candidate for the head crest phenotype of ringneck doves and identified a nonsynonymous coding mutation in the intracellular kinase domain that is significantly associated with the crested morph. This mutation is over 100 amino acid positions away from the crest mutation found in rock pigeons, yet both mutations are predicted to negatively affect the function of ATP-binding pocket. Furthermore, bacterial toxicity assays suggest that “crest” mutations in both species severely impact kinase activity. We conclude that head crests are associated with different mutations in the same functional domain of the same gene in two different columbid species, thereby representing striking evolutionary convergence in morphology and molecules. PMID:26104009

  2. Missense and nonsense mutations in melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene of different goat breeds: association with red and black coat colour phenotypes but with unexpected evidences

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Agouti and Extension loci control the relative amount of eumelanin and pheomelanin production in melanocytes that, in turn, affects pigmentation of skin and hair. The Extension locus encodes the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) whose permanent activation, caused by functional mutations, results in black coat colour, whereas other inactivating mutations cause red coat colour in different mammals. Results The whole coding region of the MC1R gene was sequenced in goats of six different breeds showing different coat colours (Girgentana, white cream with usually small red spots in the face; Maltese, white with black cheeks and ears; Derivata di Siria, solid red; Murciano-Granadina, solid black or solid brown; Camosciata delle Alpi, brown with black stripes; Saanen, white; F1 goats and the parental animals). Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified: one nonsense mutation (p.Q225X), three missense mutations (p.A81V, p.F250V, and p.C267W), and one silent mutation. The stop codon at position 225 should cause the production of a shorter MC1R protein whose functionality may be altered. These SNPs were investigated in a larger sample of animals belonging to the six breeds. The Girgentana breed was almost fixed for the p.225X allele. However, there was not complete association between the presence of red spots in the face and the presence of this allele in homozygous condition. The same allele was identified in the Derivata di Siria breed. However, its frequency was only 33%, despite the fact that these animals are completely red. The p.267W allele was present in all Murciano-Granadina black goats, whereas it was never identified in the brown ones. Moreover, the same substitution was present in almost all Maltese goats providing evidence of association between this mutation and black coat colour. Conclusion According to the results obtained in the investigated goat breeds, MC1R mutations may determine eumelanic and pheomelanic phenotypes. However

  3. A Novel Abetalipoproteinemia Missense Mutation Highlights the Importance of N-Terminal β-Barrel in Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Meghan T.; Iqbal, Jahangir; Josekutty, Joby; Soh, James; Di Leo, Enza; Özaydin, Eda; Gündüz, Mehmet; Tarugi, Patrizia; Hussain, M. Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) inhibitors is limited to severe hyperlipidemias due to associated hepatosteatosis and gastrointestinal adverse effects. Comprehensive knowledge about the structure-function of MTP might help design new molecules that avoid steatosis. Characterization of mutations in MTP causing abetalipoproteinemia have revealed that the central α-helical and C-terminal β-sheet domains are important for protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) binding and lipid transfer activity. Our aim was to identify and characterize mutations in the N-terminal domain to understand its function. Methods and Results We identified a novel missense mutation (D169V) in a 4-month old Turkish male with severe signs of ABL. To study the effect of this mutation on MTP function, we created mutants via site-directed mutagenesis. Although D169V was expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum and interacted with apoB17, it was unable to bind PDI, transfer lipids, and support apoB secretion. Computational modeling suggested that D169 could form an internal salt bridge with K187 and K189. Mutagenesis of these lysines to leucines abolished PDI heterodimerization, lipid transfer, and apoB secretion, without affecting apoB17 binding. Further, mutants with preserved charges (D169E, K187R, K189R) rescued these activities. Conclusions D169V is detrimental because it disrupts an internal salt bridge leading to loss of PDI binding and lipid transfer activities; however, it does not affect apoB-binding. Thus, the N-terminal domain of MTP is also important for its lipid transfer activity. PMID:26224785

  4. Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency in Sub-Saharan Africa: Identification of a Highly Frequent Missense Mutation (G829A;Glu277Lys) and Association with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Patrícia; Manco, Licínio; Gomes, Cláudia; Mendes, Cristina; Fernandes, Natércia; Salomé, Graça; Sitoe, Luis; Chibute, Sérgio; Langa, José; Ribeiro, Letícia; Miranda, Juliana; Cano, Jorge; Pinto, João; Amorim, António; do Rosário, Virgílio E.; Arez, Ana Paula

    2012-01-01

    Background Pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency, causing hemolytic anemia, has been associated to malaria protection and its prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa is not known so far. This work shows the results of a study undertaken to determine PK deficiency occurrence in some sub-Saharan African countries, as well as finding a prevalent PK variant underlying this deficiency. Materials and Methods Blood samples of individuals from four malaria endemic countries (Mozambique, Angola, Equatorial Guinea and Sao Tome and Principe) were analyzed in order to determine PK deficiency occurrence and detect any possible high frequent PK variant mutation. The association between this mutation and malaria was ascertained through association studies involving sample groups from individuals showing different malaria infection and outcome status. Results The percentage of individuals showing a reduced PK activity in Maputo was 4.1% and the missense mutation G829A (Glu277Lys) in the PKLR gene (only identified in three individuals worldwide to date) was identified in a high frequency. Heterozygous carrier frequency was between 6.7% and 2.6%. A significant association was not detected between either PK reduced activity or allele 829A frequency and malaria infection and outcome, although the variant was more frequent among individuals with uncomplicated malaria. Conclusions This was the first study on the occurrence of PK deficiency in several areas of Africa. A common PKLR mutation G829A (Glu277Lys) was identified. A global geographical co-distribution between malaria and high frequency of PK deficiency seems to occur suggesting that malaria may be a selective force raising the frequency of this 277Lys variant. PMID:23082140

  5. Functional characterization of an AQP0 missense mutation, R33C, that causes dominant congenital lens cataract, reveals impaired cell-to-cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sindhu S.; Gandhi, Jason; Mustehsan, Mohammed H.; Eren, Semih; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporin 0 (AQP0) performs dual functions in the lens fiber cells, as a water pore and as a cell-to-cell adhesion molecule. Mutations in AQP0 cause severe lens cataract in both humans and mice. An arginine to cysteine missense mutation at amino acid 33 (R33C) produced congenital autosomal dominant cataract in a Chinese family for five generations. We re-created this mutation in wild type (WT-AQP0) human AQP0 cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis, and cloned and expressed the mutant AQP0 (AQP0-R33C) in heterologous expression systems. Mutant AQP0-R33C showed proper trafficking and membrane localization like WT-AQP0. Functional studies conducted in Xenopus oocytes showed no significant difference (P>0.05) in water permeability between AQP0-R33C and WT-AQP0. However, the cell-to-cell adhesion property of AQP0-R33C was significantly reduced (P< 0.001) compared to that of WT-AQP0, indicated by cell aggregation and cell-to-cell adhesion assays. Scrape-loading assay using Lucifer Yellow dye showed reduction in cell-to-cell adhesion affecting gap junction coupling (P< 0.001). The data provided suggest that this mutation might not have caused significant alterations in protein folding since there was no obstruction in protein trafficking or water permeation. Reduction in cell-to-cell adhesion and development of cataract suggest that the conserved positive charge of Extracellular Loop A may play an important role in bringing fiber cells closer. The proposed schematic models illustrate that cell-to-cell adhesion elicited by AQP0 is vital for lens transparency and homeostasis. PMID:24120416

  6. A Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Rad52 Allele Expressing a C-Terminal Truncation Protein: Activities and Intragenic Complementation of Missense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Boundy-Mills, K. L.; Livingston, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    A nonsense allele of the yeast RAD52 gene, rad52-327, which expresses the N-terminal 65% of the protein was compared to two missense alleles, rad52-1 and rad52-2, and to a deletion allele. While the rad52-1 and the deletion mutants have severe defects in DNA repair, recombination and sporulation, the rad52-327 and rad52-2 mutants retain either partial or complete capabilities in repair and recombination. These two mutants behave similarly in most tests of repair and recombination during mitotic growth. One difference between these two alleles is that a homozygous rad52-2 diploid fails to sporulate, whereas the homozygous rad52-327 diploid sporulates weakly. The low level of sporulation by the rad52-327 diploid is accompanied by a low percentage of spore viability. Among these viable spores the frequency of crossing over for markers along chromosome VII is the same as that found in wild-type spores. rad52-327 complements rad52-2 for repair and sporulation. Weaker intragenic complementation occurs between rad52-327 and rad52-1. PMID:8417987

  7. A Missense Mutation in the Zinc Finger Domain of OsCESA7 Deleteriously Affects Cellulose Biosynthesis and Plant Growth in Rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daofeng; Qin, Yanling; Fang, Jingjing; Yuan, Shoujiang; Peng, Lixiang; Zhao, Jinfeng; Li, Xueyong

    2016-01-01

    Rice is a model plant species for the study of cellulose biosynthesis. We isolated a mutant, S1-24, from ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-treated plants of the japonica rice cultivar, Nipponbare. The mutant exhibited brittle culms and other pleiotropic phenotypes such as dwarfism and partial sterility. The brittle culms resulted from reduced mechanical strength due to a defect in thickening of the sclerenchyma cell wall and reduced cellulose content in the culms of the S1-24 mutant. Map-based gene cloning and a complementation assay showed that phenotypes of the S1-24 mutant were caused by a recessive point mutation in the OsCESA7 gene, which encodes cellulose synthase A subunit 7. The missense mutation changed the highly conserved C40 to Y in the zinc finger domain. The OsCESA7 gene is expressed predominantly in the culm at the mature stage, particularly in mechanical tissues such as vascular bundles and sclerenchyma cells, consistent with the brittle phenotype in the culm. These results indicate that OsCESA7 plays an important role in cellulose biosynthesis and plant growth. PMID:27092937

  8. A Missense Mutation in PPP1R15B Causes a Syndrome Including Diabetes, Short Stature, and Microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkarim, Baroj; Igoillo-Esteve, Mariana; Daures, Mathilde; Romero, Sophie; Philippi, Anne; Senée, Valérie; Lopes, Miguel; Cunha, Daniel A.; Harding, Heather P.; Derbois, Céline; Bendelac, Nathalie; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Eizirik, Décio L.; Ron, David

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum stress and phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) are associated with pancreatic β-cell failure and diabetes. Here, we report the first homozygous mutation in the PPP1R15B gene (also known as constitutive repressor of eIF2α phosphorylation [CReP]) encoding the regulatory subunit of an eIF2α-specific phosphatase in two siblings affected by a novel syndrome of diabetes of youth with short stature, intellectual disability, and microcephaly. The R658C mutation in PPP1R15B affects a conserved amino acid within the domain important for protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) binding. The R658C mutation decreases PP1 binding and eIF2α dephosphorylation and results in β-cell apoptosis. Our findings support the concept that dysregulated eIF2α phosphorylation, whether decreased by mutation of the kinase (EIF2AK3) in Wolcott-Rallison syndrome or increased by mutation of the phosphatase (PPP1R15B), is deleterious to β-cells and other secretory tissues, resulting in diabetes associated with multisystem abnormalities. PMID:26159176

  9. A missense mutation in PPP1R15B causes a syndrome including diabetes, short stature and microcephaly

    PubMed Central

    Igoillo-Esteve, Mariana; Daures, Mathilde; Romero, Sophie; Philippi, Anne; Senée, Valérie; Lopes, Miguel; Cunha, Daniel A.; Harding, Heather P.; Derbois, Céline; Bendelac, Nathalie; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Eizirik, Décio L.; Ron, David

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated endoplasmic reticulum stress and phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) are associated with pancreatic β-cell failure and diabetes. Here we report the first homozygous mutation in the PPP1R15B gene (also known as constitutive repressor of eIF2α phosphorylation, CReP), encoding the regulatory subunit of an eIF2α-specific phosphatase, in two siblings affected by a novel syndrome of diabetes of youth, with short stature, intellectual disability and microcephaly. The R658C mutation in PPP1R15B affects a conserved amino acid within the domain important for protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) binding. The R658C mutation decreases PP1 binding and eIF2α dephosphorylation, and results in β-cell apoptosis. Our findings support the concept that dysregulated eIF2α phosphorylation, whether decreased by mutation of the kinase (EIF2AK3) in Wolcott-Rallison syndrome or increased by mutation of the phosphatase (PPP1R15B), is deleterious to β-cells and other secretory tissues, resulting in diabetes associated with multi-system abnormalities. PMID:26159176

  10. De novo exon 1 missense mutations of SKI and Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome: two new cases and a clinical review.

    PubMed

    Au, P Y Billie; Racher, Hilary E; Graham, John M; Kramer, Nancy; Lowry, R Brian; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Innes, A Micheil

    2014-03-01

    Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (OMIM #182212) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, distinctive craniofacial features, skeletal abnormalities, marfanoid body habitus, aortic dilatation, and intellectual disability. Mutations in exon 1 of SKI have recently been identified as being responsible for approximately 90% of reported individuals diagnosed clinically with Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome. SKI is a known regulator of TGFβ signaling. Therefore, like Marfan syndrome and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome is likely caused by deregulated TGFβ signals, explaining the considerable phenotypic overlap between these three disorders. We describe two additional patients with exon 1 SKI mutations and review the clinical features and literature of Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome.

  11. Identification of a novel germline missense mutation of the androgen receptor in African American men with familial prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Si-Yi; Liu, Tao; Liu, Zhen-Zhen; Ledet, Elisa; Velasco-Gonzalez, Cruz; Mandal, Diptasri M; Koochekpour, Shahriar

    2010-01-01

    Race, family history and age are the unequivocally accepted risk factors for prostate cancer (PCa). Androgen receptor (AR)-dependent signaling is an important element in prostate carcinogenesis and its progression to metastatic disease. We examined the possibility of genomic changes in the AR in association with familial PCa in African Americans who have a higher incidence and mortality rate and a clinically more aggressive disease presentation than Caucasians. Genomic DNAs of 60 patients from 30 high-risk African American and Caucasian families participating in the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center genetic linkage study of PCa were studied. Exon-specific polymerase-chain reaction, bi-directional automated sequencing and restriction enzyme genotyping were used to analyze for mutations in the coding region of the AR gene. We identified a germline AR (A1675T) (T559S) substitution mutation in the DNA-binding domain in three PCa-affected members of an African-American family with a history of early-onset disease. The present study describes the first AR germline mutation in an African-American family with a history of familial PCa. The AR (T559S) mutation may contribute to the disease by altering AR DNA-binding affinity and/or its response to androgens, non-androgenic steroids or anti-androgens. Additional studies will be required to define the frequency and contribution of the AR (A1675T) allele to early-onset and/or familial PCa in African Americans. PMID:20173765

  12. Missense mutation in DISC1 C-terminal coiled-coil has GSK3β signaling and sex-dependent behavioral effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dachtler, James; Elliott, Christina; Rodgers, R. John; Baillie, George S.; Clapcote, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is a risk factor for schizophrenia and affective disorders. The full-length DISC1 protein consists of an N-terminal ‘head’ domain and a C-terminal tail domain that contains several predicted coiled-coils, structural motifs involved in protein-protein interactions. To probe the in vivo effects of missense mutation of DISC1’s C-terminal tail, we tested mice carrying mutation D453G within a predicted α-helical coiled-coil region. We report that, relative to wild-type littermates, female DISC1D453G mice exhibited novelty-induced hyperlocomotion, an anxiogenic profile in the elevated plus-maze and open field tests, and reduced social exploration of unfamiliar mice. Male DISC1D453G mice displayed a deficit in passive avoidance, while neither males nor females exhibited any impairment in startle reactivity or prepulse inhibition. Whole brain homogenates showed normal levels of DISC1 protein, but decreased binding of DISC1 to GSK3β, decreased phospho-inhibition of GSK3β at serine 9, and decreased levels of β-catenin in DISC1D453G mice of either sex. Interrupted GSK3β signaling may thus be part of the mechanism underlying the behavioral phenotype associated with D453G, in common with the previously described N-terminal domain mutations Q31L and L100P in mice, and the schizophrenia risk-conferring variant R264Q in humans. PMID:26728762

  13. Missense Mutation R338W in ARHGEF9 in a Family with X-linked Intellectual Disability with Variable Macrocephaly and Macro-Orchidism

    PubMed Central

    Long, Philip; May, Melanie M.; James, Victoria M.; Grannò, Simone; Johnson, John P.; Tarpey, Patrick; Stevenson, Roger E.; Harvey, Kirsten; Schwartz, Charles E.; Harvey, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Non-syndromal X-linked intellectual disability (NS-XLID) represents a broad group of clinical disorders in which ID is the only clinically consistent manifestation. Although in many cases either chromosomal linkage data or knowledge of the >100 existing XLID genes has assisted mutation discovery, the underlying cause of disease remains unresolved in many families. We report the resolution of a large family (K8010) with NS-XLID, with variable macrocephaly and macro-orchidism. Although a previous linkage study had mapped the locus to Xq12-q21, this region contained too many candidate genes to be analyzed using conventional approaches. However, X-chromosome exome sequencing, bioinformatics analysis and segregation analysis revealed a novel missense mutation (c.1012C>T; p.R338W) in ARHGEF9. This gene encodes collybistin (CB), a neuronal GDP-GTP exchange factor previously implicated in several cases of XLID, as well as clustering of gephyrin and GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses. Molecular modeling of the CB R338W substitution revealed that this change results in the substitution of a long electropositive side-chain with a large non-charged hydrophobic side-chain. The R338W change is predicted to result in clashes with adjacent amino acids (K363 and N335) and disruption of electrostatic potential and local folding of the PH domain, which is known to bind phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P/PtdIns-3-P). Consistent with this finding, functional assays revealed that recombinant CB CB2SH3−R338W was deficient in PI3P binding and was not able to translocate EGFP-gephyrin to submembrane microaggregates in an in vitro clustering assay. Taken together, these results suggest that the R338W mutation in ARHGEF9 is the underlying cause of NS-XLID in this family. PMID:26834553

  14. Direct Evidence on the Contribution of a Missense Mutation in GDF9 to Variation in Ovulation Rate of Finnsheep

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Michael P.; Hanrahan, James P.

    2014-01-01

    The Finnish Landrace (Finnsheep) is a well known high-prolificacy sheep breed and has been used in many countries as a source of genetic material to increase fecundity of local breeds. Analyses to date have indicated that mutations with a large effect on ovulation rate are not responsible for the exceptional prolificacy of Finnsheep. The objectives of this study were to ascertain if: 1) any of 12 known mutations with large effects on ovulation rate in sheep, or 2) any other DNA sequence variants within the candidate genes GDF9 and BMP15 are implicated in the high prolificacy of the Finnish Landrace breed; using material from lines developed by divergent selection on ovulation rate. Genotyping results showed that none of 12 known mutations (FecBB, FecXB, FecXG, FecXGR, FecXH, FecXI, FecXL, FecXO, FecXR, FecGE, FecGH, or FecGT) were present in a sample of 108 Finnsheep and, thus, do not contribute to the exceptional prolificacy of the breed. However, DNA sequence analysis of GDF9 identified a previously known mutation, V371M, whose frequency differed significantly (P<0.001) between High and Low ovulation rate lines. While analysis of ovulation rate data for Finnsheep failed to establish a significant association between this trait and V371M, analysis of data on Belclare sheep revealed a significant association between V371M and ovulation rate (P<0.01). Ewes that were heterozygous for V371M exhibited increased ovulation rate (+0.17, s.e. 0.080; P<0.05) compared to wild type and the effect was non-additive (ovulation rate of heterozygotes was significantly lower (P<0.01) than the mean of the homozygotes). This finding brings to 13 the number of mutations that have large effects on ovulation rate in sheep and to 5, including FecBB, FecGE, FecXO and FecXGR, the number of mutations within the TGFβ superfamily with a positive effect on prolificacy in the homozygous state. PMID:24751660

  15. Direct evidence on the contribution of a missense mutation in GDF9 to variation in ovulation rate of Finnsheep.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Michael P; Hanrahan, James P

    2014-01-01

    The Finnish Landrace (Finnsheep) is a well known high-prolificacy sheep breed and has been used in many countries as a source of genetic material to increase fecundity of local breeds. Analyses to date have indicated that mutations with a large effect on ovulation rate are not responsible for the exceptional prolificacy of Finnsheep. The objectives of this study were to ascertain if: 1) any of 12 known mutations with large effects on ovulation rate in sheep, or 2) any other DNA sequence variants within the candidate genes GDF9 and BMP15 are implicated in the high prolificacy of the Finnish Landrace breed; using material from lines developed by divergent selection on ovulation rate. Genotyping results showed that none of 12 known mutations (FecBB, FecXB, FecXG, FecXGR, FecXH, FecXI, FecXL, FecXO, FecXR, FecGE, FecGH, or FecGT) were present in a sample of 108 Finnsheep and, thus, do not contribute to the exceptional prolificacy of the breed. However, DNA sequence analysis of GDF9 identified a previously known mutation, V371M, whose frequency differed significantly (P<0.001) between High and Low ovulation rate lines. While analysis of ovulation rate data for Finnsheep failed to establish a significant association between this trait and V371M, analysis of data on Belclare sheep revealed a significant association between V371M and ovulation rate (P<0.01). Ewes that were heterozygous for V371M exhibited increased ovulation rate (+0.17, s.e. 0.080; P<0.05) compared to wild type and the effect was non-additive (ovulation rate of heterozygotes was significantly lower (P<0.01) than the mean of the homozygotes). This finding brings to 13 the number of mutations that have large effects on ovulation rate in sheep and to 5, including FecBB, FecGE, FecXO and FecXGR, the number of mutations within the TGFβ superfamily with a positive effect on prolificacy in the homozygous state.

  16. Severe ALG8-CDG (CDG-Ih) associated with homozygosity for two novel missense mutations detected by exome sequencing of candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Sorte, Hanne; Mørkrid, Lars; Rødningen, Olaug; Kulseth, Mari Ann; Stray-Pedersen, Asbjørg; Matthijs, Gert; Race, Valerie; Houge, Gunnar; Fiskerstrand, Torunn; Bjurulf, Bjørn; Lyle, Robert; Prescott, Trine

    2012-03-01

    Posttranslationally glycosylated proteins are important in many biological processes in humans and Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs) are associated with a broad range of phenotypes. Type I CDGs are a group of rare autosomal recessive conditions. To date 17 subtypes have been enzymatically and molecularly characterized. Impaired function of the enzyme dolichyl pyrophosphate Glc(1)Man(9)GlcNAc(2) alpha-1,3-glucosyltransferase encoded by the ALG8 gene, causes ALG8-CDG (CDG-Ih, OMIM #608104). This enzyme facilitates the transfer of a second glucose molecule to a growing lipid-linked oligosaccharide chain, a process that transpires in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We present a female patient of consanguineous parents, with pre- and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic features, significant developmental delay, visual impairment and an electrophoretic serum transferrin pattern indicative of a type I CDG. Type I CDG subgroup was determined by exome sequencing facilitated by homozygosity analysis. The patient was homozygous for two variants, nine nucleotides apart, in exon 8 of ALG8; c.799T > C [p.Ser267Pro] and c.808T > C [p.Phe270Leu]. Both missense mutations are predicted to affect a conserved region of an intraluminal ER loop of dolichyl pyrophosphate Glc(1)Man(9)GlcNAc(2) alpha-1,3-glucosyltransferase. To our knowledge, the current report describes the ninth published case of ALG8-CDG, contributing to the further delineation of this rare and variable disorder.

  17. Linkage disequilibrium analysis reveals an albuminuria risk haplotype containing three missense mutations in the cubilin gene with striking differences among European and African ancestry populations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A recent meta-analysis described a variant (p.Ile2984Val) in the cubilin gene (CUBN) that is associated with levels of albuminuria in the general population and in diabetics. Methods We implemented a Linkage Disequilibrium (LD) search with data from the 1000 Genomes Project, on African and European population genomic sequences. Results We found that the p.Ile2984Val variation is part of a larger haplotype in European populations and it is almost absent in west Africans. This haplotype contains 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in very high LD, three of which are missense mutations (p.Leu2153Phe, p.Ile2984Val, p.Glu3002Gly), and two have not been previously reported. Notably, this European haplotype is absent in west African populations, and the frequency of each individual polymorphism differs significantly in Africans. Conclusions Genotyping of these variants in existing African origin sample sets coupled to measurements of urine albumin excretion levels should reveal which is the most likely functional candidate for albuminuria risk. The unique haplotypic structure of CUBN in different populations may leverage the effort to identify the functional variant and to shed light on evolution of the CUBN gene locus. PMID:23114252

  18. Three cases of congenital dysfibrinogenemia in unrelated Chinese families: heterozygous missense mutation in fibrinogen alpha chain Argl6His.

    PubMed

    Luo, Meiling; Deng, Donghong; Xiang, Liqun; Cheng, Peng; Liao, Lin; Deng, Xuelian; Yan, Jie; Lin, Faquan

    2016-09-01

    Congenital dysfibrinogenemia (CD) is a qualitative fibrinogen disorder caused by an abnormal fibrinogen molecule structure, leading to dysfunctional blood coagulation. This study describes 3 cases of dysfibrinogenemia identified in the unrelated Chinese pedigrees.Routine coagulation screening tests were performed on the probands and their families. The antigens and functionality of fibrinogen was measured using an immunoturbidimetry assay and the Clauss method, respectively. To identify the genetic mutation responsible for these dysfibrinogens, genomic DNA extracted from the blood was analyzed using PCR amplification and direct sequencing. The presence of the mutant chains was determined using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy. Purified plasma fibrinogen of 3 probands was analyzed using SDS-PAGE, fibrinogen clottability, fibrin polymerization, fibrinopeptide release, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).The 3 probands had a long thrombin time. Levels of functional fibrinogen were found to be very low, while the fibrinogen antigen was within the normal range. DNA sequencing revealed a heterozygous Arg16His substitution in the fibrinogen Aα chain (FGA). The mutant chains were found to be expressed using MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy. SDS-PAGE did not reveal any difference in the molecular weights of 3 polypeptide chains between normal and abnormal fibrinogens. Fibrinogen clottability showed a slower fibrin clot formation than the healthy control. Fibrin polymerization, after addition of thrombin, showed a prolonged lag phase and decreased final turbidity. The kinetics of fibrinopeptides release revealed a decreased amount of the released fibrinopeptide A. SEM of the patient's fibrin clot was found to be abnormal.Results indicate that the 3 probands with dysfibrinogenemia were caused by mutations of Aα chain Arg16His. Mutation of this fibrinogen induced dysfunction of plasma fibrinogen. PMID:27684817

  19. A novel missense mutation of COL5A2 in a patient with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miki; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Suga, Ken-ichi; Goji, Aya; Kagami, Shoji; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterized by hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility and soft tissue fragility. For molecular diagnosis, targeted exome sequencing was performed on a 9-year-old male patient who was clinically suspected to have EDS. The patient presented with progressive kyphoscoliosis, joint hypermobility and hyperextensible skin without scars. Ultimately, classical EDS was diagnosed by identifying a novel, mono-allelic mutation in COL5A2 [NM_000393.3(COL5A2_v001):c.682G>A, p.Gly228Arg]. PMID:27656288

  20. Long QT syndrome with nocturnal cardiac events caused by a KCNH2 missense mutation (G604S).

    PubMed

    Sato, Akinori; Chinushi, Masaomi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Numano, Fujito; Hanyu, Takanori; Iijima, Kenichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Furushima, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    An 8-year-old boy suffered from an unconsciousness attack and torsade de pointes arrhythmia during sleep or at rest. His electrocardiogram showed prolonged QT intervals, but the T wave morphology was atypical for type 1, 2 or 3 congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Intravenous epinephrine slightly prolonged the QT interval whereas mexiletine infusion shortened the QT interval. Although these clinical characteristics might suggest type 3 LQTS, a genetic analysis identified the G604S-KCNH2 mutation (type 2 LQTS). Because mismatches between the genotype and phenotype of LQTS are possible, genetic analysis of LQTS is important to identify the most appropriate therapeutic option and risk stratification. PMID:22821100

  1. A novel missense mutation of COL5A2 in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miki; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Suga, Ken-Ichi; Goji, Aya; Kagami, Shoji; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterized by hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility and soft tissue fragility. For molecular diagnosis, targeted exome sequencing was performed on a 9-year-old male patient who was clinically suspected to have EDS. The patient presented with progressive kyphoscoliosis, joint hypermobility and hyperextensible skin without scars. Ultimately, classical EDS was diagnosed by identifying a novel, mono-allelic mutation in COL5A2 [NM_000393.3(COL5A2_v001):c.682G>A, p.Gly228Arg]. PMID:27656288

  2. A novel missense mutation of COL5A2 in a patient with Ehlers–Danlos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miki; Nakagawa, Ryuji; Naruto, Takuya; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Suga, Ken-ichi; Goji, Aya; Kagami, Shoji; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders characterized by hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility and soft tissue fragility. For molecular diagnosis, targeted exome sequencing was performed on a 9-year-old male patient who was clinically suspected to have EDS. The patient presented with progressive kyphoscoliosis, joint hypermobility and hyperextensible skin without scars. Ultimately, classical EDS was diagnosed by identifying a novel, mono-allelic mutation in COL5A2 [NM_000393.3(COL5A2_v001):c.682G>A, p.Gly228Arg].

  3. Missense mutations in the APOL1 gene are highly associated with end stage kidney disease risk previously attributed to the MYH9 gene

    PubMed Central

    Tzur, Shay; Rosset, Saharon; Shemer, Revital; Yudkovsky, Guennady; Selig, Sara; Tarekegn, Ayele; Bekele, Endashaw; Bradman, Neil; Wasser, Walter G.; Behar, Doron M.

    2010-01-01

    MYH9 has been proposed as a major genetic risk locus for a spectrum of nondiabetic end stage kidney disease (ESKD). We use recently released sequences from the 1000 Genomes Project to identify two western African-specific missense mutations (S342G and I384M) in the neighboring APOL1 gene, and demonstrate that these are more strongly associated with ESKD than previously reported MYH9 variants. The APOL1 gene product, apolipoprotein L-1, has been studied for its roles in trypanosomal lysis, autophagic cell death, lipid metabolism, as well as vascular and other biological activities. We also show that the distribution of these newly identified APOL1 risk variants in African populations is consistent with the pattern of African ancestry ESKD risk previously attributed to MYH9. Mapping by admixture linkage disequilibrium (MALD) localized an interval on chromosome 22, in a region that includes the MYH9 gene, which was shown to contain African ancestry risk variants associated with certain forms of ESKD (Kao et al. 2008; Kopp et al. 2008). MYH9 encodes nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIa, a major cytoskeletal nanomotor protein expressed in many cell types, including podocyte cells of the renal glomerulus. Moreover, 39 different coding region mutations in MYH9 have been identified in patients with a group of rare syndromes, collectively termed the Giant Platelet Syndromes, with clear autosomal dominant inheritance, and various clinical manifestations, sometimes also including glomerular pathology and chronic kidney disease (Kopp 2010; Sekine et al. 2010). Accordingly, MYH9 was further explored in these studies as the leading candidate gene responsible for the MALD signal. Dense mapping of MYH9 identified individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and sets of such SNPs grouped as haplotypes that were found to be highly associated with a large and important group of ESKD risk phenotypes, which as a consequence were designated as MYH9-associated nephropathies (Bostrom and

  4. Using diverse U.S. beef cattle genomes to identify missense mutations in EPAS1, a gene associated with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Heaton, Michael P.; Smith, Timothy P.L.; Carnahan, Jacky K.; Basnayake, Veronica; Qiu, Jiansheng; Simpson, Barry; Kalbfleisch, Theodore S.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of whole genome sequence (WGS) data has made it possible to discover protein variants in silico. However, existing bovine WGS databases do not show data in a form conducive to protein variant analysis, and tend to under represent the breadth of genetic diversity in global beef cattle. Thus, our first aim was to use 96 beef sires, sharing minimal pedigree relationships, to create a searchable and publicly viewable set of mapped genomes relevant for 19 popular breeds of U.S. cattle. Our second aim was to identify protein variants encoded by the bovine endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1 gene ( EPAS1), a gene associated with pulmonary hypertension in Angus cattle. The identity and quality of genomic sequences were verified by comparing WGS genotypes to those derived from other methods. The average read depth, genotype scoring rate, and genotype accuracy exceeded 14, 99%, and 99%, respectively. The 96 genomes were used to discover four amino acid variants encoded by EPAS1 (E270Q, P362L, A671G, and L701F) and confirm two variants previously associated with disease (A606T and G610S). The six EPAS1 missense mutations were verified with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry assays, and their frequencies were estimated in a separate collection of 1154 U.S. cattle representing 46 breeds. A rooted phylogenetic tree of eight polypeptide sequences provided a framework for evaluating the likely order of mutations and potential impact of EPAS1 alleles on the adaptive response to chronic hypoxia in U.S. cattle. This public, whole genome resource facilitates in silico identification of protein variants in diverse types of U.S. beef cattle, and provides a means of translating WGS data into a practical biological and evolutionary context for generating and testing hypotheses. PMID:27746904

  5. A missense mutation in TMEM67 causes Meckel-Gruber syndrome type 3 (MKS3): a family from China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Manli; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Aijun; Wang, Longxia; Xiong, Lihua; Chen, Meixia; Sun, Yi; Li, Jianzhong; Lu, Yu; Yuan, Huijun; Li, Yali; Lu, Yanping

    2015-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is a lethal autosomal recessive condition characterized by renal cysts and variably associated features, including developmental anomalies of the central nervous system (typically encephalocele), hepatic ductal dysplasia and cysts, and polydactyly. Genetic heterogeneity has been demonstrated at eleven loci, MKS1-11. Here, we present the clinical and molecular characteristics of a Chinese MKS3 family with occipital encephalocele and kidney enlargement. DNA sequencing of affected fetuses revealed a homozygous c.1645C>T substitution in exon 16 of TMEM67, leading to a p.R549C substitution in meckelin. The R549 residue is highly conserved across human, rat, mouse, zebrafish, chicken, wolf and platypus genomes. Hha I restriction analysis demonstrated that the c.1645C>T mutation was absent in 200 unrelated control chromosomes of Chinese background, supporting the hypothesis that it represents causative mutation, not rare polymorphism. Our data provide additional molecular and clinical information for establishing a better genotype-phenotype understanding of MKS. PMID:26191240

  6. A de novo missense mutation in ZMYND11 is associated with global developmental delay, seizures, and hypotonia

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Abby M.; Belnap, Newell; Siniard, Ashley L.; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Claasen, Ana M.; Richholt, Ryan F.; De Both, Matt; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Balak, Chris; Piras, Ignazio S.; Russell, Megan; Courtright, Amanda L.; Rangasamy, Sampath; Ramsey, Keri; Craig, David W.; Narayanan, Vinodh; Huentelman, Matt J.; Schrauwen, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the zinc finger MYND-type containing 11 (ZMYND11) gene were identified in patients with autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, aggression, and complex neuropsychiatric features, supporting that this gene is implicated in 10p15.3 microdeletion syndrome. We report a novel de novo variant in the ZMYND11 gene (p.Ser421Asn) in a patient with a complex neurodevelopmental phenotype. The patient is a 24-yr-old Caucasian/Filipino female with seizures, global developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, hypotonia, dysmorphic features, and other features including a happy disposition and ataxic gait similar to Angelman syndrome. In addition, this patient had uncommon features including eosinophilic esophagitis and multiple, severe allergies not described in similar ZMYND11 cases. This new case further supports the association of ZMYND11 with autistic-like phenotypes and suggests that ZMYND11 should be included in the list of potentially causative candidate genes in cases with complex neurodevelopmental phenotypes.

  7. A de novo missense mutation in ZMYND11 is associated with global developmental delay, seizures, and hypotonia

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Abby M.; Belnap, Newell; Siniard, Ashley L.; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Claasen, Ana M.; Richholt, Ryan F.; De Both, Matt; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Balak, Chris; Piras, Ignazio S.; Russell, Megan; Courtright, Amanda L.; Rangasamy, Sampath; Ramsey, Keri; Craig, David W.; Narayanan, Vinodh; Huentelman, Matt J.; Schrauwen, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mutations in the zinc finger MYND-type containing 11 (ZMYND11) gene were identified in patients with autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, aggression, and complex neuropsychiatric features, supporting that this gene is implicated in 10p15.3 microdeletion syndrome. We report a novel de novo variant in the ZMYND11 gene (p.Ser421Asn) in a patient with a complex neurodevelopmental phenotype. The patient is a 24-yr-old Caucasian/Filipino female with seizures, global developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, hypotonia, dysmorphic features, and other features including a happy disposition and ataxic gait similar to Angelman syndrome. In addition, this patient had uncommon features including eosinophilic esophagitis and multiple, severe allergies not described in similar ZMYND11 cases. This new case further supports the association of ZMYND11 with autistic-like phenotypes and suggests that ZMYND11 should be included in the list of potentially causative candidate genes in cases with complex neurodevelopmental phenotypes. PMID:27626064

  8. A de novo missense mutation in ZMYND11 is associated with global developmental delay, seizures, and hypotonia.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, Abby M; Belnap, Newell; Siniard, Ashley L; Szelinger, Szabolcs; Claasen, Ana M; Richholt, Ryan F; De Both, Matt; Corneveaux, Jason J; Balak, Chris; Piras, Ignazio S; Russell, Megan; Courtright, Amanda L; Rangasamy, Sampath; Ramsey, Keri; Craig, David W; Narayanan, Vinodh; Huentelman, Matt J; Schrauwen, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Recently, mutations in the zinc finger MYND-type containing 11 (ZMYND11) gene were identified in patients with autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disability, aggression, and complex neuropsychiatric features, supporting that this gene is implicated in 10p15.3 microdeletion syndrome. We report a novel de novo variant in the ZMYND11 gene (p.Ser421Asn) in a patient with a complex neurodevelopmental phenotype. The patient is a 24-yr-old Caucasian/Filipino female with seizures, global developmental delay, sensorineural hearing loss, hypotonia, dysmorphic features, and other features including a happy disposition and ataxic gait similar to Angelman syndrome. In addition, this patient had uncommon features including eosinophilic esophagitis and multiple, severe allergies not described in similar ZMYND11 cases. This new case further supports the association of ZMYND11 with autistic-like phenotypes and suggests that ZMYND11 should be included in the list of potentially causative candidate genes in cases with complex neurodevelopmental phenotypes. PMID:27626064

  9. A Pedigree with c.179 Cytosine to Threonine Missense Mutation of SLC12A3 Gene Presenting Gitelman's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yaerim; Kang, Seong Sik; Park, Woo Yeong; Jin, Kyubok; Kim, Dae-Kwang

    2016-01-01

    A 42-year-old man came to the hospital presenting chest discomfort and general weakness. He had come to the hospital with the same symptoms 3 months ago and 12 years prior. His laboratory test showed hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. The arterial blood gas analysis showed hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. He had an ultrasonography guided renal biopsy, the result was normal at light microscopy and immunofluorescence microscopy. However, a special stain for Na-Cl cotransporter was weakly expressed compared with the control. The patient and his family underwent genetic sequencing about the SLC12A3 gene. He had a homozygous mutation in the 179th nucleotide of Exon 1 on the SLC12A3 gene (p.Thr60Met) and his parents and sisters were diagnosed as carrier state of Gitelman's syndrome (GS). GS is an inherited tubular disorder which presents mild hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. Since the symptoms and laboratory results are not severe, it can go unnoticed by physicians. Herein we present a family with GS, diagnosed by genetic sequencing. PMID:27453715

  10. Characterisation of factor IX with a glycine-to-valine missense mutation at residue 190 in a patient with severe haemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Kao, Chung-Yang; Lin, Chia-Ni; Yang, Yung-Li; Hamaguchi, Nobuko; Yang, Shu-Jhu; Shen, Ming-Ching; Kao, Jau-Tsuen; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2011-04-01

    A patient with severe haemophilia B with a glycine-to-valine missense mutation at residue 190 (c25, chymotrypsin numbering) in factor IX (FIX; FIX-G190V or FIX-FuChou) had <1% of normal FIX clotting activity and 36% of normal FIX antigen levels (cross-reacting material- reduced, CRMr). Residue 190 in the C-terminal protease domain of human FIX is highly conserved in mammalian species and the serine protease family, suggesting that it has an indispensable role in protein function. To explore the pathological mechanism by which this mutation contributes to dysfunction of the FIX molecule, we functionally characterised FIX-G190V in vitro and in vivo. Liver-specific FIX-G190V gene expression following hydrodynamic plasmid delivery into haemophilia B mice revealed a 5.7-fold reduction in specific clotting activity compared with FIX-WT (wild type) and a two-fold decrease in plasma FIX-G190V concentration. Pulse-chase analysis demonstrated that FIX-G190V was secreted at a significantly slower rate than was FIX-WT. Purified FIX-G190V and FIX-WT displayed normal calcium-dependent conformational changes as shown by intrinsic fluorescence quenching. The in vivo half-lives of FIX-G190V and FIX-WT were indistinguishable. FIX-G190V was, however, more readily degraded than FIX-WT, especially after being activated by the active form of FXI. The vulnerable sites were mapped to the peptide bonds at Arg¹¹⁶-Leu¹¹⁷, Lys²⁶⁵-Tyr²⁶⁶, Arg³²⁷-Val³²⁸, and Arg³³⁸-Ser³³⁹, which are in the exposed loops of the FIX molecule. Also, failure of FXIa-activated FIX-G190V to bind p-aminobenzamidine indicated an abnormal conformation of the active-site pocket. Thus, the mutation at residue 190 of FIX may result in protein misfolding that affects secretion, clotting function, and hydrolysis. PMID:21301787

  11. Missense mutations (p.H371Y, p.D438Y) in gene CHEK2 are associated with breast cancer risk in women of Balochistan origin.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Hameed; Daud, Shakeela; Raheem, Nafeesa; Luqman, Muhammad; Ahmad, Adeel; Rehman, Abdul; Shuja, Jameela; Rasheed, Saeeda; Ali, Akhtar; Kakar, Naseebullah; Naseeb, Hafiz Khush; Mengal, Mohammad Alam; Awan, Muhammad Arif; Wasim, Muhammad; Baloch, Dost Mohammad; Ahmad, Jamil

    2014-02-01

    CHEK2 encodes a serine/threonine-protein kinase which plays a critical role in DNA damage signaling pathways. CHEK2 directly phosphorylates and regulates the functions of p53 and BRCA1. Most women with breast and/or ovarian cancer are not carriers of mutant BRCA1 or BRCA2. Multiple studies have shown that a CHEK2*1100delC confers about a two-fold increased risk of breast cancer in unselected females and a tenfold increase in males. Moreover, studies have shown that first-degree relatives of bilateral breast cancer cases who carried the CHEK2*1100delC allele had an eight-fold increased risk of breast cancer. It has been suggested that CHEK2 functions as a low-penetrance susceptibility gene for cancers and multiplies the risks associated with other gene(s) to increase cancer risk. The main goal of this study was to evaluate and to compare the role of truncating mutations, splice junction mutations and rare missense substitutions in breast cancer susceptibility gene CHEK2. Present study was performed on 140 individuals including 70 breast cancer patients both with and without family history and 70 normal individuals. Written consent was obtained and 3 ml intravenous blood was drawn from all the subjects. DNA was extracted from all the samples through inorganic method published already. Primers were synthesized for all the 14 exons of CHEK2 gene. Coding and adjacent intronic sequences of CHEK2 gene were amplified and sequenced. Two genetic variants (p.H371Y, p.D438Y) were found in exon 10 and exon 11 of gene CHEK2 which were not found in any of the 70 control individuals from same geographical area and ethnic group. The genetic variant c.1312G>T (p.D438Y) identified in a patient with a family history of breast cancer. To our knowledge, this is first mutation scanning study of gene CHEK2 from Balochistan population.

  12. Correlation of a missense mutation in the human Secretor alpha 1,2-fucosyltransferase gene with the Lewis(a+b+) phenotype: a potential molecular basis for the weak Secretor allele (Sew).

    PubMed Central

    Yu, L C; Yang, Y H; Broadberry, R E; Chen, Y H; Chan, Y S; Lin, M

    1995-01-01

    A missense mutation (A385 to T), predicting an Ile129 to Phe substitution, in the human Secretor alpha 1,2-fucosyltransferase gene was present in double dose in Lewis(a+b+) individuals, but not in Lewis(a-b+) individuals. Co-segregation of the Lewis(a+b+) phenotype with homozygosity for the mutation was also verified. These results yield a potential molecular basis for the weak Secretor allele (Sew) accounting for the Lewis(a+b+) phenotype. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8526839

  13. GM2 gangliosidosis associated with a HEXA missense mutation in Japanese Chin dogs: a potential model for Tay Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Douglas N; Zeng, Rong; Wenger, David A; Johnson, Gary S; Johnson, Gayle C; Decker, Jared E; Katz, Martin L; Platt, Simon R; O'Brien, Dennis P

    2013-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis is a fatal lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of β-hexosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.52). There are two major isoforms of the enzyme: hexosaminidase A composed of an α and a β subunit (encoded by HEXA and HEXB genes, respectively); and, hexosaminidase B composed of two β subunits. Hexosaminidase A requires an activator protein encoded by GM2A to catabolize GM2 ganglioside, but even in the absence of the activator protein, it can hydrolyze the synthetic substrates commonly used to assess enzyme activity. GM2 gangliosidosis has been reported in Japanese Chin dogs, and we identified the disease in two related Japanese Chin dogs based on clinical signs, histopathology and elevated brain GM2 gangliosides. As in previous reports, we found normal or elevated hexosaminidase activity when measured with the synthetic substrates. This suggested that the canine disease is analogous to human AB variant of G(M2) gangliosidosis, which results from mutations in GM2A. However, only common neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms were found upon sequence analysis of the canine ortholog of GM2A from the affected Japanese Chins. When the same DNA samples were used to sequence HEXA, we identified a homozygous HEXA:c967G>A transition which predicts a p.E323K substitution. The glutamyl moiety at 323 is known to make an essential contribution to the active site of hexosaminidase A, and none of the 128 normal Japanese Chins and 92 normal dogs of other breeds that we tested was homozygous for HEXA:c967A. Thus it appears that the HEXA:c967G>A transition is responsible for the GM2 gangliosidosis in Japanese Chins.

  14. GM2 gangliosidosis associated with a HEXA missense mutation in Japanese Chin dogs: a potential model for Tay Sachs disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Douglas N; Zeng, Rong; Wenger, David A; Johnson, Gary S; Johnson, Gayle C; Decker, Jared E; Katz, Martin L; Platt, Simon R; O'Brien, Dennis P

    2013-01-01

    GM2 gangliosidosis is a fatal lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of β-hexosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.52). There are two major isoforms of the enzyme: hexosaminidase A composed of an α and a β subunit (encoded by HEXA and HEXB genes, respectively); and, hexosaminidase B composed of two β subunits. Hexosaminidase A requires an activator protein encoded by GM2A to catabolize GM2 ganglioside, but even in the absence of the activator protein, it can hydrolyze the synthetic substrates commonly used to assess enzyme activity. GM2 gangliosidosis has been reported in Japanese Chin dogs, and we identified the disease in two related Japanese Chin dogs based on clinical signs, histopathology and elevated brain GM2 gangliosides. As in previous reports, we found normal or elevated hexosaminidase activity when measured with the synthetic substrates. This suggested that the canine disease is analogous to human AB variant of G(M2) gangliosidosis, which results from mutations in GM2A. However, only common neutral single nucleotide polymorphisms were found upon sequence analysis of the canine ortholog of GM2A from the affected Japanese Chins. When the same DNA samples were used to sequence HEXA, we identified a homozygous HEXA:c967G>A transition which predicts a p.E323K substitution. The glutamyl moiety at 323 is known to make an essential contribution to the active site of hexosaminidase A, and none of the 128 normal Japanese Chins and 92 normal dogs of other breeds that we tested was homozygous for HEXA:c967A. Thus it appears that the HEXA:c967G>A transition is responsible for the GM2 gangliosidosis in Japanese Chins. PMID:23266199

  15. A Missense Mutation in SLC45A2 Is Associated with Albinism in Several Small Long Haired Dog Breeds.

    PubMed

    Wijesena, Hiruni R; Schmutz, Sheila M

    2015-01-01

    Homozygosity for a large deletion in the solute carrier family 45, member 2 (SLC45A2) gene causes oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) in the Doberman Pinscher breed. An albino Lhasa Apso did not have this g.27141_31223del (CanFam2) deletion in her SLC45A2 sequence. Therefore, SLC45A2 was investigated in this female Lhasa Apso to search for other possible variants that caused her albinism. The albino Lhasa Apso was homozygous for a nonsynonymous substitution in the seventh exon, a c.1478G>A base change that resulted in a glycine to aspartic acid substitution (p.G493D). This mutation was not found in a wolf, a coyote, or any of the 15 other Lhasa Apso dogs or 32 other dogs of breeds related to the Lhasa Apso. However, an albino Pekingese, 2 albino Pomeranians, and an albino mixed breed dog that was small and long haired were also homozygous for the 493D allele. The colored puppies of the albino Lhasa Apso and the colored dam of the 2 albino Pomeranians were heterozygous for this allele. However, an albino Pug was homozygous for the 493G allele and therefore although we suggest the 493D allele causes albinism when homozygous in several small, long haired dog breeds, it does not explain all albinism in dogs. A variant effect prediction for the albino Lhasa Apso confirms that p.G493D is a deleterious substitution, and a topology prediction for SLC45A2 suggests that the 11th transmembrane domain where the 493rd amino acid was located, has an altered structure. PMID:25790827

  16. Detection of three nonsense mutations and one missense mutation in the interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] chain gene in SCIDX1 that differently affect the mRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Markiewicz, S.; Fischer, A.; Saint Basile, G. de ); Subtil, A.; Dautry-Varsat, A. )

    1994-05-01

    The interleukin-2 receptor [gamma] (IL-2R[gamma]) chain gene encodes a 64-kDa protein that not only composes the high-affinity form of the IL-2 binding receptor in association with the 2R [alpha] and [beta] chains, but also participates in at least the IL-4 and IL-7 receptor complexes. Mutations in this gene have recently been shown to cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCIDX1). This disease of the immune system results from an early block of T lymphocyte and natural killer (NK) cell differentiation, which leads to a severe cellular and humoral immune defect that is lethal unless treated by bone marrow transplantation. Analysis of the IL-2R[gamma] gene in SCIDX1 patients has revealed the presence of heterogeneous mutations principally located in the extracellular domain of the molecule. We report here three intraexonic mutations and one deletion in the IL-2R[gamma] gene in four SCIDX1 patients. These mutations appear to differentially affect RNA processing, either by decreasing IL-2R[gamma] mRNA level or by the skipping of a constitutive exon. 16 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Functional analysis of missense mutations G36A and G51A in PAX6, and PAX6(5a) causing ocular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sachin; Mishra, Rajnikant

    2011-07-01

    The PAX6 has been described a "master regulator of eye development". A specific ratio of PAX6, and its alternatively spliced isoform, PAX6(5a), has also been observed essential for optimal function. Mutations into PAX6 lead to a number of ocular, and neuronal defects of variable penetrance and expressivity but the mechanism is either poorly understood or underrepresented. This report describes analysis of functions of two missense mutations, G36A, and G51A, causing optic-nerve hypoplasia and optic-disc coloboma in humans, respectively. Mutations were created by site-directed mutagenesis. Products were detected by in-vitro translation and transient transfection to the cultured NIH-3T3 cells. Their DNA-binding, and transcriptional activation properties were analysed through electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase reporter assay, respectively. Mutations induced changes in conformation and secondary structure of PAX6, and PAX6(5a) not only restrict to specific site of mutation in the paired-domain but extend to homeodomain, and transactivation domain. The PAX6-G36A showed reduced binding to PAX6-consensus binding sequence and PAX6(5a)-consensus binding sequence but its binding affinity to homeodomain binding sequence was unaffected. It showed significantly higher transactivation potential through PAX6-consensus binding sequence but reduced activity with PAX6(5a)-consensus binding sequence and homeodomain binding sequence containing luciferase reporters. The PAX6(5a)-G36A showed enhanced transactivation potential with PAX6-consensus binding sequence, PAX6(5a)-consensus binding sequence, and homeodomain binding sequence containing luciferase reporters. The binding affinity of PAX6(5a)-G36A was significantly higher to PAX6-consensus binding sequence, and PAX6(5a)-consensus binding sequence as compared to PAX6(5a) but remains unaffected to homeodomain binding sequence. The enhanced binding affinity was observed by PAX6-G51A to PAX6-consensus binding sequence

  18. Missense Mutation of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Alters Neurocognitive Performance in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Ramli, Norlisah; Waran, Vicknes; Chinna, Karuthan; Bondi, Mark William; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Ganesan, Dharmendra

    2016-01-01

    The predictability of neurocognitive outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury is not straightforward. The extent and nature of recovery in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are usually heterogeneous and not substantially explained by the commonly known demographic and injury-related prognostic factors despite having sustained similar injuries or injury severity. Hence, this study evaluated the effects and association of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) missense mutations in relation to neurocognitive performance among patients with mTBI. 48 patients with mTBI were prospectively recruited and MRI scans of the brain were performed within an average 10.1 (SD 4.2) hours post trauma with assessment of their neuropsychological performance post full Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) recovery. Neurocognitive assessments were repeated again at 6 months follow-up. The paired t-test, Cohen’s d effect size and repeated measure ANOVA were performed to delineate statistically significant differences between the groups [wildtype G allele (Val homozygotes) vs. minor A allele (Met carriers)] and their neuropsychological performance across the time point (T1 = baseline/ admission vs. T2 = 6th month follow-up). Minor A allele carriers in this study generally performed more poorly on neuropsychological testing in comparison wildtype G allele group at both time points. Significant mean differences were observed among the wildtype group in the domains of memory (M = -11.44, SD = 10.0, p = .01, d = 1.22), executive function (M = -11.56, SD = 11.7, p = .02, d = 1.05) and overall performance (M = -6.89 SD = 5.3, p = .00, d = 1.39), while the minor A allele carriers showed significant mean differences in the domains of attention (M = -11.0, SD = 13.1, p = .00, d = .86) and overall cognitive performance (M = -5.25, SD = 8.1, p = .01, d = .66).The minor A allele carriers in comparison to the wildtype G allele group, showed considerably lower scores at admission and

  19. Missense Mutation of Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) Alters Neurocognitive Performance in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Vairavan; Veeramuthu, Vigneswaran; Ahmad-Annuar, Azlina; Ramli, Norlisah; Waran, Vicknes; Chinna, Karuthan; Bondi, Mark William; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Ganesan, Dharmendra

    2016-01-01

    The predictability of neurocognitive outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury is not straightforward. The extent and nature of recovery in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are usually heterogeneous and not substantially explained by the commonly known demographic and injury-related prognostic factors despite having sustained similar injuries or injury severity. Hence, this study evaluated the effects and association of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) missense mutations in relation to neurocognitive performance among patients with mTBI. 48 patients with mTBI were prospectively recruited and MRI scans of the brain were performed within an average 10.1 (SD 4.2) hours post trauma with assessment of their neuropsychological performance post full Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) recovery. Neurocognitive assessments were repeated again at 6 months follow-up. The paired t-test, Cohen's d effect size and repeated measure ANOVA were performed to delineate statistically significant differences between the groups [wildtype G allele (Val homozygotes) vs. minor A allele (Met carriers)] and their neuropsychological performance across the time point (T1 = baseline/ admission vs. T2 = 6th month follow-up). Minor A allele carriers in this study generally performed more poorly on neuropsychological testing in comparison wildtype G allele group at both time points. Significant mean differences were observed among the wildtype group in the domains of memory (M = -11.44, SD = 10.0, p = .01, d = 1.22), executive function (M = -11.56, SD = 11.7, p = .02, d = 1.05) and overall performance (M = -6.89 SD = 5.3, p = .00, d = 1.39), while the minor A allele carriers showed significant mean differences in the domains of attention (M = -11.0, SD = 13.1, p = .00, d = .86) and overall cognitive performance (M = -5.25, SD = 8.1, p = .01, d = .66).The minor A allele carriers in comparison to the wildtype G allele group, showed considerably lower scores at admission and

  20. Novel deletion and a new missense mutation (Glu 217 Lys) at the catalytic site in two adenosine deaminase alleles of a patient with neonatal onset adenosine deaminase severe combined immunodeficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, R.; Nicknam, M.N.; Eng, F.; Yang, D.R.; Borkowsky, W. )

    1992-11-01

    Mutations at the adenosine deaminase (ADA) locus result in a spectrum of disorders, encompassing a fulminant neonatal onset severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and childhood onset immunodeficiency, as well as apparently normal immune function. The extent of accumulation of the toxic metabolite, deoxyATP, correlates directly with severity of disease. The authors have now determined the mutations on both alleles of a child with fulminant, neonatal onset ADA SCID and accumulation of extremely high concentrations of deoxyATP. The genotype was consistent with the severely affected phenotype. One allele carried a large deletion that arose by non-homologous recombination and included the first five exons and promoter region. The second allele carried a missense mutation (G[sup 649]A) resulting in replacement of Glu[sup 217], an amino acid involved in the catalytic site, by Lys and predicting a major alteration in charge. Expression of the mutant cDNA on Cos cells confirmed that the mutation abolished enzyme activity. The authors have previously reported that a missense mutation at the preceding codon is similarly associated with neonatal onset ADA SCID and accumulation of extremely high deoxyATP. These findings suggest that genotype-phenotype correlations may be apparent for ADA SCID, despite the role that random variation in exposure to environmental pathogens may play in the initial phenotype. Such genotype-phenotype correlations may be important to consider in evaluating results of ongoing trials of [open quotes]gene[close quotes] and enzyme replacement therapy. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Case report: A novel apolipoprotein A-I missense mutation apoA-I (Arg149Ser)Boston associated with decreased lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activation and cellular cholesterol efflux.

    PubMed

    Anthanont, Pimjai; Asztalos, Bela F; Polisecki, Eliana; Zachariah, Benoy; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel heterozygous apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) missense mutation (c.517C>A, p.Arg149Ser, designated as apoA-IBoston) in a 67-year-old woman and her 2 sons, who had mean serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, apoA-I, and apoA-I in very large α-1 HDL that were 10%, 35%, and 16% of normal, respectively (all P < .05). The percentage of HDL cholesterol in the esterified form was also significantly (P < .05) reduced to 52% of control values. Cholesteryl ester tranfer protein (CETP) activity was normal. The mean global, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter A1 and scavenger receptor B type I-mediated cellular cholesterol efflux capacity in apoB-depleted serum from affected family members were 41%, 37%, 47%, 54%, and 48% of control values, respectively (all P < .05). lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity in plasma was 71% of controls, whereas in the cell-based assay, it was 73% of control values (P < .05). The data indicate that this novel apoA-I missense is associated with markedly decreased levels of HDL cholesterol and very large α-1 HDL, as well as decreased serum cellular cholesterol efflux and LCAT activity, but not with premature coronary heart disease, similar to other apoA-I mutations that have been associated with decreased LCAT activity.

  2. Case report: A novel apolipoprotein A-I missense mutation apoA-I (Arg149Ser)Boston associated with decreased lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activation and cellular cholesterol efflux.

    PubMed

    Anthanont, Pimjai; Asztalos, Bela F; Polisecki, Eliana; Zachariah, Benoy; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel heterozygous apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) missense mutation (c.517C>A, p.Arg149Ser, designated as apoA-IBoston) in a 67-year-old woman and her 2 sons, who had mean serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, apoA-I, and apoA-I in very large α-1 HDL that were 10%, 35%, and 16% of normal, respectively (all P < .05). The percentage of HDL cholesterol in the esterified form was also significantly (P < .05) reduced to 52% of control values. Cholesteryl ester tranfer protein (CETP) activity was normal. The mean global, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter A1 and scavenger receptor B type I-mediated cellular cholesterol efflux capacity in apoB-depleted serum from affected family members were 41%, 37%, 47%, 54%, and 48% of control values, respectively (all P < .05). lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity in plasma was 71% of controls, whereas in the cell-based assay, it was 73% of control values (P < .05). The data indicate that this novel apoA-I missense is associated with markedly decreased levels of HDL cholesterol and very large α-1 HDL, as well as decreased serum cellular cholesterol efflux and LCAT activity, but not with premature coronary heart disease, similar to other apoA-I mutations that have been associated with decreased LCAT activity. PMID:26073399

  3. Allosteric regulation of carbamoylphosphate synthetase-aspartate transcarbamylase multifunctional protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: selection, mapping and identification of missense mutations define three regions involved in feedback inhibition by UTP.

    PubMed

    Jaquet, L; Serre, V; Lollier, M; Penverne, B; Hervé, G; Souciet, J L; Potier, S

    1995-05-01

    The positive screening procedure previously described was used in order to select, clone and characterize mutants defective in negative feedback control by UTP of the yeast carbamoylphosphate synthetase-aspartate transcarbamylase protein (CPSase-ATCase). The selection procedure was improved by adding a general mapping method for dominant mutations in order to avoid sequencing the whole URA2 allele (7 kb). All 16 mutants obtained carry missense mutations leading to single amino acid replacements: five of them are located in the CPSase domain while the other 11 are in the ATCase domain. In these 16 mutants, ATCase is no longer inhibited by UTP although CPSase retains full sensitivity to the effector, suggesting that the regulation of the two activities involve distinct mechanisms. Amino acid replacements in the ATCase domain were located on a three-dimensional model structure of the yeast ATCase domain. They are clustered in two regions of this domain which must be directly involved in the feedback process. PMID:7752230

  4. [beta]-hexosaminidase isozymes from cells cotransfected with [alpha] and [beta] cDNA constructs: Analysis of the [alpha]-subunit missense mutation associated with the adult form of Tay-Sachs disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.A.; Mahuran, D.J. )

    1993-08-01

    In vitro mutagenesis and transient expression in COS cells has been used to associate a missense mutation with a clinical or biochemical phenotype. Mutations affecting the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A ([alpha][beta]) (E.C.3.2.1.52) result in Tay-Sachs disease. Because hexosaminidase A is heterodimeric, analysis of [alpha]-chain mutations is not straightforward. The authors examine three approaches utilizing previously identified mutations affecting [alpha]-chain folding. These involve transfection of (1) the [alpha] cDNA alone; (2) a [beta] cDNA construct encoding a [beta]-subunit substituted at a position homologous to that of the [alpha]-subunit, and (3) both [alpha] and [beta] cDNAs. The latter two procedures amplified residual activity levels over that of patient samples, an effect not previously found with mutations affecting an [open quotes]active[close quotes] [alpha]Arg residue. This effect may help to discriminate between protein-folding and active-site mutations. The authors conclude that, with proper controls, the latter method of cotransfection can be used to evaluate the effects and perhaps to predict the clinical course of some [alpha]-chain mutations. Using this technique, they demonstrate that the adult-onset Tay-Sachs mutation, [alpha]Gly[yields]Ser[sup 269], does not directly affect [alpha][beta] dimerization but exerts an indirect effect on the dimer through destabilizing the folded [alpha]-subunit at physiological temperatures. Two other [alpha] mutations linked to more severe phenotypes appear to inhibit the initial folding of the subunit. 36 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Y65C missense mutation in the WW domain of the Golabi-Ito-Hall syndrome protein PQBP1 affects its binding activity and deregulates pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Victor E; Nicolaescu, Emilia; McDonald, Caleb B; Musi, Valeria; Oka, Tsutomu; Inayoshi, Yujin; Satteson, Adam C; Mazack, Virginia; Humbert, Jasper; Gaffney, Christian J; Beullens, Monique; Schwartz, Charles E; Landgraf, Christiane; Volkmer, Rudolf; Pastore, Annalisa; Farooq, Amjad; Bollen, Mathieu; Sudol, Marius

    2010-06-18

    The PQBP1 (polyglutamine tract-binding protein 1) gene encodes a nuclear protein that regulates pre-mRNA splicing and transcription. Mutations in the PQBP1 gene were reported in several X chromosome-linked mental retardation disorders including Golabi-Ito-Hall syndrome. The missense mutation that causes this syndrome is unique among other PQBP1 mutations reported to date because it maps within a functional domain of PQBP1, known as the WW domain. The mutation substitutes tyrosine 65 with cysteine and is located within the conserved core of aromatic amino acids of the domain. We show here that the binding property of the Y65C-mutated WW domain and the full-length mutant protein toward its cognate proline-rich ligands was diminished. Furthermore, in Golabi-Ito-Hall-derived lymphoblasts we showed that the complex between PQBP1-Y65C and WBP11 (WW domain-binding protein 11) splicing factor was compromised. In these cells a substantial decrease in pre-mRNA splicing efficiency was detected. Our study points to the critical role of the WW domain in the function of the PQBP1 protein and provides an insight into the molecular mechanism that underlies the X chromosome-linked mental retardation entities classified globally as Renpenning syndrome.

  6. Nonsyndromic X-linked intellectual deficiency in three brothers with a novel MED12 missense mutation [c.5922G>T (p.Glu1974His)

    PubMed Central

    Bouazzi, Habib; Lesca, Gaetan; Trujillo, Carlos; Alwasiyah, Mohammad Khalid; Munnich, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message X-linked intellectual deficiency (XLID) is a large group of genetic disorders. MED12 gene causes syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of XLID. Only seven pathological mutations have been identified in this gene. Here, we report a novel mutation segregating with XLID phenotype. This mutation could be in favor of genotype–phenotype correlations. PMID:26273451

  7. Nonsyndromic X-linked intellectual deficiency in three brothers with a novel MED12 missense mutation [c.5922G>T (p.Glu1974His)].

    PubMed

    Bouazzi, Habib; Lesca, Gaetan; Trujillo, Carlos; Alwasiyah, Mohammad Khalid; Munnich, Arnold

    2015-07-01

    X-linked intellectual deficiency (XLID) is a large group of genetic disorders. MED12 gene causes syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of XLID. Only seven pathological mutations have been identified in this gene. Here, we report a novel mutation segregating with XLID phenotype. This mutation could be in favor of genotype-phenotype correlations. PMID:26273451

  8. Molecular characterization of minor gene rearrangements in Finnish patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia: Identification of two common missense mutations (Gly823{r_arrow}Asp and Leu380{r_arrow}His) and eight rare mutations of the LDL receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Koivisto, U.M.; Viikari, J.S.; Kontula, K.

    1995-10-01

    Two deletions of the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene were previously shown to account for about two thirds of all mutations causing familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Finland. We screened the DNA samples from a cohort representing the remaining 30% of Finnish heterozygous FH patients by amplifying all the 18 exons of the receptor gene by PCR and searching for DNA variations with the SSCP technique. Ten novel mutations were identified, comprising two nonsense and seven missense mutations as well as one frameshift mutation caused by a 13-bp deletion. A single nucleotide change, substituting adenine for guanidine at position 2533 and resulting in an amino acid change of glycine to aspartic acid at codon 823, was found in DNA samples from 14 unrelated FH probands. This mutation (FH-Turku) affects the sequence encoding the putative basolateral sorting signal of the LDL receptor protein; however, the exact functional consequences of this mutation are yet to be examined. The FH-Turku gene and another point mutation (Leu380{r_arrow}His or FH-Pori) together account for {approximately}8% of the FH-causing genes in Finland and are particularly common among FH patients from the southwestern part of the country (combined, 30%). Primer-introduced restriction analysis was applied for convenient assay of the FH-Turku and FH-Pori point mutations. In conclusion, this paper demonstrates the unique genetic background of FH in Finland and describes a commonly occurring FH gene with a missense mutation closest to the C terminus thus far reported. 32 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. A-TWinnipeg: Pathogenesis of rare ATM missense mutation c.6200C>A with decreased protein expression and downstream signaling, early-onset dystonia, cancer, and life-threatening radiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kotoka; Fike, Francesca; Haghayegh, Sara; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Dawson, Angelika J; Dörk, Thilo; Gatti, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    We studied 10 Mennonite patients who carry the c.6200C>A missense mutation (p.A2067D) in the ATM gene, all of whom exhibited a phenotypic variant of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) that is characterized by early-onset dystonia and late-onset mild ataxia, as previously described. This report provides the pathogenetic evidence for this mutation on cellular functions. Several patients have developed cancer and subsequently experienced life-threatening adverse reactions to radiation (radiotoxicity) and/or chemotherapy. As the c.6200C>A mutation is, thus far, unique to the Mennonite population and is always associated with the same haplotype or haplovariant, it was important to rule out any possible confounding DNA variant on the same haplotype. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from Mennonite patients expressed small amounts of ATM protein, which had no autophosphorylation activity at ATM Ser1981, and trace-to-absent transphosphorylation of downstream ATM targets. A-T lymphoblastoid cells stably transfected with ATM cDNA which had been mutated for c.6200C>A did not show a detectable amount of ATM protein. The same stable cell line with mutated ATM cDNA also showed a trace-to-absent transphosphorylation of downstream ATM targets SMC1pSer966 and KAP1pSer824. From these results, we conclude that c.6200A is the disease-causing ATM mutation on this haplotype. The presence of at least trace amounts of ATM kinase activity on some immunoblots may account for the late-onset, mild ataxia of these patients. The cause of the dystonia remains unclear. Because this dystonia-ataxia phenotype is often encountered in the Mennonite population in association with cancer and adverse reactions to chemotherapy, an early diagnosis is important. PMID:25077176

  10. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype.

  11. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype. PMID:26799614

  12. Effects of the missense mutations in canine BRCA2 on BRC repeat 3 functions and comparative analyses between canine and human BRC repeat 3.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Suzuki, Yu; Wada, Seiichi; Taoda, Takahiro; Iwai, Satomi; Chikazawa, Seishiro; Orino, Koichi; Watanabe, Kiyotaka

    2012-01-01

    Mammary tumors are the most common tumor type in both human and canine females. Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, have been found in most cases of inherited human breast cancer. Similarly, the canine BRCA2 gene locus has been associated with mammary tumors in female dogs. However, deleterious mutations in canine BRCA2 have not been reported, thus far. The BRCA2 protein is involved in homologous recombination repair via its interaction with RAD51 recombinase, an interaction mediated by 8 BRC repeats. These repeats are 26-amino acid, conserved motifs in mammalian BRCA2. Previous structural analyses of cancer-associated mutations affecting the BRC repeats have shown that the weakening of RAD51's affinity for even 1 repeat is sufficient to increase breast cancer susceptibility. In this study, we focused on 2 previously reported canine BRCA2 mutations (T1425P and K1435R) in BRC repeat 3 (BRC3), derived from mammary tumor samples. These mutations affected the interaction of canine BRC3 with RAD51, and were considered deleterious. Two BRC3 mutations (K1440R and K1440E), reported in human breast cancer patients, occur at amino acids corresponding to those of the K1435R mutation in dogs. These mutations affected the interaction of canine BRC3 with RAD51, and may also be considered deleterious. The two BRC3 mutations and a substitution (T1430P), corresponding to T1425P in canine BRCA2, were examined for their effects on human BRC3 function and the results were compared between species. The corresponding mutations and the substitution showed similar results in both human and canine BRC3. Therefore, canine BRCA2 may be a good model for studying human breast cancer caused by BRCA2 mutations.

  13. Effects of the missense mutations in canine BRCA2 on BRC repeat 3 functions and comparative analyses between canine and human BRC repeat 3.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Suzuki, Yu; Wada, Seiichi; Taoda, Takahiro; Iwai, Satomi; Chikazawa, Seishiro; Orino, Koichi; Watanabe, Kiyotaka

    2012-01-01

    Mammary tumors are the most common tumor type in both human and canine females. Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, have been found in most cases of inherited human breast cancer. Similarly, the canine BRCA2 gene locus has been associated with mammary tumors in female dogs. However, deleterious mutations in canine BRCA2 have not been reported, thus far. The BRCA2 protein is involved in homologous recombination repair via its interaction with RAD51 recombinase, an interaction mediated by 8 BRC repeats. These repeats are 26-amino acid, conserved motifs in mammalian BRCA2. Previous structural analyses of cancer-associated mutations affecting the BRC repeats have shown that the weakening of RAD51's affinity for even 1 repeat is sufficient to increase breast cancer susceptibility. In this study, we focused on 2 previously reported canine BRCA2 mutations (T1425P and K1435R) in BRC repeat 3 (BRC3), derived from mammary tumor samples. These mutations affected the interaction of canine BRC3 with RAD51, and were considered deleterious. Two BRC3 mutations (K1440R and K1440E), reported in human breast cancer patients, occur at amino acids corresponding to those of the K1435R mutation in dogs. These mutations affected the interaction of canine BRC3 with RAD51, and may also be considered deleterious. The two BRC3 mutations and a substitution (T1430P), corresponding to T1425P in canine BRCA2, were examined for their effects on human BRC3 function and the results were compared between species. The corresponding mutations and the substitution showed similar results in both human and canine BRC3. Therefore, canine BRCA2 may be a good model for studying human breast cancer caused by BRCA2 mutations. PMID:23071527

  14. A novel missense mutation p.L76P in the GJB2 gene causing nonsyndromic recessive deafness in a Brazilian family.

    PubMed

    Batissoco, A C; Auricchio, M T B M; Kimura, L; Tabith-Junior, A; Mingroni-Netto, R C

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in the GJB2 gene, encoding connexin 26 (Cx26), are a major cause of nonsyndromic recessive hearing loss in many countries. We report here on a novel point mutation in GJB2, p.L76P (c.227C>T), in compound heterozygosity with a c.35delG mutation, in two Brazilian sibs, one presenting mild and the other profound nonsyndromic neurosensorial hearing impairment. Their father, who carried a wild-type allele and a p.L76P mutation, had normal hearing. The mutation leads to the substitution of leucine (L) by proline (P) at residue 76, an evolutionarily conserved position in Cx26 as well as in other connexins. This mutation is predicted to affect the first extracellular domain (EC1) or the second transmembrane domain (TM2). EC1 is important for connexon-connexon interaction and for the control of channel voltage gating. The segregation of the c.227C>T (p.L76P) mutation together with c.35delG in this family indicates a recessive mode of inheritance. The association between the p.L76P mutation and hearing impairment is further supported by its absence in a normal hearing control group of 100 individuals, 50 European-Brazilians and 50 African-Brazilians.

  15. Fulminant neurological deterioration in a neonate with Leigh syndrome due to a maternally transmitted missense mutation in the mitochondrial ND3 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Leshinsky-Silver, E.; E-mail: leshinsky@wolfson.health.gov.il; Lev, D.; Tzofi-Berman, Z.; Cohen, S.; Saada, A.; Yanoov-Sharav, M.; Gilad, E.; Lerman-Sagie, T.

    2005-08-26

    Leigh syndrome can result from both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA defects. Mutations in complex V genes of the respiratory chain were considered until recently as the most frequent cause for mitochondrial inherited Leigh syndrome, while gene defects in complex I were related to recessive Leigh syndrome. Recently few reports of mutations in the mitochondrial-encoded complex I subunit genes causing Leigh syndrome have been reported. We describe a 1-month-old baby who acutely deteriorated, with abrupt onset of brainstem dysfunction, due to basal ganglia lesions extending to the brainstem. A muscle biopsy demonstrated complex I deficiency. Subsequent analysis of the mitochondrial genome revealed a homoplastic T10191C mutation in the ND3 gene (in blood and muscle), resulting in a substitution of serine to proline. Hair root analysis revealed a 50% mutant load, reflecting heteroplasmy in early embryonic stages. The mutation was also detected in his mother (5%). Western blot analysis revealed a decrease of the 20 kDa subunit (likely ND6) and of the 30 kDa subunit (NDUFA9), which is probably due to instability attributed to the inability to form subcomplexes with ND3. This is the first description of infantile Leigh syndrome due to a maternally transmitted T10191C substitution in ND3 and not due to a de novo mutation. This mutation is age and tissue dependent and therefore may not be amenable to prenatal testing.

  16. International evaluation of unrecognizably uglifying human faces in late and severe secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney disease. Sagliker syndrome. A unique catastrophic entity, cytogenetic studies for chromosomal abnormalities, calcium-sensing receptor gene and GNAS1 mutations. Striking and promising missense mutations on the GNAS1 gene exons 1, 4, 10, 4.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ismail; Sagliker, Yahya; Demirhan, Osman; Tunc, Erdal; Inandiklioglu, Nihal; Tasdemir, Deniz; Acharya, Vidya; Zhang, Ling; Golea, Ovidia; Sabry, Alaa; Ookalkar, Dhananjay S; Capusa, Cristina; Radulescu, Dana; Garneata, Liliana; Mircescu, Gabriel; Ben Maiz, Hedi; Chen, Cheng Hsu; Prado Rome, Jorge; Benzegoutta, Mansour; Paylar, Nuray; Eyuboglu, Kamil; Karatepe, Ersin; Esenturk, Mustafa; Yavascan, Onder; Grzegorzevska, Alicza; Shilo, Valery; Mazdeh, Mitra Mahdavi; Francesco, Ramos Carillo; Gouda, Zaghloul; Adam, Siddik Momin; Emir, Idris; Ocal, Faith; Usta, Erol; Kiralp, Necati; Sagliker, Cemal; Ozkaynak, Piril Sagliker; Sagliker, Hasan Sabit; Bassuoni, Mahmoud; Sekin, Oktay

    2012-01-01

    Hypotheses explaining pathogenesis of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SH) in late and severe CKD as a unique entity called Sagliker syndrome (SS) are still unclear. This international study contains 60 patients from Turkey, India, Malaysia, China, Romania, Egypt, Tunisia, Taiwan, Mexico, Algeria, Poland, Russia, and Iran. We examined patients and first degree relatives for cytogenetic chromosomal abnormalities, calcium sensing receptor (Ca SR) genes in exons 2 and 3 abnormalities and GNAS1 genes mutations in exons 1, 4, 5, 7, 10, 13. Our syndrome could be a new syndrome in between SH, CKD, and hereditary bone dystrophies. We could not find chromosomal abnormalities in cytogenetics and on Ca SR gene exons 2 and 3. Interestingly, we did find promising missense mutations on the GNAS1 gene exons 1, 4, 10, 4. We finally thought that those catastrophic bone diseases were severe SH and its late treatments due to monetary deficiencies and iatrogenic mistreatments not started as early as possible. This was a sine qua non humanity task. Those brand new striking GNAS1 genes missense mutations have to be considered from now on for the genesis of SS. PMID:22200434

  17. Mapping structural landmarks, ligand binding sites and missense mutations to the collagen IV heterotrimers predicts major functional domains, novel interactions and variation in phenotypes in inherited diseases affecting basement membranes

    PubMed Central

    Des Parkin, J.; San Antonio, James D.; Pedchenko, Vadim; Hudson, Billy; Jensen, Shane T.; Savige, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Collagen IV is the major protein found in basement membranes. It comprises 3 heterotrimers (α1α1α2, α3α4α5, and α5α5α6) that form distinct networks, and are responsible for membrane strength and integrity. We constructed linear maps of the collagen IV heterotrimers (‘interactomes’) that indicated major structural landmarks, known and predicted ligand-binding sites, and missense mutations, in order to identify functional and disease-associated domains, potential interactions between ligands, and genotype-phenotype relationships. The maps documented more than 30 known ligand-binding sites as well as motifs for integrins, heparin, von Willebrand factor (VWF), decorin and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP). They predicted functional domains for angiogenesis and haemostasis, and disease domains for autoimmunity, tumor growth and inhibition, infection and glycation. Cooperative ligand interactions were indicated by binding site proximity, for example, between integrins, matrix metalloproteinases and heparin. The maps indicated that mutations affecting major ligand-binding sites, for example for Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) protein in the α1 chain or integrins in the α5 chain, resulted in distinctive phenotypes (Hereditary Angiopathy, Nephropathy, Aneurysms and muscle Cramps (HANAC) syndrome, and early onset Alport syndrome respectively). These maps further our understanding of basement membrane biology and disease, and suggest novel membrane interactions, functions, and therapeutic targets. PMID:21280145

  18. Insights Into the Pathogenicity of Rare Missense GCK Variants From the Identification and Functional Characterization of Compound Heterozygous and Double Mutations Inherited in Cis

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Nicola L.; Osbak, Kara K.; van de Bunt, Martijn; Tribble, Nicholas D.; Steele, Anna M.; Wensley, Kirsty J.; Edghill, Emma L.; Colcough, Kevin; Barrett, Amy; Valentínová, Lucia; Rundle, Jana K.; Raimondo, Anne; Grimsby, Joseph; Ellard, Sian; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To demonstrate the importance of using a combined genetic and functional approach to correctly interpret a genetic test for monogenic diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We identified three probands with a phenotype consistent with maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) subtype GCK-MODY, in whom two potential pathogenic mutations were identified: [R43H/G68D], [E248 K/I225M], or [G261R/D217N]. Allele-specific PCR and cosegregation were used to determine phase. Single and double mutations were kinetically characterized. RESULTS The mutations occurred in cis (double mutants) in two probands and in trans in one proband. Functional studies of all double mutants revealed inactivating kinetics. The previously reported GCK-MODY mutations R43H and G68D were inherited from an affected father and unaffected mother, respectively. Both our functional and genetic studies support R43H as the cause of GCK-MODY and G68D as a neutral rare variant. CONCLUSIONS These data highlight the need for family/functional studies, even for previously reported pathogenic mutations. PMID:22611063

  19. Missense and nonsense mutations in the alternatively-spliced exon 2 of COL2A1 cause the ocular variant of Stickler syndrome.

    PubMed

    McAlinden, Audrey; Majava, Marja; Bishop, Paul N; Perveen, Rahat; Black, Graeme C M; Pierpont, Mary Ella; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Männikkö, Minna

    2008-01-01

    Stickler syndrome type I (STL1) is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by ocular and extraocular features. It is caused by null-allele mutations in the COL2A1 gene that codes for procollagen II. COL2A1 precursor mRNA undergoes alternative splicing, resulting in two isoforms, a long form including exon 2 (type IIA isoform) and a short form excluding exon 2 (type IIB isoform). The short form is predominantly expressed by differentiated chondrocytes in adult cartilage, and the long form in chondroprogenitor cells during early development and in the vitreous of the eye, which is the only adult tissue containing procollagen IIA. Recent evidence indicates that due to the tissue-specific expression of these two isoforms, premature termination codon mutations in exon 2 cause Stickler syndrome with minimal or no extraocular manifestations. We describe here two mutations in exon 2 of COL2A1 in three patients with predominantly ocular Stickler syndrome: Cys64Stop in two patients, and a novel structural mutation, Cys57Tyr, in one patient. RT-PCR of total lymphoblast RNA from one patient with the Cys64Stop mutation revealed that only the normal allele of the IIA form was present, indicating that the mutation resulted either in complete loss of the allele by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay or by skipping of exon 2 via nonsense-mediated altered splicing, resulting in production of the type IIB isoform. The results of COL2A1 minigene expression studies suggest that both Cys64Stop and Cys57Tyr alter positive cis regulatory elements for splicing, resulting in a lower IIA:IIB ratio.

  20. Missense mutation in immunodeficient patients shows the multifunctional roles of coiled-coil domain 3 (CC3) in STIM1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Mate; Jairaman, Amit; Stathopulos, Peter B.; Muik, Martin; Fahrner, Marc; Weidinger, Carl; Benson, Melina; Fuchs, Sebastian; Ehl, Stephan; Romanin, Christoph; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Prakriya, Murali; Feske, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is a universal Ca2+ influx pathway that is important for the function of many cell types. SOCE occurs upon depletion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ stores and relies on a complex molecular interplay between the plasma membrane (PM) Ca2+ channel ORAI1 and the ER Ca2+ sensor stromal interaction molecule (STIM) 1. Patients with null mutations in ORAI1 or STIM1 genes present with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-like disease. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms by which a loss-of-function STIM1 mutation (R429C) in human patients abolishes SOCE. R429 is located in the third coiled-coil (CC3) domain of the cytoplasmic C terminus of STIM1. Mutation of R429 destabilizes the CC3 structure and alters the conformation of the STIM1 C terminus, thereby releasing a polybasic domain that promotes STIM1 recruitment to ER–PM junctions. However, the mutation also impairs cytoplasmic STIM1 oligomerization and abolishes STIM1–ORAI1 interactions. Thus, despite its constitutive localization at ER–PM junctions, mutant STIM1 fails to activate SOCE. Our results demonstrate multifunctional roles of the CC3 domain in regulating intra- and intermolecular STIM1 interactions that control (i) transition of STIM1 from a quiescent to an active conformational state, (ii) cytoplasmic STIM1 oligomerization, and (iii) STIM1–ORAI1 binding required for ORAI1 activation. PMID:25918394

  1. The de novo missense mutation N117S in skeletal muscle α‑actin 1 causes a mild form of congenital nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Yu, Ping; Chen, Xiang; Cai, Tao

    2016-08-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) constitutes a spectrum of primary skeletal muscle disorders, the diagnosis of which is based on muscle weakness and the visualization of nemaline bodies in muscle biopsies. Mutations in several NM causal genes have been attributed to the majority of NM cases, particularly mutations in nebulin and skeletal muscle α‑actin 1 (ACTA1), which are responsible for ~70% of cases; therefore, a genetic diagnostic strategy using targeted gene sequencing may potentially improve the diagnosis of suspected NM. The present study identified a de novo mutation in ACTA1 (c.350A>G; p.Asn117Ser) in a Chinese patient using target‑capture sequencing of a panel containing 125 known causal genes for inherited muscle diseases. Clinical analyses revealed that the case described in the present study exhibited a relatively mild phenotype with regards to muscle weakness, as compared with more severe phenotypes reported in several other patients with the same mutation, thus suggesting the existence of genetic modifiers. In conclusion, this approach may be helpful for the identification of clinically undiagnosed patients with highly heterogeneous disorders. PMID:27357517

  2. Selective expression of Parkinson's disease-related Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 G2019S missense mutation in midbrain dopaminergic neurons impairs dopamine release and dopaminergic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoxiang; Sgobio, Carmelo; Gu, Xinglong; Sun, Lixin; Lin, Xian; Yu, Jia; Parisiadou, Loukia; Xie, Chengsong; Sastry, Namratha; Ding, Jinhui; Lohr, Kelly M.; Miller, Gary W.; Mateo, Yolanda; Lovinger, David M.; Cai, Huaibin

    2015-01-01

    Preferential dysfunction/degeneration of midbrain substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopaminergic (DA) neurons contributes to the main movement symptoms manifested in Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) G2019S missense mutation (LRRK2 G2019S) is the most common causative genetic factor linked to PD, the effects of LRRK2 G2019S on the function and survival of SNpc DA neurons are poorly understood. Using a binary gene expression system, we generated transgenic mice expressing either wild-type human LRRK2 (WT mice) or the LRRK2 G2019S mutation (G2019S mice) selectively in the midbrain DA neurons. Here we show that overexpression of LRRK2 G2019S did not induce overt motor abnormalities or substantial SNpc DA neuron loss. However, the LRRK2 G2019S mutation impaired dopamine homeostasis and release in aged mice. This reduction in dopamine content/release coincided with the degeneration of DA axon terminals and decreased expression of DA neuron-enriched genes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular monoamine transporter 2, dopamine transporter and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1. These factors are responsible for dopamine synthesis, transport and degradation, and their expression is regulated by transcription factor paired-like homeodomain 3 (PITX3). Levels of Pitx3 mRNA and protein were similarly decreased in the SNpc DA neurons of aged G2019S mice. Together, these findings suggest that PITX3-dependent transcription regulation could be one of the many potential mechanisms by which LRRK2 G2019S acts in SNpc DA neurons, resulting in downregulation of its downstream target genes critical for dopamine homeostasis and release. PMID:26123485

  3. Selective expression of Parkinson's disease-related Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 G2019S missense mutation in midbrain dopaminergic neurons impairs dopamine release and dopaminergic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoxiang; Sgobio, Carmelo; Gu, Xinglong; Sun, Lixin; Lin, Xian; Yu, Jia; Parisiadou, Loukia; Xie, Chengsong; Sastry, Namratha; Ding, Jinhui; Lohr, Kelly M; Miller, Gary W; Mateo, Yolanda; Lovinger, David M; Cai, Huaibin

    2015-09-15

    Preferential dysfunction/degeneration of midbrain substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) dopaminergic (DA) neurons contributes to the main movement symptoms manifested in Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) G2019S missense mutation (LRRK2 G2019S) is the most common causative genetic factor linked to PD, the effects of LRRK2 G2019S on the function and survival of SNpc DA neurons are poorly understood. Using a binary gene expression system, we generated transgenic mice expressing either wild-type human LRRK2 (WT mice) or the LRRK2 G2019S mutation (G2019S mice) selectively in the midbrain DA neurons. Here we show that overexpression of LRRK2 G2019S did not induce overt motor abnormalities or substantial SNpc DA neuron loss. However, the LRRK2 G2019S mutation impaired dopamine homeostasis and release in aged mice. This reduction in dopamine content/release coincided with the degeneration of DA axon terminals and decreased expression of DA neuron-enriched genes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular monoamine transporter 2, dopamine transporter and aldehyde dehydrogenase 1. These factors are responsible for dopamine synthesis, transport and degradation, and their expression is regulated by transcription factor paired-like homeodomain 3 (PITX3). Levels of Pitx3 mRNA and protein were similarly decreased in the SNpc DA neurons of aged G2019S mice. Together, these findings suggest that PITX3-dependent transcription regulation could be one of the many potential mechanisms by which LRRK2 G2019S acts in SNpc DA neurons, resulting in downregulation of its downstream target genes critical for dopamine homeostasis and release.

  4. The Domain II S4-S5 Linker in Nav1.9: A Missense Mutation Enhances Activation, Impairs Fast Inactivation, and Produces Human Painful Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Han, Chongyang; Yang, Yang; de Greef, Bianca T A; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Gerrits, Monique M; Verhamme, Camiel; Qu, Jian; Lauria, Giuseppe; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Faber, Catharina G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-01

    Painful small fiber neuropathy is a challenging medical condition with no effective treatment. Non-genetic causes can be identified in one half of the subjects. Gain-of-function variants of sodium channels Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 have recently been associated with painful small fiber neuropathy. More recently, mutations of sodium channel Nav1.9 have been linked to human pain disorders, with two gain-of-function mutations found in patients with painful small fiber neuropathy. Here we report a novel Nav1.9 mutation, a glycine 699 substitution by arginine (G699R) in the domain II S4-S5 linker, identified in a patient with painful small fiber neuropathy. In this study, we assayed the mutant channels by voltage-clamp in superior cervical ganglion neurons, which do not produce endogenous Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 currents, and provide a novel platform where Nav1.9 is expressed at relatively high levels. Voltage-clamp analysis showed that the mutation hyperpolarizes (-10.1 mV) channel activation, depolarizes (+6.3 mV) steady-state fast inactivation, slows deactivation, and enhances ramp responses compared with wild-type Nav1.9 channels. Current-clamp analysis showed that the G699R mutant channels render dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable, via depolarized resting membrane potential, reduced current threshold and increased evoked firing. These observations show that the domain II S4-S5 linker plays an important role in the gating of Nav1.9 and demonstrates that a mutation in this linker is linked to a common pain disorder. PMID:25791876

  5. The Domain II S4-S5 Linker in Nav1.9: A Missense Mutation Enhances Activation, Impairs Fast Inactivation, and Produces Human Painful Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Han, Chongyang; Yang, Yang; de Greef, Bianca T A; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Gerrits, Monique M; Verhamme, Camiel; Qu, Jian; Lauria, Giuseppe; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Faber, Catharina G; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-01

    Painful small fiber neuropathy is a challenging medical condition with no effective treatment. Non-genetic causes can be identified in one half of the subjects. Gain-of-function variants of sodium channels Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 have recently been associated with painful small fiber neuropathy. More recently, mutations of sodium channel Nav1.9 have been linked to human pain disorders, with two gain-of-function mutations found in patients with painful small fiber neuropathy. Here we report a novel Nav1.9 mutation, a glycine 699 substitution by arginine (G699R) in the domain II S4-S5 linker, identified in a patient with painful small fiber neuropathy. In this study, we assayed the mutant channels by voltage-clamp in superior cervical ganglion neurons, which do not produce endogenous Nav1.8 or Nav1.9 currents, and provide a novel platform where Nav1.9 is expressed at relatively high levels. Voltage-clamp analysis showed that the mutation hyperpolarizes (-10.1 mV) channel activation, depolarizes (+6.3 mV) steady-state fast inactivation, slows deactivation, and enhances ramp responses compared with wild-type Nav1.9 channels. Current-clamp analysis showed that the G699R mutant channels render dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable, via depolarized resting membrane potential, reduced current threshold and increased evoked firing. These observations show that the domain II S4-S5 linker plays an important role in the gating of Nav1.9 and demonstrates that a mutation in this linker is linked to a common pain disorder.

  6. A missense mutation in the VHYNP motif of a DELLA protein causes a semi-dwarf mutant phenotype in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Jilin; Huang, Tiandai; Wang, Fang; Yuan, Fang; Cheng, Xiaomao; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Shuwen; Wu, Jiangsheng; Liu, Kede

    2010-07-01

    Although dwarf genes have been widely used to improve lodging resistance and enhance harvest index in cereal crops, lodging is still a serious problem in rapeseed (Brassica napus) production. A semi-dwarf B. napus mutant, ds-1, was identified through EMS mutagenesis of a microspore-cultured DH line. The mutant had a significant reduction in height due to a lower first branch position and shorter internodes when compared with wild-type cultivars. This dwarfism was inherited as a single semi-dominant gene, ds-1. DS-1 locus was mapped to chromosome A6, and co-segregated with a microsatellite marker BnEMS1125 derived from the gene BnRGA. BnRGA encodes a DELLA protein that functions as a GA signaling repressor. The expression of a mutant BnRGA allele from ds-1, Bnrga-ds, caused dwarf phenotypes in Arabidopsis. Comparative sequencing of RGA open-reading frames (ORFs) of ds-1 and wild-type cultivars revealed a single proline (P)-to-leucine (L) substitution that may lead to a gain-of-function mutation in GA signaling. The expression of the Arabidopsis homolog, Atrga-ds, bearing this site-directed mutation also rendered dwarf phenotypes in Arabidopsis, which demonstrated that the P-to-L mutation in the VHYNP motif of Bnrga-ds is responsible for the dwarfism. A yeast two-hybrid assay confirmed that this mutation inhibited the interaction between Bnrga-ds/Atrga-ds and the GA receptor, AtGID1A, in the presence of GA(3), suggesting that the conserved proline residue in the VHYNP motif of DELLA protein directly participates in DELLA-GID1 interaction. Identification and characterization of the dwarf gene ds-1 will facilitate its utilization in improving lodging resistance in Brassica breeding.

  7. Marfan phenotype variability in a family segregating a missense mutation in the epidermal growth factor-like motif of the fibrillin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, H C; Pyeritz, R E; Puffenberger, E G; Kendzior, R J; Corson, G M; Maslen, C L; Sakai, L Y; Francomano, C A; Cutting, G R

    1992-01-01

    To examine the associations among fibrillin gene mutations, protein function, and Marfan syndrome phenotype, we screened for alterations in the fibrillin coding sequence in patients with a range of manifestations and clinical severity. A cysteine to serine substitution at codon 1409 (C1409S) was identified in an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like motif from one fibrillin allele which segregates with the disease phenotype through three generations of a family affected with the Marfan syndrome. This alteration was not observed in 60 probands from other families or in 88 unrelated normal individuals. The altered cysteine is completely conserved in all EGF-like motifs identified in fibrillin, and in all proteins that contain this motif. These observations strongly indicate that C1409S is the disease-producing mutation in this family. The phenotype of individuals carrying C1409S varied widely with respect to onset of disease, organ-system involvement, and clinical severity; certain affected adults were unaware of their status before being diagnosed through this investigation. We conclude that fibrillin gene defects cause familial Marfan syndrome, that mutations in the EGF-like motif of the fibrillin gene are not uniformly associated with severe disease, and that fibrillin genotype is not the sole determinant of Marfan phenotype. Images PMID:1569206

  8. Integrating In Silico Prediction Methods, Molecular Docking, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation to Predict the Impact of ALK Missense Mutations in Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Priya Doss, C. George; Chen, Luonan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, advancements in next generation sequencing technology have placed personalized genomic medicine upon horizon. Understanding the likelihood of disease causing mutations in complex diseases as pathogenic or neutral remains as a major task and even impossible in the structural context because of its time consuming and expensive experiments. Among the various diseases causing mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) play a vital role in defining individual's susceptibility to disease and drug response. Understanding the genotype-phenotype relationship through SNPs is the first and most important step in drug research and development. Detailed understanding of the effect of SNPs on patient drug response is a key factor in the establishment of personalized medicine. In this paper, we represent a computational pipeline in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) for SNP-centred study by the application of in silico prediction methods, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. Combination of computational methods provides a way in understanding the impact of deleterious mutations in altering the protein drug targets and eventually leading to variable patient's drug response. We hope this rapid and cost effective pipeline will also serve as a bridge to connect the clinicians and in silico resources in tailoring treatments to the patients' specific genotype. PMID:25054154

  9. Forced expression of desmin and desmin mutants in cultured cells: impact of myopathic missense mutations in the central coiled-coil domain on network formation.

    PubMed

    Bär, Harald; Kostareva, Anna; Sjöberg, Gunnar; Sejersen, Thomas; Katus, Hugo A; Herrmann, Harald

    2006-05-15

    We recently demonstrated that inherited disease-causing mutations clustered in the alpha-helical coiled-coil "rod" domain of the muscle-specific intermediate filament (IF) protein desmin display a wide range of inhibitory effects on regular in vitro assembly. In these studies, we showed that individual mutations exhibited phenotypes that were not, with respect to the severity of interference, predictable by our current knowledge of the structural design of IF proteins. Moreover, the behavior of some mutated proteins in a standard tissue culture cell expression system was found to be even more complex. Here, we systematically investigate the behavior of these disease mutants in four different cell types: three not containing desmin or the related IF protein vimentin and the standard fibroblast line 3T3, which has an extensive vimentin system. The ability of the mutants to form filaments in the vimentin-free cells varies considerably, and only the mutants forming IFs in vitro generate extended filamentous networks. Furthermore, these latter mutants integrate into the 3T3 vimentin network but all the others do not. Instead, they cause the endogenous network of 3T3 vimentin to reorganize into perinuclear bundles. In addition, most of these assembly-deficient mutant desmins completely segregate from the vimentin system. Instead, the small round to fibrillar particles formed distribute independently throughout the cytoplasm as well as between the collapsed vimentin filament arrays in the perinuclear area. PMID:16519886

  10. Abnormal cortical synaptic transmission in CaV2.1 knockin mice with the S218L missense mutation which causes a severe familial hemiplegic migraine syndrome in humans.

    PubMed

    Vecchia, Dania; Tottene, Angelita; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Pietrobon, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1) is caused by gain-of-function mutations in CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) Ca(2+) channels. Knockin (KI) mice carrying the FHM1 R192Q missense mutation show enhanced cortical excitatory synaptic transmission at pyramidal cell synapses but unaltered cortical inhibitory neurotransmission at fast-spiking interneuron synapses. Enhanced cortical glutamate release was shown to cause the facilitation of cortical spreading depression (CSD) in R192Q KI mice. It, however, remains unknown how other FHM1 mutations affect cortical synaptic transmission. Here, we studied neurotransmission in cortical neurons in microculture from KI mice carrying the S218L mutation, which causes a severe FHM syndrome in humans and an allele-dosage dependent facilitation of experimental CSD in KI mice, which is larger than that caused by the R192Q mutation. We show gain-of-function of excitatory neurotransmission, due to increased action-potential evoked Ca(2+) influx and increased probability of glutamate release at pyramidal cell synapses, but unaltered inhibitory neurotransmission at multipolar interneuron synapses in S218L KI mice. In contrast with the larger gain-of-function of neuronal CaV2.1 current in homozygous than heterozygous S218L KI mice, the gain-of-function of evoked glutamate release, the paired-pulse ratio and the Ca(2+) dependence of the excitatory postsynaptic current were similar in homozygous and heterozygous S218L KI mice, suggesting compensatory changes in the homozygous mice. Furthermore, we reveal a unique feature of S218L KI cortical synapses which is the presence of a fraction of mutant CaV2.1 channels being open at resting potential. Our data suggest that, while the gain-of-function of evoked glutamate release may explain the facilitation of CSD in heterozygous S218L KI mice, the further facilitation of CSD in homozygous S218L KI mice is due to other CaV2.1-dependent mechanisms, that likely include Ca(2+) influx at voltages sub

  11. A 19-year-old man with relapsing bilateral pneumothorax, hemoptysis, and intrapulmonary cavitary lesions diagnosed with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and a novel missense mutation in COL3A1.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, Bjørg J; Kulseth, Mari Ann; Paus, Benedicte

    2015-05-01

    A 19-year-old sportsman experienced a right-sided pneumothorax and hemoptysis after having had an intermittent cough and blood-tinged sputum for 2 months. A chest CT scan revealed small cavitary lesions in both lungs. The relapsing pneumothorax was treated with a chest tube twice, as well as surgically after the second relapse. Two months after surgery, the patient developed a cough, fever, and high C-reactive protein levels. At that time, large consolidations had developed in the right lung, while the left lung subsequently collapsed due to pneumothorax. The patient's physical appearance and anamnestic information led us to suspect a genetic connective tissue disease. A sequencing analysis of the COL3A1 gene identified a novel, de novo missense mutation that confirmed the diagnosis of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). This atypical presentation of vascular EDS with intrathoracic complications shows that enhanced awareness is required and demonstrates the usefulness of the genetic analyses that are clinically available for several hereditary connective tissue disorders.

  12. A 19-year-old man with relapsing bilateral pneumothorax, hemoptysis, and intrapulmonary cavitary lesions diagnosed with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and a novel missense mutation in COL3A1.

    PubMed

    Abrahamsen, Bjørg J; Kulseth, Mari Ann; Paus, Benedicte

    2015-05-01

    A 19-year-old sportsman experienced a right-sided pneumothorax and hemoptysis after having had an intermittent cough and blood-tinged sputum for 2 months. A chest CT scan revealed small cavitary lesions in both lungs. The relapsing pneumothorax was treated with a chest tube twice, as well as surgically after the second relapse. Two months after surgery, the patient developed a cough, fever, and high C-reactive protein levels. At that time, large consolidations had developed in the right lung, while the left lung subsequently collapsed due to pneumothorax. The patient's physical appearance and anamnestic information led us to suspect a genetic connective tissue disease. A sequencing analysis of the COL3A1 gene identified a novel, de novo missense mutation that confirmed the diagnosis of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). This atypical presentation of vascular EDS with intrathoracic complications shows that enhanced awareness is required and demonstrates the usefulness of the genetic analyses that are clinically available for several hereditary connective tissue disorders. PMID:25940258

  13. Missense mutation of FUT1 and deletion of FUT2 are responsible for Indian Bombay phenotype of ABO blood group system.

    PubMed

    Koda, Y; Soejima, M; Johnson, P H; Smart, E; Kimura, H

    1997-09-01

    The Bombay phenotype fails to express the ABH antigens of ABO blood group system on red blood cells and in secretions because of a lack in activities of the H gene (FUT1)- and Secretor gene (FUT2)-encoded alpha (1,2)fucosyltransferases. In this study, we have examined the FUT1 and the FUT2 from three unrelated Indian individuals with the Bombay phenotype. These three individuals were found to be homozygous for a T725G mutation in the coding region of the FUT1, which inactivated the enzyme activity. In addition, we did not detect any hybridized band corresponding to the FUT2 by Southern blot analysis using the catalytic domain of the FUT2 as a probe, indicating that the three individuals were homozygous for a gene deletion in the FUT2. These results suggest that the T725G mutation of FUT1 and the gene deletion of FUT2 are responsible for the classical Indian Bombay phenotype.

  14. Oral and Craniofacial Manifestations and Two Novel Missense Mutations of the NTRK1 Gene Identified in the Patient with Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yudi; Liu, Xin; Yu, Ping; Xue, Yang; Ma, Shufang; Wei, Kewen; Jin, Yan; Wen, Lingying; Xuan, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system resulting from mutations in neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 gene (NTRK1), which encodes the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TRKA. Here, we investigated the oral and craniofacial manifestations of a Chinese patient affected by autosomal-recessive CIPA and identified compound heterozygosity in the NTRK1 gene. The affected boy has multisystemic disorder with lack of reaction to pain stimuli accompanied by self-mutilation behavior, the inability to sweat leading to defective thermoregulation, and mental retardation. Oral and craniofacial manifestations included a large number of missing teeth, nasal malformation, submucous cleft palate, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and malocclusion. Histopathological evaluation of the skin sample revealed severe peripheral nerve fiber loss as well as mild loss and absent innervation of sweat glands. Ultrastructural and morphometric studies of a shed tooth revealed dental abnormalities, including hypomineralization, dentin hypoplasia, cementogenesis defects and a dysplastic periodontal ligament. Genetic analysis revealed a compound heterozygosity- c.1561T>C and c.2057G>A in the NTRK1 gene. This report extends the spectrum of NTRK1 mutations observed in patients diagnosed with CIPA and provides additional insight for clinical and molecular diagnosis. PMID:23799134

  15. Production of Transgenic Pigs with an Introduced Missense Mutation of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Type IB Gene Related to Prolificacy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xueyan; Yang, Qiang; Zhao, Kewei; Jiang, Chao; Ren, Dongren; Xu, Pan; He, Xiaofang; Liao, Rongrong; Jiang, Kai; Ma, Junwu; Xiao, Shijun; Ren, Jun; Xing, Yuyun

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, transgenic animal technology has witnessed an increasingly wide application in animal breeding. Reproductive traits are economically important to the pig industry. It has been shown that the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IB (BMPR1B) A746G polymorphism is responsible for the fertility in sheep. However, this causal mutation exits exclusively in sheep and goat. In this study, we attempted to create transgenic pigs by introducing this mutation with the aim to improve reproductive traits in pigs. We successfully constructed a vector containing porcine BMPR1B coding sequence (CDS) with the mutant G allele of A746G mutation. In total, we obtained 24 cloned male piglets using handmade cloning (HMC) technique, and 12 individuals survived till maturation. A set of polymerase chain reactions indicated that 11 of 12 matured boars were transgene-positive individuals, and that the transgenic vector was most likely disrupted during cloning. Of 11 positive pigs, one (No. 11) lost a part of the terminator region but had the intact promoter and the CDS regions. cDNA sequencing showed that the introduced allele (746G) was expressed in multiple tissues of transgene-positive offspring of No.11. Western blot analysis revealed that BMPR1B protein expression in multiple tissues of transgene-positive F1 piglets was 0.5 to 2-fold higher than that in the transgene-negative siblings. The No. 11 boar showed normal litter size performance as normal pigs from the same breed. Transgene-positive F1 boars produced by No. 11 had higher semen volume, sperm concentration and total sperm per ejaculate than the negative siblings, although the differences did not reached statistical significance. Transgene-positive F1 sows had similar litter size performance to the negative siblings, and more data are needed to adequately assess the litter size performance. In conclusion, we obtained 24 cloned transgenic pigs with the modified porcine BMPR1B CDS using HMC. c

  16. Production of Transgenic Pigs with an Introduced Missense Mutation of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor Type IB Gene Related to Prolificacy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xueyan; Yang, Qiang; Zhao, Kewei; Jiang, Chao; Ren, Dongren; Xu, Pan; He, Xiaofang; Liao, Rongrong; Jiang, Kai; Ma, Junwu; Xiao, Shijun; Ren, Jun; Xing, Yuyun

    2016-07-01

    In the last few decades, transgenic animal technology has witnessed an increasingly wide application in animal breeding. Reproductive traits are economically important to the pig industry. It has been shown that the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type IB (BMPR1B) A746G polymorphism is responsible for the fertility in sheep. However, this causal mutation exits exclusively in sheep and goat. In this study, we attempted to create transgenic pigs by introducing this mutation with the aim to improve reproductive traits in pigs. We successfully constructed a vector containing porcine BMPR1B coding sequence (CDS) with the mutant G allele of A746G mutation. In total, we obtained 24 cloned male piglets using handmade cloning (HMC) technique, and 12 individuals survived till maturation. A set of polymerase chain reactions indicated that 11 of 12 matured boars were transgene-positive individuals, and that the transgenic vector was most likely disrupted during cloning. Of 11 positive pigs, one (No. 11) lost a part of the terminator region but had the intact promoter and the CDS regions. cDNA sequencing showed that the introduced allele (746G) was expressed in multiple tissues of transgene-positive offspring of No.11. Western blot analysis revealed that BMPR1B protein expression in multiple tissues of transgene-positive F1 piglets was 0.5 to 2-fold higher than that in the transgene-negative siblings. The No. 11 boar showed normal litter size performance as normal pigs from the same breed. Transgene-positive F1 boars produced by No. 11 had higher semen volume, sperm concentration and total sperm per ejaculate than the negative siblings, although the differences did not reached statistical significance. Transgene-positive F1 sows had similar litter size performance to the negative siblings, and more data are needed to adequately assess the litter size performance. In conclusion, we obtained 24 cloned transgenic pigs with the modified porcine BMPR1B CDS using HMC. c

  17. A Missense Mutation in the LIM2 Gene Is Associated with Autosomal Recessive Presenile Cataract in an Inbred Iraqi Jewish Family

    PubMed Central

    Pras, Eran; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Bakhan, Tangiz; Lahat, Hadas; Assia, Ehud; Geffen-Carmi, Noa; Frydman, Moshe; Goldman, Boleslaw; Pras, Elon

    2002-01-01

    In an inbred Iraqi Jewish family, we have studied three siblings with presenile cataract first noticed between the ages of 20 and 51 years and segregating in an autosomal recessive mode. Using microsatellite repeat markers in close proximity to 25 genes and loci previously associated with congenital cataracts in humans and mice, we identified five markers on chromosome 19q that cosegregated with the disease. Sequencing of LIM2, one of two candidate genes in this region, revealed a homozygous T→G change resulting in a phenylalanine-to-valine substitution at position 105 of the protein. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first report, in humans, of cataract formation associated with a mutation in LIM2. Studies of late-onset single-gene cataracts may provide insight into the pathogenesis of the more common age-related cataracts. PMID:11917274

  18. A targeted Coch missense mutation: a knock-in mouse model for DFNA9 late-onset hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Nahid G.; Jones, Sherri M.; Sivakumaran, Theru A.; Giersch, Anne B.S.; Jurado, Sara A.; Call, Linda M.; Miller, Constance E.; Maison, Stéphane F.; Liberman, M. Charles; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in COCH (coagulation factor C homology) are etiologic for the late-onset, progressive, sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction known as DFNA9. We introduced the G88E mutation by gene targeting into the mouse and have created a CochG88E/G88E mouse model for the study of DFNA9 pathogenesis and cochlin function. Vestibular-evoked potential (VsEP) thresholds of CochG88E/G88E mice were elevated at all ages tested compared with wild-type littermates. At the oldest ages, two out of eight CochG88E/G88E mice had no measurable VsEP. Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds of CochG88E/G88E mice were substantially elevated at 21 months but not at younger ages tested. At 21 months, four of eight CochG88E/G88E mice had absent ABRs at all frequencies tested and two of three CochG88E/+ mice had absent ABRs at three of four frequencies tested. Distortion product otoacoustic emission amplitudes of CochG88E/G88E mice were substantially lower than Coch+/+ mice and absent in the same CochG88E/G88E mice with absent ABRs. These results suggest that vestibular function is affected beginning as early as 11 months when cochlear function appears to be normal, and dysfunction increases with age. Hearing loss declines substantially at 21 months of age and progresses to profound hearing loss at some to all frequencies tested. This is the only mouse model developed to date where hearing loss begins at such an advanced age, providing an opportunity to study both progressive age-related hearing loss and possible interventional therapies. PMID:18697796

  19. Exome sequencing identifies de novo gain of function missense mutation in KCND2 in identical twins with autism and seizures that slows potassium channel inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hane; Lin, Meng-chin A; Kornblum, Harley I; Papazian, Diane M; Nelson, Stanley F

    2014-07-01

    Numerous studies and case reports show comorbidity of autism and epilepsy, suggesting some common molecular underpinnings of the two phenotypes. However, the relationship between the two, on the molecular level, remains unclear. Here, whole exome sequencing was performed on a family with identical twins affected with autism and severe, intractable seizures. A de novo variant was identified in the KCND2 gene, which encodes the Kv4.2 potassium channel. Kv4.2 is a major pore-forming subunit in somatodendritic subthreshold A-type potassium current (ISA) channels. The de novo mutation p.Val404Met is novel and occurs at a highly conserved residue within the C-terminal end of the transmembrane helix S6 region of the ion permeation pathway. Functional analysis revealed the likely pathogenicity of the variant in that the p.Val404Met mutant construct showed significantly slowed inactivation, either by itself or after equimolar coexpression with the wild-type Kv4.2 channel construct consistent with a dominant effect. Further, the effect of the mutation on closed-state inactivation was evident in the presence of auxiliary subunits that associate with Kv4 subunits to form ISA channels in vivo. Discovery of a functionally relevant novel de novo variant, coupled with physiological evidence that the mutant protein disrupts potassium current inactivation, strongly supports KCND2 as the causal gene for epilepsy in this family. Interaction of KCND2 with other genes implicated in autism and the role of KCND2 in synaptic plasticity provide suggestive evidence of an etiological role in autism. PMID:24501278

  20. A missense mutation in DCDC2 causes human recessive deafness DFNB66, likely by interfering with sensory hair cell and supporting cell cilia length regulation

    PubMed Central

    Grati, M'hamed; Chakchouk, Imen; Ma, Qi; Bensaid, Mariem; Desmidt, Alexandra; Turki, Nouha; Yan, Denise; Baanannou, Aissette; Mittal, Rahul; Driss, Nabil; Blanton, Susan; Farooq, Amjad; Lu, Zhongmin; Liu, Xue Zhong; Masmoudi, Saber

    2015-01-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans. We show that a point mutation in DCDC2 (DCDC2a), a member of doublecortin domain-containing protein superfamily, causes non-syndromic recessive deafness DFNB66 in a Tunisian family. Using immunofluorescence on rat inner ear neuroepithelia, DCDC2a was found to localize to the kinocilia of sensory hair cells and the primary cilia of nonsensory supporting cells. DCDC2a fluorescence is distributed along the length of the kinocilium with increased density toward the tip. DCDC2a-GFP overexpression in non-polarized COS7 cells induces the formation of long microtubule-based cytosolic cables suggesting a role in microtubule formation and stabilization. Deafness mutant DCDC2a expression in hair cells and supporting cells causes cilium structural defects, such as cilium branching, and up to a 3-fold increase in length ratios. In zebrafish, the ortholog dcdc2b was found to be essential for hair cell development, survival and function. Our results reveal DCDC2a to be a deafness gene and a player in hair cell kinocilia and supporting cell primary cilia length regulation likely via its role in microtubule formation and stabilization. PMID:25601850

  1. A missense mutation in DCDC2 causes human recessive deafness DFNB66, likely by interfering with sensory hair cell and supporting cell cilia length regulation.

    PubMed

    Grati, M'hamed; Chakchouk, Imen; Ma, Qi; Bensaid, Mariem; Desmidt, Alexandra; Turki, Nouha; Yan, Denise; Baanannou, Aissette; Mittal, Rahul; Driss, Nabil; Blanton, Susan; Farooq, Amjad; Lu, Zhongmin; Liu, Xue Zhong; Masmoudi, Saber

    2015-05-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory deficit in humans. We show that a point mutation in DCDC2 (DCDC2a), a member of doublecortin domain-containing protein superfamily, causes non-syndromic recessive deafness DFNB66 in a Tunisian family. Using immunofluorescence on rat inner ear neuroepithelia, DCDC2a was found to localize to the kinocilia of sensory hair cells and the primary cilia of nonsensory supporting cells. DCDC2a fluorescence is distributed along the length of the kinocilium with increased density toward the tip. DCDC2a-GFP overexpression in non-polarized COS7 cells induces the formation of long microtubule-based cytosolic cables suggesting a role in microtubule formation and stabilization. Deafness mutant DCDC2a expression in hair cells and supporting cells causes cilium structural defects, such as cilium branching, and up to a 3-fold increase in length ratios. In zebrafish, the ortholog dcdc2b was found to be essential for hair cell development, survival and function. Our results reveal DCDC2a to be a deafness gene and a player in hair cell kinocilia and supporting cell primary cilia length regulation likely via its role in microtubule formation and stabilization.

  2. Missense Mutations in LRP5 Associated with High Bone Mass Protect the Mouse Skeleton from Disuse- and Ovariectomy-Induced Osteopenia

    PubMed Central

    Niziolek, Paul J.; Bullock, Whitney; Warman, Matthew L.; Robling, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-5 (LRP5), a co-receptor in the Wnt signaling pathway, modulates bone mass in humans and in mice. Lrp5 knock-out mice have severely impaired responsiveness to mechanical stimulation whereas Lrp5 gain-of-function knock-in and transgenic mice have enhanced responsiveness to mechanical stimulation. Those observations highlight the importance of Lrp5 protein in bone cell mechanotransduction. It is unclear if and how high bone mass-causing (HBM) point mutations in Lrp5 alter the bone-wasting effects of mechanical disuse. To address this issue we explored the skeletal effects of mechanical disuse using two models, tail suspension and Botulinum toxin-induced muscle paralysis, in two different Lrp5 HBM knock-in mouse models. A separate experiment employing estrogen withdrawal-induced bone loss by ovariectomy was also conducted as a control. Both disuse stimuli induced significant bone loss in WT mice, but Lrp5 A214V and G171V were partially or fully protected from the bone loss that normally results from disuse. Trabecular bone parameters among HBM mice were significantly affected by disuse in both models, but these data are consistent with DEXA data showing a failure to continue growing in HBM mice, rather than a loss of pre-existing bone. Ovariectomy in Lrp5 HBM mice resulted in similar protection from catabolism as was observed for the disuse experiments. In conclusion, the Lrp5 HBM alleles offer significant protection from the resorptive effects of disuse and from estrogen withdrawal, and consequently, present a potential mechanism to mimic with pharmaceutical intervention to protect against various bone-wasting stimuli. PMID:26554834

  3. Exome sequencing identification of a GJB1 missense mutation in a kindred with X-linked spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA-X1)

    PubMed Central

    Caramins, Melody; Colebatch, James G.; Bainbridge, Matthew N.; Scherer, Steven S.; Abrams, Charles K.; Hackett, Emma L.; Freidin, Mona M.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Wang, Min; Wu, Yuanqing; Muzny, Donna M.; Lindeman, Robert; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    We undertook a gene identification and molecular characterization project in a large kindred originally clinically diagnosed with SCA-X1. While presenting with ataxia, this kindred also had some unique peripheral nervous system features. The implicated region on the X chromosome was delineated using haplotyping. Large deletions and duplications were excluded by array comparative genomic hybridization. Exome sequencing was undertaken in two affected subjects. The single identified X chromosome candidate variant was then confirmed to co-segregate appropriately in all affected, carrier and unaffected family members by Sanger sequencing. The variant was confirmed to be novel by comparison with dbSNP, and filtering for a minor allele frequency of <1% in 1000 Genomes project, and was not present in the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project or a local database at the BCM HGSC. Functional experiments on transfected cells were subsequently undertaken to assess the biological effect of the variant in vitro. The variant identified consisted of a previously unidentified non-synonymous variant, GJB1 p.P58S, in the Connexin 32/Gap Junction Beta 1 gene. Segregation studies with Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of the variant in all affected individuals and one known carrier, and the absence of the variant in unaffected members. Functional studies confirmed that the p.P58S variant reduced the number and size of gap junction plaques, but the conductance of the gap junctions was unaffected. Two X-linked ataxias have been associated with genetic loci, with the first of these recently characterized at the molecular level. This represents the second kindred with molecular characterization of X-linked ataxia, and is the first instance of a previously unreported GJB1 mutation with a dominant and permanent ataxia phenotype, although different CNS deficits have previously been reported. This pedigree has also been relatively unique in its phenotype due to the presence of central and

  4. Extra nuchal-type fibroma associated with elastosis, traumatic neuroma, a rare APC gene missense mutation, and a very rare MUTYH gene polymorphism: a case report and review of the literature*.

    PubMed

    Linos, Konstantinos; Sedivcová, Monika; Cerna, Katerina; Sima, Radek; Kazakov, Dmitry V; Nazeer, Tipu; Glazyrin, Alexey; Valerian, Brian T; Carlson, J Andrew

    2011-11-01

    We report a case of an extra nuchal-type fibroma in a 51-year-old male suspected to have attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (Gardner's syndrome), who presented with a longstanding buttock mass excised due to enlargement and pain. Histopathologically, lobules of haphazard, hypocellular, hyalinized collagen bundles replaced the dermis and subcutis and entrapped nerve bundles, mimicking Morton neuroma. Ramifying nerve twigs found around larger nerve fascicles showed the co-existence of traumatic neuroma. Elastic tissue stain revealed elastosis characterized by large, arborizing fibers lying between and within the hyalinized collagen bundles. Modified Masson's trichrome stain showed light blue staining of collagen bundles producing the hyalinized nodules with irregular, light red staining of collagen bundles at their periphery and within tumor collagen. Compression and/or degeneration of collagen and secondary elastosis with later entrapment by tumor collagen could explain this microscopic phenotype. By immunohistochemistry, tumor spindle cells expressed nuclear β-catenin and cyclin D1, mostly within regions of fibrosis implicating activation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-Wnt pathway. Genetic analysis showed a missense mutation in APC gene (c.7504G>A, p.G2502S in exon 15) and a functional homozygous polymorphism in the MUTYH gene (c.36+325G>C, (IVS1+5G/C)). Nuchal-type fibroma has been associated with Gardner's syndrome and trauma. In this patient, genetic predisposition coupled with repetitive, localized trauma and collagen degeneration may have provided the stimulus for the development of extra nuchal-type fibroma.

  5. In Silico Analysis of FMR1 Gene Missense SNPs.

    PubMed

    Tekcan, Akin

    2016-06-01

    The FMR1 gene, a member of the fragile X-related gene family, is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS). Missense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are responsible for many complex diseases. The effect of FMR1 gene missense SNPs is unknown. The aim of this study, using in silico techniques, was to analyze all known missense mutations that can affect the functionality of the FMR1 gene, leading to mental retardation (MR) and FXS. Data on the human FMR1 gene were collected from the Ensembl database (release 81), National Centre for Biological Information dbSNP Short Genetic Variations database, 1000 Genomes Browser, and NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project Exome Variant Server. In silico analysis was then performed. One hundred-twenty different missense SNPs of the FMR1 gene were determined. Of these, 11.66 % of the FMR1 gene missense SNPs were in highly conserved domains, and 83.33 % were in domains with high variety. The results of the in silico prediction analysis showed that 31.66 % of the FMR1 gene SNPs were disease related and that 50 % of SNPs had a pathogenic effect. The results of the structural and functional analysis revealed that although the R138Q mutation did not seem to have a damaging effect on the protein, the G266E and I304N SNPs appeared to disturb the interaction between the domains and affect the function of the protein. This is the first study to analyze all missense SNPs of the FMR1 gene. The results indicate the applicability of a bioinformatics approach to FXS and other FMR1-related diseases. I think that the analysis of FMR1 gene missense SNPs using bioinformatics methods would help diagnosis of FXS and other FMR1-related diseases. PMID:26880065

  6. In Silico Analysis of FMR1 Gene Missense SNPs.

    PubMed

    Tekcan, Akin

    2016-06-01

    The FMR1 gene, a member of the fragile X-related gene family, is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS). Missense single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are responsible for many complex diseases. The effect of FMR1 gene missense SNPs is unknown. The aim of this study, using in silico techniques, was to analyze all known missense mutations that can affect the functionality of the FMR1 gene, leading to mental retardation (MR) and FXS. Data on the human FMR1 gene were collected from the Ensembl database (release 81), National Centre for Biological Information dbSNP Short Genetic Variations database, 1000 Genomes Browser, and NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project Exome Variant Server. In silico analysis was then performed. One hundred-twenty different missense SNPs of the FMR1 gene were determined. Of these, 11.66 % of the FMR1 gene missense SNPs were in highly conserved domains, and 83.33 % were in domains with high variety. The results of the in silico prediction analysis showed that 31.66 % of the FMR1 gene SNPs were disease related and that 50 % of SNPs had a pathogenic effect. The results of the structural and functional analysis revealed that although the R138Q mutation did not seem to have a damaging effect on the protein, the G266E and I304N SNPs appeared to disturb the interaction between the domains and affect the function of the protein. This is the first study to analyze all missense SNPs of the FMR1 gene. The results indicate the applicability of a bioinformatics approach to FXS and other FMR1-related diseases. I think that the analysis of FMR1 gene missense SNPs using bioinformatics methods would help diagnosis of FXS and other FMR1-related diseases.

  7. KD4v: Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin; Walter, Vincent; Linard, Benjamin; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Wicker, Nicolas; Lecompte, Odile; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-07-01

    A major challenge in the post-genomic era is a better understanding of how human genetic alterations involved in disease affect the gene products. The KD4v (Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant) server allows to characterize and predict the phenotypic effects (deleterious/neutral) of missense variants. The server provides a set of rules learned by Induction Logic Programming (ILP) on a set of missense variants described by conservation, physico-chemical, functional and 3D structure predicates. These rules are interpretable by non-expert humans and are used to accurately predict the deleterious/neutral status of an unknown mutation. The web server is available at http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/kd4v.

  8. KD4v: comprehensible knowledge discovery system for missense variant

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin; Walter, Vincent; Linard, Benjamin; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Wicker, Nicolas; Lecompte, Odile; Thompson, Julie D.; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge in the post-genomic era is a better understanding of how human genetic alterations involved in disease affect the gene products. The KD4v (Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant) server allows to characterize and predict the phenotypic effects (deleterious/neutral) of missense variants. The server provides a set of rules learned by Induction Logic Programming (ILP) on a set of missense variants described by conservation, physico-chemical, functional and 3D structure predicates. These rules are interpretable by non-expert humans and are used to accurately predict the deleterious/neutral status of an unknown mutation. The web server is available at http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/kd4v. PMID:22641855

  9. Growing recognition of the role for rare missense substitutions in breast cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Tavtigian, Sean V; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer susceptibility genes function as tumor suppressors; accordingly, the focus of mutation screening in breast cancer families has been to identify protein-truncating mutations. However, it is now clear that, for some breast cancer susceptibility genes, a significant proportion of the burden of disease comes from rare missense substitutions. Among genes that have been extensively evaluated, BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2 and BRIP1 stand as examples where the majority of mutations lead to protein truncation; TP53 provides a counter example, where the majority of pathogenic variants are missense substitutions. In ATM and CHEK2, missense substitutions are probably equally or more important in terms of their frequency and attributable risk. Therefore, ongoing efforts to identify new susceptibility genes should not ignore missense variation. PMID:24796624

  10. Disease-proportional proteasomal degradation of missense dystrophins.

    PubMed

    Talsness, Dana M; Belanto, Joseph J; Ervasti, James M

    2015-10-01

    The 427-kDa protein dystrophin is expressed in striated muscle where it physically links the interior of muscle fibers to the extracellular matrix. A range of mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin lead to a severe muscular dystrophy known as Duchenne (DMD) or a typically milder form known as Becker (BMD). Patients with nonsense mutations in dystrophin are specifically targeted by stop codon read-through drugs, whereas out-of-frame deletions and insertions are targeted by exon-skipping therapies. Both treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials. Dystrophin missense mutations, however, cause a wide range of phenotypic severity in patients. The molecular and cellular consequences of such mutations are not well understood, and there are no therapies specifically targeting this genotype. Here, we have modeled two representative missense mutations, L54R and L172H, causing DMD and BMD, respectively, in full-length dystrophin. In vitro, the mutation associated with the mild phenotype (L172H) caused a minor decrease in tertiary stability, whereas the L54R mutation associated with a severe phenotype had a more dramatic effect. When stably expressed in mammalian muscle cells, the mutations caused steady-state decreases in dystrophin protein levels inversely proportional to the tertiary stability and directly caused by proteasomal degradation. Both proteasome inhibitors and heat shock activators were able to increase mutant dystrophin to WT levels, establishing the new cell lines as a platform to screen for potential therapeutics personalized to patients with destabilized dystrophin. PMID:26392559

  11. Disease-proportional proteasomal degradation of missense dystrophins

    PubMed Central

    Talsness, Dana M.; Belanto, Joseph J.; Ervasti, James M.

    2015-01-01

    The 427-kDa protein dystrophin is expressed in striated muscle where it physically links the interior of muscle fibers to the extracellular matrix. A range of mutations in the DMD gene encoding dystrophin lead to a severe muscular dystrophy known as Duchenne (DMD) or a typically milder form known as Becker (BMD). Patients with nonsense mutations in dystrophin are specifically targeted by stop codon read-through drugs, whereas out-of-frame deletions and insertions are targeted by exon-skipping therapies. Both treatment strategies are currently in clinical trials. Dystrophin missense mutations, however, cause a wide range of phenotypic severity in patients. The molecular and cellular consequences of such mutations are not well understood, and there are no therapies specifically targeting this genotype. Here, we have modeled two representative missense mutations, L54R and L172H, causing DMD and BMD, respectively, in full-length dystrophin. In vitro, the mutation associated with the mild phenotype (L172H) caused a minor decrease in tertiary stability, whereas the L54R mutation associated with a severe phenotype had a more dramatic effect. When stably expressed in mammalian muscle cells, the mutations caused steady-state decreases in dystrophin protein levels inversely proportional to the tertiary stability and directly caused by proteasomal degradation. Both proteasome inhibitors and heat shock activators were able to increase mutant dystrophin to WT levels, establishing the new cell lines as a platform to screen for potential therapeutics personalized to patients with destabilized dystrophin. PMID:26392559

  12. Type IV Procollagen Missense Mutations Associated With Defects of the Eye, Vascular Stability, the Brain, Kidney Function and Embryonic or Postnatal Viability in the Mouse, Mus musculus: An Extension of the Col4a1 Allelic Series and the Identification of the First Two Col4a2 Mutant Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Favor, Jack; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Janik, Dirk; Klempt, Martina; Neuhäuser-Klaus, Angelika; Pretsch, Walter; Schmahl, Wolfgang; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia

    2007-01-01

    The basement membrane is important for proper tissue development, stability, and physiology. Major components of the basement membrane include laminins and type IV collagens. The type IV procollagens Col4a1 and Col4a2 form the heterotrimer [α1(IV)]2[α2(IV)], which is ubiquitously expressed in basement membranes during early developmental stages. We present the genetic, molecular, and phenotypic characterization of nine Col4a1 and three Col4a2 missense mutations recovered in random mutagenesis experiments in the mouse. Heterozygous carriers express defects in the eye, the brain, kidney function, vascular stability, and viability. Homozygotes do not survive beyond the second trimester. Ten mutations result in amino acid substitutions at nine conserved Gly sites within the collagenous domain, one mutation is in the carboxy-terminal noncollagenous domain, and one mutation is in the signal peptide sequence and is predicted to disrupt the signal peptide cleavage site. Patients with COL4A2 mutations have still not been identified. We suggest that the spontaneous intraorbital hemorrhages observed in the mouse are a clinically relevant phenotype with a relatively high predictive value to identify carriers of COL4A1 or COL4A2 mutations. PMID:17179069

  13. Classification of BRCA1 missense variants of unknown clinical significance

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, C; Dapic, V; Tice, B; Favis, R; Kwan, E; Barany, F; Manoukian, S; Radice, P; van der Luijt, R B; van Nesselrooij, B P M; Chenevix-Trench, G; kConFab; Caldes, T; de La Hoya, M; Lindquist, S; Tavtigian, S; Goldgar, D; Borg, A; Narod, S; Monteiro, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: BRCA1 is a tumour suppressor with pleiotropic actions. Germline mutations in BRCA1 are responsible for a large proportion of breast–ovarian cancer families. Several missense variants have been identified throughout the gene but because of lack of information about their impact on the function of BRCA1, predictive testing is not always informative. Classification of missense variants into deleterious/high risk or neutral/low clinical significance is essential to identify individuals at risk. Objective: To investigate a panel of missense variants. Methods and results: The panel was investigated in a comprehensive framework that included (1) a functional assay based on transcription activation; (2) segregation analysis and a method of using incomplete pedigree data to calculate the odds of causality; (3) a method based on interspecific sequence variation. It was shown that the transcriptional activation assay could be used as a test to characterise mutations in the carboxy-terminus region of BRCA1 encompassing residues 1396–1863. Thirteen missense variants (H1402Y, L1407P, H1421Y, S1512I, M1628T, M1628V, T1685I, G1706A, T1720A, A1752P, G1788V, V1809F, and W1837R) were specifically investigated. Conclusions: While individual classification schemes for BRCA1 alleles still present limitations, a combination of several methods provides a more powerful way of identifying variants that are causally linked to a high risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The framework presented here brings these variants nearer to clinical applicability. PMID:15689452

  14. A single missense mutation in a coiled-coil domain of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S2 confers a thermosensitive phenotype that can be suppressed by ribosomal protein S1.

    PubMed

    Aseev, Leonid V; Chugunov, Anton O; Efremov, Roman G; Boni, Irina V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal protein S2 is an essential component of translation machinery, and its viable mutated variants conferring distinct phenotypes serve as a valuable tool in studying the role of S2 in translation regulation. One of a few available rpsB mutants, rpsB1, shows thermosensitivity and ensures enhanced expression of leaderless mRNAs. In this study, we identified the nature of the rpsB1 mutation. Sequencing of the rpsB1 allele revealed a G-to-A transition in the part of the rpsB gene which encodes a coiled-coil domain of S2. The resulting E132K substitution resides in a highly conserved site, TKKE, a so-called N-terminal capping box, at the beginning of the second alpha helix. The protruding coiled-coil domain of S2 is known to provide binding with 16S rRNA in the head of the 30S subunit and, in addition, to interact with a key mRNA binding protein, S1. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a detrimental impact of the E132K mutation on the coiled-coil structure and thereby on the interactions between S2 and 16S rRNA, providing a clue for the thermosensitivity of the rpsB1 mutant. Using a strain producing a leaderless lacZ transcript from the chromosomal lac promoter, we demonstrated that not only the rpsB1 mutation generating S2/S1-deficient ribosomes but also the rpsA::IS10 mutation leading to partial deficiency in S1 alone increased translation efficiency of the leaderless mRNA by about 10-fold. Moderate overexpression of S1 relieved all these effects and, moreover, suppressed the thermosensitive phenotype of rpsB1, indicating the role of S1 as an extragenic suppressor of the E132K mutation.

  15. ABO exon and intron analysis in individuals with the AweakB phenotype reveals a novel O1v-A2 hybrid allele that causes four missense mutations in the A transferase

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini-Maaf, Bahram; Hellberg, Åsa; Rodrigues, Maria J; Chester, M Alan; Olsson, Martin L

    2003-01-01

    Background Since the cloning in 1990 of cDNA corresponding to mRNA transcribed at the blood-group ABO locus, polymorphisms due to ethnic and/or phenotypic variations have been reported. Some subgroups have been explained at the molecular level, but unresolved samples are frequently encountered in the reference laboratory. Results ABO blood grouping discrepancies were investigated serologically and by ABO genotyping [duplex polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) – restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR – allele-specific-primer (ASP) across intron 6] and DNA sequencing of the ABO gene and its proposed regulatory elements. Blood samples from five individuals living in Portugal, Switzerland, Sweden and the USA were analysed. These individuals were confirmed to be of Black ethnic origin and had the unusual AweakB phenotype but appeared to have the A2B genotype without previously reported mutations associated with weak A or B expression. Sequencing of this A allele (having 467C>T and 1061delC associated with the common A2 [A201] allele) revealed three mutations regularly encountered in the O1v [O02] allele: 106C>T (Val36Phe), 188G>A (Arg63His), 220C>T (Pro74Ser) in exons 3, 4 and 5, respectively. The additional presence of 46G>A (Ala16Thr) was noted, whilst 189C>T that normally accompanies 188G>A in O1v was missing, as were all O1v-related mutations in exons 6 and 7 (261delG, 297A>G, 646T>A, 681G>A, 771C>T and 829G>A). On screening other samples, 46G>A was absent, but two new O alleles were found, a Jordanian O1 and an African O1v allele having 188G>A but lacking 189C>T. Sequencing of introns 2, 3, 4 and 5 in common alleles (A1 [A101], A2, B [B101], O1, O1vand O2 [O03]) revealed 7, 12, 17 and 8 polymorphic positions, respectively, suggesting that alleles could be defined by intronic sequences. These polymorphic sites allowed definition of a breakpoint in intron 5 where the O1v-related sequence was fused with A2 to form the new hybrid. Intron 6 has

  16. Missense Mutation of POU Domain Class 3 Transcription Factor 3 in Pou3f3L423P Mice Causes Reduced Nephron Number and Impaired Development of the Thick Ascending Limb of the Loop of Henle.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Alexandra; Kemter, Elisabeth; Kumar, Sudhir; Popper, Bastian; Aigner, Bernhard; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    During nephrogenesis, POU domain class 3 transcription factor 3 (POU3F3 aka BRN1) is critically involved in development of distinct nephron segments, including the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL). Deficiency of POU3F3 in knock-out mice leads to underdevelopment of the TAL, lack of differentiation of TAL cells, and perinatal death due to renal failure. Pou3f3L423P mutant mice, which were established in the Munich ENU Mouse Mutagenesis Project, carry a recessive point mutation in the homeobox domain of POU3F3. Homozygous Pou3f3L423P mutants are viable and fertile. The present study used functional, as well as qualitative and quantitative morphological analyses to characterize the renal phenotype of juvenile (12 days) and aged (60 weeks) homo- and heterozygous Pou3f3L423P mutant mice and age-matched wild-type controls. In both age groups, homozygous mutants vs. control mice displayed significantly smaller kidney volumes, decreased nephron numbers and mean glomerular volumes, smaller TAL volumes, as well as lower volume densities of the TAL in the kidney. No histological or ultrastructural lesions of TAL cells or glomerular cells were observed in homozygous mutant mice. Aged homozygous mutants displayed increased serum urea concentrations and reduced specific urine gravity, but no evidence of glomerular dysfunction. These results confirm the role of POU3F3 in development and function of the TAL and provide new evidence for its involvement in regulation of the nephron number in the kidney. Therefore, Pou3f3L423P mutant mice represent a valuable research model for further analyses of POU3F3 functions, or for nephrological studies examining the role of congenital low nephron numbers. PMID:27420727

  17. Missense Mutation of POU Domain Class 3 Transcription Factor 3 in Pou3f3L423P Mice Causes Reduced Nephron Number and Impaired Development of the Thick Ascending Limb of the Loop of Henle

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Alexandra; Kemter, Elisabeth; Kumar, Sudhir; Popper, Bastian; Aigner, Bernhard; Wolf, Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger; Blutke, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    During nephrogenesis, POU domain class 3 transcription factor 3 (POU3F3 aka BRN1) is critically involved in development of distinct nephron segments, including the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle (TAL). Deficiency of POU3F3 in knock-out mice leads to underdevelopment of the TAL, lack of differentiation of TAL cells, and perinatal death due to renal failure. Pou3f3L423P mutant mice, which were established in the Munich ENU Mouse Mutagenesis Project, carry a recessive point mutation in the homeobox domain of POU3F3. Homozygous Pou3f3L423P mutants are viable and fertile. The present study used functional, as well as qualitative and quantitative morphological analyses to characterize the renal phenotype of juvenile (12 days) and aged (60 weeks) homo- and heterozygous Pou3f3L423P mutant mice and age-matched wild-type controls. In both age groups, homozygous mutants vs. control mice displayed significantly smaller kidney volumes, decreased nephron numbers and mean glomerular volumes, smaller TAL volumes, as well as lower volume densities of the TAL in the kidney. No histological or ultrastructural lesions of TAL cells or glomerular cells were observed in homozygous mutant mice. Aged homozygous mutants displayed increased serum urea concentrations and reduced specific urine gravity, but no evidence of glomerular dysfunction. These results confirm the role of POU3F3 in development and function of the TAL and provide new evidence for its involvement in regulation of the nephron number in the kidney. Therefore, Pou3f3L423P mutant mice represent a valuable research model for further analyses of POU3F3 functions, or for nephrological studies examining the role of congenital low nephron numbers. PMID:27420727

  18. Missense Polymorphisms in the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Gene and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Croitoru, Marina E.; Redston, Mark; Knight, Julia A.; Gallinger, Steven; Gryfe, Robert

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE Whereas truncating germline mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene give rise to familial adenomatous polyposis, missense polymorphisms of APC may confer a weaker risk for colorectal cancer. METHODS We sequenced the entire open reading frame of the APC gene and tested for two common MYH mutations in a population-based series of patients with colorectal cancer and 5 to 99 adenomas. Missense adenomatous polyposis coli alterations identified in this colorectal cancer multiple-polyp population were analyzed in a population-based series of patients with colorectal cancer and healthy control subjects. RESULTS Germline APC or mutY human homologue (MYH) alterations were identified in 16 of 39 colorectal cancer-multiple polyp patients. Four missense APC gene alterations (S130G, E1317Q, Dl822V, G2502S) were observed in 13 individuals and 3 additional patients carried presumed pathogenic (APC Y94X, biallelic MYH Y165C and heterozygous MYH G382D) mutations. When independently assessed in 971 patients with colorectal cancer and 954 healthy control subjects, none of the identified missense APC alterations conferred a significantly increased risk for colorectal cancer, odds ratio (95 percent confidence intervals): S130G=3.1 (0.29–32.25), E1317Q= 1.08 (0.59–2.74), G2502S= 1 (0.65–1.63), D1822V (heterozygous)=0.79 (0.64–0.98), D1822V (homozygous) =0.82 (0.63–1.27). CONCLUSIONS Germline missense APC alterations observed in 33 percent of patients with multiple colorectal neoplasms seemed to play a limited role in colorectal cancer risk when independently assessed by a population-based, case-control analysis. PMID:18612690

  19. Thirteen new patients with guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency and functional characterization of nineteen novel missense variants in the GAMT gene.

    PubMed

    Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Ndika, Joseph; Kanhai, Warsha; de Villemeur, Thierry Billette; Cheillan, David; Christensen, Ernst; Dorison, Nathalie; Hannig, Vickie; Hendriks, Yvonne; Hofstede, Floris C; Lion-Francois, Laurence; Lund, Allan M; Mundy, Helen; Pitelet, Gaele; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Scott-Schwoerer, Jessica A; Szakszon, Katalin; Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Williams, Monique; Salomons, Gajja S

    2014-04-01

    Guanidinoacetate methyltransferase deficiency (GAMT-D) is an autosomal recessively inherited disorder of creatine biosynthesis. Creatine deficiency on cranial proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and elevated guanidinoacetate levels in body fluids are the biomarkers of GAMT-D. In 74 patients, 50 different mutations in the GAMT gene have been identified with missense variants being the most common. Clinical and biochemical features of the patients with missense variants were obtained from their physicians using a questionnaire. In 20 patients, 17 missense variants, 25% had a severe, 55% a moderate, and 20% a mild phenotype. The effect of these variants on GAMT enzyme activity was overexpressed using primary GAMT-D fibroblasts: 17 variants retained no significant activity and are therefore considered pathogenic. Two additional variants, c.22C>A (p.Pro8Thr) and c.79T>C (p.Tyr27His) (the latter detected in control cohorts) are in fact not pathogenic as these alleles restored GAMT enzyme activity, although both were predicted to be possibly damaging by in silico analysis. We report 13 new patients with GAMT-D, six novel mutations and functional analysis of 19 missense variants, all being included in our public LOVD database. Our functional assay is important for the confirmation of the pathogenicity of identified missense variants in the GAMT gene. PMID:24415674

  20. Determination of cancer risk associated with germ line BRCA1 missense variants by functional analysis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Marcelo A; Marsillac, Sylvia M; Karchin, Rachel; Manoukian, Siranoush; Grist, Scott; Swaby, Ramona F; Urmenyi, Turan P; Rondinelli, Edson; Silva, Rosane; Gayol, Luis; Baumbach, Lisa; Sutphen, Rebecca; Pickard-Brzosowicz, Jennifer L; Nathanson, Katherine L; Sali, Andrej; Goldgar, David; Couch, Fergus J; Radice, Paolo; Monteiro, Alvaro N A

    2007-02-15

    Germ line inactivating mutations in BRCA1 confer susceptibility for breast and ovarian cancer. However, the relevance of the many missense changes in the gene for which the effect on protein function is unknown remains unclear. Determination of which variants are causally associated with cancer is important for assessment of individual risk. We used a functional assay that measures the transactivation activity of BRCA1 in combination with analysis of protein modeling based on the structure of BRCA1 BRCT domains. In addition, the information generated was interpreted in light of genetic data. We determined the predicted cancer association of 22 BRCA1 variants and verified that the common polymorphism S1613G has no effect on BRCA1 function, even when combined with other rare variants. We estimated the specificity and sensitivity of the assay, and by meta-analysis of 47 variants, we show that variants with <45% of wild-type activity can be classified as deleterious whereas variants with >50% can be classified as neutral. In conclusion, we did functional and structure-based analyses on a large series of BRCA1 missense variants and defined a tentative threshold activity for the classification missense variants. By interpreting the validated functional data in light of additional clinical and structural evidence, we conclude that it is possible to classify all missense variants in the BRCA1 COOH-terminal region. These results bring functional assays for BRCA1 closer to clinical applicability.

  1. Multigene testing of moderate-risk genes: be mindful of the missense

    PubMed Central

    Young, E L; Feng, B J; Stark, A W; Damiola, F; Durand, G; Forey, N; Francy, T C; Gammon, A; Kohlmann, W K; Kaphingst, K A; McKay-Chopin, S; Nguyen-Dumont, T; Oliver, J; Paquette, A M; Pertesi, M; Robinot, N; Rosenthal, J S; Vallee, M; Voegele, C; Hopper, J L; Southey, M C; Andrulis, I L; John, E M; Hashibe, M; Gertz, J; Le Calvez-Kelm, F; Lesueur, F; Goldgar, D E; Tavtigian, S V

    2016-01-01

    Background Moderate-risk genes have not been extensively studied, and missense substitutions in them are generally returned to patients as variants of uncertain significance lacking clearly defined risk estimates. The fraction of early-onset breast cancer cases carrying moderate-risk genotypes and quantitative methods for flagging variants for further analysis have not been established. Methods We evaluated rare missense substitutions identified from a mutation screen of ATM, CHEK2, MRE11A, RAD50, NBN, RAD51, RINT1, XRCC2 and BARD1 in 1297 cases of early-onset breast cancer and 1121 controls via scores from Align-Grantham Variation Grantham Deviation (GVGD), combined annotation dependent depletion (CADD), multivariate analysis of protein polymorphism (MAPP) and PolyPhen-2. We also evaluated subjects by polygenotype from 18 breast cancer risk SNPs. From these analyses, we estimated the fraction of cases and controls that reach a breast cancer OR≥2.5 threshold. Results Analysis of mutation screening data from the nine genes revealed that 7.5% of cases and 2.4% of controls were carriers of at least one rare variant with an average OR≥2.5. 2.1% of cases and 1.2% of controls had a polygenotype with an average OR≥2.5. Conclusions Among early-onset breast cancer cases, 9.6% had a genotype associated with an increased risk sufficient to affect clinical management recommendations. Over two-thirds of variants conferring this level of risk were rare missense substitutions in moderate-risk genes. Placement in the estimated OR≥2.5 group by at least two of these missense analysis programs should be used to prioritise variants for further study. Panel testing often creates more heat than light; quantitative approaches to variant prioritisation and classification may facilitate more efficient clinical classification of variants. PMID:26787654

  2. Integrating population variation and protein structural analysis to improve clinical interpretation of missense variation: application to the WD40 domain.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Roman A; Tyagi, Nidhi; Johnson, Diana; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; McWilliam, Catherine; Splitt, Miranda; Thornton, Janet M; Firth, Helen V; Wright, Caroline F

    2016-03-01

    We present a generic, multidisciplinary approach for improving our understanding of novel missense variants in recently discovered disease genes exhibiting genetic heterogeneity, by combining clinical and population genetics with protein structural analysis. Using six new de novo missense diagnoses in TBL1XR1 from the Deciphering Developmental Disorders study, together with population variation data, we show that the β-propeller structure of the ubiquitous WD40 domain provides a convincing way to discriminate between pathogenic and benign variation. Children with likely pathogenic mutations in this gene have severely delayed language development, often accompanied by intellectual disability, autism, dysmorphology and gastrointestinal problems. Amino acids affected by likely pathogenic missense mutations are either crucial for the stability of the fold, forming part of a highly conserved symmetrically repeating hydrogen-bonded tetrad, or located at the top face of the β-propeller, where 'hotspot' residues affect the binding of β-catenin to the TBLR1 protein. In contrast, those altered by population variation are significantly less likely to be spatially clustered towards the top face or to be at buried or highly conserved residues. This result is useful not only for interpreting benign and pathogenic missense variants in this gene, but also in other WD40 domains, many of which are associated with disease. PMID:26740553

  3. Integrating population variation and protein structural analysis to improve clinical interpretation of missense variation: application to the WD40 domain

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Roman A.; Tyagi, Nidhi; Johnson, Diana; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; McWilliam, Catherine; Splitt, Miranda; Thornton, Janet M.; Firth, Helen V.; Wright, Caroline F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a generic, multidisciplinary approach for improving our understanding of novel missense variants in recently discovered disease genes exhibiting genetic heterogeneity, by combining clinical and population genetics with protein structural analysis. Using six new de novo missense diagnoses in TBL1XR1 from the Deciphering Developmental Disorders study, together with population variation data, we show that the β-propeller structure of the ubiquitous WD40 domain provides a convincing way to discriminate between pathogenic and benign variation. Children with likely pathogenic mutations in this gene have severely delayed language development, often accompanied by intellectual disability, autism, dysmorphology and gastrointestinal problems. Amino acids affected by likely pathogenic missense mutations are either crucial for the stability of the fold, forming part of a highly conserved symmetrically repeating hydrogen-bonded tetrad, or located at the top face of the β-propeller, where ‘hotspot’ residues affect the binding of β-catenin to the TBLR1 protein. In contrast, those altered by population variation are significantly less likely to be spatially clustered towards the top face or to be at buried or highly conserved residues. This result is useful not only for interpreting benign and pathogenic missense variants in this gene, but also in other WD40 domains, many of which are associated with disease. PMID:26740553

  4. Codon-specific missense errors in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bouadloun, F; Donner, D; Kurland, C G

    1983-01-01

    We have developed a simple method for measuring the missense substitution of amino acids at specified positions in proteins synthesized in vivo. We find that the frequency of cysteine substitution for the single arginine in Escherichia coli ribosomal protein L7/L12 is close to 10(-3) for wild-type bacteria, decreases to 4 x 10(-4) in streptomycin-resistant bacteria containing mutant S12 (rpsL), and is virtually unchanged in Ram bacteria containing mutant S4 (rpsD). We have also found that the frequency of the cysteine substitution for the single tryptophan in E. coli ribosomal protein S6 is 3-4 x 10(-3) for wild-type bacteria, decreases to 6 x 10(-4) in streptomycin-resistant bacteria and is elevated to nearly 10(-2) in Ram bacteria.

  5. Molecular modeling indicates distinct classes of missense variants with mild and severe XLRS phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sergeev, Yuri V.; Vitale, Susan; Sieving, Paul A.; Vincent, Ajoy; Robson, Anthony G.; Moore, Anthony T.; Webster, Andrew R.; Holder, Graham E.

    2013-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a vitreo-retinal degeneration caused by mutations in the RS1 gene which encodes the protein retinoschisin (RS1), required for the structural and functional integrity of the retina. Data are presented from a group of 38 XLRS patients from Moorfields Eye Hospital (London, UK) who had one of 18 missense mutations in RS1. Patients were grouped based on mutation severity predicted by molecular modeling: mild (class I), moderate (intermediate) and severe (class II). Most patients had an electronegative scotopic bright flash electroretinogram  (ERG) (reduced b/a-wave ratio) in keeping with predominant inner retinal dysfunction. An association between the type of structural RS1 alterations and the severity of b/a-wave reduction was found in all but the oldest group of patients, significant in patients aged 15–30 years. Severe RS1 missense changes were associated with a lower ERG b/a ratio than were mild changes, suggesting that the extent of inner retinal dysfunction is influenced by the effect of the mutations on protein structure. The majority of class I mutations showed no changes involving cysteine residues. Class II mutations caused severe perturbations due to the removal or insertion of cysteine residues or due to changes in the hydrophobic core. The ERG b/a ratio in intermediate cases was abnormal but showed significant variability, possibly related to the role of proline or arginine residues. We also conducted a second study, using a completely independent cohort, to indicate a genotype–ERG phenotype correlation. PMID:23847049

  6. Most of rare missense alleles in humans are deleterious:implications for evolution of complex disease and associationstudies

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukov, Gregory V.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2006-10-24

    The accumulation of mildly deleterious missense mutations inindividual human genomes has been proposed to be a genetic basis forcomplex diseases. The plausibility of this hypothesis depends onquantitative estimates of the prevalence of mildly deleterious de novomutations and polymorphic variants in humans and on the intensity ofselective pressure against them. We combined analysis of mutationscausing human Mendelian diseases, human-chimpanzee divergence andsystematic data on human SNPs and found that about 20 percent of newmissense mutations in humans result in a loss of function, while about 27percent are effectively neutral. Thus, more than half of new missensemutations have mildly deleterious effects. These mutations give rise tomany low frequency deleterious allelic variants in the human populationas evident from a new dataset of 37 genes sequenced in over 1,500individual human chromosomes. Surprisingly, up to 70 percent of lowfrequency missense alleles are mildly deleterious and associated with aheterozygous fitness loss in the range 0.001-0.003. Thus, the low allelefrequency of an amino acid variant can by itself serve as a predictor ofits functional significance. Several recent studies have reported asignificant excess of rare missense variants in disease populationscompared to controls in candidate genes or pathways. These studies wouldbe unlikely to work if most rare variants were neutral or if rarevariants were not a significant contributor to the genetic component ofphenotypic inheritance. Our results provide a justification for thesetypes of candidate gene (pathway) association studies and imply thatmutation-selection balance may be a feasible mechanism for evolution ofsome common diseases.

  7. Mutations affecting enzymatic activity in liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Vockley, J.G.; Tabor, D.E.; Goodman, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    The hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea is catalyzed by arginase in the last step of the urea cycle. We examined a group of arginase deficient patients by PCR-SSCP analysis to characterize the molecular basis of this disorder. A heterogeneous population of nonsense mutations, microdeletions, and missense mutations has been identified in our cohort. Microdeletions which introduce premature stop codons downstream of the deletion and nonsense mutations result in no arginase activity. These mutations occur randomly along the gene. The majority of missense mutations identified appear to occur in regions of high cross-species homology. To test the effect of these missense mutations on arginase activity, site-directed mutagenesis was used to re-create the patient mutations for in vivo expression studies in a prokaryotic fusion-protein expression system. Of 4 different missense mutations identified in 6 individuals, only one was located outside of a conserved region. The three substitution mutations within the conserved regions had a significant effect on enzymatic activity (0-3.1 nmole/30min, normal is 1300-1400 nmoles/30min, as determined by in vitro arginase assay), while the fourth mutation, a T to S substitution, did not. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create mutations not in residues postulated to play a significant role in the enzymatic function or active site formation in manganese-binding proteins such as arginase. We have determined that the substitution of glycine for a histidine residue, located in a very highly conserved region of exon 3, and the substitution of a histidine and an aspartic acid residue within a similarly conserved region in exon 4, totally abolishes enzymatic activity. Mutations substituting glycine for an additional histidine and aspartic acid residue in exon 4 and two aspartic acid residues in exon 7 have also been created. We are currently in the process of characterizing these mutations.

  8. Alternating Hemiplegia of Childhood-Related Neural and Behavioural Phenotypes in Na+,K+-ATPase α3 Missense Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kirshenbaum, Greer S.; Dawson, Neil; Mullins, Jonathan G. L.; Johnston, Tom H.; Drinkhill, Mark J.; Edwards, Ian J.; Fox, Susan H.; Pratt, Judith A.; Brotchie, Jonathan M.; Roder, John C.; Clapcote, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    Missense mutations in ATP1A3 encoding Na+,K+-ATPase α3 have been identified as the primary cause of alternating hemiplegia of childhood (AHC), a motor disorder with onset typically before the age of 6 months. Affected children tend to be of short stature and can also have epilepsy, ataxia and learning disability. The Na+,K+-ATPase has a well-known role in maintaining electrochemical gradients across cell membranes, but our understanding of how the mutations cause AHC is limited. Myshkin mutant mice carry an amino acid change (I810N) that affects the same position in Na+,K+-ATPase α3 as I810S found in AHC. Using molecular modelling, we show that the Myshkin and AHC mutations display similarly severe structural impacts on Na+,K+-ATPase α3, including upon the K+ pore and predicted K+ binding sites. Behavioural analysis of Myshkin mice revealed phenotypic abnormalities similar to symptoms of AHC, including motor dysfunction and cognitive impairment. 2-DG imaging of Myshkin mice identified compromised thalamocortical functioning that includes a deficit in frontal cortex functioning (hypofrontality), directly mirroring that reported in AHC, along with reduced thalamocortical functional connectivity. Our results thus provide validation for missense mutations in Na+,K+-ATPase α3 as a cause of AHC, and highlight Myshkin mice as a starting point for the exploration of disease mechanisms and novel treatments in AHC. PMID:23527305

  9. MSV3d: database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin-Mihai; Walter, Vincent; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Toursel, Thierry; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the complex relationships linking genotypic and phenotypic variations to protein structure is a major challenge in the post-genomic era. We present MSV3d (Database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure), a new database that contains detailed annotation of missense variants of all human proteins (20 199 proteins). The multi-level characterization includes details of the physico-chemical changes induced by amino acid modification, as well as information related to the conservation of the mutated residue and its position relative to functional features in the available or predicted 3D model. Major releases of the database are automatically generated and updated regularly in line with the dbSNP (database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and SwissVar releases, by exploiting the extensive Décrypthon computational grid resources. The database (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d) is easily accessible through a simple web interface coupled to a powerful query engine and a standard web service. The content is completely or partially downloadable in XML or flat file formats. Database URL: http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d.

  10. DNA repair capacity is impaired in healthy BRCA1 heterozygous mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Vaclová, Tereza; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Setién, Fernando; Bueno, José María García; Macías, José Antonio; Barroso, Alicia; Urioste, Miguel; Esteller, Manel; Benítez, Javier; Osorio, Ana

    2015-07-01

    BRCA1 germline mutations increase the lifetime risk of developing breast and ovarian cancers. However, taking into account the differences in disease manifestation among mutation carriers, it is probable that different BRCA1 mutations have distinct haploinsufficiency effects and lead to the formation of different phenotypes. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from heterozygous BRCA1 mutation carriers and non-carriers, we investigated the haploinsufficiency effects of various mutation types using qPCR, immunofluorescence, and microarray technology. Lymphoblastoid cell lines carrying a truncating mutation showed significantly lower BRCA1 mRNA and protein levels and higher levels of gamma-H2AX than control cells or those harboring a missense mutation, indicating greater spontaneous DNA damage. Cells carrying either BRCA1 mutation type showed impaired RAD51 foci formation, suggesting defective repair in mutated cells. Moreover, compared to controls, cell lines carrying missense mutations displayed a more distinct expression profile than cells with truncating mutations, which is consistent with different mutations giving rise to distinct phenotypes. Alterations in the immune response pathway in cells harboring missense mutations point to possible mechanisms of breast cancer initiation in carriers of these mutations. Our findings offer insight into how various heterozygous mutations in BRCA1 could lead to impairment of BRCA1 function and provide strong evidence of haploinsufficiency in BRCA1 mutation carriers.

  11. A frequent tyrosinase gene mutation associated with type I-A (tyroinase-negative) oculocutaneous albinism in Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Oetting, W.S.; Witkop, C.J. Jr.; Brown, S.A.; Fryer, J.P.; Bloom, K.E.; King, R.A. ); Colomer, R. )

    1993-01-01

    The authors have determined the mutations in the tyrosinase gene from 12 unrelated Puerto Rican individuals who have type I-A (tyrosinase-negative) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA). All but one individual are of Hispanic descent. Nine individuals were homozygous for a missense mutation (G47D) in exon I at codon 47. Two individuals were heterozygous for the G47D mutation, with one having a missense mutation at codon 373 (T373K) in the homologous allele and the other having an undetermined mutation in the homologous allele. One individual with negroid features was homozygous for a nonsense mutation (W236X). The population migration between Puerto Rico and the Canary Islands is well recognized. Analysis of three individuals with OCA from the Canary Islands showed that one was a compound heterozygote for the G47D mutation and for a novel missense mutation (L216M), one was homozygous for a missense mutation (P81L), and one was heterozygous for the missense mutation P81L. The G47D and P81L missense mutations have been previously described in extended families in the United States. Haplotypes were determined using four polymorphisms linked to the tyrosinase locus. Haplotype analysis showed that the G47D mutation occurred on a single haplotype, consistent with a common founder for all individuals having this mutation. Two different haplotypes were found associated with the P81L mutation, suggesting that this may be either a recurring mutation for the tyrosinase gene or a recombination between haplotypes. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  12. A Novel Mutation of DAX-1 Associated with Secretory Azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lihua; Liu, Yuchen; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Honggang; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Secretory azoospermia is a severe form of male infertility caused by unknown factors. DAX-1 is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues and plays an important role in spermatogenesis because Dax-1 knockout male mice show spermatogenesis defects. To examine whether DAX-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory azoospermia in humans, we sequenced all of the exons of DAX-1 in 776 patients diagnosed with secretory azoospermia and 709 proven fertile men. A number of coding mutations unique to the patient group, including two synonymous mutations and six missense mutations, were identified. Of the missense mutations, our functional assay demonstrated that the V385L mutation caused the reduced functioning of DAX-1. This novel mutation (p. V385L) of DAX-1 is the first to be identified in association with secretory azoospermia, thereby highlighting the important role of DAX-1 in spermatogenesis. PMID:26207377

  13. A Novel Mutation of DAX-1 Associated with Secretory Azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Mou, Lisha; Xie, Nie; Yang, Lihua; Liu, Yuchen; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Li, Honggang; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-01-01

    Secretory azoospermia is a severe form of male infertility caused by unknown factors. DAX-1 is predominantly expressed in mammalian reproductive tissues and plays an important role in spermatogenesis because Dax-1 knockout male mice show spermatogenesis defects. To examine whether DAX-1 is involved in the pathogenesis of secretory azoospermia in humans, we sequenced all of the exons of DAX-1 in 776 patients diagnosed with secretory azoospermia and 709 proven fertile men. A number of coding mutations unique to the patient group, including two synonymous mutations and six missense mutations, were identified. Of the missense mutations, our functional assay demonstrated that the V385L mutation caused the reduced functioning of DAX-1. This novel mutation (p. V385L) of DAX-1 is the first to be identified in association with secretory azoospermia, thereby highlighting the important role of DAX-1 in spermatogenesis. PMID:26207377

  14. Detection of mutations in the ALD gene (ABCD1) in seven Italian families: description of four novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Lira, M G; Mottes, M; Pignatti, P F; Medica, I; Uziel, G; Cappa, M; Bertini, E; Rizzuto, N; Salviati, A

    2000-09-01

    The study describes the mutations causing adrenoleukodystrophy in seven Italian families. Four missense mutations leading to amino acid substitutions, two frameshift mutations leading to a premature termination signal, and a splicing mutation were identified. Mutations 2014C>T (P543L), 2053A>G (Q556A), 673-674insCC, and 1874+1G>A are described for the first time in this report. Mutations 1638C>T (R418W), 1588G>A(R401Q), and 1801-1802delAG are already known to be link to ALD.

  15. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  16. Diverse mutations in patients with Menkes disease often lead to exon skipping

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Levinson, Levinson, B.; Whitney, S.; Vulpe, C.; Packman, S.; Gitschier, J.

    1994-11-01

    Fibroblast cultures from 12 unrelated patients with classical Menkes disease were analyzed for mutations in the MNK gene, by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and chemical cleavage mismatch detection. Mutations were observed in 10 patients, and in each case a different mutation was present. All of the mutations would be predicted to have adverse effects on protein expression. Mutations that resulted in splicing abnormalities, detected by RT-PCR alone, were observed in six patients and included two splice-site changes, a nonsense mutation, a missense mutation, a small duplication, and a small deletion. Chemical cleavage analysis of the remaining six patients revealed the presence of one missense mutation. A valine/leucine polymorphism was also observed. These findings, combined with the prior observation of deletions in 15%-20% of Menkes patients, suggest that Southern blot hybridization and RT-PCR will identify mutations in the majority of patients. 26 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A common missense variant in BRCA2 predisposes to early onset breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Górski, Bohdan; Narod, Steven A; Lubiński, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in the BRCA2 gene are one of the two major causes of hereditary breast cancer. Protein-truncating mutations of BRCA2 are usually deleterious and increase the risk of breast cancer up to 80% over a lifetime. A few missense mutations in BRCA2 are believed to have a similarly high penetrance, apart from more common neutral polymorphisms. It is often difficult to classify a particular sequence variant as a mutation or a polymorphism. For a deleterious variant, one would expect a greater allele frequency in breast cancer cases than in ethnic-matched controls. In contrast, neutral polymorphic variants should be equally frequent in the two groups. Methods We genotyped 3,241 cases of breast cancer diagnosed at under 51 years of age, unselected for family history, from 18 hospitals throughout Poland and 2,791 ethnic-matched controls for a single BRCA2 C5972T variant. Results The variant was present in approximately 6% of the Polish population. In the study, 13 women (11 cases and two controls (OR = 4.7; p = 0.02)) were homozygous for the variant allele. The overall odds ratio for breast cancer in women with a single copy of the BRCA2 C5972T variant was 1.1 (p = 0.7); however, the effect was significant for patients diagnosed at or before age 40 (OR = 1.4; p = 0.04). We reviewed the association between the BRCA2 variant in different histologic subgroups and found the effect most pronounced in women who had ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) with micro-invasion (OR = 2.8; p < 0.0001). Conclusion The BRCA2 C5972T allele is a common variant in Poland that increases the risk of DCIS with micro-invasion. The homozygous state is rare but increases the risk of breast cancer five-fold. PMID:16280055

  18. Germline mutation screening and predictive testing in families with von Hippel-Lindau disease

    SciTech Connect

    Brauch, H.; Glavac, D.; Pausch, F.

    1994-09-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal inheritable disease that predisposes gene carriers to develop tumors in the eyes, central nervous system, kidney, adrenal gland, pancreas and epididymis. VHL type 1 is without phenochromocytoma (P); VHL type 2 is with P. Screening for germline mutations and preclinical diagnosis in families with VHL disease has become feasible since the VHL gene was isolated. We applied Southern blotting and hybridization with g7cDNA to detect rearrangements, PCR-SSCP and sequencing to detect missense, nonsense and splice mutations, and primer-specified restriction map modification to detect a P-specific missense mutation. In 48 apparently unrelated VHL families mainly from Germany, we identified 20/48 (42%) VHL mutations: 7 (14.5%) rearrangements, 9/48 (19%) missense mutations affecting nt505, 1/48 (2%) splice site mutation, 2/48 (4%) other missense mutations, and 1/48 (2%) nonsense mutation. The predominance of the nt505 mutation in 9 German families with VHL type 2 suggests that this genotype expresses the VHL/P disease pattern. Predictive testing for VHL gene carriers in families with specific mutations identified 7 asymptomatic gene carriers. VHL manifestations have been confirmed by clinical examination in two individuals. Early molecular diagnosis may result in a successful management of VHL disease and prolong survival of VHL patients.

  19. Rare missense variants within a single gene form yin yang haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David

    2016-01-01

    Yin yang haplotype pairs differ at every SNP. They would not be accounted for by population models that incorporate sequential mutation, with or without recombination. Previous reports have claimed that there is a tendency for common SNPs to form yin yang haplotypes more often than would be expected by sequential mutation or by a random sample of all possible haplotypic arrangements of alleles. In the course of analysing next-generation sequencing data, instances of yin yang haplotypes being formed by very rare variants within a single gene were observed. As an example, this report describes a completely yin yang haplotype formed by eight rare missense variants in the ABCA13 gene. Of 1000 genome subjects, 21 have a copy of the alternate allele at all eight of these positions and a single subject is homozygous for all of them. None of the other 1070 subjects possesses any of the altetrnates. Thus, the eight alternate alleles are always found together and never occur separately. The existence of such yin yang haplotypes has important implications for statistical methods for analysing rare variants. Also, they may be of use for gaining a better understanding of the history of human populations.

  20. Two novel heterozygous missense variations within the GLI2 gene in two unrelated Argentine patients.

    PubMed

    Juanes, Matías; Di Palma, Isabel; Ciaccio, Marta; Marino, Roxana; Ramírez, Pablo C; Pérez Garrid, Natalia; Maceiras, Mercedes; Lazzati, Juan M; Rivarola, Marco A; Belgorosky, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Several heterozygous GLI2 gene mutations have been reported in patients with isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) or multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD) with or without other malformations. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the presence of GLI2 gene alterations in a cohort of patients with IGHD or MPHD and ectopic/absent posterior pituitary. The coding sequence and flanking intronic regions of GLI2 gene were amplified and directly sequenced from gDNA of 18 affected subjects and relatives. In silico tools were applied to identify the functional impact of newly found variants (Polyphen2, SIFT, Mutation Taster). We identified two novel heterozygous missense variations in two unrelated patients, p.Arg231Gln and p.Arg226Leu, located in the repressor domain of the protein. Both variations affect highly conserved amino acids of the Gli2 protein and were not found in the available databases. In silico tools suggest that these variations might be disease causing. Our study suggests that the GLI2 gene may be one of the candidate genes to analyze when an association of pituitary hormone deficiency and developmental defects in posterior pituitary gland. The highly variable phenotype found suggests the presence of additional unknown factors that could contribute to the phenotype observed in these patients. PMID:27576279

  1. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  2. Structural and functional influences of coagulation factor XIII subunit B heterozygous missense mutants.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Anne; Biswas, Arijit; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2015-07-01

    The coagulation factor XIII(FXIII) is a plasma circulating heterotetrameric protransglutaminase that acts at the end of the coagulation cascade by covalently cross-linking preformed fibrin clots (to themselves and to fibrinolytic inhibitors) in order to stabilize them against fibrinolysis. It circulates in the plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two homomeric catalytic Factor XIIIA2 (FXIIIA2) and two homomeric protective/carrier Factor XIIIB2 subunit (FXIIIB2). Congenital deficiency of FXIII is of two types: severe homozygous/compound heterozygous FXIII deficiency which results in severe bleeding symptoms and mild heterozygous FXIII deficiency which is associated with mild bleeding (only upon trauma) or an asymptomatic phenotype. Defects in the F13B gene (Factor XIIIB subunit) occur more frequently in mild FXIII deficiency patients than in severe FXIII deficiency. We had recently reported secretion-related defects for seven previously reported F13B missense mutations. In the present study we further analyze the underlying molecular pathological mechanisms as well as the heterozygous expression phenotype for these mutations using a combination of in vitro heterologous expression (in HEK293T cells) and confocal microscopy. In combination with the in vitro work we have also performed an in silico solvated molecular dynamic simulation study on previously reported FXIIIB subunit sushi domain homology models in order to predict the putative structure-functional impact of these mutations. We were able to categorize the mutations into the following functional groups that: (1) affect antigenic stability as well as binding to FXIIIA subunit, that is, Cys5Arg, Cys316Phe, and Pro428Ser (2) affect binding to FXIIIA subunit with little or no influence on antigenic stability, that is, Ile81Asn and Val401Gln c) influence neither aspects and are most likely causality linked polymorphisms or functional polymorphisms, that is, Leu116Phe and Val217Ile. The Cys5Arg mutation was the

  3. WRN mutations in Werner syndrome patients: genomic rearrangements, unusual intronic mutations and ethnic-specific alterations

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Katrin; Lee, Lin; Leistritz, Dru F.; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Saha, Bidisha; Hisama, Fuki M.; Eyman, Daniel K.; Lessel, Davor; Nürnberg, Peter; Li, Chumei; Garcia-F-Villalta, María J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Schmidtke, Joerg; Cruz, Vítor Tedim; Van den Akker, Peter C.; Boak, Joseph; Peter, Dincy; Compoginis, Goli; Cefle, Kivanc; Ozturk, Sukru; López, Norberto; Wessel, Theda; Poot, Martin; Ippel, P. F.; Groff-Kellermann, Birgit; Hoehn, Holger; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Oshima, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive segmental progeroid syndrome caused by null mutations at the WRN locus, which codes for a member of the RecQ family of DNA helicases. Since 1988, the International Registry of Werner syndrome had enrolled 130 molecularly confirmed WS cases from among 110 worldwide pedigrees. We now report 18 new mutations, including two genomic rearrangements, a deep intronic mutation resulting in a novel exon, a splice consensus mutation leading to utilization of the nearby splice site, and two rare missense mutations. We also review evidence for founder mutations among various ethnic/geographic groups. Founder WRN mutations had been previously reported in Japan and Northern Sardinia. Our Registry now suggests characteristic mutations originated in Morocco, Turkey, The Netherlands and elsewhere. PMID:20443122

  4. Novel pathogenic mutations in the glucocerebrosidase locus.

    PubMed

    Duran, Raquel; McNeill, Alisdair; Mehta, Atul; Hughes, Derralyn; Cox, Timothy; Deegan, Patrick; Schapira, Anthony H V; Hardy, John

    2012-08-01

    To determine the frequency of mutations responsible for Gaucher's disease, we systematically sequenced the GBA1 gene as part of a molecular characterization of 73 adult patients in the United Kingdom. Five hitherto unknown pathogenic variants were identified, one of which is a splice site change; the others are novel missense mutations. Given that GBA1 gene mutations are an important risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease, we contend that a complete analysis and molecular characterization of both the known and novel GBA1 variants will be needed before the biochemical processes underlying this genetic association can be fully understood. PMID:22658918

  5. Quantification of mutant E-cadherin using bioimaging analysis of in situ fluorescence microscopy. A new approach to CDH1 missense variants

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, João Miguel; Figueiredo, Joana; Fonseca, Martina; Durães, Cecília; Melo, Soraia; Esménio, Sofia; Seruca, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations result in full-length proteins containing an amino acid substitution that can be neutral or deleterious, interfering with the normal conformation, localization, and function of a protein. A striking example is the presence of CDH1 (E-cadherin gene) germline missense variants in hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), which represent a clinical burden for genetic counseling and surveillance of mutation carriers and their families. CDH1 missense variants can compromise not only the function of E-cadherin but also its expression pattern. Here, we propose a novel method to characterize E-cadherin signature in order to identify cases with E-cadherin deregulation and functional impairment. The strategy includes a bioimaging pipeline to quantify the expression level and characterize the distribution of the protein from in situ immunofluorescence images. The algorithm computes 1D (dimension intensity) radial and internuclear fluorescence profiles to generate expression outlines and 2D virtual cells representing a typical cell within the populations analyzed. Using this new approach, we verify that cells expressing mutant forms of E-cadherin display fluorescence profiles distinct from those of the wild-type cells. Mutant proteins showed a significantly decrease of fluorescence intensity at the membrane and often abnormal expression peaks in the cytoplasm, reflecting the underlying molecular mechanism of trafficking deregulation. Our results suggest employing this methodology as a complementary approach to evaluate the pathogenicity of E-cadherin missense variants. Moreover, it can be applied to a wide range of proteins and, more importantly, to diseases characterized by aberrant protein expression or trafficking deregulation. PMID:25388006

  6. Germline Missense Variants in the BTNL2 Gene Are Associated with Prostate Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Kumar, Akash; Boyle, Evan A.; Zhang, Yuzheng; McIntosh, Laura M.; Kolb, Suzanne; Stott-Miller, Marni; Smith, Tiffany; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Hsu, Li; Shendure, Jay; Stanford, Janet L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rare, inherited mutations account for 5%–10% of all prostate cancer (PCa) cases. However, to date, few causative mutations have been identified. Methods To identify rare mutations for PCa, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) in multiple kindreds (n = 91) from 19 hereditary prostate cancer (HPC) families characterized by aggressive or early onset phenotypes. Candidate variants (n = 130) identified through family- and bioinformatics-based filtering of WES data were then genotyped in an independent set of 270 HPC families (n = 819 PCa cases; n = 496 unaffected relatives) for replication. Two variants with supportive evidence were subsequently genotyped in a population-based case-control study (n = 1,155 incident PCa cases; n = 1,060 age-matched controls) for further confirmation. All participants were men of European ancestry. Results The strongest evidence was for two germline missense variants in the butyrophilin-like 2 (BTNL2) gene (rs41441651, p.Asp336Asn and rs28362675, p.Gly454Cys) that segregated with affection status in two of the WES families. In the independent set of 270 HPC families, 1.5% (rs41441651; P = 0.0032) and 1.2% (rs28362675; P = 0.0070) of affected men, but no unaffected men, carried a variant. Both variants were associated with elevated PCa risk in the population-based study (rs41441651: OR = 2.7; 95% CI, 1.27–5.87; P = 0.010; rs28362675: OR = 2.5; 95% CI, 1.16–5.46; P = 0.019). Conclusions Results indicate that rare BTNL2 variants play a role in susceptibility to both familial and sporadic prostate cancer. Impact Results implicate BTNL2 as a novel PCa susceptibility gene. PMID:23833122

  7. A novel mutation in the IRF6 gene associated with facial asymmetry in a family affected with Van der Woude syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miñones-Suárez, Lorena; Mas-Vidal, Alberto; Fernandez-Toral, Joaquin; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; González-García, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a novel missense mutation in the interferon regulation factor 6 (IRF6) gene associated to facial asymmetry. This new feature widens the phenotype spectrum of Van der Woude syndrome (VWS). PMID:21995291

  8. S267P mutation in FGFR2: first report in a patient with Crouzon syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ke, Ronghu; Yang, Xianxian; Ge, Min; Cai, Tianyi; Lei, Jiaqi; Mu, Xiongzheng

    2015-03-01

    It has been known for several years that mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR2) result in syndromic craniosynostosis including Apert, Crouzon, or Pfeiffer syndromes. Here, we report on a child with a clinically diagnosed Crouzon syndrome that shows the missense point mutation S267P in FGFR2 gene. The mutation is firstly identified in Crouzon syndrome. Our observations expand the molecular spectrum of FGFR2 mutations in the syndrome. PMID:25759927

  9. DCDC2 Mutations Cause Neonatal Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Girard, Muriel; Bizet, Albane A; Lachaux, Alain; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Filhol, Emilie; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Henry, Charline; Fabre, Monique; Viremouneix, Loic; Galmiche, Louise; Debray, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Pariente, Danièle; Guettier, Catherine; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Heidet, Laurence; Bertholet, Aurelia; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal sclerosing cholangitis (NSC) is a rare biliary disease leading to liver transplantation in childhood. Patients with NSC and ichtyosis have already been identified with a CLDN1 mutation, encoding a tight-junction protein. However, for the majority of patients, the molecular basis of NSC remains unknown. We identified biallelic missense mutations or in-frame deletion in DCDC2 in four affected children. Mutations involve highly conserved amino acids in the doublecortin domains of the protein. In cholangiocytes, DCDC2 protein is normally located in the cytoplasm and cilia, whereas in patients the mutated protein is accumulated in the cytoplasm, absent from cilia, and associated with ciliogenesis defect. This is the first report of DCDC2 mutations in NSC. This data expands the molecular spectrum of NSC, that can be considered as a ciliopathy and also expands the clinical spectrum of the DCDC2 mutations, previously reported in dyslexia, deafness, and nephronophtisis. PMID:27319779

  10. DCDC2 Mutations Cause Neonatal Sclerosing Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Girard, Muriel; Bizet, Albane A; Lachaux, Alain; Gonzales, Emmanuel; Filhol, Emilie; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Henry, Charline; Fabre, Monique; Viremouneix, Loic; Galmiche, Louise; Debray, Dominique; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Nitschke, Patrick; Pariente, Danièle; Guettier, Catherine; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Heidet, Laurence; Bertholet, Aurelia; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Saunier, Sophie

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal sclerosing cholangitis (NSC) is a rare biliary disease leading to liver transplantation in childhood. Patients with NSC and ichtyosis have already been identified with a CLDN1 mutation, encoding a tight-junction protein. However, for the majority of patients, the molecular basis of NSC remains unknown. We identified biallelic missense mutations or in-frame deletion in DCDC2 in four affected children. Mutations involve highly conserved amino acids in the doublecortin domains of the protein. In cholangiocytes, DCDC2 protein is normally located in the cytoplasm and cilia, whereas in patients the mutated protein is accumulated in the cytoplasm, absent from cilia, and associated with ciliogenesis defect. This is the first report of DCDC2 mutations in NSC. This data expands the molecular spectrum of NSC, that can be considered as a ciliopathy and also expands the clinical spectrum of the DCDC2 mutations, previously reported in dyslexia, deafness, and nephronophtisis.

  11. Aceruloplasminemia in an asymptomatic patient with a new mutation. Diagnosis and family genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Aguilar, Fernando; Burguera, Juan A; Benlloch, Salvador; Berenguer, Marina; Rayón, Jose M

    2005-06-01

    A 39-year-old asymptomatic man showed elevated serum ferritin levels, mild hypertransaminasemia and serum ceruloplasmin almost undetectable. There was histological iron accumulation within the hepatocytes and also in the central nervous system (MRI). A genetic analysis revealed a new missense mutation in the ceruloplasmin gene. Two of the other four siblings were also affected by this mutation.

  12. Novel Mutations in the Transcriptional Activator Domain of the Human TBX20 in Patients with Atrial Septal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloisa; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; García-Trejo, José J.; Morales-Ríos, Edgar; Massó, Felipe; Sandoval-Jones, Juan Pablo; Cervantes-Salazar, Jorge; García-Montes, José Antonio; Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Background. The relevance of TBX20 gene in heart development has been demonstrated in many animal models, but there are few works that try to elucidate the effect of TBX20 mutations in human congenital heart diseases. In these studies, all missense mutations associated with atrial septal defect (ASD) were found in the DNA-binding T-box domain, none in the transcriptional activator domain. Methods. We search for TBX20 mutations in a group of patients with ASD or ventricular septal defect (VSD) using the High Resolution Melting (HRM) method and DNA sequencing. Results. We report three missense mutations (Y309D, T370O, and M395R) within the transcriptional activator domain of human TBX20 that were associated with ASD. Conclusions. This is the first association of TBX20 transcriptional activator domain missense mutations with ASD. These findings could have implications for diagnosis, genetic screening, and patient follow-up. PMID:25834824

  13. Novel PRKAR1A gene mutations in Carney Complex.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lorraine; Peng, Lan; Jean-Gilles, J; Zhang, Ximin; Wieczorek, Rosemary; Jain, Shilpa; Levine, Vicki; Osman, Iman; Prieto, Victor G; Lee, Peng

    2010-01-01

    Carney complex is a syndrome that may include cardiac and mucocutaneous myxomas, spotting skin pigmentation, and endocrine lesions. Many patients with Carney complex have been shown to have a stop codon mutation in the PRKAR1A gene in the 17q22-24 region. Here we present the case of a 57 year-old man with multiple skin lesions and cardiac myxomas. Histology of the skin lesions showed lentigenous melanocytic hyperplasia and cutaneous myxomas, confirming the diagnosis of Carney complex. Lesional and control normal tissue from the patient were identified and sequenced for the PRKAR1A gene. A germline missense mutation was identified at exon 1A. This is the first report of this mutation, and one of the few reported missense mutation associated with Carney complex. This finding strengthens the argument that there are alternative ways in which the protein kinase A 1-alpha subunit plays a role in tumorigenesis. PMID:20606737

  14. A homozygous missense variant in type I keratin KRT25 causes autosomal recessive woolly hair

    PubMed Central

    Ansar, Muhammad; Raza, Syed Irfan; Lee, Kwanghyuk; Irfanullah; Shahi, Shamim; Acharya, Anushree; Dai, Hang; Smith, Joshua D; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Santos-Cortez, Regie Lyn P; Ahmad, Wasim; Leal, Suzanne M

    2016-01-01

    Background Woolly hair (WH) is a hair abnormality that is primarily characterised by tightly curled hair with abnormal growth. Methods In two unrelated consanguineous Pakistani families with non-syndromic autosomal recessive (AR) WH, homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis identified a locus within 17q21.1–q22, which contains the type I keratin gene cluster. A DNA sample from an affected individual from each family underwent exome sequencing. Results A homozygous missense variant c.950T>C (p.(Leu317Pro)) within KRT25 segregated with ARWH in both families, and has a combined maximum two-point LOD score of 7.9 at ϴ=0. The KRT25 variant is predicted to result in disruption of the second α-helical rod domain and the entire protein structure, thus possibly interfering with heterodimerisation of K25 with type II keratins within the inner root sheath (IRS) of the hair follicle and the medulla of the hair shaft. Conclusions Our findings implicate a novel gene involved in human hair abnormality, and are consistent with the curled, fragile hair found in mice with Krt25 mutations, and further support the role of IRS-specific type I keratins in hair follicle development and maintenance of hair texture. PMID:26160856

  15. Mutation Update and Review of Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Froese, D Sean; Huemer, Martina; Suormala, Terttu; Burda, Patricie; Coelho, David; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Landolt, Markus A; Kožich, Viktor; Fowler, Brian; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-05-01

    Severe 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is caused by mutations in the MTHFR gene and results in hyperhomocysteinemia and varying severity of disease, ranging from neonatal lethal to adult onset. Including those described here, 109 MTHFR mutations have been reported in 171 families, consisting of 70 missense mutations, 17 that primarily affect splicing, 11 nonsense mutations, seven small deletions, two no-stop mutations, one small duplication, and one large duplication. Only 36% of mutations recur in unrelated families, indicating that most are "private." The most common mutation is c.1530A>G (numbered from NM_005957.4, p.Lys510 = ) causing a splicing defect, found in 13 families; the most common missense mutation is c.1129C>T (p.Arg377Cys) identified in 10 families. To increase disease understanding, we report enzymatic activity, detected mutations, and clinical onset information (early, <1 year; or late, >1 year) for all published patients available, demonstrating that patients with early onset have less residual enzyme activity than those presenting later. We also review animal models, diagnostic approaches, clinical presentations, and treatment options. This is the first large review of mutations in MTHFR, highlighting the wide spectrum of disease-causing mutations. PMID:26872964

  16. A new disease-specific machine learning approach for the prediction of cancer-causing missense variants.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Emidio; Altman, Russ B

    2011-10-01

    High-throughput genotyping and sequencing techniques are rapidly and inexpensively providing large amounts of human genetic variation data. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are an important source of human genome variability and have been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer. Amino acid mutations resulting from non-synonymous SNPs in coding regions may generate protein functional changes that affect cell proliferation. In this study, we developed a machine learning approach to predict cancer-causing missense variants. We present a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier trained on a set of 3163 cancer-causing variants and an equal number of neutral polymorphisms. The method achieve 93% overall accuracy, a correlation coefficient of 0.86, and area under ROC curve of 0.98. When compared with other previously developed algorithms such as SIFT and CHASM our method results in higher prediction accuracy and correlation coefficient in identifying cancer-causing variants.

  17. Genotype-to-phenotype analysis: Search for clinical characteristics of a missense change in the GABA{sub A}-{beta}1 receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Sobell, J.L.; Sigurdson, D.C.; Sommer, S.S.

    1996-02-16

    Genotype-to-phenotype analysis reverses the classical approach to genetic disease in which an unknown genotype is sought for a known phenotype. This paper provides an example of genotype-to-phenotype analysis for the possible psychiatric effects of a missense mutation (H396Q) at a highly conserved residue of the {Beta}1 subunit gene of the gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptor. DNA samples from 1,507 Caucasians of Western European descent were screened, and 10 heterozygotes for H396Q were identified. These individuals were matched to homozygous normal individuals by age, gender, and length of available medical records. The complete medical records of these 20 individuals were reviewed blindly by two psychiatrists (D.C.S., L.L.H.) to assess psychiatric symptomatology, with an emphasis on anxiety and related disorders. However, no association was found between this missense change at a conserved amino acid and a dominant neuropsychiatric disease phenotype. Thus, this missense change may be neutral or only mildly deleterious, may only cause recessive disease in rare individuals, or may interact epistatically with some other gene(s). 17 refs.

  18. Vibratory Urticaria Associated with a Missense Variant in ADGRE2.

    PubMed

    Boyden, Steven E; Desai, Avanti; Cruse, Glenn; Young, Michael L; Bolan, Hyejeong C; Scott, Linda M; Eisch, A Robin; Long, R Daniel; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Satorius, Colleen L; Pakstis, Andrew J; Olivera, Ana; Mullikin, James C; Chouery, Eliane; Mégarbané, André; Medlej-Hashim, Myrna; Kidd, Kenneth K; Kastner, Daniel L; Metcalfe, Dean D; Komarow, Hirsh D

    2016-02-18

    Patients with autosomal dominant vibratory urticaria have localized hives and systemic manifestations in response to dermal vibration, with coincident degranulation of mast cells and increased histamine levels in serum. We identified a previously unknown missense substitution in ADGRE2 (also known as EMR2), which was predicted to result in the replacement of cysteine with tyrosine at amino acid position 492 (p.C492Y), as the only nonsynonymous variant cosegregating with vibratory urticaria in two large kindreds. The ADGRE2 receptor undergoes autocatalytic cleavage, producing an extracellular subunit that noncovalently binds a transmembrane subunit. We showed that the variant probably destabilizes an autoinhibitory subunit interaction, sensitizing mast cells to IgE-independent vibration-induced degranulation. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.). PMID:26841242

  19. Vibratory Urticaria Associated with a Missense Variant in ADGRE2

    PubMed Central

    Boyden, Steven E.; Desai, Avanti; Cruse, Glenn; Young, Michael L.; Bolan, Hyejeong C.; Scott, Linda M.; Eisch, A. Robin; Long, R. Daniel; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Satorius, Colleen L.; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Olivera, Ana; Mullikin, James C.; Chouery, Eliane; Mégarbané, André; Medlej-Hashim, Myrna; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Komarow, Hirsh D.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Patients with autosomal dominant vibratory urticaria have localized hives and systemic manifestations in response to dermal vibration, with coincident degranulation of mast cells and increased histamine levels in serum. We identified a previously unknown missense substitution in ADGRE2 (also known as EMR2), which was predicted to result in the replacement of cysteine with tyrosine at amino acid position 492 (p.C492Y), as the only nonsynonymous variant cosegregating with vibratory urticaria in two large kindreds. The ADGRE2 receptor undergoes autocatalytic cleavage, producing an extracellular subunit that noncovalently binds a transmembrane subunit. We showed that the variant probably destabilizes an autoinhibitory subunit interaction, sensitizing mast cells to IgE-independent vibration-induced degranulation. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.) PMID:26841242

  20. Pathogenicity of the BRCA1 Missense Variant M1775K is Determined by the Disruption of the BRCT Phosphopeptide-Binding Pocket: a Multi-Modal Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tischkowitz,M.; Hamel, N.; Carvalho, M.; Birrane, G.; Soni, A.; van Beers, E.; Joosse, S.; Wong, N.; Novak, D.; et al

    2008-01-01

    A number of germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene confer susceptibility to breast and ovarian cancer. However, it remains difficult to determine whether many single amino-acid (missense) changes in the BRCA1 protein that are frequently detected in the clinical setting are pathologic or not. Here, we used a combination of functional, crystallographic, biophysical, molecular and evolutionary techniques, and classical genetic segregation analysis to demonstrate that the BRCA1 missense variant M1775K is pathogenic. Functional assays in yeast and mammalian cells showed that the BRCA1 BRCT domains carrying the amino-acid change M1775K displayed markedly reduced transcriptional activity, indicating that this variant represents a deleterious mutation. Importantly, the M1775K mutation disrupted the phosphopeptide-binding pocket of the BRCA1 BRCT domains, thereby inhibiting the BRCA1 interaction with the proteins BRIP1 and CtIP, which are involved in DNA damage-induced checkpoint control. These results indicate that the integrity of the BRCT phosphopeptide-binding pocket is critical for the tumor suppression function of BRCA1. Moreover, this study demonstrates that multiple lines of evidence obtained from a combination of functional, structural, molecular and evolutionary techniques, and classical genetic segregation analysis are required to confirm the pathogenicity of rare variants of disease-susceptibility genes and obtain important insights into the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms.

  1. Mutations in argininosuccinate synthetase mRNA of Japanese patients, causing classical citrullinemia

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Keiko; Shaheen, Nazma; Terazono, Hiroki; Saheki, Takeyori

    1994-12-01

    Citrullinemia is an autosomal recessive disease caused by a genetic deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase. In order to characterize mutations in Japanese patients with classical citrullinemia, RNA isolated from 10 unrelated patients was reverse-transcribed, and cDNA amplified by PCR was cloned and sequenced. The 10 mutations identified included 6 missense mutations (A118T, A192V, R272C, G280R, R304W, and R363L), 2 mutations associated with an absence of an exon 7 or exon 13, 1 mutation with a deletion of the first 7 bp in exon 16 (which might be caused by abnormal splicing), and 1 mutation with an insertion of 37 bp within exons 15 and 16 in cDNA. The insertion mutation and the five missense mutations (R304W being excluded) are new mutations described in the present paper. These are in addition to 14 mutations (9 missense mutations, 4 mutations associated with an absence of an exon in mRNA, and 1 splicing mutation) that we identified previously in mainly American patients with neonatal citrullinemia. Two of these 20 mutations, a deletion of exon 13 sequence and a 7-bp deletion in exon 16, were common to Japanese and American populations from different ethnic backgrounds; however, other mutations were unique to each population. Furthermore, the presence of a frequent mutation - the exon 7 deletion mutation in mRNA, which accounts for 10 of 23 affected alleles - was demonstrated in Japanese citrullinemia. This differs from the situation in the United States, where there was far greater heterogeneity of mutations.

  2. Spectrum of mutations in mut methylmalonic acidemia and identification of a common Hispanic mutation and haplotype.

    PubMed

    Worgan, Lisa C; Niles, Kirsten; Tirone, Jamie C; Hofmann, Adam; Verner, Andrei; Sammak, Alya'a; Kucic, Terrence; Lepage, Pierre; Rosenblatt, David S

    2006-01-01

    Cobalamin nonresponsive methylmalonic acidemia (MMA, mut complementation class) results from mutations in the nuclear gene MUT, which codes for the mitochondrial enzyme methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MCM). To better elucidate the spectrum of mutations that cause MMA, the MUT gene was sequenced in 160 patients with mut MMA. Sequence analysis identified mutations in 96% of disease alleles. Mutations were found in all coding exons, but predominantly in exons 2, 3, 6, and 11. A total of 116 different mutations, 68 of which were novel, were identified. Of the 116 different mutations, 53% were missense mutations, 22% were deletions, duplications or insertions, 16% were nonsense mutations, and 9% were splice-site mutations. Sixty-one of the mutations have only been identified in one family. A novel mutation in exon 2, c.322C>T (p.R108C), was identified in 16 of 27 Hispanic patients. SNP genotyping data demonstrated that Hispanic patients with this mutation share a common haplotype. Three other mutations were seen exclusively in Hispanic patients: c.280G>A (p.G94R), c.1022dupA, and c.970G>A (p.A324T). Seven mutations were seen almost exclusively in black patients, including the previously reported c.2150G>T (p.G717V) mutation, which was identified in 12 of 29 black patients. Two mutations were seen only in Asian patients. Some frequently identified mutations were not population-specific and were identified in patients of various ethnic backgrounds. Some of these mutations were found in mutation clusters in exons 2, 3, 6, and 11, suggesting a recurrent mutation.

  3. S182 and STM2 gene missense mutations in sporadic alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Susumu; Matsushita, Sachio; Hasegawa, Yoshio; Muramatsu, Taro

    1996-07-26

    The linkage of genes S182 and STM2 to early-onset or late-onset sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) was not found in a group of 97 clinically-diagnosed AD patients and 46 autopsy-confirmed AD cases, using PCR-RFLP methods. 7 refs.

  4. Myopathies associated with β-tropomyosin mutations.

    PubMed

    Tajsharghi, H; Ohlsson, M; Palm, L; Oldfors, A

    2012-11-01

    Mutations in TPM2, encoding β-tropomyosin, have recently been found to cause a range of muscle disorders. We review the clinical and morphological expression of the previously reported mutations illustrating the heterogeneity of β-tropomyosin-associated diseases and describe an additional case with a novel mutation. The manifestations of mutations in TPM2 include non-specific congenital myopathy with type 1 fibre predominance, nemaline myopathy, cap disease and distal arthrogryposis. In addition, Escobar syndrome with nemaline myopathy is a manifestation of homozygous truncating β-tropomyosin mutation. Cap disease appears to be the most common morphological manifestation. A coarse intermyofibrillar network and jagged Z lines are additional frequent changes. The dominant β-tropomyosin mutations manifest either as congenital myopathy or distal arthrogryposis. The various congenital myopathies are usually associated with moderate muscle weakness and no congenital joint contractures. The distal arthrogryposis syndromes associated with TPM2 mutations include the less severe forms, with congenital contractures mainly of the hands and feet and mild or no muscle weakness. The dominant TPM2 mutations include amino acid deletions/insertions and missense mutations. There is no clear relation between the type of mutations or the localisation of the mutated residue in the β-tropomyosin molecule and the clinical and morphological phenotype. PMID:22749895

  5. Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma in a Hispanic kindred resulting from a mutation in the keratin 9 gene.

    PubMed

    Warmuth, I; Cserhalmi-Friedman, P B; Schneiderman, P; Grossman, M E; Christiano, A M

    2000-05-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK) is a localized keratinization disorder caused by mutations in the highly conserved coil 1A domain of the keratin 9 gene, KRT9. We present a Hispanic pedigree spanning three generations, with affected individuals in all generations. Using polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing we demonstrated a previously reported missense mutation in KRT9, which is expressed almost exclusively in the skin of palms and soles. The C-->T missense mutation R162W changes a basic amino acid (arginine) to a neutral amino acid (tryptophan). We describe this mutation in a Hispanic pedigree with EPPK for the first time, extending the finding of this mutation in other genetic backgrounds, and demonstrating the prevalence of this mutation in diverse populations.

  6. Nemaline myopathy caused by mutations in the nebulin gene may present as a distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lehtokari, Vilma-Lotta; Pelin, Katarina; Herczegfalvi, Agnes; Karcagi, Veronika; Pouget, Jean; Franques, Jerôme; Pellissier, Jean François; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; von der Hagen, Maja; Huebner, Angela; Schoser, Benedikt; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2011-08-01

    Mutations in the nebulin gene are the main cause of autosomal recessive nemaline myopathy, with clinical presentations ranging from mild to severe disease. We have previously reported a nonspecific distal myopathy caused by homozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene in six Finnish patients from four different families. Here we describe three non-Finnish patients in two unrelated families with distal nemaline myopathy caused by four different compound heterozygous nebulin mutations, only one of which is a missense mutation. One of the mutations has previously been identified in one family with the severe form of nemaline myopathy. We conclude that nemaline myopathy and distal myopathy caused by nebulin mutations form a clinical and histological continuum. Nemaline myopathy should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients presenting with an early-onset predominantly distal myopathy. PMID:21724397

  7. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease due to a de novo mutation of the RAB7 gene.

    PubMed

    Meggouh, F; Bienfait, H M E; Weterman, M A J; de Visser, M; Baas, F

    2006-10-24

    We report a 32-year-old patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT2B) including foot ulcerations. Genetic analysis identified a de novo mutation in the small GTP-ase late endosomal RAB7 gene, consisting of a c.471G>C, p.Lys157Asn missense mutation. This observation strongly supports the hypothesis that RAB7 mutations are responsible for CMT2B. PMID:17060578

  8. Exome sequencing identifies PDE4D mutations in acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hane; Graham, John M; Rimoin, David L; Lachman, Ralph S; Krejci, Pavel; Tompson, Stuart W; Nelson, Stanley F; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H

    2012-04-01

    Acrodysostosis is a dominantly-inherited, multisystem disorder characterized by skeletal, endocrine, and neurological abnormalities. To identify the molecular basis of acrodysostosis, we performed exome sequencing on five genetically independent cases. Three different missense mutations in PDE4D, which encodes cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific phosphodiesterase 4D, were found to be heterozygous in three of the cases. Two of the mutations were demonstrated to have occurred de novo, providing strong genetic evidence of causation. Two additional cases were heterozygous for de novo missense mutations in PRKAR1A, which encodes the cAMP-dependent regulatory subunit of protein kinase A and which has been recently reported to be the cause of a form of acrodysostosis resistant to multiple hormones. These findings demonstrate that acrodysostosis is genetically heterogeneous and underscore the exquisite sensitivity of many tissues to alterations in cAMP homeostasis. PMID:22464252

  9. Novel mutations in 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH) are distributed throughout the protein and result in altered enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, L; de Koning, T J; Geboers, A J J M; van den Berg, I E T; Berger, R; Klomp, L W J

    2009-05-01

    Three-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (3-PGDH) deficiency is a rare recessive inborn error in the biosynthesis of the amino acid L-serine characterized clinically by congenital microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, and intractable seizures. The biochemical abnormalities associated with this disorder are low concentrations of L-serine, D-serine, and glycine in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Only two missense mutations (p.V425M and p.V490M) have been identified in PHGDH, the gene encoding 3-PGDH, but it is currently unclear how these mutations in the carboxy-terminal regulatory domain of the protein affect enzyme function. We now describe five novel mutations in five patients with 3-PGDH deficiency; one frameshift mutation (p.G238fsX), and four missense mutations (p.R135W, p.V261M, p.A373T, and p.G377S). The missense mutations were located in the nucleotide binding and regulatory domains of 3-PGDH and did not affect steady-state expression, protein stability, and protein degradation rates. Patients' fibroblasts displayed a significant, but incomplete, reduction in maximal enzyme activities associated with all missense mutations. In transient overexpression studies in HEK293T cells, the p.A373T, p.V425M, and p.V490M mutations resulted in almost undetectable enzyme activities. Molecular modeling of the p.R135W and p.V261M mutations onto the partial crystal structure of 3-PGDH predicted that these mutations affect substrate and cofactor binding. This prediction was confirmed by the results of kinetic measurements in fibroblasts and transiently transfected HEK293T cells, which revealed a markedly decreased V(max) and an increase in K(m) values, respectively. Taken together, these data suggest that missense mutations associated with 3-PGDH deficiency either primarily affect substrate binding or result in very low residual enzymatic activity. PMID:19235232

  10. Rapid identification of HEXA mutations in Tay-Sachs patients.

    PubMed

    Giraud, Carole; Dussau, Jeanne; Azouguene, Emilie; Feillet, François; Puech, Jean-Philippe; Caillaud, Catherine

    2010-02-19

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder due to mutations in the HEXA gene resulting in a beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) deficiency. The purpose of this study was to characterize the molecular abnormalities in patients with infantile or later-onset forms of the disease. The complete sequencing of the 14 exons and flanking regions of the HEXA gene was performed with a unique technical condition in 10 unrelated TSD patients. Eleven mutations were identified, including five splice mutations, one insertion, two deletions and three single-base substitutions. Four mutations were novel: two splice mutations (IVS8+5G>A, IVS2+4delAGTA), one missense mutation in exon 6 (c.621T>G (p.D207E)) and one small deletion (c.1211-1212delTG) in exon 11 resulting in a premature stop codon at residue 429. The c.621T>G missense mutation was found in a patient presenting an infantile form. Its putative role in the pathogenesis of TSD is suspected as residue 207 is highly conserved in human, mouse and rat. Moreover, structural modelling predicted changes likely to affect substrate binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. The time-saving procedure reported here could be useful for the characterization of Tay-Sachs-causing mutations, in particular in non-Ashkenazi patients mainly exhibiting rare mutations. PMID:20100466

  11. Identification and functional analysis of novel THAP1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, Katja; Uflacker, Nils; Erogullari, Alev; Lohnau, Thora; Winkler, Susen; Dendorfer, Andreas; Schneider, Susanne A; Osmanovic, Alma; Svetel, Marina; Ferbert, Andreas; Zittel, Simone; Kühn, Andrea A; Schmidt, Alexander; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Wittstock, Matthias; Kupsch, Andreas; Moro, Elena; Volkmann, Jens; Kostic, Vladimir; Kaiser, Frank J; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in THAP1 have been associated with dystonia 6 (DYT6). THAP1 encodes a transcription factor that represses the expression of DYT1. To further evaluate the mutational spectrum of THAP1 and its associated phenotype, we sequenced THAP1 in 567 patients with focal (n = 461), segmental (n = 68), or generalized dystonia (n = 38). We identified 10 novel variants, including six missense substitutions within the DNA-binding Thanatos-associated protein domain (Arg13His, Lys16Glu, His23Pro, Lys24Glu, Pro26Leu, Ile80Val), a 1bp-deletion downstream of the nuclear localization signal (Asp191Thrfs*9), and three alterations in the untranslated regions. The effect of the missense variants was assessed using prediction tools and luciferase reporter gene assays. This indicated the Ile80Val substitution as a benign variant. The subcellular localization of Asp191Thrfs*9 suggests a disturbed nuclear import for this mutation. Thus, we consider six of the 10 novel variants as pathogenic mutations accounting for a mutation frequency of 1.1%. Mutation carriers presented mainly with early onset dystonia (<12 years in five of six patients). Symptoms started in an arm or neck and spread to become generalized in three patients or segmental in two patients. Speech was affected in four mutation carriers. In conclusion, THAP1 mutations are rare in unselected dystonia patients and functional analysis is necessary to distinguish between benign variants and pathogenic mutations. PMID:21847143

  12. Identification and functional analysis of novel THAP1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Katja; Uflacker, Nils; Erogullari, Alev; Lohnau, Thora; Winkler, Susen; Dendorfer, Andreas; Schneider, Susanne A; Osmanovic, Alma; Svetel, Marina; Ferbert, Andreas; Zittel, Simone; Kühn, Andrea A; Schmidt, Alexander; Altenmüller, Eckart; Münchau, Alexander; Kamm, Christoph; Wittstock, Matthias; Kupsch, Andreas; Moro, Elena; Volkmann, Jens; Kostic, Vladimir; Kaiser, Frank J; Klein, Christine; Brüggemann, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in THAP1 have been associated with dystonia 6 (DYT6). THAP1 encodes a transcription factor that represses the expression of DYT1. To further evaluate the mutational spectrum of THAP1 and its associated phenotype, we sequenced THAP1 in 567 patients with focal (n=461), segmental (n=68), or generalized dystonia (n=38). We identified 10 novel variants, including six missense substitutions within the DNA-binding Thanatos-associated protein domain (Arg13His, Lys16Glu, His23Pro, Lys24Glu, Pro26Leu, Ile80Val), a 1bp-deletion downstream of the nuclear localization signal (Asp191Thrfs*9), and three alterations in the untranslated regions. The effect of the missense variants was assessed using prediction tools and luciferase reporter gene assays. This indicated the Ile80Val substitution as a benign variant. The subcellular localization of Asp191Thrfs*9 suggests a disturbed nuclear import for this mutation. Thus, we consider six of the 10 novel variants as pathogenic mutations accounting for a mutation frequency of 1.1%. Mutation carriers presented mainly with early onset dystonia (<12 years in five of six patients). Symptoms started in an arm or neck and spread to become generalized in three patients or segmental in two patients. Speech was affected in four mutation carriers. In conclusion, THAP1 mutations are rare in unselected dystonia patients and functional analysis is necessary to distinguish between benign variants and pathogenic mutations. PMID:21847143

  13. Predicting the Pathogenicity of RPE65 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Philp, A.R.; Jin, M.; Li, S.; Schindler, E.I.; Iannaccone, A.; Lam, B.L.; Weleber, R.G.; Fishman, G.A.; Jacobson, S.G.; Mullins, R.F.; Travis, G.H.; Stone, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    To assist in distinguishing disease-causing mutations from non-pathogenic polymorphisms, we developed an objective algorithm to calculate an “estimate of pathogenic probability” (EPP) based on the prevalence of a specific variation, its segregation within families, and its predicted effects on protein structure. Eleven missense variations in the RPE65 gene were evaluated in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) using the EPP algorithm. The accuracy of the EPP algorithm was evaluated using a cell-culture assay of RPE65-isomerase activity The variations were engineered into plasmids containing a human RPE65 cDNA and the retinoid isomerase activity of each variant was determined in cultured cells. The EPP algorithm predicted eight substitution mutations to be disease-causing variants. The isomerase catalytic activities of these RPE65 variants were all less than 6% of wild-type. In contrast, the EPP algorithm predicted the other three substitutions to be non-disease-causing, with isomerase activities of 68%, 127% and 110% of wild-type, respectively. We observed complete concordance between the predicted pathogenicities of missense variations in the RPE65 gene and retinoid isomerase activities measured in a functional assay. These results suggest that the EPP algorithm may be useful to evaluate the pathogenicity of missense variations in other disease genes where functional assays are not available. PMID:19431183

  14. Missense variant in TREML2 protects against Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Bruno A; Jin, Sheng Chih; Guerreiro, Rita; Graham, Rob; Lord, Jenny; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Gibbs, J Raphael; Bras, Jose; Sassi, Celeste; Harari, Oscar; Bertelsen, Sarah; Lupton, Michelle K; Powell, John; Bellenguez, Celine; Brown, Kristelle; Medway, Christopher; Haddick, Patrick C G; van der Brug, Marcel P; Bhangale, Tushar; Ortmann, Ward; Behrens, Tim; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Haines, Jonathan L; Turton, Jim; Braae, Anne; Barber, Imelda; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Williams, Julie; Kauwe, John S K; Amouyel, Philippe; Morgan, Kevin; Singleton, Andy; Hardy, John; Goate, Alison M; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    TREM and TREM-like receptors are a structurally similar protein family encoded by genes clustered on chromosome 6p21.11. Recent studies have identified a rare coding variant (p.R47H) in TREM2 that confers a high risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). In addition, common single nucleotide polymorphisms in this genomic region are associated with cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for AD and a common intergenic variant found near the TREML2 gene has been identified to be protective for AD. However, little is known about the functional variant underlying the latter association or its relationship with the p.R47H. Here, we report comprehensive analyses using whole-exome sequencing data, cerebrospinal fluid biomarker analyses, meta-analyses (16,254 cases and 20,052 controls) and cell-based functional studies to support the role of the TREML2 coding missense variant p.S144G (rs3747742) as a potential driver of the meta-analysis AD-associated genome-wide association studies signal. Additionally, we demonstrate that the protective role of TREML2 in AD is independent of the role of TREM2 gene as a risk factor for AD.

  15. SNP2Structure: A Public and Versatile Resource for Mapping and Three-Dimensional Modeling of Missense SNPs on Human Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Difei; Song, Lei; Singh, Varun; Rao, Shruti; An, Lin; Madhavan, Subha

    2015-01-01

    One of the long-standing challenges in biology is to understand how non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) change protein structure and further affect their function. While it is impractical to solve all the mutated protein structures experimentally, it is quite feasible to model the mutated structures in silico. Toward this goal, we built a publicly available structure database resource (SNP2Structure, https://apps.icbi.georgetown.edu/snp2structure) focusing on missense mutations, msSNP. Compared with web portals with similar aims, SNP2Structure has the following major advantages. First, our portal offers direct comparison of two related 3D structures. Second, the protein models include all interacting molecules in the original PDB structures, so users are able to determine regions of potential interaction changes when a protein mutation occurs. Third, the mutated structures are available to download locally for further structural and functional analysis. Fourth, we used Jsmol package to display the protein structure that has no system compatibility issue. SNP2Structure provides reliable, high quality mapping of nsSNPs to 3D protein structures enabling researchers to explore the likely functional impact of human disease-causing mutations. PMID:26949480

  16. Identification of six novel P450 oxidoreductase missense variants in Ashkenazi and Moroccan Jewish populations

    PubMed Central

    Tomková, Mária; Marohnic, Christopher C; Gurwitz, David; Šeda, Ondřej; Masters, Bettie Sue Siler; Martásek, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Background The enzyme NADPH–P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the main electron donor to all microsomal CYPs. The possible contribution of common POR variants to inter- and intra-individual variability in drug metabolism is of great pharmacogenetic interest. Aim To search for POR polymorphic alleles and estimate their frequencies in a Jewish population. Materials & methods We analyzed the POR gene in 301 Ashkenazi and Moroccan Jews. Results A total of 30 POR SNPs were identified, nine in the noncoding regions and 21 in the protein-coding regions (ten synonymous, 11 missense). Six of these missense variants are previously undescribed (S102P, V164M, V191M, D344N, E398A and D648N). Conclusion The data collected in this study on missense POR SNPs, interpreted in light of the crystallographic structure of human POR, indicate that some POR missense variants may be potential biomarkers for future POR pharmacogenetic screening. PMID:22462747

  17. In vitro secretion deficits are common among human coagulation factor XIII subunit B missense mutants: correlations with patient phenotypes and molecular models.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Arijit; Thomas, Anne; Bevans, Carville G; Ivaskevicius, Vytautas; Oldenburg, Johannes

    2013-11-01

    Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) proenzyme circulates in plasma as a heterotetramer composed of two each of A and B subunits. Upon activation, the B subunits dissociate from the A subunit dimer, which gains transglutaminase activity to cross-link preformed fibrin clots increasing mechanical strength and resistance to degradation. The B subunits are thought to possess a carrier/protective function before FXIII activation. Mutations in either A or B subunits are associated with pathological patient phenotypes characterized by mild to severe bleeding. In vitro expression of FXIII B subunit (FXIIIB) missense variants in HEK293T cells revealed impaired secretion for all seven variants studied. To investigate the likely molecular environments of the missense residues, we created molecular models of individual FXIIIB Sushi domains using phylogenetically similar complement factor H Sushi domain structural templates. Assessment of the local molecular environments for the models suggested surface or buried positions for each mutant residue and possible pathological mechanisms. The in vitro expression system and in silico analytical methods and models we developed can be used to further investigate the molecular basis of FXIIIB mutation pathologies. PMID:23913518

  18. BRAF mutation in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Yoram; Xing, Mingzhao; Mambo, Elizabeth; Guo, Zhongmin; Wu, Guogun; Trink, Barry; Beller, Uziel; Westra, William H; Ladenson, Paul W; Sidransky, David

    2003-04-16

    The BRAF gene has been found to be activated by mutation in human cancers, predominantly in malignant melanoma. We tested 476 primary tumors, including 214 lung, 126 head and neck, 54 thyroid, 27 bladder, 38 cervical, and 17 prostate cancers, for the BRAF T1796A mutation by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction enzyme analysis of BRAF exon 15. In 24 (69%) of the 35 papillary thyroid carcinomas examined, we found a missense thymine (T)-->adenine (A) transversion at nucleotide 1796 in the BRAF gene (T1796A). The T1796A mutation was detected in four lung cancers and in six head and neck cancers but not in bladder, cervical, or prostate cancers. Our data suggest that activating BRAF mutations may be an important event in the development of papillary thyroid cancer.

  19. Mutations in GNAL cause primary torsion dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Tania; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Masuho, Ikuo; Luciano, Marta San; Raymond, Deborah; Factor, Stewart; Lang, Anthony E.; Liang, Tsao-Wei; Trosch, Richard M.; White, Sierra; Ainehsazan, Edmond; Herve, Denis; Sharma, Nutan; Ehrlich, Michelle E.; Martemyanov, Kirill A.; Bressman, Susan B.; Ozelius, Laurie J.

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by repetitive twisting muscle contractions and postures1,2. Its molecular pathophysiology is poorly understood, in part due to limited knowledge of the genetic basis of the disorder. Only three genes for primary torsion dystonia (PTD), TOR1A (DYT1)3, THAP1 (DYT6)4, and CIZ15 have been identified. Using exome sequencing in two PTD families we identified a novel causative gene, GNAL, with a nonsense p.S293X mutation resulting in premature stop codon in one family and a missense p.V137M mutation in the other. Screening of GNAL in 39 PTD families, revealed six additional novel mutations in this gene. Impaired function of several of the mutations was shown by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays. PMID:23222958

  20. The Evaluation of Tools Used to Predict the Impact of Missense Variants Is Hindered by Two Types of Circularity

    PubMed Central

    Azencott, Chloé‐Agathe; Aicheler, Fabian; Gieraths, Udo; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Cooper, David N.; Stenson, Peter D.; Daly, Mark J.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Duncan, Laramie E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prioritizing missense variants for further experimental investigation is a key challenge in current sequencing studies for exploring complex and Mendelian diseases. A large number of in silico tools have been employed for the task of pathogenicity prediction, including PolyPhen‐2, SIFT, FatHMM, MutationTaster‐2, MutationAssessor, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, LRT, phyloP, and GERP++, as well as optimized methods of combining tool scores, such as Condel and Logit. Due to the wealth of these methods, an important practical question to answer is which of these tools generalize best, that is, correctly predict the pathogenic character of new variants. We here demonstrate in a study of 10 tools on five datasets that such a comparative evaluation of these tools is hindered by two types of circularity: they arise due to (1) the same variants or (2) different variants from the same protein occurring both in the datasets used for training and for evaluation of these tools, which may lead to overly optimistic results. We show that comparative evaluations of predictors that do not address these types of circularity may erroneously conclude that circularity confounded tools are most accurate among all tools, and may even outperform optimized combinations of tools. PMID:25684150

  1. The evaluation of tools used to predict the impact of missense variants is hindered by two types of circularity

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Dominik G.; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Aicheler, Fabian; Gieraths, Udo; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Cooper, David N.; Stenson, Peter D.; Daly, Mark J.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Duncan, Laramie E.; Borgwardt, Karsten M.

    2015-01-01

    Prioritizing missense variants for further experimental investigation is a key challenge in current sequencing studies for exploring complex and Mendelian diseases. A large number of in silico tools have been employed for the task of pathogenicity prediction, including PolyPhen-2, SIFT, FatHMM, MutationTaster-2, MutationAssessor, CADD, LRT, phyloP and GERP++, as well as optimized methods of combining tool scores, such as Condel and Logit. Due to the wealth of these methods, an important practical question to answer is which of these tools generalize best, that is, correctly predict the pathogenic character of new variants. We here demonstrate in a study of ten tools on five datasets that such a comparative evaluation of these tools is hindered by two types of circularity: they arise due to (1) the same variants or (2) different variants from the same protein occurring both in the datasets used for training and for evaluation of these tools, which may lead to overly optimistic results. We show that comparative evaluations of predictors that do not address these types of circularity may erroneously conclude that circularity-confounded tools are most accurate among all tools, and may even outperform optimized combinations of tools. PMID:25684150

  2. The evaluation of tools used to predict the impact of missense variants is hindered by two types of circularity.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Dominik G; Azencott, Chloé-Agathe; Aicheler, Fabian; Gieraths, Udo; MacArthur, Daniel G; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Cooper, David N; Stenson, Peter D; Daly, Mark J; Smoller, Jordan W; Duncan, Laramie E; Borgwardt, Karsten M

    2015-05-01

    Prioritizing missense variants for further experimental investigation is a key challenge in current sequencing studies for exploring complex and Mendelian diseases. A large number of in silico tools have been employed for the task of pathogenicity prediction, including PolyPhen-2, SIFT, FatHMM, MutationTaster-2, MutationAssessor, Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion, LRT, phyloP, and GERP++, as well as optimized methods of combining tool scores, such as Condel and Logit. Due to the wealth of these methods, an important practical question to answer is which of these tools generalize best, that is, correctly predict the pathogenic character of new variants. We here demonstrate in a study of 10 tools on five datasets that such a comparative evaluation of these tools is hindered by two types of circularity: they arise due to (1) the same variants or (2) different variants from the same protein occurring both in the datasets used for training and for evaluation of these tools, which may lead to overly optimistic results. We show that comparative evaluations of predictors that do not address these types of circularity may erroneously conclude that circularity confounded tools are most accurate among all tools, and may even outperform optimized combinations of tools. PMID:25684150

  3. Truncating mutations in APP cause a distinct neurological phenotype.

    PubMed

    Klein, Steven; Goldman, Alexander; Lee, Hane; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Bhakta, Viraj; Nelson, Stanley F; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2016-09-01

    Dominant missense mutations in the amyloid β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) gene have been implicated in early onset Alzheimer disease. These mutations alter protein structure to favor the pathologic production of Aβ. We report that homozygous nonsense mutations in APP are associated with decreased somatic growth, microcephaly, hypotonia, developmental delay, thinning of the corpus callosum, and seizures. We compare the phenotype of this case to those reported in mouse models and demonstrate multiple similarities, strengthening the role of amyloid precursor protein in normal brain function and development. Ann Neurol 2016;80:456-460. PMID:27422356

  4. In silico comparative characterization of pharmacogenomic missense variants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Missense pharmacogenomic (PGx) variants refer to amino acid substitutions that potentially affect the pharmacokinetic (PK) or pharmacodynamic (PD) response to drug therapies. The PGx variants, as compared to disease-associated variants, have not been investigated as deeply. The ability to computationally predict future PGx variants is desirable; however, it is not clear what data sets should be used or what features are beneficial to this end. Hence we carried out a comparative characterization of PGx variants with annotated neutral and disease variants from UniProt, to test the predictive power of sequence conservation and structural information in discriminating these three groups. Results 126 PGx variants of high quality from PharmGKB were selected and two data sets were created: one set contained 416 variants with structural and sequence information, and, the other set contained 1,265 variants with sequence information only. In terms of sequence conservation, PGx variants are more conserved than neutral variants and much less conserved than disease variants. A weighted random forest was used to strike a more balanced classification for PGx variants. Generally structural features are helpful in discriminating PGx variant from the other two groups, but still classification of PGx from neutral polymorphisms is much less effective than between disease and neutral variants. Conclusions We found that PGx variants are much more similar to neutral variants than to disease variants in the feature space consisting of residue conservation, neighboring residue conservation, number of neighbors, and protein solvent accessibility. Such similarity poses great difficulty in the classification of PGx variants and polymorphisms. PMID:25057096

  5. Novel PORCN mutations in focal dermal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Froyen, G; Govaerts, K; Van Esch, H; Verbeeck, J; Tuomi, M-L; Heikkilä, H; Torniainen, S; Devriendt, K; Fryns, J-P; Marynen, P; Järvelä, I; Ala-Mello, S

    2009-12-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), Goltz or Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, is an X-linked dominant multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system and eyes. We screened for mutations in the PORCN gene in eight patients of Belgian and Finnish origin with firm clinical suspicion of FDH. First, we performed quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis to define the copy number at this locus. Next, we sequenced the coding regions and flanking intronic sequences of the PORCN gene. Three de novo mutations were identified in our patients with FDH: a 150-kb deletion removing six genes including PORCN, as defined by qPCR and X-array-CGH, and two heterozygous missense mutations; c.992T>G (p.L331R) in exon 11 and c.1094G>A (p.R365Q) in exon 13 of the gene. Both point mutations changed highly conserved amino acids and were not found in 300 control X chromosomes. The three patients in whom mutations were identified all present with characteristic dermal findings together with limb manifestations, which were not seen in our mutation-negative patients. The clinical characteristics of our patients with PORCN mutations were compared with the previously reported mutation-positive cases. In this report, we summarize the literature on PORCN mutations and associated phenotypes.

  6. ELOVL5 mutations cause spinocerebellar ataxia 38.

    PubMed

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-08-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases.

  7. Genetic heterogeneity of pseudoxanthoma elasticum: the Chinese signature profile of ABCC6 and ENPP1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Jin, Liang; Jiang, Qiujie; Wu, Zhengsheng; Shao, Changxia; Zhou, Yong; Yang, Luting; Uitto, Jouni; Wang, Gang

    2015-05-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ectopic mineralization, is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. We examined clinically 29 Chinese PXE patients from unrelated families, so far the largest cohort of Asian PXE patients. In a subset of 22 patients, we sequenced ABCC6 and another candidate gene, ENPP1, and conducted pathogenicity analyses for each variant. We identified a total of 17 distinct mutations in ABCC6, 15 of them being, to our knowledge, previously unreported, including 5 frameshift and 10 missense variants. In addition, a missense mutation in combination with a recurrent nonsense mutation in ENPP1 was discovered in a pediatric PXE case. No cases with p.R1141X or del23-29 mutations, common in Caucasian patient populations, were identified. The 10 missense mutations in ABCC6 were expressed in the mouse liver via hydrodynamic tail-vein injections. One mutant protein showed cytoplasmic accumulation indicating abnormal subcellular trafficking, while the other nine mutants showed correct plasma membrane location. These nine mutations were further investigated for their pathogenicity using a recently developed zebrafish mRNA rescue assay. Minimal rescue of the morpholino-induced phenotype was achieved with eight of the nine mutant human ABCC6 mRNAs tested, implying pathogenicity. This study demonstrates that the Chinese PXE population harbors unique ABCC6 mutations. These genetic data have implications for allele-specific therapy currently being developed for PXE. PMID:25615550

  8. Excess of De Novo Deleterious Mutations in Genes Associated with Glutamatergic Systems in Nonsyndromic Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Fadi F.; Gauthier, Julie; Araki, Yoichi; Lin, Da-Ting; Yoshizawa, Yuhki; Higashi, Kyohei; Park, A-Reum; Spiegelman, Dan; Dobrzeniecka, Sylvia; Piton, Amélie; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Daoud, Hussein; Massicotte, Christine; Henrion, Edouard; Diallo, Ousmane; Shekarabi, Masoud; Marineau, Claude; Shevell, Michael; Maranda, Bruno; Mitchell, Grant; Nadeau, Amélie; D'Anjou, Guy; Vanasse, Michel; Srour, Myriam; Lafrenière, Ronald G.; Drapeau, Pierre; Lacaille, Jean Claude; Kim, Eunjoon; Lee, Jae-Ran; Igarashi, Kazuei; Huganir, Richard L.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Michaud, Jacques L.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the genetics of nonsyndromic intellectual disability (NSID). We hypothesized that de novo mutations (DNMs) in synaptic genes explain an important fraction of sporadic NSID cases. In order to investigate this possibility, we sequenced 197 genes encoding glutamate receptors and a large subset of their known interacting proteins in 95 sporadic cases of NSID. We found 11 DNMs, including ten potentially deleterious mutations (three nonsense, two splicing, one frameshift, four missense) and one neutral mutation (silent) in eight different genes. Calculation of point-substitution DNM rates per functional and neutral site showed significant excess of functional DNMs compared to neutral ones. De novo truncating and/or splicing mutations in SYNGAP1, STXBP1, and SHANK3 were found in six patients and are likely to be pathogenic. De novo missense mutations were found in KIF1A, GRIN1, CACNG2, and EPB41L1. Functional studies showed that all these missense mutations affect protein function in cell culture systems, suggesting that they may be pathogenic. Sequencing these four genes in 50 additional sporadic cases of NSID identified a second DNM in GRIN1 (c.1679_1681dup/p.Ser560dup). This mutation also affects protein function, consistent with structural predictions. None of these mutations or any other DNMs were identified in these genes in 285 healthy controls. This study highlights the importance of the glutamate receptor complexes in NSID and further supports the role of DNMs in this disorder. PMID:21376300

  9. NPHS2 mutations in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome: a mutation update and the associated phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bouchireb, Karim; Boyer, Olivia; Gribouval, Olivier; Nevo, Fabien; Huynh-Cong, Evelyne; Morinière, Vincent; Campait, Raphaëlle; Ars, Elisabet; Brackman, Damien; Dantal, Jacques; Eckart, Philippe; Gigante, Maddalena; Lipska, Beata S; Liutkus, Aurélia; Megarbane, André; Mohsin, Nabil; Ozaltin, Fatih; Saleem, Moin A; Schaefer, Franz; Soulami, Kenza; Torra, Roser; Garcelon, Nicolas; Mollet, Géraldine; Dahan, Karin; Antignac, Corinne

    2014-02-01

    Mutations in the NPHS2 gene encoding podocin are implicated in an autosomal-recessive form of nonsyndromic steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in both pediatric and adult patients. Patients with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations commonly present with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome before the age of 6 years and rapidly progress to end-stage kidney disease with a very low prevalence of recurrence after renal transplantation. Here, we reviewed all the NPHS2 mutations published between October 1999 and September 2013, and also all novel mutations identified in our personal cohort and in international genetic laboratories. We identified 25 novel pathogenic mutations in addition to the 101 already described. The mutations are distributed along the entire coding region and lead to all kinds of alterations including 53 missense, 17 nonsense, 11 small insertions, 26 small deletions, 16 splicing, two indel mutations, and one mutation in the stop codon. In addition, 43 variants were classified as variants of unknown significance, as these missense changes were exclusively described in the heterozygous state and/or considered benign by prediction software. Genotype-phenotype analyses established correlations between specific variants and age at onset, ethnicity, or clinical evolution. We created a Web database using the Leiden Open Variation Database (www.lovd.nl/NPHS2) software that will allow the inclusion of future reports.

  10. GNE mutations in an American family with quadriceps-sparing IBM and lack of mutations in s-IBM.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Olavo M; Raju, Raghavan; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2002-12-10

    Analysis for GNE mutations was performed in an American, non-Iranian Jewish, family with quadriceps-sparing inclusion body myopathy (QS-IBM) and in 11 patients with sporadic IBM (s-IBM). Two novel nonallosteric site missense mutations were found in the QS-IBM kinship. No mutations were identified in s-IBM patients. After 8 years of follow-up and severe disease progression, the quadriceps muscle in the QS-IBM patient remains strong despite subclinical involvement documented with repeat MRI and muscle biopsy.

  11. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Oscar; Kague, Erika; Bagatini, Kelly; Tu, Hongmin; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Carvalhaes, Lorenza; Gava, Elisandra; de Oliveira, Gisele; Godoi, Paulo; Oliva, Glaucius; Kitten, Gregory; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate future diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome (KS) and better understand its etiology, we sought to identify not yet described COL18A1 mutations in KS patients. In addition, we tested whether mutations in this gene lead to absence of the COL18A1 gene product and attempted to better characterize the functional effect of a previously reported missense mutation. Methods Direct sequencing of COL18A1 exons was performed in KS patients from four unrelated pedigrees. We used immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsies to evaluate the presence of type XVIII collagen in four KS patients carrying two already described mutations: c.3277C>T, a nonsense mutation, and c.3601G>A, a missense mutation. Furthermore, we determined the binding properties of the mutated endostatin domain p.A1381T (c.3601G>A) to extracellular matrix proteins using ELISA and surface plasmon resonance assays. Results We identified four novel mutations in COL18A1, including a large deletion involving exon 41. Skin biopsies from KS patients revealed lack of type XVIII collagen in epithelial basement membranes and blood vessels. We also found a reduced affinity of p.A1381T endostatin to some extracellular matrix components. Conclusions COL18A1 mutations involved in Knobloch syndrome have a distribution bias toward the coding exons of the C-terminal end. Large deletions must also be considered when point mutations are not identified in patients with characteristic KS phenotype. We report, for the first time, lack of type XVIII collagen in KS patients by immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsy samples. As a final point, we suggest the employment of this technique as a preliminary and complementary test for diagnosis of KS in cases when mutation screening either does not detect mutations or reveals mutations of uncertain effect, such as the p.A1381T change. PMID:19390655

  12. Exome-Scale Discovery of Hotspot Mutation Regions in Human Cancer Using 3D Protein Structure.

    PubMed

    Tokheim, Collin; Bhattacharya, Rohit; Niknafs, Noushin; Gygax, Derek M; Kim, Rick; Ryan, Michael; Masica, David L; Karchin, Rachel

    2016-07-01

    The impact of somatic missense mutation on cancer etiology and progression is often difficult to interpret. One common approach for assessing the contribution of missense mutations in carcinogenesis is to identify genes mutated with statistically nonrandom frequencies. Even given the large number of sequenced cancer samples currently available, this approach remains underpowered to detect drivers, particularly in less studied cancer types. Alternative statistical and bioinformatic approaches are needed. One approach to increase power is to focus on localized regions of increased missense mutation density or hotspot regions, rather than a whole gene or protein domain. Detecting missense mutation hotspot regions in three-dimensional (3D) protein structure may also be beneficial because linear sequence alone does not fully describe the biologically relevant organization of codons. Here, we present a novel and statistically rigorous algorithm for detecting missense mutation hotspot regions in 3D protein structures. We analyzed approximately 3 × 10(5) mutations from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and identified 216 tumor-type-specific hotspot regions. In addition to experimentally determined protein structures, we considered high-quality structural models, which increase genomic coverage from approximately 5,000 to more than 15,000 genes. We provide new evidence that 3D mutation analysis has unique advantages. It enables discovery of hotspot regions in many more genes than previously shown and increases sensitivity to hotspot regions in tumor suppressor genes (TSG). Although hotspot regions have long been known to exist in both TSGs and oncogenes, we provide the first report that they have different characteristic properties in the two types of driver genes. We show how cancer researchers can use our results to link 3D protein structure and the biologic functions of missense mutations in cancer, and to generate testable hypotheses about driver mechanisms. Our results

  13. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  14. Recessive axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease due to compound heterozygous mitofusin 2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Polke, J.M.; Laurá, M.; Pareyson, D.; Taroni, F.; Milani, M.; Bergamin, G.; Gibbons, V.S.; Houlden, H.; Chamley, S.C.; Blake, J.; DeVile, C.; Sandford, R.; Sweeney, M.G.; Davis, M.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Mutations in mitofusin 2 (MFN2) are the most common cause of axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2). Over 50 mutations have been reported, mainly causing autosomal dominant disease, though families with homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations have been described. We present 3 families with early-onset CMT2 associated with compound heterozygous MFN2 mutations. Transcriptional analysis was performed to investigate the effects of the mutations. Methods: Patients were examined clinically and electrophysiologically; parents were also examined where available. Genetic investigations included MFN2 DNA sequencing and dosage analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. MFN2 mRNA transcripts from blood lymphocytes were analyzed in 2 families. Results: Compound heterozygosity for MFN2 mutations was associated with early-onset CMT2 of varying severity between pedigrees. Parents, where examined, were unaffected and were heterozygous for the expected mutations. Four novel mutations were detected (one missense, one nonsense, an intragenic deletion of exons 7 + 8, and a 3–base pair deletion), as well as 2 previously reported missense mutations. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated aberrant splicing of the exonic deletion and indicated nonsense-mediated decay of mutant alleles with premature truncating mutations. Conclusions: Our findings confirm that MFN2 mutations can cause early-onset CMT2 with apparent recessive inheritance. Novel genetic findings include an intragenic MFN2 deletion and nonsense-mediated decay. Carrier parents were asymptomatic, suggesting that MFN2 null alleles can be nonpathogenic unless coinherited with another mutation. PMID:21715711

  15. Cross Talk Inhibition Nullified by a Receiver Domain Missense Substitution

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, TuAnh Ngoc; Lin, Hsia-Yin; Noriega, Chris E.; Lin, Alice V.

    2015-01-01

    inhibited in part by the high interaction specificity between cognate sensor-response regulator pairs. This study shows that a relatively subtle missense change from Val to Ala nullifies cross talk inhibition, enabling at least two noncognate sensors to enforce an inappropriate output independently of the relevant input. PMID:26260457

  16. p16 Mutations in hereditary melanomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hussussian, C.J.; Struewing, J.P.; Goldstein, A.M.

    1994-09-01

    The p16 gene (CDK4 inhibitor) is located in chromosome 9p21, a region that shows linkage to hereditary melanoma and is deleted in many different tumors. p16 was analyzed in 19 families with hereditary melanoma by amplifying the entire coding region in 5 short segments and screening by SSCP under several conditions that should resolve >95% of polymorphisms. A total of 10 variants were detected in 15 families. The mutations detected included 7 missense, 1 silent, 1 nonsense, and one that destroyed a consensus splice donor site. One of the missense mutations was present in 5/21 spouses in these families, giving an estimated allele frequency of 0.12. Therefore the {triangle}436 [G{yields}A] variant is a common polymorphism and is not involved in the development of melanoma. However, there was strong evidence for the involvement of the other p16 mutations in five 9p21 linked families. In these families, a total of 17/19 individuals with melanoma inherited the mutant allele, while only 2/26 unaffected family members (1 with dysplastic nevi) and 0/13 spouses had the mutant alleles. In two additional 9p21 linked families, one segregated a silent mutation in 3/4 of the affected individuals, and the second only contained the common {triangle}436 [G{yields}A] mutation. In the two families with strong evidence of linkage to chromosome 1p36 and exclusion of linkage to 9p21, no SSCP variants were detected at p16 among 11 melanoma cases, except for a single affected individual who inherited the variant from an unaffected parent. These data confirm the existence of genetic heterogeneity in families with hereditary melanoma. Most (5/7) of the families with strong linkage to 9p21 had p16 missense mutations that segregated with the disease, while 2 families with strong linkage to chromosome 1p36 did not have any detectable p16 mutations that segregated with the disease. Further functional analyses of these mutations will clarify which are causally related to hereditary melanoma.

  17. The spectrum of mutations causing end-plate acetylcholinesterase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ohno, K; Engel, A G; Brengman, J M; Shen, X M; Heidenreich, F; Vincent, A; Milone, M; Tan, E; Demirci, M; Walsh, P; Nakano, S; Akiguchi, I

    2000-02-01

    The end-plate species of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an asymmetric enzyme consisting of a collagenic tail subunit composed of three collagenic strands (ColQ), each attached to a tetramer of the T isoform of the catalytic subunit (AChE(T)) via a proline-rich attachment domain. The principal function of the tail subunit is to anchor asymmetric AChE in the synaptic basal lamina. Human end-plate AChE deficiency was recently shown to be caused by mutations in COLQ. We here report nine novel COLQ mutations in 7 patients with end-plate AChE deficiency. We examine the effects of the mutations on the assembly of asymmetric AChE by coexpressing each genetically engineered COLQ mutant with ACHE(T) in COS cells. We classify the newly recognized and previously reported COLQ mutations into four classes according to their position in ColQ and their effect on AChE expression. We find that missense mutations in the proline-rich attachment domain abrogate attachment of catalytic subunits, that truncation mutations in the ColQ collagen domain prevent the assembly of asymmetric AChE, that hydrophobic missense residues in the C-terminal domain prevent triple helical assembly of the ColQ collagen domain, and that other mutations in the C-terminal region produce asymmetric species of AChE that are likely insertion incompetent. PMID:10665486

  18. A novel mutation (G114V) in the prion protein gene in a family with inherited prion disease.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, M-M; Peoc'h, K; Haïk, S; Bouchet, C; Vernengo, L; Mañana, G; Salamano, R; Carrasco, L; Lenne, M; Beaudry, P; Launay, J-M; Laplanche, J-L

    2005-04-26

    Inherited prion diseases are characterized by mutations in the PRNP gene encoding the prion protein (PrP). We report a novel missense mutation in the PRNP gene (resulting in a G114V mutation in PrP) in members of a Uruguayan family with clinical and histopathologic features of prion disease. Affected individuals were characterized by an early age at onset, initial neuropsychiatric symptoms, late dementia with prominent pyramidal and extrapyramidal symptoms, and long disease duration.

  19. Preaxial polydactyly associated with a MSX1 mutation and report of two novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wattanarat, Onnida; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-01-01

    We report two novel heterozygous missense MSX1 mutations in two Thai families (c.739C>T; p.Pro247Ser and c.607G>A; p.Ala203Thr). The p.Ala203Thr mutation was found in a female patient, her sister, and their father and is associated with unilateral cleft lip and palate, hypodontia, and microdontia. The p.Pro247Ser mutation was found in a three-generation Thai family and was associated with bilateral cleft lip and palate, hypodontia, microdontia, and dens invaginatus. The proband also had preaxial polydactyly of the left hand. The role of Msx1 in limb development in mice is discussed. Intrafamilial variability of the phenotypes is clearly evident. This is the first time that a limb anomaly has been reported to be associated with a mutation in MSX1.

  20. Targeted next-generation sequencing extends the phenotypic and mutational spectrums for EYS mutations

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shun; Tian, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aim to determine genetic lesions with a phenotypic correlation in four Chinese families with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Medical histories were carefully reviewed. All patients received comprehensive ophthalmic evaluations. The next-generation sequencing (NGS) approach targeting a panel of 205 retinal disease–relevant genes and 15 candidate genes was selectively performed on probands from the four recruited families for mutation detection. Online predictive software and crystal structure modeling were also applied to test the potential pathogenic effects of identified mutations. Results Of the four families, two were diagnosed with RP sino pigmento (RPSP). Patients with RPSP claimed to have earlier RP age of onset but slower disease progression. Five mutations in the eyes shut homolog (EYS) gene, involving two novel (c.7228+1G>A and c.9248G>A) and three recurrent mutations (c.4957dupA, c.6416G>A and c.6557G>A), were found as RP causative in the four families. The missense variant c.5093T>C was determined to be a variant of unknown significance (VUS) due to the variant’s colocalization in the same allele with the reported pathogenic mutation c.6416G>A. The two novel variants were further confirmed absent in 100 unrelated healthy controls. Online predictive software indicated potential pathogenicity of the three missense mutations. Further, crystal structural modeling suggested generation of two abnormal hydrogen bonds by the missense mutation p.G2186E (c.6557G>A) and elongation of its neighboring β-sheet induced by p.G3083D (c.9248G>A), which could alter the tertiary structure of the eys protein and thus interrupt its physicochemical properties. Conclusions Taken together, with the targeted NGS approach, we reveal novel EYS mutations and prove the efficiency of targeted NGS in the genetic diagnoses of RP. We also first report the correlation between EYS mutations and RPSP. The genotypic-phenotypic relationship in all

  1. Hypomaturation Amelogenesis Imperfecta Caused By A Novel SLC24A4 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Curtis R.; Reid, Bryan M.; Seymen, Figen; Koruyucu, Mine; Tuna, Elif Bahar; Simmer, James P.; Hu, Jan C-C.

    2014-01-01

    In this case report of autosomal recessive pigmented hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), we identify a novel homozygous missense mutation (g.165151T>G; c.1317T>G; p.Leu436Arg) in SLC24A4, a gene encoding a potassium-dependent sodium-calcium exchanger that is critical for hardening dental enamel during tooth development. PMID:25442250

  2. Mutations in MECOM, Encoding Oncoprotein EVI1, Cause Radioulnar Synostosis with Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Niihori, Tetsuya; Ouchi-Uchiyama, Meri; Sasahara, Yoji; Kaneko, Takashi; Hashii, Yoshiko; Irie, Masahiro; Sato, Atsushi; Saito-Nanjo, Yuka; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Nakayama, Keiko; Ozono, Keiichi; Kure, Shigeo; Matsubara, Yoichi; Imaizumi, Masue; Aoki, Yoko

    2015-12-01

    Radioulnar synostosis with amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (RUSAT) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, characterized by thrombocytopenia and congenital fusion of the radius and ulna. A heterozygous HOXA11 mutation has been identified in two unrelated families as a cause of RUSAT. However, HOXA11 mutations are absent in a number of individuals with RUSAT, which suggests that other genetic loci contribute to RUSAT. In the current study, we performed whole exome sequencing in an individual with RUSAT and her healthy parents and identified a de novo missense mutation in MECOM, encoding EVI1, in the individual with RUSAT. Subsequent analysis of MECOM in two other individuals with RUSAT revealed two additional missense mutations. These three mutations were clustered within the 8(th) zinc finger motif of the C-terminal zinc finger domain of EVI1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and qPCR assays of the regions harboring the ETS-like motif that is known as an EVI1 binding site showed a reduction in immunoprecipitated DNA for two EVI1 mutants compared with wild-type EVI1. Furthermore, reporter assays showed that MECOM mutations led to alterations in both AP-1- and TGF-β-mediated transcriptional responses. These functional assays suggest that transcriptional dysregulation by mutant EVI1 could be associated with the development of RUSAT. We report missense mutations in MECOM resulting in a Mendelian disorder that provide compelling evidence for the critical role of EVI1 in normal hematopoiesis and in the development of forelimbs and fingers in humans.

  3. Spectrum of AGL mutations in Chinese patients with glycogen storage disease type III: identification of 31 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chaoxia; Qiu, Zhengqing; Sun, Miao; Wang, Wei; Wei, Min; Zhang, Xue

    2016-07-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III), a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by hepatomegaly, fasting hypoglycemia, growth retardation, progressive myopathy and cardiomyopathy, is caused by deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme (AGL). Direct sequencing of human AGL cDNA and genomic DNA has enabled analysis of the underlying genetic defects responsible for GSD III. To date, the frequent mutations in different areas and populations have been described in Italy, Japan, Faroe Islands and Mediterranean area, whereas little has been performed in Chinese population. Here we report a sequencing-based mutation analysis in 43 Chinese patients with GSD III from 41 families. We identified 51 different mutations, including 15 splice-site (29.4%), 11 small deletions (21.6%), 12 nonsense (23.5%), 7 missense (13.7%), 5 duplication (9.8%) and 1 complex deletion/insertion (2.0%), 31 of which are novel mutations. The most common mutation is c.1735+1G>T (11.5%). The association of AGL missense and small in-frame deletion mutations with normal creatine kinase level was observed. Our study extends the spectrum of AGL mutations and suggests a genotype-phenotype correlation in GSD III.

  4. Spectrum of AGL mutations in Chinese patients with glycogen storage disease type III: identification of 31 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chaoxia; Qiu, Zhengqing; Sun, Miao; Wang, Wei; Wei, Min; Zhang, Xue

    2016-07-01

    Glycogen storage disease type III (GSD III), a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by hepatomegaly, fasting hypoglycemia, growth retardation, progressive myopathy and cardiomyopathy, is caused by deficiency of the glycogen debranching enzyme (AGL). Direct sequencing of human AGL cDNA and genomic DNA has enabled analysis of the underlying genetic defects responsible for GSD III. To date, the frequent mutations in different areas and populations have been described in Italy, Japan, Faroe Islands and Mediterranean area, whereas little has been performed in Chinese population. Here we report a sequencing-based mutation analysis in 43 Chinese patients with GSD III from 41 families. We identified 51 different mutations, including 15 splice-site (29.4%), 11 small deletions (21.6%), 12 nonsense (23.5%), 7 missense (13.7%), 5 duplication (9.8%) and 1 complex deletion/insertion (2.0%), 31 of which are novel mutations. The most common mutation is c.1735+1G>T (11.5%). The association of AGL missense and small in-frame deletion mutations with normal creatine kinase level was observed. Our study extends the spectrum of AGL mutations and suggests a genotype-phenotype correlation in GSD III. PMID:26984562

  5. Mutations in ZBTB20 cause Primrose syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cordeddu, Viviana; Redeker, Bert; Stellacci, Emilia; Jongejan, Aldo; Fragale, Alessandra; Bradley, Ted E J; Anselmi, Massimiliano; Ciolfi, Andrea; Cecchetti, Serena; Muto, Valentina; Bernardini, Laura; Azage, Meron; Carvalho, Daniel R; Espay, Alberto J; Male, Alison; Molin, Anna-Maja; Posmyk, Renata; Battisti, Carla; Casertano, Alberto; Melis, Daniela; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Mannens, Marcel M; Bocchinfuso, Gianfranco; Stella, Lorenzo; Tartaglia, Marco; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2014-08-01

    Primrose syndrome and 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome are clinically related disorders characterized by tall stature, macrocephaly, intellectual disability, disturbed behavior and unusual facial features, with diabetes, deafness, progressive muscle wasting and ectopic calcifications specifically occurring in the former. We report that missense mutations in ZBTB20, residing within the 3q13.31 microdeletion syndrome critical region, underlie Primrose syndrome. This finding establishes a genetic link between these disorders and delineates the impact of ZBTB20 dysregulation on development, growth and metabolism.

  6. Association between Mutation and Expression of TP53 as a Potential Prognostic Marker of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Yeon; Park, Kyunghee; Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Eunjin; Cho, Eun Yoon; Lee, Kwang Hee; Bae, Soo Youn; Lee, Se Kyung; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Ahn, Jin Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose TP53, the most frequently mutated gene in breast cancer, is more frequently altered in HER2-enriched and basal-like breast cancer. However, no studies have clarified the role of TP53 status as a prognostic and predictive marker of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Materials and Methods We performed p53 immunohistochemistry (IHC), nCounter mRNA expression assay, and DNA sequencing to determine the relationship between TP53 alteration and clinical outcomes of TNBC patients. Results Seventy-seven of 174 TNBC patients were found to harbor a TP53 mutation. Patients with missense mutations showed high protein expression in contrast to patients with deletion mutations (positivity of IHC: wild type vs. missense vs. deletion mutation, 53.6% vs. 89.8% vs. 25.0%, respectively; p < 0.001). TP53 mRNA expression was influenced by mutation status (mRNA expression [median]: wild type vs. missense vs. deletion mutation, 207.36± 132.73 vs. 339.61±143.21 vs. 99.53±99.57, respectively; p < 0.001). According to survival analysis, neither class of mutation nor protein or mRNA expression status had any impact on patient prognosis. In subgroup analysis, low mRNA expression was associated with poor prognosis in patients with a TP53 missense mutation (5-year distant recurrence-free survival [5Y DRFS]: low vs. high, 50.0% vs. 87.8%; p=0.009), while high mRNA expression with a TP53 deletion mutation indicated poor prognosis (5Y DRFS: low vs. high, 91.7% vs. 75.0%; p=0.316). Conclusion Association between TP53 mutation and expression indicates a potential prognostic marker of TNBC; hence both DNA sequencing and mRNA expression analysis may be required to predict the prognosis of TNBC patients. PMID:26910472

  7. Assessment of TP53 mutations in benign and malignant salivary gland neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Orsine, Lissur Azevedo; Duarte, Alessandra Pires; Fonseca-Silva, Thiago; Conn, Brendan I; De Marco, Luiz; Pereira, Cláudia Maria; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Despite advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of salivary gland neoplasms (SGN), the molecular pathways associated with enhanced tumor growth and cell survival remain to be established. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether TP53 mutations are relevant to SGN pathogenesis and if they impact on p53 protein expression. The study included 18 benign and 18 malignant SGN samples. Two polymorphic microsatellite markers at the TP53 genetic locus were chosen to assess loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the samples that had matched normal DNA. The TP53 exons 2-11 were amplified by PCR, and all of the products were sequenced. Reverse transcription-PCR of the TP53 open reading frame (ORF) was carried out in the samples that had fresh tissue available, and immunohistochemistry for the p53 protein was performed in all samples. TP53 LOH was only found in two pleomorphic adenomas. We found two missense mutations in exon 7 (one in a pleomorphic adenoma and the other in a poly