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Sample records for mll mixed lineage

  1. WDR5 Intearcts with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein via the Histone H3-binding Pocket

    SciTech Connect

    Song, J.; Kingston, R

    2008-01-01

    WDR5 is a component of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) complex, which methylates lysine 4 of histone H3, and was identified as a methylated Lys-4 histone H3-binding protein. Here, we present a crystal structure of WDR5 bound to an MLL peptide. Surprisingly, we find that WDR5 utilizes the same pocket shown to bind histone H3 for this MLL interaction. Furthermore, the WDR5-MLL interaction is disrupted preferentially by mono- and di-methylated Lys-4 histone H3 over unmodified and tri-methylated Lys-4 histone H3. These data implicate a delicate interplay between the effector, WDR5, the catalytic subunit, MLL, and the substrate, histone H3, of the MLL complex. We suggest that the activity of the MLL complex might be regulated through this interplay.

  2. Photoperiod Influences Growth and mll (Mixed-Lineage Leukaemia) Expression in Atlantic Cod

    PubMed Central

    Nagasawa, Kazue; Giannetto, Alessia; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2012-01-01

    Photoperiod is associated to phenotypic plasticity of somatic growth in several teleost species. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are currently unknown but it is likely that epigenetic regulation by methyltransferases is involved. The MLL (mixed-lineage leukaemia) family comprises histone methyltransferases that play a critical role in regulating gene expression during early development in mammals. So far, these genes have received scant attention in teleost fish. In the present study, the mean weight of Atlantic cod juveniles reared under continuous illumination was found to be 13% greater than those kept under natural photoperiod conditions for 120 days. We newly determined cDNA sequences of five mll (mll1, mll2, mll3a, mll4b and mll5) and two setd1 (setd1a and setd1ba) paralogues from Atlantic cod. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the cod genes clustered within the appropriate mll clade and comparative mapping of mll paralogues showed that these genes lie within a region of conserved synteny among teleosts. All mll and setd1 genes were highly expressed in gonads and fast muscle of adult cod, albeit at different levels, and they were differentially regulated with photoperiod in muscle of juvenile fish. Following only one day of exposure to constant light, mll1, mll4b and setd1a were up to 57% lower in these fish compared to the natural photoperiod group. In addition, mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors (myog and myf-5) and pax7 in fast muscle was also affected by different photoperiod conditions. Notably, myog was significantly elevated in the continuous illumination group throughout the time course of the experiment. The absence of a day/night cycle is associated with a generalised decrease in mll expression concomitant with an increase in myog transcript levels in fast muscle of Atlantic cod, which may be involved in the observed epigenetic regulation of growth by photoperiod in this species. PMID:22590633

  3. Photoperiod influences growth and mll (mixed-lineage leukaemia) expression in Atlantic cod.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kazue; Giannetto, Alessia; Fernandes, Jorge M O

    2012-01-01

    Photoperiod is associated to phenotypic plasticity of somatic growth in several teleost species. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are currently unknown but it is likely that epigenetic regulation by methyltransferases is involved. The MLL (mixed-lineage leukaemia) family comprises histone methyltransferases that play a critical role in regulating gene expression during early development in mammals. So far, these genes have received scant attention in teleost fish. In the present study, the mean weight of Atlantic cod juveniles reared under continuous illumination was found to be 13% greater than those kept under natural photoperiod conditions for 120 days. We newly determined cDNA sequences of five mll (mll1, mll2, mll3a, mll4b and mll5) and two setd1 (setd1a and setd1ba) paralogues from Atlantic cod. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the cod genes clustered within the appropriate mll clade and comparative mapping of mll paralogues showed that these genes lie within a region of conserved synteny among teleosts. All mll and setd1 genes were highly expressed in gonads and fast muscle of adult cod, albeit at different levels, and they were differentially regulated with photoperiod in muscle of juvenile fish. Following only one day of exposure to constant light, mll1, mll4b and setd1a were up to 57% lower in these fish compared to the natural photoperiod group. In addition, mRNA expression of myogenic regulatory factors (myog and myf-5) and pax7 in fast muscle was also affected by different photoperiod conditions. Notably, myog was significantly elevated in the continuous illumination group throughout the time course of the experiment. The absence of a day/night cycle is associated with a generalised decrease in mll expression concomitant with an increase in myog transcript levels in fast muscle of Atlantic cod, which may be involved in the observed epigenetic regulation of growth by photoperiod in this species. PMID:22590633

  4. Crystal Structure of Menin Reveals Binding Site for Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Reddy, Gireesh; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2014-10-02

    Menin is a tumor suppressor protein that is encoded by the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia 1) gene and controls cell growth in endocrine tissues. Importantly, menin also serves as a critical oncogenic cofactor of MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) fusion proteins in acute leukemias. Direct association of menin with MLL fusion proteins is required for MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemogenesis in vivo, and this interaction has been validated as a new potential therapeutic target for development of novel anti-leukemia agents. Here, we report the first crystal structure of menin homolog from Nematostella vectensis. Due to a very high sequence similarity, the Nematostella menin is a close homolog of human menin, and these two proteins likely have very similar structures. Menin is predominantly an {alpha}-helical protein with the protein core comprising three tetratricopeptide motifs that are flanked by two {alpha}-helical bundles and covered by a {beta}-sheet motif. A very interesting feature of menin structure is the presence of a large central cavity that is highly conserved between Nematostella and human menin. By employing site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that this cavity constitutes the binding site for MLL. Our data provide a structural basis for understanding the role of menin as a tumor suppressor protein and as an oncogenic co-factor of MLL fusion proteins. It also provides essential structural information for development of inhibitors targeting the menin-MLL interaction as a novel therapeutic strategy in MLL-related leukemias.

  5. Mixed Lineage Leukemia 5 (MLL5) Protein Stability Is Cooperatively Regulated by O-GlcNac Transferase (OGT) and Ubiquitin Specific Protease 7 (USP7)

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiaodan; Jiang, Wei; Zhou, Peipei; Liu, Lulu; Wan, Xiaoling; Yuan, Xiujie; Wang, Xizi; Chen, Miao; Chen, Jun; Yang, Jing; Kong, Chao; Li, Bin; Peng, Chao; Wong, Catherine C. L.; Hou, Fajian; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) protein is a trithorax family histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase that regulates diverse biological processes, including cell cycle progression, hematopoiesis and cancer. The mechanisms by which MLL5 protein stability is regulated have remained unclear to date. Here, we showed that MLL5 protein stability is cooperatively regulated by O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) and ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7). Depletion of OGT in cells led to a decrease in the MLL5 protein level through ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent proteolytic degradation, whereas ectopic expression of OGT protein suppressed MLL5 ubiquitylation. We further identified deubiquitinase USP7 as a novel MLL5-associated protein using mass spectrometry. USP7 stabilized the MLL5 protein through direct binding and deubiquitylation. Loss of USP7 induced degradation of MLL5 protein. Conversely, overexpression of USP7, but not a catalytically inactive USP7 mutant, led to decreased ubiquitylation and increased MLL5 stability. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunostaining assays revealed that MLL5, OGT and USP7 interact with each other to form a stable ternary complex that is predominantly located in the nucleus. In addition, upregulation of MLL5 expression was correlated with increased expression of OGT and USP7 in human primary cervical adenocarcinomas. Our results collectively reveal a novel molecular mechanism underlying regulation of MLL5 protein stability and provide new insights into the functional interplay among O-GlcNAc transferase, deubiquitinase and histone methyltransferase. PMID:26678539

  6. Unique Role of the WD-40 Repeat Protein 5 (WDR5) Subunit within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia 3 (MLL3) Histone Methyltransferase Complex.

    PubMed

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2015-10-23

    The MLL3 (mixed lineage leukemia 3) protein is a member of the human SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferases and contains the conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif and the catalytic suppressor of variegation, enhancer of zeste, trithorax (SET) domain. The human SET1 family includes MLL1-4 and SETd1A/B, which all interact with a conserved subcomplex containing WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD) to form the minimal core complex required for full methyltransferase activity. However, recent evidence suggests that the WDR5 subunit may not be utilized in an identical manner within all SET1 family core complexes. Although the roles of WDR5 within the MLL1 core complex have been extensively studied, not much is known about the roles of WDR5 in other SET1 family core complexes. In this investigation, we set out to characterize the roles of the WDR5 subunit in the MLL3 core complex. We found that unlike MLL1, the MLL3 SET domain assembles with the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer independently of the Win motif-WDR5 interaction. Furthermore, we observed that WDR5 inhibits the monomethylation activity of the MLL3 core complex, which is dependent on the Win motif. We also found evidence suggesting that the WRAD subcomplex catalyzes weak H3K4 monomethylation within the context of the MLL3 core complex. Furthermore, solution structures of the MLL3 core complex assembled with and without WDR5 by small angle x-ray scattering show similar overall topologies. Together, this work demonstrates a unique role for WDR5 in modulating the enzymatic activity of the MLL3 core complex. PMID:26324722

  7. Unique Role of the WD-40 Repeat Protein 5 (WDR5) Subunit within the Mixed Lineage Leukemia 3 (MLL3) Histone Methyltransferase Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Shinsky, Stephen A.; Cosgrove, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The MLL3 (mixed lineage leukemia 3) protein is a member of the human SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferases and contains the conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif and the catalytic suppressor of variegation, enhancer of zeste, trithorax (SET) domain. The human SET1 family includes MLL1–4 and SETd1A/B, which all interact with a conserved subcomplex containing WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD) to form the minimal core complex required for full methyltransferase activity. However, recent evidence suggests that the WDR5 subunit may not be utilized in an identical manner within all SET1 family core complexes. Although the roles of WDR5 within the MLL1 core complex have been extensively studied, not much is known about the roles of WDR5 in other SET1 family core complexes. In this investigation, we set out to characterize the roles of the WDR5 subunit in the MLL3 core complex. We found that unlike MLL1, the MLL3 SET domain assembles with the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer independently of the Win motif-WDR5 interaction. Furthermore, we observed that WDR5 inhibits the monomethylation activity of the MLL3 core complex, which is dependent on the Win motif. We also found evidence suggesting that the WRAD subcomplex catalyzes weak H3K4 monomethylation within the context of the MLL3 core complex. Furthermore, solution structures of the MLL3 core complex assembled with and without WDR5 by small angle x-ray scattering show similar overall topologies. Together, this work demonstrates a unique role for WDR5 in modulating the enzymatic activity of the MLL3 core complex. PMID:26324722

  8. High-Affinity Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Menin-Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Interaction Closely Mimic a Natural Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    He, Shihan; Senter, Timothy J.; Pollock, Jonathan; Han, Changho; Upadhyay, Sunil Kumar; Purohit, Trupta; Gogliotti, Rocco D.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Stauffer, Shaun R.; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2014-10-02

    The protein–protein interaction (PPI) between menin and mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) plays a critical role in acute leukemias, and inhibition of this interaction represents a new potential therapeutic strategy for MLL leukemias. We report development of a novel class of small-molecule inhibitors of the menin–MLL interaction, the hydroxy- and aminomethylpiperidine compounds, which originated from HTS of ~288000 small molecules. We determined menin–inhibitor co-crystal structures and found that these compounds closely mimic all key interactions of MLL with menin. Extensive crystallography studies combined with structure-based design were applied for optimization of these compounds, resulting in MIV-6R, which inhibits the menin–MLL interaction with IC50 = 56 nM. Treatment with MIV-6 demonstrated strong and selective effects in MLL leukemia cells, validating specific mechanism of action. Our studies provide novel and attractive scaffold as a new potential therapeutic approach for MLL leukemias and demonstrate an example of PPI amenable to inhibition by small molecules.

  9. Acute mixed-lineage leukemia t(4;11)(q21;q23) generates an MLL-AF4 fusion product.

    PubMed Central

    Domer, P H; Fakharzadeh, S S; Chen, C S; Jockel, J; Johansen, L; Silverman, G A; Kersey, J H; Korsmeyer, S J

    1993-01-01

    A chromosomal translocation, t(4;11)-(q21;q23), is associated with an aggressive mixed-lineage leukemia. A yeast artificial chromosome was used to clone the chromosomal breakpoint of this translocation in the RS4;11 cell line. The breakpoint sequences revealed an inverted repeat bordered by a consensus site for topoisomerase II binding and cleavage as well as chi-like elements. The der(11) chromosome encodes a fusion RNA and predicted chimeric protein between the 11q23 gene MLL and a 4q21 gene designated AF4. The sequence of the complete open reading frame for this fusion transcript reveals the MLL protein to have homology with DNA methyltransferase, the Drosophila trithorax gene product, and the "AT-hook" motif of high-mobility-group proteins. An alternative splice that deletes the AT-hook region of MLL was identified. AF4 is a serine- and proline-rich putative transcription factor with a glutamine-rich carboxyl terminus. The composition of the complete MLL-AF4 fusion product argues that it may act through either a gain-of-function or a dominant negative mechanism in leukemogenesis. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7689231

  10. Prognostic Significance of Mixed-Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Gene Detected by Real-Time Fluorescence Quantitative PCR Assay in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sai; Yang, Hua; Li, Yan; Feng, Cong; Gao, Li; Chen, Guo-feng; Gao, Hong-hao; Huang, Zhi; Li, Yong-hui; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background The overall prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene-positivity is unfavorable. In this study, we evaluated the expression levels of the MLL gene in AML patients. Material/Methods We enrolled 68 MLL gene-positive patients out of 433 newly diagnosed AML patients, and 216 bone marrow samples were collected. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) was used to precisely detect the expression levels of the MLL gene. Results We divided 41 patients into 2 groups according to the variation of MRD (minimal residual disease) level of the MLL gene. Group 1 (n=22) had a rapid reduction of MRD level to ≤10−4 in all samples collected in the first 3 chemotherapy cycles, while group 2 (n=19) had MRD levels constantly >10−4 in all samples collected in the first 3 chemotherapy cycles. Group 1 had a significantly better overall survival (p=0.001) and event-free survival (p=0.001) compared to group 2. Moreover, the patients with >10−4 MRD level before the start of HSCT (hematopoietic stem cell transplantation) had worse prognosis and higher risk of relapse compared to patients with ≤10−4 before the start of HSCT. Conclusions We found that a rapid reduction of MRD level to ≤10−4 appears to be a prerequisite for better overall survival and event-free survival during the treatment of AML. The MRD levels detected by RQ-PCR were basically in line with the clinical outcome and may be of great importance in guiding early allogeneic HSCT (allo-HSCT) treatment. PMID:27561414

  11. The Superiority of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Over Chemotherapy Alone in the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients with Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Huang, Sai; Zhu, Cheng-Ying; Gao, Li; Zhu, Hai-Yan; Lv, Na; Jing, Yu; Yu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene rearrangements always had a very poor prognosis. In this study, we report the incidence of MLL rearrangements in AML patients using gene analysis, as well as the clinical significance and prognostic features of these rearrangements. Material/Methods This retrospective study took place from April 2008 to November 2011 in the People’s Liberation Army General Hospital. A total 433 AML patients were screened by multiple nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to determine the incidence of the 11 MLL gene rearrangements. There were 68 cases of MLL gene rearrangements, for a positive rate of 15.7%. A total of 24 patients underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Allo-HSCT), and 34 patients received at least 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten patients were lost to follow-up. Results The median follow-up was 29 months. The complete remission (CR) rate was 85.4%. The overall survival (OS) was 57.4±5.9 months for the Allo-HSCT group and 21.0±2.1 months for the chemotherapy group. The Allo-HSCT group had superior survival compared with the chemotherapy group (5-year OS: 59±17% vs. 13±8%, P<0.01; 5-year disease-free survival [DFS]: 65±10% vs. 40±16%, P>0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that transplantation, platelets >50×109/L at onset, and CR are associated with a better OS in MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients with thrombocytopenia and extramedullary involvement were prone to relapse. Conclusions Our results suggest that Allo-HSCT is superior to chemotherapy alone for treating MLL rearranged AML patients. Patients treated with Allo-HSCT have a better prognosis and a longer survival. CR is an independent prognostic factor for OS, and extramedullary involvement is an independent prognostic factor for DFS. MLL rearranged AML patients with thrombocytopenia at onset <50×109 had very bad OS and DFS. PMID:27373985

  12. Structure-Based Optimization of a Small Molecule Antagonist of the Interaction Between WD Repeat-Containing Protein 5 (WDR5) and Mixed-Lineage Leukemia 1 (MLL1).

    PubMed

    Getlik, Matthäus; Smil, David; Zepeda-Velázquez, Carlos; Bolshan, Yuri; Poda, Gennady; Wu, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Marcellus, Richard; Senisterra, Guillermo; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Hajian, Taraneh; Kiyota, Taira; Schapira, Matthieu; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Brown, Peter J; Vedadi, Masoud; Al-Awar, Rima

    2016-03-24

    WD repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5) is an important component of the multiprotein complex essential for activating mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1). Rearrangement of the MLL1 gene is associated with onset and progression of acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemias, and targeting the WDR5-MLL1 interaction may result in new cancer therapeutics. Our previous work showed that binding of small molecule ligands to WDR5 can modulate its interaction with MLL1, suppressing MLL1 methyltransferase activity. Initial structure-activity relationship studies identified N-(2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-substituted-phenyl) benzamides as potent and selective antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. Guided by crystal structure data and supported by in silico library design, we optimized the scaffold by varying the C-1 benzamide and C-5 substituents. This allowed us to develop the first highly potent (Kdisp < 100 nM) small molecule antagonists of the WDR5-MLL1 interaction and demonstrate that N-(4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-3'-(morpholinomethyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl)-6-oxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1,6-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide 16d (OICR-9429) is a potent and selective chemical probe suitable to help dissect the biological role of WDR5. PMID:26958703

  13. Structure-Based Optimization of a Small Molecule Antagonist of the Interaction Between WD Repeat-Containing Protein 5 (WDR5) and Mixed-Lineage Leukemia 1 (MLL1).

    PubMed

    Getlik, Matthäus; Smil, David; Zepeda-Velázquez, Carlos; Bolshan, Yuri; Poda, Gennady; Wu, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Marcellus, Richard; Senisterra, Guillermo; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Hajian, Taraneh; Kiyota, Taira; Schapira, Matthieu; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Brown, Peter J; Vedadi, Masoud; Al-Awar, Rima

    2016-03-24

    WD repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5) is an important component of the multiprotein complex essential for activating mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1). Rearrangement of the MLL1 gene is associated with onset and progression of acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemias, and targeting the WDR5-MLL1 interaction may result in new cancer therapeutics. Our previous work showed that binding of small molecule ligands to WDR5 can modulate its interaction with MLL1, suppressing MLL1 methyltransferase activity. Initial structure-activity relationship studies identified N-(2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-substituted-phenyl) benzamides as potent and selective antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. Guided by crystal structure data and supported by in silico library design, we optimized the scaffold by varying the C-1 benzamide and C-5 substituents. This allowed us to develop the first highly potent (Kdisp < 100 nM) small molecule antagonists of the WDR5-MLL1 interaction and demonstrate that N-(4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-3'-(morpholinomethyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl)-6-oxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1,6-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide 16d (OICR-9429) is a potent and selective chemical probe suitable to help dissect the biological role of WDR5.

  14. Targeting recruitment of disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like (DOT1L): characterizing the interactions between DOT1L and mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenxi; Jo, Stephanie Y; Liao, Chenzhong; Hess, Jay L; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta

    2013-10-18

    The MLL fusion proteins, AF9 and ENL, activate target genes in part via recruitment of the histone methyltransferase DOT1L (disruptor of telomeric silencing 1-like). Here we report biochemical, biophysical, and functional characterization of the interaction between DOT1L and MLL fusion proteins, AF9/ENL. The AF9/ENL-binding site in human DOT1L was mapped, and the interaction site was identified to a 10-amino acid region (DOT1L865-874). This region is highly conserved in DOT1L from a variety of species. Alanine scanning mutagenesis analysis shows that four conserved hydrophobic residues from the identified binding motif are essential for the interactions with AF9/ENL. Binding studies demonstrate that the entire intact C-terminal domain of AF9/ENL is required for optimal interaction with DOT1L. Functional studies show that the mapped AF9/ENL interacting site is essential for immortalization by MLL-AF9, indicating that DOT1L interaction with MLL-AF9 and its recruitment are required for transformation by MLL-AF9. These results strongly suggest that disruption of interaction between DOT1L and AF9/ENL is a promising therapeutic strategy with potentially fewer adverse effects than enzymatic inhibition of DOT1L for MLL fusion protein-associated leukemia.

  15. Menin-MLL inhibitors reverse oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Grembecka, Jolanta; He, Shihan; Shi, Aibin; Purohit, Trupta; Muntean, Andrew G; Sorenson, Roderick J; Showalter, Hollis D; Murai, Marcelo J; Belcher, Amalia M; Hartley, Thomas; Hess, Jay L; Cierpicki, Tomasz

    2012-03-01

    Translocations involving the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene result in human acute leukemias with very poor prognosis. The leukemogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins is critically dependent on their direct interaction with menin, a product of the multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN1) gene. Here we present what are to our knowledge the first small-molecule inhibitors of the menin-MLL fusion protein interaction that specifically bind menin with nanomolar affinities. These compounds effectively reverse MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemic transformation by downregulating the expression of target genes required for MLL fusion protein oncogenic activity. They also selectively block proliferation and induce both apoptosis and differentiation of leukemia cells harboring MLL translocations. Identification of these compounds provides a new tool for better understanding MLL-mediated leukemogenesis and represents a new approach for studying the role of menin as an oncogenic cofactor of MLL fusion proteins. Our findings also highlight a new therapeutic strategy for aggressive leukemias with MLL rearrangements.

  16. Acute leukemias of different lineages have similar MLL gene fusions encoding related chimeric proteins resulting from chromosomal translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Corral, J.; Forster, A.; Thompson, S.; Rabbitts, T.H. ); Lampert, F. ); Kaneko, Y. ); Slater, R.; Kroes, W.G. ); Van Der Schoot, C.E. ); Ludwig, W.D. ); Karpas, A. ); Pocock, C.; Cotter, F. )

    1993-09-15

    The MLL gene, on human chromosome 11q23, undergoes chromosomal translocation in acute leukemias, resulting in gene fusion with AF4 (chromosome 4) and ENL (chromosome 19). The authors report here translocation of MLL with nine different chromosomes and two paracentric chromosome 11 deletions in early B cell, B- or T-cell lineage, or nonlymphocytic acute leukemias. The mRNA translocation junction from 22t(4;11) patients, including six adult leukemias, and nine t(11;19) tumors reveals a remarkable conservation of breakpoints within MLL, AF4, or ENL genes, irrespective of tumor phenotype. Typically, the breakpoints are upstream of the zinc-finger region of MLL, and deletion of this region can accompany translocation, supporting the der(11) chromosome as the important component in leukemogenesis. Partial sequence of a fusion between MLL and the AFX1 gene from chromosome X shows the latter to be rich in Ser/Pro codons, like the ENL mRNA. These data suggest that the heterogeneous 11q23 abnormalities might cause attachment of Ser/Pro-rich segments to the NH[sub 2] terminus of MLL, lacking the zinc-finger region, and that translocation occurs in early hematopoietic cells, before commitment to distinct lineages. 36 refs., 2 figs.

  17. MicroRNA-205 downregulates mixed-lineage-AF4 oncogene expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Liping; Li, Jingxin; Zheng, Dehua; Li, Yonghui; Gao, Xiaoning; Xu, Chengwang; Gao, Li; Wang, Lili; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid/lymphoid or mixed-lineage AF4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (MLL-AF4 ALL) is a pediatric leukemia that occurs rarely in adults. MLL-AF4 ALL is typically characterized by the presence of chromosomal translocation (t(4;1l)(q21;q23)), leading to expression of MLL-AF4 fusion protein. Although MLL-AF4 fusion protein triggers a molecular pathogenesis and hematological presentations that are unique to leukemias, the precise role of this oncogene in leukemogenesis remains unclear. Previous studies have indicated that microRNAs (miRs) might modulate the expression of MLL-AF4 ALL fusion protein, thereby suggesting the involvement of miR in progression or suppression of MLL-AF4 ALL. We have previously demonstrated that miR-205 negatively regulates transcription of an MLL-AF4 luciferase reporter. Here, we report that exogenous expression of miR-205 in MLL-AF4 human cell lines (RS4;11 and MV4-11) inversely regulates the expression of MLL-AF4 at both messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein level. Furthermore, miR-205 significantly induced apoptosis in MLL-AF4 cells as evidenced by Annex in V staining using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. The proliferative capacity of leukemic cells was suppressed by miR-205. The addition of an miR-205 inhibitor was able to restore the observed effects. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that miR-205 may have potential value as a novel therapeutic agent in the treatment of MLL-AF4 ALL. PMID:24009426

  18. Structure of WDR5 bound to Mixed Lineage Leukemia protein-1 peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, A.; Dharmarajan, V; Cosgrove, M

    2008-01-01

    The mixed lineage leukemia protein-1 (MLL1) catalyzes histone H3 lysine 4 methylation and is regulated by interaction with WDR5 (WD-repeat protein-5), RbBP5 (retinoblastoma-binding protein-5), and the Ash2L (absent, small, homeotic discs-2-like) oncoprotein. In the accompanying investigation, we describe the identification of a conserved arginine containing motif, called the 'Win' or WDR5 interaction motif, that is essential for the assembly and H3K4 dimethylation activity of the MLL1 core complex. Here we present a 1.7-A crystal structure of WDR5 bound to a peptide derived from the MLL1 Win motif. Our results show that Arg-3765 of MLL1 is bound in the same arginine binding pocket on WDR5 that was previously suggested to bind histone H3. Thermodynamic binding experiments show that the MLL1 Win peptide is preferentially recognized by WDR5. These results are consistent with a model in which WDR5 recognizes Arg-3765 of MLL1, which is essential for the assembly and enzymatic activity of the MLL1 core complex.

  19. The many facets of MLL1 regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pamela; Bergamin, Elisa; Couture, Jean-François

    2013-02-01

    In the last 20 years, we have witnessed an exponential number of evidences linking the human mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) gene to several acute and myelogenous leukemias. MLL1 is one of the founding members of the SET1 family of lysine methyltransferases and is key for the proper control of developmentally regulated gene expression. MLL1 is a structurally complex protein composed of several functional domains. These domains play pivotal roles for the recruitment of regulatory proteins. These MLL1 regulatory proteins (MRPs) dynamically interact with MLL1 and consequently control gene expression. In this review, we summarize recent structural and functional studies of MRPs and discuss emergent structural paradigms for the control of MLL1 activity. PMID:23175388

  20. HoxBlinc RNA Recruits Set1/MLL Complexes to Activate Hox Gene Expression Patterns and Mesoderm Lineage Development.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Naohiro; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1(+) mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulation of hoxb pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated knockdown or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1(+) precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1(+) precursors and differentiation of Flk1(+) cells into hematopoietic lineages.

  1. HoxBlinc RNA Recruits Set1/MLL Complexes to Activate Hox Gene Expression Patterns and Mesoderm Lineage Development.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Naohiro; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2016-01-01

    Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1(+) mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulation of hoxb pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated knockdown or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1(+) precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1(+) precursors and differentiation of Flk1(+) cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  2. HoxBlinc RNA recruits Set1/MLL complexes to activate Hox gene expression patterns and mesoderm lineage development

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Zhou, Lei; Cho, Joonseok; Patel, Bhavita; Terada, Nao; Li, Yangqiu; Bungert, Jörg; Qiu, Yi; Huang, Suming

    2015-01-01

    Summary Trithorax proteins and long-intergenic noncoding RNAs are critical regulators of embryonic stem cell pluripotency; however, how they cooperatively regulate germ layer mesoderm specification remains elusive. We report here that HoxBlinc RNA first specifies Flk1+ mesoderm and then promotes hematopoietic differentiation through regulating hoxb gene pathways. HoxBlinc binds to the hoxb genes, recruits Setd1a/MLL1 complexes, and mediates long-range chromatin interactions to activate transcription of the hoxb genes. Depletion of HoxBlinc by shRNA-mediated KD or CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genetic deletion inhibits expression of hoxb genes and other factors regulating cardiac/hematopoietic differentiation. Reduced hoxb gene expression is accompanied by decreased recruitment of Set1/MLL1 and H3K4me3 modification, as well as by reduced chromatin loop formation. Re-expression of hoxb2-b4 genes in HoxBlinc-depleted embryoid bodies rescues Flk1+ precursors that undergo hematopoietic differentiation. Thus, HoxBlinc plays an important role in controlling hoxb transcription networks that mediate specification of mesoderm-derived Flk1+ precursors and differentiation of Flk1+ cells into hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26725110

  3. Aven recognition of RNA G-quadruplexes regulates translation of the mixed lineage leukemia protooncogenes.

    PubMed

    Thandapani, Palaniraja; Song, Jingwen; Gandin, Valentina; Cai, Yutian; Rouleau, Samuel G; Garant, Jean-Michel; Boisvert, Francois-Michel; Yu, Zhenbao; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Topisirovic, Ivan; Richard, Stéphane

    2015-08-12

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are extremely stable secondary structures forming stacks of guanine tetrads. DNA G4 structures have been extensively studied, however, less is known about G4 motifs in mRNAs, especially in their coding sequences. Herein, we show that Aven stimulates the mRNA translation of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) proto-oncogene in an arginine methylation-dependent manner. The Aven RGG/RG motif bound G4 structures within the coding regions of the MLL1 and MLL4 mRNAs increasing their polysomal association and translation, resulting in the induction of transcription of leukemic genes. The DHX36 RNA helicase associated with the Aven complex and was required for optimal translation of G4 mRNAs. Depletion of Aven led to a decrease in synthesis of MLL1 and MLL4 proteins resulting in reduced proliferation of leukemic cells. These findings identify an Aven-centered complex that stimulates the translation of G4 harboring mRNAs, thereby promoting survival of leukemic cells.

  4. Aven recognition of RNA G-quadruplexes regulates translation of the mixed lineage leukemia protooncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Thandapani, Palaniraja; Song, Jingwen; Gandin, Valentina; Cai, Yutian; Rouleau, Samuel G; Garant, Jean-Michel; Boisvert, Francois-Michel; Yu, Zhenbao; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Topisirovic, Ivan; Richard, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes (G4) are extremely stable secondary structures forming stacks of guanine tetrads. DNA G4 structures have been extensively studied, however, less is known about G4 motifs in mRNAs, especially in their coding sequences. Herein, we show that Aven stimulates the mRNA translation of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) proto-oncogene in an arginine methylation-dependent manner. The Aven RGG/RG motif bound G4 structures within the coding regions of the MLL1 and MLL4 mRNAs increasing their polysomal association and translation, resulting in the induction of transcription of leukemic genes. The DHX36 RNA helicase associated with the Aven complex and was required for optimal translation of G4 mRNAs. Depletion of Aven led to a decrease in synthesis of MLL1 and MLL4 proteins resulting in reduced proliferation of leukemic cells. These findings identify an Aven-centered complex that stimulates the translation of G4 harboring mRNAs, thereby promoting survival of leukemic cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06234.001 PMID:26267306

  5. MLL2 is essential for porcine embryo development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Hui; Liang, Shuang; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Cui, Xiang-Shun

    2016-06-01

    Several germ cell-specific transcription factors essential for ovarian formation and folliculogenesis have been identified and studied. However, their function during early embryo development has been poorly explored. In this study, we investigated the role of mixed-lineage leukemia protein 2 (MLL2) in the development of porcine preimplantation embryos. To explore the function of MLL2 in porcine embryo development, expression and localization of MLL2 were assessed by qRT-PCR and immunofluorescence assays. Results showed that expression of MLL2 was significantly reduced after the four-cell stage. However, immunofluorescence results showed that MLL2 only localized in the nucleus of blastocysts, revealing a potential role of MLL2 in regulating the gene expression in the blastocyst stage. Knockdown of Mll2 by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) caused a reduction in MLL2 signal in porcine blastocyst cells and in blastocyst formation. No significant differences in the cleavage and morula stages were observed. The mechanism of MLL2 regulation in blastocysts was assessed by assaying the trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 4 (H3K4m3). MLL2 knockdown significantly reduced H3K4m3 in the nucleus and further reduced expression of Sox2 and Magoh genes. In conclusion, MLL2 is essential for porcine embryo development by the regulation of methylation of H3K4 in vitro. PMID:27059328

  6. The cancer COMPASS: navigating the functions of MLL complexes in cancer.

    PubMed

    Ford, David J; Dingwall, Andrew K

    2015-05-01

    The mixed-lineage leukemia family of histone methyltransferases (MLL1-4, or KMT2A-D) were previously linked to cancer through the founding member, MLL1/KMT2A, which is often involved in translocation-associated gene fusion events in childhood leukemias. However, in recent years, a multitude of tumor exome sequencing studies have revealed that orthologues MLL3/KMT2C and MLL2/KMT2D are mutated in a significant percentage of a large variety of malignancies, particularly solid tumors. These unexpected findings necessitate a deeper inspection into the activities and functional differences between the MLL/KMT2 family members. This review provides an overview of this protein family and its relation to cancers, focusing on the recent links between MLL3/KMT2C and MLL2/4/KMT2D and their potential roles as tumor suppressors in an assortment of cell types. PMID:25794446

  7. MLL-SEPTIN gene fusions in hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Cerveira, Nuno; Bizarro, Susana; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2011-08-01

    The mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) locus is involved in more than 60 different rearrangements with a remarkably diverse group of fusion partners in approximately 10% of human leukemias. MLL rearrangements include chromosomal translocations, gene internal duplications, chromosome 11q deletions or inversions and MLL gene insertions into other chromosomes, or vice versa. MLL fusion partners can be classified into four distinct categories: nuclear proteins, cytoplasmatic proteins, histone acetyltransferases and septins. Five different septin genes (SEPT2, SEPT5, SEPT6, SEPT9, and SEPT11) have been identified as MLL fusion partners, giving rise to chimeric fusion proteins in which the N terminus of MLL is fused, in frame, to almost the entire open reading frame of the septin partner gene. The rearranged alleles result from heterogeneous breaks in distinct introns of both MLL and its septin fusion partner, originating distinct gene fusion variants. MLL-SEPTIN rearrangements have been repeatedly identified in de novo and therapy related myeloid neoplasia in both children and adults, and some clinicopathogenetic associations are being uncovered. The fundamental roles of septins in cytokinesis, membrane remodeling and compartmentalization can provide some clues on how abnormalities in the septin cytoskeleton and MLL deregulation could be involved in the pathogenesis of hematological malignancies. PMID:21714766

  8. Mixed lineage leukaemia histone methylases 1 collaborate with ERα to regulate HOXA10 expression in AML

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jie; Fang, Li-Chao; Yang, Zai-Lin; Huang, Hui; Li, Yan; Deng, Jun; Zheng, Junsong

    2014-01-01

    HOXA10, a homeobox-containing gene involved in definitive haematopoiesis, which implicated in the pathogenesis of AML (acute myeloid leukaemia), has been studied extensively. But the regulatory mechanism that drives HOXA10 expression is still unclear. In the present paper, HOXA10 regulated by MLL1 (mixed lineage leukaemia histone methylase 1) with an epigenetic way has been demonstrated. The HOXA10 promoter contains several EREs (oestrogen response elements), including ERE1 and ERE2, which are close to the transcription start site, and are associated with E2-mediated activation of HOXA10. It has been shown that knockdown of the ERα (oestrogen receptor α) suppresses E2-mediated activation of HOXA10. Similarly, knockdown of MLL1 suppresses activation of HOXA10 and is bound to the ERE of HOXA10 promoter in an E2-dependent manner by forming complex with ERα. Knockdown of ERα affects the E2-dependent binding of MLL1 into HOXA10 EREs, suggesting critical roles of ERα in recruiting MLL on the HOXA10 promoter. More interestingly, the methylation status of histone protein H3K4 (H3 at lysine 4) with E2 is much higher than without E2 treatment in leukaemia cell. On the contrary, the methylation status of HOXA10 promoter with E2 treatment is much lower, which elevate the HOXA10 expression. Moreover, with ERα knockdown, the H3K4 methylation level is also decrease in myeloid cell. Overall, it has been clearly demonstrated that HOXA10 is transcriptionally regulated by MLL1, which, in coordination with ERα, plays a critical role in this process with epigenetic way and suggests a potential anti-E2 treatment of AML. PMID:25307539

  9. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (∼90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements. PMID:23628958

  10. MLL repression domain interacts with histone deacetylases, the polycomb group proteins HPC2 and BMI-1, and the corepressor C-terminal-binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhen-Biao; Anderson, Melanie; Diaz, Manuel O.; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.

    2003-01-01

    The MLL (mixed-lineage leukemia) gene is involved in many chromosomal translocations associated with acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. We previously identified a transcriptional repression domain in MLL, which contains a region with homology to DNA methyltransferase. In chromosomal translocations, the MLL repression domain is retained in the leukemogenic fusion protein and is required for transforming activity of MLL fusion proteins. We explored the mechanism of action of the MLL repression domain. Histone deacetylase 1 interacts with the MLL repression domain, partially mediating its activity; binding of Cyp33 to the adjacent MLL-PHD domain potentiates this binding. Because the MLL repression domain activity was only partially relieved with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, we explored other protein interactions with this domain. Polycomb group proteins HPC2 and BMI-1 and the corepressor C-terminal-binding protein also bind the MLL repression domain. Expression of exogenous BMI-1 potentiates MLL repression domain activity. Functional antagonism between Mll and Bmi-1 has been shown genetically in murine knockout models for Mll and Bmi-1. Our new data suggest a model whereby recruitment of BMI-1 to the MLL protein may be able to modulate its function. Furthermore, repression mediated by histone deacetylases and that mediated by polycomb group proteins may act either independently or together for MLL function in vivo. PMID:12829790

  11. A reconfigured pattern of MLL occupancy within mitotic chromatin promotes rapid transcriptional reactivation following mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Blobel, Gerd A; Kadauke, Stephan; Wang, Eric; Lau, Alan W; Zuber, Johannes; Chou, Margaret M; Vakoc, Christopher R

    2009-12-25

    Mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) and its metazoan Trithorax orthologs have been linked with the epigenetic maintenance of transcriptional activity. To identify mechanisms by which MLL perpetuates active transcription in dividing cells, we investigated its role during M phase of the cell cycle. Unlike other chromatin-modifying enzymes examined, we found that MLL associates with gene promoters packaged within condensed mitotic chromosomes. Genome-wide location analysis identified a globally rearranged pattern of MLL occupancy during mitosis in a manner favoring genes that were highly transcribed during interphase. Knockdown experiments revealed that MLL retention at gene promoters during mitosis accelerates transcription reactivation following mitotic exit. MLL tethers Menin, RbBP5, and ASH2L to its occupied sites during mitosis, but is dispensable for preserving histone H3K4 methylation. These findings implicate mitotic bookmarking as a component of Trithorax-based gene regulation, which may facilitate inheritance of active gene expression states during cell division. PMID:20064463

  12. Requirement for CDK6 in MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Placke, Theresa; Faber, Katrin; Nonami, Atsushi; Putwain, Sarah L.; Salih, Helmut R.; Heidel, Florian H.; Krämer, Alwin; Root, David E.; Barbie, David A.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Hahn, William C.; Huntly, Brian J.; Sykes, Stephen M.; Milsom, Michael D.; Scholl, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the H3K4 methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) trigger aberrant gene expression in hematopoietic progenitors and give rise to an aggressive subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Insights into MLL fusion-mediated leukemogenesis have not yet translated into better therapies because MLL is difficult to target directly, and the identity of the genes downstream of MLL whose altered transcription mediates leukemic transformation are poorly annotated. We used a functional genetic approach to uncover that AML cells driven by MLL-AF9 are exceptionally reliant on the cell-cycle regulator CDK6, but not its functional homolog CDK4, and that the preferential growth inhibition induced by CDK6 depletion is mediated through enhanced myeloid differentiation. CDK6 essentiality is also evident in AML cells harboring alternate MLL fusions and a mouse model of MLL-AF9–driven leukemia and can be ascribed to transcriptional activation of CDK6 by mutant MLL. Importantly, the context-dependent effects of lowering CDK6 expression are closely phenocopied by a small-molecule CDK6 inhibitor currently in clinical development. These data identify CDK6 as critical effector of MLL fusions in leukemogenesis that might be targeted to overcome the differentiation block associated with MLL-rearranged AML, and underscore that cell-cycle regulators may have distinct, noncanonical, and nonredundant functions in different contexts. PMID:24764564

  13. Requirement for CDK6 in MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Placke, Theresa; Faber, Katrin; Nonami, Atsushi; Putwain, Sarah L; Salih, Helmut R; Heidel, Florian H; Krämer, Alwin; Root, David E; Barbie, David A; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Armstrong, Scott A; Hahn, William C; Huntly, Brian J; Sykes, Stephen M; Milsom, Michael D; Scholl, Claudia; Fröhling, Stefan

    2014-07-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the H3K4 methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) trigger aberrant gene expression in hematopoietic progenitors and give rise to an aggressive subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Insights into MLL fusion-mediated leukemogenesis have not yet translated into better therapies because MLL is difficult to target directly, and the identity of the genes downstream of MLL whose altered transcription mediates leukemic transformation are poorly annotated. We used a functional genetic approach to uncover that AML cells driven by MLL-AF9 are exceptionally reliant on the cell-cycle regulator CDK6, but not its functional homolog CDK4, and that the preferential growth inhibition induced by CDK6 depletion is mediated through enhanced myeloid differentiation. CDK6 essentiality is also evident in AML cells harboring alternate MLL fusions and a mouse model of MLL-AF9-driven leukemia and can be ascribed to transcriptional activation of CDK6 by mutant MLL. Importantly, the context-dependent effects of lowering CDK6 expression are closely phenocopied by a small-molecule CDK6 inhibitor currently in clinical development. These data identify CDK6 as critical effector of MLL fusions in leukemogenesis that might be targeted to overcome the differentiation block associated with MLL-rearranged AML, and underscore that cell-cycle regulators may have distinct, noncanonical, and nonredundant functions in different contexts.

  14. Molecular basis for chromatin binding and regulation of MLL5.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muzaffar; Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Zhao, Wei; Rothbart, Scott B; Tong, Qiong; Parkhurst, Susan M; Strahl, Brian D; Deng, Lih-Wen; Groudine, Mark; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2013-07-01

    The human mixed-lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) protein mediates hematopoietic cell homeostasis, cell cycle, and survival; however, the molecular basis underlying MLL5 activities remains unknown. Here, we show that MLL5 is recruited to gene-rich euchromatic regions via the interaction of its plant homeodomain finger with the histone mark H3K4me3. The 1.48-Å resolution crystal structure of MLL5 plant homeodomain in complex with the H3K4me3 peptide reveals a noncanonical binding mechanism, whereby K4me3 is recognized through a single aromatic residue and an aspartate. The binding induces a unique His-Asp swapping rearrangement mediated by a C-terminal α-helix. Phosphorylation of H3T3 and H3T6 abrogates the association with H3K4me3 in vitro and in vivo, releasing MLL5 from chromatin in mitosis. This regulatory switch is conserved in the Drosophila ortholog of MLL5, UpSET, and suggests the developmental control for targeting of H3K4me3. Together, our findings provide first insights into the molecular basis for the recruitment, exclusion, and regulation of MLL5 at chromatin. PMID:23798402

  15. Molecular basis for chromatin binding and regulation of MLL5

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muzaffar; Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Zhao, Wei; Rothbart, Scott B.; Tong, Qiong; Parkhurst, Susan M.; Strahl, Brian D.; Deng, Lih-Wen; Groudine, Mark; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2013-01-01

    The human mixed-lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) protein mediates hematopoietic cell homeostasis, cell cycle, and survival; however, the molecular basis underlying MLL5 activities remains unknown. Here, we show that MLL5 is recruited to gene-rich euchromatic regions via the interaction of its plant homeodomain finger with the histone mark H3K4me3. The 1.48-Å resolution crystal structure of MLL5 plant homeodomain in complex with the H3K4me3 peptide reveals a noncanonical binding mechanism, whereby K4me3 is recognized through a single aromatic residue and an aspartate. The binding induces a unique His–Asp swapping rearrangement mediated by a C-terminal α-helix. Phosphorylation of H3T3 and H3T6 abrogates the association with H3K4me3 in vitro and in vivo, releasing MLL5 from chromatin in mitosis. This regulatory switch is conserved in the Drosophila ortholog of MLL5, UpSET, and suggests the developmental control for targeting of H3K4me3. Together, our findings provide first insights into the molecular basis for the recruitment, exclusion, and regulation of MLL5 at chromatin. PMID:23798402

  16. Validation and structural characterization of the LEDGF/p75-MLL interface as a new target for the treatment of MLL-dependent leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cermáková, Kateřina; Tesina, Petr; Demeulemeester, Jonas; El Ashkar, Sara; Méreau, Hélène; Schwaller, Juerg; Rezáčová, Pavlína; Veverka, Vaclav; De Rijck, Jan

    2014-09-15

    Mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion-driven acute leukemias represent a genetically distinct subset of leukemias with poor prognosis. MLL forms a ternary complex with the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) and MENIN. LEDGF/p75, a chromatin reader recognizing H3K36me3 marks, contributes to the association of the MLL multiprotein complex to chromatin. Formation of this complex is critical for the development of MLL leukemia. Available X-ray data represent only a partial structure of the LEDGF/p75-MLL-MENIN complex. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we identified an additional LEDGF/p75-MLL interface, which overlaps with the binding site of known LEDGF/p75 interactors-HIV-1 integrase, PogZ, and JPO2. Binding of these proteins or MLL to LEDGF/p75 is mutually exclusive. The resolved structure, as well as mutational analysis, shows that the interaction is primarily sustained via two aromatic residues of MLL (F148 and F151). Colony-forming assays in MLL-AF9(+) leukemic cells expressing MLL interaction-defective LEDGF/p75 mutants revealed that this interaction is essential for transformation. Finally, we show that the clonogenic growth of primary murine MLL-AF9-expressing leukemic blasts is selectively impaired upon overexpression of a LEDGF/p75-binding cyclic peptide CP65, originally developed to inhibit the LEDGF/p75-HIV-1 integrase interaction. The newly defined protein-protein interface therefore represents a new target for the development of therapeutics against LEDGF/p75-dependent MLL fusion-driven leukemic disorders. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5139-51. ©2014 AACR.

  17. Musashi2 sustains the mixed-lineage leukemia–driven stem cell regulatory program

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun-Mi; Gönen, Mithat; Vu, Ly; Minuesa, Gerard; Tivnan, Patrick; Barlowe, Trevor S.; Taggart, James; Lu, Yuheng; Deering, Raquel P.; Hacohen, Nir; Figueroa, Maria E.; Paietta, Elisabeth; Fernandez, Hugo F.; Tallman, Martin S.; Melnick, Ari; Levine, Ross; Leslie, Christina; Lengner, Christopher J.; Kharas, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are found in most aggressive myeloid diseases and contribute to therapeutic resistance. Leukemia cells exhibit a dysregulated developmental program as the result of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Overexpression of the RNA-binding protein Musashi2 (MSI2) has been previously shown to predict poor survival in leukemia. Here, we demonstrated that conditional deletion of Msi2 in the hematopoietic compartment results in delayed leukemogenesis, reduced disease burden, and a loss of LSC function in a murine leukemia model. Gene expression profiling of these Msi2-deficient animals revealed a loss of the hematopoietic/leukemic stem cell self-renewal program and an increase in the differentiation program. In acute myeloid leukemia patients, the presence of a gene signature that was similar to that observed in Msi2-deficent murine LSCs correlated with improved survival. We determined that MSI2 directly maintains the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) self-renewal program by interacting with and retaining efficient translation of Hoxa9, Myc, and Ikzf2 mRNAs. Moreover, depletion of MLL target Ikzf2 in LSCs reduced colony formation, decreased proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Our data provide evidence that MSI2 controls efficient translation of the oncogenic LSC self-renewal program and suggest MSI2 as a potential therapeutic target for myeloid leukemia. PMID:25664853

  18. High-Affinity, Small-Molecule Peptidomimetic Inhibitors of MLL1/WDR5 Protein-Protein Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karatas, Hacer; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Cao, Fang; Chen, Yong; Bernard, Denzil; Liu, Liu; Lei, Ming; Dou, Yali; Wang, Shaomeng

    2013-02-12

    Mixed lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase, and targeting the MLL1 enzymatic activity has been proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. The MLL1/WDR5 protein–protein interaction is essential for MLL1 enzymatic activity. In the present study, we designed a large number of peptidomimetics to target the MLL1/WDR5 interaction based upon -CO-ARA-NH–, the minimum binding motif derived from MLL1. Our study led to the design of high-affinity peptidomimetics, which bind to WDR5 with Ki < 1 nM and function as potent antagonists of MLL1 activity in a fully reconstituted in vitro H3K4 methyltransferase assay. Determination of co-crystal structures of two potent peptidomimetics in complex with WDR5 establishes their structural basis for high-affinity binding to WDR5. Evaluation of one such peptidomimetic, MM-102, in bone marrow cells transduced with MLL1-AF9 fusion construct shows that the compound effectively decreases the expression of HoxA9 and Meis-1, two critical MLL1 target genes in MLL1 fusion protein mediated leukemogenesis. MM-102 also specifically inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in leukemia cells harboring MLL1 fusion proteins. Our study provides the first proof-of-concept for the design of small-molecule inhibitors of the WDR5/MLL1 protein–protein interaction as a novel therapeutic approach for acute leukemia harboring MLL1 fusion proteins.

  19. Epigenetic dysregulation of leukaemic HOX code in MLL-rearranged leukaemia mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ray Kit; Kong, Cheuk Ting; So, Chi Chiu; Lui, Wing Chi; Chan, Yuen Fan; Leung, Ka Chun; So, Kam Chung; Tsang, Ho Man; Chan, Li Chong; Sham, Mai Har

    2014-01-01

    HOX genes are frequently dysregulated in human leukaemia with the gene rearrangement between mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) and partner genes. The resultant MLL fusion proteins are known to mediate leukaemia through disruption of the normal epigenetic regulation at the target gene loci. To elucidate the pathogenic role of MLL fusion proteins in HOX dysregulation in leukaemia, we generated a novel haematopoietic lineage-specific Mll-Een knock-in mouse model using a Cre-mediated inversion strategy. The Mll(Een) (/+) invertor mice developed acute myeloid leukaemia, with organomegaly of the spleen, liver and mesenteric lymph nodes caused by infiltration of blast cells. Using Mll-Een-expressing leukaemic cell lines derived from bone marrow of Mll(Een) (/+) mutant mice, we showed that induction of Hox genes in leukaemic cells was associated with hypomethylated promoter regions and an aberrant active chromatin state at the Hox loci. Knock-down of Prmt1 was insufficient to reverse the active chromatin status and the hypomethylated Hox loci, suggesting that Prmt1-mediated histone arginine methylation was only partially involved in the maintenance of Hox expression in leukaemic cells. Furthermore, in vivo analysis of bone marrow cells of Mll(Een) (/+) mice revealed a Hox expression profile similar to that of wild-type haematopoietic stem cells. The leukaemic Hox profile was highly correlated with aberrant hypomethylation of Hox promoters in the mutant mice, which highlights the importance of DNA methylation in leukaemogenic mechanisms induced by MLL fusion proteins. Our results point to the involvement of dynamic epigenetic regulations in the maintenance of the stem cell-like HOX code that initiates leukaemic stem cells in MLL-rearranged leukaemia. This provides insights for the development of alternative strategies for leukaemia treatment.

  20. Histone Methylase MLL1 plays critical roles in tumor growth and angiogenesis and its knockdown suppresses tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed lineage leukemias (MLL) are human histone H3 lysine-4 specific methyl transferases that play critical roles in gene expression, epigenetics, and cancer. Herein, we demonstrated that antisense-mediated knockdown of MLL1 induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cultured cells. Intriguingly, application of MLL1-antisense specifically knocked down MLL1 in vivo and suppressed the growth of xenografted cervical tumor implanted in nude mouse. MLL1-knockdown downregulated various growth and angiogenic factors such as HIF1α, VEGF and CD31 in tumor tissue affecting tumor growth. MLL1 is overexpressed along the line of vascular network and localized adjacent to endothelial cell layer expressing CD31, indicating potential roles of MLL1 in vasculogenesis. MLL1 is also overexpressed in the hypoxic regions along with HIF1α. Overall, our studies demonstrated that MLL1 is a key player in hypoxia signaling, vasculogenesis, and tumor growth, and its depletion suppresses tumor growth in vivo, indicating its potential in novel cancer therapy. PMID:22926525

  1. MLL1, a H3K4 methyltransferase, regulates the TNFα-stimulated activation of genes downstream of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Zhu, Kun; Li, Shangze; Liao, Yifang; Du, Runlei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Shu, Hong-Bing; Guo, An-Yuan; Li, Lianyun; Wu, Min

    2012-09-01

    Genes of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) family regulate transcription by methylating histone H3K4. Six members of the MLL family exist in humans, including SETD1A, SETD1B and MLL1-MLL4. Each of them plays non-redundant roles in development and disease genesis. MLL1 regulates the cell cycle and the oscillation of circadian gene expression. Its fusion proteins are involved in leukemogenesis. Here, we studied the role of MLL1 in innate immunity and found it selectively regulates the activation of genes downstream of NF-κB mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Real-time PCR and genome-wide gene expression profile analysis proved that the deficiency of MLL1 reduced the expression of a group of genes downstream of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). However, the activation of NF-κB itself was not affected. The MLL1 complex is found both in the nucleus and cytoplasm and is associated with NF-κB. CHIP assays proved that the translocation of MLL1 to chromatin was dependent on NF-κB. Our results suggest that MLL1 is recruited to its target genes by activated NF-κB and regulates their transcription. PMID:22623725

  2. Loss of Mll3 Catalytic Function Promotes Aberrant Myelopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Arcipowski, Kelly M; Bulic, Marinka; Gurbuxani, Sandeep; Licht, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    Two of the most common myeloid malignancies, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), are associated with exceedingly low survival rates despite recent therapeutic advances. While their etiology is not completely understood, evidence suggests that certain chromosomal abnormalities contribute to MDS and AML progression. Among the most frequent chromosomal abnormalities in these disorders are alterations of chromosome 7: either complete loss of one copy of chromosome 7 (-7) or partial deletion of 7q (del(7q)), both of which increase the risk of progression from MDS to AML and are associated with chemoresistance. Notably, 7q36.1, a critical minimally deleted region in 7q, includes the gene encoding the histone methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3), which is also mutated in a small percentage of AML patients. However, the mechanisms by which MLL3 loss contributes to malignancy are unknown. Using an engineered mouse model expressing a catalytically inactive form of Mll3, we found a significant shift in hematopoiesis toward the granulocyte/macrophage lineage, correlating with myeloid infiltration and enlargement of secondary lymphoid organs. Therefore, we propose that MLL3 loss in patients may contribute to the progression of MDS and AML by promoting myelopoiesis. PMID:27610619

  3. Loss of Mll3 Catalytic Function Promotes Aberrant Myelopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Arcipowski, Kelly M.; Bulic, Marinka; Gurbuxani, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Two of the most common myeloid malignancies, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), are associated with exceedingly low survival rates despite recent therapeutic advances. While their etiology is not completely understood, evidence suggests that certain chromosomal abnormalities contribute to MDS and AML progression. Among the most frequent chromosomal abnormalities in these disorders are alterations of chromosome 7: either complete loss of one copy of chromosome 7 (-7) or partial deletion of 7q (del(7q)), both of which increase the risk of progression from MDS to AML and are associated with chemoresistance. Notably, 7q36.1, a critical minimally deleted region in 7q, includes the gene encoding the histone methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia 3 (MLL3), which is also mutated in a small percentage of AML patients. However, the mechanisms by which MLL3 loss contributes to malignancy are unknown. Using an engineered mouse model expressing a catalytically inactive form of Mll3, we found a significant shift in hematopoiesis toward the granulocyte/macrophage lineage, correlating with myeloid infiltration and enlargement of secondary lymphoid organs. Therefore, we propose that MLL3 loss in patients may contribute to the progression of MDS and AML by promoting myelopoiesis. PMID:27610619

  4. SEPT2 is a new fusion partner of MLL in acute myeloid leukemia with t(2;11)(q37;q23).

    PubMed

    Cerveira, N; Correia, C; Bizarro, S; Pinto, C; Lisboa, S; Mariz, J M; Marques, M; Teixeira, M R

    2006-10-01

    We have identified a new mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene fusion partner in a patient with treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presenting a t(2;11)(q37;q23) as the only cytogenetic abnormality. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated a rearrangement of the MLL gene and molecular genetic analyses identified a septin family gene, SEPT2, located on chromosome 2q37, as the fusion partner of MLL. RNA and DNA analyses showed the existence of an in-frame fusion of MLL exon 7 with SEPT2 exon 3, with the genomic breakpoints located in intron 7 and 2 of MLL and SEPT2, respectively. Search for DNA sequence motifs revealed the existence of two sequences with 94.4% homology with the topoisomerase II consensus cleavage site in MLL intron 7 and SEPT2 intron 2. SEPT2 is the fifth septin family gene fused with MLL, making this gene family the most frequently involved in MLL-related AML (about 10% of all known fusion partners). The protein encoded by SEPT2 is highly homologous to septins 1, 4 and 5 and is involved in the coordination of several key steps of mitosis. Further studies are warranted to understand why the septin protein family is particularly involved in the pathogenesis of MLL-associated leukemia. PMID:16682951

  5. The same site on the integrase-binding domain of lens epithelium–derived growth factor is a therapeutic target for MLL leukemia and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Pollock, Jonathan; He, Shihan; Miao, Hongzhi; Purohit, Trupta; Yokom, Adam; Hess, Jay L.; Muntean, Andrew G.; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) is a chromatin-associated protein implicated in leukemia and HIV type 1 infection. LEDGF associates with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion proteins and menin and is required for leukemic transformation. To better understand the molecular mechanism underlying the LEDGF integrase-binding domain (IBD) interaction with MLL fusion proteins in leukemia, we determined the solution structure of the MLL-IBD complex. We found a novel MLL motif, integrase domain binding motif 2 (IBM2), which binds to a well-defined site on IBD. Point mutations within IBM2 abolished leukemogenic transformation by MLL-AF9, validating that this newly identified motif is essential for the oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins. Interestingly, the IBM2 binding site on IBD overlaps with the binding site for the HIV integrase (IN), and IN was capable of efficiently sequestering IBD from the menin-MLL complex. A short IBM2 peptide binds to IBD directly and inhibits both the IBD-MLL/menin and IBD-IN interactions. Our findings show that the same site on IBD is involved in binding to MLL and HIV-IN, revealing an attractive approach to simultaneously target LEDGF in leukemia and HIV. PMID:25305204

  6. RUNX1 Is a Key Target in t(4;11) Leukemias that Contributes to Gene Activation through an AF4-MLL Complex Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Adam C.; Ballabio, Erica; Geng, Huimin; North, Phillip; Tapia, Marta; Kerry, Jon; Biswas, Debabrata; Roeder, Robert G.; Allis, C. David; Melnick, Ari; de Bruijn, Marella F.T.R.; Milne, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) protein is an important epigenetic regulator required for the maintenance of gene activation during development. MLL chromosomal translocations produce novel fusion proteins that cause aggressive leukemias in humans. Individual MLL fusion proteins have distinct leukemic phenotypes even when expressed in the same cell type, but how this distinction is delineated on a molecular level is poorly understood. Here, we highlight a unique molecular mechanism whereby the RUNX1 gene is directly activated by MLL-AF4 and the RUNX1 protein interacts with the product of the reciprocal AF4-MLL translocation. These results support a mechanism of transformation whereby two oncogenic fusion proteins cooperate by activating a target gene and then modulating the function of its downstream product. PMID:23352661

  7. MLL leukemia induction by genome editing of human CD34+ hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Buechele, Corina; Breese, Erin H.; Schneidawind, Dominik; Lin, Chiou-Hong; Jeong, Johan; Duque-Afonso, Jesus; Wong, Stephen H. K.; Smith, Kevin S.; Negrin, Robert S.; Porteus, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene occur in primary and treatment-related leukemias and confer a poor prognosis. Studies based primarily on mouse models have substantially advanced our understanding of MLL leukemia pathogenesis, but often use supraphysiological oncogene expression with uncertain implications for human leukemia. Genome editing using site-specific nucleases provides a powerful new technology for gene modification to potentially model human disease, however, this approach has not been used to re-create acute leukemia in human cells of origin comparable to disease observed in patients. We applied transcription activator-like effector nuclease–mediated genome editing to generate endogenous MLL-AF9 and MLL-ENL oncogenes through insertional mutagenesis in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. Engineered HSPCs displayed altered in vitro growth potentials and induced acute leukemias following transplantation in immunocompromised mice at a mean latency of 16 weeks. The leukemias displayed phenotypic and morphologic similarities with patient leukemia blasts including a subset with mixed phenotype, a distinctive feature seen in clinical disease. The leukemic blasts expressed an MLL-associated transcriptional program with elevated levels of crucial MLL target genes, displayed heightened sensitivity to DOT1L inhibition, and demonstrated increased oncogenic potential ex vivo and in secondary transplant assays. Thus, genome editing to create endogenous MLL oncogenes in primary human HSPCs faithfully models acute MLL-rearranged leukemia and provides an experimental platform for prospective studies of leukemia initiation and stem cell biology in a genetic subtype of poor prognosis leukemia. PMID:26311362

  8. A non-active-site SET domain surface crucial for the interaction of MLL1 and the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer within MLL family core complexes.

    PubMed

    Shinsky, Stephen A; Hu, Michael; Vought, Valarie E; Ng, Sarah B; Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2014-06-12

    The mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) enzyme is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) monomethyltransferase and has served as a paradigm for understanding the mechanism of action of the human SET1 family of enzymes that include MLL1-MLL4 and SETd1a,b. Dimethylation of H3K4 requires a sub-complex including WRAD (WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30), which binds to each SET1 family member forming a minimal core complex that is required for multiple lysine methylation. We recently demonstrated that WRAD is a novel histone methyltransferase that preferentially catalyzes H3K4 dimethylation in a manner that is dependent on an unknown non-active-site surface from the MLL1 SET domain. Recent genome sequencing studies have identified a number of human disease-associated missense mutations that localize to the SET domains of several MLL family members. In this investigation, we mapped many of these mutations onto the three-dimensional structure of the SET domain and noticed that a subset of MLL2 (KMT2D, ALR, MLL4)-associated Kabuki syndrome missense mutations map to a common solvent-exposed surface that is not expected to alter enzymatic activity. We introduced these mutations into the MLL1 SET domain and observed that all are defective for H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex, which is associated with a loss of the ability of MLL1 to interact with WRAD or with the RbBP5/Ash2L heterodimer. Our results suggest that amino acids from this surface, which we term the Kabuki interaction surface or KIS, are required for formation of a second active site within SET1 family core complexes. PMID:24680668

  9. Chromatin remodelling factor Mll1 is essential for neurogenesis from postnatal neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daniel A.; Huang, Yin-Cheng; Swigut, Tomek; Mirick, Anika L.; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Wysocka, Joanna; Ernst, Patricia; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms that maintain neurogenesis throughout adult life remain poorly understood1. Trithorax group (trxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) gene products are part of an evolutionarily conserved chromatin remodelling system that activate or silence gene expression, respectively2. Although PcG member Bmi1 has been shown to be required for postnatal neural stem cell self-renewal3,4, the role of trxG genes remains unknown. Here we show that the trxG member Mll1 (mixed-lineage leukaemia 1) is required for neurogenesis in the mouse postnatal brain. Mll1-deficient subventricular zone neural stem cells survive, proliferate and efficiently differentiate into glial lineages; however, neuronal differentiation is severely impaired. In Mll1-deficient cells, early proneural Mash1 (also known as Ascl1) and gliogenic Olig2 expression are preserved, but Dlx2, a key downstream regulator of subventricular zone neurogenesis, is not expressed. Over-expression of Dlx2 can rescue neurogenesis in Mll1-deficient cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrates that Dlx2 is a direct target of MLL in subventricular zone cells. In differentiating wild-type subventricular zone cells, Mash1, Olig2 and Dlx2 loci have high levels of histone 3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3), consistent with their transcription. In contrast, in Mll1-deficient subventricular zone cells, chromatin at Dlx2 is bivalently marked by both H3K4me3 and histone 3 trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), and the Dlx2 gene fails to properly activate. These data support a model in which Mll1 is required to resolve key silenced bivalent loci in postnatal neural precursors to the actively transcribed state for the induction of neurogenesis, but not for gliogenesis. PMID:19212323

  10. Inhibition of BET recruitment to chromatin as an effective treatment for MLL-fusion leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Mark A; Prinjha, Rab K; Dittmann, Antje; Giotopoulos, George; Bantscheff, Marcus; Chan, Wai-In; Robson, Samuel C; Chung, Chun-wa; Hopf, Carsten; Savitski, Mikhail M; Huthmacher, Carola; Gudgin, Emma; Lugo, Dave; Beinke, Soren; Chapman, Trevor D; Roberts, Emma J; Soden, Peter E; Auger, Kurt R; Mirguet, Olivier; Doehner, Konstanze; Delwel, Ruud; Burnett, Alan K; Jeffrey, Phillip; Drewes, Gerard; Lee, Kevin; Huntly, Brian J P; Kouzarides, Tony

    2011-10-02

    Recurrent chromosomal translocations involving the mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) gene initiate aggressive forms of leukaemia, which are often refractory to conventional therapies. Many MLL-fusion partners are members of the super elongation complex (SEC), a critical regulator of transcriptional elongation, suggesting that aberrant control of this process has an important role in leukaemia induction. Here we use a global proteomic strategy to demonstrate that MLL fusions, as part of SEC and the polymerase-associated factor complex (PAFc), are associated with the BET family of acetyl-lysine recognizing, chromatin 'adaptor' proteins. These data provided the basis for therapeutic intervention in MLL-fusion leukaemia, via the displacement of the BET family of proteins from chromatin. We show that a novel small molecule inhibitor of the BET family, GSK1210151A (I-BET151), has profound efficacy against human and murine MLL-fusion leukaemic cell lines, through the induction of early cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. I-BET151 treatment in two human leukaemia cell lines with different MLL fusions alters the expression of a common set of genes whose function may account for these phenotypic changes. The mode of action of I-BET151 is, at least in part, due to the inhibition of transcription at key genes (BCL2, C-MYC and CDK6) through the displacement of BRD3/4, PAFc and SEC components from chromatin. In vivo studies indicate that I-BET151 has significant therapeutic value, providing survival benefit in two distinct mouse models of murine MLL-AF9 and human MLL-AF4 leukaemia. Finally, the efficacy of I-BET151 against human leukaemia stem cells is demonstrated, providing further evidence of its potent therapeutic potential. These findings establish the displacement of BET proteins from chromatin as a promising epigenetic therapy for these aggressive leukaemias.

  11. The same pocket in menin binds both MLL and JUND but has opposite effects on transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jing; Gurung, Buddha; Wan, Bingbing; Matkar, Smita; Veniaminova, Natalia A.; Wan, Ke; Merchant, Juanita L.; Hua, Xianxin; Lei, Ming

    2013-04-08

    Menin is a tumour suppressor protein whose loss or inactivation causes multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN1), a hereditary autosomal dominant tumour syndrome that is characterized by tumorigenesis in multiple endocrine organs. Menin interacts with many proteins and is involved in a variety of cellular processes. Menin binds the JUN family transcription factor JUND and inhibits its transcriptional activity. Several MEN1 missense mutations disrupt the menin-JUND interaction, suggesting a correlation between the tumour-suppressor function of menin and its suppression of JUND-activated transcription. Menin also interacts with mixed lineage leukaemia protein 1 (MLL1), a histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase, and functions as an oncogenic cofactor to upregulate gene transcription and promote MLL1-fusion-protein-induced leukaemogenesis. A recent report on the tethering of MLL1 to chromatin binding factor lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) by menin indicates that menin is a molecular adaptor coordinating the functions of multiple proteins. Despite its importance, how menin interacts with many distinct partners and regulates their functions remains poorly understood. Here we present the crystal structures of human menin in its free form and in complexes with MLL1 or with JUND, or with an MLL1-LEDGF heterodimer. These structures show that menin contains a deep pocket that binds short peptides of MLL1 or JUND in the same manner, but that it can have opposite effects on transcription. The menin-JUND interaction blocks JUN N-terminal kinase (JNK)-mediated JUND phosphorylation and suppresses JUND-induced transcription. In contrast, menin promotes gene transcription by binding the transcription activator MLL1 through the peptide pocket while still interacting with the chromatin-anchoring protein LEDGF at a distinct surface formed by both menin and MLL1.

  12. Inhibition of BET recruitment to chromatin as an effective treatment for MLL-fusion leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Mark A.; Prinjha, Rab K.; Dittman, Antje; Giotopoulos, George; Bantscheff, Marcus; Chan, Wai-In; Robson, Samuel C; Chung, Chun-wa; Hopf, Carsten; Savitski, Mikhail M.; Huthmacher, Carola; Gudgin, Emma; Lugo, Dave; Beinke, Soren; Chapman, Trevor D.; Roberts, Emma J.; Soden, Peter E; Auger, Kurt R.; Mirguet, Olivier; Doehner, Konstanze; Delwel, Ruud; Burnett, Alan K.; Jeffrey, Phillip; Drewes, Gerard; Lee, Kevin; Huntly, Brian J.P; Kouzarides, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent chromosomal translocations involving the mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) gene initiate aggressive forms of leukaemia, which are often refractory to conventional therapies1. Many MLL-fusion partners are members of the super elongation complex (SEC), a critical regulator of transcriptional elongation, suggesting that aberrant control of this process plays an important role in leukaemia induction2,3. Here we use a global proteomic strategy to demonstrate that MLL-fusions, as part of SEC2,3 and the polymerase associated factor (PAFc) complex4,5 are associated with the BET family of acetyl-lysine recognising, chromatin “adaptor” proteins. These data provided the basis for therapeutic intervention in MLL-fusion leukaemia, via the displacement of the BET family of proteins from chromatin. We show that a novel small molecule inhibitor of the BET family GSK1210151A (I-BET151) has profound efficacy against human and murine MLL-fusion leukaemic cell lines, through the induction of early cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. I-BET151 treatment in two human leukaemia cell lines with different MLL-fusions alters the expression of a common set of genes whose function may account for these phenotypic changes. The mode of action of I-BET151 is, at least in part, due to the inhibition of transcription at key genes (BCL2, C-MYC and CDK6) through the displacement of BRD3/4, PAFc and SEC components from chromatin. In vivo studies indicate that I-BET151 has significant therapeutic value, providing survival benefit in two distinct mouse models of murine MLL-AF9 and human MLL-AF4 leukaemia. Finally, the efficacy of I-BET151 against human leukaemia stem cells (LSC) is demonstrated, providing further evidence of its potent therapeutic potential. These findings establish the displacement of BET proteins from chromatin as a promising epigenetic therapy for these aggressive leukaemias. PMID:21964340

  13. Taspase1 cleaves MLL1 to activate cyclin E for HER2/neu breast tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yiyu; Van Tine, Brian A; Oyama, Toshinao; Wang, Patricia I; Cheng, Emily H; Hsieh, James J

    2014-11-01

    Taspase1, a highly conserved threonine protease, cleaves nuclear transcriptional regulators mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL, MLL1), MLL2, TFIIA, and ALF to orchestrate a wide variety of biological processes. In vitro studies thus far demonstrated that Taspase1 plays important roles in the proliferation of various cancer cell lines, including HER2-positive breast cancer cells. To investigate the role of Taspase1 in breast tumorigenesis in vivo, we deleted Taspase1 from mouse mammary glands by generating MMTV-neu;MMTV-cre;Tasp1(F/-) mice. We demonstrate that initiation of MMTV-neu- but not MMTV-wnt-driven breast cancer is blocked in the absence of Taspase1. Importantly, Taspase1 loss alone neither impacts normal development nor pregnancy physiology of the mammary gland. In mammary glands Taspase1 deficiency abrogates MMTV-neu-induced cyclins E and A expression, thereby preventing tumorigenesis. The mechanisms were explored in HER2-positive breast cancer cell line BT474 and HER2-transformed MCF10A cells and validated using knockdown-resistant Taspase1. As Taspase1 was shown to cleave MLL which forms complexes with E2F transcription factors to regulate Cyclins E, A, and B expression in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), we investigated whether the cleavage of MLL by Taspase1 constitutes an essential in vivo axis for HER2/neu-induced mammary tumorigenesis. To this end, we generated MMTV-neu;MLL(nc/nc) transgenic mice that carry homozygous non-cleavable MLL alleles. Remarkably, these mice are also protected from HER2/neu-driven breast tumorigenesis. Hence, MLL is the primary Taspase1 substrate whose cleavage is required for MMTV-neu-induced tumor formation. As Taspase1 plays critical roles in breast cancer pathology, it may serve as a therapeutic target for HER2-positive human breast cancer. PMID:25267403

  14. The CDK9 Inhibitor Dinaciclib Exerts Potent Apoptotic and Antitumor Effects in Preclinical Models of MLL-Rearranged Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baker, Adele; Gregory, Gareth P; Verbrugge, Inge; Kats, Lev; Hilton, Joshua J; Vidacs, Eva; Lee, Erwin M; Lock, Richard B; Zuber, Johannes; Shortt, Jake; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2016-03-01

    Translocations of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene occur in 60% to 80% of all infant acute leukemias and are markers of poor prognosis. MLL-AF9 and other MLL fusion proteins aberrantly recruit epigenetic regulatory proteins, including histone deacetylases (HDAC), histone methyltransferases, bromodomain-containing proteins, and transcription elongation factors to mediate chromatin remodeling and regulate tumorigenic gene expression programs. We conducted a small-molecule inhibitor screen to test the ability of candidate pharmacologic agents targeting epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins to induce apoptosis in leukemic cells derived from genetically engineered mouse models of MLL-AF9-driven acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We found that the CDK inhibitor dinaciclib and HDAC inhibitor panobinostat were the most potent inducers of apoptosis in short-term in vitro assays. Treatment of MLL-rearranged leukemic cells with dinaciclib resulted in rapidly decreased expression of the prosurvival protein Mcl-1, and accordingly, overexpression of Mcl-1 protected AML cells from dinaciclib-induced apoptosis. Administration of dinaciclib to mice bearing MLL-AF9-driven human and mouse leukemias elicited potent antitumor responses and significantly prolonged survival. Collectively, these studies highlight a new therapeutic approach to potentially overcome the resistance of MLL-rearranged AML to conventional chemotherapies and prompt further clinical evaluation of CDK inhibitors in AML patients harboring MLL fusion proteins. PMID:26627013

  15. Hijacked in cancer: the MLL/KMT2 family of methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajesh C.; Dou, Yali

    2015-01-01

    Preface Lysine methyltransferase 2 family (KMT2) proteins methylate lysine 4 on the histone H3 tail at important regulatory regions in the genome and thus impart critical functions through modulating chromatin structures and DNA accessibility. While the human KMT2 family was initially named the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) family, due to the role of the founding member KMT2A (also called MLL, MLL1, ALL-1, HRX) in this disease, recent exome-sequencing studies revealed KMT2 genes to be among the most frequently mutated genes in many types of human cancers. Efforts to integrate the molecular mechanisms of KMT2 with its roles in tumorigenesis have led to the development of first-generation inhibitors of KMT2 function, which could become novel cancer therapies. PMID:25998713

  16. Novel Cryptic Rearrangements in Adult B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Involving the MLL Gene

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Moneeb A. K.; Grygalewicz, Beata; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Rincic, Martina; Rittscher, Katharina; Melo, Joana B.; Carreira, Isabel M.; Meyer, Britta; Marzena, Watek

    2015-01-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage-leukemia) gene rearrangements are typical for acute leukemia and are associated with an aggressive course of disease, with a worse outcome than comparable case, and thus require intensified treatment. Here we describe a 69-year-old female with adult B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) with hyperleukocytosis and immunophenotype CD10- and CD19+ with cryptic MLL rearrangements. G-banding at the time of diagnosis showed a normal karyotype: 46,XX. Molecular cytogenetics using multitude multicolor banding (mMCB) revealed a complex rearrangement of the two copies of chromosome 11. However, a locus-specific probe additionally identified that the MLL gene at 11q23.3 was disrupted, and that the 5′ region was inserted into the chromosomal sub-band 4q21; thus the aberration involved three chromosomes and five break events. Unfortunately, the patient died six months after the initial diagnosis from serious infections and severe complications. Overall, the present findings confirm that, by far not all MLL aberrations are seen by routine chromosome banding techniques and that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) should be regarded as standard tool to access MLL rearrangements in patients with BCP-ALL. PMID:25699572

  17. Novel Cryptic Rearrangements in Adult B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Involving the MLL Gene.

    PubMed

    Othman, Moneeb A K; Grygalewicz, Beata; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Rincic, Martina; Rittscher, Katharina; Melo, Joana B; Carreira, Isabel M; Meyer, Britta; Marzena, Watek; Liehr, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    MLL (mixed-lineage-leukemia) gene rearrangements are typical for acute leukemia and are associated with an aggressive course of disease, with a worse outcome than comparable case, and thus require intensified treatment. Here we describe a 69-year-old female with adult B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) with hyperleukocytosis and immunophenotype CD10- and CD19+ with cryptic MLL rearrangements. G-banding at the time of diagnosis showed a normal karyotype: 46,XX. Molecular cytogenetics using multitude multicolor banding (mMCB) revealed a complex rearrangement of the two copies of chromosome 11. However, a locus-specific probe additionally identified that the MLL gene at 11q23.3 was disrupted, and that the 5' region was inserted into the chromosomal sub-band 4q21; thus the aberration involved three chromosomes and five break events. Unfortunately, the patient died six months after the initial diagnosis from serious infections and severe complications. Overall, the present findings confirm that, by far not all MLL aberrations are seen by routine chromosome banding techniques and that fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) should be regarded as standard tool to access MLL rearrangements in patients with BCP-ALL. PMID:25699572

  18. NAD+-SIRT1 control of H3K4 trimethylation through circadian deacetylation of MLL1

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Katada, Sayako; Orozco-Solis, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock controls the transcription of hundred genes through specific chromatin remodeling events. The histone methyltransferase Mixed-Lineage Leukemia 1 (MLL1) coordinates recruitment of CLOCK–BMAL1 activator complexes to chromatin, an event associated to cyclic H3K4 tri-methylation at circadian promoters. Remarkably, in mouse liver circadian H3K4me3 is modulated by SIRT1, a NAD+ dependent deacetylase involved in clock control. We show that mammalian MLL1 is acetylated at two conserved residues, K1130 and K1133. Notably, MLL1 acetylation is cyclic, controlled by the clock and by SIRT1, and impacts the methyltransferase activity of MLL1. Moreover, H3K4 methylation at clock-controlled gene promoters is influenced by pharmacological or genetic inactivation of SIRT1. Finally, MLL1 acetylation and H3K4me3 levels at circadian gene promoters depend on NAD+ circadian levels. These findings reveal a previously unappreciated regulatory pathway between energy metabolism and histone methylation. PMID:25751424

  19. Small-molecule inhibition of MLL activity by disruption of its interaction with WDR5.

    PubMed

    Senisterra, Guillermo; Wu, Hong; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Wasney, Gregory A; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Dong, Aiping; Nguyen, Kong T; Smil, David; Bolshan, Yuri; Hajian, Taraneh; He, Hao; Seitova, Alma; Chau, Irene; Li, Fengling; Poda, Gennadiy; Couture, Jean-François; Brown, Peter J; Al-Awar, Rima; Schapira, Matthieu; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Vedadi, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    WDR5 (WD40 repeat protein 5) is an essential component of the human trithorax-like family of SET1 [Su(var)3-9 enhancer-of-zeste trithorax 1] methyltransferase complexes that carry out trimethylation of histone 3 Lys4 (H3K4me3), play key roles in development and are abnormally expressed in many cancers. In the present study, we show that the interaction between WDR5 and peptides from the catalytic domain of MLL (mixed-lineage leukaemia protein) (KMT2) can be antagonized with a small molecule. Structural and biophysical analysis show that this antagonist binds in the WDR5 peptide-binding pocket with a Kd of 450 nM and inhibits the catalytic activity of the MLL core complex in vitro. The degree of inhibition was enhanced at lower protein concentrations consistent with a role for WDR5 in directly stabilizing the MLL multiprotein complex. Our data demonstrate inhibition of an important protein-protein interaction and form the basis for further development of inhibitors of WDR5-dependent enzymes implicated in MLL-rearranged leukaemias or other cancers.

  20. Small-molecule inhibition of MLL activity by disruption of its interaction with WDR5

    PubMed Central

    Senisterra, Guillermo; Wu, Hong; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Wasney, Gregory A.; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Dong, Aiping; Nguyen, Kong T.; Smil, David; Bolshan, Yuri; Hajian, Taraneh; He, Hao; Seitova, Alma; Chau, Irene; Li, Fengling; Poda, Gennadiy; Couture, Jean-François; Brown, Peter J.; Al-Awar, Rima; Schapira, Matthieu; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Vedadi, Masoud

    2012-01-01

    WDR5 (WD40 repeat protein 5) is an essential component of the human trithorax-like family of SET1 [Su(var)3–9 enhancer-of-zeste trithorax 1] methyltransferase complexes that carry out trimethylation of histone 3 Lys4 (H3K4me3), play key roles in development and are abnormally expressed in many cancers. In the present study, we show that the interaction between WDR5 and peptides from the catalytic domain of MLL (mixed-lineage leukaemia protein) (KMT2) can be antagonized with a small molecule. Structural and biophysical analysis show that this antagonist binds in the WDR5 peptide-binding pocket with a Kd of 450 nM and inhibits the catalytic activity of the MLL core complex in vitro. The degree of inhibition was enhanced at lower protein concentrations consistent with a role for WDR5 in directly stabilizing the MLL multiprotein complex. Our data demonstrate inhibition of an important protein–protein interaction and form the basis for further development of inhibitors of WDR5-dependent enzymes implicated in MLL-rearranged leukaemias or other cancers. PMID:22989411

  1. Neuronal Kmt2a/Mll1 Histone Methyltransferase Is Essential for Prefrontal Synaptic Plasticity and Working Memory

    PubMed Central

    Jakovcevski, Mira; Ruan, Hongyu; Shen, Erica Y.; Dincer, Aslihan; Javidfar, Behnam; Ma, Qi; Peter, Cyril J.; Cheung, Iris; Mitchell, Amanda C.; Jiang, Yan; Lin, Cong L.; Pothula, Venu; Stewart, A. Francis; Ernst, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal histone H3-lysine 4 methylation landscapes are defined by sharp peaks at gene promoters and other cis-regulatory sequences, but molecular and cellular phenotypes after neuron-specific deletion of H3K4 methyl-regulators remain largely unexplored. We report that neuronal ablation of the H3K4-specific methyltransferase, Kmt2a/Mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (Mll1), in mouse postnatal forebrain and adult prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with increased anxiety and robust cognitive deficits without locomotor dysfunction. In contrast, only mild behavioral phenotypes were observed after ablation of the Mll1 ortholog Kmt2b/Mll2 in PFC. Impaired working memory after Kmt2a/Mll1 ablation in PFC neurons was associated with loss of training-induced transient waves of Arc immediate early gene expression critical for synaptic plasticity. Medial prefrontal layer V pyramidal neurons, a major output relay of the cortex, demonstrated severely impaired synaptic facilitation and temporal summation, two forms of short-term plasticity essential for working memory. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing in Mll1-deficient cortical neurons revealed downregulated expression and loss of the transcriptional mark, trimethyl-H3K4, at <50 loci, including the homeodomain transcription factor Meis2. Small RNA-mediated Meis2 knockdown in PFC was associated with working memory defects similar to those elicited by Mll1 deletion. Therefore, mature prefrontal neurons critically depend on maintenance of Mll1-regulated H3K4 methylation at a subset of genes with an essential role in cognition and emotion. PMID:25834037

  2. Neuronal Kmt2a/Mll1 histone methyltransferase is essential for prefrontal synaptic plasticity and working memory.

    PubMed

    Jakovcevski, Mira; Ruan, Hongyu; Shen, Erica Y; Dincer, Aslihan; Javidfar, Behnam; Ma, Qi; Peter, Cyril J; Cheung, Iris; Mitchell, Amanda C; Jiang, Yan; Lin, Cong L; Pothula, Venu; Stewart, A Francis; Ernst, Patricia; Yao, Wei-Dong; Akbarian, Schahram

    2015-04-01

    Neuronal histone H3-lysine 4 methylation landscapes are defined by sharp peaks at gene promoters and other cis-regulatory sequences, but molecular and cellular phenotypes after neuron-specific deletion of H3K4 methyl-regulators remain largely unexplored. We report that neuronal ablation of the H3K4-specific methyltransferase, Kmt2a/Mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (Mll1), in mouse postnatal forebrain and adult prefrontal cortex (PFC) is associated with increased anxiety and robust cognitive deficits without locomotor dysfunction. In contrast, only mild behavioral phenotypes were observed after ablation of the Mll1 ortholog Kmt2b/Mll2 in PFC. Impaired working memory after Kmt2a/Mll1 ablation in PFC neurons was associated with loss of training-induced transient waves of Arc immediate early gene expression critical for synaptic plasticity. Medial prefrontal layer V pyramidal neurons, a major output relay of the cortex, demonstrated severely impaired synaptic facilitation and temporal summation, two forms of short-term plasticity essential for working memory. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing in Mll1-deficient cortical neurons revealed downregulated expression and loss of the transcriptional mark, trimethyl-H3K4, at <50 loci, including the homeodomain transcription factor Meis2. Small RNA-mediated Meis2 knockdown in PFC was associated with working memory defects similar to those elicited by Mll1 deletion. Therefore, mature prefrontal neurons critically depend on maintenance of Mll1-regulated H3K4 methylation at a subset of genes with an essential role in cognition and emotion. PMID:25834037

  3. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, D Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-10-20

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML.

  4. MLL Histone Methylases Regulate Expression of HDLR-SR-B1 in Presence of Estrogen and Control Plasma Cholesterol in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Kasiri, Sahba; Hussain, Imran; Bobzean, Samara A. Morris; Perrotti, Linda I.

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein receptors scavenger receptor class B type I [HDLR-SR-B1 (SR-B1)] is a key player in reverse cholesterol transport and maintaining blood cholesterol. We demonstrated that human SR-B1 is transcriptionally activated by 17β-estradiol (E2) in HEPG2 and JAR cells. SR-B1 promoter contains multiple estrogen response elements (ERE half-sites) along with some Sp1 binding sites. Knockdown of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ down-regulated E2-induced SR-B1 expression. ERs were bound to SR-B1 promoter EREs in an E2-dependent manner. Along with ERs, mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) histone methylases, especially MLL1 and MLL2, play key roles in E2-mediated SR-B1 activation. MLL1 and MLL2 bind to SR-B1 promoter in an E2-dependent manner and control the assembly of transcription pre-initiation complex and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment. ERs and MLLs play critical roles in determining the cholesterol uptake by steroidogenic tissues/cells, and their knockdown suppressed the E2-induced cholesterol uptake efficiencies of the cells. Intriguingly, MLL2 knockdown in mice resulted in a 33% increase in plasma cholesterol level and also reduced SR-B1 expression in mice liver, demonstrating its crucial functions in controlling plasma cholesterol in vivo. PMID:23192982

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Taspase1, a Crucial Protease Regulating the Function of MLL

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Dunn, B.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    Taspase1 catalyzes the proteolytic processing of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) nuclear protein, which is required for maintaining Hox gene expression patterns. Chromosomal translocations of the MLL gene are associated with leukemia in infants. Taspase1, a threonine aspartase, is a member of the type 2 asparaginase family, but is the only protease in this family. We report here the crystal structures of human activated Taspase1 and its proenzyme, as well as the characterization of the effects of mutations in the active site region using a newly developed fluorogenic assay. The structure of Taspase1 has significant differences from other asparaginases, especially near the active site. Mutation of the catalytic nucleophile, Thr234, abolishes autocatalytic processing in cis but does not completely block proteolysis in trans. The structure unexpectedly showed the binding of a chloride ion in the active site, and our kinetic studies confirm that chlorides ions are inhibitors of this enzyme at physiologically relevant concentrations.

  6. MLL5 Orchestrates a Cancer Self-Renewal State by Repressing the Histone Variant H3.3 and Globally Reorganizing Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco; Coutinho, Fiona J; Vanner, Robert J; Gayden, Tenzin; Mack, Stephen C; Murison, Alex; Remke, Marc; Li, Ren; Takayama, Naoya; Desai, Kinjal; Lee, Lilian; Lan, Xiaoyang; Park, Nicole I; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Smil, David; Sturm, Dominik; Kushida, Michelle M; Head, Renee; Cusimano, Michael D; Bernstein, Mark; Clarke, Ian D; Dick, John E; Pfister, Stefan M; Rich, Jeremy N; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Taylor, Michael D; Jabado, Nada; Bazett-Jones, David P; Lupien, Mathieu; Dirks, Peter B

    2015-12-14

    Mutations in the histone 3 variant H3.3 have been identified in one-third of pediatric glioblastomas (GBMs), but not in adult tumors. Here we show that H3.3 is a dynamic determinant of functional properties in adult GBM. H3.3 is repressed by mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) in self-renewing GBM cells. MLL5 is a global epigenetic repressor that orchestrates reorganization of chromatin structure by punctuating chromosomes with foci of compacted chromatin, favoring tumorigenic and self-renewing properties. Conversely, H3.3 antagonizes self-renewal and promotes differentiation. We exploited these epigenetic states to rationally identify two small molecules that effectively curb cancer stem cell properties in a preclinical model. Our work uncovers a role for MLL5 and H3.3 in maintaining self-renewal hierarchies in adult GBM. PMID:26626085

  7. Structural basis for the requirement of additional factors for MLL1 SET domain activity and recognition of epigenetic marks.

    PubMed

    Southall, Stacey M; Wong, Poon-Sheng; Odho, Zain; Roe, S Mark; Wilson, Jon R

    2009-01-30

    The mixed-lineage leukemia protein MLL1 is a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in early development and hematopoiesis. The biological function of MLL1 is mediated by the histone H3K4 methyltransferase activity of the carboxyl-terminal SET domain. We have determined the crystal structure of the MLL1 SET domain in complex with cofactor product AdoHcy and a histone H3 peptide. This structure indicates that, in order to form a well-ordered active site, a highly variable but essential component of the SET domain must be repositioned. To test this idea, we compared the effect of the addition of MLL complex members on methyltransferase activity and show that both RbBP5 and Ash2L but not Wdr5 stimulate activity. Additionally, we have determined the effect of posttranslational modifications on histone H3 residues downstream and upstream from the target lysine and provide a structural explanation for why H3T3 phosphorylation and H3K9 acetylation regulate activity. PMID:19187761

  8. Pharmacological targeting of the Wdr5-MLL interaction in C/EBPα N-terminal leukemia.

    PubMed

    Grebien, Florian; Vedadi, Masoud; Getlik, Matthäus; Giambruno, Roberto; Grover, Amit; Avellino, Roberto; Skucha, Anna; Vittori, Sarah; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Smil, David; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Li, Fengling; Poda, Gennadiy; Schapira, Matthieu; Wu, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Senisterra, Guillermo; Stukalov, Alexey; Huber, Kilian V M; Schönegger, Andreas; Marcellus, Richard; Bilban, Martin; Bock, Christoph; Brown, Peter J; Zuber, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Al-Awar, Rima; Delwel, Ruud; Nerlov, Claus; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2015-08-01

    The CEBPA gene is mutated in 9% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Selective expression of a short (30-kDa) CCAAT-enhancer binding protein-α (C/EBPα) translational isoform, termed p30, represents the most common type of CEBPA mutation in AML. The molecular mechanisms underlying p30-mediated transformation remain incompletely understood. We show that C/EBPα p30, but not the normal p42 isoform, preferentially interacts with Wdr5, a key component of SET/MLL (SET-domain/mixed-lineage leukemia) histone-methyltransferase complexes. Accordingly, p30-bound genomic regions were enriched for MLL-dependent H3K4me3 marks. The p30-dependent increase in self-renewal and inhibition of myeloid differentiation required Wdr5, as downregulation of the latter inhibited proliferation and restored differentiation in p30-dependent AML models. OICR-9429 is a new small-molecule antagonist of the Wdr5-MLL interaction. This compound selectively inhibited proliferation and induced differentiation in p30-expressing human AML cells. Our data reveal the mechanism of p30-dependent transformation and establish the essential p30 cofactor Wdr5 as a therapeutic target in CEBPA-mutant AML.

  9. Revisiting the biology of infant t(4;11)/MLL-AF4+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Bueno, Clara; Prieto, Cristina; Acha, Pamela; Stam, Ronald W; Marschalek, Rolf; Menéndez, Pablo

    2015-12-17

    Infant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for 10% of childhood ALL. The genetic hallmark of most infant B-ALL is chromosomal rearrangements of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. Despite improvement in the clinical management and survival (∼85-90%) of childhood B-ALL, the outcome of infants with MLL-rearranged (MLL-r) B-ALL remains dismal, with overall survival <35%. Among MLL-r infant B-ALL, t(4;11)+ patients harboring the fusion MLL-AF4 (MA4) display a particularly poor prognosis and a pro-B/mixed phenotype. Studies in monozygotic twins and archived blood spots have provided compelling evidence of a single cell of prenatal origin as the target for MA4 fusion, explaining the brief leukemia latency. Despite its aggressiveness and short latency, current progress on its etiology, pathogenesis, and cellular origin is limited as evidenced by the lack of mouse/human models recapitulating the disease phenotype/latency. We propose this is because infant cancer is from an etiologic and pathogenesis standpoint distinct from adult cancer and should be seen as a developmental disease. This is supported by whole-genome sequencing studies suggesting that opposite to the view of cancer as a "multiple-and-sequential-hit" model, t(4;11) alone might be sufficient to spawn leukemia. The stable genome of these patients suggests that, in infant developmental cancer, one "big-hit" might be sufficient for overt disease and supports a key contribution of epigenetics and a prenatal cell of origin during a critical developmental window of stem cell vulnerability in the leukemia pathogenesis. Here, we revisit the biology of t(4;11)+ infant B-ALL with an emphasis on its origin, genetics, and disease models. PMID:26463423

  10. Revisiting the biology of infant t(4;11)/MLL-AF4+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Bueno, Clara; Prieto, Cristina; Acha, Pamela; Stam, Ronald W; Marschalek, Rolf; Menéndez, Pablo

    2015-12-17

    Infant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for 10% of childhood ALL. The genetic hallmark of most infant B-ALL is chromosomal rearrangements of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. Despite improvement in the clinical management and survival (∼85-90%) of childhood B-ALL, the outcome of infants with MLL-rearranged (MLL-r) B-ALL remains dismal, with overall survival <35%. Among MLL-r infant B-ALL, t(4;11)+ patients harboring the fusion MLL-AF4 (MA4) display a particularly poor prognosis and a pro-B/mixed phenotype. Studies in monozygotic twins and archived blood spots have provided compelling evidence of a single cell of prenatal origin as the target for MA4 fusion, explaining the brief leukemia latency. Despite its aggressiveness and short latency, current progress on its etiology, pathogenesis, and cellular origin is limited as evidenced by the lack of mouse/human models recapitulating the disease phenotype/latency. We propose this is because infant cancer is from an etiologic and pathogenesis standpoint distinct from adult cancer and should be seen as a developmental disease. This is supported by whole-genome sequencing studies suggesting that opposite to the view of cancer as a "multiple-and-sequential-hit" model, t(4;11) alone might be sufficient to spawn leukemia. The stable genome of these patients suggests that, in infant developmental cancer, one "big-hit" might be sufficient for overt disease and supports a key contribution of epigenetics and a prenatal cell of origin during a critical developmental window of stem cell vulnerability in the leukemia pathogenesis. Here, we revisit the biology of t(4;11)+ infant B-ALL with an emphasis on its origin, genetics, and disease models.

  11. Revisiting the biology of infant t(4;11)/MLL-AF4+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Clara; Prieto, Cristina; Acha, Pamela; Stam, Ronald W.; Marschalek, Rolf; Menéndez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Infant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for 10% of childhood ALL. The genetic hallmark of most infant B-ALL is chromosomal rearrangements of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. Despite improvement in the clinical management and survival (∼85-90%) of childhood B-ALL, the outcome of infants with MLL-rearranged (MLL-r) B-ALL remains dismal, with overall survival <35%. Among MLL-r infant B-ALL, t(4;11)+ patients harboring the fusion MLL-AF4 (MA4) display a particularly poor prognosis and a pro-B/mixed phenotype. Studies in monozygotic twins and archived blood spots have provided compelling evidence of a single cell of prenatal origin as the target for MA4 fusion, explaining the brief leukemia latency. Despite its aggressiveness and short latency, current progress on its etiology, pathogenesis, and cellular origin is limited as evidenced by the lack of mouse/human models recapitulating the disease phenotype/latency. We propose this is because infant cancer is from an etiologic and pathogenesis standpoint distinct from adult cancer and should be seen as a developmental disease. This is supported by whole-genome sequencing studies suggesting that opposite to the view of cancer as a “multiple-and-sequential-hit” model, t(4;11) alone might be sufficient to spawn leukemia. The stable genome of these patients suggests that, in infant developmental cancer, one “big-hit” might be sufficient for overt disease and supports a key contribution of epigenetics and a prenatal cell of origin during a critical developmental window of stem cell vulnerability in the leukemia pathogenesis. Here, we revisit the biology of t(4;11)+ infant B-ALL with an emphasis on its origin, genetics, and disease models. PMID:26463423

  12. Registered report: Inhibition of BET recruitment to chromatin as an effective treatment for MLL-fusion leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Juan José; Kosaka, Alan; Shan, Xiaochuan; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Gormally, Michael; Owen, Kate; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of selected experiments from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012, were selected on the basis of citations and Altmetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from ‘Inhibition of bromodomain and extra terminal (BET) recruitment to chromatin as an effective treatment for mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL)-fusion leukemia’ by Dawson and colleagues, published in Nature in 2011 (Dawson et al., 2011). The experiments to be replicated are those reported in Figures 2A, 3D, 4B, 4D and Supplementary Figures 11A-B and 16A. In this study, BET proteins were demonstrated as potential therapeutic targets for modulating aberrant gene expression programs associated with MLL-fusion leukemia. In Figure 2A, the BET bromodomain inhibitor I-BET151 was reported to suppress growth of cells harboring MLL-fusions compared to those with alternate oncogenic drivers. In Figure 3D, treatment of MLL-fusion leukemia cells with I-BET151 resulted in transcriptional suppression of the anti-apoptotic gene BCL2. Figures 4B and 4D tested the therapeutic efficacy of I-BET151 in vivo using mice injected with human MLL-fusion leukemia cells and evaluated disease progression following I-BET151 treatment. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08997.001 PMID:26327698

  13. MLL-Rearranged Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemias Activate BCL-2 through H3K79 Methylation and Are Sensitive to the BCL-2-Specific Antagonist ABT-199

    PubMed Central

    Benito, Juliana M.; Godfrey, Laura; Kojima, Kensuke; Hogdal, Leah; Wunderlich, Mark; Geng, Huimin; Marzo, Isabel; Harutyunyan, Karine G.; Golfman, Leonard; North, Phillip; Kerry, Jon; Ballabio, Erica; Chonghaile, Triona Ní; Gonzalo, Oscar; Qiu, Yihua; Jeremias, Irmela; Debose, LaKiesha; O’Brien, Eric; Ma, Helen; Zhou, Ping; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Park, Eugene; Coombes, Kevin R.; Zhang, Nianxiang; Thomas, Deborah A.; O’Brien, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Leverson, Joel D.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Andreeff, Michael; Müschen, Markus; Zweidler-McKay, Patrick A.; Mulloy, James C.; Letai, Anthony; Milne, Thomas A.; Konopleva, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Summary Targeted therapies designed to exploit specific molecular pathways in aggressive cancers are an exciting area of current research. Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) mutations such as the t(4;11) translocation cause aggressive leukemias that are refractory to conventional treatment. The t(4;11) translocation produces an MLL/AF4 fusion protein that activates key target genes through both epigenetic and transcriptional elongation mechanisms. In this study, we show that t(4;11) patient cells express high levels of BCL-2 and are highly sensitive to treatment with the BCL-2-specific BH3 mimetic ABT-199. We demonstrate that MLL/AF4 specifically upregulates the BCL-2 gene but not other BCL-2 family members via DOT1L-mediated H3K79me2/3. We use this information to show that a t(4;11) cell line is sensitive to a combination of ABT-199 and DOT1L inhibitors. In addition, ABT-199 synergizes with standard induction-type therapy in a xenotransplant model, advocating for the introduction of ABT-199 into therapeutic regimens for MLL-rearranged leukemias. PMID:26711339

  14. A SET-domain-independent role of WRAD complex in cell-cycle regulatory function of mixed lineage leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aamir; Veeranki, Sailaja Naga; Tyagi, Shweta

    2014-07-01

    MLL, the trithorax ortholog, is a well-characterized histone 3 lysine 4 methyltransferase that is crucial for proper regulation of the Hox genes during embryonic development. Chromosomal translocations, disrupting the Mll gene, lead to aggressive leukemia with poor prognosis. However, the functions of MLL in cellular processes like cell-cycle regulation are not well studied. Here we show that the MLL has a regulatory role during multiple phases of the cell cycle. RNAi-mediated knockdown reveals that MLL regulates S-phase progression and, proper segregation and cytokinesis during M phase. Using deletions and mutations, we narrow the cell-cycle regulatory role to the C subunit of MLL. Our analysis reveals that the transactivation domain and not the SET domain is important for the S-phase function of MLL. Surprisingly, disruption of MLL-WRAD interaction is sufficient to disrupt proper mitotic progression. These mitotic functions of WRAD are independent of SET domain of MLL and, therefore, define a new role of WRAD in subset of MLL functions. Finally, we address the overlapping and unique roles of the different SET family members in the cell cycle. PMID:24880690

  15. Role of the mixed-lineage protein kinase pathway in the metabolic stress response to obesity

    PubMed Central

    Kant, Shashi; Barrett, Tamera; Vertii, Anastassiia; Noh, Yun Hee; Jung, Dae Young; Kim, Jason K.; Davis, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Saturated free fatty acid (FFA) is implicated in the metabolic response to obesity. In vitro studies indicate that FFA signaling may be mediated by the mixed-lineage protein kinase (MLK) pathway that activates cJun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Here we examined the role of the MLK pathway in vivo using a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. The ubiquitously expressed MLK2 and MLK3 protein kinases have partially redundant functions. We therefore compared wild-type and compound mutant mice that lack expression of MLK2 plus MLK3. MLK-deficiency protected mice against high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and obesity. Reduced JNK activation and increased energy expenditure contribute to the metabolic effects of MLK-deficiency. These data confirm that the MLK pathway plays a critical role in the metabolic response to obesity. PMID:23954791

  16. MLL2 protein is a prognostic marker for gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Haige; Lu, Lu; Ge, Bei; Gao, Shenmeng; Ma, Yongyong; Liang, Bin; Yu, Kang; Yang, Kaiyan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed linage leukemia gene 2 (MLL2) is identified as a novel mutation gene in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the significance of MLL2 protein expression for the prognosis of DLBCL is unclear. In this study, we detected MLL2 protein expression in primary gastrointestinal diffuse large B cell lymphoma (PGI-DLBCL) samples by using tissue microarray immunohistochemistry, and analyzed the correlation between MLL2 protein expression and tumor proliferation activity. In addition, we investigated clinical significance of MLL2 protein expression for PGI-DLBCL prognosis. We found that there was significant difference in MLL2 protein expression between PGI-DLBCL and reactive hyperplasia of lymph node. High expression of MLL2 protein indicated higher clinical stage. In older patients (>60 years) with PGI-DLBCL, MLL2 protein expression was positively correlated with Ki-67 expression and negatively correlated with patient survival. Our data suggest that MLL2 protein is overexpressed in PGI-DLBCL and appears as a prognostic factor for patients of PGI-DLBCL, especially for those older than 60 years old. PMID:26722499

  17. MLL2 protein is a prognostic marker for gastrointestinal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ye, Haige; Lu, Lu; Ge, Bei; Gao, Shenmeng; Ma, Yongyong; Liang, Bin; Yu, Kang; Yang, Kaiyan

    2015-01-01

    Mixed linage leukemia gene 2 (MLL2) is identified as a novel mutation gene in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, the significance of MLL2 protein expression for the prognosis of DLBCL is unclear. In this study, we detected MLL2 protein expression in primary gastrointestinal diffuse large B cell lymphoma (PGI-DLBCL) samples by using tissue microarray immunohistochemistry, and analyzed the correlation between MLL2 protein expression and tumor proliferation activity. In addition, we investigated clinical significance of MLL2 protein expression for PGI-DLBCL prognosis. We found that there was significant difference in MLL2 protein expression between PGI-DLBCL and reactive hyperplasia of lymph node. High expression of MLL2 protein indicated higher clinical stage. In older patients (>60 years) with PGI-DLBCL, MLL2 protein expression was positively correlated with Ki-67 expression and negatively correlated with patient survival. Our data suggest that MLL2 protein is overexpressed in PGI-DLBCL and appears as a prognostic factor for patients of PGI-DLBCL, especially for those older than 60 years old. PMID:26722499

  18. A SET-domain-independent role of WRAD complex in cell-cycle regulatory function of mixed lineage leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Aamir; Veeranki, Sailaja Naga; Tyagi, Shweta

    2014-01-01

    MLL, the trithorax ortholog, is a well-characterized histone 3 lysine 4 methyltransferase that is crucial for proper regulation of the Hox genes during embryonic development. Chromosomal translocations, disrupting the Mll gene, lead to aggressive leukemia with poor prognosis. However, the functions of MLL in cellular processes like cell-cycle regulation are not well studied. Here we show that the MLL has a regulatory role during multiple phases of the cell cycle. RNAi-mediated knockdown reveals that MLL regulates S-phase progression and, proper segregation and cytokinesis during M phase. Using deletions and mutations, we narrow the cell-cycle regulatory role to the C subunit of MLL. Our analysis reveals that the transactivation domain and not the SET domain is important for the S-phase function of MLL. Surprisingly, disruption of MLL–WRAD interaction is sufficient to disrupt proper mitotic progression. These mitotic functions of WRAD are independent of SET domain of MLL and, therefore, define a new role of WRAD in subset of MLL functions. Finally, we address the overlapping and unique roles of the different SET family members in the cell cycle. PMID:24880690

  19. Impact of loss of BH3-only proteins on the development and treatment of MLL-fusion gene-driven AML in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bilardi, Rebecca A; Anstee, Natasha S; Glaser, Stefan P; Robati, Mikara; Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Cory, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the apoptosis pathway controlled by opposing members of the Bcl-2 protein family plays a central role in cancer development and resistance to therapy. To investigate how pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins impact on acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we generated mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-AF9 and MLL-ENL AMLs from BH3-only gene knockout mice. Disease development was not accelerated by loss of Bim, Puma, Noxa, Bmf, or combinations thereof; hence these BH3-only proteins are apparently ineffectual as tumor suppressors in this model. We tested the sensitivity of MLL-AF9 AMLs of each genotype in vitro to standard chemotherapeutic drugs and to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, with or without the BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Loss of Puma and/or Noxa increased resistance to cytarabine, daunorubicin and etoposide, while loss of Bim protected against cytarabine and loss of Bmf had no impact. ABT-737 increased sensitivity to the genotoxic drugs but was not dependent on any BH3-only protein tested. The AML lines were very sensitive to bortezomib and loss of Noxa conveyed significant resistance. In vivo, several MLL-AF9 AMLs responded well to daunorubicin and this response was highly dependent on Puma and Noxa but not Bim. Combination therapy with ABT-737 provided little added benefit at the daunorubicin dose trialed. Bortezomib also extended survival of AML-bearing mice, albeit less than daunorubicin. In summary, our genetic studies reveal the importance of Puma and Noxa for the action of genotoxics currently used to treat MLL-driven AML and suggest that, while addition of ABT-737-like BH3 mimetics might enhance their efficacy, new Noxa-like BH3 mimetics targeting Mcl-1 might have greater potential. PMID:27584789

  20. Impact of loss of BH3-only proteins on the development and treatment of MLL-fusion gene-driven AML in mice.

    PubMed

    Bilardi, Rebecca A; Anstee, Natasha S; Glaser, Stefan P; Robati, Mikara; Vandenberg, Cassandra J; Cory, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the apoptosis pathway controlled by opposing members of the Bcl-2 protein family plays a central role in cancer development and resistance to therapy. To investigate how pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only proteins impact on acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we generated mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-AF9 and MLL-ENL AMLs from BH3-only gene knockout mice. Disease development was not accelerated by loss of Bim, Puma, Noxa, Bmf, or combinations thereof; hence these BH3-only proteins are apparently ineffectual as tumor suppressors in this model. We tested the sensitivity of MLL-AF9 AMLs of each genotype in vitro to standard chemotherapeutic drugs and to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, with or without the BH3 mimetic ABT-737. Loss of Puma and/or Noxa increased resistance to cytarabine, daunorubicin and etoposide, while loss of Bim protected against cytarabine and loss of Bmf had no impact. ABT-737 increased sensitivity to the genotoxic drugs but was not dependent on any BH3-only protein tested. The AML lines were very sensitive to bortezomib and loss of Noxa conveyed significant resistance. In vivo, several MLL-AF9 AMLs responded well to daunorubicin and this response was highly dependent on Puma and Noxa but not Bim. Combination therapy with ABT-737 provided little added benefit at the daunorubicin dose trialed. Bortezomib also extended survival of AML-bearing mice, albeit less than daunorubicin. In summary, our genetic studies reveal the importance of Puma and Noxa for the action of genotoxics currently used to treat MLL-driven AML and suggest that, while addition of ABT-737-like BH3 mimetics might enhance their efficacy, new Noxa-like BH3 mimetics targeting Mcl-1 might have greater potential. PMID:27584789

  1. Discovery, Synthesis and Characterization of an Orally Bioavailable, Brain Penetrant Inhibitor of Mixed Lineage Kinase 3

    PubMed Central

    Goodfellow, Val S.; Loweth, Colin J.; Ravula, Satheesh B.; Wiemann, Torsten; Nguyen, Thong; Xu, Yang; Todd, Daniel E.; Sheppard, David; Pollack, Scott; Polesskaya, Oksana; Marker, Daniel F.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition of mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a potential strategy for treatment of Parkinson’s Disease and HIV-1 Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND), requiring an inhibitor that can achieve significant brain concentration levels. We report here URMC-099 (1) an orally bioavailable (F = 41%), potent (IC50 = 14 nM) MLK3 inhibitor with excellent brain exposure in mouse PK models and minimal interference with key human CYP450 enzymes or hERG channels. The compound inhibits LPS-induced TNFα release in microglial cells, HIV-1 Tat-induced release of cytokines in human monocytes, and up-regulation of phospho-JNK in Tat-injected brains of mice. Compound 1 likely functions in HAND preclinical models by inhibiting multiple kinase pathways, including MLK3 and LRRK2 (IC50 = 11 nM). We compare the kinase specificity and BBB penetration of 1 with CEP-1347 (2). Compound 1 is well tolerated, with excellent in vivo activity in HAND models, and is under investigation for further development. PMID:24044867

  2. Mixed lineage kinases activate MEK independently of RAF to mediate resistance to RAF inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Marusiak, Anna A.; Edwards, Zoe C.; Hugo, Willy; Trotter, Eleanor W.; Girotti, Maria R.; Stephenson, Natalie L.; Kong, Xiangju; Gartside, Michael G.; Fawdar, Shameem; Hudson, Andrew; Breitwieser, Wolfgang; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Marais, Richard; Lo, Roger S.; Brognard, John

    2014-01-01

    RAF inhibitor therapy yields significant reductions in tumour burden in the majority of V600E-positive melanoma patients; however, resistance occurs within 2–18 months. Here we demonstrate that the mixed lineage kinases (MLK1–4) are MEK kinases that reactivate the MEK/ERK pathway in the presence of RAF inhibitors. Expression of MLK1–4 mediates resistance to RAF inhibitors and promotes survival in V600E-positive melanoma cell lines. Furthermore, we observe upregulation of the MLKs in 9 of 21 melanoma patients with acquired drug resistance. Consistent with this observation, MLKs promote resistance to RAF inhibitors in mouse models and contribute to acquired resistance in a cell line model. Lastly, we observe that a majority of MLK1 mutations identified in patients are gain-of-function mutations. In summary, our data demonstrate a role for MLKs as direct activators of the MEK/ERK pathway with implications for melanomagenesis and resistance to RAF inhibitors. PMID:24849047

  3. Mixed lineage kinase 3 is required for matrix metalloproteinase expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Yu; Abi Saab, Widian F.; Modi, Nidhi; Stewart, Amanda M.; Liu, Jinsong; Chadee, Deborah N.

    2012-08-15

    Mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) is a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAP3K) that activates MAPK signaling pathways and regulates cellular responses such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Here we report high levels of total and phospho-MLK3 in ovarian cancer cell lines in comparison to immortalized nontumorigenic ovarian epithelial cell lines. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing, we determined that MLK3 is required for the invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, mlk3 silencing substantially reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, -2, -9 and -12 gene expression and MMP-2 and -9 activities in SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. MMP-1, -2, -9 and-12 expression, and MLK3-induced activation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 requires both extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activities. In addition, inhibition of activator protein-1 (AP-1) reduced MMP-1, MMP-9 and MMP-12 gene expression. Collectively, these findings establish MLK3 as an important regulator of MMP expression and invasion in ovarian cancer cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ovarian cancer cell lines have high levels of total and phosphorylated MLK3. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3 is required for MMP expression and activity in ovarian cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3 is required for invasion of SKOV3 and HEY1B ovarian cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLK3-dependent regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities requires ERK and JNK.

  4. Hepatitis C Virus NS5A Inhibits Mixed Lineage Kinase 3 to Block Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Amako, Yutaka; Igloi, Zsofia; Mankouri, Jamel; Kazlauskas, Arunas; Saksela, Kalle; Dallas, Mark; Peers, Chris; Harris, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in the activation of numerous stress responses including oxidative stress, with the potential to induce an apoptotic state. Previously we have shown that HCV attenuates the stress-induced, p38MAPK-mediated up-regulation of the K+ channel Kv2.1, to maintain the survival of infected cells in the face of cellular stress. We demonstrated that this effect was mediated by HCV non-structural 5A (NS5A) protein, which impaired p38MAPK activity through a polyproline motif-dependent interaction, resulting in reduction of phosphorylation activation of Kv2.1. In this study, we investigated the host cell proteins targeted by NS5A to mediate Kv2.1 inhibition. We screened a phage-display library expressing the entire complement of human SH3 domains for novel NS5A-host cell interactions. This analysis identified mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3) as a putative NS5A interacting partner. MLK3 is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is a member of the MAPK kinase kinase (MAP3K) family and activates p38MAPK. An NS5A-MLK3 interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis. We further demonstrate a novel role of MLK3 in the modulation of Kv2.1 activity, whereby MLK3 overexpression leads to the up-regulation of channel activity. Accordingly, coexpression of NS5A suppressed this stimulation. Additionally we demonstrate that overexpression of MLK3 induced apoptosis, which was also counteracted by NS5A. We conclude that NS5A targets MLK3 with multiple downstream consequences for both apoptosis and K+ homeostasis. PMID:23857585

  5. Identification of a gene, MLL, that spans the breakpoint in 11q23 translocations associated with human leukemias

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemin-van der Poel, S.; McCabe, N.R.; Gill, H.J.; Espinosa, R. III; Patel, Y.; Harden, A.; Rubinelli, P.; Smith, S.D.; LeBeau, M.M.; Rowley, J.D.; Diaz, M.O. )

    1991-12-01

    Recurring chromosomal translocations involving chromosome 11, band q23, have been observed in acute lymphoid leukemias and especially in acute myeloid leukemias. The authors recently showed that breakpoints in four 11q23 translocations, t(4,11)(q21;q23), t(6;11)(q27;q23), t(9;11)(p22;q23), and t(11;19)(q23;p13.3), were contained within a yeast artificial chromosome clone bearing the CD3D and CD3G gene loci. They have identified within the CD3 yeast artificial chromosome a transcription unit that spans the breakpoint junctions of the 4;11, 9;11, and 11;19 translocations, and they describe two other, related transcripts that are upregulated in the RS4;11 cell line. They have named this gene MLL (myeloid/lymphoid, or mixed-lineage, leukemia).

  6. Selective inhibition of EZH2 and EZH1 enzymatic activity by a small molecule suppresses MLL-rearranged leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bowen; On, Doan M; Ma, Anqi; Parton, Trevor; Konze, Kyle D; Pattenden, Samantha G; Allison, David F; Cai, Ling; Rockowitz, Shira; Liu, Shichong; Liu, Ying; Li, Fengling; Vedadi, Masoud; Frye, Stephen V; Garcia, Benjamin A; Zheng, Deyou; Jin, Jian; Wang, Gang Greg

    2015-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) and related EZH1 control gene expression and promote tumorigenesis via methylating histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27). These methyltransferases are ideal therapeutic targets due to their frequent hyperactive mutations and overexpression found in cancer, including hematopoietic malignancies. Here, we characterized a set of small molecules that allow pharmacologic manipulation of EZH2 and EZH1, which include UNC1999, a selective inhibitor of both enzymes, and UNC2400, an inactive analog compound useful for assessment of off-target effect. UNC1999 suppresses global H3K27 trimethylation/dimethylation (H3K27me3/2) and inhibits growth of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged leukemia cells. UNC1999-induced transcriptome alterations overlap those following knockdown of embryonic ectoderm development, a common cofactor of EZH2 and EZH1, demonstrating UNC1999's on-target inhibition. Mechanistically, UNC1999 preferentially affects distal regulatory elements such as enhancers, leading to derepression of polycomb targets including Cdkn2a. Gene derepression correlates with a decrease in H3K27me3 and concurrent gain in H3K27 acetylation. UNC2400 does not induce such effects. Oral administration of UNC1999 prolongs survival of a well-defined murine leukemia model bearing MLL-AF9. Collectively, our study provides the detailed profiling for a set of chemicals to manipulate EZH2 and EZH1 and establishes specific enzymatic inhibition of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-EZH2 and PRC2-EZH1 by small-molecule compounds as a novel therapeutics for MLL-rearranged leukemia.

  7. The translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) without MLL gene rearrangement--a possible marker of good prognosis in myelodysplastic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Pavel; Lysak, Daniel; Vokurka, Samuel; Michalova, Kyra; Sarova, Iveta; Jonasova, Anna; Hruba, Martina; Rykovska, Anna; Subrt, Ivan

    2014-06-01

    The translocation t(2;11)(p21;q23) is associated with de novo myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and has an overall frequency of approximately 1%. The outcome of MDS patients with this translocation is not clear until now, because most of the clinical data addressing the t(2;11)(p21;q23) has been collected without investigating the status of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. In this report, we present seven new patients with MDS diagnosis and the t(2;11)(p21;q23) in bone marrow cells; all of them without MLL gene rearrangement. They were found in two databases consisting of 1185 patients of two Czech institutions. These patients tended to be younger and showed a strong male predominance. A cytological and histological assessment of bone marrow at diagnosis revealed only mild MDS with marked dysplasia in megakaryopoiesis. Similar to other primary abnormalities in MDS (e.g. deletion of 11q), the t(2;11)(p21;q23) was frequently associated with deletion of 5q. Our results stress the common clinicopathological features of this entity and indicate that the t(2;11)(p21;q23) may be associated with a good prognosis for MDS patients (median survival 72 months).

  8. Proteasome Inhibitors Evoke Latent Tumor Suppression Programs in Pro-B MLL Leukemias Through MLL-AF4

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Westergard, Todd D.; Cashen, Amanda; Piwnica-Worms, David R.; Kunkle, Lori; Vij, Ravi; Pham, Can G.; DiPersio, John; Cheng, Emily H.; Hsieh, James J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromosomal translocations disrupting MLL generate MLL-fusion proteins that induce aggressive leukemias. Unexpectedly, MLL-fusion proteins are rarely observed at high levels, suggesting excessive MLL-fusions may be incompatible with a malignant phenotype. Here, we used clinical proteasome inhibitors, bortezomib and carfilzomib, to reduce the turnover of endogenous MLL-fusions and discovered that accumulated MLL-fusions induce latent, context-dependent tumor suppression programs. Specifically, in MLL pro-B lymphoid, but not myeloid, leukemias, proteasome inhibition triggers apoptosis and cell cycle arrest involving activation cleavage of BID by Caspase-8 and upregulation of p27, respectively. Furthermore, proteasome inhibition conferred preliminary benefit to MLL-AF4 leukemia patients. Hence, feasible strategies to treat cancer-type and oncogene specific cancers can be improvised through harnessing inherent tumor suppression properties of individual oncogenic fusions. PMID:24735925

  9. Translocation of mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein to plasma membrane leads to necrotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Li, Wenjuan; Ren, Junming; Huang, Deli; He, Wan-ting; Song, Yunlong; Yang, Chao; Li, Wanyun; Zheng, Xinru; Chen, Pengda; Han, Jiahuai

    2014-01-01

    Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) was identified to function downstream of receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF)-induced necrosis (also called necroptosis). However, how MLKL functions to mediate necroptosis is unknown. By reconstitution of MLKL function in MLKL-knockout cells, we showed that the N-terminus of MLKL is required for its function in necroptosis. The oligomerization of MLKL in TNF-treated cells is essential for necroptosis, as artificially forcing MLKL together by using the hormone-binding domain (HBD*) triggers necroptosis. Notably, forcing together the N-terminal domain (ND) but not the C-terminal kinase domain of MLKL causes necroptosis. Further deletion analysis showed that the four-α-helix bundle of MLKL (1-130 amino acids) is sufficient to trigger necroptosis. Both the HBD*-mediated and TNF-induced complexes of MLKL(ND) or MLKL are tetramers, and translocation of these complexes to lipid rafts of the plasma membrane precedes cell death. The homo-oligomerization is required for MLKL translocation and the signal sequence for plasma membrane location is located in the junction of the first and second α-helices of MLKL. The plasma membrane translocation of MLKL or MLKL(ND) leads to sodium influx, and depletion of sodium from the cell culture medium inhibits necroptosis. All of the above phenomena were not seen in apoptosis. Thus, the MLKL oligomerization leads to translocation of MLKL to lipid rafts of plasma membrane, and the plasma membrane MLKL complex acts either by itself or via other proteins to increase the sodium influx, which increases osmotic pressure, eventually leading to membrane rupture. PMID:24366341

  10. Ablation of mixed lineage kinase 3 (Mlk3) does not inhibit ototoxicity induced by acoustic trauma or aminoglycoside exposure.

    PubMed

    Polesskaya, Oksana; Cunningham, Lisa L; Francis, Shimon P; Luebke, Anne E; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Collins, David; Vasilyeva, Olga N; Sahler, Julie; Desmet, Emily A; Gelbard, Harris A; Maggirwar, Sanjay B; Walton, Joseph P; Frisina, Robert D; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2010-12-01

    Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is activated in cochlear hair cells following acoustic trauma or exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Blockade of JNK activation using mixed lineage kinase (MLK) inhibitors prevents hearing loss and hair cell death following these stresses. Since current pharmacologic inhibitors of MLKs block multiple members of this kinase family, we examined the contribution of the major neuronal family member (MLK3) to stress-induced ototoxicity, usingMlk3(-/-) mice. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that MLK3 is expressed in cochlear hair cells of C57/BL6 mice (but not in Mlk3(-/-) animals). After exposure to acoustic trauma there was no significant difference in DPOAE and ABR values betweenMlk3(-/-) and wild-type mice at 48 h following exposure or 2 weeks later. Susceptibility of hair cells to aminoglycoside toxicity was tested by exposing explanted utricles to gentamicin. Gentamicin-induced hair cell death was equivalent in utricles from wild-type and Mlk3(-/-) mice. Blockade of JNK activation with the pharmacologic inhibitor SP600125 attenuated cell death in utricles from both wild-type and Mlk3(-/-) mice. These data show that MLK3 ablation does not protect against hair cell death following acoustic trauma or exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics, suggesting that MLK3 is not the major upstream regulator of JNK-mediated hair cell death following these stresses. Rather, other MLK family members such as MLK1, which is also expressed in cochlea, may have a previously unappreciated role in noise- and aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity.

  11. Ablation of mixed lineage kinase 3 (Mlk3) does not inhibit ototoxicity induced by acoustic trauma or aminoglycoside exposure

    PubMed Central

    Polesskaya, Oksana; Cunningham, Lisa L.; Francis, Shimon P.; Luebke, Anne E.; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Collins, David; Vasilyeva, Olga N.; Sahler, Julie; Desmet, Emily A.; Gelbard, Harris A.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Walton, Joseph P.; Frisina, Robert D.; Dewhurst, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) is activated in cochlear hair cells following acoustic trauma or exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Blockade of JNK activation using mixed lineage kinase (MLK) inhibitors prevents hearing loss and hair cell death following these stresses. Since current pharmacologic inhibitors of MLKs block multiple members of this kinase family, we examined the contribution of the major neuronal family member (MLK3) to stress-induced ototoxicity, using Mlk3−/− mice. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that MLK3 is expressed in cochlear hair cells of C57/BL6 mice (but not in Mlk3−/− animals). After exposure to acoustic trauma there was no significant difference in DPOAE and ABR values between Mlk3−/− and wild-type mice at 48 hours following exposure or 2 weeks later. Susceptibility of hair cells to aminoglycoside toxicity was tested by exposing explanted utricles to gentamicin. Gentamicin-induced hair cell death was equivalent in utricles from wild-type and Mlk3−/− mice. Blockade of JNK activation with the pharmacologic inhibitor SP600125 attenuated cell death in utricles from both wild-type and Mlk3−/− mice. These data show that MLK3 ablation does not protect against hair cell death following acoustic trauma or exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics, suggesting that MLK3 is not the major upstream regulator of JNK-mediated hair cell death following these stresses. Rather, other MLK family members such as MLK1, which is also expressed in cochlea, may have a previously unappreciated role in noise- and aminoglycoside-induced ototoxicity. PMID:20971179

  12. Evolving Catalytic Properties of the MLL Family SET Domain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Mittal, Anshumali; Reid, James; Reich, Stephanie; Gamblin, Steven J.; Wilson, Jon R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Methylation of histone H3 lysine-4 is a hallmark of chromatin associated with active gene expression. The activity of H3K4-specific modification enzymes, in higher eukaryotes the MLL (or KMT2) family, is tightly regulated. The MLL family has six members, each with a specialized function. All contain a catalytic SET domain that associates with a core multiprotein complex for activation. These SET domains segregate into three classes that correlate with the arrangement of targeting domains that populate the rest of the protein. Here we show that, unlike MLL1, the MLL4 SET domain retains significant activity without the core complex. We also present the crystal structure of an inactive MLL4-tagged SET domain construct and describe conformational changes that account for MLL4 intrinsic activity. Finally, our structure explains how the MLL SET domains are able to add multiple methyl groups to the target lysine, despite having the sequence characteristics of a classical monomethylase. PMID:26320581

  13. Rebuilding Synaptic Architecture in HIV-1 Associated Neurocognitive Disease (HAND) – A Therapeutic Strategy Based on Modulation of Mixed Lineage Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Gelbard, Harris A.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Kiebala, Michelle; Polesskaya, Oksana; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2010-01-01

    Work from our laboratories has validated mixed lineage kinase type 3 (MLK3) as an enzyme pathologically activated in the central nervous system (CNS) by HIV-1 neurotoxins. In this review, we discuss MLK3 activation in the context of the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 associated neurocognitive deficits (HAND). We use findings from the literature to substantiate the neuropathologic relevance of MLK3 to neurodegenerative disease, with an emphasis on Parkinson’s disease (PD) that shares a number of important phenotypic and neuropathologic characteristics with HAND. We discuss signal transduction pathways downstream from MLK3 activation, with an emphasis on their involvement in microglia and neurons in preclinical models of HAND. Finally, we make a case for pharmacologic intervention targeted at inhibition of MLK3 as a strategy to reverse HAND in light of the fact that combination antiretroviral therapy, despite successfully managing systemic infection of HIV-1, has been largely unsuccessful in eradicating HAND. PMID:20880503

  14. Chromodomain-helicase-DNA binding protein 5, 7 and pronecrotic mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein serve as potential prognostic biomarkers in patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Seldon, Crystal S; Colbert, Lauren E; Hall, William A; Fisher, Sarah B; Yu, David S; Landry, Jerome C

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers with a very poor prognosis. Recently, there has been a significant increase in research directed towards identifying potential biomarkers that can be used to diagnose and provide prognostic information for pancreatic cancer. These markers can be used clinically to optimize and personalize therapy for individual patients. In this review, we focused on 3 biomarkers involved in the DNA damage response pathway and the necroptosis pathway: Chromodomain-helicase-DNA binding protein 5, chromodomain-helicase-DNA binding protein 7, and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein. The aim of this article is to review present literature provided for these biomarkers and current studies in which their effectiveness as prognostic biomarkers are analyzed in order to determine their future use as biomarkers in clinical medicine. Based on the data presented, these biomarkers warrant further investigation, and should be validated in future studies. PMID:27096031

  15. Bimodal degradation of MLL by SCFSkp2 and APCCdc20 assures cell cycle execution: a critical regulatory circuit lost in leukemogenic MLL fusions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Han; Cheng, Emily H.-Y.; Hsieh, James J.-D.

    2007-01-01

    Human chromosome 11q23 translocations disrupting MLL result in poor prognostic leukemias. It fuses the common MLL N-terminal ∼1400 amino acids in-frame with >60 different partners without shared characteristics. In addition to the well-characterized activity of MLL in maintaining Hox gene expression, our recent studies established an MLL–E2F axis in orchestrating core cell cycle gene expression including Cyclins. Here, we demonstrate a biphasic expression of MLL conferred by defined windows of degradation mediated by specialized cell cycle E3 ligases. Specifically, SCFSkp2 and APCCdc20 mark MLL for degradation at S phase and late M phase, respectively. Abolished peak expression of MLL incurs corresponding defects in G1/S transition and M-phase progression. Conversely, overexpression of MLL blocks S-phase progression. Remarkably, MLL degradation initiates at its N-terminal ∼1400 amino acids, and tested prevalent MLL fusions are resistant to degradation. Thus, impaired degradation of MLL fusions likely constitutes the universal mechanism underlying all MLL leukemias. Our data conclude an essential post-translational regulation of MLL by the cell cycle ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) assures the temporal necessity of MLL in coordinating cell cycle progression. PMID:17908926

  16. Histone methylase MLL1 and MLL3 coordinate with estrogen receptors in estrogen-mediated HOXB9 expression

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Shrestha, Bishakha; Hussain, Imran; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2011-01-01

    Homeobox gene HOXB9 is a critical player in development of mammary gland and sternum and in regulation of Renin which is closely linked with blood pressure control. Our studies demonstrated that HOXB9 gene is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen (E2). HOXB9 promoter contains several estrogen-response elements (ERE). Reporter assay based experiments demonstrated that HOXB9 promoter EREs are estrogen-responsive. Estrogen receptors ERα and ERβ are essential for E2-mediated transcriptional activation of HOXB9. Chromatin immuno-precipitation assay demonstrated that ERs bind to HOXB9 EREs as a function of E2. Similarly, histone methylases MLL1 and MLL3 also bind to HOXB9 EREs and play critical role in E2-mediated transcriptional activation of HOXB9. Overall, our studies demonstrated that HOXB9 is an E2-responsive gene and ERs coordinate with MLL1 and MLL3 in E2-mediated transcriptional regulation of HOXB9. PMID:21428455

  17. Molecular characterization of a rare MLL-AF4 (MLL-AFF1) fusion rearrangement in infant leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bizarro, Susana; Cerveira, Nuno; Correia, Cecília; Lisboa, Susana; Peixoto, Ana; Norton, Lucília; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2007-10-01

    The t(4;11)(q21;q23) involving the genes MLL and AF4 (alias for AFF1) is detected in 50-70% of infant leukemia. We characterize at both the DNA and RNA level a rare MLL-AF4 fusion transcript identified in a 15-month-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Direct sequence analysis of the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction product showed an in-frame fusion between MLL exon 9 and AF4 exon 6. We further demonstrated that the genomic breakpoints were located 1,553 bp downstream of MLL exon 9 and 1,239 bp upstream of AF4 exon 6. Four Alu repeats were detected in MLL intron 9 and two Alu repeats and one LINE1 repetitive element were identified downstream of AF4 exon 5. Finally, a 9-bp polypurine (A) tract and an 8-bp polypyrimidine (T) tract were found flanking the translocation breakpoint. In summary, we have characterized at both the RNA and the DNA level a rare MLL-AF4 fusion variant that was presumably mediated by Alu repeats or polypurine and polypyrimidine tracts located in the vicinity of genomic breakpoints. PMID:17889710

  18. Collagen-GAG scaffold biophysical properties bias MSC lineage choice in the presence of mixed soluble signals.

    PubMed

    Caliari, Steven R; Harley, Brendan A C

    2014-09-01

    Biomaterial strategies for regenerating multitissue structures require unique approaches. One strategy is to design scaffolds so that their local biophysical properties can enhance site-specific effects of an otherwise heterogeneous biomolecular environment. This investigation examined the role of biomaterial physical properties (relative density, mineral content) on the human mesenchymal stem cell phenotype in the presence of mixed soluble signals to drive osteogenesis or chondrogenesis. We tested a series of three-dimensional collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds with properties inspired by extracellular matrix characteristics across the osteotendinous interface (tendon, cartilage, and bone). We found that selective scaffold mineralization induced a depressed chondrogenic response compared with nonmineralized groups as demonstrated by gene expression and histological analyses. Interestingly, the greatest chondrogenic response was found in a higher density, nonmineralized scaffold variant despite increased contraction and cellular condensation in lower density nonmineralized scaffolds. In fact, the lower density scaffolds demonstrated a significantly higher expression of osteogenic transcripts as well as ample mineralization after 21 days of culture. This effect may be due to local stiffening of the scaffold microenvironment as the scaffold contracts, leading to increased cell density, accelerated differentiation, and possible endochondral ossification as evidenced by a transition from a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-rich milieu to higher mineralization at later culture times. These findings will help shape the design rules for graded biomaterials to regenerate distinct fibrillar, fibrocartilagenous, and mineralized regions of orthopedic interfaces. PMID:24568607

  19. Collagen-GAG scaffold biophysical properties bias MSC lineage choice in the presence of mixed soluble signals.

    PubMed

    Caliari, Steven R; Harley, Brendan A C

    2014-09-01

    Biomaterial strategies for regenerating multitissue structures require unique approaches. One strategy is to design scaffolds so that their local biophysical properties can enhance site-specific effects of an otherwise heterogeneous biomolecular environment. This investigation examined the role of biomaterial physical properties (relative density, mineral content) on the human mesenchymal stem cell phenotype in the presence of mixed soluble signals to drive osteogenesis or chondrogenesis. We tested a series of three-dimensional collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds with properties inspired by extracellular matrix characteristics across the osteotendinous interface (tendon, cartilage, and bone). We found that selective scaffold mineralization induced a depressed chondrogenic response compared with nonmineralized groups as demonstrated by gene expression and histological analyses. Interestingly, the greatest chondrogenic response was found in a higher density, nonmineralized scaffold variant despite increased contraction and cellular condensation in lower density nonmineralized scaffolds. In fact, the lower density scaffolds demonstrated a significantly higher expression of osteogenic transcripts as well as ample mineralization after 21 days of culture. This effect may be due to local stiffening of the scaffold microenvironment as the scaffold contracts, leading to increased cell density, accelerated differentiation, and possible endochondral ossification as evidenced by a transition from a glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-rich milieu to higher mineralization at later culture times. These findings will help shape the design rules for graded biomaterials to regenerate distinct fibrillar, fibrocartilagenous, and mineralized regions of orthopedic interfaces.

  20. Neuroprotective effects of preconditioning ischaemia on ischaemic brain injury through inhibition of mixed-lineage kinase 3 via NMDA receptor-mediated Akt1 activation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Hui; Zhang, Quan-Guang; Miao, Bei; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2005-05-01

    A number of works show that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway responds actively in cerebral ischaemia and reperfusion. We undertook our present studies to clarify the role of mixed-lineage kinase 3 (MLK3), a MAPK kinase kinase (MAPKKK) in MAPK cascades, in global ischaemia and ischaemic tolerance. The mechanism concerning NMDA receptor-mediated Akt1 activation underlying ischaemic tolerance, was also investigated. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 6 min of ischaemia and differing times of reperfusion. Our results showed MLK3 was activated in the hippocampal CA1 region with two peaks occurring at 30 min and 6 h, respectively. This activation returned to base level 3 days later. Both preconditioning with 3 min of sublethal ischaemia and NMDA pretreatment inhibited the 6-h peak of activation. However, pretreatment of ketamine before preconditioning reversed the inhibiting effect of preconditioning on MLK3 activation at 6 h of reperfusion. In the case of Akt1, however, preconditioning and NMDA pretreatment enhanced Akt1 activation at 10 min of reperfusion. Furthermore, ketamine pretreatment reversed preconditioning-induced increase of Akt1 activation. We also noted that pretreatment of LY294002 before preconditioning reversed both the inhibition of MLK3 activation at 6 h of reperfusion and the increase in Akt1 activation at 10 min of reperfusion. The above-mentioned results lead us to conclude that, in the hippocampal CA1 region, preconditioning inhibits MLK3 activation after lethal ischaemia and reperfusion and, furthermore, this effect is mediated by Akt1 activation through NMDA receptor stimulation.

  1. The Polycomb complex PRC2 supports aberrant self-renewal in a mouse model of MLL-AF9;NrasG12D acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Zuber, Johannes; Rappaport, Amy; Taylor, Meredith; Johns, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Trithorax and Polycomb groups of chromatin regulators are critical for cell-lineage specification during normal development; functions that often become deregulated during tumorigenesis. As an example, oncogenic fusions of the Trithorax-related protein MLL can initiate aggressive leukemias by altering the transcriptional circuitry governing hematopoietic cell differentiation, a process that is known to require additional epigenetic pathways to implement. Here we used shRNA screening to identify chromatin regulators uniquely required in a mouse model of MLL-fusion acute myeloid leukemia, which revealed a role for the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) in maintenance of this disease. shRNA-mediated suppression of PRC2 subunits Eed, Suz12, or Ezh1/Ezh2 led to proliferation-arrest and differentiation of leukemia cells, with a minimal impact on growth of several non-transformed hematopoietic cell lines. The requirement for PRC2 in leukemia is partly due to its role in direct transcriptional repression of genes that limit the self-renewal potential of hematopoietic cells, including Cdkn2a. In addition to implicating a role for PRC2 in the pathogenesis of MLL-fusion leukemia, our results suggest, more generally, that Trithorax and Polycomb group proteins can cooperate with one another to maintain aberrant lineage programs in cancer. PMID:22469984

  2. Structural and Biochemical Insights into MLL1 Core Complex Assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Avdic, Vanja; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Groulx, Adam; Tremblay, Véronique; Brunzelle, Joseph; Couture, Jean-François

    2012-05-02

    Histone H3 Lys-4 methylation is predominantly catalyzed by a family of methyltransferases whose enzymatic activity depends on their interaction with a three-subunit complex composed of WDR5, RbBP5, and Ash2L. Here, we report that a segment of 50 residues of RbBP5 bridges the Ash2L C-terminal domain to WDR5. The crystal structure of WDR5 in ternary complex with RbBP5 and MLL1 reveals that both proteins binds peptide-binding clefts located on opposite sides of WDR5s {beta}-propeller domain. RbBP5 engages in several hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts within a V-shaped cleft formed by the junction of two blades on WDR5. Mutational analyses of both the WDR5 V-shaped cleft and RbBP5 residues reveal that the interactions between RbBP5 and WDR5 are important for the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity. Overall, this study provides the structural basis underlying the formation of the WDR5-RbBP5 subcomplex and further highlight the crucial role of WDR5 in scaffolding the MLL1 core complex.

  3. Genetic and clinical characterization of 45 acute leukemia patients with MLL gene rearrangements from a single institution.

    PubMed

    Cerveira, Nuno; Lisboa, Susana; Correia, Cecília; Bizarro, Susana; Santos, Joana; Torres, Lurdes; Vieira, Joana; Barros-Silva, João D; Pereira, Dulcineia; Moreira, Cláudia; Meyer, Claus; Oliva, Tereza; Moreira, Ilídia; Martins, Ângelo; Viterbo, Luísa; Costa, Vítor; Marschalek, Rolf; Pinto, Armando; Mariz, José M; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2012-10-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements affecting the MLL gene are associated with high-risk pediatric, adult and therapy-associated acute leukemia. In this study, conventional cytogenetic, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and molecular genetic studies were used to characterize the type and frequency of MLL rearrangements in a consecutive series of 45 Portuguese patients with MLL-related leukemia treated in a single institution between 1998 and 2011. In the group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and an identified MLL fusion partner, 47% showed the presence of an MLL-AFF1 fusion, as a result of a t(4;11). In the remaining cases, a MLL-MLLT3 (27%), a MLL-MLLT1 (20%), or MLL-MLLT4 (7%) rearrangement was found. The most frequent rearrangement found in patients with acute myeloid leukemia was the MLL-MLLT3 fusion (42%), followed by MLL-MLLT10 (23%), MLL-MLLT1 (8%), MLL-ELL (8%), MLL-MLLT4 (4%), and MLL-MLLT11 (4%). In three patients, fusions involving MLL and a septin family gene (SEPT2, SEPT6, and SEPT9), were identified. The most frequently identified chromosomal rearrangements were reciprocal translocations, but insertions and deletions, some cryptic, were also observed. In our series, patients with MLL rearrangements were shown to have a poor prognosis, regardless of leukemia subtype. Interestingly, children with 1 year or less showed a statistically significant better overall survival when compared with both older children and adults. The use of a combined strategy in the initial genetic evaluation of acute leukemia patients allowed us to characterize the pattern of MLL rearrangements in our institution, including our previous discovery of two novel MLL fusion partners, the SEPT2 and CT45A2 genes, and a very rare MLL-MLLT4 fusion variant. PMID:22846743

  4. The transcriptomic landscape and directed chemical interrogation of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemias.

    PubMed

    Lavallée, Vincent-Philippe; Baccelli, Irène; Krosl, Jana; Wilhelm, Brian; Barabé, Frédéric; Gendron, Patrick; Boucher, Geneviève; Lemieux, Sébastien; Marinier, Anne; Meloche, Sylvain; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Using next-generation sequencing of primary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) specimens, we identified to our knowledge the first unifying genetic network common to the two subgroups of KMT2A (MLL)-rearranged leukemia, namely having MLL fusions or partial tandem duplications. Within this network, we experimentally confirmed upregulation of the gene with the most subtype-specific increase in expression, LOC100289656, and identified cryptic MLL fusions, including a new MLL-ENAH fusion. We also identified a subset of MLL fusion specimens carrying mutations in SPI1 accompanied by inactivation of its transcriptional network, as well as frequent RAS pathway mutations, which sensitized the leukemias to synthetic lethal interactions between MEK and receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This transcriptomics-based characterization and chemical interrogation of human MLL-rearranged AML was a valuable approach for identifying complementary features that define this disease.

  5. The distribution of MLL breakpoints correlates with outcome in infant acute leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Emerenciano, Mariana; Meyer, Claus; Mansur, Marcela B; Marschalek, Rolf; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S

    2013-04-01

    Acute leukaemia in early childhood - and mainly infant leukaemia (IL) - is characterized by acquired genetic alterations, most commonly by the presence of distinct MLL rearrangements (MLL-r). The aim of this study was to investigate possible correlations between clinical features and molecular analyses of a series of 545 childhood leukaemia (≤24 months of age) cases: 385 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and 160 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The location of the genomic breakpoints was determined in a subset of 30 MLL-r cases. The overall survival of the investigated cohort was 60·5%, as determined by the Kaplan-Meier method. Worse outcomes were associated with age at diagnosis ≤6 months (P < 0·001), high white blood cell count (P = 0·001), and MLL-r (P = 0·002) in ALL, while children with AML displayed a poorer outcome (P = 0·009) regardless of their age strata. Moreover, we present first evidence that MLL-r patients with poor outcome preferentially displayed chromosomal breakpoints within MLL intron 11. Based on the literature, most MLL-r IL display a breakpoint localization towards intron 11, which in turn may explain their worse clinical course. In summary, the MLL breakpoint localization is of clinical importance and should be considered as a novel outcome predictor for MLL-r patients.

  6. Impact of MLL5 expression on decitabine efficacy and DNA methylation in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yun, Haiyang; Damm, Frederik; Yap, Damian; Schwarzer, Adrian; Chaturvedi, Anuhar; Jyotsana, Nidhi; Lübbert, Michael; Bullinger, Lars; Döhner, Konstanze; Geffers, Robert; Aparicio, Samuel; Humphries, R Keith; Ganser, Arnold; Heuser, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Hypomethylating agents are widely used in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and unfit patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, it is not well understood why only some patients respond to hypomethylating agents. We found previously that the effect of decitabine on hematopoietic stem cell viability differed between Mll5 wild-type and null cells. We, therefore, investigated the role of MLL5 expression levels on outcome of acute myeloid leukemia patients who were treated with decitabine. MLL5 above the median expression level predicted longer overall survival independent of DNMT3A mutation status in bivariate analysis (median overall survival for high vs. low MLL5 expression 292 vs. 167 days; P=0.026). In patients who received three or more courses decitabine, high MLL5 expression and wild-type DNMT3A independently predicted improved overall survival (median overall survival for high vs. low MLL5 expression 468 vs. 243 days; P=0.012). In transformed murine cells, loss of Mll5 was associated with resistance to low-dose decitabine, less global DNA methylation in promoter regions, and reduced DNA demethylation upon decitabine treatment. Together, these data support our clinical observation of improved outcome in decitabine-treated patients who express MLL5 at high levels, and suggest a mechanistic role of MLL5 in the regulation of DNA methylation.

  7. The landscape of somatic mutations in infant MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemias.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Anna K; Ma, Jing; Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Xiang; Gedman, Amanda Larson; Dang, Jinjun; Nakitandwe, Joy; Holmfeldt, Linda; Parker, Matthew; Easton, John; Huether, Robert; Kriwacki, Richard; Rusch, Michael; Wu, Gang; Li, Yongjin; Mulder, Heather; Raimondi, Susana; Pounds, Stanley; Kang, Guolian; Shi, Lei; Becksfort, Jared; Gupta, Pankaj; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Boggs, Kristy; Yergeau, Donald; Manne, Jayanthi; Song, Guangchun; Edmonson, Michael; Nagahawatte, Panduka; Wei, Lei; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Sutton, Rosemary; Venn, Nicola C; Chetcuti, Albert; Rush, Amanda; Catchpoole, Daniel; Heldrup, Jesper; Fioretos, Thoas; Lu, Charles; Ding, Li; Pui, Ching-Hon; Shurtleff, Sheila; Mullighan, Charles G; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Gruber, Tanja A; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R

    2015-04-01

    Infant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with MLL rearrangements (MLL-R) represents a distinct leukemia with a poor prognosis. To define its mutational landscape, we performed whole-genome, exome, RNA and targeted DNA sequencing on 65 infants (47 MLL-R and 18 non-MLL-R cases) and 20 older children (MLL-R cases) with leukemia. Our data show that infant MLL-R ALL has one of the lowest frequencies of somatic mutations of any sequenced cancer, with the predominant leukemic clone carrying a mean of 1.3 non-silent mutations. Despite this paucity of mutations, we detected activating mutations in kinase-PI3K-RAS signaling pathway components in 47% of cases. Surprisingly, these mutations were often subclonal and were frequently lost at relapse. In contrast to infant cases, MLL-R leukemia in older children had more somatic mutations (mean of 6.5 mutations/case versus 1.3 mutations/case, P = 7.15 × 10(-5)) and had frequent mutations (45%) in epigenetic regulators, a category of genes that, with the exception of MLL, was rarely mutated in infant MLL-R ALL.

  8. Differential regulation of the c-Myc/Lin28 axis discriminates subclasses of rearranged MLL leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lili; Sun, Yuqing; Wang, Jingya; Jiang, Hui; Muntean, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    MLL rearrangements occur in myeloid and lymphoid leukemias and are generally associated with a poor prognosis, however this varies depending on the fusion partner. We modeled acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice using various MLL fusion proteins (MLL-FPs) and observed significantly different survival outcomes. To better understand the differences between these leukemias, we examined the genome wide expression profiles of leukemic cells transformed with different MLL-FPs. RNA-sequencing and pathway analysis identified the c-Myc transcriptional program as one of the top distinguishing features. c-Myc protein levels were highly correlative with AML disease latency in mice. Functionally, overexpression of c-Myc resulted in a more aggressive proliferation rate in MLL-FP cell lines. While all MLL-FP transformed cells displayed sensitivity to BET inhibitors, high c-Myc expressing cells showed greater resistance to Brd4 inhibition. The Myc target Lin28B was also differentially expressed in MLL-FP cell lines in agreement with c-Myc expression. Examination of Lin28B miRNAs targets revealed that let-7g was significantly increased in leukemic cells associated with the longest disease latency and forced let-7g expression induced differentiation of leukemic blasts. Thus, differential regulation of the c-Myc/Lin28/let-7g program by different MLL-FPs is functionally related to disease latency and BET inhibitor resistance in MLL leukemias. PMID:27007052

  9. Mutation of cancer driver MLL2 results in transcription stress and genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Kantidakis, Theodoros; Saponaro, Marco; Mitter, Richard; Horswell, Stuart; Kranz, Andrea; Boeing, Stefan; Aygün, Ozan; Kelly, Gavin P.; Matthews, Nik; Stewart, Aengus; Stewart, A. Francis; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2016-01-01

    Genome instability is a recurring feature of tumorigenesis. Mutation in MLL2, encoding a histone methyltransferase, is a driver in numerous different cancer types, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we present evidence that MLL2 mutation results in genome instability. Mouse cells in which MLL2 gene deletion can be induced display elevated levels of sister chromatid exchange, gross chromosomal aberrations, 53BP1 foci, and micronuclei. Human MLL2 knockout cells are characterized by genome instability as well. Interestingly, MLL2 interacts with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and RECQL5, and, although MLL2 mutated cells have normal overall H3K4me levels in genes, nucleosomes in the immediate vicinity of RNAPII are hypomethylated. Importantly, MLL2 mutated cells display signs of substantial transcription stress, and the most affected genes overlap with early replicating fragile sites, show elevated levels of γH2AX, and suffer frequent mutation. The requirement for MLL2 in the maintenance of genome stability in genes helps explain its widespread role in cancer and points to transcription stress as a strong driver in tumorigenesis. PMID:26883360

  10. Mutation of cancer driver MLL2 results in transcription stress and genome instability.

    PubMed

    Kantidakis, Theodoros; Saponaro, Marco; Mitter, Richard; Horswell, Stuart; Kranz, Andrea; Boeing, Stefan; Aygün, Ozan; Kelly, Gavin P; Matthews, Nik; Stewart, Aengus; Stewart, A Francis; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2016-02-15

    Genome instability is a recurring feature of tumorigenesis. Mutation in MLL2, encoding a histone methyltransferase, is a driver in numerous different cancer types, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we present evidence that MLL2 mutation results in genome instability. Mouse cells in which MLL2 gene deletion can be induced display elevated levels of sister chromatid exchange, gross chromosomal aberrations, 53BP1 foci, and micronuclei. Human MLL2 knockout cells are characterized by genome instability as well. Interestingly, MLL2 interacts with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and RECQL5, and, although MLL2 mutated cells have normal overall H3K4me levels in genes, nucleosomes in the immediate vicinity of RNAPII are hypomethylated. Importantly, MLL2 mutated cells display signs of substantial transcription stress, and the most affected genes overlap with early replicating fragile sites, show elevated levels of γH2AX, and suffer frequent mutation. The requirement for MLL2 in the maintenance of genome stability in genes helps explain its widespread role in cancer and points to transcription stress as a strong driver in tumorigenesis. PMID:26883360

  11. Expression of HOX genes in acute leukemia cell lines with and without MLL translocations.

    PubMed

    Quentmeier, Hilmar; Dirks, Wilhelm G; Macleod, Roderick A F; Reinhardt, Julia; Zaborski, Margarete; Drexler, Hans G

    2004-03-01

    In primary cells from acute leukemia patients, expression of the genes MEIS1, HOXA5, HOXA7 and HOXA9 has been reported to be correlated with the occurrence of MLL translocations. It was our aim to find out whether MLL mutant (MLLmu) and MLL wild-type (MLLwt) acute leukemia-derived cell lines might likewise be discriminated on the basis of HOX gene expression. Southern blot analysis, performed to verify the MLL status of the cells, showed that NOMO-1 was the only cell line not tested previously carrying a rearranged MLL gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that this cell line exhibited a reciprocal t(9;11)(q23;p22). Sequencing of RT-PCR products thereof identified unique MLL exon 10/AF-9 exon 5 fusion transcripts. We divided the acute leukemia-derived cell lines (n = 37) according to the results of Southern blot analysis into MLLmu (n = 19) and MLLwt (n = 18). Expression of HOX genes was then analyzed by applying reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Northern and Western blot analyses. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines expressed the HOX genes significantly more often than acute lymphoblastic (ALL) cell lines. In ALL, cells with MLL translocations expressed the genes 4 times more often than MLLwt cells. Most distinct was the correlation between MLL status and MEIS1 expression in ALL-derived cell lines: 8/8 MLLmu but 0/10 MLLwt cell lines expressed MEIS1. Northern and Western blot analysis confirmed that also HOXA9 and FLT3 were significantly more often and stronger expressed in MLLmu than in MLLwt ALL cell lines. These results suggest that MLL aberrations may regulate MEIS1 and HOXA9 gene expression in ALL-derived cell lines, while AML-derived cell lines express these genes independently of the MLL status. PMID:15160920

  12. An Network Attack Modeling Method Based on MLL-AT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fen, Yan; Xinchun, Yin; Hao, Huang

    In this paper, the method of modeling attack using attack tree is researched. The main goal is effectively using attack tree to model and express multi-stage network attacks. We expand and improve the traditional attack tree. The attack nodes in traditional attack tree are redefined, and the attack risk of leaf node is quantified. On those basis, the mentality and method of building MLL-AT (Multi-Level & Layer Attack Tree) are proposed. The improved attack tree can model attack more accurately, in particular to multi-stage network attacks. And the new model can also be used to evaluate system's risk, to distinguish between varying system security threat degrees caused by different attack sequences.

  13. Mixed heterolobosean and novel gregarine lineage genes from culture ATCC 50646: Long-branch artefacts, not lateral gene transfer, distort α-tubulin phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Contradictory and confusing results can arise if sequenced 'monoprotist' samples really contain DNA of very different species. Eukaryote-wide phylogenetic analyses using five genes from the amoeboflagellate culture ATCC 50646 previously implied it was an undescribed percolozoan related to percolatean flagellates (Stephanopogon, Percolomonas). Contrastingly, three phylogenetic analyses of 18S rRNA alone, did not place it within Percolozoa, but as an isolated deep-branching excavate. I resolve that contradiction by sequence phylogenies for all five genes individually, using up to 652 taxa. Its 18S rRNA sequence (GQ377652) is near-identical to one from stained-glass windows, somewhat more distant from one from cooling-tower water, all three related to terrestrial actinocephalid gregarines Hoplorhynchus and Pyxinia. All four protein-gene sequences (Hsp90; α-tubulin; β-tubulin; actin) are from an amoeboflagellate heterolobosean percolozoan, not especially deeply branching. Contrary to previous conclusions from trees combining protein and rRNA sequences or rDNA trees including Eozoa only, this culture does not represent a major novel deep-branching eukaryote lineage distinct from Heterolobosea, and thus lacks special significance for deep eukaryote phylogeny, though the rDNA sequence is important for gregarine phylogeny. α-Tubulin trees for over 250 eukaryotes refute earlier suggestions of lateral gene transfer within eukaryotes, being largely congruent with morphology and other gene trees. PMID:25769111

  14. MLL2 and KDM6A mutations in patients with Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Noriko; Koshimizu, Eriko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Mizuno, Seiji; Ogata, Tsutomu; Nagai, Toshiro; Kosho, Tomoki; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Goro; Mabe, Hiroyo; Watanabe, Yoriko; Yoshino, Makoto; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Takanashi, Jun-ichi; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk; Tekin, Mustafa; Ochi, Nobuhiko; Kubota, Masaya; Ito, Naoko; Ihara, Kenji; Hara, Toshiro; Tonoki, Hidefumi; Ohta, Tohru; Saito, Kayoko; Matsuo, Mari; Urano, Mari; Enokizono, Takashi; Sato, Astushi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Atsushi; Fujita, Takako; Hiraki, Yoko; Kitanaka, Sachiko; Matsubara, Yoichi; Makita, Toshio; Taguri, Masataka; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Yoshiura, Ko-ichiro; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Niikawa, Norio

    2013-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by developmental delay, intellectual disability, specific facial features including long palpebral fissures and ectropion of the lateral third of the lower eyelids, prominent digit pads, and skeletal and visceral abnormalities. Mutations in MLL2 and KDM6A cause Kabuki syndrome. We screened 81 individuals with Kabuki syndrome for mutations in these genes by conventional methods (n = 58) and/or targeted resequencing (n = 45) or whole exome sequencing (n = 5). We identified a mutation in MLL2 or KDM6A in 50 (61.7%) and 5 (6.2%) cases, respectively. Thirty-five MLL2 mutations and two KDM6A mutations were novel. Non-protein truncating-type MLL2 mutations were mainly located around functional domains, while truncating-type mutations were scattered through the entire coding region. The facial features of patients in the MLL2 truncating-type mutation group were typical based on those of the 10 originally reported patients with Kabuki syndrome; those of the other groups were less typical. High arched eyebrows, short fifth finger, and hypotonia in infancy were more frequent in the MLL2 mutation group than in the KDM6A mutation group. Short stature and postnatal growth retardation were observed in all individuals with KDM6A mutations, but in only half of the group with MLL2 mutations. PMID:23913813

  15. Spectrum of MLL2 (ALR) mutations in 110 cases of Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Mark C; Buckingham, Kati J; Ng, Sarah B; Ming, Jeffrey E; Beck, Anita E; McMillin, Margaret J; Gildersleeve, Heidi I; Bigham, Abigail W; Tabor, Holly K; Mefford, Heather C; Cook, Joseph; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Miyake, Noriko; Tonoki, Hidefumi; Naritomi, Kenji; Kaname, Tadashi; Nagai, Toshiro; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Hou, Jia-Woei; Ohta, Tohru; Liang, Deshung; Sudo, Akira; Morris, Colleen A; Banka, Siddharth; Black, Graeme C; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Nickerson, Deborah A; Zackai, Elaine H; Shaikh, Tamim H; Donnai, Dian; Niikawa, Norio; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare, multiple malformation disorder characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, cardiac anomalies, skeletal abnormalities, and mild to moderate intellectual disability. Simplex cases make up the vast majority of the reported cases with Kabuki syndrome, but parent-to-child transmission in more than a half-dozen instances indicates that it is an autosomal dominant disorder. We recently reported that Kabuki syndrome is caused by mutations in MLL2, a gene that encodes a Trithorax-group histone methyltransferase, a protein important in the epigenetic control of active chromatin states. Here, we report on the screening of 110 families with Kabuki syndrome. MLL2 mutations were found in 81/110 (74%) of families. In simplex cases for which DNA was available from both parents, 25 mutations were confirmed to be de novo, while a transmitted MLL2 mutation was found in two of three familial cases. The majority of variants found to cause Kabuki syndrome were novel nonsense or frameshift mutations that are predicted to result in haploinsufficiency. The clinical characteristics of MLL2 mutation-positive cases did not differ significantly from MLL2 mutation-negative cases with the exception that renal anomalies were more common in MLL2 mutation-positive cases. These results are important for understanding the phenotypic consequences of MLL2 mutations for individuals and their families as well as for providing a basis for the identification of additional genes for Kabuki syndrome.

  16. The potential of clofarabine in MLL-rearranged infant acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Stumpel, Dominique J P M; Schneider, Pauline; Pieters, Rob; Stam, Ronald W

    2015-09-01

    MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in infants is the most difficult-to-treat type of childhood ALL, displaying a chemotherapy-resistant phenotype, and unique histone modifications, gene expression signatures and DNA methylation patterns. MLL-rearranged infant ALL responds remarkably well to nucleoside analogue drugs in vitro, such as cytarabine and cladribine, and to the demethylating agents decitabine and zebularine as measured by cytotoxicity assays. These observations led to the inclusion of cytarabine into the treatment regimens currently used for infants with ALL. However, survival chances for infants with MLL-rearranged ALL do still not exceed 30-40%. Here we explored the in vitro potential of the novel nucleoside analogue clofarabine for MLL-rearranged infant ALL. Therefore we used both cell line models as well as primary patient cells. Compared with other nucleoside analogues, clofarabine effectively targeted primary MLL-rearranged infant ALL cells at the lowest concentrations, with median LC50 values of ∼25 nM. Interestingly, clofarabine displayed synergistic cytotoxic effects in combination with cytarabine. Furthermore, at concentrations of 5-10nM clofarabine induced demethylation of the promoter region of the tumour suppressor gene FHIT (Fragile Histidine Triad), a gene typically hypermethylated in MLL-rearranged ALL. Demethylation of the FHIT promoter region was accompanied by subtle re-expression of this gene both at the mRNA and protein level. We conclude that clofarabine is an interesting candidate for further studies in MLL-rearranged ALL in infants.

  17. Quantitative dissection and stoichiometry determination of the human SET1/MLL histone methyltransferase complexes.

    PubMed

    van Nuland, Rick; Smits, Arne H; Pallaki, Paschalina; Jansen, Pascal W T C; Vermeulen, Michiel; Timmers, H T Marc

    2013-05-01

    Methylation of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4) at promoters is tightly linked to transcriptional regulation in human cells. At least six different COMPASS-like multisubunit (SET1/MLL) complexes that contain methyltransferase activity for H3K4 have been described, but a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of these SET1/MLL complexes is lacking. We applied label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to determine the subunit composition and stoichiometry of the human SET1/MLL complexes. We identified both known and novel, unique and shared interactors and determined their distribution and stoichiometry over the different SET1/MLL complexes. In addition to being a core COMPASS subunit, the Dpy30 protein is a genuine subunit of the NURF chromatin remodeling complex. Furthermore, we identified the Bod1 protein as a discriminator between the SET1B and SET1A complexes, and we show that the H3K36me-interactor Psip1 preferentially binds to the MLL2 complex. Finally, absolute protein quantification in crude lysates mirrors many of the observed SET1/MLL complex stoichiometries. Our findings provide a molecular framework for understanding the diversity and abundance of the different SET1/MLL complexes, which together establish the H3K4 methylation landscape in human cells. PMID:23508102

  18. MLL-MLLT10 fusion gene in pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Morerio, Cristina; Rapella, Annamaria; Tassano, Elisa; Rosanda, Cristina; Panarello, Claudio

    2005-10-01

    The occurrence of MLL gene rearrangement in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AML-M7, acute myeloid leukemia, French-American-British type M7) is very rare and limited to pediatric age: in particular, MLL-MLLT10 fusion, previously reported as characteristic of monocytic leukemia, has been reported in only one case of pediatric megakaryoblastic leukemia. We describe the second case with this association in light of the few reported cases of AML-M7 with MLL and/or 11q23 involvement.

  19. Synthesis, Optimization, and Evaluation of Novel Small Molecules as Antagonists of WDR5-MLL Interaction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The WD40-repeat protein WDR5 plays a critical role in maintaining the integrity of MLL complexes and fully activating their methyltransferase function. MLL complexes, the trithorax-like family of SET1 methyltransferases, catalyze trimethylation of lysine 4 on histone 3, and they have been widely implicated in various cancers. Antagonism of WDR5 and MLL subunit interaction by small molecules has recently been presented as a practical way to inhibit activity of the MLL1 complex, and N-(2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-substituted-phenyl) benzamides were reported as potent and selective antagonists of such an interaction. Here, we describe the protein crystal structure guided optimization of prototypic compound 2 (Kdis = 7 μM), leading to identification of more potent antagonist 47 (Kdis = 0.3 μM). PMID:24900672

  20. Synthesis, Optimization, and Evaluation of Novel Small Molecules as Antagonists of WDR5-MLL Interaction.

    PubMed

    Bolshan, Yuri; Getlik, Matthäus; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Wasney, Gregory A; Hajian, Taraneh; Poda, Gennadiy; Nguyen, Kong T; Wu, Hong; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Dong, Aiping; Senisterra, Guillermo; Schapira, Matthieu; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Brown, Peter J; Al-Awar, Rima; Vedadi, Masoud; Smil, David

    2013-03-14

    The WD40-repeat protein WDR5 plays a critical role in maintaining the integrity of MLL complexes and fully activating their methyltransferase function. MLL complexes, the trithorax-like family of SET1 methyltransferases, catalyze trimethylation of lysine 4 on histone 3, and they have been widely implicated in various cancers. Antagonism of WDR5 and MLL subunit interaction by small molecules has recently been presented as a practical way to inhibit activity of the MLL1 complex, and N-(2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-substituted-phenyl) benzamides were reported as potent and selective antagonists of such an interaction. Here, we describe the protein crystal structure guided optimization of prototypic compound 2 (K dis = 7 μM), leading to identification of more potent antagonist 47 (K dis = 0.3 μM).

  1. Design of a Fluorescent Ligand Targeting the S-adenosylmethioine Binding Site of the Histone Methyltransferase MLL1

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yepeng; Blazer, Levi L.; Hu, Hao; Hajian, Taraneh; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Hong; Houliston, Scott; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Vedadi, Masoud; Zheng, Yujun George

    2015-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase MLL1 has been linked to translocation-associated gene fusion in childhood leukemias and is an attractive drug target. High-throughput biochemical analysis of MLL1 methyltransferase activity requires the production of at least a trimeric complex of MLL1, RbBP5 and WDR5 to elicit robust activity. Production of trimeric and higher order MLL1 complexes in the quantities and reproducibility required for high-throughput screening presents a significant impediment to MLL1 drug discovery efforts. We present here a small molecule fluorescent ligand (FL-NAH, 6) that is able to bind to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) binding site of MLL1 in a manner independent of the associated complex members. We have used FL-NAH to develop a fluorescence polarization-based SAM displacement assay in a 384-well format targeting the MLL1 SET domain in the absence of associated complex members. FL-NAH competes with SAM and is displaced from the MLL1 SET domain by other SAM-binding site ligands with Kdisp values similar to the higher-order complexes, but is unaffected by the H3 peptide substrate. This assay enables screening for SAM-competitive MLL1 inhibitors without requiring the use of trimeric or higher order MLL1 complexes, significantly reducing screening time and cost. PMID:26541578

  2. Expression pattern of the septin gene family in acute myeloid leukemias with and without MLL-SEPT fusion genes.

    PubMed

    Santos, Joana; Cerveira, Nuno; Bizarro, Susana; Ribeiro, Franclim R; Correia, Cecília; Torres, Lurdes; Lisboa, Susana; Vieira, Joana; Mariz, José M; Norton, Lucília; Snijder, Simone; Mellink, Clemens H; Buijs, Arjan; Shih, Lee-Yung; Strehl, Sabine; Micci, Francesca; Heim, Sverre; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2010-05-01

    Septins are proteins associated with crucial steps in cell division and cellular integrity. In humans, 14 septin genes have been identified, of which five (SEPT2, SEPT5, SEPT6, SEPT9, and SEPT11) are known to participate in reciprocal translocations with the MLL gene in myeloid neoplasias. We have recently shown a significant down-regulation of both SEPT2 and MLL in myeloid neoplasias with the MLL-SEPT2 fusion gene. In this study, we examined the expression pattern of the other 13 known septin genes in altogether 67 cases of myeloid neoplasia, including three patients with the MLL-SEPT2 fusion gene, four with MLL-SEPT6 fusion, and three patients with the MLL-SEPT9 fusion gene. When compared with normal controls, a statistically significant down-regulation was observed for the expression of both MLL (6.4-fold; p=0.008) and SEPT6 (1.7-fold; p=0.002) in MLL-SEPT6 leukemia. Significant down-regulation of MLL was also found in MLL-MLLT3 leukemias. In addition, there was a trend for SEPT9 down-regulation in MLL-SEPT9 leukemias (4.6-fold; p=0.077). Using hierarchical clustering analysis to compare acute myeloid leukemia genetic subgroups based on their similarity of septin expression changes, we found that MLL-SEPT2 and MLL-SEPT6 neoplasias cluster together apart from the remaining subgroups and that PML-RARA leukemia presents under-expression of most septin family genes. PMID:19748670

  3. Potent inhibition of DOT1L as treatment of MLL-fusion leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Scott R.; Olhava, Edward J.; Therkelsen, Carly A.; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Jin, Lei; Boriack-Sjodin, P. Ann; Allain, Christina J.; Klaus, Christine R.; Raimondi, Alejandra; Scott, Margaret Porter; Waters, Nigel J.; Chesworth, Richard; Moyer, Mikel P.; Copeland, Robert A.; Richon, Victoria M.

    2013-01-01

    Rearrangements of the MLL gene define a genetically distinct subset of acute leukemias with poor prognosis. Current treatment options are of limited effectiveness; thus, there is a pressing need for new therapies for this disease. Genetic and small molecule inhibitor studies have demonstrated that the histone methyltransferase DOT1L is required for the development and maintenance of MLL-rearranged leukemia in model systems. Here we describe the characterization of EPZ-5676, a potent and selective aminonucleoside inhibitor of DOT1L histone methyltransferase activity. The compound has an inhibition constant value of 80 pM, and demonstrates 37 000-fold selectivity over all other methyltransferases tested. In cellular studies, EPZ-5676 inhibited H3K79 methylation and MLL-fusion target gene expression and demonstrated potent cell killing that was selective for acute leukemia lines bearing MLL translocations. Continuous IV infusion of EPZ-5676 in a rat xenograft model of MLL-rearranged leukemia caused complete tumor regressions that were sustained well beyond the compound infusion period with no significant weight loss or signs of toxicity. EPZ-5676 is therefore a potential treatment of MLL-rearranged leukemia and is under clinical investigation. PMID:23801631

  4. Structure-based design and synthesis of small molecular inhibitors disturbing the interaction of MLL1-WDR5.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-Dong; Chen, Wei-Lin; Xu, Xiao-Li; Jiang, Fen; Wang, Lei; Xie, Yi-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Jin; Guo, Xiao-Ke; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    MLL1 complex catalyzes the methylation of H3K4, and plays important roles in the development of acute leukemia harboring MLL fusion proteins. Targeting MLL1-WDR5 protein-protein interaction (PPI) to inhibit the activity of histone methyltransferase of MLL1 complex is a novel strategy for treating of acute leukemia. WDR5-47 (IC50 = 0.3 μM) was defined as a potent small molecule to disturb the interaction of MLL1-WDR5. Here, we described structure-based design and synthesis of small molecular inhibitors to block MLL1-WDR5 PPI. Especially, compound 23 (IC50 = 104 nM) was the most potent small molecular, and about 3-times more potent than WDR5-47. We also discussed the SAR of these series of compounds with docking study, which may stimulate more potent compounds.

  5. Targeting the kinase activities of ATR and ATM exhibits antitumoral activity in mouse models of MLL-rearranged AML.

    PubMed

    Morgado-Palacin, Isabel; Day, Amanda; Murga, Matilde; Lafarga, Vanesa; Anton, Marta Elena; Tubbs, Anthony; Chen, Hua-Tang; Ergan, Aysegul; Anderson, Rhonda; Bhandoola, Avinash; Pike, Kurt G; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Wang, Xi; Pierce, Andrew J; Hubbard, Chad; Armstrong, Scott A; Nussenzweig, André; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Among the various subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), those with chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL oncogene (AML-MLL) have a poor prognosis. AML-MLL tumor cells are resistant to current genotoxic therapies because of an attenuated response by p53, a protein that induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage. In addition to chemicals that damage DNA, efforts have focused on targeting DNA repair enzymes as a general chemotherapeutic approach to cancer treatment. Here, we found that inhibition of the kinase ATR, which is the primary sensor of DNA replication stress, induced chromosomal breakage and death of mouse AML(MLL) cells (with an MLL-ENL fusion and a constitutively active N-RAS independently of p53. Moreover, ATR inhibition as a single agent exhibited antitumoral activity, both reducing tumor burden after establishment and preventing tumors from growing, in an immunocompetent allograft mouse model of AML(MLL) and in xenografts of a human AML-MLL cell line. We also found that inhibition of ATM, a kinase that senses DNA double-strand breaks, also promoted the survival of the AML(MLL) mice. Collectively, these data indicated that ATR or ATM inhibition represent potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AML, especially MLL-driven leukemias. PMID:27625305

  6. Global Analysis of H3K4 Methylation Defines MLL Family Member Targets and Points to a Role for MLL1-Mediated H3K4 Methylation in the Regulation of Transcriptional Initiation by RNA Polymerase II ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengfei; Lin, Chengqi; Smith, Edwin R.; Guo, Hong; Sanderson, Brian W.; Wu, Min; Gogol, Madelaine; Alexander, Tara; Seidel, Christopher; Wiedemann, Leanne M.; Ge, Kai; Krumlauf, Robb; Shilatifard, Ali

    2009-01-01

    A common landmark of activated genes is the presence of trimethylation on lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4) at promoter regions. Set1/COMPASS was the founding member and is the only H3K4 methylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae; however, in mammals, at least six H3K4 methylases, Set1A and Set1B and MLL1 to MLL4, are found in COMPASS-like complexes capable of methylating H3K4. To gain further insight into the different roles and functional targets for the H3K4 methylases, we have undertaken a genome-wide analysis of H3K4 methylation patterns in wild-type Mll1+/+ and Mll1−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We found that Mll1 is required for the H3K4 trimethylation of less than 5% of promoters carrying this modification. Many of these genes, which include developmental regulators such as Hox genes, show decreased levels of RNA polymerase II recruitment and expression concomitant with the loss of H3K4 methylation. Although Mll1 is only required for the methylation of a subset of Hox genes, menin, a component of the Mll1 and Mll2 complexes, is required for the overwhelming majority of H3K4 methylation at Hox loci. However, the loss of MLL3/MLL4 and/or the Set1 complexes has little to no effect on the H3K4 methylation of Hox loci or their expression levels in these MEFs. Together these data provide insight into the redundancy and specialization of COMPASS-like complexes in mammals and provide evidence for a possible role for Mll1-mediated H3K4 methylation in the regulation of transcriptional initiation. PMID:19703992

  7. Phylogenetic lineages in Entomophthoromycota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Entomophthoromycota Humber is one of five major phylogenetic lineages among the former phylum Zygomycota. These early terrestrial fungi share evolutionarily ancestral characters such as coenocytic mycelium and gametangiogamy as a sexual process resulting in zygospore formation. Previous molecular st...

  8. An Inducible Retroviral Expression System for Tandem Affinity Purification Mass-Spectrometry-Based Proteomics Identifies Mixed Lineage Kinase Domain-like Protein (MLKL) as an Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) Client.

    PubMed

    Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Fauster, Astrid; Rebsamen, Manuele; Kandasamy, Richard K; Scorzoni, Stefania; Vladimer, Gregory I; Müller, André C; Gstaiger, Matthias; Zuber, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2016-03-01

    Tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry (TAP-MS) is a popular strategy for the identification of protein-protein interactions, characterization of protein complexes, and entire networks. Its employment in cellular settings best fitting the relevant physiology is limited by convenient expression vector systems. We developed an easy-to-handle, inducible, dually selectable retroviral expression vector allowing dose- and time-dependent control of bait proteins bearing the efficient streptavidin-hemagglutinin (SH)-tag at their N- or C termini. Concomitant expression of a reporter fluorophore allows to monitor bait-expressing cells by flow cytometry or microscopy and enables high-throughput phenotypic assays. We used the system to successfully characterize the interactome of the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS) Gly12Asp (G12D) mutant and exploited the advantage of reporter fluorophore expression by tracking cytokine-independent cell growth using flow cytometry. Moreover, we tested the feasibility of studying cytotoxicity-mediating proteins with the vector system on the cell death-inducing mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) Ser358Asp (S358D) mutant. Interaction proteomics analysis of MLKL Ser358Asp (S358D) identified heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) as a high-confidence interacting protein. Further phenotypic characterization established MLKL as a novel HSP90 client. In summary, this novel inducible expression system enables SH-tag-based interaction studies in the cell line proficient for the respective phenotypic or signaling context and constitutes a valuable tool for experimental approaches requiring inducible or traceable protein expression.

  9. Zinc oxide nanoparticles-induced intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression requires Rac1/Cdc42, mixed lineage kinase 3, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ching-Hao; Liao, Po-Lin; Shyu, Ming-Kwang; Liu, Chen-Wei; Kao, Chen-Chieh; Huang, Shih-Hsuan; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2012-03-01

    The explosive development of nanotechnology has caused an increase in unintended biohazards in humans and in the ecosystem. Similar to particulate matter, nanoparticles (NPs) are strongly correlated with the increase in incidences of cardiovascular diseases, yet the mechanisms behind this correlation remain unclear. Within the testing concentrations of 0.1-10 μg/ml, which did not cause a marked drop in cell viability, zinc oxide NPs (ZnO-NPs) induced intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) messenger RNA, and protein expression in both concentration- and time-dependent manner in treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). ZnO-NPs treatment cause the activation of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)/cell division control protein 42 homolog (Cdc42) and protein accumulation of mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3), followed by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and transcription factor c-Jun activation. Induction of ICAM-1 and phosphorylation of JNK and c-Jun could be inhibited by either JNK inhibitor SP600125 or Rac guanosine triphosphatase inhibitor NSC23766 pretreatment. In addition, pretreatment with NSC23766 significantly reduced MLK3 accumulation, suggesting the involvement of Rac1/Cdc42-MLK3-JNK-c-Jun signaling in the regulation of ZnO-NPs-induced ICAM-1 expression, whereas these signaling factors were not activated in zinc oxide microparticles (ZnO-MPs)-treated HUVECs. The increase of ICAM-1 expression on ZnO-NPs-treated HUVECs enables leukocytes to adhere and has been identified as an indicator of vascular inflammation. Our data are essential for safety evaluation of the clinical usage of ZnO-NPs in daily supplements, cosmetics, and biomedicines.

  10. Purified mulberry leaf lectin (MLL) induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in human breast cancer and colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Mundekkad; Sureshkumar, Thavamani; Satheeshkumar, Padikara Kutty; Priya, Sulochana

    2012-10-25

    Medicinal values of mulberry are known to humans from ancient ages. The white mulberry, Morus alba L. is a rich source of many bioactive phytochemicals. Earlier investigations in our laboratory lead to the purification and characterization of an anti-proliferative lectin (MLL) from the leaves of this plant. Further to that, here we have investigated the mechanism of cell death induction by MLL on human breast cancer (MCF-7) and colon cancer (HCT-15) cells. Cells were treated with GI(50) concentration (concentration of lectin required for 50% inhibition of cell growth) of MLL (8.5 μg/ml for MCF-7 and 16 μg/ml for HCT-15) for 24 h to induce cell death. The induction of apoptosis was studied by morphological analysis, DNA fragmentation, apoptotic cell staining and caspase 3 activity assay. Apoptotic cells in sub G0-G1 phase were monitored using flow cytometry. MLL induced significant morphological changes and DNA fragmentation associated with apoptosis in MCF-7 and HCT-15 cells. Positive annexin V and acridine orange/ethidium bromide stained cells indicated apoptosis induction by MLL. Up-regulation of caspase 3 activity was also found in cells treated with MLL. Flow cytometry analysis showed an increase in the percentage of cells in sub G0-G1 phase confirming the MLL induced apoptosis. In conclusion, MLL induced apoptosis in MCF-7 and HCT-15 cells in a caspase dependent manner.

  11. HOXC6 is transcriptionally regulated via coordination of MLL histone methylase and estrogen receptor under estrogen environment

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Khairul I.; Hussain, Imran; Shrestha, Bishakha; Kasiri, Sahba; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.

    2011-01-01

    Homeobox containing gene HOXC6 is a critical player in mammary gland development, milk production and is overexpressed in breast and prostate cancer. We demonstrated that HOXC6 is transcriptionally regulated by estrogen (E2). HOXC6 promoter contains two putative estrogen-response elements (EREs), termed as ERE11/2 and ERE21/2. Promoter analysis using luciferase based reporter assay demonstrated that both EREs are responsive to E2, ERE11/2 being more responsive than ERE21/2. Estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, bind to these EREs in an E2-dependent manner and antisense-mediated knockdown of ERs suppressed the E2-dependent activation of HOXC6 expression. Similarly, knockdown of histone methylases, MLL2 and MLL3, decreased E2-mediated activation of HOXC6. However, depletion of MLL1 or MLL4 showed no significant effect. MLL2 and MLL3 were bound to the HOXC6 EREs in an E2-dependent manner. In contrast, MLL1 and MLL4 that were bound to the HOXC6 promoter in the absence of E2, decreased upon exposure to E2. MLL2 and MLL3 play key roles in histone H3K4-trimethylation and recruitment of general transcription factors and RNAP II in the HOXC6 promoter during E2-dependent transactivation. Nuclear receptor corepressors N-CoR and SAFB1 were bound in the HOXC6 promoter in absence of E2 and that binding were decreased upon E2-treatment indicating their critical roles in suppressing HOXC6 gene expression under non-activated condition. Knockdown of either ERα or ERβ abolished E2-dependent recruitment of MLL2 and MLL3 into the HOXC6 promoter demonstrating key roles of ERs in recruitment of these MLLs into HOXC6 promoter. Overall, our studies demonstrated that HOXC6 is an estrogen-responsive gene and histone methylases MLL2 and MLL3, in coordination with ERα and ERβ, transcriptionally regulate HOXC6 in an E2-dependent manner. PMID:21683083

  12. Id2 and E Proteins Orchestrate the Initiation and Maintenance of MLL-Rearranged Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ghisi, Margherita; Kats, Lev; Masson, Frederick; Li, Jason; Kratina, Tobias; Vidacs, Eva; Gilan, Omer; Doyle, Maria A; Newbold, Andrea; Bolden, Jessica E; Fairfax, Kirsten A; de Graaf, Carolyn A; Firth, Matthew; Zuber, Johannes; Dickins, Ross A; Corcoran, Lynn M; Dawson, Mark A; Belz, Gabrielle T; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2016-07-11

    E proteins and their antagonists, the Id proteins, are transcriptional regulators important for normal hematopoiesis. We found that Id2 acts as a key regulator of leukemia stem cell (LSC) potential in MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Low endogenous Id2 expression is associated with LSC enrichment while Id2 overexpression impairs MLL-AF9-leukemia initiation and growth. Importantly, MLL-AF9 itself controls the E-protein pathway by suppressing Id2 while directly activating E2-2 expression, and E2-2 depletion phenocopies Id2 overexpression in MLL-AF9-AML cells. Remarkably, Id2 tumor-suppressive function is conserved in t(8;21) AML. Low expression of Id2 and its associated gene signature are associated with poor prognosis in MLL-rearranged and t(8;21) AML patients, identifying the Id2/E-protein axis as a promising new therapeutic target in AML. PMID:27374225

  13. An Evolutionary Conserved Epigenetic Mark of Polycomb Response Elements Implemented by Trx/MLL/COMPASS.

    PubMed

    Rickels, Ryan; Hu, Deqing; Collings, Clayton K; Woodfin, Ashley R; Piunti, Andrea; Mohan, Man; Herz, Hans-Martin; Kvon, Evgeny; Shilatifard, Ali

    2016-07-21

    Polycomb response elements (PREs) are specific DNA sequences that stably maintain the developmental pattern of gene expression. Drosophila PREs are well characterized, whereas the existence of PREs in mammals remains debated. Accumulating evidence supports a model in which CpG islands recruit Polycomb group (PcG) complexes; however, which subset of CGIs is selected to serve as PREs is unclear. Trithorax (Trx) positively regulates gene expression in Drosophila and co-occupies PREs to antagonize Polycomb-dependent silencing. Here we demonstrate that Trx-dependent H3K4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) marks Drosophila PREs and maintains the developmental expression pattern of nearby genes. Similarly, the mammalian Trx homolog, MLL1, deposits H3K4me2 at CpG-dense regions that could serve as PREs. In the absence of MLL1 and H3K4me2, H3K27me3 levels, a mark of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), increase at these loci. By inhibiting PRC2-dependent H3K27me3 in the absence of MLL1, we can rescue expression of these loci, demonstrating a functional balance between MLL1 and PRC2 activities at these sites. Thus, our study provides rules for identifying cell-type-specific functional mammalian PREs within the human genome. PMID:27447986

  14. Generation and characterization of bioluminescent xenograft mouse models of MLL-related acute leukemias and in vivo evaluation of luciferase-targeting siRNA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fazzina, Raffaella; Lombardini, Lorenza; Mezzanotte, Laura; Roda, Aldo; Hrelia, Patrizia; Pession, Andrea; Tonelli, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    Chromosomal translocations involving the MLL gene on 11q23 present frequent abnormalities in pediatric, adult and therapy-related acute leukemias, and are generally associated with aggressive disease and poor prognosis. Here, we report bioluminescent acute leukemia xenograft mouse models of the most frequent and aggressive MLL-related acute leukemias (infant and adult MLL-AF9, MLL-ENL, MLL-AF4). Four acute leukemia cell lines carrying MLL-related translocations were stably transduced with a firefly luciferase transgene and injected intravenously into NOD/SCID mice. Leukemia progression was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). All mice developed MLL-related acute leukemia. The four MLL-related acute leukemia models showed a different course of infant and adult MLL-AF9 acute myeloid leukemia, and a rapid aggressiveness of MLL-ENL acute lymphoblastic leukemia and MLL-AF4 acute biphenotypic leukemia. Tissue analysis and RT-PCR of bone marrow, spleen and liver from the mice confirmed the BL results. To validate BLI for the detection of a therapeutic response, systemic treatment with an anti-luciferase-targeting siRNA (siLuc) complexed with cationic nanoparticles was administered to mice with MLL-AF4 acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The BLI signal showed a reduction following treatment with siLuc compared to the control mice. These mouse models present MLL-related acute leukemia evolution similar to the human counterparts. Moreover, they are non-invasive, rapid and sensitive models, suitable for the in vivo study of MLL-related acute leukemias. Finally, BLI showed in vivo luminescence down modulation obtained by systemic treatment with luciferase-targeting siRNA nanoparticle complexes, confirming that these MLL-related leukemia mouse models are optimal for the evaluation and selection of delivery systems for siRNA and other new biotechnological pharmaceuticals.

  15. Bronchial isomerism in a Kabuki syndrome patient with a novel mutation in MLL2 gene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare, multiple congenital anomalies/intellectual disability syndrome caused by mutations of MLL2 gene, which codifies for a histone methyltrasferase that regulates the embryogenesis and the tissue development. Left-bronchial isomerism is a rare congenital abnormality that can be defined as the absence of the normal lateralizing features which distinguish right and left-sides in the lungs. To date, this is the first report of left-bronchial isomerism in association with KS. Case presentation A one-month-old Caucasian male patient underwent our attention for microcephaly, dysmorphic features (long palpebral fissures, eyebrows with sparse lateral third, everted lower eyelids, blue sclerae, large dysplastic ears, lower lip pits), persistent fetal fingertip pads, short stature, heart defects (interventricular defect and aortic coarctation), unilateral cryptorchidism, hypotonia and delay in gross motor skills. These features suggested a diagnosis of KS and a molecular analysis confirmed a novel frame-shift mutation in the exon 11 of MLL2 gene. Subsequently, given recurrent respiratory infections with a normal immunological status, he underwent a chest CT scan that showed a left bronchial isomerism. Conclusion We report a patient affected by KS, with a novel MLL2 mutation and an atypical phenotype characterized by left-side bronchial isomerism. Interestingly, genes involved in the heterotaxia/isomerism such as ROCK2 and SHROOM3 are known to interact with MLL2 gene. In order to achieve a correct diagnosis and an appropriate therapy, the presence of pulmonary anatomical variations should be investigated in KS patients with respiratory signs not associated to immunological deficiency. Finally, our findings support the hypothesis that the mutations leading to a complete loss of function of MLL2 gene is often associated with complex visceral malformations. PMID:24472332

  16. Estradiol induces gene proximity and MLL-MLLT3 fusion in an activation-induced cytidine deaminase-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Wright, Rebecca L; Slemmons, Katherine K; Vaughan, Andrew T M

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological data have linked birth control formulations to an increased risk of infant acute leukemia involving MLL rearrangements. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that 10 nM estradiol enhanced MLL transcription in addition to its common translocation partners, MLLT2 (AF4) and MLLT3 (AF9). The same concentration of estradiol triggered MLL and MLLT3 co-localization without affecting the interaction of genes located on the same chromosomes. Estradiol also stimulated the generation of MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcripts as seen by RT-PCR. RNAi knockdown of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AICDA) suppressed the induction of MLL-MLLT3 fusion transcript formation observed with estradiol. Additionally, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed estradiol dependent localization of AICDA in MLL intron 11, upstream of a hotspot for both DNA cleavage and rearrangement, but not downstream within intron 12. Combined, these studies show that levels of estradiol consistent with that observed during pregnancy have the potential to initiate MLL fusions through an AICDA-mediated mechanism.

  17. MLL-AF6 fusion oncogene sequesters AF6 into the nucleus to trigger RAS activation in myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Manara, Elena; Baron, Emma; Tregnago, Claudia; Aveic, Sanja; Bisio, Valeria; Bresolin, Silvia; Masetti, Riccardo; Locatelli, Franco; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina

    2014-07-10

    A rare location, t(6;11)(q27;q23) (MLL-AF6), is associated with poor outcome in childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The described mechanism by which MLL-AF6, through constitutive self-association and in cooperation with DOT-1L, activates aberrant gene expression does not explain the biological differences existing between t(6;11)-rearranged and other MLL-positive patients nor their different clinical outcome. Here, we show that AF6 is expressed in the cytoplasm of healthy bone marrow cells and controls rat sarcoma viral oncogene (RAS)-guanosine triphosphate (GTP) levels. By contrast, in MLL-AF6-rearranged cells, AF6 is found localized in the nucleus, leading to aberrant activation of RAS and of its downstream targets. Silencing MLL-AF6, we restored AF6 localization in the cytoplasm, thus mediating significant reduction of RAS-GTP levels and of cell clonogenic potential. The rescue of RAS-GTP levels after MLL-AF6 and AF6 co-silencing confirmed that MLL-AF6 oncoprotein potentiates the activity of the RAS pathway through retention of AF6 within the nucleus. Exposure of MLL-AF6-rearranged AML blasts to tipifarnib, a RAS inhibitor, leads to cell autophagy and apoptosis, thus supporting RAS targeting as a novel potential therapeutic strategy in patients carrying t(6;11). Altogether, these data point to a novel role of the MLL-AF6 chimera and show that its gene partner, AF6, is crucial in AML development.

  18. miR-128b is a potent glucocorticoid sensitizer in MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia cells and exerts cooperative effects with miR-221.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Ai; Ha, Daon; Hsieh, James; Rao, Prakash K; Schotte, Diana; den Boer, Monique L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-11-01

    MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) has a poor prognosis. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small noncoding RNAs that posttranscriptionally regulate expression of target mRNAs. Our analysis of previously published data showed that expression of miR-128b and miR-221 is down-regulated in MLL-rearranged ALL relative to other types of ALL. Reexpression of these miRNAs cooperatively sensitizes 2 cultured lines of MLL-AF4 ALL cells to glucocorticoids. Target genes down-regulated by miR-128b include MLL, AF4, and both MLL-AF4 and AF4-MLL fusion genes; miR-221 down-regulates CDKN1B. These results demonstrate that down-regulation of miR-128b and miR-221 is implicated in glucocorticoid resistance and that restoration of their levels is a potentially promising therapeutic in MLL-AF4 ALL.

  19. MLL-MLLT10 fusion in acute monoblastic leukemia: variant complex rearrangements and 11q proximal breakpoint heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Morerio, Cristina; Rapella, Annamaria; Rosanda, Cristina; Lanino, Edoardo; Lo Nigro, Luca; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Maserati, Emanuela; Pasquali, Francesco; Panarello, Claudio

    2004-07-15

    Cytogenetic studies of acute monoblastic leukemia cases presenting MLL-MLLT10 (alias MLL-AF10) fusion show a broad heterogeneity of chromosomal breakpoints. We present two new pediatric cases (French-American-British type M5) with MLL-MLLT10 fusion, which we studied with fluorescence in situ hybridization. In both we detected a paracentric inversion of the 11q region that translocated onto chromosome 10p12; one case displayed a variant complex pattern. We review the cytogenetic molecular data concerning the proximal inversion breakpoint of 11q and confirm its heterogeneity.

  20. Replicators, lineages, and interactors.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel J; Bryson, Joanna J

    2014-06-01

    The target article argues that whole groups can act as interactors in an evolutionary process. We believe that Smaldino's discussion would be advanced by a more thorough analysis of the appropriate replicators and lineages for this model. We show that cultural evolution is necessarily a separate process from cultural group selection, and we also illustrate that the two processes may influence each other as demonstrated by an agent-based model of communicating food-processing skills. PMID:24970423

  1. AF4 uses the SL1 components of RNAP1 machinery to initiate MLL fusion- and AEP-dependent transcription.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Hiroshi; Kanai, Akinori; Ito, Shinji; Matsui, Hirotaka; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    2015-11-23

    Gene rearrangements generate MLL fusion genes, which can lead to aggressive leukemia. In most cases, MLL fuses with a gene encoding a component of the AEP (AF4 family/ENL family/P-TEFb) coactivator complex. MLL-AEP fusion proteins constitutively activate their target genes to immortalize haematopoietic progenitors. Here we show that AEP and MLL-AEP fusion proteins activate transcription through selectivity factor 1 (SL1), a core component of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) of RNA polymerase I (RNAP1). The pSER domain of AF4 family proteins associates with SL1 on chromatin and loads TATA-binding protein (TBP) onto the promoter to initiate RNA polymerase II (RNAP2)-dependent transcription. These results reveal a previously unknown transcription initiation mechanism involving AEP and a role for SL1 as a TBP-loading factor in RNAP2-dependent gene activation.

  2. Pharmacological targeting of the Wdr5-MLL interaction in C/EBPα N-terminal leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Giambruno, Roberto; Grover, Amit; Avellino, Roberto; Skucha, Anna; Vittori, Sarah; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Smil, David; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Li, Fengling; Poda, Gennadiy; Schapira, Matthieu; Wu, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Senisterra, Guillermo; Stukalov, Alexey; Huber, Kilian V. M.; Schönegger, Andreas; Marcellus, Richard; Bilban, Martin; Bock, Christoph; Brown, Peter J.; Zuber, Johannes; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Al-awar, Rima; Delwel, Ruud; Nerlov, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The CEBPA gene is mutated in 9% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Selective expression of a short 30 kDa C/EBPα translational isoform, termed p30, represents the most common type of CEBPA mutations in AML. The molecular mechanisms underlying p30-mediated transformation remain incompletely understood. We show that C/EBPα p30, but not the normal p42 isoform, preferentially interacts with Wdr5, a key component of SET/MLL histone-methyltransferase complexes. Accordingly, p30-bound genomic regions were enriched for MLL-dependent H3K4me3 marks. The p30-dependent increase in self-renewal and inhibition of myeloid differentiation required Wdr5, as its down-regulation inhibited proliferation and restored differentiation in p30-dependent AML models. OICR-9429 is a novel small-molecule antagonist of the Wdr5-MLL interaction. This compound selectively inhibited proliferation and induced differentiation in p30-expressing human AML cells. Our data reveal the mechanism of p30-dependent transformation and establish the essential p30-cofactor Wdr5 as a therapeutic target in CEBPA-mutant AML. PMID:26167872

  3. MLL1 and DOT1L cooperate with meningioma-1 to induce acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Simone S.; Haladyna, Jessica N.; Bezzant, Matthew; Stevens, Brett; Pollyea, Daniel A.; Sinha, Amit U.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Wei, Qi; Pollock, Roy M.; Daigle, Scott R.; Jordan, Craig T.; Ernst, Patricia; Bernt, Kathrin M.

    2016-01-01

    Meningioma-1 (MN1) overexpression is frequently observed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is predictive of poor prognosis. In murine models, forced expression of MN1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces an aggressive myeloid leukemia that is strictly dependent on a defined gene expression program in the cell of origin, which includes the homeobox genes Hoxa9 and Meis1 as key components. Here, we have shown that this program is controlled by two histone methyltransferases, MLL1 and DOT1L, as deletion of either Mll1 or Dot1l in MN1-expressing cells abrogated the cell of origin–derived gene expression program, including the expression of Hoxa cluster genes. In murine models, genetic inactivation of either Mll1 or Dot1l impaired MN1-mediated leukemogenesis. We determined that HOXA9 and MEIS1 are coexpressed with MN1 in a subset of clinical MN1hi leukemia, and human MN1hi/HOXA9hi leukemias were sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of DOT1L. Together, these data point to DOT1L as a potential therapeutic target in MN1hi AML. In addition, our findings suggest that epigenetic modulation of the interplay between an oncogenic lesion and its cooperating developmental program has therapeutic potential in AML. PMID:26927674

  4. Set1/MLL complex is indispensable for the transcriptional ability of heat shock transcription factor 2.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Naoki

    2015-11-27

    Heat shock transcription factor 2 (HSF2) is one of four mammalian HSFs, and it is essential in neurogenesis and gametogenesis. However, other aspects of this transcription factor have not been thoroughly characterized. We recently demonstrated that HSF2 suppresses the aggregation caused by polyglutamine (polyQ) protein, and that the cell protective ability of HSF2 is mediated through the induction of the small HSP alphaB-crystallin (CRYAB). In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of HSF2-induced CRYAB expression. We demonstrated that HSF2 interacted with the core component of the Set1/MLL H3K4 histone methyltransferase complex, WDR5. Indeed, HSF2 up-regulated the H3K4me3, H3K14Ac, and H3K27Ac (active histone marks) of the CRYAB promoter. WDR5 bound to the HSF2 central domain (Domain X) in vitro and in vivo, and Cys278 of HSF2 was indispensable for HSF2-WDR5 interaction. HSF2 also interacted with the Set1/MLL complex. These results suggest that the interaction with the Set1/MLL complex via binding to WDR5 is critical for the transcriptional ability of HSF2. PMID:26478434

  5. Regulation of DNA replication and chromosomal polyploidy by the MLL-WDR5-RBBP5 methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fei; Wu, Xiaojun; Yin, Feng; Chia-Fang Lee, Christina; Yu, Min; Mihaylov, Ivailo S.; Yu, Jiekai; Sun, Hong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA replication licensing occurs on chromatin, but how the chromatin template is regulated for replication remains mostly unclear. Here, we have analyzed the requirement of histone methyltransferases for a specific type of replication: the DNA re-replication induced by the downregulation of either Geminin, an inhibitor of replication licensing protein CDT1, or the CRL4CDT2 ubiquitin E3 ligase. We found that siRNA-mediated reduction of essential components of the MLL-WDR5-RBBP5 methyltransferase complexes including WDR5 or RBBP5, which transfer methyl groups to histone H3 at K4 (H3K4), suppressed DNA re-replication and chromosomal polyploidy. Reduction of WDR5/RBBP5 also prevented the activation of H2AX checkpoint caused by re-replication, but not by ultraviolet or X-ray irradiation; and the components of MLL complexes co-localized with the origin recognition complex (ORC) and MCM2-7 replicative helicase complexes at replication origins to control the levels of methylated H3K4. Downregulation of WDR5 or RBBP5 reduced the methylated H3K4 and suppressed the recruitment of MCM2-7 complexes onto replication origins. Our studies indicate that the MLL complexes and H3K4 methylation are required for DNA replication but not for DNA damage repair. PMID:27744293

  6. Unraveling the Activation Mechanism of Taspase1 which Controls the Oncogenic AF4–MLL Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sabiani, Samaneh; Geppert, Tim; Engelbrecht, Christian; Kowarz, Eric; Schneider, Gisbert; Marschalek, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated that Taspase1-mediated cleavage of the AF4–MLL oncoprotein results in the formation of a stable multiprotein complex which forms the key event for the onset of acute proB leukemia in mice. Therefore, Taspase1 represents a conditional oncoprotein in the context of t(4;11) leukemia. In this report, we used site-directed mutagenesis to unravel the molecular events by which Taspase1 becomes sequentially activated. Monomeric pro-enzymes form dimers which are autocatalytically processed into the enzymatically active form of Taspase1 (αββα). The active enzyme cleaves only very few target proteins, e.g., MLL, MLL4 and TFIIA at their corresponding consensus cleavage sites (CSTasp1) as well as AF4–MLL in the case of leukemogenic translocation. This knowledge was translated into the design of a dominant-negative mutant of Taspase1 (dnTASP1). As expected, simultaneous expression of the leukemogenic AF4–MLL and dnTASP1 causes the disappearance of the leukemogenic oncoprotein, because the uncleaved AF4–MLL protein (328 kDa) is subject to proteasomal degradation, while the cleaved AF4–MLL forms a stable oncogenic multi-protein complex with a very long half-life. Moreover, coexpression of dnTASP1 with a BFP-CSTasp1-GFP FRET biosensor effectively inhibits cleavage. The impact of our findings on future drug development and potential treatment options for t(4;11) leukemia will be discussed. PMID:26137584

  7. Acute myelogenous leukemia cells with the MLL-ELL translocation convert morphologically and functionally into adherent myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Haruko; Mizutani-Noguchi, Mitsuho; Shirasaki, Ryosuke

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow-myofibroblasts, a major component of bone marrow-stroma, are reported to originate from hematopoietic stem cells. We show in this paper that non-adherent leukemia blasts can change into myofibroblasts. When myeloblasts from two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with a fusion product comprising mixed lineage leukemia and RNA polymerase II elongation factor, were cultured long term, their morphology changed to that of myofibroblasts with similar molecular characteristics to the parental myeloblasts. The original leukemia blasts, when cultured on the leukemia blast-derived myofibroblasts, grew extensively. Leukemia blasts can create their own microenvironment for proliferation.

  8. Pro Isomerization in MLL1 PHD3-Bromo Cassette Connects H3K4me Readout to CyP33 and HDAC-Mediated Repression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhanxin; Song, Jikui; Milne, Thomas A.; Wang, Gang G.; Li, Haitao; Allis, C. David; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2010-09-13

    The MLL1 gene is a frequent target for recurrent chromosomal translocations, resulting in transformation of hematopoietic precursors into leukemia stem cells. Here, we report on structure-function studies that elucidate molecular events in MLL1 binding of histone H3K4me3/2 marks and recruitment of the cyclophilin CyP33. CyP33 contains a PPIase and a RRM domain and regulates MLL1 function through HDAC recruitment. We find that the PPIase domain of CyP33 regulates the conformation of MLL1 through proline isomerization within the PHD3-Bromo linker, thereby disrupting the PHD3-Bromo interface and facilitating binding of the MLL1-PHD3 domain to the CyP33-RRM domain. H3K4me3/2 and CyP33-RRM target different surfaces of MLL1-PHD3 and can bind simultaneously to form a ternary complex. Furthermore, the MLL1-CyP33 interaction is required for repression of HOXA9 and HOXC8 genes in vivo. Our results highlight the role of PHD3-Bromo cassette as a regulatory platform, orchestrating MLL1 binding of H3K4me3/2 marks and cyclophilin-mediated repression through HDAC recruitment.

  9. Single-cell analysis defines the divergence between the innate lymphoid cell lineage and lymphoid tissue-inducer cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Isabel E; Chea, Sylvestre; Gudjonson, Herman; Constantinides, Michael G; Dinner, Aaron R; Bendelac, Albert; Golub, Rachel

    2016-03-01

    The precise lineage relationship between innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and lymphoid tissue-inducer (LTi) cells is poorly understood. Using single-cell multiplex transcriptional analysis of 100 lymphoid genes and single-cell cultures of fetal liver precursor cells, we identified the common proximal precursor to these lineages and found that its bifurcation was marked by differential induction of the transcription factors PLZF and TCF1. Acquisition of individual effector programs specific to the ILC subsets ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 was initiated later, at the common ILC precursor stage, by transient expression of mixed ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 transcriptional patterns, whereas, in contrast, the development of LTi cells did not go through multilineage priming. Our findings provide insight into the divergent mechanisms of the differentiation of the ILC lineage and LTi cell lineage and establish a high-resolution 'blueprint' of their development.

  10. ARID5B polymorphism confers an increased risk to acquire specific MLL rearrangements in early childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute leukemia in early age (EAL) is characterized by acquired genetic alterations such as MLL rearrangements (MLL-r). The aim of this case-controlled study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of IKZF1, ARID5B, and CEBPE could be related to the onset of EAL cases (<24 months-old at diagnosis). Methods The SNPs (IKZF1 rs11978267, ARID5B rs10821936 and rs10994982, CEBPE rs2239633) were genotyped in 265 cases [169 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 96 acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)] and 505 controls by Taqman allelic discrimination assay. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between SNPs of cases and controls, adjusted on skin color and/or age. The risk was determined by calculating odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Children with the IKZF1 SNP had an increased risk of developing MLL-germline ALL in white children. The heterozygous/mutant genotype in ARID5B rs10994982 significantly increased the risk for MLL-germline leukemia in white and non-white children (OR 2.60, 95% CI: 1.09-6.18 and OR 3.55, 95% CI: 1.57-8.68, respectively). The heterozygous genotype in ARID5B rs10821936 increased the risk for MLL-r leukemia in both white and non-white (OR 2.06, 95% CI: 1.12-3.79 and OR 2.36, 95% CI: 1.09-5.10, respectively). Furthermore, ARID5B rs10821936 conferred increased risk for MLL-MLLT3 positive cases (OR 7.10, 95% CI:1.54-32.68). Our data do not show evidence that CEBPE rs2239633 confers increased genetic susceptibility to EAL. Conclusions IKZF1 and CEBPE variants seem to play a minor role in genetic susceptibility to EAL, while ARID5B rs10821936 increased the risk of MLL-MLLT3. This result shows that genetic susceptibility could be associated with the differences regarding MLL breakpoints and partner genes. PMID:24564228

  11. Coexistence of alternative MLL-SEPT9 fusion transcripts in an acute myeloid leukemia with t(11;17)(q23;q25).

    PubMed

    Santos, Joana; Cerveira, Nuno; Correia, Cecília; Lisboa, Susana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Torres, Lurdes; Bizarro, Susana; Vieira, Joana; Viterbo, Luisa; Mariz, José M; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2010-02-01

    We present the characterization at the RNA level of an acute myeloid leukemia with a t(11;17)(q23;q25) and a MLL rearrangement demonstrated by FISH. Molecular analysis led to the identification of two coexistent in-frame MLL-SEPT9 fusion transcripts (variants 1 and 2), presumably resulting from alternative splicing. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the relative expression of the MLL-SEPT9 fusion variant 2 was 1.88 fold higher than the relative expression of MLL-SEPT9 fusion variant 1. This is the first description of a MLL-SEPT9 fusion resulting in coexistence of two alternative splicing variants, each of which previously found isolated in myeloid leukemias. PMID:20113838

  12. Ancestral reconstruction of tick lineages.

    PubMed

    Mans, Ben J; de Castro, Minique H; Pienaar, Ronel; de Klerk, Daniel; Gaven, Philasande; Genu, Siyamcela; Latif, Abdalla A

    2016-06-01

    Ancestral reconstruction in its fullest sense aims to describe the complete evolutionary history of a lineage. This depends on accurate phylogenies and an understanding of the key characters of each parental lineage. An attempt is made to delineate our current knowledge with regard to the ancestral reconstruction of the tick (Ixodida) lineage. Tick characters may be assigned to Core of Life, Lineages of Life or Edges of Life phenomena depending on how far back these characters may be assigned in the evolutionary Tree of Life. These include housekeeping genes, sub-cellular systems, heme processing (Core of Life), development, moulting, appendages, nervous and organ systems, homeostasis, respiration (Lineages of Life), specific adaptations to a blood-feeding lifestyle, including the complexities of salivary gland secretions and tick-host interactions (Edges of Life). The phylogenetic relationships of lineages, their origins and importance in ancestral reconstruction are discussed. Uncertainties with respect to systematic relationships, ancestral reconstruction and the challenges faced in comparative transcriptomics (next-generation sequencing approaches) are highlighted. While almost 150 years of information regarding tick biology have been assembled, progress in recent years indicates that we are in the infancy of understanding tick evolution. Even so, broad reconstructions can be made with relation to biological features associated with various lineages. Conservation of characters shared with sister and parent lineages are evident, but appreciable differences are present in the tick lineage indicating modification with descent, as expected for Darwinian evolutionary theory. Many of these differences can be related to the hematophagous lifestyle of ticks. PMID:26868413

  13. Making sense of cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Price, J

    1993-01-01

    In this article I describe what I see as the sources of confusion in the description and interpretation of cell lineage data. I concentrate on lineage in the nervous system, since that is my interest, but most of the arguments are broadly applicable. Since there are these differences between workers in the field, all will not agree with my perspective, but perhaps a consensus can evolve from the discussion. I see the problem as having two facets: First, there is a confusion surrounding terminology, which leads to too many different types of studies to be considered as studies of cell lineage; and second, there is some confusion about what can validly be concluded from a study of cell lineage.

  14. Deciphering KRAS and NRAS mutated clone dynamics in MLL-AF4 paediatric leukaemia by ultra deep sequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    Trentin, Luca; Bresolin, Silvia; Giarin, Emanuela; Bardini, Michela; Serafin, Valentina; Accordi, Benedetta; Fais, Franco; Tenca, Claudya; De Lorenzo, Paola; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Kronnie, Geertruy te; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    To induce and sustain the leukaemogenic process, MLL-AF4+ leukaemia seems to require very few genetic alterations in addition to the fusion gene itself. Studies of infant and paediatric patients with MLL-AF4+ B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) have reported mutations in KRAS and NRAS with incidences ranging from 25 to 50%. Whereas previous studies employed Sanger sequencing, here we used next generation amplicon deep sequencing for in depth evaluation of RAS mutations in 36 paediatric patients at diagnosis of MLL-AF4+ leukaemia. RAS mutations including those in small sub-clones were detected in 63.9% of patients. Furthermore, the mutational analysis of 17 paired samples at diagnosis and relapse revealed complex RAS clone dynamics and showed that the mutated clones present at relapse were almost all originated from clones that were already detectable at diagnosis and survived to the initial therapy. Finally, we showed that mutated patients were indeed characterized by a RAS related signature at both transcriptional and protein levels and that the targeting of the RAS pathway could be of beneficial for treatment of MLL-AF4+ BCP-ALL clones carrying somatic RAS mutations. PMID:27698462

  15. Exome sequencing identifies frequent mutation of MLL2 in non-small cell lung carcinoma from Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shanye; Yang, Jing; Lin, Bin; Deng, Wenjun; Zhang, Yuchao; Yi, Xianfu; Shi, Yufang; Tao, Yong; Cai, Jun; Wu, Chung-I; Zhao, Guoping; Hurst, Laurence D; Zhang, Jie; Hu, Landian; Kong, Xiangyin

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality worldwide, with an estimated 1.4 million deaths each year. Here we report whole-exome sequencing of nine tumor/normal tissue pairs from Chinese patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). This allows us to identify a number of significantly mutated genes in NSCLC, which were highly enriched in DNA damage repair, NF-κB pathway, JAK/STAT signaling and chromatin modification. Notably, we identify a histone-lysine methyltransferase gene, namely, MLL2, as one of the most significantly mutated genes in our screen. In a following validation study, we identify deleterious mutations of MLL2 in 12 out of 105 (11.4%) NSCLC patients. Additionally, reduced or lost expression of MLL2 was commonly observed in tumor tissues as compared with paired adjacent non-tumor tissues regardless of mutation status. Together, our study defines the landscape of somatic mutations in Chinese NSCLC and supports the role of MLL2 mutation in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25112956

  16. Physical Interactions and Functional Coordination between the Core Subunits of Set1/Mll Complexes and the Reprogramming Factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhenhua; Augustin, Jonathan; Hu, Jing; Jiang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to the pluripotent state by overexpression of defined factors, and this process is profoundly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms including dynamic histone modifications. Changes in H3K4 methylation have been shown to be the predominant activating response in the early stage of cellular reprogramming. Mechanisms underlying such epigenetic priming, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the expression of the reprogramming factors (Yamanaka factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc), especially Myc, directly promotes the expression of certain core subunits of the Set1/Mll family of H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. A dynamic recruitment of the Set1/Mll complexes largely, though not sufficiently in its own, explains the dynamics of the H3K4 methylation during cellular reprogramming. We then demonstrate that the core subunits of the Set1/Mll complexes physically interact with mainly Sox2 and Myc among the Yamanaka factors. We further show that Sox2 directly binds the Ash2l subunit in the Set1/Mll complexes and this binding is mediated by the HMG domain of Sox2. Functionally, we show that the Set1/Mll complex core subunits are required for efficient cellular reprogramming. We also show that Dpy30, one of the core subunits in the complexes, is required for the efficient target binding of the reprogramming factors. Interestingly, such requirement is not necessarily dependent on locus-specific H3K4 methylation. Our work provides a better understanding of how the reprogramming factors physically interact and functionally coordinate with a key group of epigenetic modulators to mediate transitions of the chromatin state involved in cellular reprogramming. PMID:26691508

  17. Physical Interactions and Functional Coordination between the Core Subunits of Set1/Mll Complexes and the Reprogramming Factors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhenhua; Augustin, Jonathan; Hu, Jing; Jiang, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated cells can be reprogrammed to the pluripotent state by overexpression of defined factors, and this process is profoundly influenced by epigenetic mechanisms including dynamic histone modifications. Changes in H3K4 methylation have been shown to be the predominant activating response in the early stage of cellular reprogramming. Mechanisms underlying such epigenetic priming, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the expression of the reprogramming factors (Yamanaka factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc), especially Myc, directly promotes the expression of certain core subunits of the Set1/Mll family of H3K4 methyltransferase complexes. A dynamic recruitment of the Set1/Mll complexes largely, though not sufficiently in its own, explains the dynamics of the H3K4 methylation during cellular reprogramming. We then demonstrate that the core subunits of the Set1/Mll complexes physically interact with mainly Sox2 and Myc among the Yamanaka factors. We further show that Sox2 directly binds the Ash2l subunit in the Set1/Mll complexes and this binding is mediated by the HMG domain of Sox2. Functionally, we show that the Set1/Mll complex core subunits are required for efficient cellular reprogramming. We also show that Dpy30, one of the core subunits in the complexes, is required for the efficient target binding of the reprogramming factors. Interestingly, such requirement is not necessarily dependent on locus-specific H3K4 methylation. Our work provides a better understanding of how the reprogramming factors physically interact and functionally coordinate with a key group of epigenetic modulators to mediate transitions of the chromatin state involved in cellular reprogramming. PMID:26691508

  18. Ancient wolf lineages in India.

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dinesh K; Maldonado, Jesus E; Jhala, Yadrendradev V; Fleischer, Robert C

    2004-01-01

    All previously obtained wolf (Canis lupus) and dog (Canis familiaris) mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences fall within an intertwined and shallow clade (the 'wolf-dog' clade). We sequenced mtDNA of recent and historical samples from 45 wolves from throughout lowland peninsular India and 23 wolves from the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau and compared these sequences with all available wolf and dog sequences. All 45 lowland Indian wolves have one of four closely related haplotypes that form a well-supported, divergent sister lineage to the wolf-dog clade. This unique lineage may have been independent for more than 400,000 years. Although seven Himalayan wolves from western and central Kashmir fall within the widespread wolf-dog clade, one from Ladakh in eastern Kashmir, nine from Himachal Pradesh, four from Nepal and two from Tibet form a very different basal clade. This lineage contains five related haplotypes that probably diverged from other canids more than 800,000 years ago, but we find no evidence of current barriers to admixture. Thus, the Indian subcontinent has three divergent, ancient and apparently parapatric mtDNA lineages within the morphologically delineated wolf. No haplotypes of either novel lineage are found within a sample of 37 Indian (or other) dogs. Thus, we find no evidence that these two taxa played a part in the domestication of canids. PMID:15101402

  19. Postglacial colonization of Northern Europe by distinct phylogeographic lineages of the bullhead, Cottus gobio.

    PubMed

    Kontula, T; Väinölä, R

    2001-08-01

    Three major phylogeographic lineages of the cottid fish Cottus gobio (bullhead) were identified in northern Europe from mitochondrial DNA sequences and allozyme data. The largely separate freshwater distributions of the lineages demonstrate distinct postglacial colonization histories. West of the Baltic Sea, Swedish lakes were invaded from the southwest (Germany). Another, eastern lineage has colonized the inland waters northeast and east of the Baltic, from refugia in northwest Russia; this lineage comprises a distinct subgroup found only from Estonia. The third lineage, found south and southeast of the Baltic, probably descended from rivers draining to the Black Sea from the north (e.g. Dnepr). In coastal waters of the Baltic Sea, and in near-coast inland waters, the lineages are now found intermixed in various combinations. The alternating fresh- and saltwater phases of the Baltic basin have variously enabled and disabled the use of coastal waters as colonization routes. Hypotheses on the chronology of dispersal and lineage mixing can be based on the distribution of the marker genes and the paleohydrographical record. The diversity of the Fennoscandian bullhead thus comprises anciently diverged (probably mid-Pleistocene) refugial lineages that in their freshwater range constitute distinct evolutionarily significant units. The thorough mixing of the various genomic origins in and around the Baltic, however, refutes the controversial view of distinct species status for the western and eastern ('Cottus koshewnikowi') bullheads. The postglacial contact of the lineages has created new diversity that cannot be interpreted in a conventional hierarchical framework of taxonomic or conservation units.

  20. Polynesian mitochondrial DNAs reveal three deep maternal lineage clusters.

    PubMed

    Lum, J K; Rickards, O; Ching, C; Cann, R L

    1994-08-01

    The 4000-year-old human population expansion into Remote Oceania has been studied from a variety of genetic perspectives. Here, we report the discovery that Polynesians, traditionally considered to be a single cohesive linguistic and cultural unit, exhibit at least three distinct mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) groups that probably shared a common maternal ancestor more than 85,000 years ago. The major lineage groups were first identified by PCR amplification of the mitochondrial region V deletion marker, known to be present at high frequency in Polynesian populations. Sequence analysis of mtDNA hypervariable control regions reveals a surprising number of lineages in Polynesia. We also note high sequence divergence between lineage groups deleted and not deleted in region V. Major group I lineages are common in Remote Oceania and include about 95% of the Native Hawaiian, 90% of the Samoan, and 100% of the Tongan donors in our sample. They contain the region V deletion and generally share three control region transition substitutions. This group also contains non-Polynesian individuals, such as Indonesians, Native Americans, Micronesians, Malaysians, Japanese, and Chinese. The group I Polynesians differ by 4.4% in sequence identity from major lineage group II Polynesians, who do not have the region V deletion and who share among themselves four distinct single-base substitutions. Group II individuals are seen at low frequency (< 10%) in Hawaii, Samoa, and the Cook Islands and may represent the predominant maternal lineage group of Papuan Melanesia. Major lineage group III, not found in Hawaii, tentatively links Samoa to Indonesia. Our observation of deep maternal genetic branches in Polynesia today confirms the notion that during the colonization of the Pacific, mainland Asian immigrants mixed with Melanesian peoples already inhabiting Near Oceania and carried a complex assortment of maternal genotypes derived from two distinct geographic sources to isolated island

  1. Polynesian mitochondrial DNAs reveal three deep maternal lineage clusters.

    PubMed

    Lum, J K; Rickards, O; Ching, C; Cann, R L

    1994-08-01

    The 4000-year-old human population expansion into Remote Oceania has been studied from a variety of genetic perspectives. Here, we report the discovery that Polynesians, traditionally considered to be a single cohesive linguistic and cultural unit, exhibit at least three distinct mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) groups that probably shared a common maternal ancestor more than 85,000 years ago. The major lineage groups were first identified by PCR amplification of the mitochondrial region V deletion marker, known to be present at high frequency in Polynesian populations. Sequence analysis of mtDNA hypervariable control regions reveals a surprising number of lineages in Polynesia. We also note high sequence divergence between lineage groups deleted and not deleted in region V. Major group I lineages are common in Remote Oceania and include about 95% of the Native Hawaiian, 90% of the Samoan, and 100% of the Tongan donors in our sample. They contain the region V deletion and generally share three control region transition substitutions. This group also contains non-Polynesian individuals, such as Indonesians, Native Americans, Micronesians, Malaysians, Japanese, and Chinese. The group I Polynesians differ by 4.4% in sequence identity from major lineage group II Polynesians, who do not have the region V deletion and who share among themselves four distinct single-base substitutions. Group II individuals are seen at low frequency (< 10%) in Hawaii, Samoa, and the Cook Islands and may represent the predominant maternal lineage group of Papuan Melanesia. Major lineage group III, not found in Hawaii, tentatively links Samoa to Indonesia. Our observation of deep maternal genetic branches in Polynesia today confirms the notion that during the colonization of the Pacific, mainland Asian immigrants mixed with Melanesian peoples already inhabiting Near Oceania and carried a complex assortment of maternal genotypes derived from two distinct geographic sources to isolated island

  2. Cell lineage analysis of the mammalian female germline.

    PubMed

    Reizel, Yitzhak; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Adar, Rivka; Elbaz, Judith; Jinich, Adrian; Chapal-Ilani, Noa; Maruvka, Yosef E; Nevo, Nava; Marx, Zipora; Horovitz, Inna; Wasserstrom, Adam; Mayo, Avi; Shur, Irena; Benayahu, Dafna; Skorecki, Karl; Segal, Eran; Dekel, Nava; Shapiro, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of embryonic and post-natal development, including maintenance of the mammalian female germline, are largely unknown. Here we employ a retrospective, phylogenetic-based method for reconstructing cell lineage trees utilizing somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites, to study female germline dynamics in mice. Reconstructed cell lineage trees can be used to estimate lineage relationships between different cell types, as well as cell depth (number of cell divisions since the zygote). We show that, in the reconstructed mouse cell lineage trees, oocytes form clusters that are separate from hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, both in young and old mice, indicating that these populations belong to distinct lineages. Furthermore, while cumulus cells sampled from different ovarian follicles are distinctly clustered on the reconstructed trees, oocytes from the left and right ovaries are not, suggesting a mixing of their progenitor pools. We also observed an increase in oocyte depth with mouse age, which can be explained either by depth-guided selection of oocytes for ovulation or by post-natal renewal. Overall, our study sheds light on substantial novel aspects of female germline preservation and development.

  3. Cell Lineage Analysis of the Mammalian Female Germline

    PubMed Central

    Elbaz, Judith; Jinich, Adrian; Chapal-Ilani, Noa; Maruvka, Yosef E.; Nevo, Nava; Marx, Zipora; Horovitz, Inna; Wasserstrom, Adam; Mayo, Avi; Shur, Irena; Benayahu, Dafna; Skorecki, Karl; Segal, Eran; Dekel, Nava; Shapiro, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of embryonic and post-natal development, including maintenance of the mammalian female germline, are largely unknown. Here we employ a retrospective, phylogenetic-based method for reconstructing cell lineage trees utilizing somatic mutations accumulated in microsatellites, to study female germline dynamics in mice. Reconstructed cell lineage trees can be used to estimate lineage relationships between different cell types, as well as cell depth (number of cell divisions since the zygote). We show that, in the reconstructed mouse cell lineage trees, oocytes form clusters that are separate from hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, both in young and old mice, indicating that these populations belong to distinct lineages. Furthermore, while cumulus cells sampled from different ovarian follicles are distinctly clustered on the reconstructed trees, oocytes from the left and right ovaries are not, suggesting a mixing of their progenitor pools. We also observed an increase in oocyte depth with mouse age, which can be explained either by depth-guided selection of oocytes for ovulation or by post-natal renewal. Overall, our study sheds light on substantial novel aspects of female germline preservation and development. PMID:22383887

  4. Rac1 signaling protects monocytic AML cells expressing the MLL-AF9 oncogene from caspase-mediated apoptotic death.

    PubMed

    Hinterleitner, C; Huelsenbeck, J; Henninger, C; Wartlick, F; Schorr, A; Kaina, B; Fritz, G

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the relevance of signaling mechanisms regulated by the Ras-homologous GTPase Rac1 for survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells harbouring the MLL-AF9 oncogene due to t(9;11)(p21;q23) translocation. Monocytic MLL-AF9 expressing cells (MM6, THP-1) were hypersensitive to both small-molecule inhibitors targeting Rac1 (EHT 1864, NSC 23766) (IC50EHT ~12.5 μM) and lipid lowering drugs (lovastatin, atorvastatin) (IC50Lova ~7.5 μM) as compared to acute myelocytic leukemia (NOMO-1, HL60) and T cell leukemia (Jurkat) cells (IC50EHT >30 μM; IC50Lova >25 μM). Hypersensitivity of monocytic cells following Rac1 inhibition resulted from caspase-driven apoptosis as shown by profound activation of caspase-8,-9,-7,-3 and substantial (~90 %) decrease in protein expression of pro-survival factors (survivin, XIAP, p-Akt). Apoptotic death was preceded by S139-posphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a prototypical surrogate marker of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Taken together, abrogation of Rac1 signaling causes DSBs in acute monocytic leukemia cells harbouring the MLL-AF9 oncogene, which, together with downregulation of survivin, XIAP and p-Akt, results in massive induction of caspase-driven apoptotic death. Apparently, Rac1 signaling is required for maintaining genetic stability and maintaining survival in specific subtypes of AML. Hence, targeting of Rac1 is considered a promising novel strategy to induce lethality in MLL-AF9 expressing AML. PMID:23624644

  5. Molecular characterization of the MLL-SEPT6 fusion gene in acute myeloid leukemia: identification of novel fusion transcripts and cloning of genomic breakpoint junctions.

    PubMed

    Cerveira, Nuno; Micci, Francesca; Santos, Joana; Pinheiro, Manuela; Correia, Cecília; Lisboa, Susana; Bizarro, Susana; Norton, Lucília; Glomstein, Anders; Asberg, Ann E; Heim, Sverre; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2008-07-01

    One of the MLL fusion partners in leukemia is the SEPT6 gene, which belongs to the evolutionarily conserved family of genes of septins. In this work we aimed to characterize at both the RNA and DNA levels three acute myeloid leukemias with cytogenetic evidence of a rearrangement between 11q23 and Xq24. Molecular analysis led to the identification of several MLL-SEPT6 fusion transcripts in all cases, including a novel MLL-SEPT6 rearrangement (MLL exon 6 fused with SEPT6 exon 2). Genomic DNA breakpoints were found inside or near Alu or LINE repeats in the MLL breakpoint cluster region, whereas the breakpoint junctions in the SEPT6 intron 1 mapped to the vicinity of GC-rich low-complexity repeats, Alu repeats, and a topoisomerase II consensus cleavage site. These data suggest that a non-homologous end-joining repair mechanism may be involved in the generation of MLL-SEPT6 rearrangements in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:18492691

  6. Use of Genome Engineering to Create Patient Specific MLL Translocations in Primary Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Breese, Erin H; Buechele, Corina; Dawson, Catherine; Cleary, Michael L; Porteus, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    One of the challenging questions in cancer biology is how a normal cell transforms into a cancer cell. There is strong evidence that specific chromosomal translocations are a key element in this transformation process. Our studies focus on understanding the developmental mechanism by which a normal stem or progenitor cell transforms into leukemia. Here we used engineered nucleases to induce simultaneous specific double strand breaks in the MLL gene and two different known translocation partners (AF4 and AF9), which resulted in specific chromosomal translocations in K562 cells as well as primary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The initiation of a specific MLL translocation in a small number of HSPCs likely mimics the leukemia-initiating event that occurs in patients. In our studies, the creation of specific MLL translocations in CD34+ cells was not sufficient to transform cells in vitro. Rather, a variety of fates was observed for translocation positive cells including cell loss over time, a transient proliferative advantage followed by loss of the clone, or a persistent proliferative advantage. These studies highlight the application of genome engineering tools in primary human HSPCs to induce and prospectively study the consequences of initiating translocation events in leukemia pathogenesis.

  7. Reproduction barrier between two lineages of bed bug (Cimex lectularius) (Heteroptera: Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Wawrocka, Kamila; Balvín, Ondřej; Bartonička, Tomáš

    2015-08-01

    Populations of bed bugs, Cimex lectularius, have increased in recent years spreading into numerous urban areas across the Western world and making them an increasingly important pest of the twenty-first century. Research into hybridization within and between different lineages of bed bugs can help us to understand processes of micro- and macro-evolution in these ectoparasites and may inform the control of this pest species. Hybridization experiments between two host lineages of bed bug (C. lectularius) from Central Europe (Czech Republic), those associated with humans and those with bats, were conducted under laboratory conditions. Number of eggs and early instars were compared between crosses of mixed host lineages (interspecific mating) with pairs from the same host lineage, those from the same locality and same lineage from different localities (intraspecific mating). While crosses within host lineages resulted in egg production and later instars, crosses between different host lineages were unsuccessful, although of the mated females possessed sperm in their mesospermaleges and/or seminal conceptacles. These crosses did not even result in egg production. Moreover, in the mixed lineage crosses, mortality rates in adults were higher (51 and 50% higher in bat and human lineage, respectively) than in those animals from the same lineage. Survival of adults was in pairs from the same locality slightly higher than in pairs from different localities and differed statistically. These results support the existence of post-mating barriers and show reproductive isolation between two lineages of C. lectularius. Bat and human host adaptations can promote evolving of such barriers and can be product of alloxenic speciation. PMID:25952703

  8. CD2-positive B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with an early switch to the monocytic lineage.

    PubMed

    Slamova, L; Starkova, J; Fronkova, E; Zaliova, M; Reznickova, L; van Delft, F W; Vodickova, E; Volejnikova, J; Zemanova, Z; Polgarova, K; Cario, G; Figueroa, M; Kalina, T; Fiser, K; Bourquin, J P; Bornhauser, B; Dworzak, M; Zuna, J; Trka, J; Stary, J; Hrusak, O; Mejstrikova, E

    2014-03-01

    Switches from the lymphoid to myeloid lineage during B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) treatment are considered rare and thus far have been detected in MLL-rearranged leukemia. Here, we describe a novel BCP-ALL subset, switching BCP-ALL or swALL, which demonstrated monocytosis early during treatment. Despite their monocytic phenotype, 'monocytoids' share immunoreceptor gene rearrangements with leukemic B lymphoblasts. All swALLs demonstrated BCP-ALL with CD2 positivity and no MLL alterations, and the proportion of swALLs cases among BCP-ALLs was unexpectedly high (4%). The upregulation of CEBPα and demethylation of the CEBPA gene were significant in blasts at diagnosis, prior to the time when most of the switching occurs. Intermediate stages between CD14(neg)CD19(pos)CD34(pos) B lymphoblasts and CD14(pos)CD19(neg)CD34(neg) 'monocytoids' were detected, and changes in the expression of PAX5, PU1, M-CSFR, GM-CSFR and other genes accompanied the switch. Alterations in the Ikaros and ERG genes were more frequent in swALL patients; however, both were altered in only a minority of swALLs. Moreover, switching could be recapitulated in vitro and in mouse xenografts. Although children with swALL respond slowly to initial therapy, risk-based ALL therapy appears the treatment of choice for swALL. SwALL shows that transdifferentiating into monocytic lineage is specifically associated with CEBPα changes and CD2 expression. PMID:24270736

  9. Phylogenetic lineages in the Botryosphaeriaceae.

    PubMed

    Crous, Pedro W; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Michael J; Rheeder, John; Marasas, Walter F O; Philips, Alan J L; Alves, Artur; Burgess, Treena; Barber, Paul; Groenewald, Johannes Z

    2006-01-01

    Botryosphaeria is a species-rich genus with a cosmopolitan distribution, commonly associated with dieback and cankers of woody plants. As many as 18 anamorph genera have been associated with Botryosphaeria, most of which have been reduced to synonymy under Diplodia (conidia mostly ovoid, pigmented, thick-walled), or Fusicoccum (conidia mostly fusoid, hyaline, thin-walled). However, there are numerous conidial anamorphs having morphological characteristics intermediate between Diplodia and Fusicoccum, and there are several records of species outside the Botryosphaeriaceae that have anamorphs apparently typical of Botryosphaeria s.str. Recent studies have also linked Botryosphaeria to species with pigmented, septate ascospores, and Dothiorella anamorphs, or Fusicoccum anamorphs with Dichomera synanamorphs. The aim of this study was to employ DNA sequence data of the 28S rDNA to resolve apparent lineages within the Botryosphaeriaceae. From these data, 12 clades are recognised. Two of these lineages clustered outside the Botryosphaeriaceae, namely Diplodia-like anamorphs occurring on maize, which are best accommodated in Stenocarpella (Diaporthales), as well as an unresolved clade including species of Camarosporium/Microdiplodia. We recognise 10 lineages within the Botryosphaeriaceae, including an unresolved clade (Diplodia/Lasiodiplodia/Tiarosporella), Botryosphaeria s.str. (Fusicoccum anamorphs), Macrophomina, Neoscytalidium gen. nov., Dothidotthia (Dothiorella anamorphs), Neofusicoccum gen. nov. (Botryosphaeria-like teleomorphs, Dichomera-like synanamorphs), Pseudofusicoccum gen. nov., Saccharata (Fusicoccum- and Diplodia-like synanamorphs), "Botryosphaeria" quercuum (Diplodia-like anamorph), and Guignardia (Phyllosticta anamorphs). Separate teleomorph and anamorph names are not provided for newly introduced genera, even where both morphs are known. The taxonomy of some clades and isolates (e.g. B. mamane) remains unresolved due to the absence of ex-type cultures

  10. Atg5-dependent autophagy contributes to the development of acute myeloid leukemia in an MLL-AF9-driven mouse model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Longgui; Atkinson, Jennifer M; Claxton, David F; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hierarchical hematopoietic malignancy originating from leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is hypothesized to be important for the maintenance of AML as well as contribute to chemotherapy response. Here we employ a mouse model of AML expressing the fusion oncogene MLL-AF9 and explore the effects of Atg5 deletion, a key autophagy protein, on the malignant transformation and progression of AML. Consistent with a transient decrease in colony-forming potential in vitro, the in vivo deletion of Atg5 in MLL-AF9-transduced bone marrow cells during primary transplantation prolonged the survival of recipient mice, suggesting that autophagy has a role in MLL-AF9-driven leukemia initiation. In contrast, deletion of Atg5 in malignant AML cells during secondary transplantation did not influence the survival or chemotherapeutic response of leukemic mice. Interestingly, autophagy was found to be involved in the survival of differentiated myeloid cells originating from MLL-AF9-driven LSCs. Taken together, our data suggest that Atg5-dependent autophagy may contribute to the development but not chemotherapy sensitivity of murine AML induced by MLL-AF9. PMID:27607576

  11. t(3;11) translocation in treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia fuses MLL with the GMPS (GUANOSINE 5' MONOPHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE) gene.

    PubMed

    Pegram, L D; Megonigal, M D; Lange, B J; Nowell, P C; Rowley, J D; Rappaport, E F; Felix, C A

    2000-12-15

    The partner gene of MLL was identified in a patient with treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia in which the karyotype suggested t(3;11)(q25;q23). Prior therapy included the DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors, teniposide and doxorubicin. Southern blot analysis indicated that the MLL gene was involved in the translocation. cDNA panhandle polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used, which does not require partner gene-specific primers, to identify the chimeric transcript. Reverse-transcription of first-strand cDNAs with oligonucleotides containing known MLL sequence at the 5' ends and random hexamers at the 3' ends generated templates with an intra-strand loop for PCR. In-frame fusions of either MLL exon 7 or exon 8 with the GMPS (GUANOSINE 5'-MONOPHOSPHATE SYNTHETASE) gene from chromosome band 3q24 were detected. The fusion transcript was alternatively spliced. Guanosine monophosphate synthetase is essential for de novo purine synthesis. GMPS is the first partner gene of MLL on chromosome 3q and the first gene of this type in leukemia-associated translocations. (Blood. 2000;96:4360-4362)

  12. Atg5-dependent autophagy contributes to the development of acute myeloid leukemia in an MLL-AF9-driven mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Chen, Longgui; Atkinson, Jennifer M; Claxton, David F; Wang, Hong-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hierarchical hematopoietic malignancy originating from leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Autophagy is a lysosomal degradation pathway that is hypothesized to be important for the maintenance of AML as well as contribute to chemotherapy response. Here we employ a mouse model of AML expressing the fusion oncogene MLL-AF9 and explore the effects of Atg5 deletion, a key autophagy protein, on the malignant transformation and progression of AML. Consistent with a transient decrease in colony-forming potential in vitro, the in vivo deletion of Atg5 in MLL-AF9-transduced bone marrow cells during primary transplantation prolonged the survival of recipient mice, suggesting that autophagy has a role in MLL-AF9-driven leukemia initiation. In contrast, deletion of Atg5 in malignant AML cells during secondary transplantation did not influence the survival or chemotherapeutic response of leukemic mice. Interestingly, autophagy was found to be involved in the survival of differentiated myeloid cells originating from MLL-AF9-driven LSCs. Taken together, our data suggest that Atg5-dependent autophagy may contribute to the development but not chemotherapy sensitivity of murine AML induced by MLL-AF9. PMID:27607576

  13. Pygo2 functions as a prognostic factor for glioma due to its up-regulation of H3K4me3 and promotion of MLL1/MLL2 complex recruitment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cefan; Zhang, Yi; Dai, Jun; Zhou, Mengzhou; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yefu; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Tang, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Pygo2 has been discovered as an important Wnt signaling component contributing to the activation of Wnt-target gene transcription. In the present study, we discovered that Pygo2 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the majority of (152/209) human brain glioma tissues and five glioma cell lines, and significantly correlated with the age, the WHO tumor classification and poor patient survival. The histone methyltransferase complex components (WDR5, Ash2, and menin, but not CXCC1 or NCOA6) were down-regulated at the promoter loci of Wnt target genes after Pygo2 knockdown, and this was accompanied by the down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Further, we demonstrated that the involvement of Pygo2 in the activation of the Wnt pathway in human glioma progression is through up-regulation of the H3K4me3 (but not H3K4me2) by promoting the recruitment of the histone methyltransferase MLL1/MLL2 complex to Wnt target gene promoters. Thus, our study provided evidence that Pygo2 functions as a novel prognostic marker and represents a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26902498

  14. Pygo2 functions as a prognostic factor for glioma due to its up-regulation of H3K4me3 and promotion of MLL1/MLL2 complex recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cefan; Zhang, Yi; Dai, Jun; Zhou, Mengzhou; Liu, Miao; Wang, Yefu; Chen, Xing-Zhen; Tang, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Pygo2 has been discovered as an important Wnt signaling component contributing to the activation of Wnt-target gene transcription. In the present study, we discovered that Pygo2 mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated in the majority of (152/209) human brain glioma tissues and five glioma cell lines, and significantly correlated with the age, the WHO tumor classification and poor patient survival. The histone methyltransferase complex components (WDR5, Ash2, and menin, but not CXCC1 or NCOA6) were down-regulated at the promoter loci of Wnt target genes after Pygo2 knockdown, and this was accompanied by the down-regulation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity. Further, we demonstrated that the involvement of Pygo2 in the activation of the Wnt pathway in human glioma progression is through up-regulation of the H3K4me3 (but not H3K4me2) by promoting the recruitment of the histone methyltransferase MLL1/MLL2 complex to Wnt target gene promoters. Thus, our study provided evidence that Pygo2 functions as a novel prognostic marker and represents a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26902498

  15. Is t(10;11)(p11.2;q23) involving MLL and ABI-1 genes associated with congenital acute monocytic leukemia?

    PubMed

    Morerio, Cristina; Rosanda, Cristina; Rapella, Annamaria; Micalizzi, Concetta; Panarello, Claudio

    2002-11-01

    Congenital, or perinatal, leukemias are rarely observed, but retrospective molecular studies seem to suggest a more frequent onset in prenatal life. Myelocytic types are common, and chromosome band 11q23 rearrangements at the MLL locus are characteristic genetic markers. The fusion of the MLL gene with one of its partners, ABI-1, has recently been described in two infant leukemia patients with monocytic involvement and good clinical outcome. We report a case of congenital monocytic leukemia with the same gene involvement and good response to chemotherapy. The blast metaphases were probed by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and t(10;11)(p11.2;q23) involving MLL and ABI-1 genes was demonstrated with the same breakpoint in ABI-1. The congenital presentation of this case suggests a possible relationship of this genetic event with in utero leukemogenesis.

  16. Theory and Practice of Lineage Tracing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh

    2015-11-01

    Lineage tracing is a method that delineates all progeny produced by a single cell or a group of cells. The possibility of performing lineage tracing initiated the field of Developmental Biology and continues to revolutionize Stem Cell Biology. Here, I introduce the principles behind a successful lineage-tracing experiment. In addition, I summarize and compare different methods for conducting lineage tracing and provide examples of how these strategies can be implemented to answer fundamental questions in development and regeneration. The advantages and limitations of each method are also discussed.

  17. A novel mutation in the miR-128b gene reduces miRNA processing and leads to glucocorticoid resistance of MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Ai; Ha, Daon; Schotte, Diana; den Boer, Monique L; Armstrong, Scott A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-03-15

    MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia has a poor prognosis, and the mechanisms by which these leukemias develop are not understood despite intensive research based on well-known concepts and methods. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a new class of small noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate expression of target mRNA transcripts. We recently reported that ectopic expression of miR-128b together with miR-221, two of the miRNAs downregulated in MLL-AF4 ALL, restores glucocorticoid resistance through downregulation of the MLL-AF4 chimeric fusion proteins MLL-AF4 and AF4-MLL that are generated by chromosomal translocation t(4;11). Here we report the identification of new mutations in miR-128b in RS4;11 cells, derived from MLL-AF4 ALL patient. One novel mutation significantly reduces the processing of miR-128b. Finally, this base change occurs in a primary MLL-AF4 ALL sample as an acquired mutation. These results demonstrate that the novel mutation in miR-128b in MLL-AF4 ALL alters the processing of miR-128b and that the resultant downregulation of mature miR-128b contributes to glucocorticoid resistance through the failure to downregulate the fusion oncogenes.

  18. Regulation of CDX4 gene transcription by HoxA9, HoxA10, the Mll-Ell oncogene and Shp2 during leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bei, L; Shah, C; Wang, H; Huang, W; Platanias, L C; Eklund, E A

    2014-01-01

    Cdx and Hox proteins are homeodomain transcription factors that regulate hematopoiesis. Transcription of the HOX and CDX genes decreases during normal myelopoiesis, but is aberrantly sustained in leukemias with translocation or partial tandem duplication of the MLL1 gene. Cdx4 activates transcription of the HOXA9 and HOXA10 genes, and HoxA10 activates CDX4 transcription. The events that break this feedback loop, permitting a decreased Cdx4 expression during normal myelopoiesis, were previously undefined. In the current study, we find that HoxA9 represses CDX4 transcription in differentiating myeloid cells, antagonizing activation by HoxA10. We determine that tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA10 impairs transcriptional activation of CDX4, but tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA9 facilitates repression of this gene. As HoxA9 and HoxA10 are phosphorylated during myelopoiesis, this provides a mechanism for differentiation stage-specific Cdx4 expression. HoxA9 and HoxA10 are increased in cells expressing Mll-Ell, a leukemia-associated MLL1 fusion protein. We find that Mll-Ell induces a HoxA10-dependent increase in Cdx4 expression in myeloid progenitor cells. However, Cdx4 decreases in a HoxA9-dependent manner on exposure of Mll-Ell-expressing cells to differentiating cytokines. Leukemia-associated, constitutively active mutants of Shp2 block cytokine-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA9 and HoxA10. In comparison with myeloid progenitor cells that are expressing Mll-Ell alone, we find increased CDX4 transcription and Cdx4 expression in cells co-expressing Mll-Ell plus constitutively active Shp2. Increased Cdx4 expression is sustained on exposure of these cells to differentiating cytokines. Our results identify a mechanism for increased and sustained CDX4 transcription in leukemias co-overexpressing HoxA9 and HoxA10 in combination with constitutive activation of Shp2. This is clinically relevant, because MLL1 translocations and constitutive Shp2 activation co-exist in

  19. Set1 and MLL1/2 target distinct sets of functionally different genomic loci in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Elizabeth M.; Chitsazan, Alex D.; Seidel, Chris W.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) is known to correlate with both active and poised genomic loci, yet many questions remain regarding its functional roles in vivo. We identify functional genomic targets of two H3K4 methyltransferases, Set1 and MLL1/2, in both the stem cells and differentiated tissue of the planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea. We show that, despite their common substrate, these enzymes target distinct genomic loci in vivo, which are distinguishable by the pattern each enzyme leaves on the chromatin template, i.e., the breadth of the H3K4me3 peak. Whereas Set1 targets are largely associated with the maintenance of the stem cell population, MLL1/2 targets are specifically enriched for genes involved in ciliogenesis. These data not only confirm that chromatin regulation is fundamental to planarian stem cell function, but also provide evidence for post-embryonic functional specificity of H3K4me3 methyltransferases in vivo. PMID:26711341

  20. USF1 and hSET1A mediated epigenetic modifications regulate lineage differentiation and HoxB4 transcription.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changwang; Li, Ying; Liang, Shermi; Cui, Kairong; Salz, Tal; Yang, Hui; Tang, Zhanyun; Gallagher, Patrick G; Qiu, Yi; Roeder, Robert; Zhao, Keji; Bungert, Jörg; Huang, Suming

    2013-06-01

    The interplay between polycomb and trithorax complexes has been implicated in embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal and differentiation. It has been shown recently that WRD5 and Dpy-30, specific components of the SET1/MLL protein complexes, play important roles during ESC self-renewal and differentiation of neural lineages. However, not much is known about how and where specific trithorax complexes are targeted to genes involved in self-renewal or lineage-specification. Here, we report that the recruitment of the hSET1A histone H3K4 methyltransferase (HMT) complex by transcription factor USF1 is required for mesoderm specification and lineage differentiation. In undifferentiated ESCs, USF1 maintains hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HS/PC) associated bivalent chromatin domains and differentiation potential. Furthermore, USF1 directed recruitment of the hSET1A complex to the HoxB4 promoter governs the transcriptional activation of HoxB4 gene and regulates the formation of early hematopoietic cell populations. Disruption of USF or hSET1A function by overexpression of a dominant-negative AUSF1 mutant or by RNA-interference-mediated knockdown, respectively, led to reduced expression of mesoderm markers and inhibition of lineage differentiation. We show that USF1 and hSET1A together regulate H3K4me3 modifications and transcription preinitiation complex assembly at the hematopoietic-associated HoxB4 gene during differentiation. Finally, ectopic expression of USF1 in ESCs promotes mesoderm differentiation and enforces the endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition by inducing hematopoietic-associated transcription factors, HoxB4 and TAL1. Taken together, our findings reveal that the guided-recruitment of the hSET1A histone methyltransferase complex and its H3K4 methyltransferase activity by transcription regulator USF1 safeguards hematopoietic transcription programs and enhances mesoderm/hematopoietic differentiation. PMID:23754954

  1. Inhibition of Rac GTPase signaling and downstream prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins as combination targeted therapy in MLL-AF9 leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mizukawa, Benjamin; Wei, Junping; Shrestha, Mahesh; Wunderlich, Mark; Chou, Fu-Sheng; Griesinger, Andrea; Harris, Chad E; Kumar, Ashish R; Zheng, Yi; Williams, David A; Mulloy, James C

    2011-11-10

    The Rac family of small Rho GTPases coordinates diverse cellular functions in hematopoietic cells including adhesion, migration, cytoskeleton rearrangements, gene transcription, proliferation, and survival. The integrity of Rac signaling has also been found to critically regulate cellular functions in the initiation and maintenance of hematopoietic malignancies. Using an in vivo gene targeting approach, we demonstrate that Rac2, but not Rac1, is critical to the initiation of acute myeloid leukemia in a retroviral expression model of MLL-AF9 leukemogenesis. However, loss of either Rac1 or Rac2 is sufficient to impair survival and growth of the transformed MLL-AF9 leukemia. Rac2 is known to positively regulate expression of Bcl-2 family proteins toward a prosurvival balance. We demonstrate that disruption of downstream survival signaling through antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins is implicated in mediating the effects of Rac2 deficiency in MLL-AF9 leukemia. Indeed, overexpression of Bcl-xL is able to rescue the effects of Rac2 deficiency and MLL-AF9 cells are exquisitely sensitive to direct inhibition of Bcl-2 family proteins by the BH3-mimetic, ABT-737. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to NSC23766, a small-molecule inhibitor of Rac activation, increases the apoptotic effect of ABT-737, indicating the Rac/Bcl-2 survival pathway may be targeted synergistically.

  2. Colponemids represent multiple ancient alveolate lineages.

    PubMed

    Janouškovec, Jan; Tikhonenkov, Denis V; Mikhailov, Kirill V; Simdyanov, Timur G; Aleoshin, Vladimir V; Mylnikov, Alexander P; Keeling, Patrick J

    2013-12-16

    The alveolates comprise three well-studied protist lineages of significant environmental, medical, and economical importance: apicomplexans (e.g., Plasmodium), dinoflagellates (e.g., Symbiodinium), and ciliates (e.g., Tetrahymena). These major lineages have evolved distinct and unusual characteristics, the origins of which have proved to be difficult evolutionary puzzles. Mitochondrial genomes are a prime example: all three groups depart from canonical form and content, but in different ways. Reconstructing such ancient transitions is difficult without deep-branching lineages that retain ancestral characteristics. Here we describe two such lineages and how they illuminate the ancestral state of alveolate mitochondrial genomes. We established five clonal cultures of colponemids, predatory alveolates without cultured representatives and molecular data. Colponemids represent at least two independent lineages at the phylum level in multilocus phylogenetic analysis; one sister to apicomplexans and dinoflagellates, and the other at a deeper position. A genome survey from one strain showed that ancestral state of the mitochondrial genomes in the three major alveolate lineages consisted of an unusual linear chromosome with telomeres and a substantially larger gene set than known alveolates. Colponemid sequences also identified several environmental lineages as colponemids, altogether suggesting an untapped potential for understanding the origin and evolution of apicomplexans, dinoflagellates, and ciliates. PMID:24316202

  3. Cloning of ELL, a gene that fuses to MLL in a t(11; 19)(q23; p13. 1) in acute myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Thirman, M.J.; Levitan, D.A.; Kobayashi, H.; Simon, M.C.; Rowley, J.D. )

    1994-12-06

    To characterize the functions of MLL fusion transcripts, we cloned the gene that fuses to MLL in the translocation t(11;19)(q23;p13.1). This translocation is distinct from another type of 11;19 translocation with a 19p13.3 breakpoint that results in the fusion of MLL to the ENL gene. By PCR screening of a cDNA library prepared from a patient's leukemia cells with this translocation, we obtained a fusion transcript containing exon 7 of MLL and sequence of an unknown gene. The sequence of this gene was amplified and used as a probe to screen a fetal brain cDNA library. On Northern blot analysis, this cDNA detected a 4.4-kb transcript that was abundant in peripheral blood leukocytes, skeletal muscle, placenta, and testis and expressed at lower levels in spleen, thymus, heart, brain, lung, kidney, liver, and ovary. In addition, a 2.8-kb transcript was present in peripheral blood, testis, and placenta. On [open quotes]zoo blots,[close quotes] this gene was shown to be evolutionarily conserved in 10 mammalian species as well as in chicken, frog, and fish. We have named this gene ELL (for eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia gene). A highly basic, lysine-rich motif of the predicted ELL protein is homologous to similar regions of several proteins, including the DNA-binding domain of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The characterization of the normal functions of ELL as well as its altered function when fused to MLL will be critical to further our understanding of the mechanisms of leukemogenesis. 30 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Development and Use of Assay Conditions Suited to Screening for and Profiling of SET-Domain-Targeted Inhibitors of the MLL/SET1 Family of Lysine Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, Joseph J.; Smith, Robert F.; Denney, Natalie; Walsh, Colin P.; McCauley, Lauren; Qian, Jie; Ma, Haiching; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Methylation of histone H3 lysine-4 (H3K4) is an important, regulatory, epigenetic post-translational modification associated with actively transcribed genes. In humans, the principal mediators of this modification are part of the MLL/SET1 family of methyltransferases, which comprises six members, MLLs1–4 and SET1A/SET1B. Aberrations in the structure, expression, and regulation of these enzymes are implicated in various disease states, making them important potential targets for drug discovery, particularly for oncology indications. The MLL/SET1 family members are most enzymatically active when part of a “core complex,” the catalytic SET-domain-containing subunits bound to a subcomplex consisting of the proteins WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L and a homodimer of DPY-30 (WRAD2). The necessity of MLL/SET1 members to bind WRAD2 for full activity is the basis of a particular drug development strategy, which seeks to disrupt the interaction between the MLL/SET1 subunits and WDR5. This strategy is not without its theoretical and practical drawbacks, some of which relate to the ease with which complexes of Escherichia coli-expressed MLL/SET1 and WRAD2 fall apart. As an alternative strategy, we explore ways to stabilize the complex, focusing on the use of an excess of WRAD2 to drive the binding equilibria toward complex formation while maintaining low concentrations of the catalytic subunits. The purpose of this approach is to seek inhibitors that bind the SET domain, an approach proven successful with the related, but inherently more stable, enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) complex. PMID:26065558

  5. All-trans retinoic acid combined with 5-Aza-2 Prime -deoxycitidine induces C/EBP{alpha} expression and growth inhibition in MLL-AF9-positive leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiki, Atsushi; Imamura, Toshihiko; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Kawashima, Sachiko; Yoshida, Hideki; Hirashima, Yoshifumi; Miyachi, Mitsuru; Yagyu, Shigeki; Nakatani, Takuya; Sugita, Kanji; Hosoi, Hajime

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested whether ATRA and 5-Aza affect AML cell differentiation and growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell differentiation and growth arrest were induced in MLL-AF9-expressing cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{epsilon}, and PU.1 were also observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MLL-AF4/AF5q31-expressing cells are less sensitive to ATRA and 5-Aza. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different MLL fusion has distinct epigenetic properties related to RA pathway. -- Abstract: The present study tested whether all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and 5-Aza-2 Prime -deoxycitidine (5-Aza) affect AML cell differentiation and growth in vitro by acting on the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}) and c-Myc axis. After exposure to a combination of these agents, cell differentiation and growth arrest were significantly higher in human and murine MLL-AF9-expressing cells than in MLL-AF4/AF5q31-expressing cells, which were partly associated with increased expression of C/EBP{alpha}, C/EBP{epsilon}, and PU.1, and decreased expression of c-Myc. These findings indicate that MLL-AF9-expressing cells are more sensitive to ATRA and 5-Aza, indicating that different MLL fusion proteins possess different epigenetic properties associated with retinoic acid pathway inactivation.

  6. Saami mitochondrial DNA reveals deep maternal lineage clusters.

    PubMed

    Delghandi, M; Utsi, E; Krauss, S

    1998-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of 62 Saami from the north of Norway was analyzed in the D loop hypervariable region I and II and sequences were compared to other gene pools. Two major (lineage 1 and 2) and two minor (lineage 3 and 4) maternal lineage clusters were found. Lineage 1 (56.9% of all hitherto analyzed Saami samples) contains a substantial number of branching haplotypes which are unknown in European gene pools. Lineage 2 (31.5%) and lineage 4 (3.6%) have few branching points and are present at a low rate throughout European gene pools. Lineage 3 (4.7%) has polymorphisms characteristic of circumpolar lineages.

  7. Lineage Selection and the Maintenance of Sex

    PubMed Central

    de Vienne, Damien M.; Giraud, Tatiana; Gouyon, Pierre-Henri

    2013-01-01

    Sex predominates in eukaryotes, despite its short-term disadvantage when compared to asexuality. Myriad models have suggested that short-term advantages of sex may be sufficient to counterbalance its twofold costs. However, despite decades of experimental work seeking such evidence, no evolutionary mechanism has yet achieved broad recognition as explanation for the maintenance of sex. We explore here, through lineage-selection models, the conditions favouring the maintenance of sex. In the first model, we allowed the rate of transition to asexuality to evolve, to determine whether lineage selection favoured species with the strongest constraints preventing the loss of sex. In the second model, we simulated more explicitly the mechanisms underlying the higher extinction rates of asexual lineages than of their sexual counterparts. We linked extinction rates to the ecological and/or genetic features of lineages, thereby providing a formalisation of the only figure included in Darwin's “The origin of species”. Our results reinforce the view that the long-term advantages of sex and lineage selection may provide the most satisfactory explanations for the maintenance of sex in eukaryotes, which is still poorly recognized, and provide figures and a simulation website for training and educational purposes. Short-term benefits may play a role, but it is also essential to take into account the selection of lineages for a thorough understanding of the maintenance of sex. PMID:23825582

  8. Lineage Selection and the Maintenance of Sex.

    PubMed

    de Vienne, Damien M; Giraud, Tatiana; Gouyon, Pierre-Henri

    2013-01-01

    Sex predominates in eukaryotes, despite its short-term disadvantage when compared to asexuality. Myriad models have suggested that short-term advantages of sex may be sufficient to counterbalance its twofold costs. However, despite decades of experimental work seeking such evidence, no evolutionary mechanism has yet achieved broad recognition as explanation for the maintenance of sex. We explore here, through lineage-selection models, the conditions favouring the maintenance of sex. In the first model, we allowed the rate of transition to asexuality to evolve, to determine whether lineage selection favoured species with the strongest constraints preventing the loss of sex. In the second model, we simulated more explicitly the mechanisms underlying the higher extinction rates of asexual lineages than of their sexual counterparts. We linked extinction rates to the ecological and/or genetic features of lineages, thereby providing a formalisation of the only figure included in Darwin's "The origin of species". Our results reinforce the view that the long-term advantages of sex and lineage selection may provide the most satisfactory explanations for the maintenance of sex in eukaryotes, which is still poorly recognized, and provide figures and a simulation website for training and educational purposes. Short-term benefits may play a role, but it is also essential to take into account the selection of lineages for a thorough understanding of the maintenance of sex.

  9. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: I. Development of the lineage-associated fiber tracts

    PubMed Central

    Lovick, Jennifer K.; Ngo, Kathy T.; Omoto, Jaison J.; Wong, Darren C.; Nguyen, Joseph D.; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Neurons of the Drosophila central brain fall into approximately 100 paired groups, termed lineages. Each lineage is derived from a single asymmetrically-dividing neuroblast. Embryonic neuroblasts produce 1,500 primary neurons (per hemisphere) that make up the larval CNS followed by a second mitotic period in the larva that generates approximately 10,000 secondary, adult-specific neurons. Clonal analyses based on previous works using lineage-specific Gal4 drivers have established that such lineages form highly invariant morphological units. All neurons of a lineage project as one or a few axon tracts (secondary axon tracts, SATs) with characteristic trajectories, thereby representing unique hallmarks. In the neuropil, SATs assemble into larger fiber bundles (fascicles) which interconnect different neuropil compartments. We have analyzed the SATs and fascicles formed by lineages during larval, pupal, and adult stages using antibodies against membrane molecules (Neurotactin/Neuroglian) and synaptic proteins (Bruchpilot/N-Cadherin). The use of these markers allows one to identify fiber bundles of the adult brain and associate them with SATs and fascicles of the larval brain. This work lays the foundation for assigning the lineage identity of GFP-labeled MARCM clones on the basis of their close association with specific SATs and neuropil fascicles, as described in the accompanying paper (Wong et al., 2013. Postembryonic lineages of the Drosophila brain: II. Identification of lineage projection patterns based on MARCM clones. Submitted.). PMID:23880429

  10. MLL-AF9 Expression in Hematopoietic Stem Cells Drives a Highly Invasive AML Expressing EMT-Related Genes Linked to Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    Stavropoulou, Vaia; Kaspar, Susanne; Brault, Laurent; Sanders, Mathijs A; Juge, Sabine; Morettini, Stefano; Tzankov, Alexandar; Iacovino, Michelina; Lau, I-Jun; Milne, Thomas A; Royo, Hélène; Kyba, Michael; Valk, Peter J M; Peters, Antoine H F M; Schwaller, Juerg

    2016-07-11

    To address the impact of cellular origin on acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we generated an inducible transgenic mouse model for MLL-AF9-driven leukemia. MLL-AF9 expression in long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSC) in vitro resulted in dispersed clonogenic growth and expression of genes involved in migration and invasion. In vivo, 20% LT-HSC-derived AML were particularly aggressive with extensive tissue infiltration, chemoresistance, and expressed genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in solid cancers. Knockdown of the EMT regulator ZEB1 significantly reduced leukemic blast invasion. By classifying mouse and human leukemias according to Evi1/EVI1 and Erg/ERG expression, reflecting aggressiveness and cell of origin, and performing comparative transcriptomics, we identified several EMT-related genes that were significantly associated with poor overall survival of AML patients. PMID:27344946

  11. Pathogenetic, Clinical, and Prognostic Features of Adult t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AF4 Positive B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Marchesi, F.; Girardi, K.; Avvisati, G.

    2011-01-01

    Translocation t(4;11)(q21;q23) leading to formation of MLL-AF4 fusion gene is found in about 10% of newly diagnosed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adult patients. Patients expressing this chromosomal aberration present typical biological, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. This form of leukemia is universally recognized as high-risk leukemia and treatment intensification with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in first complete remission (CR) could be a valid option to improve prognosis, but data obtained from the literature are controversial. In this review, we briefly describe pathogenetic, clinical, and prognostic characteristics of adult t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AF4 positive ALL and provide a review of the clinical outcome reported by the most important cooperative groups worldwide. PMID:22190943

  12. Alternative splicing regulation and cell lineage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; He, Ling; Tang, Liling

    2012-11-01

    The alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is an essential mechanism for protein diversity. It plays important biological roles, such as proliferation, differentiation and development of cells. Furthermore, alternative splicing participates in the pathogenesis of diseases, including cancer. Thus, in-depth understanding of splicing regulation is of great significance. Regulation of alternative splicing is an extraordinary complicated process in which several signal molecules are at work. Besides the cis-elements and trans-factors, several lines of evidences suggest that other molecules, structures or process also regulate splicing, such as RNA structures, transcription and transcription factors, chromatin and protein. Meanwhile, increasing body of evidence shows that alternative splicing correlated closely to stem cell lineage differentiation. It means that there is a fundamental role for splicing in controlling regulatory program required for cell lineage differentiation. This review systematically sums up the regulation of alternative splicing and summarizes the splicing events during cell lineage differentiation of stem cells.

  13. MLL-AF9– and HOXA9-mediated acute myeloid leukemia stem cell self-renewal requires JMJD1C

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Nan; Chen, Mo; Eng, Rowena; DeJong, Joshua; Sinha, Amit U.; Rahnamay, Noushin F.; Koche, Richard; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Minehart, Janna C.; Chen, Chun-Wei; Deshpande, Aniruddha J.; Xu, Haiming; Chu, S. Haihua; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Roeder, Robert G.; Armstrong, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Self-renewal is a hallmark of both hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and leukemia stem cells (LSCs); therefore, the identification of mechanisms that are required for LSC, but not HSC, function could provide therapeutic opportunities that are more effective and less toxic than current treatments. Here, we employed an in vivo shRNA screen and identified jumonji domain–containing protein JMJD1C as an important driver of MLL-AF9 leukemia. Using a conditional mouse model, we showed that loss of JMJD1C substantially decreased LSC frequency and caused differentiation of MLL-AF9– and homeobox A9–driven (HOXA9-driven) leukemias. We determined that JMJD1C directly interacts with HOXA9 and modulates a HOXA9-controlled gene-expression program. In contrast, loss of JMJD1C led to only minor defects in blood homeostasis and modest effects on HSC self-renewal. Together, these data establish JMJD1C as an important mediator of MLL-AF9– and HOXA9-driven LSC function that is largely dispensable for HSC function. PMID:26878175

  14. An Lnc RNA (GAS5)/SnoRNA-derived piRNA induces activation of TRAIL gene by site-specifically recruiting MLL/COMPASS-like complexes

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Chen, Xinxin; Zhang, Xue; Duan, Xiaobing; Pan, Ting; Hu, Qifei; Zhang, Yijun; Zhong, Fudi; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Hong; Luo, Juan; Wu, Kang; Peng, Gao; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Lehong; Li, Xiaoxi; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) silences the transposons in germlines or induces epigenetic modifications in the invertebrates. However, its function in the mammalian somatic cells remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that a piRNA derived from Growth Arrest Specific 5, a tumor-suppressive long non-coding RNA, potently upregulates the transcription of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a proapoptotic protein, by inducing H3K4 methylation/H3K27 demethylation. Interestingly, the PIWIL1/4 proteins, which bind with this piRNA, directly interact with WDR5, resulting in a site-specific recruitment of the hCOMPASS-like complexes containing at least MLL3 and UTX (KDM6A). We have indicated a novel pathway for piRNAs to specially activate gene expression. Given that MLL3 or UTX are frequently mutated in various tumors, the piRNA/MLL3/UTX complex mediates the induction of TRAIL, and consequently leads to the inhibition of tumor growth. PMID:25779046

  15. Accelerated mutation accumulation in asexual lineages of a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Maurine; Hehman, Gery; Miller, Joseph T; Logsdon, John M; Taylor, Douglas R

    2010-04-01

    Sexual reproduction is both extremely costly and widespread relative to asexual reproduction, meaning that it must also confer profound advantages in order to persist. One theorized benefit of sex is that it facilitates the clearance of harmful mutations, which would accumulate more rapidly in the absence of recombination. The extent to which ineffective purifying selection and mutation accumulation are direct consequences of asexuality and whether the accelerated buildup of harmful mutations in asexuals can occur rapidly enough to maintain sex within natural populations, however, remain as open questions. We addressed key components of these questions by estimating the rate of mutation accumulation in the mitochondrial genomes of multiple sexual and asexual representatives of Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand snail characterized by mixed sexual/asexual populations. We found that increased mutation accumulation is associated with asexuality and occurs rapidly enough to be detected in recently derived asexual lineages of P. antipodarum. Our results demonstrate that increased mutation accumulation in asexuals can differentially affect coexisting and ecologically similar sexual and asexual lineages. The accelerated rate of mutation accumulation observed in asexual P. antipodarum provides some of the most direct evidence to date for a link between asexuality and mutation accumulation and implies that mutational buildup could be rapid enough to contribute to the short-term evolutionary mechanisms that favor sexual reproduction.

  16. SWI/SNF Subunits SMARCA4, SMARCD2 and DPF2 Collaborate in MLL-Rearranged Leukaemia Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, V Adam; Sroczynska, Patrycja; Sankar, Aditya; Miyagi, Satoru; Rundsten, Carsten Friis; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Helin, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in chromatin structure caused by deregulated epigenetic mechanisms collaborate with underlying genetic lesions to promote cancer. SMARCA4/BRG1, a core component of the SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling complex, has been implicated by its mutational spectrum as exerting a tumour-suppressor function in many solid tumours; recently however, it has been reported to sustain leukaemogenic transformation in MLL-rearranged leukaemia in mice. Here we further explore the role of SMARCA4 and the two SWI/SNF subunits SMARCD2/BAF60B and DPF2/BAF45D in leukaemia. We observed the selective requirement for these proteins for leukaemic cell expansion and self-renewal in-vitro as well as in leukaemia. Gene expression profiling in human cells of each of these three factors suggests that they have overlapping functions in leukaemia. The gene expression changes induced by loss of the three proteins demonstrate that they are required for the expression of haematopoietic stem cell associated genes but in contrast to previous results obtained in mouse cells, the three proteins are not required for the expression of c-MYC regulated genes.

  17. SWI/SNF Subunits SMARCA4, SMARCD2 and DPF2 Collaborate in MLL-Rearranged Leukaemia Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Aditya; Miyagi, Satoru; Rundsten, Carsten Friis; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Helin, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in chromatin structure caused by deregulated epigenetic mechanisms collaborate with underlying genetic lesions to promote cancer. SMARCA4/BRG1, a core component of the SWI/SNF ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling complex, has been implicated by its mutational spectrum as exerting a tumour-suppressor function in many solid tumours; recently however, it has been reported to sustain leukaemogenic transformation in MLL-rearranged leukaemia in mice. Here we further explore the role of SMARCA4 and the two SWI/SNF subunits SMARCD2/BAF60B and DPF2/BAF45D in leukaemia. We observed the selective requirement for these proteins for leukaemic cell expansion and self-renewal in-vitro as well as in leukaemia. Gene expression profiling in human cells of each of these three factors suggests that they have overlapping functions in leukaemia. The gene expression changes induced by loss of the three proteins demonstrate that they are required for the expression of haematopoietic stem cell associated genes but in contrast to previous results obtained in mouse cells, the three proteins are not required for the expression of c-MYC regulated genes. PMID:26571505

  18. Towards One Generic Name for Monophyletic Lineages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With the integration of asexually reproducing fungi into meaningful phylogenies, the need to use the same generic name for a monophyletic lineage has become urgent. At present Article 59 of the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN) requires the use of a sexual state name for sexually r...

  19. Evolution of a reassortant North American gull influenza virus lineage: drift, shift and stability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of gulls in the ecology of avian influenza (AI) is different than that of waterfowl. Different constellations of subtypes circulate within the two groups of birds and AI viruses isolated from North American gulls frequently possess reassortant genomes with genetic elements from both North America and Eurasian lineages. A 2008 isolate from a Newfoundland Great Black-backed Gull contained a mix of North American waterfowl, North American gull and Eurasian lineage genes. Methods We isolated, sequenced and phylogenetically compared avian influenza viruses from 2009 Canadian wild birds. Results We analyzed six 2009 virus isolates from Canada and found the same phylogenetic lineage had persisted over a larger geographic area, with an expanded host range that included dabbling and diving ducks as well as gulls. All of the 2009 virus isolates contained an internal protein coding set of genes of the same Eurasian lineage genes except PB1 that was from a North American lineage, and these genes continued to evolve by genetic drift. We show evidence that the 2008 Great Black-backed Gull virus was derived from this lineage with a reassortment of a North American PA gene into the more stable core set of internal protein coding genes that has circulated in avian populations for at least 2 years. From this core, the surface glycoprotein genes have switched several times creating H13N6, H13N2, and H16N3 subtypes. These gene segments were from North American lineages except for the H16 and N3 vRNAs. Conclusions This process appears similar to genetic shifts seen with swine influenza where a stable “triple reassortant internal gene” core has circulated in swine populations with genetic shifts occurring with hemaggluttinin and neuraminidase proteins getting periodically switched. Thus gulls may serve as genetic mixing vessels for different lineages of avian influenza, similar to the role of swine with regards to human influenza. These findings illustrate the

  20. Evolution of a reassortant North American gull influenza virus lineage: drift, shift and stability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, Jeffrey S.; TeSlaa, Joshua L.; Nashold, Sean W.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Stockwell, Timothy; Wentworth, David E.; Dugan, Vivien; Ip, Hon S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of gulls in the ecology of avian influenza (AI) is different than that of waterfowl. Different constellations of subtypes circulate within the two groups of birds and AI viruses isolated from North American gulls frequently possess reassortant genomes with genetic elements from both North America and Eurasian lineages. A 2008 isolate from a Newfoundland Great Black-backed Gull contained a mix of North American waterfowl, North American gull and Eurasian lineage genes. Methods: We isolated, sequenced and phylogenetically compared avian influenza viruses from 2009 Canadian wild birds. Results: We analyzed six 2009 virus isolates from Canada and found the same phylogenetic lineage had persisted over a larger geographic area, with an expanded host range that included dabbling and diving ducks as well as gulls. All of the 2009 virus isolates contained an internal protein coding set of genes of the same Eurasian lineage genes except PB1 that was from a North American lineage, and these genes continued to evolve by genetic drift. We show evidence that the 2008 Great Black-backed Gull virus was derived from this lineage with a reassortment of a North American PA gene into the more stable core set of internal protein coding genes that has circulated in avian populations for at least 2 years. From this core, the surface glycoprotein genes have switched several times creating H13N6, H13N2, and H16N3 subtypes. These gene segments were from North American lineages except for the H16 and N3 vRNAs. Conclusions: This process appears similar to genetic shifts seen with swine influenza where a stable "triple reassortant internal gene" core has circulated in swine populations with genetic shifts occurring with hemaggluttinin and neuraminidase proteins getting periodically switched. Thus gulls may serve as genetic mixing vessels for different lineages of avian influenza, similar to the role of swine with regards to human influenza. These findings illustrate the

  1. Complex Patterns of Chromosome 11 Aberrations in Myeloid Malignancies Target CBL, MLL, DDB1 and LMO2

    PubMed Central

    Klampfl, Thorsten; Milosevic, Jelena D.; Puda, Ana; Schönegger, Andreas; Bagienski, Klaudia; Berg, Tiina; Harutyunyan, Ashot S.; Gisslinger, Bettina; Rumi, Elisa; Malcovati, Luca; Pietra, Daniela; Elena, Chiara; Della Porta, Matteo Giovanni; Pieri, Lisa; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bock, Christoph; Doubek, Michael; Dvorakova, Dana; Suvajdzic, Nada; Tomin, Dragica; Tosic, Natasa; Racil, Zdenek; Steurer, Michael; Pavlovic, Sonja; Vannucchi, Alessandro M.; Cazzola, Mario; Gisslinger, Heinz; Kralovics, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Exome sequencing of primary tumors identifies complex somatic mutation patterns. Assignment of relevance of individual somatic mutations is difficult and poses the next challenge for interpretation of next generation sequencing data. Here we present an approach how exome sequencing in combination with SNP microarray data may identify targets of chromosomal aberrations in myeloid malignancies. The rationale of this approach is that hotspots of chromosomal aberrations might also harbor point mutations in the target genes of deletions, gains or uniparental disomies (UPDs). Chromosome 11 is a frequent target of lesions in myeloid malignancies. Therefore, we studied chromosome 11 in a total of 813 samples from 773 individual patients with different myeloid malignancies by SNP microarrays and complemented the data with exome sequencing in selected cases exhibiting chromosome 11 defects. We found gains, losses and UPDs of chromosome 11 in 52 of the 813 samples (6.4%). Chromosome 11q UPDs frequently associated with mutations of CBL. In one patient the 11qUPD amplified somatic mutations in both CBL and the DNA repair gene DDB1. A duplication within MLL exon 3 was detected in another patient with 11qUPD. We identified several common deleted regions (CDR) on chromosome 11. One of the CDRs associated with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (P=0.013). One patient with a deletion at the LMO2 locus harbored an additional point mutation on the other allele indicating that LMO2 might be a tumor suppressor frequently targeted by 11p deletions. Our chromosome-centered analysis indicates that chromosome 11 contains a number of tumor suppressor genes and that the role of this chromosome in myeloid malignancies is more complex than previously recognized. PMID:24147083

  2. Generating Mosaics for Lineage Analysis in Flies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tzumin

    2013-01-01

    By generating and studying mosaic organisms we are learning how intricate tissues form as cells proliferate and diversify through organism development. FLP/FRT-mediated site-specific mitotic recombination permits the generation of mosaic flies with efficiency and control. With heat-inducible or tissue-specific FLP transgenes at our disposal, we can engineer mosaics carrying clones of homozygous cells that come from specific pools of heterozygous precursors. This permits detailed cell lineage analysis followed by mosaic analysis of gene functions in the underlying developmental processes. Expression of transgenes (e.g. reporters) only in the homozygous cells enables mosaic analysis in the complex nervous system. Tracing neuronal lineages by using mosaics revolutionized mechanistic studies of neuronal diversification and differentiation, exemplifying the power of genetic mosaics in developmental biology. PMID:24902835

  3. Ancestral relationships of the major eukaryotic lineages.

    PubMed

    Sogin, M L; Morrison, H G; Hinkle, G; Silberman, J D

    1996-03-01

    Molecular systematics has revolutionized our understanding of microbial evolution. Phylogenetic frameworks relating all organisms in this biosphere can be inferred from comparisons of slowly evolving molecules such as the small and large subunit ribosomal RNAs. Unlike today's text book standard, the "Five Kingdoms" (plants, animals, fungi, protists and bacteria), molecular studies define three primary lines of descent (Eukaryotes, Eubacteria, and Archaebacteria). Within the Eukaryotes, the "higher" kingdoms (Fungi, Plantae, and Animalia) are joined by at least two novel complex evolutionary assemblages, the "Alveolates" (ciliates, dinoflagellates and apicomplexans) and the "Stramenopiles" (diatoms, oomycetes, labyrinthulids, brown algae and chrysophytes). The separation of these eukaryotic groups (described as the eukaryotic "crown") occurred approximately 10(9) years ago and was preceded by a succession of earlier diverging protist lineages, some as ancient as the separation of the prokaryotic domains. The molecular phylogenies suggest that multiple endosymbiotic events introduced plastids into discrete eukaryotic lineages.

  4. Mesenchymal progenitor cells for the osteogenic lineage

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors of the osteogenic lineage provide the flexibility for bone to grow, maintain its function and homeostasis. Traditionally, colony-forming-unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) have been regarded as surrogates for mesenchymal progenitors; however, this definition cannot address the function of these progenitors in their native setting. Transgenic murine models including lineage-tracing technologies based on the cre-lox system have proven to be useful in delineating mesenchymal progenitors in their native environment. Although heterogeneity of cell populations of interest marked by a promoter-based approach complicates overall interpretation, an emerging complexity of mesenchymal progenitors has been revealed. Current literatures suggest two distinct types of bone progenitor cells; growth-associated mesenchymal progenitors contribute to explosive growth of bone in early life, whereas bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors contribute to the much slower remodeling process and response to injury that occurs mainly in adulthood. More detailed relationships of these progenitors need to be studied through further experimentation. PMID:26526380

  5. Lineages of varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    McGeoch, Duncan J

    2009-04-01

    Relationships among varicella-zoster virus (VZV; Human herpesvirus 3) genome sequences were examined to evaluate descent of strains, structures of lineages and incidence of recombination events. Eighteen complete, published genome sequences were aligned and 494 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) extracted, each as two alleles. At 281 SNPs, a single sequence differed from all the others. Distributions of the remaining 213 SNPs indicated that the sequences fell into five groups, which coincided with previously recognized phylogenetic groupings, termed E1, E2, J, M1 and M2. The 213-SNP set was divisible into 104 SNPs that were specific to a single group, and 109 cross-group SNPs that defined relationships among groups. This last set was evaluated by criteria of continuities in relationships between groups and breaks in such patterns, to identify crossover points and ascribe them to lineages. For the 99 cross-group SNPs in the genome's long unique region, it was seen that the E2 and M2 groups were almost completely distinct in their SNP alleles, and the E1 group was derived from a recombinant of E2 and M2. A valid phylogenetic tree could thus be constructed for the four E2 and two M2 strains. There was no substantive evidence for recombination within the E2 group or the E1 group (ten strains). The J and M1 groups each contained only one strain, and both were interpreted as having substantial distinct histories plus possible recombinant elements from the E2 and M2 lineages. The view of VZV recombination and phylogeny reached represents a major clarification of deep relationships among VZV lineages. PMID:19264671

  6. Genetic Mosaics and the Germ Line Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Mark E.; Friedman, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mosaics provide information about cellular lineages that is otherwise difficult to obtain, especially in humans. De novo mutations act as cell markers, allowing the tracing of developmental trajectories of all descendants of the cell in which the new mutation arises. De novo mutations may arise at any time during development but are relatively rare. They have usually been observed through medical ascertainment, when the mutation causes unusual clinical signs or symptoms. Mutational events can include aneuploidies, large chromosomal rearrangements, copy number variants, or point mutations. In this review we focus primarily on the analysis of point mutations and their utility in addressing questions of germ line versus somatic lineages. Genetic mosaics demonstrate that the germ line and soma diverge early in development, since there are many examples of combined somatic and germ line mosaicism for de novo mutations. The occurrence of simultaneous mosaicism in both the germ line and soma also shows that the germ line is not strictly clonal but arises from at least two, and possibly multiple, cells in the embryo with different ancestries. Whole genome or exome DNA sequencing technologies promise to expand the range of studies of genetic mosaics, as de novo mutations can now be identified through sequencing alone in the absence of a medical ascertainment. These technologies have been used to study mutation patterns in nuclear families and in monozygotic twins, and in animal model developmental studies, but not yet for extensive cell lineage studies in humans. PMID:25898403

  7. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Alicia L.; Kelley, Philip M.; Tempero, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Post natal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT+ LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT+ lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  8. Lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Connor, Alicia L; Kelley, Philip M; Tempero, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    Postnatal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis presumably requires precise regulatory processes to properly assemble proliferating lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The specific mechanisms that regulate the assembly of LECs during new lymphatic vessel synthesis are unclear. Dynamic endothelial shuffling and rearrangement has been proposed as a mechanism of blood vessel growth. We developed genetic lineage-tracing strategies using an inductive transgenic technology to track the fate of entire tandem dimer tomato-positive (tdT) lymphatic vessels or small, in some cases clonal, populations of LECs. We coupled this platform with a suture-induced mouse model of corneal lymphangiogenesis and used different analytic microscopy techniques including serial live imaging to study the spatial properties of proliferating tdT(+) LEC progenies. LEC precursors and their progeny expanded from the corneal limbal lymphatic vessel and were assembled contiguously to comprise a subunit within a new lymphatic vessel. VE-cadherin blockade induced morphologic abnormalities in newly synthesized lymphatic vessels, but did not disrupt the tdT(+) lymphatic endothelial lineage assembly. Analysis of this static and dynamic data based largely on direct in vivo observations supports a model of lymphatic endothelial lineage assemblage during corneal inflammatory lymphangiogenesis. PMID:26658452

  9. Genome sequesnce of lineage III Listeria monocytogenes strain HCC23

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    More than 98% of reported human listeriosis cases are caused by Listeria monocytogenes serotypes within lineages I and II. Serotypes within lineage III (4a and 4c) are commonly isolated from environmental and food specimens. We report the first complete genome sequence of a lineage III isolate, HCC2...

  10. Phylogenomics of the Zygomycete lineages: Exploring phylogeny and genome evolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Zygomycete lineages mark the major transition from zoosporic life histories of the common ancestors of Fungi and the earliest diverging chytrid lineages (Chytridiomycota and Blastocladiomycota). Genome comparisons from these lineages may reveal gene content changes that reflect the transition to...

  11. Two deep evolutionary lineages in the circumtropical glasseye Heteropriacanthus cruentatus (Teleostei, Priacanthidae) with admixture in the south-western Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Gaither, M R; Bernal, M A; Fernandez-Silva, I; Mwale, M; Jones, S A; Rocha, C; Rocha, L A

    2015-09-01

    A phylogeographic study of the circumtropical glasseye Heteropriacanthus cruentatus was conducted. Molecular analyses indicate two mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (coI) lineages that are 10·4% divergent: one in the western Atlantic (Caribbean) and another that was detected across the Indo-Pacific. A fixed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was detected at a nuclear locus (S7 ribosomal protein) and is consistent with this finding. There is evidence of recent dispersal from the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean with individuals of mixed lineages detected in South Africa and the Mozambique Channel. Using coalescent analyses of the mitochondrial dataset, time of divergence between lineages was estimated to be c. 15·3 million years. The deep divergence between these two lineages indicates distinct evolutionary units, however, due to the lack of morphological differences and evidence of hybridization between lineages, taxonomic revision is not suggested at this time.

  12. Gene flow between sexual and facultatively asexual lineages of an aphid species and the maintenance of reproductive mode variation.

    PubMed

    Halkett, F; Plantegenest, M; Bonhomme, J; Simon, J-C

    2008-06-01

    Many organisms considered as strictly clonal may in fact experience some rare events of sexual reproduction with their sexual relatives. However, the rate of sexual-asexual gene flow has rarely been assessed mainly because its evaluation is difficult to achieve in the field. In the cyclically parthenogenetic aphid Rhopalosiphum padi, two main sets of lineages, differing in their investment in sexual reproduction and in their genetic attributes, co-exist even at a very fine scale: the 'sexual' lineages which have a full commitment to the sexual reproduction, and the 'facultatively asexual' lineages, which allocate investment in the sexual and parthenogenetic reproduction. This system offers a unique opportunity to tackle the genetic interactions between two contrasting reproductive modes. Here, we provide evidence that gene flow occurred between sexual and facultatively asexual lineages of R. padi. We carefully examined the shuffling in phenotypic and genotypic variation following a sexual reproduction event that took place in the field. Combining genotypic data and phenotypic measurements showed that this gene mixing led to the production of a wide array of reproductive modes, including strictly asexual lineages. Finally, we discuss the central role played by facultatively asexual lineages on the maintenance of reproductive mode variation.

  13. Isolation and characterization of koi herpesvirus (KHV) from Indonesia: identification of a new genetic lineage.

    PubMed

    Sunarto, A; McColl, K A; Crane, M St J; Sumiati, T; Hyatt, A D; Barnes, A C; Walker, P J

    2011-02-01

    Koi herpesvirus (KHV) is the aetiological agent of an emerging disease (KHVD) associated with mass mortalities in koi and common carp and reported from at least 30 countries. We report the first isolation of KHV from koi and common carp in Indonesia and initial characterization of the isolates. Clinical signs, histopathology and virion morphology are similar to those of isolates from other countries. Phylogenetic analyses using the thymidine kinase gene amplified from each isolate and from carp tissue samples collected from KHVD outbreaks throughout Indonesia indicated that the Indonesian isolates are more closely related to the Asian than the European KHV lineage. Sequence analysis of two other variable regions between ORF29 and ORF31 (marker I) and near the start of ORF 133 (marker II) indicated that all Indonesian isolates displayed a marker I allele (I(++)) previously identified only in isolates of the Asian lineage. However, in the marker II region, all Indonesian isolates displayed the II(-) allele, which has been reported previously only amongst isolates of the European lineage, and nine of these displayed a mixed genotype (II(+)II(-)). The I(++)II(-) genotype has not been reported previously and appears to represent a new intermediate lineage that may have emerged in Indonesia.

  14. Three-way translocation involves MLL, MLLT3, and a novel cell cycle control gene, FLJ10374, in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia with t(9;11;19)(p22;q23;p13.3).

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luís; Sousa, Ana C; Matos, Paulo; Marques, Bárbara; Alaiz, Helena; Ribeiro, Maria J; Braga, Paula; da Silva, Maria G; Jordan, Peter

    2006-05-01

    The MLL gene, at 11q23, undergoes chromosomal translocation with a large number of partner genes in both acute lymphoblastic and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We report a novel t(9;11;19)(p22;q23;p13.3) disrupting MLL in an infant AML patient. The 5' end of MLL fused to chromosome 9 sequences on the der(11), whereas the 3' end was translocated to chromosome 19. We developed long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction assays to investigate the localization of the breakpoints on der(11) and der(19). We found that intron 5 of MLL was fused to intron 5 of MLLT3 at the der(11) genomic breakpoint, resulting in a novel in-frame MLL exon 5-MLLT3 exon 6 fusion transcript. On the der(19), a novel gene annotated as FLJ10374 was disrupted by the breakpoint. Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis, we showed that FLJ10374 is ubiquitously expressed in human cells. Transfection of the FLJ10374 protein in different cell lines revealed that it localized exclusively to the nucleus. In serum-starved NIH-3T3 cells, the expression of FLJ10374 decreased the rate of the G1-to-S transition of the cell cycle, whereas the suppression of FLJ10374 through short interfering RNA increased cell proliferation. These results indicate that FLJ10374 negatively regulates cell cycle progression and proliferation. Thus, a single chromosomal rearrangement resulting in formation of the MLL-MLLT3 fusion gene and haplo-insufficiency of FLJ10374 may have cooperated to promote leukemogenesis in AML with t(9;11;19).

  15. Lineage-specific partitions in archaeal transcription

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, Richard M.R.; Touboul, Nathalie; Ouzounis, Christos A.

    2007-01-01

    The phylogenetic distribution of the components comprising the transcriptional machinery in the crenarchaeal and euryarchaeal lineages of the Archaea was analyzed in a systematic manner by genome-wide profiling of transcription complements in fifteen complete archaeal genome sequences. Initially, a reference set of transcription-associated proteins (TAPs) consisting of sequences functioning in all aspects of the transcriptional process, and originating from the three domains of life, was used to query the genomes. TAP-families were detected by sequence clustering of the TAPs and their archaeal homologues, and through extensive database searching, these families were assigned a function. The phylogenetic origins of archaeal genes matching hidden Markov model profiles of protein domains associated with transcription, and those encoding the TAP-homologues, showed there is extensive lineage-specificity of proteins that function as regulators of transcription: most of these sequences are present solely in the Euryarchaeota, with nearly all of them homologous to bacterial DNA-binding proteins. Strikingly, the hidden Markov model profile searches revealed that archaeal chromatin and histone-modifying enzymes also display extensive taxon-restrictedness, both across and within the two phyla. PMID:17350932

  16. [Advances in lineage-specific genes].

    PubMed

    Huanping, Zhang; Tongming, Yin

    2015-06-01

    Lineage-specific genes (LSGs) are defined as genes found in one particular taxonomic group but have no significant sequence similarity with genes from other lineages, which compose about 10%?20% of the total genes in the genome of a focal organism. LSGs were first uncovered in the yeast genome in 1996. The development of the whole genome sequencing leads to the emergence of studies on LSGs as a hot topic in comparative genomics. LSGs have been extensively studied on microbial species, lower marine organisms, plant (such as Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Populus), insects, primate, etc; the biological functions of LSGs are important to clarify the evolution and adaptability of a species. In this review, we summarize the progress of LSGs studies, including LSGs identification, gene characterization, origin and evolution of LSGs, biological function, and expression analysis of LSGs. In addition, we discuss the existing problems and future directions for studies in this area. Our purpose is to provide some unique insights into the researches of LSGs.

  17. Conditional Lineage Ablation to Model Human Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Paul; Morley, Gregory; Huang, Qian; Fischer, Avi; Seiler, Stephanie; Horner, James W.; Factor, Stephen; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Jalife, Jose; Fishman, Glenn I.

    1998-09-01

    Cell loss contributes to the pathogenesis of many inherited and acquired human diseases. We have developed a system to conditionally ablate cells of any lineage and developmental stage in the mouse by regulated expression of the diphtheria toxin A (DTA) gene by using tetracycline-responsive promoters. As an example of this approach, we targeted expression of DTA to the hearts of adult mice to model structural abnormalities commonly observed in human cardiomyopathies. Induction of DTA expression resulted in cell loss, fibrosis, and chamber dilatation. As in many human cardiomyopathies, transgenic mice developed spontaneous arrhythmias in vivo, and programmed electrical stimulation of isolated-perfused transgenic hearts demonstrated a strikingly high incidence of spontaneous and inducible ventricular tachycardia. Affected mice showed marked perturbations of cardiac gap junction channel expression and localization, including a subset with disorganized epicardial activation patterns as revealed by optical action potential mapping. These studies provide important insights into mechanisms of arrhythmogenesis and suggest that conditional lineage ablation may have wide applicability for studies of disease pathogenesis.

  18. Cytomegalovirus immune evasion of myeloid lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Melanie M; Dağ, Franziska; Hengel, Hartmut; Messerle, Martin; Kalinke, Ulrich; Čičin-Šain, Luka

    2015-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) evades the immune system in many different ways, allowing the virus to grow and its progeny to spread in the face of an adverse environment. Mounting evidence about the antiviral role of myeloid immune cells has prompted the research of CMV immune evasion mechanisms targeting these cells. Several cells of the myeloid lineage, such as monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages, play a role in viral control, but are also permissive for CMV and are naturally infected by it. Therefore, CMV evasion of myeloid cells involves mechanisms that qualitatively differ from the evasion of non-CMV-permissive immune cells of the lymphoid lineage. The evasion of myeloid cells includes effects in cis, where the virus modulates the immune signaling pathways within the infected myeloid cell, and those in trans, where the virus affects somatic cells targeted by cytokines released from myeloid cells. This review presents an overview of CMV strategies to modulate and evade the antiviral activity of myeloid cells in cis and in trans.

  19. Origin of strigolactones in the green lineage.

    PubMed

    Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Xie, Xiaonan; Timme, Ruth E; Puech-Pages, Virginie; Dunand, Christophe; Lecompte, Emilie; Delwiche, Charles F; Yoneyama, Koichi; Bécard, Guillaume; Séjalon-Delmas, Nathalie

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the appearance of strigolactones in the green lineage and to determine the primitive function of these molecules. We measured the strigolactone content of several isolated liverworts, mosses, charophyte and chlorophyte green algae using a sensitive biological assay and LC-MS/MS analyses. In parallel, sequence comparison of strigolactone-related genes and phylogenetic analyses were performed using available genomic data and newly sequenced expressed sequence tags. The primitive function of strigolactones was determined by exogenous application of the synthetic strigolactone analog, GR24, and by mutant phenotyping. Liverworts, the most basal Embryophytes and Charales, one of the closest green algal relatives to Embryophytes, produce strigolactones, whereas several other species of green algae do not. We showed that GR24 stimulates rhizoid elongation of Charales, liverworts and mosses, and rescues the phenotype of the strigolactone-deficient Ppccd8 mutant of Physcomitrella patens. These findings demonstrate that the first function of strigolactones was not to promote arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. Rather, they suggest that the strigolactones appeared earlier in the streptophyte lineage to control rhizoid elongation. They may have been conserved in basal Embryophytes for this role and then recruited for the stimulation of colonization by glomeromycotan fungi.

  20. A cellular lineage analysis of the chick limb bud

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, R.V.; Scherz, P. J.; Campbell, J. K.; Tabin, C. J.

    2009-01-01

    The chick limb bud has been used as a model system for studying pattern formation and tissue development for more than 50 years. However, the lineal relationships among the different cell types and the migrational boundaries of individual cells within the limb mesenchyme have not been explored. We have used a retroviral lineage analysis system to track the fate of single limb bud mesenchymal cells at different times in early limb development. We find that progenitor cells labeled at stage 19–22 can give rise to multiple cell types including clones containing cells of all five of the major lateral plate mesoderm-derived tissues (cartilage, perichondrium, tendon, muscle connective tissue, and dermis). There is a bias, however, such that clones are more likely to contain the cell types of spatially adjacent tissues such as cartilage/perichondrium and tendon/muscle connective tissue. It has been recently proposed that distinct proximodistal segments are established early in limb development; however our analysis suggests that there is not a strict barrier to cellular migration along the proximodistal axis in the early stage 19–22 limb buds. Finally, our data indicate the presence of a dorsal/ventral boundary established by stage 16 that is inhibitory to cellular mixing. This boundary is demarcated by the expression of the LIM-homeodomain factor lmx1b. PMID:17888899

  1. Optimal lineage principle for age-structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussell, Edo

    2012-02-01

    Populations whose individuals exhibit age-dependent growth have often been studied using temporal dynamics of age distributions. In this talk, I examine the dynamics of age along lineages. We will see that the lineage point-of-view provides fundamental insights into evolutionary pressures on individuals' aging profiles. I will describe a variational principle that enables exact results for lineage statistics, in a variety of models. I will also discuss measurements on continuously dividing bacterial populations growing in microfluidics devices.

  2. The melanocyte lineage in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Mort, Richard L.; Jackson, Ian J.; Patton, E. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Melanocyte development provides an excellent model for studying more complex developmental processes. Melanocytes have an apparently simple aetiology, differentiating from the neural crest and migrating through the developing embryo to specific locations within the skin and hair follicles, and to other sites in the body. The study of pigmentation mutations in the mouse provided the initial key to identifying the genes and proteins involved in melanocyte development. In addition, work on chicken has provided important embryological and molecular insights, whereas studies in zebrafish have allowed live imaging as well as genetic and transgenic approaches. This cross-species approach is powerful and, as we review here, has resulted in a detailed understanding of melanocyte development and differentiation, melanocyte stem cells and the role of the melanocyte lineage in diseases such as melanoma. PMID:25670789

  3. Somatic Cell Reprogramming into Cardiovascular Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jenny X.; Plonowska, Karolina; Wu, Sean M.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic cardiac disease is the leading cause of death in the developed world. The inability of the adult mammalian heart to adequately repair itself has motivated stem cell researchers to explore various strategies to regenerate cardiomyocytes after myocardial infarction. Over the past century, progressive gains in our knowledge about the cellular mechanisms governing fate determination have led to recent advances in cellular reprogramming. The identification of specific factors capable of inducing pluripotent phenotype in somatic cells as well as factors that can directly reprogram somatic cells into cardiomyocytes suggests the potential for these approaches to translate into clinical therapies in the future. While conceptually appealing, the field of cell lineage reprogramming is in its infancy and further research will be needed to improve the efficiency of the reprogramming process and the fidelity of the reprogrammed cells to their in vivo counterpart. PMID:24764131

  4. Feedback, Lineages and Self-Organizing Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calof, Anne L.; Lowengrub, John S.; Lander, Arthur D.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback regulation of cell lineage progression plays an important role in tissue size homeostasis, but whether such feedback also plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that a particular feedback architecture in which both positive and negative diffusible signals act on stem and/or progenitor cells leads to the appearance of bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors, ultrasensitivity to external growth cues, local growth-driven budding, self-sustaining elongation, and the triggering of self-organization in the form of lamellar fingers. Such behaviors arise not through regulation of cell cycle speeds, but through the control of stem or progenitor self-renewal. Even though the spatial patterns that arise in this setting are the result of interactions between diffusible factors with antagonistic effects, morphogenesis is not the consequence of Turing-type instabilities. PMID:26989903

  5. Feedback, Lineages and Self-Organizing Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kunche, Sameeran; Yan, Huaming; Calof, Anne L; Lowengrub, John S; Lander, Arthur D

    2016-03-01

    Feedback regulation of cell lineage progression plays an important role in tissue size homeostasis, but whether such feedback also plays an important role in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. Here we use mathematical modeling to show that a particular feedback architecture in which both positive and negative diffusible signals act on stem and/or progenitor cells leads to the appearance of bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors, ultrasensitivity to external growth cues, local growth-driven budding, self-sustaining elongation, and the triggering of self-organization in the form of lamellar fingers. Such behaviors arise not through regulation of cell cycle speeds, but through the control of stem or progenitor self-renewal. Even though the spatial patterns that arise in this setting are the result of interactions between diffusible factors with antagonistic effects, morphogenesis is not the consequence of Turing-type instabilities. PMID:26989903

  6. The melanocyte lineage in development and disease.

    PubMed

    Mort, Richard L; Jackson, Ian J; Patton, E Elizabeth

    2015-02-15

    Melanocyte development provides an excellent model for studying more complex developmental processes. Melanocytes have an apparently simple aetiology, differentiating from the neural crest and migrating through the developing embryo to specific locations within the skin and hair follicles, and to other sites in the body. The study of pigmentation mutations in the mouse provided the initial key to identifying the genes and proteins involved in melanocyte development. In addition, work on chicken has provided important embryological and molecular insights, whereas studies in zebrafish have allowed live imaging as well as genetic and transgenic approaches. This cross-species approach is powerful and, as we review here, has resulted in a detailed understanding of melanocyte development and differentiation, melanocyte stem cells and the role of the melanocyte lineage in diseases such as melanoma.

  7. The C(4) plant lineages of planet Earth.

    PubMed

    Sage, Rowan F; Christin, Pascal-Antoine; Edwards, Erika J

    2011-05-01

    Using isotopic screens, phylogenetic assessments, and 45 years of physiological data, it is now possible to identify most of the evolutionary lineages expressing the C(4) photosynthetic pathway. Here, 62 recognizable lineages of C(4) photosynthesis are listed. Thirty-six lineages (60%) occur in the eudicots. Monocots account for 26 lineages, with a minimum of 18 lineages being present in the grass family and six in the sedge family. Species exhibiting the C(3)-C(4) intermediate type of photosynthesis correspond to 21 lineages. Of these, 9 are not immediately associated with any C(4) lineage, indicating that they did not share common C(3)-C(4) ancestors with C(4) species and are instead an independent line. The geographic centre of origin for 47 of the lineages could be estimated. These centres tend to cluster in areas corresponding to what are now arid to semi-arid regions of southwestern North America, south-central South America, central Asia, northeastern and southern Africa, and inland Australia. With 62 independent lineages, C(4) photosynthesis has to be considered one of the most convergent of the complex evolutionary phenomena on planet Earth, and is thus an outstanding system to study the mechanisms of evolutionary adaptation.

  8. New native South American Y chromosome lineages.

    PubMed

    Jota, Marilza S; Lacerda, Daniela R; Sandoval, José R; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Ohasi, Dominique; Santos-Júnior, José E; Acosta, Oscar; Cuellar, Cinthia; Revollo, Susana; Paz-Y-Miño, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Schurr, Theodore G; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo M; Pena, Sergio Dj; Ayub, Qasim; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santos, Fabrício R

    2016-07-01

    Many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the non-recombining region of the human Y chromosome have been described in the last decade. High-coverage sequencing has helped to characterize new SNPs, which has in turn increased the level of detail in paternal phylogenies. However, these paternal lineages still provide insufficient information on population history and demography, especially for Native Americans. The present study aimed to identify informative paternal sublineages derived from the main founder lineage of the Americas-haplogroup Q-L54-in a sample of 1841 native South Americans. For this purpose, we used a Y-chromosomal genotyping multiplex platform and conventional genotyping methods to validate 34 new SNPs that were identified in the present study by sequencing, together with many Y-SNPs previously described in the literature. We updated the haplogroup Q phylogeny and identified two new Q-M3 and three new Q-L54*(xM3) sublineages defined by five informative SNPs, designated SA04, SA05, SA02, SA03 and SA29. Within the Q-M3, sublineage Q-SA04 was mostly found in individuals from ethnic groups belonging to the Tukanoan linguistic family in the northwest Amazon, whereas sublineage Q-SA05 was found in Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon ethnic groups. Within Q-L54*, the derived sublineages Q-SA03 and Q-SA02 were exclusively found among Coyaima individuals (Cariban linguistic family) from Colombia, while Q-SA29 was found only in Maxacali individuals (Jean linguistic family) from southeast Brazil. Furthermore, we validated the usefulness of several published SNPs among indigenous South Americans. This new Y chromosome haplogroup Q phylogeny offers an informative paternal genealogy to investigate the pre-Columbian history of South America.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 31 March 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2016.26.

  9. New native South American Y chromosome lineages.

    PubMed

    Jota, Marilza S; Lacerda, Daniela R; Sandoval, José R; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Ohasi, Dominique; Santos-Júnior, José E; Acosta, Oscar; Cuellar, Cinthia; Revollo, Susana; Paz-Y-Miño, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Schurr, Theodore G; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo M; Pena, Sergio Dj; Ayub, Qasim; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santos, Fabrício R

    2016-07-01

    Many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the non-recombining region of the human Y chromosome have been described in the last decade. High-coverage sequencing has helped to characterize new SNPs, which has in turn increased the level of detail in paternal phylogenies. However, these paternal lineages still provide insufficient information on population history and demography, especially for Native Americans. The present study aimed to identify informative paternal sublineages derived from the main founder lineage of the Americas-haplogroup Q-L54-in a sample of 1841 native South Americans. For this purpose, we used a Y-chromosomal genotyping multiplex platform and conventional genotyping methods to validate 34 new SNPs that were identified in the present study by sequencing, together with many Y-SNPs previously described in the literature. We updated the haplogroup Q phylogeny and identified two new Q-M3 and three new Q-L54*(xM3) sublineages defined by five informative SNPs, designated SA04, SA05, SA02, SA03 and SA29. Within the Q-M3, sublineage Q-SA04 was mostly found in individuals from ethnic groups belonging to the Tukanoan linguistic family in the northwest Amazon, whereas sublineage Q-SA05 was found in Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon ethnic groups. Within Q-L54*, the derived sublineages Q-SA03 and Q-SA02 were exclusively found among Coyaima individuals (Cariban linguistic family) from Colombia, while Q-SA29 was found only in Maxacali individuals (Jean linguistic family) from southeast Brazil. Furthermore, we validated the usefulness of several published SNPs among indigenous South Americans. This new Y chromosome haplogroup Q phylogeny offers an informative paternal genealogy to investigate the pre-Columbian history of South America.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 31 March 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2016.26. PMID:27030145

  10. Viral load, E2 gene disruption status, and lineage of human papillomavirus type 16 infection in cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jo L K; Lo, Keith W K; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Tang, Julian W; Chan, Paul K S

    2006-12-15

    The clinical utility of human papillomavirus (HPV) load and integration status remains unclear. We applied refined methods to delineate the viral load, integration status, and lineage of 104 women with HPV-16 monotype infection, including 19 with normal cervices, 9 with histologically proven cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1, 24 with CIN 2, 27 with CIN 3, and 25 with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Higher crude viral load, as determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the E7 gene, was observed for SCC but became insignificant after normalization for cell content. Integration was located and quantified by real-time PCRs targeting, respectively, the carboxyl, amino, and hinge domains of the E2 gene. Pure episomal, integrated, and mixed forms were observed in all disease groups. Most E2 gene disruptions involved the amino-terminal, but sparing the hinge region that has been frequently used as a surrogate marker of integration. Large-fragment disruption involving all 3 E2 regions was observed only in the CIN 3 and SCC groups. Altogether, 33.3% of the CIN 3 group and 28.0% of the SCC group harbored pure episomal genomes. The Asian lineage was associated with a higher risk for CIN 3/SCC than the European lineage, and 6 of the 7 large-fragment E2 disruptions were from Asian lineage. The link between viral lineage, integration pattern, and oncogenesis deserves further study.

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with non-L3 morphology and MLL-AF9 gene fusion: three case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sarashina, Takeo; Iwabuchi, Haruko; Miyagawa, Naoyuki; Sekimizu, Masahiro; Yokosuka, Tomoko; Fukuda, Kunio; Hamanoue, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Fuminori; Goto, Shoko; Shiomi, Masae; Imai, Chihaya; Goto, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    Mature B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is typically associated with French-American-British (FAB)-L3 morphology and MYC gene rearrangement. However, rare cases of mature B-ALL with non-L3 morphology and MLL-AF9 fusion have been reported, and such cases are characterized by a rapid and aggressive clinical course. We here report three such cases of pediatric mature B-ALL in female patients respectively aged 15 months, 4 years, and 4 months. Bone marrow smears at diagnosis showed FAB-L1 morphology in all patients. Immunophenotypically, they were positive for cluster of differentiation (CD)10, CD19, CD20 (or CD22), Human Leukocyte Antigen-DR, and surface immunoglobulin λ. No evidence of MYC rearrangement was detected in any of the cases by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis. However, MLL rearrangement was detected by FISH, and MLL-AF9 fusion was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. All patients achieved complete remission after conventional chemotherapy and subsequently underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as high-risk ALL; patient 3 for infantile ALL with MLL rearrangement and the others for ALL with MLL rearrangement and hyperleukocytosis (white blood cell count at diagnosis >50 × 10(9)/L). At the latest follow-up for each case (12-98 months post-transplantation), complete remission was maintained. Moreover, we discuss the clinical, genetic, and immunophenotypic features of this rare disease. PMID:27084248

  12. Prognostic and therapeutic role of targetable lesions in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia without recurrent fusion genes

    PubMed Central

    Fedullo, Anna Lucia; Peragine, Nadia; Gianfelici, Valentina; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Brugnoletti, Fulvia; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Pauselli, Simona; Holmes, Antony B.; Puzzolo, Maria Cristina; Ceglie, Giulia; Apicella, Valerio; Mancini, Marco; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Guarini, Anna; Rabadan, Raul; Foà, Robin

    2016-01-01

    To shed light into the molecular bases of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia lacking known fusion transcripts, i.e. BCR-ABL1, ETV6-RUNX1, E2A-PBX1, and MLL rearrangements (B-NEG ALL) and the differences between children, adolescents/young adults (AYA) and adults, we analyzed 168 B-NEG ALLs by genome-wide technologies. This approach showed that B-NEG cases carry 10.5 mutations and 9.1 copy-number aberrations/sample. The most frequently mutated druggable pathways were those pertaining to RAS/RTK (26.8%) and JAK/STAT (12.5%) signaling. In particular, FLT3 and JAK/STAT mutations were detected mainly in AYA and adults, while KRAS and NRAS mutations were more frequent in children. RAS/RTK mutations negatively affected the outcome of AYA and adults, but not that of children. Furthermore, adult B-NEG ALL carrying JAK/STAT mutations had a shorter survival. In vitro experiments showed that FLT3 inhibitors reduced significantly the proliferation of FLT3-mutated primary B-NEG ALL cells. Likewise, PI3K/mTOR inhibitors reduced the proliferation of primary cells harboring RAS and IL7R mutations. These results refine the genetic landscape of B-NEG ALL and suggest that the different distribution of lesions and their prognostic impact might sustain the diverse outcome between children, adults and partly AYA - whose genomic scenario is similar to adults - and open the way to targeted therapeutic strategies. PMID:26883104

  13. Prognostic and therapeutic role of targetable lesions in B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia without recurrent fusion genes.

    PubMed

    Messina, Monica; Chiaretti, Sabina; Wang, Jiguang; Fedullo, Anna Lucia; Peragine, Nadia; Gianfelici, Valentina; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Brugnoletti, Fulvia; Di Giacomo, Filomena; Pauselli, Simona; Holmes, Antony B; Puzzolo, Maria Cristina; Ceglie, Giulia; Apicella, Valerio; Mancini, Marco; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Testi, Anna Maria; Vitale, Antonella; Vignetti, Marco; Guarini, Anna; Rabadan, Raul; Foà, Robin

    2016-03-22

    To shed light into the molecular bases of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia lacking known fusion transcripts, i.e. BCR-ABL1, ETV6-RUNX1, E2A-PBX1, and MLL rearrangements (B-NEG ALL) and the differences between children, adolescents/young adults (AYA) and adults, we analyzed 168 B-NEG ALLs by genome-wide technologies. This approach showed that B-NEG cases carry 10.5 mutations and 9.1 copy-number aberrations/sample. The most frequently mutated druggable pathways were those pertaining to RAS/RTK (26.8%) and JAK/STAT (12.5%) signaling. In particular, FLT3 and JAK/STAT mutations were detected mainly in AYA and adults, while KRAS and NRAS mutations were more frequent in children. RAS/RTK mutations negatively affected the outcome of AYA and adults, but not that of children. Furthermore, adult B-NEG ALL carrying JAK/STAT mutations had a shorter survival. In vitro experiments showed that FLT3 inhibitors reduced significantly the proliferation of FLT3-mutated primary B-NEG ALL cells. Likewise, PI3K/mTOR inhibitors reduced the proliferation of primary cells harboring RAS and IL7R mutations. These results refine the genetic landscape of B-NEG ALL and suggest that the different distribution of lesions and their prognostic impact might sustain the diverse outcome between children, adults and partly AYA - whose genomic scenario is similar to adults - and open the way to targeted therapeutic strategies.

  14. Differential protein network analysis of the immune cell lineage.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Trevor; Hovig, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen) completed the first phase of the goal to understand the molecular circuitry underlying the immune cell lineage in mice. That milestone resulted in the creation of the most comprehensive collection of gene expression profiles in the immune cell lineage in any model organism of human disease. There is now a requisite to examine this resource using bioinformatics integration with other molecular information, with the aim of gaining deeper insights into the underlying processes that characterize this immune cell lineage. We present here a bioinformatics approach to study differential protein interaction mechanisms across the entire immune cell lineage, achieved using affinity propagation applied to a protein interaction network similarity matrix. We demonstrate that the integration of protein interaction networks with the most comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of the immune cells can be used to generate hypotheses into the underlying mechanisms governing the differentiation and the differential functional activity across the immune cell lineage. This approach may not only serve as a hypothesis engine to derive understanding of differentiation and mechanisms across the immune cell lineage, but also help identify possible immune lineage specific and common lineage mechanism in the cells protein networks. PMID:25309909

  15. Cranial size variation and lineage diversity in early Pleistocene Homo.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeremiah E

    2014-03-01

    A recent article in this journal concluded that a sample of early Pleistocene hominin crania assigned to genus Homo exhibits a pattern of size variation that is time dependent, with specimens from different time periods being more different from each other, on average, than are specimens from the same time period. The authors of this study argued that such a pattern is not consistent with the presence of multiple lineages within the sample, but rather supports the hypothesis that the fossils represent an anagenetically evolving lineage (i.e., an evolutionary species). However, the multiple-lineage models considered in that study do not reflect the multiple-species alternatives that have been proposed for early Pleistocene Homo. Using simulated data sets, I show that fossil assemblages that contain multiple lineages can exhibit the time-dependent pattern of variation specified for the single-lineage model under certain conditions, particularly when temporal overlap among fossil specimens attributed to the lineages is limited. These results do not reject the single-lineage hypothesis, but they do indicate that rejection of multiple lineages in the early Pleistocene Homo fossil record is premature, and that other sources of variation, such as differences in cranial shape, should be considered. PMID:24588348

  16. Human Hepatic Stem Cell and Maturational Liver Lineage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Rachael; Lozoya, Oswaldo; Wang, Yunfang; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Gaudio, Eugenio; Alpini, Gianfranco; Mendel, Gemma; Wauthier, Eliane; Barbier, Claire; Alvaro, Domenico; Reid, Lola M.

    2011-01-01

    Livers are comprised of maturational lineages of cells beginning extrahepatically in the hepato-pancreatic common duct near the duodenum and intrahepatically in zone 1 by the portal triads. The extrahepatic stem cell niches are the peribiliary glands deep within the walls of the bile ducts; those intrahepatically are the canals of Hering in postnatal livers and that derive from ductal plates in fetal livers. Intrahepatically, there are at least 8 maturational lineage stages from the stem cells in zone 1 (periportal), through the midacinar region (zone 2), to the most mature cells and apoptotic cells found pericentrally in zone 3. Those found in the biliary tree are still being defined. Parenchymal cells are closely associated with lineages of mesenchymal cells, and their maturation is coordinated. Each lineage stage consists of parenchymal and mesenchymal cell partners distinguishable by their morphology, ploidy, antigens, biochemical traits, gene expression, and ability to divide. They are governed by changes in chromatin (e.g. methylation), gradients of paracrine signals (soluble factors and insoluble extracellular matrix components), mechanical forces, and feedback loop signals derived from late lineage cells. Feedback loop signals, secreted by late lineage stage cells into bile, flow back to the periportal area and regulate the stem cells and other early lineage stage cells, in mechanisms dictating the size of the liver mass. Recognition of maturational lineage biology and its regulation by these multiple mechanisms offers new understandings of liver biology, pathologies, and strategies for regenerative medicine. PMID:21374667

  17. Introgression of mitochondrial DNA among lineages in a hybridogenetic ant.

    PubMed

    Darras, Hugo; Aron, Serge

    2015-02-01

    We report a remarkable pattern of incongruence between nuclear and mitochondrial variations in a social insect, the desert ant Cataglyphis hispanica. This species reproduces by social hybridogenesis. In all populations, two distinct genetic lineages coexist; non-reproductive workers develop from hybrid crosses between the lineages, whereas reproductive offspring (males and new queens) are typically produced asexually by parthenogenesis. Genetic analyses based on nuclear markers revealed that the two lineages remain highly differentiated despite constant hybridization for worker production. Here, we show that, in contrast with nuclear DNA, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) does not recover the two lineages as monophyletic. Rather, mitochondrial haplotypes cluster according to their geographical origin. We argue that this cytonuclear incongruence stems from introgression of mtDNA among lineages, and review the mechanisms likely to explain this pattern under social hybridogenesis.

  18. Identification of Genes to Differentiate Closely Related Salmonella Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Qing-Hua; Li, Ren-Qing; Wang, Ye-Jun; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2013-01-01

    Background Salmonella are important human and animal pathogens. Though highly related, the Salmonella lineages may be strictly adapted to different hosts or cause different diseases, from mild local illness like gastroenteritis to fatal systemic infections like typhoid. Therefore, rapid and accurate identification of Salmonella is essential for timely and correct diagnosis of Salmonella infections. The current identification methods such as 16S rRNA sequencing and multilocus sequence typing are expensive and time consuming. Additionally, these methods often do not have sufficient distinguishing resolution among the Salmonella lineages. Methodologies/Principal Findings We compared 27 completely sequenced Salmonella genomes to identify possible genomic features that could be used for differentiation of individual lineages. We concatenated 2372 core genes in each of the 27 genomes and constructed a neighbor-joining tree. On the tree, strains of each serotype were clustered tightly together and different serotypes were unambiguously separated with clear genetic distances, demonstrating systematic genomic divergence among the Salmonella lineages. We made detailed comparisons among the 27 genomes and identified distinct sets of genomic differences, including nucleotide variations and genomic islands (GIs), among the Salmonella lineages. Two core genes STM4261 and entF together could unambiguously distinguish all Salmonella lineages compared in this study. Additionally, strains of a lineage have a common set of GIs and closely related lineages have similar sets of GIs. Conclusions Salmonella lineages have accumulated distinct sets of mutations and laterally acquired DNA (e.g., GIs) in evolution. Two genes entF and STM4261 have diverged sufficiently among the Salmonella lineages to be used for their differentiation. Further investigation of the distinct sets of mutations and GIs will lead to novel insights into genomic evolution of Salmonella and greatly facilitate the

  19. [Dipetalonema lineage. New attempt at classification].

    PubMed

    Chabaud, A G; Bain, O

    1976-01-01

    Through comparing the morphological evolution to the host range and the geographical distribution we can suggest Dipetalonema sensu-largo may be interpreted as a gondwanian lineage which may have evolved after the three main austral continents drifted apart. Therefore, we propose the following systematic splitting: --Sprattia n.gen., type species: S. venacavincola parasite of Australian Marsupials, which may be related to Litomosa; --Breinlia Yorke and Maplestone, 1926, and Breinlia (Johnstonema) (Yeh, 1957), parasite of Australian Marsupials; --Skrjabinofilaria (Travassos, 1925), parasite of American Marsupials; --Macdonaldius (Khanna, 1933), parasite of American Reptiles; --Dipetalonema (Orihelia) n.sub. gen., type species: D. (O.) anticlava, parasite of Dasypodidae; --Dipetalonema (Acanthocheilonema) (Cobbold, 1870), parasite of Insectivora, Carnivora, Pinnipedia, sometimes Rodents; --Dipetalonema (Molinema) (Freitas and Lent, 1939), parasite of Caviomorpha and Beavers; --Dipetalonema (Loxodontofilaria) (Berghe and Gillain, 1939), parasite of Ethiopian Ungulates; --Dipetalonema (Chenofilaria) (Kou, 1958), parasite of Asiatic Pholidota and Australian Marsupials; --Dipetalonema (Dipetalonema) (Diesing, 1861), parasite of American Primates; --Monanema Anteson, 1968, parasite of Rodents other than Cariomorpha; --Ackertia (Vaz, 1934), parasite of Caviomorpha; --Tetrapetalonema (Sandnema) n.sub.gen., type species: T. (S.) digitata, parasite of Asiatic Insectivora and Primates; --Tetrapetalonema (Tetrapetalonema) (Faust, 1935), parasite of Tupaidae, Platyrhinii, and, sometimes, American Rodents and Carnivora; --Tetrapetalonema (Esslingeria) n. sub.gen., type species: T. (E.) perstans, parasite of African African Anthropoidea and Humans; --Filarissima (Chabaud, 1974), parasite of Caviomorpha.

  20. Pluripotency Factors on Their Lineage Move

    PubMed Central

    Weidgang, Clair E.; Seufferlein, Thomas; Kleger, Alexander; Mueller, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are characterised by continuous self-renewal while maintaining the potential to differentiate into cells of all three germ layers. Regulatory networks of maintaining pluripotency have been described in great detail and, similarly, there is great knowledge on key players that regulate their differentiation. Interestingly, pluripotency has various shades with distinct developmental potential, an observation that coined the term of a ground state of pluripotency. A precise interplay of signalling axes regulates ground state conditions and acts in concert with a combination of key transcription factors. The balance between these transcription factors greatly influences the integrity of the pluripotency network and latest research suggests that minute changes in their expression can strengthen but also collapse the network. Moreover, recent studies reveal different facets of these core factors in balancing a controlled and directed exit from pluripotency. Thereby, subsets of pluripotency-maintaining factors have been shown to adopt new roles during lineage specification and have been globally defined towards neuroectodermal and mesendodermal sets of embryonic stem cell genes. However, detailed underlying insights into how these transcription factors orchestrate cell fate decisions remain largely elusive. Our group and others unravelled complex interactions in the regulation of this controlled exit. Herein, we summarise recent findings and discuss the potential mechanisms involved. PMID:26770212

  1. Micromere lineages in the glossiphoniid leech Helobdella

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Francoise Z.; Kang, Dongmin; Ramirez-Weber, Felipe-Andres; Bissen, Shirley T.; Weisblat, David A.

    2002-01-01

    In leech embryos, segmental mesoderm and ectoderm arise from teloblasts by lineages that are already relatively well characterized. Here, we present data concerning the early divisions and the definitive fate maps of the micromeres, a group of 25 small cells that arise during the modified spiral cleavage in leech (Helobdella robusta) and contribute to most of the nonsegmental tissues of the adult. Three noteworthy results of this work are as follows. (1) The c"' and dm' clones (3d and 3c in traditional nomenclature) give rise to a hitherto undescribed network of fibers that run from one end of the embryo to the other. (2) The clones of micromeres b" and b"' (2b and 3b in traditional nomenclature) die in normal development; the b" clone can be rescued to assume the normal c" fate if micromere c" or its clone are ablated in early development. (3) Two qualitative differences in micromere fates are seen between H. robusta (Sacramento) and another Helobdella sp. (Galt). First, in Helobdella sp. (Galt), the clone of micromere b" does not normally die, and contributes a subset of the cells arising exclusively from c" in H. robusta (Sacramento). Second, in Helobdella sp. (Galt), micromere c"' makes no definitive contribution, whereas micromere dm' gives rise to cells equivalent to those arising from c"' and dm' in H. robusta (Sacramento).

  2. Lineage-dependent ecological coherence in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Koeppel, Alexander F; Wu, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Bacteria comprise an essential element of all ecosystems, including those present on and within the human body. Understanding bacterial diversity therefore offers enormous scientific and medical benefit, but significant questions remain regarding how best to characterize that diversity and organize it into biologically meaningful units. Bacterial communities are routinely characterized based on the relative abundances of taxa at the genus or even the phylum level, but the ecological coherence of these high-level taxonomic units is uncertain. Using human microbiota from the skin and gut as our model systems, we tested the ecological coherence of bacteria by investigating the habitat associations of bacteria at all levels of the taxonomic hierarchy. We observed four distinct taxonomic patterns of habitat association, reflecting different levels of ecological coherence among taxa. Our results support the hypothesis that deep-branch bacterial clades could be ecologically coherent and suggest that the phylogenetic depth of ecological coherence varies among the bacterial lineages and is an important factor to consider in studies of human microbiome associations.

  3. Evidence of the three main clonal Toxoplasma gondii lineages from wild mammalian carnivores in the UK.

    PubMed

    Burrells, A; Bartley, P M; Zimmer, I A; Roy, S; Kitchener, A C; Meredith, A; Wright, S E; Innes, E A; Katzer, F

    2013-12-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a zoonotic pathogen defined by three main clonal lineages (types I, II, III), of which type II is most common in Europe. Very few data exist on the prevalence and genotypes of T. gondii in the UK. Wildlife can act as sentinel species for T. gondii genotypes present in the environment, which may subsequently be transmitted to livestock and humans. DNA was extracted from tissue samples of wild British carnivores, including 99 ferrets, 83 red foxes, 70 polecats, 65 mink, 64 badgers and 9 stoats. Parasite DNA was detected using a nested ITS1 PCR specific for T. gondii, PCR positive samples were subsequently genotyped using five PCR-RFLP markers. Toxoplasma gondii DNA was detected within all these mammal species and prevalence varied from 6·0 to 44·4% depending on the host. PCR-RFLP genotyping identified type II as the predominant lineage, but type III and type I alleles were also identified. No atypical or mixed genotypes were identified within these animals. This study demonstrates the presence of alleles for all three clonal lineages with potential for transmission to cats and livestock. This is the first DNA-based study of T. gondii prevalence and genotypes across a broad range of wild British carnivores.

  4. Home Bodies and Wanderers: Sympatric Lineages of the Deep-Sea Black Coral Leiopathes glaberrima

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ramos, Dannise V.; Saunders, Miles; Fisher, Charles R.; Baums, Iliana B.

    2015-01-01

    Colonial corals occur in a wide range of marine benthic habitats from the shallows to the deep ocean, often defining the structure of their local community. The black coral Leiopathes glaberrima is a long-lived foundation species occurring on carbonate outcrops in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Multiple color morphs of L. glaberrima grow sympatrically in the region. Morphological, mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal markers supported the hypothesis that color morphs constituted a single biological species and that colonies, regardless of color, were somewhat genetically differentiated east and west of the Mississippi Canyon. Ten microsatellite loci were used to determine finer-scale population genetic structure and reproductive characteristics. Gene flow was disrupted between and within two nearby (distance = 36.4 km) hardground sites and two sympatric microsatellite lineages, which might constitute cryptic species, were recovered. Lineage one was outbred and found in all sampled locations (N = 5) across 765.6 km in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Lineage two was inbred, reproducing predominantly by fragmentation, and restricted to sites around Viosca Knoll. In these sites the lineages and the color phenotypes occurred in different microhabitats, and models of maximum entropy suggested that depth and slope influence the distribution of the color phenotypes within the Vioska Knolls. We conclude that L. glaberrima is phenotypically plastic with a mixed reproductive strategy in the Northern GoM. Such strategy might enable this long-lived species to balance local recruitment with occasional long-distance dispersal to colonize new sites in an environment where habitat is limited. PMID:26488161

  5. Home Bodies and Wanderers: Sympatric Lineages of the Deep-Sea Black Coral Leiopathes glaberrima.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ramos, Dannise V; Saunders, Miles; Fisher, Charles R; Baums, Iliana B

    2015-01-01

    Colonial corals occur in a wide range of marine benthic habitats from the shallows to the deep ocean, often defining the structure of their local community. The black coral Leiopathes glaberrima is a long-lived foundation species occurring on carbonate outcrops in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM). Multiple color morphs of L. glaberrima grow sympatrically in the region. Morphological, mitochondrial and nuclear ribosomal markers supported the hypothesis that color morphs constituted a single biological species and that colonies, regardless of color, were somewhat genetically differentiated east and west of the Mississippi Canyon. Ten microsatellite loci were used to determine finer-scale population genetic structure and reproductive characteristics. Gene flow was disrupted between and within two nearby (distance = 36.4 km) hardground sites and two sympatric microsatellite lineages, which might constitute cryptic species, were recovered. Lineage one was outbred and found in all sampled locations (N = 5) across 765.6 km in the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Lineage two was inbred, reproducing predominantly by fragmentation, and restricted to sites around Viosca Knoll. In these sites the lineages and the color phenotypes occurred in different microhabitats, and models of maximum entropy suggested that depth and slope influence the distribution of the color phenotypes within the Vioska Knolls. We conclude that L. glaberrima is phenotypically plastic with a mixed reproductive strategy in the Northern GoM. Such strategy might enable this long-lived species to balance local recruitment with occasional long-distance dispersal to colonize new sites in an environment where habitat is limited. PMID:26488161

  6. In vitro analysis of the oligodendrocyte lineage in mice during demyelination and remyelination

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, R.; Friedrich, V.L. Jr.; Holmes, K.V.; Dubois-Dalcq, M. )

    1990-09-01

    A demyelinating disease induced in C57B1/6N mice by intracranial injection of a coronavirus (murine hepatitis virus strain A59) is followed by functional recovery and efficient CNS myelin repair. To study the biological properties of the cells involved in this repair process, glial cells were isolated and cultured from spinal cords of these young adult mice during demyelination and remyelination. Using three-color immunofluorescence combined with (3H)thymidine autoradiography, we have analyzed the antigenic phenotype and mitotic potential of individual glial cells. We identified oligodendrocytes with an antibody to galactocerebroside, astrocytes with an antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein, and oligodendrocyte-type 2 astrocyte (O-2A) progenitor cells with the O4 antibody. Cultures from demyelinated tissue differed in several ways from those of age-matched controls: first, the total number of O-2A lineage cells was strikingly increased; second, the O-2A population consisted of a higher proportion of O4-positive astrocytes and cells of mixed oligodendrocyte-astrocyte phenotype; and third, all the cell types within the O-2A lineage showed enhanced proliferation. This proliferation was not further enhanced by adding PDGF, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), or insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) to the defined medium. However, bFGF and IGF-I seemed to influence the fate of O-2A lineage cells in cultures of demyelinated tissue. Basic FGF decreased the percentage of cells expressing galactocerebroside. In contrast, IGF-I increased the relative proportion of oligodendrocytes. Thus, O-2A lineage cells from adult mice display greater phenotypic plasticity and enhanced mitotic potential in response to an episode of demyelination. These properties may be linked to the efficient remyelination achieved in this demyelinating disease.

  7. Lineage fusion in Galápagos giant tortoises.

    PubMed

    Garrick, Ryan C; Benavides, Edgar; Russello, Michael A; Hyseni, Chaz; Edwards, Danielle L; Gibbs, James P; Tapia, Washington; Ciofi, Claudio; Caccone, Adalgisa

    2014-11-01

    Although many classic radiations on islands are thought to be the result of repeated lineage splitting, the role of past fusion is rarely known because during these events, purebreds are rapidly replaced by a swarm of admixed individuals. Here, we capture lineage fusion in action in a Galápagos giant tortoise species, Chelonoidis becki, from Wolf Volcano (Isabela Island). The long generation time of Galápagos tortoises and dense sampling (841 individuals) of genetic and demographic data were integral in detecting and characterizing this phenomenon. In C. becki, we identified two genetically distinct, morphologically cryptic lineages. Historical reconstructions show that they colonized Wolf Volcano from Santiago Island in two temporally separated events, the first estimated to have occurred ~199 000 years ago. Following arrival of the second wave of colonists, both lineages coexisted for approximately ~53 000 years. Within that time, they began fusing back together, as microsatellite data reveal widespread introgressive hybridization. Interestingly, greater mate selectivity seems to be exhibited by purebred females of one of the lineages. Forward-in-time simulations predict rapid extinction of the early arriving lineage. This study provides a rare example of reticulate evolution in action and underscores the power of population genetics for understanding the past, present and future consequences of evolutionary phenomena associated with lineage fusion. PMID:25223395

  8. Phylogenetic plant community structure along elevation is lineage specific.

    PubMed

    Ndiribe, Charlotte; Pellissier, Loïc; Antonelli, Silvia; Dubuis, Anne; Pottier, Julien; Vittoz, Pascal; Guisan, Antoine; Salamin, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    The trend of closely related taxa to retain similar environmental preferences mediated by inherited traits suggests that several patterns observed at the community scale originate from longer evolutionary processes. While the effects of phylogenetic relatedness have been previously studied within a single genus or family, lineage-specific effects on the ecological processes governing community assembly have rarely been studied for entire communities or flora. Here, we measured how community phylogenetic structure varies across a wide elevation gradient for plant lineages represented by 35 families, using a co-occurrence index and net relatedness index (NRI). We propose a framework that analyses each lineage separately and reveals the trend of ecological assembly at tree nodes. We found prevailing phylogenetic clustering for more ancient nodes and overdispersion in more recent tree nodes. Closely related species may thus rapidly evolve new environmental tolerances to radiate into distinct communities, while older lineages likely retain inherent environmental tolerances to occupy communities in similar environments, either through efficient dispersal mechanisms or the exclusion of older lineages with more divergent environmental tolerances. Our study illustrates the importance of disentangling the patterns of community assembly among lineages to better interpret the ecological role of traits. It also sheds light on studies reporting absence of phylogenetic signal, and opens new perspectives on the analysis of niche and trait conservatism across lineages.

  9. Instruction of hematopoietic lineage choice by cytokine signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Endele, Max; Etzrodt, Martin; Schroeder, Timm

    2014-12-10

    Hematopoiesis is the cumulative consequence of finely tuned signaling pathways activated through extrinsic factors, such as local niche signals and systemic hematopoietic cytokines. Whether extrinsic factors actively instruct the lineage choice of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells or are only selectively allowing survival and proliferation of already intrinsically lineage-committed cells has been debated over decades. Recent results demonstrated that cytokines can instruct lineage choice. However, the precise function of individual cytokine-triggered signaling molecules in inducing cellular events like proliferation, lineage choice, and differentiation remains largely elusive. Signal transduction pathways activated by different cytokine receptors are highly overlapping, but support the production of distinct hematopoietic lineages. Cellular context, signaling dynamics, and the crosstalk of different signaling pathways determine the cellular response of a given extrinsic signal. New tools to manipulate and continuously quantify signaling events at the single cell level are therefore required to thoroughly interrogate how dynamic signaling networks yield a specific cellular response. - Highlights: • Recent studies provided definite proof for lineage-instructive action of cytokines. • Signaling pathways involved in hematopoietic lineage instruction remain elusive. • New tools are emerging to quantitatively study dynamic signaling networks over time.

  10. Phylogenetic plant community structure along elevation is lineage specific

    PubMed Central

    Ndiribe, Charlotte; Pellissier, Loïc; Antonelli, Silvia; Dubuis, Anne; Pottier, Julien; Vittoz, Pascal; Guisan, Antoine; Salamin, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    The trend of closely related taxa to retain similar environmental preferences mediated by inherited traits suggests that several patterns observed at the community scale originate from longer evolutionary processes. While the effects of phylogenetic relatedness have been previously studied within a single genus or family, lineage-specific effects on the ecological processes governing community assembly have rarely been studied for entire communities or flora. Here, we measured how community phylogenetic structure varies across a wide elevation gradient for plant lineages represented by 35 families, using a co-occurrence index and net relatedness index (NRI). We propose a framework that analyses each lineage separately and reveals the trend of ecological assembly at tree nodes. We found prevailing phylogenetic clustering for more ancient nodes and overdispersion in more recent tree nodes. Closely related species may thus rapidly evolve new environmental tolerances to radiate into distinct communities, while older lineages likely retain inherent environmental tolerances to occupy communities in similar environments, either through efficient dispersal mechanisms or the exclusion of older lineages with more divergent environmental tolerances. Our study illustrates the importance of disentangling the patterns of community assembly among lineages to better interpret the ecological role of traits. It also sheds light on studies reporting absence of phylogenetic signal, and opens new perspectives on the analysis of niche and trait conservatism across lineages. PMID:24455126

  11. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from the first ... disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive assessments followed by ...

  12. Expanding the Entamoeba Universe: New Hosts Yield Novel Ribosomal Lineages.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Alison S; Busby, Eloise J; Levy, Abigail D; Komm, Natasha; Clark, C Graham

    2016-01-01

    Removing the requirement for cell culture has led to a substantial increase in the number of lineages of Entamoeba recognized as distinct. Surveying the range of potential host species for this parasite genus has barely been started and it is clear that additional sampling of the same host in different locations often identifies additional diversity. In this study, using small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequencing, we identify four new lineages of Entamoeba, including the first report of Entamoeba from an elephant, and extend the host range of some previously described lineages. In addition, examination of microbiome data from a number of host animals suggests that substantial Entamoeba diversity remains to be uncovered.

  13. Ectoderm to mesoderm lineage switching during axolotl tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Karen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2002-12-01

    Foreign environments may induce adult stem cells to switch lineages and populate multiple tissue types, but whether this mechanism is used for tissue repair remains uncertain. Urodele amphibians can regenerate fully functional, multitissue structures including the limb and tail. To determine whether lineage switching is an integral feature of this regeneration, we followed individual spinal cord cells live during tail regeneration in the axolotl. Spinal cord cells frequently migrate into surrounding tissue to form regenerating muscle and cartilage. Thus, in axolotls, cells switch lineage during a real example of regeneration. PMID:12471259

  14. Lineage sorting in multihost parasites: Eidmanniella albescens and Fregatiella aurifasciata on seabirds from the Galapagos Islands

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Parra, Jose L; Levin, Iris I; Johnson, Kevin P; Parker, Patricia G

    2015-01-01

    Parasites comprise a significant percentage of the biodiversity of the planet and are useful systems to test evolutionary and ecological hypotheses. In this study, we analyze the effect of host species identity and the immediate local species assemblage within mixed species colonies of nesting seabirds on patterns of genetic clustering within two species of multihost ectoparasitic lice. We use three genetic markers (one mitochondrial, COI, and two nuclear, EF1-α and wingless) and maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees to test whether (1) parasites show lineage sorting based on their host species; and (2) switching of lineages to the alternate host species depends on the immediate local species assemblage of individual hosts within a colony. Specifically, we examine the genetic structure of two louse species: Eidmanniella albescens, infecting both Nazca (Sula granti) and blue-footed boobies (Sula nebouxii), and Fregatiella aurifasciata, infecting both great (Fregata minor) and magnificent frigatebirds (Fregata magnificens). We found that host species identity was the only factor explaining the patterns of genetic structure in both parasites. In both cases, there is evident genetic differentiation depending on the host species. Thus, a revision of the taxonomy of these louse species is needed. One possible explanation of this pattern is extremely low louse migration rates between host species, perhaps influenced by fine-scale spatial separation of host species within mixed colonies, and low parasite infrapopulation numbers. PMID:26380662

  15. Sympatric speciation: perfume preferences of orchid bee lineages.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Duncan E

    2008-12-01

    Female attraction to an environmentally derived mating signal released by male orchid bees may be tightly linked to shared olfactory preferences of both sexes. A change in perfume preference may have led to divergence of two morphologically distinct lineages.

  16. Maintenance of aphid clonal lineages: images of immortality?

    PubMed

    Loxdale, Hugh D; Lushai, Gugs

    2003-11-01

    Artificial cloning and ancient asexuals have impacted upon both scientific and lay thinking in applied and theoretical fields as diverse as medicine and evolution. Hence, this is an opportune time to promote debate and discussion on what maintains a clonal lineage. The genetic fidelity of a clone has been discussed in detail elsewhere [Genet. Res. 79 (2002) 1; Biol. J. Linnean Soc. 79 (2003) 3]. In this paper, we focus on the lineage integrity (=longevity), or physiological lifespan of a clone with respect to senesce in relation to factors controlling telomere functioning. Aspects of cell line research pertinent to eukaryotic clonal lineages are discussed and, in particular, we try to extrapolate aspects of this research and apply it to apomictic (=mitotic) aphid lineages to suggest how they may be maintained. Analogies are made between single cells and individual aphids that senescence through a generation, whilst the respective lineages persist for finite periods, unless that is, compensatory mechanisms have evolved allowing immortality in the one and ancient asexuality in the other. Such comparison may allow fresh insights into the mechanisms of clonal lineage maintenance and evolution. We hypothesise that: (1). the cause of extinction in eukaryotic clonal lineages is due to deleterious effects on key regions of the genome, the chromosomal telomere being one such site; (2). recombination acts as a common mechanism to reset telomere functioning, perhaps more fundamental than its utility to reduce genetic load and maintain adaptability; and (3). ancient lineages persist through time as a function of group-specific compensatory mechanisms that maintain telomere integrity.

  17. Maintenance of aphid clonal lineages: images of immortality?

    PubMed

    Loxdale, Hugh D; Lushai, Gugs

    2003-11-01

    Artificial cloning and ancient asexuals have impacted upon both scientific and lay thinking in applied and theoretical fields as diverse as medicine and evolution. Hence, this is an opportune time to promote debate and discussion on what maintains a clonal lineage. The genetic fidelity of a clone has been discussed in detail elsewhere [Genet. Res. 79 (2002) 1; Biol. J. Linnean Soc. 79 (2003) 3]. In this paper, we focus on the lineage integrity (=longevity), or physiological lifespan of a clone with respect to senesce in relation to factors controlling telomere functioning. Aspects of cell line research pertinent to eukaryotic clonal lineages are discussed and, in particular, we try to extrapolate aspects of this research and apply it to apomictic (=mitotic) aphid lineages to suggest how they may be maintained. Analogies are made between single cells and individual aphids that senescence through a generation, whilst the respective lineages persist for finite periods, unless that is, compensatory mechanisms have evolved allowing immortality in the one and ancient asexuality in the other. Such comparison may allow fresh insights into the mechanisms of clonal lineage maintenance and evolution. We hypothesise that: (1). the cause of extinction in eukaryotic clonal lineages is due to deleterious effects on key regions of the genome, the chromosomal telomere being one such site; (2). recombination acts as a common mechanism to reset telomere functioning, perhaps more fundamental than its utility to reduce genetic load and maintain adaptability; and (3). ancient lineages persist through time as a function of group-specific compensatory mechanisms that maintain telomere integrity. PMID:14636687

  18. Two Hemocyte Lineages Exist in Silkworm Larval Hematopoietic Organ

    PubMed Central

    Nakahara, Yuichi; Kanamori, Yasushi; Kiuchi, Makoto; Kamimura, Manabu

    2010-01-01

    Background Insects have multiple hemocyte morphotypes with different functions as do vertebrates, however, their hematopoietic lineages are largely unexplored with the exception of Drosophila melanogaster. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the hematopoietic lineage of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, we investigated in vivo and in vitro differentiation of hemocyte precursors in the hematopoietic organ (HPO) into the four mature hemocyte subsets, namely, plasmatocytes, granulocytes, oenocytoids, and spherulocytes. Five days after implantation of enzymatically-dispersed HPO cells from a GFP-expressing transgenic line into the hemocoel of normal larvae, differentiation into plasmatocytes, granulocytes and oenocytoids, but not spherulocytes, was observed. When the HPO cells were cultured in vitro, plasmatocytes appeared rapidly, and oenocytoids possessing prophenol oxidase activity appeared several days later. HPO cells were also able to differentiate into a small number of granulocytes, but not into spherulocytes. When functionally mature plasmatocytes were cultured in vitro, oenocytoids were observed 10 days later. These results suggest that the hemocyte precursors in HPO first differentiate into plasmatocytes, which further change into oenocytoids. Conclusions/Significance From these results, we propose that B. mori hemocytes can be divided into two major lineages, a granulocyte lineage and a plasmatocyte-oenocytoid lineage. The origins of the spherulocytes could not be determined in this study. We construct a model for the hematopoietic lineages at the larval stage of B. mori. PMID:20676370

  19. Reassortment between Influenza B Lineages and the Emergence of a Coadapted PB1–PB2–HA Gene Complex

    PubMed Central

    Dudas, Gytis; Bedford, Trevor; Lycett, Samantha; Rambaut, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Influenza B viruses make a considerable contribution to morbidity attributed to seasonal influenza. Currently circulating influenza B isolates are known to belong to two antigenically distinct lineages referred to as B/Victoria and B/Yamagata. Frequent exchange of genomic segments of these two lineages has been noted in the past, but the observed patterns of reassortment have not been formalized in detail. We investigate interlineage reassortments by comparing phylogenetic trees across genomic segments. Our analyses indicate that of the eight segments of influenza B viruses only segments coding for polymerase basic 1 and 2 (PB1 and PB2) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins have maintained separate Victoria and Yamagata lineages and that currently circulating strains possess PB1, PB2, and HA segments derived entirely from one or the other lineage; other segments have repeatedly reassorted between lineages thereby reducing genetic diversity. We argue that this difference between segments is due to selection against reassortant viruses with mixed-lineage PB1, PB2, and HA segments. Given sufficient time and continued recruitment to the reassortment-isolated PB1–PB2–HA gene complex, we expect influenza B viruses to eventually undergo sympatric speciation. PMID:25323575

  20. Co-circulation of Peste-des-Petits-Ruminants Virus Asian lineage IV with Lineage II in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Woma, T Y; Adombi, C M; Yu, D; Qasim, A M M; Sabi, A A; Maurice, N A; Olaiya, O D; Loitsch, A; Bailey, D; Shamaki, D; Dundon, W G; Quan, M

    2016-06-01

    Peste-des-petits-ruminants (PPR), a major small ruminant transboundary animal disease, is endemic in Nigeria. Strains of the causal agent, peste-des-petits-ruminants virus (PPRV), have been differentiated into four genetically distinct lineages based on the partial sequence of the virus nucleoprotein (N) or fusion (F) genes. Peste-des-petits-ruminants virus strains that were identified initially in Africa were grouped into lineages I, II and III and viruses from Asia were classified as lineage IV and referred to as the Asian lineage. Many recent reports indicate that the Asian lineage is now also present in Africa. With this in mind, this study was conducted to reassess the epidemiology of PPRV in Nigeria. A total of 140 clinical samples from 16 sheep and 63 goats with symptoms suggestive of PPR were collected from different states of Nigeria during a four-year period (2010-2013). They were analysed by the amplification of fragments of the N gene. Results for 33 (42%) animals were positive. The phylogenetic analysis of the N gene sequences with those available in GenBank showed that viruses that were detected belong to both lineage II and IV. Based on an analysis of the N gene sequences, the lineage IV isolates grouped into two clades, one being predominant in the north-eastern part of the country and the other found primarily in the southern regions of the country. This study reports the presence of PPRV Asian lineage IV in Nigeria for the first time.

  1. Co-circulation of Peste-des-Petits-Ruminants Virus Asian lineage IV with Lineage II in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Woma, T Y; Adombi, C M; Yu, D; Qasim, A M M; Sabi, A A; Maurice, N A; Olaiya, O D; Loitsch, A; Bailey, D; Shamaki, D; Dundon, W G; Quan, M

    2016-06-01

    Peste-des-petits-ruminants (PPR), a major small ruminant transboundary animal disease, is endemic in Nigeria. Strains of the causal agent, peste-des-petits-ruminants virus (PPRV), have been differentiated into four genetically distinct lineages based on the partial sequence of the virus nucleoprotein (N) or fusion (F) genes. Peste-des-petits-ruminants virus strains that were identified initially in Africa were grouped into lineages I, II and III and viruses from Asia were classified as lineage IV and referred to as the Asian lineage. Many recent reports indicate that the Asian lineage is now also present in Africa. With this in mind, this study was conducted to reassess the epidemiology of PPRV in Nigeria. A total of 140 clinical samples from 16 sheep and 63 goats with symptoms suggestive of PPR were collected from different states of Nigeria during a four-year period (2010-2013). They were analysed by the amplification of fragments of the N gene. Results for 33 (42%) animals were positive. The phylogenetic analysis of the N gene sequences with those available in GenBank showed that viruses that were detected belong to both lineage II and IV. Based on an analysis of the N gene sequences, the lineage IV isolates grouped into two clades, one being predominant in the north-eastern part of the country and the other found primarily in the southern regions of the country. This study reports the presence of PPRV Asian lineage IV in Nigeria for the first time. PMID:26095085

  2. Modern Lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Exhibit Lineage-Specific Patterns of Growth and Cytokine Induction in Human Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rajesh; Lenders, Laura; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Nicol, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary in virulence. Strains that have caused outbreaks in the United States and United Kingdom have been shown to subvert the innate immune response as a potential immune evasion mechanism. There is, however, little information available as to whether these patterns of immune subversion are features of individual strains or characteristic of broad clonal lineages of M. tuberculosis. Methods Strains from two major modern lineages (lineage 2 [East-Asian] and lineage 4 [Euro-American]) circulating in the Western Cape in South Africa as well as a comparator modern lineage (lineage 3 [CAS/Delhi]) were identified. We assessed two virulence associated characteristics: mycobacterial growth (in liquid broth and monocyte derived macrophages) and early pro-inflammatory cytokine induction. Results In liquid culture, Lineage 4 strains grew more rapidly and reached higher plateau levels than other strains (lineage 4 vs. lineage 2 p = 0.0024; lineage 4 vs. lineage 3 p = 0.0005). Lineage 3 strains were characterized by low and early plateau levels, while lineage 2 strains showed an intermediate growth phenotype. In monocyte-derived macrophages, lineage 2 strains grew faster than lineage 3 strains (p<0.01) with lineage 4 strains having an intermediate phenotype. Lineage 2 strains induced the lowest levels of pro-inflammatory TNF and IL-12p40 as compared to other lineages (lineage 2: median TNF 362 pg/ml, IL-12p40 91 pg/ml; lineage 3: median TNF 1818 pg/ml, IL-12p40 123 pg/ml; lineage 4: median TNF 1207 pg/ml, IL-12p40 205 pg/ml;). In contrast, lineage 4 strains induced high levels of IL-12p40 and intermediate level of TNF. Lineage 3 strains induced high levels of TNF and intermediate levels of IL-12p40. Conclusions Strains of M. tuberculosis from the three major modern strain lineages possess distinct patterns of growth and cytokine induction. Rapid growth and immune subversion may be key characteristics to the success of

  3. An Immunocompetent Mouse Model for MLL/AF9 Leukemia Reveals the Potential of Spontaneous Cytotoxic T-Cell Response to an Antigen Expressed in Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Kana; Tanaka, Satomi; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Morimoto, Soyoko; Nakajima, Hiroko; Tatsumi, Naoya; Nakata, Jun; Takashima, Satoshi; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Oji, Yusuke; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Sugiyama, Haruo; Hosen, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Leukemia differs substantially with respect to stromal milieu from tumors that progress locally as solid masses, and the physiological importance of immunosurveillance in leukemia remains unclear. However, currently available mouse leukemia models have critical limitations in the context of analyzing immunological regulation of leukemia development. In this study, we transferred mouse MLL/AF9 leukemia-initiating cells into immunocompetent recipient mice without any pre-conditioning such as irradiation, and then analyzed the spontaneous T cell response to an immunogenic antigen expressed in leukemia cells. When the minimum numbers of leukemia-initiating cells for engraftment were transferred, leukemia cells were eradicated by the adaptive immune response in most, if not all, wild-type mice, but not in Rag2-/- recipient mice, which lack adaptive immunity. By contrast, mice transplanted with larger numbers of leukemia cells always developed leukemia. In mice with advanced leukemia, antigen-specific CTLs were also expanded, but were unresponsive to antigen stimulation and expressed high levels of PD-1 and LAG-3. These results provide the first clear demonstration that the spontaneous CTL response to a tumor-cell antigen has the potential to eradicate leukemia, whereas antigen-specific CTLs are exhausted in animals with advanced leukemia. This immunocompetent mouse leukemia model provides a useful platform for developing effective immunotherapies against leukemia. PMID:26658107

  4. Pygo2 associates with MLL2 histone methyltransferase and GCN5 histone acetyltransferase complexes to augment Wnt target gene expression and breast cancer stem-like cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiakun; Luo, Qicong; Yuan, Yuanyang; Huang, Xiaoli; Cai, Wangyu; Li, Chao; Wei, Tongzhen; Zhang, Ludi; Yang, Meng; Liu, Qingfeng; Ye, Guodong; Dai, Xing; Li, Boan

    2010-12-01

    Resent studies have identified Pygopus as a core component of the β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid-enhancing factor 1 (LEF) transcriptional activation complex required for the expression of canonical Wg/Wnt target genes in Drosophila. However, the biochemical involvement of mammalian Pygopus proteins in β-catenin/TCF/LEF gene activation remains controversial. In this study, we perform a series of molecular/biochemical experiments to demonstrate that Pygo2 associates with histone-modifying enzymatic complexes, specifically the MLL2 histone methyltransferase (HMT) and STAGA histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, to facilitate their interaction with β-catenin and to augment Wnt1-induced, TCF/LEF-dependent transcriptional activation in breast cancer cells. We identify a critical domain in Pygo2 encompassing the first 47 amino acids that mediates its HMT/HAT interaction. We further demonstrate the importance of this domain in Pygo2's ability to transcriptionally activate both artificial and endogenous Wnt target genes and to expand breast cancer stem-like cells in culture. This work now links mechanistically Pygo2's role in histone modification to its enhancement of the Wnt-dependent transcriptional program and cancer stem-like cell expansion.

  5. CCND2, CTNNB1, DDX3X, GLI2, SMARCA4, MYC, MYCN, PTCH1, TP53, and MLL2 gene variants and risk of childhood medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Anna M; Hollegaard, Mads V; Wibom, Carl; Andersson, Ulrika; Hougaard, David M; Deltour, Isabelle; Hjalmars, Ulf; Melin, Beatrice

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have described a number of genes that are frequently altered in medulloblastoma tumors and that have putative key roles in the development of the disease. We hypothesized that common germline genetic variations in these genes may be associated with medulloblastoma development. Based on recent publications, we selected 10 genes that were frequently altered in medulloblastoma: CCND2, CTNNB1, DDX3X, GLI2, SMARCA4, MYC, MYCN, PTCH1, TP53, and MLL2 (now renamed as KMT2D). Common genetic variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms) annotating these genes (n = 221) were genotyped in germline DNA (neonatal dried blood spot samples) from 243 childhood medulloblastoma cases and 247 control subjects from Sweden and Denmark. Eight genetic variants annotating three genes in the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway; CCND2, PTCH1, and GLI2, were found to be associated with the risk of medulloblastoma (P(combined) < 0.05). The findings were however not statistically significant following correction for multiple testing by the very stringent Bonferroni method. The results do not support our hypothesis that common germline genetic variants in the ten studied genes are associated with the risk of developing medulloblastoma. PMID:26290144

  6. Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying; Wang, Kai; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V.R.; Knott, Jason G.; Leach, Richard

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Epithelial-like phenotype of trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells. •Trophoblast lineage cells derived from human iPS cells exhibit trophoblast function. •Trophoblasts from iPS cells provides a proof-of-concept in regenerative medicine. -- Abstract: Background: During implantation, the blastocyst trophectoderm attaches to the endometrial epithelium and continues to differentiate into all trophoblast subtypes, which are the major components of a placenta. Aberrant trophoblast proliferation and differentiation are associated with placental diseases. However, due to ethical and practical issues, there is almost no available cell or tissue source to study the molecular mechanism of human trophoblast differentiation, which further becomes a barrier to the study of the pathogenesis of trophoblast-associated diseases of pregnancy. In this study, our goal was to generate a proof-of-concept model for deriving trophoblast lineage cells from induced pluripotency stem (iPS) cells from human fibroblasts. In future studies the generation of trophoblast lineage cells from iPS cells established from patient’s placenta will be extremely useful for studying the pathogenesis of individual trophoblast-associated diseases and for drug testing. Methods and results: Combining iPS cell technology with BMP4 induction, we derived trophoblast lineage cells from human iPS cells. The gene expression profile of these trophoblast lineage cells was distinct from fibroblasts and iPS cells. These cells expressed markers of human trophoblasts. Furthermore, when these cells were differentiated they exhibited invasive capacity and placental hormone secretive capacity, suggesting extravillous trophoblasts and syncytiotrophoblasts. Conclusion: Trophoblast lineage cells can be successfully derived from human iPS cells, which provide a proof-of-concept tool to recapitulate pathogenesis of patient placental trophoblasts in vitro.

  7. Lineage divergence in Odorrana graminea complex (Anura: Ranidae: Odorrana).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Rongchuan; Li, Cheng; Jiang, Jianping

    2015-05-26

    The confusing and unstable taxonomy of Odorrana livida (Rana livida) since its first record has made it a focal frog complex for systematics. In China, four species, Odorrana nebulosa, O. graminea, O. sinica, O. leporipes, were described to closely resemble O. livida or O. chloronota based on their morphological similarities, accompanied by much taxonomic confusion because of ambiguities in the wide distribution and morphological variations. Currently O. graminea is being used as the name of a provisional monotypic species group to include all the populations in China that closely resemble O. livida or O. chloronota. Here, we conducted a range-wide molecular phylogeographic analysis of the large green odorous frog (Odorrana graminea) complex across the majority of its range in China, based on 2780 bp DNA sequences of three mitochondrial genes (12S, 16S, ND2) in 107 samples from 20 sites. Our data recognized three distinct phylogeographic lineages of the Odorrana graminea (lato sensu) complex in China, and they together with a Thailand lineage formed a monophyletic group. Among the four lineages within O. graminea complex, the average genetic distances based on the concatenated sequences of 12S, 16S and ND2 were 7.5-8.8% and those based on 16S rRNA alone were 4.2-5.5%. Furthermore, canonical discriminant functions in morphometric analyses showed significant separations of all the paired lineage comparisons in China. The aforementioned genetic divergence and mismatched phenotypes among the lineages within the Odorrana graminea complex, in addition to their non-overlapping geographic distributions, imply extensive lineage diversification. However, precise taxonomic status of these lineages needs more studies based on adequate type information and more thorough species delimitation based on analysis of differentiation in bioacoustic and nuclear genetic characters especially regarding gene flow and admixture in geographical contact zones.

  8. Genetic admixture and lineage separation in a southern Andean plant.

    PubMed

    Morello, Santiago; Sede, Silvana M

    2016-01-01

    Mountain uplifts have generated new ecologic opportunities for plants, and triggered evolutionary processes, favouring an increase on the speciation rate in all continents. Moreover, mountain ranges may act as corridors or barriers for plant lineages and populations. In South America a high rate of diversification has been linked to Andean orogeny during Pliocene/Miocene. More recently, Pleistocene glacial cycles have also shaped species distribution and demography. The endemic genus Escallonia is known to have diversified in the Andes. Species with similar morphology obscure species delimitation and plants with intermediate characters occur naturally. The aim of this study is to characterize genetic variation and structure of two widespread species of Escallonia: E. alpina and E. rubra We analyzed the genetic variation of populations of the entire distribution range of the species and we also included those with intermediate morphological characters; a total of 94 accessions from 14 populations were used for the Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Plastid DNA sequences (trnS-trnG, 3'trnV-ndhC intergenic spacers and the ndhF gene) from sixteen accessions of Escallonia species were used to construct a Statistical Parsimony network. Additionally, we performed a geometric morphometrics analysis on 88 leaves from 35 individuals of the two E. alpina varieties to further study their differences. Wright's Fst and analysis of molecular variance tests performed on AFLP data showed a significant level of genetic structure at the species and population levels. Intermediate morphology populations showed a mixed genetic contribution from E. alpina var. alpina and E. rubra both in the Principal Coordinates Analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE. On the other hand, E. rubra and the two varieties of E. alpina are well differentiated and assigned to different genetic clusters. Moreover, the Statistical Parsimony network showed a high degree of divergence between the

  9. Genetic admixture and lineage separation in a southern Andean plant

    PubMed Central

    Morello, Santiago; Sede, Silvana M.

    2016-01-01

    Mountain uplifts have generated new ecologic opportunities for plants, and triggered evolutionary processes, favouring an increase on the speciation rate in all continents. Moreover, mountain ranges may act as corridors or barriers for plant lineages and populations. In South America a high rate of diversification has been linked to Andean orogeny during Pliocene/Miocene. More recently, Pleistocene glacial cycles have also shaped species distribution and demography. The endemic genus Escallonia is known to have diversified in the Andes. Species with similar morphology obscure species delimitation and plants with intermediate characters occur naturally. The aim of this study is to characterize genetic variation and structure of two widespread species of Escallonia: E. alpina and E. rubra. We analyzed the genetic variation of populations of the entire distribution range of the species and we also included those with intermediate morphological characters; a total of 94 accessions from 14 populations were used for the Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Plastid DNA sequences (trnS-trnG, 3′trnV-ndhC intergenic spacers and the ndhF gene) from sixteen accessions of Escallonia species were used to construct a Statistical Parsimony network. Additionally, we performed a geometric morphometrics analysis on 88 leaves from 35 individuals of the two E. alpina varieties to further study their differences. Wright’s Fst and analysis of molecular variance tests performed on AFLP data showed a significant level of genetic structure at the species and population levels. Intermediate morphology populations showed a mixed genetic contribution from E. alpina var. alpina and E. rubra both in the Principal Coordinates Analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE. On the other hand, E. rubra and the two varieties of E. alpina are well differentiated and assigned to different genetic clusters. Moreover, the Statistical Parsimony network showed a high degree of divergence between the

  10. Genetic admixture and lineage separation in a southern Andean plant.

    PubMed

    Morello, Santiago; Sede, Silvana M

    2016-01-01

    Mountain uplifts have generated new ecologic opportunities for plants, and triggered evolutionary processes, favouring an increase on the speciation rate in all continents. Moreover, mountain ranges may act as corridors or barriers for plant lineages and populations. In South America a high rate of diversification has been linked to Andean orogeny during Pliocene/Miocene. More recently, Pleistocene glacial cycles have also shaped species distribution and demography. The endemic genus Escallonia is known to have diversified in the Andes. Species with similar morphology obscure species delimitation and plants with intermediate characters occur naturally. The aim of this study is to characterize genetic variation and structure of two widespread species of Escallonia: E. alpina and E. rubra We analyzed the genetic variation of populations of the entire distribution range of the species and we also included those with intermediate morphological characters; a total of 94 accessions from 14 populations were used for the Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) analysis. Plastid DNA sequences (trnS-trnG, 3'trnV-ndhC intergenic spacers and the ndhF gene) from sixteen accessions of Escallonia species were used to construct a Statistical Parsimony network. Additionally, we performed a geometric morphometrics analysis on 88 leaves from 35 individuals of the two E. alpina varieties to further study their differences. Wright's Fst and analysis of molecular variance tests performed on AFLP data showed a significant level of genetic structure at the species and population levels. Intermediate morphology populations showed a mixed genetic contribution from E. alpina var. alpina and E. rubra both in the Principal Coordinates Analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE. On the other hand, E. rubra and the two varieties of E. alpina are well differentiated and assigned to different genetic clusters. Moreover, the Statistical Parsimony network showed a high degree of divergence between the

  11. DLGP: A database for lineage-conserved and lineage-specific gene pairs in animal and plant genomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dapeng

    2016-01-15

    The conservation of gene organization in the genome with lineage-specificity is an invaluable resource to decipher their potential functionality with diverse selective constraints, especially in higher animals and plants. Gene pairs appear to be the minimal structure for such kind of gene clusters that tend to reside in their preferred locations, representing the distinctive genomic characteristics in single species or a given lineage. Despite gene families having been investigated in a widespread manner, the definition of gene pair families in various taxa still lacks adequate attention. To address this issue, we report DLGP (http://lcgbase.big.ac.cn/DLGP/) that stores the pre-calculated lineage-based gene pairs in currently available 134 animal and plant genomes and inspect them under the same analytical framework, bringing out a set of innovational features. First, the taxonomy or lineage has been classified into four levels such as Kingdom, Phylum, Class and Order. It adopts all-to-all comparison strategy to identify the possible conserved gene pairs in all species for each gene pair in certain species and reckon those that are conserved in over a significant proportion of species in a given lineage (e.g. Primates, Diptera or Poales) as the lineage-conserved gene pairs. Furthermore, it predicts the lineage-specific gene pairs by retaining the above-mentioned lineage-conserved gene pairs that are not conserved in any other lineages. Second, it carries out pairwise comparison for the gene pairs between two compared species and creates the table including all the conserved gene pairs and the image elucidating the conservation degree of gene pairs in chromosomal level. Third, it supplies gene order browser to extend gene pairs to gene clusters, allowing users to view the evolution dynamics in the gene context in an intuitive manner. This database will be able to facilitate the particular comparison between animals and plants, between vertebrates and arthropods, and

  12. Highly Variable Rates of Genome Rearrangements between Hemiascomycetous Yeast Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gilles; Rocha, Eduardo P. C; Brunet, Frédéric; Vergassola, Massimo; Dujon, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    Hemiascomycete yeasts cover an evolutionary span comparable to that of the entire phylum of chordates. Since this group currently contains the largest number of complete genome sequences it presents unique opportunities to understand the evolution of genome organization in eukaryotes. We inferred rates of genome instability on all branches of a phylogenetic tree for 11 species and calculated species-specific rates of genome rearrangements. We characterized all inversion events that occurred within synteny blocks between six representatives of the different lineages. We show that the rates of macro- and microrearrangements of gene order are correlated within individual lineages but are highly variable across different lineages. The most unstable genomes correspond to the pathogenic yeasts Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Chromosomal maps have been intensively shuffled by numerous interchromosomal rearrangements, even between species that have retained a very high physical fraction of their genomes within small synteny blocks. Despite this intensive reshuffling of gene positions, essential genes, which cluster in low recombination regions in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, tend to remain syntenic during evolution. This work reveals that the high plasticity of eukaryotic genomes results from rearrangement rates that vary between lineages but also at different evolutionary times of a given lineage. PMID:16532063

  13. A unique lineage gives rise to the meibomian gland

    PubMed Central

    Fischesser, Katy; Lunn, Matthew O.; Kao, Winston W-Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the lineage that contributes to the morphogenesis of the meibomian gland. Methods To examine which cell lineage gives rise to the meibomian gland, the expression of Pax6 as well as that of various cytokeratin markers, including keratin 14 (Krt14), Krt15, Krt4, and Krt10, was examined with immunofluorescent staining of C57BL/6J mouse eyelids from P2 to P11 pups and adult mice. Results Pax6 was localized to the cytoplasm within the acinar region of the meibomian glands during morphogenesis but was absent in the fully developed gland. Keratin 14 was expressed throughout the gland at all stages whereas keratin 15 was absent at all stages. Keratin 4, a marker of mucosal lineage, was present throughout the gland and was colocalized with keratin 10 (epidermal lineage marker) in the developing duct at P4. This colocalization region decreased as the gland developed becoming restricted to the central duct near the opening to the acini in the fully developed gland. Conclusions We identified a unique cell lineage that expresses markers characteristic of mucosal and epidermal epithelia during meibomian gland morphogenesis. This unique group of cells was located in the central duct with a concentration near the ductule orifice. The expression of these cells reduced during meibomian gland morphogenesis and may play a role in the development and homeostasis of the gland. PMID:26957900

  14. Early and multiple origins of metastatic lineages within primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Zhao, Bixiao; Bai, Yalai; Iamarino, Atila; Gaffney, Stephen G.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P.; Rimm, David L.; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2016-01-01

    Many aspects of the evolutionary process of tumorigenesis that are fundamental to cancer biology and targeted treatment have been challenging to reveal, such as the divergence times and genetic clonality of metastatic lineages. To address these challenges, we performed tumor phylogenetics using molecular evolutionary models, reconstructed ancestral states of somatic mutations, and inferred cancer chronograms to yield three conclusions. First, in contrast to a linear model of cancer progression, metastases can originate from divergent lineages within primary tumors. Evolved genetic changes in cancer lineages likely affect only the proclivity toward metastasis. Single genetic changes are unlikely to be necessary or sufficient for metastasis. Second, metastatic lineages can arise early in tumor development, sometimes long before diagnosis. The early genetic divergence of some metastatic lineages directs attention toward research on driver genes that are mutated early in cancer evolution. Last, the temporal order of occurrence of driver mutations can be inferred from phylogenetic analysis of cancer chronograms, guiding development of targeted therapeutics effective against primary tumors and metastases. PMID:26858460

  15. Generation of enteroendocrine cell diversity in midgut stem cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Beehler-Evans, Ryan; Micchelli, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system mediates long-range peptide hormone signaling to broadcast changes in metabolic status to distant target tissues via the circulatory system. In many animals, the diffuse endocrine system of the gut is the largest endocrine tissue, with the full spectrum of endocrine cell subtypes not yet fully characterized. Here, we combine molecular mapping, lineage tracing and genetic analysis in the adult fruit fly to gain new insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing enteroendocrine cell diversity. Neuropeptide hormone distribution was used as a basis to generate a high-resolution cellular map of the diffuse endocrine system. Our studies show that cell diversity is seen at two distinct levels: regional and local. We find that class I and class II enteroendocrine cells can be distinguished locally by combinatorial expression of secreted neuropeptide hormones. Cell lineage tracing studies demonstrate that class I and class II cells arise from a common stem cell lineage and that peptide profiles are a stable feature of enteroendocrine cell identity during homeostasis and following challenge with the enteric pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila. Genetic analysis shows that Notch signaling controls the establishment of class II cells in the lineage, but is insufficient to reprogram extant class I cells into class II enteroendocrine cells. Thus, one mechanism by which secretory cell diversity is achieved in the diffuse endocrine system is through cell-cell signaling interactions within individual adult stem cell lineages. PMID:25670792

  16. Comparing effective population sizes of dominant marine alphaproteobacteria lineages.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haiwei; Swan, Brandon K; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Hughes, Austin L; Moran, Mary Ann

    2014-04-01

    A fundamental question in marine microbial ecology is how microbes adapt to ocean environments. Although numerically dominant populations are typically considered more successful, higher census population sizes (Nc) do not equate directly to a greater capability for adaptation. Instead, effective population size (Ne) determines the fate of deleterious and favourable mutations, and thus is a key parameter for determining the adaptive potential of a population. In the case of the SAR11 and Roseobacter lineages, two abundant heterotrophic bacteria in ocean surface waters with contrasting life history strategies, culture-independent population surveys suggest that SAR11s have greater Nc than Roseobacters. To determine relative Ne, we compared the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (ω) of recently diverged lineages of these taxa. Values of ω associated with several of the Roseobacter subclades were lower than for SAR11 subclades, suggesting greater Ne in these cases. Most Roseobacter lineages also had smaller ω values compared with an atypical basal Roseobacter lineage with a large Nc. This finding provides insight into variability in Ne across two important marine bacterial lineages, and provides an evolutionary context for considering how heterotrophic marine bacteria may differ in their ability to adapt to changing ocean habitats.

  17. Broad phylogenomic sampling and the sister lineage of land plants.

    PubMed

    Timme, Ruth E; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Delwiche, Charles F

    2012-01-01

    The tremendous diversity of land plants all descended from a single charophyte green alga that colonized the land somewhere between 430 and 470 million years ago. Six orders of charophyte green algae, in addition to embryophytes, comprise the Streptophyta s.l. Previous studies have focused on reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms tied to this key colonization event, but wildly conflicting results have sparked a contentious debate over which lineage gave rise to land plants. The dominant view has been that 'stoneworts,' or Charales, are the sister lineage, but an alternative hypothesis supports the Zygnematales (often referred to as "pond scum") as the sister lineage. In this paper, we provide a well-supported, 160-nuclear-gene phylogenomic analysis supporting the Zygnematales as the closest living relative to land plants. Our study makes two key contributions to the field: 1) the use of an unbiased method to collect a large set of orthologs from deeply diverging species and 2) the use of these data in determining the sister lineage to land plants. We anticipate this updated phylogeny not only will hugely impact lesson plans in introductory biology courses, but also will provide a solid phylogenetic tree for future green-lineage research, whether it be related to plants or green algae.

  18. Broad phylogenomic sampling and the sister lineage of land plants.

    PubMed

    Timme, Ruth E; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Delwiche, Charles F

    2012-01-01

    The tremendous diversity of land plants all descended from a single charophyte green alga that colonized the land somewhere between 430 and 470 million years ago. Six orders of charophyte green algae, in addition to embryophytes, comprise the Streptophyta s.l. Previous studies have focused on reconstructing the phylogeny of organisms tied to this key colonization event, but wildly conflicting results have sparked a contentious debate over which lineage gave rise to land plants. The dominant view has been that 'stoneworts,' or Charales, are the sister lineage, but an alternative hypothesis supports the Zygnematales (often referred to as "pond scum") as the sister lineage. In this paper, we provide a well-supported, 160-nuclear-gene phylogenomic analysis supporting the Zygnematales as the closest living relative to land plants. Our study makes two key contributions to the field: 1) the use of an unbiased method to collect a large set of orthologs from deeply diverging species and 2) the use of these data in determining the sister lineage to land plants. We anticipate this updated phylogeny not only will hugely impact lesson plans in introductory biology courses, but also will provide a solid phylogenetic tree for future green-lineage research, whether it be related to plants or green algae. PMID:22253761

  19. Early and multiple origins of metastatic lineages within primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Zhao, Bixiao; Bai, Yalai; Iamarino, Atila; Gaffney, Stephen G; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P; Rimm, David L; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2016-02-23

    Many aspects of the evolutionary process of tumorigenesis that are fundamental to cancer biology and targeted treatment have been challenging to reveal, such as the divergence times and genetic clonality of metastatic lineages. To address these challenges, we performed tumor phylogenetics using molecular evolutionary models, reconstructed ancestral states of somatic mutations, and inferred cancer chronograms to yield three conclusions. First, in contrast to a linear model of cancer progression, metastases can originate from divergent lineages within primary tumors. Evolved genetic changes in cancer lineages likely affect only the proclivity toward metastasis. Single genetic changes are unlikely to be necessary or sufficient for metastasis. Second, metastatic lineages can arise early in tumor development, sometimes long before diagnosis. The early genetic divergence of some metastatic lineages directs attention toward research on driver genes that are mutated early in cancer evolution. Last, the temporal order of occurrence of driver mutations can be inferred from phylogenetic analysis of cancer chronograms, guiding development of targeted therapeutics effective against primary tumors and metastases. PMID:26858460

  20. [Mixed cryoglobulinemia].

    PubMed

    Roque, R; Ramiro, S; Vinagre, F; Cordeiro, A; Godinho, F; Santos, Maria José; Gonçalves, P; Canas da Silva, J

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe two clinical cases of cryoglobulinemia. A 70 years old woman, having skin ulcers on lower limbs, arthralgias, paresthesias and constitutional symptoms, for about 10 months. Exams revealed mild anemia, elevation of the biological parameters of inflammation and aminotransferases, positive cryoglobulin and rheumatoid factor in serum, and a severe reduction in C4 complement fraction. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) serology was negative. Idiopathic mixed cryoglobulinemia was diagnosed and corticosteroid therapy started. Given the lack of response, cyclophosphamide and plasmapheresis were added. Two weeks later the patient died in septic shock. The second case refers to a 41 years old female, with untreated hepatitis C who developed over a 6 month period petechiae and livedoid lesions on the lower limbs, peripheral neuropathy, and constitutional symptoms and was admitted with intestinal necrosis. Exams were consistent with the diagnosis of mixed cryoglobulinemia associated, with HCV. She started therapy with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, with improvement. PMID:22113605

  1. Incongruous nuclear and mitochondrial phylogeographic patterns in two sympatric lineages of the wolf spider Pardosa astrigera (Araneae: Lycosidae) from China.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jin; Song, Daxiang; Zhou, Kaiya

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the genetic structure of mitochondrial DNA (COI and 16S rRNA-tRNA(Leu(CUN))-ND1) and nuclear DNA (ITS2) variations among and within populations of Pardosa astrigera in China. Two phenotypes of males were recognized. They differed genetically also in the presence (type A) or absence (type B) of common insertions and deletions in ITS2. The concordance between mtDNA based phylogeny and the phenotypic variations of P. astrigera was weak. Haplotypes of type A did not form a monophyletic group. Instead they were found in three clades, in one of them mixed with type B haplotypes, most likely as a result of long-term and ongoing gene flow of mtDNA between the two phenotypic groups (M = 0.69). Pairwise sequence divergences of all data sets indicated that the genetic divergences between the two phenotypes fall within intraspecific range. Our results indicated that the P. astrigera populations in China consist of two sympatric lineages with male phenotypic variations. Patterns of mismatch distribution within lineages suggested long-term demographic stability in the lineage A, and growth in lineage B that expanded rapidly and recolonized from a southern refuge to the northern parts of China during the late-Pleistocene. On the basis of the estimated divergence time between the two lineages (0.18-0.41 Ma), we suggest that the dry-cold climate and the uplift of the Tibetan plateau during the mid-Pleistocene appear to have a determinating impact on the evolutionary history of P. astrigera in China.

  2. The developmental origins and lineage contributions of endocardial endothelium.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Atsushi; Nakano, Haruko; Smith, Kelly A; Palpant, Nathan J

    2016-07-01

    Endocardial development involves a complex orchestration of cell fate decisions that coordinate with endoderm formation and other mesodermal cell lineages. Historically, investigations into the contribution of endocardium in the developing embryo was constrained to the heart where these cells give rise to the inner lining of the myocardium and are a major contributor to valve formation. In recent years, studies have continued to elucidate the complexities of endocardial fate commitment revealing a much broader scope of lineage potential from developing endocardium. These studies cover a wide range of species and model systems and show direct contribution or fate potential of endocardium giving rise to cardiac vasculature, blood, fibroblast, and cardiomyocyte lineages. This review focuses on the marked expansion of knowledge in the area of endocardial fate potential. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  3. Two postglacial immigration lineages of the polyploid Cerastium alpinum (Caryophyllaceae).

    PubMed

    Berglund, A B; Westerbergh, A

    2001-01-01

    The plant cover of Fennoscandia is young because of the recent glaciation. This study covers the early stages of diversification and the genetic consequences of postglacial migration of a hermaphroditic polyploid plant. Cerastium alpinum. It has a continuous distribution in the alpine region, where it grows on alpine heaths and serpentine soils that are rich in heavy metals. Within the boreal forest C. alpinum has a scattered distribution on serpentine, dolomite and steep slopes. Plants from 31 populations in Norway, Sweden and Finland were subjected to enzyme electrophoresis. Analyses of the enzyme phenotypes suggest that C. alpinum has colonized Fennoscandia through two postglacial immigration events resulting in a southeastern and a southwestern lineage. These two lineages seem to meet in a hybrid zone in northern Sweden. Large genetic differences were found among most populations in both the southeastern and the southwestern lineages. This suggests that the populations are effectively isolated from each other.

  4. Independent stem cell lineages regulate adipose organogenesis and adipose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuwei; Berry, Daniel C.; Tang, Wei; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Adipose tissues have striking plasticity, highlighted by childhood and adult obesity. Using adipose lineage analyses, smooth muscle actin (SMA)-mural cell fate mapping, and conditional PPARγ deletion to block adipocyte differentiation, we find two phases of adipocyte generation that emanate from two independent adipose progenitor compartments, Developmental and Adult. These two compartments are sequentially required for organ formation and maintenance. Although both Developmental and Adult progenitors are specified during the developmental period and express PPARγ, they have distinct micro-anatomical, functional, morphogenetic and molecular profiles. Further, the two compartments derive from different lineages, while adult adipose progenitors fate map from an SMA+ mural lineage, Developmental progenitors do not. Remarkably, the Adult progenitor compartment appears to be specified earlier than the Developmental cells, and then enters the already developmentally formed adipose depots. Thus, two distinct cell compartments control adipose organ development and organ homeostasis, which may provide discrete therapeutic target for childhood and adult obesity. PMID:25437556

  5. Evidence for Golgi bodies in proposed 'Golgi-lacking' lineages.

    PubMed

    Dacks, Joel B; Davis, Lesley A M; Sjögren, Asa M; Andersson, Jan O; Roger, Andrew J; Doolittle, W Ford

    2003-11-01

    Golgi bodies are nearly ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells. The apparent lack of such structures in certain eukaryotic lineages might be taken to mean that these protists evolved prior to the acquisition of the Golgi, and it raises questions of how these organisms function in the absence of this crucial organelle. Here, we report gene sequences from five proposed 'Golgi-lacking' organisms (Giardia intestinalis, Spironucleus barkhanus, Entamoeba histolytica, Naegleria gruberi and Mastigamoeba balamuthi). BLAST and phylogenetic analyses show these genes to be homologous to those encoding components of the retromer, coatomer and adaptin complexes, all of which have Golgi-related functions in mammals and yeast. This is, to our knowledge, the first molecular evidence for Golgi bodies in two major eukaryotic lineages (the pelobionts and heteroloboseids). This substantiates the suggestion that there are no extant primitively 'Golgi-lacking' lineages, and that this apparatus was present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor, but has been altered beyond recognition several times.

  6. Identification of CD13+CD36+ cells as a common progenitor for erythroid and myeloid lineages in human bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Gao, Zhigang; Zhu, Jianqiong; Rodgers, Griffin P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To identify bi-potential precursor cells of erythroid and myeloid development in human bone marrow. Materials and Methods Cells co-expressing CD13 and CD36 (CD13+CD36+) were investigated by analyzing cell surface marker expression during erythroid development (induced with a combination of cytokines plus erythropoietin [EPO]), or myeloid development (induced with the same cocktail of cytokines plus granulocyte-colony stimulating factor [G-CSF]) of bone marrow derived CD133 cells in liquid cultures. CD13+CD36+ subsets were also isolated on the 14th day of cultures and further evaluated for their hematopoietic clonogenic capacity in methylcellulose. Results Colony-forming analysis of sorted CD13+CD36+ cells of committed erythroid and myeloid lineages demonstrated that these cells were able to generate erythroid, granulocyte, and mixed erythroid –granulocyte colonies. In contrast, CD13+CD36− or CD13−CD36+ cells exclusively committed to granulocyte/monocyte or erythroid colonies, respectively, but failed to form mixed erythroid –granulocyte colonies; no colonies were detected in CD13−CD36− cells with lineage-supporting cytokines. In addition, our data confirmed that EPO induced both erythroid and myeloid commitment, while G-CSF only supported the differentiation of the myeloid lineage. Conclusions The present data identify some CD13+CD36+ cells as bi-potential precursors of erythroid and myeloid commitment in normal hematopoiesis. They provide a physiological explanation for the cell identification of myeloid and erythroid lineages observed in hematopoietic diseases. This unique fraction of CD13+CD36+ cells may be useful for further studies on regulating erythroid and myeloid differentiation during normal and malignant hematopoiesis. PMID:17588473

  7. Highly divergent mussel lineages in isolated Indonesian marine lakes

    PubMed Central

    de Leeuw, Christiaan A.; Knegt, Bram; Maas, Diede L.; de Voogd, Nicole J.; Abdunnur; Suyatna, Iwan; Peijnenburg, Katja T.C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Marine lakes, with populations in landlocked seawater and clearly delineated contours, have the potential to provide a unique model to study early stages of evolution in coastal marine taxa. Here we ask whether populations of the mussel Brachidontes from marine lakes in Berau, East Kalimantan (Indonesia) are isolated from each other and from the coastal mangrove systems. We analyzed sequence data of one mitochondrial marker (Cytochrome Oxidase I (COI)), and two nuclear markers (18S and 28S). In addition, we examined shell shape using a geometric morphometric approach. The Indonesian populations of Brachidontes spp. harbored four deeply diverged lineages (14–75% COI corrected net sequence divergence), two of which correspond to previously recorded lineages from marine lakes in Palau, 1,900 km away. These four lineages also showed significant differences in shell shape and constitute a species complex of at least four undescribed species. Each lake harbored a different lineage despite the fact that the lakes are separated from each other by only 2–6 km, while the two mangrove populations, at 20 km distance from each other, harbored the same lineage and shared haplotypes. Marine lakes thus represent isolated habitats. As each lake contained unique within lineage diversity (0.1–0.2%), we suggest that this may have resulted from in situdivergence due to isolation of founder populations after the formation of the lakes (6,000–12,000 years before present). Combined effects of stochastic processes, local adaptation and increased evolutionary rates could produce high levels of differentiation in small populations such as in marine lake environments. Such short-term isolation at small spatial scales may be an important contributing factor to the high marine biodiversity that is found in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. PMID:27761314

  8. Stochastic Dynamics of Interacting Haematopoietic Stem Cell Niche Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Székely, Tamás; Burrage, Kevin; Mangel, Marc; Bonsall, Michael B.

    2014-01-01

    Since we still know very little about stem cells in their natural environment, it is useful to explore their dynamics through modelling and simulation, as well as experimentally. Most models of stem cell systems are based on deterministic differential equations that ignore the natural heterogeneity of stem cell populations. This is not appropriate at the level of individual cells and niches, when randomness is more likely to affect dynamics. In this paper, we introduce a fast stochastic method for simulating a metapopulation of stem cell niche lineages, that is, many sub-populations that together form a heterogeneous metapopulation, over time. By selecting the common limiting timestep, our method ensures that the entire metapopulation is simulated synchronously. This is important, as it allows us to introduce interactions between separate niche lineages, which would otherwise be impossible. We expand our method to enable the coupling of many lineages into niche groups, where differentiated cells are pooled within each niche group. Using this method, we explore the dynamics of the haematopoietic system from a demand control system perspective. We find that coupling together niche lineages allows the organism to regulate blood cell numbers as closely as possible to the homeostatic optimum. Furthermore, coupled lineages respond better than uncoupled ones to random perturbations, here the loss of some myeloid cells. This could imply that it is advantageous for an organism to connect together its niche lineages into groups. Our results suggest that a potential fruitful empirical direction will be to understand how stem cell descendants communicate with the niche and how cancer may arise as a result of a failure of such communication. PMID:25188267

  9. Mitochondrial evolution across lineages of the vampire barnacle Notochthamalus scabrosus.

    PubMed

    Wares, John P

    2015-02-01

    Eight whole mitochondrial genomes from the barnacle Notochthamalus scabrosus, with one from the northern lineage and seven from the divergent southern lineage, are presented. The annotated and aligned data were analyzed for signals of non-neutral evolution. Overall, these data are consistent with purifying selection operating on the protein-coding regions of the mitochondrion. However, a notable region of nonsynonymous substitution at the 3' end of the ND2 gene region, along with unusual site frequency spectra in two other gene regions, was identified.

  10. Lineage shift of dengue virus in Eastern India: an increased implication for DHF/DSS.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, A; Soni, M; Shrivastava, S; Sharma, S; Dash, P K; Gopalan, N; Behera, P K; Parida, M M

    2015-06-01

    Dengue fever, a mosquito-borne viral disease, has become a major public health problem with marked expansion in recent decades. Dengue has now become hyperendemic in India with co-circulation of all the four serotypes. Herein, we report an unprecedented outbreak which occurred during August to October 2011 in Odisha, eastern India. This is the first report of a large epidemic in Odisha. Detailed serological and molecular investigation was carried out to identify the aetiology. Almost half of the samples were found to be dengue antigen (NS1) positive. Further molecular assays revealed circulation of mixed dengue serotypes (DENV-2 and DENV-3). Cosmopolitan genotype of DENV-2 and -3 were identified as the aetiology by phylogenetic analysis. Interestingly, a new lineage of DENV-3 within cosmopolitan genotype was incriminated in this outbreak. The emergence of the unprecedented magnitude of the dengue outbreak with the involvement of a novel lineage of DENV in a newer state of India is a major cause for concern. There is an urgent need to monitor phylodynamics of dengue viruses in other endemic areas.

  11. Protection of horses from West Nile virus Lineage 2 challenge following immunization with a whole, inactivated WNV lineage 1 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Richard A; Bosco-Lauth, Angela; Syvrud, Kevin; Thomas, Anne; Meinert, Todd R; Ludlow, Deborah R; Cook, Corey; Salt, Jeremy; Ons, Ellen

    2014-09-22

    Over the last years West Nile virus (WNV) lineage 2 has spread from the African to the European continent. This study was conducted to demonstrate efficacy of an inactivated, lineage 1-based, WNV vaccine (Equip WNV) against intrathecal challenge of horses with a recent isolate of lineage 2 WNV. Twenty horses, sero-negative for WNV, were enrolled and were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups: an unvaccinated control group (T01, n=10) and a group administered with Equip WNV (T02, n=10). Horses were vaccinated at Day 0 and 21 and were challenged at day 42 with WNV lineage 2, Nea Santa/Greece/2010. Personnel performing clinical observations were blinded to treatment allocation. Sixty percent of the controls had to be euthanized after challenge compared to none of the vaccinates. A significantly lower percentage of the vaccinated animals showed clinical disease (two different clinical observations present on the same day) on six different days of study and the percentage of days with clinical disease was significantly lower in the vaccinated group. A total of 80% of the non-vaccinated horses showed viremia while only one vaccinated animal was positive by virus isolation on a single occasion. Vaccinated animals started to develop antibodies against WNV lineage 2 from day 14 (2 weeks after the first vaccination) and at day 42 (the time of onset of immunity) they had all developed a strong antibody response. Histopathology scores for all unvaccinated animals ranged from mild to very severe in each of the tissues examined (cervical spinal cord, medulla and pons), whereas in vaccinated horses 8 of 10 animals had no lesions and 2 had minimal lesions in one tissue. In conclusion, Equip WNV significantly reduced the number of viremic horses, the duration and severity of clinical signs of disease and mortality following challenge with lineage 2 WNV.

  12. Structural Basis for WDR5 Interaction (Win) Motif Recognition in Human SET1 Family Histone Methyltransferases*

    PubMed Central

    Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Patel, Anamika; Skalnik, David G.; Cosgrove, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Translocations and amplifications of the mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) gene are associated with aggressive myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias in humans. MLL1 is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases, which are required for transcription of genes involved in hematopoiesis and development. MLL1 associates with a subcomplex containing WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD), which together form the MLL1 core complex that is required for sequential mono- and dimethylation of H3K4. We previously demonstrated that WDR5 binds the conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif of MLL1 in vitro, an interaction that is required for the H3K4 dimethylation activity of the MLL1 core complex. In this investigation, we demonstrate that arginine 3765 of the MLL1 Win motif is required to co-immunoprecipitate WRAD from mammalian cells, suggesting that the WDR5-Win motif interaction is important for the assembly of the MLL1 core complex in vivo. We also demonstrate that peptides that mimic SET1 family Win motif sequences inhibit H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex with varying degrees of efficiency. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we determined structures of WDR5 bound to six different naturally occurring Win motif sequences at resolutions ranging from 1.9 to 1.2 Å. Our results reveal that binding energy differences result from interactions between non-conserved residues C-terminal to the Win motif and to a lesser extent from subtle variation of residues within the Win motif. These results highlight a new class of methylation inhibitors that may be useful for the treatment of MLL1-related malignancies. PMID:22665483

  13. Structural basis for WDR5 interaction (Win) motif recognition in human SET1 family histone methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Dharmarajan, Venkatasubramanian; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Patel, Anamika; Skalnik, David G; Cosgrove, Michael S

    2012-08-10

    Translocations and amplifications of the mixed lineage leukemia-1 (MLL1) gene are associated with aggressive myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias in humans. MLL1 is a member of the SET1 family of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases, which are required for transcription of genes involved in hematopoiesis and development. MLL1 associates with a subcomplex containing WDR5, RbBP5, Ash2L, and DPY-30 (WRAD), which together form the MLL1 core complex that is required for sequential mono- and dimethylation of H3K4. We previously demonstrated that WDR5 binds the conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif of MLL1 in vitro, an interaction that is required for the H3K4 dimethylation activity of the MLL1 core complex. In this investigation, we demonstrate that arginine 3765 of the MLL1 Win motif is required to co-immunoprecipitate WRAD from mammalian cells, suggesting that the WDR5-Win motif interaction is important for the assembly of the MLL1 core complex in vivo. We also demonstrate that peptides that mimic SET1 family Win motif sequences inhibit H3K4 dimethylation by the MLL1 core complex with varying degrees of efficiency. To understand the structural basis for these differences, we determined structures of WDR5 bound to six different naturally occurring Win motif sequences at resolutions ranging from 1.9 to 1.2 Å. Our results reveal that binding energy differences result from interactions between non-conserved residues C-terminal to the Win motif and to a lesser extent from subtle variation of residues within the Win motif. These results highlight a new class of methylation inhibitors that may be useful for the treatment of MLL1-related malignancies. PMID:22665483

  14. Mixed Infections and Rifampin Heteroresistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chao; Li, Song; Luo, Zhongyue; Pi, Rui; Sun, Honghu; He, Qingxia; Tang, Ke; Luo, Mei; Li, Yuqing; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Sun, Qun

    2015-07-01

    Mixed infections and heteroresistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contribute to the difficulty of diagnosis, treatment, and control of tuberculosis. However, there is still no proper solution for these issues. This study aimed to investigate the potential relationship between mixed infections and heteroresistance and to determine the high-risk groups related to these factors. A total of 499 resistant and susceptible isolates were subjected to spoligotyping and 24-locus variable-number tandem repeat methods to analyze their genotypic lineages and the occurrence of mixed infections. Two hundred ninety-two randomly selected isolates were sequenced on their rpoB gene to examine mutations and heteroresistance. The results showed that 12 patients had mixed infections, and the corresponding isolates belonged to Manu2 (n = 8), Beijing (n = 2), T (n = 1), and unknown (n = 1) lineages. Manu2 was found to be significantly associated with mixed infections (odds ratio, 47.72; confidence interval, 9.68 to 235.23; P < 0.01). Four isolates (1.37%) were confirmed to be heteroresistant, which was caused by mixed infections in three (75%) isolates; these belonged to Manu2. Additionally, 3.8% of the rifampin-resistant isolates showing no mutation in the rpoB gene were significantly associated with mixed infections (χ(2), 56.78; P < 0.01). This study revealed for the first time that Manu2 was the predominant group in the cases of mixed infections, and this might be the main reason for heteroresistance and a possible mechanism for isolates without any mutation in the rpoB gene to become rifampin resistant. Further studies should focus on this lineage to clarify its relevance to mixed infections.

  15. Mixed Infections and Rifampin Heteroresistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chao; Li, Song; Luo, Zhongyue; Pi, Rui; Sun, Honghu; He, Qingxia; Tang, Ke; Luo, Mei; Li, Yuqing; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infections and heteroresistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contribute to the difficulty of diagnosis, treatment, and control of tuberculosis. However, there is still no proper solution for these issues. This study aimed to investigate the potential relationship between mixed infections and heteroresistance and to determine the high-risk groups related to these factors. A total of 499 resistant and susceptible isolates were subjected to spoligotyping and 24-locus variable-number tandem repeat methods to analyze their genotypic lineages and the occurrence of mixed infections. Two hundred ninety-two randomly selected isolates were sequenced on their rpoB gene to examine mutations and heteroresistance. The results showed that 12 patients had mixed infections, and the corresponding isolates belonged to Manu2 (n = 8), Beijing (n = 2), T (n = 1), and unknown (n = 1) lineages. Manu2 was found to be significantly associated with mixed infections (odds ratio, 47.72; confidence interval, 9.68 to 235.23; P < 0.01). Four isolates (1.37%) were confirmed to be heteroresistant, which was caused by mixed infections in three (75%) isolates; these belonged to Manu2. Additionally, 3.8% of the rifampin-resistant isolates showing no mutation in the rpoB gene were significantly associated with mixed infections (χ2, 56.78; P < 0.01). This study revealed for the first time that Manu2 was the predominant group in the cases of mixed infections, and this might be the main reason for heteroresistance and a possible mechanism for isolates without any mutation in the rpoB gene to become rifampin resistant. Further studies should focus on this lineage to clarify its relevance to mixed infections. PMID:25903578

  16. Distinct Zika Virus Lineage in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Naccache, Samia N.; Thézé, Julien; Sardi, Silvia I.; Somasekar, Sneha; Greninger, Alexander L.; Bandeira, Antonio C.; Campos, Gubio S.; Tauro, Laura B.; Faria, Nuno R.; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of isolates from patients in Bahia, Brazil, where most Zika virus cases in Brazil have been reported, resulted in 11 whole and partial Zika virus genomes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a well-supported Bahia-specific Zika virus lineage, which indicates sustained Zika virus circulation in Salvador, Bahia’s capital city, since mid-2014. PMID:27448188

  17. Distinct Zika Virus Lineage in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Naccache, Samia N; Thézé, Julien; Sardi, Silvia I; Somasekar, Sneha; Greninger, Alexander L; Bandeira, Antonio C; Campos, Gubio S; Tauro, Laura B; Faria, Nuno R; Pybus, Oliver G; Chiu, Charles Y

    2016-10-01

    Sequencing of isolates from patients in Bahia, Brazil, where most Zika virus cases in Brazil have been reported, resulted in 11 whole and partial Zika virus genomes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a well-supported Bahia-specific Zika virus lineage, which indicates sustained Zika virus circulation in Salvador, Bahia's capital city, since mid-2014.

  18. Origin and History of Mitochondrial DNA Lineages in Domestic Horses

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Michael; Pruvost, Melanie; Benecke, Norbert; Hofreiter, Michael; Morales, Arturo; Reissmann, Monika; Ludwig, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Domestic horses represent a genetic paradox: although they have the greatest number of maternal lineages (mtDNA) of all domestic species, their paternal lineages are extremely homogeneous on the Y-chromosome. In order to address their huge mtDNA variation and the origin and history of maternal lineages in domestic horses, we analyzed 1961 partial d-loop sequences from 207 ancient remains and 1754 modern horses. The sample set ranged from Alaska and North East Siberia to the Iberian Peninsula and from the Late Pleistocene to modern times. We found a panmictic Late Pleistocene horse population ranging from Alaska to the Pyrenees. Later, during the Early Holocene and the Copper Age, more or less separated sub-populations are indicated for the Eurasian steppe region and Iberia. Our data suggest multiple domestications and introgressions of females especially during the Iron Age. Although all Eurasian regions contributed to the genetic pedigree of modern breeds, most haplotypes had their roots in Eastern Europe and Siberia. We found 87 ancient haplotypes (Pleistocene to Mediaeval Times); 56 of these haplotypes were also observed in domestic horses, although thus far only 39 haplotypes have been confirmed to survive in modern breeds. Thus, at least seventeen haplotypes of early domestic horses have become extinct during the last 5,500 years. It is concluded that the large diversity of mtDNA lineages is not a product of animal breeding but, in fact, represents ancestral variability. PMID:21187961

  19. Lineage fate of ductular reactions in liver injury and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jörs, Simone; Jeliazkova, Petia; Ringelhan, Marc; Thalhammer, Julian; Dürl, Stephanie; Ferrer, Jorge; Sander, Maike; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Schmid, Roland M.; Siveke, Jens T.; Geisler, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ductular reactions (DRs) are observed in virtually all forms of human liver disease; however, the histogenesis and function of DRs in liver injury are not entirely understood. It is widely believed that DRs contain bipotential liver progenitor cells (LPCs) that serve as an emergency cell pool to regenerate both cholangiocytes and hepatocytes and may eventually give rise to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we used a murine model that allows highly efficient and specific lineage labeling of the biliary compartment to analyze the histogenesis of DRs and their potential contribution to liver regeneration and carcinogenesis. In multiple experimental and genetic liver injury models, biliary cells were the predominant precursors of DRs but lacked substantial capacity to produce new hepatocytes, even when liver injuries were prolonged up to 12 months. Genetic modulation of NOTCH and/or WNT/β-catenin signaling within lineage-tagged DRs impaired DR expansion but failed to redirect DRs from biliary differentiation toward the hepatocyte lineage. Further, lineage-labeled DRs did not produce tumors in genetic and chemical HCC mouse models. In summary, we found no evidence in our system to support mouse biliary-derived DRs as an LPC pool to replenish hepatocytes in a quantitatively relevant way in injury or evidence that DRs give rise to HCCs. PMID:25915586

  20. New balance in pluripotency: reprogramming with lineage specifiers.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Uri; Nissenbaum, Jonathan; Benvenisty, Nissim

    2013-05-23

    Induction of pluripotency in somatic cells has been achieved by myriad combinations of transcription factors that belong to the core pluripotency circuitry. In this issue, Shu et al. report reprogramming with lineage specifiers, lending support to the view of the pluripotent state as a fine balance between competing differentiation forces.

  1. Hybrid swarm between divergent lineages of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus).

    PubMed

    Latch, Emily K; Kierepka, Elizabeth M; Heffelfinger, James R; Rhodes, Olin E

    2011-12-01

    Studies of hybrid zones have revealed an array of evolutionary outcomes, yet the underlying structure is typically characterized as one of three types: a hybrid zone, a hybrid swarm or a hybrid taxon. Our primary objective was to determine which of these three structures best characterizes a zone of hybridization between two divergent lineages of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mule deer and black-tailed deer. These lineages are morphologically, ecologically and genetically distinct, yet hybridize readily along a zone of secondary contact between the east and west slopes of the Cascade Mountains (Washington and Oregon, USA). Using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA, we found clear evidence for extensive hybridization and introgression between lineages, with varying degrees of admixture across the zone of contact. The pattern of hybridization in this region closely resembles a hybrid swarm; based on data from 10 microsatellite loci, we detected hybrids that extend well beyond the F1 generation, did not detect linkage disequilibrium at the centre of the zone and found that genotypes were associated randomly within the zone of contact. Introgression was characterized as bidirectional and symmetric, which is surprising given that the zone of contact occurs along a sharp ecotone and that lineages are characterized by large differences in body size (a key component of mating success). Regardless of the underlying mechanisms promoting hybrid swarm maintenance, it is clear that the persistence of a hybrid swarm presents unique challenges for management in this region.

  2. Putative Lineage of Novel African Usutu Virus, Central Europe

    PubMed Central

    Cadar, Daniel; Bosch, Stefan; Jöst, Hanna; Börstler, Jessica; Garigliany, Mutien-Marie; Becker, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the complete genome of a putative novel Usutu virus (USUV) strain (Usutu-BONN) detected in a dead blackbird from Germany. Genomic analysis revealed several unique amino acid substitutions among the polyprotein gene. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that Usutu-BONN constitutes a putative novel African USUV lineage, which was probably recently introduced to central Europe. PMID:26291923

  3. Origins, admixture and founder lineages in European Roma.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cruz, Begoña; Mendizabal, Isabel; Harmant, Christine; de Pablo, Rosario; Ioana, Mihai; Angelicheva, Dora; Kouvatsi, Anastasia; Makukh, Halyna; Netea, Mihai G; Pamjav, Horolma; Zalán, Andrea; Tournev, Ivailo; Marushiakova, Elena; Popov, Vesselin; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Comas, David

    2016-06-01

    The Roma, also known as 'Gypsies', represent the largest and the most widespread ethnic minority of Europe. There is increasing evidence, based on linguistic, anthropological and genetic data, to suggest that they originated from the Indian subcontinent, with subsequent bottlenecks and undetermined gene flow from/to hosting populations during their diaspora. Further support comes from the presence of Indian uniparentally inherited lineages, such as mitochondrial DNA M and Y-chromosome H haplogroups, in a significant number of Roma individuals. However, the limited resolution of most genetic studies so far, together with the restriction of the samples used, have prevented the detection of other non-Indian founder lineages that might have been present in the proto-Roma population. We performed a high-resolution study of the uniparental genomes of 753 Roma and 984 non-Roma hosting European individuals. Roma groups show lower genetic diversity and high heterogeneity compared with non-Roma samples as a result of lower effective population size and extensive drift, consistent with a series of bottlenecks during their diaspora. We found a set of founder lineages, present in the Roma and virtually absent in the non-Roma, for the maternal (H7, J1b3, J1c1, M18, M35b, M5a1, U3, and X2d) and paternal (I-P259, J-M92, and J-M67) genomes. This lineage classification allows us to identify extensive gene flow from non-Roma to Roma groups, whereas the opposite pattern, although not negligible, is substantially lower (up to 6.3%). Finally, the exact haplotype matching analysis of both uniparental lineages consistently points to a Northwestern origin of the proto-Roma population within the Indian subcontinent. PMID:26374132

  4. Does an ecological advantage produce the asymmetric lineage ratio in a harvester ant population?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Deborah M; Pilko, Anna; De Bortoli, Nicolas; Ingram, Krista K

    2013-11-01

    In dependent-lineage harvester ant populations, two lineages interbreed but are genetically distinct. The offspring of a male and queen of the same lineage are female reproductives; the offspring of a male and queen of different lineages are workers. Geographic surveys have shown asymmetries in the ratio of the two lineages in many harvester ant populations, which may be maintained by an ecological advantage to one of the lineages. Using census data from a long-term study of a dependent-lineage population of the red harvester ant, Pogonomyrmex barbatus, we identified the lineage of 130 colonies sampled in 1997-1999, ranging in age from 1 to 19 years when collected, and 268 colonies sampled in 2010, ranging in age from 1 to 28 years when collected. The ratio of lineages in the study population is similar across an 11-year interval, 0.59 J2 in 1999 and 0.66 J2 in 2010. The rare lineage, J1, had a slightly but significantly higher number of mates of the opposite lineage than the common lineage, J2, and, using data from previous work on reproductive output, higher male production. Mature colonies of the two lineages did not differ in nest mound size, foraging activity, or the propensity to relocate their nests. There were no strong differences in the relative recruitment or survivorship of the two lineages. Our results show no ecological advantage for either lineage, indicating that differences between the lineages in sex ratio allocation may be sufficient to maintain the current asymmetry of the lineage ratio in this population.

  5. Co-infection and cross-species transmission of divergent Hepatocystis lineages in a wild African primate community★

    PubMed Central

    Thurber, Mary I.; Ghai, Ria R.; Hyeroba, Hyeroba; Weny, Geoffrey; Tumukunde, Alex; Chapman, Colin A.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Dinis, Jorge; Steeil, James; Greiner, Ellis C.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; O’Connor, David H.; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2013-01-01

    Hemoparasites of the apicomplexan family Plasmodiidae include the etiological agents of malaria, as well as a suite of non-human primate parasites from which the human malaria agents evolved. Despite the significance of these parasites for global health, little information is available about their ecology in multi-host communities. Primates were investigated in Kibale National Park, Uganda, where ecological relationships among host species are well characterized. Blood samples were examined for parasites of the genera Plasmodium and Hepatocystis using microscopy and PCR targeting the parasite mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, followed by Sanger sequencing. To assess co-infection, “deep sequencing” of a variable region within cytochrome b was performed. Out of nine black-and-white colobus (Colobus guereza), one blue guenon (Cercopithecus mitis), five grey-cheeked mangabeys (Lophocebus albigena), 23 olive baboons (Papio anubis), 52 red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus) and 12 red-tailed guenons (Cercopithecus ascanius), 79 infections (77.5%) were found, all of which were Hepatocystis spp. Sanger sequencing revealed 25 different parasite haplotypes that sorted phylogenetically into six species-specific but morphologically similar lineages. “Deep sequencing” revealed mixed-lineage co-infections in baboons and red colobus (41.7% and 64.7% of individuals, respectively) but not in other host species. One lineage infecting red colobus also infected baboons, but always as the minor variant, suggesting directional cross-species transmission. Hepatocystis parasites in this primate community are a diverse assemblage of cryptic lineages, some of which co-infect hosts and at least one of which can cross primate species barriers. PMID:23603520

  6. Co-infection and cross-species transmission of divergent Hepatocystis lineages in a wild African primate community.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Mary I; Ghai, Ria R; Hyeroba, David; Weny, Geoffrey; Tumukunde, Alex; Chapman, Colin A; Wiseman, Roger W; Dinis, Jorge; Steeil, James; Greiner, Ellis C; Friedrich, Thomas C; O'Connor, David H; Goldberg, Tony L

    2013-07-01

    Hemoparasites of the apicomplexan family Plasmodiidae include the etiological agents of malaria, as well as a suite of non-human primate parasites from which the human malaria agents evolved. Despite the significance of these parasites for global health, little information is available about their ecology in multi-host communities. Primates were investigated in Kibale National Park, Uganda, where ecological relationships among host species are well characterized. Blood samples were examined for parasites of the genera Plasmodium and Hepatocystis using microscopy and PCR targeting the parasite mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, followed by Sanger sequencing. To assess co-infection, "deep sequencing" of a variable region within cytochrome b was performed. Out of nine black-and-white colobus (Colobus guereza), one blue guenon (Cercopithecus mitis), five grey-cheeked mangabeys (Lophocebus albigena), 23 olive baboons (Papio anubis), 52 red colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus) and 12 red-tailed guenons (Cercopithecus ascanius), 79 infections (77.5%) were found, all of which were Hepatocystis spp. Sanger sequencing revealed 25 different parasite haplotypes that sorted phylogenetically into six species-specific but morphologically similar lineages. "Deep sequencing" revealed mixed-lineage co-infections in baboons and red colobus (41.7% and 64.7% of individuals, respectively) but not in other host species. One lineage infecting red colobus also infected baboons, but always as the minor variant, suggesting directional cross-species transmission. Hepatocystis parasites in this primate community are a diverse assemblage of cryptic lineages, some of which co-infect hosts and at least one of which can cross primate species barriers. PMID:23603520

  7. Lineage-specific reprogramming as a strategy for cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Darabi, Radbod; Perlingeiro, Rita C R

    2008-06-15

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are endowed with extensive ability for self renewal and differentiation. These features make them a promising candidate for cell therapy. However, despite the enthusiasm and hype surrounding the potential therapeutic use of human ES cells and more recently induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, to date few reports have documented successful therapeutic outcome with ES-derived cell populations. This is probably due to two main caveats associated with ES cells, their capacity to form teratomas and the challenge of isolating the appropriate therapeutic cell population from differentiating ES cells. We have focused our efforts on the derivation of skeletal muscle progenitors from ES cells and here we will discuss the strategy of reprogramming lineage choices by overexpression of a master regulator, which has proven successful for the generation of the skeletal myogenic lineage from mouse ES cells.

  8. CaM and CML emergence in the green lineage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Dunand, Christophe; Snedden, Wayne; Galaud, Jean-Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a well-studied calcium sensor that is ubiquitous in all eukaryotes and contributes to signaling during developmental processes and adaptation to environmental stimuli. Among eukaryotes, plants have a remarkable variety of CaM-like proteins (CMLs). The expansion of genomic data sets offers the opportunity to explore CaM and CML evolution among the green lineage from algae to land plants. Database analysis indicates that a striking diversity of CaM and CMLs evolved in angiosperms during terrestrial colonization and reveals the emergence of new CML classes throughout the green lineage that correlate with the acquisition of novel biological traits. Here, we speculate that expansion of the CML family was driven by selective pressures to process environmental signals efficiently as plants adapted to land environments. PMID:26115779

  9. Influenza B vaccine lineage selection—An optimized trivalent vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Mosterín Höpping, Ana; Fonville, Judith M.; Russell, Colin A.; James, Sarah; Smith, Derek J.

    2016-01-01

    Epidemics of seasonal influenza viruses cause considerable morbidity and mortality each year. Various types and subtypes of influenza circulate in humans and evolve continuously such that individuals at risk of serious complications need to be vaccinated annually to keep protection up to date with circulating viruses. The influenza vaccine in most parts of the world is a trivalent vaccine, including an antigenically representative virus of recently circulating influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1, and influenza B viruses. However, since the 1970s influenza B has split into two antigenically distinct lineages, only one of which is represented in the annual trivalent vaccine at any time. We describe a lineage selection strategy that optimizes protection against influenza B using the standard trivalent vaccine as a potentially cost effective alternative to quadrivalent vaccines. PMID:26896685

  10. Genes and languages in Europe: an analysis of mitochondrial lineages.

    PubMed

    Sajantila, A; Lahermo, P; Anttinen, T; Lukka, M; Sistonen, P; Savontaus, M L; Aula, P; Beckman, L; Tranebjaerg, L; Gedde-Dahl, T; Issel-Tarver, L; DiRienzo, A; Pääbo, S

    1995-08-01

    When mitochondrial DNA sequence variation is analyzed from a sample of 637 individuals in 14 European populations, most populations show little differentiation with respect to each other. However, the Saami distinguish themselves by a comparatively large amount of sequence difference when compared with the other populations, by a different distribution of sequence diversity within the population, and by the occurrence of particular sequence motifs. Thus, the Saami seem to have a long history distinct from other European populations. Linguistic affiliations are not reflected in the patterns of relationships of mitochondrial lineages in European populations, whereas prior studies of nuclear gene frequencies have shown a correlation between genetic and linguistic evolution. It is argued that this apparent contradiction is attributable to the fact that genetic lineages and gene frequencies reflect different time perspectives on population history, the latter being more in concordance with linguistic evolution.

  11. Influenza B vaccine lineage selection--an optimized trivalent vaccine.

    PubMed

    Mosterín Höpping, Ana; Fonville, Judith M; Russell, Colin A; James, Sarah; Smith, Derek J

    2016-03-18

    Epidemics of seasonal influenza viruses cause considerable morbidity and mortality each year. Various types and subtypes of influenza circulate in humans and evolve continuously such that individuals at risk of serious complications need to be vaccinated annually to keep protection up to date with circulating viruses. The influenza vaccine in most parts of the world is a trivalent vaccine, including an antigenically representative virus of recently circulating influenza A/H3N2, A/H1N1, and influenza B viruses. However, since the 1970s influenza B has split into two antigenically distinct lineages, only one of which is represented in the annual trivalent vaccine at any time. We describe a lineage selection strategy that optimizes protection against influenza B using the standard trivalent vaccine as a potentially cost effective alternative to quadrivalent vaccines.

  12. Runx3 specifies lineage commitment of innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Takashi; Song, Christina; Ryu, Stacy H; Plougastel-Douglas, Beatrice; Yang, Liping; Levanon, Ditsa; Groner, Yoram; Bern, Michael D; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Colonna, Marco; Egawa, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Wayne M

    2015-11-01

    Subsets of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) reside in the mucosa and regulate immune responses to external pathogens. While ILCs can be phenotypically classified into ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 subsets, the transcriptional control of commitment to each ILC lineage is incompletely understood. Here we report that the transcription factor Runx3 was essential for the normal development of ILC1 and ILC3 cells but not of ILC2 cells. Runx3 controlled the survival of ILC1 cells but not of ILC3 cells. Runx3 was required for expression of the transcription factor RORγt and its downstream target, the transcription factor AHR, in ILC3 cells. The absence of Runx3 in ILCs exacerbated infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Therefore, our data establish Runx3 as a key transcription factor in the lineage-specific differentiation of ILC1 and ILC3 cells. PMID:26414766

  13. Spiralian phylogeny informs the evolution of microscopic lineages.

    PubMed

    Laumer, Christopher E; Bekkouche, Nicolas; Kerbl, Alexandra; Goetz, Freya; Neves, Ricardo C; Sørensen, Martin V; Kristensen, Reinhardt M; Hejnol, Andreas; Dunn, Casey W; Giribet, Gonzalo; Worsaae, Katrine

    2015-08-01

    Despite rapid advances in the study of metazoan evolutionary history [1], phylogenomic analyses have so far neglected a number of microscopic lineages that possess a unique combination of characters and are thus informative for our understanding of morphological evolution. Chief among these lineages are the recently described animal groups Micrognathozoa and Loricifera, as well as the two interstitial "Problematica" Diurodrilus and Lobatocerebrum [2]. These genera show a certain resemblance to Annelida in their cuticle and gut [3, 4]; however, both lack primary annelid characters such as segmentation and chaetae [5]. Moreover, they show unique features such as an inverted body-wall musculature or a novel pharyngeal organ. This and their ciliated epidermis have led some to propose relationships with other microscopic spiralians, namely Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha, and in the case of Diurodrilus, with Micrognathozoa [6, 7]-lineages that are grouped by some analyses into "Platyzoa," a clade whose status remains uncertain [1, 8-11]. Here, we assess the interrelationships among the meiofaunal and macrofaunal members of Spiralia using 402 orthologs mined from genome and transcriptome assemblies of 90 taxa. Lobatocerebrum and Diurodrilus are found to be deeply nested members of Annelida, and unequivocal support is found for Micrognathozoa as the sister group of Rotifera. Analyses using site-heterogeneous substitution models further recover a lophophorate clade and position Loricifera + Priapulida as sister group to the remaining Ecdysozoa. Finally, with several meiofaunal lineages branching off early in the diversification of Spiralia, the emerging concept of a microscopic, acoelomate, direct-developing ancestor of Spiralia is reviewed. PMID:26212884

  14. Archaeal Lineages within the Human Microbiome: Absent, Rare or Elusive?

    PubMed

    Horz, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Archaea are well-recognized components of the human microbiome. However, they appear to be drastically underrepresented compared to the high diversity of bacterial taxa which can be found on various human anatomic sites, such as the gastrointestinal environment, the oral cavity and the skin. As our "microbial" view of the human body, including the methodological concepts used to describe them, has been traditionally biased on bacteria, the question arises whether our current knowledge reflects the actual ratio of archaea versus bacteria or whether we have failed so far to unravel the full diversity of human-associated archaea. This review article hypothesizes that distinct archaeal lineages within humans exist, which still await our detection. First, previously unrecognized taxa might be quite common but they have eluded conventional detection methods. Two recent prime examples are described that demonstrate that this might be the case for specific archaeal lineages. Second, some archaeal taxa might be overlooked because they are rare and/or in low abundance. Evidence for this exists for a broad range of phylogenetic lineages, however we currently do not know whether these sporadically appearing organisms are mere transients or important members of the so called "rare biosphere" with probably basic ecosystem functions. Lastly, evidence exists that different human populations harbor different archaeal taxa and/or the abundance and activity of shared archaeal taxa may differ and thus their impact on the overall microbiome. This research line is rather unexplored and warrants further investigation. While not recapitulating exhaustively all studies on archaeal diversity in humans, this review highlights pertinent recent findings that show that the choice of appropriate methodological approaches and the consideration of different human populations may lead to the detection of archaeal lineages previously not associated with humans. This in turn will help understand

  15. Archaeal Lineages within the Human Microbiome: Absent, Rare or Elusive?

    PubMed Central

    Horz, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Archaea are well-recognized components of the human microbiome. However, they appear to be drastically underrepresented compared to the high diversity of bacterial taxa which can be found on various human anatomic sites, such as the gastrointestinal environment, the oral cavity and the skin. As our “microbial” view of the human body, including the methodological concepts used to describe them, has been traditionally biased towards bacteria, the question arises whether our current knowledge reflects the actual ratio of archaea versus bacteria or whether we have failed so far to unravel the full diversity of human-associated archaea. This review article hypothesizes that distinct archaeal lineages within humans exist, which still await our detection. First, previously unrecognized taxa might be quite common but they have eluded conventional detection methods. Two recent prime examples are described that demonstrate that this might be the case for specific archaeal lineages. Second, some archaeal taxa might be overlooked because they are rare and/or in low abundance. Evidence for this exists for a broad range of phylogenetic lineages, however we currently do not know whether these sporadically appearing organisms are mere transients or important members of the so called “rare biosphere” with probably basic ecosystem functions. Lastly, evidence exists that different human populations harbor different archaeal taxa and/or the abundance and activity of shared archaeal taxa may differ and thus their impact on the overall microbiome. This research line is rather unexplored and warrants further investigation. While not recapitulating exhaustively all studies on archaeal diversity in humans, this review highlights pertinent recent findings that show that the choice of appropriate methodological approaches and the consideration of different human populations may lead to the detection of archaeal lineages previously not associated with humans. This in turn will help

  16. SCL expression at critical points in human hematopoietic lineage commitment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjia; Payne, Kimberly J; Zhu, Yuhua; Price, Mary A; Parrish, Yasmin K; Zielinska, Ewa; Barsky, Lora W; Crooks, Gay M

    2005-01-01

    The stem cell leukemia (SCL or tal-1) gene was initially identified as a translocation partner in a leukemia that possessed both lymphoid and myeloid differentiation potential. Mice that lacked SCL expression showed a complete block in hematopoiesis; thus, SCL was associated with hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. More recent studies show a role for SCL in murine erythroid differentiation. However, the expression pattern and the role of SCL during early stages of human hematopoietic differentiation are less clear. In this study we chart the pattern of human SCL expression from HSCs, through developmentally sequential populations of lymphoid and myeloid progenitors to mature cells of the hematopoietic lineages. Using recently defined surface immunophenotypes, we fluorescence-activated cell-sorted (FACS) highly purified populations of primary human hematopoietic progenitors for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of SCL expression. Our data show that SCL mRNA is easily detectable in all hematopoietic populations with erythroid potential, including HSCs, multipotential progenitors, common myeloid progenitors, megakaryocyte/erythrocyte progenitors, and nucleated erythroid lineage cells. SCL mRNA expression was present but rapidly downregulated in the common lymphoid progenitor and granulocyte/monocyte progenitor populations that lack erythroid potential. SCL expression was undetectable in immature cells of nonerythroid lineages, including pro-B cells, early thymic progenitors, and myeloid precursors expressing the M-CSF receptor. SCL expression was also absent from all mature cells of the nonerythroid lineages. Although low levels of SCL were detected in lymphoid- and myeloid-restricted progenitors, our studies show that abundant SCL expression is normally tightly linked with erythroid differentiation potential.

  17. Evolutionary change in physiological phenotypes along the human lineage

    PubMed Central

    Vining, Alexander Q.; Nunn, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Research in evolutionary medicine provides many examples of how evolution has shaped human susceptibility to disease. Traits undergoing rapid evolutionary change may result in associated costs or reduce the energy available to other traits. We hypothesize that humans have experienced more such changes than other primates as a result of major evolutionary change along the human lineage. We investigated 41 physiological traits across 50 primate species to identify traits that have undergone marked evolutionary change along the human lineage. Methodology: We analysed the data using two Bayesian phylogenetic comparative methods. One approach models trait covariation in non-human primates and predicts human phenotypes to identify whether humans are evolutionary outliers. The other approach models adaptive shifts under an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck model of evolution to assess whether inferred shifts are more common on the human branch than on other primate lineages. Results: We identified four traits with strong evidence for an evolutionary increase on the human lineage (amylase, haematocrit, phosphorus and monocytes) and one trait with strong evidence for decrease (neutrophilic bands). Humans exhibited more cases of distinct evolutionary change than other primates. Conclusions and Implications: Human physiology has undergone increased evolutionary change compared to other primates. Long distance running may have contributed to increases in haematocrit and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, while dietary changes are likely related to increases in amylase. In accordance with the pathogen load hypothesis, human monocyte levels were increased, but many other immune-related measures were not. Determining the mechanisms underlying conspicuous evolutionary change in these traits may provide new insights into human disease. PMID:27615376

  18. Multi-lineage MSC Differentiation via Engineered Morphogen Fields

    PubMed Central

    Arany, P.R.; Huang, G.X.; Gadish, O.; Feliz, J.; Weaver, J.C.; Kim, J.; Yuen, W.W.; Mooney, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue loss due to oral diseases requires the healing and regeneration of tissues of multiple lineages. While stem cells are native to oral tissues, a current major limitation to regeneration is the ability to direct their lineage-specific differentiation. This work utilizes polymeric scaffold systems with spatiotemporally controlled morphogen cues to develop precise morphogen fields to direct mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. First, a simple three-layer scaffold design was developed that presented two spatially segregated, lineage-specific cues (Dentinogenic TGF-β1 and Osteogenic BMP4). However, this system resulted in diffuse morphogen fields, as assessed by the in vitro imaging of cell-signaling pathways triggered by the morphogens. Mathematical modeling was then exploited, in combination with incorporation of specific inhibitors (neutralizing antibodies or a small molecule kinase inhibitor) into each morphogen in an opposing spatial pattern as the respective morphogen, to design a five-layer scaffold that was predicted to yield distinct, spatially segregated zones of morphogen signaling. To validate this system, undifferentiated MSCs were uniformly seeded in these scaffold systems, and distinct mineralized tissue differentiation were noted within these morphogen zones. Finally, to demonstrate temporal control over morphogen signaling, latent TGF-β1 was incorporated into one region of a concentric scaffold design, and laser treatment was used to activate the morphogen on-demand and to induce dentin differentiation solely within that specific spatial zone. This study demonstrates a significant advance in scaffold design to generate precise morphogen fields that can be used to develop in situ models to explore tissue differentiation and may ultimately be useful in engineering multi-lineage tissues in clinical dentistry. PMID:25143513

  19. Quantifying Selective Pressures Driving Bacterial Evolution Using Lineage Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Kussell, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Organisms use a variety of strategies to adapt to their environments and maximize long-term growth potential, but quantitative characterization of the benefits conferred by the use of such strategies, as well as their impact on the whole population's rate of growth, remains challenging. Here, we use a path-integral framework that describes how selection acts on lineages—i.e., the life histories of individuals and their ancestors—to demonstrate that lineage-based measurements can be used to quantify the selective pressures acting on a population. We apply this analysis to Escherichia coli bacteria exposed to cyclical treatments of carbenicillin, an antibiotic that interferes with cell-wall synthesis and affects cells in an age-dependent manner. While the extensive characterization of the life history of thousands of cells is necessary to accurately extract the age-dependent selective pressures caused by carbenicillin, the same measurement can be recapitulated using lineage-based statistics of a single surviving cell. Population-wide evolutionary pressures can be extracted from the properties of the surviving lineages within a population, providing an alternative and efficient procedure to quantify the evolutionary forces acting on a population. Importantly, this approach is not limited to age-dependent selection, and the framework can be generalized to detect signatures of other trait-specific selection using lineage-based measurements. Our results establish a powerful way to study the evolutionary dynamics of life under selection and may be broadly useful in elucidating selective pressures driving the emergence of antibiotic resistance and the evolution of survival strategies in biological systems.

  20. Spiralian phylogeny informs the evolution of microscopic lineages.

    PubMed

    Laumer, Christopher E; Bekkouche, Nicolas; Kerbl, Alexandra; Goetz, Freya; Neves, Ricardo C; Sørensen, Martin V; Kristensen, Reinhardt M; Hejnol, Andreas; Dunn, Casey W; Giribet, Gonzalo; Worsaae, Katrine

    2015-08-01

    Despite rapid advances in the study of metazoan evolutionary history [1], phylogenomic analyses have so far neglected a number of microscopic lineages that possess a unique combination of characters and are thus informative for our understanding of morphological evolution. Chief among these lineages are the recently described animal groups Micrognathozoa and Loricifera, as well as the two interstitial "Problematica" Diurodrilus and Lobatocerebrum [2]. These genera show a certain resemblance to Annelida in their cuticle and gut [3, 4]; however, both lack primary annelid characters such as segmentation and chaetae [5]. Moreover, they show unique features such as an inverted body-wall musculature or a novel pharyngeal organ. This and their ciliated epidermis have led some to propose relationships with other microscopic spiralians, namely Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha, and in the case of Diurodrilus, with Micrognathozoa [6, 7]-lineages that are grouped by some analyses into "Platyzoa," a clade whose status remains uncertain [1, 8-11]. Here, we assess the interrelationships among the meiofaunal and macrofaunal members of Spiralia using 402 orthologs mined from genome and transcriptome assemblies of 90 taxa. Lobatocerebrum and Diurodrilus are found to be deeply nested members of Annelida, and unequivocal support is found for Micrognathozoa as the sister group of Rotifera. Analyses using site-heterogeneous substitution models further recover a lophophorate clade and position Loricifera + Priapulida as sister group to the remaining Ecdysozoa. Finally, with several meiofaunal lineages branching off early in the diversification of Spiralia, the emerging concept of a microscopic, acoelomate, direct-developing ancestor of Spiralia is reviewed.

  1. Global evolution of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii clonal lineages.

    PubMed

    Zarrilli, Raffaele; Pournaras, Spyros; Giannouli, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2013-01-01

    The rapid expansion of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to carbapenems and most or all available antibiotics during the last decade is a worrying evolution. The apparent predominance of a few successful multidrug-resistant lineages worldwide underlines the importance of elucidating the mode of spread and the epidemiology of A. baumannii isolates in single hospitals, at a country-wide level and on a global scale. The evolutionary advantage of the dominant clonal lineages relies on the capability of the A. baumannii pangenome to incorporate resistance determinants. In particular, the simultaneous presence of divergent strains of the international clone II and their increasing prevalence in international hospitals further support the ongoing adaptation of this lineage to the hospital environment. Indeed, genomic and genetic studies have elucidated the role of mobile genetic elements in the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and substantiate the rate of genetic alterations associated with acquisition in A. baumannii of various resistance genes, including OXA- and metallo-β-lactamase-type carbapenemase genes. The significance of single nucleotide polymorphisms and transposon mutagenesis in the evolution of A. baumannii has been also documented. Establishment of a network of reference laboratories in different countries would generate a more complete picture and a fuller understanding of the importance of high-risk A. baumannii clones in the international dissemination of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23127486

  2. Polycomb enables primitive endoderm lineage priming in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Illingworth, Robert S; Hölzenspies, Jurriaan J; Roske, Fabian V; Bickmore, Wendy A; Brickman, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), like the blastocyst from which they are derived, contain precursors of the epiblast (Epi) and primitive endoderm (PrEn) lineages. While transient in vivo, these precursor populations readily interconvert in vitro. We show that altered transcription is the driver of these coordinated changes, known as lineage priming, in a process that exploits novel polycomb activities. We find that intragenic levels of the polycomb mark H3K27me3 anti-correlate with changes in transcription, irrespective of the gene’s developmental trajectory or identity as a polycomb target. In contrast, promoter proximal H3K27me3 is markedly higher for PrEn priming genes. Consequently, depletion of this modification stimulates the degree to which ESCs are primed towards PrEn when challenged to differentiate, but has little effect on gene expression in self-renewing ESC culture. These observations link polycomb with dynamic changes in transcription and stalled lineage commitment, allowing cells to explore alternative choices prior to a definitive decision. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14926.001 PMID:27723457

  3. Brg1 modulates enhancer activation in mesoderm lineage commitment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Hota, Swetansu K.; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Ho, Lena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Bruneau, B. G.

    2015-03-26

    The interplay between different levels of gene regulation in modulating developmental transcriptional programs, such as histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, is not well understood. Here, we show that the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 is required for enhancer activation in mesoderm induction. In an embryonic stem cell-based directed differentiation assay, the absence of Brg1 results in a failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and broad deregulation of lineage-specific gene expression during mesoderm induction. We find that Brg1 co-localizes with H3K27ac at distal enhancers and is required for robust H3K27 acetylation at distal enhancers that are activated during mesoderm induction. Brg1 is also requiredmore » to maintain Polycomb-mediated repression of non-mesodermal developmental regulators, suggesting cooperativity between Brg1 and Polycomb complexes. Thus, Brg1 is essential for modulating active and repressive chromatin states during mesoderm lineage commitment, in particular the activation of developmentally important enhancers. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate interplay between chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifications that, together, ensure robust and broad gene regulation during crucial lineage commitment decisions.« less

  4. Cartilage on the Move: Cartilage Lineage Tracing During Tadpole Metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Kerney, Ryan R.; Brittain, Alison L.; Hall, Brian K.; Buchholz, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    The reorganization of cranial cartilages during tadpole metamorphosis is a set of complex processes. The fates of larval cartilage-forming cells (chondrocytes) and sources of adult chondrocytes are largely unknown. Individual larval cranial cartilages may either degenerate or remodel, while many adult cartilages appear to form de novo during metamorphosis. Determining the extent to which adult chondrocytes/cartilages are derived from larval chondrocytes during metamorphosis requires new techniques in chondrocyte lineage tracing. We have developed two transgenic systems to label cartilage cells throughout the body with fluorescent proteins. One system strongly labels early tadpole cartilages only. The other system inducibly labels forming cartilages at any developmental stage. We examined cartilages of the skull (viscero- and neurocranium), and identified larval cartilages that either resorb or remodel into adult cartilages. Our data show that the adult otic capsules, tecti anterius and posterius, hyale, and portions of Meckel’s cartilage are derived from larval chondrocytes. Our data also suggest that most adult cartilages form de novo, though we cannot rule out the potential for extreme larval chondrocyte proliferation or de- and re-differentiation, which could dilute our fluorescent protein signal. The transgenic lineage tracing strategies developed here are the first examples of inducible, skeleton-specific, lineage tracing in Xenopus. PMID:23036161

  5. Salt tolerance evolves more frequently in C4 grass lineages.

    PubMed

    Bromham, L; Bennett, T H

    2014-03-01

    Salt tolerance has evolved many times in the grass family, and yet few cereal crops are salt tolerant. Why has it been so difficult to develop crops tolerant of saline soils when salt tolerance has evolved so frequently in nature? One possible explanation is that some grass lineages have traits that predispose them to developing salt tolerance and that without these background traits, salt tolerance is harder to achieve. One candidate background trait is photosynthetic pathway, which has also been remarkably labile in grasses. At least 22 independent origins of the C4 photosynthetic pathway have been suggested to occur within the grass family. It is possible that the evolution of C4 photosynthesis aids exploitation of saline environments, because it reduces transpiration, increases water-use efficiency and limits the uptake of toxic ions. But the observed link between the evolution of C4 photosynthesis and salt tolerance could simply be due to biases in phylogenetic distribution of halophytes or C4 species. Here, we use a phylogenetic analysis to investigate the association between photosynthetic pathway and salt tolerance in the grass family Poaceae. We find that salt tolerance is significantly more likely to occur in lineages with C4 photosynthesis than in C3 lineages. We discuss the possible links between C4 photosynthesis and salt tolerance and consider the limitations of inferring the direction of causality of this relationship.

  6. Cell lineage analysis in human brain using endogenous retroelements.

    PubMed

    Evrony, Gilad D; Lee, Eunjung; Mehta, Bhaven K; Benjamini, Yuval; Johnson, Robert M; Cai, Xuyu; Yang, Lixing; Haseley, Psalm; Lehmann, Hillel S; Park, Peter J; Walsh, Christopher A

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations occur during brain development and are increasingly implicated as a cause of neurogenetic disease. However, the patterns in which somatic mutations distribute in the human brain are unknown. We used high-coverage whole-genome sequencing of single neurons from a normal individual to identify spontaneous somatic mutations as clonal marks to track cell lineages in human brain. Somatic mutation analyses in >30 locations throughout the nervous system identified multiple lineages and sublineages of cells marked by different LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposition events and subsequent mutation of poly-A microsatellites within L1. One clone contained thousands of cells limited to the left middle frontal gyrus, whereas a second distinct clone contained millions of cells distributed over the entire left hemisphere. These patterns mirror known somatic mutation disorders of brain development and suggest that focally distributed mutations are also prevalent in normal brains. Single-cell analysis of somatic mutation enables tracing of cell lineage clones in human brain.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in a maternal lineage of Holstein cows.

    PubMed Central

    Hauswirth, W W; Laipis, P J

    1982-01-01

    Two mitochondrial genotypes are shown to exist within one Holstein cow maternal lineage. They were detected by the appearance of an extra Hae III recognition site in one genotype. The nucleotide sequence of this region has been determined and the genotypes are distinguished by an adenine/guanine base transition which creates the new Hae III site. This point mutation occurs within an open reading frame at the third position of a glycine codon and therefore does not alter the amino acid sequence. The present pattern of genotypes within the lineage demands that multiple shifts between genotypes must have occurred within the past 20 years with the most rapid shift taking place in no more than 4 years and indicates that mitochondrial DNA polymorphism can occur between maternally related mammals. The process that gave rise to different genotypes in one lineage is clearly of fundamental importance in understanding intraspecific mitochondrial polymorphism and evolution in mammals. Several potential mechanisms for rapid mitochondrial DNA variation are discussed in light of these results. Images PMID:6289312

  8. Brg1 modulates enhancer activation in mesoderm lineage commitment

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Jeffrey M.; Hota, Swetansu K.; He, Daniel; Thomas, Sean; Ho, Lena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Bruneau, B. G.

    2015-03-26

    The interplay between different levels of gene regulation in modulating developmental transcriptional programs, such as histone modifications and chromatin remodeling, is not well understood. Here, we show that the chromatin remodeling factor Brg1 is required for enhancer activation in mesoderm induction. In an embryonic stem cell-based directed differentiation assay, the absence of Brg1 results in a failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and broad deregulation of lineage-specific gene expression during mesoderm induction. We find that Brg1 co-localizes with H3K27ac at distal enhancers and is required for robust H3K27 acetylation at distal enhancers that are activated during mesoderm induction. Brg1 is also required to maintain Polycomb-mediated repression of non-mesodermal developmental regulators, suggesting cooperativity between Brg1 and Polycomb complexes. Thus, Brg1 is essential for modulating active and repressive chromatin states during mesoderm lineage commitment, in particular the activation of developmentally important enhancers. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate interplay between chromatin remodeling complexes and histone modifications that, together, ensure robust and broad gene regulation during crucial lineage commitment decisions.

  9. Quantitative evolutionary dynamics using high-resolution lineage tracking.

    PubMed

    Levy, Sasha F; Blundell, Jamie R; Venkataram, Sandeep; Petrov, Dmitri A; Fisher, Daniel S; Sherlock, Gavin

    2015-03-12

    Evolution of large asexual cell populations underlies ∼30% of deaths worldwide, including those caused by bacteria, fungi, parasites, and cancer. However, the dynamics underlying these evolutionary processes remain poorly understood because they involve many competing beneficial lineages, most of which never rise above extremely low frequencies in the population. To observe these normally hidden evolutionary dynamics, we constructed a sequencing-based ultra high-resolution lineage tracking system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that allowed us to monitor the relative frequencies of ∼500,000 lineages simultaneously. In contrast to some expectations, we found that the spectrum of fitness effects of beneficial mutations is neither exponential nor monotonic. Early adaptation is a predictable consequence of this spectrum and is strikingly reproducible, but the initial small-effect mutations are soon outcompeted by rarer large-effect mutations that result in variability between replicates. These results suggest that early evolutionary dynamics may be deterministic for a period of time before stochastic effects become important.

  10. Newly discovered sister lineage sheds light on early ant evolution

    PubMed Central

    Rabeling, Christian; Brown, Jeremy M.; Verhaagh, Manfred

    2008-01-01

    Ants are the world's most conspicuous and important eusocial insects and their diversity, abundance, and extreme behavioral specializations make them a model system for several disciplines within the biological sciences. Here, we report the discovery of a new ant that appears to represent the sister lineage to all extant ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). The phylogenetic position of this cryptic predator from the soils of the Amazon rainforest was inferred from several nuclear genes, sequenced from a single leg. Martialis heureka (gen. et sp. nov.) also constitutes the sole representative of a new, morphologically distinct subfamily of ants, the Martialinae (subfam. nov.). Our analyses have reduced the likelihood of long-branch attraction artifacts that have troubled previous phylogenetic studies of early-diverging ants and therefore solidify the emerging view that the most basal extant ant lineages are cryptic, hypogaeic foragers. On the basis of morphological and phylogenetic evidence we suggest that these specialized subterranean predators are the sole surviving representatives of a highly divergent lineage that arose near the dawn of ant diversification and have persisted in ecologically stable environments like tropical soils over great spans of time. PMID:18794530

  11. Organellar inheritance in the green lineage: insights from Ostreococcus tauri.

    PubMed

    Blanc-Mathieu, Romain; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie; Eyre-Walker, Adam; Piganeau, Gwenael

    2013-01-01

    Along the green lineage (Chlorophyta and Streptophyta), mitochondria and chloroplast are mainly uniparentally transmitted and their evolution is thus clonal. The mode of organellar inheritance in their ancestor is less certain. The inability to make clear phylogenetic inference is partly due to a lack of information for deep branching organisms in this lineage. Here, we investigate organellar evolution in the early branching green alga Ostreococcus tauri using population genomics data from the complete mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes. The haplotype structure is consistent with clonal evolution in mitochondria, while we find evidence for recombination in the chloroplast genome. The number of recombination events in the genealogy of the chloroplast suggests that recombination, and thus biparental inheritance, is not rare. Consistent with the evidence of recombination, we find that the ratio of the number of nonsynonymous to the synonymous polymorphisms per site is lower in chloroplast than in the mitochondria genome. We also find evidence for the segregation of two selfish genetic elements in the chloroplast. These results shed light on the role of recombination and the evolutionary history of organellar inheritance in the green lineage.

  12. Mapping the route from naive pluripotency to lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Tüzer; Smith, Austin

    2014-12-01

    In the mouse blastocyst, epiblast cells are newly formed shortly before implantation. They possess a unique developmental plasticity, termed naive pluripotency. For development to proceed, this naive state must be subsumed by multi-lineage differentiation within 72 h following implantation. In vitro differentiation of naive embryonic stem cells (ESCs) cultured in controlled conditions provides a tractable system to dissect and understand the process of exit from naive pluripotency and entry into lineage specification. Exploitation of this system in recent large-scale RNAi and mutagenesis screens has uncovered multiple new factors and modules that drive or facilitate progression out of the naive state. Notably, these studies show that the transcription factor network that governs the naive state is rapidly dismantled prior to upregulation of lineage specification markers, creating an intermediate state that we term formative pluripotency. Here, we summarize these findings and propose a road map for state transitions in ESC differentiation that reflects the orderly dynamics of epiblast progression in the embryo. PMID:25349449

  13. Beyond clines: lineages and haplotype blocks in hybrid zones.

    PubMed

    Sedghifar, Alisa; Brandvain, Yaniv; Ralph, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid zones formed between recently diverged populations offer an opportunity to study the mechanisms underlying reproductive isolation and the process of speciation. Here, we use a combination of analytical theory and explicit forward simulations to describe how selection against hybrid genotypes impacts patterns of introgression across genomic and geographic space. By describing how lineages move across the hybrid zone, in a model without coalescence, we add to modern understanding of how clines form and how parental haplotypes are broken up during introgression. Working with lineages makes it easy to see that clines form in about 1/s generations, where s is the strength of selection against hybrids, and linked clines persist over a genomic scale of 1/T, where T is the age, in generations, of the hybrid zone. Locally disadvantageous alleles tend to exist as small families, whose lineages trace back to the side from which they originated at speed s dispersal distances per generation. The lengths of continuous tracts of ancestry provide an additional source of information: blocks of ancestry surrounding incompatibilities can be substantially longer than the genomewide average block length at the same spatial location, an observation that might be used to identify candidate targets of selection. PMID:27148805

  14. Cryptic Lineages of the Genus Escherichia▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Walk, Seth T.; Alm, Elizabeth W.; Gordon, David M.; Ram, Jeffrey L.; Toranzos, Gary A.; Tiedje, James M.; Whittam, Thomas S.

    2009-01-01

    Extended multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis of atypical Escherichia isolates was used to identify five novel phylogenetic clades (CI to CV) among isolates from environmental, human, and animal sources. Analysis of individual housekeeping loci showed that E. coli and its sister clade, CI, remain largely indistinguishable and represent nascent evolutionary lineages. Conversely, clades of similar age (CIII and CIV) were found to be phylogenetically distinct. When all Escherichia lineages (named and unnamed) were evaluated, we found evidence that Escherichia fergusonii has evolved at an accelerated rate compared to E. coli, CI, CIII, CIV, and CV, suggesting that this species is younger than estimated by the molecular clock method. Although the five novel clades were phylogenetically distinct, we were unable to identify a discriminating biochemical marker for all but one of them (CIII) with traditional phenotypic profiling. CIII had a statistically different phenotype from E. coli that resulted from the loss of sucrose and sorbitol fermentation and lysine utilization. The lack of phenotypic distinction has likely hindered the ability to differentiate these clades from typical E. coli, and so their ecological significance and importance for applied and clinical microbiology are yet to be determined. However, our sampling suggests that CIII, CIV, and CV represent environmentally adapted Escherichia lineages that may be more abundant outside the host gastrointestinal tract. PMID:19700542

  15. IS THE AMPLIFICATION OF c-MYC, MLL AND RUNX1 GENES IN AML AND MDS PATIENTS WITH TRISOMY 8, 11 AND 21 A FACTOR FOR A CLONAL EVOLUTION IN THEIR KARYOTYPE?

    PubMed

    Angelova, S; Spassov, B; Nikolova, V; Christov, I; Tzvetkov, N; Simeonova, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was 1) to define if the amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes is related to the progressive changes of the karyotype in patients with AML and MDS with trisomy 8, 11 and 21 (+8, +11 and +21) in bone marrow and 2) can that amplification be accepted as part of the clonal evolution (CE). Karyotype analysis was performed in 179 patients with AML or MDS with the different chromosomal aberrations (CA) aged 16-81. The findings were distributed as follow: initiating balanced CA (n = 60), aneuploidia (n = 55), unbalanced CA (n = 64). Amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was found in 35% (7 out of 20) of AML and MDS patients with +8, +11 u +21 as single CA in their karyotype; in 63.6% of pts (7 out of 11)--with additional numerical or structural CA and in 75% (9 out of 12)--with complex karyotype. We assume that the amplification of the respective chromosomal regions in patients with +8, +11 and +21 is related to CE. Considering the amplification as a factor of CE, we established 3 patterns of karyotype development depending on the type of the initiating CA in it. Significant statistical differences were found between the three patterns regarding the karyotype distribution in the different stages of progression (p < 0.001). PMID:26214902

  16. Separation in flowering time contributes to the maintenance of sympatric cryptic plant lineages

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, Stefan G; Durka, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Sympatric cryptic lineages are a challenge for the understanding of species coexistence and lineage diversification as well as for management, conservation, and utilization of plant genetic resources. In higher plants studies providing insights into the mechanisms creating and maintaining sympatric cryptic lineages are rare. Here, using microsatellites and chloroplast sequence data, morphometric analyses, and phenological observations, we ask whether sympatrically coexisting lineages in the common wetland plant Juncus effusus are ecologically differentiated and reproductively isolated. Our results show two genetically highly differentiated, homoploid lineages within J. effusus that are morphologically cryptic and have similar preference for soil moisture content. However, flowering time differed significantly between the lineages contributing to reproductive isolation and the maintenance of these lineages. Furthermore, the later flowering lineage suffered less from predispersal seed predation by a Coleophora moth species. Still, we detected viable and reproducing hybrids between both lineages and the earlier flowering lineage and J. conglomeratus, a coexisting close relative. Flowering time differentiation between the lineages can be explained by neutral divergence alone and together with a lack of postzygotic isolation mechanisms; the sympatric coexistence of these lineages is most likely the result of an allopatric origin with secondary contact. PMID:26078854

  17. Population structure within lineages of Wheat streak mosaic virus derived from a common founding event exhibits stochastic variation inconsistent with the deterministic quasi-species model.

    PubMed

    French, Roy; Stenger, Drake C

    2005-12-20

    Structure of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) populations derived from a common founding event and subjected to serial passage at high multiplicity of infection (MOI) was evaluated. The founding population was generated by limiting dilution inoculation. Lineages of known pedigree were sampled at passage 9 (two populations) and at passage 15, with (three populations) or without mixing (four populations) of lineages at passage 10. Polymorphism within each population was assessed by sequencing 17-21 clones containing a 1371 nt region (WSMV-Sidney 81 nts 8001-9371) encompassing the entire coat protein cistron and flanking regions. Mutation frequency averaged approximately 5.0 x 10(-4)/nt across all populations and ranged from 2.4 to 11.6 x 10(-4)/nt within populations, but did not consistently increase or decrease with the number of passages removed from the founding population. Shared substitutions (19 nonsynonymous, 10 synonymous, and 3 noncoding) occurred at 32 sites among 44 haplotypes. Only four substitutions became fixed (frequency = 100%) within a population and nearly one third (10/32) never achieved a frequency of 10% or greater in any sampled population. Shared substitutions were randomly distributed with respect to genome position, with transitions outnumbering transversions 5.4:1 and a clear bias for A to G and U to C substitutions. Haplotype composition of each population was unique with complexity of each population varying unpredictably, in that the number and frequency of haplotypes within a lineage were not correlated with number of passages removed from the founding population or whether the population was derived from a single or mixed lineage. The simplest explanation is that plant virus lineages, even those propagated at high MOI, are subject to frequent, narrow genetic bottlenecks during systemic movement that result in low effective population size and stochastic changes in population structure upon serial passage.

  18. Population structure within lineages of Wheat streak mosaic virus derived from a common founding event exhibits stochastic variation inconsistent with the deterministic quasi-species model

    SciTech Connect

    French, Roy; Stenger, Drake C. . E-mail: dstenger@unlnotes.unl.edu

    2005-12-20

    Structure of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) populations derived from a common founding event and subjected to serial passage at high multiplicity of infection (MOI) was evaluated. The founding population was generated by limiting dilution inoculation. Lineages of known pedigree were sampled at passage 9 (two populations) and at passage 15, with (three populations) or without mixing (four populations) of lineages at passage 10. Polymorphism within each population was assessed by sequencing 17-21 clones containing a 1371 nt region (WSMV-Sidney 81 nts 8001-9371) encompassing the entire coat protein cistron and flanking regions. Mutation frequency averaged {approx}5.0 x 10{sup -4}/nt across all populations and ranged from 2.4 to 11.6 x 10{sup -4}/nt within populations, but did not consistently increase or decrease with the number of passages removed from the founding population. Shared substitutions (19 nonsynonymous, 10 synonymous, and 3 noncoding) occurred at 32 sites among 44 haplotypes. Only four substitutions became fixed (frequency = 100%) within a population and nearly one third (10/32) never achieved a frequency of 10% or greater in any sampled population. Shared substitutions were randomly distributed with respect to genome position, with transitions outnumbering transversions 5.4:1 and a clear bias for A to G and U to C substitutions. Haplotype composition of each population was unique with complexity of each population varying unpredictably, in that the number and frequency of haplotypes within a lineage were not correlated with number of passages removed from the founding population or whether the population was derived from a single or mixed lineage. The simplest explanation is that plant virus lineages, even those propagated at high MOI, are subject to frequent, narrow genetic bottlenecks during systemic movement that result in low effective population size and stochastic changes in population structure upon serial passage.

  19. Principles Governing DNA Methylation during Neuronal Lineage and Subtype Specification

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ali; Klein, Shifra S.; Barboza, Luendreo; Lohdi, Niraj

    2016-01-01

    Although comprehensively described during early neuronal development, the role of DNA methylation/demethylation in neuronal lineage and subtype specification is not well understood. By studying two distinct neuronal progenitors as they differentiate to principal neurons in mouse hippocampus and striatum, we uncovered several principles governing neuronal DNA methylation during brain development. (1) The program consists of three stages: an initial genome-wide methylation during progenitor proliferation is followed by loss of methylation during the transition of regional progenitors to “young” hippocampal/striatal neurons, which is then reversed by gain in methylation during maturation to subtype-specific neurons. (2) At the first two stages, gain and loss of methylation are limited to CpGs, whereas during the third maturation stage, methylation also occurs at non-CpG sites in both lineages. (3) Methylation/demethylation, similar to transcription, are initially highly similar in the two lineages, whereas diversification in methylation and transcription during maturation creates subtype-specific methylation differences. (4) Initially, methylation targets all genomic locations, whereas later, during early and late differentiation, the preferred targets are intronic/intergenic sequences with enhancer-like activity. (5) Differentially methylated genes are enriched in sequential neurodevelopmental functions (such as progenitor proliferation, migration, neuritogenesis, and synaptic transmission); upregulated genes represent current and consecutive stage-specific functions, and downregulated genes represent preceding functions that are no longer required. The main conclusion of our work is that the neuronal methylation/demethylation program is predominantly developmental with minimal lineage specificity, except in the final stage of development when neuron subtype-specific differences also emerge. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our work is the first to describe a set of

  20. Housing Mix, School Mix: Barriers to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camina, M. M.; Iannone, P.

    2014-01-01

    Recent UK policy has emphasised both the development of socially mixed communities and the creation of balanced school intakes. In this paper, we use a case study of an area of mixed tenure in eastern England to explore policy in practice and the extent to which mechanisms of segregation impact on both the creation of socially mixed neighbourhoods…

  1. Mixing and Transport.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chein-Chi; Chapman, Tom; Siverts-Wong, Elena; Wei, Li; Mei, Ying

    2016-10-01

    This section covers research published during the calendar year 2015 on mixing and transport processes. The review covers mixing of anaerobic digesters, mixing of heat transfer, and environmental fate and transport. PMID:27620101

  2. Quantitative lineage tracing strategies to resolve multipotency in tissue-specific stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Rulands, Steffen; Simons, Benjamin D; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-06-01

    Lineage tracing has become the method of choice to study the fate and dynamics of stem cells (SCs) during development, homeostasis, and regeneration. However, transgenic and knock-in Cre drivers used to perform lineage tracing experiments are often dynamically, temporally, and heterogeneously expressed, leading to the initial labeling of different cell types and thereby complicating their interpretation. Here, we developed two methods: the first one based on statistical analysis of multicolor lineage tracing, allowing the definition of multipotency potential to be achieved with high confidence, and the second one based on lineage tracing at saturation to assess the fate of all SCs within a given lineage and the "flux" of cells between different lineages. Our analysis clearly shows that, whereas the prostate develops from multipotent SCs, only unipotent SCs mediate mammary gland (MG) development and adult tissue remodeling. These methods offer a rigorous framework to assess the lineage relationship and SC fate in different organs and tissues. PMID:27284162

  3. Slit/Robo signaling regulates cell fate decisions in the intestinal stem cell lineage of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Biteau, Benoît; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    To maintain tissue homeostasis, cell fate decisions within stem cell lineages have to respond to the needs of the tissue. This coordination of lineage choices with regenerative demand remains poorly characterized. Here we identify a signal from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) that controls lineage specification in the Drosophila intestine. We find that EEs secrete Slit, a ligand for the Robo2 receptor in stem cells (ISCs) that limits ISC commitment to the endocrine lineage, establishing negative feedback control of EE regeneration. We further show that this lineage decision is made within ISCs and requires induction of the transcription factor Prospero in ISCs. Our work identifies a new function for the conserved Slit/Robo pathway in the regulation of adult stem cells, establishing negative feedback control of ISC lineage specification as a critical strategy to preserve tissue homeostasis. Our results further amend the current understanding of cell fate commitment within the Drosophila ISC lineage. PMID:24931602

  4. Quantitative lineage tracing strategies to resolve multipotency in tissue-specific stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Rulands, Steffen; Simons, Benjamin D.; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Lineage tracing has become the method of choice to study the fate and dynamics of stem cells (SCs) during development, homeostasis, and regeneration. However, transgenic and knock-in Cre drivers used to perform lineage tracing experiments are often dynamically, temporally, and heterogeneously expressed, leading to the initial labeling of different cell types and thereby complicating their interpretation. Here, we developed two methods: the first one based on statistical analysis of multicolor lineage tracing, allowing the definition of multipotency potential to be achieved with high confidence, and the second one based on lineage tracing at saturation to assess the fate of all SCs within a given lineage and the “flux” of cells between different lineages. Our analysis clearly shows that, whereas the prostate develops from multipotent SCs, only unipotent SCs mediate mammary gland (MG) development and adult tissue remodeling. These methods offer a rigorous framework to assess the lineage relationship and SC fate in different organs and tissues. PMID:27284162

  5. Quantitative lineage tracing strategies to resolve multipotency in tissue-specific stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wuidart, Aline; Ousset, Marielle; Rulands, Steffen; Simons, Benjamin D; Van Keymeulen, Alexandra; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-06-01

    Lineage tracing has become the method of choice to study the fate and dynamics of stem cells (SCs) during development, homeostasis, and regeneration. However, transgenic and knock-in Cre drivers used to perform lineage tracing experiments are often dynamically, temporally, and heterogeneously expressed, leading to the initial labeling of different cell types and thereby complicating their interpretation. Here, we developed two methods: the first one based on statistical analysis of multicolor lineage tracing, allowing the definition of multipotency potential to be achieved with high confidence, and the second one based on lineage tracing at saturation to assess the fate of all SCs within a given lineage and the "flux" of cells between different lineages. Our analysis clearly shows that, whereas the prostate develops from multipotent SCs, only unipotent SCs mediate mammary gland (MG) development and adult tissue remodeling. These methods offer a rigorous framework to assess the lineage relationship and SC fate in different organs and tissues.

  6. Slit/Robo signaling regulates cell fate decisions in the intestinal stem cell lineage of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Biteau, Benoît; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-06-26

    In order to maintain tissue homeostasis, cell fate decisions within stem cell lineages have to respond to the needs of the tissue. This coordination of lineage choices with regenerative demand remains poorly characterized. Here, we identify a signal from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) that controls lineage specification in the Drosophila intestine. We find that EEs secrete Slit, a ligand for the Robo2 receptor in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that limits ISC commitment to the endocrine lineage, establishing negative feedback control of EE regeneration. Furthermore, we show that this lineage decision is made within ISCs and requires induction of the transcription factor Prospero in ISCs. Our work identifies a function for the conserved Slit/Robo pathway in the regulation of adult stem cells, establishing negative feedback control of ISC lineage specification as a critical strategy to preserve tissue homeostasis. Our results further amend the current understanding of cell fate commitment within the Drosophila ISC lineage. PMID:24931602

  7. Slit/Robo signaling regulates cell fate decisions in the intestinal stem cell lineage of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Biteau, Benoît; Jasper, Heinrich

    2014-06-26

    In order to maintain tissue homeostasis, cell fate decisions within stem cell lineages have to respond to the needs of the tissue. This coordination of lineage choices with regenerative demand remains poorly characterized. Here, we identify a signal from enteroendocrine cells (EEs) that controls lineage specification in the Drosophila intestine. We find that EEs secrete Slit, a ligand for the Robo2 receptor in intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that limits ISC commitment to the endocrine lineage, establishing negative feedback control of EE regeneration. Furthermore, we show that this lineage decision is made within ISCs and requires induction of the transcription factor Prospero in ISCs. Our work identifies a function for the conserved Slit/Robo pathway in the regulation of adult stem cells, establishing negative feedback control of ISC lineage specification as a critical strategy to preserve tissue homeostasis. Our results further amend the current understanding of cell fate commitment within the Drosophila ISC lineage.

  8. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell commitment to the megakaryocyte lineage.

    PubMed

    Woolthuis, Carolien M; Park, Christopher Y

    2016-03-10

    The classical model of hematopoiesis has long held that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sit at the apex of a developmental hierarchy in which HSCs undergo long-term self-renewal while giving rise to cells of all the blood lineages. In this model, self-renewing HSCs progressively lose the capacity for self-renewal as they transit into short-term self-renewing and multipotent progenitor states, with the first major lineage commitment occurring in multipotent progenitors, thus giving rise to progenitors that initiate the myeloid and lymphoid branches of hematopoiesis. Subsequently, within the myeloid lineage, bipotent megakaryocyte-erythrocyte and granulocyte-macrophage progenitors give rise to unipotent progenitors that ultimately give rise to all mature progeny. However, over the past several years, this developmental scheme has been challenged, with the origin of megakaryocyte precursors being one of the most debated subjects. Recent studies have suggested that megakaryocytes can be generated from multiple pathways and that some differentiation pathways do not require transit through a requisite multipotent or bipotent megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitor stage. Indeed, some investigators have argued that HSCs contain a subset of cells with biased megakaryocyte potential, with megakaryocytes directly arising from HSCs under steady-state and stress conditions. In this review, we discuss the evidence supporting these nonclassical megakaryocytic differentiation pathways and consider their relative strengths and weaknesses as well as the technical limitations and potential pitfalls in interpreting these studies. Ultimately, such pitfalls will need to be overcome to provide a comprehensive and definitive understanding of megakaryopoiesis. PMID:26787736

  9. Ecological opportunity and the adaptive diversification of lineages

    PubMed Central

    Wellborn, Gary A; Langerhans, R Brian

    2015-01-01

    The tenet that ecological opportunity drives adaptive diversification has been central to theories of speciation since Darwin, yet no widely accepted definition or mechanistic framework for the concept currently exists. We propose a definition for ecological opportunity that provides an explicit mechanism for its action. In our formulation, ecological opportunity refers to environmental conditions that both permit the persistence of a lineage within a community, as well as generate divergent natural selection within that lineage. Thus, ecological opportunity arises from two fundamental elements: (1) niche availability, the ability of a population with a phenotype previously absent from a community to persist within that community and (2) niche discordance, the diversifying selection generated by the adaptive mismatch between a population's niche-related traits and the newly encountered ecological conditions. Evolutionary response to ecological opportunity is primarily governed by (1) spatiotemporal structure of ecological opportunity, which influences dynamics of selection and development of reproductive isolation and (2) diversification potential, the biological properties of a lineage that determine its capacity to diversify. Diversification under ecological opportunity proceeds as an increase in niche breadth, development of intraspecific ecotypes, speciation, and additional cycles of diversification that may themselves be triggered by speciation. Extensive ecological opportunity may exist in depauperate communities, but it is unclear whether ecological opportunity abates in species-rich communities. Because ecological opportunity should generally increase during times of rapid and multifarious environmental change, human activities may currently be generating elevated ecological opportunity – but so far little work has directly addressed this topic. Our framework highlights the need for greater synthesis of community ecology and evolutionary biology, unifying

  10. Role of LRF/Pokemon in lineage fate decisions.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Andrea; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Wang, Guocan; Maeda, Takahiro; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2013-04-11

    In the human genome, 43 different genes are found that encode proteins belonging to the family of the POK (poxvirus and zinc finger and Krüppel)/ZBTB (zinc finger and broad complex, tramtrack, and bric à brac) factors. Generally considered transcriptional repressors, several of these genes play fundamental roles in cell lineage fate decision in various tissues, programming specific tasks throughout the life of the organism. Here, we focus on functions of leukemia/lymphoma-related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor, which is probably one of the most exciting and yet enigmatic members of the POK/ZBTB family. PMID:23396304

  11. Developmental origin and lineage plasticity of endogenous cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Santini, Maria Paola; Forte, Elvira; Harvey, Richard P; Kovacic, Jason C

    2016-04-15

    Over the past two decades, several populations of cardiac stem cells have been described in the adult mammalian heart. For the most part, however, their lineage origins and in vivo functions remain largely unexplored. This Review summarizes what is known about different populations of embryonic and adult cardiac stem cells, including KIT(+), PDGFRα(+), ISL1(+)and SCA1(+)cells, side population cells, cardiospheres and epicardial cells. We discuss their developmental origins and defining characteristics, and consider their possible contribution to heart organogenesis and regeneration. We also summarize the origin and plasticity of cardiac fibroblasts and circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and consider what role these cells have in contributing to cardiac repair. PMID:27095490

  12. Developmental origin and lineage plasticity of endogenous cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Santini, Maria Paola; Forte, Elvira; Harvey, Richard P; Kovacic, Jason C

    2016-04-15

    Over the past two decades, several populations of cardiac stem cells have been described in the adult mammalian heart. For the most part, however, their lineage origins and in vivo functions remain largely unexplored. This Review summarizes what is known about different populations of embryonic and adult cardiac stem cells, including KIT(+), PDGFRα(+), ISL1(+)and SCA1(+)cells, side population cells, cardiospheres and epicardial cells. We discuss their developmental origins and defining characteristics, and consider their possible contribution to heart organogenesis and regeneration. We also summarize the origin and plasticity of cardiac fibroblasts and circulating endothelial progenitor cells, and consider what role these cells have in contributing to cardiac repair.

  13. Lineage factors and differentiation states in lung cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Cheung, W K C; Nguyen, D X

    2015-11-19

    Lung cancer encompasses a heterogeneous group of malignancies. Here we discuss how the remarkable diversity of major lung cancer subtypes is manifested in their transforming cell of origin, oncogenic dependencies, phenotypic plasticity, metastatic competence and response to therapy. More specifically, we review the increasing evidence that links this biological heterogeneity to the deregulation of cell lineage-specific pathways and the transcription factors that ultimately control them. As determinants of pulmonary epithelial differentiation, these poorly characterized transcriptional networks may underlie the etiology and biological progression of distinct lung cancers, while providing insight into innovative therapeutic strategies.

  14. Role of LRF/Pokemon in lineage fate decisions.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, Andrea; Guarnerio, Jlenia; Wang, Guocan; Maeda, Takahiro; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2013-04-11

    In the human genome, 43 different genes are found that encode proteins belonging to the family of the POK (poxvirus and zinc finger and Krüppel)/ZBTB (zinc finger and broad complex, tramtrack, and bric à brac) factors. Generally considered transcriptional repressors, several of these genes play fundamental roles in cell lineage fate decision in various tissues, programming specific tasks throughout the life of the organism. Here, we focus on functions of leukemia/lymphoma-related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor, which is probably one of the most exciting and yet enigmatic members of the POK/ZBTB family.

  15. Cell lineages, growth and repair of the mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Lescroart, Fabienne; Meilhac, Sigolène M

    2012-01-01

    The formation of the heart involves diversification of lineages which differentiate into distinct cardiac cell types or contribute to different regions such as the four cardiac chambers. The heart is the first organ to form in the embryo. However, in parallel with the growth of the organism, before or after birth, the heart has to adapt its size to maintain pumping efficiency. The adult heart has only a mild regeneration potential; thus, strategies to repair the heart after injury are based on the mobilisation of resident cardiac stem cells or the transplantation of external sources of stem cells. We discuss current knowledge on these aspects and raise questions for future research.

  16. Sequencing of Sylvilagus VDJ genes reveals a new VHa allelic lineage and shows that ancient VH lineages were retained differently in leporids.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Ana; Melo-Ferreira, José; Abrantes, Joana; Martinelli, Nicola; Lavazza, Antonio; Alves, Paulo C; Gortázar, Christian; Esteves, Pedro J

    2014-12-01

    Antigen recognition by immunoglobulins depends upon initial rearrangements of heavy chain V, D, and J genes. In leporids, a unique system exists for the VH genes usage that exhibit highly divergent lineages: the VHa allotypes, the Lepus sL lineage and the VHn genes. For the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), four VHa lineages have been described, the a1, a2, a3 and a4. For hares (Lepus sp.), one VHa lineage was described, the a2L, as well as a more ancient sL lineage. Both genera use the VHn genes in a low frequency of their VDJ rearrangements. To address the hypothesis that the VH specificities could be associated with different environments, we sequenced VDJ genes from a third leporid genus, Sylvilagus. We found a fifth and equally divergent VHa lineage, the a5, and an ancient lineage, the sS, related to the hares' sL, but failed to obtain VHn genes. These results show that the studied leporids employ different VH lineages in the generation of the antibody repertoire, suggesting that the leporid VH genes are subject to strong selective pressure likely imposed by specific pathogens.

  17. Genome Diversity, Recombination, and Virulence across the Major Lineages of Paracoccidioides

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, José F.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Gallo, Juan E.; Sykes, Sean; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Misas, Elizabeth; Whiston, Emily A.; Bagagli, Eduardo; Soares, Celia M. A.; Teixeira, Marcus de M.; Taylor, John W.; Clay, Oliver K.; McEwen, Juan G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Paracoccidioides genus includes two species of thermally dimorphic fungi that cause paracoccidioidomycosis, a neglected health-threatening human systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. To examine the genome evolution and the diversity of Paracoccidioides spp., we conducted whole-genome sequencing of 31 isolates representing the phylogenetic, geographic, and ecological breadth of the genus. These samples included clinical, environmental and laboratory reference strains of the S1, PS2, PS3, and PS4 lineages of P. brasiliensis and also isolates of Paracoccidioides lutzii species. We completed the first annotated genome assemblies for the PS3 and PS4 lineages and found that gene order was highly conserved across the major lineages, with only a few chromosomal rearrangements. Comparing whole-genome assemblies of the major lineages with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predicted from the remaining 26 isolates, we identified a deep split of the S1 lineage into two clades we named S1a and S1b. We found evidence for greater genetic exchange between the S1b lineage and all other lineages; this may reflect the broad geographic range of S1b, which is often sympatric with the remaining, largely geographically isolated lineages. In addition, we found evidence of positive selection for the GP43 and PGA1 antigen genes and genes coding for other secreted proteins and proteases and lineage-specific loss-of-function mutations in cell wall and protease genes; these together may contribute to virulence and host immune response variation among natural isolates of Paracoccidioides spp. These insights into the recent evolutionary events highlight important differences between the lineages that could impact the distribution, pathogenicity, and ecology of Paracoccidioides. IMPORTANCE Characterization of genetic differences between lineages of the dimorphic human-pathogenic fungus Paracoccidioides can identify changes linked to important phenotypes and guide the

  18. Dating the diversification of the major lineages of Ascomycota (Fungi).

    PubMed

    Prieto, María; Wedin, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Establishing the dates for the origin and main diversification events in the phylogeny of Ascomycota is among the most crucial remaining goals in understanding the evolution of Fungi. There have been several analyses of divergence times in the fungal tree of life in the last two decades, but most have yielded contrasting results for the origin of the major lineages. Moreover, very few studies have provided temporal estimates for a large set of clades within Ascomycota. We performed molecular dating to estimate the divergence times of most of the major groups of Ascomycota. To account for paleontological uncertainty, we included alternative fossil constraints as different scenarios to enable a discussion of the effect of selection of fossils. We used data from 6 molecular markers and 121 extant taxa within Ascomycota. Our various 'relaxed clock' scenarios suggest that the origin and diversification of the Pezizomycotina occurred in the Cambrian. The main lineages of lichen-forming Ascomycota originated at least as early as the Carboniferous, with successive radiations in the Jurassic and Cretaceous generating the diversity of the main modern groups. Our study provides new information about the timing of the main diversification events in Ascomycota, including estimates for classes, orders and families of both lichenized and non-lichenized Ascomycota, many of which had not been previously dated.

  19. Spatiotemporal ablation of CXCR2 on oligodendrocyte lineage cells

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Lisa C.; Prager, Briana; Benson, Bryan; Hu, BingQing; Shi, Samuel; Love, Anna; Zhang, CunJin; Yu, Meigen; Cotleur, Anne C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Residual CXCR2 expression on CNS cells in Cxcr2+/−→Cxcr2−/− chimeric animals slowed remyelination after both experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and cuprizone-induced demyelination. Methods: We generated Cxcr2fl/−:PLPCre-ER(T) mice enabling an inducible, conditional deletion of Cxcr2 on oligodendrocyte lineage cells of the CNS. Cxcr2fl/−:PLPCre-ER(T) mice were evaluated in 2 demyelination/remyelination models: cuprizone-feeding and in vitro lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) treatment of cerebellar slice cultures. Results: Cxcr2fl/−:PLPCre-ER(T)+ (termed Cxcr2-cKO) mice showed better myelin repair 4 days after LPC-induced demyelination of cerebellar slice cultures. Cxcr2-cKOs also displayed enhanced hippocampal remyelination after a 2-week recovery from 6-week cuprizone feeding. Conclusion: Using 2 independent demyelination/remyelination models, our data document enhanced myelin repair in Cxcr2-cKO mice, consistent with the data obtained from radiation chimerism studies of germline CXCR2. Further experiments are appropriate to explore how CXCR2 function in the oligodendrocyte lineage accelerates myelin repair. PMID:26668819

  20. Fate of retinoic acid-activated embryonic cell lineages.

    PubMed

    Dollé, Pascal; Fraulob, Valérie; Gallego-Llamas, Jabier; Vermot, Julien; Niederreither, Karen

    2010-12-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a vitamin A derivative, is synthesized by specific cell populations and acts as a diffusible embryonic signal activating ligand-inducible transcription factors, the RA receptors (RARs). RA-activatable transgenic systems have revealed many discrete, transient sites of RA action during development. However, there has been no attempt to permanently label the RA-activated cell lineages during mouse ontogenesis. We describe the characterization of a RA-activatable Cre transgene, which through crosses with a conditional reporter strain (the ROSA26R lacZ reporter), leads to a stable labeling of the cell populations experiencing RA signaling during embryogenesis. RA response-element (RARE)-driven Cre activity mimics at early stages the known activity of the corresponding RARE-lacZ transgene (Rossant et al.,1991). Stable labeling of the Cre-excised cell populations allows to trace the distribution of the RA-activated cell lineages at later stages. These are described in relationship with current models of RA activity in various developmental systems, including the embryonic caudal region, limb buds, hindbrain, sensory organs, and heart. PMID:21046629

  1. Telonemia, a new protist phylum with affinity to chromist lineages.

    PubMed

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, K; Eikrem, W; Klaveness, D; Vaulot, D; Minge, M A; Le Gall, F; Romari, K; Throndsen, J; Botnen, A; Massana, R; Thomsen, H A; Jakobsen, K S

    2006-07-22

    Recent molecular investigations of marine samples taken from different environments, including tropical, temperate and polar areas, as well as deep thermal vents, have revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of protists, some of them forming deep-branching clades within important lineages, such as the alveolates and heterokonts. Using the same approach on coastal samples, we have identified a novel group of protist small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences that do not correspond to any phylogenetic group previously identified. Comparison with other sequences obtained from cultures of heterotrophic protists showed that the environmental sequences grouped together with Telonema, a genus known since 1913 but of uncertain taxonomic affinity. Phylogenetic analyses using four genes (SSU, Hsp90, alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin), and accounting for gamma- and covarion-distributed substitution rates, revealed Telonema as a distinct group of species branching off close to chromist lineages. Consistent with these gene trees, Telonema possesses ultrastructures revealing both the distinctness of the group and the evolutionary affinity to chromist groups. Altogether, the data suggest that Telonema constitutes a new eukaryotic phylum, here defined as Telonemia, possibly representing a key clade for the understanding of the early evolution of bikont protist groups, such as the proposed chromalveolate supergroup. PMID:16790418

  2. Angiosperm genome comparisons reveal early polyploidy in the monocot lineage

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haibao; Bowers, John E.; Wang, Xiyin; Paterson, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    Although the timing and extent of a whole-genome duplication occurring in the common lineage of most modern cereals are clear, the existence or extent of more ancient genome duplications in cereals and perhaps other monocots has been hinted at, but remain unclear. We present evidence of additional duplication blocks of deeper hierarchy than the pancereal rho (ρ) duplication, covering at least 20% of the cereal transcriptome. These more ancient duplicated regions, herein called σ, are evident in both intragenomic and intergenomic analyses of rice and sorghum. Resolution of such ancient duplication events improves the understanding of the early evolutionary history of monocots and the origins and expansions of gene families. Comparisons of syntenic blocks reveal clear structural similarities in putatively homologous regions of monocots (rice) and eudicots (grapevine). Although the exact timing of the σ-duplication(s) is unclear because of uncertainties of the molecular clock assumption, our data suggest that it occurred early in the monocot lineage after its divergence from the eudicot clade. PMID:19966307

  3. Early diversification trend and Asian origin for extent bat lineages.

    PubMed

    Yu, W; Wu, Y; Yang, G

    2014-10-01

    Bats are a unique mammalian group, which belong to one of the largest and most diverse mammalian radiations, but their early diversification is still poorly understood, and conflicting hypotheses have emerged regarding their biogeographic history. Understanding their diversification is crucial for untangling the enigmatic evolutionary history of bats. In this study, we elucidated the rate of diversification and the biogeographic history of extant bat lineages using genus-level chronograms. The results suggest that a rapid adaptive radiation persisted from the emergence of crown bats until the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum, whereas there was a major deceleration in diversification around 35-49 Ma. There was a positive association between changes in the palaeotemperature and the net diversification rate until 35 Ma, which suggests that the palaeotemperature may have played an important role in the regulation of ecological opportunities. By contrast, there were unexpectedly higher diversification rates around 25-35 Ma during a period characterized by intense and long-lasting global cooling, which implies that intrinsic innovations or adaptations may have released some lineages from the intense selective pressures associated with these severe conditions. Our reconstruction of the ancestral distribution suggests an Asian origin for bats, thereby indicating that the current panglobal but disjunct distribution pattern of extant bats may be related to events involving seriate cross-continental dispersal and local extinction, as well as the influence of geological events and the expansion and contraction of megathermal rainforests during the Tertiary.

  4. Widespread Occurrence of Secondary Lipid Biosynthesis Potential in Microbial Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Shulse, Christine N.; Allen, Eric E.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial production of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), is constrained to a narrow subset of marine γ-proteobacteria. The genes responsible for de novo bacterial PUFA biosynthesis, designated pfaEABCD, encode large, multi-domain protein complexes akin to type I iterative fatty acid and polyketide synthases, herein referred to as “Pfa synthases”. In addition to the archetypal Pfa synthase gene products from marine bacteria, we have identified homologous type I FAS/PKS gene clusters in diverse microbial lineages spanning 45 genera representing 10 phyla, presumed to be involved in long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis. In total, 20 distinct types of gene clusters were identified. Collectively, we propose the designation of “secondary lipids” to describe these biosynthetic pathways and products, a proposition consistent with the “secondary metabolite” vernacular. Phylogenomic analysis reveals a high degree of functional conservation within distinct biosynthetic pathways. Incongruence between secondary lipid synthase functional clades and taxonomic group membership combined with the lack of orthologous gene clusters in closely related strains suggests horizontal gene transfer has contributed to the dissemination of specialized lipid biosynthetic activities across disparate microbial lineages. PMID:21629834

  5. Recent Reticulate Evolution in the Ecologically Dominant Lineage of Coccolithophores.

    PubMed

    Bendif, El Mahdi; Probert, Ian; Díaz-Rosas, Francisco; Thomas, Daniela; van den Engh, Ger; Young, Jeremy R; von Dassow, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The coccolithophore family Noëlaerhabdaceae contains a number of taxa that are very abundant in modern oceans, including the cosmopolitan bloom-forming Emiliania huxleyi. Introgressive hybridization has been suggested to account for incongruences between nuclear, mitochondrial and plastidial phylogenies of morphospecies within this lineage, but the number of species cultured to date remains rather limited. Here, we present the characterization of 5 new Noëlaerhabdaceae culture strains isolated from samples collected in the south-east Pacific Ocean. These were analyzed morphologically using scanning electron microscopy and phylogenetically by sequencing 5 marker genes (nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA, plastidial tufA, and mitochondrial cox1 and cox3 genes). Morphologically, one of these strains corresponded to Gephyrocapsa ericsonii and the four others to Reticulofenestra parvula. Ribosomal gene sequences were near identical between these new strains, but divergent from G. oceanica, G. muellerae, and E. huxleyi. In contrast to the clear distinction in ribosomal phylogenies, sequences from other genomic compartments clustered with those of E. huxleyi strains with which they share an ecological range (i.e., warm temperate to tropical waters). These data provide strong support for the hypothesis of past (and potentially ongoing) introgressive hybridization within this ecologically important lineage and for the transfer of R. parvula to Gephyrocapsa. These results have important implications for understanding the role of hybridization in speciation in vast ocean meta-populations of phytoplankton. PMID:27252694

  6. Pan-Genome Analysis of Brazilian Lineage A Amoebal Mimiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Felipe L.; Bajrai, Leena; Abrahao, Jonatas S.; Kroon, Erna G.; Dornas, Fabio P.; Andrade, Kétyllen R.; Boratto, Paulo V. M.; Pilotto, Mariana R.; Robert, Catherine; Benamar, Samia; La Scola, Bernard; Colson, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Since the recent discovery of Samba virus, the first representative of the family Mimiviridae from Brazil, prospecting for mimiviruses has been conducted in different environmental conditions in Brazil. Recently, we isolated using Acanthamoeba sp. three new mimiviruses, all of lineage A of amoebal mimiviruses: Kroon virus from urban lake water; Amazonia virus from the Brazilian Amazon river; and Oyster virus from farmed oysters. The aims of this work were to sequence and analyze the genome of these new Brazilian mimiviruses (mimi-BR) and update the analysis of the Samba virus genome. The genomes of Samba virus, Amazonia virus and Oyster virus were 97%–99% similar, whereas Kroon virus had a low similarity (90%–91%) with other mimi-BR. A total of 3877 proteins encoded by mimi-BR were grouped into 974 orthologous clusters. In addition, we identified three new ORFans in the Kroon virus genome. Additional work is needed to expand our knowledge of the diversity of mimiviruses from Brazil, including if and why among amoebal mimiviruses those of lineage A predominate in the Brazilian environment. PMID:26131958

  7. Introgressive Hybridization between Anciently Diverged Lineages of Silene (Caryophyllaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Anna; Pfeil, Bernard E.; Oxelman, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Hybridization has played a major role during the evolution of angiosperms, mediating both gene flow between already distinct species and the formation of new species. Newly formed hybrids between distantly related taxa are often sterile. For this reason, interspecific crosses resulting in fertile hybrids have rarely been described to take place after more than a few million years after divergence. We describe here the traces of a reproductively successful hybrid between two ancestral species of Silene, diverged for about six million years prior to hybridization. No extant hybrids between the two parental lineages are currently known, but introgression of the RNA polymerase gene NRPA2 provides clear evidence of a temporary and fertile hybrid. Parsimony reconciliation between gene trees and the species tree, as well as consideration of clade ages, help exclude gene paralogy and lineage sorting as alternative hypotheses. This may represent one of the most extreme cases of divergence between species prior to introgressive hybridization discovered yet, notably at a homoploid level. Although species boundaries are generally believed to be stable after millions of years of divergence, we believe that this finding may indicate that gene flow between distantly related species is merely largely undetected at present. PMID:23861793

  8. Renin lineage cells repopulate the glomerular mesangium after injury.

    PubMed

    Starke, Charlotte; Betz, Hannah; Hickmann, Linda; Lachmann, Peter; Neubauer, Björn; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel; Hohenstein, Bernd; Todorov, Vladimir T; Hugo, Christian P M

    2015-01-01

    Mesangial cell injury has a major role in many CKDs. Because renin-positive precursor cells give rise to mesangial cells during nephrogenesis, this study tested the hypothesis that the same phenomenon contributes to glomerular regeneration after murine experimental mesangial injury. Mesangiolysis was induced by administration of an anti-mesangial cell serum in combination with LPS. In enhanced green fluorescent protein-reporter mice with constitutively labeled renin lineage cells, the size of the enhanced green fluorescent protein-positive area in the glomerular tufts increased after mesangial injury. Furthermore, we generated a novel Tet-on inducible triple-transgenic LacZ reporter line that allowed selective labeling of renin cells along renal afferent arterioles of adult mice. Although no intraglomerular LacZ expression was detected in healthy mice, about two-thirds of the glomerular tufts became LacZ positive during the regenerative phase after severe mesangial injury. Intraglomerular renin descendant LacZ-expressing cells colocalized with mesangial cell markers α8-integrin and PDGF receptor-β but not with endothelial, podocyte, or parietal epithelial cell markers. In contrast with LacZ-positive cells in the afferent arterioles, LacZ-positive cells in the glomerular tuft did not express renin. These data demonstrate that extraglomerular renin lineage cells represent a major source of repopulating cells for reconstitution of the intraglomerular mesangium after injury.

  9. Recent Reticulate Evolution in the Ecologically Dominant Lineage of Coccolithophores

    PubMed Central

    Bendif, El Mahdi; Probert, Ian; Díaz-Rosas, Francisco; Thomas, Daniela; van den Engh, Ger; Young, Jeremy R.; von Dassow, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The coccolithophore family Noëlaerhabdaceae contains a number of taxa that are very abundant in modern oceans, including the cosmopolitan bloom-forming Emiliania huxleyi. Introgressive hybridization has been suggested to account for incongruences between nuclear, mitochondrial and plastidial phylogenies of morphospecies within this lineage, but the number of species cultured to date remains rather limited. Here, we present the characterization of 5 new Noëlaerhabdaceae culture strains isolated from samples collected in the south-east Pacific Ocean. These were analyzed morphologically using scanning electron microscopy and phylogenetically by sequencing 5 marker genes (nuclear 18S and 28S rDNA, plastidial tufA, and mitochondrial cox1 and cox3 genes). Morphologically, one of these strains corresponded to Gephyrocapsa ericsonii and the four others to Reticulofenestra parvula. Ribosomal gene sequences were near identical between these new strains, but divergent from G. oceanica, G. muellerae, and E. huxleyi. In contrast to the clear distinction in ribosomal phylogenies, sequences from other genomic compartments clustered with those of E. huxleyi strains with which they share an ecological range (i.e., warm temperate to tropical waters). These data provide strong support for the hypothesis of past (and potentially ongoing) introgressive hybridization within this ecologically important lineage and for the transfer of R. parvula to Gephyrocapsa. These results have important implications for understanding the role of hybridization in speciation in vast ocean meta-populations of phytoplankton. PMID:27252694

  10. Widespread transmission of independent cancer lineages within multiple bivalve species.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Michael J; Villalba, Antonio; Carballal, María J; Iglesias, David; Sherry, James; Reinisch, Carol; Muttray, Annette F; Baldwin, Susan A; Goff, Stephen P

    2016-06-30

    Most cancers arise from oncogenic changes in the genomes of somatic cells, and while the cells may migrate by metastasis, they remain within that single individual. Natural transmission of cancer cells from one individual to another has been observed in two distinct cases in mammals (Tasmanian devils and dogs), but these are generally considered to be rare exceptions in nature. The discovery of transmissible cancer in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) suggested that this phenomenon might be more widespread. Here we analyse disseminated neoplasia in mussels (Mytilus trossulus), cockles (Cerastoderma edule), and golden carpet shell clams (Polititapes aureus) and find that neoplasias in all three species are attributable to independent transmissible cancer lineages. In mussels and cockles, the cancer lineages are derived from their respective host species; however, unexpectedly, cancer cells in P. aureus are all derived from Venerupis corrugata, a different species living in the same geographical area. No cases of disseminated neoplasia have thus far been found in V. corrugata from the same region. These findings show that transmission of cancer cells in the marine environment is common in multiple species, that it has originated many times, and that while most transmissible cancers are found spreading within the species of origin, cross-species transmission of cancer cells can occur. PMID:27338791

  11. Dating the Diversification of the Major Lineages of Ascomycota (Fungi)

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, María; Wedin, Mats

    2013-01-01

    Establishing the dates for the origin and main diversification events in the phylogeny of Ascomycota is among the most crucial remaining goals in understanding the evolution of Fungi. There have been several analyses of divergence times in the fungal tree of life in the last two decades, but most have yielded contrasting results for the origin of the major lineages. Moreover, very few studies have provided temporal estimates for a large set of clades within Ascomycota. We performed molecular dating to estimate the divergence times of most of the major groups of Ascomycota. To account for paleontological uncertainty, we included alternative fossil constraints as different scenarios to enable a discussion of the effect of selection of fossils. We used data from 6 molecular markers and 121 extant taxa within Ascomycota. Our various ‘relaxed clock’ scenarios suggest that the origin and diversification of the Pezizomycotina occurred in the Cambrian. The main lineages of lichen–forming Ascomycota originated at least as early as the Carboniferous, with successive radiations in the Jurassic and Cretaceous generating the diversity of the main modern groups. Our study provides new information about the timing of the main diversification events in Ascomycota, including estimates for classes, orders and families of both lichenized and non–lichenized Ascomycota, many of which had not been previously dated. PMID:23799026

  12. Telonemia, a new protist phylum with affinity to chromist lineages.

    PubMed

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, K; Eikrem, W; Klaveness, D; Vaulot, D; Minge, M A; Le Gall, F; Romari, K; Throndsen, J; Botnen, A; Massana, R; Thomsen, H A; Jakobsen, K S

    2006-07-22

    Recent molecular investigations of marine samples taken from different environments, including tropical, temperate and polar areas, as well as deep thermal vents, have revealed an unexpectedly high diversity of protists, some of them forming deep-branching clades within important lineages, such as the alveolates and heterokonts. Using the same approach on coastal samples, we have identified a novel group of protist small subunit (SSU) rDNA sequences that do not correspond to any phylogenetic group previously identified. Comparison with other sequences obtained from cultures of heterotrophic protists showed that the environmental sequences grouped together with Telonema, a genus known since 1913 but of uncertain taxonomic affinity. Phylogenetic analyses using four genes (SSU, Hsp90, alpha-tubulin and beta-tubulin), and accounting for gamma- and covarion-distributed substitution rates, revealed Telonema as a distinct group of species branching off close to chromist lineages. Consistent with these gene trees, Telonema possesses ultrastructures revealing both the distinctness of the group and the evolutionary affinity to chromist groups. Altogether, the data suggest that Telonema constitutes a new eukaryotic phylum, here defined as Telonemia, possibly representing a key clade for the understanding of the early evolution of bikont protist groups, such as the proposed chromalveolate supergroup.

  13. Renin Lineage Cells Repopulate the Glomerular Mesangium after Injury

    PubMed Central

    Starke, Charlotte; Betz, Hannah; Hickmann, Linda; Lachmann, Peter; Neubauer, Björn; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S.; Gomez, R. Ariel; Hohenstein, Bernd; Hugo, Christian P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Mesangial cell injury has a major role in many CKDs. Because renin-positive precursor cells give rise to mesangial cells during nephrogenesis, this study tested the hypothesis that the same phenomenon contributes to glomerular regeneration after murine experimental mesangial injury. Mesangiolysis was induced by administration of an anti-mesangial cell serum in combination with LPS. In enhanced green fluorescent protein–reporter mice with constitutively labeled renin lineage cells, the size of the enhanced green fluorescent protein–positive area in the glomerular tufts increased after mesangial injury. Furthermore, we generated a novel Tet-on inducible triple-transgenic LacZ reporter line that allowed selective labeling of renin cells along renal afferent arterioles of adult mice. Although no intraglomerular LacZ expression was detected in healthy mice, about two-thirds of the glomerular tufts became LacZ positive during the regenerative phase after severe mesangial injury. Intraglomerular renin descendant LacZ-expressing cells colocalized with mesangial cell markers α8-integrin and PDGF receptor-β but not with endothelial, podocyte, or parietal epithelial cell markers. In contrast with LacZ-positive cells in the afferent arterioles, LacZ-positive cells in the glomerular tuft did not express renin. These data demonstrate that extraglomerular renin lineage cells represent a major source of repopulating cells for reconstitution of the intraglomerular mesangium after injury. PMID:24904091

  14. Dermal stem cells can differentiate down an endothelial lineage.

    PubMed

    Bell, Emma; Richardson, Gavin D; Jahoda, Colin A; Gledhill, Karl; Phillips, Helen M; Henderson, Deborah; Owens, W Andrew; Hole, Nicholas

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we have demonstrated that cells of neural crest origin located in the dermal papilla (DP) exhibit endothelial marker expression and a functional activity. When grown in endothelial growth media, DP primary cultures upregulate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (FLT1) mRNA and downregulate expression of the dermal stem cell marker α-smooth muscle actin. DP cells have demonstrated functional characteristics of endothelial cells, including the ability to form capillary-like structures on Matrigel, increase uptake of low-density lipoprotein and upregulate ICAM1 (CD54) in response to tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulation. We confirmed that these observations were not due to contaminating endothelial cells, by using DP clones. We have also used the WNT1cre/ROSA26R and WNT1cre/YFP lineage-tracing mouse models to identify a population of neural crest-derived cells in DP cultures that express the endothelial marker PECAM (CD31); these cells also form capillary-like structures on Matrigel. Importantly, cells of neural crest origin that express markers of endothelial and mesenchymal lineages exist within the dermal sheath of the vibrissae follicle.

  15. Canonical Wnt signaling in the oligodendroglial lineage--puzzles remain.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fuzheng; Lang, Jordan; Sohn, Jiho; Hammond, Elizabeth; Chang, Marcello; Pleasure, David

    2015-10-01

    The straightforward concept that accentuated Wnt signaling via the Wnt-receptor-β-catenin-TCF/LEF cascade (also termed canonical Wnt signaling or Wnt/β-catenin signaling) delays or blocks oligodendrocyte differentiation is very appealing. According to this concept, canonical Wnt signaling is responsible for remyelination failure in multiple sclerosis and for persistent hypomyelination in periventricular leukomalacia. This has given rise to the hope that pharmacologically inhibiting this signaling will be of therapeutic potential in these disabling neurological disorders. But current studies suggest that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays distinct roles in oligodendrogenesis, oligodendrocyte differentiation, and myelination in a context-dependent manner (central nervous system regions, developmental stages), and that Wnt/β-catenin signaling interplays with, and is subjected to regulation by, other central nervous system factors and signaling pathways. On this basis, we propose the more nuanced concept that endogenous Wnt/β-catenin activity is delicately and temporally regulated to ensure the seamless development of oligodendroglial lineage cells in different contexts. In this review, we discuss the role Wnt/β-catenin signaling in oligodendrocyte development, focusing on the interpretation of disparate results, and highlighting areas where important questions remain to be answered about oligodendroglial lineage Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:25782433

  16. Anterior dental evolution in the Australopithecus anamensis–afarensis lineage

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Carol V.; Plavcan, J. Michael; Manthi, Fredrick K.

    2010-01-01

    Australopithecus anamensis is the earliest known species of the Australopithecus–human clade and is the likely ancestor of Australopithecus afarensis. Investigating possible selective pressures underlying these changes is key to understanding the patterns of selection shaping the origins and early evolution of the Australopithecus–human clade. During the course of the Au. anamensis–afarensis lineage, significant changes appear to occur particularly in the anterior dentition, but also in jaw structure and molar form, suggesting selection for altered diet and/or food processing. Specifically, canine tooth crown height does not change, but maxillary canines and P3s become shorter mesiodistally, canine tooth crowns become more symmetrical in profile and P3s less unicuspid. Canine roots diminish in size and dimorphism, especially relative to the size of the postcanine teeth. Molar crowns become higher. Tooth rows become more divergent and symphyseal form changes. Dietary change involving anterior dental use is also suggested by less intense anterior tooth wear in Au. afarensis. These dental changes signal selection for altered dietary behaviour and explain some differences in craniofacial form between these taxa. These data identify Au. anamensis not just as a more primitive version of Au. afarensis, but as a dynamic member of an evolving lineage leading to Au. afarensis, and raise intriguing questions about what other evolutionary changes occurred during the early evolution of the Australopithecus–human clade, and what characterized the origins of the group. PMID:20855307

  17. Genetic diversity and lineage dynamic of dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV-1) in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Duong, Veasna; Simmons, Cameron; Gavotte, Laurent; Viari, Alain; Ong, Sivuth; Chantha, Ngan; Lennon, Niall J; Birren, Bruce W; Vong, Sirenda; Farrar, Jeremy J; Henn, Matthew R; Deubel, Vincent; Frutos, Roger; Buchy, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In Cambodia, dengue virus (DENV) was first isolated in 1963 and has become endemic with peak epidemic during raining season. Since 2000, the Dengue National Control Program has reported from 10,000 to 40,000 cases per year with fatality rates ranging from 0.7 to 1.7. All four dengue serotypes are found circulating in Cambodia with alternative predominance of serotypes DENV-2 and DENV-3. The DENV-1 represents from 5% to 20% of all circulating viruses, depending upon the year. In this work, 79 clinical strains of DENV-1 were isolated between 2000 and 2009 and their genome fully sequenced. Four distinct lineages with different dynamics were identified. The main evolutionary drive was negative selective pressure but each lineage was characterized by the presence of specific mutations acquired through evolution. Coexistence, extinction and replacement of lineages occurred over the 10-year period. Lineages 1, 2 and 3 were all detected since 2000-2002 and disappeared in 2003, 2004-2005 and 2007, respectively. Lineages 1 and 2 displayed different dynamics. Lineage 1 was very diverse whereas lineage 2 was very homogeneous. Lineage 4 which derived from lineage 3 in 2003 remained the only one at the end of the sampling period in 2008-2009 owing to a selective sweep. The lineages dynamic of DENV-1 viruses and consequences for molecular epidemiology are discussed.

  18. Lineage-associated tracts defining the anatomy of the Drosophila first instar larval brain.

    PubMed

    Hartenstein, Volker; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Lovick, Jennifer K; Kong, Angel; Omoto, Jaison J; Ngo, Kathy T; Viktorin, Gudrun

    2015-10-01

    Fixed lineages derived from unique, genetically specified neuroblasts form the anatomical building blocks of the Drosophila brain. Neurons belonging to the same lineage project their axons in a common tract, which is labeled by neuronal markers. In this paper, we present a detailed atlas of the lineage-associated tracts forming the brain of the early Drosophila larva, based on the use of global markers (anti-Neuroglian, anti-Neurotactin, inscuteable-Gal4>UAS-chRFP-Tub) and lineage-specific reporters. We describe 68 discrete fiber bundles that contain axons of one lineage or pairs/small sets of adjacent lineages. Bundles enter the neuropil at invariant locations, the lineage tract entry portals. Within the neuropil, these fiber bundles form larger fascicles that can be classified, by their main orientation, into longitudinal, transverse, and vertical (ascending/descending) fascicles. We present 3D digital models of lineage tract entry portals and neuropil fascicles, set into relationship to commonly used, easily recognizable reference structures such as the mushroom body, the antennal lobe, the optic lobe, and the Fasciclin II-positive fiber bundles that connect the brain and ventral nerve cord. Correspondences and differences between early larval tract anatomy and the previously described late larval and adult lineage patterns are highlighted. Our L1 neuro-anatomical atlas of lineages constitutes an essential step towards following morphologically defined lineages to the neuroblasts of the early embryo, which will ultimately make it possible to link the structure and connectivity of a lineage to the expression of genes in the particular neuroblast that gives rise to that lineage. Furthermore, the L1 atlas will be important for a host of ongoing work that attempts to reconstruct neuronal connectivity at the level of resolution of single neurons and their synapses.

  19. Evolutionary dynamics of foot-and-mouth disease virus O/ME-SA/Ind2001 lineage.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Saravanan; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Sharma, Gaurav K; Biswal, Jitendra K; Ranjan, Rajeev; Rout, Manoranjan; Das, Biswajit; Dash, Bana B; Sanyal, Aniket; Pattnaik, Bramhadev

    2015-08-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus serotype O Ind2001 lineage within the Middle East-South Asia topotype is the major cause of recent FMD incidences in India. A sub-lineage of Ind2001 caused severe outbreaks in the southern region of the country during 2013 and also reported for the first time from Libya. In this study, we conducted a detailed evolutionary analysis of Ind2001 lineage. Phylogenetic analysis of Ind2001 lineage based on maximum likelihood method revealed two major splits and three sub-lineages. The mean nucleotide substitution rate for this lineage was calculated to be 6.338×10(-3)substitutions/site/year (s/s/y), which is similar to those of PanAsian sub-lineages. Evolutionary time scale analysis indicated that the Ind2001 lineage might have originated in 1989. The sub-lineage Ind2001d that caused 2013 outbreaks seems to be relatively more divergent genetically from other Ind2001 sub-lineages. Seven codons in the VP1 region of Ind2001 were found to be under positive selection. Four out of 24 recent Ind2001 strains tested in 2D-MNT had antigenic relationship value of <0.3 with the serotype O vaccine strain indicating intra-epidemic antigenic diversity. Amino acid substitutions found in these minor variants with reference to antigenic diversity have been discussed. The dominance of antigenically homologous strains indicates absence of vaccine immunity in the majority of the affected hosts. Taken together, the evolution of Ind2001 lineage deviates from the strict molecular clock and a typical lineage evolutionary dynamics characterized by periodic emergence and re-emergence of Ind2001 and PanAsia lineage have been observed in respect of serotype O.

  20. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs.

    PubMed

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell-specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte-specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte-specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell-regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell-specific transcriptional activity.

  1. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs

    PubMed Central

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell–specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte–specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte–specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell–regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell–specific transcriptional activity. PMID:26808502

  2. A cryptic three-way translocation t(10;19;11)(p12.31;q13.31;q23.3) with a derivative Y-chromosome in an infant with acute myeloblastic leukemia (M5b).

    PubMed

    Othman, Moneeb A K; Vujić, Dragana; Zecević, Zeljko; Đurišić, Marina; Slavković, Bojana; Meyer, Britta; Liehr, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by the malignant transformation of hematopoietic precursors to a pathogenic cell clone. Chromosomal band 11q23 harboring MLL (=mixed lineage leukemia) gene is known to be involved in rearrangements with variety of genes as activating partners of MLL in different AML subtypes. Overall, an unfavorable prognosis is associated with MLL abnormalities. Here we investigated an 11-month-old male presenting with hyperleukocytosis being diagnosed with AML subtype FAB-M5b. In banding cytogenetics a der(19)t(19;?)(q13.3;?) and del(Y)(q11.23) were found as sole aberrations. Molecular cytogenetics revealed that the MLL gene was disrupted and even partially lost due to a t(10;19;11)(p12.31;q13.31;q23.3), an MLL/MLLT10 fusion appeared, and the der(Y) was an asymmetric inverted duplication with breakpoints in Yp11.2 and Yq11.23. The patient got hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from his haploidentical mother. Still three months afterwards 15% of blasts were detected in bone marrow and later the patient was lost during follow-up. The present case highlights the necessity to exclude MLL rearrangements, even when there seems to be no actual hint from banding cytogenetics.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of ligninolytic peroxidases: preliminary insights into the alternation of white-rot and brown-rot fungi in their lineage

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li-Wei; Wei, Yu-Lian; Dai, Yu-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    White-rot and brown-rot fungi employ different mechanisms to degrade lignocellulose. These fungi are not monophyletic and even alternate in their common lineage. To explore the reason for this, seventy-six ligninolytic peroxidases (LPs), including 14 sequences newly identified from available basidiomycetous whole-genome and EST databases in this study, were utilized for phylogenetic and selective pressure analyses. We demonstrate that LPs were subjected to the mixed process of concerted and birth-and-death evolution. After the duplication events of original LPs, various LP types may originate from mutation events of several key residues driven by positive selection, which may change LP types and even rot types in a small fraction of wood-decaying fungi. Our findings provide preliminary insights into the cause for the alternation of the two fungal rot types within the same lineage. PMID:24772372

  4. Immunocytochemical and ultrastructural characterization of type 1 astrocytes and 0-2A lineage cells in long-term co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Andersson, C; Brunso-Bechtold, J; Tytell, M

    1994-05-16

    We examined cultures of purified type 1 astrocytes and mixed glial co-cultures containing type 1 astrocytes and 0-2A lineage cells in media containing fetal calf serum at 5 days in vitro (DIV), 12 DIV, and 30 DIV, using cell-specific immunocytochemical markers and electron microscopy. At all three time points and in both culture systems, the polygonal-shaped type 1 astrocytes were A2B5-, GFAP+, and GalC-(specific markers for 0-2A lineage cells, and mature astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, respectively). From 5 to 30 DIV, the type 1 astrocytes increased markedly in size and the appearance of the cytoskeleton changed dramatically, with the amount of glial filaments increasing and microtubules decreasing. At 5, 12, and 30 DIV, the 0-2A lineage cells were multipolar, A2B5 +, HNK-1 +, GFAP-, and GalC-. The 0-2 lineage cells could not be distinguished as either astrocytes or oligodendrocytes on the basis of immunocytochemical or ultrastructural characteristics. These cells had dense cytoplasm, very few intermediate filaments, and a large number of vacuoles and dense bodies. The general characteristics of the cultured astrocytes at 12 DIV and 30 DIV were similar to mature and aged astrocytes in vivo, respectively. These findings suggest that the culture environment in this study accelerated aging of type 1 astrocytes. 0-2A lineage cells, on the other hand, appeared unable to differentiate into either type 2 astrocytes or oligodendrocytes when cultured in the presence of both type 1 astrocytes and fetal calf serum.

  5. Clonify: unseeded antibody lineage assignment from next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Briney, Bryan; Le, Khoa; Zhu, Jiang; Burton, Dennis R.

    2016-01-01

    Defining the dynamics and maturation processes of antibody clonal lineages is crucial to understanding the humoral response to infection and immunization. Although individual antibody lineages have been previously analyzed in isolation, these studies provide only a narrow view of the total antibody response. Comprehensive study of antibody lineages has been limited by the lack of an accurate clonal lineage assignment algorithm capable of operating on next-generation sequencing datasets. To address this shortcoming, we developed Clonify, which is able to perform unseeded lineage assignment on very large sets of antibody sequences. Application of Clonify to IgG+ memory repertoires from healthy individuals revealed a surprising lack of influence of large extended lineages on the overall repertoire composition, indicating that this composition is driven less by the order and frequency of pathogen encounters than previously thought. Clonify is freely available at www.github.com/briney/clonify-python. PMID:27102563

  6. Clonify: unseeded antibody lineage assignment from next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Briney, Bryan; Le, Khoa; Zhu, Jiang; Burton, Dennis R

    2016-04-22

    Defining the dynamics and maturation processes of antibody clonal lineages is crucial to understanding the humoral response to infection and immunization. Although individual antibody lineages have been previously analyzed in isolation, these studies provide only a narrow view of the total antibody response. Comprehensive study of antibody lineages has been limited by the lack of an accurate clonal lineage assignment algorithm capable of operating on next-generation sequencing datasets. To address this shortcoming, we developed Clonify, which is able to perform unseeded lineage assignment on very large sets of antibody sequences. Application of Clonify to IgG+ memory repertoires from healthy individuals revealed a surprising lack of influence of large extended lineages on the overall repertoire composition, indicating that this composition is driven less by the order and frequency of pathogen encounters than previously thought. Clonify is freely available at www.github.com/briney/clonify-python.

  7. Identification and isolation of a dermal lineage with intrinsic fibrogenic potential

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Aaron M.; Drukker, Micha; Januszyk, Michael; Krampitz, Geoffrey W.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Lorenz, H. Peter; Weissman, Irving L.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts represent a heterogeneous population of cells with diverse features that remain largely undefined. We reveal the presence of at least two fibroblast lineages in murine dorsal skin. Lineage tracing and transplantation assays demonstrate that a single fibroblast lineage is responsible for the bulk of connective tissue deposition during embryonic development, cutaneous wound healing, radiation fibrosis, and cancer stroma formation. Lineage-specific cell ablation leads to diminished connective tissue deposition in wounds and reduces melanoma growth. Using flow cytometry, we identify CD26/DPP4 as a surface marker that allows isolation of this lineage. Small molecule–based inhibition of CD26/DPP4 enzymatic activity during wound healing results in diminished cutaneous scarring. Identification and isolation of these lineages hold promise for translational medicine aimed at in vivo modulation of fibrogenic behavior. PMID:25883361

  8. Geographical distribution and risk association of human papillomavirus genotype 52-variant lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuqing; Park, Jong-Sup; Grce, Magdalena; Hibbitts, Samantha; Palefsky, Joel M; Konno, Ryo; Smith-McCune, Karen K; Giovannelli, Lucia; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Picconi, María Alejandra; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Settheetham-Ishida, Wannapa; Coutlée, Francois; De Marco, Federico; Woo, Yin-Ling; Ho, Wendy C S; Wong, Martin C S; Chirenje, Mike Z; Magure, Tsitsi; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Sabol, Ivan; Fiander, Alison N; Chen, Zigui; Chan, Martin C W; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Burk, Robert D; Chan, Paul K S

    2014-11-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype 52 is commonly found in Asian cases of cervical cancer but is rare elsewhere. Analysis of 611 isolates collected worldwide revealed a remarkable geographical distribution, with lineage B predominating in Asia (89.0% vs 0%-5.5%; P(corrected) < .001), whereas lineage A predominated in Africa, the Americas, and Europe. We propose that the name "Asian lineage" be used to denote lineage B, to signify this feature. Preliminary analysis suggested a higher disease risk for lineage B, although ethnogeographical confounders could not be excluded. Further studies are warranted to verify whether the reported high attribution of disease to HPV52 in Asia is due to the high prevalence of lineage B.

  9. Cardiovascular Development and the Colonizing Cardiac Neural Crest Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Snider, Paige; Olaopa, Michael; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2008-01-01

    Although it is well established that transgenic manipulation of mammalian neural crest-related gene expression and microsurgical removal of premigratory chicken and Xenopus embryonic cardiac neural crest progenitors results in a wide spectrum of both structural and functional congenital heart defects, the actual functional mechanism of the cardiac neural crest cells within the heart is poorly understood. Neural crest cell migration and appropriate colonization of the pharyngeal arches and outflow tract septum is thought to be highly dependent on genes that regulate cell-autonomous polarized movement (i.e., gap junctions, cadherins, and noncanonical Wnt1 pathway regulators). Once the migratory cardiac neural crest subpopulation finally reaches the heart, they have traditionally been thought to participate in septation of the common outflow tract into separate aortic and pulmonary arteries. However, several studies have suggested these colonizing neural crest cells may also play additional unexpected roles during cardiovascular development and may even contribute to a crest-derived stem cell population. Studies in both mice and chick suggest they can also enter the heart from the venous inflow as well as the usual arterial outflow region, and may contribute to the adult semilunar and atrioventricular valves as well as part of the cardiac conduction system. Furthermore, although they are not usually thought to give rise to the cardiomyocyte lineage, neural crest cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can contribute to the myocardium and may have different functions in a species-dependent context. Intriguingly, both ablation of chick and Xenopus premigratory neural crest cells, and a transgenic deletion of mouse neural crest cell migration or disruption of the normal mammalian neural crest gene expression profiles, disrupts ventral myocardial function and/or cardiomyocyte proliferation. Combined, this suggests that either the cardiac neural crest secrete factor/s that

  10. Systematic Review of Pharmacological Properties of the Oligodendrocyte Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Marinelli, Carla; Bertalot, Thomas; Zusso, Morena; Skaper, Stephen D.; Giusti, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Oligodendrogenesis and oligodendrocyte precursor maturation are essential processes during the course of central nervous system development, and lead to the myelination of axons. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage are generated in the germinal zone from migratory bipolar oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), and acquire cell surface markers as they mature and respond specifically to factors which regulate proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival. Loss of myelin underlies a wide range of neurological disorders, some of an autoimmune nature—multiple sclerosis probably being the most prominent. Current therapies are based on the use of immunomodulatory agents which are likely to promote myelin repair (remyelination) indirectly by subverting the inflammatory response, aspects of which impair the differentiation of OPCs. Cells of the oligodendrocyte lineage express and are capable of responding to a diverse array of ligand-receptor pairs, including neurotransmitters and nuclear receptors such as γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, adenosine triphosphate, serotonin, acetylcholine, nitric oxide, opioids, prostaglandins, prolactin, and cannabinoids. The intent of this review is to provide the reader with a synopsis of our present state of knowledge concerning the pharmacological properties of the oligodendrocyte lineage, with particular attention to these receptor-ligand (i.e., neurotransmitters and nuclear receptor) interactions that can influence oligodendrocyte migration, proliferation, differentiation, and myelination, and an appraisal of their therapeutic potential. For example, many promising mediators work through Ca2+ signaling, and the balance between Ca2+ influx and efflux can determine the temporal and spatial properties of oligodendrocytes (OLs). Moreover, Ca2+ signaling in OPCs can influence not only differentiation and myelination, but also process extension and migration, as well as cell death in mature mouse OLs. There is also evidence

  11. Monomorphous Plurihormonal Pituitary Adenoma of Pit-1 Lineage in a Giant Adolescent with Central Hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Bernardo Dias; Raimundo, Luísa; Mete, Ozgur; Oliveira, Ana; Portugal, Jorge; Asa, Sylvia L

    2016-03-01

    Thyrotropin (TSH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are exceedingly rare at the pediatric age and no cases of co-secretion with other pituitary hormones in these tumors have been described in this age range. We present a case of a monomorphous plurihormonal pituitary adenoma that co-secreted TSH and GH in a pediatric patient. A 13-year-old male presented with increasing height velocity (17.75 cm/year, 9.55SD), weight loss, and visual impairment. Initial biochemical evaluations revealed secondary hyperthyroidism. A giant pituitary tumor compressing the surrounding structures was detected by magnetic resonance, and a transsphenoidal surgery was initially performed. Pathological examinations revealed an atypical, monomorphous plurihormonal Pit-1 lineage tumor with mixed features of silent subtype 3 adenoma and acidophil stem cell adenoma. In the postoperative period, secondary hyperthyroidism recurred with high levels of both GH and IGF1. In addition, due to tumor re-growth, a multimodality treatment plan was undertaken including surgery, somatostatin analogs, and radiotherapy. We report the first pediatric case of a plurihormonal TSH- and GH-secreting pituitary adenoma, further expanding the clinical manifestations of pediatric pituitary tumors. Comprehensive pathological evaluation and close follow-up surveillance are crucial to the prompt delivery of the best therapeutic options in the context of this particularly aggressive pituitary tumor. PMID:26330191

  12. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  13. Temporal variation in Trypanosoma cruzi lineages from the native rodent Octodon degus in semiarid Chile.

    PubMed

    Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Rojo, Gemma; Sandoval-Rodríguez, Alejandra; Peña, Fabiola; Ortiz, Sylvia; Solari, Aldo

    2015-11-01

    Chagas disease is a zoonosis caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by triatomine insects to several mammalian species acting as reservoir hosts. In the present study, we assess T. cruzi-prevalence and DTU composition of the endemic rodent Octodon degus from a hyper-endemic area of Chagas disease in Chile. Parasite detection is performed by PCR assays on blood samples of individuals captured in the austral summers of 2010-2013. The infection level in rodents differed in the summers of these four years between 18% and 70%. Overall, infected O. degus showed similar T. cruzi-DTU composition (TcI, TcII, TcV and TcVI lineages) among years, corresponding to single and mixed infection, but the relative importance of each DTU changed among years. In 2013, we detected that only three out of the four T. cruzi-DTU found in O. degus were present in the endemic triatomine Mepria spinolai. We suggest that O. degus, an abundant long-lived rodent, is an important native reservoir of T. cruzi in the wild transmission cycle of Chagas disease and it is able to maintain all the T. cruzi-DTUs described in semiarid Chile.

  14. Striking Diversification of Exudate Profiles in Selected Primula Lineages.

    PubMed

    Elser, David; Gilli, Christian; Brecker, Lothar; Valant-Vetschera, Karin M

    2016-05-01

    In continuation of previous studies on glandular exudates of Primula, we analyzed eleven so far unstudied species and several populations for exudate composition. Unsubstituted flavone and unusually substituted flavones, normally predominant in Primula exudates, were not detected in all of the analyzed samples. Instead, some species exhibited regular substituted flavonoids, and in some cases, no flavonoids could be detected at all. The detection of a diterpene (1) in P. minima exudates is new to Primula. On basis of MS and NMR, 1 was structurally characterized as ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid. Comparative profiling of exudates as performed by HPLC and TLC against authentic markers indicated further the presence of the benzoquinone primin and derivatives in some exudates. Thus, exudates of newly studied species contrast markedly with those analyzed so far. The significance of observed exudate diversification is discussed in view of the phylogeny of derived lineages in European alpine regions. PMID:27319123

  15. Two novel begomoviruses belonging to different lineages infecting Rhynchosia minima.

    PubMed

    Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Moriones, Enrique; Martínez-Zubiaur, Yamila

    2010-12-01

    Rhynchosia minima is a host for several begomoviruses, both in the Old World and the New World. In Cuba, a whitefly-transmitted disease causing yellow mosaic symptoms, suggested to be of viral origin, was described more than 30 years ago in R. minima, but no information about the nature of the viruses infecting this weed in this country is available to date. Here, we report the detection of isolates of two novel begomovirus species infecting R. minima in Cuba, which we proposed be named Rhynchosia golden mosaic Havana virus (RhGMHaV) and Rhynchosia rugose golden mosaic virus (RhRGMV). The highest nucleotide sequence identities of RhGMHaV and RhRGMV DNA-A were with isolates of Rhynchosia golden mosaic virus (78.7%) and Sida golden mosaic virus (87.5%), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that these novel viruses belong to two different lineages of New World begomoviruses.

  16. Lineage-specific laminar organization of cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Ciceri, Gabriele; Dehorter, Nathalie; Sols, Ignasi; Huang, Z Josh; Maravall, Miguel; Marín, Oscar

    2013-09-01

    In the cerebral cortex, pyramidal cells and interneurons are generated in distant germinal zones, and so the mechanisms that control their precise assembly into specific microcircuits remain an enigma. Here we report that cortical interneurons labeled at the clonal level do not distribute randomly but rather have a strong tendency to cluster in the mouse neocortex. This behavior is common to different classes of interneurons, independently of their origin. Interneuron clusters are typically contained within one or two adjacent cortical layers, are largely formed by isochronically generated neurons and populate specific layers, as revealed by unbiased hierarchical clustering methods. Our results suggest that different progenitor cells give rise to interneurons populating infra- and supragranular cortical layers, which challenges current views of cortical neurogenesis. Thus, specific lineages of cortical interneurons seem to be produced to primarily mirror the laminar structure of the cerebral cortex, rather than its columnar organization.

  17. Universal scaling of production rates across mammalian lineages.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Marcus J; Davidson, Ana D; Sibly, Richard M; Brown, James H

    2011-02-22

    Over many millions of years of independent evolution, placental, marsupial and monotreme mammals have diverged conspicuously in physiology, life history and reproductive ecology. The differences in life histories are particularly striking. Compared with placentals, marsupials exhibit shorter pregnancy, smaller size of offspring at birth and longer period of lactation in the pouch. Monotremes also exhibit short pregnancy, but incubate embryos in eggs, followed by a long period of post-hatching lactation. Using a large sample of mammalian species, we show that, remarkably, despite their very different life histories, the scaling of production rates is statistically indistinguishable across mammalian lineages. Apparently all mammals are subject to the same fundamental metabolic constraints on productivity, because they share similar body designs, vascular systems and costs of producing new tissue.

  18. [Chin Junso--founder of the medical lineage Uirou].

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2002-01-01

    Chin Junso was an excellent doctor with expertise in the medical sciences gained from teachings that originated in the Kin and Gen dynasties. He devised and used unique prescriptions with various aromatics, which he collectively called Hoyaku (fragrant medication). Although he did not desire to enter government service because of his old age, his knowledge and wishes were handed down to his descendants. He led a quiet life in his later years by practicing meditation at a Zen temple of the Rinzai-shu order. Uirou in Odawara incidentally belongs to the Nichiren-shu order and not to the lineage of Junso. Nichiren-shu was a Buddhism order popular among townspeople in Kyoto at that time. It may be of interest to note the second master Souju and the third master Jouyu contributed to the trade between Japan and Korea.

  19. Shikimate and Phenylalanine Biosynthesis in the Green Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Tohge, Takayuki; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Hoefgen, Rainer; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2013-01-01

    The shikimate pathway provides carbon skeletons for the aromatic amino acids l-tryptophan, l-phenylalanine, and l-tyrosine. It is a high flux bearing pathway and it has been estimated that greater than 30% of all fixed carbon is directed through this pathway. These combined pathways have been subjected to considerable research attention due to the fact that mammals are unable to synthesize these amino acids and the fact that one of the enzymes of the shikimate pathway is a very effective herbicide target. However, in addition to these characteristics these pathways additionally provide important precursors for a wide range of important secondary metabolites including chlorogenic acid, alkaloids, glucosinolates, auxin, tannins, suberin, lignin and lignan, tocopherols, and betalains. Here we review the shikimate pathway of the green lineage and compare and contrast its evolution and ubiquity with that of the more specialized phenylpropanoid metabolism which this essential pathway fuels. PMID:23543266

  20. Phylogenetic relationships within the lophophorate lineages (Ectoprocta, Brachiopoda and Phoronida).

    PubMed

    Hausdorf, Bernhard; Helmkampf, Martin; Nesnidal, Maximilian P; Bruchhaus, Iris

    2010-06-01

    We produced two new EST datasets of so far uncovered clades of ectoprocts to investigate the phylogenetic relationships within the lophophorate lineages, Ectoprocta, Brachiopoda and Phoronida. Maximum-likelihood analyses based on 78 ribosomal proteins of 62 metazoan taxa support the monophyly of Ectoprocta and a sister group relationship of Phylactolaemata living in freshwater and the mainly marine Gymnolaemata. Hypotheses suggesting that Ectoprocta is diphyletic with phylactolaemates forming a clade with phoronids or paraphyletic with respect to Entoprocta could be rejected by topology tests. The hypotheses that Stenolaemata are the sister group of all other ectoprocts, that Stenolaemata constitutes a monophyletic group with Cheilostomata, and that Phylactolaemata have been derived from Ctenostomata could also be excluded. However, the hypothesis that Phylactolaemata and Stenolaemata form a monophyletic group could not be rejected. Brachiopoda and Phoronida constitute a monophylum, Brachiozoa. The hypotheses that phoronids are the sister group of articulate or inarticulate brachiopods could be rejected by topology tests, thus confirming the monophyly of Brachiopoda.

  1. Universal scaling of production rates across mammalian lineages

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Marcus J.; Davidson, Ana D.; Sibly, Richard M.; Brown, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Over many millions of years of independent evolution, placental, marsupial and monotreme mammals have diverged conspicuously in physiology, life history and reproductive ecology. The differences in life histories are particularly striking. Compared with placentals, marsupials exhibit shorter pregnancy, smaller size of offspring at birth and longer period of lactation in the pouch. Monotremes also exhibit short pregnancy, but incubate embryos in eggs, followed by a long period of post-hatching lactation. Using a large sample of mammalian species, we show that, remarkably, despite their very different life histories, the scaling of production rates is statistically indistinguishable across mammalian lineages. Apparently all mammals are subject to the same fundamental metabolic constraints on productivity, because they share similar body designs, vascular systems and costs of producing new tissue. PMID:20798111

  2. A substantial prehistoric European ancestry amongst Ashkenazi maternal lineages

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marta D.; Pereira, Joana B.; Pala, Maria; Fernandes, Verónica; Olivieri, Anna; Achilli, Alessandro; Perego, Ugo A.; Rychkov, Sergei; Naumova, Oksana; Hatina, Jiři; Woodward, Scott R.; Eng, Ken Khong; Macaulay, Vincent; Carr, Martin; Soares, Pedro; Pereira, Luísa; Richards, Martin B.

    2013-01-01

    The origins of Ashkenazi Jews remain highly controversial. Like Judaism, mitochondrial DNA is passed along the maternal line. Its variation in the Ashkenazim is highly distinctive, with four major and numerous minor founders. However, due to their rarity in the general population, these founders have been difficult to trace to a source. Here we show that all four major founders, ~40% of Ashkenazi mtDNA variation, have ancestry in prehistoric Europe, rather than the Near East or Caucasus. Furthermore, most of the remaining minor founders share a similar deep European ancestry. Thus the great majority of Ashkenazi maternal lineages were not brought from the Levant, as commonly supposed, nor recruited in the Caucasus, as sometimes suggested, but assimilated within Europe. These results point to a significant role for the conversion of women in the formation of Ashkenazi communities, and provide the foundation for a detailed reconstruction of Ashkenazi genealogical history. PMID:24104924

  3. Striking Diversification of Exudate Profiles in Selected Primula Lineages.

    PubMed

    Elser, David; Gilli, Christian; Brecker, Lothar; Valant-Vetschera, Karin M

    2016-05-01

    In continuation of previous studies on glandular exudates of Primula, we analyzed eleven so far unstudied species and several populations for exudate composition. Unsubstituted flavone and unusually substituted flavones, normally predominant in Primula exudates, were not detected in all of the analyzed samples. Instead, some species exhibited regular substituted flavonoids, and in some cases, no flavonoids could be detected at all. The detection of a diterpene (1) in P. minima exudates is new to Primula. On basis of MS and NMR, 1 was structurally characterized as ent-kaur-16-en-19-oic acid. Comparative profiling of exudates as performed by HPLC and TLC against authentic markers indicated further the presence of the benzoquinone primin and derivatives in some exudates. Thus, exudates of newly studied species contrast markedly with those analyzed so far. The significance of observed exudate diversification is discussed in view of the phylogeny of derived lineages in European alpine regions.

  4. Lineage origins of GABAergic versus glutamatergic neurons in the neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Oscar; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Summary Neocortical circuits are assembled from subtypes of glutamatergic excitatory and GABAergic inhibitory neurons with divergent anatomical and molecular signatures and unique physiological properties. Excitatory neurons derive from progenitors in the pallium, whereas inhibitory neurons originate from progenitors in the subpallium. Both classes of neurons subsequently migrate along well-defined routes to their final target area, where they integrate into common neuronal circuits. Recent findings show that neuronal diversity within the lineages of excitatory and inhibitory neurons is in part already established at the level of progenitor cells prior to migration. This poses challenges for our understanding of how radial units of interconnected excitatory and inhibitory neurons are assembled from progenitors that are spatially segregated and diverse in nature. PMID:24549207

  5. Incomplete lineage sorting is common in extant gibbon genera.

    PubMed

    Wall, Jeffrey D; Kim, Sung K; Luca, Francesca; Carbone, Lucia; Mootnick, Alan R; de Jong, Pieter J; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2013-01-01

    We sequenced reduced representation libraries by means of Illumina technology to generate over 1.5 Mb of orthologous sequence from a representative of each of the four extant gibbon genera (Nomascus, Hylobates, Symphalangus, and Hoolock). We used these data to assess the evolutionary relationships between the genera by evaluating the likelihoods of all possible bifurcating trees involving the four taxa. Our analyses provide weak support for a tree with Nomascus and Hylobates as sister taxa and with Hoolock and Symphalangus as sister taxa, though bootstrap resampling suggests that other phylogenetic scenarios are also possible. This uncertainty is due to short internal branch lengths and extensive incomplete lineage sorting across taxa. The true phylogenetic relationships among gibbon genera will likely require a more extensive whole-genome sequence analysis.

  6. Early myeloid lineage choice is not initiated by random PU.1 to GATA1 protein ratios.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Philipp S; Schwarzfischer, Michael; Loeffler, Dirk; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Hilsenbeck, Oliver; Moritz, Nadine; Endele, Max; Filipczyk, Adam; Gambardella, Adriana; Ahmed, Nouraiz; Etzrodt, Martin; Coutu, Daniel L; Rieger, Michael A; Marr, Carsten; Strasser, Michael K; Schauberger, Bernhard; Burtscher, Ingo; Ermakova, Olga; Bürger, Antje; Lickert, Heiko; Nerlov, Claus; Theis, Fabian J; Schroeder, Timm

    2016-07-14

    The mechanisms underlying haematopoietic lineage decisions remain disputed. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors with the capacity for lineage reprogramming, positive auto-regulation and mutual inhibition have been described as being expressed in uncommitted cell populations. This led to the assumption that lineage choice is cell-intrinsically initiated and determined by stochastic switches of randomly fluctuating cross-antagonistic transcription factors. However, this hypothesis was developed on the basis of RNA expression data from snapshot and/or population-averaged analyses. Alternative models of lineage choice therefore cannot be excluded. Here we use novel reporter mouse lines and live imaging for continuous single-cell long-term quantification of the transcription factors GATA1 and PU.1 (also known as SPI1). We analyse individual haematopoietic stem cells throughout differentiation into megakaryocytic-erythroid and granulocytic-monocytic lineages. The observed expression dynamics are incompatible with the assumption that stochastic switching between PU.1 and GATA1 precedes and initiates megakaryocytic-erythroid versus granulocytic-monocytic lineage decision-making. Rather, our findings suggest that these transcription factors are only executing and reinforcing lineage choice once made. These results challenge the current prevailing model of early myeloid lineage choice. PMID:27411635

  7. Dual roles of lineage restricted transcription factors: the case of MITF in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Carmit; Fisher, David E

    2011-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated Transcription Factor, MITF, is a master regulator of melanocyte development, differentiation, migration, and survival.(1) A broad collection of studies have indicated that MITF directly regulates the transcription of genes involved in pigmentation, which are selective to the melanocyte lineage. In addition, MITF controls expression of genes which are expressed in multiple cell lineages, and may also play differential roles in activating vs. maintaining gene expression patterns. In this Point of View article, we discuss lineage restricted transcription factor activation of both tissue-specific and ubiquitously expressed genes using melanocytes and MITF as a model system that may eventually provide insights into such processes in multiple cell lineages.

  8. Two distinct, geographically overlapping lineages of the corallimorpharian Ricordea florida (Cnidaria: Hexacorallia: Ricordeidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Pratts, H.; Lado-Insua, T.; Rhyne, A. L.; Rodríguez-Matos, L.; Schizas, N. V.

    2011-06-01

    We examined the genetic variation of the corallimorpharian Ricordea florida; it is distributed throughout the Caribbean region and is heavily harvested for the marine aquarium trade. Eighty-four distinct individuals of R. florida were sequenced from four geographically distant Caribbean locations (Curaçao, Florida, Guadeloupe, and Puerto Rico). Analysis of the ribosomal nuclear region (ITS1, 5.8S, ITS2) uncovered two geographically partially overlapping genetic lineages in R. florida, probably representing two cryptic species. Lineage 1 was found in Florida and Puerto Rico, and Lineage 2 was found in Florida, Puerto Rico, Guadeloupe, and Curaçao. Because of the multi-allelic nature of the ITS region, four individuals from Lineage 1 and six from Lineage 2 were cloned to evaluate the levels of hidden intra-individual variability. Pairwise genetic comparisons indicated that the levels of intra-individual and intra-lineage variability (<1%) were approximately an order of magnitude lower than the divergence (~9%) observed between the two lineages. The fishery regulations of the aquarium trade regard R. florida as one species. More refined regulations should take into account the presence of two genetic lineages, and they should be managed separately in order to preserve the long-term evolutionary potential of this corallimorpharian. The discovery of two distinct lineages in R. florida illustrates the importance of evaluating genetic variability in harvested species prior to the implementation of management policies.

  9. Epistatic interactions determine the mutational pathways and coexistence of lineages in clonal Escherichia coli populations.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Ram Prasad; Ferenci, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Understanding how diversity emerges in a single niche is not fully understood. Rugged fitness landscapes and epistasis between beneficial mutations could explain coexistence among emerging lineages. To provide an experimental test of this notion, we investigated epistasis among four pleiotropic mutations in rpoS, mglD, malT, and hfq present in two coexisting lineages that repeatedly fixed in experimental populations of Escherichia coli. The mutations were transferred into the ancestral background individually or in combination of double or triple alleles. The combined competitive fitness of two or three beneficial mutations from the same lineage was consistently lower than the sum of the competitive fitness of single mutants--a clear indication of negative epistasis within lineages. We also found sign epistasis (i.e., the combined fitness of two beneficial mutations lower than the ancestor), not only from two different lineages (i.e., hfq and rpoS) but also from the same lineage (i.e., mglD and malT). The sign epistasis between loci of different lineages indeed indicated a rugged fitness landscape, providing an epistatic explanation for the coexistence of distinct rpoS and hfq lineages in evolving populations. The negative and sign epistasis between beneficial mutations within the same lineage can further explain the order of mutation acquisition.

  10. Estimates of nuclear DNA content in red algal lineages

    PubMed Central

    Kapraun, Donald F.; Freshwater, D. Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The red algae are an evolutionarily ancient group of predominantly marine organisms with an estimated 6000 species. Consensus higher-level molecular phylogenies support a basal split between the unicellular Cyanidiophytina and morphologically diverse Rhodophytina, the later subphylum containing most red algal species. The Rhodophytina is divided into six classes, of which five represent early diverging lineages of generally uninucleate species, whose evolutionary relationships are poorly resolved. The remaining species compose the large (27 currently recognized orders), morphologically diverse and typically multinucleate Florideophyceae. Nuclear DNA content estimates have been published for <1 % of the described red algae. The present investigation summarizes the state of our knowledge and expands our coverage of DNA content information from 196 isolates of red algae. Methodology The DNA-localizing fluorochrome DAPI (4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and RBC (chicken erythrocytes) standards were used to estimate 2C values with static microspectrophotometry. Principal results Nuclear DNA contents are reported for 196 isolates of red algae, almost doubling the number of estimates available for these organisms. Present results also confirm the reported DNA content range of 0.1–2.8 pg, with species of Ceramiales, Nemaliales and Palmariales containing apparently polyploid genomes with 2C = 2.8, 2.3 and 2.8 pg, respectively. Conclusions Early diverging red algal lineages are characterized by relatively small 2C DNA contents while a wide range of 2C values is found within the derived Florideophyceae. An overall correlation between phylogenetic placement and 2C DNA content is not apparent; however, genome size data are available for only a small portion of red algae. Current data do support polyploidy and aneuploidy as pervasive features of red algal genome evolution. PMID:22479676

  11. Two subpopulations of stem cells for T cell lineage

    SciTech Connect

    Katsura, Y.; Amagai, T.; Kina, T.; Sado, T.; Nishikawa, S.

    1985-11-01

    An assay system for the stem cell that colonizes the thymus and differentiates into T cells was developed, and by using this assay system the existence of two subpopulations of stem cells for T cell lineage was clarified. Part-body-shielded and 900-R-irradiated C57BL/6 (H-2b, Thy-1.2) recipient mice, which do not require the transfer of pluripotent stem cells for their survival, were transferred with cells from B10 X Thy-1.1 (H-2b, Thy-1.1) donor mice. The reconstitution of the recipient's thymus lymphocytes was accomplished by stem cells in the donor cells and those spared in the shielded portion of the recipient that competitively colonize the thymus. Thus, the stem cell activity of donor cells can be evaluated by determining the proportion of donor-type (Thy-1.1+) cells in the recipient's thymus. Bone marrow cells were the most potent source of stem cells. By contrast, when the stem cell activity was compared between spleen and bone marrow cells of whole-body-irradiated (800 R) C57BL/6 mice reconstituted with B10 X Thy-1.1 bone marrow cells by assaying in part-body-shielded and irradiated C57BL/6 mice, the activity of these two organs showed quite a different time course of development. The results strongly suggest that the stem cells for T cell lineage in the bone marrow comprise at least two subpopulations, spleen-seeking and bone marrow-seeking cells.

  12. Human paternal lineages, languages, and environment in the Caucasus.

    PubMed

    Tarkhnishvili, David; Gavashelishvili, Alexander; Murtskhvaladze, Marine; Gabelaia, Mariam; Tevzadze, Gigi

    2014-01-01

    Publications that describe the composition of the human Y-DNA haplogroup in diffferent ethnic or linguistic groups and geographic regions provide no explicit explanation of the distribution of human paternal lineages in relation to specific ecological conditions. Our research attempts to address this topic for the Caucasus, a geographic region that encompasses a relatively small area but harbors high linguistic, ethnic, and Y-DNA haplogroup diversity. We genotyped 224 men that identified themselves as ethnic Georgian for 23 Y-chromosome short tandem-repeat markers and assigned them to their geographic places of origin. The genotyped data were supplemented with published data on haplogroup composition and location of other ethnic groups of the Caucasus. We used multivariate statistical methods to see if linguistics, climate, and landscape accounted for geographical diffferences in frequencies of the Y-DNA haplogroups G2, R1a, R1b, J1, and J2. The analysis showed significant associations of (1) G2 with wellforested mountains, (2) J2 with warm areas or poorly forested mountains, and (3) J1 with poorly forested mountains. R1b showed no association with environment. Haplogroups J1 and R1a were significantly associated with Daghestanian and Kipchak speakers, respectively, but the other haplogroups showed no such simple associations with languages. Climate and landscape in the context of competition over productive areas among diffferent paternal lineages, arriving in the Caucasus in diffferent times, have played an important role in shaping the present-day spatial distribution of patrilineages in the Caucasus. This spatial pattern had formed before linguistic subdivisions were finally shaped, probably in the Neolithic to Bronze Age. Later historical turmoil had little influence on the patrilineage composition and spatial distribution. Based on our results, the scenario of postglacial expansions of humans and their languages to the Caucasus from the Middle East, western

  13. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  14. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  15. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  16. Derivation of a polymorphic lineage of Gasteromycetes from boletoid ancestors.

    PubMed

    Binder, Manfred; Bresinsky, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    The phylogeny of selected gasteromycetes and hymenomycetes was inferred from partial nuclear large subunit rDNA (nuc-lsu, 28S) sequences, delimited by primers LR0R and LR5. Taxon sampling with emphasis on relationships within the Boletales further included some gasteroid groups, which obviously have evolved convergent fruiting body morphology, and therefore remained controversial in taxonomy. This study confirms the close relationship of Geastrales, Gauteriales and Phallales and the presumable derivation of Nidulariales and Tulostomatales within the euagarics clade, as widely accepted. In addition, four Hymenogaster species investigated were found to be in the euagarics clade and a relationship to the Cortinariaceae was indicated. The gasteroid fungus Zelleromyces stephensii is an example for maintaining morphological linkage by a lactiferous hyphal system to the genus Lactarius in the Russulales, and this relationship was affirmed in the sequence analysis. Several previously suggested relationships of gasteromycetes and Boletales were reproducible by analyzing nuc-lsu sequences. As a new result, Astraeus hygrometricus, the barometer earth star, is an additional representative of the Boletales. Together with Boletinellus, Phlebopus, Pisolithus, Calostoma, Gyroporus, Scleroderma, and Veligaster, Astraeus forms an unusual group comprising pileate-stipitate hymenomycetes and polymorphic gasteromycetes. This group is a major lineage within the Boletales and we propose the new suborder Sclerodermatineae, including the six families Boletinellaceae fam. nov. (Boletinellus and Phlebopus), Gyroporaceae (Singer) fam. nov. (Gyroporus), Pisolithaceae (Pisolithus), Astraeaceae (Astraeus), Calostomataceae (Calostoma), and the typus subordinis Sclerodermataceae (Scleroderma and Veligaster). Morphological and ecological characters, and pigment synthesis support the delimitation of the Sclerodermatineae, and indicate the radiation of different lineages in the Boletales originating

  17. Human paternal lineages, languages, and environment in the Caucasus.

    PubMed

    Tarkhnishvili, David; Gavashelishvili, Alexander; Murtskhvaladze, Marine; Gabelaia, Mariam; Tevzadze, Gigi

    2014-01-01

    Publications that describe the composition of the human Y-DNA haplogroup in diffferent ethnic or linguistic groups and geographic regions provide no explicit explanation of the distribution of human paternal lineages in relation to specific ecological conditions. Our research attempts to address this topic for the Caucasus, a geographic region that encompasses a relatively small area but harbors high linguistic, ethnic, and Y-DNA haplogroup diversity. We genotyped 224 men that identified themselves as ethnic Georgian for 23 Y-chromosome short tandem-repeat markers and assigned them to their geographic places of origin. The genotyped data were supplemented with published data on haplogroup composition and location of other ethnic groups of the Caucasus. We used multivariate statistical methods to see if linguistics, climate, and landscape accounted for geographical diffferences in frequencies of the Y-DNA haplogroups G2, R1a, R1b, J1, and J2. The analysis showed significant associations of (1) G2 with wellforested mountains, (2) J2 with warm areas or poorly forested mountains, and (3) J1 with poorly forested mountains. R1b showed no association with environment. Haplogroups J1 and R1a were significantly associated with Daghestanian and Kipchak speakers, respectively, but the other haplogroups showed no such simple associations with languages. Climate and landscape in the context of competition over productive areas among diffferent paternal lineages, arriving in the Caucasus in diffferent times, have played an important role in shaping the present-day spatial distribution of patrilineages in the Caucasus. This spatial pattern had formed before linguistic subdivisions were finally shaped, probably in the Neolithic to Bronze Age. Later historical turmoil had little influence on the patrilineage composition and spatial distribution. Based on our results, the scenario of postglacial expansions of humans and their languages to the Caucasus from the Middle East, western

  18. Astrocytes in Oligodendrocyte Lineage Development and White Matter Pathology.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiasi; Zhang, Lei; Chu, Yongxin; Namaka, Michael; Deng, Benqiang; Kong, Jiming; Bi, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    White matter is primarily composed of myelin and myelinated axons. Structural and functional completeness of myelin is critical for the reliable and efficient transmission of information. White matter injury has been associated with the development of many demyelinating diseases. Despite a variety of scientific advances aimed at promoting re-myelination, their benefit has proven at best to be marginal. Research suggests that the failure of the re-myelination process may be the result of an unfavorable microenvironment. Astrocytes, are the most ample and diverse type of glial cells in central nervous system (CNS) which display multiple functions for the cells of the oligodendrocytes lineage. As such, much attention has recently been drawn to astrocyte function in terms of white matter myelin repair. They are different in white matter from those in gray matter in specific regards to development, morphology, location, protein expression and other supportive functions. During the process of demyelination and re-myelination, the functions of astrocytes are dynamic in that they are able to change functions in accordance to different time points, triggers or reactive pathways resulting in vastly different biologic effects. They have pivotal effects on oligodendrocytes and other cell types in the oligodendrocyte lineage by serving as an energy supplier, a participant of immunological and inflammatory functions, a source of trophic factors and iron and a sustainer of homeostasis. Astrocytic impairment has been shown to be directly linked to the development of neuromyelities optica (NMO). In addition, astroctyes have also been implicated in other white matter conditions such as psychiatric disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Inhibiting specifically detrimental signaling pathways in astrocytes while preserving their beneficial functions may be a promising approach for

  19. The secondary contact zone of phylogenetic lineages of the Philaenus spumarius (Hemiptera: Aphrophoridae): an example of incomplete allopatric speciation.

    PubMed

    Lis, Agata; Maryańska-Nadachowska, Anna; Lachowska-Cierlik, Dorota; Kajtoch, Lukasz

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on the phylogeography of the meadow spittlebug Philaenus spumarius (L.) (Hemiptera: Aphrophoridae) suggest the existence of a contact zone of its main phylogenetic lineages along mountain chains in Europe and western Asia. This study presents a detailed examination of the population genetics of P. spumarius within the Carpathian Mountains. The main objective was to determine whether the populations inhabiting that area consist of individuals belonging to different genetic units and whether the observed pattern could be an example of secondary contact zone which formed after incomplete allopatric speciation. Specimens from six transects across the Carpathian arc were examined. The mitochondrial phylogeography of the meadow spittlebug in the examined area clearly shows that individuals from both main clades meet and mix there. Representatives of all three main EF1-α clades were also found. The present distribution of the main clades with a zone of overlap along the mountain ranges may suggest that these phylogenetic lineages form a young hybrid zone. Moreover, a limited number of individuals were shown to possess heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA, which gives additional support to intraspecific hybridization. P. spumarius could be used in future work as an excellent model species in investigating population genetics, intraspecific hybridization, and speciation in progress.

  20. The secondary contact zone of phylogenetic lineages of the Philaenus spumarius (Hemiptera: Aphrophoridae: Cercopidae): an example of incomplete allopatric speciation.

    PubMed

    Lis, Agata; Maryańska-Nadachowska, Anna; Lachowska-Cierlik, Dorota; Kajtoch, Łukasz

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on the phylogeography of the meadow spittlebug Philaenus spumarius (L.) (Hemiptera: Aphrophoridae: Cercopidae) suggest the existence of a contact zone of its main phylogenetic lineages along mountain chains in Europe and western Asia. This study presents a detailed examination of the population genetics of P. spumarius within the Carpathian Mountains. The main objective was to determine whether the populations inhabiting that area consist of individuals belonging to different genetic units and whether the observed pattern could be an example of secondary contact zone which formed after incomplete allopatric speciation. Specimens from six transects across the Carpathian arc were examined. The mitochondrial phylogeography of the meadow spittlebug in the examined area clearly shows that individuals from both main clades meet and mix there. Representatives of all three main EF1-α clades were also found. The present distribution of the main clades with a zone of overlap along the mountain ranges may suggest that these phylogenetic lineages form a young hybrid zone. Moreover, a limited number of individuals were shown to possess heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA, which gives additional support to intraspecific hybridization. P. spumarius could be used in future work as an excellent model species in investigating population genetics, intraspecific hybridization, and speciation in progress.

  1. Vector Competence of Culex neavei and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) from Senegal for Lineages 1, 2, Koutango and a Putative New Lineage of West Nile virus

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Gamou; Diallo, Mawlouth; Loucoubar, Cheikh; Faye, Ousmane; Sall, Amadou Alpha

    2014-01-01

    West Nile virus (WN virus) is one of the most widespread arbovirus and exhibits a great genetic diversity with 8 lineages, at least 4 (1, 2, Koutango, and putative new) are present in Africa. In West Africa, Culex neavei and Culex quinquefasciatus are considered as potential vectors for WN virus transmission in sylvatic or urban context. We analyzed the vector competence of these Culex species from Senegal for African lineages and envelope proteins sequences of viral strains used. We showed that lineage 1 is transmitted by both Culex mosquitoes, whereas the putative new lineage 8 is transmitted only by Cx. neavei. Our findings suggest that genetic variability can affect vector competence and depend on mosquito. However, when considering the infective life rate, the mosquito population seems to be inefficient for WN virus transmission in the field and could explain the low impact of WN virus in Africa. PMID:24567319

  2. Comparative Genomic Analyses of the Moraxella catarrhalis Serosensitive and Seroresistant Lineages Demonstrate Their Independent Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Joshua P.; de Vries, Stefan P.W.; Ahmed, Azad; Powell, Evan; Schultz, Matthew P.; Hermans, Peter W.M.; Hill, Darryl J.; Zhou, Zhemin; Constantinidou, Crystala I.; Hu, Fen Z.; Bootsma, Hester J.; Ehrlich, Garth D.

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial species Moraxella catarrhalis has been hypothesized as being composed of two distinct lineages (referred to as the seroresistant [SR] and serosensitive [SS]) with separate evolutionary histories based on several molecular typing methods, whereas 16S ribotyping has suggested an additional split within the SS lineage. Previously, we characterized whole-genome sequences of 12 SR-lineage isolates, which revealed a relatively small supragenome when compared with other opportunistic nasopharyngeal pathogens, suggestive of a relatively short evolutionary history. Here, we performed whole-genome sequencing on 18 strains from both ribotypes of the SS lineage, an additional SR strain, as well as four previously identified highly divergent strains based on multilocus sequence typing analyses. All 35 strains were subjected to a battery of comparative genomic analyses which clearly show that there are three lineages—the SR, SS, and the divergent. The SR and SS lineages are closely related, but distinct from each other based on three different methods of comparison: Allelic differences observed among core genes; possession of lineage-specific sets of core and distributed genes; and by an alignment of concatenated core sequences irrespective of gene annotation. All these methods show that the SS lineage has much longer interstrain branches than the SR lineage indicating that this lineage has likely been evolving either longer or faster than the SR lineage. There is evidence of extensive horizontal gene transfer (HGT) within both of these lineages, and to a lesser degree between them. In particular, we identified very high rates of HGT between these two lineages for ß-lactamase genes. The four divergent strains are sui generis, being much more distantly related to both the SR and SS groups than these other two groups are to each other. Based on average nucleotide identities, gene content, GC content, and genome size, this group could be considered as a separate

  3. Detection of Two Zoonotic Babesia microti Lineages, the Hobetsu and U.S. Lineages, in Two Sympatric Tick Species, Ixodes ovatus and Ixodes persulcatus, Respectively, in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Masayoshi; Qiang, Wei; Nakao, Minoru; Hirata, Haruyuki; Ishihara, Chiaki

    2012-01-01

    The species Babesia microti, commonly found in rodents, demonstrates a high degree of genetic diversity. Three lineages, U.S., Kobe, and Hobetsu, are known to have zoonotic potential, but their tick vector(s) in Japan remains to be elucidated. We conducted a field investigation at Nemuro on Hokkaido Island and at Sumoto on Awaji Island, where up to two of the three lineages occur with similar frequencies in reservoirs. By flagging vegetation at these spots and surrounding areas, 4,010 ticks, comprising six species, were collected. A nested PCR that detects the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia species revealed that Ixodes ovatus and I. persulcatus alone were positive. Lineage-specific PCR for rRNA-positive samples demonstrated that I. ovatus and I. persulcatus carried, respectively, the Hobetsu and U.S. parasites. No Kobe-specific DNA was detected. Infected I. ovatus ticks were found at multiple sites, including Nemuro and Sumoto, with minimum infection rates (MIR) of ∼12.3%. However, all I. persulcatus ticks collected within the same regions, a total of 535, were negative for the Hobetsu lineage, indicating that I. ovatus, but not I. persulcatus, was the vector for the lineage. At Nemuro, U.S. lineage was detected in 2 of 139 adult I. persulcatus ticks (MIR, 1.4%), for the first time, while 48 of I. ovatus ticks were negative for that lineage. Laboratory experiments confirmed the transmission of Hobetsu and U.S. parasites to hamsters via I. ovatus and I. persulcatus, respectively. Differences in vector capacity shown by MIRs at Nemuro, where the two species were equally likely to acquire either lineage of parasite, may explain the difference in distribution of Hobetsu throughout Japan and U.S. taxa in Nemuro. These findings are of importance in the assessment of the regional risk for babesiosis in humans. PMID:22389378

  4. Mixing in explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-12-01

    Explosions always contain embedded turbulent mixing regions, for example: boundary layers, shear layers, wall jets, and unstable interfaces. Described here is one particular example of the latter, namely, the turbulent mixing occurring in the fireball of an HE-driven blast wave. The evolution of the turbulent mixing was studied via two-dimensional numerical simulations of the convective mixing processes on an adaptive mesh. Vorticity was generated on the fireball interface by baroclinic effects. The interface was unstable, and rapidly evolved into a turbulent mixing layer. Four phases of mixing were observed: (1) a strong blast wave phase; (2) and implosion phase; (3) a reshocking phase; and (4) an asymptotic mixing phase. The flowfield was azimuthally averaged to evaluate the mean and r.m.s. fluctuation profiles across the mixing layer. The vorticity decayed due to a cascade process. This caused the corresponding enstrophy parameter to increase linearly with time -- in agreement with homogeneous turbulence calculations of G.K. Batchelor.

  5. Mixing in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Fryer, Christopher Lee

    2011-01-07

    Turbulent mixing plays a vital role in many fields in astronomy. Here I review a few of these sites, discuss the importance of this turbulent mixing and the techniques used by astrophysicists to solve these problems.

  6. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Dengue Virus Serotype 1 Genotype V Strains from Different Lineages.

    PubMed

    Vedovello, Danila; Menegaldo, Tauyne; Biselli-Périco, Joice M; Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; Araújo Junior, João Pessoa; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda

    2016-01-01

    Previous phylogenetic studies involving dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV1) have shown several lineages of genotype V circulating worldwide. After sequencing the complete genome of strains from São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, we identified a list of 50 different amino acids that differ between the two lineages, announced here. PMID:27688321

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Dengue Virus Serotype 1 Genotype V Strains from Different Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Vedovello, Danila; Menegaldo, Tauyne; Biselli-Périco, Joice M.; Ullmann, Leila Sabrina; Araújo Junior, João Pessoa

    2016-01-01

    Previous phylogenetic studies involving dengue virus serotype 1 (DENV1) have shown several lineages of genotype V circulating worldwide. After sequencing the complete genome of strains from São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo, Brazil, we identified a list of 50 different amino acids that differ between the two lineages, announced here. PMID:27688321

  8. Virulence, sporulation, and elicitin production in three clonal lineages of Phytophthora ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytophthora ramorum populations are clonal and consist of three lineages. Recent studies have shown that the clonal lineages may have varying degrees of aggressiveness on some host species, such as Quercus rubra. In this study, we examined virulence, sporulation and elicitin production of five P. ...

  9. Lineage, Temperature, and Host Species Have Interacting Effects on Lesion Development in Phytophthora Ramorum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are four recognized clonal lineages of the pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. The two major lineages present in North America are NA1 and NA2. With a few exceptions, NA1 is found in natural forest ecosystems and nurseries, and NA2 is generally restricted to nurseries. Isolates from the NA1 and NA2...

  10. Metabolic bacterial genes and the construction of high-level composite lineages of life.

    PubMed

    Méheust, Raphaël; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how major organismal lineages originated is fundamental for understanding processes by which life evolved. Major evolutionary transitions, like eukaryogenesis, merging genetic material from distantly related organisms, are rare events, hence difficult ones to explain causally. If most archaeal lineages emerged after massive acquisitions of bacterial genes, a rule however arises: metabolic bacterial genes contributed to all major evolutionary transitions.

  11. Influence of M. tuberculosis Lineage Variability within a Clinical Trial for Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nahid, Payam; Bliven, Erin E.; Kim, Elizabeth Y.; Mac Kenzie, William R.; Stout, Jason E.; Diem, Lois; Johnson, John L.; Gagneux, Sebastien; Hopewell, Philip C.; Kato-Maeda, Midori

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that M. tuberculosis lineage and host genetics interact to impact how active tuberculosis presents clinically. We determined the phylogenetic lineages of M. tuberculosis isolates from participants enrolled in the Tuberculosis Trials Consortium Study 28, conducted in Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Spain, Uganda and the United States, and secondarily explored the relationship between lineage, clinical presentation and response to treatment. Large sequence polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed to determine lineage and sublineage of isolates. Of 306 isolates genotyped, 246 (80.4%) belonged to the Euro-American lineage, with sublineage 724 predominating at African sites (99/192, 51.5%), and the Euro-American strains other than 724 predominating at non-African sites (89/114, 78.1%). Uneven distribution of lineages across regions limited our ability to discern significant associations, nonetheless, in univariate analyses, Euro-American sublineage 724 was associated with more severe disease at baseline, and along with the East Asian lineage was associated with lower bacteriologic conversion after 8 weeks of treatment. Disease presentation and response to drug treatment varied by lineage, but these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for other variables associated with week-8 culture status. PMID:20505778

  12. Influence of M. tuberculosis lineage variability within a clinical trial for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Bliven, Erin E; Kim, Elizabeth Y; Mac Kenzie, William R; Stout, Jason E; Diem, Lois; Johnson, John L; Gagneux, Sebastien; Hopewell, Philip C; Kato-Maeda, Midori

    2010-05-20

    Recent studies suggest that M. tuberculosis lineage and host genetics interact to impact how active tuberculosis presents clinically. We determined the phylogenetic lineages of M. tuberculosis isolates from participants enrolled in the Tuberculosis Trials Consortium Study 28, conducted in Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Spain, Uganda and the United States, and secondarily explored the relationship between lineage, clinical presentation and response to treatment. Large sequence polymorphisms and single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed to determine lineage and sublineage of isolates. Of 306 isolates genotyped, 246 (80.4%) belonged to the Euro-American lineage, with sublineage 724 predominating at African sites (99/192, 51.5%), and the Euro-American strains other than 724 predominating at non-African sites (89/114, 78.1%). Uneven distribution of lineages across regions limited our ability to discern significant associations, nonetheless, in univariate analyses, Euro-American sublineage 724 was associated with more severe disease at baseline, and along with the East Asian lineage was associated with lower bacteriologic conversion after 8 weeks of treatment. Disease presentation and response to drug treatment varied by lineage, but these associations were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for other variables associated with week-8 culture status.

  13. What can asexual lineage age tell us about the maintenance of sex?

    PubMed

    Neiman, Maurine; Meirmans, Stephanie; Meirmans, Patrick G

    2009-06-01

    Sexual reproduction is both extremely costly and extremely common relative to asexuality, indicating that it must confer profound benefits. This in turn points to major disadvantages of asexual reproduction, which is usually given as an explanation for why almost all asexual lineages are apparently quite short-lived. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that some asexual lineages are actually quite old. Insight into why sex is so common may come from understanding why asexual lineages persist in some places or taxa but not others. Here, we review the distribution of asexual lineage ages estimated from a diverse array of taxa, and we discuss our results in light of the main mutational and environmental hypotheses for sex. Along with strengthening the case for wide variation in asexual lineage age and the existence of many old asexual taxa, we also found that the distribution of asexual lineage age estimates follows a surprisingly regular distribution, to the extent that asexual taxa viewed as "scandalously" ancient merely fall on the high end of this distribution. We interpret this result to mean that similar mechanisms may determine asexual lineage age across eukaryotic taxa. We also derive some qualitative predictions for asexual lineage age under different theories for sex and discuss empirical evidence for these predictions. Ultimately, we were limited in the extent to which we could use these data to make inferences about the maintenance of sex by the absence of both clear theoretical expectations and estimates of key parameters.

  14. Genetic and epigenetic variation in the lineage specification of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Arvey, Aaron; van der Veeken, Joris; Plitas, George; Rich, Stephen S; Concannon, Patrick; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2015-10-28

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress autoimmunity and other inflammatory states, are characterized by a distinct set of genetic elements controlling their gene expression. However, the extent of genetic and associated epigenetic variation in the Treg cell lineage and its possible relation to disease states in humans remain unknown. We explored evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements and natural human inter-individual epigenetic variation in Treg cells to identify the core transcriptional control program of lineage specification. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in core lineage-specific enhancers revealed disease associations, which were further corroborated by high-resolution genotyping to fine map causal polymorphisms in lineage-specific enhancers. Our findings suggest that a small set of regulatory elements specify the Treg lineage and that genetic variation in Treg cell-specific enhancers may alter Treg cell function contributing to polygenic disease.

  15. Local Expansion of a Panmictic Lineage of Water Bloom-Forming Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Yuuhiko; Watanabe, Makoto M.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that the population structure of the bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is clonal. Expanded multilocus sequence typing analysis of M. aeruginosa using 412 isolates identified five intraspecific lineages suggested to be panmictic while maintaining overall clonal structure probably due to a reduced recombination rate between lineages. Interestingly, since 2005 most strains belonging to one of these panmictic clusters (group G) have been found in a particular locality (Lake Kasumigaura Basin) in Japan. In this locality, multiple, similar but distinct genotypes of this lineage predominated in the bloom, a pattern that is unprecedented for M. aeruginosa. The population structure underlying blooms associated with this lineage is comparable to epidemics of pathogens. Our results may reveal an expansion of the possible adaptive lineage in a localized aquatic environment, providing us with a unique opportunity to investigate its ecological and biogeographical consequences. PMID:21390221

  16. Evolutionary history and global spread of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing lineage.

    PubMed

    Merker, Matthias; Blin, Camille; Mona, Stefano; Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Lecher, Sophie; Willery, Eve; Blum, Michael G B; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Mokrousov, Igor; Aleksic, Eman; Allix-Béguec, Caroline; Antierens, Annick; Augustynowicz-Kopeć, Ewa; Ballif, Marie; Barletta, Francesca; Beck, Hans Peter; Barry, Clifton E; Bonnet, Maryline; Borroni, Emanuele; Campos-Herrero, Isolina; Cirillo, Daniela; Cox, Helen; Crowe, Suzanne; Crudu, Valeriu; Diel, Roland; Drobniewski, Francis; Fauville-Dufaux, Maryse; Gagneux, Sébastien; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Hanekom, Madeleine; Hoffner, Sven; Jiao, Wei-wei; Kalon, Stobdan; Kohl, Thomas A; Kontsevaya, Irina; Lillebæk, Troels; Maeda, Shinji; Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Rasmussen, Michael; Rastogi, Nalin; Samper, Sofia; Sanchez-Padilla, Elisabeth; Savic, Branislava; Shamputa, Isdore Chola; Shen, Adong; Sng, Li-Hwei; Stakenas, Petras; Toit, Kadri; Varaine, Francis; Vukovic, Dragana; Wahl, Céline; Warren, Robin; Supply, Philip; Niemann, Stefan; Wirth, Thierry

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains of the Beijing lineage are globally distributed and are associated with the massive spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis in Eurasia. Here we reconstructed the biogeographical structure and evolutionary history of this lineage by genetic analysis of 4,987 isolates from 99 countries and whole-genome sequencing of 110 representative isolates. We show that this lineage initially originated in the Far East, from where it radiated worldwide in several waves. We detected successive increases in population size for this pathogen over the last 200 years, practically coinciding with the Industrial Revolution, the First World War and HIV epidemics. Two MDR clones of this lineage started to spread throughout central Asia and Russia concomitantly with the collapse of the public health system in the former Soviet Union. Mutations identified in genes putatively under positive selection and associated with virulence might have favored the expansion of the most successful branches of the lineage.

  17. Foundations of chaotic mixing.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Stephen; Ottino, Julio M

    2004-05-15

    The simplest mixing problem corresponds to the mixing of a fluid with itself; this case provides a foundation on which the subject rests. The objective here is to study mixing independently of the mechanisms used to create the motion and review elements of theory focusing mostly on mathematical foundations and minimal models. The flows under consideration will be of two types: two-dimensional (2D) 'blinking flows', or three-dimensional (3D) duct flows. Given that mixing in continuous 3D duct flows depends critically on cross-sectional mixing, and that many microfluidic applications involve continuous flows, we focus on the essential aspects of mixing in 2D flows, as they provide a foundation from which to base our understanding of more complex cases. The baker's transformation is taken as the centrepiece for describing the dynamical systems framework. In particular, a hierarchy of characterizations of mixing exist, Bernoulli --> mixing --> ergodic, ordered according to the quality of mixing (the strongest first). Most importantly for the design process, we show how the so-called linked twist maps function as a minimal picture of mixing, provide a mathematical structure for understanding the type of 2D flows that arise in many micromixers already built, and give conditions guaranteeing the best quality mixing. Extensions of these concepts lead to first-principle-based designs without resorting to lengthy computations.

  18. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  19. Distinct populations of adipogenic and myogenic Myf5-lineage progenitors in white adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Shan, Tizhong; Liang, Xinrong; Bi, Pengpeng; Zhang, Pengpeng; Liu, Weiyi; Kuang, Shihuan

    2013-08-01

    Brown adipose tissues (BAT) are derived from a myogenic factor 5 (Myf5)-expressing cell lineage and white adipose tissues (WAT) predominantly arise from non-Myf5 lineages, although a subpopulation of adipocytes in some WAT depots can be derived from the Myf5 lineage. However, the functional implication of the Myf5- and non-Myf5-lineage cells in WAT is unclear. We found that the Myf5-lineage constitution in subcutaneous WAT depots is negatively correlated to the expression of classical BAT and newly defined beige/brite adipocyte-specific genes. Consistently, fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS)-purified Myf5-lineage adipo-progenitors give rise to adipocytes expressing lower levels of BAT-specific Ucp1, Prdm16, Cidea, and Ppargc1a genes and beige adipocyte-specific CD137, Tmem26, and Tbx1 genes compared with the non-Myf5-lineage adipocytes from the same depots. Ablation of the Myf5-lineage progenitors in WAT stromal vascular cell (SVC) cultures leads to increased expression of BAT and beige cell signature genes. Strikingly, the Myf5-lineage cells in WAT are heterogeneous and contain distinct adipogenic [stem cell antigen 1(Sca1)-positive] and myogenic (Sca1-negative) progenitors. The latter differentiate robustly into myofibers in vitro and in vivo, and they restore dystrophin expression after transplantation into mdx mouse, a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These results demonstrate the heterogeneity and functional differences of the Myf5- and non-Myf5-lineage cells in the white adipose tissue.

  20. Cloning from stem cells: different lineages, different species, same story.

    PubMed

    Oback, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Following nuclear transfer (NT), the most stringent measure of extensive donor cell reprogramming is development into viable offspring. This is referred to as cloning efficiency and quantified as the proportion of cloned embryos transferred into surrogate mothers that survive into adulthood. Cloning efficiency depends on the ability of the enucleated recipient cell to carry out the reprogramming reactions ('reprogramming ability') and the ability of the nuclear donor cell to be reprogrammed ('reprogrammability'). It has been postulated that reprogrammability of the somatic donor cell epigenome is inversely proportional to its differentiation status. In order to test this hypothesis, reprogrammability was compared between undifferentiated stem cells and their differentiated isogenic progeny. In the mouse, cells of divergent differentiation status from the neuronal, haematopoietic and skin epithelial lineage were tested. In cattle and deer, skeletal muscle and antler cells, respectively, were used as donors. No conclusive correlation between differentiation status and cloning efficiency was found, indicating that somatic donor cell type may not be the limiting factor for cloning success. This may reflect technical limitations of the NT-induced reprogramming assay. Alternatively, differentiation status and reprogrammability may be unrelated, making all cells equally difficult to reprogramme once they have left the ground state of pluripotency.

  1. Usp22 deficiency impairs intestinal epithelial lineage specification in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kosinsky, Robyn L; Wegwitz, Florian; Hellbach, Nicole; Dobbelstein, Matthias; Mansouri, Ahmed; Vogel, Tanja; Begus-Nahrmann, Yvonne; Johnsen, Steven A

    2015-11-10

    Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms play a central role in controlling gene expression during development, cell differentiation and tumorigenesis. Monoubiquitination of histone H2B is one epigenetic modification which is dynamically regulated by the opposing activities of specific ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs). The Ubiquitin-specific Protease 22 (USP22) is the ubiquitin hydrolase component of the human SAGA complex which deubiquitinates histone H2B during transcription. Recently, many studies have investigated an oncogenic potential of USP22 overexpression. However, its physiological function in organ maintenance, development and its cellular function remain largely unknown. A previous study reported embryonic lethality in Usp22 knockout mice. Here we describe a mouse model with a global reduction of USP22 levels which expresses the LacZ gene under the control of the endogenous Usp22 promoter. Using this reporter we found Usp22 to be ubiquitously expressed in murine embryos. Notably, adult Usp2(2lacZ/lacZ) displayed low residual Usp22 expression levels coupled with a reduced body size and weight. Interestingly, the reduction of Usp22 significantly influenced the frequency of differentiated cells in the small intestine and the brain while H2B and H2Bub1 levels remained constant. Taken together, we provide evidence for a physiological role for USP22 in controlling cell differentiation and lineage specification.

  2. Inferring Phylogenetic Networks with Maximum Pseudolikelihood under Incomplete Lineage Sorting

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Lemus, Claudia; Ané, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Phylogenetic networks are necessary to represent the tree of life expanded by edges to represent events such as horizontal gene transfers, hybridizations or gene flow. Not all species follow the paradigm of vertical inheritance of their genetic material. While a great deal of research has flourished into the inference of phylogenetic trees, statistical methods to infer phylogenetic networks are still limited and under development. The main disadvantage of existing methods is a lack of scalability. Here, we present a statistical method to infer phylogenetic networks from multi-locus genetic data in a pseudolikelihood framework. Our model accounts for incomplete lineage sorting through the coalescent model, and for horizontal inheritance of genes through reticulation nodes in the network. Computation of the pseudolikelihood is fast and simple, and it avoids the burdensome calculation of the full likelihood which can be intractable with many species. Moreover, estimation at the quartet-level has the added computational benefit that it is easily parallelizable. Simulation studies comparing our method to a full likelihood approach show that our pseudolikelihood approach is much faster without compromising accuracy. We applied our method to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships among swordtails and platyfishes (Xiphophorus: Poeciliidae), which is characterized by widespread hybridizations. PMID:26950302

  3. Cell Lineages and the Logic of Proliferative Control

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Frederic Y. M; Nie, Qing; Calof, Anne L

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the growth and regeneration of tissues and organs is tightly controlled. Although experimental studies are beginning to reveal molecular mechanisms underlying such control, there is still very little known about the control strategies themselves. Here, we consider how secreted negative feedback factors (“chalones”) may be used to control the output of multistage cell lineages, as exemplified by the actions of GDF11 and activin in a self-renewing neural tissue, the mammalian olfactory epithelium (OE). We begin by specifying performance objectives—what, precisely, is being controlled, and to what degree—and go on to calculate how well different types of feedback configurations, feedback sensitivities, and tissue architectures achieve control. Ultimately, we show that many features of the OE—the number of feedback loops, the cellular processes targeted by feedback, even the location of progenitor cells within the tissue—fit with expectations for the best possible control. In so doing, we also show that certain distinctions that are commonly drawn among cells and molecules—such as whether a cell is a stem cell or transit-amplifying cell, or whether a molecule is a growth inhibitor or stimulator—may be the consequences of control, and not a reflection of intrinsic differences in cellular or molecular character. PMID:19166268

  4. Cell population tracking and lineage construction with spatiotemporal context.

    PubMed

    Li, Kang; Miller, Eric D; Chen, Mei; Kanade, Takeo; Weiss, Lee E; Campbell, Phil G

    2008-10-01

    Automated visual-tracking of cell populations in vitro using time-lapse phase contrast microscopy enables quantitative, systematic, and high-throughput measurements of cell behaviors. These measurements include the spatiotemporal quantification of cell migration, mitosis, apoptosis, and the reconstruction of cell lineages. The combination of low signal-to-noise ratio of phase contrast microscopy images, high and varying densities of the cell cultures, topological complexities of cell shapes, and wide range of cell behaviors poses many challenges to existing tracking techniques. This paper presents a fully automated multi-target tracking system that can efficiently cope with these challenges while simultaneously tracking and analyzing thousands of cells observed using time-lapse phase contrast microscopy. The system combines bottom-up and top-down image analysis by integrating multiple collaborative modules, which exploit a fast geometric active contour tracker in conjunction with adaptive interacting multiple models (IMM) motion filtering and spatiotemporal trajectory optimization. The system, which was tested using a variety of cell populations, achieved tracking accuracy in the range of 86.9-92.5%.

  5. Abundance and novel lineages of thraustochytrids in Hawaiian waters.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Xin; Liu, Xianhua; Jiao, Nianzhi; Wang, Guangyi

    2013-11-01

    Thraustochydrids has been known for their ubiquitous distribution in the ocean. However, a few efforts have been made to investigate their ecology. In this study, we have applied molecular method, acriflavine direct detection, and classical oceanographic methods to investigate the abundance and diversity of thraustochytrids in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. Our results revealed interesting temporal and spatial variations of their population. Out of three seasons (spring, summer, and fall), cruise Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT)-216 during November 2009 obtained the highest abundance of thraustochytrids ranging from 1,890 (Station S1C1, 45 m) to 630,000 (Station S2C12, 100 m) cells L(-1) of seawater, which accounted for a 0.79 to 281.0 % biomass ratio to that of bacteria in terms of gram carbon per liter. A patchy distribution of these organisms was widely observed in the water column and they were somehow related to the maximum chlorophyll layers. A total of 25 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from cruise HOT-216 formed four phylogroups in the specific labyrinthulomycetes 18S rRNA-based phylogenetic tree, with the largest group of 20 OTUs fell into the Aplanochytrium cluster and the others aligned with uncultured clones or none, thus appeared to be undescribed. This study indicates the presence of new thraustochytrids lineages and their quantitative importance in the marine water column. PMID:23942794

  6. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Drougka, E.; Foka, A.; Posantzis, D.; Giormezis, N.; Anastassiou, E.D.; Petinaki, E.; Spiliopoulou, I.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL) and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1) were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst–negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred. PMID:26623381

  7. Designer blood: creating hematopoietic lineages from embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Abby L.; Stachura, David L.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2006-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibit the remarkable capacity to become virtually any differentiated tissue upon appropriate manipulation in culture, a property that has been beneficial for studies of hematopoiesis. Until recently, the majority of this work used murine ES cells for basic research to elucidate fundamental properties of blood-cell development and establish methods to derive specific mature lineages. Now, the advent of human ES cells sets the stage for more applied pursuits to generate transplantable cells for treating blood disorders. Current efforts are directed toward adapting in vitro hematopoietic differentiation methods developed for murine ES cells to human lines, identifying the key interspecies differences in biologic properties of ES cells, and generating ES cell-derived hematopoietic stem cells that are competent to repopulate adult hosts. The ultimate medical goal is to create patient-specific and generic ES cell lines that can be expanded in vitro, genetically altered, and differentiated into cell types that can be used to treat hematopoietic diseases. PMID:16254136

  8. How do divergent ecological strategies emerge among marine bacterioplankton lineages?

    PubMed

    Luo, Haiwei; Moran, Mary Ann

    2015-09-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria in pelagic marine environments are frequently categorized into two canonical ecological groups: patch-associated and free-living. This framework provides a conceptual basis for understanding bacterial utilization of oceanic organic matter. Some patch-associated bacteria are ecologically linked with eukaryotic phytoplankton, and this observation fits with predicted coincidence of their genome expansion with marine phytoplankton diversification. By contrast, free-living bacteria in today's oceans typically live singly with streamlined metabolic and regulatory functions that allow them to grow in nutrient-poor seawater. Recent analyses of marine Alphaproteobacteria suggest that some free-living bacterioplankton lineages evolved from patch-associated ancestors up to several hundred million years ago. While evolutionary analyses agree with the hypothesis that natural selection has maintained these distinct ecological strategies and genomic traits in present-day populations, they do not rule out a major role for genetic drift in driving ancient ecological switches. These two evolutionary forces may have acted on ocean bacteria at different geological time scales and under different geochemical constraints, with possible implications for future adaptations to a changing ocean. New evolutionary models and genomic data are leading to a more comprehensive understanding of marine bacterioplankton evolutionary history.

  9. B lymphocyte lineage cells and the respiratory system

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Atsushi; Hulse, Kathryn E.; Tan, Bruce K.; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive humoral immune responses in the airways are mediated by B cells and plasma cells that express highly evolved and specific receptors and produce immunoglobulins of most isotypes. In some cases, such as autoimmune diseases or inflammatory diseases caused by excessive exposure to foreign antigens, these same immune cells can cause disease by virtue of overly vigorous responses. This review discusses the generation, differentiation, signaling, activation and recruitment pathways of B cells and plasma cells, with special emphasis on unique characteristics of subsets of these cells functioning within the respiratory system. The primary sensitization events that generate B cells responsible for effector responses throughout the airways usually occur in the upper airways, in tonsils and adenoid structures that make up Waldeyer’s Ring. Upon secondary exposure to antigen in the airways, antigen-processing dendritic cells migrate into secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph nodes that drain the upper and lower airways and further B cell expansion takes place at those sites. Antigen exposure in the upper or lower airways can also drive expansion of B lineage cells in the airway mucosal tissue and lead to the formation of inducible lymphoid follicles or aggregates that can mediate local immunity or disease. PMID:23540615

  10. Human Staphylococcus aureus lineages among Zoological Park residents in Greece.

    PubMed

    Drougka, E; Foka, A; Posantzis, D; Giormezis, N; Anastassiou, E D; Petinaki, E; Spiliopoulou, I

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a part of the microbiota flora in many animal species. The clonal spread of S. aureus among animals and personnel in a Zoological Park was investigated. Samples were collected from colonized and infected sites among 32 mammals, 11 birds and eight humans. The genes mecA, mecC, lukF/lukS-PV (encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin, PVL) and tst (toxic shock syndrome toxin-1) were investigated by PCR. Clones were defined by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST), spa type and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Seven S. aureus isolates were recovered from four animals and one from an employee. All were mecA, mecC and tst-negative, whereas, one carried the PVL genes and was isolated from an infected Squirrel monkey. Clonal analysis revealed the occurrence of seven STs, eight PFGE and five spa types including ones of human origin. Even though a variety of genotypes were identified among S. aureus strains colonizing zoo park residents, our results indicate that colonization with human lineages has indeed occurred. PMID:26623381

  11. Parsing polyphyletic Pueraria: Delimiting distinct evolutionary lineages through phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Egan, Ashley N; Vatanparast, Mohammad; Cagle, William

    2016-11-01

    Several taxonomic and phylogenetic studies have hypothesized polyphyly within Pueraria DC., a genus comprising 19 species (24 with varieties) including the highly invasive Pueraria montana var. lobata (Kudzu) introduced to the U.S.A. about 150years ago. Previous efforts to investigate monophyly of the genus have been hampered by limited taxon sampling or a lack of comprehensive evolutionary context that would enable definitive taxonomic associations. This work presents a comprehensive phylogenetic investigation of Pueraria within the context of tribe Phaseoleae (Leguminosae). Polyphyly was found to be more extensive than previously thought, with five distinct lineages spread across the tribe and spanning over 25mya of divergence strongly supported by two chloroplast and one nuclear marker, AS2, presented here as a phylogenetic marker for the first time. Our phylogenies support taxonomic revisions to rectify polyphyly within Pueraria, including the resurrection of Neustanthus, moving one species to Teyleria, and the creation of two new genera, Haymondia and Toxicopueraria (taxonomic revisions published elsewhere). PMID:27495827

  12. Lung development and repair: Contribution of the ciliated lineage

    PubMed Central

    Rawlins, Emma L.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Randell, Scott H.; Hogan, Brigid L. M.

    2007-01-01

    The identity of the endogenous epithelial cells in the adult lung that are responsible for normal turnover and repair after injury is still controversial. In part, this is due to a paucity of highly specific genetic lineage tools to follow efficiently the fate of the major epithelial cell populations: the basal, secretory, ciliated, neuroendocrine, and alveolar cells. As part of a program to address this problem we have used a 1-kb FOXJ1 promoter to drive CreER in the ciliated cells of the embryonic and adult lung. Analysis of FOXJ1-GFP transgenic lungs shows that labeled cells appear in a proximal-distal pattern during embryogenesis and that the promoter drives expression in all ciliated cells. Using FOXJ1CreER adult mice, we have followed the fate of ciliated cells after epithelial injury by naphthalene or sulfur dioxide. From quantitative analysis and confocal microscopy we conclude that ciliated cells transiently change their morphology in response to lung injury but do not proliferate or transdifferentiate as part of the repair process. PMID:17194755

  13. Cell Population Tracking and Lineage Construction with Spatiotemporal Context 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Chen, Mei; Kanade, Takeo; Miller, Eric D.; Weiss, Lee E.; Campbell, Phil G.

    2008-01-01

    Automated visual-tracking of cell populations in vitro using phase contrast time-lapse microscopy enables quantitative, systematic and high-throughput measurements of cell behaviors. These measurements include the spatiotemporal quantification of cell migration, mitosis, apoptosis, and the construction of cell lineages. The combination of low signal-to-noise ratio of phase contrast microscopy images, high and varying densities of the cell cultures, topological complexities of cell shapes, and wide range of cell behaviors pose many challenges to existing tracking techniques. This paper presents a fully-automated multi-target tracking system that can efficiently cope with these challenges while simultaneously tracking and analyzing thousands of cells observed using time-lapse phase contrast microscopy. The system combines bottom-up and top-down image analysis by integrating multiple collaborative modules, which exploit a fast geometric active contour tracker in conjunction with adaptive interacting multiple models (IMM) motion filtering and spatiotemporal trajectory optimization. The system, which was tested using a variety of cell populations, achieved tracking accuracy in the range of 86.9%–92.5%. PMID:18656418

  14. Lineage Analysis of Axis Formation Under Novel Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Sen

    1998-01-01

    Recent intriguing work by Cooke ('86) and Neff, et al. ('93) suggests that there are subtle developmental changes in the Xenopus laevis embryos subjected to novel gravitational fields. These changes include the position of the third cleavage plane, the dorsal lip of the blastopore, and also the size of the head and eyes. However, compensation occurred later in development, so that by the tadpole stages there is no apparent difference between experimental and control embryos. How these early morphological changes are corrected is not clear. Through this project, we plan to determine whether the distribution of cytoplasmic morphogenetic determinants, and thus the developmental fate of blastomeres, is altered by novel gravitational fields by either tilting them or rotating them in a horizontal clinostat. We then plan to compare the control and experimental embryos with respect to blastomere fate (by lineage tracing with fluorescent dextrans), blastomere commitment and autonomous differentiation potential (by transplantation and culture), and distribution of cytoplasmic morphogens (by in situ hybridization). These three approaches, when applied in tandem, will provide a definitive test of the hypothesis that the distribution of cytoplasmic morphogenetic determinants and thus the developmental fate of blastomeres can be altered by novel gravitational fields.

  15. Evolutionary analysis of a streamlined lineage of surface ocean Roseobacters

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Haiwei; Swan, Brandon K; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Hughes, Austin L; Moran, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of surface ocean bacteria are uncultivated. Compared with their cultured relatives, they frequently exhibit a streamlined genome, reduced G+C content and distinct gene repertoire. These genomic traits are relevant to environmental adaptation, and have generally been thought to become fixed in marine bacterial populations through selection. Using single-cell genomics, we sequenced four uncultivated cells affiliated with the ecologically relevant Roseobacter clade and used a composition-heterogeneous Bayesian phylogenomic model to resolve these single-cell genomes into a new clade. This lineage has no representatives in culture, yet accounts for ∼35% of Roseobacters in some surface ocean waters. Analyses of multiple genomic traits, including genome size, G+C content and percentage of noncoding DNA, suggest that these single cells are representative of oceanic Roseobacters but divergent from isolates. Population genetic analyses showed that substitution of physicochemically dissimilar amino acids and replacement of G+C-rich to G+C-poor codons are accelerated in the uncultivated clade, processes that are explained equally well by genetic drift as by the more frequently invoked explanation of natural selection. The relative importance of drift vs selection in this clade, and perhaps in other marine bacterial clades with streamlined G+C-poor genomes, remains unresolved until more evidence is accumulated. PMID:24451207

  16. Characterization of discrete equine intestinal epithelial cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Liara M.; Kinnin, Leslie A.; Blikslager, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize epithelial cells of the small intestine and colon in horses without clinical gastrointestinal abnormalities with an emphasis on the stem cell niche constituents. SAMPLE Mucosal biopsy specimens from small and large intestines obtained from 12 horses euthanized for reasons unrelated to gastrointestinal disease or systemic disease. PROCEDURES Intestinal biopsy specimens were collected by sharp dissection immediately following euthanasia. Specimens were prepared for immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence, and transmission electron microscopic imaging to detect and characterize each epithelial cell type. Antibodies against protein biomarkers for cellular identification were selected on the basis of expression in other mammalian species. RESULTS Intestinal epithelial cell types were identified by means of immunostaining and morphological characterization with transmission electron microscopy. Some differences in biomarker expression and antibody cross-reactivity were identified in equine tissue, compared with other species. However, each known type of mucosal epithelial cell was identified in equine tissue. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The methodology used can enhance detection of stem cells and progenitor cells as well as postmitotic cell lineages in equine intestinal tissues. Results may have relevance to regenerative potential of intestinal mucosa and survival in horses with colic. PMID:25815577

  17. Hematopoietic organs of Manduca sexta and hemocyte lineages.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Pilas, Barbara; Ujhelyi, Elizabeth; Garsha, Karl; Kanost, Michael R

    2003-10-01

    Cells of the moth immune system are derived from organs that loosely envelop the four wing imaginal discs. The immune response in these insects is believed to depend on the activities of two main classes of hemocytes: plasmatocytes and granular cells. The fates of cells that arise from these hematopoietic organs have been followed by immunolabeling with plasmatocyte-specific and granular-cell-specific antibodies. Cells within each hematopoietic organ differ in their coherence and in their expression of two plasmatocyte-specific surface proteins, integrin and neuroglian. Within an organ there is no overlap in the expression of these two surface proteins; neuroglian is found on the surfaces of the coherent cells while integrin is expressed on cells that are losing coherence, rounding up, and dispersing. A granular-cell-specific marker for the protein lacunin labels the basal lamina that delimits each organ but only a small number of granular cells that lie on or near the periphery of the hematopoietic organ. When organs are cultured in the absence of hemolymph, all cells derived from hematopoietic organs turn out to immunolabel with the plasmatocyte-specific antibody MS13. The circulating plasmatocytes derived from hematopoietic organs have higher ploidy levels than the granular cells and represent a separate lineage of hemocytes. PMID:14551769

  18. Evaluation of Cross-Protection of a Lineage 1 West Nile Virus Inactivated Vaccine against Natural Infections from a Virulent Lineage 2 Strain in Horses, under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Chaintoutis, Serafeim C; Diakakis, Nikolaos; Papanastassopoulou, Maria; Banos, Georgios; Dovas, Chrysostomos I

    2015-09-01

    Although experimental data regarding cross-protection of horse West Nile virus (WNV) vaccines against lineage 2 infections exist, the cross-protective efficacy of these vaccines under field conditions has not been demonstrated. This study was conducted to evaluate the capability of an inactivated lineage 1 vaccine (Equip WNV) to protect against natural infections from the Nea Santa-Greece-2010 lineage 2 strain. In total, 185 WNV-seronegative horses in Thessaloniki, Greece, were selected during 2 consecutive years (2011 and 2012); 140 were immunized, and 45 were used as controls. Horses were examined for signs compatible with WNV infection. Neutralizing antibody titers against the Greek strain and the PaAn001/France lineage 1 strain were determined in immunized horses. WNV circulation was detected during both years in the study area. It was estimated that 37% and 27% of the horses were infected during 2011 and 2012, respectively. Three control animals developed clinical signs, and the WNV diagnosis was confirmed. Signs related to WNV infection were not observed in the vaccinated animals. The nonvaccinated animals had a 7.58% ± 1.82% higher chance of exhibiting signs than immunized animals (P < 0.05). Neutralizing antibodies raised against both strains in all immunized horses were detectable 1 month after the initial vaccination course. The cross-protective capacity of the lowest titer (1:40) was evident in 19 animals which were subsequently infected and did not exhibit signs. Neutralizing antibodies were detectable until the annual booster, when strong anamnestic responses were observed (geometrical mean titer ratio [GMTR] for lineage 1 of 30.2; GMTR for lineage 2 of 27.5). The results indicate that Equip WNV is capable of inducing cross-protection against natural infections from a virulent lineage 2 WNV strain in horses.

  19. Evaluation of Cross-Protection of a Lineage 1 West Nile Virus Inactivated Vaccine against Natural Infections from a Virulent Lineage 2 Strain in Horses, under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chaintoutis, Serafeim C.; Diakakis, Nikolaos; Papanastassopoulou, Maria; Banos, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Although experimental data regarding cross-protection of horse West Nile virus (WNV) vaccines against lineage 2 infections exist, the cross-protective efficacy of these vaccines under field conditions has not been demonstrated. This study was conducted to evaluate the capability of an inactivated lineage 1 vaccine (Equip WNV) to protect against natural infections from the Nea Santa-Greece-2010 lineage 2 strain. In total, 185 WNV-seronegative horses in Thessaloniki, Greece, were selected during 2 consecutive years (2011 and 2012); 140 were immunized, and 45 were used as controls. Horses were examined for signs compatible with WNV infection. Neutralizing antibody titers against the Greek strain and the PaAn001/France lineage 1 strain were determined in immunized horses. WNV circulation was detected during both years in the study area. It was estimated that 37% and 27% of the horses were infected during 2011 and 2012, respectively. Three control animals developed clinical signs, and the WNV diagnosis was confirmed. Signs related to WNV infection were not observed in the vaccinated animals. The nonvaccinated animals had a 7.58% ± 1.82% higher chance of exhibiting signs than immunized animals (P < 0.05). Neutralizing antibodies raised against both strains in all immunized horses were detectable 1 month after the initial vaccination course. The cross-protective capacity of the lowest titer (1:40) was evident in 19 animals which were subsequently infected and did not exhibit signs. Neutralizing antibodies were detectable until the annual booster, when strong anamnestic responses were observed (geometrical mean titer ratio [GMTR] for lineage 1 of 30.2; GMTR for lineage 2 of 27.5). The results indicate that Equip WNV is capable of inducing cross-protection against natural infections from a virulent lineage 2 WNV strain in horses. PMID:26178384

  20. Cryptic variation in an ecological indicator organism: mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data confirm distinct lineages of Baetis harrisoni Barnard (Ephemeroptera: Baetidae) in southern Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Baetis harrisoni Barnard is a mayfly frequently encountered in river studies across Africa, but the external morphological features used for identifying nymphs have been observed to vary subtly between different geographic locations. It has been associated with a wide range of ecological conditions, including pH extremes of pH 2.9–10.0 in polluted waters. We present a molecular study of the genetic variation within B. harrisoni across 21 rivers in its distribution range in southern Africa. Results Four gene regions were examined, two mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I [COI] and small subunit ribosomal 16S rDNA [16S]) and two nuclear (elongation factor 1 alpha [EF1α] and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase [PEPCK]). Bayesian and parsimony approaches to phylogeny reconstruction resulted in five well-supported major lineages, which were confirmed using a general mixed Yule-coalescent (GMYC) model. Results from the EF1α gene were significantly incongruent with both mitochondrial and nuclear (PEPCK) results, possibly due to incomplete lineage sorting of the EF1α gene. Mean between-clade distance estimated using the COI and PEPCK data was found to be an order of magnitude greater than the within-clade distance and comparable to that previously reported for other recognised Baetis species. Analysis of the Isolation by Distance (IBD) between all samples showed a small but significant effect of IBD. Within each lineage the contribution of IBD was minimal. Tentative dating analyses using an uncorrelated log-normal relaxed clock and two published estimates of COI mutation rates suggest that diversification within the group occurred throughout the Pliocene and mid-Miocene (~2.4–11.5 mya). Conclusions The distinct lineages of B. harrisoni correspond to categorical environmental variation, with two lineages comprising samples from streams that flow through acidic Table Mountain Sandstone and three lineages with samples from neutral-to-alkaline streams

  1. Venus trap in the mouse embryo reveals distinct molecular dynamics underlying specification of first embryonic lineages.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jens-Erik; Panavaite, Laura; Gunther, Stefan; Wennekamp, Sebastian; Groner, Anna C; Pigge, Anton; Salvenmoser, Stefanie; Trono, Didier; Hufnagel, Lars; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian development begins with the segregation of embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages in the blastocyst. Recent studies revealed cell-to-cell gene expression heterogeneity and dynamic cell rearrangements during mouse blastocyst formation. Thus, mechanistic understanding of lineage specification requires quantitative description of gene expression dynamics at a single-cell resolution in living embryos. However, only a few fluorescent gene expression reporter mice are available and quantitative live image analysis is limited so far. Here, we carried out a fluorescence gene-trap screen and established reporter mice expressing Venus specifically in the first lineages. Lineage tracking, quantitative gene expression and cell position analyses allowed us to build a comprehensive lineage map of mouse pre-implantation development. Our systematic analysis revealed that, contrary to the available models, the timing and mechanism of lineage specification may be distinct between the trophectoderm and the inner cell mass. While expression of our trophectoderm-specific lineage marker is upregulated in outside cells upon asymmetric divisions at 8- and 16-cell stages, the inside-specific upregulation of the inner-cell-mass marker only becomes evident at the 64-cell stage. This study thus provides a framework toward systems-level understanding of embryogenesis marked by high dynamicity and stochastic variability. PMID:26142281

  2. Ecological Genomics of the Uncultivated Marine Roseobacter Lineage CHAB-I-5

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yao; Sun, Ying; Jiao, Nianzhi; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2016-01-01

    Members of the marine Roseobacter clade are major participants in global carbon and sulfur cycles. While roseobacters are well represented in cultures, several abundant pelagic lineages, including SAG-O19, DC5-80-3, and NAC11-7, remain largely uncultivated and show evidence of genome streamlining. Here, we analyzed the partial genomes of three single cells affiliated with CHAB-I-5, another abundant but exclusively uncultivated Roseobacter lineage. Members of this lineage encode several metabolic potentials that are absent in streamlined genomes. Examples are quorum sensing and type VI secretion systems, which enable them to effectively interact with host and other bacteria. Further analysis of the CHAB-I-5 single-cell amplified genomes (SAGs) predicted that this lineage comprises members with relatively large genomes (4.1 to 4.4 Mbp) and a high fraction of noncoding DNA (10 to 12%), which is similar to what is observed in many cultured, nonstreamlined Roseobacter lineages. The four uncultured lineages, while exhibiting highly variable geographic distributions, together represent >60% of the global pelagic roseobacters. They are consistently enriched in genes encoding the capabilities of light harvesting, oxidation of “energy-rich” reduced sulfur compounds and methylated amines, uptake and catabolism of various carbohydrates and osmolytes, and consumption of abundant exudates from phytoplankton. These traits may define the global prevalence of the four lineages among marine bacterioplankton. PMID:26826224

  3. Rabies virus isolates of India - simultaneous existence of two distinct evolutionary lineages.

    PubMed

    Reddy, R V Chandrasekhar; Mohana Subramanian, B; Surendra, K S N L; Babu, R P Aravindh; Rana, S K; Manjari, K Sunitha; Srinivasan, V A

    2014-10-01

    Rabies is a fatal viral disease of serious public health implication. The disease is enzootic in India. In the present study, thirty six rabies virus isolates were obtained from terrestrial mammals of India during 2002-2012. Ecto-domain coding region of the glycoprotein gene from all the isolates were sequenced and the phylogenetic analysis was performed in relation to the global rabies and rabies related virus isolates. The Indian isolates grouped into two distinctly separate lineages with majority of the Indian isolates in Arctic like 1 lineage and the remaining isolates in sub-continental lineage. Isolates of the two distinct lineages were identified simultaneously from the same geographical region. Time scaled phylogenetic tree indicated that the sub-continental lineage of the virus is one of the earliest clade of rabies virus that diverged from bat rabies virus. On the contrary, the Arctic-like 1 lineage of India appeared to be a more recent divergence event. The amino acid sequence comparison revealed that all the major antigenic sites were almost conserved among the Indian isolates whereas few amino acid variations could be identified around site IIa, minor site I and IV. The dN/dS study based on G ecto-domain is in support of the earlier reports of strong purifying selection. In conclusion, it is evident that the Indian rabies virus isolates are of two major distinct lineages with distant phylogenetic and evolutionary relationship. PMID:25077994

  4. Biogeography and ecology of the rare and abundant microbial lineages in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rika E; Sogin, Mitchell L; Baross, John A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental gradients generate countless ecological niches in deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems, which foster diverse microbial communities. The majority of distinct microbial lineages in these communities occur in very low abundance. However, the ecological role and distribution of rare and abundant lineages, particularly in deep, hot subsurface environments, remain unclear. Here, we use 16S rRNA tag sequencing to describe biogeographic patterning and microbial community structure of both rare and abundant archaea and bacteria in hydrothermal vent systems. We show that while rare archaeal lineages and almost all bacterial lineages displayed geographically restricted community structuring patterns, the abundant lineages of archaeal communities displayed a much more cosmopolitan distribution. Finally, analysis of one high-volume, high-temperature fluid sample representative of the deep hot biosphere described a unique microbial community that differed from microbial populations in diffuse flow fluid or sulfide samples, yet the rare thermophilic archaeal groups showed similarities to those that occur in sulfides. These results suggest that while most archaeal and bacterial lineages in vents are rare and display a highly regional distribution, a small percentage of lineages, particularly within the archaeal domain, are successful at widespread dispersal and colonization. PMID:25764538

  5. IL12B expression is sustained by a heterogenous population of myeloid lineages during tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Reeme, Allison E.; Miller, Halli E.; Robinson, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary IL12B is required for resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, promoting the initiation and maintenance of Mtb-specific effector responses. While this makes the IL12-pathway an attractive target for experimental tuberculosis (TB) therapies, data regarding what lineages express IL12B after infection is established are limited. This is not obvious in the lung, an organ in which both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages produce IL12p40 upon pathogen encounter. Here, we use radiation bone marrow chimeras and Yet40 reporter mice to determine what lineages produce IL12p40 during experimental TB. We observed that hematopoietic IL12p40-production was sufficient to control Mtb, with no contribution by non-hematopoietic lineages. Furthermore, rather than being produced by a single subset, IL12p40 was produced by cells that were heterogenous in their size, granularity, autofluorescence and expression of CD11c, CD11b and CD8α. While depending on the timepoint and tissue examined, the surface phenotype of IL12p40-producers most closely resembled macrophages based on previous surveys of lung myeloid lineages. Importantly, depletion of CDllchi cells during infection had no affect on lung IL12p40-concentrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that IL12p40 production is sustained by a heterogenous population of myeloid lineages during experimental TB, and that redundant mechanisms of IL12p40-production exist when CD11chi lineages are absent. PMID:23491716

  6. Standardizing the nomenclature for clonal lineages of the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, Niklaus J; Goss, Erica M; Ivors, Kelly; Garbelotto, Matteo; Martin, Frank N; Prospero, Simone; Hansen, Everett; Bonants, Peter J M; Hamelin, Richard C; Chastagner, Gary; Werres, Sabine; Rizzo, David M; Abad, Gloria; Beales, Paul; Bilodeau, Guillaume J; Blomquist, Cheryl L; Brasier, Clive; Brière, Stephan C; Chandelier, Anne; Davidson, Jennifer M; Denman, Sandra; Elliott, Marianne; Frankel, Susan J; Goheen, Ellen M; de Gruyter, Hans; Heungens, Kurt; James, Delano; Kanaskie, Alan; McWilliams, Michael G; Man in 't Veld, Willem; Moralejo, Eduardo; Osterbauer, Nancy K; Palm, Mary E; Parke, Jennifer L; Sierra, Ana Maria Perez; Shamoun, Simon F; Shishkoff, Nina; Tooley, Paul W; Vettraino, Anna Maria; Webber, Joan; Widmer, Timothy L

    2009-07-01

    Phytophthora ramorum, the causal agent of sudden oak death and ramorum blight, is known to exist as three distinct clonal lineages which can only be distinguished by performing molecular marker-based analyses. However, in the recent literature there exists no consensus on naming of these lineages. Here we propose a system for naming clonal lineages of P. ramorum based on a consensus established by the P. ramorum research community. Clonal lineages are named with a two letter identifier for the continent on which they were first found (e.g., NA = North America; EU = Europe) followed by a number indicating order of appearance. Clonal lineages known to date are designated NA1 (mating type: A2; distribution: North America; environment: forest and nurseries), NA2 (A2; North America; nurseries), and EU1 (predominantly A1, rarely A2; Europe and North America; nurseries and gardens). It is expected that novel lineages or new variants within the existing three clonal lineages could in time emerge.

  7. Biogeography and ecology of the rare and abundant microbial lineages in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rika E; Sogin, Mitchell L; Baross, John A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental gradients generate countless ecological niches in deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems, which foster diverse microbial communities. The majority of distinct microbial lineages in these communities occur in very low abundance. However, the ecological role and distribution of rare and abundant lineages, particularly in deep, hot subsurface environments, remain unclear. Here, we use 16S rRNA tag sequencing to describe biogeographic patterning and microbial community structure of both rare and abundant archaea and bacteria in hydrothermal vent systems. We show that while rare archaeal lineages and almost all bacterial lineages displayed geographically restricted community structuring patterns, the abundant lineages of archaeal communities displayed a much more cosmopolitan distribution. Finally, analysis of one high-volume, high-temperature fluid sample representative of the deep hot biosphere described a unique microbial community that differed from microbial populations in diffuse flow fluid or sulfide samples, yet the rare thermophilic archaeal groups showed similarities to those that occur in sulfides. These results suggest that while most archaeal and bacterial lineages in vents are rare and display a highly regional distribution, a small percentage of lineages, particularly within the archaeal domain, are successful at widespread dispersal and colonization.

  8. Clonal Tracking of Rhesus Macaque Hematopoiesis Highlights A Distinct Lineage Origin for Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, Samson J.; Yang, Yanqin; Jares, Alexander; Krouse, Alan E.; Metzger, Mark; Liang, Frank; Loré, Karin; Wu, Colin O.; Donahue, Robert E.; Chen, Irvin S.Y; Weissman, Irving; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Analysis of hematopoietic stem cell function in non-human primates provides insights that are relevant for human biology and therapeutic strategies. In this study, we applied quantitative genetic barcoding to track the clonal output of transplanted autologous rhesus macaque hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells over a time period of up to 9.5 months. We found that uni-lineage short-term progenitors reconstituted myeloid and lymphoid lineages at one month, but were supplanted over time by multi-lineage clones, initially myeloid-restricted, then myeloid-B clones, and then stable myeloid-B-T multi-lineage long-term repopulating clones. Surprisingly, reconstitution of the natural killer cell lineage, and particularly the major CD16+/CD56− peripheral blood NK compartment, showed limited clonal overlap with T, B or myeloid lineages, and therefore appears to be ontologically distinct. Thus, in addition to providing insights into clonal behavior over time, our analysis suggests an unexpected paradigm for the relationship between NK cells and other hematopoietic lineages in primates. PMID:24702997

  9. Comparative Epidemiology of Influenza B Yamagata- and Victoria-Lineage Viruses in Households.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cuiling; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Tsang, Tim K; Fang, Vicky J; Fung, Rita O P; Ip, Dennis K M; Cauchemez, Simon; Leung, Gabriel M; Peiris, J S Malik; Cowling, Benjamin J

    2015-10-15

    Influenza B viruses split into 2 distinct lineages in the early 1980s, commonly named the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. There are few data on the comparative epidemiology of Victoria- and Yamagata-lineage viruses. In 2007-2011, we enrolled 75 and 34 households containing index patients with acute respiratory illness who tested positive for Yamagata- and Victoria-lineage viruses, respectively, from outpatient clinics in Hong Kong, China. These index patients and their household contacts were followed up for 7-10 days. We examined overall risk of polymerase chain reaction-confirmed infection among household contacts and the risk of secondary infection within households using an individual-based hazard model that accounted for tertiary transmission and infections occurring outside the household. We found that for Victoria-lineage viruses, the risk of within-household infection among household contacts aged ≤15 years was significantly higher (risk ratio = 12.9, 95% credibility interval: 4.2, 43.6) than that for older household contacts, while for Yamagata-lineage viruses, the risk of within-household infection for household contacts did not differ by age. Influenza B Yamagata- and Victoria-lineage viruses have similar characteristics in terms of viral shedding and clinical illness. The mechanisms underlying these epidemiologic differences deserve further investigation. PMID:26400854

  10. Venus trap in the mouse embryo reveals distinct molecular dynamics underlying specification of first embryonic lineages.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jens-Erik; Panavaite, Laura; Gunther, Stefan; Wennekamp, Sebastian; Groner, Anna C; Pigge, Anton; Salvenmoser, Stefanie; Trono, Didier; Hufnagel, Lars; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian development begins with the segregation of embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages in the blastocyst. Recent studies revealed cell-to-cell gene expression heterogeneity and dynamic cell rearrangements during mouse blastocyst formation. Thus, mechanistic understanding of lineage specification requires quantitative description of gene expression dynamics at a single-cell resolution in living embryos. However, only a few fluorescent gene expression reporter mice are available and quantitative live image analysis is limited so far. Here, we carried out a fluorescence gene-trap screen and established reporter mice expressing Venus specifically in the first lineages. Lineage tracking, quantitative gene expression and cell position analyses allowed us to build a comprehensive lineage map of mouse pre-implantation development. Our systematic analysis revealed that, contrary to the available models, the timing and mechanism of lineage specification may be distinct between the trophectoderm and the inner cell mass. While expression of our trophectoderm-specific lineage marker is upregulated in outside cells upon asymmetric divisions at 8- and 16-cell stages, the inside-specific upregulation of the inner-cell-mass marker only becomes evident at the 64-cell stage. This study thus provides a framework toward systems-level understanding of embryogenesis marked by high dynamicity and stochastic variability.

  11. Y Chromosome Lineages in Men of West African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Keita, Shomarka O. Y.; Kittles, Rick A.

    2012-01-01

    The early African experience in the Americas is marked by the transatlantic slave trade from ∼1619 to 1850 and the rise of the plantation system. The origins of enslaved Africans were largely dependent on European preferences as well as the availability of potential laborers within Africa. Rice production was a key industry of many colonial South Carolina low country plantations. Accordingly, rice plantations owners within South Carolina often requested enslaved Africans from the so-called “Grain Coast” of western Africa (Senegal to Sierra Leone). Studies on the African origins of the enslaved within other regions of the Americas have been limited. To address the issue of origins of people of African descent within the Americas and understand more about the genetic heterogeneity present within Africa and the African Diaspora, we typed Y chromosome specific markers in 1,319 men consisting of 508 west and central Africans (from 12 populations), 188 Caribbeans (from 2 islands), 532 African Americans (AAs from Washington, DC and Columbia, SC), and 91 European Americans. Principal component and admixture analyses provide support for significant Grain Coast ancestry among African American men in South Carolina. AA men from DC and the Caribbean showed a closer affinity to populations from the Bight of Biafra. Furthermore, 30–40% of the paternal lineages in African descent populations in the Americas are of European ancestry. Diverse west African ancestries and sex-biased gene flow from EAs has contributed greatly to the genetic heterogeneity of African populations throughout the Americas and has significant implications for gene mapping efforts in these populations. PMID:22295064

  12. Rituximab in B-Lineage Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Maury, Sébastien; Chevret, Sylvie; Thomas, Xavier; Heim, Dominik; Leguay, Thibaut; Huguet, Françoise; Chevallier, Patrice; Hunault, Mathilde; Boissel, Nicolas; Escoffre-Barbe, Martine; Hess, Urs; Vey, Norbert; Pignon, Jean-Michel; Braun, Thorsten; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Chalandon, Yves; Lhéritier, Véronique; Beldjord, Kheira; Béné, Marie C; Ifrah, Norbert; Dombret, Hervé

    2016-09-15

    Background Treatment with rituximab has improved the outcome for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Patients with B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may also have the CD20 antigen, which is targeted by rituximab. Although single-group studies suggest that adding rituximab to chemotherapy could improve the outcome in such patients, this hypothesis has not been tested in a randomized trial. Methods We randomly assigned adults (18 to 59 years of age) with CD20-positive, Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative ALL to receive chemotherapy with or without rituximab, with event-free survival as the primary end point. Rituximab was given during all treatment phases, for a total of 16 to 18 infusions. Results From May 2006 through April 2014, a total of 209 patients were enrolled: 105 in the rituximab group and 104 in the control group. After a median follow-up of 30 months, event-free survival was lon