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Sample records for mll irita kallis

  1. [Massive localized lymphoedema (MLL) in the mons pubis].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Novák, András; István, Gábor

    2014-08-01

    Massive localized lymphoedema (MLL) is a relatively frequent complication in obesity. MLL is present as a giant swelling and associated with characteristic skin changes. Due to the pathologic and morphologic similarity to sarcoma, MLL is also called "pseudosarcoma". MLL can degenerate into angiosarcoma without surgery. We present a case of MLL of the mons pubis in a 54-year-old man with a BMI of 48.6.

  2. Protein Interactions of the MLL PHD Fingers Modulate MLL Target Gene Regulation in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fair, Keri; Anderson, Melanie; Bulanova, Elena; Mi, Huaifeng; Tropschug, Maximilian; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2001-01-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes. PMID:11313484

  3. Protein interactions of the MLL PHD fingers modulate MLL target gene regulation in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fair, K; Anderson, M; Bulanova, E; Mi, H; Tropschug, M; Diaz, M O

    2001-05-01

    The PHD fingers of the human MLL and Drosophila trx proteins have strong amino acid sequence conservation but their function is unknown. We have determined that these fingers mediate homodimerization and binding of MLL to Cyp33, a nuclear cyclophilin. These two proteins interact in vitro and in vivo in mammalian cells and colocalize at specific nuclear subdomains. Overexpression of the Cyp33 protein in leukemia cells results in altered expression of HOX genes that are targets for regulation by MLL. These alterations are suppressed by cyclosporine and are not observed in cell lines that express a mutant MLL protein without PHD fingers. These results suggest that binding of Cyp33 to MLL modulates its effects on the expression of target genes.

  4. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (∼90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements. PMID:23628958

  5. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (≈ 90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements.

  6. Targeting human SET1/MLL family of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Blazer, Levi; Eram, Mohammad S.; Barsyte‐Lovejoy, Dalia; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Hajian, Taraneh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The SET1 family of proteins, and in particular MLL1, are essential regulators of transcription and key mediators of normal development and disease. Here, we summarize the detailed characterization of the methyltransferase activity of SET1 complexes and the role of the key subunits, WDR5, RbBP5, ASH2L, and DPY30. We present new data on full kinetic characterization of human MLL1, MLL3, SET1A, and SET1B trimeric, tetrameric, and pentameric complexes to elaborate on substrate specificities and compare our findings with what has been reported before. We also review exciting recent work identifying potent inhibitors of oncogenic MLL1 function through disruption of protein–protein interactions within the MLL1 complex. PMID:28160335

  7. MLL1 and menin: not partners in crime?

    PubMed

    Djabali, Malek

    2013-09-19

    In this issue of Blood, Li et al report an unexpected but clinically relevant finding. They demonstrate that the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL1) gene acts independently from menin (Men1) in the hematopoietic system.

  8. Histone methylase MLL1 and MLL3 coordinate with estrogen receptors in estrogen-mediated HOXB9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Shrestha, Bishakha; Hussain, Imran; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2011-01-01

    Homeobox gene HOXB9 is a critical player in development of mammary gland and sternum and in regulation of Renin which is closely linked with blood pressure control. Our studies demonstrated that HOXB9 gene is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen (E2). HOXB9 promoter contains several estrogen-response elements (ERE). Reporter assay based experiments demonstrated that HOXB9 promoter EREs are estrogen-responsive. Estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ are essential for E2-mediated transcriptional activation of HOXB9. Chromatin immuno-precipitation assay demonstrated that ERs bind to HOXB9 EREs as a function of E2. Similarly, histone methylases MLL1 and MLL3 also bind to HOXB9 EREs and play critical role in E2-mediated transcriptional activation of HOXB9. Overall, our studies demonstrated that HOXB9 is an E2-responsive gene and ERs coordinate with MLL1 and MLL3 in E2-mediated transcriptional regulation of HOXB9. PMID:21428455

  9. NUP98-MLL fusion in human acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaltenbach, Sophie; Soler, Gwendoline; Barin, Carole; Gervais, Carine; Bernard, Olivier A; Penard-Lacronique, Virginie; Romana, Serge P

    2010-09-30

    Posttranscriptional modifications of histones play important roles in the control of chromatin structure and transcription. H3K4 (histone H3 lysine 4) methylation by the SET domain of the trithorax-group protein MLL (mixed-lineage leukemia) is important for the control of homeobox (HOX) gene expression during development. MLL is tethered to the HOXA locus through interaction of its amino-terminus with menin. MLL fusion proteins associated with human leukemia contain the menin interaction peptide and frequently recruit H3K79 (histone H3 lysine 79) methylation activity. This allows sustained expression of HOXA genes important for cellular transformation. We have characterized a novel recurrent chromosomal aberration, inv(11)(p15q23), as an isolated chromosomal abnormality in 2 patients with acute myeloid leukemia. This aberration is predicted to result in the expression of an NUP98 (nucleoporin 98 kDa)-MLL fusion protein that is unable to interact with menin. As expected, low levels of HOXA gene expression were observed in the patients' samples. This fusion protein is predicted to participate in cellular transformation by activating MLL targets other than HOXA genes.

  10. Expression of MLL-AF4 or AF4-MLL fusions does not impact the efficiency of DNA damage repair.

    PubMed

    Castaño, Julio; Herrero, Ana B; Bursen, Aldeheid; González, Federico; Marschalek, Rolf; Gutiérrez, Norma C; Menendez, Pablo

    2016-05-24

    The most frequent rearrangement of the human MLL gene fuses MLL to AF4 resulting in high-risk infant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). MLL fusions are also hallmark oncogenic events in secondary acute myeloid leukemia. They are a direct consequence of mis-repaired DNA double strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) due to defects in the DNA damage response associated with exposure to topoisomerase-II poisons such as etoposide. It has been suggested that MLL fusions render cells susceptible to additional chromosomal damage upon exposure to etoposide. Conversely, the genome-wide mutational landscape in MLL-rearranged infant B-ALL has been reported silent. Thus, whether MLL fusions compromise the recognition and/or repair of DNA damage remains unanswered. Here, the fusion proteins MLL-AF4 (MA4) and AF4-MLL (A4M) were CRISPR/Cas9-genome edited in the AAVS1 locus of HEK293 cells as a model to study MLL fusion-mediated DNA-DSB formation/repair. Repair kinetics of etoposide- and ionizing radiation-induced DSBs was identical in WT, MA4- and A4M-expressing cells, as revealed by flow cytometry, by immunoblot for γH2AX and by comet assay. Accordingly, no differences were observed between WT, MA4- and A4M-expressing cells in the presence of master proteins involved in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ; i.e.KU86, KU70), alternative-NHEJ (Alt-NHEJ; i.e.LigIIIa, WRN and PARP1), and homologous recombination (HR, i.e.RAD51). Moreover, functional assays revealed identical NHEJ and HR efficiency irrespective of the genotype. Treatment with etoposide consistently induced cell cycle arrest in S/G2/M independent of MA4/A4M expression, revealing a proper activation of the DNA damage checkpoints. Collectively, expression of MA4 or A4M does neither influence DNA signaling nor DNA-DSB repair.

  11. Loss of Mll3 Catalytic Function Promotes Aberrant Myelopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Arcipowski, Kelly M.; Bulic, Marinka; Gurbuxani, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Two of the most common myeloid malignancies, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), are associated with exceedingly low survival rates despite recent therapeutic advances. While their etiology is not completely understood, evidence suggests that certain chromosomal abnormalities contribute to MDS and AML progression. Among the most frequent chromosomal abnormalities in these disorders are alterations of chromosome 7: either complete loss of one copy of chromosome 7 (-7) or partial deletion of 7q (del(7q)), both of which increase the risk of progression from MDS to AML and are associated with chemoresistance. Notably, 7q36.1, a critical minimally deleted region in 7q, includes the gene encoding the histone methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3), which is also mutated in a small percentage of AML patients. However, the mechanisms by which MLL3 loss contributes to malignancy are unknown. Using an engineered mouse model expressing a catalytically inactive form of Mll3, we found a significant shift in hematopoiesis toward the granulocyte/macrophage lineage, correlating with myeloid infiltration and enlargement of secondary lymphoid organs. Therefore, we propose that MLL3 loss in patients may contribute to the progression of MDS and AML by promoting myelopoiesis. PMID:27610619

  12. Validation and structural characterization of the LEDGF/p75-MLL interface as a new target for the treatment of MLL-dependent leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cermáková, Kateřina; Tesina, Petr; Demeulemeester, Jonas; El Ashkar, Sara; Méreau, Hélène; Schwaller, Juerg; Rezáčová, Pavlína; Veverka, Vaclav; De Rijck, Jan

    2014-09-15

    Mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion-driven acute leukemias represent a genetically distinct subset of leukemias with poor prognosis. MLL forms a ternary complex with the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) and MENIN. LEDGF/p75, a chromatin reader recognizing H3K36me3 marks, contributes to the association of the MLL multiprotein complex to chromatin. Formation of this complex is critical for the development of MLL leukemia. Available X-ray data represent only a partial structure of the LEDGF/p75-MLL-MENIN complex. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identified an additional LEDGF/p75-MLL interface, which overlaps with the binding site of known LEDGF/p75 interactors-HIV-1 integrase, PogZ, and JPO2. Binding of these proteins or MLL to LEDGF/p75 is mutually exclusive. The resolved structure, as well as mutational analysis, shows that the interaction is primarily sustained via two aromatic residues of MLL (F148 and F151). Colony-forming assays in MLL-AF9(+) leukemic cells expressing MLL interaction-defective LEDGF/p75 mutants revealed that this interaction is essential for transformation. Finally, we show that the clonogenic growth of primary murine MLL-AF9-expressing leukemic blasts is selectively impaired upon overexpression of a LEDGF/p75-binding cyclic peptide CP65, originally developed to inhibit the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction. The newly defined protein-protein interface therefore represents a new target for the development of therapeutics against LEDGF/p75-dependent MLL fusion-driven leukemic disorders. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5139-51. ©2014 AACR.

  13. WDR5 Intearcts with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein via the Histone H3-binding Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Kingston, R

    2008-01-01

    WDR5 is a component of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) complex, which methylates lysine 4 of histone H3, and was identified as a methylated Lys-4 histone H3-binding protein. Here, we present a crystal structure of WDR5 bound to an MLL peptide. Surprisingly, we find that WDR5 utilizes the same pocket shown to bind histone H3 for this MLL interaction. Furthermore, the WDR5-MLL interaction is disrupted preferentially by mono- and di-methylated Lys-4 histone H3 over unmodified and tri-methylated Lys-4 histone H3. These data implicate a delicate interplay between the effector, WDR5, the catalytic subunit, MLL, and the substrate, histone H3, of the MLL complex. We suggest that the activity of the MLL complex might be regulated through this interplay.

  14. CCI-007, a novel small molecule with cytotoxic activity against infant leukemia with MLL rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Middlemiss, Shiloh M.C.; Wen, Victoria W.; Clifton, Molly; Kwek, Alan; Liu, Bing; Mayoh, Chelsea; Bongers, Angelika; Karsa, Mawar; Pan, Sukey; Cruikshank, Sarah; Scandlyn, Marissa; Hoang, Wendi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Kees, Ursula R.; Gudkov, Andrei V.; Chernova, Olga B.

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for the development of less toxic, more selective and targeted therapies for infants with leukemia characterized by translocation of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. In this study, we performed a cell-based small molecule library screen on an infant MLL-rearranged (MLL-r) cell line, PER-485, in order to identify selective inhibitors for MLL-r leukemia. After screening initial hits for a cytotoxic effect against a panel of 30 cell lines including MLL-r and MLL wild-type (MLL-wt) leukemia, solid tumours and control cells, small molecule CCI-007 was identified as a compound that selectively and significantly decreased the viability of a subset of MLL-r and related leukemia cell lines with CALM-AF10 and SET-NUP214 translocation. CCI-007 induced a rapid caspase-dependent apoptosis with mitochondrial depolarization within twenty-four hours of treatment. CCI-007 altered the characteristic MLL-r gene expression signature in sensitive cells with downregulation of the expression of HOXA9, MEIS1, CMYC and BCL2, important drivers in MLL-r leukemia, within a few hours of treatment. MLL-r leukemia cells that were resistant to the compound were characterised by significantly higher baseline gene expression levels of MEIS1 and BCL2 in comparison to CCI-007 sensitive MLL-r leukemia cells. In conclusion, we have identified CCI-007 as a novel small molecule that displays rapid toxicity towards a subset of MLL-r, CALM-AF10 and SET-NUP214 leukemia cell lines. Our findings suggest an important new avenue in the development of targeted therapies for these deadly diseases and indicate that different therapeutic strategies might be needed for different subtypes of MLL-r leukemia. PMID:27317766

  15. CCI-007, a novel small molecule with cytotoxic activity against infant leukemia with MLL rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Somers, Klaartje; Chudakova, Daria A; Middlemiss, Shiloh M C; Wen, Victoria W; Clifton, Molly; Kwek, Alan; Liu, Bing; Mayoh, Chelsea; Bongers, Angelika; Karsa, Mawar; Pan, Sukey; Cruikshank, Sarah; Scandlyn, Marissa; Hoang, Wendi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Kees, Ursula R; Gudkov, Andrei V; Chernova, Olga B; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D; Henderson, Michelle J

    2016-07-19

    There is an urgent need for the development of less toxic, more selective and targeted therapies for infants with leukemia characterized by translocation of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. In this study, we performed a cell-based small molecule library screen on an infant MLL-rearranged (MLL-r) cell line, PER-485, in order to identify selective inhibitors for MLL-r leukemia. After screening initial hits for a cytotoxic effect against a panel of 30 cell lines including MLL-r and MLL wild-type (MLL-wt) leukemia, solid tumours and control cells, small molecule CCI-007 was identified as a compound that selectively and significantly decreased the viability of a subset of MLL-r and related leukemia cell lines with CALM-AF10 and SET-NUP214 translocation. CCI-007 induced a rapid caspase-dependent apoptosis with mitochondrial depolarization within twenty-four hours of treatment. CCI-007 altered the characteristic MLL-r gene expression signature in sensitive cells with downregulation of the expression of HOXA9, MEIS1, CMYC and BCL2, important drivers in MLL-r leukemia, within a few hours of treatment. MLL-r leukemia cells that were resistant to the compound were characterised by significantly higher baseline gene expression levels of MEIS1 and BCL2 in comparison to CCI-007 sensitive MLL-r leukemia cells.In conclusion, we have identified CCI-007 as a novel small molecule that displays rapid toxicity towards a subset of MLL-r, CALM-AF10 and SET-NUP214 leukemia cell lines. Our findings suggest an important new avenue in the development of targeted therapies for these deadly diseases and indicate that different therapeutic strategies might be needed for different subtypes of MLL-r leukemia.

  16. Mll2 is required for H3K4 trimethylation on bivalent promoters in embryonic stem cells, whereas Mll1 is redundant.

    PubMed

    Denissov, Sergei; Hofemeister, Helmut; Marks, Hendrik; Kranz, Andrea; Ciotta, Giovanni; Singh, Sukhdeep; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Stewart, A Francis

    2014-02-01

    Trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) at the promoters of actively transcribed genes is a universal epigenetic mark and a key product of Trithorax group action. Here, we show that Mll2, one of the six Set1/Trithorax-type H3K4 methyltransferases in mammals, is required for trimethylation of bivalent promoters in mouse embryonic stem cells. Mll2 is bound to bivalent promoters but also to most active promoters, which do not require Mll2 for H3K4me3 or mRNA expression. By contrast, the Set1 complex (Set1C) subunit Cxxc1 is primarily bound to active but not bivalent promoters. This indicates that bivalent promoters rely on Mll2 for H3K4me3 whereas active promoters have more than one bound H3K4 methyltransferase, including Set1C. Removal of Mll1, sister to Mll2, had almost no effect on any promoter unless Mll2 was also removed, indicating functional backup between these enzymes. Except for a subset, loss of H3K4me3 on bivalent promoters did not prevent responsiveness to retinoic acid, thereby arguing against a priming model for bivalency. In contrast, we propose that Mll2 is the pioneer trimethyltransferase for promoter definition in the naïve epigenome and that Polycomb group action on bivalent promoters blocks the premature establishment of active, Set1C-bound, promoters.

  17. Photoperiod influences growth and mll (mixed-lineage leukaemia) expression in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kazue; Giannetto, Alessia; Fernandes, Jorge M O

    2012-01-01

    Photoperiod is associated to phenotypic plasticity of somatic growth in several teleost species. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are currently unknown but it is likely that epigenetic regulation by methyltransferases is involved. The MLL (mixed-lineage leukaemia) family comprises histone methyltransferases that play a critical role in regulating gene expression during early development in mammals. So far, these genes have received scant attention in teleost fish. In the present study, the mean weight of Atlantic cod juveniles reared under continuous illumination was found to be 13% greater than those kept under natural photoperiod conditions for 120 days. We newly determined cDNA sequences of five mll (mll1, mll2, mll3a, mll4b and mll5) and two setd1 (setd1a and setd1ba) paralogues from Atlantic cod. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the cod genes clustered within the appropriate mll clade and comparative mapping of mll paralogues showed that these genes lie within a region of conserved synteny among teleosts. All mll and setd1 genes were highly expressed in gonads and fast muscle of adult cod, albeit at different levels, and they were differentially regulated with photoperiod in muscle of juvenile fish. Following only one day of exposure to constant light, mll1, mll4b and setd1a were up to 57% lower in these fish compared to the natural photoperiod group. In addition, mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors (myog and myf-5) and pax7 in fast muscle was also affected by different photoperiod conditions. Notably, myog was significantly elevated in the continuous illumination group throughout the time course of the experiment. The absence of a day/night cycle is associated with a generalised decrease in mll expression concomitant with an increase in myog transcript levels in fast muscle of Atlantic cod, which may be involved in the observed epigenetic regulation of growth by photoperiod in this species.

  18. The distribution of MLL breakpoints correlates with outcome in infant acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Emerenciano, Mariana; Meyer, Claus; Mansur, Marcela B; Marschalek, Rolf; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2013-04-01

    Acute leukaemia in early childhood - and mainly infant leukaemia (IL) - is characterized by acquired genetic alterations, most commonly by the presence of distinct MLL rearrangements (MLL-r). The aim of this study was to investigate possible correlations between clinical features and molecular analyses of a series of 545 childhood leukaemia (≤24 months of age) cases: 385 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and 160 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The location of the genomic breakpoints was determined in a subset of 30 MLL-r cases. The overall survival of the investigated cohort was 60·5%, as determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Worse outcomes were associated with age at diagnosis ≤6 months (P < 0·001), high white blood cell count (P = 0·001), and MLL-r (P = 0·002) in ALL, while children with AML displayed a poorer outcome (P = 0·009) regardless of their age strata. Moreover, we present first evidence that MLL-r patients with poor outcome preferentially displayed chromosomal breakpoints within MLL intron 11. Based on the literature, most MLL-r IL display a breakpoint localization towards intron 11, which in turn may explain their worse clinical course. In summary, the MLL breakpoint localization is of clinical importance and should be considered as a novel outcome predictor for MLL-r patients.

  19. MLL2 protein is a prognostic marker for gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Haige; Lu, Lu; Ge, Bei; Gao, Shenmeng; Ma, Yongyong; Liang, Bin; Yu, Kang; Yang, Kaiyan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed linage leukemia gene 2 (MLL2) is identified as a novel mutation gene in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the significance of MLL2 protein expression for the prognosis of DLBCL is unclear. In this study, we detected MLL2 protein expression in primary gastrointestinal diffuse large B cell lymphoma (PGI-DLBCL) samples by using tissue microarray immunohistochemistry, and analyzed the correlation between MLL2 protein expression and tumor proliferation activity. In addition, we investigated clinical significance of MLL2 protein expression for PGI-DLBCL prognosis. We found that there was significant difference in MLL2 protein expression between PGI-DLBCL and reactive hyperplasia of lymph node. High expression of MLL2 protein indicated higher clinical stage. In older patients (>60 years) with PGI-DLBCL, MLL2 protein expression was positively correlated with Ki-67 expression and negatively correlated with patient survival. Our data suggest that MLL2 protein is overexpressed in PGI-DLBCL and appears as a prognostic factor for patients of PGI-DLBCL, especially for those older than 60 years old. PMID:26722499

  20. Mutation of cancer driver MLL2 results in transcription stress and genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Kantidakis, Theodoros; Saponaro, Marco; Mitter, Richard; Horswell, Stuart; Kranz, Andrea; Boeing, Stefan; Aygün, Ozan; Kelly, Gavin P.; Matthews, Nik; Stewart, Aengus; Stewart, A. Francis; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2016-01-01

    Genome instability is a recurring feature of tumorigenesis. Mutation in MLL2, encoding a histone methyltransferase, is a driver in numerous different cancer types, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we present evidence that MLL2 mutation results in genome instability. Mouse cells in which MLL2 gene deletion can be induced display elevated levels of sister chromatid exchange, gross chromosomal aberrations, 53BP1 foci, and micronuclei. Human MLL2 knockout cells are characterized by genome instability as well. Interestingly, MLL2 interacts with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and RECQL5, and, although MLL2 mutated cells have normal overall H3K4me levels in genes, nucleosomes in the immediate vicinity of RNAPII are hypomethylated. Importantly, MLL2 mutated cells display signs of substantial transcription stress, and the most affected genes overlap with early replicating fragile sites, show elevated levels of γH2AX, and suffer frequent mutation. The requirement for MLL2 in the maintenance of genome stability in genes helps explain its widespread role in cancer and points to transcription stress as a strong driver in tumorigenesis. PMID:26883360

  1. MLL5 maintains spindle bipolarity by preventing aberrant cytosolic aggregation of PLK1.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoming; Deng, Lih-Wen

    2016-03-28

    Faithful chromosome segregation with bipolar spindle formation is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. Perturbation of this process often leads to severe mitotic failure, contributing to tumorigenesis. MLL5 has been demonstrated to play vital roles in cell cycle progression and the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we identify a novel interaction between MLL5 and PLK1 in the cytosol that is crucial for sustaining spindle bipolarity during mitosis. Knockdown of MLL5 caused aberrant PLK1 aggregation that led to acentrosomal microtubule-organizing center (aMTOC) formation and subsequent spindle multipolarity. Further molecular studies revealed that the polo-box domain (PBD) of PLK1 interacted with a binding motif on MLL5 (Thr887-Ser888-Thr889), and this interaction was essential for spindle bipolarity. Overexpression of wild-type MLL5 was able to rescue PLK1 mislocalization and aMTOC formation in MLL5-KD cells, whereas MLL5 mutants incapable of interacting with the PBD failed to do so. We thus propose that MLL5 preserves spindle bipolarity through maintaining cytosolic PLK1 in a nonaggregated form.

  2. PU.1 is essential for MLL leukemia partially via crosstalk with the MEIS/HOX pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, J; Wu, J; Li, B; Liu, D; Yu, J; Yan, X; Zheng, S; Wang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, L; He, F; Li, Q; Chen, A; Zhang, Y; Zhao, X; Guan, Y; Zhao, X; Yan, J; Ni, J; Nobrega, MA; Löwenberg, B; Delwel, R; Valk, PJM; Kumar, A; Xie, L; Tenen, DG; Huang, G; Wang, Q-f

    2015-01-01

    Mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion proteins directly activate the expression of key downstream genes such as MEIS1, HOXA9 to drive an aggressive form of human leukemia. However, it is still poorly understood what additional transcriptional regulators, independent of the MLL fusion pathway, contribute to the development of MLL leukemia. Here we show that the transcription factor PU.1 is essential for MLL leukemia and is required for the growth of MLL leukemic cells via the promotion of cell-cycle progression and inhibition of apoptosis. Importantly, PU.1 expression is not under the control of MLL fusion proteins. We further identified a PU.1-governed 15-gene signature, which contains key regulators in the MEIS-HOX program (MEIS1, PBX3, FLT3, and c-KIT). PU.1 directly binds to the genomic loci of its target genes in vivo, and is required to maintain active expression of those genes in both normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and in MLL leukemia. Finally, the clinical significance of the identified PU.1 signature was indicated by its ability to predict survival in acute myelogenous leukemia patients. Together, our findings demonstrate that PU.1 contributes to the development of MLL leukemia, partially via crosstalk with the MEIS/HOX pathway. PMID:24445817

  3. Histone recognition and nuclear receptor co-activator functions of Drosophila Cara Mitad, a homolog of the N-terminal portion of mammalian MLL2 and MLL3

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Chhavi; Zraly, Claudia B.; Parilla, Megan; Diaz, Manuel O.; Dingwall, Andrew K.

    2012-01-01

    MLL2 and MLL3 histone lysine methyltransferases are conserved components of COMPASS-like co-activator complexes. In vertebrates, the paralogous MLL2 and MLL3 contain multiple domains required for epigenetic reading and writing of the histone code involved in hormone-stimulated gene programming, including receptor-binding motifs, SET methyltransferase, HMG and PHD domains. The genes encoding MLL2 and MLL3 arose from a common ancestor. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the ancestral gene underwent a fission event in some Brachycera dipterans, including Drosophila species, creating two independent genes corresponding to the N- and C-terminal portions. In Drosophila, the C-terminal SET domain is encoded by trithorax-related (trr), which is required for hormone-dependent gene activation. We identified the cara mitad (cmi) gene, which encodes the previously undiscovered N-terminal region consisting of PHD and HMG domains and receptor-binding motifs. The cmi gene is essential and its functions are dosage sensitive. CMI associates with TRR, as well as the EcR-USP receptor, and is required for hormone-dependent transcription. Unexpectedly, although the CMI and MLL2 PHDf3 domains could bind histone H3, neither showed preference for trimethylated lysine 4. Genetic tests reveal that cmi is required for proper global trimethylation of H3K4 and that hormone-stimulated transcription requires chromatin binding by CMI, methylation of H3K4 by TRR and demethylation of H3K27 by the demethylase UTX. The evolutionary split of MLL2 into two distinct genes in Drosophila provides important insight into distinct epigenetic functions of conserved readers and writers of the histone code. PMID:22569554

  4. Histone recognition and nuclear receptor co-activator functions of Drosophila cara mitad, a homolog of the N-terminal portion of mammalian MLL2 and MLL3.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Chhavi; Zraly, Claudia B; Parilla, Megan; Diaz, Manuel O; Dingwall, Andrew K

    2012-06-01

    MLL2 and MLL3 histone lysine methyltransferases are conserved components of COMPASS-like co-activator complexes. In vertebrates, the paralogous MLL2 and MLL3 contain multiple domains required for epigenetic reading and writing of the histone code involved in hormone-stimulated gene programming, including receptor-binding motifs, SET methyltransferase, HMG and PHD domains. The genes encoding MLL2 and MLL3 arose from a common ancestor. Phylogenetic analyses reveal that the ancestral gene underwent a fission event in some Brachycera dipterans, including Drosophila species, creating two independent genes corresponding to the N- and C-terminal portions. In Drosophila, the C-terminal SET domain is encoded by trithorax-related (trr), which is required for hormone-dependent gene activation. We identified the cara mitad (cmi) gene, which encodes the previously undiscovered N-terminal region consisting of PHD and HMG domains and receptor-binding motifs. The cmi gene is essential and its functions are dosage sensitive. CMI associates with TRR, as well as the EcR-USP receptor, and is required for hormone-dependent transcription. Unexpectedly, although the CMI and MLL2 PHDf3 domains could bind histone H3, neither showed preference for trimethylated lysine 4. Genetic tests reveal that cmi is required for proper global trimethylation of H3K4 and that hormone-stimulated transcription requires chromatin binding by CMI, methylation of H3K4 by TRR and demethylation of H3K27 by the demethylase UTX. The evolutionary split of MLL2 into two distinct genes in Drosophila provides important insight into distinct epigenetic functions of conserved readers and writers of the histone code.

  5. A PTIP–PA1 subcomplex promotes transcription for IgH class switching independently from the associated MLL3/MLL4 methyltransferase complex

    PubMed Central

    Starnes, Linda M.; Su, Dan; Pikkupeura, Laura M.; Weinert, Brian T.; Santos, Margarida A.; Mund, Andreas; Soria, Rebeca; Cho, Young-Wook; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Kubec Højfeldt, Martina; Vala, Andrea; Yang, Wenjing; López-Méndez, Blanca; Lee, Ji-Eun; Peng, Weiqun; Yuan, Joan; Ge, Kai; Montoya, Guillermo; Nussenzweig, André; Choudhary, Chunaram; Daniel, Jeremy A.

    2016-01-01

    Class switch recombination (CSR) diversifies antibodies for productive immune responses while maintaining stability of the B-cell genome. Transcription at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus targets CSR-associated DNA damage and is promoted by the BRCT domain-containing PTIP (Pax transactivation domain-interacting protein). Although PTIP is a unique component of the mixed-lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3)/MLL4 chromatin-modifying complex, the mechanisms for how PTIP promotes transcription remain unclear. Here we dissected the minimal structural requirements of PTIP and its different protein complexes using quantitative proteomics in primary lymphocytes. We found that PTIP functions in transcription and CSR separately from its association with the MLL3/MLL4 complex and from its localization to sites of DNA damage. We identified a tandem BRCT domain of PTIP that is sufficient for CSR and identified PA1 as its main functional protein partner. Collectively, we provide genetic and biochemical evidence that a PTIP–PA1 subcomplex functions independently from the MLL3/MLL4 complex to mediate transcription during CSR. These results further our understanding of how multifunctional chromatin-modifying complexes are organized by subcomplexes that harbor unique and distinct activities. PMID:26744420

  6. Epigenetic dysregulation of leukaemic HOX code in MLL-rearranged leukaemia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ray Kit; Kong, Cheuk Ting; So, Chi Chiu; Lui, Wing Chi; Chan, Yuen Fan; Leung, Ka Chun; So, Kam Chung; Tsang, Ho Man; Chan, Li Chong; Sham, Mai Har

    2014-01-01

    HOX genes are frequently dysregulated in human leukaemia with the gene rearrangement between mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) and partner genes. The resultant MLL fusion proteins are known to mediate leukaemia through disruption of the normal epigenetic regulation at the target gene loci. To elucidate the pathogenic role of MLL fusion proteins in HOX dysregulation in leukaemia, we generated a novel haematopoietic lineage-specific Mll-Een knock-in mouse model using a Cre-mediated inversion strategy. The Mll(Een) (/+) invertor mice developed acute myeloid leukaemia, with organomegaly of the spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes caused by infiltration of blast cells. Using Mll-Een-expressing leukaemic cell lines derived from bone marrow of Mll(Een) (/+) mutant mice, we showed that induction of Hox genes in leukaemic cells was associated with hypomethylated promoter regions and an aberrant active chromatin state at the Hox loci. Knock-down of Prmt1 was insufficient to reverse the active chromatin status and the hypomethylated Hox loci, suggesting that Prmt1-mediated histone arginine methylation was only partially involved in the maintenance of Hox expression in leukaemic cells. Furthermore, in vivo analysis of bone marrow cells of Mll(Een) (/+) mice revealed a Hox expression profile similar to that of wild-type haematopoietic stem cells. The leukaemic Hox profile was highly correlated with aberrant hypomethylation of Hox promoters in the mutant mice, which highlights the importance of DNA methylation in leukaemogenic mechanisms induced by MLL fusion proteins. Our results point to the involvement of dynamic epigenetic regulations in the maintenance of the stem cell-like HOX code that initiates leukaemic stem cells in MLL-rearranged leukaemia. This provides insights for the development of alternative strategies for leukaemia treatment.

  7. Crystal Structure of Menin Reveals Binding Site for Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Reddy, Gireesh; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2014-10-02

    Menin is a tumor suppressor protein that is encoded by the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia 1) gene and controls cell growth in endocrine tissues. Importantly, menin also serves as a critical oncogenic cofactor of MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) fusion proteins in acute leukemias. Direct association of menin with MLL fusion proteins is required for MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemogenesis in vivo, and this interaction has been validated as a new potential therapeutic target for development of novel anti-leukemia agents. Here, we report the first crystal structure of menin homolog from Nematostella vectensis. Due to a very high sequence similarity, the Nematostella menin is a close homolog of human menin, and these two proteins likely have very similar structures. Menin is predominantly an {alpha}-helical protein with the protein core comprising three tetratricopeptide motifs that are flanked by two {alpha}-helical bundles and covered by a {beta}-sheet motif. A very interesting feature of menin structure is the presence of a large central cavity that is highly conserved between Nematostella and human menin. By employing site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that this cavity constitutes the binding site for MLL. Our data provide a structural basis for understanding the role of menin as a tumor suppressor protein and as an oncogenic co-factor of MLL fusion proteins. It also provides essential structural information for development of inhibitors targeting the menin-MLL interaction as a novel therapeutic strategy in MLL-related leukemias.

  8. MLL-Rearranged Leukemias—An Update on Science and Clinical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Amanda C.; Bernt, Kathrin M.

    2017-01-01

    The mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) gene (now renamed Lysine [K]-specific MethylTransferase 2A or KMT2A) on chromosome 11q23 is disrupted in a unique group of acute leukemias. More than 80 different partner genes in these fusions have been described, although the majority of leukemias result from MLL1 fusions with one of about six common partner genes. Approximately 10% of all leukemias harbor MLL1 translocations. Of these, two patient populations comprise the majority of cases: patients younger than 1 year of age at diagnosis (primarily acute lymphoblastic leukemias) and young- to-middle-aged adults (primarily acute myeloid leukemias). A much rarer subgroup of patients with MLL1 rearrangements develop leukemia that is attributable to prior treatment with certain chemotherapeutic agents—so-called therapy-related leukemias. In general, outcomes for all of these patients remain poor when compared to patients with non-MLL1 rearranged leukemias. In this review, we will discuss the normal biological roles of MLL1 and its fusion partners, how these roles are hypothesized to be dysregulated in the context of MLL1 rearrangements, and the clinical manifestations of this group of leukemias. We will go on to discuss the progress in clinical management and promising new avenues of research, which may lead to more effective targeted therapies for affected patients. PMID:28232907

  9. The potential of clofarabine in MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Stumpel, Dominique J P M; Schneider, Pauline; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W

    2015-09-01

    MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in infants is the most difficult-to-treat type of childhood ALL, displaying a chemotherapy-resistant phenotype, and unique histone modifications, gene expression signatures and DNA methylation patterns. MLL-rearranged infant ALL responds remarkably well to nucleoside analogue drugs in vitro, such as cytarabine and cladribine, and to the demethylating agents decitabine and zebularine as measured by cytotoxicity assays. These observations led to the inclusion of cytarabine into the treatment regimens currently used for infants with ALL. However, survival chances for infants with MLL-rearranged ALL do still not exceed 30-40%. Here we explored the in vitro potential of the novel nucleoside analogue clofarabine for MLL-rearranged infant ALL. Therefore we used both cell line models as well as primary patient cells. Compared with other nucleoside analogues, clofarabine effectively targeted primary MLL-rearranged infant ALL cells at the lowest concentrations, with median LC50 values of ∼25 nM. Interestingly, clofarabine displayed synergistic cytotoxic effects in combination with cytarabine. Furthermore, at concentrations of 5-10nM clofarabine induced demethylation of the promoter region of the tumour suppressor gene FHIT (Fragile Histidine Triad), a gene typically hypermethylated in MLL-rearranged ALL. Demethylation of the FHIT promoter region was accompanied by subtle re-expression of this gene both at the mRNA and protein level. We conclude that clofarabine is an interesting candidate for further studies in MLL-rearranged ALL in infants.

  10. MLL-Rearranged Leukemias-An Update on Science and Clinical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Winters, Amanda C; Bernt, Kathrin M

    2017-01-01

    The mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) gene (now renamed Lysine [K]-specific MethylTransferase 2A or KMT2A) on chromosome 11q23 is disrupted in a unique group of acute leukemias. More than 80 different partner genes in these fusions have been described, although the majority of leukemias result from MLL1 fusions with one of about six common partner genes. Approximately 10% of all leukemias harbor MLL1 translocations. Of these, two patient populations comprise the majority of cases: patients younger than 1 year of age at diagnosis (primarily acute lymphoblastic leukemias) and young- to-middle-aged adults (primarily acute myeloid leukemias). A much rarer subgroup of patients with MLL1 rearrangements develop leukemia that is attributable to prior treatment with certain chemotherapeutic agents-so-called therapy-related leukemias. In general, outcomes for all of these patients remain poor when compared to patients with non-MLL1 rearranged leukemias. In this review, we will discuss the normal biological roles of MLL1 and its fusion partners, how these roles are hypothesized to be dysregulated in the context of MLL1 rearrangements, and the clinical manifestations of this group of leukemias. We will go on to discuss the progress in clinical management and promising new avenues of research, which may lead to more effective targeted therapies for affected patients.

  11. Epigenetic regulation of planarian stem cells by the SET1/MLL family of histone methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Amy; Henderson, Jordana M; Ross, Kelly G; Cowles, Martis W; Torres, Jessica; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin regulation is a fundamental mechanism underlying stem cell pluripotency, differentiation, and the establishment of cell type-specific gene expression profiles. To examine the role of chromatin regulation in stem cells in vivo, we study regeneration in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. These animals possess a high concentration of pluripotent stem cells, which are capable of restoring any damaged or lost tissues after injury or amputation. Here, we identify the S. mediterranea homologs of the SET1/MLL family of histone methyltransferases and COMPASS and COMPASS-like complex proteins and investigate their role in stem cell function during regeneration. We identified six S. mediterranea homologs of the SET1/MLL family (set1, mll1/2, trr-1, trr-2, mll5-1 and mll5-2), characterized their patterns of expression in the animal, and examined their function by RNAi. All members of this family are expressed in the stem cell population and differentiated tissues. We show that set1, mll1/2, trr-1, and mll5-2 are required for regeneration and that set1, trr-1 and mll5-2 play roles in the regulation of mitosis. Most notably, knockdown of the planarian set1 homolog leads to stem cell depletion. A subset of planarian homologs of COMPASS and COMPASS-like complex proteins are also expressed in stem cells and implicated in regeneration, but the knockdown phenotypes suggest that some complex members also function in other aspects of planarian biology. This work characterizes the function of the SET1/MLL family in the context of planarian regeneration and provides insight into the role of these enzymes in adult stem cell regulation in vivo.

  12. Epigenetic regulation of planarian stem cells by the SET1/MLL family of histone methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Hubert, Amy; Henderson, Jordana M.; Ross, Kelly G.; Cowles, Martis W.; Torres, Jessica; Zayas, Ricardo M.

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin regulation is a fundamental mechanism underlying stem cell pluripotency, differentiation, and the establishment of cell type-specific gene expression profiles. To examine the role of chromatin regulation in stem cells in vivo, we study regeneration in the freshwater planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. These animals possess a high concentration of pluripotent stem cells, which are capable of restoring any damaged or lost tissues after injury or amputation. Here, we identify the S. mediterranea homologs of the SET1/MLL family of histone methyltransferases and COMPASS and COMPASS-like complex proteins and investigate their role in stem cell function during regeneration. We identified six S. mediterranea homologs of the SET1/MLL family (set1, mll1/2, trr-1, trr-2, mll5–1 and mll5–2), characterized their patterns of expression in the animal, and examined their function by RNAi. All members of this family are expressed in the stem cell population and differentiated tissues. We show that set1, mll1/2, trr-1, and mll5–2 are required for regeneration and that set1, trr-1 and mll5–2 play roles in the regulation of mitosis. Most notably, knockdown of the planarian set1 homolog leads to stem cell depletion. A subset of planarian homologs of COMPASS and COMPASS-like complex proteins are also expressed in stem cells and implicated in regeneration, but the knockdown phenotypes suggest that some complex members also function in other aspects of planarian biology. This work characterizes the function of the SET1/MLL family in the context of planarian regeneration and provides insight into the role of these enzymes in adult stem cell regulation in vivo. PMID:23235145

  13. High-Affinity, Small-Molecule Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of MLL1/WDR5 Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karatas, Hacer; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Cao, Fang; Chen, Yong; Bernard, Denzil; Liu, Liu; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng

    2013-02-12

    Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase, and targeting the MLL1 enzymatic activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. The MLL1/WDR5 protein–protein interaction is essential for MLL1 enzymatic activity. In the present study, we designed a large number of peptidomimetics to target the MLL1/WDR5 interaction based upon -CO-ARA-NH–, the minimum binding motif derived from MLL1. Our study led to the design of high-affinity peptidomimetics, which bind to WDR5 with Ki < 1 nM and function as potent antagonists of MLL1 activity in a fully reconstituted in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase assay. Determination of co-crystal structures of two potent peptidomimetics in complex with WDR5 establishes their structural basis for high-affinity binding to WDR5. Evaluation of one such peptidomimetic, MM-102, in bone marrow cells transduced with MLL1-AF9 fusion construct shows that the compound effectively decreases the expression of HoxA9 and Meis-1, two critical MLL1 target genes in MLL1 fusion protein mediated leukemogenesis. MM-102 also specifically inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. Our study provides the first proof-of-concept for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of the WDR5/MLL1 protein–protein interaction as a novel therapeutic approach for acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins.

  14. Trans-tail regulation of MLL4-catalyzed H3K4 methylation by H4R3 symmetric dimethylation is mediated by a tandem PHD of MLL4.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Shilpa S; Lee, Sung-Hun; Kan, Pu-Yeh; Voigt, Philipp; Ma, Li; Shi, Xiaobing; Reinberg, Danny; Lee, Min Gyu

    2012-12-15

    Mixed-lineage leukemia 4 (MLL4; also called MLL2 and ALR) enzymatically generates trimethylated histone H3 Lys 4 (H3K4me3), a hallmark of gene activation. However, how MLL4-deposited H3K4me3 interplays with other histone marks in epigenetic processes remains largely unknown. Here, we show that MLL4 plays an essential role in differentiating NT2/D1 stem cells by activating differentiation-specific genes. A tandem plant homeodomain (PHD(4-6)) of MLL4 recognizes unmethylated or asymmetrically dimethylated histone H4 Arg 3 (H4R3me0 or H4R3me2a) and is required for MLL4's nucleosomal methyltransferase activity and MLL4-mediated differentiation. Kabuki syndrome mutations in PHD(4-6) reduce PHD(4-6)'s binding ability and MLL4's catalytic activity. PHD(4-6)'s binding strength is inhibited by H4R3 symmetric dimethylation (H4R3me2s), a gene-repressive mark. The protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7), but not PRMT5, represses MLL4 target genes by up-regulating H4R3me2s levels and antagonizes MLL4-mediated differentiation. Consistently, PRMT7 knockdown increases MLL4-catalyzed H3K4me3 levels. During differentiation, decreased H4R3me2s levels are associated with increased H3K4me3 levels at a cohort of genes, including many HOXA and HOXB genes. These findings indicate that the trans-tail inhibition of MLL4-generated H3K4me3 by PRMT7-regulated H4R3me2s may result from H4R3me2s's interference with PHD(4-6)'s binding activity and is a novel epigenetic mechanism that underlies opposing effects of MLL4 and PRMT7 on cellular differentiation.

  15. MLL3 is a haploinsufficient 7q tumor suppressor in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chong; Liu, Yu; Rappaport, Amy R; Kitzing, Thomas; Schultz, Nikolaus; Zhao, Zhen; Shroff, Aditya S; Dickins, Ross A; Vakoc, Christopher R; Bradner, James E; Stock, Wendy; LeBeau, Michelle M; Shannon, Kevin M; Kogan, Scott; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W

    2014-05-12

    Recurring deletions of chromosome 7 and 7q [-7/del(7q)] occur in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and are associated with poor prognosis. However, the identity of functionally relevant tumor suppressors on 7q remains unclear. Using RNAi and CRISPR/Cas9 approaches, we show that an ∼50% reduction in gene dosage of the mixed lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3) gene, located on 7q36.1, cooperates with other events occurring in -7/del(7q) AMLs to promote leukemogenesis. Mll3 suppression impairs the differentiation of HSPC. Interestingly, Mll3-suppressed leukemias, like human -7/del(7q) AMLs, are refractory to conventional chemotherapy but sensitive to the BET inhibitor JQ1. Thus, our mouse model functionally validates MLL3 as a haploinsufficient 7q tumor suppressor and suggests a therapeutic option for this aggressive disease.

  16. MLL leukemia induction by genome editing of human CD34+ hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Buechele, Corina; Breese, Erin H.; Schneidawind, Dominik; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Jeong, Johan; Duque-Afonso, Jesus; Wong, Stephen H. K.; Smith, Kevin S.; Negrin, Robert S.; Porteus, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene occur in primary and treatment-related leukemias and confer a poor prognosis. Studies based primarily on mouse models have substantially advanced our understanding of MLL leukemia pathogenesis, but often use supraphysiological oncogene expression with uncertain implications for human leukemia. Genome editing using site-specific nucleases provides a powerful new technology for gene modification to potentially model human disease, however, this approach has not been used to re-create acute leukemia in human cells of origin comparable to disease observed in patients. We applied transcription activator-like effector nuclease–mediated genome editing to generate endogenous MLL-AF9 and MLL-ENL oncogenes through insertional mutagenesis in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. Engineered HSPCs displayed altered in vitro growth potentials and induced acute leukemias following transplantation in immunocompromised mice at a mean latency of 16 weeks. The leukemias displayed phenotypic and morphologic similarities with patient leukemia blasts including a subset with mixed phenotype, a distinctive feature seen in clinical disease. The leukemic blasts expressed an MLL-associated transcriptional program with elevated levels of crucial MLL target genes, displayed heightened sensitivity to DOT1L inhibition, and demonstrated increased oncogenic potential ex vivo and in secondary transplant assays. Thus, genome editing to create endogenous MLL oncogenes in primary human HSPCs faithfully models acute MLL-rearranged leukemia and provides an experimental platform for prospective studies of leukemia initiation and stem cell biology in a genetic subtype of poor prognosis leukemia. PMID:26311362

  17. MLL leukemia induction by genome editing of human CD34+ hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Buechele, Corina; Breese, Erin H; Schneidawind, Dominik; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Jeong, Johan; Duque-Afonso, Jesus; Wong, Stephen H K; Smith, Kevin S; Negrin, Robert S; Porteus, Matthew; Cleary, Michael L

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene occur in primary and treatment-related leukemias and confer a poor prognosis. Studies based primarily on mouse models have substantially advanced our understanding of MLL leukemia pathogenesis, but often use supraphysiological oncogene expression with uncertain implications for human leukemia. Genome editing using site-specific nucleases provides a powerful new technology for gene modification to potentially model human disease, however, this approach has not been used to re-create acute leukemia in human cells of origin comparable to disease observed in patients. We applied transcription activator-like effector nuclease-mediated genome editing to generate endogenous MLL-AF9 and MLL-ENL oncogenes through insertional mutagenesis in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. Engineered HSPCs displayed altered in vitro growth potentials and induced acute leukemias following transplantation in immunocompromised mice at a mean latency of 16 weeks. The leukemias displayed phenotypic and morphologic similarities with patient leukemia blasts including a subset with mixed phenotype, a distinctive feature seen in clinical disease. The leukemic blasts expressed an MLL-associated transcriptional program with elevated levels of crucial MLL target genes, displayed heightened sensitivity to DOT1L inhibition, and demonstrated increased oncogenic potential ex vivo and in secondary transplant assays. Thus, genome editing to create endogenous MLL oncogenes in primary human HSPCs faithfully models acute MLL-rearranged leukemia and provides an experimental platform for prospective studies of leukemia initiation and stem cell biology in a genetic subtype of poor prognosis leukemia.

  18. Inhibition of BET recruitment to chromatin as an effective treatment for MLL-fusion leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Mark A; Prinjha, Rab K; Dittmann, Antje; Giotopoulos, George; Bantscheff, Marcus; Chan, Wai-In; Robson, Samuel C; Chung, Chun-wa; Hopf, Carsten; Savitski, Mikhail M; Huthmacher, Carola; Gudgin, Emma; Lugo, Dave; Beinke, Soren; Chapman, Trevor D; Roberts, Emma J; Soden, Peter E; Auger, Kurt R; Mirguet, Olivier; Doehner, Konstanze; Delwel, Ruud; Burnett, Alan K; Jeffrey, Phillip; Drewes, Gerard; Lee, Kevin; Huntly, Brian J P; Kouzarides, Tony

    2011-10-02

    Recurrent chromosomal translocations involving the mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) gene initiate aggressive forms of leukaemia, which are often refractory to conventional therapies. Many MLL-fusion partners are members of the super elongation complex (SEC), a critical regulator of transcriptional elongation, suggesting that aberrant control of this process has an important role in leukaemia induction. Here we use a global proteomic strategy to demonstrate that MLL fusions, as part of SEC and the polymerase-associated factor complex (PAFc), are associated with the BET family of acetyl-lysine recognizing, chromatin 'adaptor' proteins. These data provided the basis for therapeutic intervention in MLL-fusion leukaemia, via the displacement of the BET family of proteins from chromatin. We show that a novel small molecule inhibitor of the BET family, GSK1210151A (I-BET151), has profound efficacy against human and murine MLL-fusion leukaemic cell lines, through the induction of early cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. I-BET151 treatment in two human leukaemia cell lines with different MLL fusions alters the expression of a common set of genes whose function may account for these phenotypic changes. The mode of action of I-BET151 is, at least in part, due to the inhibition of transcription at key genes (BCL2, C-MYC and CDK6) through the displacement of BRD3/4, PAFc and SEC components from chromatin. In vivo studies indicate that I-BET151 has significant therapeutic value, providing survival benefit in two distinct mouse models of murine MLL-AF9 and human MLL-AF4 leukaemia. Finally, the efficacy of I-BET151 against human leukaemia stem cells is demonstrated, providing further evidence of its potent therapeutic potential. These findings establish the displacement of BET proteins from chromatin as a promising epigenetic therapy for these aggressive leukaemias.

  19. Tumorigenicity of Ewing sarcoma is critically dependent on the trithorax proteins MLL1 and menin

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, Laurie K.; Bailey, Natashay; Van Noord, Raelene A.; Krook, Melanie A.; Harris, Ashley; Cramer, Cassondra; Jasman, Brooke; Patel, Rajiv M.; Thomas, Dafydd; Borkin, Dmitry; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Grembecka, Jolanta; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.

    2017-01-01

    Developmental transcription programs are epigenetically regulated by the competing actions of polycomb and trithorax (TrxG) protein complexes, which repress and activate genes, respectively. Ewing sarcoma is a developmental tumor that is associated with widespread de-regulation of developmental transcription programs, including HOX programs. Posterior HOXD genes are abnormally over-expressed by Ewing sarcoma and HOXD13, in particular, contributes to the tumorigenic phenotype. In MLL1 fusion-driven leukemia, aberrant activation of HOXA genes is epigenetically mediated by the TrxG complex and HOXA gene expression and leukemogenesis are critically dependent on the protein-protein interaction between the TrxG proteins MLL1 and menin. Based on these data, we investigated whether posterior HOXD gene activation and Ewing sarcoma tumorigenicity are similarly mediated by and dependent on MLL1 and/or menin. Our findings demonstrate that Ewing sarcomas express high levels of both MLL1 and menin and that continued expression of both proteins is required for maintenance of tumorigenicity. In addition, exposure of Ewing sarcoma cells to MI-503, an inhibitor of the MLL1-menin protein-protein interaction developed for MLL1-fusion driven leukemia, leads to loss of tumorigenicity and down-regulated expression of the posterior HOXD gene cluster. Together these data demonstrate an essential role for MLL1 and menin in mediating tumor maintenance and posterior HOXD gene activation in Ewing sarcoma. A critical dependency of these tumors on the MLL1-menin interaction presents a potentially novel therapeutic target. PMID:27888797

  20. The same pocket in menin binds both MLL and JUND but has opposite effects on transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Gurung, Buddha; Wan, Bingbing; Matkar, Smita; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Wan, Ke; Merchant, Juanita L.; Hua, Xianxin; Lei, Ming

    2013-04-08

    Menin is a tumour suppressor protein whose loss or inactivation causes multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1), a hereditary autosomal dominant tumour syndrome that is characterized by tumorigenesis in multiple endocrine organs. Menin interacts with many proteins and is involved in a variety of cellular processes. Menin binds the JUN family transcription factor JUND and inhibits its transcriptional activity. Several MEN1 missense mutations disrupt the menin-JUND interaction, suggesting a correlation between the tumour-suppressor function of menin and its suppression of JUND-activated transcription. Menin also interacts with mixed lineage leukaemia protein 1 (MLL1), a histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase, and functions as an oncogenic cofactor to upregulate gene transcription and promote MLL1-fusion-protein-induced leukaemogenesis. A recent report on the tethering of MLL1 to chromatin binding factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) by menin indicates that menin is a molecular adaptor coordinating the functions of multiple proteins. Despite its importance, how menin interacts with many distinct partners and regulates their functions remains poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structures of human menin in its free form and in complexes with MLL1 or with JUND, or with an MLL1-LEDGF heterodimer. These structures show that menin contains a deep pocket that binds short peptides of MLL1 or JUND in the same manner, but that it can have opposite effects on transcription. The menin-JUND interaction blocks JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated JUND phosphorylation and suppresses JUND-induced transcription. In contrast, menin promotes gene transcription by binding the transcription activator MLL1 through the peptide pocket while still interacting with the chromatin-anchoring protein LEDGF at a distinct surface formed by both menin and MLL1.

  1. Targeting the kinase activities of ATR and ATM exhibits antitumoral activity in mouse models of MLL-rearranged AML.

    PubMed

    Morgado-Palacin, Isabel; Day, Amanda; Murga, Matilde; Lafarga, Vanesa; Anton, Marta Elena; Tubbs, Anthony; Chen, Hua-Tang; Ergan, Aysegul; Anderson, Rhonda; Bhandoola, Avinash; Pike, Kurt G; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Wang, Xi; Pierce, Andrew J; Hubbard, Chad; Armstrong, Scott A; Nussenzweig, André; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-09-13

    Among the various subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), those with chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL oncogene (AML-MLL) have a poor prognosis. AML-MLL tumor cells are resistant to current genotoxic therapies because of an attenuated response by p53, a protein that induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage. In addition to chemicals that damage DNA, efforts have focused on targeting DNA repair enzymes as a general chemotherapeutic approach to cancer treatment. Here, we found that inhibition of the kinase ATR, which is the primary sensor of DNA replication stress, induced chromosomal breakage and death of mouse AML(MLL) cells (with an MLL-ENL fusion and a constitutively active N-RAS independently of p53. Moreover, ATR inhibition as a single agent exhibited antitumoral activity, both reducing tumor burden after establishment and preventing tumors from growing, in an immunocompetent allograft mouse model of AML(MLL) and in xenografts of a human AML-MLL cell line. We also found that inhibition of ATM, a kinase that senses DNA double-strand breaks, also promoted the survival of the AML(MLL) mice. Collectively, these data indicated that ATR or ATM inhibition represent potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AML, especially MLL-driven leukemias.

  2. Enhancer-associated H3K4 monomethylation by Trithorax-related, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian Mll3/Mll4

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Hans-Martin; Mohan, Man; Garruss, Alexander S.; Liang, Kaiwei; Takahashi, Yoh-hei; Mickey, Kristen; Voets, Olaf; Verrijzer, C. Peter; Shilatifard, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Monomethylation of histone H3 on Lys 4 (H3K4me1) and acetylation of histone H3 on Lys 27 (H3K27ac) are histone modifications that are highly enriched over the body of actively transcribed genes and on enhancers. Although in yeast all H3K4 methylation patterns, including H3K4me1, are implemented by Set1/COMPASS (complex of proteins associated with Set1), there are three classes of COMPASS-like complexes in Drosophila that could carry out H3K4me1 on enhancers: dSet1, Trithorax, and Trithorax-related (Trr). Here, we report that Trr, the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian Mll3/4 COMPASS-like complexes, can function as a major H3K4 monomethyltransferase on enhancers in vivo. Loss of Trr results in a global decrease of H3K4me1 and H3K27ac levels in various tissues. Assays with the cut wing margin enhancer implied a functional role for Trr in enhancer-mediated processes. A genome-wide analysis demonstrated that Trr is required to maintain the H3K4me1 and H3K27ac chromatin signature that resembles the histone modification patterns described for enhancers. Furthermore, studies in the mammalian system suggested a role for the Trr homolog Mll3 in similar processes. Since Trr and mammalian Mll3/4 complexes are distinguished by bearing a unique subunit, the H3K27 demethylase UTX, we propose a model in which the H3K4 monomethyltransferases Trr/Mll3/Mll4 and the H3K27 demethylase UTX cooperate to regulate the transition from inactive/poised to active enhancers. PMID:23166019

  3. ELL and EAF1 are Cajal Body Components That Are Disrupted in MLL-ELL Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Paul E.; Simone, Federico; Kaberlein, Joseph J.; Luo, Roger T.; Thirman, Michael J.

    2003-01-01

    The (11;19)(q23;p13.1) translocation in acute leukemia results in the formation of a chimeric MLL-ELL fusion protein. ELL is an RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) transcriptional elongation factor that interacts with the recently identified EAF1 protein. Here, we show that ELL and EAF1 are components of Cajal bodies (CBs). Although ELL and EAF1 colocalize with p80 coilin, the signature protein of CBs, ELL and EAF1 do not exhibit a direct physical interaction with p80 coilin. Treatment of cells with actinomycin D, DRB, or α-amanitin, specific inhibitors of Pol II, disperses ELL and EAF1 from CBs, indicating that localization of ELL and EAF1 in CBs is dependent on active transcription by Pol II. The concentration of ELL and EAF1 in CBs links the transcriptional elongation activity of ELL to the RNA processing functions previously identified in CBs. Strikingly, CBs are disrupted in MLL-ELL leukemia. EAF1 and p80 coilin are delocalized from CBs in murine MLL-ELL leukemia cells and in HeLa cells transiently transfected with MLL-ELL. Nuclear and cytoplasmic fractionation revealed diminished expression of p80 coilin and EAF1 are not present in the nuclei of MLL-ELL leukemia cells. These studies are the first demonstration of a direct role of CB components in leukemogenesis. PMID:12686606

  4. Mutation spectrum of MLL2 in a cohort of kabuki syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Kabuki syndrome (Niikawa-Kuroki syndrome) is a rare, multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome characterized by a peculiar face, short stature, skeletal, visceral and dermatoglyphic abnormalities, cardiac anomalies, and immunological defects. Recently mutations in the histone methyl transferase MLL2 gene have been identified as its underlying cause. Methods Genomic DNAs were extracted from 62 index patients clinically diagnosed as affected by Kabuki syndrome. Sanger sequencing was performed to analyze the whole coding region of the MLL2 gene including intron-exon junctions. The putative causal and possible functional effect of each nucleotide variant identified was estimated by in silico prediction tools. Results We identified 45 patients with MLL2 nucleotide variants. 38 out of the 42 variants were never described before. Consistently with previous reports, the majority are nonsense or frameshift mutations predicted to generate a truncated polypeptide. We also identified 3 indel, 7 missense and 3 splice site. Conclusions This study emphasizes the relevance of mutational screening of the MLL2 gene among patients diagnosed with Kabuki syndrome. The identification of a large spectrum of MLL2 mutations possibly offers the opportunity to improve the actual knowledge on the clinical basis of this multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome, design functional studies to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease, establish genotype-phenotype correlations and improve clinical management. PMID:21658225

  5. Solution NMR structure and histone binding of the PHD domain of human MLL5.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Alexander; Yee, Adelinda; Wu, Hong; Yap, Damian; Zeng, Hong; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Houliston, Scott; Aparicio, Samuel; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H

    2013-01-01

    Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) is a histone methyltransferase that plays a key role in hematopoiesis, spermatogenesis and cell cycle progression. In addition to its catalytic domain, MLL5 contains a PHD finger domain, a protein module that is often involved in binding to the N-terminus of histone H3. Here we report the NMR solution structure of the MLL5 PHD domain showing a variant of the canonical PHD fold that combines conserved H3 binding features from several classes of other PHD domains (including an aromatic cage) along with a novel C-terminal α-helix, not previously seen. We further demonstrate that the PHD domain binds with similar affinity to histone H3 tail peptides di- and tri-methylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me2 and H3K4me3), the former being the putative product of the MLL5 catalytic reaction. This work establishes the PHD domain of MLL5 as a bone fide 'reader' domain of H3K4 methyl marks suggesting that it may guide the spreading or further methylation of this site on chromatin.

  6. Histone Acetyltransferase Activity of MOF Is Required for MLL-AF9 Leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Daria G; Xu, Haiming; Chen, Chun-Wei; Hoshii, Takayuki; Eisold, Meghan E; Delaney, Christopher; Cusan, Monica; Deshpande, Aniruddha J; Huang, Chun-Hao; Lujambio, Amaia; Zheng, YuJun George; Zuber, Johannes; Pandita, Tej K; Lowe, Scott W; Armstrong, Scott A

    2017-02-15

    Chromatin-based mechanisms offer therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that are of great current interest. In this study, we conducted an RNAi-based screen to identify druggable chromatin regulator-based targets in leukemias marked by oncogenic rearrangements of the MLL gene. In this manner, we discovered the H4K16 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) MOF to be important for leukemia cell growth. Conditional deletion of Mof in a mouse model of MLL-AF9-driven leukemogenesis reduced tumor burden and prolonged host survival. RNA sequencing showed an expected downregulation of genes within DNA damage repair pathways that are controlled by MOF, as correlated with a significant increase in yH2AX nuclear foci in Mof-deficient MLL-AF9 tumor cells. In parallel, Mof loss also impaired global H4K16 acetylation in the tumor cell genome. Rescue experiments with catalytically inactive mutants of MOF showed that its enzymatic activity was required to maintain cancer pathogenicity. In support of the role of MOF in sustaining H4K16 acetylation, a small-molecule inhibitor of the HAT component MYST blocked the growth of both murine and human MLL-AF9 leukemia cell lines. Furthermore, Mof inactivation suppressed leukemia development in an NUP98-HOXA9-driven AML model. Taken together, our results establish that the HAT activity of MOF is required to sustain MLL-AF9 leukemia and may be important for multiple AML subtypes. Blocking this activity is sufficient to stimulate DNA damage, offering a rationale to pursue MOF inhibitors as a targeted approach to treat MLL-rearranged leukemias. Cancer Res; 77(7); 1-10. ©2017 AACR.

  7. A human ESC model for MLL-AF4 leukemic fusion gene reveals an impaired early hematopoietic-endothelial specification.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Melen, Gustavo J; Ramos-Mejia, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Ayllón, Verónica; Sanchez, Laura; Ligero, Gertrudis; Gutierrez-Aranda, Iván; Fernández, Agustín F; Fraga, Mario F; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Burks, Deborah; Plaza-Calonge, María del Carmen; Rodríguez-Manzaneque, Juan C; Menendez, Pablo

    2012-06-01

    The MLL-AF4 fusion gene is a hallmark genomic aberration in high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants. Although it is well established that MLL-AF4 arises prenatally during human development, its effects on hematopoietic development in utero remain unexplored. We have created a human-specific cellular system to study early hemato-endothelial development in MLL-AF4-expressing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Functional studies, clonal analysis and gene expression profiling reveal that expression of MLL-AF4 in hESCs has a phenotypic, functional and gene expression impact. MLL-AF4 acts as a global transcriptional activator and a positive regulator of homeobox gene expression in hESCs. Functionally, MLL-AF4 enhances the specification of hemogenic precursors from hESCs but strongly impairs further hematopoietic commitment in favor of an endothelial cell fate. MLL-AF4 hESCs are transcriptionally primed to differentiate towards hemogenic precursors prone to endothelial maturation, as reflected by the marked upregulation of master genes associated to vascular-endothelial functions and early hematopoiesis. Furthermore, we report that MLL-AF4 expression is not sufficient to transform hESC-derived hematopoietic cells. This work illustrates how hESCs may provide unique insights into human development and further our understanding of how leukemic fusion genes, known to arise prenatally, regulate human embryonic hematopoietic specification.

  8. A human ESC model for MLL-AF4 leukemic fusion gene reveals an impaired early hematopoietic-endothelial specification

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Melen, Gustavo J; Ramos-Mejia, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Ayllón, Verónica; Sanchez, Laura; Ligero, Gertrudis; Gutierrez-Aranda, Iván; Fernández, Agustín F; Fraga, Mario F; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Burks, Deborah; del Carmen Plaza-Calonge, María; Rodríguez-Manzaneque, Juan C; Menendez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    The MLL-AF4 fusion gene is a hallmark genomic aberration in high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants. Although it is well established that MLL-AF4 arises prenatally during human development, its effects on hematopoietic development in utero remain unexplored. We have created a human-specific cellular system to study early hemato-endothelial development in MLL-AF4-expressing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Functional studies, clonal analysis and gene expression profiling reveal that expression of MLL-AF4 in hESCs has a phenotypic, functional and gene expression impact. MLL-AF4 acts as a global transcriptional activator and a positive regulator of homeobox gene expression in hESCs. Functionally, MLL-AF4 enhances the specification of hemogenic precursors from hESCs but strongly impairs further hematopoietic commitment in favor of an endothelial cell fate. MLL-AF4 hESCs are transcriptionally primed to differentiate towards hemogenic precursors prone to endothelial maturation, as reflected by the marked upregulation of master genes associated to vascular-endothelial functions and early hematopoiesis. Furthermore, we report that MLL-AF4 expression is not sufficient to transform hESC-derived hematopoietic cells. This work illustrates how hESCs may provide unique insights into human development and further our understanding of how leukemic fusion genes, known to arise prenatally, regulate human embryonic hematopoietic specification. PMID:22212479

  9. HOXC6 Is transcriptionally regulated via coordination of MLL histone methylase and estrogen receptor in an estrogen environment.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Khairul I; Hussain, Imran; Shrestha, Bishakha; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2011-08-12

    Homeobox (HOX)-containing gene HOXC6 is a critical player in mammary gland development and milk production, and is overexpressed in breast and prostate cancers. We demonstrated that HOXC6 is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen (E2). HOXC6 promoter contains two putative estrogen response elements (EREs), termed as ERE1(1/2) and ERE2(1/2). Promoter analysis using luciferase-based reporter assay demonstrated that both EREs are responsive to E2, with ERE1(1/2) being more responsive than ERE2(1/2). Estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ bind to these EREs in an E2-dependent manner, and antisense-mediated knockdown of ERs suppressed the E2-dependent activation of HOXC6 expression. Similarly, knockdown of histone methylases MLL2 and MLL3 decreased the E2-mediated activation of HOXC6. However, depletion of MLL1 or MLL4 showed no significant effect. MLL2 and MLL3 were bound to the HOXC6 EREs in an E2-dependent manner. In contrast, MLL1 and MLL4 that were bound to the HOXC6 promoter in the absence of E2 decreased upon exposure to E2. MLL2 and MLL3 play key roles in histone H3 lysine-4 trimethylation and in the recruitment of general transcription factors and RNA polymerase II in the HOXC6 promoter during E2-dependent transactivation. Nuclear receptor corepressors N-CoR and SAFB1 were bound in the HOXC6 promoter in the absence of E2, and that binding was decreased upon E2 treatment, indicating their critical roles in suppressing HOXC6 gene expression under nonactivated conditions. Knockdown of either ERα or ERβ abolished E2-dependent recruitment of MLL2 and MLL3 into the HOXC6 promoter, demonstrating key roles of ERs in the recruitment of these mixed lineage leukemias into the HOXC6 promoter. Overall, our studies demonstrated that HOXC6 is an E2-responsive gene, and that histone methylases MLL2 and MLL3, in coordination with ERα and ERβ, transcriptionally regulate HOXC6 in an E2-dependent manner.

  10. HOXC6 is transcriptionally regulated via coordination of MLL histone methylase and estrogen receptor under estrogen environment

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Hussain, Imran; Shrestha, Bishakha; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2011-01-01

    Homeobox containing gene HOXC6 is a critical player in mammary gland development, milk production and is overexpressed in breast and prostate cancer. We demonstrated that HOXC6 is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen (E2). HOXC6 promoter contains two putative estrogen-response elements (EREs), termed as ERE11/2 and ERE21/2. Promoter analysis using luciferase based reporter assay demonstrated that both EREs are responsive to E2, ERE11/2 being more responsive than ERE21/2. Estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, bind to these EREs in an E2-dependent manner and antisense-mediated knockdown of ERs suppressed the E2-dependent activation of HOXC6 expression. Similarly, knockdown of histone methylases, MLL2 and MLL3, decreased E2-mediated activation of HOXC6. However, depletion of MLL1 or MLL4 showed no significant effect. MLL2 and MLL3 were bound to the HOXC6 EREs in an E2-dependent manner. In contrast, MLL1 and MLL4 that were bound to the HOXC6 promoter in the absence of E2, decreased upon exposure to E2. MLL2 and MLL3 play key roles in histone H3K4-trimethylation and recruitment of general transcription factors and RNAP II in the HOXC6 promoter during E2-dependent transactivation. Nuclear receptor corepressors N-CoR and SAFB1 were bound in the HOXC6 promoter in absence of E2 and that binding were decreased upon E2-treatment indicating their critical roles in suppressing HOXC6 gene expression under non-activated condition. Knockdown of either ERα or ERβ abolished E2-dependent recruitment of MLL2 and MLL3 into the HOXC6 promoter demonstrating key roles of ERs in recruitment of these MLLs into HOXC6 promoter. Overall, our studies demonstrated that HOXC6 is an estrogen-responsive gene and histone methylases MLL2 and MLL3, in coordination with ERα and ERβ, transcriptionally regulate HOXC6 in an E2-dependent manner. PMID:21683083

  11. Requirement for MLL3 in p53 regulation of hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner and bile acid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Juhee; Lee, Jae W

    2011-12-01

    The histone H3-lysine-4 methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3) belongs to a large complex that functions as a coactivator of multiple transcription factors, including the bile acid (BA)-activated nuclear receptor, farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a critical player in BA homeostasis. BA-activated FXR induces hepatic expression of small heterodimer partner (SHP), which in turn suppresses expression of BA synthesis genes, Cyp7a1 and Cyp8b1. Thus, MLL3(Δ/Δ) mice that express a catalytically inactive mutant form of MLL3 display increased BA levels. Recently, we have discovered a distinct regulatory pathway for BA homeostasis, in which p53 independently up-regulates SHP expression in the liver. Here, we show that the MLL3 complex is also essential for p53 transactivation of SHP. Although activated p53 signaling in MLL3(+/+) mice results in decreased BA levels through hepatic up-regulation of SHP, these changes are abolished in MLL3(Δ/Δ) mice. For both HepG2 cells and mouse liver, we also demonstrate that p53 directs the recruitment of different components of the MLL3 complex to the p53-response elements of SHP and that p53-dependent H3-lysine-4-trimethylation of SHP requires MLL3. From these results, we conclude that both FXR- and p53-dependent regulatory pathways for SHP expression in BA homeostasis require the MLL3 complex; thus, the MLL3 complex is likely a master regulator of BA homeostasis. Using a common coregulator complex for multiple transcription factors, which independently control expression of the same gene, might be a prevalent theme in gene regulation and may also play critical roles in assigning a specific biological function to a coregulator complex.

  12. Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) Protein Stability Is Cooperatively Regulated by O-GlcNac Transferase (OGT) and Ubiquitin Specific Protease 7 (USP7)

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaodan; Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Peipei; Liu, Lulu; Wan, Xiaoling; Yuan, Xiujie; Wang, Xizi; Chen, Miao; Chen, Jun; Yang, Jing; Kong, Chao; Li, Bin; Peng, Chao; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Hou, Fajian; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) protein is a trithorax family histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase that regulates diverse biological processes, including cell cycle progression, hematopoiesis and cancer. The mechanisms by which MLL5 protein stability is regulated have remained unclear to date. Here, we showed that MLL5 protein stability is cooperatively regulated by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7). Depletion of OGT in cells led to a decrease in the MLL5 protein level through ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent proteolytic degradation, whereas ectopic expression of OGT protein suppressed MLL5 ubiquitylation. We further identified deubiquitinase USP7 as a novel MLL5-associated protein using mass spectrometry. USP7 stabilized the MLL5 protein through direct binding and deubiquitylation. Loss of USP7 induced degradation of MLL5 protein. Conversely, overexpression of USP7, but not a catalytically inactive USP7 mutant, led to decreased ubiquitylation and increased MLL5 stability. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunostaining assays revealed that MLL5, OGT and USP7 interact with each other to form a stable ternary complex that is predominantly located in the nucleus. In addition, upregulation of MLL5 expression was correlated with increased expression of OGT and USP7 in human primary cervical adenocarcinomas. Our results collectively reveal a novel molecular mechanism underlying regulation of MLL5 protein stability and provide new insights into the functional interplay among O-GlcNAc transferase, deubiquitinase and histone methyltransferase. PMID:26678539

  13. Crucial Roles for Interactions between MLL3/4 and INI1 in Nuclear Receptor Transactivation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seunghee; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Goo, Young Hwa; Lee, Young Chul; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Jae W.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear receptor (NR) transactivation involves multiple coactivators, and the molecular basis for how these are functionally integrated needs to be determined to fully understand the NR action. Activating signal cointegrator-2 (ASC-2), a transcriptional coactivator of many NRs and transcription factors, forms a steady-state complex, ASCOM (for ASC-2 complex), which contains histone H3-lysine-4 (H3K4) methyltransferase MLL3 or its paralog MLL4. Here, we show that ASCOM requires a functional cross talk with the ATPase-dependent chromatin remodeling complex Swi/Snf for efficient NR transactivation. Our results reveal that ASCOM and Swi/Snf are tightly colocalized in the nucleus and that ASCOM and Swi/Snf promote each other’s binding to NR target genes. We further show that the C-terminal SET domain of MLL3 and MLL4 directly interacts with INI1, an integral subunit of Swi/Snf. Our mutational analysis demonstrates that this interaction underlies the mutual facilitation of ASCOM and Swi/Snf recruitment to NR target genes. Importantly, this study uncovers a specific protein-protein interaction as a novel venue to couple two distinct enzymatic coactivator complexes during NR transactivation. PMID:19221051

  14. Novel variants in MLL confer to bladder cancer recurrence identified by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Huang, Yi; Liu, Huan; Li, Feida; He, Luyun; Sun, Da; Yu, Yuan; Li, Qiaoling; Huang, Peide; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Xin; Bi, Tengteng; Zhuang, Xuehan; Zhang, Liyan; Lu, Jingxiao; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Fangjian; Liu, Chunxiao; Yang, Guosheng; Hou, Yong; Fan, Zusen; Cai, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is distinguished by high rate of recurrence after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we performed the whole-exome sequencing of 37 BC individuals including 20 primary and 17 recurrent samples in which the primary and recurrent samples were not from the same patient. We uncovered that MLL, EP400, PRDM2, ANK3 and CHD5 exclusively altered in recurrent BCs. Specifically, the recurrent BCs and bladder cancer cells with MLL mutation displayed increased histone H3 tri-methyl K4 (H3K4me3) modification in tissue and cell levels and showed enhanced expression of GATA4 and ETS1 downstream. What's more, MLL mutated bladder cancer cells obtained with CRISPR/Cas9 showed increased ability of drug-resistance to epirubicin (a chemotherapy drug for bladder cancer) than wild type cells. Additionally, the BC patients with high expression of GATA4 and ETS1 significantly displayed shorter lifespan than patients with low expression. Our study provided an overview of the genetic basis of recrudescent bladder cancer and discovered that genetic alterations of MLL were involved in BC relapse. The increased modification of H3K4me3 and expression of GATA4 and ETS1 would be the promising targets for the diagnosis and therapy of relapsed bladder cancer. PMID:26625313

  15. Novel variants in MLL confer to bladder cancer recurrence identified by whole-exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Song; Yang, Zhao; Ye, Rui; An, Dan; Li, Chong; Wang, Yitian; Wang, Yongqiang; Huang, Yi; Liu, Huan; Li, Feida; He, Luyun; Sun, Da; Yu, Yuan; Li, Qiaoling; Huang, Peide; Zhang, Meng; Zhao, Xin; Bi, Tengteng; Zhuang, Xuehan; Zhang, Liyan; Lu, Jingxiao; Sun, Xiaojuan; Zhou, Fangjian; Liu, Chunxiao; Yang, Guosheng; Hou, Yong; Fan, Zusen; Cai, Zhiming

    2016-01-19

    Bladder cancer (BC) is distinguished by high rate of recurrence after surgery, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we performed the whole-exome sequencing of 37 BC individuals including 20 primary and 17 recurrent samples in which the primary and recurrent samples were not from the same patient. We uncovered that MLL, EP400, PRDM2, ANK3 and CHD5 exclusively altered in recurrent BCs. Specifically, the recurrent BCs and bladder cancer cells with MLL mutation displayed increased histone H3 tri-methyl K4 (H3K4me3) modification in tissue and cell levels and showed enhanced expression of GATA4 and ETS1 downstream. What's more, MLL mutated bladder cancer cells obtained with CRISPR/Cas9 showed increased ability of drug-resistance to epirubicin (a chemotherapy drug for bladder cancer) than wild type cells. Additionally, the BC patients with high expression of GATA4 and ETS1 significantly displayed shorter lifespan than patients with low expression. Our study provided an overview of the genetic basis of recrudescent bladder cancer and discovered that genetic alterations of MLL were involved in BC relapse. The increased modification of H3K4me3 and expression of GATA4 and ETS1 would be the promising targets for the diagnosis and therapy of relapsed bladder cancer.

  16. Homozygous inv(11)(q21q23) and MLL gene rearrangement in two patients with myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Guilin; Lu, Xinyan; Wang, Sa A; Roney, Erin K; Zhang, Liping; Hu, Shimin; Lu, Gary; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Patel, Ankita

    2014-01-01

    Rearrangements of the MLL gene located at chromosome 11q23 are common chromosomal abnormalities associated with acute leukemias. In vast majority of cases with MLL gene rearrangements, only one chromosome 11 or a single MLL allele got involved. We report two very unusual cases of myeloid neoplasms with homozygous inv(11)(q21q23) and biallelic MLL rearrangement. Both patients, a 12-year old boy and a 29-year old woman, presented initially with T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL), achieved complete remission with intensive chemotherapy, then recurred as acute myeloid leukemia in one patient and therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes in the other patient, 24 and 15 months after initial T-ALL diagnosis, respectively. In both cases, biallelic MLL gene rearrangements were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Mastermind like 2 gene was identified as MLL partner gene in one case. To our knowledge, homozygous inv(11)(q21q23) with two MLL genes rearrangement are extremely rare; it is likely a result of acquired uniparental disomy. PMID:25031740

  17. Discovery of MLL1 binding units, their localization to CpG Islands, and their potential function in mitotic chromatin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mixed Lineage Leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila Trithorax. In Drosophila, Trithorax complexes transmit the memory of active genes to daughter cells through interactions with Trithorax Response Elements (TREs). However, despite their functional importance, nothing is known about sequence features that may act as TREs in mammalian genomic DNA. Results By analyzing results of reported DNA binding assays, we identified several CpG rich motifs as potential MLL1 binding units (defined as morphemes). We find that these morphemes are dispersed within a relatively large collection of human promoter sequences and appear densely packed near transcription start sites of protein-coding genes. Genome wide analyses localized frequent morpheme occurrences to CpG islands. In the human HOX loci, the morphemes are spread across CpG islands and in some cases tail into the surrounding shores and shelves of the islands. By analyzing results of chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we found a connection between morpheme occurrences, CpG islands, and chromatin segments reported to be associated with MLL1. Furthermore, we found a correspondence of reported MLL1-driven “bookmarked” regions in chromatin to frequent occurrences of MLL1 morphemes in CpG islands. Conclusion Our results implicate the MLL1 morphemes in sequence-features that define the mammalian TREs and provide a novel function for CpG islands. Apparently, our findings offer the first evidence for existence of potential TREs in mammalian genomic DNA and the first evidence for a connection between CpG islands and gene-bookmarking by MLL1 to transmit the memory of highly active genes during mitosis. Our results further suggest a role for overlapping morphemes in producing closely packed and multiple MLL1 binding events in genomic DNA so that MLL1 molecules could interact and reside simultaneously on extended potential transcriptional maintenance elements in human chromosomes to transmit the

  18. miR-128b is a potent glucocorticoid sensitizer in MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia cells and exerts cooperative effects with miR-221.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Ai; Ha, Daon; Hsieh, James; Rao, Prakash K; Schotte, Diana; den Boer, Monique L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-11-05

    MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) has a poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate expression of target mRNAs. Our analysis of previously published data showed that expression of miR-128b and miR-221 is down-regulated in MLL-rearranged ALL relative to other types of ALL. Reexpression of these miRNAs cooperatively sensitizes 2 cultured lines of MLL-AF4 ALL cells to glucocorticoids. Target genes down-regulated by miR-128b include MLL, AF4, and both MLL-AF4 and AF4-MLL fusion genes; miR-221 down-regulates CDKN1B. These results demonstrate that down-regulation of miR-128b and miR-221 is implicated in glucocorticoid resistance and that restoration of their levels is a potentially promising therapeutic in MLL-AF4 ALL.

  19. Interaction between MLL3 genetic polymorphisms, smoking, and alcohol drinking in laryngeal cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dong; Gong, Liang; Jiang, Qichuan; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhang, Bin

    2016-03-01

    A previous study indicated that MLL3 genetic polymorphisms were associated with human cancer. However, whether MLL3 genetic variants are associated with the risk of laryngeal cancer is not clear. This study investigated the association between MLL3 gene polymorphisms and laryngeal cancer in a Chinese population. Four polymorphisms of the MLL3 gene (rs6943984, rs4725443, rs3800836, rs6464211) were genotyped using the TaqMan method in 592 patients with larynx cancer and 602 age- and sex-matched noncancer controls. We found that rs6943984 and rs4725443 of the MLL3 gene were significantly associated with the risk of larynx cancer after Bonferroni correction. The minor allele A for rs6943984 was associated with increased larynx cancer risk (P < 0.001, OR = 1.960, 95% CI = 1.587-2.420). C allele frequency (0.151) for rs4725443 was significantly higher in the case group than the control group (0.072, P < 0.001). Haplotype analyses showed that haplotypes A-T-A-C and G-T-G-C increased the risk of laryngeal cancer (OR = 2.406, 95% CI: 1.820-3.180, P < 0.001; OR = 1.399, 95% CI: 1.180-1.659, respectively), and haplotypes G-T-A-C and G-T-G-T significantly reduced the risk of laryngeal cancer (OR = 0.332, 95% CI: 0.271-0.408, P < 0.001; OR = 0.742, 95% CI: 0.607-0.908, respectively). We also found that MLL3 rs6943984 and rs4725443 polymorphisms had synergistic effects with smoking or alcohol drinking for the risk of laryngeal cancer. This study indicated that MLL3 genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes were associated with larynx cancer in a Chinese population. There was a mutually synergistic effect between smoking, alcohol drinking, and MLL3 gene polymorphisms for laryngeal cancer.

  20. Increased MLL gene rearrangements in amniocytes from fetuses of mothers who smoke.

    PubMed

    de la Chica, Rosa Ana; Mediano, Carmen; Salido, Marta; Espinet, Blanca; Manresa, Josep Maria; Solé, Francesc

    2011-08-01

    We assess the possible genotoxic effect of maternal smoking on amniotic fluid cells, based on the presence of an increasing of structural abnormality of the 11q23 band bearing the MLL gene rearrangements. In this observational and prospective study cultured amniocytes were obtained from 20 control and 20 women who smoke (>10 cigarettes/day for >10 years and during pregnancy). We performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis in amniocytes. Comparison of FISH data between smoker and control groups showed statistical significance for the MLL gene rearrangements. Epidemiologic studies, including a large series of patients, will be needed to determine whether the offspring of parents who smoke have an increased lifetime risk of leukemia.

  1. Crystal Structure of Human Taspase1, a Crucial Protease Regulating the Function of MLL

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Dunn, B.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    Taspase1 catalyzes the proteolytic processing of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) nuclear protein, which is required for maintaining Hox gene expression patterns. Chromosomal translocations of the MLL gene are associated with leukemia in infants. Taspase1, a threonine aspartase, is a member of the type 2 asparaginase family, but is the only protease in this family. We report here the crystal structures of human activated Taspase1 and its proenzyme, as well as the characterization of the effects of mutations in the active site region using a newly developed fluorogenic assay. The structure of Taspase1 has significant differences from other asparaginases, especially near the active site. Mutation of the catalytic nucleophile, Thr234, abolishes autocatalytic processing in cis but does not completely block proteolysis in trans. The structure unexpectedly showed the binding of a chloride ion in the active site, and our kinetic studies confirm that chlorides ions are inhibitors of this enzyme at physiologically relevant concentrations.

  2. Mll partial tandem duplication and Flt3 internal tandem duplication in a double knock-in mouse recapitulates features of counterpart human acute myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Zorko, Nicholas A.; Bernot, Kelsie M.; Whitman, Susan P.; Siebenaler, Ronald F.; Ahmed, Elshafa H.; Marcucci, Gabriele G.; Yanes, Daniel A.; McConnell, Kathleen K.; Mao, Charlene; Kalu, Chidimma; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jarjoura, David; Dorrance, Adrienne M.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Lee, Benjamin H.; Huang, Gang; Marcucci, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The MLL-partial tandem duplication (PTD) associates with high-risk cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Concurrent presence of FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) is observed in 25% of patients with MLL-PTD AML. However, mice expressing either Mll-PTD or Flt3-ITD do not develop AML, suggesting that 2 mutations are necessary for the AML phenotype. Thus, we generated a mouse expressing both Mll-PTD and Flt3-ITD. MllPTD/WT:Flt3ITD/WT mice developed acute leukemia with 100% penetrance, at a median of 49 weeks. As in human MLL-PTD and/or the FLT3-ITD AML, mouse blasts exhibited normal cytogenetics, decreased Mll-WT-to-Mll-PTD ratio, loss of the Flt3-WT allele, and increased total Flt3. Highlighting the adverse impact of FLT3-ITD dosage on patient survival, mice with homozygous Flt3-ITD alleles, MllPTD/WT:Flt3ITD/ITD, demonstrated a nearly 30-week reduction in latency to overt AML. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that Mll-PTD contributes to leukemogenesis as a gain-of-function mutation and describe a novel murine model closely recapitulating human AML. PMID:22674806

  3. Targeting the kinase activities of ATR and ATM exhibits therapeutic potential in a mouse model of MLL-rearranged AML

    PubMed Central

    Lafarga, Vanesa; Anton, Marta Elena; Tubbs, Anthony; Chen, Hua Tang; Ergan, Aysegul; Anderson, Rhonda; Bhandoola, Avinash; Pike, Kurt G.; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Wang, Xi; Pierce, Andrew J.; Hubbard, Chad; Armstrong, Scott A.; Nussenzweig, André; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Among the various subtypes of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), those with chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL oncogene (AML-MLL) have a poor prognosis. AML-MLL tumor cells are resistant to current genotoxic therapies due to an attenuated response by p53, which induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage. In addition to chemicals that damage DNA, efforts have focused on targeting DNA repair enzymes as a general chemotherapeutic approach to cancer treatment. Here, we found that inhibition of the kinase ATR, which is the primary sensor of DNA replication stress, induced chromosomal breakage and death of mouse AMLMLL cells (with an MLL-ENL fusion and a constitutively active N-RAS) independently of p53. Moreover, ATR inhibition as a single agent exhibited antitumoral activity, both reducing tumor burden after establishment and preventing tumors from growing, in an immunocompetent allograft mouse model of AMLMLL and in xenografts of a human AML-MLL cell line. We also found that inhibition of ATM, a kinase that senses DNA double-strand breaks, also promoted the survival of the AMLMLL mice. Collectively, these data indicated that ATR and ATM inhibition represent potential alternative therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AML, especially MLL-driven leukemias. PMID:27625305

  4. Clonal variegation and dynamic competition of leukemia-initiating cells in infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia with MLL rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Bardini, M; Woll, P S; Corral, L; Luc, S; Wittmann, L; Ma, Z; Lo Nigro, L; Basso, G; Biondi, A; Cazzaniga, G; Jacobsen, S E W

    2015-01-01

    Distinct from other forms of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), infant ALL with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangement, the most common leukemia occurring within the first year of life, might arise without the need for cooperating genetic lesions. Through Ig/TCR rearrangement analysis of MLL-AF4+ infant ALL at diagnosis and xenograft leukemias from mice transplanted with the same diagnostic samples, we established that MLL-AF4+ infant ALL is composed of a branching subclonal architecture already at diagnosis, frequently driven by an Ig/TCR-rearranged founder clone. Some MLL-AF4+ clones appear to be largely quiescent at diagnosis but can reactivate and dominate when serially transplanted into immunodeficient mice, whereas other dominant clones at diagnosis can become more quiescent, suggesting a dynamic competition between actively proliferating and quiescent subclones. Investigation of paired diagnostic and relapse samples suggested that relapses often occur from subclones already present but more quiescent at diagnosis. Copy-number alterations identified at relapse might contribute to the activation and expansion of previously quiescent subclones. Finally, each of the identified subclones is able to contribute to the diverse phenotypic pool of MLL-AF4+ leukemia-propagating cells. Unraveling of the subclonal architecture and dynamics in MLL+ infant ALL may provide possible explanations for the therapy resistance and frequent relapses observed in this group of poor prognosis ALL.

  5. H3K4 mono- and di-methyltransferase MLL4 is required for enhancer activation during cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Eun; Wang, Chaochen; Xu, Shiliyang; Cho, Young-Wook; Wang, Lifeng; Feng, Xuesong; Baldridge, Anne; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Zhuang, Lenan; Peng, Weiqun; Ge, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Enhancers play a central role in cell-type-specific gene expression and are marked by H3K4me1/2. Active enhancers are further marked by H3K27ac. However, the methyltransferases responsible for H3K4me1/2 on enhancers remain elusive. Furthermore, how these enzymes function on enhancers to regulate cell-type-specific gene expression is unclear. In this study, we identify MLL4 (KMT2D) as a major mammalian H3K4 mono- and di-methyltransferase with partial functional redundancy with MLL3 (KMT2C). Using adipogenesis and myogenesis as model systems, we show that MLL4 exhibits cell-type- and differentiation-stage-specific genomic binding and is predominantly localized on enhancers. MLL4 co-localizes with lineage-determining transcription factors (TFs) on active enhancers during differentiation. Deletion of Mll4 markedly decreases H3K4me1/2, H3K27ac, Mediator and Polymerase II levels on enhancers and leads to severe defects in cell-type-specific gene expression and cell differentiation. Together, these findings identify MLL4 as a major mammalian H3K4 mono- and di-methyltransferase essential for enhancer activation during cell differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01503.001 PMID:24368734

  6. Acute leukemias of different lineages have similar MLL gene fusions encoding related chimeric proteins resulting from chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, J.; Forster, A.; Thompson, S.; Rabbitts, T.H. ); Lampert, F. ); Kaneko, Y. ); Slater, R.; Kroes, W.G. ); Van Der Schoot, C.E. ); Ludwig, W.D. ); Karpas, A. ); Pocock, C.; Cotter, F. )

    1993-09-15

    The MLL gene, on human chromosome 11q23, undergoes chromosomal translocation in acute leukemias, resulting in gene fusion with AF4 (chromosome 4) and ENL (chromosome 19). The authors report here translocation of MLL with nine different chromosomes and two paracentric chromosome 11 deletions in early B cell, B- or T-cell lineage, or nonlymphocytic acute leukemias. The mRNA translocation junction from 22t(4;11) patients, including six adult leukemias, and nine t(11;19) tumors reveals a remarkable conservation of breakpoints within MLL, AF4, or ENL genes, irrespective of tumor phenotype. Typically, the breakpoints are upstream of the zinc-finger region of MLL, and deletion of this region can accompany translocation, supporting the der(11) chromosome as the important component in leukemogenesis. Partial sequence of a fusion between MLL and the AFX1 gene from chromosome X shows the latter to be rich in Ser/Pro codons, like the ENL mRNA. These data suggest that the heterogeneous 11q23 abnormalities might cause attachment of Ser/Pro-rich segments to the NH[sub 2] terminus of MLL, lacking the zinc-finger region, and that translocation occurs in early hematopoietic cells, before commitment to distinct lineages. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  7. The Mll2 branch of the COMPASS family regulates bivalent promoters in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Deqing; Garruss, Alexander S; Gao, Xin; Morgan, Marc A; Cook, Malcolm; Smith, Edwin R; Shilatifard, Ali

    2013-09-01

    Promoters of many developmentally regulated genes, in the embryonic stem cell state, have a bivalent mark of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3, proposed to confer precise temporal activation upon differentiation. Although Polycomb repressive complex 2 is known to implement H3K27 trimethylation, the COMPASS family member responsible for H3K4me3 at bivalently marked promoters was previously unknown. Here, we identify Mll2 (KMT2b) as the enzyme catalyzing H3K4 trimethylation at bivalentlymarked promoters in embryonic stem cells. Although H3K4me3 at bivalent genes is proposed to prime future activation, we detected no substantial defect in rapid transcriptional induction after retinoic acid treatment in Mll2-depleted cells. Our identification of the Mll2 complex as the COMPASS family member responsible for H3K4me3 marking bivalent promoters provides an opportunity to reevaluate and experimentally test models for the function of bivalency in the embryonic stem cell state and in differentiation.

  8. Regulation of DNA replication and chromosomal polyploidy by the MLL-WDR5-RBBP5 methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fei; Wu, Xiaojun; Yin, Feng; Chia-Fang Lee, Christina; Yu, Min; Mihaylov, Ivailo S.; Yu, Jiekai; Sun, Hong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA replication licensing occurs on chromatin, but how the chromatin template is regulated for replication remains mostly unclear. Here, we have analyzed the requirement of histone methyltransferases for a specific type of replication: the DNA re-replication induced by the downregulation of either Geminin, an inhibitor of replication licensing protein CDT1, or the CRL4CDT2 ubiquitin E3 ligase. We found that siRNA-mediated reduction of essential components of the MLL-WDR5-RBBP5 methyltransferase complexes including WDR5 or RBBP5, which transfer methyl groups to histone H3 at K4 (H3K4), suppressed DNA re-replication and chromosomal polyploidy. Reduction of WDR5/RBBP5 also prevented the activation of H2AX checkpoint caused by re-replication, but not by ultraviolet or X-ray irradiation; and the components of MLL complexes co-localized with the origin recognition complex (ORC) and MCM2-7 replicative helicase complexes at replication origins to control the levels of methylated H3K4. Downregulation of WDR5 or RBBP5 reduced the methylated H3K4 and suppressed the recruitment of MCM2-7 complexes onto replication origins. Our studies indicate that the MLL complexes and H3K4 methylation are required for DNA replication but not for DNA damage repair. PMID:27744293

  9. MLL1 and DOT1L cooperate with meningioma-1 to induce acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Simone S.; Haladyna, Jessica N.; Bezzant, Matthew; Stevens, Brett; Pollyea, Daniel A.; Sinha, Amit U.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Wei, Qi; Pollock, Roy M.; Daigle, Scott R.; Jordan, Craig T.; Ernst, Patricia; Bernt, Kathrin M.

    2016-01-01

    Meningioma-1 (MN1) overexpression is frequently observed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is predictive of poor prognosis. In murine models, forced expression of MN1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces an aggressive myeloid leukemia that is strictly dependent on a defined gene expression program in the cell of origin, which includes the homeobox genes Hoxa9 and Meis1 as key components. Here, we have shown that this program is controlled by two histone methyltransferases, MLL1 and DOT1L, as deletion of either Mll1 or Dot1l in MN1-expressing cells abrogated the cell of origin–derived gene expression program, including the expression of Hoxa cluster genes. In murine models, genetic inactivation of either Mll1 or Dot1l impaired MN1-mediated leukemogenesis. We determined that HOXA9 and MEIS1 are coexpressed with MN1 in a subset of clinical MN1hi leukemia, and human MN1hi/HOXA9hi leukemias were sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of DOT1L. Together, these data point to DOT1L as a potential therapeutic target in MN1hi AML. In addition, our findings suggest that epigenetic modulation of the interplay between an oncogenic lesion and its cooperating developmental program has therapeutic potential in AML. PMID:26927674

  10. Pharmacological targeting of the Wdr5-MLL interaction in C/EBPα N-terminal leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Giambruno, Roberto; Grover, Amit; Avellino, Roberto; Skucha, Anna; Vittori, Sarah; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Smil, David; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Li, Fengling; Poda, Gennadiy; Schapira, Matthieu; Wu, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Senisterra, Guillermo; Stukalov, Alexey; Huber, Kilian V. M.; Schönegger, Andreas; Marcellus, Richard; Bilban, Martin; Bock, Christoph; Brown, Peter J.; Zuber, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Al-awar, Rima; Delwel, Ruud; Nerlov, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The CEBPA gene is mutated in 9% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Selective expression of a short 30 kDa C/EBPα translational isoform, termed p30, represents the most common type of CEBPA mutations in AML. The molecular mechanisms underlying p30-mediated transformation remain incompletely understood. We show that C/EBPα p30, but not the normal p42 isoform, preferentially interacts with Wdr5, a key component of SET/MLL histone-methyltransferase complexes. Accordingly, p30-bound genomic regions were enriched for MLL-dependent H3K4me3 marks. The p30-dependent increase in self-renewal and inhibition of myeloid differentiation required Wdr5, as its down-regulation inhibited proliferation and restored differentiation in p30-dependent AML models. OICR-9429 is a novel small-molecule antagonist of the Wdr5-MLL interaction. This compound selectively inhibited proliferation and induced differentiation in p30-expressing human AML cells. Our data reveal the mechanism of p30-dependent transformation and establish the essential p30-cofactor Wdr5 as a therapeutic target in CEBPA-mutant AML. PMID:26167872

  11. Homing and invasiveness of MLL/ENL leukemic cells is regulated by MEF2C.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, Maike; Schüler, Andrea; Forster, Martin; Engelmann, Afra; Arnold, Michael A; Delwel, Ruud; Valk, Peter J; Löhler, Jürgen; Slany, Robert K; Olson, Eric N; Stocking, Carol

    2009-09-17

    Acute myelogenous leukemia is driven by leukemic stem cells (LSCs) generated by mutations that confer (or maintain) self-renewal potential coupled to an aberrant differentiation program. Using retroviral mutagenesis, we identified genes that generate LSCs in collaboration with genetic disruption of the gene encoding interferon response factor 8 (Irf8), which induces a myeloproliferation in vivo. Among the targeted genes, we identified Mef2c, encoding a MCM1-agamous-deficiens-serum response factor transcription factor, and confirmed that overexpression induced a myelomonocytic leukemia in cooperation with Irf8 deficiency. Strikingly, several of the genes identified in our screen have been reported to be up-regulated in the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) subtype. High MEF2C expression levels were confirmed in acute myelogenous leukemia patient samples with MLL gene disruptions, prompting an investigation of the causal interplay. Using a conditional mouse strain, we demonstrated that Mef2c deficiency does not impair the establishment or maintenance of LSCs generated in vitro by MLL/ENL fusion proteins; however, its loss led to compromised homing and invasiveness of the tumor cells. Mef2c-dependent targets included several genes encoding matrix metalloproteinases and chemokine ligands and receptors, providing a mechanistic link to increased homing and motility. Thus, MEF2C up-regulation may be responsible for the aggressive nature of this leukemia subtype.

  12. Neuronal Kmt2a/Mll1 Histone Methyltransferase Is Essential for Prefrontal Synaptic Plasticity and Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Jakovcevski, Mira; Ruan, Hongyu; Shen, Erica Y.; Dincer, Aslihan; Javidfar, Behnam; Ma, Qi; Peter, Cyril J.; Cheung, Iris; Mitchell, Amanda C.; Jiang, Yan; Lin, Cong L.; Pothula, Venu; Stewart, A. Francis; Ernst, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal histone H3-lysine 4 methylation landscapes are defined by sharp peaks at gene promoters and other cis-regulatory sequences, but molecular and cellular phenotypes after neuron-specific deletion of H3K4 methyl-regulators remain largely unexplored. We report that neuronal ablation of the H3K4-specific methyltransferase, Kmt2a/Mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (Mll1), in mouse postnatal forebrain and adult prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with increased anxiety and robust cognitive deficits without locomotor dysfunction. In contrast, only mild behavioral phenotypes were observed after ablation of the Mll1 ortholog Kmt2b/Mll2 in PFC. Impaired working memory after Kmt2a/Mll1 ablation in PFC neurons was associated with loss of training-induced transient waves of Arc immediate early gene expression critical for synaptic plasticity. Medial prefrontal layer V pyramidal neurons, a major output relay of the cortex, demonstrated severely impaired synaptic facilitation and temporal summation, two forms of short-term plasticity essential for working memory. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing in Mll1-deficient cortical neurons revealed downregulated expression and loss of the transcriptional mark, trimethyl-H3K4, at <50 loci, including the homeodomain transcription factor Meis2. Small RNA-mediated Meis2 knockdown in PFC was associated with working memory defects similar to those elicited by Mll1 deletion. Therefore, mature prefrontal neurons critically depend on maintenance of Mll1-regulated H3K4 methylation at a subset of genes with an essential role in cognition and emotion. PMID:25834037

  13. Unraveling the Activation Mechanism of Taspase1 which Controls the Oncogenic AF4–MLL Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sabiani, Samaneh; Geppert, Tim; Engelbrecht, Christian; Kowarz, Eric; Schneider, Gisbert; Marschalek, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Taspase1-mediated cleavage of the AF4–MLL oncoprotein results in the formation of a stable multiprotein complex which forms the key event for the onset of acute proB leukemia in mice. Therefore, Taspase1 represents a conditional oncoprotein in the context of t(4;11) leukemia. In this report, we used site-directed mutagenesis to unravel the molecular events by which Taspase1 becomes sequentially activated. Monomeric pro-enzymes form dimers which are autocatalytically processed into the enzymatically active form of Taspase1 (αββα). The active enzyme cleaves only very few target proteins, e.g., MLL, MLL4 and TFIIA at their corresponding consensus cleavage sites (CSTasp1) as well as AF4–MLL in the case of leukemogenic translocation. This knowledge was translated into the design of a dominant-negative mutant of Taspase1 (dnTASP1). As expected, simultaneous expression of the leukemogenic AF4–MLL and dnTASP1 causes the disappearance of the leukemogenic oncoprotein, because the uncleaved AF4–MLL protein (328 kDa) is subject to proteasomal degradation, while the cleaved AF4–MLL forms a stable oncogenic multi-protein complex with a very long half-life. Moreover, coexpression of dnTASP1 with a BFP-CSTasp1-GFP FRET biosensor effectively inhibits cleavage. The impact of our findings on future drug development and potential treatment options for t(4;11) leukemia will be discussed. PMID:26137584

  14. UTX and MLL4 Coordinately Regulate Transcriptional Programs for Cell Proliferation and Invasiveness in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Sharma, Amrish; Dhar, Shilpa S.; Lee, Sung-Hun; Gu, Bingnan; Chan, Chia-Hsin; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Lee, Min Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Histone methyltransferases and demethylases reversibly modulate histone lysine methylation, which is considered a key epigenetic mark associated with gene regulation. Recently, aberrant regulation of gene expression by histone methylation modifiers has emerged as an important mechanism for tumorigenesis. However, it remains largely unknown how histone methyltransferases and demethylases co-regulate transcriptional profiles for cancer cell characteristics. Here, we show that in breast cancer cells, the histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase UTX (also known as KDM6A) positively regulates gene expression programs associated with cell proliferation and invasion. The majority of UTX-controlled genes, including a cohort of oncogenes and pro-metastatic genes, are co-regulated by the H3K4 methyltransferase mixed lineage leukemia 4 (MLL4, also called ALR, KMT2D, and MLL2). UTX interacted with a C-terminal region of MLL4. UTX knockdown resulted in significant decreases in the proliferation and invasiveness of breast cancer cells in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model. Such defective cellular characteristics of UTX-depleted cells were phenocopied by MLL4 knockdown cells. UTX-catalyzed demethylation of trimethylated H3K27 and MLL4-mediated trimethylation at H3K4 occurred inter-dependently at co-target genes of UTX and MLL4. Clinically, high levels of UTX or MLL4 were associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Taken together, these findings uncover that coordinated regulation of gene expression programs by a histone methyltransferase and a histone demethylase is coupled to the proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cells. PMID:24491801

  15. Crosstalk between NSL histone acetyltransferase and MLL/SET complexes: NSL complex functions in promoting histone H3K4 di-methylation activity by MLL/SET complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoming; Su, Jiaming; Wang, Fei; Liu, Da; Ding, Jian; Yang, Yang; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C; Cao, Lingling; Wu, Donglu; Wu, Min; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2013-11-01

    hMOF (MYST1), a histone acetyltransferase (HAT), forms at least two distinct multiprotein complexes in human cells. The male specific lethal (MSL) HAT complex plays a key role in dosage compensation in Drosophila and is responsible for histone H4K16ac in vivo. We and others previously described a second hMOF-containing HAT complex, the non-specific lethal (NSL) HAT complex. The NSL complex has a broader substrate specificity, can acetylate H4 on K16, K5, and K8. The WD (tryptophan-aspartate) repeat domain 5 (WDR5) and host cell factor 1 (HCF1) are shared among members of the MLL/SET (mixed-lineage leukemia/set-domain containing) family of histone H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. The presence of these shared subunits raises the possibility that there are functional links between these complexes and the histone modifications they catalyze; however, the degree to which NSL and MLL/SET influence one another's activities remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from biochemical assays and knockdown/overexpression approaches arguing that the NSL HAT promotes histone H3K4me2 by MLL/SET complexes by an acetylation-dependent mechanism. In genomic experiments, we identified a set of genes including ANKRD2, that are affected by knockdown of both NSL and MLL/SET subunits, suggested they are co-regulated by NSL and MLL/SET complexes. In ChIP assays, we observe that depletion of the NSL subunits hMOF or NSL1 resulted in a significant reduction of both H4K16ac and H3K4me2 in the vicinity of the ANKRD2 transcriptional start site proximal region. However, depletion of RbBP5 (a core component of MLL/SET complexes) only reduced H3K4me2 marks, but not H4K16ac in the same region of ANKRD2, consistent with the idea that NSL acts upstream of MLL/SET to regulate H3K4me2 at certain promoters, suggesting coordination between NSL and MLL/SET complexes is involved in transcriptional regulation of certain genes. Taken together, our results suggest a crosstalk between the NSL and MLL

  16. Not All H3K4 Methylations Are Created Equal: Mll2/COMPASS Dependency in Primordial Germ Cell Specification.

    PubMed

    Hu, Deqing; Gao, Xin; Cao, Kaixiang; Morgan, Marc A; Mas, Gloria; Smith, Edwin R; Volk, Andrew G; Bartom, Elizabeth T; Crispino, John D; Di Croce, Luciano; Shilatifard, Ali

    2017-02-02

    The spatiotemporal regulation of gene expression is central for cell-lineage specification during embryonic development and is achieved through the combinatorial action of transcription factors/co-factors and epigenetic states at cis-regulatory elements. Here, we show that in addition to implementing H3K4me3 at promoters of bivalent genes, Mll2 (KMT2B)/COMPASS can also implement H3K4me3 at a subset of non-TSS regulatory elements, a subset of which shares epigenetic signatures of active enhancers. Our mechanistic studies reveal that association of Mll2's CXXC domain with CpG-rich regions plays an instrumental role for chromatin targeting and subsequent implementation of H3K4me3. Although Mll2/COMPASS is required for H3K4me3 implementation on thousands of loci, generation of catalytically mutant MLL2/COMPASS demonstrated that H3K4me3 implemented by this enzyme was essential for expression of a subset of genes, including those functioning in the control of transcriptional programs during embryonic development. Our findings suggest that not all H3K4 trimethylations implemented by MLL2/COMPASS are functionally equivalent.

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia induced by MLL-ENL is cured by oncogene ablation despite acquisition of complex genetic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Horton, Sarah J; Walf-Vorderwülbecke, Vanessa; Chatters, Steve J; Sebire, Neil J; de Boer, Jasper; Williams, Owen

    2009-05-14

    Chromosomal translocations involving 11q23 are frequent in infant acute leukemia and give rise to the formation of MLL fusion genes. The mechanism of leukemic transformation by these fusions has been the subject of numerous investigations. However, the dependence of acute leukemia on MLL fusion activity in vivo and the efficacy of targeting this activity to eliminate disease have not been established. We have developed a model for conditional expression of MLL-ENL in hematopoietic progenitor cells, in which expression of the fusion oncogene is turned off by doxycycline. Conditionally immortalized myeloblast cells derived from these progenitors were found to induce leukemia in vivo. Leukemic cells isolated from primary recipient mice were shown to have acquired additional genetic abnormalities and, when transplanted into secondary recipients, induced leukemia with shortened latencies. However, the leukemic cells remained dependent on MLL-ENL expression in vitro and in vivo, and its ablation resulted in regression of established leukemias. This study demonstrates that even genetically complex leukemias can be reversed on inactivation of the initiating MLL fusion and has important implications for the design of novel leukemia therapies.

  18. Somatic cancer mutations in the MLL1 histone methyltransferase modulate its enzymatic activity and dependence on the WDR5/RBBP5/ASH2L complex.

    PubMed

    Weirich, Sara; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Jeltsch, Albert

    2017-02-09

    Somatic missense mutations in the MLL1 histone H3K4 methyltransferase are often observed in cancers. MLL1 forms a complex with WDR5, RBBP5 and ASH2L (WRA) which stimulates its activity. The MM-102 compound prevents the interaction between MLL1 and WDR5 and functions as an MLL1 inhibitor. We have studied the effects of four cancer mutations in the catalytic SET domain of MLL1 on the enzymatic activity of MLL1 and MLL1-WRA complexes. In addition, we studied the interaction of the MLL1 mutants with the WRA proteins and inhibition of MLL1-WRA complexes by MM-102. All four investigated mutations had strong effects on the activity of MLL1. R3903H was inactive and S3865F showed reduced activity both alone and in complex with WRA, but its activity was stimulated by the WRA complex. By contrast, R3864C and R3841W were both more active than wildtype MLL1, but still less active than the wildtype MLL1-WRA complex. Both mutants were not stimulated by complex formation with WRA, although no differences in the interaction with the complex proteins were observed. These results indicate that both mutants are in an active conformation even in the absence of the WRA complex and their normal control of activity by the WRA complex is altered. In agreement with this observation, the activity of R3864C and R3841W was not reduced by addition of the MM-102 inhibitor. We show that different cancer mutations in MLL1 lead to a loss or increase in activity, illustrating the complex and tumor-specific role of MLL1 in carcinogenesis. Our data exemplify that biochemical investigations of somatic tumor mutations are required to decipher their pathological role. Moreover, our data indicate that MM-102 may not be used as an MLL1 inhibitor if the R3864C and R3841W mutations are present. More generally, efficacy of any enzyme inhibitor must be experimentally confirmed for mutant enzymes before an application can be considered. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Pro Isomerization in MLL1 PHD3-Bromo Cassette Connects H3K4me Readout to CyP33 and HDAC-Mediated Repression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhanxin; Song, Jikui; Milne, Thomas A.; Wang, Gang G.; Li, Haitao; Allis, C. David; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2010-09-13

    The MLL1 gene is a frequent target for recurrent chromosomal translocations, resulting in transformation of hematopoietic precursors into leukemia stem cells. Here, we report on structure-function studies that elucidate molecular events in MLL1 binding of histone H3K4me3/2 marks and recruitment of the cyclophilin CyP33. CyP33 contains a PPIase and a RRM domain and regulates MLL1 function through HDAC recruitment. We find that the PPIase domain of CyP33 regulates the conformation of MLL1 through proline isomerization within the PHD3-Bromo linker, thereby disrupting the PHD3-Bromo interface and facilitating binding of the MLL1-PHD3 domain to the CyP33-RRM domain. H3K4me3/2 and CyP33-RRM target different surfaces of MLL1-PHD3 and can bind simultaneously to form a ternary complex. Furthermore, the MLL1-CyP33 interaction is required for repression of HOXA9 and HOXC8 genes in vivo. Our results highlight the role of PHD3-Bromo cassette as a regulatory platform, orchestrating MLL1 binding of H3K4me3/2 marks and cyclophilin-mediated repression through HDAC recruitment.

  20. The CDK9 Inhibitor Dinaciclib Exerts Potent Apoptotic and Antitumor Effects in Preclinical Models of MLL-Rearranged Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baker, Adele; Gregory, Gareth P; Verbrugge, Inge; Kats, Lev; Hilton, Joshua J; Vidacs, Eva; Lee, Erwin M; Lock, Richard B; Zuber, Johannes; Shortt, Jake; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2016-03-01

    Translocations of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene occur in 60% to 80% of all infant acute leukemias and are markers of poor prognosis. MLL-AF9 and other MLL fusion proteins aberrantly recruit epigenetic regulatory proteins, including histone deacetylases (HDAC), histone methyltransferases, bromodomain-containing proteins, and transcription elongation factors to mediate chromatin remodeling and regulate tumorigenic gene expression programs. We conducted a small-molecule inhibitor screen to test the ability of candidate pharmacologic agents targeting epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins to induce apoptosis in leukemic cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of MLL-AF9-driven acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found that the CDK inhibitor dinaciclib and HDAC inhibitor panobinostat were the most potent inducers of apoptosis in short-term in vitro assays. Treatment of MLL-rearranged leukemic cells with dinaciclib resulted in rapidly decreased expression of the prosurvival protein Mcl-1, and accordingly, overexpression of Mcl-1 protected AML cells from dinaciclib-induced apoptosis. Administration of dinaciclib to mice bearing MLL-AF9-driven human and mouse leukemias elicited potent antitumor responses and significantly prolonged survival. Collectively, these studies highlight a new therapeutic approach to potentially overcome the resistance of MLL-rearranged AML to conventional chemotherapies and prompt further clinical evaluation of CDK inhibitors in AML patients harboring MLL fusion proteins.

  1. ARID5B polymorphism confers an increased risk to acquire specific MLL rearrangements in early childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia in early age (EAL) is characterized by acquired genetic alterations such as MLL rearrangements (MLL-r). The aim of this case-controlled study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IKZF1, ARID5B, and CEBPE could be related to the onset of EAL cases (<24 months-old at diagnosis). Methods The SNPs (IKZF1 rs11978267, ARID5B rs10821936 and rs10994982, CEBPE rs2239633) were genotyped in 265 cases [169 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 96 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)] and 505 controls by Taqman allelic discrimination assay. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between SNPs of cases and controls, adjusted on skin color and/or age. The risk was determined by calculating odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Children with the IKZF1 SNP had an increased risk of developing MLL-germline ALL in white children. The heterozygous/mutant genotype in ARID5B rs10994982 significantly increased the risk for MLL-germline leukemia in white and non-white children (OR 2.60, 95% CI: 1.09-6.18 and OR 3.55, 95% CI: 1.57-8.68, respectively). The heterozygous genotype in ARID5B rs10821936 increased the risk for MLL-r leukemia in both white and non-white (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.12-3.79 and OR 2.36, 95% CI: 1.09-5.10, respectively). Furthermore, ARID5B rs10821936 conferred increased risk for MLL-MLLT3 positive cases (OR 7.10, 95% CI:1.54-32.68). Our data do not show evidence that CEBPE rs2239633 confers increased genetic susceptibility to EAL. Conclusions IKZF1 and CEBPE variants seem to play a minor role in genetic susceptibility to EAL, while ARID5B rs10821936 increased the risk of MLL-MLLT3. This result shows that genetic susceptibility could be associated with the differences regarding MLL breakpoints and partner genes. PMID:24564228

  2. Nm-scale spatial resolution x-ray imaging with MLL nanofocusing optics: instrumentational requirements and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaretski, E.; Yan, H.; Lauer, K.; Huang, X.; Xu, W.; Kalbfleisch, S.; Yan, Hui; Li, Li; Bouet, N.; Zhou, J.; Shu, D.; Conley, R.; Chu, Y. S.

    2016-08-30

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline at NSLS-II has been designed and constructed to enable imaging experiments with unprecedented spatial resolution and detection sensitivity. The HXN X-ray Microscope is a key instrument for the beamline, providing a suite of experimental capabilities which includes scanning fluorescence, diffraction, differential phase contrast and ptychography utilizing Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLL) and zoneplate (ZP) as nanofocusing optics. In this paper, we present technical requirements for the MLL-based scanning microscope, outline the development concept and present first ~15 x 15 nm2 spatial resolution x-ray fluorescence images.

  3. Smyd2 is a Myc-regulated gene critical for MLL-AF9 induced leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bagislar, Sevgi; Sabò, Arianna; Kress, Theresia R.; Doni, Mirko; Nicoli, Paola; Campaner, Stefano; Amati, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    The Smyd2 protein (Set- and Mynd domain containing protein 2) is a methyl-transferase that can modify both histones and cytoplasmic proteins. Smyd2 is over-expressed in several cancer types and was shown to be limiting for tumor development in the pancreas. However, genetic evidence for a role of Smyd2 in other cancers or in mouse development was missing to date. Using germ line-deleted mouse strains, we now show that Smyd2 and the related protein Smyd3 are dispensable for normal development. Ablation of Smyd2 did not affect hematopoiesis, but retarded the development of leukemia promoted by MLL-AF9, a fusion oncogene associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in humans. Smyd2-deleted leukemic cells showed a competitive disadvantage relative to wild-type cells, either in vitro or in vivo. The Smyd2 gene was directly activated by the oncogenic transcription factor Myc in either MLL9-AF9-induced leukemias, Myc-induced lymphomas, or fibroblasts. However, unlike leukemias, the development of lymphomas was not dependent upon Smyd2. Our data indicate that Smyd2 has a critical role downstream of Myc in AML. PMID:27655694

  4. Loss of Dnmt3b accelerates MLL-AF9 leukemia progression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y; Zhang, H; Wang, Y; Li, X; Lu, P; Dong, F; Pang, Y; Ma, S; Cheng, H; Hao, S; Tang, F; Yuan, W; Zhang, X; Cheng, T

    2016-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous hematopoietic disorder with a poor prognosis. Abnormal DNA methylation is involved in the initiation and progression of AML. The de novo methyltransferases Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b are responsible for the generation of genomic methylation patterns. While DNMT3A is frequently mutated in hematological malignancies, DNMT3B is rarely mutated. Although it has been previously reported that Dnmt3b functions as a tumor suppressor in a mouse model of Myc-induced lymphomagenesis, its function in AML is yet to be determined. In this study, we demonstrated that deletion of Dnmt3b accelerated the progression of MLL-AF9 leukemia by increasing stemness and enhancing cell cycle progression. Gene profiling analysis revealed upregulation of the oncogenic gene set and downregulation of the cell differentiation gene set. Furthermore, loss of Dnmt3b was able to synergize with Dnmt3a deficiency in leukemia development. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Dnmt3b plays a tumor suppressive role in MLL-AF9 AML progression, thereby providing new insights into the roles of DNA methylation in leukemia development.

  5. Development Refractoriness of MLL-Rearranged Human B Cell Acute Leukemias to Reprogramming into Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, Alvaro; Romero-Moya, Damià; Prieto, Cristina; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Agraz-Doblas, Antonio; Varela, Ignacio; Buschbeck, Marcus; Palau, Anna; Carvajal-Vergara, Xonia; Giorgetti, Alessandra; Ford, Anthony; Lako, Majlinda; Granada, Isabel; Ruiz-Xivillé, Neus; Rodríguez-Perales, Sandra; Torres-Ruíz, Raul; Stam, Ronald W; Fuster, Jose Luis; Fraga, Mario F; Nakanishi, Mahito; Cazzaniga, Gianni; Bardini, Michela; Cobo, Isabel; Bayon, Gustavo F; Fernandez, Agustin F; Bueno, Clara; Menendez, Pablo

    2016-10-11

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a powerful tool for disease modeling. They are routinely generated from healthy donors and patients from multiple cell types at different developmental stages. However, reprogramming leukemias is an extremely inefficient process. Few studies generated iPSCs from primary chronic myeloid leukemias, but iPSC generation from acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemias (ALL) has not been achieved. We attempted to generate iPSCs from different subtypes of B-ALL to address the developmental impact of leukemic fusion genes. OKSM(L)-expressing mono/polycistronic-, retroviral/lentiviral/episomal-, and Sendai virus vector-based reprogramming strategies failed to render iPSCs in vitro and in vivo. Addition of transcriptomic-epigenetic reprogramming "boosters" also failed to generate iPSCs from B cell blasts and B-ALL lines, and when iPSCs emerged they lacked leukemic fusion genes, demonstrating non-leukemic myeloid origin. Conversely, MLL-AF4-overexpressing hematopoietic stem cells/B progenitors were successfully reprogrammed, indicating that B cell origin and leukemic fusion gene were not reprogramming barriers. Global transcriptome/DNA methylome profiling suggested a developmental/differentiation refractoriness of MLL-rearranged B-ALL to reprogramming into pluripotency.

  6. The Broken MLL Gene Is Frequently Located Outside the Inherent Chromosome Territory in Human Lymphoid Cells Treated with DNA Topoisomerase II Poison Etoposide

    PubMed Central

    Glukhov, Sergey I.; Rubtsov, Mikhail A.; Alexeyevsky, Daniil A.; Alexeevski, Andrei V.; Razin, Sergey V.; Iarovaia, Olga V.

    2013-01-01

    The mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) gene is frequently rearranged in secondary leukaemias, in which it could fuse to a variety of different partners. Breakage in the MLL gene preferentially occurs within a ~8 kb region that possesses a strong DNA topoisomerase II cleavage site. It has been proposed that DNA topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage within this and other regions triggers translocations that occur due to incorrect joining of broken DNA ends. To further clarify a possible mechanism for MLL rearrangements, we analysed the frequency of MLL cleavage in cells exposed to etoposide, a DNA topoisomerase II poison commonly used as an anticancer drug, and positioning of the broken 3’-end of the MLL gene in respect to inherent chromosomal territories. It was demonstrated that exposure of human Jurkat cells to etoposide resulted in frequent cleavage of MLL genes. Using MLL-specific break-apart probes we visualised cleaved MLL genes in ~17% of nuclei. Using confocal microscopy and 3D modelling, we demonstrated that in cells treated with etoposide and cultivated for 1 h under normal conditions, ~9% of the broken MLL alleles were present outside the chromosome 11 territory, whereas in both control cells and cells inspected immediately after etoposide treatment, virtually all MLL alleles were present within the chromosomal territory. The data are discussed in the framework of the “breakage first” model of juxtaposing translocation partners. We propose that in the course of repairing DNA topoisomerase II-mediated DNA lesions (removal of stalled DNA topoisomerase II complexes and non-homologous end joining), DNA ends acquire additional mobility, which allows the meeting and incorrect joining of translocation partners. PMID:24086652

  7. Frequencies and prognostic impact of RAS mutations in MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants

    PubMed Central

    Driessen, Emma M.C.; van Roon, Eddy H.J.; Spijkers-Hagelstein, Jill A.P.; Schneider, Pauline; de Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants represents an aggressive malignancy associated with a high incidence (approx. 80%) of translocations involving the Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) gene. Attempts to mimic Mixed Lineage Leukemia fusion driven leukemogenesis in mice raised the question whether these fusion proteins require secondary hits. RAS mutations are suggested as candidates. Earlier results on the incidence of RAS mutations in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia are inconclusive. Therefore, we studied frequencies and relation with clinical parameters of RAS mutations in a large cohort of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Using conventional sequencing analysis, we screened neuroblastoma RAS viral (v-ras) oncogene homolog gene (NRAS), v-Ki-ras Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog gene (KRAS), and v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 gene (BRAF) for mutations in a large cohort (n=109) of infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients and studied the mutations in relation to several clinical parameters, and in relation to Homeobox gene A9 expression and the presence of ALL1 fused gene 4-Mixed Lineage Leukemia (AF4-MLL). Mutations were detected in approximately 14% of all cases, with a higher frequency of approximately 24% in t(4;11)-positive patients (P=0.04). Furthermore, we identified RAS mutations as an independent predictor (P=0.019) for poor outcome in Mixed Lineage Leukemia-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia, with a hazard ratio of 3.194 (95% confidence interval (CI):1.211–8.429). Also, RAS-mutated infants have higher white blood cell counts at diagnosis (P=0.013), and are more resistant to glucocorticoids in vitro (P<0.05). Finally, we demonstrate that RAS mutations, and not the lack of Homeobox gene A9 expression nor the expression of AF4-MLL are associated with poor outcome in t(4;11)-rearranged infants. We conclude that the presence of RAS mutations in Mixed Lineage Leukemia

  8. Deciphering KRAS and NRAS mutated clone dynamics in MLL-AF4 paediatric leukaemia by ultra deep sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Trentin, Luca; Bresolin, Silvia; Giarin, Emanuela; Bardini, Michela; Serafin, Valentina; Accordi, Benedetta; Fais, Franco; Tenca, Claudya; De Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Kronnie, Geertruy Te; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-10-04

    To induce and sustain the leukaemogenic process, MLL-AF4+ leukaemia seems to require very few genetic alterations in addition to the fusion gene itself. Studies of infant and paediatric patients with MLL-AF4+ B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) have reported mutations in KRAS and NRAS with incidences ranging from 25 to 50%. Whereas previous studies employed Sanger sequencing, here we used next generation amplicon deep sequencing for in depth evaluation of RAS mutations in 36 paediatric patients at diagnosis of MLL-AF4+ leukaemia. RAS mutations including those in small sub-clones were detected in 63.9% of patients. Furthermore, the mutational analysis of 17 paired samples at diagnosis and relapse revealed complex RAS clone dynamics and showed that the mutated clones present at relapse were almost all originated from clones that were already detectable at diagnosis and survived to the initial therapy. Finally, we showed that mutated patients were indeed characterized by a RAS related signature at both transcriptional and protein levels and that the targeting of the RAS pathway could be of beneficial for treatment of MLL-AF4+ BCP-ALL clones carrying somatic RAS mutations.

  9. Deciphering KRAS and NRAS mutated clone dynamics in MLL-AF4 paediatric leukaemia by ultra deep sequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, Luca; Bresolin, Silvia; Giarin, Emanuela; Bardini, Michela; Serafin, Valentina; Accordi, Benedetta; Fais, Franco; Tenca, Claudya; De Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Kronnie, Geertruy te; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    To induce and sustain the leukaemogenic process, MLL-AF4+ leukaemia seems to require very few genetic alterations in addition to the fusion gene itself. Studies of infant and paediatric patients with MLL-AF4+ B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) have reported mutations in KRAS and NRAS with incidences ranging from 25 to 50%. Whereas previous studies employed Sanger sequencing, here we used next generation amplicon deep sequencing for in depth evaluation of RAS mutations in 36 paediatric patients at diagnosis of MLL-AF4+ leukaemia. RAS mutations including those in small sub-clones were detected in 63.9% of patients. Furthermore, the mutational analysis of 17 paired samples at diagnosis and relapse revealed complex RAS clone dynamics and showed that the mutated clones present at relapse were almost all originated from clones that were already detectable at diagnosis and survived to the initial therapy. Finally, we showed that mutated patients were indeed characterized by a RAS related signature at both transcriptional and protein levels and that the targeting of the RAS pathway could be of beneficial for treatment of MLL-AF4+ BCP-ALL clones carrying somatic RAS mutations. PMID:27698462

  10. Exome sequencing identifies frequent mutation of MLL2 in non–small cell lung carcinoma from Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shanye; Yang, Jing; Lin, Bin; Deng, Wenjun; Zhang, Yuchao; Yi, Xianfu; Shi, Yufang; Tao, Yong; Cai, Jun; Wu, Chung-I; Zhao, Guoping; Hurst, Laurence D.; Zhang, Jie; Hu, Landian; Kong, Xiangyin

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide, with an estimated 1.4 million deaths each year. Here we report whole-exome sequencing of nine tumor/normal tissue pairs from Chinese patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). This allows us to identify a number of significantly mutated genes in NSCLC, which were highly enriched in DNA damage repair, NF-κB pathway, JAK/STAT signaling and chromatin modification. Notably, we identify a histone-lysine methyltransferase gene, namely, MLL2, as one of the most significantly mutated genes in our screen. In a following validation study, we identify deleterious mutations of MLL2 in 12 out of 105 (11.4%) NSCLC patients. Additionally, reduced or lost expression of MLL2 was commonly observed in tumor tissues as compared with paired adjacent non-tumor tissues regardless of mutation status. Together, our study defines the landscape of somatic mutations in Chinese NSCLC and supports the role of MLL2 mutation in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25112956

  11. Diverse functions of PHD fingers of the MLL/KMT2 subfamily.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muzaffar; Hom, Robert A; Blakeslee, Weston; Ikenouye, Larissa; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2014-02-01

    Five members of the KMT2 family of lysine methyltransferases, originally named the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL1-5) proteins, regulate gene expression during embryogenesis and development. Each KMT2A-E contains a catalytic SET domain that methylates lysine 4 of histone H3, and one or several PHD fingers. Over the past few years a growing number of studies have uncovered diverse biological roles of the KMT2A-E PHD fingers, implicating them in binding to methylated histones and other nuclear proteins, and in mediating the E3 ligase activity and dimerization. Mutations in the PHD fingers or deletion of these modules are linked to human diseases including cancer and Kabuki syndrome. In this work, we summarize recently identified biological functions of the KMT2A-E PHD fingers, discuss mechanisms of their action, and examine preference of these domains for histone and non-histone ligands.

  12. High-Affinity Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Menin-Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Interaction Closely Mimic a Natural Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shihan; Senter, Timothy J.; Pollock, Jonathan; Han, Changho; Upadhyay, Sunil Kumar; Purohit, Trupta; Gogliotti, Rocco D.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2014-10-02

    The protein–protein interaction (PPI) between menin and mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) plays a critical role in acute leukemias, and inhibition of this interaction represents a new potential therapeutic strategy for MLL leukemias. We report development of a novel class of small-molecule inhibitors of the menin–MLL interaction, the hydroxy- and aminomethylpiperidine compounds, which originated from HTS of ~288000 small molecules. We determined menin–inhibitor co-crystal structures and found that these compounds closely mimic all key interactions of MLL with menin. Extensive crystallography studies combined with structure-based design were applied for optimization of these compounds, resulting in MIV-6R, which inhibits the menin–MLL interaction with IC50 = 56 nM. Treatment with MIV-6 demonstrated strong and selective effects in MLL leukemia cells, validating specific mechanism of action. Our studies provide novel and attractive scaffold as a new potential therapeutic approach for MLL leukemias and demonstrate an example of PPI amenable to inhibition by small molecules.

  13. AF4 uses the SL1 components of RNAP1 machinery to initiate MLL fusion- and AEP-dependent transcription

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Hiroshi; Kanai, Akinori; Ito, Shinji; Matsui, Hirotaka; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Gene rearrangements generate MLL fusion genes, which can lead to aggressive leukemia. In most cases, MLL fuses with a gene encoding a component of the AEP (AF4 family/ENL family/P-TEFb) coactivator complex. MLL–AEP fusion proteins constitutively activate their target genes to immortalize haematopoietic progenitors. Here we show that AEP and MLL–AEP fusion proteins activate transcription through selectivity factor 1 (SL1), a core component of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) of RNA polymerase I (RNAP1). The pSER domain of AF4 family proteins associates with SL1 on chromatin and loads TATA-binding protein (TBP) onto the promoter to initiate RNA polymerase II (RNAP2)-dependent transcription. These results reveal a previously unknown transcription initiation mechanism involving AEP and a role for SL1 as a TBP-loading factor in RNAP2-dependent gene activation. PMID:26593443

  14. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, D Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-10-20

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML.

  15. The Human Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5), a Sequentially and Structurally Divergent SET Domain-Containing Protein with No Intrinsic Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Teyssier, Catherine; Déméné, Hélène; Carvalho, João E.; Bird, Louise E.; Lebedev, Andrey; Fattori, Juliana; Schubert, Michael; Dumas, Christian; Bourguet, William; le Maire, Albane

    2016-01-01

    Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) plays a key role in hematopoiesis, spermatogenesis and cell cycle progression. Chromatin binding is ensured by its plant homeodomain (PHD) through a direct interaction with the N-terminus of histone H3 (H3). In addition, MLL5 contains a Su(var)3-9, Enhancer of zeste, Trithorax (SET) domain, a protein module that usually displays histone lysine methyltransferase activity. We report here the crystal structure of the unliganded SET domain of human MLL5 at 2.1 Å resolution. Although it shows most of the canonical features of other SET domains, both the lack of key residues and the presence in the SET-I subdomain of an unusually large loop preclude the interaction of MLL5 SET with its cofactor and substrate. Accordingly, we show that MLL5 is devoid of any in vitro methyltransferase activity on full-length histones and histone H3 peptides. Hence, the three dimensional structure of MLL5 SET domain unveils the structural basis for its lack of methyltransferase activity and suggests a new regulatory mechanism. PMID:27812132

  16. MLL Histone Methylases Regulate Expression of HDLR-SR-B1 in Presence of Estrogen and Control Plasma Cholesterol in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Kasiri, Sahba; Hussain, Imran; Bobzean, Samara A. Morris; Perrotti, Linda I.

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein receptors scavenger receptor class B type I [HDLR-SR-B1 (SR-B1)] is a key player in reverse cholesterol transport and maintaining blood cholesterol. We demonstrated that human SR-B1 is transcriptionally activated by 17β-estradiol (E2) in HEPG2 and JAR cells. SR-B1 promoter contains multiple estrogen response elements (ERE half-sites) along with some Sp1 binding sites. Knockdown of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ down-regulated E2-induced SR-B1 expression. ERs were bound to SR-B1 promoter EREs in an E2-dependent manner. Along with ERs, mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) histone methylases, especially MLL1 and MLL2, play key roles in E2-mediated SR-B1 activation. MLL1 and MLL2 bind to SR-B1 promoter in an E2-dependent manner and control the assembly of transcription pre-initiation complex and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment. ERs and MLLs play critical roles in determining the cholesterol uptake by steroidogenic tissues/cells, and their knockdown suppressed the E2-induced cholesterol uptake efficiencies of the cells. Intriguingly, MLL2 knockdown in mice resulted in a 33% increase in plasma cholesterol level and also reduced SR-B1 expression in mice liver, demonstrating its crucial functions in controlling plasma cholesterol in vivo. PMID:23192982

  17. Targeting recruitment of disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like (DOT1L): characterizing the interactions between DOT1L and mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenxi; Jo, Stephanie Y; Liao, Chenzhong; Hess, Jay L; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta

    2013-10-18

    The MLL fusion proteins, AF9 and ENL, activate target genes in part via recruitment of the histone methyltransferase DOT1L (disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like). Here we report biochemical, biophysical, and functional characterization of the interaction between DOT1L and MLL fusion proteins, AF9/ENL. The AF9/ENL-binding site in human DOT1L was mapped, and the interaction site was identified to a 10-amino acid region (DOT1L865-874). This region is highly conserved in DOT1L from a variety of species. Alanine scanning mutagenesis analysis shows that four conserved hydrophobic residues from the identified binding motif are essential for the interactions with AF9/ENL. Binding studies demonstrate that the entire intact C-terminal domain of AF9/ENL is required for optimal interaction with DOT1L. Functional studies show that the mapped AF9/ENL interacting site is essential for immortalization by MLL-AF9, indicating that DOT1L interaction with MLL-AF9 and its recruitment are required for transformation by MLL-AF9. These results strongly suggest that disruption of interaction between DOT1L and AF9/ENL is a promising therapeutic strategy with potentially fewer adverse effects than enzymatic inhibition of DOT1L for MLL fusion protein-associated leukemia.

  18. Fine-tuning the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by a histone H3-based peptide mimetic

    SciTech Connect

    Avdic, Vanja; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Voronova, Anastassia; Skerjanc, Ilona; Couture, Jean-Francois

    2011-08-24

    The SET1 family of methyltransferases carries out the bulk of histone H3 Lys-4 methylation in vivo. One of the common features of this family is the regulation of their methyltransferase activity by a tripartite complex composed of WDR5, RbBP5, and Ash2L. To selectively probe the role of the SET1 family of methyltransferases, we have developed a library of histone H3 peptide mimetics and report herein the characterization of an N{alpha} acetylated form of histone H3 peptide (N{alpha}H3). Binding and inhibition studies reveal that the addition of an acetyl moiety to the N terminus of histone H3 significantly enhances its binding to WDR5 and prevents the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by the WDR5-RbBP5-Ash2L complex. The crystal structure of N{alpha}H3 in complex with WDR5 reveals that a high-affinity hydrophobic pocket accommodates the binding of the acetyl moiety. These results provide the structural basis to control WDR5-RbBP5-Ash2L-MLL1 activity and a tool to manipulate stem cell differentiation programs.-Avdic, V., Zhang, P., Lanouette, S., Voronova, A., Skerjanc, I., Couture, J.-F. Fine-tuning the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by a histone H3-based peptide mimetic.

  19. Histone H3 Recogntion and Presentation by the WDR5 Module of the MLL1 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Ruthenburg,A.; Wang, W.; Graybosch, D.; Li, H.; Allis, D.; Patel, D.; Verdine, G.

    2006-01-01

    WDR5 is a core component of SET1-family complexes that achieve transcriptional activation via methylation of histone H3 on Nzeta of Lys4 (H3K4). The role of WDR5 in the MLL1 complex has recently been described as specific recognition of dimethyl-K4 in the context of a histone H3 amino terminus; WDR5 is essential for vertebrate development, Hox gene activation and global H3K4 trimethylation. We report the high-resolution X-ray structures of WDR5 in the unliganded form and complexed with histone H3 peptides having unmodified and mono-, di- and trimethylated K4, which together provide the first comprehensive analysis of methylated histone recognition by the ubiquitous WD40-repeat fold. Contrary to predictions, the structures reveal that WDR5 does not read out the methylation state of K4 directly, but instead serves to present the K4 side chain for further methylation by SET1-family complexes.

  20. SON and its alternatively spliced isoforms control MLL complex-mediated H3K4me3 and transcription of leukemia-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Baddoo, Melody C.; Park, Eun Young; Stone, Joshua K.; Park, Hyeonsoo; Butler, Thomas W.; Huang, Gang; Yan, Xiaomei; Pauli-Behn, Florencia; Myers, Richard M.; Tan, Ming; Flemington, Erik K.; Lim, Ssang-Taek; Erin Ahn, Eun-Young

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Dysregulation of MLL complex-mediated histone methylation plays a pivotal role in gene expression associated with diseases, but little is known about cellular factors modulating MLL complex activity. Here, we report that SON, previously known as an RNA splicing factor, controls MLL complex-mediated transcriptional initiation. SON binds to DNA near transcription start sites, interacts with menin, and inhibits MLL complex assembly, resulting in decreased H3K4me3 and transcriptional repression. Importantly, alternatively spliced short isoforms of SON are markedly upregulated in acute myeloid leukemia. The short isoforms compete with full-length SON for chromatin occupancy, but lack the menin-binding ability, thereby antagonizing full-length SON function in transcriptional repression while not impairing full-length SON-mediated RNA splicing. Furthermore, overexpression of a short isoform of SON enhances replating potential of hematopoietic progenitors. Our findings define SON as a fine-tuner of the MLL-menin interaction and reveal short SON overexpression as a marker indicating aberrant transcriptional initiation in leukemia. PMID:26990989

  1. A role for Set1/MLL-related components in epigenetic regulation of the Caenorhabditis elegans germ line.

    PubMed

    Li, Tengguo; Kelly, William G

    2011-03-01

    The methylation of lysine 4 of Histone H3 (H3K4me) is an important component of epigenetic regulation. H3K4 methylation is a consequence of transcriptional activity, but also has been shown to contribute to "epigenetic memory"; i.e., it can provide a heritable landmark of previous transcriptional activity that may help promote or maintain such activity in subsequent cell descendants or lineages. A number of multi-protein complexes that control the addition of H3K4me have been described in several organisms. These Set1/MLL or COMPASS complexes often share a common subset of conserved proteins, with other components potentially contributing to tissue-specific or developmental regulation of the methyltransferase activity. Here we show that the normal maintenance of H3K4 di- and tri-methylation in the germ line of Caenorhabditis elegans is dependent on homologs of the Set1/MLL complex components WDR-5.1 and RBBP-5. Different methylation states that are each dependent on wdr-5.1 and rbbp-5 require different methyltransferases. In addition, different subsets of conserved Set1/MLL-like complex components appear to be required for H3K4 methylation in germ cells and somatic lineages at different developmental stages. In adult germ cells, mutations in wdr-5.1 or rbbp-5 dramatically affect both germ line stem cell (GSC) population size and proper germ cell development. RNAi knockdown of RNA Polymerase II does not significantly affect the wdr-5.1-dependent maintenance of H3K4 methylation in either early embryos or adult GSCs, suggesting that the mechanism is not obligately coupled to transcription in these cells. A separate, wdr-5.1-independent mode of H3K4 methylation correlates more directly with transcription in the adult germ line and in embryos. Our results indicate that H3K4 methylation in the germline is regulated by a combination of Set1/MLL component-dependent and -independent modes of epigenetic establishment and maintenance.

  2. Pygo2 functions as a prognostic factor for glioma due to its up-regulation of H3K4me3 and promotion of MLL1/MLL2 complex recruitment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cefan; Zhang, Yi; Dai, Jun; Zhou, Mengzhou; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yefu; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Tang, Jingfeng

    2016-02-23

    Pygo2 has been discovered as an important Wnt signaling component contributing to the activation of Wnt-target gene transcription. In the present study, we discovered that Pygo2 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the majority of (152/209) human brain glioma tissues and five glioma cell lines, and significantly correlated with the age, the WHO tumor classification and poor patient survival. The histone methyltransferase complex components (WDR5, Ash2, and menin, but not CXCC1 or NCOA6) were down-regulated at the promoter loci of Wnt target genes after Pygo2 knockdown, and this was accompanied by the down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Further, we demonstrated that the involvement of Pygo2 in the activation of the Wnt pathway in human glioma progression is through up-regulation of the H3K4me3 (but not H3K4me2) by promoting the recruitment of the histone methyltransferase MLL1/MLL2 complex to Wnt target gene promoters. Thus, our study provided evidence that Pygo2 functions as a novel prognostic marker and represents a potential therapeutic target.

  3. MLL5 Orchestrates a Cancer Self-Renewal State by Repressing the Histone Variant H3.3 and Globally Reorganizing Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco; Coutinho, Fiona J; Vanner, Robert J; Gayden, Tenzin; Mack, Stephen C; Murison, Alex; Remke, Marc; Li, Ren; Takayama, Naoya; Desai, Kinjal; Lee, Lilian; Lan, Xiaoyang; Park, Nicole I; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Smil, David; Sturm, Dominik; Kushida, Michelle M; Head, Renee; Cusimano, Michael D; Bernstein, Mark; Clarke, Ian D; Dick, John E; Pfister, Stefan M; Rich, Jeremy N; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Taylor, Michael D; Jabado, Nada; Bazett-Jones, David P; Lupien, Mathieu; Dirks, Peter B

    2015-12-14

    Mutations in the histone 3 variant H3.3 have been identified in one-third of pediatric glioblastomas (GBMs), but not in adult tumors. Here we show that H3.3 is a dynamic determinant of functional properties in adult GBM. H3.3 is repressed by mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) in self-renewing GBM cells. MLL5 is a global epigenetic repressor that orchestrates reorganization of chromatin structure by punctuating chromosomes with foci of compacted chromatin, favoring tumorigenic and self-renewing properties. Conversely, H3.3 antagonizes self-renewal and promotes differentiation. We exploited these epigenetic states to rationally identify two small molecules that effectively curb cancer stem cell properties in a preclinical model. Our work uncovers a role for MLL5 and H3.3 in maintaining self-renewal hierarchies in adult GBM.

  4. Morus alba Leaf Lectin (MLL) Sensitizes MCF-7 Cells to Anoikis by Inhibiting Fibronectin Mediated Integrin-FAK Signaling through Ras and Activation of P38 MAPK

    PubMed Central

    Saranya, Jayaram; Shilpa, Ganesan; Raghu, Kozhiparambil G.; Priya, Sulochana

    2017-01-01

    Lectins are a unique class of carbohydrate binding proteins/glycoproteins, and many of them possess anticancer properties. They can induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, inhibit protein synthesis, telomerase activity and angiogenesis in cancer cells. In the present study, we have demonstrated the effect of Morus alba leaf lectin (MLL) on anoikis induction in MCF-7 cells. Anoikis induction in cancer cells has a significant role in preventing early stage metastasis. MLL treatment in monolayers of MCF-7 cells caused significant detachment of cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. The detached cells failed to re-adhere and grew even to culture plates coated with different matrix proteins. DNA fragmentation, membrane integrity studies, annexin V staining, caspase 9 activation and upregulation of Bax/Bad confirmed that the detached cells underwent apoptosis. Upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) caused a decrease in fibronectin (FN) production which facilitated the cells to detach by blocking the FN mediated downstream signaling. On treatment with MLL, we have observed downregulation of integrin expression, decreased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), loss in FAK-integrin interaction and active Ras. MLL treatment downregulated the levels of phosphorylated Akt and PI3K. Also, we have studied the effect of MLL on two stress activated protein kinases p38 MAPK and JNK. p38 MAPK activation was found to be elevated, but there was no change in the level of JNK. Thus our study substantiated the possible antimetastatic effect of MLL by inducing anoikis in MCF-7 cells by activation of caspase 9 and proapoptotic Bax/Bad by blockage of FN mediated integrin/FAK signaling and partly by activation of p38 MAPK. PMID:28223935

  5. Favorable outcome in non-infant children with MLL-AF4-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report from the Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Daisuke; Kato, Motohiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Fujimura, Junya; Inukai, Takeshi; Fukushima, Takashi; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Ohara, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Unlike acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants, MLL gene rearrangement (MLL-r) is rare in ALL children (≥1 year old). The outcome and optimal treatment options for MLL-r ALL remain controversial. Among the 1827 children enrolled in the Tokyo Children's Cancer Study Group ALL studies L95-14, L99-15, L99-1502, L04-16, and L07-1602 (1995-2009), 25 MLL-r ALL patients (1.3 %) were identified. Their median age and leukocyte count at diagnosis was 2 years old (range 1-15 years) and 27,690/μL (range 1800-1,113,000/μL), respectively. All but one patient achieved complete remission (CR) after induction therapy, and 19 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in first CR according to the protocol. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rate were 60.0 % [standard error (SE), 9.7 %] and 64.0 % (SE 9.6 %), respectively. Notably, 9/12 cases with MLL-AF4-positive ALL are alive in continuous CR with a 75.0 % (SE 12.5 %) EFS rate. The causes of treatment failure were as follows: one induction failure, five relapses, and five transplant-related deaths. With intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic HSCT, favorable outcome of children (≥1 year old) with MLL-AF4-positive ALL was observed. However, considering the risk of acute and late toxicities associated with HSCT, its indication should be restricted.

  6. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, Der-Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML. PMID:26375248

  7. A novel mutation in the miR-128b gene reduces miRNA processing and leads to glucocorticoid resistance of MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Ai; Ha, Daon; Schotte, Diana; den Boer, Monique L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-03-15

    MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia has a poor prognosis, and the mechanisms by which these leukemias develop are not understood despite intensive research based on well-known concepts and methods. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of small noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate expression of target mRNA transcripts. We recently reported that ectopic expression of miR-128b together with miR-221, two of the miRNAs downregulated in MLL-AF4 ALL, restores glucocorticoid resistance through downregulation of the MLL-AF4 chimeric fusion proteins MLL-AF4 and AF4-MLL that are generated by chromosomal translocation t(4;11). Here we report the identification of new mutations in miR-128b in RS4;11 cells, derived from MLL-AF4 ALL patient. One novel mutation significantly reduces the processing of miR-128b. Finally, this base change occurs in a primary MLL-AF4 ALL sample as an acquired mutation. These results demonstrate that the novel mutation in miR-128b in MLL-AF4 ALL alters the processing of miR-128b and that the resultant downregulation of mature miR-128b contributes to glucocorticoid resistance through the failure to downregulate the fusion oncogenes.

  8. HoxBlinc RNA recruits Set1/MLL complexes to activate Hox gene expression patterns and mesoderm lineage development

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Nao; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2015-01-01

    Summary Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1+ mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulating hoxb gene pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated KD or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb gene expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1+ precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1+ precursors and differentiation of Flk1+ cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  9. HoxBlinc RNA Recruits Set1/MLL Complexes to Activate Hox Gene Expression Patterns and Mesoderm Lineage Development.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Naohiro; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2016-01-05

    Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1(+) mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulation of hoxb pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated knockdown or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1(+) precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1(+) precursors and differentiation of Flk1(+) cells into hematopoietic lineages.

  10. Knockdown of ALR (MLL2) Reveals ALR Target Genes and Leads to Alterations in Cell Adhesion and Growth▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Issaeva, Irina; Zonis, Yulia; Rozovskaia, Tanya; Orlovsky, Kira; Croce, Carlo M.; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Mazo, Alex; Eisenbach, Lea; Canaani, Eli

    2007-01-01

    ALR (MLL2) is a member of the human MLL family, which belongs to a larger SET1 family of histone methyltransferases. We found that ALR is present within a stable multiprotein complex containing a cohort of proteins shared with other SET1 family complexes and several unique components, such as PTIP and the jumonji family member UTX. Like other complexes formed by SET1 family members, the ALR complex exhibited strong H3K4 methyltransferase activity, conferred by the ALR SET domain. By generating ALR knockdown cell lines and comparing their expression profiles to that of control cells, we identified a set of genes whose expression is activated by ALR. Some of these genes were identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation as direct ALR targets. The ALR complex was found to associate in an ALR-dependent fashion with promoters and transcription initiation sites of target genes and to induce H3K4 trimethylation. The most characteristic features of the ALR knockdown cells were changes in the dynamics and mode of cell spreading/polarization, reduced migration capacity, impaired anchorage-dependent and -independent growth, and decreased tumorigenicity in mice. Taken together, our results suggest that ALR is a transcriptional activator that induces the transcription of target genes by covalent histone modification. ALR appears to be involved in the regulation of adhesion-related cytoskeletal events, which might affect cell growth and survival. PMID:17178841

  11. Systematic chemical and molecular profiling of MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals efficacy of romidepsin

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, M N; Ford, J; Cheung, L C; Heng, J; Singh, S; Wells, J; Failes, T W; Arndt, G M; Smithers, N; Prinjha, R K; Anderson, D; Carter, K W; Gout, A M; Lassmann, T; O'Reilly, J; Cole, C H; Kotecha, R S; Kees, U R

    2017-01-01

    To address the poor prognosis of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (iALL), we generated a panel of cell lines from primary patient samples and investigated cytotoxic responses to contemporary and novel Food and Drug Administration-approved chemotherapeutics. To characterize representation of primary disease within cell lines, molecular features were compared using RNA-sequencing and cytogenetics. High-throughput screening revealed variable efficacy of currently used drugs, however identified consistent efficacy of three novel drug classes: proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Gene expression of drug targets was highly reproducible comparing iALL cell lines to matched primary specimens. Histone deacetylase inhibitors, including romidepsin (ROM), enhanced the activity of a key component of iALL therapy, cytarabine (ARAC) in vitro and combined administration of ROM and ARAC to xenografted mice further reduced leukemia burden. Molecular studies showed that ROM reduces expression of cytidine deaminase, an enzyme involved in ARAC deactivation, and enhances the DNA damage–response to ARAC. In conclusion, we present a valuable resource for drug discovery, including the first systematic analysis of transcriptome reproducibility in vitro, and have identified ROM as a promising therapeutic for MLL-rearranged iALL. PMID:27443263

  12. Set1 and MLL1/2 target distinct sets of functionally different genomic loci in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Elizabeth M.; Chitsazan, Alex D.; Seidel, Chris W.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is known to correlate with both active and poised genomic loci, yet many questions remain regarding its functional roles in vivo. We identify functional genomic targets of two H3K4 methyltransferases, Set1 and MLL1/2, in both the stem cells and differentiated tissue of the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea. We show that, despite their common substrate, these enzymes target distinct genomic loci in vivo, which are distinguishable by the pattern each enzyme leaves on the chromatin template, i.e., the breadth of the H3K4me3 peak. Whereas Set1 targets are largely associated with the maintenance of the stem cell population, MLL1/2 targets are specifically enriched for genes involved in ciliogenesis. These data not only confirm that chromatin regulation is fundamental to planarian stem cell function, but also provide evidence for post-embryonic functional specificity of H3K4me3 methyltransferases in vivo. PMID:26711341

  13. Systematic chemical and molecular profiling of MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals efficacy of romidepsin.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, M N; Ford, J; Cheung, L C; Heng, J; Singh, S; Wells, J; Failes, T W; Arndt, G M; Smithers, N; Prinjha, R K; Anderson, D; Carter, K W; Gout, A M; Lassmann, T; O'Reilly, J; Cole, C H; Kotecha, R S; Kees, U R

    2017-01-01

    To address the poor prognosis of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (iALL), we generated a panel of cell lines from primary patient samples and investigated cytotoxic responses to contemporary and novel Food and Drug Administration-approved chemotherapeutics. To characterize representation of primary disease within cell lines, molecular features were compared using RNA-sequencing and cytogenetics. High-throughput screening revealed variable efficacy of currently used drugs, however identified consistent efficacy of three novel drug classes: proteasome inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. Gene expression of drug targets was highly reproducible comparing iALL cell lines to matched primary specimens. Histone deacetylase inhibitors, including romidepsin (ROM), enhanced the activity of a key component of iALL therapy, cytarabine (ARAC) in vitro and combined administration of ROM and ARAC to xenografted mice further reduced leukemia burden. Molecular studies showed that ROM reduces expression of cytidine deaminase, an enzyme involved in ARAC deactivation, and enhances the DNA damage-response to ARAC. In conclusion, we present a valuable resource for drug discovery, including the first systematic analysis of transcriptome reproducibility in vitro, and have identified ROM as a promising therapeutic for MLL-rearranged iALL.

  14. Nucleoporin Nup98 associates with Trx/MLL and NSL histone-modifying complexes and regulates Hox gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Garcia, Pau; Jeong, Jieun; Capelson, Maya

    2014-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex is a transport channel embedded in the nuclear envelope and made up of 30 different components termed nucleoporins (Nups). In addition to their classical role in transport, a subset of Nups has a conserved role in the regulation of transcription via direct binding to chromatin. The molecular details of this function remain obscure, and it is unknown how metazoan Nups are recruited to their chromatin locations or what transcription steps they regulate. Here, we demonstrate genome-wide and physical association between Nup98 and histone-modifying complexes MBD-R2/NSL [corrected] and Trx/MLL. Importantly, we identify a requirement for MBD-R2 in recruitment of Nup98 to many of its genomic target sites. Consistent with its interaction with the Trx/MLL complex, Nup98 is shown to be necessary for Hox gene expression in developing fly tissues. These findings introduce roles of Nup98 in epigenetic regulation that may underlie the basis of oncogenicity of Nup98 fusions in leukemia.

  15. Property Focused Structure-Based Optimization of Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Protein-Protein Interaction between Menin and Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL).

    PubMed

    Borkin, Dmitry; Pollock, Jonathan; Kempinska, Katarzyna; Purohit, Trupta; Li, Xiaoqin; Wen, Bo; Zhao, Ting; Miao, Hongzhi; Shukla, Shirish; He, Miao; Sun, Duxin; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2016-02-11

    Development of potent small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions with optimized druglike properties represents a challenging task in lead optimization process. Here, we report synthesis and structure-based optimization of new thienopyrimidine class of compounds, which block the protein-protein interaction between menin and MLL fusion proteins that plays an important role in acute leukemias with MLL translocations. We performed simultaneous optimization of both activity and druglike properties through systematic exploration of substituents introduced to the indole ring of lead compound 1 (MI-136) to identify compounds suitable for in vivo studies in mice. This work resulted in the identification of compound 27 (MI-538), which showed significantly increased activity, selectivity, polarity, and pharmacokinetic profile over 1 and demonstrated a pronounced effect in a mouse model of MLL leukemia. This study, which reports detailed structure-activity and structure-property relationships for the menin-MLL inhibitors, demonstrates challenges in optimizing inhibitors of protein-protein interactions for potential therapeutic applications.

  16. Importance of a specific amino acid pairing for murine MLL leukemias driven by MLLT1/3 or AFF1/4.

    PubMed

    Lokken, Alyson A; Achille, Nicholas J; Chang, Ming-Jin; Lin, Jeffrey J; Kuntimaddi, Aravinda; Leach, Benjamin I; Malik, Bhavna; Nesbit, Jacqueline B; Zhang, Shubin; Bushweller, John H; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J; Hemenway, Charles S

    2014-11-01

    Acute leukemias caused by translocations of the MLL gene at chromosome 11 band q23 (11q23) are characterized by a unique gene expression profile. More recently, data from several laboratories indicate that the most commonly encountered MLL fusion proteins, MLLT1, MLLT3, and AFF1 are found within a molecular complex that facilitates the elongation phase of mRNA transcription. Mutational analyses suggest that interaction between the MLLT1/3 proteins and AFF family proteins are required for experimental transformation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Here, we define a specific pairing of two amino acids that creates a salt bridge between MLLT1/3 and AFF proteins that is critically important for MLL-mediated transformation of HPCs. Our findings, coupled with the newly defined structure of MLLT3 in complex with AFF1, should facilitate the development of small molecules that block this amino acid interaction and interfere with the activity of the most common MLL oncoproteins.

  17. Cloning of ELL, a gene that fuses to MLL in a t(11; 19)(q23; p13. 1) in acute myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thirman, M.J.; Levitan, D.A.; Kobayashi, H.; Simon, M.C.; Rowley, J.D. )

    1994-12-06

    To characterize the functions of MLL fusion transcripts, we cloned the gene that fuses to MLL in the translocation t(11;19)(q23;p13.1). This translocation is distinct from another type of 11;19 translocation with a 19p13.3 breakpoint that results in the fusion of MLL to the ENL gene. By PCR screening of a cDNA library prepared from a patient's leukemia cells with this translocation, we obtained a fusion transcript containing exon 7 of MLL and sequence of an unknown gene. The sequence of this gene was amplified and used as a probe to screen a fetal brain cDNA library. On Northern blot analysis, this cDNA detected a 4.4-kb transcript that was abundant in peripheral blood leukocytes, skeletal muscle, placenta, and testis and expressed at lower levels in spleen, thymus, heart, brain, lung, kidney, liver, and ovary. In addition, a 2.8-kb transcript was present in peripheral blood, testis, and placenta. On [open quotes]zoo blots,[close quotes] this gene was shown to be evolutionarily conserved in 10 mammalian species as well as in chicken, frog, and fish. We have named this gene ELL (for eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene). A highly basic, lysine-rich motif of the predicted ELL protein is homologous to similar regions of several proteins, including the DNA-binding domain of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The characterization of the normal functions of ELL as well as its altered function when fused to MLL will be critical to further our understanding of the mechanisms of leukemogenesis. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Impact of loss of BH3-only proteins on the development and treatment of MLL-fusion gene-driven AML in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bilardi, Rebecca A; Anstee, Natasha S; Glaser, Stefan P; Robati, Mikara; Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Cory, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the apoptosis pathway controlled by opposing members of the Bcl-2 protein family plays a central role in cancer development and resistance to therapy. To investigate how pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins impact on acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we generated mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-AF9 and MLL-ENL AMLs from BH3-only gene knockout mice. Disease development was not accelerated by loss of Bim, Puma, Noxa, Bmf, or combinations thereof; hence these BH3-only proteins are apparently ineffectual as tumor suppressors in this model. We tested the sensitivity of MLL-AF9 AMLs of each genotype in vitro to standard chemotherapeutic drugs and to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, with or without the BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Loss of Puma and/or Noxa increased resistance to cytarabine, daunorubicin and etoposide, while loss of Bim protected against cytarabine and loss of Bmf had no impact. ABT-737 increased sensitivity to the genotoxic drugs but was not dependent on any BH3-only protein tested. The AML lines were very sensitive to bortezomib and loss of Noxa conveyed significant resistance. In vivo, several MLL-AF9 AMLs responded well to daunorubicin and this response was highly dependent on Puma and Noxa but not Bim. Combination therapy with ABT-737 provided little added benefit at the daunorubicin dose trialed. Bortezomib also extended survival of AML-bearing mice, albeit less than daunorubicin. In summary, our genetic studies reveal the importance of Puma and Noxa for the action of genotoxics currently used to treat MLL-driven AML and suggest that, while addition of ABT-737-like BH3 mimetics might enhance their efficacy, new Noxa-like BH3 mimetics targeting Mcl-1 might have greater potential. PMID:27584789

  19. All-trans retinoic acid combined with 5-Aza-2 Prime -deoxycitidine induces C/EBP{alpha} expression and growth inhibition in MLL-AF9-positive leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiki, Atsushi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Kawashima, Sachiko; Yoshida, Hideki; Hirashima, Yoshifumi; Miyachi, Mitsuru; Yagyu, Shigeki; Nakatani, Takuya; Sugita, Kanji; Hosoi, Hajime

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested whether ATRA and 5-Aza affect AML cell differentiation and growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell differentiation and growth arrest were induced in MLL-AF9-expressing cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{epsilon}, and PU.1 were also observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLL-AF4/AF5q31-expressing cells are less sensitive to ATRA and 5-Aza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different MLL fusion has distinct epigenetic properties related to RA pathway. -- Abstract: The present study tested whether all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 5-Aza-2 Prime -deoxycitidine (5-Aza) affect AML cell differentiation and growth in vitro by acting on the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}) and c-Myc axis. After exposure to a combination of these agents, cell differentiation and growth arrest were significantly higher in human and murine MLL-AF9-expressing cells than in MLL-AF4/AF5q31-expressing cells, which were partly associated with increased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{epsilon}, and PU.1, and decreased expression of c-Myc. These findings indicate that MLL-AF9-expressing cells are more sensitive to ATRA and 5-Aza, indicating that different MLL fusion proteins possess different epigenetic properties associated with retinoic acid pathway inactivation.

  20. Aberrant DNA methylation of acute myeloid leukemia and colorectal cancer in a Chinese pedigree with a MLL3 germline mutation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuhua; Gong, Qiang; Shi, Wentao; Zou, Yunding; Shi, Jingmin; Wei, Fengjiang; Li, Qingrong; Chen, Jieping; Li, Wei-Dong

    2016-09-01

    Unlike genetic aberrations, epigenetic alterations do not modify the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) coding sequence and can be reversed pharmacologically. Identifying a particular epigenetic alteration such as abnormal DNA methylation may provide better understanding of cancers and improve current therapy. In a Chinese pedigree with colorectal carcinoma and acute myeloid leukemia, we examined the genome-wide DNA methylation level of cases and explored the role of methylation in pathogenesis and progression. DNA methylation status in the four cases, which all harbor a MLL3 germline mutation, differed from that of the normal control, and hypermethylation was more prevalent. Also, more CpG sites were hypermethylated in the acute-phase AML patient than in the AML patient in remission. Fifty-nine hyper- or hypomethylated genes were identified as common to all four cases. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis demonstrated that differentially methylated sites among acute myeloid leukemia and colorectal carcinoma cases and the control were in both promoters (CpG island) and gene body regions (shelf/shore areas). Hypermethylation was more prevalent in cancer cases. The study supports the suggestion that the level of DNA methylation changes in AML progression.

  1. SWI/SNF Subunits SMARCA4, SMARCD2 and DPF2 Collaborate in MLL-Rearranged Leukaemia Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, V Adam; Sroczynska, Patrycja; Sankar, Aditya; Miyagi, Satoru; Rundsten, Carsten Friis; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Helin, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in chromatin structure caused by deregulated epigenetic mechanisms collaborate with underlying genetic lesions to promote cancer. SMARCA4/BRG1, a core component of the SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling complex, has been implicated by its mutational spectrum as exerting a tumour-suppressor function in many solid tumours; recently however, it has been reported to sustain leukaemogenic transformation in MLL-rearranged leukaemia in mice. Here we further explore the role of SMARCA4 and the two SWI/SNF subunits SMARCD2/BAF60B and DPF2/BAF45D in leukaemia. We observed the selective requirement for these proteins for leukaemic cell expansion and self-renewal in-vitro as well as in leukaemia. Gene expression profiling in human cells of each of these three factors suggests that they have overlapping functions in leukaemia. The gene expression changes induced by loss of the three proteins demonstrate that they are required for the expression of haematopoietic stem cell associated genes but in contrast to previous results obtained in mouse cells, the three proteins are not required for the expression of c-MYC regulated genes.

  2. CDKN1A-mediated responsiveness of MLL-AF4-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia to Aurora kinase-A inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Ping; Lin, Hui-Ju; Chen, Jiann-Shiuh; Tsai, Ming-Ying; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang; Chang, Jang-Yang; Chen, Nai-Feng; Chang, Kung-Chao; Huang, Wen-Tsung; Su, Wu-Chou; Yang, Shu-Ting; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Liang-Yi; Chen, Tsai-Yun

    2014-08-01

    Overexpression of Aurora kinases is largely observed in many cancers, including hematologic malignancies. In this study, we investigated the effects and molecular mechanisms of Aurora kinase inhibitors in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Western blot analysis showed that both Aurora-A and Aurora-B are overexpressed in ALL cell lines and primary ALL cells. Both VE-465 and VX-680 effectively inhibited Aurora kinase activities in nine ALL cell lines, which exhibited different susceptibilities to the inhibitors. Cells sensitive to Aurora kinase inhibitors underwent apoptosis at an IC50 of ∼10-30 nM and displayed a phenotype of Aurora-A inhibition, whereas cells resistant to Aurora kinase inhibitors (with an IC50 more than 10 μM) accumulated polyploidy, which may have resulted from Aurora-B inhibition. Drug susceptibility of ALL cell lines was not correlated with the expression level or activation status of Aurora kinases. Interestingly, RS4;11 and MV4;11 cells, which contain the MLL-AF4 gene, were both sensitive to Aurora kinase-A inhibitors treatment. Complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray analysis suggested that CDKN1A might govern the drug responsiveness of ALL cell lines in a TP53-independent manner. Most importantly, primary ALL cells with MLL-AF4 and CDKN1A expression were sensitive to Aurora kinase inhibitors. Our study suggests CDKN1A could be a potential biomarker in determining the drug responsiveness of Aurora kinase inhibitors in ALL, particularly in MLL-AF4-positive patients.

  3. CD93 marks a non-quiescent human leukemia stem cell population and is required for development of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Masayuki; Liedtke, Michaela; Gentles, Andrew J.; Cleary, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are thought to share several properties with hematopoietic stem cells, including cell cycle quiescence and a capacity for self-renewal. These features are hypothesized to underlie leukemic initiation, progression, and relapse, and also complicate efforts to eradicate leukemia through therapeutic targeting of LSCs without adverse effects on HSCs. Here, we show that acute myeloid leukemias with genomic rearrangements of the MLL gene contain a non-quiescent LSC population. Although human CD34+CD38− LSCs are generally highly quiescent, the C-type lectin CD93 is expressed on a subset of actively cycling, non-quiescent AML cells enriched for LSC activity. CD93 expression is functionally required for engraftment of primary human AML LSCs and leukemogenesis, and regulates LSC self-renewal predominantly by silencing CDKN2B, a major tumor suppressor in AML. Thus, CD93 expression identifies a predominantly cycling, non-quiescent leukemia-initiating cell population in MLL-rearranged AML, providing opportunities for selective targeting and eradication of LSCs. PMID:26387756

  4. t(11;22)(q23;q11.2) In acute myeloid leukemia of infant twins fuses MLL with hCDCrel, a cell division cycle gene in the genomic region of deletion in DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndromes.

    PubMed

    Megonigal, M D; Rappaport, E F; Jones, D H; Williams, T M; Lovett, B D; Kelly, K M; Lerou, P H; Moulton, T; Budarf, M L; Felix, C A

    1998-05-26

    We examined the MLL genomic translocation breakpoint in acute myeloid leukemia of infant twins. Southern blot analysis in both cases showed two identical MLL gene rearrangements indicating chromosomal translocation. The rearrangements were detectable in the second twin before signs of clinical disease and the intensity relative to the normal fragment indicated that the translocation was not constitutional. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with an MLL-specific probe and karyotype analyses suggested t(11;22)(q23;q11. 2) disrupting MLL. Known 5' sequence from MLL but unknown 3' sequence from chromosome band 22q11.2 formed the breakpoint junction on the der(11) chromosome. We used panhandle variant PCR to clone the translocation breakpoint. By ligating a single-stranded oligonucleotide that was homologous to known 5' MLL genomic sequence to the 5' ends of BamHI-digested DNA through a bridging oligonucleotide, we formed the stem-loop template for panhandle variant PCR which yielded products of 3.9 kb. The MLL genomic breakpoint was in intron 7. The sequence of the partner DNA from band 22q11.2 was identical to the hCDCrel (human cell division cycle related) gene that maps to the region commonly deleted in DiGeorge and velocardiofacial syndromes. Both MLL and hCDCrel contained homologous CT, TTTGTG, and GAA sequences within a few base pairs of their respective breakpoints, which may have been important in uniting these two genes by translocation. Reverse transcriptase-PCR amplified an in-frame fusion of MLL exon 7 to hCDCrel exon 3, indicating that an MLL-hCDCrel chimeric mRNA had been transcribed. Panhandle variant PCR is a powerful strategy for cloning translocation breakpoints where the partner gene is undetermined. This application of the method identified a region of chromosome band 22q11.2 involved in both leukemia and a constitutional disorder.

  5. Double minute chromosomes in acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia are associated with micronuclei, MYC or MLL amplification, and complex karyotype.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yang O; Tang, Guilin; Talwalkar, Sameer S; Khoury, Joseph D; Ohanian, Maro; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Abruzzo, Lynne V

    2016-01-01

    Double minute chromosomes (dmin) are small, paired chromatin bodies that lack a centromere and represent a form of extrachromosomal gene amplification. Dmin are rare in myeloid neoplasms and are generally associated with a poor prognosis. Most studies of dmin in myeloid neoplasms are case reports or small series. In the current study, we present the clinicopathologic and cytogenetic features of 22 patients with myeloid neoplasms harboring dmin. These neoplasms included acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 18), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 3), and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) (n = 1). The AML cases consisted of AML with myelodysplasia-related changes (n = 13) and therapy-related AML (n = 5). Dmin were detected in initial pre-therapy samples in 14 patients with AML or CMML; they were acquired during the disease course in 8 patients who had AML or MDS. The presence of dmin was associated with micronuclei (18/18; 100%), complex karyotype (17/22; 77.3%), and amplification of MYC (12/16; 75%) or MLL (4/16; 25%). Immunohistochemical staining for MYC performed on bone marrow core biopsy or clot sections revealed increased MYC protein in all 19 cases tested. Except for one patient, most patients failed to respond to risk-adapted chemotherapies. At last follow up, all patients had died of disease after a median of 5 months following dmin detection. In conclusion, dmin in myeloid neoplasms commonly harbor MYC or MLL gene amplification and manifest as micronuclei within leukemic blasts. Dmin are often associated with myelodysplasia or therapy-related disease, and complex karyotypes.

  6. Increased expression of the histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase MLL4 and the histone H3 lysine 27 demethylase UTX prolonging the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma and a methylated MGMT promoter.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; Lee, Sung-Hun; Jang, Ji Hwan; Kim, Mee-Seon; Lee, Eun Hee; Kim, Young Zoon

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of the present study was to investigate the epigenetic and prognostic roles of an H3K4 methyltransferase (mixed lineage leukemia 4 [MLL4]) and H3K27 demethylase (ubiquitously transcribed tetratricopeptide repeat gene on X chromosome [UTX]) in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) who were treated with radiotherapy, chemotherapy, or both after resection. In addition, the authors examined methylation at the promoter of the O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene and other prognostic factors predicting length of PFS and OS in these patients. METHODS The medical records of 76 patients having a new diagnosis of histologically ascertained GBM in the period of January 2002 to December 2013 at the authors' institution were retrospectively reviewed. Immunohistochemical staining for MLL4 and UTX was performed on archived paraffin-embedded tissues obtained by biopsy or resection. The methylation status of the MGMT promoter in these tissues was determined by methylation-specific PCR analysis. RESULTS During the follow-up period (mean length 18.1 months, range 4.1-43.5 months), 68 (89.5%) of the patients died. The MGMT promoter was methylated in 49 patients (64.5%) and unmethylated in 27 (35.5%). The immunoreactivity pattern of UTX was identical to that of MLL4; increased expression of these 2 proteins was observed in samples from 34 patients (44.7%) and decreased expression in 42 patients (55.3%). The mean length of PFS was 9.2 months (95% CI 6.8-11.6 months). Extent of surgery, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, and methylation status of the MGMT promoter were all associated with increased PFS in the multivariate analysis of factors predicting PFS. The mean length of OS was 18.6 months (95% CI 14.3-22.9 months). Patient age (p = 0.004), WHO performance status score (p = 0.019), extent of surgery (p = 0.007), RPA class (p = 0.036), methylation status of the MGMT promoter (p = 0

  7. Haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell transplantation without irradiation or busulfan after reduced-intensity conditioning for KMT2A(MLL)-rearranged infant B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Ai; Kato, Keisuke; Hosaka, Sho; Suzuki, Ryoko; Fukushima, Hiroko; Nakao, Tomohei; Kobayashi, Chie; Fukushima, Takashi; Koike, Kazutoshi; Sumazaki, Ryo; Tsuchida, Masahiro

    2017-03-22

    We present two infants with KMT2A(MLL)-gene-R-associated BCP-ALL, who received HLA haploidentical PBSCT after RIC. The patients developed ALL at age 6 months and 3 months, respectively. Case 1 underwent PBSCT at the second CR with detectable KMT2A-AFF1(MLL-AF4) fusion gene transcript at 11 months of age, and Case 2 at the first CR without KMT2A-MLLT1(MLL-ENL) fusion gene transcript at 8 months of age. Both patients received G-CSF-mobilized unmanipulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from their HLA haploidentical mothers after administration of FLU, MEL, and ATG. Tacrolimus, methotrexate, and mPSL were administered as prophylaxis against GVHD. Engraftment was rapidly obtained with complete chimerism in both patients. Acute adverse events included acute GVHD in Case 1 and bacterial sepsis in Case 2. At last clinical check at age 5 years and 4 years, respectively, both patients were recurrence-free and attained normal growth and development. We conclude that PBSCT from an HLA haploidentical mother with non-TBI and non-BU regimen seems feasible and efficacious, offering favorable life quality for infants.

  8. Autophagy is dispensable for Kmt2a/Mll-Mllt3/Af9 AML maintenance and anti-leukemic effect of chloroquine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoyi; Clark, Jason; Wunderlich, Mark; Fan, Cuiqing; Davis, Ashley; Chen, Song; Guan, Jun-Lin; Mulloy, James C; Kumar, Ashish; Zheng, Yi

    2017-02-15

    Recently, macroautophagy/autophagy has emerged as a promising target in various types of solid tumor treatment. However, the impact of autophagy on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) maintenance and the validity of autophagy as a viable target in AML therapy remain unclear. Here we show that Kmt2a/Mll-Mllt3/Af9 AML (MA9-AML) cells have high autophagy flux compared with normal bone marrow cells, but autophagy-specific targeting, either through Rb1cc1-disruption to abolish autophagy initiation, or via Atg5-disruption to prevent phagophore (the autophagosome precursor) membrane elongation, does not affect the growth or survival of MA9-AML cells, either in vitro or in vivo. Mechanistically, neither Atg5 nor Rb1cc1 disruption impairs endolysosome formation or survival signaling pathways. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine shows autophagy-independent anti-leukemic effects in vitro but has no efficacy in vivo likely due to limited achievable drug efficacy in blood. Further, vesicular exocytosis appears to mediate chloroquine resistance in AML cells, and exocytotic inhibition significantly enhances the anti-leukemic effect of chloroquine. Thus, chloroquine can induce leukemia cell death in vitro in an autophagy-independent manner but with inadequate efficacy in vivo, and vesicular exocytosis is a possible mechanism of chloroquine resistance in MA9-AML. This study also reveals that autophagy-specific targeting is unlikely to benefit MA9-AML therapy.

  9. Single-cell Sequencing Reveals Variants in ARID1A, GPRC5A and MLL2 Driving Self-renewal of Human Bladder Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhao; Li, Chong; Fan, Zusen; Liu, Hongjie; Zhang, Xiaolong; Cai, Zhiming; Xu, Liqin; Luo, Jian; Huang, Yi; He, Luyun; Liu, Chunxiao; Wu, Song

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are considered responsible for many important aspects of tumors such as their self-renewal, tumor-initiating, drug-resistance and metastasis. However, the genetic basis and origination of human bladder cancer stem cells (BCSCs) remains unknown. Here, we conducted single-cell sequencing on 59 cells including BCSCs, bladder cancer non-stem cells (BCNSCs), bladder epithelial stem cells (BESCs) and bladder epithelial non-stem cells (BENSCs) from three bladder cancer (BC) specimens. Specifically, BCSCs demonstrate clonal homogeneity and suggest their origin from BESCs or BCNSCs through phylogenetic analysis. Moreover, 21 key altered genes were identified in BCSCs including six genes not previously described in BC (ETS1, GPRC5A, MKL1, PAWR, PITX2 and RGS9BP). Co-mutations of ARID1A, GPRC5A and MLL2 introduced by CRISPR/Cas9 significantly enhance the capabilities of self-renewal and tumor-initiating of BCNSCs. To our knowledge, our study first provides an overview of the genetic basis of human BCSCs with single-cell sequencing and demonstrates the biclonal origin of human BCSCs via evolution analysis.

  10. FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD influence the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA but not LRP mRNA assessed with RQ-PCR method in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nasilowska-Adamska, Barbara; Solarska, Iwona; Paluszewska, Monika; Malinowska, Iwona; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw W; Warzocha, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3-internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) and mixed-lineage leukemia gene-partial tandem duplication (MLL-PTD) are aberrations associated with leukemia which indicate unsatisfactory prognosis. Downstream regulatory targets of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD are not well defined. We have analyzed the expression of MDR-1, multidrug resistant protein-1 (MRP-1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and lung resistance protein (LRP) messenger RNA (mRNA) in relation to the mutational status of FLT3-ITD and MLL-PTD in 185 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) adult patients. The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction method was performed to assess the expression of the MDR-1, MRP-1, BCRP, and LRP mRNA, and the results were presented as coefficients calculated using an intermediate method according to Pfaffl's rule. Significantly higher expressions of MDR-1 mRNA were found in patients who did not harbor FLT3-ITD (0.20 vs. 0.05; p = 0.0001) and MRP-1 mRNA in patients with this mutation (0.96 vs. 0.70; p = 0.002) and of BCRP mRNA in patients with MLL-PTD (0.61 vs. 0.38; p = 0.03). In univariate analysis, the high expression of MDR-1 mRNA (≥0.1317) negatively influenced the outcome of induction therapy (p = 0.05), whereas the high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) was associated with a high relapse rate (RR) (p = 0.013). We found that the high expression of MDR-1 (≥0.1317), MRP-1 (≥0.8409), and BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) significantly influenced disease-free survival (DFS; p = 0.059, 0.032, and 0.009, respectively) and overall survival (0.048, 0.014, and 0.059, respectively). Moreover, a high expression of BCRP mRNA (≥1.1487) proved to be an independent prognostic factor for RR (p = 0.01) and DFS (p = 0.002) in multivariate analysis. The significant correlation between the expression of MDR-1, MRP-1, and BCRP mRNA and FLT3-ITD or MLL-PTD in AML patients requires further investigation.

  11. An MLL/COMPASS subunit functions in the C. elegans dosage compensation complex to target X chromosomes for transcriptional regulation of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pferdehirt, Rebecca R.; Kruesi, William S.; Meyer, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    Here we analyze the essential process of X-chromosome dosage compensation (DC) to elucidate mechanisms that control the assembly, genome-wide binding, and function of gene regulatory complexes that act over large chromosomal territories. We demonstrate that a subunit of Caenorhabditis elegans MLL/COMPASS, a gene activation complex, acts within the DC complex (DCC), a condensin complex, to target the DCC to both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites for chromosome-wide reduction of gene expression. The DCC binds to two categories of sites on X: rex (recruitment element on X) sites that recruit the DCC in an autonomous, sequence-dependent manner, and dox (dependent on X) sites that reside primarily in promoters of expressed genes and bind the DCC robustly only when attached to X. We find that DC mutations that abolish rex site binding greatly reduce dox site binding but do not eliminate it. Instead, binding is diminished to the low level observed at autosomal sites in wild-type animals. Changes in DCC binding to these non-rex sites occur throughout development and correlate directly with transcriptional activity of adjacent genes. Moreover, autosomal DCC binding is enhanced by rex site binding in cis in X-autosome fusion chromosomes. Thus, dox and autosomal sites have similar binding potential but are distinguished by linkage to rex sites. We propose a model for DCC binding in which low-level DCC binding at dox sites is dictated by intrinsic properties correlated with high transcriptional activity. Sex-specific DCC recruitment to rex sites then enhances the magnitude of DCC binding to dox sites in cis, which lack high affinity for the DCC on their own. We also show that the DCC balances X-chromosome gene expression between sexes by controlling transcription. PMID:21363964

  12. Histone H3K4 trimethylation by MLL3 as part of ASCOM complex is critical for NR activation of bile acid transporter genes and is downregulated in cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfeng; Surapureddi, S.; Balasubramaniyan, N.; Ahn, Jaeyong; Goldstein, J. A.; Suchy, Frederick J.

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear receptor Farnesoid x receptor (FXR) is a critical regulator of multiple genes involved in bile acid homeostasis. The coactivators attracted to promoters of FXR target genes and epigenetic modifications that occur after ligand binding to FXR have not been completely defined, and it is unknown whether these processes are disrupted during cholestasis. Using a microarray, we identified decreased expression of mixed lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3), a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) lysine methyl transferase at 1 and 3 days of post-common bile duct ligation (CBDL) in mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP) analysis revealed that H3K4me3 of transporter promoters by MLL3 as part of activating signal cointegrator-2 -containing complex (ASCOM) is essential for activation of bile salt export pump (BSEP), multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (MRP2), and sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) genes by FXR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Knockdown of nuclear receptor coactivator 6 (NCOA6) or MLL3/MLL4 mRNAs by small interfering RNA treatment led to a decrease in BSEP and NTCP mRNA levels in hepatoma cells. Human BSEP promoter transactivation by FXR/RXR was enhanced in a dose-dependent fashion by NCOA6 cDNA coexpression and decreased by AdsiNCOA6 infection in HepG2 cells. GST-pull down assays showed that domain 3 and 5 of NCOA6 (LXXLL motifs) interacted with FXR and that the interaction with domain 5 was enhanced by chenodeoxycholic acid. In vivo ChIP assays in HepG2 cells revealed ligand-dependent recruitment of ASCOM complex to FXR element in BSEP and GR element in NTCP promoters, respectively. ChIP analysis demonstrated significantly diminished recruitment of ASCOM complex components and H3K4me3 to Bsep and Mrp2 promoter FXR elements in mouse livers after CBDL. Taken together, these data show that the “H3K4me3” epigenetic mark is essential to activation of BSEP, NTCP, and MRP2 genes by nuclear receptors and is downregulated in cholestasis

  13. IS THE AMPLIFICATION OF c-MYC, MLL AND RUNX1 GENES IN AML AND MDS PATIENTS WITH TRISOMY 8, 11 AND 21 A FACTOR FOR A CLONAL EVOLUTION IN THEIR KARYOTYPE?

    PubMed

    Angelova, S; Spassov, B; Nikolova, V; Christov, I; Tzvetkov, N; Simeonova, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was 1) to define if the amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes is related to the progressive changes of the karyotype in patients with AML and MDS with trisomy 8, 11 and 21 (+8, +11 and +21) in bone marrow and 2) can that amplification be accepted as part of the clonal evolution (CE). Karyotype analysis was performed in 179 patients with AML or MDS with the different chromosomal aberrations (CA) aged 16-81. The findings were distributed as follow: initiating balanced CA (n = 60), aneuploidia (n = 55), unbalanced CA (n = 64). Amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was found in 35% (7 out of 20) of AML and MDS patients with +8, +11 u +21 as single CA in their karyotype; in 63.6% of pts (7 out of 11)--with additional numerical or structural CA and in 75% (9 out of 12)--with complex karyotype. We assume that the amplification of the respective chromosomal regions in patients with +8, +11 and +21 is related to CE. Considering the amplification as a factor of CE, we established 3 patterns of karyotype development depending on the type of the initiating CA in it. Significant statistical differences were found between the three patterns regarding the karyotype distribution in the different stages of progression (p < 0.001).

  14. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia with KMT2A (MLL) rearrangements: a retrospective study from the paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia working group of the Japan Society for Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Motohiro; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Kato, Keisuke; Takita, Junko; Inagaki, Jiro; Yabe, Hiromasa; Goto, Hiroaki; Adachi, Souichi; Hayakawa, Akira; Takeshita, Yasufumi; Sawada, Akihisa; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Kato, Koji

    2015-02-01

    Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is still considered to play an important role as a consolidation therapy for high-risk infants with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Here, we retrospectively analysed outcomes of HSCT in infants with ALL based on nationwide registry data of the Japan Society for Haematopoietic Cell Transplantation. A total of 132 allogeneic HSCT for infant ALL with KMT2A (MLL) gene rearrangements, which were performed in first complete remission (CR1), were analysed. The 5-year overall survival rate after transplantation was 67·4 ± 4·5%). Although recent HSCT (after 2004) had a trend toward better survival, no statistical correlation was observed between outcomes and each factor, including age at diagnosis, initial leucocyte count, cytogenetics, donor types or conditioning of HSCT. Myeloablative conditioning with total body irradiation did not provide a better survival (60·7 ± 9·2%) over that with busulfan (BU; 67·8 ± 5·7%). Two of the 28 patients treated with irradiation, but none of the 90 BU-treated patients, developed a secondary malignant neoplasm. In conclusion, allogeneic HSCT using BU was a valuable option for infant ALL with KMT2A rearrangements in CR1.

  15. Low-dose salinomycin induces anti-leukemic responses in AML and MLL.

    PubMed

    Roulston, Gary D R; Burt, Charlotte L; Kettyle, Laura M J; Matchett, Kyle B; Keenan, Heather L; Mulgrew, Nuala M; Ramsey, Joanne M; Dougan, Caoifa; McKiernan, John; Grishagin, Ivan V; Mills, Ken I; Thompson, Alexander

    2016-11-08

    Development of anti-cancer drugs towards clinical application is costly and inefficient. Large screens of drugs, efficacious for non-cancer disease, are currently being used to identify candidates for repurposing based on their anti-cancer properties. Here, we show that low-dose salinomycin, a coccidiostat ionophore previously identified in a breast cancer screen, has anti-leukemic efficacy. AML and MLLr cell lines, primary cells and patient samples were sensitive to submicromolar salinomycin. Most strikingly, colony formation of normal hematopoietic cells was unaffected by salinomycin, demonstrating a lack of hemotoxicity at the effective concentrations. Furthermore, salinomycin treatment of primary cells resulted in loss of leukemia repopulation ability following transplantation, as demonstrated by extended recipient survival compared to controls. Bioinformatic analysis of a 17-gene signature identified and validated in primary MLLr cells, uncovered immunomodulatory pathways, hubs and protein interactions as potential transducers of low dose salinomycin treatment. Additionally, increased protein expression of p62/Sqstm1, encoded for by one of the 17 signature genes, demonstrates a role for salinomycin in aggresome/vesicle formation indicative of an autophagic response.Together, the data support the efficacy of salinomycin as an anti-leukemic at non-hemotoxic concentrations. Further investigation alone or in combination with other therapies is warranted for future clinical trial.

  16. Venetoclax responses of pediatric ALL xenografts reveal sensitivity of MLL-rearranged leukemia.

    PubMed

    Khaw, Seong Lin; Suryani, Santi; Evans, Kathryn; Richmond, Jennifer; Robbins, Alissa; Kurmasheva, Raushan T; Billups, Catherine A; Erickson, Stephen W; Guo, Yuelong; Houghton, Peter J; Smith, Malcolm A; Carol, Hernan; Roberts, Andrew W; Huang, David C S; Lock, Richard B

    2016-09-08

    The clinical success of the BCL-2-selective BH3-mimetic venetoclax in patients with poor prognosis chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) highlights the potential of targeting the BCL-2-regulated apoptotic pathway in previously untreatable lymphoid malignancies. By selectively inhibiting BCL-2, venetoclax circumvents the dose-limiting, BCL-XL-mediated thrombocytopenia of its less selective predecessor navitoclax, while enhancing efficacy in CLL. We have previously reported the potent sensitivity of many high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) xenografts to navitoclax. Given the superior tolerability of venetoclax, here we have investigated its efficacy in childhood ALL. We demonstrate that in contrast to the clear dependence of CLL on BCL-2 alone, effective antileukemic activity in the majority of ALL xenografts requires concurrent inhibition of both BCL-2 and BCL-XL We identify BCL-XL expression as a key predictor of poor response to venetoclax and demonstrate that concurrent inhibition of both BCL-2 and BCL-XL results in synergistic killing in the majority of ALL xenografts. A notable exception is mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged infant ALL, where venetoclax largely recapitulates the activity of navitoclax, identifying this subgroup of patients as potential candidates for clinical trials of venetoclax in childhood ALL. Conversely, our findings provide a clear basis for progressing navitoclax into trials ahead of venetoclax in other subgroups.

  17. Low-dose salinomycin induces anti-leukemic responses in AML and MLL

    PubMed Central

    Kettyle, Laura M.J.; Matchett, Kyle B.; Keenan, Heather L.; Mulgrew, Nuala M.; Ramsey, Joanne M.; Dougan, Caoifa; McKiernan, John; Grishagin, Ivan V.; Mills, Ken I.; Thompson, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Development of anti-cancer drugs towards clinical application is costly and inefficient. Large screens of drugs, efficacious for non-cancer disease, are currently being used to identify candidates for repurposing based on their anti-cancer properties. Here, we show that low-dose salinomycin, a coccidiostat ionophore previously identified in a breast cancer screen, has anti-leukemic efficacy. AML and MLLr cell lines, primary cells and patient samples were sensitive to submicromolar salinomycin. Most strikingly, colony formation of normal hematopoietic cells was unaffected by salinomycin, demonstrating a lack of hemotoxicity at the effective concentrations. Furthermore, salinomycin treatment of primary cells resulted in loss of leukemia repopulation ability following transplantation, as demonstrated by extended recipient survival compared to controls. Bioinformatic analysis of a 17-gene signature identified and validated in primary MLLr cells, uncovered immunomodulatory pathways, hubs and protein interactions as potential transducers of low dose salinomycin treatment. Additionally, increased protein expression of p62/Sqstm1, encoded for by one of the 17 signature genes, demonstrates a role for salinomycin in aggresome/vesicle formation indicative of an autophagic response. Together, the data support the efficacy of salinomycin as an anti-leukemic at non-hemotoxic concentrations. Further investigation alone or in combination with other therapies is warranted for future clinical trial. PMID:27612428

  18. Proceedings of the 27th International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Conference Held Jointly with the 25th PME-NA Conference (Honolulu, Hawaii, July 13-18, 2003). Volume 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pateman, Neil A., Ed; Dougherty, Barbara J., Ed.; Zilliox, Joseph T., Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This volume of the 27th International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Conference includes the following research reports: (1) Improving Decimal Number Conception by Transfer from Fractions to Decimals (Irita Peled and Juhaina Awawdy Shahbari); (2) The Development of Student Teachers' Efficacy Beliefs in Mathematics during…

  19. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Haruko; Mizutani-Noguchi, Mitsuho; Shirasaki, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  20. A MEMS-based device used for alignment and manipulation of MLL x-ray focusing optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weihe; Lauer, Kenneth; Yan, Hui; Millanovic, Veljko; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Brookhaven Natl Lab Team; Mirrorcle Technologies, Inc. Team

    2015-03-01

    Multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs) X-ray microscopy is a powerful tool used for materials research. To push the spatial resolution of x-ray microscopy studies below 10 nm the system needs to be compact and rigid. Applications of MEMS based tip-tilt stages used for alignment and manipulation of nanofocusing optics is a promising route to achieve high stability. In this work, we report characterization and stability testing of a MEMS device suitable for manipulation of nanofocusing optics. We developed two closed-loop circuits implemented in a MEMS tip-tilt device utilizing capacitive and laser interferometry techniques. Test results demonstrate better than 10 mille-degree resolution when using capacitive sensors and better than 0.8 mille-degree resolution when using interferometry sensing respectively.

  1. From Looking at Our Schools (LAOS) to Whole School Evaluation--Management, Leadership and Learning (WSE-MLL): The Evolution of Inspection in Irish Schools over the Past Decade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Gerry; O'Hara, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to provide an overview of the key assumptions underpinning the "Whole School Evaluation" (WSE) inspection policy developed in Ireland since 2003. Beginning with a documentary analysis the paper argues that the capacity to generate useful self evaluative data in schools was seen as being at the heart of the model of…

  2. Southwestern Division 2012 History Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Abel Malo Max E Otis John J Rowe Harley Wong John E Kershaw Patricia A Alvey Kenneth L Voelkel Betty J Marinos Constantine G LITTLE ROCK DISTRICT...Superior SWG Gus Marinos Superior SWF Mead Sams Superior SWF Steven Swihart Superior SWT Kalli Clark Superior SWL Philip Copeland Superior SWDO Nick

  3. High Temperature Silicides and Refractory Alloys Symposium Held in Boston, Massachusetts on November 29 -December 2, 1993. Volume 322

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-02

    297 Gaurav Agarwal, Wen-yi Lin, and Robert F. Speyer PART V: RECENT ADVANCES IN REFRACTORY ALLOYS AND PROCESSING THE PROPERTIES AND...Jackson PART VIII: APPLICATIONS OF REFRACTORY ALLOYS *PROCESSING, PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS OF HIGH- TEMPERATURE NIOBIUM ALLOYS ...Potential higher fracture toughness at operating temperatures o Alloying may be extensively employed to improve mechanical properties "o Thcinnodrnas•kally

  4. Congenital leukaemia after heavy abuse of permethrin during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Borkhardt, A; Wilda, M; Fuchs, U; Gortner, L; Reiss, I

    2003-09-01

    A single case is described of congenital leukaemia with 11q23/MLL rearrangement in a preterm female newborn. Because of arachnophobia, the mother had heavily abused aerosolised permethrin, a widely used household insecticide. Permethrin is considered comparatively safe, but, in view of the mother's history, its potential to induce cleavage of the MLL gene in cell culture was tested. Incubation of the BV173 cell line with 50 micro M permethrin readily induced MLL cleavage.

  5. Massage Timing Affects Postexercise Muscle Recovery and Inflammation in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Caroline; Butterfield, Timothy A.; Abshire, Sarah; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jarjoura, David; Best, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study compared the effect of immediate versus delayed massage-like compressive loading (MLL) on peak isometric torque recovery and inflammatory cell infiltration following eccentric exercise (EEX). Methods Eighteen skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits were instrumented with peroneal nerve cuffs for stimulation of hindlimb tibialis anterior muscles. Following a bout of EEX, rabbits were randomly assigned to a MLL protocol (0.5Hz, 10N, 15min) started immediately post-EEX, 48 hours post-EXX, or no-MLL control and performed for four consecutive days. A torque-angle (T-Θ) relationship was obtained for 21 joint angles pre and post-EEX and post four consecutive days of MLL or no-MLL. Muscle wet weights and immunohistochemical sections were obtained following final treatments. Results EEX produced an average 51% (±13%) decrease in peak isometric torque output. Greatest peak torque recovery occurred with immediate application of MLL. There were differences in torque recovery between immediate and delayed MLL (p=0.0012), immediate MLL and control (p<0.0001), and delayed MLL and control (p=0.025). Immunohistochemical analysis showed 39.3% and 366.0% differences in the number of RPN3/57 and CD11b positive cells between immediate (p=0.71) and delayed MLL (p=0.12). Area under the T-Θ curve showed a difference for immediate (p<0.0001) and delayed (p=0.0051) MLL as compared to control. Exercise produced an average 10°± 0.2 rightward shift from pre exercise peak isometric torque angle. Control, immediate MLL and delayed MLL produced an average leftward angular shift from the post exercise angle (p=0.28, p=0.03, and p=0.47, respectively). Conclusion Post-EEX, immediate MLL was more beneficial than delayed MLL in restoring muscle function and modulating inflammatory cell infiltration. These findings invite similar human studies in order to make definitive conclusions on optimal timing of massage-based therapies. PMID:23274593

  6. In vivo passive mechanical properties of skeletal muscle improve with massage-like loading following eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Caroline; Best, Thomas M.; Wang, Qian; Butterfield, Timothy A.; Zhao, Yi

    2012-01-01

    A quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) model was used to study passive time-dependent responses of skeletal muscle to repeated massage-like compressive loading (MLL) following damaging eccentric exercise. Six skeletally mature rabbits were surgically instrumented with bilateral peroneal nerve cuffs for stimulation of the hindlimb tibialis anterior (TA) muscles. Following the eccentric exercise, rabbits were randomly assigned to a four-day MLL protocol mimicking deep effleurage (0.5 Hz, 10 N for 15 min or for 30 min). The contralateral hindlimb served as the exercised, no-MLL control for both MLL conditions. Viscoelastic properties of the muscle pre-exercise, post-exercise on Day 1, and pre- and post-MLL Day 1 through Day 4 were determined with ramp-and-hold tests. The instantaneous elastic response (AG0) increased following exercise (p <0.05) and decreased due to both the 15 min and 30 min four-day MLL protocols (p<0.05). Post-four days of MLL the normalized AG0 decreased from post-exercise (Day 1, 248.5%) to the post-MLL (Day 4, 98.5%) (p<0.05), compared to the no-MLL group (Day 4, 222.0%) (p<0.05). Exercise and four-day MLL showed no acute or cumulative effects on the fast and slow relaxation coefficients (p>0.05). This is the first experimental evidence of the effect of both acute (daily) and cumulative changes in viscoelastic properties of intensely exercised muscle due to ex vivo MLL. It provides a starting point for correlating passive muscle properties with mechanical effects of manual therapies, and may shed light on design and optimization of massage protocols. PMID:22944344

  7. Stimulation of short-term plant growth by glycerol applied as foliar sprays and drenches under greenhouse conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foliar and drench applications of glycerol were tested at 0, 0.1, 5, 10, 25, and 50 ml.l-1 on ‘Chantenay’ carrot (Daucus carota L.) family Apiaceae. Certain glycerol levels, especially the 1 to 10 ml.L-1 treatments, substantially increased fresh and dry weights of carrots sprayed twice over a 60-day...

  8. [Inhibition of growth of microscopic fungi with organic acids].

    PubMed

    Conková, E; Para, L; Kocisová, A

    1993-01-01

    Fungicidal effects of five selected organic acids (lactic, acetic, formic, oxalic, and propionic) in concentrations 3, 5, 10, 20 and 50 ml/l on nine selected species of moulds were tested. Lactic and oxalic acids did not prove the satisfactory fungicidal activity in any of the chosen concentrations. The antifungal effect of the other three acids, manifested by the growth inhibition of the tested moulds is shown in Tab. I and it can be expressed by sequence: propionic acid, formic acid, and acetic acid. These acids also had effects only in concentrations 20 ml/l and 50 ml/l. Propionic acid in concentration 20 ml/l inhibited the growth of five moulds (Penicillium glabrum, Aspergillus niger, Fusarium moniliforme, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium sphaerospermum). In testing of concentration 50 ml/l, the lower fungicidal ability was ascertained only in growth suppression of Aspergillus flavus. The fungicidal activity of formic acid was registered in concentration 20 ml/l in two cases and in concentration 50 ml/l in six cases. Acetic acid inhibited the growth in concentration 50 ml/l only in two cases. Tab. II shows the percentual evaluation of propionic acid and formic acid with regard to their inhibition abilities. The fungicidal efficiency of propionic acid resulting from the experiment is 88.9%.

  9. Wedged multilayer Laue Lens.

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, R.; Liu, C.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C. M.; Macrander, A. T.; Yan, H.; Kang, H. C.; Maser, J.; Stephenson, G. B.

    2008-05-01

    A multilayer Laue lens (MLL) is an x-ray focusing optic fabricated from a multilayer structure consisting of thousands of layers of two different materials produced by thin-film deposition. The sequence of layer thicknesses is controlled to satisfy the Fresnel zone plate law and the multilayer is sectioned to form the optic. An improved MLL geometry can be created by growing each layer with an in-plane thickness gradient to form a wedge, so that every interface makes the correct angle with the incident beam for symmetric Bragg diffraction. The ultimate hard x-ray focusing performance of a wedged MLL has been predicted to be significantly better than that of a nonwedged MLL, giving subnanometer resolution with high efficiency. Here, we describe a method to deposit the multilayer structure needed for an ideal wedged MLL and report our initial deposition results to produce these structures.

  10. Microbial reduction of hexavalent chromium by landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Li, Yarong; Low, Gary K-C; Scott, Jason A; Amal, Rose

    2007-04-02

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in municipal landfill leachates (MLL) and a non-putrescible landfill leachate (NPLL) was investigated. Complete Cr(VI) reduction was achieved within 17 days in a MLL when spiked with 100 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) or less. In the same period, negligible Cr(VI) reduction was observed in NPLL. In MLL, Cr(VI) reduction was demonstrated to be a function of initial Cr(VI) concentration and bacterial biomass and organic matter concentrations. The bacteria were observed to tolerate 250 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) in MLL and had an optimal growth activity at pH 7.4 in a growth medium. The MLL also possessed an ability to sequentially reduce Cr(VI) over three consecutive spiking cycles.

  11. Mass-like lesions as a rare form of neuro-Behçet's disease: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bilge, Nazife Şule Yasar; Şaylısoy, Suzan; Kaşifoglu, Timuçin; Korkmaz, Cengiz

    2014-03-01

    Cerebral mass-like lesion (MLL) is a rare form of Neuro-Behçet's (NB) disease. There is currently no detailed knowledge on this issue in the literature. Our aim was to describe a Behçet's disease (BD) patient with MLL, followed by a clinical analysis in light of the available literature regarding BD patients who suffered from an MLL or tumefactive lesion in the brain. We conducted a review of the English literature to analyse data on MLL in BD. The Pub-Med, Web of Science, Proquest and Ovid databases were searched for articles or abstracts using the term "Behçet's disease" combined with one of the following terms: mass-like lesion, tumour-like lesion and tumefactive lesion. We compared clinical and laboratory features of BD patients with MLL with NB patients. We found 12 cases plus our case (6 male, 7 female; mean age: 40 years) with BD who developed MLL alongside BD. Five out of 13 BD patients (38%) had a history of BD before the onset of neurological symptoms. In 8 patients (62%), BD was diagnosed after the onset of neurological involvement. Headache, hemiparesis, dizziness, aphasia, nausea and vomiting were the presenting manifestations of NB patients with MLL. Genital ulceration, eye involvement, skin lesion and arthritis/arthralgia were less commonly reported in NB patients with MLL compared to NB patients without MLL. NB disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cerebral MLL even when other cardinal manifestations of BD are absent. Mucocutaneous manifestations, eye and joint involvement may be seen less often in these patients.

  12. Structure of WDR5 bound to Mixed Lineage Leukemia protein-1 peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Dharmarajan, V; Cosgrove, M

    2008-01-01

    The mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) catalyzes histone H3 lysine 4 methylation and is regulated by interaction with WDR5 (WD-repeat protein-5), RbBP5 (retinoblastoma-binding protein-5), and the Ash2L (absent, small, homeotic discs-2-like) oncoprotein. In the accompanying investigation, we describe the identification of a conserved arginine containing motif, called the 'Win' or WDR5 interaction motif, that is essential for the assembly and H3K4 dimethylation activity of the MLL1 core complex. Here we present a 1.7-A crystal structure of WDR5 bound to a peptide derived from the MLL1 Win motif. Our results show that Arg-3765 of MLL1 is bound in the same arginine binding pocket on WDR5 that was previously suggested to bind histone H3. Thermodynamic binding experiments show that the MLL1 Win peptide is preferentially recognized by WDR5. These results are consistent with a model in which WDR5 recognizes Arg-3765 of MLL1, which is essential for the assembly and enzymatic activity of the MLL1 core complex.

  13. Exploding Wire Shock Test Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-15

    M o h as :la the *44 le it~ Uir t s -w Ittt eý 6tý-a s-~~ tasi w~ n ’~ithisaflN4 $ *th git’t iA t~ W𔃽ae we~ti k~~ tieir týv Irita44_l4kot# htves ý%e...aitW o0$s4f’§’ t@iut X§ N £ mafeg yf i45:~~V# ra )r •,t 100 S0p mow-. TtjI ci Ott80 I Li \\000 . 4d @4L nJ~) Li -aL ~P TComPuim~o Li ~ ~ TU5ES E...noeomnlry wiltogo. Thy reau~tozti of this i*tnrumonet in dependent Go tho wiro diaworof the semiiyttrainri.~% tihvh 1P thin e~onw in 1enIF tv~ n o. fl 1

  14. Mutations in the histone methyltransferase gene KMT2B cause complex early-onset dystonia.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Esther; Carss, Keren J; Rankin, Julia; Nichols, John M E; Grozeva, Detelina; Joseph, Agnel P; Mencacci, Niccolo E; Papandreou, Apostolos; Ng, Joanne; Barral, Serena; Ngoh, Adeline; Ben-Pazi, Hilla; Willemsen, Michel A; Arkadir, David; Barnicoat, Angela; Bergman, Hagai; Bhate, Sanjay; Boys, Amber; Darin, Niklas; Foulds, Nicola; Gutowski, Nicholas; Hills, Alison; Houlden, Henry; Hurst, Jane A; Israel, Zvi; Kaminska, Margaret; Limousin, Patricia; Lumsden, Daniel; McKee, Shane; Misra, Shibalik; Mohammed, Shekeeb S; Nakou, Vasiliki; Nicolai, Joost; Nilsson, Magnus; Pall, Hardev; Peall, Kathryn J; Peters, Gregory B; Prabhakar, Prab; Reuter, Miriam S; Rump, Patrick; Segel, Reeval; Sinnema, Margje; Smith, Martin; Turnpenny, Peter; White, Susan M; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wiethoff, Sarah; Wilson, Brian T; Winter, Gidon; Wragg, Christopher; Pope, Simon; Heales, Simon J H; Morrogh, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Carr, Lucinda J; Perez-Dueñas, Belen; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Reis, Andre; Gahl, William A; Toro, Camilo; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Chong, Wui K; Gissen, Paul; Topf, Maya; Dale, Russell C; Chubb, Jonathan R; Raymond, F Lucy; Kurian, Manju A

    2017-02-01

    Histone lysine methylation, mediated by mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) proteins, is now known to be critical in the regulation of gene expression, genomic stability, cell cycle and nuclear architecture. Despite MLL proteins being postulated as essential for normal development, little is known about the specific functions of the different MLL lysine methyltransferases. Here we report heterozygous variants in the gene KMT2B (also known as MLL4) in 27 unrelated individuals with a complex progressive childhood-onset dystonia, often associated with a typical facial appearance and characteristic brain magnetic resonance imaging findings. Over time, the majority of affected individuals developed prominent cervical, cranial and laryngeal dystonia. Marked clinical benefit, including the restoration of independent ambulation in some cases, was observed following deep brain stimulation (DBS). These findings highlight a clinically recognizable and potentially treatable form of genetic dystonia, demonstrating the crucial role of KMT2B in the physiological control of voluntary movement.

  15. The Results of a Laboratory Feasibility Study for the Biological Treatment of Umatilla Groundwater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    ethanol 10 mL/L 0.1629 1638 173 benzoic acid 0.1 g/L 0.0008 47 13 EOS 10 mL/L 0.0346 539 87 lactose 20 mL/L ? 1646 181 whey 6 mL/L ? 211 11 Sampling...0.705 Lactose 0.377 1.838 Molasses 0.326 2.124 Whey 0.240 2.889 Corn Syrup 0.220 3.146 Na Lactate 0.029 24.151 Ethanol 0.027 25.961 Autoclaved...0.23 0.27 0.21 0.24 0.03 Day Ethanol Average St Dev 0 15 0.00 0.01 0.12 0.04 0.07 27 0.29 0.18 0.02 0.16 0.14 Day Whey Average St Dev 0

  16. Bonded multilayer Laue Lens for focusing hard x-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Conley, R.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C.M.; Macrander, A.T.; Maser, J.; Kang, H.C.; Yan, H.; Stephenson, G.B.; Advanced Photonics Research Institute; Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology

    2007-11-11

    We have fabricated partial Multilayer Laue Lens (MLL) linear zone plate structures with thousands of alternating WSi{sub 2} and Si layers and various outermost zone widths according to the Fresnel zone plate formula. Using partial MLL structures, we were able to focus hard X-rays to line foci with a width of 30 nm and below. Here, we describe challenges and approaches used to bond these multilayers to achieve line and point focusing. Bonding was done by coating two multilayers with AuSn and heating in a vacuum oven at 280-300 C. X-ray reflectivity measurements confirmed that there was no change in the multilayers after heating to 350 C. A bonded MLL was polished to a 5-25 {micro}m wedge without cracking. SEM image analyses found well-positioned multilayers after bonding. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a bonded full MLL for focusing hard X-rays.

  17. Effects of garlic and ginger oils on hematological and biochemical variables of sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Sevdan; Ergün, Sebahattin

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of garlic and ginger oils on hematological and biochemical health characteristics of sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax. Fish were exposed to garlic oil (0.01 or 0.02 mL/L), ginger oil (0.01 or 0.02 mL/L), or a combination of the two oils (each oil at a concentration of 0.005 or 0.01 mL/L) for 96 h via bath immersion. Results showed that the red blood cell count, hematocrit (%), hemoglobin (Hb) concentration (g/dL), mean corpuscular volume (μm(3)), mean corpuscular Hb (pg), and mean corpuscular Hb concentration (%) were not significantly affected by herb oil exposure. However, some changes in biochemical variables were observed. Sea bass exposed to the 0.005-mL/L garlic oil-ginger oil mixture exhibited a significant increase in serum glucose. Serum total protein and albumin levels decreased in sea bass that were exposed to a garlic oil-ginger oil mixture (0.005 or 0.01 mL/L) or to garlic oil at 0.02 mL/L. Serum globulin levels decreased and triglyceride levels increased in sea bass exposed to 0.02-mL/L garlic oil or to the 0.01-mL/L mixture. The serum lipase level decreased and the cholesterol level increased in fish that were exposed to 0.02-mL/L garlic oil. In summary, ginger oil at 0.01-0.02 mL/L can be used without negative effects, while the garlic oil or garlic oil-ginger oil mixture should be applied at a concentration below 0.005 mL/L for bath immersion of sea bass. This is the first study to examine how garlic oil and ginger oil exposure via bath immersion affects the hematological and biochemical status of sea bass.

  18. Full Multilayer Laue Lens for Focusing Hard X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chian; Shi, B.; Qian, J.; Conley, R.; Yan, H.; Wieczorek, M.; Macrander, A. T.; Maser, J.; Stephenson, G. B.

    2010-06-23

    Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLLs) were developed by us using dynamic diffraction effects to efficiently focus hard x-rays to very small spots. Using a partial MLL we were able to focus 19.5-keV hard x-rays to a line focus of 16 nm with an efficiency of 31%. A full MLL is a complete linear MLL structure. It can be fabricated by bonding two partial MLL wafers, or by growing the full structure using magnetron sputtering without bonding. A 40-{mu}m full MLL, with a total of 5166 layers of WSi{sub 2} and Si, has been successfully grown by sputter deposition. The layer thicknesses gradually vary from 4 nm to {approx}400 nm and then back to 4 nm. Two coating runs were used to grow the full structure, one for each half. It took over 56 h for each run. A 100-{mu}m nearly-full MLL was constructed by bonding. Each 50-{mu}m half-structure has 1788 WSi{sub 2} and Si layers with 12-nm to {approx}32-nm thicknesses and {approx}32-{mu}m total thickness, followed by a thick WSi{sub 2} layer of {approx}17 {mu}m, and an AuSn layer of {approx}1 {mu}m. Both full MLL structures survived dicing and polishing. The primary results demonstrate the feasibility and potential of a full MLL with a doubled numerical aperture and large beam acceptance for hard x-rays.

  19. Full Multilayer Laue Lens for focusing hard x-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Shi, B.; Qian, J.; Conley, R.; Yan, H.; Wieczorek, M.; Macrander, A. T.; Maser, J.; Stephenson, G. B.

    2010-06-01

    Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLLs) were developed by us using dynamic diffraction effects to efficiently focus hard x-rays to very small spots. Using a partial MLL we were able to focus 19.5-keV hard x-rays to a line focus of 16 nm with an efficiency of 31%. A full MLL is a complete linear MLL structure. It can be fabricated by bonding two partial MLL wafers, or by growing the full structure using magnetron sputtering without bonding. A 40-{micro}m full MLL, with a total of 5166 layers of WSi{sub 2} and Si, has been successfully grown by sputter deposition. The layer thicknesses gradually vary from 4 nm to {approx}400 nm and then back to 4 nm. Two coating runs were used to grow the full structure, one for each half. It took over 56 h for each run. A 100-{micro}m nearly-full MLL was constructed by bonding. Each 50-{micro}m half-structure has 1788 WSi{sub 2} and Si layers with 12-nm to {approx}32-nm thicknesses and {approx}32-{micro}m total thickness, followed by a thick WSi{sub 2} layer of {approx}17 {micro}m, and an AuSn layer of {approx}1 {micro}m. Both full MLL structures survived dicing and polishing. The primary results demonstrate the feasibility and potential of a full MLL with a doubled numerical aperture and large beam acceptance for hard x-rays.

  20. Cooperation between AlphavBeta3 integrin and the fibroblast growth factor receptor enhances proliferation of Hox-overexpressing acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Chirag A.; Bei, Ling; Wang, Hao; Altman, Jessica K.; Platanias, Leonidas C.; Eklund, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    A poor prognosis subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by increased expression of a set of homeodomain (HD) transcription factors, including HoxA9, HoxA10 and Cdx4. This encompasses AML with MLL1 gene translocations, because Mll1-fusion proteins aberrantly activate HOX transcription. We previously identified FGF2 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 2) as a target gene for HoxA9 and HoxA10 that was indirectly activated by Mll-Ell (an Mll1-fusion protein). Autocrine stimulation of Mll-Ell+ myeloid progenitor cells by Fgf2 stabilized βcatenin and increased expression of βcatenin target genes, including CDX4. Since HOXA9 and HOXA10 are Cdx4 target genes, Fgf2 indirectly augmented direct effects of Mll-Ell on these genes. ITGB3, encoding β3 integrin, is another HoxA10 target gene. In the current studies, we found activation of ITGB3 transcription in Mll-Ell+ myeloid progenitor cells via HoxA9 and HoxA10. Increased expression of αvβ3 integrin increased Syk-activation; contributing to cytokine hypersensitivity. However, inhibiting Fgf-R partly reversed αvβ3 activity in Mll-Ell+ progenitor cells by decreasing ITGB3 promoter activity in a βcatenin- and Cdx4-dependent manner. Inhibitors of Fgf-R or Syk impaired proliferation of CD34+ bone marrow cells from AML subjects with increased Hox-expression; with a greater combined effect. These studies identified a rational therapeutic approach to this AML subtype. PMID:27340869

  1. PU.1 affects proliferation of the human acute myeloid leukemia U937 cell line by directly regulating MEIS1

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, JING; ZHANG, XIAOFENG; WANG, YUHUA; GUAN, YINGHUI

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is a member of the ETS family, which is expressed in a wide variety of hematopoietic lineages. Accumulating evidence has indicated that PU.1 plays a key role in hematopoiesis, and reduced expression of PU.1 leads to the pathogenesis of human myeloid leukemia. As a multi-functional factor, PU.1 is also required for mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) stem cell potential and the development of MLL. However, the function of PU.1 in human non-MLL leukemia and its molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. In the present study, PU.1 siRNA was demonstrated to efficiently inhibit the transcription level of oncogene MEIS1 in the human acute myeloid non-MLL leukemia U937 cell line. In addition, PU.1, as a positive regulator of MEIS1, performed a crucial role in maintaining cell proliferation. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and luciferase reporter assay, previously unexplored evidence that PU.1 activated the MEIS1 promoter through a conserved binding motif in vitro and in vivo was further defined. Overall, the present study provides insight into the molecular mechanism of the contribution of PU.1 to the pathogenesis of non-MLL U937 cells, which is mediated by direct regulation of MEIS1 transcription. The present data reveal the possibility of developing an alternative therapy for non-MLL leukemia by targeting PU.1-mediated MEIS1 gene activation. PMID:26622774

  2. New and little known Brachodidae from tropical Asia and Papua New Guinea (Lepidoptera, Cossoidea).

    PubMed

    Kallies, Axel

    2013-01-01

    In this study nine new species and a new genus of Brachodidae are described from tropical Asia and Papua New Guinea. Synechodes polias sp. nov. and Synechodes tamila sp. nov. are described from Sulawesi and southern India, respectively. A new genus, Saccocera gen. nov. (type species Miscera orpheus Kallies, 2004), is described to accommodate five species occurring from Taiwan and Sumatra across Melanesia to Papua New Guinea. It differs significantly from the related genera Miscera Walker, 1863 and Synechodes Turner, 1913 in morphological details of the head and the male and female genitalia. Two species of Saccocera are described here, Saccocera panaras sp. nov. from Papua New Guinea and Saccocera miangkabau sp. nov. from Sumatra. Furthermore, Miscera minahasa sp. nov. and Paranigilgia mariannae sp. nov. are described from Sulawesi, Paranigilgia brandti sp. nov. and Nigilgia atribractea sp. nov. from Papua, and Nigilgia browni sp. nov. is described from Christmas Island. Finally, Synechodes heppneri Kallies, 1998 syn. nov. is reverted to a junior synonym of Synechodes coniophora Turner, 1913. Nigilgia anactis Diakonoff, 1982 is figured for the first time and its distribution in Asia is discussed.

  3. Baseline Neurocognitive Performance in Professional Lacrosse Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Plancher, Kevin D.; Brooks-James, Ariana; Nissen, Carl W.; Diduch, B. Kent; Petterson, Stephanie C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Concussions have become a major public health concern for both youth and professional athletes. The long-term consequences of concussion can be debilitating or even life threatening. To reduce these concerns, baseline neurocognitive performance can aid decision making in postconcussion recovery and return to play for athletes sustaining concussions. To date, these data are not available for lacrosse athletes. Purpose: To present baseline neurocognitive performance for Major League Lacrosse (MLL) players and to determine differences between athletes with and without a history of concussion. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted of Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) scores from MLL players who completed baseline testing from June 2010 to June 2011. Inclusion required a valid baseline test and no history of concussion in the 3 months prior to testing. Means ± standard deviations were computed for all demographic variables and ImPACT composite scores including visual and verbal memory, reaction time, and visual motor processing speed. Independent-samples t tests were used to determine differences between athletes with and without a history of concussion. Results: Valid baseline ImPACT testing was available for 235 MLL athletes (mean age, 25.1 ± 3.0 years). Forty percent of MLL athletes (n = 94) reported a history of concussion, with 14% of those (n = 13) reporting a history of 3 or more previous concussions. There were no differences on any demographic variables between MLL athletes with and without a history of concussion. MLL athletes with a history of concussion had lower ImPACT composite scores than those without a history of concussion, although only the verbal memory composite was found to be statistically significant (MLL with concussion, 83.2 ± 10.8 vs MLL without concussion, 86.9 ± 9.5; P = .007). Conclusion: This study establishes baseline Im

  4. Epigenetic regulation of IL-12-dependent T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Matthew; Ito, Toshihiro; Allen, Ronald M.; Kroetz, Danielle; Kittan, Nicolai; Ptaschinski, Catherine; Cavassani, Karen; Carson, William F.; Godessart, Nuria; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Dou, Yali; Kunkel, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the cytokine IL-12 and the transcription factor STAT4, an essential part of the IL-12 signaling pathway, are critical components of the Th1 differentiation process in T cells. In response to pathogenic stimuli, this process causes T cells to proliferate rapidly and secrete high amounts of the cytokine IFN-γ, leading to the Th1 proinflammatory phenotype. However, there are still unknown components of this differentiation pathway. We here demonstrated that the expression of the histone methyltransferase Mll1 is driven by IL-12 signaling through STAT4 in humans and mice and is critical for the proper differentiation of a naïve T cell to a Th1 cell. Once MLL1 is up-regulated by IL-12, it regulates the proliferation of Th1 cells. As evidence of this, we show that Th1 cells from Mll1+/− mice are unable to proliferate rapidly in a Th1 environment in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, upon restimulation with cognate antigen Mll1+/−, T cells do not convert to a Th1 phenotype, as characterized by IFN-γ output. Furthermore, we observed a reduction in IFN-γ production and proliferation in human peripheral blood stimulated with tetanus toxoid by use of a specific inhibitor of the MLL1/menin complex. Together, our results demonstrate that the MLL1 gene plays a previously unrecognized but essential role in Th1 cell biology and furthermore, describes a novel pathway through which Mll1 expression is regulated. PMID:26059830

  5. Effects of Petrol Exposure on Glucose, Liver and Muscle glycogen levels in the Common African toad Bufo regularis.

    PubMed

    Isehunwa, G O; Yusuf, I O; Alada, A Ar

    2017-03-06

    This study investigated the effects of exposure to petrol on blood glucose, liver and muscle glycogen levels in the common African toad Bufo regularis. A total of 126 adult toads of either sex weighing between 70-100g were used for this study. The experiment was divided into three phases. The phase 1 experiment the acute toxicity test consisted of animals divided into six groups of 10 toads per group and were exposed to water (H2O), H2O + Tween 80, 2ml/l, 3ml/l, 5ml/l, and 10ml/l of petrol respectively for 96 hours using the static renewal bioassay system. In the Phase 2 experiment, the animals were exposed to H2O, H2O + Tween 80, 0.14ml/l, 0.3ml/l, 0.6ml/l, and 1.13ml/l of petrol respectively for 3 days; while in phase 3 experiment they were exposed to petrol solutions for 14 days. After the various exposures, the blood glucose, liver and muscle glycogen contents were determined using standard methods. The results of the study showed that the median lethal concentration of petrol (96 hours LC50) was 4.5ml/l and sub-lethal concentration of petrol caused mortality of animals. Exposure to petrol solutions for 3 days had no significant effect on blood glucose level of the animals but caused significant decrease in the liver and muscle glycogen levels at high concentrations. In the animals exposed to petrol solutions for 14 days, there was a significant increase in glucose levels and significant reduction in liver and muscle glycogen levels at high concentrations when compared with the control. The results show that sub-lethal concentrations of petrol can cause mortality of animals, hyperglycemia and reduction in liver and muscle glycogen levels. The effects of petrol exposure on carbohydrate metabolism depend on the concentration and duration of exposure.

  6. The COMPASS Family of H3K4 Methylases in Drosophila ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Man; Herz, Hans-Martin; Smith, Edwin R.; Zhang, Ying; Jackson, Jessica; Washburn, Michael P.; Florens, Laurence; Eissenberg, Joel C.; Shilatifard, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is implemented by Set1/COMPASS, which was originally purified based on the similarity of yeast Set1 to human MLL1 and Drosophila melanogaster Trithorax (Trx). While humans have six COMPASS family members, Drosophila possesses a representative of the three subclasses within COMPASS-like complexes: dSet1 (human SET1A/SET1B), Trx (human MLL1/2), and Trr (human MLL3/4). Here, we report the biochemical purification and molecular characterization of the Drosophila COMPASS family. We observed a one-to-one similarity in subunit composition with their mammalian counterparts, with the exception of LPT (lost plant homeodomains [PHDs] of Trr), which copurifies with the Trr complex. LPT is a previously uncharacterized protein that is homologous to the multiple PHD fingers found in the N-terminal regions of mammalian MLL3/4 but not Drosophila Trr, indicating that Trr and LPT constitute a split gene of an MLL3/4 ancestor. Our study demonstrates that all three complexes in Drosophila are H3K4 methyltransferases; however, dSet1/COMPASS is the major monoubiquitination-dependent H3K4 di- and trimethylase in Drosophila. Taken together, this study provides a springboard for the functional dissection of the COMPASS family members and their role in the regulation of histone H3K4 methylation throughout development in Drosophila. PMID:21875999

  7. Taproot promoters cause tissue specific gene expression within the storage root of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Oltmanns, Heiko; Kloos, Dorothee U; Briess, Waltraud; Pflugmacher, Maike; Stahl, Dietmar J; Hehl, Reinhard

    2006-08-01

    The storage root (taproot) of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) originates from hypocotyl and primary root and contains many different tissues such as central xylem, primary and secondary cambium, secondary xylem and phloem, and parenchyma. It was the aim of this work to characterize the promoters of three taproot-expressed genes with respect to their tissue specificity. To investigate this, promoters for the genes Tlp, His1-r, and Mll were cloned from sugar beet, linked to reporter genes and transformed into sugar beet and tobacco. Reporter gene expression analysis in transgenic sugar beet plants revealed that all three promoters are active in the storage root. Expression in storage root tissues is either restricted to the vascular zone (Tlp, His1-r) or is observed in the whole organ (Mll). The Mll gene is highly organ specific throughout different developmental stages of the sugar beet. In tobacco, the Tlp and Mll promoters drive reporter gene expression preferentially in hypocotyl and roots. The properties of the Mll promoter may be advantageous for the modification of sucrose metabolism in storage roots.

  8. Seed vigour studies in corn, soybean and tomato in response to fish protein hydrolysates and consequences on phenolic-linked responses.

    PubMed

    Horii, Akiyo; McCue, Patrick; Shetty, Kalidas

    2007-08-01

    Seed priming with fish protein hydrolysates (FPH) has been studied for the enhancement of seed vigour of corn, soybean and tomato. The influence of FPH at 2.5 mL/L and 5.0 mL/L on traditional agronomic parameters for seed vigour (germination percentage, seedling weight, seedling height) and potential new vigour-associated parameters (phenolic content, antioxidant activity, guaiacol peroxidase (GuPX) activity, chlorophyll content) was investigated. FPH treatment preferentially stimulated seedling vigour in the following order: soybean>tomato>corn. For soybean, FPH at 2.5 mL/L and 5 mL/L improved the majority of the seed vigour parameters (seedling weight and height, phenolic content, antioxidant activity and chlorophyll content, and lignification-associated GuPX activity). Similarly, for tomato, FPH at 2.5 mL/L stimulated seedling weight and height, GuPX activity and chlorophyll content. However, FPH did not stimulate corn seed vigour. Our results suggest an ability of proline precursor-rich FPH to improve of plant growth and development (e.g., seed vigour) in phenolic-rich plant species through modulation of phenolic and chlorophyll metabolisms.

  9. Compositions and methods for detecting gene rearrangements and translocations

    DOEpatents

    Rowley, Janet D.; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a series of nucleic acid probes for use in diagnosing and monitoring certain types of leukemia using, e.g., Southern and Northern blot analyses and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These probes detect rearrangements, such as translocations involving chromosome band 11q23 with other chromosomes bands, including 4q21, 6q27, 9p22, 19p13.3, in both dividing leukemic cells and interphase nuclei. The breakpoints in all such translocations are clustered within an 8.3 kb BamHI genomic region of the MLL gene. A novel 0.7 kb BamH1 cDNA fragment derived from this gene detects rearrangements on Southern blot analysis with a single BamHI restriction digest in all patients with the common 11q23 translocations and in patients with other 11q23 anomalies. Northern blot analyses are presented demonstrating that the MLL gene has multiple transcripts and that transcript size differentiates leukemic cells from normal cells. Also disclosed are MLL fusion proteins, MLL protein domains and anti-MLL antibodies.

  10. Psip1/Ledgf p75 restrains Hox gene expression by recruiting both trithorax and polycomb group proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepa, Madapura M.; Grimes, Graeme R.; Taylor, Gillian C.A.; Sutherland, Heidi G.; Bickmore, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    Trithorax and polycomb group proteins are generally thought to antagonize one another. The trithorax family member MLL (myeloid/lymphoid or mixed-lineage leukemia) is presumed to activate Hox expression, counteracting polycomb-mediated repression. PC4 and SF2 interacting protein 1 (PSIP1)/p75, also known as LEDGF, whose PWWP domain binds to H3K36me3, interacts with MLL and tethers MLL fusion proteins to HOXA9 in leukaemias. Here we show, unexpectedly, that Psip1/p75 regulates homeotic genes by recruiting not only MLL complexes, but also the polycomb group protein Bmi1. In Psip1−/− cells binding of Mll1/2, Bmi1 and the co-repressor Ctbp1 at Hox loci are all abrogated and Hoxa and Hoxd mRNA expression increased. Our data not only reveal a potential mechanism of action for Psip1 in the regulation of Hox genes but also suggest an unexpected interplay between proteins usually considered as transcriptional activators and repressors. PMID:25056311

  11. Morel-Lavallée Lesion of the Knee in a Recreational Frisbee Player

    PubMed Central

    Shmerling, Alison; Bravman, Jonathan T.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic swelling/effusion in the knee region is a relatively common presenting complaint among athletes and nonathletes. Due to its broad differential diagnosis, a comprehensive evaluation beginning with history and physical examination are recommended. Knee joint effusion can be differentiated from other types of swelling by careful physical examination. Imaging, including plain radiography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is preferred modality. Aspiration of a local fluctuating mass may help with the diagnosis and management of some of these conditions. We present a case of a 26-year-old gentleman with superomedial Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) of the knee with history of a fall during a Frisbee game. His MLL was successfully treated with therapeutic aspiration and compression wrap without further sequelae. MLL is a rare condition consisting of a closed degloving injury caused by pressure and shear stress between the subcutaneous tissue and the superficial fascia or bone. Most commonly, MLL is found over the greater trochanter and sacrum but in rare cases can occur in other regions of the body. In most cases, concurrent severe injury mechanisms and concomitant fractures are present. MLL due to sports injuries are very rare. Therapeutic strategies may vary from compression wraps and aspiration to surgical evacuation. PMID:27493817

  12. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  13. Significance of CD66c expression in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Iijima, Kazutoshi; Tomita, Osamu; Miharu, Masashi; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Kenichiro; Okita, Hajime; Kajiwara, Michiko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Inukai, Takeshi; Makimoto, Atsushi; Fukushima, Takashi; Nanmoku, Toru; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Manabe, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Akira; Sugita, Kanji; Fujimoto, Junichiro; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Ohara, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Upon analyzing 696 childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) cases, we identified the characteristics of CD66c expression. In addition to the confirmation of strong correlation with BCR-ABL positivity and hyperdiploid, we further observed that CD66c is frequently expressed in CRLF2-positive (11/15, p<0.01 against chimeric gene-negative) as well as hypodiploid cases (3/4), whereas it is never expressed in ETV6-RUNX1, MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, MLL-ENL, and E2A-PBX1-positive cases. Although the expression of CD66c itself is not directly linked to the prognosis, the accompanying genetic abnormalities are important prognostic factors for BCP-ALL, indicating the importance of CD66c expression in the initial diagnosis of BCP-ALL.

  14. MRD detection of leukemia relapse using HLA typing by FACS in combination with FISH after mismatched allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Eri; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Tsuma, Yusuke; Kawashima-Goto, Sachiko; Tamura, Shinichi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Hosoi, Hajime

    2014-08-01

    Loss of mismatched HLA is a cause of relapse following HLA-mismatched allo-SCT. We directly detected the loss of mismatched HLA alleles in relapsed leukemic cells at a MRD level using HLA typing by multicolor FACS (HLA-Flow) in combination with FISH in the BM of two patients with MLL-AF9-positive AML, at 6 and 10 months after mismatched allo-SCT. HLA-Flow with FISH analysis detected relapsed leukemic cells not expressing a mismatched HLA allele and harboring the MLL rearrangement. Simultaneously, real-time quantitative RT-PCR detected a low copy number of MLL-AF9 transcripts, consistent with MRD detection. HLA-Flow with FISH is a powerful method for detecting molecular relapse after mismatched allo-SCT and provides important information on the HLA expression status of the relapsed leukemic cells to help determine the next intervention.

  15. Prepaying the entropic cost for allosteric regulation in KIX.

    PubMed

    Law, Sean M; Gagnon, Jessica K; Mapp, Anna K; Brooks, Charles L

    2014-08-19

    The kinase-inducible domain interacting (KIX) domain of the CREB binding protein (CBP) is capable of simultaneously binding two intrinsically disordered transcription factors, such as the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) and c-Myb peptides, at isolated interaction sites. In vitro, the affinity for binding c-Myb is approximately doubled when KIX is in complex with MLL, which suggests a positive cooperative binding mechanism, and the affinity for MLL is also slightly increased when KIX is first bound by c-Myb. Expanding the scope of recent NMR and computational studies, we explore the allosteric mechanism at a detailed molecular level that directly connects the microscopic structural dynamics to the macroscopic shift in binding affinities. To this end, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of free KIX, KIX-c-Myb, MLL-KIX, and MLL-KIX-c-Myb using a topology-based Gō-like model. Our results capture an increase in affinity for the peptide in the allosteric site when KIX is prebound by a complementary effector and both peptides follow an effector-independent folding-and-binding mechanism. More importantly, we discover that MLL binding lowers the entropic cost for c-Myb binding, and vice versa, by stabilizing the L12-G2 loop and the C-terminal region of the α3 helix on KIX. This work demonstrates the importance of entropy in allosteric signaling between promiscuous molecular recognition sites and can inform the rational design of small molecule stabilizers to target important regions of conformationally dynamic proteins.

  16. Is there an Upgrading to Malignancy at Surgery of Mucocele-Like Lesions Diagnosed on Percutaneous Breast Biopsy?

    PubMed

    Diorio, Caroline; Provencher, Louise; Morin, Josée; Desbiens, Christine; Poirier, Brigitte; Poirier, Éric; Hogue, Jean-Charles; Jacob, Simon; Côté, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Management of pure mucocele-like lesion (MLL) diagnosed on percutaneous breast biopsy (PBB) is controversial. To assess surgical upgrade rate and clinical outcome of pure MLL obtained as sole diagnosis on PBB. Patients diagnosed with a MLL as the most advanced lesion on PBB from April 1997 to December 2010 were reviewed for radiologic presentation, biopsy technique, and pathologic and clinical outcomes. Of the 21,340 image-guided PBB performed during the study period, 50 women with 51 MLL (0.24%) were identified. Mean age was 53.1 ± 7.7 years. Radiologic findings were mostly microcalcifications (n = 47, 92.2%). Stereotactic PBB was performed for 49 lesions (96.1%). Surgery was performed shortly after biopsy in 35 women, with benign final pathology in 33, and upgrade to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in two patients (2/35, 5.7%). Mean follow-up was 4.2 ± 2.5 years (3.7 ± 2.1 years for surgical patients; 5.9 ± 2.9 years for follow-up only patients); three women were lost to follow-up (3/50). Three invasive cancers (3/47, 6.4%) were diagnosed 1.2, 1.2, and 2.8 years after biopsy: two in surgical patients, and one in a follow-up only patient. No cancer occurred at the same site as the original MLL. Pure MLL lesion of the breast is a rare entity and is mostly associated with a benign outcome. We observed an upgrade to DCIS slightly superior to 5%, but no invasive cancer. It is therefore unclear if these lesions should be excised or clinically and radiologically followed up when such lesions are found at PBB.

  17. Collaboration of MLLT1/ENL, Polycomb and ATM for transcription and genome integrity.

    PubMed

    Ui, Ayako; Yasui, Akira

    2016-04-25

    Polycomb group (PcG) repress, whereas Trithorax group (TrxG) activate transcription for tissue development and cellular proliferation, and misregulation of these factors is often associated with cancer. ENL (MLLT1) and AF9 (MLLT3) are fusion partners of Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL), TrxG proteins, and are factors in Super Elongation Complex (SEC). SEC controls transcriptional elongation to release RNA polymerase II, paused around transcription start site. In MLL rearranged leukemia, several components of SEC have been found as MLL-fusion partners and the control of transcriptional elongation is misregulated leading to tumorigenesis in MLL-SEC fused Leukemia. It has been suggested that unexpected collaboration of ENL/AF9-MLL and PcG are involved in tumorigenesis in leukemia. Recently, we found that the collaboration of ENL/AF9 and PcG led to a novel mechanism of transcriptional switch from elongation to repression under ATM-signaling for genome integrity. Activated ATM phosphorylates ENL/AF9 in SEC, and the phosphorylated ENL/AF9 binds BMI1 and RING1B, a heterodimeric E3-ubiquitin-ligase complex in Polycomb Repressive complex 1 (PRC1), and recruits PRC1 at transcriptional elongation sites to rapidly repress transcription. The ENL/AF9 in SEC- and PcG-mediated transcriptional repression promotes DSB repair near transcription sites. The implication of this is that the collaboration of ENL/AF9 in SEC and PcG ensures a rapid response of transcriptional switching from elongation to repression to neighboring genotoxic stresses for DSB repair. Therefore, these results suggested that the collaboration of ENL/AF9 and PcG in transcriptional control is required to maintain genome integrity and may be link to the MLL-ENL/AF9 leukemia.

  18. Human coronavirus NL63 replication is cyclophilin A-dependent and inhibited by non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine A-derivatives including Alisporivir.

    PubMed

    Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Ma-Lauer, Yue; Malešević, Miroslav; Theuerkorn, Martin; Kahlert, Viktoria; Prell, Erik; von Brunn, Brigitte; Muth, Doreen; Baumert, Thomas F; Drosten, Christian; Fischer, Gunter; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2014-05-12

    Until recently, there were no effective drugs available blocking coronavirus (CoV) infection in humans and animals. We have shown before that CsA and FK506 inhibit coronavirus replication (Carbajo-Lozoya, J., Müller, M.A., Kallies, S., Thiel, V., Drosten, C., von Brunn, A. Replication of human coronaviruses SARS-CoV, HCoV-NL63 and HCoV-229E is inhibited by the drug FK506. Virus Res. 2012; Pfefferle, S., Schöpf, J., Kögl, M., Friedel, C., Müller, M.A., Stellberger, T., von Dall'Armi, E., Herzog, P., Kallies, S., Niemeyer, D., Ditt, V., Kuri, T., Züst, R., Schwarz, F., Zimmer, R., Steffen, I., Weber, F., Thiel, V., Herrler, G., Thiel, H.-J., Schwegmann-Weßels, C., Pöhlmann, S., Haas, J., Drosten, C. and von Brunn, A. The SARS-Coronavirus-host interactome: identification of cyclophilins as target for pan-Coronavirus inhibitors. PLoS Pathog., 2011). Here we demonstrate that CsD Alisporivir, NIM811 as well as novel non-immunosuppressive derivatives of CsA and FK506 strongly inhibit the growth of human coronavirus HCoV-NL63 at low micromolar, non-cytotoxic concentrations in cell culture. We show by qPCR analysis that virus replication is diminished up to four orders of magnitude to background levels. Knockdown of the cellular Cyclophilin A (CypA/PPIA) gene in Caco-2 cells prevents replication of HCoV-NL63, suggesting that CypA is required for virus replication. Collectively, our results uncover Cyclophilin A as a host target for CoV infection and provide new strategies for urgently needed therapeutic approaches.

  19. Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Megakaryoblastic) With t(1;22)(p13;q13); RBM15-MKL1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With a Variant RARA Translocation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Variant MLL Translocations; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Development and characterization of monolithic multilayer Laue lens nanofocusing optics

    DOE PAGES

    Nazaretski, E.; Xu, W.; Bouet, N.; ...

    2016-06-27

    In this study, we have developed an experimental approach to bond two independent linear Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLLs) together. A monolithic MLL structure was characterized using ptychography at 12 keV photon energy, and we demonstrated 12 nm and 24 nm focusing in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. Fabrication of 2D MLL optics allows installation of these focusing elements in more conventional microscopes suitable for x-ray imaging using zone plates, and opens easier access to 2D imaging with high spatial resolution in the hard x-ray regime.

  1. Abnormal dicentric chromosome with co-amplification of sequences from chromosomes 11 and 19: a novel rearrangement in a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome transforming to acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Smith, A; Heaps, L S; Sharma, P; Jarvis, A; Forsyth, C

    2001-10-01

    A 66-year-old man with a myelodysplastic syndrome transforming to acute myeloid leukemia showed a complex abnormal karyotype on bone marrow aspirate. An unbalanced dicentric translocation with a very long der(11) long arm-dic(11;19)(q25;p13.4)-was present. Fluorescence in situ hybridization studies utilised paints for chromosomes 11 and 19 as well as the locus specific probe MLL, localised to 11q23. The abnormal chromosome 11q contained 6 copies of intact MLL and 6 copies of chromosome 19 (unidentified) sequences. To our knowledge, gene co-amplification of chromosomes 11 and 19 sequences has not been reported before.

  2. Development and characterization of monolithic multilayer Laue lens nanofocusing optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaretski, E.; Xu, W.; Bouet, N.; Zhou, J.; Yan, H.; Huang, X.; Chu, Y. S.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed an experimental approach to bond two independent linear Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLLs) together. A monolithic MLL structure was characterized using ptychography at 12 keV photon energy, and we demonstrated 12 nm and 24 nm focusing in horizontal and vertical directions, respectively. Fabrication of 2D MLL optics allows installation of these focusing elements in more conventional microscopes suitable for x-ray imaging using zone plates, and opens easier access to 2D imaging with high spatial resolution in the hard x-ray regime.

  3. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, R. A.; Bernard, S. M.; Bird, C. C.; Darwin, C. M.; O'Brien, C.; Richards, I. D.; Roberts, B.; McKinney, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second report of a large case control study of lymphoma/leukaemia occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84, and deals with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia presenting either in its haematological (CLL) or more solid lymphomatous (malignant lymphoma-lymphocytic or MLL) forms. In all, 330 cases and 561 controls were interviewed. The results support the concept that CLL/MLL is a condition of multiple aetiologies with evidence for genetic predisposition through an excess of family cases, immune perturbation demonstrated by excessive previous skin diseases and phenylbutazone use, and viral involvement shown by links with infectious diseases and multiple sclerosis. PMID:3304389

  4. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; Bernard, S M; Bird, C C; Darwin, C M; O'Brien, C; Richards, I D; Roberts, B; McKinney, P A

    1987-07-01

    This is the second report of a large case control study of lymphoma/leukaemia occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84, and deals with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia presenting either in its haematological (CLL) or more solid lymphomatous (malignant lymphoma-lymphocytic or MLL) forms. In all, 330 cases and 561 controls were interviewed. The results support the concept that CLL/MLL is a condition of multiple aetiologies with evidence for genetic predisposition through an excess of family cases, immune perturbation demonstrated by excessive previous skin diseases and phenylbutazone use, and viral involvement shown by links with infectious diseases and multiple sclerosis.

  5. A Theory of Collective Induction. Final Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-03

    Associates 8616 Weetwood Center Drive Dan of the Acadni Dept. MlL VA 22180 U. S. Naval Academy Annapolis, MD 21402-018 Dr. Michael Lasky Office of the...South Elena Avenue 1801 N. Beauregard Street Fourth Floor Alexandria, VA 22311 Redondo Beach, CA 90277 Lt. Dennis McBride, USN Dr. Harold P. Van Cott

  6. Decitabine and Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome, in Adults; AML (Adult) With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; AML (Adult) With Del(5q); AML (Adult) With Inv(16)(p13;q22); AML (Adult) With t(16;16)(p13;q22); AML (Adult) With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary AML (Adult); Untreated AML (Adult)

  7. Targeting Chromatin Regulators Inhibits Leukemogenic Gene Expression in NPM1 Mutant Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Michael W M; Song, Evelyn; Feng, Zhaohui; Sinha, Amit; Chen, Chun-Wei; Deshpande, Aniruddha J; Cusan, Monica; Farnoud, Noushin; Mupo, Annalisa; Grove, Carolyn; Koche, Richard; Bradner, James E; de Stanchina, Elisa; Vassiliou, George S; Hoshii, Takayuki; Armstrong, Scott A

    2016-10-01

    Homeobox (HOX) proteins and the receptor tyrosine kinase FLT3 are frequently highly expressed and mutated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Aberrant HOX expression is found in nearly all AMLs that harbor a mutation in the Nucleophosmin (NPM1) gene, and FLT3 is concomitantly mutated in approximately 60% of these cases. Little is known about how mutant NPM1 (NPM1(mut)) cells maintain aberrant gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that the histone modifiers MLL1 and DOT1L control HOX and FLT3 expression and differentiation in NPM1(mut) AML. Using a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing domain screen, we show NPM1(mut) AML to be exceptionally dependent on the menin binding site in MLL1. Pharmacologic small-molecule inhibition of the menin-MLL1 protein interaction had profound antileukemic activity in human and murine models of NPM1(mut) AML. Combined pharmacologic inhibition of menin-MLL1 and DOT1L resulted in dramatic suppression of HOX and FLT3 expression, induction of differentiation, and superior activity against NPM1(mut) leukemia.

  8. 2-Phenoxyethanol as anaesthetic in removing relocating 102 species of fishes representing from Sea World to uShaka Marine World, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, D B; Penning, M R; Christison, K W

    2008-09-01

    2-Phenoxyethanol was used as an anaesthetic to translocate 102 species of fishes representing 30 families from the Sea World aquarium on Durban's beachfront to uShaka Marine World. Most fishes responded well to a final anaesthetic concentration of 0.150 ml/l and there were no mortalities.

  9. Implementing the Small Business Innovation Development Act--The First 2 Years.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-25

    Information an WW atch anddvlmetpo 5l Sd diYwlOi~ft 10 mll flelds. Including pasm bs required for milew of agency requet O&uCMp aNd the social sciences. as well...mapping. collec. or comaparable organhational unit that conducta ihon Of general Purpose Statistim. experlimental such activities (section 44.31

  10. Project CHECO Southeast Asia Report. Khe Sanh (Operation NIAGARA) 22 January - 31 March 68

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1968-09-13

    two A-lEs (Hobo 35) loaded with two BLU 32s, four LAU 59s, two Mll7s, and four frag bombs each. These Hobos worked the area for almost one hour, and...altertate targets would preferably be located in the Kontum/ Dak To area. These targetsI must be capable :f aupporiing the entire efort Once fragged, the

  11. DNA Damage-Induced HSPC Malfunction Depends on ROS Accumulation Downstream of IFN-1 Signaling and Bid Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Tasdogan, Alpaslan; Kumar, Suresh; Allies, Gabriele; Bausinger, Julia; Beckel, Franziska; Hofemeister, Helmut; Mulaw, Medhanie; Madan, Vikas; Scharfetter-Kochanek, Karin; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Doehner, Konstanze; Speit, Günter; Stewart, A Francis; Fehling, Hans Joerg

    2016-12-01

    Mouse mutants with an impaired DNA damage response frequently exhibit a set of remarkably similar defects in the HSPC compartment that are of largely unknown molecular basis. Using Mixed-Lineage-Leukemia-5 (Mll5)-deficient mice as prototypical examples, we have identified a mechanistic pathway linking DNA damage and HSPC malfunction. We show that Mll5 deficiency results in accumulation of DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HSPCs. Reduction of ROS efficiently reverses hematopoietic defects, establishing ROS as a major cause of impaired HSPC function. The Ink4a/Arf locus also contributes to HSPC phenotypes, at least in part via promotion of ROS. Strikingly, toxic ROS levels in Mll5(-/-) mice are critically dependent on type 1 interferon (IFN-1) signaling, which triggers mitochondrial accumulation of full-length Bid. Genetic inactivation of Bid diminishes ROS levels and reverses HSPC defects in Mll5(-/-) mice. Overall, therefore, our findings highlight an unexpected IFN-1 > Bid > ROS pathway underlying DNA damage-associated HSPC malfunction.

  12. Low Genetic Diversity in Melanaphis sacchari Aphid Populations at the Worldwide Scale

    PubMed Central

    Nibouche, Samuel; Fartek, Benjamin; Mississipi, Stelly; Delatte, Hélène; Reynaud, Bernard; Costet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the genetic diversity and genetic structure of invading species, with contrasting results concerning the relative roles of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity in the success of introduced populations. Increasing evidence shows that asexual lineages of aphids are able to occupy a wide geographical and ecological range of habitats despite low genetic diversity. The anholocyclic aphid Melanaphis sacchari is a pest of sugarcane and sorghum which originated in the old world, was introduced into the Americas, and is now distributed worldwide. Our purpose was to assess the genetic diversity and structuring of populations of this species according to host and locality. We used 10 microsatellite markers to genotype 1333 individuals (57 samples, 42 localities, 15 countries) collected mainly on sugarcane or sorghum. Five multilocus lineages (MLL) were defined, grouping multilocus genotypes (MLG) differing by only a few mutations or scoring errors. Analysis of a 658 bp sequence of mitochondrial COI gene on 96 individuals revealed five haplotypes, with a mean divergence of only 0.19 %. The distribution of MLL appeared to be strongly influenced by geography but not by host plant. Each of the five MLL grouped individuals from (A) Africa, (B) Australia, (C) South America, the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean including East Africa, (D) USA, and (E) China. The MLL A and C, with a wide geographic distribution, matched the definition of superclone. Among aphids, M. sacchari has one of the lowest known rates of genetic diversity for such a wide geographical distribution. PMID:25148510

  13. Complete pulse characterization of quantum dot mode-locked lasers suitable for optical communication up to 160 Gbit/s.

    PubMed

    Schmeckebier, H; Fiol, G; Meuer, C; Arsenijević, D; Bimberg, D

    2010-02-15

    A complete characterization of pulse shape and phase of a 1.3 microm, monolithic-two-section, quantum-dot mode-locked laser (QD-MLL) at a repetition rate of 40 GHz is presented, based on frequency resolved optical gating. We show that the pulse broadening of the QD-MLL is caused by linear chirp for all values of current and voltage investigated here. The chirp increases with the current at the gain section, whereas larger bias at the absorber section leads to less chirp and therefore to shorter pulses. Pulse broadening is observed at very high bias, likely due to the quantum confined stark effect. Passive- and hybrid-QD-MLL pulses are directly compared. Improved pulse intensity profiles are found for hybrid mode locking. Via linear chirp compensation pulse widths down to 700 fs can be achieved independent of current and bias, resulting in a significantly increased overall mode-locking range of 101 MHz. The suitability of QD-MLL chirp compensated pulse combs for optical communication up to 160 Gbit/s using optical-time-division multiplexing are demonstrated by eye diagrams and autocorrelation measurements.

  14. Decontamination of a municipal landfill leachate from endocrine disruptors using a combined sorption/bioremoval approach.

    PubMed

    Loffredo, Elisabetta; Castellana, Giancarlo; Senesi, Nicola

    2014-02-01

    Sorption and biodegradation are the main mechanisms for the removal of endocrine disruptor compounds (EDs) from both solid and liquid matrices. There are recent evidences about the capacity of white-rot fungi to decontaminate water systems from phenolic EDs by means of their ligninolytic enzymes. Most of the available studies report the removal of EDs by biodegradation or adsorption separately. This study assessed the simultaneous removal of five EDs—the xenoestrogens bisphenol A (BPA), ethynilestradiol (EE2), and 4-n-nonylphenol (NP), and the herbicide linuron and the insecticide dimethoate—from a municipal landfill leachate (MLL) using a combined sorption/bioremoval approach. The adsorption matrices used were potato dextrose agar alone or added with each of the following adsorbent materials: ground almond shells, a coffee compost, a coconut fiber, and a river sediment. These matrices were either not inoculated or inoculated with the fungus Pleurotus ostreatus and superimposed on the MLL. The residual amount of each ED in the MLL was quantified after 4, 7, 12, and 20 days by HPLC analysis and UV detection. Preliminary experiments showed that (1) all EDs did not degrade significantly in the untreatedMLL for at least 28 days, (2) the mycelial growth of P. ostreatus was largely stimulated by components of the MLL, and (3) the enrichment of potato dextrose agar with any adsorbent material favored the fungal growth for 8 days after inoculation. A prompt relevant disappearance of EDs in the MLL occurred both without and, especially, with fungal activity, with the only exception of the very water soluble dimethoate that was poorly adsorbed and possibly degraded only during the first few days of experiments. An almost complete removal of phenolic EDs, especially EE2 and NP, occurred after 20 days or much earlier and was generally enhanced by the adsorbent materials used. Data obtained indicated that both adsorption and biodegradation mechanisms contribute

  15. BIOMECHANICAL AND HISTOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE GASTROCNEMIUS IN RATS SUBJECTED TO MUSCLE INJURY AND TREATMENT WITH LOW-LEVEL LASER THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Falcai, Mauricio José; Monte-Raso, Vanessa Vilela; Okubo, Rodrigo; Zamarioli, Ariane; Carvalho, Leonardo César; Shimano, Antõnio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To mechanically and histologically evaluate the application of low-level laser therapy to the reparative process on lesions caused by impact on the gastrocnemius muscles of rats. Methods: 45 female Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n=15/ group): C (control, no lesion), ML (muscle lesion) and ML-L (muscle lesion and laser therapy). The experimental muscle lesion was produced by letting a 250 g load drop from a height of 30 cm, directly onto the muscle. The animals in the ML-L group were subjected to application of 960 nm laser, 2 J/cm2, on the lesion site, for three days, twice a day. Mechanical tests were performed on an Emic® universal testing machine. Results: The mean values for the maximum force were: 35.70 (± 2.69) N in group C, 31.77 (± 2.59) N in group ML and 34.36 (± 3.63) N in group ML-L, with a statistically significant difference between groups C and ML (p < 0.05). The mean values for relative stiffness were: 3.75 (± 0.98) N/mm in group C, 3.84 (± 0.32) N/mm in group ML and 4.43 (± 0.68) N/mm in group ML-L, with no statistically significant differences (p>0.05). Histological analysis showed the presence of blood vessels in group ML-L and hematomas during the repair process. Conclusion: Laser therapy had a positive effect on the regeneration process of the muscle injury. PMID:27022578

  16. DNA-damage-induced differentiation of leukaemic cells as an anti-cancer barrier

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Margarida A.; Faryabi, Robert B.; Ergen, Aysegul V.; Day, Amanda M.; Malhowski, Amy; Canela, Andres; Onozawa, Masahiro; Lee, Ji-Eun; Callen, Elsa; Gutierrez-Martinez, Paula; Chen, Hua-Tang; Wong, Nancy; Finkel, Nadia; Deshpande, Aniruddha; Sharrow, Susan; Rossi, Derrick J.; Ito, Keisuke; Ge, Kai; Aplan, Peter D.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Nussenzweig, André

    2015-01-01

    Self-renewal is the hallmark feature both of normal stem cells and cancer stem cells1. Since the regenerative capacity of normal haematopoietic stem cells is limited by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and DNA double-strand breaks2–4, we speculated that DNA damage might also constrain leukaemic self-renewal and malignant haematopoiesis. Here we show that the histone methyl-transferase MLL4, a suppressor of B-cell lymphoma5,6, is required for stem-cell activity and an aggressive form of acute myeloid leukaemia harbouring the MLL–AF9 oncogene. Deletion of MLL4 enhances myelopoiesis and myeloid differentiation of leukaemic blasts, which protects mice from death related to acute myeloid leukaemia. MLL4 exerts its function by regulating transcriptional programs associated with the antioxidant response. Addition of reactive oxygen species scavengers or ectopic expression of FOXO3 protects MLL4−/− MLL–AF9 cells from DNA damage and inhibits myeloid maturation. Similar to MLL4 deficiency, loss of ATM or BRCA1 sensitizes transformed cells to differentiation, suggesting that myeloid differentiation is promoted by loss of genome integrity. Indeed, we show that restriction-enzyme-induced double-strand breaks are sufficient to induce differentiation of MLL–AF9 blasts, which requires cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1 (Cdkn1a) activity. In summary, we have uncovered an unexpected tumour-promoting role of genome guardians in enforcing the oncogene-induced differentiation blockade in acute myeloid leukaemia. PMID:25079327

  17. Production of hydrogen and volatile fatty acid by Enterobacter sp. T4384 using organic waste materials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Chun; Deshpande, Tushar R; Chun, Jongsik; Yi, Sung Chul; Kim, Hyunook; Um, Youngsoon; Sang, Byoung-In

    2013-02-01

    In a study of hydrogen-producing bacteria, strain T4384 was isolated from rice field samples in the Republic of Korea. The isolate was identified as Enterobacter sp. T4384 by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequences. Enterobacter sp. T4384 grew at a temperature range of 10-45 degrees C and at an initial pH range of 4.5-9.5. Strain T4384 produced hydrogen at 0-6% NaCl by using glucose, fructose, and mannose. In serum bottle cultures using a complete medium, Enterobacter sp. T4384 produced 1,098 ml/l H2, 4.0 g/l ethanol, and 1.0 g/l acetic acid. In a pH-regulated jar fermenter culture with the biogas removed, 2,202 ml/l H2, 6.2 g/l ethanol, and 1.0 g/l acetic acid were produced, and the lag-phase time was 4.8 h. Strain T4384 metabolized the hydrolysate of organic waste for the production of hydrogen and volatile fatty acid. The strain T4384 produced 947 ml/l H2, 3.2 g/l ethanol, and 0.2 g/l acetic acid from 6% (w/v) food waste hydrolysate; 738 ml/l H2, 4.2 g/l ethanol, and 0.8 g/l acetic acid from Miscanthus sinensis hydrolysate; and 805 ml/l H2, 5.0 g/l ethanol, and 0.7 g/l acetic acid from Sorghum bicolor hydrolysate.

  18. Effects of washed platelets vs platelet-rich plasma on the proliferation and mineralization of rat dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Xie, Y H; Lin, B R

    2015-08-14

    We examined the effects of washed platelets (WPLTs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on the proliferation and mineralization of rat dental pulp cells. Rat dental pulp cells were separated, cultured, and identified. Medium containing 1, 10, 100, or 500 mL/L PRP or WPLTs was added to 4th generation cells. The MTS method was used to determine cell proliferation. Alizarin red staining was used to observe the formation of mineralized nodules after cell mineralization and induction for 10 and 20 days under different culture conditions, and the areas of the mineralized nodules formed 20 days after induction were computed. The addition of 1, 10, and 100 mL/L WPLTs or PRP significantly promoted rat dental pulp cell proliferation (P < 0.05) whereas 500 mL/L WPLTs or PRP had no significant effect (P > 0.05). Under the same concentrations, no significant differences on cell proliferation were observed between WPLT and PRP treatments (P > 0.05 in all groups). After 10 days mineralization and culture, the 100 and 500 mL/L WPLT and PRP group positive nodule rates were significantly higher than those of the low concentration and the control groups (P < 0.05). After 20 days, the areas of the mineralized nodules formed in the 100 and 500 mL/L WPLT and PRP groups were significantly larger than those in the control group (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that both WPLTs and PRP are equally able to significantly promote the proliferation and calcification of rat dental pulp cells under a certain range of concentrations.

  19. X-ray Diffraction Studies of the Thick Filament in Permeabilized Myocardium from Rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,S.; Martyn, D.; Zaman, J.; Yu, L.

    2007-01-01

    Low angle x-ray diffraction patterns from relaxed permeabilized rabbit cardiac trabeculae and psoas muscle fibers were compared. Temperature was varied from 25{sup o}C to 5{sup o}C at 200 mM and 50 mM ionic strengths ({mu}), respectively. Effects of temperature and {mu} on the intensities of the myosin layer lines (MLL), the equatorial intensity ratio I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, and the spacing of the filament lattice are similar in both muscles. At 25{sup o}C, particularly at {mu} = 50 mM, the x-ray patterns exhibited up to six orders of MLL and sharp meridional reflections, signifying that myosin heads (cross-bridges) are distributed in a well-ordered helical array. Decreasing temperature reduced MLL intensities but increased I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}. Decreases in the MLL intensities indicate increasing disorder in the distribution of cross-bridges on the thick filaments surface. In the skeletal muscle, order/disorder is directly correlated with the hydrolysis equilibrium of ATP by myosin, [M.ADP.P{sub i}]/[M.ATP]. Similar effects of temperature on MLL and similar biochemical ATP hydrolysis pathway found in both types of muscles suggest that the order/disorder states of cardiac cross-bridges may well be correlated with the same biochemical and structural states. This implies that in relaxed cardiac muscle under physiological conditions, the unattached cross-bridges are largely in the M.ADP.P{sub i} state and with the lowering of the temperature, the equilibrium is increasingly in favor of [M.ATP] and [A.M.ATP]. There appear to be some differences in the diffraction patterns from the two muscles, however. Mainly, in the cardiac muscle, the MLL are weaker, the I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0} ratio tends to be higher, and the lattice spacing D{sub 10}, larger. These differences are consistent with the idea that under a wide range of conditions, a greater fraction of cross-bridges is weakly bound to actin in the myocardium.

  20. Disinfecting properties of performic acid against bacteriophage phi X 174 as a model of small envelope--free viruses.

    PubMed

    Bydzovská, O; Mĕrka, V

    1981-01-01

    Performic acid HCOOH (PFA) is a wide-spectrum disinfectant. It inactivates viruses, bacteria and bacterial spores, mycobacteria as well as microscopic fungi. Its main drawback is its instability, which makes it a logical necessity that it is to be prepared prior to use from its components HCOOH and H2O2. The mixing of 8 ml HCOOH of the concentration 850 ml/l and 17 ml H2O2 of the concentration 300 ml/l in a 100 ml-volume reagent bottle with a ground-in glass stopper gives, after an 1-hour rest at room temperature and after another 1 hour in a refrigerator, a stock solution that contains about 50 ml/l of PFA the actual concentration of which is determined iodometrically. Bacteriophage phi X 174 (host E. coli C) is characterized by cubic ikosahedral-type symmetry of particles free of envelope, has 27 mm in diameter and contains single-strand cyclic DNA; formerly was classed among Parvoviridae. The possibility of plaque assay-based quantitative determination of the number of infectious particles makes if it a feasible model for assessing disinfectant action on small hydrophilic viruses under conditions close to those of practical disinfection procedures. PFA stock solution diluted to 1 X 10(-3) (0.05 ml/l of effective component) inactivates the model virus of a concentration 10(8) pfu/ml aqueous suspension within 5 min so that no virus is detectable; the drop in the number of pfu amounts to 7 log orders of magnitude. In the presence of 400 ml/l of serum, the identical effect is achieved within 5 min by PFA stock solution diluted to 5 X 10(-3). The lowest PFA concentration that reliably inactivates bacteriophage phi X 174 in aqueous suspension is identical with the lowest concentration inactivating Coxsackie B 1 virus in tissue cultures. On textile, glass, plastic, rubber and metal carriers contaminated by swabbing or by a dried drop of bacteriophage suspension containing about 1 X 10(9) pfu/ml, the lowest reliably effective concentrations of PFA range within 0

  1. WSi2/Si multilayer sectioning by reactive ion etching for multilayer Laue lens fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouet, N.; Conley, R.; Biancarosa, J.; Divan, R.; Macrander, A. T.

    2010-09-01

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) has been employed in a wide range of fields such as semiconductor fabrication, MEMS (microelectromechanical systems), and refractive x-ray optics with a large investment put towards the development of deep RIE. Due to the intrinsic differing chemistries related to reactivity, ion bombardment, and passivation of materials, the development of recipes for new materials or material systems can require intense effort and resources. For silicon in particular, methods have been developed to provide reliable anisotropic profiles with good dimensional control and high aspect ratios1,2,3, high etch rates, and excellent material to mask etch selectivity. A multilayer Laue lens4 is an x-ray focusing optic, which is produced by depositing many layers of two materials with differing electron density in a particular stacking sequence where the each layer in the stack satisfies the Fresnel zone plate law. When this stack is sectioned to allow side-illumination with radiation, the diffracted exiting radiation will constructively interfere at the focal point. Since the first MLLs were developed at Argonne in the USA in 20064, there have been published reports of MLL development efforts in Japan5, and, very recently, also in Germany6. The traditional technique for sectioning multilayer Laue lens (MLL) involves mechanical sectioning and polishing7, which is labor intensive and can induce delamination or structure damage and thereby reduce yield. If a non-mechanical technique can be used to section MLL, it may be possible to greatly shorten the fabrication cycle, create more usable optics from the same amount of deposition substrate, and perhaps develop more advanced structures to provide greater stability or flexibility. Plasma etching of high aspect-ratio multilayer structures will also expand the scope for other types of optics fabrication (such as gratings, zone plates, and so-on). However, well-performing reactive ion etching recipes have been developed

  2. Statistical Optimization of the Content Composition Precursors Using Response Surface Methodology to Enhance Agaricoglyceride A Production from the Shaggy Ink Cap Medicinal Mushroom, Coprinus comatus (Higher Basidiomycetes) Mycelia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Di, Zhibiao; Li, Ruiguo; Tian, Jingzhen

    2015-01-01

    Coprinus comatus, a novel cultivated edible mushroom, has a various of pharmacological effects due to its many active components. In this study, agaricoglycerides, a new class of fungal secondary metabolites that have strong activity against neurolysin, were isolated from C. comatus mycelia. Simultaneously, a 3-level Box-Behnken factorial design was used, combined with response surface methodology, to optimize the precursor composition of agaricoglycerides for the production of agaricoglyceride A. The model estimated that a maximal yield of agaricoglyceride A (20.105 mg/L) could be obtained when the concentrations of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, glycerol, and methanol (MeOH) were set at 75 mg/L, 0.75 mL/L, and 0.75 mL/L, respectively. The verified experiments showed that the model was significantly consistent with the model prediction. These results showed that appropriately adding the precursors could increase the production of agaricoglyceride A.

  3. Cell-Cycle Control of Bivalent Epigenetic Domains Regulates the Exit from Pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar M; Sun, Yuhua; Li, Li; Zhang, Wenjuan; Wu, Tianming; Zhao, Shaying; Qin, Zhaohui; Dalton, Stephen

    2015-09-08

    Here we show that bivalent domains and chromosome architecture for bivalent genes are dynamically regulated during the cell cycle in human pluripotent cells. Central to this is the transient increase in H3K4-trimethylation at developmental genes during G1, thereby creating a "window of opportunity" for cell-fate specification. This mechanism is controlled by CDK2-dependent phosphorylation of the MLL2 (KMT2B) histone methyl-transferase, which facilitates its recruitment to developmental genes in G1. MLL2 binding is required for changes in chromosome architecture around developmental genes and establishes promoter-enhancer looping interactions in a cell-cycle-dependent manner. These cell-cycle-regulated loops are shown to be essential for activation of bivalent genes and pluripotency exit. These findings demonstrate that bivalent domains are established to control the cell-cycle-dependent activation of developmental genes so that differentiation initiates from the G1 phase.

  4. Frequent mutations of chromatin remodeling genes in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Yaoting; Guo, Guangwu; Huang, Yi; Hu, Xueda; Tang, Aifa; Gao, Shengjie; Wu, Renhua; Chen, Chao; Li, Xianxin; Zhou, Liang; He, Minghui; Li, Zesong; Sun, Xiaojuan; Jia, Wenlong; Chen, Jinnong; Yang, Shangming; Zhou, Fangjian; Zhao, Xiaokun; Wan, Shengqing; Ye, Rui; Liang, Chaozhao; Liu, Zhisheng; Huang, Peide; Liu, Chunxiao; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Hancheng; Sun, Liang; Liu, Xingwang; Jiang, Zhimao; Feng, Dafei; Chen, Jing; Wu, Song; Zou, Jing; Zhang, Zhongfu; Yang, Ruilin; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Congjie; Yin, Weihua; Guan, Zhichen; Ye, Jiongxian; Zhang, Hong; Li, Jingxiang; Kristiansen, Karsten; Nickerson, Michael L; Theodorescu, Dan; Li, Yingrui; Zhang, Xiuqing; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Cai, Zhiming

    2017-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common type of bladder cancer. Here we sequenced the exomes of nine individuals with TCC and screened all the somatically mutated genes in a prevalence set of 88 additional individuals with TCC with different tumor stages and grades. In our study, we discovered a variety of genes previously unknown to be mutated in TCC. Notably, we identified genetic aberrations of the chromatin remodeling genes (UTX, MLL-MLL3, CREBBP-EP300, NCOR1, ARID1A and CHD6) in 59% of our 97 subjects with TCC. Of these genes, we showed UTX to be altered substantially more frequently in tumors of low stages and grades, highlighting its potential role in the classification and diagnosis of bladder cancer. Our results provide an overview of the genetic basis of TCC and suggest that aberration of chromatin regulation might be a hallmark of bladder cancer. PMID:21822268

  5. Dynamic headspace analysis of the release of volatile organic compounds from ethanolic systems by direct APCI-MS.

    PubMed

    Tsachaki, Maroussa; Linforth, Robert S T; Taylor, Andrew J

    2005-10-19

    Static equilibrium headspace was diluted with a stream of nitrogen to study the stability of the volatile headspace concentration. The headspace dilution profile of 18 volatile compounds above aqueous and ethanolic solutions was measured in real time using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry. Under dynamic conditions the volatiles headspace concentration above water solutions decreased readily upon dilution. The presence of ethanol helped to maintain the volatile headspace concentration when the ethanol solution concentration was above 50 mL/L. This effect was such that under dynamic conditions the absolute volatile concentration above an ethanolic solution was higher than that above an aqueous solution, contrary to results observed in equilibrium studies. The ratio of the headspace concentration of volatiles above ethanolic 120 mL/L and water solutions was correlated to their air/water partition coefficient.

  6. Search for new high-mass particles decaying to Lepton pairs in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Daronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dituro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitin, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; van Remortel, N; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Sjolin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2005-12-16

    A search for new particles (X) that decay to electron or muon pairs has been performed using approximately 200 pb(-1) of pp collision data at (square root) s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. Limits on sigma(pp --> X)BR (X --> ll) are presented as a function of dilepton invariant mass m(ll) > 150 GeV/c2, for different spin hypotheses (0, 1, or 2). The limits are approximately 25 fb for m(ll) > GeV/c2. Lower mass bounds for X from representative models beyond the standard model including heavy neutral gauge bosons are presented.

  7. The NSLS-II Multilayer Laue Lens Deposition System

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, R.; Bouet, N.; Biancarosa, J.; Shen, Q.; Boas, L.; Feraca, J.; Rosenbaum, L.

    2009-08-02

    The NSLS-II[1] program has a requirement for an unprecedented level of x-ray nanofocusing and has selected the wedged multilayer Laue lens[2,3] (MLL) as the optic of choice to meet this goal. In order to fabricate the MLL a deposition system is required that is capable of depositing depth-graded and laterally-graded multilayers with precise thickness control over many thousands of layers, with total film growth in one run up to 100m thick or greater. This machine design expounds on the positive features of a rotary deposition system[4] constructed previously for MLLs and will contain multiple stationary, horizontally-oriented magnetron sources where a transport will move a substrate back and forth in a linear fashion over shaped apertures at well-defined velocities to affect a multilayer coating.

  8. Simple dispersion estimate for single-section quantum-dash and quantum-dot mode-locked laser diodes.

    PubMed

    O Duill, Sean P; Murdoch, Stuart G; Watts, Regan T; Rosales, Ricardo; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Landais, Pascal; Barry, Liam P

    2016-12-15

    The optical outputs of single-section quantum-dash and quantum-dot mode-locked lasers (MLLs) are well known to exhibit strong group velocity dispersion. Based on careful measurements of the spectral phase of the pulses from these MLLs, we confirm that the difference in group delay between the modes at either end of the MLL spectrum equals the cavity round-trip time. This observation allows us to deduce an empirical formula relating the accumulated dispersion of the output pulse to the spectral extent and free-spectral range of the MLL. We find excellent agreement with previously reported dispersion measurements of both quantum-dash and quantum-dot MLLs over a wide range of operating conditions.

  9. Recovery of Copper from Cyanidation Tailing by Flotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Tingsheng; Huang, Xiong; Yang, Xiuli

    2016-02-01

    In this work, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, sodium metabisulfite and copper sulfate as activators were investigated to lessen the depression effect of cyanide for deep-depressing chalcopyrite. The experimental results indicate that the copper recovery exceeded 94%, 84% and 97% at the dosage: sodium hypochlorite 3 mL/L, hydrogen peroxide 2 mL/L, sodium metabisulfite 2 × 10-3 mol/L and copper sulfate 1.67 × 10-4 mol/L, respectively. According to the results of zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared spectrum, it is suggested that chalcopyrite was depressed because of the chemical adsorption of cyanide on the chalcopyrite surfaces. Sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide and sodium metabisulfite can destroy Cu-C bond on the deep-depressing chalcopyrite surface by chemical reaction. Copper sulfate can activate deep-depressing chalcopyrite by copper ion adsorption.

  10. Dicer independent small RNAs associate with telomeric heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Fang; Li, Xiangzhi; Hiew, Samantha; Brady, Hugh; Liu, Yifan; Dou, Yali

    2009-01-01

    Small RNAs play important roles in the establishment and maintenance of heterochromatin structures. We show the presence of telomere specific small RNAs (tel-sRNAs) in mouse embryonic stem cells that are ∼24 nucleotides in length, Dicer-independent, and 2′-O-methylated at the 3′ terminus. The tel-sRNAs are asymmetric with specificity toward telomere G-rich strand, and evolutionarily conserved from protozoan to mammalian cells. Furthermore, tel-sRNAs are up-regulated in cells that carry null mutation of H3K4 methyltransferase MLL (Mll(−/−)) and down-regulated in cells that carry null mutations of histone H3K9 methyltransferase SUV39H (Suv39h1/h2(−/−)), suggesting that they are subject to epigenetic regulation. These results support that tel-sRNAs are heterochromatin associated pi-like small RNAs. PMID:19460867

  11. CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Ectopic DNMT3B expression delays leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Robert F; Steidl, Ulrich

    2016-03-24

    In this issue of Blood, Schulze et al use a tetracycline-inducible Dnmt3b knock-in mouse model to investigate how DNMT3B-mediated DNA methylation affects leukemogenesis. Increased DNMT3B expression prolonged survival in retrovirally induced Myc-Bcl2– or MLL-AF9–driven leukemia, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with high expression of DNMT3B target genes showed inferior overall survival.

  14. Biostimulant action of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate produced through enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Colla, Giuseppe; Rouphael, Youssef; Canaguier, Renaud; Svecova, Eva; Cardarelli, Mariateresa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biostimulant action (hormone like activity, nitrogen uptake, and growth stimulation) of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate by means of two laboratory bioassays: a corn (Zea mays L.) coleoptile elongation rate test (Experiment 1), a rooting test on tomato cuttings (Experiment 2); and two greenhouse experiments: a dwarf pea (Pisum sativum L.) growth test (Experiment 3), and a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) nitrogen uptake trial (Experiment 4). Protein hydrolysate treatments of corn caused an increase in coleoptile elongation rate when compared to the control, in a dose-dependent fashion, with no significant differences between the concentrations 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L, and inodole-3-acetic acid treatment. The auxin-like effect of the protein hydrolysate on corn has been also observed in the rooting experiment of tomato cuttings. The shoot, root dry weight, root length, and root area were significantly higher by 21, 35, 24, and 26%, respectively, in tomato treated plants with the protein hydrolysate at 6 ml/L than untreated plants. In Experiment 3, the application of the protein hydrolysate at all doses (0.375, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L) significantly increased the shoot length of the gibberellin-deficient dwarf pea plants by an average value of 33% in comparison with the control treatment. Increasing the concentration of the protein hydrolysate from 0 to 10 ml/L increased the total dry biomass, SPAD index, and leaf nitrogen content by 20.5, 15, and 21.5%, respectively. Thus the application of plant-derived protein hydrolysate containing amino acids and small peptides elicited a hormone-like activity, enhanced nitrogen uptake and consequently crop performances.

  15. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes That Have Relapsed or Not Responded to Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. GTI-2040 and High-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Lenalidomide and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Relative toxicity of spent lubricant oil and detergent against benthic macro-invertebrates of a west African estuarine lagoon.

    PubMed

    Chukwu, L O; Odunzeh, C C

    2006-07-01

    The relative acute toxicity of spent lubricant oil and detergent was evaluated against hermit crab, Clibanarius africanus (Aurivillus) and periwinkle, Tympanotonus fuscatus (L) from the Lagos lagoon in laboratory bioassays. Based on the derived toxicity indices, the detergent (96 hr LC50 = 5.77ml/l) was found to be 1.73 times more toxic than spent engine oil (96 hr LC50 = 10.01 ml/l) when acting singly against C africanus and 18.73 times (96 hr LC50-48.67 ml/l) more toxic (96 hr LC50 = 911.57 ml/l) when acting singly against T. fuscatus. On the basis of the computed susceptibility factors, C. africanus was found to be about eight times and ninety-one times more susceptible to the toxic effect of detergent and spent lubricant oil respectively. The randomized analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that there was significant difference (Fcal 58.83 Ftab 3.87; DF 13; p > 0.05) between all treatments of spent lubricant oil and detergent during the 96 hr exposure period of test animals. At 5% level of significance the Student Neuman-Keuls (SNK) test further revealed significant differences in the mean mortality response of test animals exposed to toxicants at all concentrations and untreated control. The results obtained in this study suggest that the estuarine benthic macroinvertebrates, which play key roles in the environment, may serve as useful in-situ sentinels for biomonitoring studies of petroleum pollutants in fragile aquatic ecosystems such as the Lagos lagoon.

  20. RAS mutations in early age leukaemia modulated by NQO1 rs1800566 (C609T) are associated with second-hand smoking exposures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deregulation of the MAPK genes signalling caused by somatic mutations have been implied in leukaemia pathogenesis, including RAS mutation (RASmut) in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), which has been associated with intra-uterine chemical exposures. A case-case study was conducted in order to explore maternal and child exposures to tobacco smoking associations with early age leukaemia (EAL). Methods Covariables of reference were MLL rearrangements (MLL-r), RASmut and NQO1 rs1800566 (C609T). Samples from 150 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and 85 AML were included. Maternal exposures were assessed using a structured questionnaire with demographic, personal habits and residence history information. Restriction fragment length polymorphism and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography were used to screen FLT3, KRAS, and NRAS mutations; direct sequencing was performed to validate the results. NQO1 polymorphism was detected by real-time allelic discrimination technique. Results Overall, RASmut were detected in 28.7% of EAL cases; BRAFmut was found only in one AML patient. Higher rate of KRASmut was found in ALL (30.3%) compared to AML (20.8%) with MLL-r; RASmut showed an association with second-hand tobacco smoking exposures (OR, 3.06, 95% CI, 1.03-9.07). A considerable increased risk for EAL with the combination of RASmut and NQO1 609CT (OR, 4.24, 95% CI, 1.24-14.50) was observed. Conclusions Our data demonstrated the increased risk association between maternal smoking and EAL with MLL-r. Additionally, suggests that children second-hand tobacco exposures are associated with increased risk of EAL with RASmut modulated by NQO1 rs1800566 (C609T). PMID:24571676

  1. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Radiolabeled BC8 Antibody, Busulfan, Cyclophosphamide Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Myelogenous Leukemia in First Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  4. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. DOD Supply Chain: Preliminary Observations Indicate That Counterfeit Electronic Parts Can Be Found on Internet Purchasing Platforms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-08

    samples revealed that the leads contain no lead ( Pb ), which, according to military performance standards defined in section A.3.5.6.3 of the MIL-PRF...38535J DOD Performance Specification for Integrated Circuits (Microcircuits) Manufacturing, should be alloyed with at least 3 percent of lead ( Pb ).6,7...parts MLL1, XRF testing of the DAA6 samples revealed that the leads contain no lead ( Pb ) instead of the 3 percent lead ( Pb ) required by military

  6. Biostimulant action of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate produced through enzymatic hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Colla, Giuseppe; Rouphael, Youssef; Canaguier, Renaud; Svecova, Eva; Cardarelli, Mariateresa

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biostimulant action (hormone like activity, nitrogen uptake, and growth stimulation) of a plant-derived protein hydrolysate by means of two laboratory bioassays: a corn (Zea mays L.) coleoptile elongation rate test (Experiment 1), a rooting test on tomato cuttings (Experiment 2); and two greenhouse experiments: a dwarf pea (Pisum sativum L.) growth test (Experiment 3), and a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) nitrogen uptake trial (Experiment 4). Protein hydrolysate treatments of corn caused an increase in coleoptile elongation rate when compared to the control, in a dose-dependent fashion, with no significant differences between the concentrations 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L, and inodole-3-acetic acid treatment. The auxin-like effect of the protein hydrolysate on corn has been also observed in the rooting experiment of tomato cuttings. The shoot, root dry weight, root length, and root area were significantly higher by 21, 35, 24, and 26%, respectively, in tomato treated plants with the protein hydrolysate at 6 ml/L than untreated plants. In Experiment 3, the application of the protein hydrolysate at all doses (0.375, 0.75, 1.5, and 3.0 ml/L) significantly increased the shoot length of the gibberellin-deficient dwarf pea plants by an average value of 33% in comparison with the control treatment. Increasing the concentration of the protein hydrolysate from 0 to 10 ml/L increased the total dry biomass, SPAD index, and leaf nitrogen content by 20.5, 15, and 21.5%, respectively. Thus the application of plant-derived protein hydrolysate containing amino acids and small peptides elicited a hormone-like activity, enhanced nitrogen uptake and consequently crop performances. PMID:25250039

  7. Assessment of the Activation State of Rho Family GTP-Binding Proteins in Breast Cancer Cells and Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    with the yeast cell division cycle protein Caenorhabditis elegans , 23 in Drosophila Cdc24 and the human break point cluster region melanogaster and 46...Graf fused to MLL Abbreviations: C. elegans , Caenorhabditis elegans ; FAK, focal-adhesion kinase; GAP, GTPase-activating protein; MAP, mitogen...suppressors are the prominent ones. Overexpression or mutation of these receptors and many signal transducers downstream of these receptors, as well as genetic

  8. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Dimethylsulfoxide-soluble smoking particles and nicotine affect vascular contractibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Yan; Cao, Lei; Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Cang-Bao; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2009-10-01

    The aim is to study the effect of dimethylsulfoxide-soluble smoking particles (DSP) and nicotine on the contractility of rat mesenteric artery. The superior mesenteric artery segments were cultured with DSP or nicotine for 24 h. The vascular contractibility was recorded with myograph system. DSP 0.4 mL/L and nicotine 0.48 and 0.96 mg/L shifted the concentration-contractile curves induced by sarafotoxin 6c, a selective agonist for ET(B) receptor toward the left with increased E(max). DSP 0.4 mL/L and nicotine 0.96 mg/L shifted ET(A) receptor-mediated the concentration-contractile curves toward the left with increased E(max). However, nicotine 0.06 mg/L which is the equivalent concentration of nicotine in DSP 0.4 mL/L did not affect the curves and the E(max) mediated with ET(A) receptor and ET(B) receptor. DSP 0.2 and 0.4 mL/L shifted the concentration-contractile curves induced by noradrenaline toward the right with decreased E(max). Neither did nicotine 0.06 and 0.96 mg/L. Both DSP and nicotine shifted the concentration-contractile curves induced by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) toward the right parallely. DSP changed the phenotypes towards an increased efficacy of ET(A) receptor and ET(B) receptor, and a reduced efficacy of 5-HT receptor and alpha-adrenocceptor. The effects of DSP on ET(B) receptor, ET(A) receptor and alpha-adrenocceptor were independent of nicotine. The effect on 5-HT receptor was responsible to nicotine.

  10. Three-dimensional distribution of larval fish habitats in the shallow oxygen minimum zone in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, S. M.; Sánchez-Velasco, L.; Beier, E.; Godínez, Victor M.; Barton, Eric D.; Tamayo, A.

    2015-07-01

    Three-dimensional distribution of larval fish habitats was analyzed, from the upper limit of the shallow oxygen minimum zone (~0.2 mL/L) to the sea surface, in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Mexico in February 2010. The upper limit rises from ~250 m depth in the entrance of the Gulf of California to ~80 m depth off Cabo Corrientes. Three larval fish habitats were defined statistically: (i) a Gulf of California habitat dominated by Anchoa spp. larvae (epipelagic species), constrained to the oxygenated surface layer (>3.5 mL/L) in and above the thermocline (~60 m depth), and separated by a salinity front from the Tropical Pacific habitat; (ii) a Tropical Pacific habitat, dominated by Vinciguerria lucetia larvae (mesopelagic species), located throughout the sampled water column, but with the highest abundance in the oxygenated upper layer above the thermocline; (iii) an Oxygen Minimum habitat defined mostly below the thermocline in hypoxic (<1 mL/L; ~70 m depth) and anoxic (<0.2 mL/L; ~80 m depth) water off Cabo Corrientes. This subsurface hypoxic habitat had the highest species richness and larval abundance, with dominance of Bregmaceros bathymaster, an endemic neritic pelagic species; which was an unexpected result. This may be associated with the shoaling of the upper limit of the shallow oxygen minimum zone near the coast, a result of the strong costal upwelling detected by the Bakun Index. In this region of strong and semi-continuous coastal upwelling in the eastern tropical Pacific off Mexico, the shallow hypoxic water does not have dramatic effects on the total larval fish abundance but appears to affect species composition.

  11. Decoding the Epigenetic Heterogeneity of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells with Seamless Gene Editing.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar M; Perry, Dustin W; Steffey, Valeriya V Adjan; Miller, Kenneth; Allison, Daniel W

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells exhibit cell cycle-regulated heterogeneity for trimethylation of histone-3 on lysine-4 (H3K4me3) on developmental gene promoters containing bivalent epigenetic domains. The heterogeneity of H3K4me3 can be attributed to Cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2) phosphorylation and activation of the histone methyltransferase, MLL2 (KMT2B), during late-G1. The deposition of H3K4me3 on developmental promoters in late-G1 establishes a permissive chromatin architecture that enables signaling cues to promote differentiation from the G1 phase. These data suggest that the inhibition of MLL2 phosphorylation and activation will prevent the initiation of differentiation. Here, we describe a method to seamlessly modify a putative CDK2 phosphorylation site on MLL2 to restrict its phosphorylation and activation. Specifically, by utilizing dimeric CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases, RFNs (commercially known as the NextGEN™ CRISPR), in combination with an excision-only piggyBac™ transposase, we demonstrate how to generate a point mutation of threonine-542, a predicted site to prevent MLL2 activation. This gene editing method enables the use of both positive and negative selection, and allows for subsequent removal of the donor cassette without leaving behind any unwanted DNA sequences or modifications. This seamless "donor-excision" approach provides clear advantages over using single stranded oligo-deoxynucleotides (ssODN) as donors to create point mutations, as the use of ssODN necessitate additional mutations in the donor PAM sequence, along with extensive cloning efforts. The method described here therefore provides the highest targeting efficiency with the lowest "off-target" mutation rates possible, while removing the labor-intensive efforts associated with screening thousands of clones. In sum, this chapter describes how seamless gene editing may be utilized to examine stem cell heterogeneity of epigenetic marks, but is also widely applicable for performing

  12. Toxicity of aircraft de-icer and anti-icer solutions to aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, S.I.; Jordahl, D.M.; Evans, J.E.; May, E.B.

    1995-08-01

    Laboratory studies were undertaken to assess the toxicity of industrial mixtures of aviation de-icers and anti-icers. Various additives and contaminants are present in these solutions at proportions of 10 to 20% of the total volume. Static-renewal toxicity tests were performed at concentrations that bracketed published LC50 values for the primary ingredients (9--51 ml glycol/L) using fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), Daphnia magna, Daphnia pulex, Ceriodaphnia dubia, and Photobacterium phosphoreum (Microtox{reg_sign}) bioassays. Water from a stream that receives runoff from a large commercial airport was also tested during a late winter storm (March), and spring baseflow (April). The anti-icer solution was more toxic than the de-icer solution by two orders of magnitude (96-h LC50 range 0.03-0.44 ml/L, 3.02--13.48 ml/L, respectively). Both types of solutions exhibited greater toxicity than previously reported values for the primary ingredients. Toxic effects were observed in the March stream sample, but not the April sample. Significant inhibition of reproduction in C. dubia in the anti-icer and de-icer solutions occurred at 0.05 and 0.38 ml/L, respectively. Effects were observed in the Microtox assay at concentrations of 0.125 and 0.25 ml/L for the anti-icer and de-icer, respectively. Results suggest that the additives, rather than the glycols, are the major source of toxicity. Histological damage observed in fathead minnows primarily involved gill, kidney, and skin tissue, with the most prominent responses seen in fish exposed to the anti-icer solution. The de-icer solution elicited respiratory epithelial ``disruption`` and renal damage, and the anti-icer caused proliferative branchitis (hyperplastic response) and delamination of the epidermis from the dermis of the skin.

  13. Fiber Optic Chemical Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    75 B. DESIGN OF UV NIR PROBE ......................................................... 79 C. CONCEPT FOR AN...0.5rml/l water) 5cm Absorption cell UV -VIS ............................ 52 26 Toluene (0.5rmr/l water) 5cm Absorption cell UV -VIS...52 27 Xylene (0.5ml/l water) 5cm Absorption cell UV -VIS ............................ 53 28 1: 1:1 Benzene, Toluene, Xylene 5cm Absorption Cell UV

  14. Processes influencing seasonal hypoxia in the northern California Current System

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, T. P.; Hickey, B. M.; Geier, S. L.; Cochlan, W. P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper delineates the role of physical and biological processes contributing to hypoxia, dissolved oxygen (DO) < 1.4 mL/L, over the continental shelf of Washington State in the northern portion of the California Current System (CCS). In the historical record (1950–1986) during the summer upwelling season, hypoxia is more prevalent and severe off Washington than further south off northern Oregon. Recent data (2003–2005) show that hypoxia over the Washington shelf occurred at levels previously observed in the historical data. 2006 was an exception, with hypoxia covering ~5000 km2 of the Washington continental shelf and DO concentrations below 0.5 mL/L at the inner shelf, lower than any known previous observations at that location. In the four years studied, upwelling of low DO water and changes in source water contribute to interannual variability, but cannot account for seasonal decreases below hypoxic concentrations. Deficits of DO along salinity surfaces, indicating biochemical consumption of DO, vary significantly between surveys, accounting for additional decreases of 0.5–2.5 mL/L by late summer. DO consumption is associated with denitrification, an indicator of biochemical sediment processes. Mass balances of DO and nitrate show that biochemical processes in the water column and sediments each contribute ~50% to the total consumption of DO in near-bottom water. At shorter than seasonal time scales on the inner shelf, along-shelf advection of hypoxic patches and cross-shelf advection of seasonal gradients are both shown to be important, changing DO concentrations by 1.5 mL/L or more over five days. PMID:20463844

  15. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Bioremediation of Crude Oil Using Bacterium from the Coastal Sediments of Kish Island, Iran

    PubMed Central

    SADEGHI HADDAD ZAVAREH, Maryam; EBRAHIMIPOUR, Gholamhossein; SHAHRIARI MOGHADAM, Mohsen; FAKHARI, Javad; ABDOLI, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Much of the environment is affected by petroleum contamination. It imposes serious health problems for humans as well as serious environmental impact. Bioremediation is an important consideration for removing environmental pollutants because, compared with other technologies, it incurrs lower costs and is environmentally compatible. Methods: Crude oil degrading bacteria were isolated using serial dilutions of a bacterial consortium. The Taguchi experimental design L16 (45) was used to optimize the biodegradation process of crude oil by the isolated strain. This investigation applied the parameters of temperature, salinity, pH, NH4Cl and FeSO4.7H2O. Modeling the kinetics of crude oil biodegradation included five batch cultivation experiments (2.5 ml/L to 40 ml/L) using crude oil as a single limiting substrate. Results: Halomonas sp. MS1 was identified using identification tests. Maximum biodegradation efficiency was predicted to occur at pH=9, temperature=30 °C, salinity=2%, NH4Cl concentration=0.4 g/L and FeSO4.7H2O=0.04 g/L. After optimization, biodagradation was significantly (P<0.05) higher (i.e. 90.65%) than it results under the original conditions. Furthermore, growth kinetics modelling of bacteria in various concentrations of crude oil showed a positive correlation between increased concentration, up to 10 ml/L and bacterial growth, but this was not evident at higher concentrations (20–40 mL/L) Conclusion: Overall, bacteria in surface sediment samples from Kish Island have been determined as having good potential for application in oil biodegradation. Optimum amounts of the studied factors were determined successfully by applying the Taguchi experimental design and the models of Teissier and Haldane are suggested as kinetic models to describe the batch crude oil degradation behavior of MS1. PMID:27398340

  17. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Lymphocytic or Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  19. Diffraction properties of multilayer Laue lenses with an aperture of 102 µm and WSi₂/Al bilayers.

    PubMed

    Kubec, Adam; Kujala, Naresh; Conley, Raymond; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Mooney, Tim M; Shu, Deming; Kirchman, Jeffrey; Goetze, Kurt; Maser, Jörg; Macrander, Albert

    2015-10-19

    We report on the characterization of a multilayer Laue lens (MLL) with large acceptance, made of a novel WSi2/Al bilayer system. Fabrication of multilayers with large deposition thickness is required to obtain MLL structures with sufficient apertures capable of accepting the full lateral coherence length of x-rays at typical nanofocusing beamlines. To date, the total deposition thickness has been limited by stress-buildup in the multilayer. We were able to grow WSi2/Al with low grown-in stress, and asses the degree of stress reduction. X-ray diffraction experiments were conducted at beamline 1-BM at the Advanced Photon Source. We used monochromatic x-rays with a photon energy of 12 keV and a bandwidth of ΔE/E=5.4·10(-4). The MLL was grown with parallel layer interfaces, and was designed to have a large focal length of 9.6 mm. The mounted lens was 2.7 mm in width. We found and quantified kinks and bending of sections of the MLL. Sections with bending were found to partly have a systematic progression in the interface angles. We observed kinking in some, but not all, areas. The measurements are compared with dynamic diffraction calculations made with Coupled Wave Theory. Data are plotted showing the diffraction efficiency as a function of the external tilting angle of the entire mounted lens. This way of plotting the data was found to provide an overview into the diffraction properties of the whole lens, and enabled the following layer tilt analyses.

  20. Quercetin alters the DNA damage response in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells via TopoII- and PI3K-dependent mechanisms synergizing in leukemogenic rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Biechonski, Shahar; Gourevich, Dana; Rall, Melanie; Aqaqe, Nasma; Yassin, Muhammad; Zipin-Roitman, Adi; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Olender, Leonid; Raz, Yael; Jaffa, Ariel J; Grisaru, Dan; Wiesmuller, Lisa; Elad, David; Milyavsky, Michael

    2017-02-15

    Quercetin (Que) is an abundant flavonoid in the human diet and high-concentration food supplement with reported pro- and anti-carcinogenic activities. Topoisomerase II (TopoII) inhibition and subsequent DNA damage induction by Que was implicated in the mixed lineage leukemia gene (MLL) rearrangements that can induce infant and adult leukemias. This notion raised concerns regarding possible genotoxicities of Que in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). However, molecular targets mediating Que effects on DNA repair relevant to MLL translocations have not been defined. In this study we describe novel and potentially genotoxic Que activities in suppressing non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination pathways downstream of MLL cleavage. Using pharmacological dissection of DNA-PK, ATM and PI3K signalling we defined PI3K inhibition by Que with a concomitant decrease in the abundance of key DNA repair genes to be responsible for DNA repair inhibition. Evidence for the downstream TopoII-independent mutagenic potential of Que was obtained by documenting further increased frequencies of MLL rearrangements in human HSPCs concomitantly treated with Etoposide and Que versus single treatments. Importantly, by engaging a tissue engineered placental barrier, we have established the extent of Que transplacental transfer and hence provided the evidence for Que reaching fetal HSPCs. Thus, Que exhibits genotoxic effects in human HSPCs via different mechanisms when applied continuously and at high concentrations. In light of the demonstrated Que transfer to the fetal compartment our findings are key to understanding the mechanisms underlying infant leukemia and provide molecular markers for the development of safety values.

  1. A Phase II Study Of The Farnesyltransferase Inhibitor ZANESTRA (R115777, NSC #702818, IND #58,359) In Complete Remission Following Induction And/Or Consolidation Chemotherapy In Adults With Poor-Risk Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML) And High-Risk Myelodysplasia (MDS)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  2. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Prevalence of gene rearrangements in Mexican children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a population study-report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the identification of the causes of childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Rangel-López, Angélica; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María Del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010-2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children.

  4. Study of the reuse of treated wastewater on waste container washing vehicles.

    PubMed

    Vaccari, Mentore; Gialdini, Francesca; Collivignarelli, Carlo

    2013-02-01

    The wheelie bins for the collection of municipal solid waste (MSW) shall be periodically washed. This operation is usually carried out by specific vehicles which consume about 5000 L of water per day. Wastewater derived from bins washing is usually stored on the same vehicle and then discharged and treated in a municipal WWTP. This paper presents a study performed to evaluate the reuse of the wastewater collected from bins washing after it has been treated in a small plant mounted on the vehicle; the advantage of such a system would be the reduction of both vehicle dimension and water consumption. The main results obtained by coagulation-flocculation tests performed on two wastewater samples are presented. The addition of 2 mL/L of an aqueous solution of aluminum polychloride (18% w/w), about 35 mL/L of an aqueous solution of CaO (4% w/w) and 25 mL/L of an aqueous solution of an anionic polyelectrolyte (1 ‰ w/w) can significantly reduce turbidity and COD in treated water (to about 99% and 42%, respectively); the concomitant increase of UV transmittance at 254 nm (up to 15%) enables UV disinfection application by a series of two ordinary UV lamps. Much higher UV transmittance values (even higher than 80%) can be obtained by dosing powdered activated carbon, which also results in a greater removal of COD.

  5. A novel selection system for chromosome translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Rachel B; Ebran, Nathalie; Herrera, Anissa E; Lindsley, Janet E

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are common genetic abnormalities found in both leukemias and solid tumors. While much has been learned about the effects of specific translocations on cell proliferation, much less is known about what causes these chromosome rearrangements. This article describes the development and use of a system that genetically selects for rare translocation events using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A translocation YAC was created that contains the breakpoint cluster region from the human MLL gene, a gene frequently involved in translocations in leukemia patients, flanked by positive and negative selection markers. A translocation between the YAC and a yeast chromosome, whose breakpoint falls within the MLL DNA, physically separates the markers and forms the basis for the selection. When RAD52 is deleted, essentially all of the selected and screened cells contain simple translocations. The detectable translocation rates are the same in haploids and diploids, although the mechanisms involved and true translocation rates may be distinct. A unique double-strand break induced within the MLL sequences increases the number of detectable translocation events 100- to 1000-fold. This novel system provides a tractable assay for answering basic mechanistic questions about the development of chromosomal translocations. PMID:11973293

  6. Induction of cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer cells by the dietary compound isoliquiritigenin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeo Myeong; Lim, Do Young; Choi, Hyun Ju; Jung, Jae In; Chung, Won-Yoon; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2009-02-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid chalcone that is present in licorice, shallot, and bean sprouts, is known to have antitumorigenic activities. The present study examined whether ISL alters prostate cancer cell cycle progression. DU145 human and MatLyLu (MLL) rat prostate cancer cells were cultured with various concentrations of ISL. In both DU145 and MLL cells treated with ISL, the percentage of cells in the G1 phase increased, and the incorporation of [(3)H]thymidine decreased. ISL decreased the protein levels of cyclin D1, cyclin E, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, whereas cyclin A and CDK2 expressions were unaltered in cells treated with ISL. The expression of the CDK inhibitor p27(KIP1) was increased in cells treated with 20 micromol/L ISL. In addition, treatment of cells with 20 micromol/L ISL for 24 hours led to G2/M cell cycle arrest. Cell division control (CDC) 2 protein levels remained unchanged. The protein levels of phospho-CDC2 (Tyr15) and cyclin B1 were increased, and the CDC25C level was decreased by ISL dose-dependently. We demonstrate that ISL promotes cell cycle arrest in DU145 and MLL cells, thereby providing insights into the mechanisms underlying its antitumorigenic activities.

  7. Prevalence of Gene Rearrangements in Mexican Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Population Study—Report from the Mexican Interinstitutional Group for the Identification of the Causes of Childhood Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina; Miranda-Peralta, Enrique; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Olarte-Carrillo, Irma; Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Pompa-Mera, Ericka Nelly; Ocaña-Mondragón, Alicia; Bernáldez-Ríos, Roberto; Medina-Sanson, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Amador-Sánchez, Raquel; Peñaloza-González, José Gabriel; de Diego Flores-Chapa, José; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, Arturo; Flores-Lujano, Janet; Rodríguez-Zepeda, María del Carmen; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa María; Bolea-Murga, Victoria; Núñez-Villegas, Nancy; Velázquez-Aviña, Martha Margarita; Torres-Nava, José Refugio; Reyes-Zepeda, Nancy Carolina; González-Bonilla, Cesar; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Mexico has one of the highest incidences of childhood leukemia worldwide and significantly higher mortality rates for this disease compared with other countries. One possible cause is the high prevalence of gene rearrangements associated with the etiology or with a poor prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The aims of this multicenter study were to determine the prevalence of the four most common gene rearrangements [ETV6-RUNX1, TCF3-PBX1, BCR-ABL1, and MLL rearrangements] and to explore their relationship with mortality rates during the first year of treatment in ALL children from Mexico City. Patients were recruited from eight public hospitals during 2010–2012. A total of 282 bone marrow samples were obtained at each child's diagnosis for screening by conventional and multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to determine the gene rearrangements. Gene rearrangements were detected in 50 (17.7%) patients. ETV6-RUNX1 was detected in 21 (7.4%) patients, TCF3-PBX1 in 20 (7.1%) patients, BCR-ABL1 in 5 (1.8%) patients, and MLL rearrangements in 4 (1.4%) patients. The earliest deaths occurred at months 1, 2, and 3 after diagnosis in patients with MLL, ETV6-RUNX1, and BCR-ABL1 gene rearrangements, respectively. Gene rearrangements could be related to the aggressiveness of leukemia observed in Mexican children. PMID:25692130

  8. Transcription control by the ENL YEATS domain in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Erb, Michael A; Scott, Thomas G; Li, Bin E; Xie, Huafeng; Paulk, Joshiawa; Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Souza, Amanda; Roberts, Justin M; Dastjerdi, Shiva; Buckley, Dennis L; Sanjana, Neville E; Shalem, Ophir; Nabet, Behnam; Zeid, Rhamy; Offei-Addo, Nana K; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Zhang, Feng; Orkin, Stuart H; Winter, Georg E; Bradner, James E

    2017-03-09

    Recurrent chromosomal translocations producing a chimaeric MLL oncogene give rise to a highly aggressive acute leukaemia associated with poor clinical outcome. The preferential involvement of chromatin-associated factors as MLL fusion partners belies a dependency on transcription control. Despite recent progress made in targeting chromatin regulators in cancer, available therapies for this well-characterized disease remain inadequate, prompting the need to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, using unbiased CRISPR-Cas9 technology to perform a genome-scale loss-of-function screen in an MLL-AF4-positive acute leukaemia cell line, we identify ENL as an unrecognized gene that is specifically required for proliferation in vitro and in vivo. To explain the mechanistic role of ENL in leukaemia pathogenesis and dynamic transcription control, a chemical genetic strategy was developed to achieve targeted protein degradation. Acute loss of ENL suppressed the initiation and elongation of RNA polymerase II at active genes genome-wide, with pronounced effects at genes featuring a disproportionate ENL load. Notably, an intact YEATS chromatin-reader domain was essential for ENL-dependent leukaemic growth. Overall, these findings identify a dependency factor in acute leukaemia and suggest a mechanistic rationale for disrupting the YEATS domain in disease.

  9. Acaricidal activity of petroleum ether extract of neem (Azadirachta indica) oil and its four fractions separated by column chromatography against Sarcoptes scabiei var. cuniculi larvae in vitro.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yunxia; Shi, Dongxia; Yin, Zhongqiong; Guo, Jianhong; Jia, Renyong; Xu, Jiao; Song, Xu; Lv, Cheng; Fan, Qiaojia; Liang, Xiaoxia; Shi, Fei; Ye, Gang; Zhang, Wei

    2012-04-01

    The petroleum ether extract of neem oil and its four fractions separated by column chromatography was diluted at different concentrations with liquid paraffin. The acaricidal bioassay was conducted using a dipping method. The results indicated that the median lethal concentration (LC50) of the petroleum ether extract (at the concentration of 500.0ml/l) was 70.9ml/l, 24h after treatment. At concentrations of 500.0, 250.0, 125.0, 62.5 and 31.2ml/l, the median lethal times (LT50) of the petroleum ether extract were 8.7, 8.8, 10.8, 11.5 and 13.1h, respectively. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) showed that the petroleum ether extract of neem oil separated into four fractions (F1-F4). Acaricidal activity of 68.3% and 100.0% in the F2 and F4 was confirmed. These results suggest that petroleum ether extracts of neem oil and its four fractions possess useful acaricidal activity in vitro.

  10. Mammary Stem Cell Based Somatic Mouse Models Reveal Breast Cancer Drivers Causing Cell Fate Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Christin, John R.; Wang, Chunhui; Ge, Kai; Oktay, Maja H.; Guo, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer genomics have provided an unprecedented opportunity for understanding genetic causes of human cancer. However, distinguishing which mutations are functionally relevant to cancer pathogenesis remains a major challenge. We describe here a mammary stem cell (MaSC) organoid-based approach for rapid generation of somatic GEMMs (genetically engineered mouse models). By using RNAi and CRISPR-mediated genome engineering in MaSC-GEMMs, we have discovered that inactivation of Ptpn22 or Mll3, two genes mutated in human breast cancer, greatly accelerated PI3K-driven mammary tumorigenesis. Using these tumor models, we have also identified genetic alterations promoting tumor metastasis and causing resistance to PI3K-targeted therapy. Both Ptpn22 and Mll3 inactivation resulted in disruption of mammary gland differentiation and an increase in stem cell activity. Mechanistically, Mll3 deletion enhanced stem cell activity through activation of the HIF pathway. Thus, our study established a robust in vivo platform for functional cancer genomics and discovered functional breast cancer mutations. PMID:27653681

  11. Development and validation of a comprehensive genomic diagnostic tool for myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    McKerrell, Thomas; Moreno, Thaidy; Ponstingl, Hannes; Bolli, Niccolo; Dias, João M. L.; Tischler, German; Colonna, Vincenza; Manasse, Bridget; Bench, Anthony; Bloxham, David; Herman, Bram; Fletcher, Danielle; Park, Naomi; Quail, Michael A.; Manes, Nicla; Hodkinson, Clare; Baxter, Joanna; Sierra, Jorge; Foukaneli, Theodora; Warren, Alan J.; Chi, Jianxiang; Costeas, Paul; Rad, Roland; Huntly, Brian; Grove, Carolyn; Ning, Zemin; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Varela, Ignacio; Scott, Mike; Nomdedeu, Josep; Mustonen, Ville

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of hematologic malignancies relies on multidisciplinary workflows involving morphology, flow cytometry, cytogenetic, and molecular genetic analyses. Advances in cancer genomics have identified numerous recurrent mutations with clear prognostic and/or therapeutic significance to different cancers. In myeloid malignancies, there is a clinical imperative to test for such mutations in mainstream diagnosis; however, progress toward this has been slow and piecemeal. Here we describe Karyogene, an integrated targeted resequencing/analytical platform that detects nucleotide substitutions, insertions/deletions, chromosomal translocations, copy number abnormalities, and zygosity changes in a single assay. We validate the approach against 62 acute myeloid leukemia, 50 myelodysplastic syndrome, and 40 blood DNA samples from individuals without evidence of clonal blood disorders. We demonstrate robust detection of sequence changes in 49 genes, including difficult-to-detect mutations such as FLT3 internal-tandem and mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) partial-tandem duplications, and clinically significant chromosomal rearrangements including MLL translocations to known and unknown partners, identifying the novel fusion gene MLL-DIAPH2 in the process. Additionally, we identify most significant chromosomal gains and losses, and several copy neutral loss-of-heterozygosity mutations at a genome-wide level, including previously unreported changes such as homozygosity for DNMT3A R882 mutations. Karyogene represents a dependable genomic diagnosis platform for translational research and for the clinical management of myeloid malignancies, which can be readily adapted for use in other cancers. PMID:27121471

  12. The tissue-specific lncRNA Fendrr is an essential regulator of heart and body wall development in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Grote, Phillip; Wittler, Lars; Hendrix, David; Koch, Frederic; Währisch, Sandra; Beisaw, Arica; Macura, Karol; Bläss, Gaby; Kellis, Manolis; Werber, Martin; Herrmann, Bernhard G

    2013-01-28

    The histone-modifying complexes PRC2 and TrxG/MLL play pivotal roles in determining the activation state of genes controlling pluripotency, lineage commitment, and cell differentiation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can bind to either complex, and some have been shown to act as modulators of PRC2 or TrxG/MLL activity. Here we show that the lateral mesoderm-specific lncRNA Fendrr is essential for proper heart and body wall development in the mouse. Embryos lacking Fendrr displayed upregulation of several transcription factors controlling lateral plate or cardiac mesoderm differentiation, accompanied by a drastic reduction in PRC2 occupancy along with decreased H3K27 trimethylation and/or an increase in H3K4 trimethylation at their promoters. Fendrr binds to both the PRC2 and TrxG/MLL complexes, suggesting that it acts as modulator of chromatin signatures that define gene activity. Thus, we identified an lncRNA that plays an essential role in the regulatory networks controlling the fate of lateral mesoderm derivatives.

  13. Histone methyltransferase EZH2 is transcriptionally induced by estradiol as well as estrogenic endocrine disruptors bisphenol-A and diethylstilbestrol.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Arunoday; Hussain, Imran; Ansari, Khairul I; Bobzean, Samara A M; Perrotti, Linda I; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2014-10-09

    Enhancer of Zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), a methyltransferase specific to histone 3 lysine 27, is a critical player in gene silencing and is overexpressed in breast cancer. Our studies demonstrate that EZH2 is transcriptionally induced by estradiol in cultured breast cancer cells and in the mammary glands of ovariectomized rats. EZH2 promoter contains multiple functional estrogen-response elements. Estrogen receptors (ERs) and ER coregulators such as mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) histone methylases (MLL2 and MLL3) and histone acetyltransferase CBP/P300 bind to the EZH2 promoter in the presence of estradiol and regulate estradiol-induced EZH2 expression. EZH2 expression is also increased upon exposure to estrogenic endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as bisphenol-A (BPA) and diethylstilbestrol (DES). Similar to estradiol, BPA and DES-induced EZH2 expression is coordinated by ERs, MLLs and CBP/P300. In summary, we demonstrate that EZH2 is transcriptionally regulated by estradiol in vitro and in vivo, and its expression is potentially dysregulated upon exposure to estrogenic EDCs.

  14. Bisphenol-A and diethylstilbestrol exposure induces the expression of breast cancer associated long noncoding RNA HOTAIR in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Arunoday; Hussain, Imran; Ansari, Khairul I; Bobzean, Samara A M; Perrotti, Linda I; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2014-05-01

    Antisense transcript, long non-coding RNA HOTAIR is a key player in gene silencing and breast cancer and is transcriptionally regulated by estradiol. Here, we have investigated if HOTAIR expression is misregulated by bisphenol-A (BPA) and diethylstilbestrol (DES). Our findings demonstrate BPA and DES induce HOTAIR expression in cultured human breast cancer cells (MCF7) as well as in vivo in the mammary glands of rat. Luciferase assay showed that HOTAIR promoter estrogen-response-elements (EREs) are induced by BPA and DES. Estrogen-receptors (ERs) and ER-coregulators such as MLL-histone methylases (MLL1 and MLL3) bind to the HOTAIR promoter EREs in the presence of BPA and DES, modify chromatin (histone methylation and acetylation) and lead to gene activation. Knockdown of ERs down-regulated the BPA and DES-induced expression of HOTAIR. In summary, our results demonstrate that BPA and DES exposure alters the epigenetic programming of the HOTAIR promoters leading to its endocrine disruption in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Essential role of lncRNA binding for WDR5 maintenance of active chromatin and embryonic stem cell pluripotency

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yul W; Flynn, Ryan A; Chen, Yong; Qu, Kun; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C; Lei, Ming; Chang, Howard Y

    2014-01-01

    The WDR5 subunit of the MLL complex enforces active chromatin and can bind RNA; the relationship between these two activities is unclear. Here we identify a RNA binding pocket on WDR5, and discover a WDR5 mutant (F266A) that selectively abrogates RNA binding without affecting MLL complex assembly or catalytic activity. Complementation in ESCs shows that WDR5 F266A mutant is unable to accumulate on chromatin, and is defective in gene activation, maintenance of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, and ESC self renewal. We identify a family of ESC messenger and lncRNAs that interact with wild type WDR5 but not F266A mutant, including several lncRNAs known to be important for ESC gene expression. These results suggest that specific RNAs are integral inputs into the WDR5-MLL complex for maintenance of the active chromatin state and embryonic stem cell fates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02046.001 PMID:24521543

  16. Fabrication and efficiency measurement of a Mo/C/Si/C three material system multilayer Laue lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubec, A.; Maser, J.; Formánek, P.; Franke, V.; Braun, S.; Gawlitza, P.; Leson, A.; Macrander, A.

    2017-03-01

    In this letter, we report on the manufacturing of a multilayer Laue lens (MLL) consisting of a multilayer stack with three materials: molybdenum and silicon as the absorber and spacer layer, respectively, and carbon as transition layers. The design has four layers per period: Mo/C/Si/C. It yields 6000 zones and provides an aperture of 50 μm. This allows the MLL structure to accept a large portion of the coherent part of the beam and to achieve a small spot size. The MLL deposition was made by magnetron sputtering at the Fraunhofer IWS, and the sectioning was done by laser cutting and subsequent focused ion beam milling to a thickness that provides a good efficiency for a photon energy of 12 keV. The diffraction efficiency as a function of the tilting angle has been measured at beamline 1-BM of the Advanced Photon Source. An efficiency of almost 40% has been achieved. This shows that the material system performs well compared to MLLs made of two-materials and that it is in excellent agreement with the numerically calculated efficiency for a comparable molybdenum/silicon bilayer system lens. We conclude that the three material system offers high efficiencies and is advantageous for stress reduction in MLLs.

  17. FLT3 is implicated in cytarabine transport by human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 in pediatric acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Català, Albert; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Caviedes-Cárdenas, Liska; Malatesta, Roberta; Rives, Susana; Vega-García, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    FLT3 abnormalities are negative prognostic markers in acute leukemia. Infant leukemias are a subgroup with frequent MLL (KMT2A) rearrangements, FLT3 overexpression and high sensitivity to cytarabine, but dismal prognosis. Cytarabine is transported into cells by Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter-1 (hENT1, SLC29A1), but the mechanisms that regulate hENT1 in acute leukemia have been scarcely studied. We explored the expression and functional link between FLT3 and main cytarabine transporters in 50 pediatric patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and MLL rearrangement (ALL-MLL+) and other subtypes of leukemia, and in leukemia cell lines. A significant positive correlation was found between FLT3 and hENT1 expression in patients. Cytarabine uptake into cells was mediated mainly by hENT1, hENT2 and hCNT1. hENT1-mediated uptake of cytarabine was transiently abolished by the FLT3 inhibitor PKC412, and this effect was associated with decreased hENT1 mRNA and protein levels. Noticeably, the cytotoxicity of cytarabine was lower when cells were first exposed to FLT3 inhibitors (PKC412 or AC220), probably due to decreased hENT1 activity, but we observed a higher cytotoxic effect if FLT3 inhibitors were administered after cytarabine. FLT3 regulates hENT1 activity and thereby affects cytarabine cytotoxicity. The sequence of administration of cytarabine and FLT3 inhibitors is important to maintain their efficacy. PMID:27391351

  18. Biohydrogen production by dark fermentation of glycerol using Enterobacter and Citrobacter Sp.

    PubMed

    Maru, Biniam T; Constanti, Magda; Stchigel, Alberto M; Medina, Francesc; Sueiras, Jesus E

    2013-01-01

    Glycerol is an attractive substrate for biohydrogen production because, in theory, it can produce 3 mol of hydrogen per mol of glycerol. Moreover, glycerol is produced in substantial amounts as a byproduct of producing biodiesel, the demand for which has increased in recent years. Therefore, hydrogen production from glycerol was studied by dark fermentation using three strains of bacteria: namely, Enterobacter spH1, Enterobacter spH2, and Citrobacter freundii H3 and a mixture thereof (1:1:1). It was found that, when an initial concentration of 20 g/L of glycerol was used, all three strains and their mixture produced substantial amounts of hydrogen ranging from 2400 to 3500 mL/L, being highest for C. freundii H3 (3547 mL/L) and Enterobacter spH1 (3506 mL/L). The main nongaseous fermentation products were ethanol and acetate, albeit in different ratios. For Enterobacter spH1, Enterobacter spH2, C. freundii H3, and the mixture (1:1:1), the ethanol yields (in mol EtOH/mol glycerol consumed) were 0.96, 0.67, 0.31, and 0.66, respectively. Compared to the individual strains, the mixture (1:1:1) did not show a significantly higher hydrogen level, indicating that there was no synergistic effect. Enterobacter spH1 was selected for further investigation because of its higher yield of hydrogen and ethanol.

  19. Toxicity of water and sediment from stormwater retarding basins to Hydra hexactinella.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Rikke T; Pollino, Carmel A; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Baun, Anders

    2008-12-01

    Hydra hexactinella was used to assess the toxicity of stormwater and sediment samples from three retarding basins in Melbourne, Australia, using an acute test, a sublethal test, and a pulse test. Stormwater from the Avoca St retarding basins resulted in a LC50 of 613 ml/L, NOEC and LOEC values of 50 ml/L and 100 ml/L, while the 7h pulse exposure caused a significant increase in the mean population growth rate compared to the control. Water samples from the two other retarding basins were found non-toxic to H. hexactinella. This is the first study to employ sediment tests with Hydra spp. on stormwater sediments and a lower population growth rate was observed for organisms exposed to sediment from the Avoca St retarding basins. The behavioral study showed that H. hexactinella tended to avoid the sediment-water interface when exposed to sediment from all retarding basins, compared to the reference sediment. Further work is needed to determine the long-term effects of stormwater polluted sediments and acute effects due to organism exposure to short-term high concentrations during rain events.

  20. The role of iron in hexavalent chromium reduction by municipal landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Li, Yarong; Low, Gary K-C; Scott, Jason A; Amal, Rose

    2009-01-30

    The function of iron (ferric (Fe(III)) and ferrous (Fe(II))) in the hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) reduction mechanism by bacteria in municipal landfill leachate (MLL) was assessed. Evidence of an "electron shuttle" mechanism was observed, whereby the Cr(VI) was reduced to trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) by Fe(II) with the resulting Fe(III) bacterially re-reduced to Fe(II). Typically, investigations on this electron shuttle mechanism have been performed in an artificial medium. As MLL comprises an elaborate mixture of bacteria, humic materials and organic and inorganic species, additional complexities were evident within the cycle in this study. Bioavailability of the Fe(III) for bacterial reduction, availability of bacterially produced Fe(II) for chemical Cr(VI) reduction and hydrolysis of Fe(II) and Fe(III) become prevalent during each phase of the shuttle cycle when MLL is present. Each of these factors contributes to the overall rate of bacterial Cr(VI) reduction in this media. This work highlights the need to consider local environmental conditions when assessing the bacterial reduction of Cr(VI).

  1. Maternal exposure to household chemicals and risk of infant leukemia: A report from the Children's Oncology Group1

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Megan E.; Linabery, Amy M.; Spector, Logan G.; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Hilden, Joanne M.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Robison, Leslie L.; Ross, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Utilizing data from the largest study to date, we examined associations between maternal preconception/prenatal exposure to household chemicals and infant acute leukemia. Methods We present data from a Children's Oncology Group case-control study of 443 infants (<1 year of age) diagnosed with acute leukemia (including acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML)) between 1996-2006 and 324 population controls. Mothers recalled household chemical use one month before and throughout pregnancy. We used unconditional logistic regression adjusted for birth year, maternal age, and race/ethnicity to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results We did not find evidence for an association between infant leukemia and eight of nine chemical categories. However, exposure to petroleum products during pregnancy was associated with AML (OR=2.54; 95% CI:1.40-4.62) and leukemia without mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements (“MLL-”) (OR=2.69; 95% CI: 1.47-4.93). No associations were observed for exposure in the month before pregnancy. Conclusions Gestational exposure to petroleum products was associated with infant leukemia, particularly AML and MLL- cases. Benzene is implicated as a potential carcinogen within this exposure category, but a clear biological mechanism has yet to be elucidated. PMID:21691732

  2. [Effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on metabolism of glutamine in the liver].

    PubMed

    Savilov, P N

    2014-01-01

    The effect of three-day course of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO; 3 atm, 50 min, 1 session per day) on glutamine metabolism in the liver has been investigated in 72 adult albino rats. The content of ammonia, glutamate, glutamine, activity of glutamine synthetase (GS), phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) were studied in left (LLL) and median (MLL) lobes of the liver. The course of HBO had an inhibitory effect on all the enzymes studied. Inhibitory effect of hyperoxia on GDH activity persisted up to day 11 after the course of HBO in both lobes of the liver, while decreased glutamate normalized in both lobes. Reduced glutamine concentration normalized to day 4, and the concentration of ammonia and remained elevated for 11 days after the end of hyperoxic exposure. Inhibitory effect of hyperoxia on GS activity in LLL and MLL disappeared on day 4 and day 11 day after the end of the HBO course. PDG activity reduced by HBO in both lobes normalized to the day 4 day after oxygenation; however, on day 11 it selectively decreased in LLL, where simultaneous stimulation of GS activity was also observed. The results demonstrate different sensitivity of liver GS, PDG and GDH of normal rats to the inhibitory effect of HBO. Different dynamics of GS and PDG activity in LLL and MLL of oxygenated rats suggests functional heterogeneity of the glutamine cycle in hepatocytes of liver lobes after HBO.

  3. Multiple cellular proteins interact with LEDGF/p75 through a conserved unstructured consensus motif.

    PubMed

    Tesina, Petr; Čermáková, Kateřina; Hořejší, Magdalena; Procházková, Kateřina; Fábry, Milan; Sharma, Subhalakshmi; Christ, Frauke; Demeulemeester, Jonas; Debyser, Zeger; De Rijck, Jan; Veverka, Václav; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2015-08-06

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is an epigenetic reader and attractive therapeutic target involved in HIV integration and the development of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL1) fusion-driven leukaemia. Besides HIV integrase and the MLL1-menin complex, LEDGF/p75 interacts with various cellular proteins via its integrase binding domain (IBD). Here we present structural characterization of IBD interactions with transcriptional repressor JPO2 and domesticated transposase PogZ, and show that the PogZ interaction is nearly identical to the interaction of LEDGF/p75 with MLL1. The interaction with the IBD is maintained by an intrinsically disordered IBD-binding motif (IBM) common to all known cellular partners of LEDGF/p75. In addition, based on IBM conservation, we identify and validate IWS1 as a novel LEDGF/p75 interaction partner. Our results also reveal how HIV integrase efficiently displaces cellular binding partners from LEDGF/p75. Finally, the similar binding modes of LEDGF/p75 interaction partners represent a new challenge for the development of selective interaction inhibitors.

  4. Efficiency of a multilayer-Laue-lens with a 102 μm aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, Albert T.; Kubec, Adam; Conley, Raymond; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Wojcik, Michael; Maser, Jorg

    2015-08-25

    A multilayer-Laue-lens (MLL) comprised of WSi2/Al layers stacked to a full thickness of 102 microns was characterized for its diffraction efficiency and dynamical diffraction properties by x-ray measurements made in the far field. The achieved aperture roughly doubles the previous maximum reported aperture for an MLL, thereby doubling the working distance. Negative and positive first orders were found to have 14.2 % and 13.0 % efficiencies, respectively. A section thickness of 9.6 μm was determined from Laue-case thickness fringes in the diffraction data. A background gas consisting of 90 % Ar and 10 % N2 was used for sputtering. This material system was chosen to reduce grown-in stress as the multilayer is deposited. Although some regions of the full MLL exhibited defects, the presently reported results were obtained for a region devoid of defects. The data compare well to dynamical diffraction calculations with Coupled Wave Theory (CWT) which provided confirmation of the optical constants and densities assumed for the CWT calculations.

  5. Efficiency of a multilayer-Laue-lens with a 102 μm aperture

    DOE PAGES

    Macrander, Albert T.; Kubec, Adam; Conley, Raymond; ...

    2015-08-25

    A multilayer-Laue-lens (MLL) comprised of WSi2/Al layers stacked to a full thickness of 102 microns was characterized for its diffraction efficiency and dynamical diffraction properties by x-ray measurements made in the far field. The achieved aperture roughly doubles the previous maximum reported aperture for an MLL, thereby doubling the working distance. Negative and positive first orders were found to have 14.2 % and 13.0 % efficiencies, respectively. A section thickness of 9.6 μm was determined from Laue-case thickness fringes in the diffraction data. A background gas consisting of 90 % Ar and 10 % N2 was used for sputtering. Thismore » material system was chosen to reduce grown-in stress as the multilayer is deposited. Although some regions of the full MLL exhibited defects, the presently reported results were obtained for a region devoid of defects. The data compare well to dynamical diffraction calculations with Coupled Wave Theory (CWT) which provided confirmation of the optical constants and densities assumed for the CWT calculations.« less

  6. Exploring drug delivery for the DOT1L inhibitor pinometostat (EPZ-5676): Subcutaneous administration as an alternative to continuous IV infusion, in the pursuit of an epigenetic target.

    PubMed

    Waters, Nigel J; Daigle, Scott R; Rehlaender, Bruce N; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Campbell, Carly T; Jensen, Tyler B; Truitt, Brett F; Olhava, Edward J; Pollock, Roy M; Stickland, Kim A; Dovletoglou, Angelos

    2015-12-28

    Protein methyltransferases are emerging as promising drug targets for therapeutic intervention in human cancers. Pinometostat (EPZ-5676) is a small molecule inhibitor of the DOT1L enzyme, a histone methyltransferase that methylates lysine 79 of histone H3. DOT1L activity is dysregulated in the pathophysiology of rearranged mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-r). Pinometostat is currently in Phase 1 clinical trials in relapsed refractory acute leukemia patients and is administered as a continuous IV infusion (CIV). The studies herein investigated alternatives to CIV administration of pinometostat to improve patient convenience. Various sustained release technologies were considered, and based on the required dose size as well as practical considerations, subcutaneous (SC) bolus administration of a solution formulation was selected for further evaluation in preclinical studies. SC administration offered improved exposure and complete bioavailability of pinometostat relative to CIV and oral administration. These findings warranted further evaluation in rat xenograft models of MLL-r leukemia. SC dosing in xenograft models demonstrated inhibition of MLL-r tumor growth and inhibition of pharmacodynamic markers of DOT1L activity. However, a dosing frequency of thrice daily (t.i.d) was required in these studies to elicit optimal inhibition of DOT1L target genes and tumor growth inhibition. Development of an extended release formulation may prove useful in the further optimization of the SC delivery of pinometostat, moving towards a more convenient dosing paradigm for patients.

  7. Efficiency of a multilayer-Laue-lens with a 102 μm aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, Albert T. Wojcik, Michael; Maser, Jorg; Kubec, Adam; Conley, Raymond; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan

    2015-08-24

    A multilayer-Laue-lens (MLL) comprised of WSi{sub 2}/Al layers stacked to a full thickness of 102 μm was characterized for its diffraction efficiency and dynamical diffraction properties by x-ray measurements made in the far field. The achieved aperture roughly doubles the previous maximum reported aperture for an MLL, thereby doubling the working distance. Negative and positive first orders were found to have 14.2% and 13.0% efficiencies, respectively. A section thickness of 9.6 μm was determined from Laue-case thickness fringes in the diffraction data. A background gas consisting of 90% Ar and 10% N{sub 2} was used for sputtering. This material system was chosen to reduce grown-in stress as the multilayer is deposited. Although some regions of the full MLL exhibited defects, the presently reported results were obtained for a region devoid of defects. The data compare well to dynamical diffraction calculations with Coupled Wave Theory (CWT) which provided confirmation of the optical constants and densities assumed for the CWT calculations.

  8. Genotoxic potential and heart rate disorders in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to Superdispersant-25 and dispersed diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Martinović, Rajko; Kolarević, Stoimir; Kračun-Kolarević, Margareta; Kostić, Jovana; Marković, Sandra; Gačić, Zoran; Kljajić, Zoran; Vuković-Gačić, Branka

    2015-07-01

    The effects of ex situ exposure of Mytilus galloprovincialis to Superdispersant-25 (S-25), diesel oil and dispersed diesel oil mixtures were studied by the impact on level of DNA damage in haemocytes (comet assay) and the cardiac activity patterns of mussels. Specimens were exposed for 72 h in a static system to diesel oil (100 μL/L and 1 mL/L), S-25 (5 and 50 μL/L), and dispersed diesel oil mixtures M1 (diesel oil 100 μL/L + S-25 5 μL/L) and M2 (diesel oil 1 mL/L + S-25 50 μL/L). For positive control 40 μM CdCl2 was used. The comet assay results indicated genotoxic potential of S-25 while the effects of diesel oil alone were not observed. The highest response was detected for M1 while the effects of M2 were not detected. The heart rate disorders were recorded for the diesel oil (1 mL/L), S-25 (50 μL/L) and both dispersed diesel oil mixtures.

  9. Reduced group delay dispersion in quantum dot passively mode-locked lasers operating at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mee, J. K.; Raghunathan, R.; Murrell, D.; Braga, A.; Li, Y.; Lester, L. F.

    2014-09-01

    A detailed study of the pulse characteristics emitted from a monolithic Quantum Dot (QD) passively Mode-Locked Laser (MLL) has been performed using a state-of-the-art Frequency Resolved Optical Gating (FROG) pulse measurement system. While traditionally the time-domain pulse characteristics of semiconductor MLLs have been studied using digital sampling oscilloscope or intensity autocorrelation techniques, the FROG measurements allow for simultaneous characterization of time and frequency, which has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for true determination of mode-locked stability. In this paper, FROG pulse measurements are presented on a two-section QD MLL operating over wide temperature excursions. The FROG measurement allows for extraction of the temporal and spectral intensity and phase profiles from which the Group Delay Dispersion (GDD) can be determined. The magnitude of the GDD is found to decrease from 16.1 to 3.5 ps/nm when the temperature is increased from 20 to 50 oC, mirroring the trend of pulse width reduction at elevated temperature, which has been shown to correlate strongly with reduced unsaturated absorption. The possibility to further optimize pulse generation via intra-cavity dispersion compensation in a novel three-section MLL design is also examined, and shows strong potential toward providing valuable insight into the optimal cavity designs and operating parameters for QD MLLs.

  10. Genotoxic potential of the latex from cotton-leaf physicnut (Jatropha gossypiifolia L.)

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Pedro Marcos; de Sousa Araújo, Silvany; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Brasileiro-Vidal, Ana Christina

    2015-01-01

    Jatropha gossypiifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae), popularly known as cotton-leaf physicnut, is a milky shrub notable for its medicinal properties. The present study aimed to evaluate the toxic, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of the latex of J. gossypiifolia, using Allium cepa L. as test system. Seeds of A. cepa were exposed to five concentrations of the latex (1.25; 2.5; 5; 10 and 20 mL/L) in order to evaluate parameters of toxicity (evaluation of root growth), cytotoxicity (mitotic index frequency) and genotoxicity (frequency of chromosome alterations). The latex showed a significant decrease in root mean growth value as well as mitotic index for the tested concentrations, except for 1.25 mL/L, when compared to results from the negative control. The 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mL/L concentrations induced significant chromo-some adherences, C-metaphases and/or chromosome bridges, as genotoxic effects. The significant frequency of chromosome bridges also indicated mutagenic potential for chromosomes of J. gossypiifolia as discussed in the paper. Considering that the latex is used in popular therapies, and that the test system A. cepa presents good correlation with tests carried out in mammals, it can be pointed out that its use for medicinal purposes may be harmful to human health especially if ingested. PMID:25983630

  11. Genotoxic potential of the latex from cotton-leaf physicnut (Jatropha gossypiifolia L.).

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Pedro Marcos; de Sousa Araújo, Silvany; Marin-Morales, Maria Aparecida; Benko-Iseppon, Ana Maria; Brasileiro-Vidal, Ana Christina

    2015-03-01

    Jatropha gossypiifolia L. (Euphorbiaceae), popularly known as cotton-leaf physicnut, is a milky shrub notable for its medicinal properties. The present study aimed to evaluate the toxic, cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of the latex of J. gossypiifolia, using Allium cepa L. as test system. Seeds of A. cepa were exposed to five concentrations of the latex (1.25; 2.5; 5; 10 and 20 mL/L) in order to evaluate parameters of toxicity (evaluation of root growth), cytotoxicity (mitotic index frequency) and genotoxicity (frequency of chromosome alterations). The latex showed a significant decrease in root mean growth value as well as mitotic index for the tested concentrations, except for 1.25 mL/L, when compared to results from the negative control. The 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mL/L concentrations induced significant chromo-some adherences, C-metaphases and/or chromosome bridges, as genotoxic effects. The significant frequency of chromosome bridges also indicated mutagenic potential for chromosomes of J. gossypiifolia as discussed in the paper. Considering that the latex is used in popular therapies, and that the test system A. cepa presents good correlation with tests carried out in mammals, it can be pointed out that its use for medicinal purposes may be harmful to human health especially if ingested.

  12. An Africanised Study of Astronomical History in the Northern Cape South Africa, for Purposes of Secondary and Higher Education Programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Beer, K. J.; Hoffman, M. J.

    2007-07-01

    Dr M.J. Hoffman, Head of the Department Physics, University of the Free State (UFS), presented a paper at the Duineveld Secondary School in Upington, to enhance the idea of a natural observatory centre in the Northern Cape. Quite aptly, the National Institute for Higher Education: Northern Cape (NIHE) also invited a renowned African astronomer, Dr T Medupe, to address their graduation ceremony in 2005. However, Dr Albert Strydom, Programme Head of Tourism Management at the Central University for Technology, Free State (CUT), is very much aware of the delicate nature of this type of high scientific profile in Tourism Management. It is foreseen by Dr Kallie de Beer, Director of Distance Education, that teaching and learning in this field will predominantly be conducted via Open and Distance e-Learning (ODeL). Consequently, it is also important to understand the philosophy of ODeL within global and Africanized perspectives. Astronomy, in this case, offers excellent examples of Africanised science in practice to add scientific value to tourist packages in the Northern Cape. (www.saao.ac.za/assa/aahs).

  13. From Solar Dimming to Solar Brightening: Observations, Modeling, Impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, M.; Ohmura, A.; Feichter, J.; Stier, P.; Robock, A.; Li, H.

    2005-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the amount of solar radiation reaching the earth surface is not stable over time but exhibits significant decadal variations. These variations, in addition to the changes in thermal radiation induced by alterations in greenhouse gases, cause changes in radiative forcings which may significantly affect surface climate. Observations from the Global Energy Balanced Archive (GEBA) and Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) databases at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology suggest that surface solar radiation, after decades of dimming, reversed into a brightening since the mid 1980s at widespread locations. These changes are in line with a recovery of atmospheric transparency, possibly related to reduced aerosol loadings due to air pollution control and the breakdown of industry in formerly Communist countries. Not many GCMs currently represent aerosol effects with a degree of sophistication to capture such effects, but we used a special version of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology GCM which includes a detailed aerosol scheme, ECHAM5-HAM, to investigate the observed trends. In addition, we investigate the potential impact of the variations in surface radiation on other elements of the climate system, such as soil moisture, which shows changes in line with the changes in radiation. Reference: Wild, M., Gilgen, H., Roesch, A., Ohmura, A., Long, C., Dutton, E., Forgan, B., Kallis, A., Russak, V., Tsvetkov, A., 2005: From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface. Science , 308, 847-850

  14. PML-RARA requires DNA methyltransferase 3A to initiate acute promyelocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Christopher B.; Verdoni, Angela M.; Ketkar, Shamika; Leight, Elizabeth R.; Russler-Germain, David A.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Magrini, Vincent; Ley, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA methyltransferases DNMT3A and DNMT3B are primarily responsible for de novo methylation of specific cytosine residues in CpG dinucleotides during mammalian development. While loss-of-function mutations in DNMT3A are highly recurrent in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), DNMT3A mutations are almost never found in AML patients with translocations that create oncogenic fusion genes such as PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1, and MLL-AF9. Here, we explored how DNMT3A is involved in the function of these fusion genes. We used retroviral vectors to express PML-RARA, RUNX1-RUNX1T1, or MLL-AF9 in bone marrow cells derived from WT or DNMT3A-deficient mice. Additionally, we examined the phenotypes of hematopoietic cells from Ctsg-PML-RARA mice, which express PML-RARA in early hematopoietic progenitors and myeloid precursors, with or without DNMT3A. We determined that the methyltransferase activity of DNMT3A, but not DNMT3B, is required for aberrant PML-RARA–driven self-renewal ex vivo and that DNMT3A is dispensable for RUNX1-RUNX1T1– and MLL-AF9–driven self-renewal. Furthermore, both the PML-RARA–driven competitive transplantation advantage and development of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) required DNMT3A. Together, these findings suggest that PML-RARA requires DNMT3A to initiate APL in mice. PMID:26595813

  15. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Thys, Ryan G.; Lehman, Christine E.; Pierce, Levi C.T.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The distribution of breakpoints by exposure to non-cytotoxic levels of chemicals showed a similar pattern to fusion breakpoints in leukemia patients. Our findings demonstrate that HSPCs exposed to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals and chemotherapeutic agents are prone to topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage at the leukemia-associated genes MLL and CBFB. These data suggest a role for long-term environmental chemical or residual

  16. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Thys, Ryan G; Lehman, Christine E; Pierce, Levi C T; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The distribution of breakpoints by exposure to non-cytotoxic levels of chemicals showed a similar pattern to fusion breakpoints in leukemia patients. Our findings demonstrate that HSPCs exposed to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals and chemotherapeutic agents are prone to topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage at the leukemia-associated genes MLL and CBFB. These data suggest a role for long-term environmental chemical or residual

  17. Dilepton Measurements at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geurts, Frank; STAR Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    In the study of hot and dense nuclear matter, created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, dilepton measurements play an essential role. Leptons, when compared to hadrons, have only little interaction with the strongly interacting system. Thus, dileptons provide ideal penetrating probes that allow the study of such a system throughout its space-time evolution. In the low mass range (Mll < 1.1 GeV/c2), the dominant source of dileptons originates from the decay of vector mesons which may see effects from chiral symmetry restoration. In the intermediate mass range (1.1 < Mll < 3.0 GeV/c2), the main contributions to the mass spectrum are expected to originate from the thermal radiation of a quark-gluon plasma as well as the decays of charm mesons. In the high mass range (Mll > 3.0 GeV/c2), dilepton measurements are expected to see contributions from primordial processes involving heavy quarks, and Drell-Yan production. With the introduction of the Time-of-Flight detector, the STAR detector has been able to perform large acceptance, high purity electron identification. In this contribution, we will present STAR's recent dielectron measurements in the low and intermediate mass range for RHIC beam energies ranging between 19.6 and 200 GeV. Compared to electrons, muon measurements have the advantage of reduced bremsstrahlung radiation in the surrounding detector materials. With the upcoming detector upgrades, specifically the muon detector (MTD), STAR will be able to include such measurements in its (di-)lepton studies. We will discuss the future dilepton program at STAR and the physics cases for these upgrades.

  18. Rational Design of Orthogonal Multipolar Interactions with Fluorine in Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Jonathan; Borkin, Dmitry; Lund, George; Purohit, Trupta; Dyguda-Kazimierowicz, Edyta; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2015-09-24

    Multipolar interactions involving fluorine and the protein backbone have been frequently observed in protein-ligand complexes. Such fluorine-backbone interactions may substantially contribute to the high affinity of small molecule inhibitors. Here we found that introduction of trifluoromethyl groups into two different sites in the thienopyrimidine class of menin-MLL inhibitors considerably improved their inhibitory activity. In both cases, trifluoromethyl groups are engaged in short interactions with the backbone of menin. In order to understand the effect of fluorine, we synthesized a series of analogues by systematically changing the number of fluorine atoms, and we determined high-resolution crystal structures of the complexes with menin. We found that introduction of fluorine at favorable geometry for interactions with backbone carbonyls may improve the activity of menin-MLL inhibitors as much as 5- to 10-fold. In order to facilitate the design of multipolar fluorine-backbone interactions in protein-ligand complexes, we developed a computational algorithm named FMAP, which calculates fluorophilic sites in proximity to the protein backbone. We demonstrated that FMAP could be used to rationalize improvement in the activity of known protein inhibitors upon introduction of fluorine. Furthermore, FMAP may also represent a valuable tool for designing new fluorine substitutions and support ligand optimization in drug discovery projects. Analysis of the menin-MLL inhibitor complexes revealed that the backbone in secondary structures is particularly accessible to the interactions with fluorine. Considering that secondary structure elements are frequently exposed at protein interfaces, we postulate that multipolar fluorine-backbone interactions may represent a particularly attractive approach to improve inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  19. A novel forward osmosis system in landfill leachate treatment for removing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and for direct fertigation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Niu, Aping; Lu, Chun-Jiao; Zhang, Jing-Hui; Junaid, Muhammad; Strauss, Phyllis R; Xiao, Ping; Wang, Xiao; Ren, Yi-Wei; Pei, De-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    Landfill leachate (LL) is harmful to aquatic environment because it contains high concentrations of dissolved organic matter, inorganic components, heavy metals, and other xenobiotics. Thus, the remediation of LL is crucial for environmental conservation. Here, a potential application of the forward osmosis (FO) filtration process with ammonium bicarbonate (NH4HCO3) as a draw solution (DS) was investigated to remediate membrane bioreactor-treated LL (M-LL). After the leachate treatment, the toxicity and removal efficiencies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were evaluated using zebrafish and cultured human cells. The water recovery rate was improved using the current protocol up to 86.6% and 91.6% by both the pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) mode and the forward osmosis (FO) mode. Water flux increased with the increasing DS concentrations, but solution velocities decreased with the operation time. Toxicity tests revealed that the M-LL treated by NH4HCO3 had no toxic effect on zebrafish and human cells. Moreover, green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in the transgenic zebrafish Tg(cyp1a:gfp) induced by PAHs was very weak compared to the effects induced by untreated M-LL. Since the diluted DS met local safety requirements of liquid fertilizer, it could be directly applied as the liquid fertilizer for fertigation. In conclusion, this novel FO system using NH4HCO3 as the DS provides a cheap and efficient protocol to effectively remove PAHs and other pollutants in LL, and the diluted DS can be directly applied to crops as a liquid fertilizer, indicating that this technique is effective and eco-friendly for the treatment of different types of LL.

  20. Bio-Physicochemical Interactions of Engineered Nanomaterials in in Vitro Cell Culture Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-11

    cell lines viz., human embryonic kidney cell line (HEK 293) and human neuroblastoma cell line (IMR 32). The mean size of CeO2, Co3O4, and WO3 NMs...with 10% FBS, 0.2% sodium bicarbonate and 10 ml/L antibiotic solution at 37oC under a humidified atmosphere of 5% CO2/95% air.  Human neuroblastoma ...Toxicity study of cerium oxide nanoparticles in human neuroblastoma cells. International Journal of Toxicology 2014 Mar;33(2):86-97 I.F. 1.346 2

  1. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-13

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, and/or Advanced Myeloproliferative Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm With 10% Blasts or Higher

  7. Optimization model of the stomatal regulation in C{sub 3} plants: 4. Stomatal response to changes in O{sub 2} concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, A.A.

    1995-07-01

    The optimization model of photosynthesis predicts stomatal response to changing oxygen concentration. According to the optimization statement, a decrease in oxygen concentration will result in a decline in CO{sub 2} concentration in the leaf intercellular spaces (c{sub i}), accompanied by an enhancement of photosynthesis. Because we have failed to find satisfactory data in the literature, we estimated the predicted changes in c{sub i} by 30-50 ml/l and increase photosynthesis by 40%. These estimates are consistent with the literature data. Futhermore, the predictions of the model were directly confirmed by the data obtained on six plant species. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Growing Cutting-edge X-ray Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Conley

    2012-11-30

    Ever imagined that an Xbox controller could help open a window into a world spanning just one billionth of a meter? Brookhaven Lab's Ray Conley grows cutting-edge optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) one atomic layer at a time to focus high-energy x-rays to within a single nanometer. To achieve this focusing feat, Ray uses a massive, custom-built atomic deposition device, an array of computers, and a trusty Xbox controller. These lenses will be deployed at the Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II, due to begin shining super-bright light on pressing scientific puzzles in 2015

  11. Diagnosis and management of neonatal leukaemia.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Marieke H; Creemers, Sara; Pieters, Rob

    2012-08-01

    Leukaemia in neonates (infants <1 month) is rare, whereby neonatal acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is more frequent than neonatal acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). High mortality rates are observed, though AML has a better prognosis than ALL. Neonatal leukaemia is typically presented with hepatosplenomegaly, leukaemia cutis and/or hyperleucocytosis. Congenital infections should be ruled out before diagnosis. Rearrangement of the MLL gene is the most frequently occurring genetic aberration. Treatment includes intensive multi-agent chemotherapy, usually with age-related dose adjustments next to supportive care. Treatment intensification for ALL could be indicated in the future as the dismal prognosis is subject to high relapse rates in ALL.

  12. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. Hydrogen production from formic acid in pH-stat fed-batch operation for direct supply to fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Tai Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Enterobacter asburiae SNU-1 harvested after cultivation was used as a whole cell biocatalyst, for the production of hydrogen. Formic acid was efficiently converted to hydrogen using the harvested cells with an initial hydrogen production rate and total hydrogen production of 491 ml/l/h and 6668 ml/l, respectively, when 1 g/l of whole cell enzyme was used. Moreover, new pH-stat fed-batch operation was conducted, and total hydrogen production was 1.4 times higher than that of batch operation. For practical application, bio-hydrogen produced from formic acid using harvested cells was directly applied to PEMFC for power generation.

  14. Hydrogen and electricity production from a food processing wastewater using fermentation and microbial fuel cell technologies.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sang Eun; Logan, Bruce E

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen can be produced from fermentation of sugars in wastewaters, but much of the organic matter remains in solution. We demonstrate here that hydrogen production from a food processing wastewater high in sugar can be linked to electricity generation using a microbial fuel cell (MFC) to achieve more effective wastewater treatment. Grab samples were taken from: plant effluent at two different times during the day (Effluents 1 and 2; 735+/-15 and 3250+/-90 mg-COD/L), an equalization tank (Lagoon; 1670+/-50mg-COD/L), and waste stream containing a high concentration of organic matter (Cereal; 8920+/-150 mg-COD/L). Hydrogen production from the Lagoon and effluent samples was low, with 64+/-16 mL of hydrogen per liter of wastewater (mL/L) for Effluent 1, 21+/-18 mL/L for Effluent 2, and 16+/-2 mL/L for the Lagoon sample. There was substantially greater hydrogen production using the Cereal wastewater (210+/-56 mL/L). Assuming a theoretical maximum yield of 4 mol of hydrogen per mol of glucose, hydrogen yields were 0.61-0.79 mol/mol for the Cereal wastewater, and ranged from 1 to 2.52 mol/mol for the other samples. This suggests a strategy for hydrogen recovery from wastewater based on targeting high-COD and high-sugar wastewaters, recognizing that sugar content alone is an insufficient predictor of hydrogen yields. Preliminary tests with the Cereal wastewater (diluted to 595 mg-COD/L) in a two-chambered MFC demonstrated a maximum of 81+/-7 mW/m(2) (normalized to the anode surface area), or 25+/-2 mA per liter of wastewater, and a final COD of <30 mg/L (95% removal). Using a one-chambered MFC and pre-fermented wastewater, the maximum power density was 371+/-10 mW/m(2) (53.5+/-1.4 mA per liter of wastewater). These results suggest that it is feasible to link biological hydrogen production and electricity producing using MFCs in order to achieve both wastewater treatment and bioenergy production.

  15. Organ-Sparing Marrow-Targeted Irradiation Before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-30

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. 3-AP and High-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Performance Evaluation of a Radar by Computer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    spatial-resolution map (0.25 nmi x 2.80 ) is employed to select the appropriate threshold values for the ground clutter; a doppler weighting that...seconds with approximately 16 mi’ x 3-Doppler-bin resolution. The second filter integrates over 5 seconds and covers within 20 miles of radar and within 3...also includes receiver matching loss , beamshape loss , and the signal processing loss. D, can be written as D,=D, (n) MLL,= -f- (3.2) where x

  18. Development of a Cool Propellant for the 3 in/70 Caliber Gun. Ballistic Test of Cool Propellants EX-6802, EX-6841 and EX-6842

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-03-26

    G-12, No« 24927 As indicated«, Epsom salt loaded {15*00 lbs«) As indicated^ ,E"xp-» No0 5, Steel * Rubber Crimped« British cases used with... Steel $ Rubber Crimped EX-24«°2 (15 o00 lbs o) Epsom Salt Loaded _.’-." .XC-Mll .’ Cardboard Powder Tempo JL*£L 7-u 122 138 155 145...Primer? Lead Foil: Powder Temp« Esspe No6 5» Steels , Rubber Crimped BFitiehs Steel , Rubber Crimped xc-i&i None * - • ’ As indieated si 1

  19. Time Delay Estimation: For Known & Unknown Signals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-25

    T’Prflt h mll fote Nov h er )C, 1981 0 10 ~TIME IjI-;I,AY ES3T1MAPION: O KNOWN Fe INKN17(-, (,[;NAt,’) by 3hunn-Jr-ing Chern El oct-ri nil Enri...separated sensors. The Aknike FPM ( Final power error)criterion is also concerned in deciding the order of AR model and signal & noise power spectrum...Sound and Vibrntion, vol. 76, pp. 117-128., 1981 . 2. J.C. Hassab And H.E. Boucher, " Optimum estimation of time delay by al generlized correlntor

  20. Highway Snow Control Research in Japan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    to 0.50 g/ ci11" . Packed snow-A network texture of crains 0.05 to0.3 mll in diameter: p = 0.45 to 0.75 g/cm’. hardness H = 20 to 170 kg/cm-. Ice... textures . Base on the results, it was proposed that snow and ice on roads should be divided into seven types: new snow, powdery snow, grainy snow, packed...compression due to the natural weight of the snow cover. The main features of these results, such as the appearance of the saw-toothed curve of resistance

  1. Therapeutic Allogeneic Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Degradation Of 4-Chlorophenol Using Water Falling Film Dbd Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dojcinovic, B.; Roglic, G.; Obradovic, B. M.; Kuraica, M. M.; Puric, J.; Natic, M.; Tosti, T.; Manojlovic, D.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we present experimental results of degradation of 4-chlorphenol using falling film dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. Degradation of 100 ml/L water solution of 4-chlorphenol was examined using catalysts in four different set of conditions: DBD, DBD/H2O2, DBD/TiO2 i DBD/Fe2+. Kinetics of the 4-chlorophenol degrada- tion in several successive passes trough the reactor was monitored using HPLC. Changes in concentrations of carbon that originate from products of degradations like acetic, formic and oxalic acids and changes in concentrations of carbon calculated on basis of degraded 4-chlorophenole are presented.

  3. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Measurement of forward-backward asymmetry and other properties of B decays to K*ll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Jared

    2013-04-01

    We present a study of B decays to K^(*) and two leptons (e,μ) in the full Belle υ(4s) data set (771 x10^6 BB pairs). The flavor-changing neutral current process responsible for this decay, b ->sl^+l^-, proceeds via electro-weak penguin diagrams in the Standard Model. However, this process may be sensitive to new physics due to contributions from Beyond the Standard Model particles in these diagrams. We report the differential branching fraction, isospin asymmetry, K^* polarization, and forward-backward asymmetry (AFB) as a function of q^2 = Mll^2c^2.

  5. Ohmic Contacts for Technology for Frequency Agile Digitally Synthesized Transmitters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Catalyzed by Ru) Gold potassium cyanide 0.2 g/L Hydrazine hydrate 4ml/L NaOH (pH adjustment) As needed PH 12.2 Temperature 70 - 80°C Table V. Second...electroless Au bath (auto-catalytic). [7] Au Bath #2 (Auto-catalytic) Gold potassium cyanide 5.8 g/L Potassium cyanide 6.5 g/L KOH 11.2 g/L KBH4...result in a non- uniform plating potential (and a non-uniform deposition rate) across the wa- fer. Alternatively, a selective electroless process can

  6. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Unrelated Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Fanconi Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-16

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  8. Busulfan, Etoposide, and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Myeloid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  9. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Frequent mutation of histone-modifying genes in non-Hodgkin lymphoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In a recent Nature article, Morin et al. uncovered a novel role for chromatin modification in driving the progression of two non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs), follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Through DNA and RNA sequencing of 117 tumor samples and 10 assorted cell lines, the authors identified and validated 109 genes with multiple mutations in these B-cell NHLs. Of the 109 genes, several genes not previously linked to lymphoma demonstrated positive selection for mutation including two genes involved in histone modification, MLL2 and MEF2B.

  12. Recovery Following Orthognathic Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    AD-A267 PAGE Form Approved IJIIIJi PAGEll IIIIiBlll0MB No. 0204-0 US ONL (LWv bl0nk 2.; REjR DATE t0, P .• ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 ’o M"• >’lr.n , . mll.r ,t9 co...SPONSORING/ MONITORING DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 2 P TIC WRIGHT-PATTERSON AFB OH 45433-7765 _E L ,bCTE- 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 12a...DISTRIBUTION ’ AVAILABILITY STATEMENT I12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE Approved for Public Release IAW 190-1 Distribution Unlimited MICHAEL M. BRICKER, SMSgt

  13. Antiviral activities of Indonesian medicinal plants in the East Java region against hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease and a potential cause of substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The overall prevalence of HCV infection is 2%, representing 120 million people worldwide. Current standard treatment using pegylated interferon and ribavirin is effective in only 50% of the patients infected with HCV genotype 1, and is associated with significant side effects. Therefore, it is still of importance to develop new drugs for treatment of HCV. Antiviral substances obtained from natural products, including medicinal plants, are potentially good targets to study. In this study, we evaluated Indonesian medicinal plants for their anti-HCV activities. Methods Ethanol extracts of 21 samples derived from 17 species of medicinal plants explored in the East Java region were tested. Anti-HCV activities were determined by a cell culture method using Huh7.5 cells and HCV strains of 9 different genotypes (1a to 7a, 1b and 2b). Results Four of the 21 samples tested showed antiviral activities against HCV: Toona sureni leaves (TSL) with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 13.9 and 2.0 μg/ml against the HCV J6/JFH1-P47 and -P1 strains, respectively, Melicope latifolia leaves (MLL) with IC50 of 3.5 and 2.1 μg/ml, respectively, Melanolepis multiglandulosa stem (MMS) with IC50 of 17.1 and 6.2 μg/ml, respectively, and Ficus fistulosa leaves (FFL) with IC50 of 15.0 and 5.7 μg/ml, respectively. Time-of-addition experiments revealed that TSL and MLL inhibited both at the entry and post-entry steps while MMS and FFL principally at the entry step. TSL and MLL inhibited all of 11 HCV strains of all the genotypes tested to the same extent. On the other hand, FFL showed significantly weaker inhibitory activities against the HCV genotype 1a strain, and MMS against the HCV strains of genotypes 2b and 7a to a lesser extent, compared to the other HCV genotypes. Conclusions Ethanol extracts of TSL, MLL, MMS and FFL showed antiviral

  14. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or Poor-Prognosis Hematologic Cancer or Other Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  15. Sirolimus and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia That is Recurrent or Not Eligible for Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Trithorax group proteins: switching genes on and keeping them active.

    PubMed

    Schuettengruber, Bernd; Martinez, Anne-Marie; Iovino, Nicola; Cavalli, Giacomo

    2011-11-23

    Cellular memory is provided by two counteracting groups of chromatin proteins termed Trithorax group (TrxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) proteins. TrxG proteins activate transcription and are perhaps best known because of the involvement of the TrxG protein MLL in leukaemia. However, in terms of molecular analysis, they have lived in the shadow of their more famous counterparts, the PcG proteins. Recent advances have improved our understanding of TrxG protein function and demonstrated that the heterogeneous group of TrxG proteins is of critical importance in the epigenetic regulation of the cell cycle, senescence, DNA damage and stem cell biology.

  17. McChord AFB, Tacoma, Washington. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-03-19

    OBSERVATIONS 2860 I 1< C USAF ETAC 0’?. 14.5 (OL A) nrmou oi *. o, 0 ~ tot "I Au Lli~f -- -- -- --------- ------- - -"- ! Mll- I - . "w - GAI "T: .r4 OAT,4...3196176 247 384, 2957 -1 l. _ ,oy 80, Dy Bulb 06~~ 295L 7 o [03 F 772uOP1j ~ D~rr Porn , 55 t13 13464 45.5 _____ LA / 5 5 7 1 13

  18. Growing Cutting-edge X-ray Optics

    ScienceCinema

    Ray Conley

    2016-07-12

    Ever imagined that an Xbox controller could help open a window into a world spanning just one billionth of a meter? Brookhaven Lab's Ray Conley grows cutting-edge optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) one atomic layer at a time to focus high-energy x-rays to within a single nanometer. To achieve this focusing feat, Ray uses a massive, custom-built atomic deposition device, an array of computers, and a trusty Xbox controller. These lenses will be deployed at the Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II, due to begin shining super-bright light on pressing scientific puzzles in 2015

  19. Vorinostat and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  20. Elucidating the cancer-specific genetic alteration spectrum of glioblastoma derived cell lines from whole exome and RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2015-01-01

    Cell lines derived from tumor tissues have been used as a valuable system to study gene regulation and cancer development. Comprehensive characterization of the genetic background of cell lines could provide clues on novel genes responsible for carcinogenesis and help in choosing cell lines for particular studies. Here, we have carried out whole exome and RNA sequencing of commonly used glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines (U87, T98G, LN229, U343, U373 and LN18) to unearth single nucleotide variations (SNVs), indels, differential gene expression, gene fusions and RNA editing events. We obtained an average of 41,071 SNVs out of which 1,594 (3.88%) were potentially cancer-specific. The cell lines showed frequent SNVs and indels in some of the genes that are known to be altered in GBM- EGFR, TP53, PTEN, SPTA1 and NF1. Chromatin modifying genes- ATRX, MLL3, MLL4, SETD2 and SRCAP also showed alterations. While no cell line carried IDH1 mutations, five cell lines showed hTERT promoter activating mutations with a concomitant increase in hTERT transcript levels. Five significant gene fusions were found of which NUP93-CYB5B was validated. An average of 18,949 RNA editing events was also obtained. Thus we have generated a comprehensive catalogue of genetic alterations for six GBM cell lines. PMID:26496030

  1. Human AML-iPSCs Reacquire Leukemic Properties after Differentiation and Model Clonal Variation of Disease.

    PubMed

    Chao, Mark P; Gentles, Andrew J; Chatterjee, Susmita; Lan, Feng; Reinisch, Andreas; Corces, M Ryan; Xavy, Seethu; Shen, Jinfeng; Haag, Daniel; Chanda, Soham; Sinha, Rahul; Morganti, Rachel M; Nishimura, Toshinobu; Ameen, Mohamed; Wu, Haodi; Wernig, Marius; Wu, Joseph C; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-02

    Understanding the relative contributions of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) should assist integrated design of targeted therapies. In this study, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from AML patient samples harboring MLL rearrangements and found that they retained leukemic mutations but reset leukemic DNA methylation/gene expression patterns. AML-iPSCs lacked leukemic potential, but when differentiated into hematopoietic cells, they reacquired the ability to give rise to leukemia in vivo and reestablished leukemic DNA methylation/gene expression patterns, including an aberrant MLL signature. Epigenetic reprogramming was therefore not sufficient to eliminate leukemic behavior. This approach also allowed us to study the properties of distinct AML subclones, including differential drug susceptibilities of KRAS mutant and wild-type cells, and predict relapse based on increased cytarabine resistance of a KRAS wild-type subclone. Overall, our findings illustrate the value of AML-iPSCs for investigating the mechanistic basis and clonal properties of human AML.

  2. Local gene density predicts the spatial position of genetic loci in the interphase nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Murmann, Andrea E.; Gao Juntao; Encinosa, Marissa; Peter, Marcus E.; Eils, Roland; Lichter, Peter . E-mail: m.macleod@dkfz.de; Rowley, Janet D.

    2005-11-15

    Specific chromosomal translocations are hallmarks of many human leukemias. The basis for these translocation events is poorly understood, but it has been assumed that spatial positioning of genes in the nucleus of hematopoietic cells is a contributing factor. Analysis of the nuclear 3D position of the gene MLL, frequently involved in chromosomal translocations and five of its translocation partners (AF4, AF6, AF9, ENL and ELL), and two control loci revealed a characteristic radial distribution pattern in all hematopoietic cells studied. Genes in areas of high local gene density were found positioned towards the nuclear center, whereas genes in regions of low gene density were detected closer to the nuclear periphery. The gene density within a 2 Mbp window was found to be a better predictor for the relative positioning of a genomic locus within the cell nucleus than the gene density of entire chromosomes. Analysis of the position of MLL, AF4, AF6 and AF9 in cell lines carrying chromosomal translocations involving these genes revealed that the position of the normal genes was different from that of the fusion genes, and this was again consistent with the changes in local gene density within a 2 Mbp window. Thus, alterations in gene density directly at translocation junctions could explain the change in the position of affected genes in leukemia cells.

  3. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Preparation and application of a novel bioflocculant by two strains of Rhizopus sp. using potato starch wastewater as nutrilite.

    PubMed

    Pu, Sheng-yan; Qin, Lan-lan; Che, Jun-ping; Zhang, Bao-rong; Xu, Mo

    2014-06-01

    A complex bioflocculant MBF917 was prepared by Rhizopus sp. M9 and M17 using potato starch wastewater (PSW) as nutrilite, and its flocculation characteristics of treating PSW were studied. Culture conditions of the two strains were optimized, and flocculating conditions of the bioflocculant for treating PSW were also investigated. The optimal and economical culture conditions were determined as COD of about 1600 mg/L, 0.3 g/L urea and 0.04 g/L potassium dihydrogen phosphate, with no need of adding carbon sources or adjusting pH. When the bioflocculant was used to flocculate PSW, the optimal dosage was 0.1 mL/L with addition of 5 mL/L 10% CaCl2 as coagulant aid, and there was no need to adjust pH. After flocculation, COD and turbidity removal rates of the PSW could reach 54.09% and 92.11%, respectively, and 1.1g/L proteic substance was recycled from the PSW as a byproduct that could be used for animal feed.

  5. Analysis of gene rearrangements using a fluorescence in situ hybridization method in Mexican patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: experience at a single institution.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vera, Patricia; Salas, Consuelo; Montero-Ruiz, Oreth; Frías, Sara; Dehesa, Gloria; Jarquín, Berenice; Rivera-Luna, Roberto

    2008-07-15

    We evaluated the prevalence of BCR/ABL, MLL, and ETV6/RUNX1 rearrangements as well as CDKN2A (alias p16) deletion in a group of Mexican children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) to determine whether the changes coexist, and to compare the incidences found with other reports in the literature. To increase the detection of these abnormalities, we combined conventional cytogenetics and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. Bone marrow samples were obtained from 59 consecutive children with ALL. FISH detected a total of 63 abnormalities with the selected probes, 34 of which were related to the conventional cytogenetic results. The most common abnormality was the p16 deletion (22.8%), followed by MLL and ETV6/RUNX1 rearrangements (8.7%), and the BCR/ABL fusion was the least frequent (2.7%). The coexistence of two recurrent abnormalities with specific prognostic significance in the same patient was not found. A lesser proportion of the p16 deletion in T-ALL patients was observed, probably related to the low prevalence of this subtype in our population. In addition, we confirmed the low frequency of the ETV6/RUNX1 fusion observed in Hispanics. Due to the different prevalence of these abnormalities in the Mexican population, similar studies should be conducted analyzing new rearrangements, to improve the adequate classification of the abnormalities and the stratification in prognostic groups.

  6. Role for Dpy-30 in ES cell-fate specification by regulation of H3K4 methylation within bivalent domains.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hao; Shukla, Abhijit; Wang, Xiaoling; Chen, Wei-yi; Bernstein, Bradley E; Roeder, Robert G

    2011-02-18

    Histone H3K4 methylation is associated with active genes and, along with H3K27 methylation, is part of a bivalent chromatin mark that typifies poised developmental genes in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, its functional roles in ESC maintenance and differentiation are not established. Here we show that mammalian Dpy-30, a core subunit of the SET1/MLL histone methyltransferase complexes, modulates H3K4 methylation in vitro, and directly regulates chromosomal H3K4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) throughout the mammalian genome. Depletion of Dpy-30 does not affect ESC self-renewal, but significantly alters the differentiation potential of ESCs, particularly along the neural lineage. The differentiation defect is accompanied by defects in gene induction and in H3K4 methylation at key developmental loci. Our results strongly indicate an essential functional role for Dpy-30 and SET1/MLL complex-mediated H3K4 methylation, as a component of the bivalent mark, at developmental genes during the ESC fate transitions.

  7. Gastric Cancer: Molecular and Clinical Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Roopma; Song, Shumei; Lee, Ju-Seog; Yao, Yixin; Wei, Qingyi; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) imposes a significant health burden around the globe despite its declining incidence. GC is often diagnosed in advanced stages and carries a poor prognosis. In depth understanding of molecular underpinnings of GC has lagged behind many other cancers of its magnitude, as a result our knowledge base for identifying germline susceptibility traits for risk and somatic drivers of progression (to identify novel therapeutic targets) is limited. A few germline (PLCE1) and somatic (ERBB2, ERBB3, PTEN, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, FGF, TP53, CDH1, and c-MET) alterations are emerging and some are being pursued in the clinic. Novel somatic gene targets, Arid1a, FAT4, and MLL/MLL3 are of interest. Clinically, variations in the therapeutic approaches for localized GC are evident by geographic regions. These are driven by preferences for the adjunctive strategies and the extent of surgery coupled with philosophical divides. However, there is a greater uniformity in approaches to metastatic cancer, an incurable condition. Having realized only modest successes, the momentum is building for carrying out more phase 3 comparative trials and some are using biomarker-based patient selection. Overall, rapid progress in biotechnology is improving our molecular understanding and can help with new drug discovery. The future prospects are excellent for defining biomarker-based subsets of patients and application of specific therapeutics. However, many challenges remain to be tackled. Here we review representative molecular and clinical dimensions of GC. PMID:24061039

  8. Acute toxicity of a shoreline cleaner, CytoSol, mixed with oil and ecological risk assessment of its use on the Galician Coast.

    PubMed

    Rial, Diego; Beiras, Ricardo; Vázquez, José A; Murado, Miguel A

    2010-10-01

    The application of embryo-larval bioassay with the purple sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis at 48 hours, and with neonates of the mysid Siriella armata at 96 hours, was used to evaluate the acute toxicities of the following preparations: (1) the shoreline cleaning agent CytoSol; (2) the water-accommodated fraction of CytoSol plus a light crude oil; and (3) the runoff from a pilot-scale treatment with CytoSol of a rocky coastal substrate impregnated with residues from the Prestige oil spill (which occurred on November 19, 2002). The mussel was the most sensitive organism to CytoSol and runoff effects (EC(50) = 8.0 microL/L and 64.3 mL/L, respectively), and the mysid was the least sensitive to the runoff (EC(50) > 200 mL/L). The predicted no-effect environmental concentration (PNEC) was calculated from the no observed-effect concentration of the species most sensitive to the runoff. The predicted environmental concentration (PEC) was estimated from a simple and reasonable dilution model, and the PEC/PNEC ratio was calculated according to the area treated and the values of the variables considered in the model. Implications for the management of the treatment operations are discussed.

  9. Hif-1α and Hif-2α synergize to suppress AML development but are dispensable for disease maintenance.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Milica; Guitart, Amelie V; Sepulveda, Catarina; Villacreces, Arnaud; O'Duibhir, Eoghan; Panagopoulou, Theano I; Ivens, Alasdair; Menendez-Gonzalez, Juan; Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Allen, Lewis; Glykofrydis, Fokion; Subramani, Chithra; Armesilla-Diaz, Alejandro; Post, Annemarie E M; Schaak, Katrin; Gezer, Deniz; So, Chi Wai Eric; Holyoake, Tessa L; Wood, Andrew; O'Carroll, Dónal; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Kranc, Kamil R

    2015-12-14

    Leukemogenesis occurs under hypoxic conditions within the bone marrow (BM). Knockdown of key mediators of cellular responses to hypoxia with shRNA, namely hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) or HIF-2α, in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples results in their apoptosis and inability to engraft, implicating HIF-1α or HIF-2α as therapeutic targets. However, genetic deletion of Hif-1α has no effect on mouse AML maintenance and may accelerate disease development. Here, we report the impact of conditional genetic deletion of Hif-2α or both Hif-1α and Hif-2α at different stages of leukemogenesis in mice. Deletion of Hif-2α accelerates development of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) and shortens AML latency initiated by Mll-AF9 and its downstream effectors Meis1 and Hoxa9. Notably, the accelerated initiation of AML caused by Hif-2α deletion is further potentiated by Hif-1α codeletion. However, established LSCs lacking Hif-2α or both Hif-1α and Hif-2α propagate AML with the same latency as wild-type LSCs. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of the HIF pathway or HIF-2α knockout using the lentiviral CRISPR-Cas9 system in human established leukemic cells with MLL-AF9 translocation have no impact on their functions. We therefore conclude that although Hif-1α and Hif-2α synergize to suppress the development of AML, they are not required for LSC maintenance.

  10. Constrained invariant mass distributions in cascade decays. The shape of the “mqll-threshold” and similar distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Christopher G.

    2007-10-01

    Considering the cascade decay D → cC → cbB → cbaA in which D, C, B, A are massive particles and c, b, a are massless particles, we determine for the shape of the distribution of the invariant mass of the three massless particles mabc for the sub-set of decays in which the invariant mass mab of the last two particles in the chain is (optionally) constrained to lie inside an arbitrary interval, mab ∈ [mabcut min, mabcut max]. An example of an experimentally important distribution of this kind is the “mqll threshold”—which is the distribution of the combined invariant mass of the visible Standard Model particles radiated from the hypothesised decay of a squark to the lightest neutralino via successive two body decay: q˜ → qχ˜20 → qll˜ → qllχ˜10, in which the experimenter requires additionally that mll be greater than mllmax /√{ 2}. The location of the “foot” of this distribution is often used to constrain sparticle mass scales. The new results presented here permit the location of this foot to be better understood as the shape of the distribution is derived. The effects of varying the position of the mll cut(s) may now be seen more easily.

  11. The DNA damage- and transcription-associated protein paxip1 controls thymocyte development and emigration.

    PubMed

    Callen, Elsa; Faryabi, Robert B; Luckey, Megan; Hao, Bingtao; Daniel, Jeremy A; Yang, Wenjing; Sun, Hong-Wei; Dressler, Greg; Peng, Weiqun; Chi, Hongbo; Ge, Kai; Krangel, Michael S; Park, Jung-Hyun; Nussenzweig, André

    2012-12-14

    Histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is associated with promoters of active genes and found at hot spots for DNA recombination. Here we have shown that PAXIP1 (also known as PTIP), a protein associated with MLL3 and MLL4 methyltransferase and the DNA damage response, regulates RAG-mediated cleavage and repair during V(D)J recombination in CD4(+) CD8(+) DP thymocytes. Loss of PAXIP1 in developing thymocytes diminished Jα H3K4me3 and germline transcription, suppressed double strand break formation at 3' Jα segments, but resulted in accumulation of unresolved T cell receptor α-chain gene (Tcra) breaks. Moreover, PAXIP1 was essential for release of mature single positive (SP) αβ T cells from the thymus through transcriptional activation of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor S1pr1 as well as for natural killer T cell development. Thus, in addition to maintaining genome integrity during Tcra rearrangements, PAXIP1 controls distinct transcriptional programs during DP differentiation necessary for Tcra locus accessibility, licensing mature thymocytes for trafficking and natural killer T cell development.

  12. Characterization of time-domain fluorescence properties of typical photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Jennifer; Diamond, Kevin; Collins, Tony; Weston, Mark; Lovell, Jonathan; Hayward, Joseph; Farrell, Tom; Patterson, Michael S.; Fang, Qiyin

    2007-02-01

    We report the investigation of fluorescence lifetime of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) and Photofrinin vitro in MAT-LyLu (MLL) rat prostate adenocarcinoma cells. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been extensively investigated in the past decade as an effective treatment option for various types of invasive tumors. The efficacy of PDT treatment depends strongly on cell uptake and subsequent excitation of the photosensitizers. Characterization of fluorescence lifetime of these drugs provides the basis for further investigation of in vivo PDT dosage measurements using time-domain spectroscopy and imaging. Physiologically relevant concentrations of the photosensitizer solutions were prepared. A picosecond diode laser was used to excite the two drugs and the time-resolved fluorescence decay was recorded using a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) system. MLL cells were incubated with the photosensitizers and were treated with light under well-oxygenated or hypoxic conditions. Fluorescence lifetime images of these cells were recorded by a confocal FLIM microscope. The measured fluorescence lifetimes of both photosensitizers are much longer than typical endogenous tissue fluorescence, which suggests time-domain methods are good candidates for in vivo PDT monitoring.

  13. Development of X-ray Microscopy at IPOE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Mu, B.; Huang, Q.; Huang, C.; Yi, S.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, F.; Wang, Z.; Chen, L.

    2011-09-01

    In order to meet the different requirements of applications in synchrotron radiation and plasma diagnosis in China, focusing and imaging optics based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors, compound refractive lenses (CRLs), and multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs) were studied in our lab. A one-dimensional KB microscope using mirrors with a dual-periodic multilayer coating was developed. The multilayer mirror can reflect both 4.75 keV (Ti K-line) and 8.05 keV (Cu K-line) simultaneously, which makes alignment easier. For hard x-ray microscopy, CRL was studied. Using a SU-8 resist planar parabolic CRL, a focal line of 28.8-μm width was obtained. To focus hard x-rays to nanometer levels efficiently, an MLL was fabricated using a WSi2/Si multilayer. The MLL consists of 324 alternating WSi2 and Si layers with a total thickness of 7.9 μm. (Recently, a much thicker multilayer has been deposited with a layer number of n = 1582 and a total thickness of 27 μm.) After deposition, the sample was sliced and polished into an approximate ideal aspect ratio (depth of the zone plate to outmost layer thickness); the measured results show an intact structure remains, and the surface roughness of the cross section is about 0.4 nm after grinding and polishing processes.

  14. [Isolation, culture and identification of adipose-derived stem cells from SD rat adipose tissues subjected to long-term cryopreservation].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qin; Wang, Liping; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yi

    2017-02-01

    Objective To study the feasibility of isolation and culture of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) from SD rat adipose tissues subjected to long-term cryopreservation. Methods We took inguinal fat pads from healthy SD rats. Adipose tissues were stored with 100 mL/L dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) combined with 900 mL/L fetal bovine serum (FBS) in liquid nitrogen. Three months later, the adipose tissues were resuscitated for the isolation and culture of ADSCs. The growth status and morphology were observed. The growth curve and cell surface markers CD29, CD45, CD90 of the 3rd passage cells were analyzed respectively by CCK-8 assay and immunocytochemistry. The 3rd passage cells were induced towards adipogenic lineages and osteogenic lineages by different inducers, and the resulting cells were examined separately by oil red O staining and alizarin red staining. Results The ADSCs obtained from SD rat adipose tissues subjected to long-term cryopreservation showed a spindle-shape appearance and had a good proliferation ability. The cell growth curve was typical "S" curve. Immunocytochemistry showed that the 3rd passage cells were positive for CD29 and CD90, while negative for CD45. The cells were positive for oil red O staining after adipogenic induction, and also positive for alizarin red staining after osteogenic induction. Conclusion The ADSCs can be isolated from SD rat adipose tissues subjected to long-term cryopreservation.

  15. Distribution of common genetic subgroups in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in four developing countries.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Rubina; Nancy, Nirmala; Naing, Win P; Ali, Sarah; Dar, Lalit; Khan, Baldip K; Padua, Rose A; Carr, Robert

    2010-07-15

    An international project was conducted to identify the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)-specific fusion genes (ETV6-RUNX1,MLL-AF4,TCF3-PBX1, and BCR-ABL1) in developing countries to provide additional prognostic information at diagnosis. A total of 181 children with newly diagnosed ALL were tested by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction at laboratories in India, Pakistan, Myanmar, and Sudan, following a common protocol. To our knowledge, this report is novel in its report from these countries, except India. Across the four countries, the ETV6-RUNX1 (TEL-AML1) fusion gene was present in only 5% of cases. All the positive samples were from children aged 1 to 10 years, in whom the prevalence of this fusion gene, which is associated with good prognosis, was 7.4% (9 out of 121 samples), a much lower rate than reported from Western populations. In the 18 ALL cases tested in Sudan, a notable excess of MLL-AF4 (17%) and BCR-ABL1 (22%) fusion genes was found. This study highlights the need for wider international surveys of the molecular epidemiology of ALL.

  16. Altered oncomodules underlie chromatin regulatory factors driver mutations.

    PubMed

    Frigola, Joan; Iturbide, Ane; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Peiro, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel

    2016-05-24

    Chromatin regulatory factors (CRFs), are known to be involved in tumorigenesis in several cancer types. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms through which driver alterations of CRFs cause tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here, we developed a CRFs Oncomodules Discovery approach, which mines several sources of cancer genomics and perturbaomics data. The approach prioritizes sets of genes significantly miss-regulated in primary tumors (oncomodules) bearing mutations of driver CRFs. We applied the approach to eleven TCGA tumor cohorts and uncovered oncomodules potentially associated to mutations of five driver CRFs in three cancer types. Our results revealed, for example, the potential involvement of the mTOR pathway in the development of tumors with loss-of-function mutations of MLL2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The experimental validation that MLL2 loss-of-function increases the sensitivity of cancer cell lines to mTOR inhibition lends further support to the validity of our approach. The potential oncogenic modules detected by our approach may guide experiments proposing ways to indirectly target driver mutations of CRFs.

  17. Downregulation of the Wnt inhibitor CXXC5 predicts a better prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kühnl, Andrea; Valk, Peter J. M.; Sanders, Mathijs A.; Ivey, Adam; Hills, Robert K.; Mills, Ken I.; Gale, Rosemary E.; Kaiser, Martin F.; Dillon, Richard; Joannides, Melanie; Gilkes, Amanda; Haferlach, Torsten; Schnittger, Susanne; Duprez, Estelle; Linch, David C.; Delwel, Ruud; Löwenberg, Bob; Baldus, Claudia D.; Solomon, Ellen; Burnett, Alan K.

    2015-01-01

    The gene CXXC5 on 5q31 is frequently deleted in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with del(5q), suggesting that inactivation of CXXC5 might play a role in leukemogenesis. Here, we investigated the functional and prognostic implications of CXXC5 expression in AML. CXXC5 mRNA was downregulated in AML with MLL rearrangements, t(8;21) and GATA2 mutations. As a mechanism of CXXC5 inactivation, we found evidence for epigenetic silencing by promoter methylation. Patients with CXXC5 expression below the median level had a lower relapse rate (45% vs 59%; P = .007) and a better overall survival (OS, 46% vs 28%; P < .001) and event-free survival (EFS, 36% vs 21%; P < .001) at 5 years, independent of cytogenetic risk groups and known molecular risk factors. In gene-expression profiling, lower CXXC5 expression was associated with upregulation of cell-cycling genes and codownregulation of genes implicated in leukemogenesis (WT1, GATA2, MLL, DNMT3B, RUNX1). Functional analyses demonstrated CXXC5 to inhibit leukemic cell proliferation and Wnt signaling and to affect the p53-dependent DNA damage response. In conclusion, our data suggest a tumor suppressor function of CXXC5 in AML. Inactivation of CXXC5 is associated with different leukemic pathways and defines an AML subgroup with better outcome. PMID:25805812

  18. Hydrogen production by Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158 under intense irradiation.

    PubMed

    Krujatz, Felix; Härtel, Paul; Helbig, Karsten; Haufe, Nora; Thierfelder, Simone; Bley, Thomas; Weber, Jost

    2015-01-01

    To identify optimal hydrogen production conditions using growing cultures of Rhodobacter sphaeroides DSM 158 the effects of varying the reactor's volumetric power input (0.01-1.4kWm(-3)) and irradiation intensity (5-2500Wm(-2)) were investigated in batch and continuous production modes. Irradiation intensity had a greater effect on hydrogen production than volumetric power input. Hydrogen production and photofermentative biomass formation were maximized by irradiation at 2250Wm(-2) with a volumetric power input of 0.55kWm(-3). The bacterial dry weight (2.64gL(-1)) and rate of hydrogen production (195mLL(-1)h(-1)) achieved under these conditions were greater than any that have previously been reported for batch-mode hydrogen production by R. sphaeroides. Continuous mode experiments (D=0.1h(-1)) yielded a bacterial dry weight, hydrogen production rate, productivity and hydrogen yield of 2.35±0.18gL(-1), 165±6.2mLL(-1)h(-1), 3.96LL(-1)d(-1) and 36.6%, respectively.

  19. Endocrine disrupting chemical, bisphenol-A, induces breast cancer associated gene HOXB9 expression in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Deb, Paromita; Bhan, Arunoday; Hussain, Imran; Ansari, Khairul I; Bobzean, Samara A; Pandita, Tej K; Perrotti, Linda I; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2016-09-30

    HOXB9 is a homeobox-containing gene that plays a key role in mammary gland development and is associated with breast and other types of cancer. Here, we demonstrate that HOXB9 expression is transcriptionally regulated by estradiol (E2), in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that the endocrine disrupting chemical bisphenol-A (BPA) induces HOXB9 expression in cultured human breast cancer cells (MCF7) as well as in vivo in the mammary glands of ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Luciferase assay showed that estrogen-response-elements (EREs) in the HOXB9 promoter are required for BPA-induced expression. Estrogen-receptors (ERs) and ER-co-regulators such as MLL-histone methylase (MLL3), histone acetylases, CBP/P300, bind to the HOXB9 promoter EREs in the presence of BPA, modify chromatin (histone methylation and acetylation) and lead to gene activation. In summary, our results demonstrate that BPA exposure, like estradiol, increases HOXB9 expression in breast cells both in vitro and in vivo through a mechanism that involves increased recruitment of transcription and chromatin modification factors.

  20. Reducing sugar loss in enzymatic hydrolysis of ethylenediamine pretreated corn stover.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Chao; Li, Xia; Qin, Lei; Zhu, Jia-Qing; Han, Xiao; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of ethylenediamine (EDA) on enzymatic hydrolysis with different cellulosic substrates and the approaches to reduce sugar loss in enzymatic hydrolysis were investigated. During enzymatic hydrolysis, xylose yield reduced 21.2%, 18.1% and 13.0% with 7.5mL/L EDA for AFEX pretreated corn stover (CS), washed EDA pretreated CS and CS cellulose. FTIR and GPC analysis demonstrated EDA reacted with sugar and produced high molecular weight (MW) compounds. EDA was prone to react with xylose other than glucose. H2O2 and Na2SO3 cannot prevent sugar loss in glucose/xylose-EDA mixture, although they inhibited the browning and high MW compounds formation. By decreasing temperature to 30°C, the loss of xylose yield reduced to only 3.8%, 3.6% and 4.2% with 7.5mL/L EDA in the enzymatic hydrolysis of AFEX pretreated CS, washed EDA pretreated CS and CS cellulose.

  1. Identification of Candida tropicalis BH-6 and synergistic effect with Pantoea agglomerans BH-18 on hydrogen production in marine culture.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Daling; Ma, Yingchao; Wang, Guangce; Pan, Guanghua

    2015-03-01

    A marine yeast was isolated from mangrove sludge and named Candida tropicalis BH-6. The optimum temperature and the initial pH value for growth of the isolated strain were 37 °C and 5.0, respectively. The strain had high salt tolerance and could survive at NaCl concentrations of 0-6 %. Additionally, the yield of hydrogen production by C. tropicalis BH-6 was only 66.30 ml/l. However, when the yeast was mixed with Pantoea agglomerans BH-18, hydrogen production increased significantly to a maximum of 1707.5 ml/l, which was 36.94 and 247.54 % higher than the monoculture of P. agglomerans BH-18 and C. tropicalis BH-6, respectively. Taken together, these results revealed that in mixed culture, the yeast strain isolated from the same ecosystem as P. agglomerans BH-18 likely consumed the organic acids produced by fermentation, thus eliminating the factor inhibiting hydrogen production by P. agglomerans BH-18. As a result, the yield of hydrogen production during mixed culture increased significantly.

  2. Loss of Function of Mouse Pax-Interacting Protein 1-Associated Glutamate Rich Protein 1a (Pagr1a) Leads to Reduced Bmp2 Expression and Defects in Chorion and Amnion Development

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Lualdi, Margaret; Loncarek, Jadranka; Cho, Young-Wook; Lee, Ji-Eun; Ge, Kai; Kuehn, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Human PAX-Interacting Protein 1 (PAXIP1)-associated glutamate rich protein 1 (PAGR1, also known as PA1) originally was discovered as part of a complex containing PAXIP1 and histone H3K4 methyltransferases MLL3 and MLL4, suggesting a role in epigenetic gene regulation. Further in vitro studies suggested additional functions in DNA damage repair and transcription. However, in vivo analysis of PAGR1 function has been lacking. Results Here we show that expression of the cognate mouse gene Pagr1a is found predominately in the extraembryonic and chorionic ectoderm from pregastrulation stages and is up-regulated within the embryo proper after gastrulation. Embryos with a germ line deletion of Pagr1a establish the anterior–posterior axis, and show normal neuroectodermal, mesodermal, and endodermal patterning, but fail to develop beyond the four- to five-somite stage or to undergo axial rotation. Pagr1a−/− embryos also show abnormal development of extraembryonic tissues with defects seen in the amnion, chorion and visceral yolk sac. At the molecular level, Pagr1a−/− embryos have reduced expression of BMP2, a known regulator of extraembryonic development. Conclusions Loss of mouse Pagr1a function leads to defective extraembryonic development, likely due at least in part to altered BMP signaling, contributing to developmental arrest. PMID:24633704

  3. Epigenetic regulator Smchd1 functions as a tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Leong, Huei San; Chen, Kelan; Hu, Yifang; Lee, Stanley; Corbin, Jason; Pakusch, Miha; Murphy, James M; Majewski, Ian J; Smyth, Gordon K; Alexander, Warren S; Hilton, Douglas J; Blewitt, Marnie E

    2013-03-01

    SMCHD1 is an epigenetic modifier of gene expression that is critical to maintain X chromosome inactivation. Here, we show in mouse that genetic inactivation of Smchd1 accelerates tumorigenesis in male mice. Loss of Smchd1 in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts increased tumor growth upon transplantation into immunodeficient nude mice. In addition, loss of Smchd1 in Eμ-Myc transgenic mice that undergo lymphomagenesis reduced disease latency by 50% relative to control animals. In premalignant Eμ-Myc transgenic mice deficient in Smchd1, there was an increase in the number of pre-B cells in the periphery, likely accounting for the accelerated disease in these animals. Global gene expression profiling suggested that Smchd1 normally represses genes activated by MLL chimeric fusion proteins in leukemia, implying that Smchd1 loss may work through the same pathways as overexpressed MLL fusion proteins do in leukemia and lymphoma. Notably, we found that SMCHD1 is underexpressed in many types of human hematopoietic malignancy. Together, our observations collectively highlight a hitherto uncharacterized role for SMCHD1 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene in hematopoietic cancers.

  4. Toxicological characterization of a novel wastewater treatment process using EDTA-Na2Zn as draw solution (DS) for the efficient treatment of MBR-treated landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Niu, Aping; Ren, Yi-Wei; Yang, Li; Xie, Shao-Lin; Jia, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Jing-Hui; Wang, Xiao; Li, Jing; Pei, De-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Landfill leachate has become an important source of environmental pollution in past decades, due to the increase of waste volume. Acute toxic and genotoxic hazards to organisms can be caused by landfill leachate. Thus, how to efficiently recover water from landfill leachate and effectively eliminate combined toxicity of landfill leachate are the most pressing issues in waste management. In this study, EDTA-Na2Zn as draw solution (DS) was used to remove the toxicity of membrane bioreactor-treated landfill leachate (MBR-treated landfill leachate) in forward osmosis (FO) process, and nanofiltration (NF) was designed for recovering the diluted DS. Zebrafish and human cells were used for toxicity assay after the novel wastewater treatment process using EDTA-Na2Zn as DS. Results showed that the water recovery rate of MBR-treated landfill leachate (M-LL) in FO membrane system could achieve 66.5% and 71.2% in the PRO and FO mode respectively, and the diluted DS could be efficiently recovered by NF. Toxicity tests performed by using zebrafish and human cells showed that M-LL treated by EDTA-Na2Zn had no toxicity effect on zebrafish larvae and human cells, but it had very slight effect on zebrafish embryos. In conclusion, all results indicated that EDTA-Na2Zn as DS can effectively eliminate toxicity of landfill leachate and this method is economical and eco-friendly for treatment of different types of landfill leachate.

  5. Effect of agomelatine on memory deficits and hippocampal gene expression induced by chronic social defeat stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Vincent; Allaïli, Najib; Euvrard, Marine; Marday, Tevrasamy; Riffaud, Armance; Franc, Bernard; Mocaër, Elisabeth; Gabriel, Cecilia; Fossati, Philippe; Lehericy, Stéphane; Lanfumey, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    Chronic stress is known to induce not only anxiety and depressive-like phenotypes in mice but also cognitive impairments, for which the action of classical antidepressant compounds remains unsatisfactory. In this context, we investigated the effects of chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) on anxiety-, social- and cognitive-related behaviors, as well as hippocampal Bdnf, synaptic plasticity markers (PSD-95, Synaptophysin, Spinophilin, Synapsin I and MAP-2), and epigenetic modifying enzymes (MYST2, HDAC2, HDAC6, MLL3, KDM5B, DNMT3B, GADD45B) gene expression in C57BL/6J mice. CSDS for 10 days provoked long-lasting anxious-like phenotype in the open field and episodic memory deficits in the novel object recognition test. While total Bdnf mRNA level was unchanged, Bdnf exon IV, MAP-2, HDAC2, HDAC6 and MLL3 gene expression was significantly decreased in the CSDS mouse hippocampus. In CSDS mice treated 3 weeks with 50 mg/kg/d agomelatine, an antidepressant with melatonergic receptor agonist and 5-HT2C receptor antagonist properties, the anxious-like phenotype was not reversed, but the treatment successfully prevented the cognitive impairments and hippocampal gene expression modifications. Altogether, these data evidenced that, in mice, agomelatine was effective in alleviating stress-induced altered cognitive functions, possibly through a mechanism involving BDNF signaling, synaptic plasticity and epigenetic remodeling. PMID:28374847

  6. Altered oncomodules underlie chromatin regulatory factors driver mutations

    PubMed Central

    Frigola, Joan; Iturbide, Ane; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Peiro, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin regulatory factors (CRFs), are known to be involved in tumorigenesis in several cancer types. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms through which driver alterations of CRFs cause tumorigenesis remain unknown. Here, we developed a CRFs Oncomodules Discovery approach, which mines several sources of cancer genomics and perturbaomics data. The approach prioritizes sets of genes significantly miss-regulated in primary tumors (oncomodules) bearing mutations of driver CRFs. We applied the approach to eleven TCGA tumor cohorts and uncovered oncomodules potentially associated to mutations of five driver CRFs in three cancer types. Our results revealed, for example, the potential involvement of the mTOR pathway in the development of tumors with loss-of-function mutations of MLL2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The experimental validation that MLL2 loss-of-function increases the sensitivity of cancer cell lines to mTOR inhibition lends further support to the validity of our approach. The potential oncogenic modules detected by our approach may guide experiments proposing ways to indirectly target driver mutations of CRFs. PMID:27095575

  7. Biochemical responses in armored catfish (Pterygoplichthys anisitsi) after short-term exposure to diesel oil, pure biodiesel and biodiesel blends.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Lílian; da Silva, Danilo Grünig Humberto; Oliveira, Thiago Yukio Kikuchi; da Rosa, Joel Maurício Correa; Felício, Andréia Arantes; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves

    2013-09-01

    Biodiesel fuel is gradually replacing petroleum-based diesel oil use. Despite the biodiesel being considered friendlier to the environment, little is known about its effects in aquatic organisms. In this work we evaluated whether biodiesel exposure can affect oxidative stress parameters and biotransformation enzymes in armored catfish (Pterygoplichthys anisitsi, Loricariidae), a South American endemic species. Thus, fish were exposed for 2 and 7d to 0.01mLL(-1) and 0.1mLL(-1) of pure diesel, pure biodiesel (B100) and blends of diesel with 5% (B5) and 20% (B20) biodiesel. Lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde) levels and the activities of the enzymes glutathione S-transferase, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were measured in liver and gills. Also, DNA damage (8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine) levels in gills and 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity in liver were assessed. Pure diesel, B5 and B20 blends changed most of the enzymes tested and in some cases, B5 and B20 induced a higher enzyme activity than pure diesel. Antioxidant system activation in P. anisitsi was effective to counteract reactive oxygen species effects, since DNA damage and lipid peroxidation levels were maintained at basal levels after all treatments. However, fish gills exposed to B20 and B100 presented increased lipid peroxidation. Despite biodiesel being more biodegradable fuel that emits less greenhouse gases, the increased lipid peroxidation showed that biofuel and its blends also represent hazards to aquatic biota.

  8. Cloning and expression of IspDF from Mesorhizobium loti. Characterization of a bifunctional protein that catalyzes non-consecutive steps in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Testa, Charles A; Lherbet, Christian; Pojer, Florence; Noel, Joseph P; Poulter, C Dale

    2006-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria, plant chloroplasts, green algae and some Gram-positive bacteria utilize the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway for the biosynthesis of isoprenoids. IspD, ispE, and ispF encode the enzymes required to convert MEP to 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate (cMEDP) during the biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate in the MEP pathway. Upon analysis of the Mesorhizobium loti genome, ORF mll0395 showed homology to both ispD and ispF and appeared to encode a fusion protein. M. loti ispE was located elsewhere on the chromosome. Purified recombinant IspDF protein was mostly a homodimer, MW approximately 46 kDa/subunit. Incubation of IspDF with MEP, CTP, and ATP gave 4-diphosphocytidyl-2-C-methyl-d-erythritol (CDP-ME) as the only product. When Escherichia coli IspE protein was added to the incubation mixture, cMEDP was formed. In addition, M. loti ORF mll0395 complements lethal disruptions in both ispD and ispF in Salmonella typhimurium. These results indicate that IspDF is a bifunctional protein, which catalyzes the first and third steps in the conversion of MEP to cMEDP.

  9. Film stress studies and the multilayer laue lens project.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Conley, R.; Macrander, A. T.; X-Ray Science Division

    2006-01-01

    A Multilayer Laue Lens (MLL) is a new type of linear zone plate, made by sectioning a planar depth-graded multilayer and used in Laue transmission diffraction geometry, for nanometer-scale focusing of hard x-rays. To produce an MLL, a depth-graded multilayer consisting of thousands of layers with a total thickness of tens of microns is needed. Additionally, the multilayer wafer has to be sectioned and polished to a thickness of {approx}10 to 25 microns to yield a diffracting grating to focus x-rays. The multilayers must have both low stress and good adhesion to survive the subsequent cutting and polishing processes, as well as sharp interfaces and accurate layer placement. Several partial MLLs using WSi{sub 2}/Si multilayers with precise zone-plate structures have been successfully fabricated. A W/Si multilayer with the same structure, however, cracked and peeled off from the Si substrate after it was grown. Here we report results of our film stress studies of dc magnetron-sputtered WSi{sub 2}, W, and Mo thin films and WSi{sub 2}/Si, W/Si, and Mo/Si multilayers grown on Si(100) substrates. The stress measurements were carried out using a stylus profiler to measure the curvatures of 2-inch-diameter, 0.5-mm-thick Si(100) wafers before and after each coating. The physical origins of the stress and material properties of these systems will be discussed.

  10. Development of X-ray Microscopy at IPOE

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Mu, B.; Huang, Q.; Huang, C.; Yi, S.; Zhang, Z.; Wang, F.; Wang, Z.; Chen, L.

    2011-09-09

    In order to meet the different requirements of applications in synchrotron radiation and plasma diagnosis in China, focusing and imaging optics based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirrors, compound refractive lenses (CRLs), and multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs) were studied in our lab. A one-dimensional KB microscope using mirrors with a dual-periodic multilayer coating was developed. The multilayer mirror can reflect both 4.75 keV (Ti K-line) and 8.05 keV (Cu K-line) simultaneously, which makes alignment easier. For hard x-ray microscopy, CRL was studied. Using a SU-8 resist planar parabolic CRL, a focal line of 28.8-{mu}m width was obtained. To focus hard x-rays to nanometer levels efficiently, an MLL was fabricated using a WSi{sub 2}/Si multilayer. The MLL consists of 324 alternating WSi{sub 2} and Si layers with a total thickness of 7.9 {mu}m. (Recently, a much thicker multilayer has been deposited with a layer number of n = 1582 and a total thickness of 27 {mu}m.) After deposition, the sample was sliced and polished into an approximate ideal aspect ratio (depth of the zone plate to outmost layer thickness); the measured results show an intact structure remains, and the surface roughness of the cross section is about 0.4 nm after grinding and polishing processes.

  11. Radionuclide Concentrations in Soils and Vegetation at Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area G during the 1997 Growing Season

    SciTech Connect

    L. Naranjo, Jr.; P. R. Fresquez; R. J. Wechsler

    1998-08-01

    Soil and overstory and understory vegetation (washed and unwashed) collected at eight locations within and around Area G-a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory-were analyzed for 3H, 238Pu, 239Pu, 137CS, 234U, 235U, 228AC, Be, 214Bi, 60Co, 40& 54Mn, 22Na, 214Pb and 208Tl. In general, most radionuclide concentrations, with the exception of 3Ef and ~9Pu, in soils and overstory and understory vegetation collected from within and around Area G were within upper (95'%) level background concentrations. Although 3H concentrations in vegetation from most sites were significantly higher than background (>2 pCi mL-l), concentrations decreased markedly in comparison to last year's results. The highest `H concentration in vegetation was detected from a juniper tree that was growing over tritium shaft /+150; it contained 530,000 pCi 3H mL-l. Also, as in the pas~ the transuranic waste pad area contained the highest levels of 239Pu in soils and in understory vegetation as compared to other areas at Area G.

  12. Advanced treatment of textile dyeing secondary effluent using magnetic anion exchange resin and its effect on organic fouling in subsequent RO membrane.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Li; Shi, Jialu; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2015-03-02

    Strict regulations are forcing dyeing factory to upgrade existing waste treatment system. In this study, advanced treatment of dyeing secondary effluent by magnetic anion exchange resin (NDMP) was investigated and compared with ultrafiltration (UF); NDMP as a pre-treatment of reverse osmosis (RO) was also studied. NDMP resin (20 mL/L) gave higher removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (83.9%) and colority (94.9%) than UF with a cut-off of 10 kDa (only 48.6% and 44.1%, respectively), showing that NDMP treatment was effective to meet the stringent discharge limit of DOC and colority. Besides, NDMP resin (20 mL/L) as a pretreatment of RO increased the permeate flux by 12.5% and reduced irreversible membrane fouling by 6.6%, but UF pretreatment did not mitigate RO membrane fouling. The results of excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectra and resin fractions showed that NDMP had more efficient removal than UF for transphilic acid and hydrophilic fraction, such as protein-like organic matters and soluble microbial products, which contributed to a significant proportion of RO membrane fouling. In sum, NDMP resin treatment not only gave effective removal of DOC and colority of dyeing secondary effluent, but exhibited some improvement for RO membrane flux and irreversible fouling.

  13. The optimization of FA/O barrier slurry with respect to removal rate selectivity on patterned Cu wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hu; Yan, Li; Yuling, Liu; Yangang, He

    2016-02-01

    Because the polishing of different materials is required in barrier chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) processes, the development of a kind of barrier slurry with improved removal rate selectivity for Cu/barrier/TEOS would reduce erosion and dishing defects on patterned Cu wafers. In this study, we developed a new benzotriazole-free barrier slurry named FA/O barrier slurry, containing 20 mL/L of the chelating agent FA/O, 5 mL/L surfactant, and a 1:5 concentration of abrasive particles. By controlling the polishing slurry ingredients, the removal rate of different materials could be controlled. For process integration considerations, the effect of the FA/O barrier slurry on the dielectric layer of the patterned Cu wafer was investigated. After CMP processing by the FA/O barrier slurry, the characteristics of the dielectric material were tested. The results showed that the dielectric characteristics met demands for industrial production. The current leakage was of pA scale. The resistance and capacitance were 2.4 kω and 2.3 pF, respectively. The dishing and erosion defects were both below 30 nm in size. CMP-processed wafers using this barrier slurry could meet industrial production demands. Project supported by the Special Project Items No. 2 in National Long-Term Technology Development Plan (No. 2009ZX02308), the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province (No. F2012202094), and the Doctoral Program Foundation of Xinjiang Normal University Plan (No. XJNUBS1226).

  14. Antigen Loss Variants: Catching Hold of Escaping Foes

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Maulik; Müller, Rolf; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke

    2017-01-01

    Since mid-1990s, the field of cancer immunotherapy has seen steady growth and selected immunotherapies are now a routine and preferred therapeutic option of certain malignancies. Both active and passive cancer immunotherapies exploit the fact that tumor cells express specific antigens on the cell surface, thereby mounting an immune response specifically against malignant cells. It is well established that cancer cells typically lose surface antigens following natural or therapy-induced selective pressure and these antigen-loss variants are often the population that causes therapy-resistant relapse. CD19 and CD20 antigen loss in acute lymphocytic leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia, respectively, and lineage switching in leukemia associated with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements are well-documented evidences in this regard. Although increasing number of novel immunotherapies are being developed, majority of these do not address the control of antigen loss variants. Here, we review the occurrence of antigen loss variants in leukemia and discuss the therapeutic strategies to tackle the same. We also present an approach of dual-targeting immunoligand effectively retargeting NK cells against antigen loss variants in MLL-associated leukemia. Novel immunotherapies simultaneously targeting more than one tumor antigen certainly hold promise to completely eradicate tumor and prevent therapy-resistant relapses. PMID:28286501

  15. Unraveling the effect of structurally different classes of insecticide on germination and early plant growth of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr].

    PubMed

    Dhungana, Sanjeev Kumar; Kim, Il-Doo; Kwak, Hwa-Sook; Shin, Dong-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    Although a considerable number of studies about the effect of different insecticides on plant physiology and metabolism have been carried out, research work about the comparative action of structurally different classes of insecticide on physiological and biochemical properties of soybean seed germination and early growth has not been found. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of different classes of insecticides on soybean seed germination and early plant growth. Soybean seeds of Bosuk cultivar were soaked for 24h in distilled water or recommended dose (2mLL(-1), 1mLL(-1), 0.5gL(-1), and 0.5gL(-1) water for insecticides Mepthion, Myungtaja, Actara, and Stonate, respectively) of pesticide solutions of four structurally different classes of insecticides - Mepthion (fenitrothion; organophosphate), Myungtaja (etofenprox; pyrethroid), Actara (thiamethoxam; neonicotinoid), and Stonate (lambda-cyhalothrin cum thiamethoxam; pyrethroid cum neonicotinoid) - which are used for controlling stink bugs in soybean crop. Insecticides containing thiamethoxam and lamda-cyhalothrin cum thiamethoxam showed positive effects on seedling biomass and content of polyphenol and flavonoid, however fenitrothion insecticide reduced the seed germination, seed and seedling vigor, and polyphenol and flavonoid contents in soybean. Results of this study reveal that different classes of insecticide have differential influence on physiologic and metabolic actions like germination, early growth, and antioxidant activities of soybean and this implies that yield and nutrient content also might be affected with the application of different types of insecticide.

  16. Chimeric antigen receptor-redirected CD45RA-negative T cells have potent antileukemia and pathogen memory response without graft-versus-host activity.

    PubMed

    Chan, W K; Suwannasaen, D; Throm, R E; Li, Y; Eldridge, P W; Houston, J; Gray, J T; Pui, C-H; Leung, W

    2015-02-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected cellular therapy is an attractive modality for cancer treatment. We hypothesized that allogeneic CAR-engineered CD45RA-negative T cells can control cancer and infection without the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We used CD19(+) MLL-rearranged leukemia as prototype because it is an aggressive and generally drug-resistant malignancy. CD45RA(-) cells that were transduced with anti-CD19 CAR containing 4-1BB and CD3ζ signaling domains effectively lysed MLL-rearranged leukemia cell lines and primary blasts in vitro. In a disseminated leukemia mouse model, CAR(+)CD45RA(-) cells significantly reduced leukemia burdens and prolonged overall survival without GVHD. CAR(+) cells were sustainable in blood, and all the treated mice remained leukemia-free even after they were re-challenged with leukemia cells. Despite the transduction process, CD45RA(-) cells retained recall activity both in vitro and in vivo against human pathogens commonly found in cancer patients. In comparison with CD45RA(+) cells, CD45RA(-) cells showed less allogeneic activity in mixed leukocyte reactions and in mouse models. Thus, the use of CAR(+)CD45RA(-) cells can separate GVHD from graft-versus-malignancy effect and infection control. These cells should also be useful in nontransplant settings and may be administered as off-the-shelf third-party cells.

  17. [Establishment of the feeding methodology of Aedes aegypti (Diptera-Culicidae) in Swiss mice and evaluation of the toxicity and residual effect of essential oil from Tagetes minuta L (Asteraceae), in populations of Aedes aegypti].

    PubMed

    Lima, Waldemir Pereira; Chiaravalloti Neto, Francisco; Macoris, Maria de Lourdes da Graça; Zuccari, Débora Aparecida Pires de Campos; Dibo, Margareth Regina

    2009-01-01

    The objectives here were to develop a procedure for feeding females of Aedes aegypti that does not cause stress in Swiss mice and to evaluate the toxicity and residual effect of essential oil from Tagetes minuta L. (Asteraceae) in Aedes aegypti populations. Two mice were anesthetized: one was used to observe the duration of sedation and the other was placed in a cage to feed the female mosquitoes. Essential oil was diluted in acetone and used in bioassays to assess the lethal concentrations in larvae from the Cities of Bauru (SP) and São José do Rio Preto (SP) that were sensitive and resistant to temephos, respectively. The data obtained were compared with the American Rockefeller strain. The procedure with mice was approved. There was no difference between the populations regarding susceptibility to Tagetes minuta, and the assays showed LC50 of 0.24, 0.25 and 0.21 ml/l and LC99.9 of 0.35, 0.39 and 0.42 ml/l, for Rockefeller, Bauru and São José do Rio Preto, respectively. The solution did not show any residual effect.

  18. Multilayer Laue Lens Growth at NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Conley R.; Bouet, N.; Lauer, K.; Carlucci-Dayton, M.; Biancarosa, J.; Boas, L.; Drannbauer, J.; Feraca, J.; Rosenbaum, L.

    2012-08-15

    The new NSLS-II deposition laboratory has been commissioned to include a variety of thin-film characterization equipment and a next-generation deposition system. The primary goal for this effort is R&D on the multilayer Laue lens (MLL), which is a new type of x-ray optic with the potential for an unprecedented level of x-ray nano-focusing. This unique deposition system contains many design features in order to facilitate growth of combined depth-graded and laterally graded multilayers with precise thickness control over many thousands of layers, providing total film growth in one run of up to 100 {micro}m thick or greater. A precision in-vacuum linear motor servo system raster scans a substrate over an array of magnetrons with shaped apertures at well-defined velocities to affect a multilayer coating. The design, commissioning, and performance metrics of the NSLS-II deposition system will be discussed. Latest growth results of both MLL and reflective multilayers in this machine will be presented.

  19. MEASUREMENT OF WASTE LOADING IN SALTSTONE

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-07-18

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. One of those properties of importance is the Waste Loading (WL) of the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) in the Saltstone waste form. Waste loading is a measure of the amount of waste that can be incorporated within a waste form. The value of the Saltstone waste loading ultimately determines the number of vaults that will be required to disposition all of the DSS. In this report, the waste loading is defined as the volume in milliliters of DSS per liter of Saltstone waste form. The two most important parameters that determine waste loading for Saltstone are water to cementitious material (w/cm) ratio and the cured grout density. Data are provided that show the dependence of waste loading on the w/cm ratio for a fixed DSS composition using the current premix material (45% Blast Furnace Slag (BFS), 45% Fly Ash (FA) and 10% Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC)). The impact of cured grout density on waste loading was also demonstrated. Mixes (at 0.60 w/cm) made with a Modular Caustic side extraction Unit (MCU) simulant and either OPC or BFS have higher cured grout densities than mixes made with premix and increase the WL to 709 mL/L for the OPC mix and 689 mL/L for the BFS mix versus the value of 653 mL/L for MCU in premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio. Bleed liquid reduces the waste loading and lowers the effective w/cm ratio of Saltstone. A method is presented (and will be used in future tasks) for correcting the waste loading and the w/cm ratio of the as-batched mixes in those cases where bleed liquid is present. For example, the Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment (DDA) mix at an as-batched 0.60 w/cm ratio, when corrected for % bleed, gives a mix with a 0.55 w/cm ratio and a WL that has been reduced from 662 to 625 mL/L. An example is provided that

  20. Intense ventilation of the Black Sea pycnocline due to vertical turbulent exchange in the Rim Current area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrovskii, Alexander G.; Zatsepin, Andrey G.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents new observational data, which indicate that deep ventilation events in the aerobic zone extending across the upper part of the permanent pycnocline may occur sporadically in the Rim Current area, even during relatively warm seasons, when the seasonal thermocline is still notable. The strongest observed event of this type occurred on November 2014 off the continental shelf break near Gelendzhik Bay. Vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen were accurately measured using an SBE 52-MP Conductivity, Temperature, Depth (CTD) probe equipped with a fast-response SBE 43F oxygen sensor mounted on a moored Aqualog automatic mobile profiler. The analysis of the profiling data from October 6 through December 16, 2014, from depths between 35 m and 215 m revealed an anomaly on November 6-7. The dissolved oxygen exceeded the background levels by more than 0.2 ml/l (8.9 μM) at the 14.9-15.7 kg/m3 isopycnals in the pycnocline and reached approximately 1 ml/l (44.66 μM) for short periods. The peak absolute value of the dissolved oxygen reached an exceptionally high value of approximately 0.3 ml/l (13.4 μM) at the 15.9 kg/m3 isopycnal. The ventilation event increased the temperature by 0.2 °C at depths of 120-160 m. The simultaneous observations of both the thermohaline stratification and the ocean currents suggest that the ventilation event was associated with the sinking of pycnocline waters in the near-bottom Ekman layer along the continental slope and intense vertical turbulent exchange in the Rim Current area near the continental slope. The ventilation of the pycnocline when the overlaying upper ocean is stably stratified sharply differs from the convection reaching the Cold Intermediate Layer during extensive cooling of the sea surface. Indications of such ventilation events were also found in the Aqualog mooring data archive from 2012.

  1. [PCR detection of relevant translocations in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Guerra-Castillo, Francisco Xavier; Ramos-Cervantes, María Teresa; Rosel-Pech, Cecilia; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Bekker-Méndez, Vilma Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: en México, las leucemias representan el tipo de cáncer más frecuente en la población menor de 15 años con una tasa de incidencia alta cuando se compara con países desarrollados. La etiología de las leucemias puede ser desconocida, sin embargo se presentan distintos factores que pueden condicionar la enfermedad, tal es el caso de las translocaciones cromosómicas. El objetivo de este trabajo es detectar las alteraciones moleculares: TEL-AML1, MLL-AF4, BCR-ABL menor y E2A-PBX1 en los pacientes pediátricos con leucemia aguda linfoblástica. Métodos: se colectaron 91 muestras de médula ósea de enero de 2012 a marzo de 2013 de pacientes pediátricos con leucemia aguda linfoblástica del Servicio de Hematología. Se detectaron las translocaciones (TEL-AML1, MLL-AF4, BCR-ABL menor y E2A-PBX1) con técnicas moleculares de tiempo real con SYBR Green (Qiagen, Alameda, CA). Resultados: se procesaron 91 muestras, las frecuencias detectadas para cada una de las translocaciones fueron: TEL-AML1 (7.21%), E2A-PBX1 (5.15%). Las translocaciones MLL-AF4 y BCR-ABL menor no fueron detectadas en este estudio. Conclusiones: las frecuencias mostradas en este estudio están en concordancia con los datos mostrados en la literatura donde TEL-AML1 es la translocación más común encontrada en pacientes pediátricos. Es importante mencionar que E2A-PBX1 se encuentra en una frecuencia alta en países en vías de desarrollo al comparase con países desarrollados.

  2. Surface-water hydrology of the Little Black River basin, Missouri and Arkansas, before water-land improvement practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkas, W.R.; Femmer, Suzanne R.; Mesko, T.O.; Thompson, B.W.

    1987-01-01

    The U. S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, in accordance with Public Law 566, is implementing various types of water-land improvement practices in the Little Black River basin in southeastern Missouri. These practices are designed, in part, to decrease the suspended sediment (SS) transport in the basin, decrease flood damage in the basin, and improve drainage in the agricultural area. The general features of the basin, such as geology, groundwater hydrology, soils, land use, water use, and precipitation are described; surface water quantity, quality, and suspended sediment discharge are also described. The aquifers are the Mississippi River valley alluvial aquifer, which can yield about 3,500 gal/min to properly constructed wells, and the Ozark and St. Francois aquifers, which can yield from about 30 to 500 gal/min to properly constructed wells. Soils in the area have formed in loess and cherty residuum in the uplands or have formed in alluvial sediment in the lowlands. About 93% of the estimated 3 billion gal/year of water used in the basin is for crop irrigation. The average monthly precipitation varies slightly throughout the year, with an average annual precipitation of about 47 inches. Water quality data were collected at seven stations. Specific conductance values ranged from 50 to 400 microsiemens/cm at 25 C. Water temperatures ranged from 0.0 C in the winter to 33.5 C in summer. pH values ranged from 6.4 to 8.5 units. Dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 2.2 to 12.8 ml/l. Total nitrogen concentrations ranged from 0.13 to 2.20 ml/l as nitrogen, with organic nitrogen as the most abundant form. Phosphorus concentrations ranged from zero to 0.29 ml/l as phosphorus. Bacterial counts were largest during storm runoff in the basin with livestock waste as the significant contributor. For the period from October 1, 1980, to September 30, 1984, the average annual SS discharge ranged from 2,230 tons/yr in the headwater areas to 27,800 tons

  3. Self-Irradiation Effects on 99Mo Reagents and Products

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, S.D.; Garcia, M.J.; McDonald, M.J.; Simpson, R.L.; Tallant, D.R.

    1998-10-07

    produced in 1996 and shipped to pharmaceutical houses for evaluation of compatibility with oxime solution used to precipitate `?vfo as the oxime complex is both air and light-sensitive, and containing a black precipitate that forms during shipment, presumably as a result of self- irradiation. Addition of sodium hypochlorite to the product solution prior to shipment prevents precipitate formation, indicating the precipitate is a reduced form of `%lo. to remove any precipitate. Duplicate aliquots of the filtered samples were titrated to a phenolphthalein irradiation and afler standing at room temperature for 86.4 hours. Precipitates were washed to a FTIR analysis of the white precipitate showed it to be alpha benzoin oxime. Since the basic After 86.4 hours, no precipitate had formed in bottles containing sodium hypochlorite. Black precipitate had formed in all bottles that did not contain sodium hypochlorite after 14.4 hours. The precipitate appeared to initially form on the surface of the HDPE sample bottles and Black precipitate was first noticed in sample set 1 after 28.8 hrs' irradiation. No visible sample containing precipitate was kept at room temperature in the original bottle. Precipitate in sample sets 2 and 3. Since no precipitate formed in these bottles, this was equivalent to duplicate samples. Once the precipitate in the 20-mL aliquots that had been set aside had returned to sample sets 1 through 3 and the samples with redissolved precipitate all experienced an average decrease in base strength of 0.013 meq mL-l. Sample 1-C had a decrease of 0.004 meq mL-l and sample 1-D had returned to the initial value of 0.198 meq mL-l. Raman spectra for the black precipitate from samples l-C, 1-D and supplemental sample set 1 Fig. 2. Raman spectra of the black precipitate formed in 9%40 product solutions after 28.8,43.2, 72 and 86.4 hours of `oCo irradiation in Sandia's Gamma Irradiation Facility. increase with time, as seen in the titration of 1-C and 1-D samples

  4. Validity of quasi-degenerate neutrino mass models and their predictions on baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Ng. K.; Nimai Singh, N.

    2012-10-01

    Quasi-degenerate neutrino mass models (QDN) which can explain the current data on neutrino masses and mixings, are studied. In the first part, we study the effect of CP-phases on QDN mass matrix (mLL) obeying μ-τ symmetry in normal hierarchical (QD-NH) and inverted hierarchical (QD-IH) patterns. The numerical predictions are consistent with observed data on (i) solar mixing angle (θ12) which lies below tri-bimaximal (TBM) value, (ii) absolute neutrino masses consistent with 0νββ decay mass parameter (mee) and (iii) cosmological upper bound ∑i3mi. mLL is parameterized using only two unknown parameters (ɛ,η) within μ-τ symmetry. The second part deals with the estimation of observed baryon asymmetry of the universe (BAU) where we consider the Majorana CP violating phases (α,β) and the Dirac neutrino mass matrix (mLR). mLR is taken as either the charged lepton or the up quark mass matrix. α, β is derived from the heavy right-handed Majorana mass matrix MRR. MRR is generated from mLL and mLR through inversion of Type-I seesaw formula. The predictions for BAU are nearly consistent with observations for flavoured thermal leptogenesis scenario for Type-IA in both QD-NH and QD-IH models. We also observe some enhancement effects in flavour leptogenesis compared to non-flavour leptogenesis by a magnitude of order one. In non-thermal leptogenesis QD-NH Type-IA is the only model consistent with observed data on baryon asymmetry. QD-NH model appears to be more favourable than those of QD-IH. The predicted inflaton mass needed to produce the BAU is found to be Mϕ˜1010 GeV corresponding to the reheating temperature TR=106 GeV. The present analysis shows that the three absolute neutrino masses may exhibit quasi-degenerate pattern in nature.

  5. Leukaemia cell of origin identified by chromatin landscape of bulk tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    George, Joshy; Uyar, Asli; Young, Kira; Kuffler, Lauren; Waldron-Francis, Kaiden; Marquez, Eladio; Ucar, Duygu; Trowbridge, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    The precise identity of a tumour's cell of origin can influence disease prognosis and outcome. Methods to reliably define tumour cell of origin from primary, bulk tumour cell samples has been a challenge. Here we use a well-defined model of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) to demonstrate that transforming haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent progenitors results in more aggressive AML than transforming committed progenitor cells. Transcriptome profiling reveals a gene expression signature broadly distinguishing stem cell-derived versus progenitor cell-derived AML, including genes involved in immune escape, extravasation and small GTPase signal transduction. However, whole-genome profiling of open chromatin reveals precise and robust biomarkers reflecting each cell of origin tested, from bulk AML tumour cell sampling. We find that bulk AML tumour cells exhibit distinct open chromatin loci that reflect the transformed cell of origin and suggest that open chromatin patterns may be leveraged as prognostic signatures in human AML. PMID:27397025

  6. Solidago canadensis L. Essential Oil Vapor Effectively Inhibits Botrytis cinerea Growth and Preserves Postharvest Quality of Strawberry as a Food Model System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shumin; Shao, Xingfeng; Wei, Yanzhen; Li, Yonghua; Xu, Feng; Wang, Hongfei

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the anti-fungal properties of Solidago canadensis L. essential oil (SCLEO) against Botrytis cinerea in vitro, and its ability to control gray mold and maintain quality in strawberry fruits. SCLEO exhibited dose-dependent antifungal activity against B. cinerea and profoundly altered mycelial morphology, cellular ultrastructure, and membrane permeability as evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. SCLEO vapor at 0.1 mL/L maintained higher sensory acceptance and reduced decay of fresh strawberry fruit, and also reduced gray mold in artificially inoculated fruit. SCLEO treatment did not, however, stimulate phenylalanin ammonia-lyase, polyphenol oxidase, or chitinase, enzymes related to disease resistance. This suggests that SCLEO reduces gray mold by direct inhibition of pathogen growth. SCLEO vapor may provide a new and effective strategy for controlling postharvest disease and maintaining quality in strawberries. PMID:27531994

  7. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Clofarabine or Daunorubicin Hydrochloride and Cytarabine Followed By Decitabine or Observation in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. OBTAINING OF THE TRANSGENIC HELIANTHUS TUBEROSUS L. PLANTS, CALLUS AND "HAIRY" ROOT CULTURES ABLE TO EXPRESS THE RECOMBINANT HUMAN INTERFERON ALPHA-2b GENE.

    PubMed

    Maistrenko, O M; Luchakivska, Yu S; Zholobak, N M; Spivak, M Ya; Kuchuk, M V

    2015-01-01

    This work is the first to our knowledge to describe the successful attempt of Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of topinambour in order to obtain the transgenic H. tuberosus plants, callus and "hairy" root cultures. The plasmid vectors contained the sequence of interferon gene fused with Nicotiana plumbagenifolia L. calreticulin apoplast targeting signal driven by 35S CaMV promoter or root-specific Mll promoter. Nearly 75% isolated Ri-root lines and callus cultures were proved (by PCR analysis) to contain HuINFa-2b transgene. We also managed to obtain H. tuberosus transgenic plants through somatic embryogenesis on the transgenic "hairy" root culture. The obtained transgenic H. tuberosus cultures exhibited high-level antiviral activity that ranged from 2000 to 54500 IU/g FW that makes this crop considered a promising source of recombinant interferon alpha 2b protein.

  13. Causes of different impact of Major Baltic Inflows on cod reproduction in the Gotland Basin of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaseva, E. M.; Zezera, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of the Major Baltic Inflows (MBIs) of 1976, 1993, and 2003 on cod reproduction in the Gotland Basin of the Baltic Sea is considered based on calculations of the eastern Baltic cod egg abundance and offspring survival indices. The reproductive success (1976-1977) was defined by the elevation of the 11 psu isohaline and deepening of the 2 mL/L isooxygene surface, which provided the formation of a water layer suitable for cod spawning at a depth of 90-130 m. Prerequisites of the appearance of the reproductive layer in 1976-1977 were a previously high salinity level and penetrating two successive MBIs in one year. The cause of the weak MBI impact in 1993 was the previous salinity minimum; in 2003 it was rapid oxygen depletion due to an increase in temperature. As a result of their weaker influence, small and fragmented cod spawning biotopes appeared in the Gotland Basin.

  14. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Decitabine Followed by Idarubicin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory AML and MDS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  16. Sirolimus, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  19. Metformin+Cytarabine for the Treatment of Relapsed/Refractory AML

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. AML Therapy With Irradiated Allogeneic Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-01

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8, Fludarabine Phosphate, Total Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. Ixazomib (MLN9708) in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Molecular Biological Studies on the Biogenesis of Human Cholinesterases In Vivo and as Directed by Cloned Cholinesterase DNA Sequences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    transcniption. constructs. i The Sa~mll-Aci faget f BhE2 a priid" n Page 12c LN’DUCED TIIOCIIOL NE YDROLYLING ACTIVI’I ES M h..ChL ,J%’. wse ,woyies T T... M *n Ln ,/ .- I8 °I Co. ,° * I C. -. S - S C)D o • 0 = 0 D 0 •0 II a)a ** I ChE HOMOLOGIES Figure 2. Amino acid (up) and nucleotide (down...Pro h’I AS, C.. aA ?y¢ a r r1. P t Ti LCW era, .I P . C fAA C m see AT& Try ITT C C Z"? %; ;A An A ’C41 AT 0a. a’ac I1o C- M Cn, P-: A ACT ?CV.T

  11. Mutation spectra of histone methyltransferases with canonical SET domains and EZH2-targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2016-02-01

    Germline mutations in canonical SET-methyltransferases have been identified in autism and intellectual disability syndromes and gain-of-function somatic alterations in EZH2, MLL3, NSD1, WHSC1 (NSD2) and WHSC1L1 (NSD3) in cancer. EZH2 interacts with AR, ERα, β-catenin, FOXP3, NF-κB, PRC2, REST and SNAI2, resulting in context-dependent transcriptional activation and repression. Pharmacological EZH2 inhibitors are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of B-cell lymphomas and solid tumors. EZH2 inhibitors might also be applicable in the treatment of SWI/SNF-mutant cancers, reflecting the reciprocal expression of and functional overlap between EZH2 and SMARCA4. Because of the risks for autoimmune diseases, cognitive impairment, cardiomyopathy and myelodysplastic syndrome, EZH2 inhibitors should be utilized for cancer treatment in patients receiving long-term surveillance but not for cancer chemoprevention.

  12. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Search for exclusive Z-boson production and observation of high-mass pp[over ]-->pgammagammap[over ]-->pl;{+}l;{-}p[over ] events in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pinfold, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-06-05

    This Letter presents a search for exclusive Z boson production in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV, using the CDF II detector. No exclusive Z-->l;{+}l;{-} candidates are observed and the first upper limit on the exclusive Z cross section in hadron collisions is found to be sigma_{excl}(Z)<0.96 pb at 95% confidence level. In addition, eight candidate exclusive dilepton events from the process pp[over ]-->pgammagammap[over ]-->pl;{+}l;{-}p[over ] are observed, and a measurement of the cross section for M_{ll}>40 GeV/c;{2} and |eta_{l}|<4 is found to be sigma=0.24_{-0.10};{+0.13} pb, which is consistent with the standard model prediction.

  15. Agroindustrial residues and energy crops for the production of hydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate via photofermentation.

    PubMed

    Corneli, Elisa; Adessi, Alessandra; Dragoni, Federico; Ragaglini, Giorgio; Bonari, Enrico; De Philippis, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The present study was aimed at assessing the biotransformation of dark fermented agroindustrial residues and energy crops for the production of hydrogen and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), in lab-scale photofermentation. The investigation on novel substrates for photofermentation is needed in order to enlarge the range of sustainable feedstocks. Dark fermentation effluents of ensiled maize, ensiled giant reed, ensiled olive pomace, and wheat bran were inoculated with Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA676, a mutant strain suitable for hydrogen production in ammonium-rich media. The highest hydrogen producing performances were observed in wheat bran and maize effluents (648.6 and 320.3mLL(-1), respectively), both characterized by high initial volatile fatty acids (VFAs) concentrations. Giant reed and olive pomace effluents led to poor hydrogen production due to low initial VFAs concentrations, as the original substrates are rich in fiber. The highest PHB content was accumulated in olive pomace effluent (11.53%TS), ascribable to magnesium deficiency.

  16. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Vortex Pinning in Superconducting MoGe Films Containing Conformal Arrays of Nanoscale Holes and Magnetic Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. L.; Latimer, M. L.; Xiao, Z. L.; Ocola, L. E.; Divan, R.; Welp, U.; Crabtree, G. W.; Kwok, W. K.

    2013-03-01

    Recent numerical simulations by Ray et al. predict that a conformal pinning array can produce stronger vortex pinning effect than other pinning structures with an equivalent density of pinning sites. Here we present experimental investigations on conformal pinning structures. Direct and conformal pinning arrays of triangular and square lattices were introduced into MoGe superconducting films using focused-ion-beam milling or electron-beam lithography. Transport measurements on critical currents and magnetoresistances were carried out on these samples to reveal the advantages of conformal pinnings. Effects of random pinnings with the same average density were also studied for comparison. Details on sample fabrications and effects of pinning types (holes versus magnetic dots) will be presented. Work supported by the US DoE-BES funded Energy Frontier Research Center (YLW), and by Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (MLL, ZLX, LEO, RD, UW, WKK), under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357

  18. Infusion of Off-the-Shelf Expanded Cord Blood Cells to Augment Cord Blood Transplant in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-20

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  19. Vorinostat and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-11-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Autophagy mediates proteolysis of NPM1 and HEXIM1 and sensitivity to BET inhibition in AML cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Garcia, Jacqueline S.; Thomas, Daniel; Zhu, Li; Nguyen, Le Xuan Truong; Chan, Steven M.; Majeti, Ravindra; Medeiros, Bruno C.; Mitchell, Beverly S.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying activation of the BET pathway in AML cells remain poorly understood. We have discovered that autophagy is activated in acute leukemia cells expressing mutant nucleophosmin 1 (NPMc+) or MLL-fusion proteins. Autophagy activation results in the degradation of NPM1 and HEXIM1, two negative regulators of BET pathway activation. Inhibition of autophagy with pharmacologic inhibitors or through knocking down autophagy-related gene 5 (Atg5) expression increases the expression of both NPM1 and HEXIM1. The Brd4 inhibitors JQ1 and I-BET-151 also inhibit autophagy and increase NPM1 and HEXIM1 expression. We conclude that the degradation of NPM1 and HEXIM1 through autophagy in certain AML subsets contributes to the activation of the BET pathway in these cells. PMID:27732946

  1. Measurement of the B-->Xsl+l- branching fraction with a sum over exclusive modes.

    PubMed

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Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-08-20

    We measure the branching fraction for the flavor-changing neutral-current process B-->X(s)l(+)l(-) with a sample of 89x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BBmacr; events recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e(+)e(-) storage ring. The final state is reconstructed from e(+)e(-) or micro(+)micro(-) pairs and a hadronic system X(s) consisting of one K+/- or K(0)(S) and up to two pions, with at most one pi(0). We observe a signal of 40+/-10(stat)+/-2(syst) events and extract the inclusive branching fraction B(B-->X(s)l(+)l(-))=(5.6+/-1.5(stat)+/-0.6(exp syst)+/-1.1(model syst))x10(-6) for ml(+)(l(-))>0.2 GeV/c(2).

  2. Low-Dose or High-Dose Conditioning Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-23

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Transient Myeloproliferative Disorder; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  3. Hox gene dysregulation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    De Braekeleer, Etienne; Douet-Guilbert, Nathalie; Basinko, Audrey; Le Bris, Marie-Josée; Morel, Frédéric; De Braekeleer, Marc

    2014-02-01

    In humans, class I homeobox genes (HOX genes) are distributed in four clusters. Upstream regulators include transcriptional activators and members of the CDX family of transcription factors. HOX genes encode proteins and need cofactor interactions, to increase their specificity and selectivity. HOX genes contribute to the organization and regulation of hematopoiesis by controlling the balance between proliferation and differentiation. Changes in HOX gene expression can be associated with chromosomal rearrangements generating fusion genes, such as those involving MLL and NUP98, or molecular defects, such as mutations in NPM1 and CEBPA for example. Several miRNAs are involved in the control of HOX gene expression and their expression correlates with HOX gene dysregulation. HOX genes dysregulation is a dominant mechanism of leukemic transformation. A better knowledge of their target genes and the mechanisms by which their dysregulated expression contributes to leukemogenesis could lead to the development of new drugs.

  4. Mapping cellular hierarchy by single cell analysis of the cell surface repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guoji; Luc, Sidinh; Marco, Eugenio; Lin, Ta-Wei; Peng, Cong; Kerenyi, Marc A.; Beyaz, Semir; Kim, Woojin; Xu, Jian; Das, Partha Pratim; Neff, Tobias; Zou, Keyong; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Stem cell differentiation pathways are most often studied at the population level, whereas critical decisions are executed at the level of single cells. We have established a highly multiplexed, quantitative PCR assay to profile in an unbiased manner a panel of all commonly used cell surface markers (280 genes) from individual cells. With this method we analyzed over 1500 single cells throughout the mouse hematopoietic system, and illustrate its utility for revealing important biological insights. The comprehensive single cell dataset permits mapping of the mouse hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation hierarchy by computational lineage progression analysis. Further profiling of 180 intracellular regulators enabled construction of a genetic network to assign the earliest differentiation event during hematopoietic lineage specification. Analysis of acute myeloid leukemia elicited by MLL-AF9 uncovered a distinct cellular hierarchy containing two independent self-renewing lineages with different clonal activities. The strategy has broad applicability in other cellular systems. PMID:24035353

  5. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-01

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Classification, subtype discovery, and prediction of outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Eng-Juh; Ross, Mary E; Shurtleff, Sheila A; Williams, W Kent; Patel, Divyen; Mahfouz, Rami; Behm, Fred G; Raimondi, Susana C; Relling, Mary V; Patel, Anami; Cheng, Cheng; Campana, Dario; Wilkins, Dawn; Zhou, Xiaodong; Li, Jinyan; Liu, Huiqing; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Naeve, Clayton; Wong, Limsoon; Downing, James R

    2002-03-01

    Treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is based on the concept of tailoring the intensity of therapy to a patient's risk of relapse. To determine whether gene expression profiling could enhance risk assignment, we used oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze the pattern of genes expressed in leukemic blasts from 360 pediatric ALL patients. Distinct expression profiles identified each of the prognostically important leukemia subtypes, including T-ALL, E2A-PBX1, BCR-ABL, TEL-AML1, MLL rearrangement, and hyperdiploid >50 chromosomes. In addition, another ALL subgroup was identified based on its unique expression profile. Examination of the genes comprising the expression signatures provided important insights into the biology of these leukemia subgroups. Further, within some genetic subgroups, expression profiles identified those patients that would eventually fail therapy. Thus, the single platform of expression profiling should enhance the accurate risk stratification of pediatric ALL patients.

  7. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Reduced Intensity Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With De Novo or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-25

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. The performance efficiency of bioaugmentation to prevent anaerobic digestion failure from ammonia and propionate inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Sun, Yongming; Wu, Shubiao; Kong, Xiaoying; Yuan, Zhenhong; Dong, Renjie

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of bioaugmentation with enriched methanogenic propionate degrading microbial consortia on propionate fermentation under ammonia stress from total ammonia nitrogen concentration (TAN) of 3.0gNL(-1). Results demonstrated that bioaugmentation could prevent unstable digestion against further deterioration. After 45days of 1dosage (0.3g dry cell weight L(-1)d(-1), DCW L(-1)d(-1)) of bioaugmentation, the average volumetric methane production (VMP), methane recovery rate and propionic acid (HPr) degradation rate was enhanced by 70mLL(-1)d(-1), 21% and 51%, respectively. In contrast, the non-bioaugmentation reactor almost failed. Routine addition of a double dosage (0.6g DCW L(-1)d(-1)) of bioaugmentation culture was able to effectively recover the failing digester. The results of FISH suggested that the populations of Methanosaetaceae increased significantly, which could be a main contributor for the positive effect on methane production.

  12. Study on methane fermentation and production of vitamin B12 from alcohol waste slurry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenya; Quan, Taisheng; Li, Pomin; Zhang, Yansheng; Sugiura, Norio; Maekawa, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    We studied biogas fermentation from alcohol waste fluid to evaluate the anaerobic digestion process and the production of vitamin B12 as a byproduct. Anaerobic digestion using acclimated methanogens was performed using the continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and fixed-bed reactor packed with rock wool as carrier material at 55 degrees C. We also studied the effects of metal ions added to the culture broth on methane and vitamin B12 formation. Vitamin B12 production was 2.92 mg/L in the broth of the fixed-bed reactor, twice that of the CSTR. The optimum concentrations of trace metal ions added to the culture liquid for methane and vitamin B12 production were 1.0 and 8 mL/L for the CSTR and fixed-bed reactor, respectively. Furthermore, an effective method for extracting and purifying vitamin B12 from digested fluid was developed.

  13. Catalytic site remodelling of the DOT1L methyltransferase by selective inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wenyu; Chory, Emma J.; Wernimont, Amy K.; Tempel, Wolfram; Scopton, Alex; Federation, Alexander; Marineau, Jason J.; Qi, Jun; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Yi, Joanna; Marcellus, Richard; Iacob, Roxana E.; Engen, John R.; Griffin, Carly; Aman, Ahmed; Wienholds, Erno; Li, Fengling; Pineda, Javier; Estiu, Guillermina; Shatseva, Tatiana; Hajian, Taraneh; Al-awar, Rima; Dick, John E.; Vedadi, Masoud; Brown, Peter J.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Bradner, James E.; Schapira, Matthieu

    2012-12-18

    Selective inhibition of protein methyltransferases is a promising new approach to drug discovery. An attractive strategy towards this goal is the development of compounds that selectively inhibit binding of the cofactor, S-adenosylmethionine, within specific protein methyltransferases. Here we report the three-dimensional structure of the protein methyltransferase DOT1L bound toEPZ004777, the first S-adenosylmethionine-competitive inhibitor of a protein methyltransferase with in vivo efficacy. This structure and those of four new analogues reveal remodelling of the catalytic site. EPZ004777 and a brominated analogue, SGC0946, inhibit DOT1L in vitro and selectively kill mixed lineage leukaemia cells, in which DOT1L is aberrantly localized via interaction with an oncogenic MLL fusion protein. These data provide important new insight into mechanisms of cell-active S-adenosylmethionine-competitive protein methyltransferase inhibitors, and establish a foundation for the further development of drug-like inhibitors of DOT1L for cancer therapy.

  14. Search for doubly charged Higgs bosons decaying to dileptons in pp collisions at square root of s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'agnello, S; Dell'orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Moulik, T; Movilla Fernandez, P A; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schemitz, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stefanini, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2004-11-26

    We present the results of a search for doubly charged Higgs bosons (H+/-+/-) decaying to dileptons (ll(')) using approximately 240 pb(-1) of pp collision data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In our search region, given by same-sign ll(') mass m(ll('))>80 GeV/c(2) (100 GeV/c(2) for ee channel), we observe no evidence for H+/-+/- production. We set limits on sigma(pp -->H++H---->l(+)l('+)l(-)l('-)) as a function of the mass of the H+/-+/- and the chirality of its couplings. Assuming exclusive same-sign dilepton decays, we derive lower mass limits on H(+/-+/-)(L) of 133, 136, and 115 GeV/c(2) in the ee, mumu, and emu channels, respectively, and a lower mass limit of 113 GeV/c(2) on H(+/-+/-)(R) in the mumu channel, all at the 95% confidence level.

  15. Report of the Task Force on Specifications and Standards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-04-01

    Linlt. NMtvroikayv andl X Raiattion Gitii’ritil lit- MILI-S’I I- 1671 II’ 5-01 -71 Mi’t-attjal V’ibrations if S-hiplmard EqUJi)MItn l s N-SH- Mll-ST’I)D...I’.Jttiloni’t A I"-]1:;.EI)S NILS1 )-4-19 2-22-73] Raio FrequencyItt Spetr umn ’haract-r’ii NIf-asul. -. t’ N- E M I L -SI𔃻-411) 2-09-71...Engineering Reiuiremen ,ts fior Militar Sy Nstvils. Equipment and Facilities A-Nil mI I i-sTI)- x 2 7-15-69 System Safety Progam for Systems and

  16. Treatment for Relapsed/Refractory AML Based on a High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  17. Crystal structure of the N-terminal region of human Ash2L shows a winged-helix motif involved in DNA binding

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong; Wan, Bingbing; Wang, Kevin C.; Cao, Fang; Yang, Yuting; Protacio, Angeline; Dou, Yali; Chang, Howard Y.; Lei, Ming

    2011-09-06

    Ash2L is a core component of the MLL family histone methyltransferases and has an important role in regulating the methylation of histone H3 on lysine 4. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of Ash2L and reveal a new function of Ash2L. The structure shows that Ash2L contains an atypical PHD finger that does not have histone tail-binding activity. Unexpectedly, the structure shows a previously unrecognized winged-helix motif that directly binds to DNA. The DNA-binding-deficient mutants of Ash2L reduced Ash2L localization to the HOX locus. Strikingly, a single mutation in Ash2L{sub WH} (K131A) breaks the chromatin domain boundary, suggesting that Ash2L also has a role in chromosome demarcation.

  18. Building Partnerships for the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    PNO low-. 4-J (40) *WL 0 pow WNW Ow" C4 a C o 0 PM" 0 m /-, -ýi Op* ct ct ct ct...C:is u U 0 PNO 4-0 0 U) (D C6 0 0- 0. o a x LLJ ’Eo mLL IOM a) lo- r.L 2 9 c im, 0e 0a. 0 .Li . 4- CO E 0 LO cd Q,, M .02 :G tm T) c >,,o E -04- (D 4).S2...POO m 4-oPN=4 0 W C W 4-o 4-4 Poo 0 POO 4-o 400 0 rA too W 4-o ON P-o 4-o P-0 OF0 pmoo= 0ORE E 40 4.00 pno OF* 0-4 Pro Plmý Wo CA CA 06ý 1 A ýJ’ V

  19. Real Property Acquisition, Management, and Disposal

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    156 and 157 (reference ( m )) s’ates that withdrawal or restriction of public domain lands, including the Outer Continental Shelf, or any one acquisition...ance with DoD 7220.9- M (reference (o)). (3) Before acquiring real property by purchase, or lease, DoD Components shall determine that the requirements...8217 11a1x 1 (iuui xtenI)t possiblep c n iset n-ile l tlt. 1 1 1 t 1 j-1 1, in1I’mll l ’. m t ni f or 22 r i i ~ IT l0i . ~ t I I I II j I. Ii t 2 Comp

  20. Comparing Three Different Combination Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Mechanism of Generation of Therapy Related Leukemia in Response to Anti-Topoisomerase II Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cowell, Ian G.; Austin, Caroline A.

    2012-01-01

    Type II DNA topoisomerases have the ability to generate a transient DNA double-strand break through which a second duplex can be passed; an activity essential for DNA decatenation and unknotting. Topoisomerase poisons stabilize the normally transient topoisomerase-induced DSBs and are potent and widely used anticancer drugs. However, their use is associated with therapy-related secondary leukemia, often bearing 11q23 translocations involving the MLL gene. We will explain recent discoveries in the fields of topoisomerase biology and transcription that have consequences for our understanding of the etiology of leukemia, especially therapy-related secondary leukemia and describe how these findings may help minimize the occurrence of these neoplasias. PMID:22829791

  3. Glutamine synthetase I-deficiency in Mesorhizobium loti differentially affects nodule development and activity in Lotus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Chungopast, Sirinapa; Thapanapongworakul, Pilunthana; Matsuura, Hiroyuki; Van Dao, Tan; Asahi, Toshimasa; Tada, Kuninao; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Nomura, Mika

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we focused on the effect of glutamine synthetase (GSI) activity in Mesorhizobium loti on the symbiosis between the host plant, Lotus japonicus, and the bacteroids. We used a signature-tagged mutant of M. loti (STM30) with a transposon inserted into the GSI (mll0343) gene. The L. japonicus plants inoculated with STM30 had significantly more nodules, and the occurrence of senesced nodules was much higher than in plants inoculated with the wild-type. The acetylene reduction activity (ARA) per nodule inoculated with STM30 was lowered compared to the control. Also, the concentration of chlorophyll, glutamine, and asparagine in leaves of STM30-infected plants was found to be reduced. Taken together, these data demonstrate that a GSI deficiency in M. loti differentially affects legume-rhizobia symbiosis by modifying nodule development and metabolic processes.

  4. AMPK protects leukemia-initiating cells in myeloid leukemias from metabolic stress in the bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yusuke; Chapple, Richard H.; Lin, Angelique; Kitano, Ayumi; Nakada, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY How cancer cells adapt to metabolically adverse conditions in patients and strive to proliferate is a fundamental question in cancer biology. Here we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic checkpoint kinase, confers metabolic stress resistance to leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) and promotes leukemogenesis. Upon dietary restriction, MLL-AF9-induced murine AML activated AMPK and maintained leukemogenic potential. AMPK deletion significantly delayed leukemogenesis and depleted LICs by reducing the expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), compromising glucose flux, and increasing oxidative stress and DNA damage. LICs were particularly dependent on AMPK to suppress oxidative stress in the hypoglycemic bone marrow environment. Strikingly, AMPK inhibition synergized with physiological metabolic stress caused by dietary restriction and profoundly suppressed leukemogenesis. Our results indicate that AMPK protects LICs from metabolic stress, and that combining AMPK inhibition with physiological metabolic stress potently suppresses AML by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:26440282

  5. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M.; Frumm, Stacey M.; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F.; Lewis, Caroline A.; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hemann, Michael T.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Banerji, Versha

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  7. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Vorinostat, Azacitidine, and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin for Older Patients With Relapsed or Refractory AML

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-22

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  12. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Immunosuppression Therapy in Treating Older Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Fludarabine Phosphate, Busulfan, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant, Tacrolimus, and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Myeloid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  15. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. A novel KMT2D mutation resulting in Kabuki syndrome: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jun; Mo, Guiling; Ling, Yaojun; Ji, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare genetic syndrome characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and varying degrees of mental retardation. Patients with KS often present with facial, skeletal, visceral and dermatoglyphic abnormalities, cardiac anomalies and immunological defects. Mutation of the lysine methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D) gene (formerly known as MLL2) is the primary cause of KS. The present study reported the case of a 4-year-old Chinese girl who presented with atypical KS, including atypical facial features, unclear speech and suspected mental retardation. A diagnosis of KS was confirmed by genetic testing, which revealed a nonsense mutation in exon 16 of KMT2D (c.4485C>A, Tyr1495Ter). To the best of our knowledge, this is a novel mutation that has not been reported previously. The present case underscores the importance of genetic testing in KS diagnosis. PMID:27573763

  17. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Rasburicase and Allopurinol in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Search for Exclusive Z-Boson Production and Observation of High-Mass p pmacr →pγγ pmacr →pl+l- pmacr Events in p pmacr Collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pinfold, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spalding, J.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Stuart, D.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-06-01

    This Letter presents a search for exclusive Z boson production in proton-antiproton collisions at s=1.96TeV, using the CDF II detector. No exclusive Z→l+l- candidates are observed and the first upper limit on the exclusive Z cross section in hadron collisions is found to be σexcl(Z)<0.96pb at 95% confidence level. In addition, eight candidate exclusive dilepton events from the process p pmacr →pγγ pmacr →pl+l- pmacr are observed, and a measurement of the cross section for Mll>40GeV/c2 and |ηl|<4 is found to be σ=0.24-0.10+0.13pb, which is consistent with the standard model prediction.

  20. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Virtual screening and biological characterization of novel histone arginine methyltransferase PRMT1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Heinke, Ralf; Spannhoff, Astrid; Meier, Rene; Trojer, Patrick; Bauer, Ingo; Jung, Manfred; Sippl, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Lysine and arginine methyltransferases participate in the posttranslational modification of histones and regulate key cellular functions. Protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) has been identified as an essential component of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) oncogenic complexes, revealing its potential as a novel therapeutic target in human cancer. The first potent arginine methyltransferase inhibitors were recently discovered by random- and target-based screening approaches. Herein we report virtual and biological screening for novel inhibitors of PRMT1. Structure-based virtual screening (VS) of the Chembridge database composed of 328 000 molecules was performed with a combination of ligand- and target-based in silico approaches. Nine inhibitors were identified from the top-scored docking solutions; these were experimentally tested using human PRMT1 and an antibody-based assay with a time-resolved fluorescence readout. Among several aromatic amines, an aliphatic amine and an amide were also found to be active in the micromolar range.

  2. Chemotherapy Plus Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Refractory Myeloid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Thrombocytopenia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. S0432 Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Drug discovery in rare indications: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Richon, Victoria M

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, the number of new therapies developed for the treatment of rare diseases continues to increase. The most rapid growth has been in the development of new drugs for oncology indications. One focus in drug discovery for oncology indications is the development of targeted therapies for select patient subgroups characterized by genetic alterations. The identification of these patient subgroups has increased in the past decade and has resulted in a corresponding increase in the development of new drugs for genetically defined patient subgroups. As an example of the development of new therapeutics for rare indications, I describe here the drug discovery efforts leading to the development of DOT1L inhibitors for the treatment of MLL-rearranged leukemia.

  5. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Trace and rare earth elemental variation in Arabian sea sediments through a transect across the oxygen minimum zone

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, B.N.; Rao, B.R.; Rao, C.M.; Bau, M.

    1997-06-01

    We have determined the calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}), organic carbon (C{sub org}), trace element, and rare earth element (REE) composition of surface sediments collected from a transect on the central western continental shelf and slope of India in the Eastern Arabian Sea. The transect samples across the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) allows us to compare the relative abundances of trace elements and REEs in the sediments beneath and beyond the OMZ. Shale-normalized REE patterns, La{sub n}/Yb{sub n} ratios, and Eu/Eu* anamolies indicate that the sediments in the study area are either derived from the adjoining Archaean land masses or from distal Indus source. Sediment deposited in the OMZ have high U values from 3.6 to 8.1 ppm, with their U{sub excess} (of that can be supplied by continental particles) values ranging between 82-91% of the total U, indicating that the U may be precipitated as U{sup +4} in the reducing conditions of OMZ. Sediments deposited beneath the intense OMZ (<0.2 mL/L) and away from the OMZ (1-2 mL/L) show slight negative Ce anomalies, with no significant differences between these two sets of sediments. The Ce/Ce*{sub shale} values are poorly related to U and C{sub org} which are indicators of suboxic bottom waters. Normative calculations suggest that two sources, namely, terrestrial and seawater (terrestrial > seawater) contribute to the total Ce anomaly of the sediments. The Ce anomaly values of the calculated seawater derived component are similar to the anomalies reported for other coastal waters and the oxygenated surface waters of the Arabian Sea and do not show any correspondence to the lowered redox state of the overlying water, probably due to the redirection of dissolved Ce into the oxic deeper water. 103 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Energy conversion in laser propulsion: III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Carl W.; Mead, Franklin B., Jr.; Kalliomaa, Wayne M.

    2002-09-01

    Conversion of pulses of CO2 laser energy (18 microsecond pulses) to propellant kinetic energy was studied in a Myrabo Laser Lightcraft (MLL) operating with laser heated STP air and laser ablated delrin propellants. The MLL incorporates an inverted parabolic reflector that focuses laser energy into a toroidal volume where it is absorbed by a unit of propellant mass that subsequently expands in the geometry of the plug nozzle aerospike. With Delrin propellant, measurements of the coupling coefficients and the ablated mass as a function of laser pulse energy showed that the efficiency of conversion of laser energy to propellant kinetic energy was approximately 54%. With STP air, direct experimental measurement efficiency was not possible because the propellant mass associated with measured coupling coefficients was not known. Thermodynamics predicted that the upper limit of the efficiency of conversion of the internal energy of laser heated air to jet kinetic energy, (alpha) , is approximately 0.30 for EQUILIBRIUM expansion to 1 bar pressure. For FROZEN expansion (alpha) approximately 0.27. These upper limit efficiencies are nearly independent of the initial specific energy from 1 to 110 MJ/kg. With heating of air at its Mach 5 stagnation density (5.9 kg/m3 as compared to STP air density of 1.18 kg/m3) these efficiencies increase to about 0.55 (equilibrium) and 0.45 (frozen). Optimum blowdown from 1.18 kg/m3 to 1 bar occurs with expansion ratios approximately 1.5 to 4 as internal energy increases from 1 to 100 MJ/kg. Optimum expansion from the higher density state requires larger expansion ratios, 8 to 32. Expansion of laser ablated Delrin propellant appears to convert the absorbed laser energy more efficiently to jet kinetic energy because the effective density of the ablated gaseous Delrin is significantly greater than that of STP air.

  8. Energy conversion in laser propulsion III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B.; Kalliomaa, Wayne M.

    2003-05-01

    Conversion of pulses of CO2 laser energy (18 microsecond pulses) to propellant kinetic energy was studied in a Myrabo Laser Lightcraft (MLL) operating with laser heated STP air and laser ablated delrin propellants. The MLL incorporates an inverted parabolic reflector that focuses laser energy into a toroidal volume where it is absorbed by a unit of propellant mass that subsequently expands in the geometry of the plug nozzle aerospike. With Delrin propellant, measurements of the coupling coefficients and the ablated mass as a function of laser pulse energy showed that the efficiency of conversion of laser energy to propellant kinetic energy was ~ 54%. With STP air, direct experimental measurement of efficiency was not possible because the propellant mass associated with measured coupling coefficients was not known. Thermodynamics predicted that the upper limit of the efficiency of conversion of the internal energy of laser heated air to jet kinetic energy, α, is ~ 0.30 for EQUILIBRIUM expansion to 1 bar pressure. For FROZEN expansion α ~ 0.27. These upper limit efficiencies are nearly independent of the initial specific energy from 1 to 110 MJ/kg. With heating of air at its Mach 5 stagnation density (5.9 kg/m3 as compared to STP air density of 1.18 kg/m3) these efficiencies increase to about 0.55 (equilibrium) and 0.45 (frozen). Optimum blowdown from 1.18 kg/m3 to 1 bar occurs with expansion ratios ~ 1.5 to 4 as internal energy increases from 1 to 100 MJ/kg. Optimum expansion from the higher density state requires larger expansion ratios, 8 to 32. Expansion of laser ablated Delrin propellant appears to convert the absorbed laser energy more efficiently to jet kinetic energy because the effective density of the ablated gaseous Delrin is significantly greater than that of STP air.

  9. RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 targeting of oncogenic transcripts promotes hematopoietic progenitor proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Palanichamy, Jayanth Kumar; Tran, Tiffany M.; Howard, Jonathan M.; Contreras, Jorge R.; Fernando, Thilini R.; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Katzman, Sol; Toloue, Masoud; Yan, Weihong; Sanford, Jeremy R.; Rao, Dinesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional control of gene expression is important for defining both normal and pathological cellular phenotypes. In vitro, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have recently been shown to play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation; however, the contribution of RBPs to cell specification is not well understood. Here, we determined that the RBP insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) is specifically overexpressed in mixed lineage leukemia–rearranged (MLL-rearranged) B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), which constitutes a subtype of this malignancy associated with poor prognosis and high risk of relapse. IGF2BP3 was required for the survival of B-ALL cell lines, as knockdown led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Enforced expression of IGF2BP3 provided murine BM cells with a strong survival advantage, led to proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and skewed hematopoietic development to the B cell/myeloid lineage. Cross-link immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing uncovered the IGF2BP3-regulated transcriptome, which includes oncogenes MYC and CDK6 as direct targets. IGF2BP3 regulated transcripts via targeting elements within 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTR), and enforced IGF2BP3 expression in mice resulted in enhanced expression of Myc and Cdk6 in BM. Together, our data suggest that IGF2BP3-mediated targeting of oncogenic transcripts may represent a critical pathogenetic mechanism in MLL-rearranged B-ALL and support IGF2BP3 and its cognate RNA-binding partners as potential therapeutic targets in this disease. PMID:26974154

  10. Single step non-thermal cleaning/sanitation of knives used in meat industry with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Brasil, Carla Cristina Bauermann; Barin, Juliano Smanioto; Jacob-Lopes, Eduardo; Menezes, Cristiano Ragagnin; Zepka, Leila Queiroz; Wagner, Roger; Campagnol, Paulo Cezar Bastianello; Cichoski, Alexandre José

    2017-01-01

    The combination of ultrasound (US) with chlorinated water (CW) and neutral detergent (ND) for simultaneous cleaning and sanitation of knives used during cattle slaughter was evaluated as a novel non thermal treatment. The US mode of operation, detergent concentration and time of treatment were studied and the results were compared with the conventional sanitation method used in meat industries. The conventional sanitation method promoted a decrease (p<0.05) in the counts of mesophiles, Enterobacteriaceae, molds and yeasts, and a similar behavior was observed for US+CW (2.05±0.08mg/l of chlorine, and mode operation normal and sweep for 10min) and US+CW+ND (5ml/l and mode operation sweep for 5min) methods. Nevertheless, when detergent concentration and sonication time were increased (20ml/l, 15min) a strong decrease (p<0.05) in the counts of mesophiles, Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus, molds and yeasts. Knife blades presented appropriate hygienic-sanitary properties in such conditions based on the Clean-Trace Surface Protein Plus™ test swab, which were better than the results obtained from conventional method. Kinetic modeling of knife sanitation was performed according to the transfer of organic matter, nitrogen and phosphorus during the process indicated highest migration rate of residues for US+CW+ND method, reaching 1.61mg/l·min. The hardness of knives' surface (Rockwell) was not changed by sonication using US+CW+ND method. These results indicate that both knife cleaning and sanitation processes could be performed in a unique step without the use of heat.

  11. Dynamic association of epigenetic H3K4me3 and DNA 5hmC marks in the dorsal hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex following reactivation of a fear memory.

    PubMed

    Webb, William M; Sanchez, Richard G; Perez, Gabriella; Butler, Anderson A; Hauser, Rebecca M; Rich, Megan C; O'Bierne, Aidan L; Jarome, Timothy J; Lubin, Farah D

    2017-02-20

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone methylation are critical regulators of gene transcription changes during memory consolidation. However, it is unknown how these epigenetic modifications coordinate control of gene expression following reactivation of a previously consolidated memory. Here, we found that retrieval of a recent contextual fear conditioned memory increased global levels of H3 lysine 4-trimethylation (H3K4me3) and DNA 5-hydroxymethylation (5hmC) in area CA1 of the dorsal hippocampus. Further experiments revealed increased levels of H3K4me3 and DNA 5hmC within a CpG-enriched coding region of the Npas4, but not c-fos, gene. Intriguingly, retrieval of a 30-day old memory increased H3K4me3 and DNA 5hmC levels at a CpG-enriched coding region of c-fos, but not Npas4, in the anterior cingulate cortex, suggesting that while these two epigenetic mechanisms co-occur following the retrieval of a recent or remote memory, their gene targets differ depending on the brain region. Additionally, we found that in vivo siRNA-mediated knockdown of the H3K4me3 methyltransferase Mll1 in CA1 abolished retrieval-induced increases in DNA 5hmC levels at the Npas4 gene, suggesting that H3K4me3 couples to DNA 5hmC mechanisms. Consistent with this, loss of Mll1 prevented retrieval-induced increases in Npas4 mRNA levels in CA1 and impaired fear memory. Collectively, these findings suggest an important link between histone methylation and DNA hydroxymethylation mechanisms in the epigenetic control of de novo gene transcription triggered by memory retrieval.

  12. Updated determination of particulate and dissolved thorium-234

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleer, Alan P.

    The determination of particulate and dissolved 234Th is similar to the procedure of Anderson and Fleer [1982]. Samples are collected using 30 L Niskin bottles with Teflon- or epoxy-coated internal springs. On deck, the sample is pumped with a delrin impeller pump through a 0.45 μm pore size 147-mm diameter Millipore filter and into a pre-rinsed 6 gallon plastic cubitainer held in a plastic milk crate. An in-line plastic water meter records volumes in gallons. The particulate sample filter is folded twice and stored in a polyethylene sample bag. To the ˜20 L filtered sample is added: 30 mL reagent grade 16 N HNO3; 500 mL 230Th tracer of ˜30 dpm mL-l and 5 mL 50 mg mL-l iron carrier previously cleaned by extraction into isopropyl ether from an 8 M HCl solution and back-extracted into 0.1 M HCl. The acidified sample is allowed to equilibrate for from one day to a maximum of several days. The sample is weighed on a Heathkit digital scale and the pH is adjusted to approximately 8 with about 40 mL 10 M NH4OH to precipitate iron hydroxide, which carries the thorium and uranium from the solution. The precipitate is allowed to settle for 12 to 24 hours. The supernate is drawn off, and the precipitate is spun down in a centrifuge tube to about an 8 mL volume. The precipitate is resuspended in distilled water and spun down again, then dissolved in three times its volume with 12 N HCl to make a 9 N HCl solution. A 1.5 cm×12 cm ion exchange column is filled with AG1×8 100-200 mesh resin and conditioned with 9 N HCl. The sample solution is run slowly through.

  13. Deleterious activity of natural products on postures of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Diatraea saccharalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    PubMed

    Tavares, Wagner S; Cruz, Ivan; Fonseca, Felipe G; Gouveia, Natalia L; Serrão, José E; Zanuncio, José C

    2010-01-01

    The control of Lepidoptera pests should be carried out before hatching of their caterpillars to avoid damage to the crops. The aim of this work was to assess the activity of neem (trade name: Natuneem, producer: Base Fértil, Chapadão do Sul, Brazil) and pyroligneous extracts (trade name: Biopirol 7M, producer: Biocarbo, Itabirito, Brazil) at 10 mL/L (1%) and 20 mL/L (2%) contents on egg masses of different ages of Spodoptera frugiperda Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and of Diatraea saccharalis F. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) at Embrapa Corn and Sorghum in Sete Lagoas, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The tests took place in an unbiased casualized design with 12 treatments and four replications. The insecticides were diluted in water, and 0.04 mL of the solution was applied to recently laid and one- and two-day-old eggs of S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis. Caterpillars hatching from recently laid egg masses of S. frugiperda was lower with 2% pyroligneous extract [(0.02 +/- 0.00)%]. Recently laid eggs and one- or two-day-old eggs of D. saccharalis presented lower caterpillar hatching with 1% neem extract [(0.00 +/- 0.00)%, (0.00 +/- 0.00)%, and (1.00 +/- 0.01)%] and 2% neem extract [(0.00 +/- 0.00)%], compared to 1% pyroligneous extract [(27.30 +/- 3.22)%, (28.40 +/- 3.32)%, and (37.80 +/- 4.14)%] and 2% pyroligneous extract [(42.20 +/- 4.49)%, (48.70 +/- 4.97)%, and (56.60 +/- 5.52)%], respectively. Neem and pyroligneous extracts had impact on hatching of S. frugiperda and D. saccharalis caterpillars.

  14. Profiling of somatic mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with FLT3-ITD at diagnosis and relapse

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Yasunobu; Kanojia, Deepika; Mayakonda, Anand; Yoshida, Kenichi; Haridas Keloth, Sreya; Zang, Zhi Jiang; Okuno, Yusuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Ding, Ling-Wen; Alpermann, Tamara; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Lin, De-Chen; Chien, Wenwen; Madan, Vikas; Liu, Li-Zhen; Tan, Kar-Tong; Sampath, Abhishek; Venkatesan, Subhashree; Inokuchi, Koiti; Wakita, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Chng, Wee Joo; Kham, Shirley-Kow Yin; Yeoh, Allen Eng-Juh; Sanada, Masashi; Schiller, Joanna; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Kornblau, Steven M.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Haferlach, Torsten; Lill, Michael; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Shih, Lee-Yung; Blau, Igor-Wolfgang; Blau, Olga; Yang, Henry; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with a grave prognosis. To identify the mutational spectrum associated with relapse, whole-exome sequencing was performed on 13 matched diagnosis, relapse, and remission trios followed by targeted sequencing of 299 genes in 67 FLT3-ITD patients. The FLT3-ITD genome has an average of 13 mutations per sample, similar to other AML subtypes, which is a low mutation rate compared with that in solid tumors. Recurrent mutations occur in genes related to DNA methylation, chromatin, histone methylation, myeloid transcription factors, signaling, adhesion, cohesin complex, and the spliceosome. Their pattern of mutual exclusivity and cooperation among mutated genes suggests that these genes have a strong biological relationship. In addition, we identified mutations in previously unappreciated genes such as MLL3, NSD1, FAT1, FAT4, and IDH3B. Mutations in 9 genes were observed in the relapse-specific phase. DNMT3A mutations are the most stable mutations, and this DNMT3A-transformed clone can be present even in morphologic complete remissions. Of note, all AML matched trio samples shared at least 1 genomic alteration at diagnosis and relapse, suggesting common ancestral clones. Two types of clonal evolution occur at relapse: either the founder clone recurs or a subclone of the founder clone escapes from induction chemotherapy and expands at relapse by acquiring new mutations. Relapse-specific mutations displayed an increase in transversions. Functional assays demonstrated that both MLL3 and FAT1 exert tumor-suppressor activity in the FLT3-ITD subtype. An inhibitor of XPO1 synergized with standard AML induction chemotherapy to inhibit FLT3-ITD growth. This study clearly shows that FLT3-ITD AML requires additional driver genetic alterations in addition to FLT3-ITD alone. PMID:26438511

  15. RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 targeting of oncogenic transcripts promotes hematopoietic progenitor proliferation.

    PubMed

    Palanichamy, Jayanth Kumar; Tran, Tiffany M; Howard, Jonathan M; Contreras, Jorge R; Fernando, Thilini R; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Katzman, Sol; Toloue, Masoud; Yan, Weihong; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina; Sanford, Jeremy R; Rao, Dinesh S

    2016-04-01

    Posttranscriptional control of gene expression is important for defining both normal and pathological cellular phenotypes. In vitro, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have recently been shown to play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation; however, the contribution of RBPs to cell specification is not well understood. Here, we determined that the RBP insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) is specifically overexpressed in mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged (MLL-rearranged) B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), which constitutes a subtype of this malignancy associated with poor prognosis and high risk of relapse. IGF2BP3 was required for the survival of B-ALL cell lines, as knockdown led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Enforced expression of IGF2BP3 provided murine BM cells with a strong survival advantage, led to proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and skewed hematopoietic development to the B cell/myeloid lineage. Cross-link immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing uncovered the IGF2BP3-regulated transcriptome, which includes oncogenes MYC and CDK6 as direct targets. IGF2BP3 regulated transcripts via targeting elements within 3' untranslated regions (3'UTR), and enforced IGF2BP3 expression in mice resulted in enhanced expression of Myc and Cdk6 in BM. Together, our data suggest that IGF2BP3-mediated targeting of oncogenic transcripts may represent a critical pathogenetic mechanism in MLL-rearranged B-ALL and support IGF2BP3 and its cognate RNA-binding partners as potential therapeutic targets in this disease.

  16. Detection of antibiotics in goat's milk: effect of detergents on the response of microbial inhibitor tests.

    PubMed

    Romero, Tamara; Beltrán, María Carmen; Althaus, Rafael Lisandro; Molina, María Pilar

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the interference of acid and alkaline detergents employed in the cleaning of milking equipment of caprine dairy farms on the performance of microbial tests used in antibiotic control (BRT MRL, Delvotest MCS, and Eclipse 100). Eight concentrations of commercial detergents, five acid (0-0.25%) and five alkaline (0-1%) were add to antimicrobial-free goat's milk to evaluate the detergent effect on the response of microbial inhibitor tests. To evaluate the effect of detergents on the detection capability of microbial tests two detergents at 0.5 ml/l (one acid and one basic) and eight concentrations of four β-lactam antibiotics (ampicillin, amoxicillin, cloxacillin and benzylpenicillin) were used. Milk without detergents was used as control. The spiked samples were analysed twelve times by three microbial tests. The results showed that the presence of acid detergents did not affect the response of microbial tests for any of the concentrations tested. However, at concentrations equal to or greater than 2 ml/l alkaline detergents positive results were found in microbial tests (16.7-100%). The detection limits of the screening tests for penicillins were not modified substantially by the presence of detergents. In general, the presence of acid and alkaline detergents in goat's milk did not produce a great interference in the microbial tests, only high concentrations of detergents could cause non-compliant results, but these concentrations are difficult to find in practice if proper cleaning procedures are applied in goat dairy farms.

  17. A Year in Hypoxia: Epibenthic Community Responses to Severe Oxygen Deficit at a Subsea Observatory in a Coastal Inlet

    PubMed Central

    Matabos, Marjolaine; Tunnicliffe, Verena; Juniper, S. Kim; Dean, Courtney

    2012-01-01

    Changes in ocean ventilation driven by climate change result in loss of oxygen in the open ocean that, in turn, affects coastal areas in upwelling zones such as the northeast Pacific. Saanich Inlet, on the west coast of Canada, is a natural seasonally hypoxic fjord where certain continental shelf species occur in extreme hypoxia. One study site on the VENUS cabled subsea network is located in the hypoxic zone at 104 m depth. Photographs of the same 5 m2 area were taken with a remotely-controlled still camera every 2/3 days between October 6th 2009 and October 18th 2010 and examined for community composition, species behaviour and microbial mat features. Instruments located on a near-by platform provided high-resolution measurements of environmental variables. We applied multivariate ordination methods and a principal coordinate analysis of neighbour matrices to determine temporal structures in our dataset. Responses to seasonal hypoxia (0.1–1.27 ml/l) and its high variability on short time-scale (hours) varied among species, and their life stages. During extreme hypoxia, microbial mats developed then disappeared as a hippolytid shrimp, Spirontocaris sica, appeared in high densities (200 m−2) despite oxygen below 0.2 ml/l. The slender sole Lyopsetta exilis was abundant in severe hypoxia and diminished as oxygen increased in the summer. This planktivore may be responding to changes in the depth of the diurnal migration of zooplankton. While the squat lobster Munida quadrispina was common at all times, juveniles disappeared in fluctuating conditions. Despite low oxygen conditions, animal densities were high indicating that the risk from hypoxia is balanced by factors such as food availability and escape from less tolerant predators. As hypoxia increases on the continental shelf, we expect benthic communities to become dominated by low diversity, hypoxia-tolerant species of low commercial significance. PMID:23029145

  18. Geochemical characterization and biomonitoring of reclaimed soils in the Po River Delta (Northern Italy): implications for the agricultural activities.

    PubMed

    Di Giuseppe, Dario; Bianchini, Gianluca; Vittori Antisari, Livia; Martucci, Annalisa; Natali, Claudio; Beccaluva, Luigi

    2014-05-01

    This geochemical study is focused on the easternmost part of the Po River alluvial plain in Northern Italy, which is interested by widespread agricultural activities, investigating a reclaimed sector of the Province of Ferrara, known as "Valle del Mezzano" (Mezzano Low Land, hereafter reported as MLL) characterized by peat-rich soils. The chemical-mineralogical characterization of these reclaimed soils is important to compare the local geochemical backgrounds with those recorded in other sectors of the River Po plain and to monitor if the observed concentration exceeds critical thresholds. The reported analyses include (a) measurement of the soil salinity, (b) nutrient evaluation, (c) major and trace element concentrations carried out on bulk soils, (d) tests of metal extraction with both aqua regia and EDTA to highlight the distinct elemental mobility and (e) phyto-toxicological measurement of heavy metal concentrations in plants (Lactuca sativa acephala) grown on the studied soils. The results indicate (1) high soil salinity, often with drastic increase of sodium and chloride along the soil profiles, (2) high nitrogen content (in part related to anthropogenic activities) on superficial horizons and nitrate decrease along the soil profiles and (3) comparative enrichments in heavy metals with respect to other soils of the province, which indicate that peat deposits are effective in trapping metals from anthropogenic sources. This, in turn, implies potential geochemical risks for the agricultural activities. In this regard, specific concerns are related to the high nickel and arsenic content of MLL soils due to the mobility of these elements and their attitude to be taken up by plants.

  19. X-ray dynamical diffraction from multilayer Laue lenses with rough interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Hanfei

    2009-04-15

    A modeling approach for x-ray dynamical diffraction from multilayer Laue lenses (MLLs) with rough interfaces is developed. Although still based on the principle of the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), this model is formulated from the perspective of the physical scattering process, very different from the conventional DWBA formalism. Using this model, one can study x-ray scattering from rough interfaces in the regime of Fresnel diffraction and in the case of absorptive samples, for example, x-ray dynamical diffraction from MLLs with rough interfaces, which is hard to handle in the framework of the conventional DWBA. Theoretical simulations for various MLLs with rough interfaces are conducted. It is found that interfacial roughness results in a decrease in the local diffraction intensity, where the attenuation factor is a function of the root-mean-square (rms) roughness versus the local zone width ratio. This study shows that if all zones possess an identical rms roughness value that is less than half of the outmost MLL zone width, the focal broadening effect due to roughness is almost unnoticeable, provided that the mean position of the interface does not deviate from the required zone plate law. A further study shows that uncorrelated interfacial roughness can be treated the same as interfacial diffusion, in which case a roughness factor similar to the ''Debye-Waller factor'' can be used, and the pseudo-Fourier coefficients of the susceptibility function for an MLL [H. F. Yan et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 115438 (2007)] have to be multiplied by this factor.

  20. Prognostic significance of minimal residual disease in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated within the Interfant-99 protocol.

    PubMed

    Van der Velden, V H J; Corral, L; Valsecchi, M G; Jansen, M W J C; De Lorenzo, P; Cazzaniga, G; Panzer-Grümayer, E R; Schrappe, M; Schrauder, A; Meyer, C; Marschalek, R; Nigro, L L; Metzler, M; Basso, G; Mann, G; Den Boer, M L; Biondi, A; Pieters, R; Van Dongen, J J M

    2009-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in infants younger than 1 year is a rare but relatively homogeneous disease ( approximately 80% MLL gene rearranged, approximately 70% CD10-negative) when compared with childhood and adult ALL. Several studies in children and adults with ALL have shown that minimal residual disease (MRD) status is a strong and independent prognostic factor. We therefore evaluated the prognostic significance of MRD in infant ALL. Ninety-nine infant patients treated according to the Interfant-99 protocol were included in this study. MRD was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR analysis of rearranged immunoglobulin genes, T-cell receptor genes and MLL genes at various time points (TP) during therapy. Higher MRD levels at the end of induction (TP2) and consolidation (TP3) were significantly associated with lower disease-free survival. Combined MRD information at TP2 and TP3 allowed recognition of three patients groups that significantly differed in outcome. All MRD-high-risk patients (MRD levels > or =10(-4) at TP3; 26% of patients) relapsed. MRD-low-risk patients (MRD level <10(-4) at both TP2 and TP3) constituted 44% of patients and showed a relapse-rate of only 13%, whereas remaining patients (MRD-medium-risk patients; 30% of patients) had a relapse rate of 31%. Comparison between the current Interfant-06 stratification at diagnosis and the here presented MRD-based stratification showed that both stratifications recognized different subgroups of patients. These data indicate that MRD diagnostics has added value for recognition of risk groups in infant ALL and that MRD diagnostics can be used for treatment intervention in infant ALL as well.

  1. Biochemical responses, morphometric changes, genotoxic effects and CYP1A expression in the armored catfish Pterygoplichthys anisitsi after 15 days of exposure to mineral diesel and biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Arantes Felício, Andréia; Martins Parente, Thiago Estevam; Regina Maschio, Lucilene; Nogueira, Lílian; Rodrigues Venancio, Larissa Paola; de Freitas Rebelo, Mauro; Schlenk, Daniel; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves

    2015-05-01

    Despite being considered friendlier to the environment, biodiesel fuel can be harmful to aquatic organisms, especially when combined with petroleum diesel fuel. In this work we evaluated the effects of mineral diesel fuel containing increasing concentrations of biodiesel (5% and 20%, namely B5 and B20) and pure biodiesel (B100), at concentrations of 0.001 and 0.01mLL(-1), after 15 days of exposure, in armored catfish (Pterygoplichtys anisitsi). Toxicity tests were also performed to estimate LC50 values (96h) for each compound. Biotransformation enzymes [ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), and glutathione S-transferase (GST)] as well as oxidative stress markers (superoxide dismutase, SOD, catalase, CAT, glutathione peroxidase, GPx, and the level of lipid peroxidation) were measured in liver and gills after treatment. Genotoxic effects were also accessed in erythrocytes using the comet assay and by evaluating the frequency of micronuclei formation. Further, the mRNA of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) was also measured in liver. Mortality was not observed even exposure to concentrations as high as 6.0mLL(-1). EROD and GST activities were increased after B5 and B20 treatments; however, CYP1A mRNA induction was not observed. SOD and CAT activities were decreased, but GPx was significantly higher for all treatments in gills. There were no significant changes in lipid peroxidation, but genotoxicity markers revealed that all treatments increased comet scores. Fuels B5 and B20 increased micronuclei frequency. Our results indicate that despite being less toxic, biodiesel may cause sublethal alterations in fish that may alter long term health.

  2. Changes in Surface Radiation and Associated Effects on Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, M.

    2005-12-01

    recent absence of solar dimming may have allowed the greenhouse effect to finally develop at full size, as seen in accelerated temperature increases in the 1990s. The rate of temperature change at land surfaces has increased by an order of magnitude in the period 1985-2002 where solar dimming was absent, compared to the period with significant dimming (1958-1985). In the 1990s, more energy may therefore have been available at the surface compared to earlier decades, favoring, for example, an accelerated retreat of worldwide glaciers, or higher evaporation in areas of unlimited water supply and associated reduced soil moisture tendencies, with associated implications for the global hydrological cycle. Reference: Wild, M., Gilgen, H., Roesch, A., Ohmura, A., Long, C., Dutton, E., Forgan, B., Kallis, A., Russak, V., Tsvetkov, A., 2005: From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface. Science , 308, 847-850.

  3. Effects of solar dimming and brightening on the terrestrial carbon sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, L.; Bellouin, N.; Sitch, S.; Boucher, O.; Huntingford, C.; Wild, M.; Cox, P. M.

    2009-04-01

    photosynthesis for climate model applications. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical Meteorology, 59, 553-565. Niyogi D., Chang H.I., Saxena V.K., Holt T., Alapaty K., Booker F., Chen F., Davis K.J., Holben B., Matsui T., Meyers T., Oechel W.C., Pielke R.A., Wells R., Wilson K. & Xue Y.K. (2004) Direct observations of the effects of aerosol loading on net ecosystem CO2 exchanges over different landscapes. Geophysical Research Letters, 31. Oliveira P.H.F., Artaxo P., Pires C., De Lucca S., Procopio A., Holben B., Schafer J., Cardoso L.F., Wofsy S.C. & Rocha H.R. (2007) The effects of biomass burning aerosols and clouds on the CO2 flux in Amazonia. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical Meteorology, 59, 338-349. Roderick M.L., Farquhar G.D., Berry S.L. & Noble I.R. (2001) On the direct effect of clouds and atmospheric particles on the productivity and structure of vegetation. Oecologia, 129, 21-30. Stanhill G. & Cohen S. (2001) Global dimming: a review of the evidence for a widespread and significant reduction in global radiation with discussion of its probable causes and possible agricultural consequences. 107, 255-278. Wild M., Gilgen H., Roesch A., Ohmura A., Long C.N., Dutton E.G., Forgan B., Kallis A., Russak V. & Tsvetkov A. (2005) From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at Earth's surface. Science, 308, 847-850.

  4. r-Modes of Neutron Stars with Superfluid Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Umin; Yoshida, Shijun

    2003-03-01

    We investigate the modal properties of the r-modes of rotating neutron stars with the core filled with neutron and proton superfluids, taking account of entrainment effects between the superfluids. The stability of the r-modes against gravitational radiation reaction is also examined considering viscous dissipation due to shear and a damping mechanism called ``mutual friction'' between the superfluids in the core. We find that the r-modes in the superfluid core are split into ordinary r-modes and superfluid r-modes, which we call, respectively, ro- and rs-modes. The two superfluids in the core flow together for the ro-modes, while they countermove for the rs-modes. For the ro-modes, the coefficient κ0≡limΩ-->0ω/Ω is equal to 2m/[l'(l'+1)], almost independent of the parameter η that parameterizes the entrainment effects between the superfluids, where Ω is the angular frequency of rotation, ω is the oscillation frequency observed in the corotating frame of the star, and l' and m are the indices of the spherical harmonic function representing the angular dependence of the r-modes. For the rs-modes, on the other hand, κ0 is equal to 2m/[l'(l'+1)] at η=0 (no entrainment), and it almost linearly increases as η is increased from η=0. The ro-modes, for which w'≡v'p- v'n~Ω3, correspond to the r-modes discussed by L. Lindblom & G. Mendell, where v'n and v'p are the Eulerian velocity perturbations of the neutron and proton superfluids, respectively. The mutual friction in the superfluid core is found ineffective to stabilize the r-mode instability caused by the ro-mode except in a few narrow regions of η. The r-mode instability caused by the rs-modes, on the other hand, is extremely weak and easily damped by dissipative processes in the star.

  5. Oceanography of East Madagascar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiasa, John

    2014-05-01

    During six week survey (August - September 2008) in Southern and Eastern coast of Madagascar, the R/V 'Dr. Fridtjof Nansen' has carried out a study of the pelagic ecosystem. In collaboration with Agulhas & Somali Current Large Marine Ecosystems project (ASCLME) and South West Indian Ocean Fisheries Project (SWIOFP), the aim of the survey was to establish the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the Western Madagascar shelf region as a whole. A total of 102 CTD stations were conducted along selected hydrographical transects and ranged to a maximum of 3000 m depth. Water samples were also collected with Niskin bottles at predefined depths. A Seabird 911plus CTD was used to obtain vertical profiles of temperature, salinity and oxygen. As results, the first section between latitude 25o-26oS showed sea surface temperature values ranging between 25oC to 15oC upper 250m depth. As part of the south-west, the shelf is narrow and widen slightly along the tip south of the Island coast. In contrast of the west coast, in all transects performed along the south and the east coast, in most cases, the isotherms showed non stratified waters from the coast to offshore. The presence of the upwelling system in the south-east coast modifies drastically the patterns of all measured parameters. Fluorescence had a maximum values (0.25 µg/l) at surface near the coast in 2nd to 5th transects. Inversely, low temperature values were observed along the south and south-east with minimum values in the range of 18. 5oC-11oC at 50-250 m depth. These conditions were consistent along and between the 2nd to 5th transects, with more variation observed at transect 5. The salinity values (5 m depth) decreased from 35.7 psu in the south to 34.5 psu in the east. The horizontal distribution of oxygen showed non homogenous conditions with values between 5 ml/l (south) and 2.5 ml/l (south-east). Also starting from the coast to offshore, surface temperatures and surface salinities, surface

  6. Paleoceanographic changes on the Farallon Escarpment off central California during the last 16,000 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGann, M.

    2011-01-01

    New benthic and planktic foraminiferal assemblage census data and Benthic Foraminiferal Oxygen Index (BFOI) values, previously published marine climate proxy data (stable isotopes and Ca/Cd), and unpublished results of total carbon, organic carbon, and calcium carbonate analyses of sediments recovered off central California on the Farallon Escarpment (1605m water depth; 37??13.4???N, 123??14.6???W; core F-8-90-G21) document paleoceanographic changes during the latest Quaternary which reflect the intensity and source of North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) and surface productivity. Accelerator mass spectrometry radiocarbon dates of both benthic and planktic species provide an excellent age-depth model for the last 16,000 years, covering the latest glacial, B??lling-Aller??d, Younger Dryas, and early, middle, and late Holocene intervals. A Q-mode cluster analysis separated the benthic fauna into three clusters, one Pleistocene and two Holocene, whereas the planktic fauna was divided only into Pleistocene and Holocene clusters. Stable oxygen isotope values show an increase in water temperature of ~1??C from the late glacial to late Holocene and a change in faunal composition of the planktic assemblage implies surface waters warmed as well. A general trend of decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration from the Pleistocene (high oxic; 3.0-6.0+ ml/l O2) to the Holocene (low oxic; 1.5-3.0ml/l O2) suggested by the BFOI and Cd/Ca data reflect decreased ventilation as the source of the NPIW shifted from the Sea of Okhotsk to the tropical east Pacific at ~11,000 cal BP. The middle Holocene cooling reported in other central and northern California margin studies is not apparent in F-8-90-G21, which compares more favorably with studies from southern California and British Columbia. Total carbon and organic carbon values are highest in the B??lling-Aller??d, early Holocene, and late Holocene. Similarly, calcium carbonate values are high in the B??lling-Aller??d and peak in the

  7. Chromium precipitation from tanning spent liquors using industrial alkaline residues: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Fonseca Almeida, M.A.; Boaventura, R.A.R.

    1998-07-01

    Chromium precipitation from spent tanning liquors using industrial alkaline tailings is described and removal efficiencies are compared with those obtained with traditional chemicals as NaOH, CaO and MgO: (1) using steelmaking dusts at dosages up to 70 g/l residual Cr remains {ge} 3.7 mg/l. Moreover Cr and mainly Pb are partially leached by the spent tanning liquor, therefore limiting the use of this industrial residue as Cr precipitant; (2) a dosage of 80 g/l (dry basis) of chemical sludge from a water treatment plant results in a removal efficiency of 99.97% Cr and residual Cr {le} 2 mg/l under experimental conditions that include stirring at 100 rpm for 1 h and settling for 23 h. Sedimentation time may be reduced to 2 h if stirring is extended to 2 h. Resulting sludge volume is about 400 ml/l. However, during Cr precipitation, Al is leached form the added product up to about 40 mg Al per liter of supernatant; (3) precipitation using acetylene production sludge only requires a dosage of 16 g/l (dry basis) to remove 99.96% Cr after stirring for 1 h and settling for 2 h. The soluble Cr concentration in the clarified effluent is {le} 2 mg/l and the sludge volume about 500 ml/l. This Cr level can also be achieved at a dosage of 14 g/l, provided the stirring time is increased to 3 h; (4) these results are comparable with those using either CaO or MgO at similar dosages; and (5) NaOH at dosages between 6.4 and 14 g/l proved to be not sufficiently effective for Cr precipitation. Although removal efficiencies up to 99.9% are achieved, residual Cr is always above 8.7 mg/l. Additionally, the resulting sludge is not very dense, thus leading to high sludge volume production.

  8. Pomegranate polyphenols and extract inhibit nuclear factor of activated T-cell activity and microglial activation in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Puig, Kendra L; Combs, Colin K

    2013-05-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) brain is characterized by extracellular plaques of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide with reactive microglia. This study aimed to determine whether a dietary intervention could attenuate microgliosis. Memory was assessed in 12-mo-old male amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APP/PS1) transgenic mice via Barnes maze testing followed by division into either a control-fed group provided free access to normal chow and water or a treatment group provided free access to normal chow and drinking water supplemented with pomegranate extract (6.25 mL/L) for 3 mo followed by repeat Barnes maze testing for both groups. Three months of pomegranate feeding decreased the path length to escape of mice compared with their initial 12-mo values (P < 0.05) and their control-fed counterparts (P < 0.05). Brains of the 3-mo study pomegranate-fed mice had lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) concentrations (P < 0.05) and lower nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT) transcriptional activity (P < 0.05) compared with controls. Brains of the 3-mo pomegranate or control mice were also compared with an additional control group of 12-mo-old mice for histologic analysis. Immunocytochemistry showed that pomegranate- but not control-fed mice had attenuated microgliosis (P < 0.05) and Aβ plaque deposition (P < 0.05) compared with 12-mo-old mice. An additional behavioral study again used 12-mo-old male APP/PS1 mice tested by T-maze followed by division into a control group provided with free access to normal chow and sugar supplemented drinking water or a treatment group provided with normal chow and pomegranate extract-supplemented drinking water (6.25 mL/L) for 1 mo followed by repeat T-maze testing in both groups. One month of pomegranate feeding increased spontaneous alternations versus control-fed mice (P < 0.05). Cell culture experiments verified that 2 polyphenol components of pomegranate extract, punicalagin and ellagic acid, attenuated NFAT activity in a reporter cell

  9. Heterogeneous cytogenetic subgroups and outcomes in childhood acute megakaryoblastic leukemia: a retrospective international study

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yinmei; Abla, Oussama; Adachi, Souichi; Auvrignon, Anne; Beverloo, H. Berna; de Bont, Eveline; Chang, Tai-Tsung; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael; Elitzur, Sarah; Fynn, Alcira; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik; Liang, Der-Cherng; Lee, Vincent; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; De Moerloose, Barbara; Reinhardt, Dirk; Rodriguez, Laura; Van Roy, Nadine; Shen, Shuhong; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Yeoh, Allen E. J.; Zimmermann, Martin; Raimondi, Susana C.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive clinical studies of patients with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) are lacking. We performed an international retrospective study on 490 patients (age ≤18 years) with non–Down syndrome de novo AMKL diagnosed from 1989 to 2009. Patients with AMKL (median age 1.53 years) comprised 7.8% of pediatric AML. Five-year event-free (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 43.7% ± 2.7% and 49.0% ± 2.7%, respectively. Patients diagnosed in 2000 to 2009 were treated with higher cytarabine doses and had better EFS (P = .037) and OS (P = .003) than those diagnosed in 1989 to 1999. Transplantation in first remission did not improve survival. Cytogenetic data were available for 372 (75.9%) patients: hypodiploid (n = 18, 4.8%), normal karyotype (n = 49, 13.2%), pseudodiploid (n = 119, 32.0%), 47 to 50 chromosomes (n = 142, 38.2%), and >50 chromosomes (n = 44, 11.8%). Chromosome gain occurred in 195 of 372 (52.4%) patients: +21 (n = 106, 28.5%), +19 (n = 93, 25.0%), +8 (n = 77, 20.7%). Losses occurred in 65 patients (17.5%): –7 (n = 13, 3.5%). Common structural chromosomal aberrations were t(1;22)(p13;q13) (n = 51, 13.7%) and 11q23 rearrangements (n = 38, 10.2%); t(9;11)(p22;q23) occurred in 21 patients. On the basis of frequency and prognosis, AMKL can be classified to 3 risk groups: good risk—7p abnormalities; poor risk—normal karyotypes, –7, 9p abnormalities including t(9;11)(p22;q23)/MLL-MLLT3, –13/13q-, and –15; and intermediate risk—others including t(1;22)(p13;q13)/OTT-MAL (RBM15-MKL1) and 11q23/MLL except t(9;11). Risk-based innovative therapy is needed to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26215111

  10. From ecology to geochemistry to DNA: New information about Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkett, A. M.; Rathburn, A. E.; Venturelli, R. A.; Perez, M. E.; Levin, L. A.; Spendal, N.

    2014-12-01

    Cibicidoides wuellerstorfi remains one of the most useful benthic species in paleoceanographic studies due to its epibenthic lifestyle and use in geochemical studies. However, misconceptions exist about this important taxon. Genetic comparisons with Genbank have shown that C. wuellerstorfi living in the Pacific are the same species as those in the North Atlantic, and the Antarctic. Sediment cores taken on a transect through the Southern California Bight oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) have shown that C. wuellerstorfi make up as much as 11.2% of the stained population despite oxygen-poor conditions (0.47-0.63 mL/L with water depths ranging from 360-3000m). Living C. wuellerstorfi has also been found to inhabit many areas of methane seepage with available oxygen levels as low as 0.23mL/L. Colonization of experimental substrates at Hydrate Ridge revealed substantial colonization within 12 months (~1,000 individuals/~5,000cm3) and preference between substrate materials (e.g. abundance on plastic and absence on adjacent wood). As in other seep studies; stable carbon isotopic values of C. wuellerstorfi of Hydrate Ridge seeps exhibit a wider range than their non-seep counterparts. Stable carbon isotopes at Hydrate Ridge were significantly different between seep and non-seep locations despite having an overlapping range. Changes in seep fluid characteristics (e.g. temperature and composition) are evidently recorded in the δ18O of benthic foraminiferal calcite at methane seeps and hydrothermal seeps in the Pacific. The use of δ18O of benthic foraminiferal calcite may hold promise as a valuable means to assess seep characteristics, especially in recognizing and evaluating hydrothermal seeps. These results have significant implications for the cosmopolitan distribution, ecophenotypic variation, and genetic exchange of C. wuellerstorfi. The prevalence of C. wuellerstorfi in areas of low oxygen availability shows that this species is able to thrive in oxygen-poor habitats, and

  11. Evaluation of the One-Step ELISA kit for the detection of buprenorphine in urine, blood, and hair specimens.

    PubMed

    Cirimele, V; Etienne, S; Villain, M; Ludes, B; Kintz, P

    2004-07-16

    A solid-phase enzyme immunoassay involving microtiter plates was recently proposed by International Diagnostic Systems corporation (IDS) to screen for buprenorphine in human serum. The performance of the kit led us to investigate its applicability in other biological matrices such as urine or blood, and also hair specimens. Low concentrations of buprenorphine were detected with the ELISA test and confirmed by HPLC/MS (buprenorphine concentrations measured by HPLC/MS: 0.3 ng/mL in urine, 0.2 ng/mL in blood, and 40 pg/mg in hair). The intra-assay precision values were 8.7% at 1 ng/mL of urine (n = 8), 11.5% at 2 ng/mL in serum (n = 8), and 11.5% at 250 pg/mg of hair (n = 8), respectively. The immunoassay had no cross-reactivity with dihydrocodeine, ethylmorphine, 6-monoacetylmorphine, pholcodine, propoxyphene, dextromoramide, dextrometorphan at 1 and 10 mg/L, or codeine, morphine, methadone, and its metabolite EDDP. A 1% cross-reactivity was measured for a norbuprenorphine concentration of 50 ng/mL. Finally, the immunoassay was validated by comparing authentic specimens results with those of a validated HPLC/MS method. From the 136 urine samples tested, 93 were positive (68.4%) after the ELISA screening test (cutoff: 0.5 ng/mL) and confirmed by HPLC/MS (buprenorphine concentrations: 0.3-2036 ng/mL). From the 108 blood or serum samples screened, 27 were positive (25%) after the ELISA test with a cutoff value of 0.5 ng/mL (buprenorphine concentrations: 0.2-13.3 ng/mL). Eighteen hair specimens were positive (72%) after the screening (cutoff: 10 pg/mg) and confirmed by LC/MS (buprenorphine concentrations: 40-360 pg/mg). The ELISA method produced false positive results in less than 21% of the cases, but no false negative results were observed with the immunological test. Four potential adulterants (hypochloride 50 mL/L, sodium nitrite 50 g/L, liquid soap 50 mL/L, and sodium chloride 50 g/L) that were added to 10 positive urine specimens (buprenorphine concentrations in

  12. Sunitinib in Treating Patients With Idiopathic Myelofibrosis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-12

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Mast Cell Leukemia; Meningeal Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Primary Myelofibrosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia

  13. Recognition of enhancer element-specific histone methylation by TIP60 in transcriptional activation

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Kwang Won; Kim, Kyunghwan; Situ, Alan Jialun; Ulmer, Tobias S.; An, Woojin; Stallcup, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Many coregulator proteins are recruited by DNA-bound transcription factors to remodel chromatin and activate transcription. However, mechanisms for coordinating actions of multiple coregulator proteins are poorly understood. We demonstrate that multiple protein-protein interactions by protein acetyltransferase TIP60 are required for estrogen-induced transcription of a subset of estrogen receptor (ER) α target genes in human cells. Estrogen-induced recruitment of TIP60 requires direct binding of TIP60 to ERα and the action of chromatin remodeling ATPase BRG1, leading to increased recruitment of histone methyltransferase MLL1 and increased monomethylation of histone H3 at Lys4. TIP60 recruitment also requires preferential binding of the TIP60 chromodomain to histone H3 containing monomethylated Lys4, which marks active and poised enhancer elements. After recruitment, TIP60 increases acetylation of histone H2A at Lys5. Thus, complex cooperation of TIP60 with ERα and other chromatin remodeling enzymes is required for estrogen-induced transcription. PMID:22081016

  14. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation for monitoring interstitial fluid pressure in tumours -in vitro and in vivo proof of concept

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsdottir, V G; Dave, J K; Eisenbrey, J R; Machado, P; Zhao, H; Liu, J B; Merton, D A; Forsberg, F

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of using subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) to noninvasively estimate interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) was studied. In vitro, radiofrequency signals, from 0.2 ml/l of Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA) were acquired within a water-tank with a Sonix RP ultrasound scanner (Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada; fT/R=6.7/3.35 MHz and fT/R =10/5 MHz) and the subharmonic amplitudes of the signals were compared over 0–50 mmHg. In vivo, five swine with naturally occurring melanomas were studied. Subharmonic signals were acquired from tumours and surrounding tissue during infusion of Definity and compared to needle-based pressure measurements. Both in vitro and in vivo, an inverse linear relationship between hydrostatic pressure and subharmonic amplitude was observed with r2=0.63–0.95; p<0.05, maximum amplitude drop 11.36 dB at 10 MHz and −8 dB, and r2 as high as 0.97; p<0.02 (10 MHz and −4/−8 dB most promising), respectively, indicating that SHAPE may be useful in monitoring IFP. PMID:24856899

  15. Emergence of a Southern Ocean oxygen minimum zone during glacial periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Hoogakker, B.; Hillenbrand, C. D.; Zhou, X.; Thomas, E.; Gutchess, K. M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZ) in the upper ocean are commonly associated with poor ventilation and storage of respired carbon, potentially linked to atmospheric CO2 level. Iodine to calcium ratios (I/Ca) in recent planktonic foraminifera suggest that values less than ~2.5 mmol/mol indicate the presence of an OMZ. We apply this proxy to estimate past dissolved oxygen concentrations in the currently well oxygenated Southern Ocean, which played a critical role in carbon sequestration during glacial times. A down-core planktonic I/Ca record from South of the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) shows that minimum O2 concentrations in the upper ocean fell below 1.5 ml/l during the last two glacial periods, indicating the development of a persistent glacial OMZ at the heart of the carbon engine of our climate system. New estimates of past ocean oxygenation variability may assist in resolving mechanisms responsible for the much-debated ice age atmospheric CO2 decline.

  16. Discovery of Novel Disruptor of Silencing Telomeric 1-Like (DOT1L) Inhibitors using a Target-Specific Scoring Function for the (S)-Adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-Dependent Methyltransferase Family.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yulan; Li, Linjuan; Zhang, Bidong; Xing, Jing; Chen, Shijie; Wan, Wei; Song, Yakai; Jiang, Hao; Jiang, Hualiang; Luo, Cheng; Zheng, Mingyue

    2017-02-21

    The disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like (DOT1L) protein is a histone H3K79 methyltransferase that plays a key role in transcriptional elongation and cell cycle regulation and is required for the development and maintenance of MLL-rearranged mixed lineage leukemia. Much effort has been dedicated toward discovering novel scaffold DOT1L inhibitors using different strategies. Here, we report the development and application of a target-specific scoring function, the SAM score, for (S)-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent methyltransferases, for the discovery of novel DOT1L inhibitors. On the basis of the SAM score, we successfully identified a novel class of DOT1L inhibitors with a scaffold of [1,2,4]-triazolo-[3,4-b][1,3,4]-thiadiazole, in which compound 6 exhibits an IC50 value of 8.3 μM with selectivity versus other tested SAM-dependent methyltransferases. In cellular studies, 6 selectively targets DOT1L, blocks the proliferation of mixed lineage leukemia cell lines, and causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, we analyzed the putative binding modes of 6 and its analogues obtained by molecular docking, which may assist with the future development of DOT1L inhibitors with improved potency and selectivity profiles.

  17. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  18. Isolation of ethyl acetic based AGF bio-nutrient and its application on the growth of Capsicum annum L. plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrawan, Sonjaya, Yaya; Khoerunnisa, Fitri; Musthapa, Iqbal; Nurmala, Astri Rizki

    2015-12-01

    The study aimed to obtain the bionutrient derived from extraction of AGF leafs in ethyl acetic solvents and to explore its application on the plant growth of capsicum annum L. (curly red chili). Particularly, the fraction of secondary metabolites groups composed bionutrient was intensively elucidated by liquid vacuum chromatography technique. The characterization of secondary metabolites groups was conducted through several methods, i.e. thin layer chromatography, phytochemical screening, and FTIR spectroscopy. The AGF extracts based bionutrient then was applied on capsicum annum L. plants with dosage of 2 and 10 mL/L. The ethyl acetic solvent and commercial nutrient of Phonska and pesticide of curacron (EC 500) were selected as a blank and a positive control to evaluate the growth pattern of capsicum annum L., respectively. The result showed that the CF 1 dan CF2 of AGF extract contained alkaloid and terpenoid of secondary metabolite group, the CF 3, and CF 4 of AGF extracts were dominated by alkaloid, flavonoid, and terpenoid, while the CF 5 of AGF extract contained alkaloid, tannin and terpenoid groups. The CF 2 of AGF extract has the highest growth rate constant of 0.1702 week-1 with the number and heaviest mass of the yield of 82 pieces and 186.60, respectively. It was also showed the significant bio-pesticide activity that should be useful to support plant growth, indicating that AGF extract can be applied as both bio-nutrient and bio-pesticide.

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia of donor origin after allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a sibling who harbors germline XPD and XRCC3 homozygous polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was diagnosed with infiltrative ductal breast carcinoma. Two years after treatment, the patient developed an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) which harbored del(11q23) in 8% of the blast cells. The patient was submitted for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (aSCT) from her HLA-compatible sister. Ten months after transplantation, she relapsed with an AML with basophilic maturation characterized by CD45low CD33high, CD117+, CD13-/+, HLA Drhigh, CD123high, and CD203c+ blast cells lacking expression of CD7, CD10, CD34, CD15, CD14, CD56, CD36, CD64, and cytoplasmic tryptase. Karyotype analysis showed the emergence of a new clone with t(2;14) and FISH analysis indicated the presence of MLL gene rearrangement consistent with del(11q23). Interestingly, AML blast cell DNA tested with microsatellite markers showed the same pattern as the donor's, suggesting that this AML emerged from donor cells. Additionally, polymorphisms of the XPA, XPD, XRCC1, XRCC3 and RAD51 DNA repair genes revealed three unfavorable alleles with low DNA repair capacity. In summary, we report the first case of AML involving XPD and XRCC3 polymorphisms from donor origin following allogeneic stem cell transplantation and highlight the potential need for careful analysis of DNA repair gene polymorphisms in selecting candidate donors prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:21951951

  20. DNMT3A Mutations in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in South Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pezzi, Annelise; Moraes, Lauro; Valim, Vanessa; Amorin, Bruna; Melchiades, Gabriela; Oliveira, Fernanda; da Silva, Maria Aparecida; Matte, Ursula; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Bittencourt, Rosane; Daudt, Liane; Silla, Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex and heterogeneous hematopoietic tissue neoplasm. Several molecular markers have been described that help to classify AML patients into risk groups. DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) gene mutations have been recently identified in about 22% of AML patients and associated with poor prognosis as an independent risk factor. Our aims were to determine the frequency of somatic mutations in the gene DNMT3A and major chromosomal translocations in a sample of patients with AML. We investigated in 82 samples of bone marrow from patients with AML for somatic mutations in DNMT3A gene by sequencing and sought major fusion transcripts by RT-PCR. We found mutations in the DNMT3A gene in 6 patients (8%); 3 were type R882H. We found fusion transcripts in 19 patients, namely, AML1/ETO (n = 5; 6.1%), PML/RARα (n = 12; 14.6%), MLL/AF9 (0; 0%), and CBFβ/MYH11 (n = 2; 2.4%). The identification of recurrent mutations in the DNMT3A gene and their possible prognostic implications can be a valuable tool for making treatment decisions. This is the first study on the presence of somatic mutations of the DNMT3A gene in patients with AML in Brazil. The frequency of these mutations suggests a possible ethnogeographic variation. PMID:23193409

  1. Precise Alignment and Permanent Mounting of Thin and Lightweight X-ray Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biskach, Michael P.; Chan, Kai-Wing; Hong, Melinda N.; Mazzarella, James R.; McClelland, Ryan S.; Norman, Michael J.; Saha, Timo T.; Zhang, William W.

    2012-01-01

    To provide observations to support current research efforts in high energy astrophysics. future X-ray telescope designs must provide matching or better angular resolution while significantly increasing the total collecting area. In such a design the permanent mounting of thin and lightweight segments is critical to the overall performance of the complete X-ray optic assembly. The thin and lightweight segments used in the assemhly of the modules are desigued to maintain and/or exceed the resolution of existing X-ray telescopes while providing a substantial increase in collecting area. Such thin and delicate X-ray segments are easily distorted and yet must be aligned to the arcsecond level and retain accurate alignment for many years. The Next Generation X-ray Optic (NGXO) group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has designed, assembled. and implemented new hardware and procedures mth the short term goal of aligning three pairs of X-ray segments in a technology demonstration module while maintaining 10 arcsec alignment through environmental testing as part of the eventual design and construction of a full sized module capable of housing hundreds of X-ray segments. The recent attempts at multiple segment pair alignment and permanent mounting is described along with an overview of the procedure used. A look into what the next year mll bring for the alignment and permanent segment mounting effort illustrates some of the challenges left to overcome before an attempt to populate a full sized module can begin.

  2. Palbociclib can overcome mutations in cyclin dependent kinase 6 that break hydrogen bonds between the drug and the protein

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez Maganhi, Stella; Jensen, Patrizia; Caracelli, Ignez; Zukerman Schpector, Julio; Fröhling, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 prevent cells from entering the synthesis phase of the cell cycle. CDK4 and 6 are therefore important drug targets in various cancers. The selective CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib is approved for the treatment of breast cancer and has shown activity in a cellular model of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL)‐rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We studied the interactions of palbociclib and CDK6 using molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of the simulations suggested several interactions that stabilized the drug in its binding site and that were not observed in the crystal structure of the protein‐drug complex. These included a hydrogen bond to His 100 that was hitherto not reported and several hydrophobic contacts. Evolutionary‐based bioinformatic analysis was used to suggest two mutants, D163G and H100L that would potentially yield drug resistance, as they lead to loss of important protein–drug interactions without hindering the viability of the protein. One of the mutants involved a change in the glycine of the well‐conserved DFG motif of the kinase. Interestingly, CDK6‐dependent human AML cells stably expressing either mutant retained sensitivity to palbociclib, indicating that the protein‐drug interactions are not affected by these. Furthermore, the cells were proliferative in the absence of palbociclib, indicating that the Asp to Gly mutation in the DFG motif did not interfere with the catalytic activity of the protein. PMID:28168755

  3. AF1q is a novel TCF7 co-factor which activates CD44 and promotes breast cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jino; Schlederer, Michaela; Schreiber, Martin; Ice, Ryan; Merkel, Olaf; Bilban, Martin; Hofbauer, Sebastian; Kim, Soojin; Addison, Joseph; Zou, Jie; Ji, Chunyan; Bunting, Silvia T; Wang, Zhengqi; Shoham, Menachem; Huang, Gang; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Gibson, Laura F; Rojanasakul, Yon; Remick, Scot; Ivanov, Alexey; Pugacheva, Elena; Bunting, Kevin D; Moriggl, Richard; Kenner, Lukas; Tse, William

    2015-08-21

    AF1q is an MLL fusion partner that was identified from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with t (1; 11) (q21; q23) chromosomal abnormality. The function of AF1q is not yet fully known, however, elevated AF1q expression is associated with poor clinical outcomes in various malignancies. Here, we show that AF1q specifically binds to T-cell-factor-7 (TCF7) in the Wnt signaling pathway and results in transcriptional activation of CD44 as well as multiple downstream targets of the TCF7/LEF1. In addition, enhanced AF1q expression promotes breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, mammosphere formation, and chemo-resistance. In xenograft models, enforced AF1q expression in breast cancer cells also promotes liver metastasis and lung colonization. In a cohort of 63 breast cancer patients, higher percentages of AF1q-positive cancer cells in primary sites were associated with significantly poorer overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), and brain metastasis-free survival (b-MFS). Using paired primary/metastatic samples from the same patients, we demonstrate that AF1q-positive breast cancer cells become dynamically dominant in the metastatic sites compared to the primary sites. Our findings indicate that breast cancer cells with a hyperactive AF1q/TCF7/CD44 regulatory axis in the primary sites may represent "metastatic founder cells" which have invasive properties.

  4. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome in a case of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Naofumi; Shinohara, Kenji; Ota, Ituro; Muraki, Kazuhiko; Shimohakamada, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) in adult T-cell lymphoma. A 69-year-old man suffered from cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma, which was treated with radiation to the skin and combination chemotherapy of CHOP-V-MMV and VEPA-B. After 14 months of these therapies, anemia and thrombocytopenia appeared, and bone marrow aspiration smears showed immature myeloblasts, dysplastic erythroblasts, and micromegakaryocytes. Therapy-related MDS of refractory anemia with an excess of blasts was diagnosed. Cytogenetic study of the bone marrow cells showed 5q- and additional abnormalities. Rearrangement of the MLL gene was observed in the bone marrow cells. Mutations of N-ras codons at 12,13, and 61, p53 tumor suppressor gene, and monoclonal integration of human T-lymphotrophic virus -1 provirus DNA were not observed in the bone marrow cells. The patient died of pneumonia 21 months after diagnosis of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

  5. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes

    PubMed Central

    Biankin, Andrew V.; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S.; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B.; Johns, Amber L.; Miller, David K.; Wilson, Peter J.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K.; Cowley, Mark J.; Gardiner, Brooke B.; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Gill, Anthony J.; Pinho, Andreia V.; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J. Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R. Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L.; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D.; Colvin, Emily K.; Nagrial, Adnan M.; Humphrey, Emily S.; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T.; Chantrill, Lorraine A.; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S.; Kench, James G.; Lovell, Jessica A.; Daly, Roger J.; Merrett, Neil D.; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q.; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M.; Fisher, William E.; Brunicardi, F. Charles; Hodges, Sally E.; Reid, Jeffrey G.; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R.; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J.; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E.; Yung, Christina K.; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Morgan, Richard A.; Lawlor, Rita T.; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A.; Mann, Karen M.; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Adams, David J.; Largaespada, David A.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Rust, Alistair G.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Tuveson, David A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Musgrove, Elizabeth A.; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Wheeler, David A.; Pearson, John V.; McPherson, John D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Grimmond, Sean M.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis. PMID:23103869

  6. Increased DNA methylation of Dnmt3b targets impairs leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Isabell; Rohde, Christian; Scheller-Wendorff, Marina; Bäumer, Nicole; Krause, Annika; Herbst, Friederike; Riemke, Pia; Hebestreit, Katja; Tschanter, Petra; Lin, Qiong; Linhart, Heinz; Godley, Lucy A; Glimm, Hanno; Dugas, Martin; Wagner, Wolfgang; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Rosenbauer, Frank; Müller-Tidow, Carsten

    2016-03-24

    The de novo DNA methyltransferases Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b are of crucial importance in hematopoietic stem cells. Dnmt3b has recently been shown to play a role in genic methylation. To investigate how Dnmt3b-mediated DNA methylation affects leukemogenesis, we analyzed leukemia development under conditions of high and physiological methylation levels in a tetracycline-inducible knock-in mouse model. High expression of Dnmt3b slowed leukemia development in serial transplantations and impaired leukemia stem cell (LSC) function. Forced Dnmt3b expression induced widespread DNA hypermethylation inMyc-Bcl2-induced leukemias, preferentially at gene bodies.MLL-AF9-induced leukemogenesis showed much less pronounced DNA hypermethylation upon Dnmt3b expression. Nonetheless, leukemogenesis was delayed in both models with a shared core set of DNA hypermethylated regions and suppression of stem cell-related genes. Acute myeloid leukemia patients with high expression of Dnmt3b target genes showed inferior survival. Together, these findings indicate a critical role for Dnmt3b-mediated DNA methylation in leukemia development and maintenance of LSC function.

  7. GFI1 as a novel prognostic and therapeutic factor for AML/MDS.

    PubMed

    Hönes, J M; Botezatu, L; Helness, A; Vadnais, C; Vassen, L; Robert, F; Hergenhan, S M; Thivakaran, A; Schütte, J; Al-Matary, Y S; Lams, R F; Fraszscak, J; Makishima, H; Radivoyevitch, T; Przychodzen, B; da Conceição Castro, S V; Görgens, A; Giebel, B; Klein-Hitpass, L; Lennartz, K; Heuser, M; Thiede, C; Ehninger, G; Dührsen, U; Maciejewski, J P; Möröy, T; Khandanpour, C

    2016-06-01

    Genetic and epigenetic aberrations contribute to the initiation and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). GFI1, a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor, exerts its function by recruiting histone deacetylases to target genes. We present data that low expression of GFI1 is associated with an inferior prognosis of AML patients. To elucidate the mechanism behind this, we generated a humanized mouse strain with reduced GFI1 expression (GFI1-KD). Here we show that AML development induced by onco-fusion proteins such as MLL-AF9 or NUP98-HOXD13 is accelerated in mice with low human GFI1 expression. Leukemic cells from animals that express low levels of GFI1 show increased H3K9 acetylation compared to leukemic cells from mice with normal human GFI1 expression, resulting in the upregulation of genes involved in leukemogenesis. We investigated a new epigenetic therapy approach for this subgroup of AML patients. We could show that AML blasts from GFI1-KD mice and from AML patients with low GFI1 levels were more sensitive to treatment with histone acetyltransferase inhibitors than cells with normal GFI1 expression levels. We suggest therefore that GFI1 has a dose-dependent role in AML progression and development. GFI1 levels are involved in epigenetic regulation, which could open new therapeutic approaches for AML patients.

  8. A signature motif in LIM proteins mediates binding to checkpoint proteins and increases tumour radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojie; Fan, Zhongyi; Liang, Chaoyang; Li, Ling; Wang, Lili; Liang, Yingchun; Wu, Jun; Chang, Shaohong; Yan, Zhifeng; Lv, Zhaohui; Fu, Jing; Liu, Yang; Jin, Shuai; Wang, Tao; Hong, Tian; Dong, Yishan; Ding, Lihua; Cheng, Long; Liu, Rui; Fu, Shenbo; Jiao, Shunchang; Ye, Qinong

    2017-01-01

    Tumour radiotherapy resistance involves the cell cycle pathway. CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators. However, how CDC25 activity is precisely controlled remains largely unknown. Here, we show that LIM domain-containing proteins, such as FHL1, increase inhibitory CDC25 phosphorylation by forming a complex with CHK2 and CDC25, and sequester CDC25 in the cytoplasm by forming another complex with 14-3-3 and CDC25, resulting in increased radioresistance in cancer cells. FHL1 expression, induced by ionizing irradiation in a SP1- and MLL1-dependent manner, positively correlates with radioresistance in cancer patients. We identify a cell-penetrating 11 amino-acid motif within LIM domains (eLIM) that is sufficient for binding CHK2 and CDC25, reducing the CHK2–CDC25 and CDC25–14-3-3 interaction and enhancing CDC25 activity and cancer radiosensitivity accompanied by mitotic catastrophe and apoptosis. Our results provide novel insight into molecular mechanisms underlying CDC25 activity regulation. LIM protein inhibition or use of eLIM may be new strategies for improving tumour radiosensitivity. PMID:28094252

  9. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  10. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Final report, January 1--December 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1998-03-01

    It has been clear for the last 15 years that cloning translocation breakpoints in both AML de novo and t-AML would provide the DNA probes required to determine whether the breakpoints in cytogenetically apparently similar translocations were identical at the level of DNA. Therefore the author has pursued an analysis of rearrangements in both types of leukemia simultaneously. She has also cloned and sequenced several translocations in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and in chronic lymphatic leukemia. Recently she cloned the breakpoint in a number of translocations involving chromosome bands 11q23 and 21q22. She has cloned the gene which she called MLL, that is located in 11q23 that is involved in the 6;11, 9;11, and 11;19 translocations that are seen in AML de novo as well as in t-AML. She has evidence that the breakpoint in 11q23 and in the t(9;11) is relatively similar in de novo and secondary AML. In addition, she has cloned the gene at the breakpoint in chromosome 21 in the t(3;21). These studies have provided DNA probes that will be very important for diagnosis and for monitoring the patient`s response to treatment.

  11. Hydrothermal fluids vented at shallow depths at the Aeolian islands: relationships with volcanic and geothermal systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Italiano, Francesco; Caracausi, Antonio; Longo, Manfredi; Maugeri, Roberto; Paonita, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    Scuba diving investigations carried out over the last two decades at the Aeolian islands revealed the existence of submarine magmatic and late-magmatic hydrothermalism at all the islands, despite the absence of on-shore activity at some of the islands. The results gained by diving activities provided useful information to evaluate the volcanic and geothermal activity and to manage the volcanic crisis occurred on November 2002 off the island of Panarea. Scuba diving investigations carried out from middle 80's, had shown that despite the absence of on shore volcanic manifestations, submarine hydrothermal activity is recognizable at shallow depth around all the Aeolian islands related either to volcanic and geothermal activity. The sampled gases are CO2-dominated with low amounts of oxygen and reactive gases (H2, CO, CH4 and H2S) with concentrations ranging from a few ppm to some mole percent. Sometimes significant N2 amount are detectable together with high helium contents. Samples having low CO2 content, besides relevant N2 and He amounts, are the consequence of CO2 dissolution in sea-water due to gas-water interactions (GWI) occurred before the sample collection. The high CO2 solubility (878 ml/l, T=20°C, P=1bar) may, in fact, decrease the CO2 content in the venting gases thus increasing the concentrations of the less soluble species (e.g. He 8 ml/l, CO 23 ml/l and CH4 33.8 ml/l) in the gas mixture. Such a process might occur at any level, however, because of the slow water circulation in deep sediments, CO2 is able to saturate the circulating sea-water. The isotopic composition of carbon displays a small range of values while helium isotopes are in the range of 4.1

  12. Genetic alterations of JAK/STAT cascade and histone modification in extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type

    PubMed Central

    Kang, So Young; Kim, Seok Jin; Hwang, Jinha; Lee, Seungho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Park, Kyong Soo; Yoo, Hae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type (ENKL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that more frequently occurs in East Asia and Latin America. Even though its molecular background has been discussed in the last few years, the current knowledge does not explain the disease pathogenesis in most cases of ENKL. Here, we performed multiple types of next-generation sequencing on 34 ENKL samples, including whole-exome sequencing (9 cancer tissues and 4 cancer cell lines), targeted sequencing (21 cancer tissues), and RNA sequencing (3 cancer tissues and 4 cancer cell lines). Mutations were found most frequently in 3 genes, STAT3, BCOR, and MLL2 (which were present in 9, 7, and 6 cancer samples, respectively), whereas there were only 2 cases of JAK3 mutation. In total, JAK/STAT pathway- and histone modification-related genes accounted for 55.9% and 38.2% of cancer samples, respectively, and their involvement in ENKL pathogenesis was also supported by gene expression analysis. In addition, we provided 177 genes upregulated only in cancer tissues, which appear to be linked with angiocentric and angiodestructive growth of ENKL. In this study, we propose several novel driver genes of ENKL, and show that these genes and their functional groups may be future therapeutic targets of this disease. PMID:25980440

  13. A highly sensitive spectrophotometric determination of chromium using leuco Xylene cyanol FF.

    PubMed

    Revanasiddappa, H D; Kiran Kumar, T N

    2003-05-28

    A highly sensitive and selective spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of trace amounts of chromium with leuco Xylene cynaol FF. The method is based on the oxidation of leuco Xylene cyanol FF (LXCFF) to its blue form of Xylene cyanol FF by chromium(VI) in sulphuric acid medium (pH 1.2-2.4), the absorbance of the formed dye is measured in an acetate buffer medium (pH 3.0-4.6) at 615 nm. The method obeys Beer's law in the concentration range of 0.05-0.45 mug ml(-l) chromium, having molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity of 8.23x10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-l) and 0.00063 mug cm(-2), respectively. All the variables were studied in order to optimise the reaction conditions. The developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of chromium in steels, pharmaceutical samples, industrial effluents, natural water, and soil.

  14. Highly Stable Wideband Microwave Extraction by Synchronizing Widely Tunable Optoelectronic Osci