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Sample records for mls jaanus paal

  1. MLS: Airplane system modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. D.; Stapleton, B. P.; Walen, D. B.; Rieder, P. F.; Moss, D. G.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis, modeling, and simulations were conducted as part of a multiyear investigation of the more important airplane-system-related items of the microwave landing system (MLS). Particular emphasis was placed upon the airplane RF system, including the antenna radiation distribution, the cabling options from the antenna to the receiver, and the overall impact of the airborne system gains and losses upon the direct-path signal structure. In addition, effort was expended toward determining the impact of the MLS upon the airplane flight management system and developing the initial stages of a fast-time MLS automatic control system simulation model. Results ot these studies are presented.

  2. Volume MLS ray casting.

    PubMed

    Ledergerber, Christian; Guennebaud, Gaël; Meyer, Miriah; Bächer, Moritz; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2008-01-01

    The method of Moving Least Squares (MLS) is a popular framework for reconstructing continuous functions from scattered data due to its rich mathematical properties and well-understood theoretical foundations. This paper applies MLS to volume rendering, providing a unified mathematical framework for ray casting of scalar data stored over regular as well as irregular grids. We use the MLS reconstruction to render smooth isosurfaces and to compute accurate derivatives for high-quality shading effects. We also present a novel, adaptive preintegration scheme to improve the efficiency of the ray casting algorithm by reducing the overall number of function evaluations, and an efficient implementation of our framework exploiting modern graphics hardware. The resulting system enables high-quality volume integration and shaded isosurface rendering for regular and irregular volume data.

  3. Wither the MLS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonergan, David

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years a troubling pattern has emerged, one that might be termed the trivialization of the Master of Library Science (MLS). As a result of several factors, not least the closing of library schools, low rates of pay for librarians, and high costs of living in many parts of the country, some college libraries have found it difficult…

  4. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  5. Validation of UARS MLS C10 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J.; Read, W.; Froideveaux, L.; Lungu, T.; Perun, V.; Stachnik, R.; Jarnot, R.; Cofield, R.; Fishbein, E.; Flower, D.; Burke, J.; Hardy, J.; Nakamura, L.; Ridenoure, B.; Shippony, Z.; Thurstans, R.; Avallone, L.; Toohey, D.; deZafra, R.; Shindell, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of stratospheric C10 measurements by the MLS on the UARS. The comparisons done to date between MLS and other measurements of C10 indicate general agreement to within the estimated MLS uncertainties and the uncertainties of the comparative measurements.

  6. Effect of a new functional double-hydrophilic block copolymer PAAL on the morphology of calcium carbonate particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, M. . E-mail: leiming@aphy.iphy.ac.cn; Tang, W.H.; Yu, J.G.

    2005-04-20

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) particles with various shapes were prepared by the reaction of sodium carbonate with calcium chloride in the presence of a new functional double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly (acrylic acid)-block-(acrylic hydroxy lactide) (PAAL) at room temperature. The as-prepared products were characterized with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The effects of pH, concentration of PAAL and CaCO{sub 3} on the crystal form and morphologies of the as-prepared CaCO{sub 3} were investigated. The results show that pH, concentration of PAAL and CaCO{sub 3} are important parameters for the control of morphologies of CaCO{sub 3}. Depending on the experimental conditions, various morphologies of CaCO{sub 3}, such as plate-like aggregates, poly-nucleated spheres, ellipsoids, monodispersed spheres, rhombohedras, etc., can be obtained. Especially, the optimal experimental conditions for the production of monodispersed spherical CaCO{sub 3} particles were determined.

  7. Optimization of MLS receivers for multipath environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalpine, G. A.; Highfill, J. H., III; Irwin, S. H.; Padgett, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    A receiver is designed for aircraft (A/C), which, as a component of the proposed Microwave Landing System (MLS), is capable of optimal performance in the multipath environments found in air terminal areas. Topics discussed include: the angle-tracking problem of the MLS receiver; signal modeling; preliminary approaches to optimal design; suboptimal design; and simulation study.

  8. Validation of UARS MLS Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. f.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; Margitan, J. J.; Stachnik, I. S.; Peckham, G. E.; Braathen, G.; Deshler, T.; Fishman, J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.; McDermid, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz.

  9. Flow synthesis using gaseous ammonia in a Teflon AF-2400 tube-in-tube reactor: Paal-Knorr pyrrole formation and gas concentration measurement by inline flow titration.

    PubMed

    Cranwell, Philippa B; O'Brien, Matthew; Browne, Duncan L; Koos, Peter; Polyzos, Anastasios; Peña-López, Miguel; Ley, Steven V

    2012-08-14

    Using a simple and accessible Teflon AF-2400 based tube-in-tube reactor, a series of pyrroles were synthesised in flow using the Paal-Knorr reaction of 1,4-diketones with gaseous ammonia. An inline flow titration technique allowed measurement of the ammonia concentration and its relationship to residence time and temperature.

  10. Successively recycle waste as catalyst: a one-pot Wittig/1,4-reduction/Paal-Knorr sequence for modular synthesis of substituted furans.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Du, Yi; Zeng, Xing-Ping; Shi, Tao-Da; Zhou, Feng; Zhou, Jian

    2015-03-20

    A one-pot tandem Wittig/conjugate reduction/Paal-Knorr reaction is reported for the synthesis of di- or trisubstituted furans. This novel sequence first demonstrates the possibility of successively recycling waste from upstream steps to catalyze downstream reactions.

  11. Arctic Ozone Depletion from UARS MLS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of ozone during four Arctic winters are compared. The evolution of ozone in the lower stratosphere is related to temperature, chlorine monoxide (also measured by MLS), and the evolution of the polar vortex. Lagrangian transport calculations using winds from the United Kingdom Meteorological Office's Stratosphere-Troposphere Data Assimilation system are used to estimate to what extent the evolution of lower stratospheric ozone is controlled by dynamics. Observations, along with calculations of the expected dynamical behavior, show evidence for chemical ozone depletion throughout most of the Arctic lower stratospheric vortex during the 1992-93 middle and late winter, and during all of the 1994-95 winter that was observed by MLS. Both of these winters were unusually cold and had unusually cold and had unusually strong Arctic polar vortices compared to meteorological data over the past 17 years.

  12. Assimilation of MLS and OMI Ozone Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, I.; Wargan, K.; Chang, L.-P.; Hayashi, H.; Pawson, S.; Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N.

    2005-01-01

    Ozone data from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were assimilated into the ozone model at NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO). This assimilation produces ozone fields that are superior to those from the operational GMAO assimilation of Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument data. Assimilation of Aura data improves the representation of the "ozone hole" and the agreement with independent Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III and ozone sonde data. Ozone in the lower stratosphere is captured better: mean state, vertical gradients, spatial and temporal variability are all improved. Inclusion of OMI and MLS data together, or separately, in the assimilation system provides a way of checking how consistent OMI and MLS data are with each other, and with the ozone model. We found that differences between OMI total ozone column data and model forecasts decrease after MLS data are assimilated. This indicates that MLS stratospheric ozone profiles are consistent with OMI total ozone columns. The evaluation of error characteristics of OMI and MLS ozone will continue as data from newer versions of retrievals becomes available. We report on the initial step in obtaining global assimilated ozone fields that combine measurements from different Aura instruments, the ozone model at the GMAO, and their respective error characteristics. We plan to use assimilated ozone fields in estimation of tropospheric ozone. We also plan to investigate impacts of assimilated ozone fields on numerical weather prediction through their use in radiative models and in the assimilation of infrared nadir radiance data from NASA's Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS).

  13. Optimization of MLS receivers for multipath environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalpine, G. A.; Irwin, S. H.; NELSON; Roleyni, G.

    1977-01-01

    Optimal design studies of MLS angle-receivers and a theoretical design-study of MLS DME-receivers are reported. The angle-receiver results include an integration of the scan data processor and tracking filter components of the optimal receiver into a unified structure. An extensive simulation study comparing the performance of the optimal and threshold receivers in a wide variety of representative dynamical interference environments was made. The optimal receiver was generally superior. A simulation of the performance of the threshold and delay-and-compare receivers in various signal environments was performed. An analysis of combined errors due to lateral reflections from vertical structures with small differential path delays, specular ground reflections with neglible differential path delays, and thermal noise in the receivers is provided.

  14. Optimization of MLS receivers for multipath environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalpine, G. A.; Highfill, J. H., III

    1976-01-01

    The design of a microwave landing system (MLS) aircraft receiver, capable of optimal performance in multipath environments found in air terminal areas, is reported. Special attention was given to the angle tracking problem of the receiver and includes tracking system design considerations, study and application of locally optimum estimation involving multipath adaptive reception and then envelope processing, and microcomputer system design. Results show processing is competitive in this application with i-f signal processing performance-wise and is much more simple and cheaper. A summary of the signal model is given.

  15. Space Station Water Processor Mostly Liquid Separator (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzarone, Anthony

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of the development testing conducted under this contract to the Space Station Water Processor (WP) Mostly Liquid Separator (MLS). The MLS units built and modified during this testing demonstrated acceptable air/water separation results in a variety of water conditions with inlet flow rates ranging from 60 - 960 LB/hr.

  16. Monitoring of MLS Measurements for Ozone Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winslow, Nathan; Stajner, I.; Rood, R.; Goplan, A.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ozone data assimilation system at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Data Assimilation Office (DAO) has operationally provided near real time global three dimensional analyzed ozone fields since December 1999. Presently, 4 system assimilates both total column ozone and profile measurements from the NOAA - 16 SBUV/2 instrument into an off-line transport model using a physical space statistical analysis scheme (PS AS). Recently, this system was modified to investigate a possible impact from including MLS profile observations. Over a period from December 13, 1991 to March 1, 1992 the system assimilated both NOAA 11 SBUV/2 profile measurements and TOMS total column measurements. Short term ozone forecasts were produced and compared to MLS observations. The resulting observed -minus -forecast (O-F) residuals were studied regionally (by both latitude bands and pressure levels) in order to explore the potential impact of MLS observations on the assimilation and sensitivity to the UARS yaw maneuver and other instrument and algorithm characteristics. In addition, MLS profiles were compared to nearest neighbor SBUV and analysis profiles. In the tropics, analyzed ozone values tend to be too high from 1-3 hPa and too low from 10-20 hPa. MLS measurements in these regions tend be lower and higher (respectively) than forecast ozone values. This indicates that assimilating MLS measurements may improve, analysis results in these areas. Further, nearest neighbor profile comparisons in the southern high latitudes indicate that laminar features present in the analysis but not present in SBUV measurements, are also present in MLS measurements. This, together with the availability of MLS measurements in polar night regions indicates that assimilating MLS measurements in polar night regions indicates that assimilating MLS measurements may improve analyzed ozone values in high latitudes.

  17. Processing EOS MLS Level-2 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. Van; Wu, Dong; Read, William; Jiang, Jonathan; Wagner, Paul; Livesey, Nathaniel; Schwartz, Michael; Filipiak, Mark; Pumphrey, Hugh; Shippony, Zvi

    2006-01-01

    A computer program performs level-2 processing of thermal-microwave-radiance data from observations of the limb of the Earth by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The purpose of the processing is to estimate the composition and temperature of the atmosphere versus altitude from .8 to .90 km. "Level-2" as used here is a specialists f term signifying both vertical profiles of geophysical parameters along the measurement track of the instrument and processing performed by this or other software to generate such profiles. Designed to be flexible, the program is controlled via a configuration file that defines all aspects of processing, including contents of state and measurement vectors, configurations of forward models, measurement and calibration data to be read, and the manner of inverting the models to obtain the desired estimates. The program can operate in a parallel form in which one instance of the program acts a master, coordinating the work of multiple slave instances on a cluster of computers, each slave operating on a portion of the data. Optionally, the configuration file can be made to instruct the software to produce files of simulated radiances based on state vectors formed from sets of geophysical data-product files taken as input.

  18. Performance of a commercial transport under typical MLS noise environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, J. K.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of a 747-200 automatic flight control system (AFCS) subjected to typical Microwave Landing System (MLS) noise is discussed. The performance is then compared with the results from a previous study which had a B747 AFCS subjected to the MLS standards and recommended practices (SARPS) maximum allowable noise. A glide slope control run with Instrument Landing System (ILS) noise is also conducted. Finally, a linear covariance analysis is presented.

  19. Global Gravity Wave Variances from Aura MLS: Characteristics and Interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    The gravity wave (GW)-resolving capabilities of 118-GHz saturated thermal radiances acquired throughout the stratosphere by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite are investigated and initial results presented. Because the saturated (optically thick) radiances resolve GW perturbations from a given altitude at different horizontal locations, variances are evaluated at 12 pressure altitudes between 21 and 51 km using the 40 saturated radiances found at the bottom of each limb scan. Forward modeling simulations show that these variances are controlled mostly by GWs with vertical wavelengths z 5 km and horizontal along-track wavelengths of y 100-200 km. The tilted cigar-shaped three-dimensional weighting functions yield highly selective responses to GWs of high intrinsic frequency that propagate toward the instrument. The latter property is used to infer the net meridional component of GW propagation by differencing the variances acquired from ascending (A) and descending (D) orbits. Because of improved vertical resolution and sensitivity, Aura MLS GW variances are 5?8 times larger than those from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) MLS. Like UARS MLS variances, monthly-mean Aura MLS variances in January and July 2005 are enhanced when local background wind speeds are large, due largely to GW visibility effects. Zonal asymmetries in variance maps reveal enhanced GW activity at high latitudes due to forcing by flow over major mountain ranges and at tropical and subtropical latitudes due to enhanced deep convective generation as inferred from contemporaneous MLS cloud-ice data. At 21-28-km altitude (heights not measured by the UARS MLS), GW variance in the tropics is systematically enhanced and shows clear variations with the phase of the quasi-biennial oscillation, in general agreement with GW temperature variances derived from radiosonde, rocketsonde, and limb-scan vertical profiles.

  20. Analysis of a range estimator which uses MLS angle measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, David R.; Linse, Dennis

    1987-01-01

    A concept that uses the azimuth signal from a microwave landing system (MLS) combined with onboard airspeed and heading data to estimate the horizontal range to the runway threshold is investigated. The absolute range error is evaluated for trajectories typical of General Aviation (GA) and commercial airline operations (CAO). These include constant intercept angles for GA and CAO, and complex curved trajectories for CAO. It is found that range errors of 4000 to 6000 feet at the entry of MLS coverage which then reduce to 1000-foot errors at runway centerline intercept are possible for GA operations. For CAO, errors at entry into MLS coverage of 2000 feet which reduce to 300 feet at runway centerline interception are possible.

  1. The UARS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Flower, D. A.; Lau, G. K.; Pickett, H. M.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.; Boyles, M. A.; Burke, J. R.; Lay, R. R.; Loo, M. S.; Livesey, N. J.; Lungu, T. A.; Manney, G. L.; Nakamura, L. L.;  Perun, V. S.;  Ridenoure, B. P.;  Shippony, Z.;  Siegel, P. H.;  Thurstans, R. P.;  Harwood, R. S.;  Pumphrey, H. C.;  Filipiak, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) experiments obtain measurements of atmospheric composition, temperature, and pressure by observations of millimeter- and submillimeter-wavelength thermal emission as the instrument field of view is scanned through the atmospheric limb. Features of the measurement technique include the ability to measure many atmospheric gases as well as temperature and pressure, to obtain measurements even in the presence of dense aerosol and cirrus, and to provide near-global coverage on a daily basis at all times of day and night from an orbiting platform. The composition measurements are relatively insensitive to uncertainties in atmospheric temperature. An accurate spectroscopic database is available, and the instrument calibration is also very accurate and stable. The first MLS experiment in space, launched on the (NASA) Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) in September 1991, was designed primarily to measure stratospheric profiles of ClO, O3, H2O, and atmospheric pressure as a vertical reference. Global measurement of ClO, the predominant radical in chlorine destruction of ozone, was an especially important objective of UARS MLS. All objectives of UARS MLS have been accomplished and additional geophysical products beyond those for which the experiment was designed have been obtained, including measurement of upper-tropospheric water vapor, which is important for climate change studies. A follow-on MLS experiment is being developed for NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) and is scheduled to be launched on the EOS CHEMISTRY platform in late 2002. EOS MLS is designed for many stratospheric measurements, including HOx radicals, which could not be measured by UARS because adequate technology was not available, and better and more extensive upper-tropospheric and lower-stratospheric measurements.

  2. EOS Aura MLS, first year post-launch engineering assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Karen A.; Lay, Richard R.; Jarnot, Robert F.; Cofield, Richard E.; Flower, Dennis A.; Pickett, Herbert M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the current status of the MLS instrument which now continuously provides data to produce global maps of targeted chemical species as well as temperature, cloud ice, and gravity wave activity. Performance trends are assessed with respect to characterization during initial on-orbit activiation of the instrument, and with data from ground test verification prior to launch.

  3. MLS student active learning within a "cloud" technology program.

    PubMed

    Tille, Patricia M; Hall, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In November 2009, the MLS program in a large public university serving a geographically large, sparsely populated state instituted an initiative for the integration of technology enhanced teaching and learning within the curriculum. This paper is intended to provide an introduction to the system requirements and sample instructional exercises used to create an active learning technology-based classroom. Discussion includes the following: 1.) define active learning and the essential components, 2.) summarize teaching methods, technology and exercises utilized within a "cloud" technology program, 3.) describe a "cloud" enhanced classroom and programming 4.) identify active learning tools and exercises that can be implemented into laboratory science programs, and 5.) describe the evaluation and assessment of curriculum changes and student outcomes. The integration of technology in the MLS program is a continual process and is intended to provide student-driven active learning experiences.

  4. Interannual Variations of MLS Carbon Monoxide Induced by Solar Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jae N.; Wu, Dong L.; Ruzmaikin, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    More than eight years (2004-2012) of carbon monoxide (CO) measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are analyzed. The mesospheric CO, largely produced by the carbon dioxide (CO2) photolysis in the lower thermosphere, is sensitive to the solar irradiance variability. The long-term variation of observed mesospheric MLS CO concentrations at high latitudes is likely driven by the solar-cycle modulated UV forcing. Despite of different CO abundances in the southern and northern hemispheric winter, the solar-cycle dependence appears to be similar. This solar signal is further carried down to the lower altitudes by the dynamical descent in the winter polar vortex. Aura MLS CO is compared with the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE) total solar irradiance (TSI) and also with the spectral irradiance in the far ultraviolet (FUV) region from the SORCE Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE). Significant positive correlation (up to 0.6) is found between CO and FUVTSI in a large part of the upper atmosphere. The distribution of this positive correlation in the mesosphere is consistent with the expectation of CO changes induced by the solar irradiance variations.

  5. EOS MLS Lessons Learned: Design Ideas for Safer and Lower Cost Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dominick

    2012-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a complex instrument with a front end computer and 32 subsystem computers. MLS is one of four instruments on NASA's EOS Aura spacecraft With almost 8 years in orbit, MLS has a few lessons learned which can be applied during the design phase of future instruments to effect better longevity, more robust operations and a significant cost benefit during operations phase.

  6. [Macrolides, lincosamides, streptogramines (MLS): mechanisms of action and resistance].

    PubMed

    Ungureanu, Vasilica

    2010-01-01

    Macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramines are distinct antibiotic (AB) families, with different chemical structure, but with similar antibacterial spectre and mechanisms. Macrolides are natural products of secondary metabolism of several species of actynomyces; they represent a group of compounds with a lactonic ring of variable dimensions (12-22 atoms of C) that can bind, by means of glycosidic bonds, sacharridic and/or amino-sacharridic structures. Most of the MLS antibiotics are bacteriostatic. Their mechanisms consist in inhibiting protein synthesis. the target being 50 S subunit of the bacterial ribosome, the binding sites being different for the different MLS classes. Erythromycin (E) was introduced in therapy in 1952; quickly, several bacterial genera started developing resistance to E. Strains resistant to E were as well resistant to all macrolides and other antibiotics with different structures--lincosamides and streptogramines B--resistance phenotype called MLSB. The main molecular mechanisms for bacterial resistance to MLS are: (1) Target modification, coded by erm genes (>12 classes). In Gram-positive cocii MLSB resistance, regardless of erm gene, can be: inducible (i MLSB)--when the presence of the inductor AB is necessary for methylation enzyme production; constitutive (c MLSB)--when the methylation enzyme is continuously produced Distinction between iMLSB and cMLSB can be easily appreciated based on the phenotypic expression of bacteria. In streptococci--all MLSB antibiotics can act as methylase inductors. (2) The decrease of AB intracellular concentration by active efflux, coded by mef genes--also called M resistance phenotype, low level resistance (LLR). (3) AB inactivation (enzymatic modification of AB); there are different resistance phenotypes: MLSB +SA and L phenotype (in staphyilococci) or SA4 phenotype and L phenotype (in enterococci).

  7. Air traffic control by distributed management in a MLS environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreifeldt, J. G.; Parkin, L.; Hart, S.

    1977-01-01

    The microwave landing system (MLS) is a technically feasible means for increasing runway capacity since it could support curved approaches to a short final. The shorter the final segment of the approach, the wider the variety of speed mixes possible so that theoretically, capacity would ultimately be limited by runway occupance time only. An experiment contrasted air traffic control in a MLS environment under a centralized form of management and under distributed management which was supported by a traffic situation display in each of the 3 piloted simulators. Objective flight data, verbal communication and subjective responses were recorded on 18 trial runs lasting about 20 minutes each. The results were in general agreement with previous distributed management research. In particular, distributed management permitted a smaller spread of intercrossing times and both pilots and controllers perceived distributed management as the more 'ideal' system in this task. It is concluded from this and previous research that distributed management offers a viable alternative to centralized management with definite potential for dealing with dense traffic in a safe, orderly and expeditious manner.

  8. Software safety analysis activities during software development phases of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Hui-Yin; Sherif, Joseph S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the MLS software safety analysis activities and documents the SSA results. The scope of this software safety effort is consistent with the MLS system safety definition and is concentrated on the software faults and hazards that may have impact on the personnel safety and the environment safety.

  9. 76 FR 24045 - Notice of HUD-Held Multifamily Loan Sale (MLS 2011-1)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... Federal Housing Administration (FHA) insurance, in a competitive, sealed bid sale (MLS 2011-1). This notice also describes generally the bidding process for the sale and certain persons who are ineligible... of Mortgage Loans or on individual loans in MLS 2011-1. The Bidding Process The BIP described...

  10. The respiratory arsenate reductase from Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Afkar, E.; Lisak, J.; Saltikov, C.; Basu, P.; Oremland, R.S.; Stolz, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    The respiratory arsenate reductase from the Gram-positive, haloalkaliphile, Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10 was purified and characterized. It is a membrane bound heterodimer (150 kDa) composed of two subunits ArrA (110 kDa) and ArrB (34 kDa), with an apparent Km for arsenate of 34 ??M and Vmax of 2.5 ??mol min-1 mg-1. Optimal activity occurred at pH 9.5 and 150 g l-1 of NaCl. Metal analysis (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) of the holoenzyme and sequence analysis of the catalytic subunit (ArrA; the gene for which was cloned and sequenced) indicate it is a member of the DMSO reductase family of molybdoproteins. ?? 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Aura MLS Cloud Measurements: First-Year Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wu, Dong L.

    2005-01-01

    Aura MLS provides the first vertical upper tropospheric cloud profiling from space, enabling global survey of the vertical structure of cloud systems, with seasonal and geographical variations, needed to evaluate the way clouds are parameterized in global models, thereby contributing to the understanding of cloud-climate feedbacks, and improved weather and climate predictions. The vertical structure of cloud systems is fundamentally important for understanding how clouds affect both their regional and large-scale atmospheric and radiative environments. The regional cloud profiles provide a critical tests of important parameterizations that enable the calculation of radiative flux profiles and heating rates throughout the atmospheric column, which in turn also regulates the water and energy cycles in the upper troposphere

  12. EOS MLS Level 1B Data Processing Software. Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perun, Vincent S.; Jarnot, Robert F.; Wagner, Paul A.; Cofield, Richard E., IV; Nguyen, Honghanh T.; Vuu, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This software is an improvement on Version 2, which was described in EOS MLS Level 1B Data Processing, Version 2.2, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 5 (May 2009), p. 34. It accepts the EOS MLS Level 0 science/engineering data, and the EOS Aura spacecraft ephemeris/attitude data, and produces calibrated instrument radiances and associated engineering and diagnostic data. This version makes the code more robust, improves calibration, provides more diagnostics outputs, defines the Galactic core more finely, and fixes the equator crossing. The Level 1 processing software manages several different tasks. It qualifies each data quantity using instrument configuration and checksum data, as well as data transmission quality flags. Statistical tests are applied for data quality and reasonableness. The instrument engineering data (e.g., voltages, currents, temperatures, and encoder angles) is calibrated by the software, and the filter channel space reference measurements are interpolated onto the times of each limb measurement with the interpolates being differenced from the measurements. Filter channel calibration target measurements are interpolated onto the times of each limb measurement, and are used to compute radiometric gain. The total signal power is determined and analyzed by each digital autocorrelator spectrometer (DACS) during each data integration. The software converts each DACS data integration from an autocorrelation measurement in the time domain into a spectral measurement in the frequency domain, and estimates separately the spectrally, smoothly varying and spectrally averaged components of the limb port signal arising from antenna emission and scattering effects. Limb radiances are also calibrated.

  13. HNO3 From MLS: Building on the UARS Legacy With Aura Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.; Livesey, N. J.; Filipiak, M. J.; Waters, J. W.

    2003-12-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measured the global distribution of stratospheric HNO3 over annual cycles for much of the 1990s, albeit with reduced sampling frequency in the latter half of the decade. The UARS MLS HNO3 dataset, unique in its scope, has previously been studied to explore the seasonal, interhemispheric, and interannual variations in the distribution of HNO3. This work, however, suffered from a number of limitations: It was confined to a single level in the lower stratosphere (465 K potential temperature), it was based on version~4 MLS data, and it relied heavily on zonal-mean comparisons of the evolution of HNO3 in the northern and southern hemispheres. Here we update and significantly expand the previous work by examining the distribution of HNO3 throughout the lower and middle stratosphere from 420 to 960 K. We use version~6 MLS HNO3 data, which, in addition to having much better precision, a larger vertical range, and better definition of the HNO3 profile, have also been corrected to account for the neglect of some excited vibrational state lines that caused the version~4 (and version~5) retrievals to substantially overestimate HNO3 peak values. In addition, we calculate averages over equivalent latitude, which are more representative of vortex behavior than zonal means, especially in the Arctic. This work provides a comprehensive picture of the behavior of stratospheric HNO3 during the UARS timeframe and establishes an important baseline for upcoming measurements from the EOS Aura mission, which will include a second-generation MLS experiment. The capability of EOS MLS is greatly enhanced over that of UARS MLS. We review the anticipated improvements in the EOS MLS HNO3 measurements (e.g., better spatial and temporal coverage, better horizontal and vertical resolution, larger vertical range), show some results from retrieval simulations, and discuss a few specific polar process studies that

  14. Modeling methodology for MLS range navigation system errors using flight test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karmali, M. S.; Phatak, A. V.

    1982-01-01

    Flight test data was used to develop a methodology for modeling MLS range navigation system errors. The data used corresponded to the constant velocity and glideslope approach segment of a helicopter landing trajectory. The MLS range measurement was assumed to consist of low frequency and random high frequency components. The random high frequency component was extracted from the MLS range measurements. This was done by appropriate filtering of the range residual generated from a linearization of the range profile for the final approach segment. This range navigation system error was then modeled as an autoregressive moving average (ARMA) process. Maximum likelihood techniques were used to identify the parameters of the ARMA process.

  15. Guidance law simulation studies for complex approaches using the Microwave Landing System (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    This report documents results for MLS guidance algorithm development conducted by DAC for NASA under the Advance Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) Technology Studies program (NAS1-18028). The study consisted of evaluating guidance laws for vertical and lateral path control, as well as speed control, by simulating an MLS approach for the Washington National Airport. This work is an extension and generalization of a previous ATOPS contract (NAS1-16202) completed by DAC in 1985. The Washington river approach was simulated by six waypoints and one glideslope change and consisted of an eleven nautical mile approach path. Tracking performance was generated for 10 cases representing several different conditions, which included MLS noise, steady wind, turbulence, and windshear. Results of this simulation phase are suitable for use in future fixed-base simulator evaluations employing actual hardware (autopilot and a performance management system), as well as crew procedures and information requirements for MLS.

  16. TES/MLS Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Nadir (TML2COS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-04-06

    ... associated errors derived using TES & MLS spectral radiance measurements taken at nearest time and locations. Also provided are calculated ... kernels and a priori constraint vectors. News:  TES News Join TES News List Project ...

  17. TES/MLS Aura L2 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Nadir (TML2CO)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-04-05

    ... associated errors derived using TES & MLS spectral radiance measurements taken at nearest time and locations. Also provided are calculated ... kernels and a priori constraint vectors. News:  TES News Join TES News List Project ...

  18. Early Validation Analyses of Atmospheric Profiles from EOS MLS on the Aura Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, Lucien; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Read, William G.; Jiang, Yibo B.; Jimenez, Carlos; Filipiak, Mark J.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Santee, Michelle L.; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wu, Dong L.; Manney, Gloria L.; Drouin, Brian J.; Waters, Joe W.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Chris D.; Walker, Kaley A.; Jucks, Kenneth W.; Geoffrey, C. Toon; Margitan, James J.; Sen, Bhaswar; Webster, Christopher R.; Christensen, Lance E.; Elkins, James W.

    2006-01-01

    We present results of early validation studies using retrieved atmospheric profiles from the Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on the Aura satellite. 'Global' results are presented for MLS measurements of atmospheric temperature, ozone, water vapor, hydrogen chloride, nitrous oxide, nitric acid, and carbon monoxide, with a focus on the January-March 2005 time period. These global comparisons are made using long-standing global satellites and meteorological datasets, as well as some measurements from more recently launched satellites. Comparisons of MLS data with measurements from the Ft. Sumner, NM, September 2004 balloon flights are also presented. Overall, good agreeement is obtained, often within 5% to 10%, but we point out certain issues to resolve and some larger systematic differences; some artifacts in the first publicly released MLS (version 1.5) dataset are noted.We comment briefly on future plans for validation and software improvements.

  19. EOS MLS Level 2 Data Processing Software Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livesey, Nathaniel J.; VanSnyder, Livesey W.; Read, William G.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Lambert, Alyn; Santee, Michelle L.; Nguyen, Honghanh T.; Froidevaux, Lucien; wang, Shuhui; Manney, Gloria L.; Wu, Dong L.; Wagner, Paul A.; Vuu, Christina; Pumphrey, Hugh C.

    2011-01-01

    This software accepts the EOS MLS calibrated measurements of microwave radiances products and operational meteorological data, and produces a set of estimates of atmospheric temperature and composition. This version has been designed to be as flexible as possible. The software is controlled by a Level 2 Configuration File that controls all aspects of the software: defining the contents of state and measurement vectors, defining the configurations of the various forward models available, reading appropriate a priori spectroscopic and calibration data, performing retrievals, post-processing results, computing diagnostics, and outputting results in appropriate files. In production mode, the software operates in a parallel form, with one instance of the program acting as a master, coordinating the work of multiple slave instances on a cluster of computers, each computing the results for individual chunks of data. In addition, to do conventional retrieval calculations and producing geophysical products, the Level 2 Configuration File can instruct the software to produce files of simulated radiances based on a state vector formed from a set of geophysical product files taken as input. Combining both the retrieval and simulation tasks in a single piece of software makes it far easier to ensure that identical forward model algorithms and parameters are used in both tasks. This also dramatically reduces the complexity of the code maintenance effort.

  20. Solar Occultation Satellite Data and Derived Meteorological Products: Sampling Issues and Comparisons with Aura MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, Gloria; Daffer, William H.; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Bernath, Peter F.; Hoppel, Karl W.; Walker, Kaley A.; Knosp, Brian W.; Boone, Chris; Remsberg, Ellis E.; Santee, Michelle L.; Harvey, V. Lynn; Pawson, Steven; Jackson, David R.; Deaver, Lance; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Lambert, Alyn; Schwartz, Michael J.; Froidevaux, Lucien; McLeod, Sean; Takacs, Lawrence L.; Suarez, Max J.; Trepte, Charles R.; Livesey, Nathaniel; Harwood, Robert S.; Waters, Joe W.

    2007-01-01

    Derived Meteorological Products (DMPs, including potential temperature (theta), potential vorticity, equivalent latitude (EqL), horizontal winds and tropopause locations) have been produced for the locations and times of measurements by several solar occultation (SO) instruments and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). DMPs are calculated from several meteorological analyses for the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer, Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and III, Halogen Occultation Experiment, and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement II and III SO instruments and MLS. Time-series comparisons of MLS version 1.5 and SO data using DMPs show good qualitative agreement in time evolution of O3, N2O, H20, CO, HNO3, HCl and temperature; quantitative agreement is good in most cases. EqL-coordinate comparisons of MLS version 2.2 and SO data show good quantitative agreement throughout the stratosphere for most of these species, with significant biases for a few species in localized regions. Comparisons in EqL coordinates of MLS and SO data, and of SO data with geographically coincident MLS data provide insight into where and how sampling effects are important in interpretation of the sparse SO data, thus assisting in fully utilizing the SO data in scientific studies and comparisons with other sparse datasets. The DMPs are valuable for scientific studies and to facilitate validation of non-coincident measurements.

  1. Climatology 2011: An MLS and Sonde Derived Ozone Climatology for Satellite Retrieval Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPeters, Richard D.; Labow, Gordon J.

    2012-01-01

    The ozone climatology used as the a priori for the version 8 Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) retrieval algorithms has been updated. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on Aura has excellent latitude coverage and measures ozone daily from the upper troposphere to the lower mesosphere. The new climatology consists of monthly average ozone profiles for ten degree latitude zones covering pressure altitudes from 0 to 65 km. The climatology was formed by combining data from Aura MLS (2004-2010) with data from balloon sondes (1988-2010). Ozone below 8 km (below 12 km at high latitudes) is based on balloons sondes, while ozone above 16 km (21 km at high latitudes) is based on MLS measurements. Sonde and MLS data are blended in the transition region. Ozone accuracy in the upper troposphere is greatly improved because of the near uniform coverage by Aura MLS, while the addition of a large number of balloon sonde measurements improves the accuracy in the lower troposphere, in the tropics and southern hemisphere in particular. The addition of MLS data also improves the accuracy of climatology in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere. The revised climatology has been used for the latest reprocessing of SBUV and TOMS satellite ozone data.

  2. Recent Divergences Between Stratospheric Water Vapor Measurements by Aura MLS and Frost Point Hygrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, D. F.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Davis, S. M.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.; Read, W. G.; Voemel, H.; Selkirk, H. B.

    2015-12-01

    A recent comparison of stratospheric water vapor measurements by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and frost point hygrometers (FPs) during 2004-2012 reported agreement better than 1% from 68 to 26 hPa, small but statistically significant biases at 83 and 100 hPa, and no compelling evidence of long-term linear trends in FP-MLS differences [Hurst et al., 2014]. A previous comparison [Voemel et al., 2007] also found good agreement above 83 hPa. Recently it has become evident that differences between FP and MLS stratospheric water vapor measurements have widened during the last 5 years at two Northern Hemisphere (NH) mid-latitude sounding sites. Here we examine differences between coincident MLS and FP measurements of stratospheric water vapor at five sounding sites: two in the NH mid-latitudes (Boulder, Colorado and Lindenberg, Germany), two in the tropics (San Jose, Costa Rica and Hilo, Hawaii), and one in the SH mid-latitudes (Lauder, New Zealand). Analyses of the Boulder and Lindenberg data reveal reasonably uniform breakpoints in the timeseries of FP-MLS differences throughout the stratosphere, indicating that trends after mid-2010 are statistically different from trends before mid-2010. At Boulder and Lindenberg the post-breakpoint trends are statistically significant and fairly consistent over eight MLS retrieval pressures (100-26 hPa), averaging -0.08 ± 0.02 and -0.05 ± 0.02 ppmv per year, respectively (Figure 1). These translate to mean changes in stratospheric FP-MLS differences of -0.42 ± 0.08 ppmv (-10 ± 2%) and -0.23 ± 0.08 ppmv (-6 ± 2%) between mid-2010 and mid-2015. Breakpoints for the eight MLS pressure levels above Lauder are less uniform than for the two NH sites, however forced breakpoints of mid-2010 produce a mean stratospheric trend of -0.05 ± 0.02 ppmv per year in the FP-MLS differences. Breakpoints for the two tropical sites are inconsistent, as are the trend results with forced breakpoints of mid-2010. Hurst, D.F., et al., (2014

  3. Relationships of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor, Clouds and SST: MLS Observations, ECMWF Analyses and GCM Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Hui; Waliser, Duane E.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Li, Jui-lin; Read, William G.; Waters, Joe W.; Tompkins, Adrian M.

    2006-01-01

    The relationships of upper tropospheric water vapor (UTWV), cloud ice and sea surface temperature (SST) are examined in the annual cycles of ECMWF analyses and simulations from 15 atmosphere-ocean coupled models which were contributed to the IPCC AR4. The results are compared with the observed relationships based on UTWV and cloud ice measurements from MLS on Aura. It is shown that the ECMWF analyses produce positive correlations between UTWV, cloud ice and SST, similar to the MLS data. The rate of the increase of cloud ice and UTWV with SST is about 30% larger than that for MLS. For the IPCC simulations, the relationships between UTWV, cloud ice and SST are qualitatively captured. However, the magnitudes of the simulated cloud ice show a considerable disagreement between models, by nearly a factor of 10. The amplitudes of the approximate linear relations between UTWV, cloud ice and SST vary by a factor up to 4.

  4. Polar processing and development of the 2004 Antarctic ozone hole : first results from MLS on Aura

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Read, W. G.; Schwartz, M. J.; Waters, J. W.; Harwood, R. S.

    2005-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on Aura is providing an extensive data set on stratospheric winter polar processing, including the first daily global observations of HCl, together with simultaneous measurements of ClO, HNO3, H2O, O3, N2O, and temperature (among others). We present first results charting the evolution of these quantities during the 2004 Antarctic late winter. MLS observations of chlorine deactivation and ozone loss during this period are shown to be consistent with results from the SLIMCAT chemical transport model.

  5. Refinement and validation of two digital Microwave Landing System (MLS) theoretical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duff, W. G.; Guarino, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    Two digital microwave landing system theoretical models are considered which are generic models for the Doppler and scanning-beam frequency reference versions of the MLS. These models represent errors resulting from both system noise and discrete multipath. The data used for the validation effort were obtained from the Texas Instrument conventional scanning beam and the Hazeltine Doppler feasibility hardware versions of the MLS. Topics discussed include tape read software, time history plots, computation of power spectral density, smoothed power spectra, best-fit models, different equations for digital simulation, and discrete multipath errors.

  6. Mid-latitude Ozone and CIO Trends Based on Two Years of UARS MLS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    Variations in ozone and chlorine monoxide observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) abroad the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) during the first two years of operation are presented. We focus on mid-latitudes, where significant ozone decreases are observed in the lower stratosphere, and we offer some comparisons with other data sets. We will attempt to place the mid-latitude changes in context with changes observed at other latitudes. Possible correlations between the MLS ozone and CIO observations will be discussed.

  7. Terminal area automatic navigation, guidance, and control research using the Microwave Landing System (MLS). Part 3: A comparison of waypoint guidance algorithms for RNAV/MLS transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.

    1982-01-01

    The results of an investigation carried out for the Langley Research Center Terminal Configured Vehicle Program are presented. The investigation generated and compared three path update algorithms designed to provide smooth transition for an aircraft guidance system from DME, VORTAC, and barometric navaids to the more precise MLS by modifying the desired 3-D flight path. The first, called the Zero Cross Track, eliminates the discontinuity in cross track and altitude error by designating the first valid MLS aircraft position as the desired first waypoint, while retaining all subsequent waypoints. The discontinuity in track angle is left unaltered. The second, called the Tangent Path also eliminates the discontinuity in cross track and altitude and choose a new desired heading to be tangent to the next oncoming circular arc turn. The third, called the Continued Track eliminates the discontinuity in cross track, altitude and track angle by accepting the current MLS position and track angle as the desired ones and recomputes the location of the next waypoint. A method is presented for providing a waypoint guidance path reconstruction which treats turns of less than, and greater than, 180 degrees in a uniform manner to construct the desired path.

  8. Flight performance of the TCV B-737 airplane at Jorge Newberry Airport, Buenos Aires, Argentina using TRSB/MLS guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F.; Clark, L.

    1980-01-01

    The flight performance of the Terminal Configured Vehicle airplane is summarized. Demonstration automatic approaches and landings utilizing time reference scanning beam microwave landing system (TRSB/MLS) guidance are presented. The TRSB/MLS was shown to provide the terminal area guidance necessary for flying curved automatic approaches with final legs as short as 2 km.

  9. 78 FR 74157 - Notice of HUD-Held Multifamily Loan Sale (MLS 2014-1)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... by Units of Local Governments (ULGs) and Non-profit Corporations on December 12, 2013 (MLS 2014-1... individual or entity that is not/cannot be classified as a Unit of Local Government (ULG) or Non-profit..., Missouri. The Mortgage Loan is a non-performing mortgage loan. A listing of this Mortgage Loan is...

  10. Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome: Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsay, E.A.; Grillo, A.; Ferrero, G.B.; Baldini, A.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y.; Roth, E.J.; Magenis, E.; Grompe, M.; Hulten, M.

    1994-01-15

    The microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome (MIM309801) is a severe developmental disorder observed in XX individuals with distal Xp segmental monosomy. The phenotype of this syndrome overlaps with that of both Aicardi (MIM 305050) and Goltz (MIM 305600) syndromes, two X-linked dominant, male-lethal disorders. Here the authors report the clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular characterization of 3 patients with this syndrome. Two of these patients are females with a terminal Xpter-p22.2 deletion. One of these 2 patients had an aborted fetus with anencephaly and the same chromosome abnormality. The third patient is an XX male with Xp/Yp exchange spanning the SRY gene which results in distal Xp monosomy. The extensive clinical variability observed in these patients and the results of the molecular analysis suggest that X-inactivation plays an important role in determining the phenotype of the MLS syndrome. The authors propose that the MLS, Aicardi, and Goltz syndromes are due to the involvement of the same gene(s), and that different patterns of X-inactivation are responsible for the phenotypic differences observed in these 3 disorders. However, they cannot rule out that each component of the MLS phenotype is caused by deletion of a different gene (a contiguous gene syndrome). 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Global Carbon Monoxide Products from Combined AIRS, TES and MLS Measurements on A-Train Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, Juying X.; Yang, R.; Wei, Z.; Carminati, F.; Tangborn, A.; Sun, Z.; Lahoz, W.; Attie, J. L.; El Amraoui, L.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    This study tests a novel methodology to add value to satellite data sets. This methodology, data fusion, is similar to data assimilation, except that the background modelbased field is replaced by a satellite data set, in this case AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder) carbon monoxide (CO) measurements. The observational information comes from CO measurements with lower spatial coverage than AIRS, namely, from TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) and MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder). We show that combining these data sets with data fusion uses the higher spectral resolution of TES to extend AIRS CO observational sensitivity to the lower troposphere, a region especially important for air quality studies. We also show that combined CO measurements from AIRS and MLS provide enhanced information in the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere) region compared to each product individually. The combined AIRS-TES and AIRS-MLS CO products are validated against DACOM (differential absorption mid-IR diode laser spectrometer) in situ CO measurements from the INTEX-B (Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment: MILAGRO and Pacific phases) field campaign and in situ data from HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations) flights. The data fusion results show improved sensitivities in the lower and upper troposphere (20-30% and above 20%, respectively) as compared with AIRS-only version 5 CO retrievals, and improved daily coverage compared with TES and MLS CO data.

  12. Automated landing, rollout, and turnoff using MLS and magnetic cable sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.; Schmidt, S. F.; Mann, F. I.

    1977-01-01

    A description of the simulation program used to study the landing approach, rollout and turnoff of the B737-100 aircraft utilizing MLS and a buried magnetic leader cable as navigation aids is presented. Simulation results are given and show the concept to be both feasible and practical for commercial type aircraft terminal area control.

  13. Comparisons of EOS MLS cloud ice measurements with ECMWF analyses and GCM simulations : initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, J. - L.; Waliser, D. E.; Jiang, J. H.; Wu, D. L.; Read, W.; Waters, J. W.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the status of global climate models (GCMs) in simulating upper-tropospheric ice water content (IWC), a new set of IWC measurements from the Earth Observing System's Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are used. Comparisons are made with ECMWF analyses and simulations from several GCMs, including two with multi-scale-modeling framework.

  14. Comparisons of global cloud ice from MLS, CloudSat, and correlative data sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. L.; Austin, R. T.; Deng, M.; Durden, S. L.; Heymsfield, A. J.; Jiang, J. H.; Lambert, A.; Li, J.-L.; Livesey, N. J.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Pittman, J. V.; Stephens, G. L.; Tanelli, S.; Vane, D. G.; Waliser, D. E.

    2009-04-01

    Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) version 2.2 (V2.2) and CloudSat R04 (release 4) ice water content (IWC) and partial-column ice water path (pIWP) measurements are analyzed and compared to other correlative data sets. The MLS IWC, representing an average over ˜300 × 7 × 4 km3 volume, is retrieved at 215-268 hPa with precision varying between 0.06 and 1 mg/m3. The MLS pIWP products, representing the partial columns over ˜100 × 7 km2 area with the bottom at ˜8, ˜6, and ˜11 km for 115, 240, and 640 GHz, have estimated precisions of 5, 1.5, and 0.8 g/m2, respectively. CloudSat, on the other hand, shows a minimum detectable sensitivity of -31 dBZ in the reflectivity measurement at 94 GHz. CloudSat IWC is an average over ˜1.8 × 1.4 × 0.5 km3 volume, and its precision varies from 0.4 mg/m3 at 8 km to 1.6 mg/m3 at 12 km. The estimated single-profile precision for CloudSat IWP is ˜9 g/m2. However, these measurements are associated with relatively large systematic error, mostly due to uncertainties in the retrieval assumptions about microphysics, which lead to relatively poor accuracy compared to measurement precision. To characterize systematic differences among various observations and those derived from models, we employ the normalized probability density function (pdf) in the comparisons. CloudSat IWC shows generally consistent slopes of pdf distribution with in situ observations, particularly at ˜12 km where the in situ data come mostly from long-leg flights. Despite similar IWC morphology found between MLS and CloudSat observations, CloudSat R04 IWC retrieval is higher compared to MLS, especially at 14-17 km where the MLS technique is not limited by sensitivity saturation. The MLS and CloudSat IWC pdf's agree well in the overlapped sensitivity range with relative difference <50%, but the difference appears to increase with IWC. MLS and CloudSat cloud ice measurements are compared with other data sets in terms of monthly map and pdf. Comparisons with

  15. Divergent MLS1 Promoters Lie on a Fitness Plateau for Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Andrew C; Olsen, Gerilyn M; Fay, Justin C

    2016-05-01

    Qualitative patterns of gene activation and repression are often conserved despite an abundance of quantitative variation in expression levels within and between species. A major challenge to interpreting patterns of expression divergence is knowing which changes in gene expression affect fitness. To characterize the fitness effects of gene expression divergence, we placed orthologous promoters from eight yeast species upstream of malate synthase (MLS1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae As expected, we found these promoters varied in their expression level under activated and repressed conditions as well as in their dynamic response following loss of glucose repression. Despite these differences, only a single promoter driving near basal levels of expression caused a detectable loss of fitness. We conclude that the MLS1 promoter lies on a fitness plateau whereby even large changes in gene expression can be tolerated without a substantial loss of fitness.

  16. Science Accomplishments from a Decade of Aura OMI/MLS Tropospheric Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, Jerald R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Joiner, Joanna; Duncan, Bryan N.; Olsen, Mark A.; Oman, Luke D.; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Liu, X.; Wargan, K.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Strahan, Susan E.; Pawson, Steven; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Newman, Paul A.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Cooper, Owen R.; Haffner, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of tropospheric ozone from combined Aura OMI and MLS instruments have yielded a large number of new and important science discoveries over the last decade. These discoveries have generated a much greater understanding of biomass burning, lightning NO, and stratosphere-troposphere exchange sources of tropospheric ozone, ENSO dynamics and photochemistry, intra-seasonal variability-Madden-Julian Oscillation including convective transport, radiative forcing, measuring ozone pollution from space, improvements to ozone retrieval algorithms, and evaluation of chemical-transport and chemistry-climate models. The OMI-MLS measurements have been instrumental in giving us better understanding of the dynamics and chemistry involving tropospheric ozone and the many drivers affecting the troposphere in general. This discussion will provide an overview focusing on our main science results.

  17. Enhanced Positive Water Vapor Feedback Associated with Tropical Deep Convection: New Evidence from Aura MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Su, Hui; Read, William G.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Waters, Joe W.; Wu, Dong L.; Fetzer, Eric J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent simultaneous observations of upper tropospheric (UT) water vapor and cloud ice from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite provide new evidence for tropical convective influence on UT water vapor and its associated greenhouse effect. The observations show that UT water vapor increases as cloud ice water content increases. They also show that, when sea surface temperature (SST) exceeds approx.300 K, UT cloud ice associated with tropical deep convection increases sharply with increasing SST. The moistening of the upper troposphere by deep convection leads to an enhanced positive water vapor feedback, about 3 times that implied solely by thermodynamics. Over tropical oceans when SST greater than approx.300 K, the 'convective UT water vapor feedback' inferred from the MLS observations contributes approximately 65% of the sensitivity of the clear-sky greenhouse parameter to SST.

  18. Dermatoscopic aspects of the microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Hiram Larangeira de; Rossi, Gabriela; Abreu, Luciana Boff de; Bergamaschi, Cristina; Silva, Alessandra Banaszeski da; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    The association of microphthalmia and linear skin defects was named microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS) or MIDAS syndrome (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea), an X-chromosomal disorder manifesting mainly in females. We examined a female newborn with facial linear skin defects following the Blaschko lines. Computer tomography and ophthalmological examination confirmed bilateral microphthalmia. An interstitial microdeletion at Xp22.2, encompassing the entire HCCS gene, was identified. Dermatoscopic examination showed erythematous linear areas with telangectasias and absence of sebaceous glands, which appear as brilliant white dots. Vellus hairs were also absent in the red areas. Dermatoscopy could help to establish the diagnosis of MLS/MIDAS syndrome by confirming the aplastic nature of the lesions.

  19. NASA/FAA Helicopter ATC simulation investigation of RNAV/MLS instrument approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peach, L. L., Jr.; Tobias, L.; Lee, H. Q.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA/FAA Helicopter Air Traffic Control (ATC) simulation investigations to determine the feasibility of simultaneous, independent instrument approach procedures for helicopters at major terminal areas, using Area Navigation/Microwave Landing System (RNAV/MLS) guidance, was conducted at several levels of helicopter display sophistication, up to that of a Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) system. Test objectives included the determination of pilot acceptability and the tracking performance of the RNAV/MLS's noninterfering rotorcraft approach path structure, along with the evaluation of the effect on controller workload of multiroute structures combining conventional and rotorcraft approaches at various arrival rates and traffic separations. The utility of electronic area maps and CDTI displays was also investigated. Participating pilots flew 127 simulated instrument approaches in an ATC simulation laboratory.

  20. Divergent MLS1 Promoters Lie on a Fitness Plateau for Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bergen, Andrew C.; Olsen, Gerilyn M.; Fay, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative patterns of gene activation and repression are often conserved despite an abundance of quantitative variation in expression levels within and between species. A major challenge to interpreting patterns of expression divergence is knowing which changes in gene expression affect fitness. To characterize the fitness effects of gene expression divergence, we placed orthologous promoters from eight yeast species upstream of malate synthase (MLS1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As expected, we found these promoters varied in their expression level under activated and repressed conditions as well as in their dynamic response following loss of glucose repression. Despite these differences, only a single promoter driving near basal levels of expression caused a detectable loss of fitness. We conclude that the MLS1 promoter lies on a fitness plateau whereby even large changes in gene expression can be tolerated without a substantial loss of fitness. PMID:26782997

  1. EOS MLS Science Data Processing System: A Description of Architecture and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddy, David T.; Echeverri, Mark D.; Wagner, Paul A.; Hanzel, Audrey T.; Fuller, Ryan A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture and capabilities of the Science Data Processing System (SDPS) for the EOS MLS. The SDPS consists of two major components--the Science Computing Facility and the Science Investigator-led Processing System. The Science Computing Facility provides the facilities for the EOS MLS Science Team to perform the functions of scientific algorithm development, processing software development, quality control of data products, and scientific analyses. The Science Investigator-led Processing System processes and reprocesses the science data for the entire mission and delivers the data products to the Science Computing Facility and to the Goddard Space Flight Center Earth Science Distributed Active Archive Center, which archives and distributes the standard science products.

  2. Software management and implementation plan for the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) carried on a NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, H. Y.; Girard, M. A.; Perun, V. S.; Sherif, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a Software Management and Implementation Plan (SIMP) for managing and controlling the development of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument software, and the Instrument Ground Support Equipment (IGSE) software.

  3. The effect of near-infrared MLS laser radiation on cell membrane structure and radical generation.

    PubMed

    Kujawa, Jolanta; Pasternak, Kamila; Zavodnik, Ilya; Irzmański, Robert; Wróbel, Dominika; Bryszewska, Maria

    2014-09-01

    The therapeutic effects of low-power laser radiation of different wavelengths and light doses are well known, but the biochemical mechanism of the interaction of laser light with living cells is not fully understood. We have investigated the effect of MLS (Multiwave Locked System) laser near-infrared irradiation on cell membrane structure, functional properties, and free radical generation using human red blood cells and breast cancer MCF-4 cells. The cells were irradiated with low-intensity MLS near-infrared (simultaneously 808 nm, continuous emission and 905 nm, pulse emission, pulse-wave frequency, 1,000 or 2,000 Hz) laser light at light doses from 0 to 15 J (average power density 212.5 mW/cm(2), spot size was 3.18 cm(2)) at 22 °C, the activity membrane bound acetylcholinesterase, cell stability, anti-oxidative activity, and free radical generation were the parameters used in characterizing the structural and functional changes of the cell. Near-infrared low-intensity laser radiation changed the acetylcholinesterase activity of the red blood cell membrane in a dose-dependent manner: There was a considerable increase of maximal enzymatic rate and Michaelis constant due to changes in the membrane structure. Integral parameters such as erythrocyte stability, membrane lipid peroxidation, or methemoglobin levels remained unchanged. Anti-oxidative capacity of the red blood cells increased after MLS laser irradiation. This irradiation induced a time-dependent increase in free radical generation in MCF-4 cells. Low-intensity near-infrared MLS laser radiation induces free radical generation and changes enzymatic and anti-oxidative activities of cellular components. Free radical generation may be the mechanism of the biomodulative effect of laser radiation.

  4. Global ozone observations from the UARS MLS: An overview of zonal-mean results

    SciTech Connect

    Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.; Read, W.G.; Elson, L.S.; Flower, D.A.; Jarnot, R.F.

    1994-10-15

    Global ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are presented, in both vertically resolved and column abundance formats. The authors review the zonal-mean ozone variations measured over the two and a half years since launch in September 1991. Well-known features such as the annual and semiannual variations are ubiquitous. In the equatorial regions, longer-term changes are believed to be related to the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), with a strong semiannual signal above 20 hPa. Ozone values near 50 hPa exhibit an equatorial low from October 1991 to June 1992, after which the low ozone pattern splits into two subtropical lows (possibly in connection with residual circulation changes tied to the QBO) and returns to an equatorial low in September 1993. The ozone hole development at high southern latitudes is apparent in MLS column data integrated down to 100 hPa, with a pattern generally consistent with Nimbus-7 Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) measurements of total column; the MLS data reinforce current knowledge of this lower-stratospheric phenomenon by providing a height-dependent view of the variations. The region from 30{degrees}S to 30{degrees}N (an area equal to half the global area) shows very little change in the ozone column from year to year and within each year. Finally, residual ozone values extracted from TOMS-minus-MLS column data are briefly presented as a preliminary view into the potential usefulness of such studies, with information on tropospheric ozone as an ultimate goal. 99 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Analysis of the Suitability of OMPS LP Ozone Profile Dataset for Extending the Aura MLS Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramarova, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Stolarski, R. S.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    The new Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), launched on 28 October 2011 on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, represents the next generation of the US ozone monitoring system. The OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) sensor measures solar radiances scattered from the atmospheric limb in the UV and visible spectral ranges and reconstruct the vertical ozone profiles from the cloud top up to 60 km. The regular LP observations started in early 2012, and now the LP data record exceeds 2.5 years. In this presentation we will demonstrate capability of the new LP sensor to characterize the vertical ozone distribution in different atmospheric regions that are most sensitive to the changes in the stratospheric composition and dynamics. We will consider: a) the seasonal ozone patterns in the lower stratosphere - upper troposphere; b) the vertical ozone distribution inside the Antarctic ozone hole; c) the ozone patterns forced by the Quasi-Biennial Oscillations in the lower tropical stratosphere. The main focus of this study is to perform a comprehensive analysis of ozone patterns obtained from OMPS LP with those observed by Aura MLS to isolate similarities and differences between two sensors in characterizing these processes. We will examine how well LP reproduces the named above natural signals in comparison with MLS in terms of amplitude, phase and vertical structure. One of the key issues is that two instruments measure ozone in different coordinate systems: the LP measures ozone profiles as number density on a regular altitude scale, while Aura MLS retrieves ozone profiles as mixing ratios on pressure vertical grids. The comparison of two measurements requires unit conversion that in turn involves temperature profiles. Thus, the uncertainties related to the unit conversion should be accounted during the analysis. This scientific validation is critical for the further LP algorithm improvement and continuation of the Aura MLS ozone record in the future.

  6. A global climatology of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone derived from Aura OMI and MLS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Chandra, S.; Labow, G.; Bhartia, P. K.; Froidevaux, L.; Witte, J. C.

    2011-06-01

    A global climatology of tropospheric and stratospheric column ozone is derived by combining six years of Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) ozone measurements for the period October 2004 through December 2010. The OMI/MLS tropospheric ozone climatology exhibits large temporal and spatial variability which includes ozone accumulation zones in the tropical south Atlantic year-round and in the subtropical Mediterranean/Asia region in summer months. High levels of tropospheric ozone in the Northern Hemisphere also persist in mid-latitudes over the Eastern North American and Asian continents extending eastward over the Pacific Ocean. For stratospheric ozone climatology from MLS, largest ozone abundance lies in the Northern Hemisphere in the latitude range 70° N-80° N in February-April and in the Southern Hemisphere around 40° S-50° S during months August-October. The largest stratospheric ozone abundances in the Northern Hemisphere lie over North America and Eastern Asia extending eastward across the Pacific Ocean and in the Southern Hemisphere south of Australia extending eastward across the dateline. With the advent of many newly developing 3-D chemistry and transport models it is advantageous to have such a dataset for evaluating the performance of the models in relation to dynamical and photochemical processes controlling the ozone distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere. The OMI/MLS ozone gridded climatology data, both calculated mean values and RMS uncertainties are made available to the science community via the NASA total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) website http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov.

  7. A global climatology of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone derived from Aura OMI and MLS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Chandra, S.; Labow, G. J.; Bhartia, P. K.; Froidevaux, L.; Witte, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    A global climatology of tropospheric and stratospheric column ozone is derived by combining six years of Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) ozone measurements for the period October 2004 through December 2010. The OMI/MLS tropospheric ozone climatology exhibits large temporal and spatial variability which includes ozone accumulation zones in the tropical south Atlantic year-round and in the subtropical Mediterranean/Asia region in summer months. High levels of tropospheric ozone in the Northern Hemisphere also persist in mid-latitudes over the eastern part of the North American continent extending across the Atlantic Ocean and the eastern part of the Asian continent extending across the Pacific Ocean. For stratospheric ozone climatology from MLS, largest column abundance is in the Northern Hemisphere in the latitude range 70° N-80° N in February-April and in the Southern Hemisphere around 40° S-50° S during August-October. Largest stratospheric ozone lies in the Northern Hemisphere and extends from the eastern Asian continent eastward across the Pacific Ocean and North America. With the advent of many newly developing 3-D chemistry and transport models it is advantageous to have such a dataset for evaluating the performance of the models in relation to dynamical and photochemical processes controlling the ozone distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere. The OMI/MLS gridded ozone climatology data are made available to the science community via the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center ozone and air quality website http://ozoneaq.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

  8. Impact of EOS MLS ozone data on medium-extended range ensemble weather forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, J. C. H.; Haigh, J. D.; Jackson, D. R.

    2014-08-01

    As the stratosphere is largely characterized by its ozone abundance, the quality of the ozone field is important for a realistic representation of the stratosphere in weather and climate models. While the stratosphere is directly affected by radiative heating from ozone photodissociation, ozone abundance might also impact the representation of the troposphere since the stratosphere and troposphere are dynamically linked. In this paper, we examine the potential benefits of using ozone data from the Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) for medium-extended range tropospheric forecasts in a current numerical weather prediction system. The global component of the Met Office Global and Regional Ensemble Prediction System is used, which is run at a resolution of N216 L85 with 24 ensemble members. We compare two scenarios of 31 day forecasts covering the same period, one with the current operational ozone climatology and the other with a monthly mean zonally averaged ozone field computed from the MLS data set. In the extreme case of the Arctic "ozone hole" of March 2011, our results show a general reduction in stratospheric forecast errors in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere as a result of the improved representation of ozone. However, even in such a scenario, where the MLS ozone field is much superior to that of the control, we find that tropospheric forecast errors in the medium-extended range are dominated by the spread of ensemble members and no significant reduction in the root-mean-square forecast errors.

  9. Models for estimating runway landing capacity with Microwave Landing System (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosic, V.; Horonjeff, R.

    1975-01-01

    A model is developed which is capable of computing the ultimate landing runway capacity, under ILS and MLS conditions, when aircraft population characteristics and air traffic control separation rules are given. This model can be applied in situations when only a horizontal separation between aircraft approaching a runway is allowed, as well as when both vertical and horizontal separations are possible. It is assumed that the system is free of errors, that is that aircraft arrive at specified points along the prescribed flight path precisely when the controllers intend for them to arrive at these points. Although in the real world there is no such thing as an error-free system, the assumption is adequate for a qualitative comparison of MLS with ILS. Results suggest that an increase in runway landing capacity, caused by introducing the MLS multiple approach paths, is to be expected only when an aircraft population consists of aircraft with significantly differing approach speeds and particularly in situations when vertical separation can be applied. Vertical separation can only be applied if one of the types of aircraft in the mix has a very steep descent angle.

  10. A Global Climatology of Tropospheric and Stratospheric Ozone Derived from Aura OMI and MLS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, J.R.; Chandra, S.; Labow, G.; Bhartia, P. K.; Froidevaux, L.; Witte, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    A global climatology of tropospheric and stratospheric column ozone is derived by combining six years of Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) ozone measurements for the period October 2004 through December 2010. The OMI/MLS tropospheric ozone climatology exhibits large temporal and spatial variability which includes ozone accumulation zones in the tropical south Atlantic year-round and in the subtropical Mediterranean! Asia region in summer months. High levels of tropospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere also persist in mid-latitudes over the eastern North American and Asian continents extending eastward over the Pacific Ocean. For stratospheric ozone climatology from MLS, largest ozone abundance lies in the northern hemisphere in the latitude range 70degN-80degN in February-April and in the southern hemisphere around 40degS-50degS during months August-October. The largest stratospheric ozone abundances in the northern hemisphere lie over North America and eastern Asia extending eastward across the Pacific Ocean and in the southern hemisphere south of Australia extending eastward across the dateline. With the advent of many newly developing 3D chemistry and transport models it is advantageous to have such a dataset for evaluating the performance of the models in relation to dynamical and photochemical processes controlling the ozone distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere.

  11. Constraining Middle Atmospheric Moisture in GEOS-5 Using EOS-MLS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jianjun; Pawson, Steven; =Wargan, Krzysztof; Livesey, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Middle atmospheric water vapor plays an important role in climate and atmospheric chemistry. In the middle atmosphere, water vapor, after ozone and carbon dioxide, is an important radiatively active gas that impacts climate forcing and the energy balance. It is also the source of the hydroxyl radical (OH) whose abundances affect ozone and other constituents. The abundance of water vapor in the middle atmosphere is determined by upward transport of dehydrated air through the tropical tropopause layer, by the middle atmospheric circulation, production by the photolysis of methane (CH4), and other physical and chemical processes in the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis with GEOS-5 did not assimilate any moisture observations in the middle atmosphere. The plan is to use such observations, available sporadically from research satellites, in future GEOS-5 reanalyses. An overview will be provided of the progress to date with assimilating the EOS-Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) moisture retrievals, alongside ozone and temperature, into GEOS-5. Initial results demonstrate that the MLS observations can significantly improve the middle atmospheric moisture field in GEOS-5, although this result depends on introducing a physically meaningful representation of background error covariances for middle atmospheric moisture into the system. High-resolution features in the new moisture field will be examined, and their relationships with ozone, in a two-year assimilation experiment with GEOS-5. Discussion will focus on how Aura MLS moisture observations benefit the analyses.

  12. B-737 flight test of curved-path and steep-angle approaches using MLS guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branstetter, J. R.; White, W. F.

    1989-01-01

    A series of flight tests were conducted to collect data for jet transport aircraft flying curved-path and steep-angle approaches using Microwave Landing System (MLS) guidance. During the test, 432 approaches comprising seven different curved-paths and four glidepath angles varying from 3 to 4 degrees were flown in NASA Langley's Boeing 737 aircraft (Transport Systems Research Vehicle) using an MLS ground station at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. Subject pilots from Piedmont Airlines flew the approaches using conventional cockpit instrumentation (flight director and Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI). The data collected will be used by FAA procedures specialists to develop standards and criteria for designing MLS terminal approach procedures (TERPS). The use of flight simulation techniques greatly aided the preliminary stages of approach development work and saved a significant amount of costly flight time. This report is intended to complement a data report to be issued by the FAA Office of Aviation Standards which will contain all detailed data analysis and statistics.

  13. EOS MLS Level 1B Data Processing, Version 2.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perun, Vincent; Jarnot, Robert; Pickett, Herbert; Cofield, Richard; Schwartz, Michael; Wagner, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A computer program performs level- 1B processing (the term 1B is explained below) of data from observations of the limb of the Earth by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), which is an instrument aboard the Aura spacecraft. This software accepts, as input, the raw EOS MLS scientific and engineering data and the Aura spacecraft ephemeris and attitude data. Its output consists of calibrated instrument radiances and associated engineering and diagnostic data. [This software is one of several computer programs, denoted product generation executives (PGEs), for processing EOS MLS data. Starting from level 0 (representing the aforementioned raw data, the PGEs and their data products are denoted by alphanumeric labels (e.g., 1B and 2) that signify the successive stages of processing.] At the time of this reporting, this software is at version 2.2 and incorporates improvements over a prior version that make the code more robust, improve calibration, provide more diagnostic outputs, improve the interface with the Level 2 PGE, and effect a 15-percent reduction in file sizes by use of data compression.

  14. Analysis of Small-Scale Atmospheric Gravity Waves Using UARS MLS Radiance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.

    1999-01-01

    Gravity waves play an important role in determining atmospheric circulation and small-scale mixing. Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) 63-GHz radiances can be used to calculate small-scale wave variances at 30-80 km altitudes. The major results from this new data set are summarized in the following: (1) MLS radiance fluctuations are contributed mostly by gravity waves of small (about 100 km) horizontal and large (>10 km) vertical scales. (2) MLS observations show that variance enhancements are strongly correlated with the stratospheric polar vortices, tropospheric deep convection zones, and surface topography. (3) As expected for gravity wave propagation, the normalized wave variances grow exponentially with height in the stratosphere but saturate in the mesosphere. (4) The long-term variations of the wave variance are dominated by an annual cycle in the stratosphere and a semiannual cycle in the mesosphere. (5) Separate analyses of the ascending and descending measurements show that the variances are sensitive to wave propagation directions. The subtropical variances, which are associated with deep convection, are likely caused by the gravity waves that propagate upward and eastward in the westward background wind. Additional information contained in the original.

  15. MLS data segmentation using Point Cloud Library procedures. (Polish Title: Segmentacja danych MLS z użyciem procedur Point Cloud Library)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grochocka, M.

    2013-12-01

    Mobile laser scanning is dynamically developing measurement technology, which is becoming increasingly widespread in acquiring three-dimensional spatial information. Continuous technical progress based on the use of new tools, technology development, and thus the use of existing resources in a better way, reveals new horizons of extensive use of MLS technology. Mobile laser scanning system is usually used for mapping linear objects, and in particular the inventory of roads, railways, bridges, shorelines, shafts, tunnels, and even geometrically complex urban spaces. The measurement is done from the perspective of use of the object, however, does not interfere with the possibilities of movement and work. This paper presents the initial results of the segmentation data acquired by the MLS. The data used in this work was obtained as part of an inventory measurement infrastructure railway line. Measurement of point clouds was carried out using a profile scanners installed on the railway platform. To process the data, the tools of 'open source' Point Cloud Library was used. These tools allow to use templates of programming libraries. PCL is an open, independent project, operating on a large scale for processing 2D/3D image and point clouds. Software PCL is released under the terms of the BSD license (Berkeley Software Distribution License), which means it is a free for commercial and research use. The article presents a number of issues related to the use of this software and its capabilities. Segmentation data is based on applying the templates library pcl_ segmentation, which contains the segmentation algorithms to separate clusters. These algorithms are best suited to the processing point clouds, consisting of a number of spatially isolated regions. Template library performs the extraction of the cluster based on the fit of the model by the consensus method samples for various parametric models (planes, cylinders, spheres, lines, etc.). Most of the mathematical

  16. Evaluation of UTLS Carbon Monoxide Simulations in GMI and GEOS-Chem Chemical Transport Models using Aura MLS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Murray, Lee T.; Damon, Megan R.; Su, Hui; Livesey, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the distribution and variation of carbon monoxide (CO) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) during 2004-2012 as simulated by two chemical transport models, using the latest version of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations. The simulated spatial distributions, temporal variations and vertical transport of CO in the UTLS region are compared with those observed by MLS. We also investigate the impact of surface emissions and deep convection on CO concentrations in the UTLS over different regions, using both model simulations and MLS observations. Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) and GEOS-Chem simulations of UTLS CO both show similar spatial distributions to observations. The global mean CO values simulated by both models agree with MLS observations at 215 and 147 hPa, but are significantly underestimated by more than 40% at 100 hPa. In addition, the models underestimate the peak CO values by up to 70% at 100 hPa, 60% at 147 hPa and 40% at 215 hPa, with GEOS-Chem generally simulating more CO at 100 hPa and less CO at 215 hPa than GMI. The seasonal distributions of CO simulated by both models are in better agreement with MLS in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) than in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), with disagreements between model and observations over enhanced CO regions such as southern Africa. The simulated vertical transport of CO shows better agreement with MLS in the tropics and the SH subtropics than the NH subtropics. We also examine regional variations in the relationships among surface CO emission, convection and UTLS CO concentrations. The two models exhibit emission-convection- CO relationships similar to those observed by MLS over the tropics and some regions with enhanced UTLS CO.

  17. Evaluation of UTLS carbon monoxide simulations in GMI and GEOS-Chem chemical transport models using Aura MLS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Murray, Lee T.; Damon, Megan R.; Su, Hui; Livesey, Nathaniel J.

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluates the distribution and variation of carbon monoxide (CO) in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) during 2004-2012 as simulated by two chemical transport models, using the latest version of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations. The simulated spatial distributions, temporal variations and vertical transport of CO in the UTLS region are compared with those observed by MLS. We also investigate the impact of surface emissions and deep convection on CO concentrations in the UTLS over different regions, using both model simulations and MLS observations. Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) and GEOS-Chem simulations of UTLS CO both show similar spatial distributions to observations. The global mean CO values simulated by both models agree with MLS observations at 215 and 147 hPa, but are significantly underestimated by more than 40 % at 100 hPa. In addition, the models underestimate the peak CO values by up to 70 % at 100 hPa, 60 % at 147 hPa and 40 % at 215 hPa, with GEOS-Chem generally simulating more CO at 100 hPa and less CO at 215 hPa than GMI. The seasonal distributions of CO simulated by both models are in better agreement with MLS in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) than in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), with disagreements between model and observations over enhanced CO regions such as southern Africa. The simulated vertical transport of CO shows better agreement with MLS in the tropics and the SH subtropics than the NH subtropics. We also examine regional variations in the relationships among surface CO emission, convection and UTLS CO concentrations. The two models exhibit emission-convection-CO relationships similar to those observed by MLS over the tropics and some regions with enhanced UTLS CO.

  18. SABER (TIMED) and MLS (UARS) Temperature Observations of Mesospheric and Stratospheric QBO and Related Tidal Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Frank T.; Mayr, Hans G.; Reber, Carl A.; Russell, James; Mlynczak, Marty; Mengel, John

    2006-01-01

    More than three years of temperature observations from the SABER (TIMED) and MLS WARS) instruments are analyzed to study the annual and inter-annual variations extending from the stratosphere into the upper mesosphere. The SABER measurements provide data from a wide altitude range (15 to 95 km) for the years 2002 to 2004, while the MLS data were taken in the 16 to 55 km altitude range a decade earlier. Because of the sampling properties of SABER and MLS, the variations with local solar time must be accounted for when estimating the zonal mean variations. An algorithm is thus applied that delineates with Fourier analysis the year-long variations of the migrating tides and zonal mean component. The amplitude of the diurnal tide near the equator shows a strong semiannual periodicity with maxima near equinox, which vary from year to year to indicate the influence from the Quasi-biennial Oscillation (QBO) in the zonal circulation. The zonal mean QBO temperature variations are analyzed over a range of latitudes and altitudes, and the results are presented for latitudes from 48"s to 48"N. New results are obtained for the QBO, especially in the upper stratosphere and mesosphere, and at mid-latitudes. At Equatorial latitudes, the QBO amplitudes show local peaks, albeit small, that occur at different altitudes. From about 20 to 40 km, and within about 15" of the Equator, the amplitudes can approach 3S K for the stratospheric QBO or SQBO. For the mesospheric QBO or MQBO, we find peaks near 70 km, with temperature amplitudes reaching 3.5"K, and near 85 km, the amplitudes approach 2.5OK. Morphologically, the amplitude and phase variations derived from the SABER and MLS measurements are in qualitative agreement. The QBO amplitudes tend to peak at the Equator but then increase again pole-ward of about 15" to 20'. The phase progression with altitude varies more gradually at the Equator than at mid-latitudes. A comparison of the observations with results from the Numerical Spectral

  19. Global ozone observations from the UARS MLS: An overview of zonal-mean results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, Lucien; Waters, Joe W.; Read, William G.; Elson, Lee S.; Flower, Dennis A.; Jarnot, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    Global ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are presented, in both vertically resolved and column abundance formats. The authors review the zonal-mean ozone variations measured over the two and a half years since launch in September 1991. Well-known features such as the annual and semiannual variations are ubiquitous. In the equatorial regions, longer-term changes are believed to be related to the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO), with a strong semiannual signal above 20 hPa. Ozone values near 50 hPa exhibit an equatorial low from October 1991 to June 1992, after which the low ozone pattern splits into two subtropical lows (possibly in connection with residual circulation changes tied to the QBO) and returns to an equatorial low in September 1993. The ozone hole development at high southern latitudes is apparent in MLS column data integrated down to 100 hPa, the MLS data reinforce current knowledge of this lower-stratospheric phenomenon by providing a height-dependent view of the variations. The region from 30 deg S to 30 deg N (an area equal to half the global area) shows very little change in the ozone column from year to year and within each year. The most striking ozone changes have occurred at northern midlatitudes, with the October 1992 to July 1993 column values significantly lower than during the prior year. The zonal-mean changes manifest themselves as a slower rate of increase during the 1992/93 winter, and there is some evidence for a lower fall minimum. A recovery occurs during late summer of 1993; early 1994 values are significantly larger than during the two previous winters. The timing and latitudinal extent of the northern midlatitude decreases appear to rule out observed ClO enhancements in the Arctic vortex, with related chemical processing and ozone dilution effects, as a unique cause. Local depletion from ClO-related chemical mechanisms alone is also not sufficient, based

  20. Investigation of the shielding effect of tree structures measured by MLS on UV-B transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haoran; Lin, Yi; Zhao, Huijing

    2014-11-01

    Learning the shielding effect of tree crowns with various structures on ultraviolet-B (UV-B) transmission is of great significance, such as for reducing its damage on human. The cutting-edge remote sensing technique of mobile laser scanning (MLS) is a potential option for tree structure representation. This work was dedicated to investigating the correlation between the shielding efficiency of UV-B and tree crown structural parameters. Positive correlations were achieved between the shielding efficiency of UV-B and the canopy structural parameters, and this is of implications for selecting appropriate tree species for such as livable environment construction.

  1. Review of operational aspects of initial experiments utilizing the U.S. MLS. [microwave landing system effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, T. M.; Morello, S. A.; Reeder, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An exercise to support the Federal Aviation Administration in demonstrating the U.S. candidate for an international microwave landing system (MLS) was conducted by NASA. During this demonstration the MLS was utilized to provide the TCV Boeing 737 research airplane with guidance for automatic control during transition from conventional RNAV to MLS RNAV in curved, descending flight; flare; touchdown; and roll-out. Flight profiles, system configuration, displays, and operating procedures used in the demonstration are described, and preliminary results of flight data analysis are discussed. Recent experiences with manually controlled flight in the NAFEC MLS environment are also discussed. The demonstration shows that in automatic three-dimensional flight, the volumetric signal coverage of the MLS can be exploited to enable a commercial carrier class airplane to perform complex curved, descending paths with precision turns into short final approaches terminating in landing and roll-out, even when subjected to strong and gusty tail and cross wind components and severe wind shear.

  2. On Orbit Commissioning of the Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) On the Aura Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lay, Richard R.; Lee, Karen A.; Holden, James R.; Oswald, John E.; Jarnot, Robert F.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Stek, Paul C.; Cofield, Richard E., III; Flower, Dennis A.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Shoemaker, Candace M.

    2005-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder instrument was launched aboard NASA's EOS AURA satellite in July, 2004. The overall scientific objectives for MLS are to measure temperature, pressure, and several important chemical species in the upper troposphere and stratosphere relevant to ozone processes and climate change. MLS consists of a suite of radiometers designed to operate from 11 8 GHz to 2.5 THz, with two antennas (one for 2.5 THz, the other for the lower frequencies) that scan vertically through the atmospheric limb, and spectrometers with spectral resolution of 6 MHz at spectral line centers. This paper describes the on-orbit commissioning the MLS instrument which includes activation and engineering functional verifications and calibrations.

  3. Evaluation of Microwave Landing System (MLS) effect on the delivery performance of a fixed-path metering and spacing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, L.; Davis, C. M.; Capron, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    Metering and spacing (M & S) system's algorithms described assume an aircraft two dimensional are navigation capability. The three navigation systems compared were: very high frequency omnidirectional range/distance measuring equipment (VOR/DME) and ILS, VOR/DME and + or - 40 MLS, and VOR/DME and + or - 60 MLS. Other factors studied were M & S tentative schedule point location, route geometry effects, and approach gate location effects. Summarized results are: the MLS offers some improvement over VOR/DME and ILS if all approach routes contain computer assisted turns; pilot reaction to moving the gate closer to the runway threshold may adversely affect M & S performance; and coupling en route metering to terminal scheduling transfers most of the terminal holding to more full efficient, higher altitude en route delay.

  4. Impacts of Assimilating MLS Temperature on the Upper Stratosphere in GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, S.; Jin, S.; Coy, L.; Wargan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Standard configurations of the GEOS-5 data assimilation system use nadir infrared and microwave sounders that provide deep-layer constraints on the thermal structure in the stratosphere. In the upper stratosphere, this information is currently provided by the Advanced Microwave Sounding Units (AMSU-As) on NOAA s polar-orbiting satellites. The highest peaking AMSU-A channel (14) peaks near 2.5hPa. Evaluation of the upper stratosphere reveals substantial biases in the temperature, cased in part by biases in the underlying GCM, and difficulties in representing the stratopause structure under disturbed conditions. This work demonstrates, unsurprisingly, that the assimilation into GEOS-5 of temperature profiles derived from EOS-Aura MLS leads to a substantially better representation of the stratopause structure from a climatological perspective and for disturbed events. Future plans with GEOS-5 include a reanalysis that includes numerous "research" datasets alongside the operational NOAA datasets that were used in MERRA. As preparation for this reanalysis, the present study examines how assimilating the MLS observations impact the error statistics for the AMSU-A instruments. Discussion will address the issue of bias correction for the AMSU-A Channel 14 radiances, which is presently turned off in GEOS-5 because of the absence of accurate temperature observations that can anchor the GEOS-5 analyses. The issue of what can be done in periods when no limb-sounder data are available will also be addressed.

  5. Comparison of GOME-2/Metop-A ozone profiles with GOMOS, OSIRIS and MLS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Määttä, A.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Tukiainen, S.; Sofieva, V.; Tamminen, J.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a comparison of vertical ozone profiles retrieved by the Ozone ProfilE Retrieval Algorithm (OPERA) from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 (GOME-2) measurements on board Metop-A with high-vertical-resolution ozone profiles by Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS), Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System (OSIRIS) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The comparison, with global coverage, focuses on the stratosphere and the lower mesosphere and covers the period from March 2008 until the end of 2011. The comparison shows an agreement of the GOME-2 ozone profiles with those of GOMOS, OSIRIS and MLS within ±15 % in the altitude range from 15 km up to ~ 35-40 km depending on latitude. The GOME-2 ozone profiles from non-degradation corrected radiances have a tendency to a systematic negative bias with respect to the reference data above ~ 30 km. The GOME-2 bias with respect to the high-vertical resolution instruments depends on season, with the strongest dependence observed at high latitudes.

  6. Influence of MLS laser radiation on erythrocyte membrane fluidity and secondary structure of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Kamila; Nowacka, Olga; Wróbel, Dominika; Pieszyński, Ireneusz; Bryszewska, Maria; Kujawa, Jolanta

    2014-03-01

    The biostimulating activity of low level laser radiation of various wavelengths and energy doses is widely documented in the literature, but the mechanisms of the intracellular reactions involved are not precisely known. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of low level laser radiation from an multiwave locked system (MLS) of two wavelengths (wavelength = 808 nm in continuous emission and 905 nm in pulsed emission) on the human erythrocyte membrane and on the secondary structure of human serum albumin (HSA). Human erythrocytes membranes and HSA were irradiated with laser light of low intensity with surface energy density ranging from 0.46 to 4.9 J cm(-2) and surface energy power density 195 mW cm(-2) (1,000 Hz) and 230 mW cm(-2) (2,000 Hz). Structural and functional changes in the erythrocyte membrane were characterized by its fluidity, while changes in the protein were monitored by its secondary structure. Dose-dependent changes in erythrocyte membrane fluidity were induced by near-infrared laser radiation. Slight changes in the secondary structure of HSA were also noted. MLS laser radiation influences the structure and function of the human erythrocyte membrane resulting in a change in fluidity.

  7. Fabrication and Thermo-Optical Properties of the MLS Composite Primary Reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.; Dyer, Jack; Dummer, Sam

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a limb-sounding radiometer sensing emissions in the millimeter and sub-millimeter range. MLS will contribute to an understanding of atmospheric chemistry by assessing stratospheric and tropospheric ozone depletion, climate forcings and volcanic effects. The heart of the antenna is the primary reflector, constructed from graphite/cyanate composites in a facesheet/core construction. The reflector has an aperture of one square meter, a mass of 8.7 kilos and final figure accuracy of 4.37 microns rms. The surface is also modified to ensure RF reflectivity, prevent solar concentration and provide thermal balance to the spacecraft The surface is prepared by precision beadblasting, then coated with vapor deposited aluminum (VDA) and finally a layer of silicon suboxide (SiO(x)) to control the infrared emissivity. The resulting surface has a solar absorptance of 0.43 and an absorptance/emittance ratio of 1.3. BRDF analysis shows that 93% of the incident thermal energy is reflected outside a 10 degree angle of cone. For its mass and aperture, we believe this reflector to have the highest figure accuracy yet achieved in a composite antenna construction.

  8. MLS110213:022733+130617: a new eclipsing polar above the period gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, K. M. G.; Rodrigues, C. V.; Oliveira, A. S.; Almeida, L. A.; Cieslinski, D.; Costa, J. E. R.; Jablonski, F. J.

    2015-08-01

    This study confirms MLS110213:022733+130617 as a new eclipsing polar. We performed optical spectroscopic, polarimetric and photometric follow-up of this variable source identified by the Catalina Real Time Transient Survey. Using the mid-eclipse times, we estimated an orbital period of 3.787 h, which is above the orbital period gap of the cataclysmic variables (CVs). There are nine other known polars with longer orbital periods, and only two of them are eclipsing. We identified high- and low-brightness states and high polarization modulated with the orbital period. The spectra are typical of polars, with strong high ionization emission lines and inverted Balmer decrement. The He II 4686 Å line is as strong as H β. We modelled the photometric and polarimetric bright-state light curves using the CYCLOPS code. Our modelling suggests an extended emitting region on the white dwarf (WD) surface, with a mean temperature of 9 keV and B in the range 18-33, although the possibility that it could be a two-pole accretor cannot yet be ruled out. The WD mass estimated from the shock temperature is 0.67 M⊙. The derived parameters are consistent with the eclipse profile. The distance was estimated as 406 ± 54 pc using the period-luminosity-colours method. MLS110213 populates a rare sub-group of polars, near the upper limit of the period distribution, important to understand the evolution of mCVs.

  9. MLS and CALIOP Cloud Ice Measurements in the Upper Troposphere: A Constraint from Microwave on Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong L.; Lambert, Alyn; Read, William G.; Eriksson, Patrick; Gong, Jie

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the consistency and microphysics assumptions among satellite ice water content (IWC) retrievals in the upper troposphere with collocated A-Train radiances from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and lidar backscatters from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). For the cases in which IWC values are small (less than 10mg m(exp-23)), the cloud ice retrievals are constrained by both MLS 240- and 640- GHz radiances and CALIOP 532-nm backscatter beta(532). From the observed relationships between MLS cloud-induced radiance T(sub cir) and the CALIOP backscatter integrated gamma532 along the MLS line of sight, an empirical linear relation between cloud ice and the lidar backscatter is found: IWC/beta532=0.58+/-0.11. This lidar cloud ice relation is required to satisfy the cloud ice emission signals simultaneously observed at microwave frequencies, in which ice permittivity is relatively well known. This empirical relationship also produces IWC values that agree well with the CALIOP, version 3.0, retrieval at values, less than 10mg m(exp-3). Because the microphysics assumption is critical in satellite cloud ice retrievals, the agreement found in the IWC-beta532 relationships increase fidelity of the assumptions used by the lidar and microwave techniques for upper-tropospheric clouds.

  10. Keeping Pace with Information Literacy Instruction for the Real World: When Will MLS Programs Wake Up and Smell the LILACs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies-Hoffman, Kimberly; Alvarez, Barbara; Costello, Michelle; Emerson, Debby

    2013-01-01

    For over thirty years, numerous studies have discussed the contradiction between the growing importance of information literacy instruction to the Library's core mission and lack of pedagogical training for new librarians. This article reviews the more recent contributions on the topic, presents a survey of New York State MLS curricula and…

  11. Guidance studies for curved, descending approaches using the Microwave Landing System (MLS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Results for the Microwave Landing System (MLS) guidance algorithm development conducted under the Advance Transport Operating System (ATOPS) Technology Studies (NAS1-16202) are documented. The study consisted of evaluating guidance law for vertical and lateral path control, as well as speed control, for approaches not possible with the present Instrument Landing System (ILS) equipment. Several specific approaches were simulated using the MD-80 aircraft simulation program, including curved, descending (segmented glide slope), and decelerating paths. Emphasis was placed on development of guidance algorithms specifically for approaches at Burbank, where proposed flight demonstrations are planned. Results of this simulation phase are suitable for use in future fixed base simulator evaluations employing actual hardware (autopilot and a performance management system).

  12. Assimilating EOS-Aura OMI and MLS Data in GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Xu, Philippe; Douglass, Anne R.; Olsen, Mark; Strahan, Susan; Nielsen, J. Eric; McKee, Nicole; Sienkiewicz, Meta; Wargan, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Data assimilation is a potentially powerful method of extracting the maximum amount of information from observed data by combining their information with models. in this application, we will use stratospheric ozone profiles retrieved from EOS MLS and total column amounts retrieved from OMI' along with the GEOS-5 GCM, that includes a representation of ozone chemistry and transport. The presentation will discuss how well we can derive tropospheric ozone column information in this system, including its sensitivity to model errors and some assumptions made in the assimilation system. We discuss also ozone structures in the tropopause region and their sensitivity to model resolution and other fact=ors. An important issue we examine is how much more information we obtain from ozone assimilation than from model studies using state of the art chemistry models - answering such questions helps determine how useful ozone assimilation really is, given our present capabilities in chemical modeling.

  13. Characterization of Water Vapor in the North American Monsoon with JLH Mark2 and Aura MLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, R. L.; Troy, R. F.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Ray, E. A.; Schwartz, M. J.; Read, W. G.; Bedka, K. M.; Fu, D.; Christensen, L. E.; Bui, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    Several NASA ER-2 aircraft flights during the recent NASA Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) field mission sampled the UTLS region heavily influenced by the North American Monsoon (NAM). Enhanced water vapor was measured in the lower stratosphere between 160 hPa and 80 hPa over the continental United States. Here we present in situ water vapor measurements from the newly improved JPL Laser Hygrometer (JLH Mark2) to characterize the NAM water vapor field during August and September 2013. Regional context is provided by water observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and overshooting deep convective cloud tops from GOES imagery.

  14. Application-Oriented Confidentiality and Integrity Dynamic Union Security Model Based on MLS Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Mingfu; Hu, Aiqun; He, Chunlong

    We propose a new security model based on MLS Policy to achieve a better security performance on confidentiality, integrity and availability. First, it realizes a combination of BLP model and Biba model through a two-dimensional independent adjustment of integrity and confidentiality. And, the subject's access range is adjusted dynamically according to the security label of related objects and the subject's access history. Second, the security level of the trusted subject is extended to writing and reading privilege range respectively, following the principle of least privilege. Third, it adjusts the objects' security levels after adding confidential information to prevent the information disclosure. Fourth, it uses application-oriented logic to protect specific applications to avoid the degradation of security levels. Thus, it can ensure certain applications operate smoothly. Lastly, examples are presented to show the effectiveness and usability of the proposed model.

  15. Observations of the Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor Feedback in UARS MLS and HALOE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Minschwaner, K. R.

    2004-01-01

    One of the biggest uncertainties in climate science today concerns the water vapor feedback. Most GCMs hold relative humidity fixed as the climate changes, which provides a strong positive feedback to warming due from anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Some in the community, on the other hand, have speculated that tropospheric specific humidity will remain fixed as the climate changes. Observational studies have attempted to resolve this disagreement, but the results have been inconclusive, and few of the studies have focused on the upper troposphere (UT). This is a significant oversight: the surface temperature is especially sensitive to changes in water vapor in the UT owing to the cold temperatures found there. We present an analysis of UARS MLS and HALOE water vapor measurements at 21 5 hPa. We find strong evidence that the water vapor feedback in the UT is positive, but not as strong as fixed relative humidity scenarios. This suggests that GCMs are overestimating the sensitivity of the climate.

  16. Flight simulation of a wide-body transport aircraft to evaluate MLS-RNAV procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branstetter, James R.; Houck, Jacob A.; Guenther, Arlene D.

    1988-01-01

    In a collaborative effort between the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) NASA and the U.S. Air Force, a piloted simulation was conducted to look at the issues involved with flying a large, wide-body aircraft in the airport terminal area using Microwave Landing System Area Navigation (MLS)-RNAV procedures. A variety of approach paths, departure paths, and holding patterns were evaluated during the course of the study for operational use, flight technical errors, and safety. In addition, several methods for driving the horizontal situation indicator and flight director instruments were investigated along with needle sensitivity. The ultimate goal of the simulation was to develop and verify candidate paths and procedures prior to flight tests conducted in 1986/87. Subject pilots for the simulation study were provided by the FAA, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and the airline industry.

  17. Arctic Ozone Depletion Observed by UARS MLS During the 1994-95 Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.; Santee, M. L.; Read, W. G.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Zurek, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    During the unusually cold 1994-95 Arctic winter, the Microwave Limb Sounder observed enhanced chlorine monoxide (ClO) in late Dec and throughout Feb and early Mar. Late Dec ClO was higher than during any of the previous 3 years, consistent with the colder early winter. Between late Dec 1994 and early Feb 1995, 465 K (about 50 hPa) vortex-averaged ozone (03) decreased by about 15%, with local decreases of about 30%; additional local decreases of about 5% were seen between early Feb and early Mar. Transport calculations indicate that vortex-averaged chemical loss between late Dec and early Feb was about 20% at 465 K, with about 1/4 of that masked by downward transport of O3. This Arctic chemical O3 loss is not readily detectable in MLS column O3 data.

  18. Five-Year (2004-2009)Observations of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor and Cloud Ice from MLS and Comparisons with GEOS-5 Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Su, Hui; Pawson, Steven; Liu, Hui-Chun; Read, William; Waters, Joe W.; Santee, Michelle; Wu, Dong L.; Schwartz, Michael; Lambert, Alyn; Fuller, Ryan; Lee, Jae N.; Livesey, Nathaniel

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of August 2004 through July 2009 upper tropospheric (UT) water vapor (H2O) and ice water content (IWC) from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and comparisons with outputs from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system. Both MLS and GEOS-5 show that high values of H2O and IWC at 215 to 147 hPa are associated with areas of deep convection. They exhibit good (within approximately 15%) agreement in IWC at these altitudes, but GEOS-5 H2O is approximately 50% (215 hPa) to approximately 30% (147 hPa) larger than MLS, possibility due to its higher temperatures at these altitudes. GOES-5 produces a weaker intertropical convergence zone than MLS, while a seasonally-migrating band of tropical deep convection is clearly evident in both the MLS and GEOS-5 UT H2O and IWC. MLS and GEOS-5 both show spatial anti-correlation between IWC and H2O at 100 hPa, where less H2O is associated with low temperatures in regions of tropical convection. At 100 hPa, GEOS-5 produces 50% less IWC and 15% less H2O in the tropics, and approximately 20% more H2O in the extra-tropics, than does MLS. Behavior of the 100 hPa H2O, which exhibits a quasi-biennial oscillation, appears consistent with it being controlled by temperature. The seasonal cycle in the vertical transport of tropical mean H2O from approximately 147 hPa to approximately 10 hPa appears much stronger in MLS than in GEOS-5. The UT IWC and H2O interannual variations, from both MLS and GEOS-5, show clear imprints of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation.

  19. MLS-2384, a new 6-bromoindirubin derivative with dual JAK/Src kinase inhibitory activity, suppresses growth of diverse cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lucy; Gaboriaud, Nicolas; Vougogianopoulou, Konstantina; Tian, Yan; Wu, Jun; Wen, Wei; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Jove, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Janus kinase (JAK) and Src kinase are the two major tyrosine kinase families upstream of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT). Among the seven STAT family proteins, STAT3 is constitutively activated in many diverse cancers. Upon activation, JAK and Src kinases phosphorylate STAT3, and thereby promote cell growth and survival. MLS-2384 is a novel 6-bromoindirubin derivative with a bromo-group at the 6-position on one indole ring and a hydrophilic group at the 3'-position on the other indole ring. In this study, we investigated the kinase inhibitory activity and anticancer activity of MLS-2384. Our data from in vitro kinase assays, cell viability analyses, western blotting analyses, and animal model studies, demonstrate that MLS-2384 is a dual JAK/Src kinase inhibitor, and suppresses growth of various human cancer cells, such as prostate, breast, skin, ovarian, lung, and liver. Consistent with the inactivation of JAK and Src kinases, phosphorylation of STAT3 was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in the cancer cells treated with MLS-2384. STAT3 downstream proteins involved in cell proliferation and survival, such as c-Myc and Mcl-1, are downregulated by MLS-2384 in prostate cancer cells, whereas survivin is downregulated in A2058 cells. In these two cancer cell lines, PARP is cleaved, indicating that MLS-2384 induces apoptosis in human melanoma and prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MLS-2384 suppresses tumor growth with low toxicity in a mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. Taken together, MLS-2384 demonstrates dual JAK/Src inhibitory activity and suppresses tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings support further development of MLS-2384 as a potential small-molecule therapeutic agent that targets JAK, Src, and STAT3 signaling in multiple human cancer cells.

  20. Midlatitude stratosphere - troposphere exchange as diagnosed by MLS O3 and MOPITT CO assimilated fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amraoui, L.; Attié, J.-L.; Semane, N.; Claeyman, M.; Peuch, V.-H.; Warner, J.; Ricaud, P.; Cammas, J.-P.; Piacentini, A.; Cariolle, D.; Massart, S.; Bencherif, H.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a complete characterization of a very deep stratospheric intrusion which occurred over the British Isles on 15 August 2007. The signature of this event is diagnosed using ozonesonde measurements over Lerwick, UK (60.14° N, 1.19° W) and is also well characterized using meteorological analyses from the global operational weather prediction model of Météo-France, ARPEGE. Modelled as well as assimilated fields of both ozone (O3) and carbon monoxide (CO) have been used in order to better document this event. The paper also presents a demonstration of the capability of O3 and CO assimilated fields to better describe a stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) event in comparison with the free run modelled O3 and CO fields. O3 and CO from Aura/MLS and Terra/MOPITT instruments, respectively, are assimilated into the three-dimensional chemical transport model MOCAGE of Météo-France using a variational 3-D-FGAT (First Guess at Appropriate Time) method within the MOCAGE-PALM assimilation system. The usefulness of assimilated MOPITT CO data in a STE study is demonstrated in this novel result. The study shows that the use of the model MOCAGE gives consistent 3-D fields capable of describing the synoptic evolution of the event. However, modelled O3 and CO vertical distributions do not provide a quantitative evaluation of the intrusion. Although the assimilation of MLS data improves the distribution of O3 above the tropopause compared to the free model run, it is not sufficient to reproduce the stratospheric intrusion event well. Conversely, assimilated MOPITT CO allows a better description of the stratospheric intrusion event. Indeed, the horizontal distribution of the CO assimilated field is consistent with meteorological analyses. Moreover, the vertical distribution of the CO assimilated field is in accordance with the potential vorticity distribution and reveals a deeper intrusion from the lower stratosphere downward to the mid-troposphere compared to

  1. Microphysical Simulations of Polar Stratospheric Clouds Compared with Calipso and MLS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Toon, O. B.; Kinnison, D. E.; Lambert, A.; Brakebusch, M.

    2014-12-01

    Polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) form in the lower stratosphere during the polar night due to the cold temperature inside the polar vortex. PSCs are important to understand because they are responsible for the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole and the ozone depletion over the Arctic. In this work, we explore the formation and evolution of STS particles (Super-cooled Ternary Solution) and NAT (Nitric-acid Trihydrate) particles using the SD-WACCM/CARMA model. SD-WACCM/CARMA couples the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model using Specific Dynamics with the microphysics model (CARMA). The 2010-2011 Arctic winter has been simulated because the Arctic vortex remained cold enough for PSCs from December until the end of March (Manney et al., 2011). The unusual length of this cold period and the presence of PSCs caused strong ozone depletion. This model simulates the growth and evaporation of the STS particles instead of considering them as being in equilibrium as other models do (Carslaw et al., 1995). This work also explores the homogeneous nucleation of NAT particles and derives a scheme for NAT formation based on the observed denitrification during the winter 2010-2011. The simulated microphysical features (particle volumes, size distributions, etc.) of both STS (Supercooled Ternary Solutions) and NAT particles show a consistent comparison with historical observations. The modeled evolution of PSCs and gas phase ozone related chemicals inside the vortex such as HCl and ClONO2 are compared with the observations from MLS, MIPAS and CALIPSO over this winter. The denitrification history indicate the surface nucleation rate from Tabazadeh et al. (2002) removes too much HNO3 over the winter. With a small modification of the free energy term of the equation, the denitification and the PSC backscattering features are much closer to the observations. H2O, HCl, O3 and ClONO2 are very close to MLS and MIPAS observations inside the vortex. The model underestimates ozone

  2. Female infant with oncocytic cardiomyopathy and microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS): A clue to the pathogenesis of oncocytic cardiomyopathy?

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, L.M.; Krous, H.F.; Eichenfield, L.F.; Swalwell, C.I.; Jones, M.C.

    1994-11-01

    A infant girl had red stellate skin lesions on the cheeks and neck, and mildly short palpebral fissures. Her skin abnormality was typical of microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS), a newly recognized syndrome consisting of congenital linear skin defects and ocular abnormalities in females monosomic for Xp22. She died suddenly and unexpectedly at age 4 months; the cause of death was ascribed to oncocytic cardiomyopathy. Oncocytic cardiomyopathy occurs only in young children, who present with refractory arrhythmias leading to cardiac arrest. The coexistence of two rare conditions, one of which is mapped to the X chromosome, and an excess of affected females with oncocytic cardiomyopathy is also X-linked, with Xp22 being a candidate region. Overlapping manifestations in the two conditions (ocular abnormalities in cases of oncocytic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmias in MLS) offer additional support for this hypothesis. 43 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Attempt of UAV oblique images and MLS point clouds for 4D modelling of roadside pole-like objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi; West, Geoff

    2014-11-01

    The state-of-the-art remote sensing technologies, namely Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) based oblique imaging and Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS) show great potential for spatial information acquisition. This study investigated the combination of the two data sources for 4D modelling of roadside pole-like objects. The data for the analysis were collected by the Microdrone md4-200 UAV imaging system and the Sensei MLS system developed by the Finnish Geodetic Institute. Pole extraction, 3D structural parameter derivation and texture segmentation were deployed on the oblique images and point clouds, and their results were fused to yield the 4D models for one example of pole-like objects, namely lighting poles. The combination techniques proved promising.

  4. Characterization of MJO-Related Upper Tropospheric Hydrological Processes using MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Michael J.; Waliser, Duane E.; Tian, Baijun; Wu, Dong L.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Read, William G.

    2008-01-01

    This study quantifies Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO)- related hydrological variability in the upper troposphere/ lower stratosphere (UT/LS) using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) cloud ice water content (IWC) and water vapor (H2O). In a composite of six boreal-winter MJO events, the UT/LS IWC anomaly is strongly positively correlated with the convection (TRMM rainfall) anomaly. IWC anomalies range from +/-2 mg/cu m at 215 hPa to +/-0.08 mg/cu m at 100 hPa. The UT/LS H2O anomaly has an eastward-tilting structure similar to the previous-documented temperature structure, but the H2O maximum lags the temperature maximum by about a week. The H2O anomaly is positively correlated with the convection anomaly in the UT (261 hPa) and LS (68 hPa) but negatively correlated with the convection anomaly near the tropopause (100 hPa). This analysis provides a multi-parameter construct useful in validating and improving the parameterization of convection, clouds and cloud microphysics in MJO modeling.

  5. Springtime stratospheric water vapour in the Southern Hemisphere as measured by MLS. [Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harwood, R. S.; Carr, E. S.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lahoz, W. A.; Lau, C. L.; Peckham, G. E.; Read, W. G.; Ricaud, P. D.; Suttie, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of the break-up of the Antarctic vortex on the water vapor distribution are studied using MLS measurements of water vapor made during September 1991 and November 1991. In early November at 22 hPa a moist area is found within the polar vortex, consistent with an observed descent of order 10 km and strong radiative cooling. As the vortex erodes (beginning of November 1991), parcels of moist air become detached from the edge of the vortex and mix rapidly (within 2-3 days) with drier mid-latitude air. When the vortex breaks up (mid-November), larger parcels of moist air from both the edge and the inner vortex migrate to mid-latitudes. These parcels have a longer lifetime than those produced by vortex erosion, probably because they are correlated with higher potential vorticity gradients. The break-up of the vortex is accompanied by a mean adiabatic equatorward transport resulting in a significant increase in midstratospheric water vapor values at mid-latitudes in late spring.

  6. Induction of ribosome methylation in MLS-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae by macrolides and ketolides.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Cao, Z; Hammond, R; Chen, Y; Beyer, J; Shortridge, V D; Phan, L Y; Pratt, S; Capobianco, J; Reich, K A; Flamm, R K; Or, Y S; Katz, L

    1999-01-01

    One major mechanism for resistance to macrolide antibiotics in Streptococcus pneumoniae is MLS (macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B) resistance, manifested when the 23S rRNA is methylated by the product of an erm gene. This modification results in the decreased binding of all known macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramin B antibiotics to the ribosome. More than 30 ermAM-containing clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae were examined in our lab and showed high-level resistance (MIC > or =128 microg/ml) to erythromycin, azithromycin, tylosin, clindamycin, and ketolide (macrolides that lack the cladinose sugar) TE-802. We found that the new generation of ketolides A965 and A088 displayed variable activity against the same group of resistant S. pneumoniae strains. To understand the basis of variability of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of A965 and A088, we examined the effects of a series of macrolides and ketolides on the level of 23S rRNA methylation in five ermAM-containing resistant S. pneumoniae isolates. We show here that the basal levels of ribosomal methylation vary from strain to strain. The level of rRNA methylation can be strongly induced by erythromycin, azithromycin, and TE-802, resulting in high-level of resistance to these compounds. Ketolide A965 and A088, however, are weak inducers at sub-MIC drug concentrations, therefore showing variable activities in strains with differential methylation levels. PMID:10566867

  7. Polar Vortex Conditions during the 1995-96 Artic Winter: Meteorology and MLS Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J. W.; Zurek, R. W.

    1996-01-01

    The 1995-96 northern hemisphere (NH) 205 winter stratosphere was colder than in any of the previous 17 winters, with lower stratospheric temperatures continuously below the type 1 (primarily HN03) polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) threshold for over 2 1/2 months. Upper tropospheric ridges in late Feb and early Mar 1996 led to the lowest observed NH lower stratospheric temperatures, and the latest observed NH temperatures below the type 2 (water ice) PSC threshold. Consistent with the unusual cold and chemical processing on PSCS, Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) MLS observed a greater decrease in lower stratospheric ozone (03) in 1995-96 than in any of the previous 4 NH winters. 03 decreased throughout the vortex over an altitude range nearly as large as that typical of the southern hemisphere (SH). The decrease between late Dec 1995 and early Mar 1996 was about 2/3 of that over the equivalent SH period. As in other NH winters, temperatures in 1996 rose above the PSC threshold before the spring equinox, ending chemical processing in the NH vortex much earlier than is usual in the SH. A downward trend in column 03 above 100 hPa during Jan and Feb 1996 appears to be related to the lower stratospheric 03 depletion.

  8. Investigations of Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange of Ozone Derived From MLS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Mark A.; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Ziemke, Jerry R.

    2006-01-01

    Daily high-resolution maps of stratospheric ozone have been constructed using observations by MLS combined with trajectory information. These fields are used to determine the extratropical stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) of ozone for the year 2005 using two diagnostic methods. The resulting two annual estimates compare well with past model- and observational-based estimates. Initial analyses of the seasonal characteristics indicate that significant STE of ozone in the polar regions occurs only during spring and early summer. We also examine evidence that the Antarctic ozone hole is responsible for a rapid decrease in the rate of ozone STE during the SH spring. Subtracting the high-resolution stratospheric ozone fiom OMI total column measurements creates a high-resolution tropospheric ozone residual (HTOR) product. The HTOR fields are compared to the spatial distribution of the ozone STE. We show that the mean tropospheric ozone maxima tend to occur near locations of significant ozone STE. This suggests that STE may be responsible for a significant fraction of many mean tropospheric ozone anomalies.

  9. Investigations of Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange of Ozone Derived From MLS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Ziemke, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Daily high-resolution maps of stratospheric ozone have been constructed using observations by MLS combined with trajectory information. These fields are used to determine the extratropical stratosphere- troposphere exchange (STE) of ozone for the year 2005 using two diagnostic methods. The resulting two annual estimates compare well with past model- and observational-based estimates. Initial analyses of the seasonal characteristics indicate that significant STE of ozone in the polar regions occurs only during spring and early summer. We also examine evidence that the Antarctic ozone hole is responsible for a rapid decrease in the rate of ozone STE during the SH spring. Subtracting the high-resolution stratospheric ozone from OMI total column measurements creates a high- resolution tropospheric ozone residual (HTOR) product. The HTOR fields are compared to the spatial distribution of the ozone STE. We show that the mean tropospheric ozone maxima tend to occur near locations of significant ozone STE. This suggests that ozone transported from the stratosphere may be responsible for a significant fraction of the mean tropospheric ozone maxima.

  10. UARS/MLS Cloud Ice Measurements: Implications for H2O Transport near the Tropopause.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. L.; Read, W. G.; Dessler, A. E.; Sherwood, S. C.; Jiang, J. H.

    2005-02-01

    A technique for detecting large hydrometeors at high altitudes is described here and applied to the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite/Microwave Limb Sounder (UARS/MLS) 203-GHz radiance measurements at tangent pressures between 200 and 46 hPa. At these tangent pressures the radiances remain optically thin and cloudy-sky radiances are brighter than normal clear-sky cases. Unlike infrared/visible cloud observations, the 203-GHz radiances can penetrate most ice clouds and are sensitive to ice crystals of convective origin. Rough ice water content (IWC) retrievals are made near the tropopause using estimated size distributions from in situ convective studies. The seasonal mean IWC observed at 100 hPa reaches vapor-equivalent 20 ppmv or more over convective centers, dominating the total water content. Convectively lofted ice, therefore, appears to be hydrologically significant at the tropical cold point. IWC is well correlated spatially with relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi) at 100 hPa during both the dry (January-March) and moist (July-September) periods.

  11. Analysis of cirrus in the tropical tropopause layer from CALIPSO and MLS data: A water perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Dessler, Andrew E.

    2012-02-01

    Two mechanisms are thought to be primarily responsible for the formation of cirrus in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL): detrainment from deep convective anvils and in situ initiation. By analyzing water vapor (H2O) measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and ice water content (IWC) measurements from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), we identify TTL cirrus that contain too much ice to have been formed in situ—and therefore must be of convective origin. Analyzing 3 years of CALIPSO measurements (2008-2010), we found three maxima in the occurrence of convective cirrus: equatorial Africa, the tropical western Pacific, and South America. Over the entire tropics, we found that convective cirrus occur more frequently during boreal winter-spring and less frequently during boreal summer-fall. The convective fractions of cirrus also increase until the cold point tropopause is reached in most seasons—implying higher probabilities of cirrus around the tropopause being of convective origin. Averaged over 3 years, we find that at least ˜30% of cirrus in the TTL are definitely of convective origin.

  12. The Mesospheric Polar Vortices in GEOS, WACCM, SABER, and EOS-MLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, V.; Randall, C. E.; Pawson, S.; Garcia, R.; Lieberman, R.; Manney, G. L.

    2007-12-01

    Satellite data analysis is combined with global modeling to characterize the 3-D structure and day-to-day variability of the polar vortex in the mesosphere. We use satellite temperature and geopotential height data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument and temperature, carbon monoxide, and methane data from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument to characterize the structure of the upper stratospheric and mesospheric polar vortex in each hemisphere on a daily basis. The mesospheric vortex, as seen by these satellite instruments, is then compared to the representation of the mesospheric vortex in the GEOS-4 and GEOS-5 data assimilation systems as well as in the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). We will show the 3-D structure of the mesospheric vortex at times when the stratospheric vortex is strong as well as how this structure is modified during stratospheric warming events. This work will conduct model/observation intercomparisons of the mesospheric vortex to further understanding of its role in the descent of EPP-NOx.

  13. The influence of Multiwave Locked System (MLS) laser therapy on clinical features, microcirculatory abnormalities and selected modulators of angiogenesis in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kuryliszyn-Moskal, Anna; Kita, Jacek; Dakowicz, Agnieszka; Chwieśko-Minarowska, Sylwia; Moskal, Diana; Kosztyła-Hojna, Bożena; Jabłońska, Ewa; Klimiuk, Piotr Adrian

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of the Multiwave Locked System (MLS) laser therapy on clinical features, microvascular changes in nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC) and circulating modulators releasing as a consequence of vascular endothelium injury such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and angiopoietin 2 (Ang-2) in patients with primary and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon. Seventy-eight RP patients and 30 healthy volunteers were recruited into the study. All patients with RP received MLS laser irradiation for 3 weeks. Clinical, NVC and laboratory investigations were performed before and after the MLS laser therapy. The serum concentration of VEGF and Ang-2 were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). After 3 weeks of MLS laser therapy, the clinical improvement manifested by decreasing of the number of RP attacks, mean duration of Raynaud's attack and pain intensity in RP patients was observed. After MLS laser therapy in 65% of patients with primary and in 35% with secondary RP, an increase in the loop number and/or a reduction in avascular areas in NVC were observed. In comparison with a control group, higher serum concentration of VEGF and Ang-2 in RP patients was demonstrated. After MLS laser therapy, a reduction of Ang-2 in both groups of RP patients was found. Our results suggest that NVC may reflect microvascular changes associated with clinical improvement after MLS laser therapy in patients with primary and secondary RP. Ang-2 serum levels may be a useful marker of microvascular abnormalities in RP patients treated with MLS laser therapy.

  14. Assessment of Odin-OSIRIS ozone measurements from 2001 to the present using MLS, GOMOS, and ozonesondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, C.; Bourassa, A. E.; Sofieva, V.; Froidevaux, L.; McLinden, C. A.; Hubert, D.; Lambert, J.-C.; Sioris, C. E.; Degenstein, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imaging System (OSIRIS) was launched aboard the Odin satellite in 2001 and is continuing to take limb-scattered sunlight measurements of the atmosphere. This work aims to characterize and assess the stability of the OSIRIS 11 yr v5.0x ozone data set. Three validation data sets were used: the v2.2 Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and v6 Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) satellite data records, and ozonesonde measurements. Global mean percent differences between coincident OSIRIS and validation measurements are within 5% at all altitudes above 18.5 km for MLS, above 21.5 km for GOMOS, and above 17.5 km for ozonesondes. Below 17.5 km, OSIRIS measurements agree with ozonesondes within 5% and are well-correlated (R > 0.75) with them. For low OSIRIS optics temperatures (< 16 °C), OSIRIS ozone measurements have a negative bias of 1-6% compared with the validation data sets for 25.5-40.5 km. Biases between OSIRIS ascending and descending node measurements were investigated and found to be related to aerosol retrievals below 27.5 km. Above 30 km, agreement between OSIRIS and the validation data sets was related to the OSIRIS retrieved albedo, which measures apparent upwelling, with a positive bias in OSIRIS data with large albedos. In order to assess the long-term stability of OSIRIS measurements, global average drifts relative to the validation data sets were calculated and were found to be < 3% per decade for comparisons with MLS for 19.5-36.5 km, GOMOS for 18.5-54.5 km, and ozonesondes for 12.5-22.5 km. Above 36.5 km, the relative drift for OSIRIS versus MLS ranged from ~ 0 to 6% per decade, depending on the data set used to convert MLS data to the OSIRIS altitude versus number density grid. Overall, this work demonstrates that the OSIRIS 11 yr ozone data set from 2001 to the present is suitable for trend studies.

  15. Use of AIRS, OMI, MLS, and TES Data in Assessing Forest Ecosystem Exposure to Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    Ground-level ozone at high levels poses health threats to exposed flora and fauna, including negative impacts to human health. While concern is common regarding depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, portions of the urban and rural United States periodically have high ambient levels of tropospheric ozone on the ground. Ozone pollution can cause a variety of impacts to susceptible vegetation (e.g., Ponderosa and Jeffrey pine species in the southwestern United States), such as stunted growth, alteration of growth form, needle or leaf chlorosis, and impaired ability to withstand drought-induced water stress. In addition, Southern Californian forests with high ozone exposures have been recently subject to multiyear droughts that have led to extensive forest overstory mortality from insect outbreaks and increased incidence of wildfires. Residual forests in these impacted areas may be more vulnerable to high ozone exposures and to other forest threats than ever before. NASA sensors collect a wealth of atmospheric data that have been used recently for mapping and monitoring regional tropospheric ozone levels. AIRS (Atmospheric Infrared Sounder), OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder), and TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) data could be used to assess forest ecosystem exposure to ozone. Such NASA data hold promise for providing better or at least complementary synoptic information on ground-level ozone levels that Federal agency partners can use to assess forest health trends and to mitigate the threats as needed in compliance with Federal laws and mandates. NASA data products on ozone concentrations may be able to aid applications of DSTs (decision support tools) adopted by the USDA FS (U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service) and by the NPS (National Park Service), such as the Ozone Calculator, in which ground ozone estimates are employed to assess ozone impacts to forested vegetation.

  16. Variability in the Speed of the Brewer-Dobson Circulation as Observed by Aura/MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flury, Thomas; Wu, Dong L.; Read, W. G.

    2013-01-01

    We use Aura/MLS stratospheric water vapour (H2O) measurements as tracer for dynamics and infer interannual variations in the speed of the Brewer-Dobson circulation (BDC) from 2004 to 2011. We correlate one-year time series of H2O in the lower stratosphere at two subsequent pressure levels (68 hPa, approx.18.8 km and 56 hPa, approx 19.9 km at the Equator) and determine the time lag for best correlation. The same calculation is made on the horizontal on the 100 hPa (approx 16.6 km) level by correlating the H2O time series at the Equator with the ones at 40 N and 40 S. From these lag coefficients we derive the vertical and horizontal speeds of the BDC in the tropics and extra-tropics, respectively. We observe a clear interannual variability of the vertical and horizontal branch. The variability reflects signatures of the Quasi Biennial Oscillation (QBO). Our measurements confirm the QBO meridional circulation anomalies and show that the speed variations in the two branches of the BDC are out of phase and fairly well anti-correlated. Maximum ascent rates are found during the QBO easterly phase. We also find that transport of H2O towards the Northern Hemisphere (NH) is on the average two times faster than to the Southern Hemisphere (SH) with a mean speed of 1.15m/s at 100 hPa. Furthermore, the speed towards the NH shows much more interannual variability with an amplitude of about 21% whilst the speed towards the SH varies by only 10 %. An amplitude of 21% is also observed in the variability of the ascent rate at the Equator which is on the average 0.2mm/s.

  17. Merging OSIRIS, SAGE II and MLS Vertical Ozone Profiles for the Determination of Long Term Trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenstein, D. A.; Lloyd, N.; Bourassa, A. E.; Roth, C.; Rieger, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The OSIRIS instrument has been in operation onboard the Odin spacecraft since the autumn of 2001. Since that time OSIRIS has routinely measured spectrally dispersed limb-scattered sunlight from which vertical ozone profiles have been derived. The length of the OSIRIS ozone data record makes it a valuable resource for the analysis of long term trends. However, on its own it is not of sufficient length to capture all of the relevant signatures required to completely understand important changes in the vertical distribution of ozone. In particular the 1997 turnaround is not captured within the OSIRIS time series. For this reason it is important that the OSIRIS measurements be combined, or merged, with other data records like the SAGE II time series before a full analysis can be performed. This paper is focused on the merged SAGE II - OSIRIS time series and the resulting trends. It has been recently noted that the post 1997 positive trends at around 40 km that have been derived from this time series are higher than those calculated using other merged data sets. In this paper we will detail our efforts to understand why this is so. We will present analyses related to instrument drift, sampling biases and sensitivity to the method used to determine long term trends. Included along with the thorough analysis of the SAGE II - OSIRIS merged time series is an analysis of a SAGE II - MLS time series combined using the exact same method. Similarities and differences in the results derived from the two merged time series will also be discussed.

  18. Polar stratospheric cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modeled by ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Hideaki; Wohltmann, Ingo; Wegner, Tobias; Takeda, Masanori; Pitts, Michael C.; Poole, Lamont R.; Lehmann, Ralph; Santee, Michelle L.; Rex, Markus

    2016-03-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO, and of HCl and ClO by MLS along air mass trajectories, to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/2010 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an air mass encountered PSCs. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  19. Polar Stratospheric Cloud evolution and chlorine activation measured by CALIPSO and MLS, and modelled by ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, H.; Wohltmann, I.; Wegner, T.; Takeda, M.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Lehmann, R.; Santee, M. L.; Rex, M.

    2015-08-01

    We examined observations of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) by CALIPSO and of HCl, ClO and HNO3 by MLS along air mass trajectories to investigate the dependence of the inferred PSC composition on the temperature history of the air parcels, and the dependence of the level of chlorine activation on PSC composition. Several case studies based on individual trajectories from the Arctic winter 2009/10 were conducted, with the trajectories chosen such that the first processing of the air mass by PSCs in this winter occurred on the trajectory. Transitions of PSC composition classes were observed to be highly dependent on the temperature history. In cases of a gradual temperature decrease, nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) and super-cooled ternary solution (STS) mixture clouds were observed. In cases of rapid temperature decrease, STS clouds were first observed, followed by NAT/STS mixture clouds. When temperatures dropped below the frost point, ice clouds formed, and then transformed into NAT/STS mixture clouds when temperature increased above the frost point. The threshold temperature for rapid chlorine activation on PSCs is approximately 4 K below the NAT existence temperature, TNAT. Furthermore, simulations of the ATLAS chemistry and transport box model along the trajectories were used to corroborate the measurements and show good agreement with the observations. Rapid chlorine activation was observed when an airmass encountered PSCs. The observed and modelled dependence of the rate of chlorine activation on the PSC composition class was small. Usually, chlorine activation was limited by the amount of available ClONO2. Where ClONO2 was not the limiting factor, a large dependence on temperature was evident.

  20. Monitoring the distribution of tropospheric ozone concentration over Pakistan by using OMI/MLS satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noreen, Asma; Fahim Khokhar, Muhammad; Murtaza, Rabbia; Zeb, Naila

    2016-07-01

    Pakistan is a semi-arid, agricultural country located in Indian Sub-continent, Asia. Due to exponential population growth, poor control and regulatory measures and practices in industries, it is facing a major problem of air pollution. The concentration of greenhouse gases and aerosols are showing an increasing trend in general. One of these greenhouse gases is tropospheric ozone, one of the criteria pollutant, which has a radiative forcing (RF) of about 0.4 ± 0.2 Wm-2, contributing about 14% of the present total RF. Spatial distribution and temporal evolution of tropospheric ozone concentration over Pakistan during 2004 to 2014 was studied by using combined OMI/MLS product, which was derived by tropospheric ozone residual (TOR) method. Results showed an overall increase of 3.2 ± 2.2 DU in tropospheric ozone concentration over Pakistan since October 2004. The mean spatial distribution showed high concentrations of ozone in the Punjab and southern Sindh where there is high population densities along with rapid urbanization and enhanced anthropogenic activities. The seasonal variations were observed in the provinces of the country and TO3 VCDs were found to be high during summer while minimum during winter. The statistical analysis by using seasonal Mann Kendal test also showed strong positive trends over the four provinces as well as in major cities of Pakistan. These variations were driven by various factors such as seasonality in UV-B fluxes, seasonality in ozone precursor gases such as NOx and VOCs and agricultural fire activities in Pakistan. A strong correlation of 97% was found between fire events and tropospheric ozone concentration over the country. The results also depicted the influence of UV-B radiations on the tropospheric ozone concentration over different regions of Pakistan especially in Baluchistan and Sindh provinces.

  1. Tropospheric column ozone response to ENSO in GEOS-5 assimilation of OMI and MLS ozone data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Mark A.; Wargan, Krzysztof; Pawson, Steven

    2016-06-01

    We use GEOS-5 analyses of Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) ozone observations to investigate the magnitude and spatial distribution of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) influence on tropospheric column ozone (TCO) into the middle latitudes. This study provides the first explicit spatially resolved characterization of the ENSO influence and demonstrates coherent patterns and teleconnections impacting the TCO in the extratropics. The response is evaluated and characterized by both the variance explained and sensitivity of TCO to the Niño 3.4 index. The tropospheric response in the tropics agrees well with previous studies and verifies the analyses. A two-lobed response symmetric about the Equator in the western Pacific/Indonesian region seen in some prior studies and not in others is confirmed here. This two-lobed response is consistent with the large-scale vertical transport. We also find that the large-scale transport in the tropics dominates the response compared to the small-scale convective transport. The ozone response is weaker in the middle latitudes, but a significant explained variance of the TCO is found over several small regions, including the central United States. However, the sensitivity of TCO to the Niño 3.4 index is statistically significant over a large area of the middle latitudes. The sensitivity maxima and minima coincide with anomalous anti-cyclonic and cyclonic circulations where the associated vertical transport is consistent with the sign of the sensitivity. Also, ENSO related changes to the mean tropopause height can contribute significantly to the midlatitude response. Comparisons to a 22-year chemical transport model simulation demonstrate that these results from the 9-year assimilation are representative of the longer term. This investigation brings insight to several seemingly disparate prior studies of the El Niño influence on tropospheric ozone in the middle latitudes.

  2. The Contributions of Chemistry and Transport to Low Arctic Ozone in March 2011 Derived from Aura MLS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahan, S. E.; Douglass, A. R.; Newman, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Stratospheric and total columns of Arctic O3 (63-90 N) in late March 2011 averaged 320 and 349 DU, respectively. These values are 74 DU lower than averages for the previous 6 years. We use Aura MLS O3 observations to quantify the roles of chemistry and transport and find there are two major reasons for low O3 in March 2011: heterogeneous chemical loss and a late final warming that delayed the resupply of O3 until April. Daily vortex-averaged partial columns in the lowermost stratosphere (p greater than 133 hPa) and middle stratosphere (p less than 29 hPa) are unaffected by local heterogeneous chemistry and show a near total lack of transport into the vortex between late January and late March, contributing to the observed low column. The lower stratospheric (LS) column (133-29 hPa) is affected by both heterogeneous chemistry and transport. Low interannual variability of Aura MLS 0 3 columns and temperature inside the Arctic vortex (2004-2011) shows that the transport contribution to vortex O3 in fall and early winter is nearly the same each year. The descent of MLS N2O vortex profiles in 2011 provides an estimate of O3 transported into the LS column during late winter. By quantifying the role of transport we determine that PSC-driven chemical loss causes 80 (plus or minus 10) DU of vortex-averaged O3 loss by late March 2011. Without heterogeneous chemical loss, March 2011 vortex O3 would have been 40 DU lower than normal due to the late final warming and resupply of O3 which did not occur until April.

  3. Analysis of tropopause-level thin cirrus from Calipso cloud measurements and Aura MLS water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessler, A. E.; Cardona, A.

    2008-05-01

    Thin cirrus and thick cloud distributions in the tropical tropopause region are analyzed using Calipso data. Observations obtained between December 2006 and November 2007 show that thin cirrus between 30N and 30S occur in regions of intense convection. Measurements of water vapor from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) were used to determine the relationship between cloud occurrence, relative humidity with respect to ice (RHI), and OLR. We show that both RHI and proximity to convection determine the occurrence frequency of tropopause-level thin cirrus.

  4. The Nkx5/HMX homeodomain protein MLS-2 is required for proper tube cell shape in the C. elegans excretory system.

    PubMed

    Abdus-Saboor, Ishmail; Stone, Craig E; Murray, John I; Sundaram, Meera V

    2012-06-15

    Cells perform wide varieties of functions that are facilitated, in part, by adopting unique shapes. Many of the genes and pathways that promote cell fate specification have been elucidated. However, relatively few transcription factors have been identified that promote shape acquisition after fate specification. Here we show that the Nkx5/HMX homeodomain protein MLS-2 is required for cellular elongation and shape maintenance of two tubular epithelial cells in the C. elegans excretory system, the duct and pore cells. The Nkx5/HMX family is highly conserved from sea urchins to humans, with known roles in neuronal and glial development. MLS-2 is expressed in the duct and pore, and defects in mls-2 mutants first arise when the duct and pore normally adopt unique shapes. MLS-2 cooperates with the EGF-Ras-ERK pathway to turn on the LIN-48/Ovo transcription factor in the duct cell during morphogenesis. These results reveal a novel interaction between the Nkx5/HMX family and the EGF-Ras pathway and implicate a transcription factor, MLS-2, as a regulator of cell shape.

  5. Investigating In-cloud Relative Humidity and Thin Cirrus in the Upper Tropical Atmosphere Using AIRS, CALIPSO, and MLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, C. K.; Kahn, B. H.; Eldering, A.; Fetzer, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate vertical and horizontal distributions of tropical oceanic thin cirrus optical and microphysical properties observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). These properties are related to thermodynamic quantities, i.e., relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi), and cloud top temperature derived from the AIRS Level 2 operational soundings. Differences between all sky and in-cloud RHi are explored and possible mechanisms that explain these anomalies are discussed. Furthermore, we evaluate the hypothesis that many of the observed clouds are physically much thinner than the nominal resolution of AIRS, which may lead to dry biases of in-cloud RHi. To test this we exploit the co-located AIRS RHi and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) cloud thickness. Finally, we diagnose the ability of AIRS to measure water vapor in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) using co- located observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). From this, a combined AIRS-MLS RHi product is used to investigate joint distributions of cirrus microphysical and optical properties, and RHi in the TTL.

  6. Navigation and flight director guidance for the NASA/FAA helicopter MLS curved approach flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phatak, A. V.; Lee, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    The navigation and flight director guidance systems implemented in the NASA/FAA helicopter microwave landing system (MLS) curved approach flight test program is described. Flight test were conducted at the U.S. Navy's Crows Landing facility, using the NASA Ames UH-lH helicopter equipped with the V/STOLAND avionics system. The purpose of these tests was to investigate the feasibility of flying complex, curved and descending approaches to a landing using MLS flight director guidance. A description of the navigation aids used, the avionics system, cockpit instrumentation and on-board navigation equipment used for the flight test is provided. Three generic reference flight paths were developed and flown during the test. They were as follows: U-Turn, S-turn and Straight-In flight profiles. These profiles and their geometries are described in detail. A 3-cue flight director was implemented on the helicopter. A description of the formulation and implementation of the flight director laws is also presented. Performance data and analysis is presented for one pilot conducting the flight director approaches.

  7. Combined assimilation of IASI and MLS observations to constrain tropospheric and stratospheric ozone in a global chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emili, E.; Barret, B.; Massart, S.; Le Flochmoen, E.; Piacentini, A.; El Amraoui, L.; Pannekoucke, O.; Cariolle, D.

    2013-08-01

    Accurate and temporally resolved fields of free-troposphere ozone are of major importance to quantify the intercontinental transport of pollution and the ozone radiative forcing. In this study we examine the impact of assimilating ozone observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) in a global chemical transport model (MOdèle de Chimie Atmosphérique à Grande Échelle, MOCAGE). The assimilation of the two instruments is performed by means of a variational algorithm (4-D-VAR) and allows to constrain stratospheric and tropospheric ozone simultaneously. The analysis is first computed for the months of August and November 2008 and validated against ozone-sondes measurements to verify the presence of observations and model biases. It is found that the IASI Tropospheric Ozone Column (TOC, 1000-225 hPa) should be bias-corrected prior to assimilation and MLS lowermost level (215 hPa) excluded from the analysis. Furthermore, a longer analysis of 6 months (July-August 2008) showed that the combined assimilation of MLS and IASI is able to globally reduce the uncertainty (Root Mean Square Error, RMSE) of the modeled ozone columns from 30% to 15% in the Upper-Troposphere/Lower-Stratosphere (UTLS, 70-225 hPa) and from 25% to 20% in the free troposphere. The positive effect of assimilating IASI tropospheric observations is very significant at low latitudes (30° S-30° N), whereas it is not demonstrated at higher latitudes. Results are confirmed by a comparison with additional ozone datasets like the Measurements of OZone and wAter vapour by aIrbus in-service airCraft (MOZAIC) data, the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) total ozone columns and several high-altitude surface measurements. Finally, the analysis is found to be little sensitive to the assimilation parameters and the model chemical scheme, due to the high frequency of satellite observations compared to the average life-time of free

  8. Bacteria evade immune recognition via TLR13 and binding of their 23S rRNA by MLS antibiotics by the same mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hochrein, Hubertus; Kirschning, Carsten J.

    2013-01-01

    The immune system recognizes pathogens and other danger by means of pattern recognition receptors. Recently, we have demonstrated that the orphan Toll-like receptor 13 (TLR13) senses a defined sequence of the bacterial rRNA and that bacteria use specific mechanisms to evade macrolide lincosamide streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics detection via TLR13. PMID:23802068

  9. Flight tests of three-dimensional path-redefinition algorithms for transition from Radio Navigation (RNAV) to Microwave Landing System (MLS) navigation when flying an aircraft on autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains results of flight tests for three path update algorithms designed to provide smooth transition for an aircraft guidance system from DME, VORTAC, and barometric navaids to the more precise MLS by modifying the desired 3-D flight path. The first algorithm, called Zero Cross Track, eliminates the discontinuity in cross-track and altitude error at transition by designating the first valid MLS aircraft position as the desired first waypoint, while retaining all subsequent waypoints. The discontinuity in track angle is left unaltered. The second, called Tangent Path, also eliminates the discontinuity in cross-track and altitude errors and chooses a new desired heading to be tangent to the next oncoming circular arc turn. The third, called Continued Track, eliminates the discontinuity in cross-track, altitude, and track angle errors by accepting the current MLS position and track angle as the desired ones and recomputes the location of the next waypoint. The flight tests were conducted on the Transportation Systems Research Vehicle, a small twin-jet transport aircraft modified for research under the Advanced Transport Operating Systems program at Langley Research Center. The flight tests showed that the algorithms provided a smooth transition to MLS.

  10. Evidence from CALIPSO and Aura MLS for Summertime Mid-Latitude Lower Stratospheric Moistening by Convective Ice Lofting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S.; Dessler, A. E.

    2008-05-01

    Cloud top height measurements from Cloud-Aerosol LIDAR Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) and H2O and O3 measurements from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are used to investigate the influence of mid-latitude convection on the summertime lower stratosphere between 30°N and 60°N. We find that most of the convection over this latitude range occurs over the Asian monsoon and over North America. Over both continents, the effects of convection extend to 420-440 K (~17-19 km). We see evidence of moistening of the lower stratosphere by evaporating ice crystals. The impact of convection on the lower stratospheric water vapor budget is greater over North America. The reason is that ice clouds over North America are found in higher latitudes, where the relative humidity is low, so that ice can efficiently evaporate. Over the Asian monsoon, near saturation conditions limit ice evaporation.

  11. Atmospheric inertia-gravity waves retrieved from level-2 data of the satellite microwave limb sounder Aura/MLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocke, Klemens; Lainer, Martin; Moreira, Lorena; Hagen, Jonas; Fernandez Vidal, Susana; Schranz, Franziska

    2016-09-01

    The temperature profiles of the satellite experiment Aura/MLS are horizontally spaced by 1.5° or 165 km along the satellite orbit. These level-2 data contain valuable information about horizontal fluctuations in temperature, which are mainly induced by inertia-gravity waves. Wave periods of 2-12 h, horizontal wavelengths of 200-1500 km, and vertical wavelengths of 6-30 km efficiently contribute to the standard deviation of the horizontal temperature fluctuations. The study retrieves and discusses the global distributions of inertia-gravity waves in the stratosphere and mesosphere during July 2015 and January 2016. We find many patterns that were previously present in data of TIMED/SABER, Aura/HIRDLS, and ECMWF analysis. However, it seems that Aura/MLS achieves a higher vertical resolution in the gravity wave maps since the maps are derived from the analysis of horizontal fluctuations along the orbit of the sounding volume. The zonal mean of the inertia-gravity wave distribution shows vertical modulations with scales of 10-20 km. Enhanced wave amplitudes occur in regions of increased zonal wind or in the vicinity of strong wind gradients. Further, we find a banana-like shape of enhanced inertia-gravity waves above the Andes in the winter mesosphere. We find areas of enhanced inertia-gravity wave activity above tropical deep convection zones at 100 hPa (z ˜ 13 km). Finally, we study the temporal evolution of inertia-gravity wave activity at 100 hPa in the African longitude sector from December 2015 to February 2016.

  12. Continuation of SAGE and MLS High-Resolution Ozone Profiles with the Suomi NPP OMPS Limb Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramarova, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Moy, L.; Chen, Z.; Frith, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Ozone Mapper and Profiler Suite (OMPS) Limb Profiler (LP) onboard the Suomi NPP satellite is design to measure ozone profiles with a high vertical resolution (~2 km) and dense spatial sampling (~1° latitude). The LP sensor represents a new generation of the US ozone profile instruments with the plan for a follow-up limb instrument onboard the Joint Polar Satellite System 2 (JPSS-2) in 2021. In this study we will examine the suitability of using LP profiles to continue the EOS climate ozone profile record from the SAGE and MLS datasets. First of all, we evaluate the accuracy in determining the LP tangent height by analyzing measured and calculated radiances. The accurate estimation of the tangent height is critical for limb observations. Several methods were explored to estimate the uncertainties in the LP tangent height registration, and the results will be briefly summarized in this presentation. Version 2 of LP data, released in May 2014, includes a static adjustment of ~1.5 km and a dynamic tangent height adjustment within each orbit. A recent analysis of Version 2 Level 1 radiances revealed a 100 m step in the tangent height that occurred on 26 April 2013, due to a switch to two star trackers in determining spacecraft position. In addition, a ~200 m shift in the tangent height along each orbit was detected. These uncertainties in tangent height registrations can affect the stability of the LP ozone record. Therefore, the second step in our study includes a validation of LP ozone profiles against correlative satellite ozone measurements (Aura MLS, ACE-FTS, OSIRIS, and SBUV) with the focus on time-dependent changes. We estimate relative drifts between OMPS LP and correlative ozone records to evaluate stability of the LP measurements. We also test the tangent height corrections found in the internal analysis of Version 2 measurements to determine their effect on the long-term stability of the LP ozone record.

  13. Validation of Aura MLS retrievals of temperature, water vapour and ozone in the upper troposphere and lower-middle stratosphere over the Tibetan Plateau during boreal summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Xiaolu; Wright, Jonathon S.; Zheng, Xiangdong; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Vömel, Holger; Zhou, Xiuji

    2016-08-01

    We validate Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) version 3 (v3) and version 4 (v4) retrievals of summertime temperature, water vapour and ozone in the upper troposphere and lower-middle stratosphere (UTLS; 10-316 hPa) against balloon soundings collected during the Study of Ozone, Aerosols and Radiation over the Tibetan Plateau (SOAR-TP). Mean v3 and v4 profiles of temperature, water vapour and ozone in this region during the measurement campaigns are almost identical through most of the stratosphere (10-68 hPa), but differ in several respects in the upper troposphere and tropopause layer. Differences in v4 relative to v3 include slightly colder mean temperatures from 100 to 316 hPa, smaller mean water vapour mixing ratios in the upper troposphere (215-316 hPa) and a more vertically homogeneous profile of mean ozone mixing ratios below the climatological tropopause (100-316 hPa). These changes substantially improve agreement between ozonesondes and MLS ozone retrievals in the upper troposphere, but slightly worsen existing cold and dry biases at these levels. Aura MLS temperature profiles contain significant cold biases relative to collocated temperature measurements in several layers of the lower-middle stratosphere and in the upper troposphere. MLS retrievals of water vapour volume mixing ratio generally compare well with collocated measurements, excepting a substantial dry bias (-32 ± 11 % in v4) that extends through most of the upper troposphere (121-261 hPa). MLS retrievals of ozone volume mixing ratio are biased high relative to collocated ozonesondes in the stratosphere (18-83 hPa), but are biased low at 100 hPa. The largest relative biases in ozone retrievals (approximately +70 %) are located at 83 hPa. MLS v4 offers substantial benefits relative to v3, particularly with respect to water vapour and ozone. Key improvements include larger data yields, reduced noise in the upper troposphere and smaller fluctuations in the bias profile at pressures larger than 100

  14. Comparison of ER-2 Aircraft and POAM-III, MLS, and SAGE-II Satellite Measurements During SOLVE Using Traditional Correlative Analysis and Trajectory Hunting Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danilin, M. Y.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Bevilacqua, R. M.; Lyjak, L. V.; Froidevaux, L.; Santee, M. L.; Zawodny, J. M.; Hoppel, K. W.; Richard, E. C.; Spackman, J. R.; Jackman, Charles H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We compared the version 5 Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), version 3 Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement-III (POAM-111) aboard the French satellite SPOT-IV, version 6.0 Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment 11 (SAGE-II) aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite, and NASA ER-2 aircraft measurements made in the northern hemisphere in January-February 2000 during the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE). This study addresses one of the key scientific objectives of the SOLVE campaign, namely, to validate multi-platform satellite measurements made in the polar stratosphere during winter. This intercomparison was performed using a traditional correlative analysis (TCA) and a trajectory hunting technique (THT). Launching backward and forward trajectories from the points of measurement, the THT identifies air parcels sampled at least twice within a prescribed match criterion during the course of 5 days. We found that the ozone measurements made by these four instruments agree most of the time within 110% in the stratosphere up to 1400 K (approximately 35 km). The water vapor measurements from POAM-III and the ER-2 Harvard Lyman-alpha hygrometer and JPL laser hygrometer agree to within 10.5 ppmv (or about +/-10%) in the lower stratosphere above 380 K. The MLS and ER-2 ClO measurements agree within their error bars for the TCA. The MLS and ER-2 nitric acid measurements near 17-20 km altitude agree within their uncertainties most of the time with a hint of a positive offset by MLS according to the TCA. We also applied the AER box model constrained by the ER-2 measurements for analysis of the ClO and HN03 measurements using the THT. We found that: (1) the model values of ClO are smaller by about 0.3-0.4 (0.2) ppbv below (above) 400 K than those by MLS and (2) the HN03 comparison shows a positive offset of MLS values by approximately 1 and 1-2 ppbv below 400 K and near 450 K, respectively. It is hard to

  15. Combined assimilation of IASI and MLS observations to constrain tropospheric and stratospheric ozone in a global chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emili, Emanuele; Barret, Brice; Massart, Sebastien; Piacentini, Andrea; Pannekoucke, Olivier; Cariolle, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Ozone acts as the main shield against UV radiation in the stratosphere, it contributes to the greenhouse effect in the troposphere and it is a major pollutant in the planetary boundary layer. In the last decades models and satellite observations reached a mature level, providing estimates of ozone with an accuracy of few percents in the stratosphere. On the other hand, tropospheric ozone still represents a challenge, because its signal is less detectable by space-borne sensors, its modelling depends on the knowledge of gaseous emissions at the surface, and stratosphere/troposphere exchanges might rapidly increase its abundance by several times. Moreover there is generally lack of in-situ observations of tropospheric ozone in many regions of the world. For these reasons the assimilation of satellite data into chemical transport models represents a promising technique to overcome limitations of both satellites and models. The objective of this study is to assess the value of vertically resolved observations from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) to constrain both the tropospheric and stratospheric ozone profile in a global model. While ozone total columns and stratospheric profiles from UV and microwave sensors are nowadays routinely assimilated in operational models, still few studies have explored the assimilation of ozone products from IR sensors such as IASI, which provide better sensitivity in the troposphere. We assimilate both MLS ozone profiles and IASI tropospheric (1000-225 hPa) ozone columns in the Météo France chemical transport model MOCAGE for 2008. The model predicts ozone concentrations on a 2x2 degree global grid and for 60 vertical levels, ranging from the surface up to 0.1 hPa. The assimilation is based on a 4D-VAR algorithm, employs a linear chemistry scheme and accounts for the satellite vertical sensitivity via the averaging kernels. The assimilation of the two products is first tested

  16. A-train CALIOP and MLS observations of early winter antarctic polar stratospheric clouds and nitric acid in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, A.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.; Chae, J. H.

    2011-10-01

    A-train Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations are used to investigate the development of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and the gas phase nitric acid distribution in the early 2008 Antarctic winter. Observational evidence of gravity-wave activity is provided by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances and infrared spectroscopic detection of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in PSCs is obtained from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 DAS) analyses are used to derive Lagrangian trajectories and to determine temperature-time histories of air parcels. We use CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements to classify PSCs and the MLS measurements to determine the corresponding gas phase HNO3 as a function of temperature. For liquid PSCs the uptake of HNO3 follows the theoretical equilibrium curve for supercooled ternary solutions (STS), but at temperatures about 1 K lower as determined from GEOS-5. In the presence of solid phase PSCs, above the ice frost-point, the HNO3 depletion occurs over a wider range of temperatures (+2 to -7 K) distributed about the NAT equilibrium curve. Rapid gas phase HNO3 depletion is first seen by MLS from from 23-25 May 2008, consisting of a decrease in the volume mixing ratio (parts per billion by volume) from 14 ppbv to 7 ppbv on the 46-32 hPa (hectopascal) pressure levels and accompanied by a 2-3 ppbv increase by renitrification at the 68 hPa pressure level. Temperature-time histories of air parcels demonstrate that the depleted HNO3 region is more clearly correlated with prior low temperature exposure of a few kelvin above the frost-point than with either the region bounded by the NAT existence temperature threshold or the region of minimum temperatures. From the combined data we infer the presence of large-size NAT particles with effective radii >5-7 μm and low NAT

  17. A-train CALIOP and MLS observations of early winter Antarctic polar stratospheric clouds and nitric acid in 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, A.; Santee, M. L.; Wu, D. L.; Chae, J. H.

    2012-03-01

    A-train Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations are used to investigate the development of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) and the gas-phase nitric acid distribution in the early 2008 Antarctic winter. Observational evidence of gravity-wave activity is provided by Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) radiances and infrared spectroscopic detection of nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) in PSCs is obtained from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS). Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS-5 DAS) analyses are used to derive Lagrangian trajectories and to determine temperature-time histories of air parcels. We use CALIOP backscatter and depolarization measurements to classify PSCs and the MLS measurements to determine the corresponding gas-phase HNO3 as a function of temperature. For liquid PSCs the uptake of HNO3 follows the theoretical equilibrium curve for supercooled ternary solutions (STS), but at temperatures about 1 K lower as determined from GEOS-5. In the presence of solid phase PSCs, above the ice frost-point, the HNO3 depletion occurs over a wider range of temperatures (+2 to -7 K) distributed about the NAT equilibrium curve. Rapid gas-phase HNO3 depletion is first seen by MLS from from 23-25 May 2008, consisting of a decrease in the volume mixing ratio from 14 ppbv (parts per billion by volume) to 7 ppbv on the 46-32 hPa (hectopascal) pressure levels and accompanied by a 2-3 ppbv increase by renitrification at the 68 hPa pressure level. The observed region of depleted HNO3 is substantially smaller than the region bounded by the NAT existence temperature threshold. Temperature-time histories of air parcels demonstrate that the depletion is more clearly correlated with prior exposure to temperatures a few kelvin above the frost-point. From the combined data we infer the presence of large-size NAT particles with effective radii >5-7 μm and low NAT

  18. Variability of Antarctic ozone loss in the last decade (2004-2013): high resolution simulations compared to Aura MLS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuttippurath, J.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Lefèvre, F.; Santee, M. L.; Froidevaux, L.; Hauchecorne, A.

    2014-11-01

    A detailed analysis of the polar ozone loss processes during ten recent Antarctic winters is presented with high resolution Mimosa-Chim model simulations and high frequency polar vortex observations from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument. Our model results for the Antarctic winters 2004-2013 show that chemical ozone loss starts in the edge region of the vortex at equivalent latitudes (EqLs) of 65-69° S in mid-June/July. The loss progresses with time at higher EqLs and intensifies during August-September over the range 400-600 K. The loss peaks in late September/early October, where all EqLs (65-83°) show similar loss and the maximum loss (>2 ppmv [parts per million by volume]) is found over a broad vertical range of 475-550 K. In the lower stratosphere, most winters show similar ozone loss and production rates. In general, at 500 K, the loss rates are about 2-3 ppbv sh-1 (parts per billion by volume/sunlit hour) in July and 4-5 ppbv sh-1 in August/mid-September, while they drop rapidly to zero by late September. In the middle stratosphere, the loss rates are about 3-5 ppbv sh-1 in July-August and October at 675 K. It is found that the Antarctic ozone hole (June-September) is controlled by the halogen cycles at about 90-95% (ClO-ClO, BrO-ClO, and ClO-O) and the loss above 700 K is dominated by the NOx cycle at about 70-75%. On average, the Mimosa-Chim simulations show that the very cold winters of 2005 and 2006 exhibit a maximum loss of ~3.5 ppmv around 550 K or about 149-173 DU over 350-850 K and the warmer winters of 2004, 2010, and 2012 show a loss of ~2.6 ppmv around 475-500 K or 131-154 DU over 350-850 K. The winters of 2007, 2008, and 2011 were moderately cold and thus both ozone loss and peak loss altitudes are between these two ranges (3 ppmv around 500 K or 150 ± 10 DU). The modeled ozone loss values are in reasonably good agreement with those estimated from Aura MLS measurements, but the model underestimates the observed ClO, largely due

  19. Mls-1-like superantigen in the MA/MyJ mouse is encoded by a new mammary tumor provirus that is distinct from Mtv-7

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Mls-1 is an endogenous superantigen that leads to in vivo deletion and in vitro stimulation of T cell receptor (TCR) V beta 6-, 7-, 8.1-, and 9-expressing cells. The MA/MyJ mouse deletes the identical set of TCR from its mature T cell repertoire; however, it does not contain Mtv-7, the murine mammary tumor provirus (MMTV), whose sag gene encodes Mls-1. Interestingly, the superantigen activity of this mouse strain segregates with a new mammary tumor provirus, Mtv-43, not seen in other inbred strains. The predicted amino acid sequence of the sag gene of Mtv-43 was compared with that of Mtv-7. Strikingly, the COOH terminus of the two molecules is very similar, while all other MMTV-encoded superantigens differ 100% in this segment. PMID:1316931

  20. Tropospheric Ozone Determined from Aura OMI and MLS: Evaluation of Measurements and Comparison with the Global Modeling Initiative's Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Chandra, S.; Duncan, B. N.; Froidevaux, L.; Bhartia, P. K.; Levelt, P. F.; Waters, J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Ozone measurements from the OMI and MLS instruments on board the Aura satellite are used for deriving global distributions of tropospheric column ozone (TCO). TCO is determined using the tropospheric ozone residual method which involves subtracting measurements of MLS stratospheric column ozone (SCO) from OMI total column ozone after adjusting for intercalibration differences of the two instruments using the convective-cloud differential method. The derived TCO field, which covers one complete year of mostly continuous daily measurements from late August 2004 through August 2005, is used for studying the regional and global pollution on a timescale of a few days to months. The seasonal and zonal characteristics of the observed TCO fields are also compared with TCO fields derived from the Global Modeling Initiative's Chemical Transport Model. The model and observations show interesting similarities with respect to zonal and seasonal variations. However, there are notable differences, particularly over the vast region of the Saharan desert.

  1. Highlights from the 11-year record of tropospheric ozone from OMI/MLS and continuation of that long record using OMPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemke, Jerry; Kramarova, Natalya; Bhartia, Pawan; Degenstein, Doug; Deland, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Since October 2004 the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) onboard the Aura satellite have provided over 11 years of continuous tropospheric ozone measurements. These OMI/MLS measurements have been used in many studies to evaluate dynamical and photochemical effects caused by ENSO, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and shorter timescales, as well as long-term trends and the effects of deep convection on tropospheric ozone. Given that the OMI and MLS instruments have now extended well beyond their expected lifetimes, our goal is to continue their long record of tropospheric ozone using recent Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) measurements. The OMPS onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership NPP satellite was launched on October 28, 2011 and is comprised of three instruments: the nadir mapper, the nadir profiler, and the limb profiler. Our study combines total column ozone from the OMPS nadir mapper with stratospheric column ozone from the OMPS limb profiler to measure tropospheric ozone residual. The time period for the OMPS measurements is March 2012 - present. For the OMPS limb profiler retrievals, the OMPS v2 algorithm from Goddard is tested against the SASKatchewan radiative TRANsfer (SASKTRAN) algorithm. The retrieved ozone profiles from each of these algorithms are evaluated with ozone profiles from both ozonesondes and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). Effects on derived OMPS tropospheric ozone caused by the 2015-2016 El Nino event are highlighted. This recent El Nino produced anomalies in tropospheric ozone throughout the tropical Pacific involving increases of ~10 DU over Indonesia and decreases ~5-10 DU in the eastern Pacific. These changes in ozone due to El Nino were predominantly dynamically-induced, caused by the eastward shift in sea-surface temperature and convection from the western to the eastern Pacific.

  2. Comparison between the first Odin-SMR, Aura MLS and CloudSat retrievals of cloud ice mass in the upper tropical troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, P.; Ekström, M.; Rydberg, B.; Wu, D. L.; Austin, R. T.; Murtagh, D. P.

    2007-08-01

    Emerging microwave satellite techniques are expected to provide improved global measurements of cloud ice mass. CloudSat, Aura MLS and Odin-SMR fall into this category and first cloud ice retrievals from these instruments are compared. The comparison is made for partial ice water columns above 12 km, following the SMR retrieval product. None of the instruments shows significant false cloud detections and a consistent view of the geographical distribution of cloud ice is obtained, but differences on the absolute levels exist. CloudSat gives the lowest values, with an overall mean of 2.12 g/m2. A comparable mean for MLS is 4.30 g/m2. This relatively high mean can be an indication of overestimation of the vertical altitude of cloud ice by the MLS retrievals. The vertical response of SMR has also some uncertainty, but this does not affect the comparison between MLS and CloudSat. SMR observations are sensitive to cloud inhomogeneities inside the footprint and some compensation is required. Results in good agreement with CloudSat, both in regard of the mean and probability density functions, are obtained for a weak compensation, while a simple characterisation of the effect indicates the need for stronger compensation. The SMR mean was found to be 1.89/2.62/4.10 g/m2 for no/selected/strongest compensation, respectively. Assumptions about the particle size distribution are a consideration for all three instruments, and constitute the dominating retrieval uncertainty for CloudSat. The comparison indicates a retrieval accuracy of about 40% (3.1±1.2 g/m2). This number is already very small compared to uncertainties of cloud ice parametrisation in atmospheric models, but can be decreased further through a better understanding of main retrieval error sources.

  3. Cloning and characterization of a putative human holocytochrome c-type synthetase gene (HCCS) isolated from the critical region for microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS)

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, L.; Ballabio, A.; Zoghbi, H.Y.

    1996-06-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome (MLS) is an X-linked male-lethal disorder associated with X chromosomal rearrangements resulting in monosomy from Xpter to Xp22. Features include microphthalmia, sclerocornea, linear skin defects, and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Using a cross-species conservation strategy, an expressed sequence from the 450- to the 550-kb MLS critical region on Xp22 was identified by screening a human embryo cDNA library. Northern analysis revealed a transcript of {approx}2.6 kb in all tissues examined, with weaker expression of {approx}1.2- and {approx}5.2-kb transcripts. The strongest expression was observed in heart and skeletal muscle. Sequence analysis of a 3-kb cDNA contig revealed an 807-bp open reading frame encoding a putative 268-amino-acid-protein. Comparison of the sequence with sequences in the databases revealed homology with holocytochrome c-type synthetases, which catalyze the covalent addition of a heme group onto c-type cytochromes in the mitochondria. The c-type cytochromes are required for proper functioning of the electron transport pathway. The human gene (HGMW-approved symbol HCCS) and the corresponding murine gene characterized in this paper are the first mammalian holocytochrome c-type synthetases to be described in the literature. Because of the lack of a neuromuscular phenotype in MLS, it is uncertain whether the deletion of a mitochondrial holocytochrome synthetase would contribute to the phenotype seen in MLS. The expression pattern of this gene and knowledge about the function of holocytochrome synthetases, however, suggest that it is a good candidate for X-linked encephalomyopathies typically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Highlights from the 11-Year Record of Tropospheric Ozone from OMI/MLS and Continuation of that Long Record Using OMPS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Kramarova, N. A.; Bhartia, P. K.; Degenstein, D. A.; Deland, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Since October 2004 the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) onboard the Aura satellite have provided over 11 years of continuous tropospheric ozone measurements. These OMI/MLS measurements have been used in many studies to evaluate dynamical and photochemical effects caused by ENSO, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and shorter timescales, as well as long-term trends and the effects of deep convection on tropospheric ozone. Given that the OMI and MLS instruments have now extended well beyond their expected lifetimes, our goal is to continue their long record of tropospheric ozone using recent Ozone Mapping Profiler Suite (OMPS) measurements. The OMPS onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership NPP satellite was launched on October 28, 2011 and is comprised of three instruments: the nadir mapper, the nadir profiler, and the limb profiler. Our study combines total column ozone from the OMPS nadir mapper with stratospheric column ozone from the OMPS limb profiler to measure tropospheric ozone residual. The time period for the OMPS measurements is March 2012 present. For the OMPS limb profiler retrievals, the OMPS v2 algorithm from Goddard is tested against the University of Saskatchewan (USask) Algorithm. The retrieved ozone profiles from each of these algorithms are evaluated with ozone profiles from both ozonesondes and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). Effects on derived OMPS tropospheric ozone caused by the 2015-2016 El Nino event are highlighted. This recent El Nino produced anomalies in tropospheric ozone throughout the tropical Pacific involving increases of approximately 10 DU over Indonesia and decreases approximately 5-10 DU in the eastern Pacific. These changes in ozone due to El Nino were predominantly dynamically-induced, caused by the eastward shift in sea-surface temperature and convection from the western to the eastern Pacific.

  5. Evidence of Convective Redistribution of Carbon Monoxide in Aura Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manyin, Michael; Douglass, Anne; Schoeberl, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Vertical convective transport is a key element of the tropospheric circulation. Convection lofts air from the boundary layer into the free troposphere, allowing surface emissions to travel much further, and altering the rate of chemical processes such as ozone production. This study uses satellite observations to focus on the convective transport of CO from the boundary layer to the mid and upper troposphere. Our hypothesis is that strong convection associated with high rain rate regions leads to a correlation between mid level and upper level CO amounts. We first test this hypothesis using the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry and transport model. We find the correlation is robust and increases as the precipitation rate (the strength of convection) increases. We next examine three years of CO profiles from the Tropospheric Emission Sounder (TES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments aboard EOS Aura. Rain rates are taken from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B-42 multi-satellite product. Again we find a correlation between mid-level and upper tropospheric CO, which increases with rain rate. Our result shows the critical importance of tropical convection in coupling vertical levels of the troposphere in the transport of trace gases. The effect is seen most clearly in strong convective regions such as the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone.

  6. Correlation among Cirrus Ice Content, Water Vapor and Temperature in the TTL as Observed by CALIPSO and Aura-MLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flury, T.; Wu, D. L.; Read, W. G.

    2012-01-01

    Water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) has a local radiative cooling effect. As a source for ice in cirrus clouds, however, it can also indirectly produce infrared heating. Using NASA A-Train satellite measurements of CALIPSO and Aura/MLS we calculated the correlation of water vapor, ice water content and temperature in the TTL. We find that temperature strongly controls water vapor (correlation r =0.94) and cirrus clouds at 100 hPa (r = -0.91). Moreover we observe that the cirrus seasonal cycle is highly (r =-0.9) anticorrelated with the water vapor variation in the TTL, showing higher cloud occurrence during December-January-February. We further investigate the anticorrelation on a regional scale and find that the strong anticorrelation occurs generally in the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone). The seasonal cycle of the cirrus ice water content is also highly anticorrelated to water vapor (r = -0.91) and our results support the hypothesis that the total water at 100 hPa is roughly constant. Temperature acts as a main regulator for balancing the partition between water vapor and cirrus clouds. Thus, to a large extent, the depleting water vapor in the TTL during DJF is a manifestation of cirrus formation.

  7. Trajectory Calculations of Hydration/Dehydration in the Lower Stratosphere from Aura/MLS Water Vapor Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, S.; Dessler, A. E.

    2009-12-01

    Hydration/dehydration rates at 365 K isentrope are estimated by averaging the differences of two Aura MLS H2O measurements closely linked by two-day Lagrangian trajectories. Stratospheric dehydration mainly occurs in Northern Hemispheric winter over the tropical western Pacific, where seasonally averaged rates are collocated with regions of high deep convective activity and relative humidity (RH). The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) modulates the tropical dehydration through the migration of deep convection. The dehydration rate over the western Pacific is strongest when the enhancement in deep convection migrates to about 160°E, and dehydration appears over the Indian Ocean when the convection is enhanced over 80°E. Hydration of the stratosphere mainly occurs over the summertime subtropical-extratropical continents. The Asian monsoon provides the strongest stratospheric hydration during Northern Hemispheric summer. The hydration rates associated with the Asian monsoon is modulated by the MJO, becoming larger when the tropical convection is enhanced over the Indo/Pacific region (120°-160°E), when the Asian monsoon deep convective activity is also enhanced.

  8. Technique to produce daily estimates of the migrating diurnal tide using TIMED/SABER and EOS Aura/MLS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Vu; Palo, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    A technique to explicitly compute the day-to-day variability of the migrating diurnal tide (DW1) between 20 km and 80 km on a global scale is presented and analyzed. Our method employs temperature data from two satellite instruments: the MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) instrument on the EOS (Earth Observing System) Aura spacecraft and the SABER (Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) instrument on the TIMED (Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics) spacecraft. By taking advantage of the four daily solar local time measurements from the two instruments, a least squares fit representing the DW1 is constructed. Consequently, the daily zonal mean, DW1 amplitude and phase are all estimated on a daily basis. Before the implementation of our technique, a comparative analysis between the instrument data sets is conducted. The analysis reveals temperature biases of up to 10 K, which are removed to improve our estimates. To evaluate performance, our method is applied to a model atmosphere constructed from tidal fields obtained from the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM). Performance results indicate that the DW1 is most effectively extracted from the background atmosphere and other tidal components when each latitude circle is well sampled and the local time sampling is evenly spaced. A comparison of our results to the GSWM and past observations support the conclusion that our method produces daily estimates of the DW1 that can be utilized for scientifically useful investigations of short term tidal variability.

  9. Chemical discontinuity at the extratropical tropopause and isentropic stratosphere-troposphere exchange pathways diagnosed using Aura MLS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, J. J.; Livesey, N. J.; Manney, G. L.; Jiang, J. H.; Schwartz, M. J.; Daffer, W. H.

    2013-05-01

    The chemical discontinuity at the extratropical tropopause (ExTP) and stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) pathways are investigated using the long-lived chemical species carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3) measured by the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). A relative coordinate, tropopause latitude (TpLat), is developed based on potential vorticity (PV) from the Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system. TpLat is defined as the shortest geographic distance along an isentropic surface from the extratropical tropopause (ExTP) to an observation location. Our results show that this coordinate highlights the sharp chemical discontinuities at the ExTP more clearly than the widely-used equivalent latitude coordinate. Geographical distributions of STE pathways and barriers are investigated based on meridional gradients in O3 abundances in the new TpLat coordinate in conjunction with analysis of Rossby wave breaking between 330 K and 360 K. In northern hemispheric (NH) winter (Dec-Jan-Feb), NH STE pathways are seen mainly above the northeast Pacific. In NH summer (Jun-Jul-Aug), the NH pathway covers all longitudes at 330 K. However, it is mainly located above Asia at 340 K and above the Atlantic and the North Pacific at 350 K and 360 K. In the southern hemisphere (SH), there is a weaker STE region above the Eastern Indian Ocean and the southwestern Pacific, at and above 350 K in SH winter, and a stronger STE region over the Southeastern Pacific at these levels during SH summer. In addition, this study shows NH PV gradients are slightly stronger near the ExTP in summer than in winter even though the subtropical jet is weaker and Rossby wave breaking is stronger in summer than in winter.

  10. Intercomparisons of Aura MLS, ACE, and HALOE Observations of Long-Lived Trace Species Using the Langley Lagrangian Chemistry and Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, David B.; Natarajan, Murali; Fairlie, T. D.; Lingenfelser, Gretchen S.; Bernath, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We use the LaRC Lagrangian Chemistry and Transport Model (LCTM) [Considine et al., 2007; Pierce et al., 2003] to intercompare ACE, Aura, and HALOE observations of long-lived trace species. The LCTM calculates the transport, mixing, and photochemical evolution of an ensemble of parcels that have been initialized from ACE-FTS measurements. Here we focus on late November, 2004 comparisons, due to the previous 3-week period of continuous HALOE observations and MLS v2.2 data on November 29, 2004.

  11. HCl and ClO profiles inside the Antarctic vortex as observed by SMILES in November 2009: comparisons with MLS and ACE-FTS instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, T.; Kasai, Y.; Terao, Y.; Hayashida, S.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W. H.; Sagawa, H.; Suzuki, M.; Shiotani, M.; Walker, K. A.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.

    2013-07-01

    We present vertical profiles of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine monoxide (ClO) as observed by the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) inside the Antarctic vortex on 19-24 November 2009. The SMILES HCl value reveals 2.8-3.1 ppbv between 450 and 500 K levels in potential temperature (PT). The high value of HCl is highlighted since it is suggested that HCl was a main component of the total inorganic chlorine (Cly), defined as Cly ≃ HCl + ClO + chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) inside the Antarctic vortex in spring, owing to low ozone values. To confirm the quality of two SMILES Level 2 (L2) data products provided by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) from a view point of the partitioning of Cly, comparisons are made using other satellite data, from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). HCl values from the SMILES NICT L2 product agree to within 10% with the MLS HCl data between 425 and 650 K levels in PT and with the ACE-FTS HCl data between 425 and 575 K, respectively. The SMILES JAXA L2 product is 10 to 20% smaller than that from MLS (ACE-FTS) between 400 (500 K) and 700 K. For ClO in daytime, the difference between SMILES (JAXA and NICT) and MLS was less than ±0.05 ppbv between 500 and 650 K with the ClO values less than 0.2 ppbv. ClONO2 values as measured by ACE-FTS also reveal 0.2 ppbv at 475-500 K level, resulting in the HCl/Cly ratios of 0.91-0.95. The high HCl value and HCl/Cly ratio found from the three satellite instruments agree with the past observations inside the Antarctic vortex at this time (October to November) of year in the lower stratosphere.

  12. HCl and ClO profiles inside the Antarctic vortex as observed by SMILES in November 2009: comparisons with MLS and ACE-FTS instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, T.; Kasai, Y.; Terao, Y.; Hayashida, S.; Manney, G. L.; Daffer, W. H.; Sagawa, H.; Suzuki, M.; Shiotani, M.; Walker, K. A.; Boone, C. D.; Bernath, P. F.

    2013-11-01

    We present vertical profiles of hydrogen chloride (HCl) and chlorine monoxide (ClO) as observed by the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on the International Space Station (ISS) inside the Antarctic vortex on 19-24 November 2009. The SMILES HCl value reveals 2.8-3.1 ppbv between 450 K and 500 K levels in potential temperature (PT). The high value of HCl is highlighted since it is suggested that HCl is a main component of the total inorganic chlorine (Cly), defined as Cly ≃ HCl + ClO + chlorine nitrate (ClONO2), inside the Antarctic vortex in spring, owing to low ozone values. To confirm the quality of two SMILES level 2 (L2) data products provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Japan's National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), vis-à-vis the partitioning of Cly, comparisons are made using other satellite data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). HCl values from the SMILES NICT L2 product agree to within 10% (0.3 ppbv) with the MLS HCl data between 450 and 575 K levels in PT and with the ACE-FTS HCl data between 425 and 575 K. The SMILES JAXA L2 product is 10 to 20% (0.2-0.5 ppbv) lower than that from MLS between 400 and 700 K and from ACE-FTS between 500 and 700 K. For ClO in daytime, the difference between SMILES (JAXA and NICT) and MLS is less than ±0.05 ppbv (100 %) between 500 K and 650 K with the ClO values less than 0.2 ppbv. ClONO2 values as measured by ACE-FTS also reveal 0.2 ppbv at 475-500 K level, resulting in the HCl / Cly ratios of 0.91-0.95. The HCl / Cly ratios derived from each retrieval agree to within -5 to 8 % with regard to their averages. The high HCl values and HCl / Cly ratios observed by the three instruments in the lower stratospheric Antarctic vortex are consistent with previous observations in late Austral spring.

  13. UARS MLS Observations of Lower Stratospheric ClO in the 1992-93 and 1993-94 Arctic Winter Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) measurements of lower stratospheric ClO during the 1992-93 and 1993-94 Arctic winters are presented. Enhanced ClO in the 1992-93 winter was first observed in early December, and extensively during February when temperatures were continually low enough for PSCs. Sporadic episodes of enhanced ClO were observed for most of the 1993-94 winter as minimum temperatures hovered near the PSC threshold, with largest ClO amounts occurring in early March after a sudden deep cooling in late February.

  14. UARS MLS observations of lower stratospheric ClO in the 1992-93 and 1993-94 Arctic winter vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.

    1995-01-01

    Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of lower stratospheric ClO during 1992-93 and 1993-94 Arctic winters are presented. Enhanced ClO in the 1992-93 winter was first observed in early December, and extensively during February when temperatures were continually low enough for polar stratospheric cloud (PSCs). Sporadic episodes of enhanced ClO were observed for most of the 1993-94 winter as minimum temperatures hovered near the PSC threshold, with largest ClO amounts occurring in early March after a sudden deep cooling in late February.

  15. MLS: Hire Ground?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    2009-01-01

    While some professions maintain strong professional boundaries, public librarianship remains a field in which a significant number of those delivering service do not have library degrees. In this article, the author discusses the results of a new hiring practices survey from "Library Journal" ("LJ"). The survey, coupled with interviews, looks at…

  16. The impairment of HCCS leads to MLS syndrome by activating a non-canonical cell death pathway in the brain and eyes

    PubMed Central

    Indrieri, Alessia; Conte, Ivan; Chesi, Giancarlo; Romano, Alessia; Quartararo, Jade; Tatè, Rosarita; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo; Goffrini, Paola; Ferrero, Ileana; Bovolenta, Paola; Franco, Brunella

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial-dependent (intrinsic) programmed cell death (PCD) is an essential homoeostatic mechanism that selects bioenergetically proficient cells suitable for tissue/organ development. However, the link between mitochondrial dysfunction, intrinsic apoptosis and developmental anomalies has not been demonstrated to date. Now we provide the evidence that non-canonical mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis explains the phenotype of microphthalmia with linear skin lesions (MLS), an X-linked developmental disorder caused by mutations in the holo-cytochrome c-type synthase (HCCS) gene. By taking advantage of a medaka model that recapitulates the MLS phenotype we demonstrate that downregulation of hccs, an essential player of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC), causes increased cell death via an apoptosome-independent caspase-9 activation in brain and eyes. We also show that the unconventional activation of caspase-9 occurs in the mitochondria and is triggered by MRC impairment and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We thus propose that HCCS plays a key role in central nervous system (CNS) development by modulating a novel non-canonical start-up of cell death and provide the first experimental evidence for a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, intrinsic apoptosis and developmental disorders. PMID:23239471

  17. Comparison between two ground-based millimeter wave radiometers at IRF Kiruna and Aura/MLS for the winter/spring season 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffalski, Uwe; Ryan, Niall J.; Walker, Kaley A.; Gross, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    The Swedish Institute of Space Physics in Kiruna (67.8N/20.4E) operates two millimeter wave radiometers for atmospheric remote sensing of strato-mesospheric ozone, the Swedish KIruna Millimeter wave RAdiometer and, since November 2012, the German MIllimeter wave RAdiometer 2, installed by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, KIT. In this study we compare ozone measurements by KIMRA and MIRA2 at 230 GHz and 273 GHz, respectively. Additionally data from Aura/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) is used to compare the ground-based data set with the satellite data. The ozone concentration profiles are retrieved using an optimal estimation inversion technique, covering an altitude range of ~16 - 56 km, with an altitude resolution of, at best, 8 km. From this comparison it can be seen that KIMRA has a rather strong +/- 1ppmv bias in the altitude range of ~20-35 km, most likely due to standing wave features. However, both data sets compare quite well with the Aura/MLS data. This shows that even in the future ground-based remote sensing radiometry is a powerful tool for longterm ozone monitoring covering several solar cycles over many decades.

  18. Assessment and Applications of NASA Ozone Data Products Derived from Aura OMI-MLS Satellite Measurements in Context of the GMI Chemical Transport Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Olsen, M. A.; Witte, J. C.; Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Wargan, K.; Liu, X.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Yang, K.; Kaplan, T. B.; Pawson, S.; Duncan, B. N.; Newman, P. A.; Bhartia, K.; Heney, M. K.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), both onboard the Aura spacecraft, have been used to produce daily global maps of column and profile ozone since August 2004. Here we compare and evaluate three strategies to obtain daily maps of tropospheric and stratospheric ozone from OMI and MLS measurements: trajectory mapping, direct profile retrieval, and data assimilation. Evaluation is based upon an assessment that includes validation using ozonesondes and comparisons with the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemical transport model (CTM). We investigate applications of the three ozone data products from near-decadal and inter-annual timescales to day-to-day case studies. Zonally averaged inter-annual changes in tropospheric ozone from all of the products in any latitude range are of the order 1-2 Dobson Units while changes (increases) over the 8-year Aura record investigated http://eospso.gsfc.nasa.gov/atbd-category/49 vary approximately 2-4 Dobson Units. It is demonstrated that all of the ozone products can measure and monitor exceptional tropospheric ozone events including major forest fire and pollution transport events. Stratospheric ozone during the Aura record has several anomalous inter-annual events including stratospheric warming split events in the Northern Hemisphere extra-tropics that are well captured using the data assimilation ozone profile product. Data assimilation with continuous daily global coverage and vertical ozone profile information is the best of the three strategies at generating a global tropospheric and stratospheric ozone product for science applications.

  19. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Czech Cystic Fibrosis Patients: High Rate of Ribosomal Mutation Conferring Resistance to MLS(B) Antibiotics as a Result of Long-Term and Low-Dose Azithromycin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tkadlec, Jan; Vařeková, Eva; Pantůček, Roman; Doškař, Jiří; Růžičková, Vladislava; Botka, Tibor; Fila, Libor; Melter, Oto

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequent pathogens infecting the respiratory tract of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This study was the first to examine S. aureus isolates from CF patients in the Czech Republic. Among 100 S. aureus isolates from 92 of 107 observed patients, we found a high prevalence of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) antibiotics (56%). More than half of the resistant strains (29 of 56) carried a mutation in the MLS(B) target site. The emergence of MLS(B) resistance and mutations conferring resistance to MLS(B) antibiotics was associated with azithromycin treatment (p=0.000000184 and p=0.000681, respectively). Methicillin resistance was only detected in 3% of isolates and the rate of resistance to other antibiotics did not exceed 12%. The prevalence of small-colony variant (SCV) strains was relatively low (9%) and eight of nine isolates with the SCV phenotype were thymidine dependent. The study population of S. aureus was heterogeneous in structure and both the most prevalent community-associated and hospital-acquired clonal lineages were represented. Of the virulence genes, enterotoxin genes seg (n=52), sei (n=49), and sec (n=16) were the most frequently detected among the isolates. The PVL genes (lukS-PV and lukF-PV) have not been revealed in any of the isolates.

  20. Effects of two large solar energetic particle events on middle atmosphere nighttime odd hydrogen and ozone content: Aura/MLS and TIMED/SABER measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Wang, S.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Hunt, L. A.; Zank, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    is well established that large solar energetic particle (SEP) events affect ozone in the middle atmosphere through chemical reactions involving odd hydrogen (HOx) species. We analyze global middle atmospheric effects at local nighttime for two large SEP events during the intervals of 7-17 November 2004 and 20-30 August 2005. Properties of the SEP events and concomitant geomagnetic storms are discussed using in situ measurements. Temporal dynamics and latitudinal distribution of HOx and ozone densities inferred from measurements by the Aura/MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) instrument are analyzed. We show statistically significant increases of nighttime hydroxyl (OH) density in the middle atmosphere up to 5°106 cm-3 in the latitude range from 70° down to 50° latitude in northern and to -40° latitude in southern hemispheres in connection with peaks in proton fluxes of >10 MeV energy range measured by GOES spacecraft. During the storm main phases, the nighttime OH density increases were observed around ±50° in southern and northern hemispheres in the altitude range of 65-80 km. There is a correspondence between averaged nighttime OH partial column density (in 0.005 to 0.1 hPa pressure range) in the polar latitudes and energetic proton (>10 MeV) fluxes. Corresponding statistically significant nighttime ozone destructions up to 45% are observed from 70° down to 60° latitude in the northern and southern hemispheres. The SEP impulsive phases correspond to onsets of ozone density depletions. Larger relative ozone destructions are observed in the northern hemisphere in November and in the southern hemisphere in August. Simultaneous measurements of ozone density by the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (TIMED/SABER) instrument independently confirm the MLS results.

  1. An Assessment of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor in the MERRA-2 Reanalysis: Comparisons with MLS and In Situ Water Vapor Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selkirk, H. B.; Molod, A.; Pawson, S.; Douglass, A. R.; Voemel, H.; Hurst, D. F.; Jiang, J. H.; Read, W. G.; Schwartz, M. J.; Manyin, M.

    2015-12-01

    The recently released MERRA-2 reanalysis represents a significant evolution of the GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model and data assimilation system since the original MERRA project, and it is expected that MERRA-2 will be widely used in climate change studies as has its predecessor. A number of studies have demonstrated critical sensitivities of the climate system to the water vapor content of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS) and it is therefore important to assess how well the MERRA-2 reanalysis represents the mean structure and variability of water vapor in this part of the atmosphere. Recent comparisons with MLS water vapor indicate that the ECMWF and original MERRA reanalyses overestimate water vapor throughout the global upper troposphere by 50-80%. These overestimates are particularly acute at 147 hPa and 215 hPa and occur in all seasons. In this presentation, we analyze differences between the MLS v.4.2 water vapor data and the new MERRA-2 reanalysis to assess improvements in the treatment of water vapor in the GEOS-5 system since MERRA. We also include in our analysis a comparison of MERRA-2 profiles with water vapor and relative humidity profiles from frostpoint hygrometers at five sites with long-term records and a sixth with an intensive campaign of one month. Three of the long-term sites, Boulder, Colorado, Lindenburg, Germany and Lauder, New Zealand, lie in middle latitudes, and two sites, San José, Costa Rica and Hilo, Hawaii, are in the tropics and subtropics, respectively. The campaign-only database is from the NASA SEAC4RS mission at Ellington Field, Houston, TX in 2013.

  2. MIPAS temperature from the stratosphere to the lower thermosphere: comparison of version vM21 with ACE-FTS, MLS, OSIRIS, SABER, SOFIE and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Comas, M.; Funke, B.; Gardini, A.; López-Puertas, M.; Jurado-Navarro, A.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G.; Kiefer, M.; Boone, C. D.; Leblanc, T.; Marshall, B. T.; Schwartz, M. J.; Sheese, P. E.

    2014-07-01

    We present vM21 MIPAS temperatures from the lower stratosphere to the lower thermosphere, which cover all optimized resolution measurements performed by MIPAS in the Middle Atmosphere, Upper Atmosphere and NoctiLucent Cloud modes during its lifetime. i.e., from January 2005 to March 2012. The main upgrades with respect to the previous version of MIPAS temperatures (vM11) are the update of the spectroscopic database, the use of a different climatology of atomic oxygen and carbon dioxide, and the improvement of important technical aspects of the retrieval setup (temperature gradient along the line of sight and offset regularizations, apodization accuracy). Additionally, an updated version of ESA calibrated L1b spectra (5.02/5.06) is used. The vM21 temperatures correct the main systematic errors of the previous version because they on average provide a 1-2 K warmer stratopause and middle mesosphere, and a 6-10 K colder mesopause (except in high latitude summers) and lower thermosphere. These lead to a remarkable improvement of MIPAS comparisons with ACE-FTS, MLS, OSIRIS, SABER, SOFIE and the two Rayleigh lidars at Mauna Loa and Table Mountain, that, with few specific exceptions, typically exhibit differences smaller than 1 K below 50 km and than 2 K at 50-80 km in spring, autumn, winter at all latitudes, and summer at low to mid-latitudes. Differences in the high latitude summers are typically smaller than 1 K below 50 km, smaller than 2 K at 50-65 km and 5 K at 65-80 km. Differences with the other instruments in the mid-mesosphere are generally negative. MIPAS mesopause is within 4 K of the other instruments measurements, except in the high latitude summers, where it is within 5-10 K of the other instruments, being warmer than SABER, MLS and OSIRIS and colder than ACE-FTS and SOFIE. The agreement in the lower thermosphere is typically better than 5 K, except for high latitudes during spring and summer, where MIPAS usually exhibits larger vertical gradients.

  3. MIPAS temperature from the stratosphere to the lower thermosphere: Comparison of vM21 with ACE-FTS, MLS, OSIRIS, SABER, SOFIE and lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Comas, M.; Funke, B.; Gardini, A.; López-Puertas, M.; Jurado-Navarro, A.; von Clarmann, T.; Stiller, G.; Kiefer, M.; Boone, C. D.; Leblanc, T.; Marshall, B. T.; Schwartz, M. J.; Sheese, P. E.

    2014-11-01

    We present vM21 MIPAS temperatures from the lower stratosphere to the lower thermosphere, which cover all optimized resolution measurements performed by MIPAS in the middle-atmosphere, upper-atmosphere and noctilucent-cloud modes during its lifetime, i.e., from January 2005 to April 2012. The main upgrades with respect to the previous version of MIPAS temperatures (vM11) are the update of the spectroscopic database, the use of a different climatology of atomic oxygen and carbon dioxide, and the improvement in important technical aspects of the retrieval setup (temperature gradient along the line of sight and offset regularizations, apodization accuracy). Additionally, an updated version of ESA-calibrated L1b spectra (5.02/5.06) is used. The vM21 temperatures correct the main systematic errors of the previous version because they provide on average a 1-2 K warmer stratopause and middle mesosphere, and a 6-10 K colder mesopause (except in high-latitude summers) and lower thermosphere. These lead to a remarkable improvement in MIPAS comparisons with ACE-FTS, MLS, OSIRIS, SABER, SOFIE and the two Rayleigh lidars at Mauna Loa and Table Mountain, which, with a few specific exceptions, typically exhibit differences smaller than 1 K below 50 km and than 2 K at 50-80 km in spring, autumn and winter at all latitudes, and summer at low to midlatitudes. Differences in the high-latitude summers are typically smaller than 1 K below 50 km, smaller than 2 K at 50-65 km and 5 K at 65-80 km. Differences between MIPAS and the other instruments in the mid-mesosphere are generally negative. MIPAS mesopause is within 4 K of the other instruments measurements, except in the high-latitude summers, when it is within 5-10 K, being warmer there than SABER, MLS and OSIRIS and colder than ACE-FTS and SOFIE. The agreement in the lower thermosphere is typically better than 5 K, except for high latitudes during spring and summer, when MIPAS usually exhibits larger vertical gradients.

  4. Ticosonde CFH at Costa Rica: A Seasonal Climatology of Tropical UT-LS Water Vapor and Inter-Comparisons with MLS and CALIPSO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Voemel, Holger; Avery, Melody; Rosenlof, Karen; Davis, Sean; Hurst, Dale; Schoeberl, Mark; Diaz, Jorge Andres; Morris, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Balloon sonde measurements of tropical water vapor using the Cryogenic Frostpoint Hygrometer were initiated in Costa Rica in July 2005 and have continued to the present day. Over the nine years through July 2014, the Ticosonde program has launched 174 CFH payloads, representing the longest-running and most extensive single-site balloon dataset for tropical water vapor. In this presentation we present a seasonal climatology for water vapor and ozone at Costa Rica and examine the frequency of upper tropospheric supersaturation with comparisons to cloud fraction and cloud ice water content observations from the Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on the CALIPSO mission. We then make a critical comparison of these data to water vapor measurements from the MLS instrument on board Aura in light of recently published work for other sites. Finally, we examine time series of 2-km altitude averages in the upper troposphere-lower stratosphere at Costa Rica in light of anomalies and trends seen in various large-scale indices of tropical water vapor.

  5. Collocated approximations on unstructured grids: a comparison between General Finite Differences (GFD), Moving Least Squares (MLS), and Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyliv, Yaroslav; Alexeev, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    In the meshfree family of methods, partial differential equations are solved on unstructured grids where a search radius establishes an implicit nodal connectivity used to determine whether to include or exclude neighboring nodes in the constructed approximation. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is widely attributed to be the eldest of the meshfree methods dating back to an astrophysics paper published in 1977 by Gingold and Monaghan. However, beating them by five years was Jensen when he published Finite Differences for Arbitrary Grids (FIDAG) in 1972. Ultimately this work and others were generalized by Liszka and Orkisz in 1979 as a weighted least squares formulation solving for the Taylor coefficients and is now commonly known as General Finite Differences (GFD). Shortly after in 1981, Lancaster and Salkauskas introduced the Moving Least Squares (MLS) approximation for surface reconstruction using a weighted least squares formulation where the unknown coefficients are treated as functions varying from node to node in the support domain. Here we examine important differences, similarities and limitations of each method by solving the 2D Poisson equation on unstructured grids. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship under Grant No. DGE-1148903.

  6. ClO Observations from Space by JEM/SMILES: First results of SMILES L2 research product and comparison with MLS and Odin/SMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tomohiro; Kasai, Yasuko; Baron, Philippe; Ochiai, Satoshi; Kanamori, Hideto; Murayama, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Takeshi; Urban, Joachim; Murtagh, Donal; Smiles Mission Team

    Submillimetre-wave receiving Systems based on sensitive SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) detector Technology provide new opportunities for Accurate Observation of ClO in the at-mosphere. The Superconducting Submillimetre-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) was launched and installed onboard the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) in September 2009. The SMILES project is a collaboration of the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The aims of THE SMILES project are: i) Space demonstration of super-conductive SIS mixer for submillimetre-wave limb emission sounding cooled down to 4K using a mechanical cooler. ii) Global measurements of atmospheric molecules and radicals. SMILES observes atmospheric species and isotopologues such as Osub3/sub, Hsup35/supCl, Hsup37/supCl, ClO, Upper tro-pospheric humidity, BrO, HOBr, HOCl, HOsub2/sub, Hsub2/subOsub2/sub, HNOsub3/sub, CHsub3/subCN, SOsub2/sub, and ozone isotope species in the altitude region from the upper troposphere to the mesosphere with a precision of a few percent. SMILES observes day and night profiles of ClO in the altitude range 20-65km between 65N and 38S. We have been analyzing the ClO observations. We will present the recent status of the analysis with respect to the NICT research level-2 data product, give an error estimation, and provide early comparison/validation results from comparisons with global measurements from Odin/SMR and MLS.

  7. A tropospheric chemistry reanalysis for the years 2005-2012 based on an assimilation of OMI, MLS, TES, and MOPITT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Eskes, H. J.; Sudo, K.

    2015-07-01

    We present the results from an 8-year tropospheric chemistry reanalysis for the period 2005-2012 obtained by assimilating multiple data sets from the OMI, MLS, TES, and MOPITT satellite instruments. The reanalysis calculation was conducted using a global chemical transport model and an ensemble Kalman filter technique that simultaneously optimises the chemical concentrations of various species and emissions of several precursors. The optimisation of both the concentration and the emission fields is an efficient method to correct the entire tropospheric profile and its year-to-year variations, and to adjust various tracers chemically linked to the species assimilated. Comparisons against independent aircraft, satellite, and ozonesonde observations demonstrate the quality of the analysed O3, NO2, and CO concentrations on regional and global scales and for both seasonal and year-to-year variations from the lower troposphere to the lower stratosphere. The data assimilation statistics imply persistent reduction of model error and improved representation of emission variability, but they also show that discontinuities in the availability of the measurements lead to a degradation of the reanalysis. The decrease in the number of assimilated measurements increased the ozonesonde-minus-analysis difference after 2010 and caused spurious variations in the estimated emissions. The Northern/Southern Hemisphere OH ratio was modified considerably due to the multiple-species assimilation and became closer to an observational estimate, which played an important role in propagating observational information among various chemical fields and affected the emission estimates. The consistent concentration and emission products provide unique information on year-to-year variations in the atmospheric environment.

  8. A tropospheric chemistry reanalysis for the years 2005-2012 based on an assimilation of OMI, MLS, TES and MOPITT satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Eskes, H. J.; Sudo, K.

    2015-03-01

    We present the results from an eight-year tropospheric chemistry reanalysis for the period 2005-2012 obtained by assimilating multiple retrieval data sets from the OMI, MLS, TES, and MOPITT satellite instruments. The reanalysis calculation was conducted using a global chemical transport model and an ensemble Kalman filter technique that simultaneously optimises the chemical concentrations of various species and emissions of several precursors. The optimisation of both the concentration and the emission fields is an efficient method to correct the entire tropospheric profile and its year-to-year variations, and to adjust various tracers chemically linked to the species assimilated. Comparisons against independent aircraft, satellite, and ozonesonde observations demonstrate the quality of the analysed O3, NO2, and CO concentrations on regional and global scales and for both seasonal and year-to-year variations from the lower troposphere to the lower stratosphere. The data assimilation statistics imply persistent reduction of model error and improved representation of emission variability, but also show that discontinuities in the availability of the measurements lead to a degradation of the reanalysis. The decrease in the number of assimilated measurements increased the ozonesonde minus analysis difference after 2010 and caused spurious variations in the estimated emissions. The Northern/Southern Hemisphere OH ratio was modified considerably due to the multiple species assimilation and became closer to an observational estimate, which played an important role in propagating observational information among various chemical fields and affected the emission estimates. The consistent concentration and emission products provide unique information on year-to-year variations of the atmospheric environment.

  9. A 46,X,der(X)t(X;Y)(p22.3;q11.2) karyotype found in a newborn with microcornea and sclerocornea: An example of the MLS/Goltz/Aicardi contiguous gene syndrome?

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovich, A.; Becker, T.; Kaufman, A.

    1994-09-01

    There have been 15 reports in the literature of patients with microphthalmia and linear skin defects (MLS) who have deletions of the distal region of the short arm of the X chromosome, Xp22.3-pter. Since there appears to be some overlap of features between MLS, Goltz and Aicardi syndromes, it has been suggested that these syndromes represent a contiguous gene syndrome. At least three individuals have been reported with t(X;Y) and some common clinical features. We have seen a female infant with several anterior chamber anomalies including microcornea and sclerocornea, who also has an unbalanced translocation between the X and Y chromosomes, 46,X,der(X)t(X;Y) (p22.3;q11.2). Q-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a Y chromosome cocktail (Oncor) confirmed the identity of this derivative chromosome. X-inactivation studies done by RBG-banding showed that the der(X) is preferentially inactivated in all 50 metaphase cells examined from PHA-stimulated lymphocytes. It is likely some gene(s) on the distal Xp do not escape inactivation and when deleted result in anterior chamber abnormalities. X-inactivation patterns may be different in different tissues or at different times during development. Molecular studies will be helpful in determining what gene(s) are actually deleted in this case. This case is important because the clinical findings are limited to the development of the eyes and may help to define the critical regions and/or minimum region of overlap among MLS, Goltz and Aicardi syndromes.

  10. A nudged chemistry-climate model simulation of chemical constituent distribution at northern high-latitude stratosphere observed by SMILES and MLS during the 2009/2010 stratospheric sudden warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, H.; Nakamura, T.; Miyasaka, T.; Shiotani, M.; Suzuki, M.

    2016-02-01

    Stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) is a dramatic phenomenon of the winter stratosphere in which the distribution of chemical constituents, associated chemical tendency, and transport of chemical constituents differ significantly inside and outside of the polar vortex. In this study, the chemical constituent distributions in the major SSW of 2009/2010 were simulated by the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate 3.2-Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM) nudged toward the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts-Interim Re-Analysis data. The results were compared with Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations. In addition, ozone tendency due to ozone transport and chemical ozone loss in the high-latitude lower stratosphere before and after the SSW was analyzed for the period from 1 January 2010 to 11 February 2010. The evolution and distribution of ozone and HCl inside/outside the polar vortex associated with the vortex shift to the midlatitudes in January are quite similar between SMILES and MLS. Those of ClO are also similar, considering the difference in the local time for the measurement. Analyses of the nudged CCM run indicate that inside the polar vortex at 50 hPa, the ozone concentration increased moderately owing to partial cancelation between the large negative ozone tendency due to chemical ozone destruction and large positive ozone tendency due to horizontal ozone influx from outside of the vortex as well as downward advection. In the region of a high ozone concentration with the same area as that of the polar vortex at 50 hPa, the large increase in ozone was primarily due to a downward advection of ozone. SMILES and MLS observations, nudged CCM simulations, and ozone tendency analyses revealed a highly longitudinal dependent ozone tendency at high latitudes during the SSW.

  11. Long-term (2004-2015) tendencies and variabilities of tropical UTLS water vapor mixing ratio and temperature observed by AURA/MLS using multivariate regression analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, S.; Sandhya, M.

    2016-09-01

    Long-term variabilities and tendencies in the tropical (30°N-30°S)monthly averaged zonal mean water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) and temperature in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), obtained from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument onboard Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite for the period October 2004-September 2015, are studied using multivariate regression analysis. It is found that the WVMR shows a decreasing trend of 0.02-0.1 ppmv/year in WVMR below 100 hPa while the trend is positive (0.02-0.035 ppmv/year) above 100 hPa. There is no significant trend at 121 hPa. The WVMR response to solar cycle (SC) is negative below 21 hPa. However, the magnitude decreases with height from 0.13 ppmv/100 sfu(solar flux unit) at 178 hPa to 0.07 ppmv/100sfuat 26 hPa. The response of WVMR to multivariate El Niño index (MEI), which is a proxy for El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), is positive at and below 100 hPa and negative above 100 hPa. It is negative at 56-46 hPa with maximum value of 0.1 ppmv/MEI at 56 hPa. Large positive (negative) quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in WVMR at 56-68 hPa reconstructed from the regression analysis coincide with eastward (westward) to westward (eastward) transition of QBO winds at that level. The trend in zonal mean tropical temperature is negative above 56 hPa with magnitude increasing with height. The maximum negative trend of 0.05 K/year is observed at 21-17 hPa and the trend insignificant around tropopause. The response of temperature to SC is negative in the UTLS region and to ENSO is positive below 100 hPa and mostly negative above 100 hPa. The negative response of WVMR to MEI in the stratosphere is suggested to be due to the extended cold trap of tropopause temperature during El Niño years that might have controlled the water vapor entry into the stratosphere. The WVMR response to residual vertical velocity at 70 hPa is positive in the stratosphere, whereas the temperature response is positive in the

  12. Suppressor T cells regulate the nonanergic cell population that remains after peripheral tolerance is induced to the Mls-1 antigen in T cell receptor Vβ8.1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hironori; Fujimoto, Shigeyoshi; Greene, Mark I.

    2000-01-01

    We have found suppressor T cells that inhibit the proliferative response of naive CD4+ T cells in T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ8.1 transgenic mice rendered tolerant in vivo by inoculation of Mls-1a-positive cells. This suppression was mediated by CD4+ T cells but not by CD8+ T cells or double-negative (DN) cells, and splenic CD4+ T cells from tolerant mice displayed a greater suppression than lymph node CD4+ T cells. Cell contact was required for efficient suppression, and known inhibitory cytokines such as IL-4, IL-10, and transforming growth factor β were not involved. Suppressor T cells inhibited IL-2 production by naive CD4+ T cells, and the addition of exogenous IL-2 diminished the suppressed activity while having little activity on tolerant T cells. Suppression was abolished by the elimination of CD25+ T cells in the tolerant CD4+ T cell subset. CD25+CD4+ T cells suppressed the proliferative response of the residual fraction of the nonanergic population, namely, 6C10+CD4+ T cells still present in the tolerant mice. However, 6C10−CD4+ T cells still had reduced reactivity to Mls-1a even after CD25+CD4+ T cells were removed and exogenous IL-2 was added. Suppressor cells appear to affect only residual nonanergic cells in situ, thereby facilitating the maintenance of the unresponsive state in vivo. These data provide a framework for understanding suppressor T cells and explain the difficulties and variables in defining their activity in other systems, because suppressor T cells apparently control only a small population of nonanergic cells in the periphery and may be viewed as a homeostatic mechanism. PMID:11069296

  13. Pipe Attrition Acoustic Locater (PAAL) from multi-mode dispersion analysis.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, Bouko; Golombok, Michael; Campman, Xander

    2016-05-01

    Multi-mode dispersion imaging shows that pure dispersion-free torsional waves are reflected at a pipe end and flexural wave modes are suppressed. This effect can be used to locate and assess internal damage. The end reflection coefficient of this single propagating mode decreases with increasing wear. The pipe damage is located from the travel time of the torsional wave component reflected from the damage point. PMID:26922401

  14. Terminal area automatic navigation, guidance and control research using the Microwave Landing System (MLS). Part 5: Design and development of a Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System (DIALS) for steep final approach using modern control techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halyo, N.

    1983-01-01

    The design and development of a 3-D Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System (DIALS) for the Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) Research Aircraft, a B-737-100 is described. The system was designed using sampled data Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LOG) methods, resulting in a direct digital design with a modern control structure which consists of a Kalman filter followed by a control gain matrix, all operating at 10 Hz. DIALS uses Microwave Landing System (MLS) position, body-mounted accelerometers, as well as on-board sensors usually available on commercial aircraft, but does not use inertial platforms. The phases of the final approach considered are the localizer and glideslope capture which may be performed simultaneously, localizer and steep glideslope track or hold, crab/decrab and flare to touchdown. DIALS captures, tracks and flares from steep glideslopes ranging from 2.5 deg to 5.5 deg, selected prior to glideslope capture. Digital Integrated Automatic Landing System is the first modern control design automatic landing system successfully flight tested. The results of an initial nonlinear simulation are presented here.

  15. Multi-instrument gravity-wave measurements over Tierra del Fuego and the Drake Passage - Part 1: Potential energies and vertical wavelengths from AIRS, COSMIC, HIRDLS, MLS-Aura, SAAMER, SABER and radiosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, C. J.; Hindley, N. P.; Moss, A. C.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2015-07-01

    Gravity waves in the terrestrial atmosphere are a vital geophysical process, acting to transport energy and momentum on a wide range of scales and to couple the various atmospheric layers. Despite the importance of these waves, the many studies to date have often exhibited very dissimilar results, and it remains unclear whether these differences are primarily instrumental or methodological. Here, we address this problem by comparing observations made by a diverse range of the most widely-used gravity wave resolving instruments in a common geographic region around the southern Andes and Drake Passage, an area known to exhibit strong wave activity. Specifically, we use data from three limb-sounding radiometers (MLS-Aura, HIRDLS and SABER), the COSMIC GPS-RO constellation, a ground-based meteor radar, the AIRS infrared nadir sounder and radiosondes to examine the gravity wave potential energy (GWPE) and vertical wavelengths (λz) of individual gravity wave packets from the lower troposphere to the edge of the lower thermosphere. Our results show important similarities and differences. Limb sounder measurements show high intercorrelation, typically > 0.80 between any instrument pair. Meteor-radar observations agree in form with the limb sounders, despite vast technical differences. AIRS and radiosonde observations tend to be uncorrelated or anticorrelated with the other datasets, suggesting very different behaviour of the wave field in the different spectral regimes accessed by each instrument. Except in spring, we see little dissipation of GWPE throughout the stratosphere and lower mesosphere. Observed GWPE for individual wave packets exhibits a log-normal distribution, with short-timescale intermittency dominating over a well-repeated monthly-median seasonal cycle. GWPE and λz exhibit strong correlations with the stratospheric winds, but not with local surface winds. Our results provide guidance for interpretation and intercomparison of such datasets in their full

  16. Multi-instrument gravity-wave measurements over Tierra del Fuego and the Drake Passage - Part 1: Potential energies and vertical wavelengths from AIRS, COSMIC, HIRDLS, MLS-Aura, SAAMER, SABER and radiosondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Corwin J.; Hindley, Neil P.; Moss, Andrew C.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.

    2016-03-01

    Gravity waves in the terrestrial atmosphere are a vital geophysical process, acting to transport energy and momentum on a wide range of scales and to couple the various atmospheric layers. Despite the importance of these waves, the many studies to date have often exhibited very dissimilar results, and it remains unclear whether these differences are primarily instrumental or methodological. Here, we address this problem by comparing observations made by a diverse range of the most widely used gravity-wave-resolving instruments in a common geographic region around the southern Andes and Drake Passage, an area known to exhibit strong wave activity. Specifically, we use data from three limb-sounding radiometers (Microwave Limb Sounder, MLS-Aura; HIgh Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder, HIRDLS; Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry, SABER), the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS-RO constellation, a ground-based meteor radar, the Advanced Infrared Sounder (AIRS) infrared nadir sounder and radiosondes to examine the gravity wave potential energy (GWPE) and vertical wavelengths (λz) of individual gravity-wave packets from the lower troposphere to the edge of the lower thermosphere ( ˜ 100 km). Our results show important similarities and differences. Limb sounder measurements show high intercorrelation, typically > 0.80 between any instrument pair. Meteor radar observations agree in form with the limb sounders, despite vast technical differences. AIRS and radiosonde observations tend to be uncorrelated or anticorrelated with the other data sets, suggesting very different behaviour of the wave field in the different spectral regimes accessed by each instrument. Evidence of wave dissipation is seen, and varies strongly with season. Observed GWPE for individual wave packets exhibits a log-normal distribution, with short-timescale intermittency dominating over a well-repeated monthly-median seasonal

  17. Equatorial Kelvin Waves: A UARS MLS View.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canziani, Pablo O.; Holton, James R.; Fishbein, Evan; Froidevaux, Lucien; Waters, Joe W.

    1994-10-01

    Data from the Microwave Limb Sounder instrument on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite are used to compare two periods of Kelvin wave activity during different stages of the equatorial quasi-biennial oscillation. The analysis is carried out using an asynoptic mapping technique. A wide bandpass filter is used to isolate the frequency bands where Kelvin waves have been identified in previous studies. Time-height and time-latitude plots of the bandpassed data are used to identify Kelvin wave activity in the temperature and ozone fields. Frequency spectra of temperature and ozone amplitudes are constructed to further analyze the latitudinal and meridional distribution of Kelvin wave activity in zonal wavenumbers 1 and 2. The characteristics identified in these plots agree well with theoretical predictions and previous observations of middle atmosphere Kelvin waves.The time-height and time-latitude plots support the existence of Kelvin waves in discrete frequency bands; the slow, fast, and ultrafast Kelvin modes are all identified in the data. The characteristics of these modes do not vary much despite different mean flow conditions in the two periods examined.For the Kelvin wave-induced perturbations in ozone, the change from a transport-dominated regime below 10 hPa to a photochemically controlled regime above 10 hPa is clearly apparent in the height dependence of the phase difference between temperature and ozone. The ratios of the ozone perturbation amplitude to the temperature perturbation amplitude for the various observed Kelvin wave modes are in agreement with model estimates and LIMS (Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere) observations in the lower half of the region sampled but appear to be too large in the upper stratosphere and lower mesosphere.

  18. Optimization of MLS receivers for multipath environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcalpine, G. A.; Highfill, J. H., III

    1979-01-01

    The angle tracking problems in microwave landing system receivers along with a receiver design capable of optimal performance in the multipath environments found in air terminal areas were studied. Included were various theoretical and evaluative studies like: (1) signal model development; (2) derivation of optimal receiver structures; and (3) development and use of computer simulations for receiver algorithm evaluation. The development of an experimental receiver for flight testing is presented. An overview of the work and summary of principal results and conclusions are reported.

  19. The M.L.S. Hiring Requirement. SPEC Kit 257.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blixrud, Julia C., Comp.

    2000-01-01

    This survey of ARL (Association of Research Libraries) libraries was conducted in 1999 to determine whether findings of a 1994 survey that examined if research libraries were hiring non-M.L.S. (Master of Library Science) degreed applicants into professional positions had changed. Results revealed that, of the 111 ARL members responding, 73…

  20. Graduate and Post-MLS Study in Digital Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blummer, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    As librarians confront the Information Age, it is imperative that they remain aware of the issues that affect the profession. Traditional library skills are no longer adequate for maintaining a competitive edge in the field. Post-graduate education in digital libraries offers information professionals an opportunity to broaden their knowledge of…

  1. Nano-organocatalyst: Magnetically retrievable ferrite-anchored glutathione for microwave-assisted Paal-Knorr reaction, Aza-Michael addition and pyrazole synthesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Postsynthetic surface modification of magnetic nanoparticles by glutathione imparts desirable chemical functionality and enables the generation of catalytic sites on the surfaces of ensuing organocatalysts. In this article, we discuss the developments, unique activity and high s...

  2. Terminal area automatic navigation, guidance, and control research using the Microwave Landing System (MLS). Part 2: RNAV/MLS transition problems for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pines, S.

    1982-01-01

    The problems in navigation and guidance encountered by aircraft in the initial transition period in changing from distance measuring equipment, VORTAC, and barometric instruments to the more precise microwave landing system data type navaids in the terminal area are investigated. The effects of the resulting discontinuities on the estimates of position and velocity for both optimal (Kalman type navigation schemes) and fixed gain (complementary type) navigation filters, and the effects of the errors in cross track, track angle, and altitude on the guidance equation and control commands during the critical landing phase are discussed. A method is presented to remove the discontinuities from the navigation loop and to reconstruct an RNAV path designed to land the aircraft with minimal turns and altitude changes.

  3. Does C-C bonding proceed during exposure of adequate metal surfaces to CH{sub 4}? Reply to {open_quotes}Comment by Z. Hlavathy, Z. Paal, and P. Tetenyi{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Amaraiglio, A.; Pareja, P.; Amariglio, H.

    1997-02-01

    The comments, results, and reflections presented by Hlavathy and co-workers in their Letter aim at demonstrating that C-C bonding between CH{sub x} adspecies, formed upon exposure of Pt to CH{sub 4}, can proceed as well during the exposure itself as during further exposure to H{sub 2}. This possibility was implicitly put forward because they thought that a tight parallelism exists between the interactions of CH{sub 4} and CO with a metal surface, provided that the exposure to CH{sub 4} is carried out at a high enough temperature (450{degrees}C). In both cases these authors assumed that three kinds of carbon, C{sub {alpha}}, C{sub {beta}}, and C{sub {gamma}}, can be formed, C{sub {alpha}} being the main species responsible for the production of CH{sub 4} and of the C{sub 2}, alkanes obtained when the metal was further contacted with H{sub 2} at 100{degrees}C. As they argued that C{sub {alpha}} (also named carbidic carbon) has only metal atoms in its first coordination shell, they were implicitly led it that C-C bonding must take place during the hydrogenation step. The authors have not denied this possibility, but they have suggested that different situations can result from exposures to CH{sub 4} conducted at temperatures much lower than those used by Koerts et al.. 13 refs.

  4. Physical Mechanisms Controlling Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor as Revealed by MLS Data from UARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, Reginald E.

    1998-01-01

    The seasonal changes of the upper tropospheric humidity are studied with the water vapor data from the Microwave Limb Sounder on the NASA Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, and the winds and vertical velocity data obtained from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Using the same algorithm for vertical transport as that used for horizontal transport (Zhu and Newell, 1998), we find that the moisture in the tropical upper troposphere may be increased mainly by intensified local convection in a small portion, less than 10%, of the whole area between 40 deg S to 40 deg N. The contribution of large scale background circulations and divergence of horizontal transport is relatively small in these regions. These dynamic processes cannot be revealed by the traditional analyses of moisture fluxes. The negative feedback suggested by Lindzen (1990) also exists, if enhanced convection is concentrated in the tropics, but is apparently not the dominant process in the moisture budget.

  5. Intra-seasonal Oscillations Inferred from SABER (TIMED) and MLS (UARS) Temperature Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, F. T.; Mayr, H. G.; Russell, J.; Mlynczak, M.; Reber, C. A.; Mengel, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    In the zonal mean meridional winds of the upper mesosphere, intra-seasonal oscillations with periods between 1 and 4 months have been inferred from UARS measurements and independently predicted with the Numerical Spectral Model WSM). The wind oscillations tend to be confined to low latitudes and appear to be driven, at least in part, by small-scale gravity waves propagating in the meridional direction. Winds across the equator should generate, due to dynamical heating and cooling, temperature oscillations with opposite phase in the two hemispheres. Investigating this phenomenon, we have analyzed SABER temperatures from TIMED in the altitude range between 55 and 95 km to delineate with an empirical model, the year-long variability of the migrating tides and zonal mean components. The inferred seasonal variations of the diurnal tide, characterized by amplitude maxima near equinox, are in substantial agreement with UARS observations and results from the NSM. For the zonal mean, the dominant seasonal variations in the SABER temperatures, with annual (12 months) and semiannual (6 months) periodicities, agree well with those derived from UARS measurements. The intra-seasonal variations with periods between 2 and 4 months have amplitudes close to 2 K, almost half as large as those for the dominant seasonal variations. Their amplitudes are in qualitative agreement with the corresponding values inferred from UARS during different years. The SABER and UARS temperature variations reveal pronounced hemispherical asymmetries, consistent with meridional wind oscillations across the equator. The phase of the semi-annual temperature oscillations from the NSM agrees with the observations from UARS and SABER. But the amplitudes are systematically smaller, which may indicate that planetary waves are more important than is allowed for in the model. For the shorter-period intra-seasonal variations, which can be generated by gravity wave drag, the model results are generally in better agreement with the observations.

  6. The Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) on the Aura Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, Joe W.; Froidevaux, Lucien; Harwood, Robert S.; Jarnot, Robert F.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Read, William G.; Siegel, Peter H.; Cofield, Richard E.; Filipiak, Mark J.; Flower, Dennis A.; Holden, James R.; Lau, Gary K.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Manney, Gloria L; Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Santee, Michelle L.; Wu, Dong L.; Cuddy, David T.; Lay, Richard R.; Loo, Mario S.; Perun, Vincent S.; Schwartz, Michael J.; Stek, Paul C.; Thurstans, Robert P.; Boyles, Mark A.

    2006-01-01

    The Earth Observing System Microwave Limb Sounder measures several atmospheric chemical species (OH, HO2, H2O, O3, HCl, ClO, HOCl, BrO, HNO3, N2O, CO, HCN, CH3CN, volcanic SO2), cloud ice, temperature, and geopotential height to improve our understanding of stratospheric ozone chemistry, the interaction of composition and climate, and pollution in the upper troposphere. All measurements are made simultaneously and continuously, during both day and night. The instrument uses heterodyne radiometers that observe thermal emission from the atmospheric limb in broad spectral regions centered near 118, 190, 240, and 640 GHz, and 2.5 THz. It was launched July 15, 2004 on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aura satellite and started full-up science operations on August 13, 2004. An atmospheric limb scan and radiometric calibration for all bands are performed routinely every 25 s. Vertical profiles are retrieved every 165 km along the suborbital track, covering 82 S to 82 N latitudes on each orbit. Instrument performance to date has been excellent; data have been made publicly available; and initial science results have been obtained.

  7. The evolution of ozone observed by UARS MLS in the 1992 late winter southern polar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Manney, G.L.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W.; Elson, L.S.; Fishbein, E.F.; Zurek, R.W. ); Harwood, R.S.; Lahoz, W.A. )

    1993-06-18

    This paper presents initial data analysis of ozone distributions in the southern polar vortex region during the winter of 1992. The data comes from the microwave limb sounder on the upper atmosphere research satellite. The data provides never before available coverage of the polar stratosphere, and reveals the development of an ozone hole from column ozone data, changes in ozone mixing ratios in the lower stratosphere consistent with ozone destruction processes in the stratosphere, and evidence to support the transport of ozone toward the pole by tidal wave activity in the stratosphere. The ozone measurements are compared with the development of the polar vortex derived from national meteorological center data.

  8. Excitation and Evolution of the Quasi-2-Day Wave Observed in UARS/MLS Temperature Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. L.; Fishbein, E. F.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.

    1996-03-01

    The quasi-2-day wave is known as a strong and transient perturbation in the middle and upper atmosphere that often occurs shortly after solstice. The excitation mechanisms of this transient wave have been discussed for years, but no clear answer has yet been attained. In this paper, propagating characteristics of the 2-day wave are studied based on 8-mon temperature measurements from the Microwave Limb Sounder onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The studies are focused on the wave events that happened in January 1993 and in July-August 1993. The observations suggests that winter planetary waves could be responsible for triggering the summer 2-day wave through long penetration into the summer stratosphere. A connection is evident in the evolution of the wave amplitude between the summer 2-day wave generation and winter wave penetration. The data also suggest that the enhancement of the wave amplitude is a manifestation of both a local unstable wave and a global normal-mode Rossby wave.

  9. ATC simulation of helicopter IFR approaches into major terminal areas using RNAV, MLS, and CDTI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, L.; Lee, H. Q.; Peach, L. L.; Willett, F. M., Jr.; Obrien, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The introduction of independent helicopter IFR routes at hub airports was investigated in a real time air traffic control system simulation involving a piloted helicopter simulator, computer generated air traffic, and air traffic controllers. The helicopter simulator was equipped to fly area navigation (RNAV) routes and microwave landing system approaches. Problems studied included: (1) pilot acceptance of the approach procedure and tracking accuracy; (2) ATC procedures for handling a mix of helicopter and fixed wing traffic; and (3) utility of the cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) for the helicopter in the hub airport environment. Results indicate that the helicopter routes were acceptable to the subject pilots and were noninterfering with fixed wing traffic. Merging and spacing maneuvers using CDTI were successfully carried out by the pilots, but controllers had some reservations concerning the acceptability of the CDTI procedures.

  10. 76 FR 47226 - Notice of HUD-Held Multifamily Loan Sale (MLS 2011-2)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ..., extension 3927. Hearing- or speech-impaired individuals may call 202-708-4594 (TTY). These are not toll-free... before June 30, 2011; Freedom of Information Act Requests HUD reserves the right, in its sole and... HUD is obligated to disclose pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act and all...

  11. Traffic sign detection in MLS acquired point clouds for geometric and image-based semantic inventory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soilán, Mario; Riveiro, Belén; Martínez-Sánchez, Joaquín; Arias, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, mobile laser scanning has become a valid technology for infrastructure inspection. This technology permits collecting accurate 3D point clouds of urban and road environments and the geometric and semantic analysis of data became an active research topic in the last years. This paper focuses on the detection of vertical traffic signs in 3D point clouds acquired by a LYNX Mobile Mapper system, comprised of laser scanning and RGB cameras. Each traffic sign is automatically detected in the LiDAR point cloud, and its main geometric parameters can be automatically extracted, therefore aiding the inventory process. Furthermore, the 3D position of traffic signs are reprojected on the 2D images, which are spatially and temporally synced with the point cloud. Image analysis allows for recognizing the traffic sign semantics using machine learning approaches. The presented method was tested in road and urban scenarios in Galicia (Spain). The recall results for traffic sign detection are close to 98%, and existing false positives can be easily filtered after point cloud projection. Finally, the lack of a large, publicly available Spanish traffic sign database is pointed out.

  12. Simple Approaches to Improve the Automatic Inventory of ZEBRA Crossing from Mls Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, P.; Riveiro, B.; Soilán, M.; Díaz-Vilariño, L.; Martínez-Sánchez, J.

    2015-08-01

    The city management is increasingly supported by information technologies, leading to paradigms such as smart cities, where decision-makers, companies and citizens are continuously interconnected. 3D modelling turns of great relevance when the city has to be managed making use of geospatial databases or Geographic Information Systems. On the other hand, laser scanning technology has experienced a significant growth in the last years, and particularly, terrestrial mobile laser scanning platforms are being more and more used with inventory purposes in both cities and road environments. Consequently, large datasets are available to produce the geometric basis for the city model; however, this data is not directly exploitable by management systems constraining the implementation of the technology for such applications. This paper presents a new algorithm for the automatic detection of zebra crossing. The algorithm is divided in three main steps: road segmentation (based on a PCA analysis of the points contained in each cycle of collected by a mobile laser system), rasterization (conversion of the point cloud to a raster image coloured as a function of intensity data), and zebra crossing detection (using the Hough Transform and logical constrains for line classification). After evaluating different datasets collected in three cities located in Northwest Spain (comprising 25 strips with 30 visible zebra crossings) a completeness of 83% was achieved.

  13. Low-Level Tie Feature Extraction of Mobile Mapping Data (mls/images) and Aerial Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jende, P.; Hussnain, Z.; Peter, M.; Oude Elberink, S.; Gerke, M.; Vosselman, G.

    2016-03-01

    Mobile Mapping (MM) is a technique to obtain geo-information using sensors mounted on a mobile platform or vehicle. The mobile platform's position is provided by the integration of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Inertial Navigation Systems (INS). However, especially in urban areas, building structures can obstruct a direct line-of-sight between the GNSS receiver and navigation satellites resulting in an erroneous position estimation. Therefore, derived MM data products, such as laser point clouds or images, lack the expected positioning reliability and accuracy. This issue has been addressed by many researchers, whose aim to mitigate these effects mainly concentrates on utilising tertiary reference data. However, current approaches do not consider errors in height, cannot achieve sub-decimetre accuracy and are often not designed to work in a fully automatic fashion. We propose an automatic pipeline to rectify MM data products by employing high resolution aerial nadir and oblique imagery as horizontal and vertical reference, respectively. By exploiting the MM platform's defective, and therefore imprecise but approximate orientation parameters, accurate feature matching techniques can be realised as a pre-processing step to minimise the MM platform's three-dimensional positioning error. Subsequently, identified correspondences serve as constraints for an orientation update, which is conducted by an estimation or adjustment technique. Since not all MM systems employ laser scanners and imaging sensors simultaneously, and each system and data demands different approaches, two independent workflows are developed in parallel. Still under development, both workflows will be presented and preliminary results will be shown. The workflows comprise of three steps; feature extraction, feature matching and the orientation update. In this paper, initial results of low-level image and point cloud feature extraction methods will be discussed as well as an outline of the project and its framework will be given.

  14. Magnetic nanoparticle-supported glutathione: a conceptually sustainable organocatalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    A conceptually novel nanoparticle-supported and magnetically recoverable organocatalyst has been developed, which is readily prepared from inexpensive starting materials in a truly sustainable manner; which catalyzes Paal-Knorr reaction with high yield in pure aqueous medium that...

  15. MIDAS syndrome respectively MLS syndrome: A separate entity rather than a particular lyonization pattern of the gene causing Goltz syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Muecke, J.; Happle, R.; Theile, H.

    1995-05-22

    Although it is true that MIDAS syndrome, Aicardi syndrome and Goltz syndrome show the same transmission, representing X-linked dominant traits with lethality of hemizygote male embryos, and have a number of anomalies such as defects of the eyes or brain in common, it should be noted that MIDAS syndrome and Goltz syndrome have so far never occurred as alternating phenotypes within the same family. In addition, the observation of MIDAS syndrome in a mother and her daughter lends additional support to the notion that this syndrome represents a distinct entity. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Use of GTE, Mozaic, Sonex, and UARS-MLS Data in Understanding Tropospheric Processes Critical to Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newell, Reginald E. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    During the first year we focused on the analysis of data collected on over 7600 commercial aircraft flights (the MOZAIC program). The aim was to further our understanding of the fundamental dynamical processes that drive mesoscale phenomena in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, and their effects on the advection of passive scalars. Through these studies we made the following findings. 2001]: We derived the Kolmogorov equation for the third-order velocity structure function on an f-plane. We showed how the sign of the function yields the direction of the energy cascade. The remarkable linearity of the measured off diagonal third-order structure function was studied. We suggested that the Coriolis term, which appears explicitly in this equation, may be crucial in understanding the observed kinetic energy spectra at scales larger than 100 km, instead of the nonlinear advection term as previously assumed. Also, we showed that decreases with latitude for mid- to high-latitudes, and tabulated the values. Ozone concentration structure functions were calculated by restricting the data points to approximately isentropic pairings. In this way we were able to make comparisons with scalar advection theories. We found that, at even the largest scales, there was no evidence for the simple scaling predicted for smooth advection/diffusion.

  17. Multilingual and Native English-Speaking Student Writers in Medical Laboratory Sciences (MLS): A Comparative Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway-Klaassen, Janice M.; Thompson, Julie M.; Eliason, Patricia A.; Collins, Molly Rojas; Murie, Robin; Spannaus-Martin, Donna J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical laboratory scientists are health care practitioners who perform testing on blood and other body fluids providing vital information to physicians for the diagnosis, treatment, and management of patients in health and disease. Miscommunications between laboratory personnel and other health care practitioners can result in unwarranted delays…

  18. Real-time simulation of helicopter IFR approaches into major terminal areas using RNAV, MLS, and CDTI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, L.; Lee, H. Q.; Peach, L. L.; Willett, F. M., Jr.; Obrien, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    Helicopter IFR routes at hub airports have been investigated in an air-traffic-control system simulation involving a piloted helicopter simulator, computer-generated air traffic, and air traffic controllers. Problems studied included: (1) pilot acceptance of the approach procedure and tracking accuracy; (2) ATC procedures for handling a mix of helicopter and fixed-wing traffic; and (3) utility of the Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) for the helicopter. Results indicate that the helicopter routes were pilot acceptable and were noninterfering with fixed-wing traffic. Merging and spacing maneuvers using CDTI were successfully carried out by the pilots, but controllers had some reservations concerning CDTI.

  19. Tropical and Midlatitude Tropospheric Column Ozone Response to ENSO in GEOS-5 Assimilation of OMI and MLS Ozone Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, M. A.; Wargan, K.; Pawson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Nine years of ozone observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument and Microwave Limb Sounder have been assimilated into the Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 data assimilation system. We investigate the magnitude and spatial distribution of the influence by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on tropospheric column ozone (TCO) in the tropics through the middle latitudes. The tropospheric response in the tropics agrees well with previous studies. A newly identified two-lobed response symmetric about the Equator in the western Pacific/Indonesian region is consistent with the large-scale vertical transport. The ozone response is weaker in the middle latitudes, but significant explained variance of the TCO is found over several small regions, including the central United States. However, the sensitivity of TCO to the Niño 3.4 index is significant over a large area of the middle latitudes. The sensitivity maxima and minima coincide with anomalous anti-cyclonic and cyclonic circulations. The associated vertical transport is consistent with the sign of the sensitivity. ENSO related changes to the mean depth of the tropospheric column have little impact on the TCO response in the tropics but can contribute significantly to the midlatitude response. Comparisons to a 22-year chemical transport model simulation demonstrate that these results from the nine-year assimilation are representative of the longer-term. This investigation brings insight to several seemingly disparate prior studies of the El Niño influence on tropospheric ozone in the middle latitudes. In addition, these results are valuable as a process-oriented assessment of the tropospheric response in model simulations.

  20. Atmospheric Profiling Combining the Features of GPS ro & Mls: Satellite to Satellite Occultations Near Water & Ozone Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Ward, D.; Otarola, A. C.; McGhee, J.; Reed, H.; Erickson, D.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing climate models & their predictions requires observations that determine the state of the real climate system precisely and unambiguously, independently from models. For this purpose, we have been developing a new orbiting remote sensing system called the Active Temperature, Ozone & Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS) which is a cross between GPS RO and the Microwave Limb Sounder. ATOMMS actively probes water vapor, ozone & other absorption lines at cm & mm wavelengths in a satellite to satellite occultation geometry to simultaneously profile temperature, pressure, water vapor and ozone as well as other important constituents. Individual profiles of water vapor, temperature & pressure heights will extend from near the surface into the mesosphere with ~1%, 0.4K and 10 m precision respectively and still better accuracy, with 100 m vertical resolution. Ozone profiles will extend upward from the upper troposphere. Line of sight wind profiles will extend upwards from the mid-stratosphere. ATOMMS is a doubly differential absorption system which eliminates drift and both sees clouds and sees thru them, to deliver performance in clouds within a factor of 2 of the performance in clear skies. This all-weather sampling combined with insensitivity to surface emissivity avoids sampling biases that limit most existing satellite records. ATOMMS will profile slant liquid water in clouds & rain and as well as turbulence via scintillations ("twinkling of a star"). Using prototype ATOMMS instrumentation that we developed with funding from NSF, several ATOMMS ground field campaigns precisely measured water vapor, cloud amount, rainfall, turbulence and absorption line spectroscopy. ATOMMS's dynamic range was demonstrated as water vapor was derived to 1% precision in optical depths up to 17. We are developing high altitude aircraft to aircraft instrumentation to further demonstrate ATOMMS performance, refine spectroscopy & support future field campaigns. Our vision is a constellation of microsatellites carrying ATOMMS to provide radiosonde-like profiles for weather prediction, an unprecedented characterization of present climate, a continuous global field campaign to constrain critical processes to improve models, and a long term record quantifying trends in climatic behavior.

  1. The Ideal Candidate for School Library Media Specialist: Views from School Administrators, Library School Faculty, and MLS Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roys, Nadine K.; Brown, Mary E.

    2004-01-01

    Preferred characteristics in applicants for school library media specialist (SLMS) positions are studied in this article from three perspectives, that of the library school faculty, the library school student, and the school administrator. Surveys were sent to public high school administrators in the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho;…

  2. Flight simulation study to determine MLS lateral course width requirements on final approach for general aviation. [runway conditions affecting microwave landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumrine, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of various lateral course widths and runway lengths for manual CAT I Microwave Landing System instrument approaches was carried out with instrument rated pilots in a General Aviation simulator. Data are presented on the lateral dispersion at the touchdown zone, and the middle and outer markers, for approaches to 3,000, 8,000 (and trial 12,000 foot) runway lengths with full scale angular lateral course widths of + or - 1.19 deg, + or - 2.35 deg, and + or - 3.63 deg. The distance from touchdown where the localizer deviation went to full scale was also recorded. Pilot acceptance was measured according to the Cooper-Harper rating system.

  3. 14 CFR 171.307 - Minimum requirements for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171... before the FAA approves an IFR procedure for a non-Federal MLS facility: (1) The performance of the MLS... maintain the MLS facility in accordance with § 171.325. (4) The owner must agree to furnish...

  4. Extant and Extinct Lunar Regolith Simulants: Modal Analyses of NU-LHT-1M and -2m, OB-1, JSC-1, JSC-1A and -1AF,FJS-1, and MLS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrader, Christian; Rickman, Doug; McLemore, Carole; Fikes, John; Wilson, Stephen; Stoeser, Doug; Butcher, Alan; Botha, Pieter

    2008-01-01

    This work is part of a larger effort to compile an internally consistent database on lunar regolith (Apollo samples) and lunar regolith simulants. Characterize existing lunar regolith and simulants in terms of: a) Particle type; b) Particle size distribution; c) Particle shape distribution; d) Bulk density; and e) Other compositional characteristics. Evaluate regolith simulants (Figure of Merit) by above properties by comparison to lunar regolith (Apollo sample) This presentation covers new data on lunar simulants.

  5. [Occurrence of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistant isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in clinical specimens in 2003-2004].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Budzyńska, Anna; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was the analysis of frequency of macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) resistance among MSSA (n=1682) and MRSA (n=272) strains which were isolated in 2002-2004 from various clinical materials from patients hospitalized in the University Hospital at the L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, University of Nicolaus Copernicus in Toruń. Susceptibility testing and examination of methicillin-resistant strains were performed by the disc diffusion techniques according to recommendation of NCCLS. Resistance to the MLS(B) antimicrobials agents was higher among MRSA compared to MSSA isolates. The MLS, constitutive phenotype was more prevalent than the MLS(B) inducible phenotype among investigated MRSA (65.4%) and MSSA (7.6%) isolates. Inducible resistance had only 2.5% of the MSSA and 2.6% of the MRSA strains. Moreover in 2004 there were found increasing frequency of inducible MLS(B) resistance from 1.1% to 5.7% and decreasing frequency of constitutive MLS(B) resistance from 9.2% to 4.7% among MSSA strains, in comparison to 2003. The investigated MSSA MLS(B)-, MLS(B)- and MRSAMLS(B)+, MLS(B)- strains were the most frequently isolated from pus (adequately 5.2%, 28.8% and 30.5%, 10.7%) and also from nosopharynx swabs (1.7% MSSA MLS(B)+ and 22.9% MSSA MLS(B)-) and biomaterials (15,1% MRSA MLS(B)+ and 9.6% MRSA MLS(B)-). They mainly came from patients of the outpatient clinic (2,4% MSSA MLS(B)+ and 19.9% MSSA MLS(B)-) and patients treated at the neurosurgical ward (20.6% MRSA MLS(B)+ and 12.1% MRSA MLS(B)-).

  6. Investigating How and What Prospective Teachers Learn through Microteaching Lesson Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Maria Lorelei

    2010-01-01

    Microteaching Lesson Study [MLS] combines elements of Japanese lesson study and microteaching. A case study of MLS was conducted with 18 prospective teachers in an initial course on learning to teach. Various data sources (i.e., pre- and post-lesson plans, MLS lesson plans, videotaped lessons, transcripts of group discussions, observation field…

  7. 76 FR 25231 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a...; Sec. 97.29 ILS, ILS/DME, MLS, MLS/DME, MLS/RNAV; Sec. 97.31 RADAR SIAPs; Sec. 97.33 RNAV SIAPs;...

  8. 14 CFR 171.309 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.309 General requirements. The MLS is a precision approach and landing guidance system which provides position information.... (a) An MLS constructed to meet the requirements of this subpart must include: (1) Approach...

  9. 14 CFR 171.327 - Operational records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.327 Operational records. The owner of the MLS facility or his maintenance representative must submit the following... Form 6030-1 is permanent record of all the activities required to maintain the MLS facility....

  10. 78 FR 56829 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-16

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a.... 97.29 ILS, ILS/DME, MLS, MLS/DME, MLS/RNAV; Sec. 97.31 RADAR SIAPs; Sec. 97.33 RNAV SIAPs; and...

  11. 14 CFR 171.305 - Requests for IFR procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.305 Requests for IFR procedure. (a) Each person who requests an IFR procedure based on an MLS facility which that... with this subparagraph. (b) FAA inspects and evaluates the MLS facility; it advises the owner of...

  12. 14 CFR 171.305 - Requests for IFR procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.305 Requests for IFR procedure. (a) Each person who requests an IFR procedure based on an MLS facility which that... with this subparagraph. (b) FAA inspects and evaluates the MLS facility; it advises the owner of...

  13. Airborne antenna coverage requirements for the TCV B-737 aircraft. [for operation with microwave landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southall, W. A., Jr.; White, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The airborne antenna line of sight look angle requirement for operation with a Microwave Landing System (MLS) was studied. The required azimuth and elevation line of sight look angles from an antenna located on an aircraft to three ground based antenna sites at the Wallops Flight Center (FPS-16 radar, MLS aximuth, and MLS elevation) as the aircraft follows specific approach paths selected as representative of MLS operations at the Denver, Colorado, terminal area are presented. These required azimuth and elevation look angles may be interpreted as basic design requirements for antenna of the TCV B-737 airplane for MLS operations along these selected approach paths.

  14. National INFOSEC technical baseline: multi-level secure systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J P

    1998-09-28

    The purpose of this report is to provide a baseline description of the state of multilevel processor/processing to the INFOSEC Research Council and at their discretion to the R&D community at large. From the information in the report, it is hoped that the members of the IRC will be aware of gaps in MLS research. A primary purpose is to bring IRC and the research community members up to date on what is happening in the MLS arena. The review will attempt to cover what MLS products are still available, and to identify companies who still offer MLS products. We have also attempted to identify requirements for MLS by interviewing senior officers of the Intelligence community as well as those elements of DoD and DOE who are or may be interested in procuring MLS products for various applications. The balance of the report consists of the following sections; a background review of the highlights of the developments of MLS, a quick summary of where we are today in terms of products, installations, and companies who are still in the business of supplying MLS systems [or who are developing MLS system], the requirements as expressed by senior members of the Intelligence community and DoD and DOE, issues and unmet R&D challenges surrounding MLS, and finally a set of recommended research topics.

  15. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder HCl Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Jiang, Y. B.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Fuller, R. A.; Marcy, T. P.; Popp, P. J.; Gao, R. S.; Fahey, D. W.; Jucks, K. W.; Stachnik, R. A.; Toon, G. C.; Christensen, L. E.; Webster, C. R.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Walker, K. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Harwood, R. S.; Manney, G. L.; Schwartz, M. J.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite has provided daily global HCl profiles since August 2004. We provide a characterization of the resolution, random and systematic uncertainties, and known issues for the version 2.2 MLS HCl data. The MLS sampling allows for comparisons with many (1500 to more than 3000) closely matched profiles from the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) and Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS). These data sets provide HCl latitudinal distributions that are, overall, very similar to those from (coincident) MLS profiles, although there are some discrepancies in the upper stratosphere between the MLS and HALOE gradients. As found in previous work, MLS and ACE HCl profiles agree very well (within approximately 5%, on average), but the MLS HCl abundances are generally larger (by 10-20%) than HALOE HCl. The bias versus HALOE is unlikely to arise mostly from MLS, as a similar systematic bias (of order 15%) is not observed between average MLS and balloon-borne measurements of HCl, obtained over Fort Sumner, New Mexico, in 2004 and 2005. At the largest pressure (147 hPa) for MLS HCl, a high bias (approximately 0.2 ppbv) is apparent in analyses of low to midlatitude data versus in situ aircraft chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) HCl measurements from the Aura Validation Experiment (AVE) campaigns in 2004, 2005, and 2006; this bias is also observed in comparisons of MLS and aircraftHCl/O3 correlations. Good agreement between MLS and CIMS HCl is obtained at 100 to 68 hPa. The recommended pressure range for MLS HCl is from 100 to 0.15 hPa.

  16. BRAF inhibitor therapy-associated melanocytic lesions lack the BRAF V600E mutation and show increased levels of cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Mudaliar, Kumaran; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Duvic, Madeleine; Ciurea, Ana; Hymes, Sharon; Milton, Denái R; Tsai, Kenneth Y; Prieto, Victor G; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Curry, Jonathan L

    2016-04-01

    Newly appearing or changing melanocytic lesions (MLs) are a recently reported toxicity of BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) therapy. Morphologically, MLs associated with BRAFi therapy (BRAFi-MLs) may demonstrate alarming features of melanoma with an epithelioid cell phenotype with notable cytologic atypia. We sought to characterize the clinicopathological and molecular features of BRAFi-MLs. A retrospective review over a 4-year period revealed 20 patients in which 44 MLs (including 11 control nevi) were characterized by histopathology, review of clinical medical records, and immunohistochemical (IHC) studies (with anti-BRAF V600E, anti-BAP1, anti-cyclin D1, and anti-p16); the percentage of IHC+ cells was scored. Of the 20 patients, 3 (15%) whose BRAFi-MLs were biopsied had a second primary cutaneous melanoma. Of the 44 BRAFi-MLs tested, 37 (100%) of 37 MLs available for BRAF V600E testing lacked expression in contrast to 1 (9%) of 11 control nevi (lesions not associated with targeted therapy). A significantly higher level of cyclin D1 expression (>50% IHC+ cells) was more commonly seen in BRAFi-MLs (44%) than in control nevi (9%). No difference in p16 expression in melanocytes was seen between the 2 groups. BRAF mutation status distinctly differs between BRAFi-MLs from melanomas and nevi biopsied in patients who do not receive BRAFi therapy. Morphologically, BRAFi-MLs demonstrate a greater degree of atypia than do control nevi. Furthermore, BRAFi-MLs with coexisting cutaneous keratinocyte toxicity developed during fewer days of targeted therapy. Paradoxical activation of the MAPK pathway in BRAF(WT) melanocytes may account for ~15% to 21% of patients developing a second new primary melanoma within a year of starting BRAFi therapy; thus, close clinical surveillance is warranted.

  17. 75 FR 80680 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a...; Sec. 97.29 ILS, ILS/DME, MLS, MLS/DME, MLS/RNAV; Sec. 97.31 RADAR SIAPs; Sec. 97.33 RNAV SIAPs; and...-11 NM Roswell Roswell Intl Air 0/8879 11/23/10 RADAR 1, Orig. Center. 13 Jan-11 NM Roswell...

  18. 76 FR 21234 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-15

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a....25, 97.27, 97.29, 97.31, 97.33 and 97.35 By amending: Sec. 97.23 VOR, VOR/DME, VOR or TACAN, and VOR... ILS, ILS/DME, MLS, MLS/DME, MLS/RNAV; Sec. 97.31 RADAR SIAPs; Sec. 97.33 RNAV SIAPs; and Sec....

  19. 78 FR 7652 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a....25, 97.27, 97.29, 97.31, 97.33 and 97.35 By amending: Sec. 97.23 VOR, VOR/DME, VOR or TACAN, and VOR... ILS, ILS/DME, MLS, MLS/DME, MLS/RNAV; Sec. 97.31 RADAR SIAPs; Sec. 97.33 RNAV SIAPs; and Sec....

  20. 76 FR 18381 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation of a....25, 97.27, 97.29, 97.31, 97.33, and 97.35 By amending: Sec. 97.23 VOR, VOR/DME, VOR or TACAN, and VOR... ILS, ILS/DME, MLS, MLS/DME, MLS/RNAV; Sec. 97.31 RADAR SIAPs; Sec. 97.33 RNAV SIAPs; and Sec....

  1. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder Ozone by Ozonesonde and Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Y. B.; Froidevaux, L.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Waters, J. W.; Bojkov, B.; Leblanc, T.; McDermid, I. S.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Filipiak, M. J.; Harwood, R. S.; Fuller, R. A.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.; Cofield, R. E.; Cuddy, D. T.; Jarnot, R. F.; Knosp, B. W.; Perun, V. S.; Schwartz, W. V.; Snyder, P. C.; Stek, R. P.; Thurstans, P. A.; Wagner, M. J.

    2007-01-01

    We present validation studies of MLS version 2.2 upper tropospheric and stratospheric ozone profiles using ozonesonde and lidar data as well as climatological data. Ozone measurements from over 60 ozonesonde stations worldwide and three lidar stations are compared with coincident MLS data. The MLS ozone stratospheric data between 150 and 3 hPa agree well with ozonesonde measurements, within 8% for the global average. MLS values at 215 hPa are biased high compared to ozonesondes by approximately 20% at middle to high latitude, although there is a lot of variability in this altitude region.

  2. Machine learning of fault characteristics from rocket engine simulation data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ke, Min; Ali, Moonis

    1990-01-01

    Transformation of data into knowledge through conceptual induction has been the focus of our research described in this paper. We have developed a Machine Learning System (MLS) to analyze the rocket engine simulation data. MLS can provide to its users fault analysis, characteristics, and conceptual descriptions of faults, and the relationships of attributes and sensors. All the results are critically important in identifying faults.

  3. 14 CFR 171.303 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definitions. 171.303 Section 171.303 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL.... Microwave Landing System (MLS) means the MLS selected by ICAO for international standardization....

  4. SHADOZ in the Aura Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, J. C.; Thompson, A. M.; Oltmans, S. J.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Bhartia, P. K.; Froidevaux, L.; Schmidlin, F.; Calpini, B.; Shiotani, M.; Fujiwara, M.; Posny, F.; Vomel, H.; Chow, K. K.; Coetzee, G. R.; Kelder, H.

    2007-01-01

    We present comparisons of observed tropical and sub-tropical ozone from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project with satellite measurements using Aura's Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instruments. Satellite products of total and derived tropospheric column ozone from OMI and profiles of ozone in the UT/LS region from MLS are used.

  5. Microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-Rabasco, Ana; De-Unamuno, Blanca; Martínez, Francisco; Febrer-Bosch, Isabel; Alegre-de-Miquel, Víctor

    2013-01-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) or microcornea, dermal aplasia and sclerocornea (MIDAS) syndrome is a rare X-linked-dominant disorder. We present a patient with agenesis of corpus callosum, ocular abnormalities, and multiple skin defects. The cytogenetic studies of the MLS critical region (Xp22.2) were normal, but a skewed X-chromosome inactivation pattern (85:15) was observed.

  6. 14 CFR 171.301 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.301 Scope. This subpart sets forth minimum requirements for the approval, installation, operation and maintenance of non-Federal Microwave Landing System (MLS) facilities that provide the basis for instrument flight rules...

  7. 14 CFR 171.301 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.301 Scope. This subpart sets forth minimum requirements for the approval, installation, operation and maintenance of non-Federal Microwave Landing System (MLS) facilities that provide the basis for instrument flight rules...

  8. The Return on the Investment in Library Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van House, Nancy A.

    1985-01-01

    Measures change in social and private net present value of expected lifetime earnings attributable to M.L.S. degree under current market conditions and calculates effect of changes in placement rates and of two-year MLS degrees. Implications for profession's ability to attract capable individuals and for its sex composition are discussed. (33…

  9. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  10. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  11. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  12. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  13. 14 CFR 171.321 - DME and marker beacon performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false DME and marker beacon performance... (MLS) § 171.321 DME and marker beacon performance requirements. (a) The DME equipment must meet the..._regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) MLS marker beacon equipment must meet the performance...

  14. Low cost airborne microwave landing system receiver, task 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. B.; Vancleave, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Work performed on the low cost airborne Microwave Landing System (MLS) receiver is summarized. A detailed description of the prototype low cost MLS receiver is presented. This detail includes block diagrams, schematics, board assembly drawings, photographs of subassemblies, mechanical construction, parts lists, and microprocessor software. Test procedures are described and results are presented.

  15. High School Students' Scientific Epistemological Beliefs, Motivation in Learning Science, and Their Relationships: A Comparative Study within the Chinese Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Tzung-Jin; Deng, Feng; Chai, Ching Sing; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the differences in high school students' scientific epistemological beliefs (SEBs), motivation in learning science (MLS), and the different relationships between them in Taiwan and China. 310 Taiwanese and 302 Chinese high school students' SEBs and MLS were assessed quantitatively. Taiwanese students generally were more prone…

  16. HSP90 inhibition blocks ERBB3 and RET phosphorylation in myxoid/round cell liposarcoma and causes massive cell death in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Setareh; Järnum, Sofia; Vannas, Christoffer; Udhane, Sameer; Jonasson, Emma; Tomic, Tajana Tesan; Grundevik, Pernilla; Fagman, Henrik; Hansson, Magnus; Kalender, Zeynep; Jauhiainen, Alexandra; Dolatabadi, Soheila; Stratford, Eva Wessel; Myklebost, Ola; Eriksson, Mikael; Stenman, Göran; Stock, Regine Schneider; Ståhlberg, Anders; Åman, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Myxoid sarcoma (MLS) is one of the most common types of malignant soft tissue tumors. MLS is characterized by the FUS-DDIT3 or EWSR1-DDIT3 fusion oncogenes that encode abnormal transcription factors. The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) encoding RET was previously identified as a putative downstream target gene to FUS-DDIT3 and here we show that cultured MLS cells expressed phosphorylated RET together with its ligand Persephin. Treatment with RET specific kinase inhibitor Vandetanib failed to reduce RET phosphorylation and inhibit cell growth, suggesting that other RTKs may phosphorylate RET. A screening pointed out EGFR and ERBB3 as the strongest expressed phosphorylated RTKs in MLS cells. We show that ERBB3 formed nuclear and cytoplasmic complexes with RET and both RTKs were previously reported to form complexes with EGFR. The formation of RTK hetero complexes could explain the observed Vandetanib resistence in MLS. EGFR and ERBB3 are clients of HSP90 that help complex formation and RTK activation. Treatment of cultured MLS cells with HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG, caused loss of RET and ERBB3 phosphorylation and lead to rapid cell death. Treatment of MLS xenograft carrying Nude mice resulted in massive necrosis, rupture of capillaries and hemorrhages in tumor tissues. We conclude that complex formation between RET and other RTKs may cause RTK inhibitor resistance. HSP90 inhibitors can overcome this resistance and are thus promising drugs for treatment of MLS/RCLS. PMID:26595521

  17. Virtual and Traditional Slides for Teaching Cellular Morphology to Medical Laboratory Science Undergraduates: A Comparative Study of Performance Outcomes, Retention, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solberg, Brooke L.

    2011-01-01

    As a result of massive retirement and educational program expense and closure, the field of Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) is facing a critical workforce shortage. Combatting this issue by increasing undergraduate class size is a difficult proposition due to the intense psychomotor curricular requirements of MLS programs. Technological advances…

  18. Abstract of Lectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, Lucien

    1993-01-01

    Three lectures will be given. The first one will draw from the general literature on microwave sounding from space. The next two will focus on a description of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and results obtained from its measurements relating to atmospheric chemistry and dynamics; this will draw from material recently published (or soon-to-be published) by the MLS team.

  19. Optical and structural characterization of CeO2/B4C multilayers near boron K-edge energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sertsu, M. G.; Giglia, A.; Brose, S.; Comisso, A.; Wang, Z. S.; Juschkin, L.; Nicolosi, P.

    2015-05-01

    A search for novel materials for making multilayers of high reflectivity has been driven by the vigorous demand towards miniaturizing photonics. A typical consumer of high performance multilayers (MLs) is the extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) based on the 13.5 nm laser produced plasma (LPP) source. To sustain "Moore's law" and print fine features below 10 nm on integrated circuits (IC), source of radiation for the EUVL has to shift towards even shorter wavelengths where 6.x nm wavelength seems to be immediate successor. However, the 6.x nm EUV lithography needs MLs of reflectivity performance above 70 % to support high volume manufacturing (HVM). It is clear that more work is required particularly on the development of MLs with high reflectance, stable to thermal heat and sufficient lifetime. In this work new MLs of B4C/CeO2 are deposited, analyzed and characterized for the first time. Combinations of X-ray reflectometry (XRR) and EUV reflectance measurements near resonance edge of boron are analyzed to derive structural and optical parameters of MLs. ML coatings of B4C/CeO2 MLs have shown similar reflectance performance with the leading candidate MLs around 6.x nm wavelength. Analysis shows that interlayer diffusion is a major reason for low reflectivity performance. Cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the MLs have proved formation of interlayer diffusion.

  20. Differential thermal analysis of lunar soil simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, D.; Setzer, A.

    1991-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis of a lunar soil simulant, 'Minnesota Lunar Simulant-1' (MLS-1) was performed. The MLS-1 was tested in as-received form (in glass form) and with another silica. The silica addition was seen to depress nucleation events which lead to a better glass former.

  1. Practitioners' & LIS Students' Perceptions on Preparedness in the New York Metropolitan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creel, Stacy L.; Pollicino, Elizabeth B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of a study that focused on the perceived preparedness of recent graduates. Fifty-five St. John's University MLS students surveyed 348 practitioners in public libraries (181) and school libraries (167) concerning perceived preparedness of recent MLS graduates for the realities of working in libraries. The overriding…

  2. Prospective Teachers' Perspectives on Microteaching Lesson Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Maria L.; Robinson, Matthew

    2006-01-01

    Microteaching Lesson Study [MLS] is a cooperative learning experience that we felt could challenge our prospective teachers thinking about teaching and support their connection of theory and practice during an initial course on learning to teach mathematics. We studied seventy-four prospective teachers' perspectives on MLS over four sections of…

  3. Microteaching Lesson Study: Mentor Interaction Structure and Its Relation to Elementary Preservice Mathematics Teacher Knowledge Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, Roxanne V.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated Microteaching Lesson Study (MLS) and three possible MLS mentor interaction structures during the debriefing sessions in relation to elementary preservice teacher development of knowledge for teaching. One hundred three elementary preservice teachers enrolled in five different sections of a mathematics methods course at a…

  4. Intermolecular interactions of the malate synthase of Paracoccidioides spp

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The fungus Paracoccidioides spp is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a pulmonary mycosis acquired by the inhalation of fungal propagules. Paracoccidioides malate synthase (PbMLS) is important in the infectious process of Paracoccidioides spp because the transcript is up-regulated during the transition from mycelium to yeast and in yeast cells during phagocytosis by murine macrophages. In addition, PbMLS acts as an adhesin in Paracoccidioides spp. The evidence for the multifunctionality of PbMLS indicates that it could interact with other proteins from the fungus and host. The objective of this study was to identify and analyze proteins that possibly bind to PbMLS (PbMLS-interacting proteins) because protein interactions are intrinsic to cell processes, and it might be possible to infer the function of a protein through the identification of its ligands. Results The search for interactions was performed using an in vivo assay with a two-hybrid library constructed in S. cerevisiae; the transcripts were sequenced and identified. In addition, an in vitro assay using pull-down GST methodology with different protein extracts (yeast, mycelium, yeast-secreted proteins and macrophage) was performed, and the resulting interactions were identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Some of the protein interactions were confirmed by Far-Western blotting using specific antibodies, and the interaction of PbMLS with macrophages was validated by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. In silico analysis using molecular modeling, dynamics and docking identified the amino acids that were involved in the interactions between PbMLS and PbMLS-interacting proteins. Finally, the interactions were visualized graphically using Osprey software. Conclusion These observations indicate that PbMLS interacts with proteins that are in different functional categories, such as cellular transport, protein biosynthesis, modification and degradation of proteins and signal

  5. Structures, reactivities, and antibiotic properties of the marinopyrroles A-F.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Chambers C; Kauffman, Christopher A; Jensen, Paul R; Fenical, William

    2010-05-21

    Cultivation of actinomycete strain CNQ-418, retrieved from a deep ocean sediment sample off the coast of La Jolla, CA, has provided marinopyrroles A-F. Sharing just 98% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with S. sannurensis, the strain likely represents a new Streptomyces species. The metabolites contain an unusual 1,3'-bipyrrole core decorated with several chlorine and bromine substituents and possess marked antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The congested N,C-biaryl bond establishes an axis of chirality that, for marinopyrroles A-E, is configurationally stable at room temperature. Moreover, the natural products are fashioned strictly in the M-configuration. The Paal-Knorr condensation was adapted for the synthesis of the 1,3'-bipyrrole core. Halogenation of this material with N-bromosuccinimide cleanly furnished the 4,4',5,5'-tetrahalogenated core that characterizes this class of marine-derived metabolites.

  6. Ultralow thermal conductivity of multilayers with highly dissimilar Debye temperatures.

    PubMed

    Dechaumphai, Edward; Lu, Dylan; Kan, Jimmy J; Moon, Jaeyun; Fullerton, Eric E; Liu, Zhaowei; Chen, Renkun

    2014-05-14

    Thermal transport in multilayers (MLs) has attracted significant interest and shows promising applications. Unlike their single-component counterparts, MLs exhibit a thermal conductivity that can be effectively engineered by both the number density of the layers and the interfacial thermal resistance between layers, with the latter being highly tunable via the contrast of acoustic properties of each layer. In this work, we experimentally demonstrated an ultralow thermal conductivity of 0.33 ± 0.04 W m(-1) K(-1) at room temperature in MLs made of Au and Si with a high interfacial density of ∼0.2 interface nm(-1). The measured thermal conductivity is significantly lower than the amorphous limit of either Si or Au and is also much lower than previously measured MLs with a similar interfacial density. With a Debye temperature ratio of ∼3.9 for Au and Si, the Au/Si MLs represent the highest mismatched system in inorganic MLs measured to date. In addition, we explore the prior theoretical prediction that full phonon dispersion could better model the interfacial thermal resistance involving materials with low Debye temperatures. Our results demonstrate that MLs with highly dissimilar Debye temperatures represent a rational approach to achieve ultralow thermal conductivity in inorganic materials and can also serve as a platform for investigating interfacial thermal transport.

  7. MLSD-OSEM reconstruction algorithm for cosmic ray muon radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Ziran; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Li; Xing, Yuxiang

    2008-03-01

    Cosmic ray muon radiography which has a good penetrability and sensitivity to high-Z materials is an effective way for detecting shielded nuclear materials. Reconstruction algorithm is the key point of this technique. Currently, there are two main algorithms about this technique. One is the Point of Closest Approach (POCA) reconstruction algorithm which uses the track information to reconstruct; the other is the Maximum Likelihood estimation, such as the Maximum Likelihood Scattering (MLS) and the Maximum Likelihood Scattering and Displacement (MLSD) reconstruction algorithms which are proposed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The performance of MLSD is better than MLS. Since MLSD reconstruction algorithm includes scattering and displacement information while MLS reconstruction algorithm only includes scattering information. In order to get this Maximum Likelihood estimation, in this paper, we propose to use EM method to get the estimation (MLS-EM and MLSD-EM). Then, in order to saving reconstruction time we use the OS technique to accelerate MLS and MLSD reconstruction algorithm with the initial value set to be the result of the POCA reconstruction algorithm. That is, the Maximum Likelihood Scattering-OSEM (MLS-OSEM) and the Maximum Likelihood Scattering and Displacement-OSEM (MLSD-OSEM). Numerical simulations show that the MLSD-OSEM is an effective algorithm and the performance of MLSD-OSEM is better than MLS-OSEM.

  8. The Finland–United States Investigation of Non–Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Genetics (FUSION) Study. I. An Autosomal Genome Scan for Genes That Predispose to Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soumitra; Watanabe, Richard M.; Valle, Timo T.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Magnuson, Victoria L.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Ally, Delphine S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Silander, Kaisa; Kohtamäki, Kimmo; Chines, Peter; Balow, Jr., James; Birznieks, Gunther; Chang, Jennie; Eldridge, William; Erdos, Michael R.; Karanjawala, Zarir E.; Knapp, Julie I.; Kudelko, Kristina; Martin, Colin; Morales-Mena, Anabelle; Musick, Anjene; Musick, Tiffany; Pfahl, Carrie; Porter, Rachel; Rayman, Joseph B.; Rha, David; Segal, Leonid; Shapiro, Shane; Sharaf, Ravi; Shurtleff, Ben; So, Alistair; Tannenbaum, Joyce; Te, Catherine; Tovar, Jason; Unni, Arun; Welch, Christian; Whiten, Ray; Witt, Alyson; Blaschak-Harvan, Jillian; Douglas, Julie A.; Duren, William L.; Epstein, Michael P.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Kaleta, Hong Shi; Lange, Ethan M.; Li, Chun; McEachin, Richard C.; Stringham, Heather M.; Trager, Edward; White, Peggy P.; Eriksson, Johan; Toivanen, Liisa; Vidgren, Gabriele; Nylund, Stella J.; Tuomilehto-Wolf, Eva; Ross, Edna H.; Demirchyan, Elza; Hagopian, William A.; Buchanan, Thomas A.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Bergman, Richard N.; Collins, Francis S.; Boehnke, Michael

    2000-01-01

    We performed a genome scan at an average resolution of 8 cM in 719 Finnish sib pairs with type 2 diabetes. Our strongest results are for chromosome 20, where we observe a weighted maximum LOD score (MLS) of 2.15 at map position 69.5 cM from pter and secondary weighted LOD-score peaks of 2.04 at 56.5 cM and 1.99 at 17.5 cM. Our next largest MLS is for chromosome 11 (MLS = 1.75 at 84.0 cM), followed by chromosomes 2 (MLS = 0.87 at 5.5 cM), 10 (MLS = 0.77 at 75.0 cM), and 6 (MLS = 0.61 at 112.5 cM), all under an additive model. When we condition on chromosome 2 at 8.5 cM, the MLS for chromosome 20 increases to 5.50 at 69.0 cM (P=.0014). An ordered-subsets analysis based on families with high or low diabetes-related quantitative traits yielded results that support the possible existence of disease-predisposing genes on chromosomes 6 and 10. Genomewide linkage-disequilibrium analysis using microsatellite marker data revealed strong evidence of association for D22S423 (P=.00007). Further analyses are being carried out to confirm and to refine the location of these putative diabetes-predisposing genes. PMID:11032783

  9. A novel 7-bromoindirubin with potent anticancer activity suppresses survival of human melanoma cells associated with inhibition of STAT3 and Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lucy; Kritsanida, Marina; Magiatis, Prokopios; Gaboriaud, Nicolas; Wang, Yan; Wu, Jun; Buettner, Ralf; Yang, Fan; Nam, Sangkil; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Jove, Richard

    2012-11-01

    STAT3 and Akt signaling have been validated as potential molecular targets for treatment of cancers including melanoma. These small molecule inhibitors of STAT3 or Akt signaling are promising for developing anti-melanoma therapeutic agents. MLS-2438, a novel 7-bromoindirubin, a derivative of the natural product indirubin, was synthesized with a bromo-group at the 7-position on one indole ring and a hydrophilic group at the 3'-position on the other indole ring. We tested the anticancer activity of MLS-2438 and investigated its mechanism of action in human melanoma cell lines. Here, we show that MLS-2438 inhibits viability and induces apoptosis of human melanoma cells associated with inhibition of STAT3 and Akt signaling. Several pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins are involved in the MLS-2438 mediated apoptosis. MLS-2438 inhibits Src kinase activity in vitro and phosphorylation of JAK2, Src, STAT3 and Akt in cultured cancer cells. In contrast to the decreased phosphorylation levels of JAK2, Src, STAT3 and Akt, phosphorylation levels of the MAPK (Erk1/2) signaling protein were not reduced in cells treated with MLS-2438. These results demonstrate that MLS-2438, a novel natural product derivative, is a Src inhibitor and potentially regulates kinase activity of JAK2 and Akt in cancer cells. Importantly, MLS-2438 suppressed tumor growth with low toxicity in a mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. Our findings support further development of MLS-2438 as a potential small-molecule therapeutic agent that targets both STAT3 and Akt signaling in human melanoma cells.

  10. Midline-shift corresponds to the amount of brain edema early after hemispheric stroke--an MRI study in rats.

    PubMed

    Walberer, Maureen; Blaes, Franz; Stolz, Erwin; Müller, Clemens; Schoenburg, Markus; Tschernatsch, Marlene; Bachmann, Georg; Gerriets, Tibo

    2007-04-01

    Vasogenic brain edema formation is a serious complication in hemispheric stroke. Its space-occupying effect can lead to midline-shift (MLS), cerebral herniation, and death. Clinical studies indicate that quantification of MLS can predict cerebral herniation and subsequent death at early time-points, even before clinical deterioration becomes apparent. The present experimental study was designed to determine the relation between MLS, absolute edema volume, lesion size, and clinical findings in a rat stroke model. Middle cerebral artery-occlusion was performed in 24 rats using the suture technique. Clinical evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (Bruker PharmaScan 7.0T) was performed 24 hours later. Lesion volume, the volume-increase within the affected hemisphere (%HEV), and MLS were quantified on T2-weighted images. The absolute increase of hemispheric water content (DeltaH2O) was determined in a subgroup using the wet-dry method (n=12). MLS correlated significantly with the total amount of brain edema (magnetic resonance imaging study: r=0.82; P<0.01; wet-dry analysis r=0.80; P<0.01). MLS correlated only moderately with T2-lesion volume (r=0.55; P<0.01). No significant correlation could be detected between MLS and clinical scores (r=0.26; P>0.05). MLS thus quantitatively reflects the amount of vasogenic brain edema within the affected hemisphere at early time-points. MLS quantification can be regarded as an easily assessable and valid global quantitative parameter for brain edema and thus might facilitate the surgical and nonsurgical management of edema in acute stroke patients. PMID:17413996

  11. Seasonal and interannual variations of mixed layer salinity in the southeast tropical Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ningning; Feng, Ming; Du, Yan; Lan, Jian; Wijffels, Susan E.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, seasonal and interannual variations of the mixed layer salinity (MLS) in the southeast tropical Indian Ocean (SETIO) are analyzed using satellite observations, historical data sets, and data-assimilating ocean model outputs. On the seasonal cycle, the MLS in the SETIO becomes fresher in austral winter and saltier in austral summer: between the Java-Lesser Sunda coast and the South Equatorial Current (SEC, 12°S), where positive entrainment and fresh advections counterbalance each other, the annual cycle of the MLS closely follows the variation of the air-sea freshwater forcing; off the northwest and west Australian coasts, the MLS variations are influenced by the annual cycles of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) and Leeuwin Current (LC) transports as well as the air-sea freshwater forcing, with eddy fluxes acting to freshen the MLS along the SEC, the Eastern Gyral Current, and the LC. On the interannual-scale, El Niño (La Niña) events are typically associated with saltier (fresher) MLS in the SETIO. Composite and budget analyses reveal that interannual variations in precipitations drive the MLS anomalies off the Java-Lesser Sunda coast; between 12°S and the northwest Australian coast, the MLS variations are influenced by both advection anomalies and local precipitation anomalies; whereas anomalous meridional currents contribute to the MLS variations off the west Australian coast. Both enhanced local precipitations and the ITF transport anomalies have substantial contributions to the drastic freshening of the Indonesian-Australian Basin between the Java-Lesser Sunda coast and the northwest Australian coast during the extended La Niña events in 1999-2001 and 2010-2012.

  12. Microwave landing system autoland system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, J. B.; Craven, B. K.

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the ability of present day aircraft equipped with automatic flight control systems to fly advanced Microwave Landing Systems (MLS) approaches. The tactical approach used to achieve this objective included reviewing the design and autoland operation of the MD-80 aircraft, simulating the MLS approaches using a batch computer program, and assessing the performance of the autoland system from computer generated data. The results showed changes were required to present Instrument Landing System (ILS) procedures to accommodate the new MLS curved paths. It was also shown that in some cases, changes to the digital flight guidance systems would be required so that an autoland could be performed.

  13. Observation of the exhaust plume from the space shuttle main engine using the Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumphrey, H. C.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.

    2010-08-01

    A space shuttle launch deposits 700 t of water in the atmosphere. Some of this water is released into the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere where it may be directly detected by a limb sounding satellite instrument. We report measurements of water vapour plumes from shuttle launches made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite. Approximately 50% of shuttle launches are detected by MLS. The signal appears at a similar level across the upper 10 km of the MLS limb scan, suggesting that the bulk of the observed water is above the top of the scan. Only a small fraction at best of smaller launches (Ariane, Proton) are detected. We conclude that the sensitivity of MLS is only just great enough to detect a shuttle sized launch, but that a suitably designed instrument of the same general type could detect the exhausts from a large proportion of heavy-lift launches.

  14. Observation of the exhaust plume from the space shuttle main engines using the microwave limb sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumphrey, H. C.; Lambert, A.; Livesey, N. J.

    2011-01-01

    A space shuttle launch deposits 700 tonnes of water in the atmosphere. Some of this water is released into the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere where it may be directly detected by a limb sounding satellite instrument. We report measurements of water vapour plumes from shuttle launches made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite. Approximately 50%-65% of shuttle launches are detected by MLS. The signal appears at a similar level across the upper 10 km of the MLS limb scan, suggesting that the bulk of the observed water is above the top of the scan. Only a small fraction at best of smaller launches (Ariane 5, Proton) are detected. We conclude that the sensitivity of MLS is only just great enough to detect a shuttle sized launch, but that a suitably designed instrument of the same general type could detect the exhausts from a large proportion of heavy-lift launches.

  15. 14 CFR 171.327 - Operational records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.327 Operational... accurate record of facility operation and adjustment. (b) Facility Maintenance Log (FAA Form 6030-1)....

  16. 14 CFR 171.307 - Minimum requirements for approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171... records as set forth in § 171.327 and agree to allow the FAA to inspect the facility and its...

  17. Variations in the Free Chlorine Content of the Stratosphere (1991-1997): Anthropogenic an Volcanic Influences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.; Read, W.; Connell, P.; Kinnison, D.; Russell, J.

    1999-01-01

    Remote sensing of chlorine monoxide (CIO) by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) experiment aboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) has provided global measurements of variations in stratospheric free chlorine (for 1991 to 1997).

  18. Living with Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Washington, DC; Betty C. Proctor, Native Indian Sacred Earth Society, Brandywine, MD; Oscencio W. Tom, M.L.S., ... Privacy Statement | FOIA | FAQs | Comments Moderation Policy Site Map | Viewers and Players

  19. Magnetism and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 3dtransition metal monolayers on Pt(001): a density-functional study.

    PubMed

    Taivansaikhan, P; Odkhuu, D; Kwon, O R; Tsogbadrakh, N; Hong, S C

    2014-12-01

    We systematically investigate the effects of having Pt as a substrate and/or capping layer on the magnetism and magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) of 3d transition metal (TMs; Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co) monolayers (MLs) by using a first-principles calculationl method. We found that Fe and Co MLs are ferromagnetic (FM) on a Pt(001) surface, but Mn and Cr MLs are antiferromagnetic (AFM). The magnetic moments are quite robust with additional Pt-capping. Furthermore, Pt-capping enhances the small perpendicular MCA (meV) of Fe/Pt(001) significantly to 4.44 meV. Our electronic structure analyses indicate that strong hybridization between Pt-5d and TM-3d orbitals plays a crucial role in determining magnetic ordering and MCA. For comparison we also calculated magnetism and MCA of 3d TM MLs on Ta(001) with and without Ta-capping.

  20. Mechanism of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin antibiotics in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) group antibiotics in the dairy bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus (ST) is documented but the mechanism of resistance has not been elucidated. MIC values for erythromycin (Erm), azithromycin (Azm), tylosin (Tyl), spiramycin (Spm), pristinamyci...

  1. Friends of the National Library of Medicine 2015 Awards Gala Event | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... PhD, MLS, for her exemplary contributions to medical education and librarianship in her community. Help Out for Health: Be a Friend If you or your company can help support and expand the publication and ...

  2. 75 FR 14206 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... companies, and any person eligible under the Atomic Energy Act to apply for ESPs, SDCs, COLs, or MLs. 5. The... suitability of an applicant's site, plant design, construction, training and experience, and plans...

  3. 75 FR 42168 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for the Office of Management and Budget (OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... companies, and any person eligible under the Atomic Energy Act to apply for ESPs, SDCs, COLs, or MLs. 7. An... applicant's site, plant design, construction, training and experience, plans and procedures for...

  4. Variations and climatology of CI0 in the polar lower stratosphere from UARS Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Water, J. W.; Livesey, N. J.

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) measured the global distribution of stratospheric ClO over annual cycles for much of the 1990s, albeit with reduced sampling frequency in the latter half of the decade. Here we present an overview of the interannual and interhemispheric variations in the distribution of ClO derived from UARS MLS measurements, with a particular emphasis on enhancements in the winter polar lower stratosphere.

  5. Comparison of Response Surface Construction Methods for Derivative Estimation Using Moving Least Squares, Kriging and Radial Basis Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan

    2005-01-01

    Response construction methods using Moving Least Squares (MLS), Kriging and Radial Basis Functions (RBF) are compared with the Global Least Squares (GLS) method in three numerical examples for derivative generation capability. Also, a new Interpolating Moving Least Squares (IMLS) method adopted from the meshless method is presented. It is found that the response surface construction methods using the Kriging and RBF interpolation yields more accurate results compared with MLS and GLS methods. Several computational aspects of the response surface construction methods also discussed.

  6. New Collections of Aura Atmospheric data Products at the GES DISC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, James; Ahmad, Suraiya; Gerasimov, Irina; Lepthoukh, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) is the primary archive of atmospheric composition data from the Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), Microwave Limb sounder (MLS), and High-Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) instruments. The most recent versions of Aura OMI, MLS and HIRDLS data are available free to the public (http://disc.gsfc.nasa.gov/Aura). TES data are at ASDC (http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov).

  7. Study Pollution Impacts on Upper-Tropospheric Clouds with Aura, CloudSat, and CALIPSO Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Dong

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the impact of pollution on clouds in the Upper Troposphere. Using the data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), CloudSat, CALIPSO the presentation shows signatures of pollution impacts on clouds in the upper troposphere. The presentation demonstrates the complementary sensitivities of MLS , CloudSat and CALIPSO to upper tropospheric clouds. It also calls for careful analysis required to sort out microphysical changes from dynamical changes.

  8. Analytical evaluation of ILM sensors. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The applicability of various sensing concepts to independent landing monitor systems was analyzed. Microwave landing system MLS accuracy requirements are presented along with a description of MLS airborne equipment. Computer programs developed during the analysis are described and include: a mathematical computer model for use in the performance assessment of reconnaissance sensor systems; a theoretical formulation of electromagnetic scattering to generate data at high incidence angles; atmospheric attenuation of microwaves; and microwave radiometry, programs

  9. IR and THz Beamlines at the Metrology Light Source of the PTB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ralph; Hoehl, Arne; Klein, Roman; Serdyukov, Anton; Ulm, Gerhard; Feikes, Jörg; von Hartrott, Michael; Schade, Ulrich; Wüstefeld, Godehard

    2010-02-01

    The low-energy electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation source, is in user operation since April 2008. As a special option it provides coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the THz range when it is operated in a low-α mode with short electron bunches. At the MLS three beamlines dedicated to the use of IR and THz radiation were designed, built and commissioned.

  10. Correlation of agar dilution and VITEK2 system for detection of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and pristinamycin among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis: association with genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Juvin, M-E; Corvec, S; Ros, A; Drugeon, H

    2005-08-01

    The performance of the VITEK2 system was evaluated against the agar dilution reference procedure for testing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (MLS). Eighty clinical isolates were selected according to their resistance phenotype and genotype. Results for erythromycin and clindamycin showed 100% agreement; results for lincomycin showed agreement of 78%, with one very major error and 17 minor errors; and results for pristinamycin showed agreement of 46%, with one major error and 43 minor errors. Most isolates resistant to lincomycin and streptogramin A (L SgAr phenotype) were falsely susceptible to lincomycin, and intermediately-resistant or resistant to pristinamycin, with the VITEK2 system. No resistance gene was detected. Most (80%) isolates resistant constitutively to MLS (MLS(r)BC phenotype) were falsely intermediately-resistant to pristinamycin with the VITEK2 system. The erm(A) gene was more common than erm(C) in MLS(r)BC strains. Resistance to pristinamycin alone (SgA SgB PTr phenotype), or associated with either lincomycin resistance (L SgA SgB PTr phenotype) or constitutive MLS(B) resistance (MLS(BC) SgA PTr phenotype), was well-characterised without discordant results. Resistance to pristinamycin was always associated with resistance to streptogramin A, encoded by the vga(A), vga(B), vgb(A) and vat(A) genes in association with the erm(A) or erm(C) genes.

  11. Endermologie (with and without compression bandaging)--a new treatment option for secondary arm lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Moseley, A L; Esplin, M; Piller, N B; Douglass, J

    2007-09-01

    Two treatment protocols are presented using the LPG Endermologie system in combination with compression bandaging as a new treatment option for secondary arm lymphedema. Both protocols were applied 4 days a week for 4 weeks but differed in Trial II in time spent clearing the regions of the trunk adjacent to the swollen limb and the addition of a larger treatment head so that a greater area could be covered more quickly. The first protocol involved 24 women and the second involved 10 women. At the end of the treatment period, both protocols demonstrated overall reductions in limb volume (134mls; 18.3% p = 0.000 and 185mls; 28%, p = 0.002), limb fluid (182mls; 28%, p = 0.000 and 216mls; 33%. p = 0.014), truncal fluid (342mls; p = 0.002 and 290mls; p = 0.066), improvements in fibrotic induration in some lymphatic territories, and significant improvements in subject reporting of heaviness, tightness, tissue hardness and limb size. Trial II demonstrated additional benefits in terms of reduction in whole arm volume at 24 hours, improved fluid and arm volume reductions, and a significant improvement in subject reported arm range of movement. The additional time spent clearing the regions adjacent to the swollen limb in the second protocol appears to produce an increase in limb volume and limb fluid loss compared to the original treatment protocol.

  12. Scan Profiles Based Method for Segmentation and Extraction of Planar Objects in Mobile Laser Scanning Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoang Long; Belton, David; Helmholz, Petra

    2016-06-01

    The demand for accurate spatial data has been increasing rapidly in recent years. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) systems have become a mainstream technology for measuring 3D spatial data. In a MLS point cloud, the point clouds densities of captured point clouds of interest features can vary: they can be sparse and heterogeneous or they can be dense. This is caused by several factors such as the speed of the carrier vehicle and the specifications of the laser scanner(s). The MLS point cloud data needs to be processed to get meaningful information e.g. segmentation can be used to find meaningful features (planes, corners etc.) that can be used as the inputs for many processing steps (e.g. registration, modelling) that are more difficult when just using the point cloud. Planar features are dominating in manmade environments and they are widely used in point clouds registration and calibration processes. There are several approaches for segmentation and extraction of planar objects available, however the proposed methods do not focus on properly segment MLS point clouds automatically considering the different point densities. This research presents the extension of the segmentation method based on planarity of the features. This proposed method was verified using both simulated and real MLS point cloud datasets. The results show that planar objects in MLS point clouds can be properly segmented and extracted by the proposed segmentation method.

  13. Correlation of agar dilution and VITEK2 system for detection of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and pristinamycin among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis: association with genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Juvin, M-E; Corvec, S; Ros, A; Drugeon, H

    2005-08-01

    The performance of the VITEK2 system was evaluated against the agar dilution reference procedure for testing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (MLS). Eighty clinical isolates were selected according to their resistance phenotype and genotype. Results for erythromycin and clindamycin showed 100% agreement; results for lincomycin showed agreement of 78%, with one very major error and 17 minor errors; and results for pristinamycin showed agreement of 46%, with one major error and 43 minor errors. Most isolates resistant to lincomycin and streptogramin A (L SgAr phenotype) were falsely susceptible to lincomycin, and intermediately-resistant or resistant to pristinamycin, with the VITEK2 system. No resistance gene was detected. Most (80%) isolates resistant constitutively to MLS (MLS(r)BC phenotype) were falsely intermediately-resistant to pristinamycin with the VITEK2 system. The erm(A) gene was more common than erm(C) in MLS(r)BC strains. Resistance to pristinamycin alone (SgA SgB PTr phenotype), or associated with either lincomycin resistance (L SgA SgB PTr phenotype) or constitutive MLS(B) resistance (MLS(BC) SgA PTr phenotype), was well-characterised without discordant results. Resistance to pristinamycin was always associated with resistance to streptogramin A, encoded by the vga(A), vga(B), vgb(A) and vat(A) genes in association with the erm(A) or erm(C) genes. PMID:16008619

  14. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO)-based liposomes as magnetic resonance imaging probes

    PubMed Central

    Frascione, Daniela; Diwoky, Clemens; Almer, Gunter; Opriessnig, Peter; Vonach, Caroline; Gradauer, Kerstin; Leitinger, Gerd; Mangge, Harald; Stollberger, Rudolf; Prassl, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnetic liposomes (MLs) are phospholipid vesicles that encapsulate magnetic and/or paramagnetic nanoparticles. They are applied as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MLs have an advantage over free magnetic nanocores, in that various functional groups can be attached to the surface of liposomes for ligand-specific targeting. We have synthesized PEG-coated sterically-stabilized magnetic liposomes (sMLs) containing ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxides (USPIOs) with the aim of generating stable liposomal carriers equipped with a high payload of USPIOs for enhanced MRI contrast. Methods Regarding iron oxide nanoparticles, we have applied two different commercially available surface-coated USPIOs; sMLs synthesized and loaded with USPIOs were compared in terms of magnetization and colloidal stability. The average diameter size, morphology, phospholipid membrane fluidity, and the iron content of the sMLs were determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fluorescence polarization, and absorption spectroscopy, respectively. A colorimetric assay using potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) was performed to evaluate the encapsulation efficiency (EE%) to express the amount of iron enclosed into a liposome. Subsequently, MRI measurements were carried out in vitro in agarose gel phantoms to evaluate the signal enhancement on T1- and T2-weighted sequences of sMLs. To monitor the biodistribution and the clearance of the particles over time in vivo, sMLs were injected in wild type mice. Results DLS revealed a mean particle diameter of sMLs in the range between 100 and 200 nm, as confirmed by TEM. An effective iron oxide loading was achieved just for one type of USPIO, with an EE% between 74% and 92%, depending on the initial Fe concentration (being higher for lower amounts of Fe). MRI measurements demonstrated the applicability of these nanostructures as MRI probes. Conclusion Our results show that the development of

  15. Toward the characterization of upper tropospheric clouds using Atmospheric Infrared Sounder and Microwave Limb Sounder observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Brian H.; Eldering, Annmarie; Braverman, Amy J.; Fetzer, Eric J.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Fishbein, Evan; Wu, Dong L.

    2007-03-01

    We estimate the accuracy of cloud top altitude (Z) retrievals from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) observing suite (ZA) on board the Earth Observing System Aqua platform. We compare ZA with coincident measurements of Z derived from the micropulse lidar and millimeter wave cloud radar at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program sites of Nauru and Manus islands (ZARM) and the inferred Z from vertically resolved Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) ice water content (IWC) retrievals. The mean difference in ZA minus ZARM plus or minus one standard deviation ranges from -2.2 to 1.6 km ± 1.0 to 4.2 km for all cases of AIRS effective cloud fraction (fA) > 0.15 at Manus Island using the cloud radar only. The range of mean values results from using different approaches to determine ZARM, day/night differences, and the magnitude of fA; the variation about the mean decreases for increasing values of fA. Analysis of ZARM from the micropulse lidar at Nauru Island for cases restricted to 0.05 ≤ fA ≤ 0.15 indicates a statistically significant improvement in ZA - ZARM over the cloud radar-derived values at Manus Island. In these cases the ZA - ZARM difference is -1.1 to 2.1 km ± 3.0 to 4.5 km. These results imply that the operational ZA is quantitatively useful for constraining cirrus altitude despite the nominal 45 km horizontal resolution. Mean differences of cloud top pressure (PCLD) inferred from coincident AIRS and MLS ice water content (IWC) retrievals depend upon the method of defining AIRS PCLD (as with the ARM comparisons) over the MLS spatial scale, the peak altitude and maximum value of MLS IWC, and fA. AIRS and MLS yield similar vertical frequency distributions when comparisons are limited to fA > 0.1 and IWC > 1.0 mg m-3. Therefore the agreement depends upon the opacity of the cloud, with decreased agreement for optically tenuous clouds. Further, the mean difference and standard deviation of AIRS and MLS

  16. Characterization of molybdenum doped indium oxide/aluminum doped zinc oxide thin film stacks for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elamurugu, Elangovan; Flores, Raquel; Janeiro, Ricardo; Dahlem, Marcus; Viegas, Jaime

    2014-03-01

    Multilayer (ML) thin films, based on indium molybdenum oxide (IMO) and aluminum zinc oxide (AZO), having different stacking were deposited using RF sputtering at room temperature (RT). The total-layer thickness of the MLs ranges between 93 nm and 98 nm. The deposited films were characterized by their structural, electrical, microstructural, and optical properties. X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks obtained at 2θ of around 30.6° and 34.27° are matched with cubic-In2O3 (222) and hexagonal-ZnO (002), respectively. The MLs have both nano-crystalline and polycrystalline structures depending on the layer properties. A conspicuous feature of XRD analysis is the absence of diffraction peak from 50 nm thick IMO layer when it is stacked below 50 nm thick AZO, whereas it appears significantly when the stacking is reversed to place IMO above AZO layer. Hall measurements confirmed that the deposited MLs are n- type conducting and the electrical properties are varied as a function of layer properties. The deposited MLs show high shortwavelength infrared transmittance (SWIRT) even at 3300 nm, which is ranging as high as 75 % - 90 %. Overall, the MLs show high transmittance in the entire Vis-SWIR region. The optical band gap (Eg) calculated using the absorption coefficient (α) and photon energy (hν) of the deposited MLs is ranging between 3.19 eV and 3.56 eV, depending on the layer properties. Selected as- deposited films were annealed in open air at 400 °C for 1 h; the transmittance of annealed films was improved but their electrical properties deteriorated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis shows that the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the MLs ranges between 0.8 nm and 1.5 nm.

  17. Molecular basis of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins in Staphylococcus saprophyticus clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Le Bouter, Anne; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of resistance to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics as well as to assess the molecular basis of this resistance amongst 72 Staphylococcus saprophyticus urinary isolates collected from 2005 to 2009 in University Hospital of Caen (France). Of the 72 strains studied, 33 (45.8%) were resistant to at least one MLS antibiotic, including 24 (72.7%) with an M phenotype, 5 (15.2%) with an inducible MLS(B) phenotype, 3 (9.1%) with a combined M+L phenotype and 1 (3.0%) with an L phenotype. All isolates were susceptible to the combination of streptogramins A and B. The resistance genes erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), msr(A) and lnu(A) were detected alone in 0, 0, 5 (15.2%), 24 (72.7%) and 1 (3.0%) of the 33 MLS-resistant isolates, respectively, whereas 2 strains (6.1%) were positive for both msr(A) and lnu(A). All msr(A)-positive isolates exhibited an M phenotype, whereas all five erm(C)-positive and all three lnu(A)-positive strains displayed, respectively, an inducible MLS(B) phenotype and an L phenotype with a positive Hodge test. Plasmid analysis indicated that erm(C) and lnu(A) genes were borne by small-size plasmids (ca. 2.5 kb), whereas larger plasmids (30-90 kb) harboured msr(A). In conclusion, these findings show a high prevalence of MLS resistance in S. saprophyticus, which was mainly associated with the presence of the msr(A) gene. Since S. saprophyticus colonises the gastrointestinal tract, it may constitute an unexpected reservoir for MLS resistance genes, in particular msr(A), amongst coagulase-negative staphylococci.

  18. The Cell Wall-Associated Mycolactone Polyketide Synthases Are Necessary but Not Sufficient for Mycolactone Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Pidot, Sacha J.; Falgner, Steffen; Tuck, Kellie L.; Vettiger, Andrea; Hong, Hui; Leadlay, Peter F.; Stinear, Timothy P.

    2013-01-01

    Mycolactones are polyketide-derived lipid virulence factors made by the slow-growing human pathogen, Mycobacterium ulcerans. Three unusually large and homologous plasmid-borne genes (mlsA1: 51 kb, mlsB: 42 kb and mlsA2: 7 kb) encode the mycolactone type I polyketide synthases (PKS). The extreme size and low sequence diversity of these genes has posed significant barriers for exploration of the genetic and biochemical basis of mycolactone synthesis. Here, we have developed a truncated, more tractable 3-module version of the 18-module mycolactone PKS and we show that this engineered PKS functions as expected in the natural host M. ulcerans to produce an additional polyketide; a triketide lactone (TKL). Cell fractionation experiments indicated that this 3-module PKS and the putative accessory enzymes encoded by mup045 and mup038 associated with the mycobacterial cell wall, a finding supported by confocal microscopy. We then assessed the capacity of the faster growing, Mycobacterium marinum to harbor and express the 3-module Mls PKS and accessory enzymes encoded by mup045 and mup038. RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and cell fractionation experiments confirmed that the truncated Mls PKS multienzymes were expressed and also partitioned with the cell wall material in M. marinum. However, this heterologous host failed to produce TKL. The systematic deconstruction of the mycolactone PKS presented here suggests that the Mls multienzymes are necessary but not sufficient for mycolactone synthesis and that synthesis is likely to occur (at least in part) within the mycobacterial cell wall. This research is also the first proof-of-principle demonstration of the potential of this enzyme complex to produce tailored small molecules through genetically engineered rearrangements of the Mls modules. PMID:23894666

  19. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder temperature and pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishbein, E. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lungu, T.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Singh, U.; Gross, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-04-01

    The accuracy and precision of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) atmospheric temperature and tangent-point pressure measurements are described. Temperatures and tangent-point pressure (atmospheric pressure at the tangent height of the field of view boresight) are retrieved from a 15-channel 63-GHz radiometer measuring O2 microwave emissions from the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Version 3 data (first public release) contains scientifically useful temperatures from 22 to 0.46 hPa. Accuracy estimates are based on instrument performance, spectroscopic uncertainty and retrieval numerics, and range from 2.1 K at 22 hPa to 4.8 K at 0.46 hPa for temperature and from 200 m (equivalent log pressure) at 10 hPa to 300 m at 0.1 hPa. Temperature accuracy is limited mainly by uncertainty in instrument characterization, and tangent-point pressure accuracy is limited mainly by the accuracy of spectroscopic parameters. Precisions are around 1 K and 100 m. Comparisons are presented among temperatures from MLS, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) stratospheric analysis and lidar stations at Table Mountain, California, Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP), France, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, Maryland. MLS temperatures tend to be 1-2 K lower than NMC and lidar, but MLS is often 5 - 10 K lower than NMC in the winter at high latitudes, especially within the northern hemisphere vortex. Winter MLS and OHP (44°N) lidar temperatures generally agree and tend to be lower than NMC. Problems with Version 3 MLS temperatures and tangent-point pressures are identified, but the high precision of MLS radiances will allow improvements with better algorithms planned for the future.

  20. Effectiveness of Radiotherapy in Myxoid Sarcomas Is Associated With a Dense Vascular Pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeze, Ronald S.A. de Jong, Daphne de; Haas, Rick L.; Stewart, Fiona; Coevorden, Frits van

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: Surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) have long been the standard treatment for most deep-seated sarcomas; however, since the randomized trial from the National Cancer Institute of Canada, which described similar local control for pre- vs. postoperative RT, both modalities are now widely accepted. As a group, sarcomas are classified as radiation resistant. The subgroup of myxoid liposarcoma (MLS), a sarcoma with a typical vascular crow's feet pattern, is highly radiosensitive, but a mechanism for this phenomenon is unknown. Here we describe our results with preoperative RT and propose a mechanism explaining the high sensitivity based on the distinctive vascularization pattern of MLS. Methods and Materials: Between 2002 and 2006, 31 sarcoma patients, including 10 with MLS, underwent preoperative RT at our institute. Resected specimens were histologically evaluated, focusing on classification, grade, and vascularization patterns. Results: Twenty sarcomas showed more than 80% pathologic response after preoperative RT. A pathologic complete response was found in all 'pure' MLS specimens after preoperative RT (n = 8). There were no pathologic complete responses in the remaining sarcoma patients (n = 23), although 12 showed 80% to 90% pathologic response. In contrast to the remaining RT-resistant sarcomas, the highly responding specimens contained branching vasculature, partial thrombus formation and inflammation of medium sized arterioles, similar to the vascular changes in MLS. Conclusions: Both MLS and sarcomas with MLS-like vasculature are highly radiosensitive. Radiation sensitivity may be explained by changes in medium-sized arterioles, obstructing the specific crow's feet vascularization and inducing hypoxia with secondary tumor cell death.

  1. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Temperature and Pressure Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishbein, E. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R. F.; Lungu, T.; Read, W. G.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; McDermid, I. S.; McGee, T. J.; Singh, U.; Gross, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Keckhut, P.; Gelman, M. E.; Nagatani, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) atmospheric temperature and tangent-point pressure measurements are described. Temperatures and tangent- point pressure (atmospheric pressure at the tangent height of the field of view boresight) are retrieved from a 15-channel 63-GHz radiometer measuring O2 microwave emissions from the stratosphere and mesosphere. The Version 3 data (first public release) contains scientifically useful temperatures from 22 to 0.46 hPa. Accuracy estimates are based on instrument performance, spectroscopic uncertainty and retrieval numerics, and range from 2.1 K at 22 hPa to 4.8 K at 0.46 hPa for temperature and from 200 m (equivalent log pressure) at 10 hPa to 300 m at 0.1 hPa. Temperature accuracy is limited mainly by uncertainty in instrument characterization, and tangent-point pressure accuracy is limited mainly by the accuracy of spectroscopic parameters. Precisions are around 1 K and 100 m. Comparisons are presented among temperatures from MLS, the National Meteorological Center (NMC) stratospheric analysis and lidar stations at Table Mountain, California, Observatory of Haute Provence (OHP), France, and Goddard Spaceflight Center, Maryland. MLS temperatures tend to be 1-2 K lower than NMC and lidar, but MLS is often 5 - 10 K lower than NMC in the winter at high latitudes, especially within the northern hemisphere vortex. Winter MLS and OHP (44 deg N) lidar temperatures generally agree and tend to be lower than NMC. Problems with Version 3 MLS temperatures and tangent-point pressures are identified, but the high precision of MLS radiances will allow improvements with better algorithms planned for the future.

  2. Evaluation of water vapour assimilation in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere by a chemical transport model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payra, Swagata; Ricaud, Philippe; Abida, Rachid; El Amraoui, Laaziz; Attié, Jean-Luc; Rivière, Emmanuel; Carminati, Fabien; von Clarmann, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The present analysis deals with one of the most debated aspects of the studies on the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS), namely the budget of water vapour (H2O) at the tropical tropopause. Within the French project "Multiscale water budget in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in the TROpics" (TRO-pico), a global-scale analysis has been set up based on space-borne observations, models and assimilation techniques. The MOCAGE-VALENTINA assimilation tool has been used to assimilate the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) version 3.3 H2O measurements within the 316-5 hPa range from August 2011 to March 2013 with an assimilation window of 1 h. Diagnostics based on observations minus analysis and forecast are developed to assess the quality of the assimilated H2O fields. Comparison with an independent source of H2O measurements in the UTLS based on the space-borne Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) observations and with meteorological ARPEGE analyses is also shown. Sensitivity studies of the analysed fields have been performed by (1) considering periods when no MLS measurements are available and (2) using H2O data from another MLS version (4.2). The studies have been performed within three different spaces in time and space coincidences with MLS (hereafter referred to as MLS space) and MIPAS (MIPAS space) observations and with the model (model space) outputs and at three different levels: 121 hPa (upper troposphere), 100 hPa (tropopause) and 68 hPa (lower stratosphere) in January and February 2012. In the MLS space, the analyses behave consistently with the MLS observations from the upper troposphere to the lower stratosphere. In the model space, the analyses are wetter than the reference atmosphere as represented by ARPEGE and MLS in the upper troposphere (121 hPa) and around the tropopause (100 hPa), but are consistent with MLS and MIPAS in the lower stratosphere (68 hPa). In the MIPAS space, the sensitivity and the

  3. Childhood allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis presenting as a middle lobe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Gera, Kamal; Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is infrequently documented in children with asthma. Although collapse is not uncommon, middle lobe syndrome (MLS) as a presentation of ABPA is rather a rarity. A 9-year-old female child with asthma presented with increase in intensity of symptoms along with a right midzone patchy consolidation on a chest radiograph. In addition, an ill-defined opacity abutting the right cardiac border with loss of cardiac silhouette was noted. A right lateral view confirmed a MLS, which was further corroborated by high resolution computed tomography. Central bronchiectasis was also observed, which prompted a work-up for ABPA. The child met 7/8 major diagnostic criteria for ABPA. She was then initiated on oral prednisolone that resulted in a marked clinical improvement within a fortnight. Radiological clearance occurred at 3 months with inflation of the middle lobe. ABPA presenting with MLS in a child is yet to be reported. A high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnosis of ABPA in a child presenting with MLS. This would obviate the invasive investigations usually done to ascertain the cause of MLS.

  4. Structural and Magnetic Properties of LaCoO3/SrTiO3 Multilayers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongrui; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Huaiwen; Lan, Qianqian; Hong, Deshun; Wang, Shufang; Shen, Xi; Khan, Tahira; Yu, Richeng; Sun, Jirong; Shen, Baogen

    2016-07-20

    Structural and magnetic properties of the LaCoO3/SrTiO3 (LCO/STO) multilayers (MLs) with a fixed STO layer of 4 nm but varied LCO layer thicknesses have been systematically studied. The MLs grown on Sr0.7La0.3Al0.65Ta0.35O3 (LSAT) and SrTiO3 (STO) exhibit the in-plane lattice constant of the substrates, but those on LaAlO3 (LAO) show the in-plane lattice constant between those of the first two kinds of MLs. Compared with the LCO single layer (SL), the magnetic order of the MLs is significantly enhanced, as demonstrated by a very slow decrease, which is fast for the SL, of the Curie temperature and the saturation magnetization as the LCO layer thickness decreases. For example, clear ferromagnetic order is observed in the ML with the LCO layer of ∼1.5 nm, whereas it vanishes below ∼6 nm for the LCO SL. This result is consistent with the observation that the dark stripes, which are believed to be closely related to the magnetic order, remain clear in the MLs while they are vague in the corresponding LCO SL. The present work suggests a novel route to tune the magnetism of perovskite oxide films. PMID:27377147

  5. a Feasibility Study on Use of Generic Mobile Laser Scanning System for Detecting Asphalt Pavement Cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinqu; Li, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to automatically detect pavement cracks on urban roads by employing the 3D point clouds acquired by a mobile laser scanning (MLS) system. Our method consists of four steps: ground point filtering, high-pass convolution, matched filtering, and noise removal. First, a voxel-based upward growing method is applied to construct Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the road surface. Then, a high-pass filter convolutes the DTM to detect local elevation changes that may embed cracking information. Next, a two-step matched filter is applied to extract crack features. Lastly, a noise removal process is conducted to refine the results. Instead of using MLS intensity, this study takes advantages of the MLS elevation information to perform automated crack detection from large-volume, mixed-density, unstructured MLS point clouds. Four types of cracks including longitudinal, transvers, random, and alligator cracks are detected. Our results demonstrated that the proposed method works well with the RIEGL VMX-450 point clouds and can detect cracks in moderate-to-severe severity (13 - 25 mm) within a 200 m by 30 m urban road segment located in Kingston, Ontario, at one time. Due to the resolution capability, small cracks with slight severity remain unclear in the MLS point cloud.

  6. Childhood allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis presenting as a middle lobe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ashok; Gera, Kamal; Panjabi, Chandramani

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is infrequently documented in children with asthma. Although collapse is not uncommon, middle lobe syndrome (MLS) as a presentation of ABPA is rather a rarity. A 9-year-old female child with asthma presented with increase in intensity of symptoms along with a right midzone patchy consolidation on a chest radiograph. In addition, an ill-defined opacity abutting the right cardiac border with loss of cardiac silhouette was noted. A right lateral view confirmed a MLS, which was further corroborated by high resolution computed tomography. Central bronchiectasis was also observed, which prompted a work-up for ABPA. The child met 7/8 major diagnostic criteria for ABPA. She was then initiated on oral prednisolone that resulted in a marked clinical improvement within a fortnight. Radiological clearance occurred at 3 months with inflation of the middle lobe. ABPA presenting with MLS in a child is yet to be reported. A high index of suspicion is required to establish the diagnosis of ABPA in a child presenting with MLS. This would obviate the invasive investigations usually done to ascertain the cause of MLS. PMID:26844222

  7. Pumping tests in networks of multilevel sampling wells: Motivation and methodology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butler, J.J.; McElwee, C.D.; Bohling, G.C.

    1999-01-01

    The identification of spatial variations in hydraulic conductivity (K) on a scale of relevance for transport investigations has proven to be a considerable challenge. Recently, a new field method for the estimation of interwell variations in K has been proposed. This method, hydraulic tomography, essentially consists of a series of short-term pumping tests performed in a tomographic-like arrangement. In order to fully realize the potential of this approach, information about lateral and vertical variations in pumping-induced head changes (drawdown) is required with detail that has previously been unobtainable in the field. Pumping tests performed in networks of multilevel sampling (MLS) wells can provide data of the needed density if drawdown can accurately and rapidly be measured in the small-diameter tubing used in such wells. Field and laboratory experiments show that accurate transient drawdown data can be obtained in the small-diameter MLS tubing either directly with miniature fiber-optic pressure sensors or indirectly using air-pressure transducers. As with data from many types of hydraulic tests, the quality of drawdown measurements from MLS tubing is quite dependent on the effectiveness of well development activities. Since MLS ports of the standard design are prone to clogging and are difficult to develop, alternate designs are necessary to ensure accurate drawdown measurements. Initial field experiments indicate that drawdown measurements obtained from pumping tests performed in MLS networks have considerable potential for providing valuable information about spatial variations in hydraulic conductivity.

  8. Preventive effects of lansoprazole and famotidine on gastric mucosal injury induced by low-dose aspirin in Helicobacter pylori-negative healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Masafumi; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Kodaira, Chise; Yamade, Mihoko; Uotani, Takahiro; Shirai, Naohito; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Tanaka, Tatsuo; Sugimura, Haruhiko; Hishida, Akira; Furuta, Takahisa

    2011-07-01

    The preventive effects of lansoprazole and famotidine on low-dose aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in relation to gastric acidity were compared in healthy Japanese volunteers. Fifteen Helicobacter pylori-negative volunteers with different CYP2C19 genotypes were randomly administered aspirin 100 mg, aspirin plus famotidine 20 mg twice daily, or aspirin plus lansoprazole 15 mg once daily for 7 days each in a crossover fashion. Gastroscopy for the evaluation of mucosal injury based on modified Lanza score (MLS) and 24-hour intragastric pH monitoring were performed on day 7 of each regimen. Aspirin induced gastric mucosal injury (median MLS = 3). Lansoprazole significantly decreased MLS to 0, which was significantly lower than that by famotidine (MLS = 1) (P < .05). Medians of pH 3 holding time and mean 24-hour pH values with the lansoprazole regimen were significantly higher than those with famotidine (P < .05). No significant differences in MLS were observed among the different CYP2C19 genotype groups in any of the treatment regimens. In this 7-day study, lansoprazole appeared to be more protective than famotidine against low-dose aspirin-induced mucosal injury but a larger well-controlled study is necessary to establish a definitive clinical benefit. PMID:20663999

  9. Fabrication and critical current density analysis of YBa2Cu3O7+(BaSnO3)‧/YBa2Cu3O7+(BaSnO3)″ multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horide, Tomoya; Sakamoto, Nobuhiro; Ichinose, Ataru; Matsumoto, Kaname

    2016-08-01

    Multilayers (MLs) comprising of YBa2Cu3O7(YBCO)+BaSnO3(BSO) layers with different BSO content were fabricated, and their critical current density (J c) was measured to understand influence of ML structure on vortex pinning. Elongated and segmented nanorods were observed in the MLs, and ab-plane aligned nanoparticles appeared depending on BSO content. When BSO formed only elongated and segmented nanorods in MLs, J c exhibited a linear relationship between J c in the single layer films. On the other hand, when MLs contained ab-plane aligned nanoparticles in addition to nanorods, J c decreased with lower-J c-layer fraction more rapidly. These results suggest that J c was degraded due to easy vortex flow along the lower-J c-layers, and that the acceleration of vortex motion depended on the type of lower-J c-layers. Vortex behavior which is not observed in conventional systems such as single layer films and bulk samples is strongly expected in MLs, since fine tuning of pinning center structure is possible.

  10. Involvement of Macrophages in the Pathogenesis of Familial Amyloid Polyneuropathy and Efficacy of Human iPS Cell-Derived Macrophages in Its Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takamatsu, Koutaro; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Tasaki, Masayoshi; Misumi, Yohei; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Ito, Takaaki; Senju, Satoru; Ando, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that tissue-resident macrophages in familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) patients will exhibit qualitative or quantitative abnormalities, that may accelerate transthyretin (TTR)-derived amyloid deposition. To evaluate this, we examined the number and subset of tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue from amyloid-deposited FAP and control patients. In both FAP and control patients, tissue-resident macrophages in heart tissue were all Iba+/CD163+/CD206+ macrophages. However, the number of macrophages was significantly decreased in FAP patients compared with control patients. Furthermore, the proportion of intracellular TTR in CD14+ monocytes was reduced in peripheral blood compared with healthy donors. Based on these results, we next examined degradation and endocytosis of TTR in human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-derived myeloid lineage cells (MLs), which function like macrophages. iPS-MLs express CD163 and CD206, and belong to the inhibitory macrophage category. In addition, iPS-MLs degrade both native and aggregated TTR in a cell-dependent manner in vitro. Further, iPS-MLs endocytose aggregated, and especially polymerized, TTR. These results suggest that decreased tissue-localized macrophages disrupt clearance of TTR-derived amyloid deposits, leading to progression of a pathological condition in FAP patients. To improve this situation, clinical application of pluripotent stem cell-derived MLs may be useful as an approach for FAP therapy. PMID:27695122

  11. Structure property and deformation analysis of polypropylene montmorillonite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Luna, Alejandro

    Nanocomposites with expandable smectites such as montmorillonite layered silicates (MLS) in polymer matrices have attracted extensive application interest. Numerous MLS concentrations have been used with no particular justification. Here, we investigate the effects of MLS dispersion within the matrix and on mechanical performance. The latter is resolved through a three-prong investigation on rate dependent tensile results, time dependent creep results and the influence of a sharp notch in polypropylene (PP) nanocomposites. A fixed concentration of maleated polypropylene (mPP) was utilized as a compatibilizer between the MLS and non-polar PP. Analysis of transmission electron micrographs and X-ray diffraction patterns on the surface and below the surface of our samples revealed a unique skin-core effect induced by the presence of clay. Differential scanning calorimetric and polarized optical microscopic examination of spherulites sizes showed changes in nucleation and growth resulting from both the maleated PP compatibilizer and the MLS. These structural changes resulted in a tough nanocomposite, a concept not reported before in the PP literature. Nonlinear creep analysis of the materials showed two concentrations 3 and 5% wt of PP, which reduced the compliance in the base PP. The use of thermal wave imaging allowed the identification of ductile failure among materials, but more important, aided the mapping of the elastic and plastic contributions. These are essential concepts in fracture analysis.

  12. Satellite telemetry and social modeling offer new insights into the origin of primate multilevel societies

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiao-Guang; Garber, Paul A.; Ji, Weihong; Huang, Zhi-Pang; Huang, Kang; Zhang, Peng; Guo, Song-Tao; Wang, Xiao-Wei; He, Gang; Zhang, Pei; Li, Bao-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Multilevel societies (MLS), in which polygynous reproductive units are nested in a larger social matrix, represent a highly complex social system documented only in a small number of mammalian species. Using long-term behavioural data, satellite telemetry and social network analysis, we present a new framework for understanding the function and social dynamics of the golden snub-nosed monkey MLS. Here we show that several one-male units form a cohesive breeding band that associates with one or more all-male units to form a herd. Herds seasonally aggregate and exchange members, thus facilitating gene flow and inbreeding avoidance. This MLS evolved from the aggregation of independent one-male, multifemale units that characterize ancestral Asian colobines; the evolutionary pathway leading to this MLS contrasts with that proposed for African papionins, which appear to have undergone internal fissioning of multimale–multifemale groups. The results suggest that both environmental and phylogenetic factors are important in the evolution of a primate MLS. PMID:25335993

  13. Skull-stripping magnetic resonance brain images using a model-based level set.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Audrey H; Valentino, Daniel J; Toga, Arthur W

    2006-08-01

    The segmentation of brain tissue from nonbrain tissue in magnetic resonance (MR) images, commonly referred to as skull stripping, is an important image processing step in many neuroimage studies. A new mathematical algorithm, a model-based level set (MLS), was developed for controlling the evolution of the zero level curve that is implicitly embedded in the level set function. The evolution of the curve was controlled using two terms in the level set equation, whose values represented the forces that determined the speed of the evolving curve. The first force was derived from the mean curvature of the curve, and the second was designed to model the intensity characteristics of the cortex in MR images. The combination of these forces in a level set framework pushed or pulled the curve toward the brain surface. Quantitative evaluation of the MLS algorithm was performed by comparing the results of the MLS algorithm to those obtained using expert segmentation in 29 sets of pediatric brain MR images and 20 sets of young adult MR images. Another 48 sets of elderly adult MR images were used for qualitatively evaluating the algorithm. The MLS algorithm was also compared to two existing methods, the brain extraction tool (BET) and the brain surface extractor (BSE), using the data from the Internet brain segmentation repository (IBSR). The MLS algorithm provides robust skull-stripping results, making it a promising tool for use in large, multi-institutional, population-based neuroimaging studies.

  14. Using Microwave Limb Sounder Data to Validate Model Ice Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waliser, Duane E.; Li, Jui-Lin; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Tompkins, Adrian; Chern, J.-D.; Tao, W.-K.; Khairoutdinov, M.

    2006-01-01

    MLS IWC overall tends to be higher relative to ECMWF after considering MLS track sampling and sensitivity (cutoff application). Disagreement tends to be accentuated over Indian and Western Pacific Oceans and over tropical landmasses. Large disagreement occur at upper level at 147 hPa but small at lower levels at 215 and 316 hPa suggesting the need to investigate the strength of model large-scale circulation and physics associated with the IWC formation. Future work includes: Present MMF/ECMWF Comparisons at AGU/Baltimore Session on MMF/Cloud Resolving Modeling, GMAO/GSFC & at the WPac/Bejing/AGU in Tao's Cloud-Radiation Session. Write-up Results on ECMWF/MLS Comparisons for GRL. Continue with MLS vs ECMWF Water Vapor & Temperature comparisons - will seek more interaction with other MLS colleagues. Investigate the Development of Biases in ECMWF Forecasts - i.e. in the actual model. Work with GMAO-5 development team regarding their cloud microphysics performance. Integrate CloudSat into IWC Analyses.

  15. Multilevel selection theory and evidence: a critique of Gardner, 2015.

    PubMed

    Goodnight, C J

    2015-09-01

    Gardner (2015) recently developed a model of a 'Genetical Theory of Multilevel Selection, which is a thoughtfully developed, but flawed model. The model's flaws appear to be symptomatic of common misunderstandings of the multi level selection (MLS) literature and the recent quantitative genetic literature. I use Gardner's model as a guide for highlighting how the MLS literature can address the misconceptions found in his model, and the kin selection literature in general. I discuss research on the efficacy of group selection, the roll of indirect genetic effects in affecting the response to selection and the heritability of group-level traits. I also discuss why the Price multilevel partition should not be used to partition MLS, and why contextual analysis and, by association, direct fitness are appropriate for partitioning MLS. Finally, I discuss conceptual issues around questions concerning the level at which fitness is measured, the units of selection, and I present a brief outline of a model of selection in class-structured populations. I argue that the results derived from the MLS research tradition can inform kin selection research and models, and provide insights that will allow researchers to avoid conceptual flaws such as those seen in the Gardner model. PMID:26265012

  16. Polymer/metal hybrid multilayers modified Schottky devices

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, V.; Isgrò, G.; Li Destri, G.; Marletta, G.; Ruffino, F.; Grimaldi, M. G.; Crupi, I.

    2013-11-04

    Insulating, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), and semiconducting, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), nanometer thick polymers/Au nanoparticles based hybrid multilayers (HyMLs) were fabricated on p-Si single-crystal substrate. An iterative method, which involves, respectively, spin-coating (PMMA and P3HT deposition) and sputtering (Au nanoparticles deposition) techniques to prepare Au/HyMLs/p-Si Schottky device, was used. The barrier height and the ideality factor of the Au/HyMLs/p-Si Schottky devices were investigated by current-voltage measurements in the thickness range of 1–5 bilayers. It was observed that the barrier height of such hybrid layered systems can be tuned as a function of bilayers number and its evolution was quantified and analyzed.

  17. Pictorial estimation of blood loss in a birthing pool--an aide memoire.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Anushia

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this article is to share some photographic images to help midwives visually estimate blood loss at water births. PubMed, CINAHL and MEDLINE databases were searched for relevant research. There is little evidence to inform the practice of visually estimating blood loss in water, as discussed further on in the article. This article outlines a simulation where varying amounts of blood were poured into a birthing pool, captured by photo images. Photo images of key amounts like 150mls, 300mls and 450mls can be useful visual markers when estimating blood loss at water births. The speed of spread across the pool may be a significant factor in assessing blood loss. The author recommends that midwives and educators embark on similar simulations to inform their skill in estimating blood loss at water births.

  18. Preliminary assessment of the microwave landing system requirements for STOL operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrous, C. N.; Brown, S. C.; Goka, T.; Park, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an investigation made to assess the Microwave Landing System (MLS) Requirements for use by civil STOL aircraft are described. The principal MLS characteristics investigated in the report were signal accuracy and volume of coverage. The study utilized a nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom digital simulation of a De Havilland Buffalo C-8A aircraft. Fully automatic control of timed curve flight down to touchdown was simulated. Selected MLS accuracy and coverage parameters for the azimuth, primary elevation, flare evelation and DME signals were varied. The resulting STOL aircraft system performance in following a representative curved flight path was statistically determined. Coverage requirements for STOL aircraft operating in the terminal area environment were also investigated.

  19. Localization of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells

    SciTech Connect

    Babakhanian, Karlo; Bendayan, Moise; Bendayan, Reina . E-mail: r.bendayan@utoronto.ca

    2007-09-21

    P-Glycoprotein is a plasma membrane drug efflux protein implicated in extrusion of cytotoxic compounds out of a cell. There is now evidence that suggests expression of this transporter at several subcellular sites, including the nucleus, mitochondria, and Golgi apparatus. This study investigated the localization and expression of P-glycoprotein at the nuclear membrane of rat brain microvessel endothelial (RBE4) and microglial (MLS-9) cell lines. Immunocytochemistry at the light and electron microscope levels using P-glycoprotein monoclonals antibodies demonstrated the localization of the protein at the nuclear envelope of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. Western blot analysis revealed a single band of 170-kDa in purified nuclear membranes prepared from isolated nuclei of RBE4 and MLS-9 cells. These findings indicate that P-glycoprotein is expressed at the nuclear envelope of rat brain cells and suggest a role in multidrug resistance at this subcellular site.

  20. Soil Carbon Change and Net Energy Associated with Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: A Regional Modeling Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaru, Varaprasad; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; Link, Robert P.; Zhang, Xuesong; Post, W. M.

    2013-12-01

    The use of marginal lands (MLs) for biofuel production has been contemplated as a promising solution for meeting biofuel demands. However, there have been concerns with spatial location of MLs, their inherent biofuel potential, and possible environmental consequences with the cultivation of energy crops. Here, we developed a new quantitative approach that integrates high-resolution land cover and land productivity maps and uses conditional probability density functions for analyzing land use patterns as a function of land productivity to classify the agricultural lands. We subsequently applied this method to determine available productive croplands (P-CLs) and non-crop marginal lands (NC-MLs) in a nine-county Southern Michigan. Furthermore, Spatially Explicit Integrated Modeling Framework (SEIMF) using EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) was used to understand the net energy (NE) and soil organic carbon (SOC) implications of cultivating different annual and perennial production systems.

  1. Mountain Waves in the Middle Atmosphere: Microwave Limb Sounder Observations and Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Jonathan H.; Wu, Dong L.; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Ma, Jun

    2003-01-01

    Observations and analyses of mesoscale gravity waves in the stratosphere from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are summarized, with focus on global distribution of topography related wave activities. We found most of the orographical wave activities occur during the winter seasons over high latitude mountain ridges. In the northern hemisphere, the strongest waves are those over Scandinavia, Central Eurasia, and southern Greenland, whereas in the southern hemisphere, wave activities are outstanding over the Andes, New Zealand, and Antarctic rim;, MLS observations suggest that these orographic waves are located mostly on the down stream side of the mountain ridge with downward phase progression and have horizontal phase velocities opposite to the stratospheric jet-stream. Future studies using MLS data and numerical modeling will lead to better understanding of gravity wave effects on dynamics and chemistry in the middle atmosphere.

  2. Solidification and crystallization kinetics of synthetic and lunar simulant basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dela'o, J. D.; Hellawell, A.; Pletka, B. J.; Rose, W. I.

    A program of extraterrestrial materials research has been initiated in order to improve understanding of the evolution of planetary crystal structures and to devise methods of processing extraterrestrial materials at their source. As part of this program, samples of synthetic silicates with compositions in the quasi-binary eutectic system Diopside-Anorthite and naturally occurring terrestrial basalts having compositions approximating lunar basalts (Minnesota Lunar Simulant, MLS) were float zone-melted and solidified in an arc image furnace. At growth rates less than 6 mm/yr, samples of each composition solidified as wholly crystalline materials, while at higher growth rates samples of MLS and synthetics of compositions intermediate between anorthite and diopside showed decreasing proportions of crystalline material. MLS samples grown in air showed greater crystallization rates than those grown in argon; the crystalline phases had compositions corresponding to common igneous materials.

  3. 177-207 GHz Radiometer Front End: Single Sideband Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galin, I.; Schnitzer, C. A.; Dengler, R. J.; Quintero, O.

    1999-01-01

    Twenty years of progress in 200 GHz receivers for spaceborne remote sensing has yielded a 180-220 GHz technology with maturing characteristics, as evident by increasing availability of relevant hardware, paralleled by further refinement in receiver performance requirements at this spectrum band. The 177-207 GHz superheterodyne receiver, for the Earth observing system (EOS) microwave limb sounder (MLS), effectively illustrates such technology developments. This MLS receiver simultaneously detects six different signals, located at sidebands below and above its 191.95 GHZ local-oscillator (LO). The paper describes the MLS 177-207 GHz receiver front-end (RFE), and provides measured data for its lower and upper sidebands. Sideband ratio data is provided as a function of IF frequency, at different LO power drive, and for variation in the ambient temperature.

  4. Ecological approach of macrolide-lincosamides-streptogramin producing actinomyces from Cuban soils.

    PubMed

    González, I; Niebla, A; Lemus, M; González, L; Iznaga, I O; Pérez, M E; Vallin, C

    1999-09-01

    We report in this study the frequency of Streptomyces strains to produce macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) antibiotics isolated from Cuban soils. The screening assay is based on the induction of MLS-resistance phenotype in a clinical isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus S-18. Our results suggest that of 800 Streptomyces strains isolated from different soil samples, 6% were positives in the screening test used. The ferralitic red soil from Pinar del Río (north) provided the major percentage (3.6%) of MLS producing strains. The other soil samples tested belonging to Guira de Melena and Bauta in Havana, Matanzas City, Topes De Collantes (Villa Clara), and Soroa Mountains (Pinar del Rio) hill reached very low percentages.

  5. Thermally enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy behaviors of ultrathin [Co/Pd]{sub n} multilayers via NiO{sub x} capping layer

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Woo Seong; Lee, Ja Bin; An, Gwang Guk; Yang, Seung Mo; Kim, Jae Hong; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-06-01

    We report the enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) features of ultrathin [Co/Pd]{sub 3} multilayers (MLs) employing a NiO{sub x} insertion layer at high annealing temperatures. Thermally enhanced PMA in [Co/Pd]{sub 3}/NiO{sub x} (capping layer) MLs were achieved at a specific capping layer thickness, while no PMA responses were observed for a NiO{sub x} (buffer layer)/[Co/Pd]{sub 3} ML, regardless of NiO{sub x} thickness. X-ray diffraction observations, including rocking curves, identified the relatively different crystalline characteristics of the NiO{sub x} capping and buffer layers. Origin of the enhanced PMAs of [Co/Pd]{sub 3} MLs containing a NiO{sub x} capping layer is described based on the NiO{sub x} capping effect possibly providing additional Co/Oxide i-PMA under high-temperature annealing.

  6. Crew procedures for microwave landing system operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, Leland G.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify crew procedures involved in Microwave Landing System (MLS) operations and to obtain a preliminary assessment of crew workload. The crew procedures were identified for three different complements of airborne equipment coupled to an autopilot. Using these three equipment complements, crew tasks were identified for MLS approaches and precision departures and compared to an ILS approach and a normal departure. Workload comparisons between the approaches and departures were made by using a task-timeline analysis program that obtained workload indexes, i.e., the radio of time required to complete the tasks to the time available. The results showed an increase in workload for the MLS scenario for one of the equipment complements. However, even this workload was within the capacity of two crew members.

  7. Geometric validation of a mobile laser scanning system for urban applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Haiyan; Li, Jonathan; Yu, Yongtao; Liu, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) technologies have been actively studied and implemented over the past decade, as their application fields are rapidly expanding and extending beyond conventional topographic mapping. Trimble's MX-8, as one of the MLS systems in the current market, generates rich survey-grade laser and image data for urban surveying. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether Trimble MX-8 MLS data satisfies the accuracy requirements of urban surveying. According to the formula of geo-referencing, accuracies of navigation solution and laser scanner determines the accuracy of the collected LiDAR point clouds. Two test sites were selected to test the performance of Trimble MX-8. Those extensive tests confirm that Trimble MX-8 offers a very promising tool to survey complex urban areas.

  8. Variability of ozone loss during Arctic winter (1991 to 2000) estimated from UARS Microwave Limb Sounder measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G.; Froidevaux, F.; Santee, M. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Sabutis, J. L.; Waters, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of version 5 Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) ozone data using a Lagrangian Transport (LT) model provides estimates of chemical ozone depletion for the 1991-1992 through 1997-1998 Arctic winters. These new estimates give a consistent, three-dimensional picture of ozone loss during seven Arctic winters; previous Arctic ozone loss estimates from MLS were based on various earlier data versions and were done only for late winter and only for a subset of the years observed by MLS. We find large interannual variability in the amount, timing, and patterns of ozone depletion and in the degree to which chemical loss is masked by dynamical processes.

  9. EOS Microwave Limb Sounder Observations of the Antarctic Polar Vortex Breakup in 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manney, G. L.; Santee, M. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Waters, J. W.; Pawson, S.

    2005-01-01

    Observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on NASA's new Aura satellite give an unprecedentedly detailed picture of the spring Antarctic polar vortex breakup throughout the stratosphere. HCl is a particularly valuable tracer in the lower stratosphere after chlorine deactivation. MLS HCl, N2O, H2O broke up in the upper stratosphere by early October, in the midstratosphere by early November, and in the lower stratosphere by late December. The subvortex broke up just a few days later than the lower stratospheric vortex. Vortex remnants persisted in the midstratosphere through December, but only through early January 2005 in the lower stratosphere. MLS N2O observations show diabatic descent continuing throughout November, with evidence of weak ascent after late October in the lower stratospheric vortex core.

  10. Multilevel Selection in Kin Selection Language.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Few issues have raised more debate among evolutionary biologists than kin selection (KS) versus multilevel selection (MLS). They are formally equivalent, but use different-looking mathematical approaches, and are not causally equivalent: for a given problem KS can be a more suitable causal explanation than MLS, and vice versa. Methods for analyzing a given model from both viewpoints would therefore be valuable. I argue that there is often an easy way to achieve this: MLS can be written using the components of KS. This applies to the very general regression approach as well as to the practical evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) maximization approach, and can hence be used to analyze many common ESS models from a multilevel perspective. I demonstrate this with example models of gamete competition and limitation. PMID:27590987

  11. A review on the toxicity and non-target effects of macrocyclic lactones in terrestrial and aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Lumaret, Jean-Pierre; Errouissi, Faiek; Floate, Kevin; Römbke, Jörg; Wardhaugh, Keith

    2012-05-01

    The avermectins, milbemycins and spinosyns are collectively referred to as macrocyclic lactones (MLs) which comprise several classes of chemicals derived from cultures of soil micro-organisms. These compounds are extensively and increasingly used in veterinary medicine and agriculture. Due to their potential effects on non-target organisms, large amounts of information on their impact in the environment has been compiled in recent years, mainly caused by legal requirements related to their marketing authorization or registration. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present knowledge about the acute and chronic ecotoxicological effects of MLs on organisms, mainly invertebrates, in the terrestrial and aquatic environment. Detailed information is presented on the mode-of-action as well as the ecotoxicity of the most important compounds representing the three groups of MLs. This information, based on more than 360 references, is mainly provided in nine tables, presenting the effects of abamectin, ivermectin, eprinomectin, doramectin, emamectin, moxidectin, and spinosad on individual species of terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates as well as plants and algae. Since dung dwelling organisms are particularly important non-targets, as they are exposed via dung from treated animals over their whole life-cycle, the information on the effects of MLs on dung communities is compiled in an additional table. The results of this review clearly demonstrate that regarding environmental impacts many macrocyclic lactones are substances of high concern particularly with larval instars of invertebrates. Recent studies have also shown that susceptibility varies with life cycle stage and impacts can be mitigated by using MLs when these stages are not present. However information on the environmental impact of the MLs is scattered across a wide range of specialised scientific journals with research focusing mainly on ivermectin and to a lesser extent on abamectin

  12. Alkaloids as Inhibitors of Malate Synthase from Paracoccidioides spp.: Receptor-Ligand Interaction-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Docking Studies, Antifungal Activity, and the Adhesion Process

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Fausto Guimaraes; Neto, Benedito Rodrigues da Silva; Gonçalves, Ricardo Lemes; da Silva, Roosevelt Alves; de Oliveira, Cecília Maria Alves; Kato, Lucília; Freitas, Carla dos Santos; Giannini, Maria José Soares Mendes; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioides is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis. Malate synthase plays a crucial role in the pathogenicity and virulence of various fungi, such as those that are human pathogens. Thus, an inhibitor of this enzyme may be used as a powerful antifungal without side effects in patients once these enzymes are absent in humans. Here, we searched for compounds with inhibitory capacity against the malate synthase of Paracoccidioides species (PbMLS). The three-dimensional (3D) structure of PbMLS was determined using the I-TASSER server. Compounds were selected from the ZINC database. Based on the mechanism underlying the interaction of the compounds with PbMLS, it was possible to identify β-carboline moiety as a standard key structure. The compounds with β-carboline moiety that are available in our laboratories were investigated. A total of nine alkaloid compounds were selected. The primary mechanisms of interaction of the alkaloid compounds in the binding pocket of PbMLS were identified and compared with the mechanism of interaction of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). We discovered that the amphipathic nature of the compounds, concomitant with the presence of β-carboline moiety, was crucial for their stability in the binding pocket of PbMLS. In addition, the importance of a critical balance of the polar and nonpolar contacts of the compounds in this region was observed. Four β-carboline alkaloid compounds showed the ability to inhibit recombinant PbMLS (PbMLSr) activity, Paracoccidioides species growth, and adhesion of the fungus and PbMLSr to the extracellular matrix components. The cytotoxicity of the alkaloids was also evaluated. PMID:26124176

  13. Recent divergences in stratospheric water vapor measurements by frost point hygrometers and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, Dale F.; Read, William G.; Vömel, Holger; Selkirk, Henry B.; Rosenlof, Karen H.; Davis, Sean M.; Hall, Emrys G.; Jordan, Allen F.; Oltmans, Samuel J.

    2016-09-01

    Balloon-borne frost point hygrometers (FPs) and the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) provide high-quality vertical profile measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). A previous comparison of stratospheric water vapor measurements by FPs and MLS over three sites - Boulder, Colorado (40.0° N); Hilo, Hawaii (19.7° N); and Lauder, New Zealand (45.0° S) - from August 2004 through December 2012 not only demonstrated agreement better than 1 % between 68 and 26 hPa but also exposed statistically significant biases of 2 to 10 % at 83 and 100 hPa (Hurst et al., 2014). A simple linear regression analysis of the FP-MLS differences revealed no significant long-term drifts between the two instruments. Here we extend the drift comparison to mid-2015 and add two FP sites - Lindenberg, Germany (52.2° N), and San José, Costa Rica (10.0° N) - that employ FPs of different manufacture and calibration for their water vapor soundings. The extended comparison period reveals that stratospheric FP and MLS measurements over four of the five sites have diverged at rates of 0.03 to 0.07 ppmv year-1 (0.6 to 1.5 % year-1) from ˜ 2010 to mid-2015. These rates are similar in magnitude to the 30-year (1980-2010) average growth rate of stratospheric water vapor ( ˜ 1 % year-1) measured by FPs over Boulder (Hurst et al., 2011). By mid-2015, the FP-MLS differences at some sites were large enough to exceed the combined accuracy estimates of the FP and MLS measurements.

  14. Mutations in NDUFB11, Encoding a Complex I Component of the Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain, Cause Microphthalmia with Linear Skin Defects Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Rahden, Vanessa A.; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject’s mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations. PMID:25772934

  15. Mutations in NDUFB11, encoding a complex I component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cause microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Rahden, Vanessa A; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject's mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations.

  16. A Review on the Toxicity and Non-Target Effects of Macrocyclic Lactones in Terrestrial and Aquatic Environments

    PubMed Central

    Lumaret, Jean-Pierre; Errouissi, Faiek; Floate, Kevin; Römbke, Jörg; Wardhaugh, Keith

    2012-01-01

    The avermectins, milbemycins and spinosyns are collectively referred to as macrocyclic lactones (MLs) which comprise several classes of chemicals derived from cultures of soil micro-organisms. These compounds are extensively and increasingly used in veterinary medicine and agriculture. Due to their potential effects on non-target organisms, large amounts of information on their impact in the environment has been compiled in recent years, mainly caused by legal requirements related to their marketing authorization or registration. The main objective of this paper is to critically review the present knowledge about the acute and chronic ecotoxicological effects of MLs on organisms, mainly invertebrates, in the terrestrial and aquatic environment. Detailed information is presented on the mode-of-action as well as the ecotoxicity of the most important compounds representing the three groups of MLs. This information, based on more than 360 references, is mainly provided in nine tables, presenting the effects of abamectin, ivermectin, eprinomectin, doramectin, emamectin, moxidectin, and spinosad on individual species of terrestrial and aquatic invertebrates as well as plants and algae. Since dung dwelling organisms are particularly important non-targets, as they are exposed via dung from treated animals over their whole life-cycle, the information on the effects of MLs on dung communities is compiled in an additional table. The results of this review clearly demonstrate that regarding environmental impacts many macrocyclic lactones are substances of high concern particularly with larval instars of invertebrates. Recent studies have also shown that susceptibility varies with life cycle stage and impacts can be mitigated by using MLs when these stages are not present. However information on the environmental impact of the MLs is scattered across a wide range of specialised scientific journals with research focusing mainly on ivermectin and to a lesser extent on abamectin

  17. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ozone measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; Margitan, J. J.; McDermid, I. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Braathen, G.; Deshler, T.; Fishman, J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz. Analyses described here focus on the MLS Version 3 data (the first set of files made publicly available). We describe results of simulations performed to assess the quality of the retrieval algorithms, in terms of both mixing ratio and radiance closure. From actual MLS observations, the 205-GHz ozone retrievals give better closure (smaller radiance residuals) than that from the 183-GHz measurements and should be considered more accurate from the calibration aspects. However, the 183-GHz data are less noise limited in the mesosphere and can provide the most useful scientific results in that region. We compare the retrieved 205-GHz ozone profiles in the middle-to lower stratosphere to ozonesonde measurements at a wide range of latitudes and seasons. Ground-based lidar data from Table Mountain, California, provide a good reference for comparisons at higher altitudes. Based on these analyses, comparisons with balloon-borne measurements and others, as well as a detailed budget of estimated uncertainties, MLS results appear to be generally of high quality, with some biases worth mentioning. Results for the lowermost stratosphere (˜50 to 100 hPa) are still in need of improvement. A set of estimated precision and accuracy values is derived for the MLS ozone data sets. We also comment on recent updates in the retrieval algorithms and their impact on ozone values.

  18. Investigation of quantum efficiency in mid-wave infrared (MWIR) InAs/GaSb type-II strained layer superlattice (T2SL) detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Lilian; Klein, Brianna; Tian, Zhao-Bing; Frantz, Eric; Myers, Stephen; Gautam, Nutan; Schuler-Sandy, Ted; Plis, Elena; Krishna, Sanjay

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study is to optimize the absorption in the active region of InAs/GaSb T2SL photodetectors for the realization of high-performance MWIR devices. Two sets of MWIR (λ100% cut-off ~ 5.5μm at 77K) T2SL detectors were realized; one set with varied detector absorber thickness, the other set with varied T2SL period. The T2SL material quality was evaluated on the basis of room temperature photoluminescence (RTPL) and the high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) data. Then the device performance was compared using spectral response, dark current and responsivity measurements. Finally, quantum efficiency was calculated and employed as a metric for the definition of the optimal T2SL period and active region thickness. For the first part of the study, a homojunction pin architecture based on 8 monolayers (MLs) InAs/8MLs GaSb T2SL was used. The thickness of the non-intentionally doped absorber layers were 1.5μm, 2.5μm, and 3.5μm. For the second part of the study, unipolar barrier (pBiBn) devices were grown. The thickness of the absorber region and the T2SL constituent InAs layer thicknesses were kept the same (1.5 μm and 8 MLs, respectively) whereas the T2SL constituent GaSb thickness was varied as 6 MLs, 8 MLs, and 10 MLs. We have found that the pin detector with 2.5 μm thick absorber and the pBiBn detector with 8 ML InAs/ 8 ML GaSb T2SL composition are, within the scope of this study, optimal for the realization of MWIR single-element devices and FPAs with corresponding architectures.

  19. Mutations in NDUFB11, encoding a complex I component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, cause microphthalmia with linear skin defects syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Rahden, Vanessa A; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Alawi, Malik; Brand, Kristina; Fellmann, Florence; Horn, Denise; Zeviani, Massimo; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is an X-linked male-lethal disorder also known as MIDAS (microphthalmia, dermal aplasia, and sclerocornea). Additional clinical features include neurological and cardiac abnormalities. MLS syndrome is genetically heterogeneous given that heterozygous mutations in HCCS or COX7B have been identified in MLS-affected females. Both genes encode proteins involved in the structure and function of complexes III and IV, which form the terminal segment of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). However, not all individuals with MLS syndrome carry a mutation in either HCCS or COX7B. The majority of MLS-affected females have severe skewing of X chromosome inactivation, suggesting that mutations in HCCS, COX7B, and other as-yet-unidentified X-linked gene(s) cause selective loss of cells in which the mutated X chromosome is active. By applying whole-exome sequencing and filtering for X-chromosomal variants, we identified a de novo nonsense mutation in NDUFB11 (Xp11.23) in one female individual and a heterozygous 1-bp deletion in a second individual, her asymptomatic mother, and an affected aborted fetus of the subject's mother. NDUFB11 encodes one of 30 poorly characterized supernumerary subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, known as complex I (cI), the first and largest enzyme of the MRC. By shRNA-mediated NDUFB11 knockdown in HeLa cells, we demonstrate that NDUFB11 is essential for cI assembly and activity as well as cell growth and survival. These results demonstrate that X-linked genetic defects leading to the complete inactivation of complex I, III, or IV underlie MLS syndrome. Our data reveal an unexpected role of cI dysfunction in a developmental phenotype, further underscoring the existence of a group of mitochondrial diseases associated with neurocutaneous manifestations. PMID:25772934

  20. Alkaloids as inhibitors of malate synthase from Paracoccidioides spp.: receptor-ligand interaction-based virtual screening and molecular docking studies, antifungal activity, and the adhesion process.

    PubMed

    Costa, Fausto Guimaraes; Neto, Benedito Rodrigues da Silva; Gonçalves, Ricardo Lemes; da Silva, Roosevelt Alves; de Oliveira, Cecília Maria Alves; Kato, Lucília; Freitas, Carla Dos Santos; Giannini, Maria José Soares Mendes; da Silva, Julhiany de Fátima; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Pereira, Maristela

    2015-09-01

    Paracoccidioides is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis. Malate synthase plays a crucial role in the pathogenicity and virulence of various fungi, such as those that are human pathogens. Thus, an inhibitor of this enzyme may be used as a powerful antifungal without side effects in patients once these enzymes are absent in humans. Here, we searched for compounds with inhibitory capacity against the malate synthase of Paracoccidioides species (PbMLS). The three-dimensional (3D) structure of PbMLS was determined using the I-TASSER server. Compounds were selected from the ZINC database. Based on the mechanism underlying the interaction of the compounds with PbMLS, it was possible to identify β-carboline moiety as a standard key structure. The compounds with β-carboline moiety that are available in our laboratories were investigated. A total of nine alkaloid compounds were selected. The primary mechanisms of interaction of the alkaloid compounds in the binding pocket of PbMLS were identified and compared with the mechanism of interaction of acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). We discovered that the amphipathic nature of the compounds, concomitant with the presence of β-carboline moiety, was crucial for their stability in the binding pocket of PbMLS. In addition, the importance of a critical balance of the polar and nonpolar contacts of the compounds in this region was observed. Four β-carboline alkaloid compounds showed the ability to inhibit recombinant PbMLS (PbMLSr) activity, Paracoccidioides species growth, and adhesion of the fungus and PbMLSr to the extracellular matrix components. The cytotoxicity of the alkaloids was also evaluated.

  1. Highly Significant Linkage to the SLI1 Locus in an Expanded Sample of Individuals Affected by Specific Language Impairment

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Specific language impairment (SLI) is defined as an unexplained failure to acquire normal language skills despite adequate intelligence and opportunity. We have reported elsewhere a full-genome scan in 98 nuclear families affected by this disorder, with the use of three quantitative traits of language ability (the expressive and receptive tests of the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals and a test of nonsense word repetition). This screen implicated two quantitative trait loci, one on chromosome 16q (SLI1) and a second on chromosome 19q (SLI2). However, a second independent genome screen performed by another group, with the use of parametric linkage analyses in extended pedigrees, found little evidence for the involvement of either of these regions in SLI. To investigate these loci further, we have collected a second sample, consisting of 86 families (367 individuals, 174 independent sib pairs), all with probands whose language skills are ⩾1.5 SD below the mean for their age. Haseman-Elston linkage analysis resulted in a maximum LOD score (MLS) of 2.84 on chromosome 16 and an MLS of 2.31 on chromosome 19, both of which represent significant linkage at the 2% level. Amalgamation of the wave 2 sample with the cohort used for the genome screen generated a total of 184 families (840 individuals, 393 independent sib pairs). Analysis of linkage within this pooled group strengthened the evidence for linkage at SLI1 and yielded a highly significant LOD score (MLS = 7.46, interval empirical P<.0004). Furthermore, linkage at the same locus was also demonstrated to three reading-related measures (basic reading [MLS = 1.49], spelling [MLS = 2.67], and reading comprehension [MLS = 1.99] subtests of the Wechsler Objectives Reading Dimensions). PMID:15133743

  2. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Ozone Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lungu, T. A.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Waters, J. W.; Margitan, J. J.; McDermid, I. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Peckham, G. E.; Braathen, G.; Deshler, T.; Fishman, J.; Hofmann, D. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the validation of ozone data from the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). The MLS ozone retrievals are obtained from the calibrated microwave radiances (emission spectra) in two separate bands, at frequencies near 205 and 183 GHz. Analyses described here focus on the MLS Version 3 data (the first set of files made publicly available). We describe results of simulations performed to assess the quality of the retrieval algorithms, in terms of both mixing ratio and radiance closure. From actual MLS observations, the 205-GHz ozone retrievals give better closure (smaller radiance residuals) than that from the 183-GHz measurements and should be considered more accurate from the calibration aspects. However, the 183-GHz data are less noise limited in the mesosphere and can provide the most useful scientific results in that region. We compare the retrieved 205-GHz ozone profiles in the middle-to lower stratosphere to ozonesonde measurements at a wide range of latitudes and seasons. Ground-based lidar data from Table Mountain, California, provide a good reference for comparisons at higher altitudes. Based on these analyses, comparisons with balloon-borne measurements and others, as well as a detailed budget of estimated uncertainties, MLS results appear to be generally of high quality, with some biases worth mentioning. Results for the lowermost stratosphere (approx. 50 to 100 bPa) are still in need of improvement. A set of estimated precision and accuracy values is derived for the MLS ozone data sets. We also comment on recent updates in the retrieval algorithms and their impact on ozone values.

  3. Estimating contaminant mass discharge: a field comparison of the multilevel point measurement and the integral pumping investigation approaches and their uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Béland-Pelletier, Caroline; Fraser, Michelle; Barker, Jim; Ptak, Thomas

    2011-03-25

    In this field study, two approaches to assess contaminant mass discharge were compared: the sampling of multilevel wells (MLS) and the integral groundwater investigation (or integral pumping test, IPT) that makes use of the concentration-time series obtained from pumping wells. The MLS approached used concentrations, hydraulic conductivity and gradient rather than direct chemical flux measurements, while the IPT made use of a simplified analytical inversion. The two approaches were applied at a control plane located approximately 40m downgradient of a gasoline source at Canadian Forces Base Borden, Ontario, Canada. The methods yielded similar estimates of the mass discharging across the control plane. The sources of uncertainties in the mass discharge in each approach were evaluated, including the uncertainties inherent in the underlying assumptions and procedures. The maximum uncertainty of the MLS method was about 67%, and about 28% for the IPT method in this specific field situation. For the MLS method, the largest relative uncertainty (62%) was attributed to the limited sampling density (0.63 points/m(2)), through a novel comparison with a denser sampling grid nearby. A five-fold increase of the sampling grid density would have been required to reduce the overall relative uncertainty for the MLS method to about the same level as that for the IPT method. Uncertainty in the complete coverage of the control plane provided the largest relative uncertainty (37%) in the IPT method. While MLS or IPT methods to assess contaminant mass discharge are attractive assessment tools, the large relative uncertainty in either method found for this reasonable well monitored and simple aquifer suggests that results in more complex plumes in more heterogeneous aquifers should be viewed with caution.

  4. Estimating contaminant mass discharge: A field comparison of the multilevel point measurement and the integral pumping investigation approaches and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béland-Pelletier, Caroline; Fraser, Michelle; Barker, Jim; Ptak, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    In this field study, two approaches to assess contaminant mass discharge were compared: the sampling of multilevel wells (MLS) and the integral groundwater investigation (or integral pumping test, IPT) that makes use of the concentration-time series obtained from pumping wells. The MLS approached used concentrations, hydraulic conductivity and gradient rather than direct chemical flux measurements, while the IPT made use of a simplified analytical inversion. The two approaches were applied at a control plane located approximately 40 m downgradient of a gasoline source at Canadian Forces Base Borden, Ontario, Canada. The methods yielded similar estimates of the mass discharging across the control plane. The sources of uncertainties in the mass discharge in each approach were evaluated, including the uncertainties inherent in the underlying assumptions and procedures. The maximum uncertainty of the MLS method was about 67%, and about 28% for the IPT method in this specific field situation. For the MLS method, the largest relative uncertainty (62%) was attributed to the limited sampling density (0.63 points/m 2), through a novel comparison with a denser sampling grid nearby. A five-fold increase of the sampling grid density would have been required to reduce the overall relative uncertainty for the MLS method to about the same level as that for the IPT method. Uncertainty in the complete coverage of the control plane provided the largest relative uncertainty (37%) in the IPT method. While MLS or IPT methods to assess contaminant mass discharge are attractive assessment tools, the large relative uncertainty in either method found for this reasonable well monitored and simple aquifer suggests that results in more complex plumes in more heterogeneous aquifers should be viewed with caution.

  5. Pharmacological inhibition of PHOSPHO1 suppresses vascular smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Yadav, Manisha C; Zhu, Dongxing; Narisawa, Sonoko; Sheen, Campbell; Stec, Boguslaw; Cosford, Nicholas D; Dahl, Russell; Farquharson, Colin; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Macrae, Vicky E; Millán, José Luis

    2013-01-01

    Medial vascular calcification (MVC) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease, obesity, and aging. MVC is an actively regulated process that resembles skeletal mineralization, resulting from chondro-osteogenic transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we used mineralizing murine VSMCs to study the expression of PHOSPHO1, a phosphatase that participates in the first step of matrix vesicles-mediated initiation of mineralization during endochondral ossification. Wild-type (WT) VSMCs cultured under calcifying conditions exhibited increased Phospho1 gene expression and Phospho1(-/-) VSMCs failed to mineralize in vitro. Using natural PHOSPHO1 substrates, potent and specific inhibitors of PHOSPHO1 were identified via high-throughput screening and mechanistic analysis and two of these inhibitors, designated MLS-0390838 and MLS-0263839, were selected for further analysis. Their effectiveness in preventing VSMC calcification by targeting PHOSPHO1 function was assessed, alone and in combination with a potent tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) inhibitor MLS-0038949. PHOSPHO1 inhibition by MLS-0263839 in mineralizing WT cells (cultured with added inorganic phosphate) reduced calcification in culture to 41.8% ± 2.0% of control. Combined inhibition of PHOSPHO1 by MLS-0263839 and TNAP by MLS-0038949 significantly reduced calcification to 20.9% ± 0.74% of control. Furthermore, the dual inhibition strategy affected the expression of several mineralization-related enzymes while increasing expression of the smooth muscle cell marker Acta2. We conclude that PHOSPHO1 plays a critical role in VSMC mineralization and that "phosphatase inhibition" may be a useful therapeutic strategy to reduce MVC.

  6. Promoting motivation through mode of instruction: The relationship between use of affective teaching techniques and motivation to learn science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Rivera, Yamil

    The purpose of this study is to add to what we know about the affective domain and to create a valid instrument for future studies. The Motivation to Learn Science (MLS) Inventory is based on Krathwohl's Taxonomy of Affective Behaviors (Krathwohl et al., 1964). The results of the Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) demonstrated that the MLS Inventory is a valid and reliable instrument. Therefore, the MLS Inventory is a uni-dimensional instrument composed of 9 items with convergent validity (no divergence). The instrument had a high Chronbach Alpha value of .898 during the EFA analysis and .919 with the CFA analysis. Factor loadings on the 9 items ranged from .617 to .800. Standardized regression weights ranged from .639 to .835 in the CFA analysis. Various indices (RMSEA = .033; NFI = .987; GFI = .985; CFI = 1.000) demonstrated a good fitness of the proposed model. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to statistical analyze data where students' motivation to learn science scores (level-1) were nested within teachers (level-2). The analysis was geared toward identifying if teachers' use of affective behavior (a level-2 classroom variable) was significantly related with students' MLS scores (level-1 criterion variable). Model testing proceeded in three phases: intercept-only model, means-as-outcome model, and a random-regression coefficient model. The intercept-only model revealed an intra-class correlation coefficient of .224 with an estimated reliability of .726. Therefore, data suggested that only 22.4% of the variance in MLS scores is between-classes and the remaining 77.6% is at the student-level. Due to the significant variance in MLS scores, X2(62.756, p<.0001), teachers' TAB scores were added as a level-2 predictor. The regression coefficient was non-significant (p>.05). Therefore, the teachers' self-reported use of affective behaviors was not a significant predictor of students' motivation to learn science.

  7. Abundance and distribution of Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin resistance genes in an anaerobic-aerobic system treating spiramycin production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Miaomiao; Ding, Ran; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yingxin; Tian, Zhe; Zhang, Tong; Yang, Min

    2014-10-15

    The behaviors of the Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were investigated in an anaerobic-aerobic pilot-scale system treating spiramycin (SPM) production wastewater. After screening fifteen typical MLS resistance genes with different mechanisms using conventional PCR, eight detected genes were determined by quantitative PCR, together with three mobile elements. Aerobic sludge in the pilot system exhibited a total relative abundance of MLS resistance genes (per 16S rRNA gene) 2.5 logs higher than those in control samples collected from sewage and inosine wastewater treatment systems (P < 0.05), implying the presence of SPM could induce the production of MLS resistance genes. However, the total relative gene abundance in anaerobic sludge (4.3 × 10(-1)) was lower than that in aerobic sludge (3.7 × 10(0)) despite of the higher SPM level in anaerobic reactor, showing the advantage of anaerobic treatment in reducing the production of MLS resistance genes. The rRNA methylase genes (erm(B), erm(F), erm(X)) were the most abundant in the aerobic sludge (5.3 × 10(-1)-1.7 × 10(0)), followed by esterase gene ere(A) (1.3 × 10(-1)) and phosphorylase gene mph(B) (5.7 × 10(-2)). In anaerobic sludge, erm(B), erm(F), ere(A), and msr(D) were the major ones (1.2 × 10(-2)-3.2 × 10(-1)). These MLS resistance genes (except for msr(D)) were positively correlated with Class 1 integron (r(2) = 0.74-0.93, P < 0.05), implying the significance of horizontal transfer in their proliferation.

  8. Synthetic and Biological Studies of Sesquiterpene Polygodial: Activity of 9-Epipolygodial against Drug-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Ramesh; De Carvalho, Annelise; Medellin, Derek C; Middleton, Kelsey N; Hague, Frédéric; Volmar, Marie N M; Frolova, Liliya V; Rossato, Mateus F; De La Chapa, Jorge J; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Pillai, Akshita; Mathieu, Véronique; Rogelj, Snezna; Gonzales, Cara B; Calixto, João B; Evidente, Antonio; Gautier, Mathieu; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Glass, Rainer; Burth, Patricia; Pelly, Stephen C; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Polygodial, a terpenoid dialdehyde isolated from Polygonum hydropiper L., is a known agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). In this investigation a series of polygodial analogues were prepared and investigated for TRPV1-agonist and anticancer activities. These experiments led to the identification of 9-epipolygodial, which has antiproliferative potency significantly exceeding that of polygodial. 9-Epipolygodial was found to maintain potency against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells as well as those displaying the multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype. In addition, the chemical feasibility for the previously proposed mechanism of action of polygodial, involving the formation of a Paal-Knorr pyrrole with a lysine residue on the target protein, was demonstrated by the synthesis of a stable polygodial pyrrole derivative. These studies reveal rich chemical and biological properties associated with polygodial and its direct derivatives. These compounds should inspire further work in this area aimed at the development of new pharmacological agents, or the exploration of novel mechanisms of covalent modification of biological molecules with natural products. PMID:26434977

  9. Synthetic and Biological Studies of Sesquiterpene Polygodial: Activity of 9-Epipolygodial against Drug-Resistant Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Ramesh; De Carvalho, Annelise; Medellin, Derek C; Middleton, Kelsey N; Hague, Frédéric; Volmar, Marie N M; Frolova, Liliya V; Rossato, Mateus F; De La Chapa, Jorge J; Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Pillai, Akshita; Mathieu, Véronique; Rogelj, Snezna; Gonzales, Cara B; Calixto, João B; Evidente, Antonio; Gautier, Mathieu; Munirathinam, Gnanasekar; Glass, Rainer; Burth, Patricia; Pelly, Stephen C; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Polygodial, a terpenoid dialdehyde isolated from Polygonum hydropiper L., is a known agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). In this investigation a series of polygodial analogues were prepared and investigated for TRPV1-agonist and anticancer activities. These experiments led to the identification of 9-epipolygodial, which has antiproliferative potency significantly exceeding that of polygodial. 9-Epipolygodial was found to maintain potency against apoptosis-resistant cancer cells as well as those displaying the multidrug-resistant (MDR) phenotype. In addition, the chemical feasibility for the previously proposed mechanism of action of polygodial, involving the formation of a Paal-Knorr pyrrole with a lysine residue on the target protein, was demonstrated by the synthesis of a stable polygodial pyrrole derivative. These studies reveal rich chemical and biological properties associated with polygodial and its direct derivatives. These compounds should inspire further work in this area aimed at the development of new pharmacological agents, or the exploration of novel mechanisms of covalent modification of biological molecules with natural products.

  10. New design and operating techniques and requirements for improved aircraft terminal area operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. P.; Taylor, R. T.; Walsh, T. M.

    1974-01-01

    Current aircraft operating problems that must be alleviated for future high-density terminal areas are safety, dependence on weather, congestion, energy conservation, noise, and atmospheric pollution. The Microwave Landing System (MLS) under development by FAA provides increased capabilities over the current ILS. The development of the airborne system's capability to take maximum advantage of the MLS capabilities in order to solve terminal area problems are discussed. A major limiting factor in longitudinal spacing for capacity increase is the trailing vortex hazard. Promising methods for causing early dissipation of the vortices were explored. Flight procedures for avoiding the hazard were investigated. Terminal configured vehicles and their flight test development are discussed.

  11. Career research opportunities for the medical laboratory scientist.

    PubMed

    McGlasson, David L

    2011-01-01

    Medical Laboratory Scientists (MLS) typically practice in hospital laboratories; however there are multiple alternatives in research. This article details the advantages of working in a variety of research laboratory settings. These include public institutions, federal laboratory workplaces, private facilities, and industry settings. A view of the different research laboratory settings such as public institutions, federal laboratory workplaces, private facilities, and industry settings will be provided. An assessment on how MLS professionals can prepare for a career in research is outlined and the report concludes with a brief summary of the various aspects of the research setting.

  12. Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John J.

    1990-01-01

    NASA-Langley's Advanced Transport Operating Systems Program employs a heavily instrumented, B 737-100 as its Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TRSV). The TRSV has been used during the demonstration trials of the Time Reference Scanning Beam Microwave Landing System (TRSB MLS), the '4D flight-management' concept, ATC data links, and airborne windshear sensors. The credibility obtainable from successful flight test experiments is often a critical factor in the granting of substantial commitments for commercial implementation by the FAA and industry. In the case of the TRSB MLS, flight test demonstrations were decisive to its selection as the standard landing system by the ICAO.

  13. Reply to discussion of "Tropospheric ozone variability over the Iberian Peninsula Atmospheric Environment" by Kulkarni et al. (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Pavan S.; Bortoli, D.; Salgado, R.; Antón, M.; Costa, M. J.; Silva, A. M.

    2011-05-01

    In the discussion paper on our article ( Kulkarni et al., 2011), de Laat has criticized TOR methodology and TOR data and thus questioned the validity of the findings. He has also pointed out the fact that the authors may have used the OMI/MLS data. In this reply to the discussion, the clarifications and references given herewith endeavour to undoubtedly answer the questions posed by de Laat on TOR methodology and on TOR data and thus proving that the findings of Kulkarni et al. (2011) are scientifically justified and therefore entirely valid. Furthermore, reasons were presented to justify the non use of the OMI/MLS data.

  14. A Review of Bachelor’s Degree Medical Laboratory Scientist Education and Entry Level Practice in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The baccalaureate degree is generally the degree that provides the laboratory professional with the greatest level of general scientific background, training, job flexibility, and advancement opportunities. It is widely considered the requirement for entry-level work in the field of medical laboratory science, especially for those that covet work in management or specialty areas. This paper focuses on the educational models and levels of practice for MLS professionals including the entry level competencies of new professionals at the baccalaureate level. The accreditation of MLS programs and professional certification serve as important quality management systems to ensure program quality and professional competency prior to the start of entry level work. PMID:27683433

  15. A Review of Bachelor's Degree Medical Laboratory Scientist Education and Entry Level Practice in the United States.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Perry M

    2013-04-01

    The baccalaureate degree is generally the degree that provides the laboratory professional with the greatest level of general scientific background, training, job flexibility, and advancement opportunities. It is widely considered the requirement for entry-level work in the field of medical laboratory science, especially for those that covet work in management or specialty areas. This paper focuses on the educational models and levels of practice for MLS professionals including the entry level competencies of new professionals at the baccalaureate level. The accreditation of MLS programs and professional certification serve as important quality management systems to ensure program quality and professional competency prior to the start of entry level work.

  16. Near real time data processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousessian, Ardvas; Vuu, Christina

    2008-08-01

    Raytheon recently developed and implemented a Near Real Time (NRT) data processing subsystem for Earth Observing System (EOS) Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS3) instrument on NASA Aura spacecraft. The NRT can be viewed as a customized Science Information Processing System (SIPS) where the measurements and information provided by the instrument are expeditiously processed, packaged, and delivered. The purpose of the MLS NRT is to process Level 0 data up through Level 2, and distribute standard data products to the customer within 3-5 hours of the first set of data arrival.

  17. The design, development, and flight test results of the Boeing 737 aircraft antennas for the ICAO demonstration of the TRSB microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, T. G.; White, W. E.; Gilreath, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    The Research Support Flight System, a modified Boeing 737, was used to evaluate the performance of several aircraft antennas and locations for the Time Reference Scanning Beam (TRSB) Microwave Landing System (MLS). These tests were conducted at the National Aviation Facilities Experimental Center (NAFEC), Atlantic City, New Jersey on December 18, 1975. The flight tests measured the signal strength and all pertinent MLS data during a straight-in approach, a racetrack approach, and ICAO approach profiles using the independent antenna-receiver combinations simultaneously on the aircraft. Signal drop-outs were experienced during the various approaches but only a small percentage could be attributed to antenna pattern effects.

  18. A Review of Bachelor’s Degree Medical Laboratory Scientist Education and Entry Level Practice in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The baccalaureate degree is generally the degree that provides the laboratory professional with the greatest level of general scientific background, training, job flexibility, and advancement opportunities. It is widely considered the requirement for entry-level work in the field of medical laboratory science, especially for those that covet work in management or specialty areas. This paper focuses on the educational models and levels of practice for MLS professionals including the entry level competencies of new professionals at the baccalaureate level. The accreditation of MLS programs and professional certification serve as important quality management systems to ensure program quality and professional competency prior to the start of entry level work.

  19. Microwave limb sounder measurement of stratospheric SO[sub 2] from the Mt. Pinatubo Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Read, W.G.; Froidevaux, L.; Waters, J.W. )

    1993-06-18

    This paper presents measurements of sulfur dioxide densities in the stratosphere made by the microwave limb sounder (MLS) on the upper atmosphere research satellite. The SO[sub 2] came from the eruption of the Mt Pinatubo volcano which injected a massive quantity of gas into the stratosphere. The MLS is able to measure the decay rate of the gas densities based on its extended time and spatial coverage, and from this decay rate infer the OH densities in the stratosphere, since OH is the major reactive species which converts the SO[sub 2] into sulfuric acid.

  20. Comparison of Global Distributions of Zonal-Mean Gravity Wave Variance Inferred from Different Satellite Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preusse, Peter; Eckermann, Stephen D.; Offermann, Dirk; Jackman, Charles H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Gravity wave temperature fluctuations acquired by the CRISTA instrument are compared to previous estimates of zonal-mean gravity wave temperature variance inferred from the LIMS, MLS and GPS/MET satellite instruments during northern winter. Careful attention is paid to the range of vertical wavelengths resolved by each instrument. Good agreement between CRISTA data and previously published results from LIMS, MLS and GPS/MET are found. Key latitudinal features in these variances are consistent with previous findings from ground-based measurements and some simple models. We conclude that all four satellite instruments provide reliable global data on zonal-mean gravity wave temperature fluctuations throughout the middle atmosphere.

  1. Hitting the Goalpost: Calculating the Fine Line Between Winning and Losing a Penalty Shootout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widenhorn, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The Portland Timbers won their first Major League Soccer (MLS) Cup Championship in December 2015. However, if it had not been for a kind double goalpost miss during a penalty shootout a few weeks earlier, the Timbers would never have been in the finals. On Oct. 30th, after what has been called "the greatest penalty kick shootout in MLS…

  2. Probability of Potential Multi-Canister Overpack Loading System Drop of Proof Load in the K West Basin South Loadout Pit

    SciTech Connect

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    2000-01-20

    This document presents the results of a probabilistic analysis of the potential for load drop during the load test of the K West Basin South Loadout Pit Gantry. The calculations are in support of the cask loading system (CLS) subproject load test of the gantry. The purpose of this calculation note is to document the probabilistic calculation of the per lift potential for drop of a test load by the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Loading System (MLS) during load testing at the K West Basin south loadout pit. The MLS subproject needs to load test the MLS in the K West Basin south loadout pit. To perform this test, a basket mockup weighing approximately 4,500 lb (125% of a fully loaded MCO basket accounting for water displacement) needs to be used for one or more load tests. The test load will comprise a standard basket lifting attachment with several ring-shaped steel segments to provide the required weight. The test load will exceed the K Basin Safety Analysis Report (WHC-SD-WM-SAR-062) (SAR) allowances for load drop in the K West Basin south loadout pit. This probabilistic calculation will be used as part of the basis for seeking U.S. Department of Energy approval to use an MLS test weight that exceeds SAR allowances.

  3. 77 FR 71842 - Notice of Permit Applications Received Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... regulations for the establishment of a permit system for various activities in Antarctica and designation of... Introduce non-indigenous species into Antarctica. The applicant will use 5 x 100 mls each of Ditylum... cysts as food for krill. They plan to measure how fast DNA is digested by feeding a group of krill...

  4. Maze Busters: Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane & Kathleen Sheehan--Harvard University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Even if one is equipped with an MLS, the 11 libraries that comprise the Harvard College Library can be pretty daunting. That is why Carrie Miyoshi Macfarlane and Kathleen Sheehan created Threading the Maze. The online publication is presented to students in expository writing, the one course all undergraduates must take. "This highly effective…

  5. 76 FR 32933 - International Standard-Setting Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... (60 FR 15845), designated the U.S. Department of Agriculture as the agency responsible for informing... Code of Practice. Develop MLs for Arsenic in rice, specifying whether they apply to total and/or inorganic Arsenic in rice. The Committee decided to continue work on: Proposed draft Maximum Level for...

  6. Resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin type B antibiotics due to a mutation in an rRNA operon of Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Pernodet, J L; Boccard, F; Alegre, M T; Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Guérineau, M

    1988-01-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens produces spiramycin, a macrolide antibiotic and expresses an inducible resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramin B antibiotics (MLS). From a mutant of S.ambofaciens exhibiting a constitutive MLS resistance phenotype a resistance determinant was cloned on a low copy number vector (pIJ61) through its expression in Streptomyces lividans. Further characterization has shown that this determinant corresponded to a mutant rRNA operon with a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene. In different organisms, mutations leading to MLS resistance have been located at a position corresponding to the adenine 2058 of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA. In the 23S rRNA from S.ambofaciens a similar position for the mutation has been postulated and DNA sequencing of this region has shown an adenine to guanine transition at a position corresponding to 2058. S.ambofaciens possesses four rRNA operons which we have cloned. In Streptomyces, contrary to other bacteria, a mutation in one among several rRNA operons confers a selectable MLS resistance phenotype. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed. Images PMID:2834204

  7. Paternal Alcoholism, Family Functioning, and Infant Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Hiram E.; Eiden, Rina Das

    2007-01-01

    The authors share results from two longitudinal studies exploring the impact of father's alcohol use on child development. The Michigan Longitudinal Study (MLS) has followed a sample of alcoholic families with 3-5 year old children for 20 years. The Buffalo Longitudinal Study (BLS) has followed a sample of alcoholic and nonalcoholic families…

  8. Reliability of the Motor Learning Strategy Rating Instrument for Children and Youth with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamath, Trishna; Pfeifer, Megan; Banerjee-Guenette, Priyanka; Hunter, Theresa; Ito, Julia; Salbach, Nancy M.; Wright, Virginia; Levac, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate reliability and feasibility of the Motor Learning Strategy Rating Instrument (MLSRI) in children with acquired brain injury (ABI). The MLSRI quantifies the extent to which motor learning strategies (MLS) are used within physiotherapy (PT) interventions. Methods: PT sessions conducted by ABI team physiotherapists with a…

  9. Use Of EOS-AURA Observation In The MERRA-2 Reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawson, Steven; Wargan, Krzysztof; Coy, Lawrence L.; McCarty, Will

    2014-01-01

    Meteorological reanalyses provide multi-year gridded datasets that describe the evolution of the atmosphere. Such products use a data assimilation system, comprising of an atmospheric model, a broad suite of observations, and an analysis system that optimally combines the model forecast with the observations, using an algorithm that includes information about model and data accuracy. The mixture of observations is of central importance to the quality of the assimilated datasets. The Modern-era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) included constraints on the thermal structure of the middle atmosphere from nadir sounders on the NOAA polar-orbiting platforms (Stratospheric Sounding Units and Advanced Microwave Sounding Units). These instruments have peak sensitivities that occur well below the stratopause. As such, the radiance measurements do not provide strong constraints on stratopause temperature. The new MERRA-2 reanalysis is using EOS-MLS temperature retrievals after they are available: it will be demonstrated that these data lead to a more realistic stratopause structure in MERRA-2 than in MERRA. Similarly, the work demonstrates the improvements in lower stratospheric ozone in MERRA-2 than in MERRA, for the period when EOS-MLS ozone data are assimilated. This improvement occurs because of the ozone profile information offered by MLS in the low stratosphere, in contrast to the SBUV/2 data used for the rest of MERRA-2. The impacts of choosing to use the EOS-MLS datasets are discussed in context of the continuity of the data record in MERRA- 2.

  10. Validation of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder O3 and CO Observations in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livesey, N. J.; Filipiak, M. J.; Froidevaux, L.; Read, W. G.; Lambert, A.; Santee, J. L.; Jiang, J. H.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Waters, J. W.; Cofield, R. E.; Cuddy, D. T.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.; Fuller, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Jiang, Y. B.; Knosp, B. W.; Li, Q. B.; Perun, V. S.; Schwartz, M. J.; Snyder, W. V.; Stek, P. C.; Thurstans, R. P.; Wagner, P. A.; Avery, M.

    2008-01-01

    Global satellite observations of ozone and carbon monoxide from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the EOS Aura spacecraft are discussed with emphasis on those observations in the 2 15 - 100 hPa region (the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere). The precision, resolution and accuracy of the data produced by the MLS "version 2.2" processing algorithms are discussed and quantified. O3 accuracy is estimated at approx.40 ppbv +5% (approx.20 ppbv +20% at 215 hPa) while the CO accuracy is estimated at approx.30 ppbv +30% for pressures of 147 hPa and less. Comparisons with expectations and other observations show good agreements for the O3 product, generally consistent with the systematic errors quoted above. In the case of COY a persistent factor of approx.2 high bias is seen at 215 hPa. However, the morphology is shown to be realistic, consistent with raw MLS radiance data, and useful for scientific study. The MLS CO data at higher altitudes are shown to be consistent with other observations.

  11. The Evolution of the Reference Librarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendell G.

    2011-01-01

    The job of the contemporary reference librarian has a virtual component unimaginable a generation ago. Today's library professional can obtain an MLS (or equivalent) online with a minimal residency requirement. Not only the degree, but also library sources, and indeed patrons, have become virtual. Both books and periodicals can be consulted by…

  12. Testing Microwave Landing Systems With Satellite Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiriazes, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Less time and equipment needed to perform tests. Satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS) measures accuracy of microwave scanning-beam landing system (MSBLS) at airports used to support Shuttle landings. Provides time and three-dimensional information on position and velocity with unprecedented accuracy. Useful for testing other electronic navigation aids like LORAN, TACAN and microwave landing systems (MLS).

  13. Enhancements in lower stratospheric CH3CN observed by the upper atmosphere research Sattellite Microwave Limb Sounder following boreal forest fires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livesey, N. J.; Fromm, M. D.; Waters, J. W.; Manney, G. L.; Santee, M. L.; Read, W. G.

    2004-01-01

    On 25 August 1992, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite observed a significant enhancement in the abundance of lower stratospheric methyl cyanide (CH3CN) at 100??hPa (16??km altitude) in a small region off the east coast of Florida.

  14. Operationalising resilience to drought: Multi-layered safety for flooding applied to droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijke, Jeroen; Smith, Jennifer Vessels; Gersonius, Berry; van Herk, Sebastiaan; Pathirana, Assela; Ashley, Richard; Wong, Tony; Zevenbergen, Chris

    2014-11-01

    This paper sets out a way of thinking about how to prepare for and respond to droughts in a holistic way using a framework developed for managing floods. It shows how the multi-layered safety (MLS) approach for flood resilience can be utilised in the context of drought in a way that three layers of intervention can be distinguished for operationalising drought resilience: (1) protection against water shortage through augmentation and diversification of water supplies; (2) prevention of damage in case of water shortage through increased efficiency of water use and timely asset maintenance; (3) preparedness for future water shortages through mechanisms to reduce the use of water and adopt innovative water technologies. Application of MLS to the cities of Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney shows that recent water reforms in these cities were primarily focused on protection measures that aim to reduce the hazard source or exposure to insufficient water supplies. Prevention and preparedness measures could be considered in defining interventions that aim to further increase the drought resilience of these cities. Although further research is needed, the application suggests that MLS can be applied to the context of drought risk management. The MLS framework can be used to classify the suite of plans deployed by a city to manage future drought risks and can be considered a planning tool to identify opportunities for increasing the level of redundancy and hence resilience of the drought risk management system.

  15. Automatic change detection using mobile laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebel, M.; Hammer, M.; Gordon, M.; Arens, M.

    2014-10-01

    Automatic change detection in 3D environments requires the comparison of multi-temporal data. By comparing current data with past data of the same area, changes can be automatically detected and identified. Volumetric changes in the scene hint at suspicious activities like the movement of military vehicles, the application of camouflage nets, or the placement of IEDs, etc. In contrast to broad research activities in remote sensing with optical cameras, this paper addresses the topic using 3D data acquired by mobile laser scanning (MLS). We present a framework for immediate comparison of current MLS data to given 3D reference data. Our method extends the concept of occupancy grids known from robot mapping, which incorporates the sensor positions in the processing of the 3D point clouds. This allows extracting the information that is included in the data acquisition geometry. For each single range measurement, it becomes apparent that an object reflects laser pulses in the measured range distance, i.e., space is occupied at that 3D position. In addition, it is obvious that space is empty along the line of sight between sensor and the reflecting object. Everywhere else, the occupancy of space remains unknown. This approach handles occlusions and changes implicitly, such that the latter are identifiable by conflicts of empty space and occupied space. The presented concept of change detection has been successfully validated in experiments with recorded MLS data streams. Results are shown for test sites at which MLS data were acquired at different time intervals.

  16. Semi-automated extraction and delineation of 3D roads of street scene from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Fang, Lina; Li, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Accurate 3D road information is important for applications such as road maintenance and virtual 3D modeling. Mobile laser scanning (MLS) is an efficient technique for capturing dense point clouds that can be used to construct detailed road models for large areas. This paper presents a method for extracting and delineating roads from large-scale MLS point clouds. The proposed method partitions MLS point clouds into a set of consecutive "scanning lines", which each consists of a road cross section. A moving window operator is used to filter out non-ground points line by line, and curb points are detected based on curb patterns. The detected curb points are tracked and refined so that they are both globally consistent and locally similar. To evaluate the validity of the proposed method, experiments were conducted using two types of street-scene point clouds captured by Optech's Lynx Mobile Mapper System. The completeness, correctness, and quality of the extracted roads are over 94.42%, 91.13%, and 91.3%, respectively, which proves the proposed method is a promising solution for extracting 3D roads from MLS point clouds.

  17. Mutations in COX7B cause microphthalmia with linear skin lesions, an unconventional mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Indrieri, Alessia; van Rahden, Vanessa Alexandra; Tiranti, Valeria; Morleo, Manuela; Iaconis, Daniela; Tammaro, Roberta; D'Amato, Ilaria; Conte, Ivan; Maystadt, Isabelle; Demuth, Stephanie; Zvulunov, Alex; Kutsche, Kerstin; Zeviani, Massimo; Franco, Brunella

    2012-11-01

    Microphthalmia with linear skin lesions (MLS) is an X-linked dominant male-lethal disorder associated with mutations in holocytochrome c-type synthase (HCCS), which encodes a crucial player of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC). Unlike other mitochondrial diseases, MLS is characterized by a well-recognizable neurodevelopmental phenotype. Interestingly, not all clinically diagnosed MLS cases have mutations in HCCS, thus suggesting genetic heterogeneity for this disorder. Among the possible candidates, we analyzed the X-linked COX7B and found deleterious de novo mutations in two simplex cases and a nonsense mutation, which segregates with the disease, in a familial case. COX7B encodes a poorly characterized structural subunit of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the MRC complex IV. We demonstrated that COX7B is indispensable for COX assembly, COX activity, and mitochondrial respiration. Downregulation of the COX7B ortholog (cox7B) in medaka (Oryzias latipes) resulted in microcephaly and microphthalmia that recapitulated the MLS phenotype and demonstrated an essential function of complex IV activity in vertebrate CNS development. Our results indicate an evolutionary conserved role of the MRC complexes III and IV for the proper development of the CNS in vertebrates and uncover a group of mitochondrial diseases hallmarked by a developmental phenotype.

  18. Street environment change detection from mobile laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Wen; Vallet, Bruno; Brédif, Mathieu; Paparoditis, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Mobile laser scanning (MLS) has become a popular technique for road inventory, building modelling, infrastructure management, mobility assessment, etc. Meanwhile, due to the high mobility of MLS systems, it is easy to revisit interested areas. However, change detection using MLS data of street environment has seldom been studied. In this paper, an approach that combines occupancy grids and a distance-based method for change detection from MLS point clouds is proposed. Unlike conventional occupancy grids, our occupancy-based method models space based on scanning rays and local point distributions in 3D without voxelization. A local cylindrical reference frame is presented for the interpolation of occupancy between rays according to the scanning geometry. The Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is utilized for both intra-data evidence fusion and inter-data consistency assessment. Occupancy of reference point cloud is fused at the location of target points and then the consistency is evaluated directly on the points. A point-to-triangle (PTT) distance-based method is combined to improve the occupancy-based method. Because it is robust to penetrable objects, e.g. vegetation, which cause self-conflicts when modelling occupancy. The combined method tackles irregular point density and occlusion problems, also eliminates false detections on penetrable objects.

  19. SAGE II

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-16

    ... of stratospheric aerosols, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, water vapor and cloud occurrence by mapping vertical profiles and calculating ... (i.e. MLS and SAGE III versus HALOE) Fixed various bugs Details are in the  SAGE II V7.00 Release Notes .   ...

  20. A toxicological and dermatological assessment of macrocyclic lactone and lactide derivatives when used as fragrance ingredients.

    PubMed

    Belsito, D; Bickers, D; Bruze, M; Calow, P; Dagli, M L; Fryer, A D; Greim, H; Miyachi, Y; Saurat, J H; Sipes, I G

    2011-12-01

    The Macrocyclic Lactone and Lactide derivative (ML) group of fragrance ingredients was critically evaluated for safety following a complete literature search. For high end users, calculated maximum dermal exposures vary from 0.47% to 11.15%; systemic exposures vary from 0.0008 to 0.25mg/kg/day. The MLs had low acute toxicity and no significant toxicity in repeat dose oral or dermal toxicity studies. Effects on blood biochemistry were reversible after 2 weeks of no treatment. No mutagenic or genotoxic activity in bacteria and mammalian cell line assays was observed. Reproductive and developmental toxicity was not observed. Human dermatological studies show MLs are generally not irritating after one application. Minor irritation was observed in a few individuals following multiple applications. At rates consistent with reported levels for current human exposure, no phototoxicity or photosensitization was observed. In animal studies, the MLs are not sensitizers at lower exposures from consumer products. Eleven ML materials were evaluated for human sensitization. Of these, only ethylene brassylate showed evidence of sensitization in 2/27 studies (sensitization frequency 4/2059 total). Based on these findings, the Panel is of the opinion that there are no safety concerns for the MLs at reported levels of use and exposure as fragrance ingredients.

  1. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ClO measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Lungu, T. A.; Perun, V. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Burke, J. R.; Hardy, J. C.; Nakamura, L. L.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Thurstans, R. P.; Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; Dezafra, R. L.; Shindell, D. T.

    1996-04-01

    Validation of stratospheric ClO measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is described. Credibility of the measurements is established by (1) the consistency of the measured ClO spectral emission line with the retrieved ClO profiles and (2) comparisons of ClO from MLS with that from correlative measurements by balloon-based, ground-based, and aircraft-based instruments. Values of "noise" (random), "scaling" (multiplicative), and "bias" (additive) uncertainties are determined for the Version 3 data, the first version publicly released, and known artifacts in these data are identified. Comparisons with correlative measurements indicate agreement to within the combined uncertainties expected for MLS and the other measurements being compared. It is concluded that MLS Version 3 ClO data, with proper consideration of the uncertainties and "quality" parameters produced with these data, can be used for scientific analyses at retrieval surfaces between 46 and 1 hPa (approximately 20-50 km in height). Future work is planned to correct known problems in the data and improve their quality.

  2. Comparative toxicity of lead shot in black ducks and mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Fleming, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    An extreme sensitivity of pen-reared black ducks (BDs) to lead shot was observed incidental to development of an enzyme assay (Pain & Rattner, 1988). Intubation of pen-reared BDs with one no. 4 lead shot resulted in 60% mortality in 6 days. It was concluded that BDs were more sensitive to lead shot than expected, or that lead toxicity may be exacerbated by stressful conditions (elevated temperature, confinement in small pens). We reexamined lead shot toxicity in BDs and mallards (MLs). In winter 1986 (Ta=1.7-14.6? C), pen-reared and wild BDs, and game-farm and wild MLs were sham-dosed or given one no. 4 shot. After 14 days, dosed birds were redosed with two or four additional shot. Since the original observation of enhanced. shot toxicity to BDs occurred during summer, the study was also repeated in summer 1987 (Ta=I7:6-30.9?C), with pen-reared BDs and game-farm MLs. Mortality, overt intoxication, weight change, aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity, and protoporphyrin concentration were used to compare sensitivity among groups. Sensitivity to lead shot was similar between BDs and MLs. However, the wild ducks appeared more vulnerable than their domesticated counterparts, and signs of intoxication were more pronounced in winter than in summer.

  3. The Effect of Parenting Stress on Child Behavior Problems in High-Risk Children with Prenatal Drug Exposure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagner, Daniel M.; Sheinkopf, Stephen J.; Miller-Loncar, Cynthia; LaGasse, Linda L.; Lester, Barry M.; Liu, Jing; Bauer, Charles R.; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta; Das, Abhik

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between early parenting stress and later child behavior in a high-risk sample and measure the effect of drug exposure on the relationship between parenting stress and child behavior. Methods: A subset of child-caregiver dyads (n = 607) were selected from the Maternal Lifestyle Study (MLS), which is a large…

  4. A Ramble through the Cell: How Can We Clear Such a Complicated Trail?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobich, Joseph A.

    2006-01-01

    The arrangement of course information in a logical sequence for molecular life science (MLS) courses remains a matter of some controversy, even within a single subdiscipline such as biochemistry. This is due to the explosion of knowledge, the latest bioinformatic revelations, and the observation that new discoveries sometimes reveal specific…

  5. Competency-Based Education Programs: A Library Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education (CBE) is an emerging model for higher education designed to reduce certain barriers to educational attainment. This essay describes CBE and the challenges and opportunities for academic librarians desiring to serve students and faculty in Library and Information Management Master of Library Science (MLS) programs. Every…

  6. The Academic Librarian Labor Market and the Role of the Master of Library Science Degree: 1975 through 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Marybeth F.; Grimes, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    To examine the evolving role of the Master of Library Science (MLS) degree in academic libraries, pooled cross-sectional data were collected from job advertisements in "College and Research Library News." Beginning with 1975 and continuing at 5-year intervals through 2005, pertinent information from all job advertisements in each monthly issue…

  7. Chemical Observations of a Polar Vortex Intrusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Douglass, A. R.; McGee, T. J.; Browell, E.; Waters, J.; Livesey, N.; Read, W.; Froidevaux, L.

    2006-01-01

    An intrusion of vortex edge air in D the interior of the Arctic polar vortex was observed on the January 31,2005 flight of the NASA DC-8 aircraft. This intrusion was identified as anomalously high values of ozone by the AROTAL and DIAL lidars. Our analysis shows that this intrusion formed when a blocking feature near Iceland collapsed, allowing edge air to sweep into the vortex interior. along the DC-8 flight track also shows the intrusion in both ozone and HNO3. Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were observed by the DIAL lidar on the DC-8. The spatial variability of the PSCs can be explained using MLS HNO3 and H2O observations and meteorological analysis temperatures. We also estimate vortex denitrification using the relationship between N2O and HNO3. Reverse domain fill back trajectory calculations are used to focus on the features in the MLS data. The trajectory results improve the agreement between lidar measured ozone and MLS ozone and also improve the agreement between the HNO3 measurements PSC locations. The back trajectory calculations allow us to compute the local denitrification rate and reduction of HCl within the filament. We estimate a denitrification rate of about lO%/day after exposure to below PSC formation temperature. Analysis of Aura MLS observations made

  8. Misleading reconstruction of seawater intrusion via integral depth sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombani, N.; Volta, G.; Osti, A.; Mastrocicco, M.

    2016-05-01

    Saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers is an urgent issue for the actual and future groundwater supply and a detailed characterization of groundwater quality with depth is a fundamental prerequisite to correctly distinguish salinization processes. In this study, interpolated Cl- maps of the Po River delta coastal aquifer (Italy), gained with Integrated Depth Sampling (IDS) and Multi-Level Sampling (MLS) techniques, are compared. The data set used to build up the IDS and MLS interpolated Cl- maps come from numerous monitoring campaigns on surface and ground waters, covering the time frame from 2010 to 2014. The IDS interpolated Cl- map recalls the phenomenon of actual seawater intrusion, with Cl- concentration never exceeding that of seawater and the absence of hypersaline groundwater all over the study area. On the contrary, in the MLS interpolated Cl- maps the lower portion of the unconfined aquifer presents hypersaline groundwater making it necessary to consider salinization processes other than actual seawater intrusion, like upward flux from a saline aquitard. Results demonstrate the obligation of using MLS in reconstructing a reliable representation of the distribution of salinity, especially in areas where the density contrast between fresh and saline groundwater is large. Implications of the reported field case are not limited to the local situation but have a wider significance, since the IDS technique is often employed in saltwater intrusion monitoring even in recent works, with detrimental effect on the sustainable water resource management of coastal aquifers.

  9. The Jobs Can Be Found

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conners, David; McCarthy, Laena

    2007-01-01

    In fall 2005, Rachel Holt and Adrienne L. Strock's article, "The Entry-Level Gap," ("Library Journal" 5/1/05, p.36-38) became the talk of the town. Holt and Strock argued that the new Master of Library Science (MLS) graduates have trouble finding work because of low salaries and the disappearance of entry-level positions owing to…

  10. Microwave landing system modeling with application to air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulose, M. M.

    1991-01-01

    Compared to the current instrument landing system, the microwave landing system (MLS), which is in the advanced stage of implementation, can potentially provide significant fuel and time savings as well as more flexibility in approach and landing functions. However, the expanded coverage and increased accuracy requirements of the MLS make it more susceptible to the features of the site in which it is located. An analytical approach is presented for evaluating the multipath effects of scatterers that are commonly found in airport environments. The approach combines a multiplane model with a ray-tracing technique and a formulation for estimating the electromagnetic fields caused by the antenna array in the presence of scatterers. The model is applied to several airport scenarios. The reduced computational burden enables the scattering effects on MLS position information to be evaluated in near real time. Evaluation in near real time would permit the incorporation of the modeling scheme into air traffic control automation; it would adaptively delineate zones of reduced accuracy within the MLS coverage volume, and help establish safe approach and takeoff trajectories in the presence of uneven terrain and other scatterers.

  11. Changing Paradigms Managed Learning Environments and Web 2.0

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Emory M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to understand how emerging technologies and Web 2.0 services are transforming the structure of the web and their potential impact on managed learning environments (MLS) and learning content management systems (LCMS). Design/methodology/approach: Innovative Web 2.0 applications are reviewed in the paper to…

  12. Honouring ESL Students' Lived Experiences in School Learning with Multiliteracies Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Anne; Hardware, Shawnee

    2015-01-01

    The increased presence of technology in school communities and children's lives poses a challenge to traditional teaching and learning tools. The present case study examines ways in which a classroom teacher, Marnie, conceptualised the use of a multiliteracies pedagogy (MLS) and a multimodal approach to elicit the lived experiences of her English…

  13. STS-83 Onboard Photo: Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MLS-1) onboard STS-83 photo of the most recent comet to date, Hale-Bopp, which passed by Earth during the spring and summer of 1997. In this view, the comet is visible during sunset. The streaks and distorted lights seen in the bottom of the photo are city lights and petroleum fires.

  14. Simultaneous Observations fo Polar Stratospheric Clouds and HNO3 over Scandinavia in January, 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massie, S. T.; Santee, M. L.; Read, W. G.; Grainger, R. G.; Lambert, A.; Mergenthaler, J. L.; Dye, J. E.; Baumbardner, D.; Randel, W. J.; Tabazadeh, A.; Tie, X.; Pan, L.; Figarol, F.; Wu, F.; Brasseur, G. P.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of Polar Stratospheric Cloud aerosol extinction and HNO3 mixing ratios over Scandinavia are examined for January 9-10, 1992. Data measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon, Spectrometer (CLAES), and Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMA) experiments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) are examined at locations adjacent to parcel trajectory positions.

  15. La variacion de /s/ en Valdivia: sexo y edad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karen L.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the study of the use of /s/ vs. /h/ or O (in Spanish) in Valdivia, Chile, by speakers who differed in sex and age. No marked differences in relation to sex and age were found, indicating a relatively homogeneous community. (MLS)

  16. Temporal Decrease in Upper Atmospheric Chlorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, L.; Livesey, N. J.; Read, W. G.; Salawitch, R. J.; Waters, J. W.; Drouin, B.; MacKenzie, I. A.; Pumphrey, H. C.; Bernath, P.; Boone, C.; Nassar, R.; Montzka, S.; Elkins, J.; Cunnold, D.; Waugh, D.

    2006-01-01

    We report a steady decrease in the upper stratospheric and lower mesospheric abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl) from August 2004 through January 2006, as measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) aboard the Aura satellite. For 60(deg)S to 60(deg)N zonal means, the average yearly change in the 0.7 to 0.1 hPa (approx.50 to 65 km) region is -27 +/- 3 pptv/year, or -0.78 +/- 0.08 percent/year. This is consistent with surface abundance decrease rates (about 6 to 7 years earlier) in chlorine source gases. The MLS data confirm that international agreements to reduce global emissions of ozone-depleting industrial gases are leading to global decreases in the total gaseous chlorine burden. Tracking stratospheric HCl variations on a seasonal basis is now possible with MLS data. Inferred stratospheric total chlorine (CITOT) has a value of 3.60 ppbv at the beginning of 2006, with a (2-sigma) accuracy estimate of 7%; the stratospheric chlorine loading has decreased by about 43 pptv in the 18-month period studied here. We discuss the MLS HCl measurements in the context of other satellite-based HCl data, as well as expectations from surface chlorine data. A mean age of air of approx. 5.5 years and an age spectrum width of 2 years or less provide a fairly good fit to the ensemble of measurements.

  17. 14 CFR 171.323 - Fabrication and installation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... utilize solid state technology except that traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTA) may be used. A maximum... primary power, either from a power distribution system or locally generated. Adequate power capacity must...) The MLS facility must have a continuously engaged or floating battery power source for the...

  18. 14 CFR 171.323 - Fabrication and installation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... utilize solid state technology except that traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTA) may be used. A maximum... primary power, either from a power distribution system or locally generated. Adequate power capacity must...) The MLS facility must have a continuously engaged or floating battery power source for the...

  19. 14 CFR 171.323 - Fabrication and installation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... utilize solid state technology except that traveling wave tube amplifiers (TWTA) may be used. A maximum... primary power, either from a power distribution system or locally generated. Adequate power capacity must...) The MLS facility must have a continuously engaged or floating battery power source for the...

  20. The Profession's Coach: Cindi Hickey--Institute for Continuous Education, Emporia State University, KS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Kansas librarians were delighted when Cindi Hickey came into their lives. Kansas is a really big state, sprawling over 82,000 square miles. For its small-town librarians, many of whom are without an MLS, professional development opportunities required hours spent driving--as well as hard-to-come-by travel money for overnight lodging. Hickey,…

  1. Spatial Visualization as Mediating between Mathematics Learning Strategy and Mathematics Achievement among 8th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabab'h, Belal; Veloo, Arsaythamby

    2015-01-01

    Jordanian 8th grade students revealed low achievement in mathematics through four periods (1999, 2003, 2007 & 2011) of Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). This study aimed to determine whether spatial visualization mediates the affect of Mathematics Learning Strategies (MLS) factors namely mathematics attitude,…

  2. Weaving Diversity into LIS: An Examination of Diversity Course Offerings in iSchool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subramaniam, Mega M.; Jaeger, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the current state of diversity course offerings in Library and Information Science (LIS) programs through the analysis of syllabi of diversity-related courses offered in the American Library Association accredited Master of Library and Information Science (MLS) programs at iSchools (a group of information schools that include…

  3. 14 CFR 171.323 - Fabrication and installation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... marked on the antenna enclosures. (k) The latitude, longitude and mean sea level elevation of all MLS... level of common modularity must be provided along with diagnostics to facilitate maintenance and... power, the radome deicers and the environmental system need not operate. The equipment must meet...

  4. 14 CFR 171.323 - Fabrication and installation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... marked on the antenna enclosures. (k) The latitude, longitude and mean sea level elevation of all MLS... level of common modularity must be provided along with diagnostics to facilitate maintenance and... power, the radome deicers and the environmental system need not operate. The equipment must meet...

  5. Status of the Metrology Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.; Ulm, G.; Feikes, J.; Hartrott, M. von; Wuestefeld, G.

    2010-06-23

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German national metrology institute, has set up the low-energy electron storage ring Metrology Light Source (MLS) in close cooperation with the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB, formerly BESSY). This new storage ring has been in regular user operation since April 2008 and is dedicated to synchrotron-radiation-based metrology and technological developments in the far-IR/THz, IR, UV, VUV and EUV spectral range. The MLS has a double-bend-achromate lattice structure, injection is from a 105 MeV racetrack microtron. The electron energy can be ramped to any value from 105 MeV up to 630 MeV and the electron beam current covers the range from one stored electron (1 pA) up to 200 mA. The MLS is the first electron storage ring optimized for the generation of coherent synchrotron radiation, based on an electron bunch shortening mode. In this mode, MLS delivers coherent radiation in the far-IR/THz spectral range with enhanced intensity as compared to the normal mode of operation. Several beamlines are in operation or in construction, including one undulator beamline, bending magnet beamlines for the calibration of radiation sources and detectors and for reflectometry, an EUV metrology beamline and three IR/THz beamlines.

  6. Information Literacy Courses in LIS Schools: Emerging Perspectives for Future Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishimura, Yusuke; Bartlett, Joan C.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates how information literacy courses have been taught in American Library Association-accredited library and information science programmes. Using a content analysis approach, we compared information literacy course syllabi from Master of Library Science (MLS) programmes collected in 2005 and 2009. In addition, courses in…

  7. Promoting Motivation through Mode of Instruction: The Relationship between Use of Affective Teaching Techniques and Motivation to Learn Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez Rivera, Yamil

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to add to what we know about the affective domain and to create a valid instrument for future studies. The Motivation to Learn Science (MLS) Inventory is based on Krathwohl's Taxonomy of Affective Behaviors (Krathwohl et. al., 1964). The results of the Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Confirmatory Factor…

  8. Adult Learners and Mathematics Learning Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzmaurice, Olivia; Mac an Bhaird, Ciarán; Ní Fhloinn, Eabhnat; O'Sullivan, Ciarán

    2015-01-01

    The provision of some level of Mathematics Learning Support (MLS) is now standard in the majority of Higher Education Institutions in Ireland, the UK, and in many other countries. This provision is, in part, a response to the large numbers of students entering Higher Education who do not have the mathematical skills required and this cohort…

  9. Bacillus arsenicoselenatis, sp. nov., and Bacillus selenitireducens, sp. nov.: Two haloalkaliphiles from Mono Lake, California that respire oxyanions of selenium and arsenic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Switzer, Blum J.; Burns, Bindi A.; Buzzelli, J.; Stolz, J.F.; Oremland, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Two gram-positive anaerobic bacteria (strains E1H and MLS10) were isolated from the anoxic muds of Mono Lake, California, an alkaline, hypersaline, arsenic-rich water body. Both grew by dissimilatory reduction of As(V) to As(III) with the concomitant oxidation of lactate to acetate plus CO2. Bacillus arsenicoselenatis (strain E1H) is a spore-forming rod that also grew by dissimilatory reduction of Se(VI) to Se(IV). Bacillus selenitireducens (strain MLS 10) is a short, non-spore-forming rod that grew by dissimilatory reduction of Se(IV) to Se(0). When the two isolates were cocultured, a complete reduction of Se(VI) to Se(0) was achieved. Both isolates are alkaliphiles and had optimal specific growth rates in the pH range of 8.5-10. Strain E1H had a salinity optimum at 60 g 1-1 NaCl, while strain MLS10 had optimal growth at lower salinities (24-60 g 1-1 NaCl). Both strains have limited abilities to grow with electron donors and acceptors other than those given above. Strain MLS10 demonstrated weak growth as a microaerophile and was also capable of fermentative growth on glucose, while strain E1H is a strict anaerobe. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis placed the two isolates with other Bacillus spp. in the low G+C gram-positive group of bacteria.

  10. Home Performance XML to Real Estate Standards Organization Data Dictionary Translator

    SciTech Connect

    2015-10-27

    This translator takes fields from the HPXML and translates them into RESO’s Data Dictionary, which is used in MLS systems for real estate transactions across the country. The purpose is to get energy efficiency data into the real estate transaction.

  11. Dehydration in the tropical tropopause layer: implications from the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, W. G.; Wu, D. L.; Waters, J. W.

    2004-01-01

    The new MLS data are consistent with convective input of H(sub 2)O into the bottom of the TTL followed by slow ascent with a maximum relative amplitude in the seasonal cycle occurring near the tropopause nearly in phase with the tropopause temperature seasonal cycle.

  12. 14 CFR 171.319 - Approach elevation monitor system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approach elevation monitor system... (MLS) § 171.319 Approach elevation monitor system requirements. (a) The monitor system must act to... mean error to ±0.067 degree can be satisfied by the following procedure. The integral monitor...

  13. 14 CFR 171.315 - Azimuth monitor system requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Azimuth monitor system requirements. 171... (MLS) § 171.315 Azimuth monitor system requirements. (a) The approach azimuth or back azimuth monitor... following procedure. The integral monitor alarm limit should be set to the angular equivalent of ±10 ft....

  14. Validation of UARS Microwave Limb Sounder ClO Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, J. W.; Read, W. G.; Froidevaux, L.; Lungu, T. A.; Perun, V. S.; Stachnik, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Fishbein, E. F.; Flower, D. A.; Burke, J. R.; Hardy, J. C.; Nakamura, L. L.; Ridenoure, B. P.; Shippony, Z.; Thurstans, R. P.; Thurstans, R. P.; Avallone, L. M.; Toohey, D. W.; deZafra, R. L.; Shindell, D. T.

    1996-01-01

    Validation of stratospheric ClO measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) is described. Credibility of the measurements is established by (1) the consistency of the measured ClO spectral emission line with the retrieved ClO profiles and (2) comparisons of ClO from MLS with that from correlative measurements by balloon-based, ground-based, and aircraft-based instruments. Values of "noise" (random), "scaling" (multiplicative), and "bias" (additive) uncertainties are determined for the Version 3 data, in the first version public release of the known artifacts in these data are identified. Comparisons with correlative measurements indicate agreement to within the combined uncertainties expected for MLS and the other measurements being compared. It is concluded that MLS Version 3 ClO data, with proper consideration of the uncertainties and "quality" parameters produced with these data, can be used for scientific analyses at retrieval surfaces between 46 and 1 hPa (approximately 20-50 km in height). Future work is planned to correct known problems in the data and improve their quality.

  15. Helical automatic approaches of helicopters with microwave landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. D.; Mcgee, L. A.; Dugan, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    A program is under way to develop a data base for establishing navigation and guidance concepts for all-weather operation of rotorcraft. One of the objectives is to examine the feasibility of conducting simultaneous rotorcraft and conventional fixed-wing, noninterfering, landing operations in instrument meteorological conditions at airports equipped with microwave landing systems (MLSs) for fixed-wing traffic. An initial test program to investigate the feasibility of conducting automatic helical approaches was completed, using the MLS at Crows Landing near Ames. These tests were flown on board a UH-1H helicopter equipped with a digital automatic landing system. A total of 48 automatic approaches and landings were flown along a two-turn helical descent, tangent to the centerline of the MLS-equipped runway to determine helical light performance and to provide a data base for comparison with future flights for which the helical approach path will be located near the edge of the MLS coverage. In addition, 13 straight-in approaches were conducted. The performance with varying levels of state-estimation system sophistication was evaluated as part of the flight tests. The results indicate that helical approaches to MLS-equipped runways are feasible for rotorcraft and that the best position accuracy was obtained using the Kalman-filter state-estimation with inertial navigation systems sensors.

  16. Extratropical Influence of Upper Tropospheric Water Vapor on Greenhouse Warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, H.; Liu, W.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to re-examine the impact of upper tropospheric water vapor on greenhouse warming in midlatitudes by analyzing the recent observations of the upper tropospheric water vapor from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), in conjuction with other space-based measurement and model simulation products.

  17. Inhibition of mixed-layer deepening during winter in the northeastern Arabian Sea by the West India Coastal Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, D.; Remya, R.; Vinayachandran, P. N.; Chatterjee, Abhisek; Behera, Ambica

    2016-08-01

    Though the deep mixed layers (MLs) that form in the northeastern Arabian Sea (NEAS) during the winter monsoon (November-February) have been attributed to convective mixing driven by dry, cool northeasterly winds from the Indian subcontinent, data show that the deepest MLs occur in the northern NEAS and the maxima of latent-heat and net heat fluxes in the southern NEAS. We use an oceanic general circulation model to show that the deep MLs in the NEAS extend up to ~20°N till the end of December, but are restricted poleward of ~22°N (~23°N) in January (February). This progressive restriction of the deep mixed layers within the NEAS is due to poleward advection of water of lower salinity by the West India Coastal Current (WICC). The deep MLs are sustained till February in the northern NEAS because convective mixing deepens the ML before the waters of lower salinity reach this region and the wind stirring and convective overturning generate sufficient turbulent energy for the ML to maintain the depth attained in January. Though the atmospheric fluxes tend to cool the ML in the southern NEAS, this cooling is countered by the warming due to horizontal advection. Likewise, the cooling due to entrainment, which continues in the southern NEAS even as the ML shallows during January-February, is almost cancelled by the warming caused by a downwelling vertical velocity field. Therefore, the SST changes very little during December-February even as the ML shallows dramatically in the southern NEAS. These deep MLs of the NEAS also preclude a strong intraseasonal response to the intraseasonal variability in the fluxes. This role of horizontal advection implies that the ML depth in the NEAS is determined by an interplay of physical processes that are forced differently. The convective mixing depends on processes that are local to the region, but the advection is due to the WICC, whose seasonal cycle is primarily forced by remote winds. By inhibiting the formation of deep MLs in

  18. Automatic estimation of midline shift in patients with cerebral glioma based on enhanced voigt model and local symmetry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyang; Elazab, Ahmed; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Li, Xiaodong; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral glioma is one of the most aggressive space-occupying diseases, which will exhibit midline shift (MLS) due to mass effect. MLS has been used as an important feature for evaluating the pathological severity and patients' survival possibility. Automatic quantification of MLS is challenging due to deformation, complex shape and complex grayscale distribution. An automatic method is proposed and validated to estimate MLS in patients with gliomas diagnosed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The deformed midline is approximated by combining mechanical model and local symmetry. An enhanced Voigt model which takes into account the size and spatial information of lesion is devised to predict the deformed midline. A composite local symmetry combining local intensity symmetry and local intensity gradient symmetry is proposed to refine the predicted midline within a local window whose size is determined according to the pinhole camera model. To enhance the MLS accuracy, the axial slice with maximum MSL from each volumetric data has been interpolated from a spatial resolution of 1 mm to 0.33 mm. The proposed method has been validated on 30 publicly available clinical head MRI scans presenting with MLS. It delineates the deformed midline with maximum MLS and yields a mean difference of 0.61 ± 0.27 mm, and average maximum difference of 1.89 ± 1.18 mm from the ground truth. Experiments show that the proposed method will yield better accuracy with the geometric center of pathology being the geometric center of tumor and the pathological region being the whole lesion. It has also been shown that the proposed composite local symmetry achieves significantly higher accuracy than the traditional local intensity symmetry and the local intensity gradient symmetry. To the best of our knowledge, for delineation of deformed midline, this is the first report on both quantification of gliomas and from MRI, which hopefully will provide valuable information for diagnosis

  19. Automatic estimation of midline shift in patients with cerebral glioma based on enhanced voigt model and local symmetry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingyang; Elazab, Ahmed; Jia, Fucang; Wu, Jianhuang; Li, Guanglin; Li, Xiaodong; Hu, Qingmao

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral glioma is one of the most aggressive space-occupying diseases, which will exhibit midline shift (MLS) due to mass effect. MLS has been used as an important feature for evaluating the pathological severity and patients' survival possibility. Automatic quantification of MLS is challenging due to deformation, complex shape and complex grayscale distribution. An automatic method is proposed and validated to estimate MLS in patients with gliomas diagnosed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The deformed midline is approximated by combining mechanical model and local symmetry. An enhanced Voigt model which takes into account the size and spatial information of lesion is devised to predict the deformed midline. A composite local symmetry combining local intensity symmetry and local intensity gradient symmetry is proposed to refine the predicted midline within a local window whose size is determined according to the pinhole camera model. To enhance the MLS accuracy, the axial slice with maximum MSL from each volumetric data has been interpolated from a spatial resolution of 1 mm to 0.33 mm. The proposed method has been validated on 30 publicly available clinical head MRI scans presenting with MLS. It delineates the deformed midline with maximum MLS and yields a mean difference of 0.61 ± 0.27 mm, and average maximum difference of 1.89 ± 1.18 mm from the ground truth. Experiments show that the proposed method will yield better accuracy with the geometric center of pathology being the geometric center of tumor and the pathological region being the whole lesion. It has also been shown that the proposed composite local symmetry achieves significantly higher accuracy than the traditional local intensity symmetry and the local intensity gradient symmetry. To the best of our knowledge, for delineation of deformed midline, this is the first report on both quantification of gliomas and from MRI, which hopefully will provide valuable information for diagnosis

  20. Assimilation of the Microwave Limb Sounder Radiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wargan, K.; Read, W.; Livesey, N.; Wagner, P.; Nguyen. H.; Pawson, S.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the assimilation of limb-sounder data can significantly improve the representation of ozone in NASA's GEOS Data Assimilation Systems (GEOS-DAS), particularly in the stratosphere. The studies conducted so far utilized retrieved data from the MIPAS, POAM, ILAS and EOS Microwave Limb Sounder (EOS MLS) instruments. Direct assimilation of the radiance data can be seen as the natural next step to those studies. The motivation behind working with radiances is twofold. First, retrieval algorithms use a priori data which are either climatological or are obtained from previous analyses. This introduces additional uncertainty and, in some cases, may lead to "self-contamination"- when the a priori is taken from the same assimilation system in which subsequently ingests the retrieved observations. Second, radiances can be available in near real time thus providing an opportunity for operational assimilation, which could help improve the use of infrared radiance instruments from operational satellite instruments. In this presentation we summarize our ongoing work on an implementation of the assimilation of EOS MLS radiances into the GEOS-5 DAS. This work focuses on assimilation of band 7 brightness temperatures which are sensitive to ozone. Our implementation uses the MLS Callable Forward Model developed by the MLS team at NASA JPL as the observation operator. We will describe our approach and recent results which are not yet final. In particular, we will demonstrate that this approach has a potential to improve the vertical structure of ozone in the lower tropical stratosphere as compared with the retrieved MLS product. We will discuss the computational efficiency of this implementation.

  1. A global relationship between the ocean water cycle and near-surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lisan

    2011-10-01

    Ocean evaporation (E) and precipitation (P) are the fundamental components of the global water cycle. They are also the freshwater flux forcing (i.e., E-P) for the open ocean salinity. The apparent connection between ocean salinity and the global water cycle leads to the proposition of using the oceans as a rain gauge. However, the exact relationship between E-P and salinity is governed by complex upper ocean dynamics, which may complicate the inference of the water cycle from salinity observations. To gain a better understanding of the ocean rain gauge concept, here we address a fundamental issue as to how E-P and salinity are related on the seasonal timescales. A global map that outlines the dominant process for the mixed-layer salinity (MLS) in different regions is thus derived, using a lower-order MLS dynamics that allows key balance terms (i.e., E-P, the Ekman and geostrophic advection, vertical entrainment, and horizontal diffusion) to be computed from satellite-derived data sets and a salinity climatology. Major E-P control on seasonal MLS variability is found in two regions: the tropical convergence zones featuring heavy rainfall and the western North Pacific and Atlantic under the influence of high evaporation. Within this regime, E-P accounts for 40-70% MLS variance with peak correlations occurring at 2-4 month lead time. Outside of the tropics, the MLS variations are governed predominantly by the Ekman advection, and then vertical entrainment. The study suggests that the E-P regime could serve as a window of opportunity for testing the ocean rain gauge concept once satellite salinity observations are available.

  2. Automatic brain extraction methods for T1 magnetic resonance images using region labeling and morphological operations.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, K; Kalaiselvi, T

    2011-08-01

    In this work we propose two brain extraction methods (BEM) that solely depend on the brain anatomy and its intensity characteristics. Our methods are simple, unsupervised and knowledge based. Using an adaptive intensity thresholding method on the magnetic resonance images of head scans, a binary image is obtained. The binary image is labeled using the anatomical facts that the scalp is the boundary between head and background, and the skull is the boundary separating brain and scalp. A run length scheme is applied on the labeled image to get a rough brain mask. Morphological operations are then performed to obtain the fine brain on the assumption that brain is the largest connected component (LCC). But the LCC concept failed to work on some slices where brain is composed of more than one connected component. To solve this problem a 3-D approach is introduced in the BEM. Experimental results on 61 sets of T1 scans taken from MRI scan center and neuroimage web services showed that our methods give better results than the popular methods, FSL's Brain Extraction Tool (BET), BrainSuite's Brain Surface Extractor (BSE) gives results comparable to that of Model-based Level Sets (MLS) and works well even where MLS failed. The average Dice similarity index computed using the "Gold standard" and the specificity values are 0.938 and 0.992, respectively, which are higher than that for BET, BSE and MLS. The average processing time by one of our methods is ≈1s/slice, which is smaller than for MLS, which is ≈4s/slice. One of our methods produces the lowest false positive rate of 0.075, which is smaller than that for BSE, BET and MLS. It is independent of imaging orientation and works well for slices with abnormal features like tumor and lesion in which the existing methods fail in certain cases. PMID:21724183

  3. Macrocyclic lactones in the treatment and control of parasitism in small companion animals.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Thomas J; Lok, James B

    2012-05-01

    Macrocyclic lactones (MLs) have many anti-parasitic applications in small companion animal medicine. They were first developed as chemoprophylactics against heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) infection to be applied monthly for retroactive killing of third- and fourth-stage larvae. ML-containing products formulated for oral (ivermectin, milbemycin oxime), topical (selamectin, moxidectin) or injectable sustained release (moxidectin, ivermectin) are approved for heartworm prevention in dogs or cats. Clearance of microfilariae and gradual or "soft" killing of adult heartworms constitute increasingly prevalent extra-label uses of MLs against D. immitis. Some commercial ML formulations contain sufficient levels of active ingredient (milbemycin oxime, selamectin, moxidectin) to support additional label claims against gastrointestinal nematode parasites such as hookworms (Ancylostoma spp.) and ascarid round worms (Toxocara spp. and Toxascaris leonina). Beyond these approved applications, safe, extra-label uses of MLs against nematodes parasitizing the urinary tract, such as Capillaria spp., and parasites of the tissues, such as Dipetalonema reconditum, Dirofilaria repens, Thelazia spp. and Spirocerca lupi, in dogs and cats as well as exotic pets have been reported. MLs as a group have intrinsic insecticidal and acaricidal activity, and topical or otic formulations of certain compounds (selamectin, moxidectin, milbemycin oxime or ivermectin) are approved for treatment and control of fleas, certain ixodid ticks, sarcoptiform and demodectic mange mites and psoroptiform ear mites. Extra-label applications of MLs against ectoparasites include notoedric mange mites, dermanyssids such as Ornythonussus bacoti, numerous species of fur mite (e.g. Cheyletiella spp. and Lynxacarus) and trombiculids ("chiggers") in cats, dogs and nontraditional or exotic pets.

  4. Effects of User Puff Topography, Device Voltage, and Liquid Nicotine Concentration on Electronic Cigarette Nicotine Yield: Measurements and Model Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Talih, Soha; Balhas, Zainab; Eissenberg, Thomas; Salman, Rola; Karaoghlanian, Nareg; El Hellani, Ahmad; Baalbaki, Rima; Saliba, Najat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Some electronic cigarette (ECIG) users attain tobacco cigarette–like plasma nicotine concentrations while others do not. Understanding the factors that influence ECIG aerosol nicotine delivery is relevant to regulation, including product labeling and abuse liability. These factors may include user puff topography, ECIG liquid composition, and ECIG design features. This study addresses how these factors can influence ECIG nicotine yield. Methods: Aerosols were machine generated with 1 type of ECIG cartridge (V4L CoolCart) using 5 distinct puff profiles representing a tobacco cigarette smoker (2-s puff duration, 33-ml/s puff velocity), a slow average ECIG user (4 s, 17 ml/s), a fast average user (4 s, 33 ml/s), a slow extreme user (8 s, 17 ml/s), and a fast extreme user (8 s, 33 ml/s). Output voltage (3.3–5.2 V or 3.0–7.5 W) and e-liquid nicotine concentration (18–36 mg/ml labeled concentration) were varied. A theoretical model was also developed to simulate the ECIG aerosol production process and to provide insight into the empirical observations. Results: Nicotine yields from 15 puffs varied by more than 50-fold across conditions. Experienced ECIG user profiles (longer puffs) resulted in higher nicotine yields relative to the tobacco smoker (shorter puffs). Puff velocity had no effect on nicotine yield. Higher nicotine concentration and higher voltages resulted in higher nicotine yields. These results were predicted well by the theoretical model (R 2 = 0.99). Conclusions: Depending on puff conditions and product features, 15 puffs from an ECIG can provide far less or far more nicotine than a single tobacco cigarette. ECIG emissions can be predicted using physical principles, with knowledge of puff topography and a few ECIG device design parameters. PMID:25187061

  5. Orthopedic Practice Patterns Relating to Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction in Elite Athletes.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Brandon J; Harris, Joshua D; Fillingham, Yale A; Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Bush-Joseph, Charles; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R; Verma, Nikhil N

    2015-12-01

    We conducted an online survey of National Hockey League (NHL), Major League Soccer (MLS), and US Olympic/World Cup Ski/Snowboard (Olympic) team orthopedic surgeons to determine practice patterns relating to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in elite athletes. Of the 94 team orthopedic surgeons surveyed, 47 (50%) responded. Mean (SD) experience as a team physician was 7.73 (5.33) years for NHL, 6.77 (6.64) years for MLS, and 1.14 (0.36) years for Olympic. Mean (SD) number of ACL reconstructions performed in 2012 was 101 (51) for NHL, 78 (38) for MLS, and 110 (105) for Olympic. Overall, 33 surgeons (70.2%) indicated they would use bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) autograft to treat their starting athletes. Twenty-one (44.7%) drilled the femoral tunnel through a transtibial portal, 36.2% through an anteromedial portal, and 12.8% by a 2-incision technique. All the surgeons used a single-bundle technique. Thirty-three (70.2%) did not recommend a brace for their elite athletes during play on return to sport (RTS). Twenty-seven NHL and MLS surgeons (81.8%) recommended RTS only after an athlete has passed a series of RTS tests (eg, Vail, single-leg hop). Most of the NHL, MLS, and Olympic team orthopedic surgeons who were surveyed perform their ACL reconstructions using BPTB autograft, using a single-bundle technique, and through a transtibial portal, and do not require bracing for their athletes returning to sport. Most required their athletes to complete a series of RTS tests before resuming competitive play. PMID:26665248

  6. PREFACE: Algebra, Geometry, and Mathematical Physics 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolin, A.; Abramov, V.; Fuchs, J.; Paal, E.; Shestopalov, Y.; Silvestrov, S.

    2012-02-01

    This proceedings volume presents results obtained by the participants of the 6th Baltic-Nordic workshop 'Algebra, Geometry, and Mathematical Physics (AGMP-6)' held at the Sven Lovén Centre for Marine Sciences in Tjärnö, Sweden on October 25-30, 2010. The Baltic-Nordic Network AGMP 'Algebra, Geometry, and Mathematical Physics' http://www.agmp.eu was created in 2005 on the initiative of two Estonian universities and two Swedish universities: Tallinn University of Technology represented by Eugen Paal (coordinator of the network), Tartu University represented by Viktor Abramov, Lund University represented by Sergei Silvestrov, and Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg represented by Alexander Stolin. The goal was to promote international and interdisciplinary cooperation between scientists and research groups in the countries of the Baltic-Nordic region in mathematics and mathematical physics, with special emphasis on the important role played by algebra and geometry in modern physics, engineering and technologies. The main activities of the AGMP network consist of a series of regular annual international workshops, conferences and research schools. The AGMP network also constitutes an important educational forum for scientific exchange and dissimilation of research results for PhD students and Postdocs. The network has expanded since its creation, and nowadays its activities extend beyond countries in the Baltic-Nordic region to universities in other European countries and participants from elsewhere in the world. As one of the important research-dissimilation outcomes of its activities, the network has a tradition of producing high-quality research proceedings volumes after network events, publishing them with various international publishers. The PDF also contains the following: List of AGMP workshops and other AGMP activities Main topics discussed at AGMP-6 Review of AGMP-6 proceedings Acknowledgments List of Conference Participants

  7. Ruthenium Metal-Organic Frameworks with Different Defect Types: Influence on Porosity, Sorption, and Catalytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhua; Kauer, Max; Halbherr, Olesia; Epp, Konstantin; Guo, Penghu; Gonzalez, Miguel I; Xiao, Dianne J; Wiktor, Christian; LIabrés I Xamena, Francesc X; Wöll, Christof; Wang, Yuemin; Muhler, Martin; Fischer, Roland A

    2016-09-26

    By employing the mixed-component, solid-solution approach, various functionalized ditopic isophthalate (ip) defect-generating linkers denoted 5-X-ipH2 , where X=OH (1), H (2), NH2 (3), Br (4), were introduced into the mixed-valent ruthenium analogue of [Cu3 (btc)2 ]n (HKUST-1, btc=benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate) to yield Ru-DEMOFs (defect-engineered metal-organic frameworks) of the general empirical formula [Ru3 (btc)2-x (5-X-ip)x Yy ]n . Framework incorporation of 5-X-ip was confirmed by powder XRD, FTIR spectroscopy, ultrahigh-vacuum IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, (1) H NMR spectroscopy, N2 sorption, and X-ray absorption near edge structure. Interestingly, Ru-DEMOF 1 c with 32 % framework incorporation of 5-OH-ip shows the highest BET surface area (≈1300 m(2)  g(-1) , N2 adsorption, 77 K) among all materials (including the parent framework [Ru3 (btc)2 Yy ]n ). The characterization data are consistent with two kinds of structural defects induced by framework incorporation of 5-X-ip: modified paddlewheel nodes featuring reduced ruthenium sites (Ru(δ+) , 0<δ<2, type A) and missing nodes leading to enhanced porosity (type B). Their relative abundances depend on the choice of the functional group X in the defect linkers. Defects A and B also appeared to play a key role in sorption of small molecules (i.e., CO2 , CO, H2 ) and the catalytic properties of the materials (i.e., ethylene dimerization and the Paal-Knorr reaction). PMID:27529415

  8. [Multiple dependent variables LS-SVM regression algorithm and its application in NIR spectral quantitative analysis].

    PubMed

    An, Xin; Xu, Shuo; Zhang, Lu-Da; Su, Shi-Guang

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper, on the basis of LS-SVM algorithm, we built a multiple dependent variables LS-SVM (MLS-SVM) regression model whose weights can be optimized, and gave the corresponding algorithm. Furthermore, we theoretically explained the relationship between MLS-SVM and LS-SVM. Sixty four broomcorn samples were taken as experimental material, and the sample ratio of modeling set to predicting set was 51 : 13. We first selected randomly and uniformly five weight groups in the interval [0, 1], and then in the way of leave-one-out (LOO) rule determined one appropriate weight group and parameters including penalizing parameters and kernel parameters in the model according to the criterion of the minimum of average relative error. Then a multiple dependent variables quantitative analysis model was built with NIR spectrum and simultaneously analyzed three chemical constituents containing protein, lysine and starch. Finally, the average relative errors between actual values and predicted ones by the model of three components for the predicting set were 1.65%, 6.47% and 1.37%, respectively, and the correlation coefficients were 0.9940, 0.8392 and 0.8825, respectively. For comparison, LS-SVM was also utilized, for which the average relative errors were 1.68%, 6.25% and 1.47%, respectively, and the correlation coefficients were 0.9941, 0.8310 and 0.8800, respectively. It is obvious that MLS-SVM algorithm is comparable to LS-SVM algorithm in modeling analysis performance, and both of them can give satisfying results. The result shows that the model with MLS-SVM algorithm is capable of doing multi-components NIR quantitative analysis synchronously. Thus MLS-SVM algorithm offers a new multiple dependent variables quantitative analysis approach for chemometrics. In addition, the weights have certain effect on the prediction performance of the model with MLS-SVM, which is consistent with our intuition and is validated in this study. Therefore, it is necessary to optimize

  9. In vitro investigation of contrast flow jet timing in patient-specific intracranial aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Virendra R.; Britz, Garvin W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The direction and magnitude of intra-aneurysmal flow jet are significant risk factors of subarachnoid hemorrhage, and the change of flow jet during an endovascular procedure has been used for prediction of aneurysm occlusion or whether an additional flow diverter (FD) is warranted. However, evaluation of flow jets is often unreliable due to a large variation of flow jet on the digital subtraction angiograms, and this flow pattern variation may result in incorrect clinical diagnosis Therefore, factors contributing to the variation in flow jet are examined at an in vitro setting, and the findings can help us to understand the nature of flow jet and devise a better plan to quantify the aneurysmal hemodynamics accurately. Methods Intra-aneurysmal flows in three patient-specific aneurysms between 11 and 25 mm were investigated in vitro, and a FD was deployed in each aneurysm model. X-ray imaging of these models were performed at injection rates between 0.2 and 2 mL/s. Pulsatile blood pump and aneurysm model were imaged together to determine the timing of flow jet. Results The contrast bolus arrives at the aneurysm early at high contrast injection rates. The flow patterns with slow injection rates exhibit strong inertia that is associated with the systole flow. Flow jets arrive at the aneurysms at the peak systole when the bolus is injected at 0.2 mL/s. The contrast-to-signal ratio is the highest at the injection rate of 0.5 mL/s. Effect of flow diversion can only be assessed at an injection rate greater than 0.5 mL/s. Conclusions Intra-aneurysmal flow jet is highly dependent on the injection rate of the contrast agent. For the internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms, the systolic flows can be visualized at slow injection rates (<0.5 mL/s), while the diastolic flow jets are visible at higher injection rates (>1 mL/s). Dependence of flow jet on the contrast injection rate has serious clinical implications and needs to be considered during diagnostic procedures

  10. Trends and transport of water vapour in the middle atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Joachim

    2012-07-01

    J. Urban with data contributions from the SAGE, HALOE, Odin, MIPAS, ACE, MLS, and SABER teams The evolution and spatio-temporal variability of water vapour in the tropical tropopause region, stratosphere, and mesosphere is analyzed using "historical" (SAGE-II, UARS/HALOE) and "recent" (Odin/SMR, TIMED/SABER, ENVISAT/MIPAS, ACE/FTS, Aura/MLS) satellite limb measurements. Water vapour mixing ratios in the tropical lower stratosphere are correlated with changes of the very variable tropical tropopause cold-point temperatures and the water vapour entry signal is further modulated and altered by transport and mixing of air masses. A water vapour signal originating and ascending in the tropical tropopause region can within certain limits be followed through the stratosphere and mesosphere allowing us for example to test consistency with "age-of-air" estimates and present understanding of poleward transport in this atmospheric region.

  11. Levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury in the branchial plate and muscle tissue of mobulid rays.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Michelle S M; Townsend, Kathy A; Bennett, Michael B; Richardson, Anthony J; Fernando, Daniel; Villa, Cesar A; Gaus, Caroline

    2015-05-15

    Mobulid rays are targeted in fisheries for their branchial plates, for use in Chinese medicine. Branchial plate and muscle tissue from Mobula japanica were collected from fish markets in Sri Lanka, and muscle tissue biopsies from Manta alfredi in Australia. These were analysed for arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury and compared to maximum levels (MLs) set by Food Standards Australia and New Zealand (FSANZ), European Commission (EC) and Codex Alimentarius Commission. The estimated intake for a vulnerable human age group was compared to minimal risk levels set by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. The mean inorganic arsenic concentration in M. japanica muscle was equivalent to the FSANZ ML while cadmium exceeded the EC ML. The mean concentration of lead in M. alfredi muscle tissue exceeded EC and Codex MLs. There were significant positive linear correlations between branchial plate and muscle tissue concentrations for arsenic, cadmium and lead.

  12. Silicon-rich SiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayers: A promising material for the third generation of solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Gourbilleau, F.; Ternon, C.; Dufour, C.

    2009-07-01

    Si-rich-SiO{sub 2}(SRSO)/SiO{sub 2} multilayers (MLs) have been grown by reactive magnetron sputtering. The presence of silicon nanoclusters (Si-ncls) within the SRSO sublayer and annealing temperature influence optical absorption as well as photoluminescence. The optimized annealing temperature has been found to be 1100 deg. C, which allows the recovery of defects and thus enhances photoluminescence. Four MLs with Si-ncl size ranging from 1.5 to 8 nm have been annealed using the optimized conditions and then studied by transmission measurements. Optical absorption has been modeled so that a size effect in the linear absorption coefficient alpha (in cm{sup -1}) has been evidenced and correlated with TEM observations. It is demonstrated that amorphous Si-ncl absorption is fourfold higher than that of crystalline Si-ncls.

  13. Construction of Response Surface with Higher Order Continuity and Its Application to Reliability Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Romero, V. J.

    2002-01-01

    The usefulness of piecewise polynomials with C1 and C2 derivative continuity for response surface construction method is examined. A Moving Least Squares (MLS) method is developed and compared with four other interpolation methods, including kriging. First the selected methods are applied and compared with one another in a two-design variables problem with a known theoretical response function. Next the methods are tested in a four-design variables problem from a reliability-based design application. In general the piecewise polynomial with higher order derivative continuity methods produce less error in the response prediction. The MLS method was found to be superior for response surface construction among the methods evaluated.

  14. Visualization, Analysis and Subsetting Tools for EOS Aura Data Products in HDF-EOS5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J.; Ahmad, S.; Gopalan, A.; Smith, P.; Leptoukh, G.; Kempler, S.

    2004-01-01

    Aura data products are among the first to use the new version 5 of the Hierarchical Data Format for the Earth Observing System, or HDF-EOS5. This presentation discusses the common HDF-EOS5 file layout that is adopted for most of the EOS Aura standard data products. Details of the various tools that can be used to access, visualize and subset these data will also be provided. Aura, the NASA Earth Observing System's atmospheric chemistry mission, was successfully launched July 15, 2004. The Aura spacecraft includes four instruments: the High Resolution Dynamics Limb Sounder (HIRDLS), the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES). Data from the HIRDLS, MLS and OMI will be archived at the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC), while TES data will be archived at the NASA Langley Research Center DAAC. For more information see http://daac.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

  15. Balloon-borne cryogenic frost-point hygrometer observations of water vapour in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere over India: First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunilkumar, S. V.; Muhsin, M.; Emmanuel, Maria; Ramkumar, Geetha; Rajeev, K.; Sijikumar, S.

    2016-03-01

    Balloon-borne cryogenic frost-point hygrometer (CFH) observations of water vapour in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region carried out over India, from Trivandrum [8.5°N, 76.9°E] and Hyderabad [17.5°N, 78.6°E], were compared with that obtained from quasi-collocated Aura-Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) satellite observations. Comparisons show a small dry bias for MLS in the stratosphere. Saturated or super-saturation layers observed near the base of tropical tropopause layer (TTL) are consistent with the quasi-collocated space-based observations of tropical cirrus from KALPANA-1 and CALIPSO. Disturbance of large scale waves in the upper troposphere appears to modulate the water vapour and cirrus distribution.

  16. Techniques in audio and acoustic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kite, Thomas D.

    2003-10-01

    Measurement of acoustic devices and spaces is commonly performed with time-delay spectrometry (TDS) or maximum length sequence (MLS) analysis. Both techniques allow an impulse response to be measured with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that can be traded off against the measurement time. However, TDS suffers from long measurement times because of its linear sweep, while MLS suffers from the corruption of the impulse response by distortion. Recently a logarithmic sweep-based method has been devised which offers high SNR, short measurement times, and the ability to separate the linear impulse response from the impulse responses of distortion products. The applicability of these methods to audio and acoustic measurement will be compared.

  17. Road Orthophoto/dtm Generation from Mobile Laser Scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallet, B.; Papelard, J.-P.

    2015-08-01

    This paper proposes a pipeline to produce road orthophoto and DTM from Mobile Laser Scanning (MLS). For the ortho, modern laser scanners provide a reflectance information allowing for high quality grayscale images, at a much finer resolution than aerial photography can offer. For DTM, MLS offers a much higher accuracy and density than aerial products. This increased precision and resolution leverages new applications for both ortho and DEM. The first task is to filter ground vs non ground, then an interpolation is conducted to build image tiles from the filtered points. Finally, multiple layers are registered and blended to allow for seamless fusion. Our proposed approach achieves high quality products and scaling up is demonstrated.

  18. Metal Concentrations in Two Commercial Tuna Species from an Active Volcanic Region in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Torres, Paulo; Rodrigues, Armindo; Soares, Lília; Garcia, Patrícia

    2016-02-01

    Concentrations of cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead [Pb (µg g(-1) wet weight)] were determined in liver and muscle samples of 15 bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and 15 skipjack tunas (Katsuwonus pelamis) caught over an active volcanic region in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean (Azores, Portugal) and evaluated regarding consumption safety. None of the muscle samples (edible part) exceeded the European Union (EU) maximum limits (MLs) for Hg and Pb. Cd concentrations in muscle were much greater than EU MLs with 53 and 26 % of the bigeye tuna and skipjack tuna, respectively, in exceedance of the limits. Results obtained in this work, together with other studies in the same region, support the existence of an important volcanic source of Cd in waters of the Mid-Atlantic region, which should be carefully monitored given the importance of many commercial marine species for human consumption, mainly in Europe. PMID:26681184

  19. Adsorption and transformation of selected human-used macrolide antibacterial agents with iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxides.

    PubMed

    Feitosa-Felizzola, Juliana; Hanna, Khalil; Chiron, Serge

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption/transformation of two members (clarithromycin and roxithromycin) of the macrolide (ML) antibacterial agents on the surface of three environmental subsurface sorbents (clay, iron(III) and manganese(IV) oxy-hydroxides) was investigated. The adsorption fitted well to the Freundlich model with a high sorption capacity. Adsorption probably occurred through a surface complexation mechanism and was accompanied by slow degradation of the selected MLs. Transformation proceeded through two parallel pathways: a major pathway was the hydrolysis of the cladinose sugar, and to a lesser extent the hydrolysis of the lactone ring. A minor pathway was the N-dealkylation of the amino sugar. This study indicates that Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxy-hydroxides in aquatic sediments may play an important role in the natural attenuation of MLs. Such an attenuation route yields a range of intermediates that might retain some of their biological activity.

  20. Mobile Laser Scanning along Dieppe coastal cliffs: reliability of the acquired point clouds applied to rockfall assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michoud, Clément; Carrea, Dario; Augereau, Emmanuel; Cancouët, Romain; Costa, Stéphane; Davidson, Robert; Delacourt, Chirstophe; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Letortu, Pauline; Maquaire, Olivier

    2013-04-01

    Dieppe coastal cliffs, in Normandy, France, are mainly formed by sub-horizontal deposits of chalk and flintstone. Largely destabilized by an intense weathering and the Channel sea erosion, small and large rockfalls are regularly observed and contribute to retrogressive cliff processes. During autumn 2012, cliff and intertidal topographies have been acquired with a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and a Mobile Laser Scanner (MLS), coupled with seafloor bathymetries realized with a multibeam echosounder (MBES). MLS is a recent development of laser scanning based on the same theoretical principles of aerial LiDAR, but using smaller, cheaper and portable devices. The MLS system, which is composed by an accurate dynamic positioning and orientation (INS) devices and a long range LiDAR, is mounted on a marine vessel; it is then possible to quickly acquire in motion georeferenced LiDAR point clouds with a resolution of about 15 cm. For example, it takes about 1 h to scan of shoreline of 2 km long. MLS is becoming a promising technique supporting erosion and rockfall assessments along the shores of lakes, fjords or seas. In this study, the MLS system used to acquire cliffs and intertidal areas of the Cap d'Ailly was composed by the INS Applanix POS-MV 320 V4 and the LiDAR Optech Ilirs LR. On the same day, three MLS scans with large overlaps (J1, J21 and J3) have been performed at ranges from 600 m at 4 knots (low tide) up to 200 m at 2.2 knots (up tide) with a calm sea at 2.5 Beaufort (small wavelets). Mean scan resolutions go from 26 cm for far scan (J1) to about 8.1 cm for close scan (J3). Moreover, one TLS point cloud on this test site has been acquired with a mean resolution of about 2.3 cm, using a Riegl LMS Z390i. In order to quantify the reliability of the methodology, comparisons between scans have been realized with the software Polyworks™, calculating shortest distances between points of one cloud and the interpolated surface of the reference point cloud. A Mat

  1. Metal Concentrations in Two Commercial Tuna Species from an Active Volcanic Region in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Torres, Paulo; Rodrigues, Armindo; Soares, Lília; Garcia, Patrícia

    2016-02-01

    Concentrations of cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead [Pb (µg g(-1) wet weight)] were determined in liver and muscle samples of 15 bigeye (Thunnus obesus) and 15 skipjack tunas (Katsuwonus pelamis) caught over an active volcanic region in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean (Azores, Portugal) and evaluated regarding consumption safety. None of the muscle samples (edible part) exceeded the European Union (EU) maximum limits (MLs) for Hg and Pb. Cd concentrations in muscle were much greater than EU MLs with 53 and 26 % of the bigeye tuna and skipjack tuna, respectively, in exceedance of the limits. Results obtained in this work, together with other studies in the same region, support the existence of an important volcanic source of Cd in waters of the Mid-Atlantic region, which should be carefully monitored given the importance of many commercial marine species for human consumption, mainly in Europe.

  2. Stratospheric CH3CN from the UARS Microwave Limb Sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Waters, Joe W.; Khosravi, Rashid; Brasseur, Guy P.; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Read, William G.

    CH3CN in the stratosphere has been measured by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), providing the first global CH3CN dataset. The MLS observations are in broad agreement with past high and midlatitude observations of CH3CN, although concentrations are a little larger than previously observed. In the tropics, where CH3CN has not up to now been measured, a persistent ‘peak’ in the profiles is seen around 22 hPa, which may be evidence of a tropical stratospheric CH3CN source. Comparisons are made with the NCAR SOCRATES model, including runs having an artificial tropical stratospheric CH3CN source.

  3. Design challenges for tomorrow's manned launch systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowell, Lawrence F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper attempts to capture some of the technical and national challenges facing the design of America's next manned launch system (MLS). There are three basic paths for pursuing tomorrow's MLS; each with variations. Some characteristics that will be sought regardless of the concept selected include low development (or front-end) and life-cycle costs, safety, operability, availability, and a host of other 'ilities'. In order to discriminate among the concepts, a robust design environment and a variety of new and improved analysis tools are needed that produce critical metrics in a timely, efficient manner from a large study space. This paper presents some of the challenges in development, integration, and application of optimization, costing, operations modeling, and several engineering disciplinary tools including geometry modeling, structures, aerodynamics/aeroheating, and trajectory/performance.

  4. Long-Term Global Morphology of Gravity Wave Activity Using UARS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckermann, Stephen D.; Bacmeister, Julio T.; Wu, Dong L.

    1998-01-01

    This is the first quarter's report on research to extract global gravity-wave data from satellite data and to model those observations synoptically. Preliminary analysis of global maps of extracted middle atmospheric temperature variance from the CRISTA instrument is presented, which appear to contain gravity-wave information. Corresponding simulations of global gravity-wave and mountain-wave activity during this mission period are described using global ray-tracing and mountain-wave models, and interesting similarities among simulated data and CRISTA data are noted. Climatological simulations of mesospheric gravity-wave activity using the HWM-03 wind-temperature climatology are also reported, for comparison with UARS MLS data. Preparatory work on modeling of gravity wave observations from space-based platforms and subsequent interpretation of the MLS gravity-wave product are also described. Preliminary interpretation and relation to the research objectives are provided, and further action for the next quarter's research is recommended.

  5. Multi-level security for computer networking: SAC digital network approach

    SciTech Connect

    Griess, W.; Poutre, D.L.

    1983-10-01

    For telecommunications systems simultaneously handling data of different security levels, multilevel secure (MLS) operation permits maximum use of resources by automatically providing protection to users with various clearances and needs-to-know. The strategic air command (SAC) is upgrading the primary record data system used to command and control its strategic forces. The upgrade, called the SAC Digital Network (SACDIN), is designed to provide multilevel security to support users and external interfaces, with allowed accesses ranging from unclassified to top secret. SACDIN implements a security kernel based upon the Bell and Lapadula security model. This study presents an overview of the SACDIN security architecture and describes the basic message flow across the MLS network. 7 references.

  6. Evidenced based practice: classroom to clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Landin, Cecelia W

    2013-01-01

    Evidence based practice (EBP) can be incorporated into the curriculum of Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) Programs. Current components of curriculum can include EBP in pre-analytic, analytic, and post-analytic topics. Discussion of EBP topics in the classroom using practices assessed through the Laboratory Medicine Best Practices Initiative (LMBP) of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will give students a clear understanding of EBP and how it is used in the clinical laboratory for improved health care quality. Student involvement in Quality Improvement projects to improve laboratory performance and patient outcomes can be developed through capstone projects. Examples of clinical projects and application of EBP into the MLS curriculum are discussed.

  7. Flight tests of IFR landing approach systems for helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Hegarty, D. M.; Peach, L. L.; Phillips, J. D.; Anderson, D. J.; Dugan, D. C.; Ross, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    Joint NASA/FAA helicopter flight tests were conducted to investigate airborne radar approaches (ARA) and microwave landing system (MLS) approaches. Flight-test results were utilized to prove NASA with a data base to be used as a performance measure for advanced guidance and navigation concepts, and to provide FAA with data for establishment of TERPS criteria. The first flight-test investigation consisted of helicopter IFR approaches to offshore oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico, using weather/mapping radar, operational pilots, and a Bell 212 helicopter. The second flight-test investigation consisted of IFR MLS approaches at Crows Landing (near Ames Research Center), with a Bell UH-1H helicopter, using NASA, FAA, and operational industry pilots. Tests are described and results discussed.

  8. Inverse Crack Problems in Piezoelectric Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Jan; Sladek, Vladimir; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2010-05-01

    In the present paper, the meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method is applied to cracked piezoelectric solids under a stationary or transient dynamic load and unspecified electrical conditions on the crack surfaces. On the outer surface of the cracked solid the electrical boundary conditions are over-specified. The coupled governing partial differential equations are satisfied in a weak-form on small fictitious sub-domains. Nodal points are introduced and spread on the analyzed domain and each node is surrounded by a small circle for simplicity, but without loss of generality. The spatial variations of the displacements and the electric potential are approximated by the Moving Least-Squares (MLS) scheme. After performing the spatial integrations, a system of linear algebraic equations for unknown nodal values is obtained. Singular value decomposition (SVD) is applied to solve the ill-conditioned linear system of algebraic equations obtained from the local integral equations (LIEs) after the MLS approximation.

  9. Co/Cu multilayers with reduced magnetoresistive hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubinski, D. J.; Holloway, H.

    1997-01-01

    Practical applications of Co/Cu multilayers (MLs) require copper thicknesses either ≈ 9 Å or ≈ 20 Å corresponding to the first or second antiferromagnetic maximum (AFM). The first AFM has much smaller magnetoresistive hysteresis than the second, but also has lower sensitivity. We discuss application of these MLs when low hysteresis is required. For the first AFM we may improve the sensitivity while retaining low hysteresis by increasing the cobalt thickness to 30-40 Å. At the second AFM we can reduce the magnetoresistive hysteresis by reducing the cobalt thickness to ˜ 3 Å. A particularly attractive combination of high sensitivity and low hysteresis is obtained at the second AFM by alternating such very thin Co layers with 15 Å thick Co layers.

  10. Identification of an organic semiconductor superlattice structure of pentacene and perfluoro-pentacene through resonant and non-resonant X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kowarik, S.; Weber, C.; Hinderhofer, A.; Gerlach, A.; Schreiber, F.; Wang, C.; Hexemer, A.; Leone, S. R.

    2015-11-15

    Highly crystalline and stable molecular superlattices are grown with the smallest possible stacking period using monolayers (MLs) of the organic semiconductors pentacene (PEN) and perfluoro-pentacene (PFP). Superlattice reflections in X-ray reflectivity and their energy dependence in resonant soft X-ray reflectivity measurements show that PFP and PEN MLs indeed alternate even though the coherent ordering is lost after ∼ 4 ML. The observed lattice spacing of 15.9 Å in the superlattice is larger than in pure PEN and PFP films, presumably because of more upright standing molecules and lack of interdigitation between the incommensurate crystalline PEN and PFP layers. The findings are important for the development of novel organic quantum optoelectronic devices.

  11. A new facility for the synchrotron radiation-based calibration of transfer radiation sources in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet spectral range

    SciTech Connect

    Thornagel, Reiner; Fliegauf, Rolf; Klein, Roman Kroth, Simone; Paustian, Wolfgang; Richter, Mathias

    2015-01-15

    The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) has a long tradition in the calibration of radiation sources in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet spectral range, with traceability to calculable synchrotron radiation. Within this context, new instrumentation in the PTB laboratory at the Metrology Light Source (MLS) has been put into operation that opens up extended and improved calibration possibilities. A new facility for radiation source calibrations has been set up in the spectral range from 7 nm to 400 nm based on a combined normal incidence-grazing incidence monochromator. The facility can be used for the calibration of transfer sources in terms of spectral radiant intensity or mean spectral radiance, with traceability to the MLS primary source standard. We describe the design and performance of the experimental station and give examples of some commissioning results.

  12. Automatic Railway Power Line Extraction Using Mobile Laser Scanning Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shanxin; Wang, Cheng; Yang, Zhuang; Chen, Yiping; Li, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Research on power line extraction technology using mobile laser point clouds has important practical significance on railway power lines patrol work. In this paper, we presents a new method for automatic extracting railway power line from MLS (Mobile Laser Scanning) data. Firstly, according to the spatial structure characteristics of power-line and trajectory, the significant data is segmented piecewise. Then, use the self-adaptive space region growing method to extract power lines parallel with rails. Finally use PCA (Principal Components Analysis) combine with information entropy theory method to judge a section of the power line whether is junction or not and which type of junction it belongs to. The least squares fitting algorithm is introduced to model the power line. An evaluation of the proposed method over a complicated railway point clouds acquired by a RIEGL VMX450 MLS system shows that the proposed method is promising.

  13. Cytokine treatment of macrophage suppression of T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Daniel; Bucknum, Amanda; Kozlowski, Megan; Matlack, Robin; Riggs, James

    2010-01-01

    High Mphi:T cell ratios suppress the immune response to the retroviral superantigen Mls by IFNgamma-triggered production of the arg- and trp-consuming enzymes iNOS and IDO. Attempts to reverse suppression by treatment with pro-inflammatory cytokines revealed that IL-6 improved the T cell response to Mls and the pro-hematopoietic cyokines IL-3 and GM-CSF increased suppression. GM-CSF treatment increased Mphi expression of CD80, a ligand for the immune suppressive B7H1 and CTLA-4 receptors. These results illustrate potential strategies for reversing the suppression of cell-mediated immunity characteristic of the high Mphi:T cell ratios found in many tumors.

  14. Effect of motion cues during complex curved approach and landing tasks: A piloted simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted to examine the effect of motion cues using a high fidelity simulation of commercial aircraft during the performance of complex approach and landing tasks in the Microwave Landing System (MLS) signal environment. The data from these tests indicate that in a high complexity MLS approach task with moderate turbulence and wind, the pilot uses motion cues to improve path tracking performance. No significant differences in tracking accuracy were noted for the low and medium complexity tasks, regardless of the presence of motion cues. Higher control input rates were measured for all tasks when motion was used. Pilot eye scan, as measured by instrument dwell time, was faster when motion cues were used regardless of the complexity of the approach tasks. Pilot comments indicated a preference for motion. With motion cues, pilots appeared to work harder in all levels of task complexity and to improve tracking performance in the most complex approach task.

  15. Discovery of 4′′-Ether Linked Azithromycin-Quinolone Hybrid Series: Influence of the Central Linker on the Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A series of novel C-4′′-substituted azithromycins was synthesized and evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activity against a panel of representative erythromycin-susceptible and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistant pathogens. In summary, azithromycin and quinolone substructures merged in a mutually SAR-compatible design gave rise to a new class of antimicrobials with an improved spectrum and potency over azithromycin. Prototypical analogues 7f and 8f display an improved potency versus azithromycin against Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative pathogens. In particular, these new leads maintain activity against MLS-resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. In addition, they represent an improvement over telithromycin (1) and cethromycin (2) against the fastidious Gram-negative pathogen Haemophilus influenzae. PMID:24900314

  16. How do the macrocyclic lactones kill filarial nematode larvae?

    PubMed

    Wolstenholme, Adrian J; Maclean, Mary J; Coates, Ruby; McCoy, Ciaran J; Reaves, Barbara J

    2016-09-01

    The macrocyclic lactones (MLs) are one of the few classes of drug used in the control of the human filarial infections, onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis, and the only one used to prevent heartworm disease in dogs and cats. Despite their importance in preventing filarial diseases, the way in which the MLs work against these parasites is unclear. In vitro measurements of nematode motility have revealed a large discrepancy between the maximum plasma concentrations achieved after drug administration and the amounts required to paralyze worms. Recent evidence has shed new light on the likely functions of the ML target, glutamate-gated chloride channels, in filarial nematodes and supports the hypothesis that the rapid clearance of microfilariae that follows treatment involves the host immune system. PMID:27279086

  17. Preliminary study of a possible automatic landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, W. L.; Winfrey, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Navigation and control laws for a possible automatic landing system have been investigated. The system makes use of data from an inertial table and either an airborne or ground radar to generate signals that guide the airplane to a landing. All landing maneuvers take place within a zone that extends 6000 m out from the touchdown point, 4000 m on each side of the runway center line, and 540 m high. The results show that the system can adequately control the airplane on steep, curved decelerating approaches to a landing that takes place with small errors from the desired landing point and desired airplane attitude. The system studied would interface well with the scanning beam microwave landing system (MLS). The use of this system with the MLS makes it possible to incorporate an independent landing monitor.

  18. An efficient one-pot synthesis of thiochromeno[3,4-d]pyrimidines derivatives: Inducing ROS dependent antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Lingala; Sagar Vijay Kumar, P; Poornachandra, Y; Ganesh Kumar, C; Chandramouli, G V P

    2016-10-01

    An efficient synthesis of thiochromeno[3,4-d]pyrimidine derivatives has been achieved successfully via a one-pot three-component reaction of thiochrome-4-one, aromatic aldehyde and thiourea in the presence of 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium hydrogen sulphate [Bmim]HSO4. This new protocol has the advantages of environmental friendliness, high yields, short reaction times, and convenient operation. Furthermore, among all the tested derivatives, compounds 4b and 4c exhibited promising antibacterial, minimum bactericidal concentration and anti-biofilm activities against Staphylococcus aureus MTCC 96, Staphylococcus aureus MLS16 MTCC 2940 and Bacillus subtilis MTCC 121. The compound 4c also showed promising intracellular ROS accumulation in Staphylococcus aureus MLS16 MTCC 2940 comparable to that of ciprofloxacin resulting in apoptotic cell death of the bacterium. PMID:27522461

  19. Calibration of the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarnot, R. F.; Cofield, R. E.; Waters, J. W.; Flower, D. A.; Peckham, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) is a three-radiometer, passive, limb emission instrument onboard the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Radiometric, spectral and field-of-view calibrations of the MLS instrument are described in this paper. In-orbit noise performance, gain stability, spectral baseline and dynamic range are described, as well as use of in-flight data for validation and refinement of prelaunch calibrations. Estimated systematic scaling uncertainties (3 sigma) on calibrated limb radiances from prelaunch calibrations are 2.6% in bands 1 through 3, 3.4% in band 4, and 6% in band 5. The observed systematic errors in band 6 are about 15%, consistent with prelaunch calibration uncertainties. Random uncertainties on individual limb radiance measurements are very close to the levels predicted from measured radiometer noise temperature, with negligible contribution from noise and drifts on the regular in-flight gain calibration measurements.

  20. Application of aircraft navigation sensors to enhanced vision systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, Barbara T.

    1993-01-01

    In this presentation, the applicability of various aircraft navigation sensors to enhanced vision system design is discussed. First, the accuracy requirements of the FAA for precision landing systems are presented, followed by the current navigation systems and their characteristics. These systems include Instrument Landing System (ILS), Microwave Landing System (MLS), Inertial Navigation, Altimetry, and Global Positioning System (GPS). Finally, the use of navigation system data to improve enhanced vision systems is discussed. These applications include radar image rectification, motion compensation, and image registration.

  1. Improved Ozone Profile Retrievals Using Multispectral Measurements from NASA 'A Train' Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Worden, J.; Livesey, N. J.; Irion, F. W.; Schwartz, M. J.; Bowman, K. W.; Pawson, S.; Wargan, K.

    2013-12-01

    Ozone, a radiatively and chemically important trace gas, plays various roles in different altitude ranges in the atmosphere. In the stratosphere, it absorbs the solar UV radiation from the Sun and protects us from sunburn and skin cancers. In the upper troposphere, ozone acts as greenhouse gas. Ozone in the middle troposphere reacts with many anthropogenic pollutants and cleans up the atmosphere. Near surface ozone is harmful to human health and plant life. Accurate monitoring of ozone vertical distributions is crucial for a better understanding of air quality and climate change. The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) are both in orbit on the Earth Observing System Aura satellite and are providing ozone concentration profile measurements. MLS observes limb signals from 118 GHz to 2.5 THz, and measures upper tropospheric and stratospheric ozone concentration (among many other species) with a vertical resolution of about 3 km. OMI is a nadir-viewing pushbroom ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) imaging spectrograph that measures backscattered radiances covering the 270-500 nm wavelength range. AIRS is a grating spectrometer, on EOS Aqua satellite, that measures the thermal infrared (TIR) radiances emitted by Earth's surface and by gases and particles in the spectral range 650 - 2665 cm-1. We present an approach to combine simultaneously measured UV and TIR radiances together with the retrieved MLS ozone fields, to improve the ozone sounding. This approach has the potential to provide a decadal record of ozone profiles with an improved spatial coverage and vertical resolution from space missions. For evaluating the quality of retrieved profiles, we selected a set of AIRS and OMI measurements, whose ground pixels were collocated with ozonesonde launch sites. The results from combination of these measurements are presented and discussed. The improvements on vertical resolution of tropospheric ozone profiles from the MLS/AIRS/OMI joint

  2. Treatment of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries by Major League Soccer Team Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Joseph; Harris, Joshua D.; Kolstad, Kaare; McCulloch, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The treatment and rehabilitation procedures of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in elite soccer players are controversial. Points of debate include surgical timing, technique, graft choice, rehabilitation, and return-to-sport criteria and timing. Purpose: To identify practice preferences among current Major League Soccer (MLS) team orthopaedic surgeons for ACL injuries. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: The survey was administered at the MLS team physician annual meeting in January 2013. At least 1 orthopaedic surgeon representative from each of the 19 clubs (16 from the United States, 3 from Canada) was in attendance. Teams with more than 1 affiliated orthopaedic surgeon were given an additional survey to be completed either at the meeting or returned via e-mail. Descriptive statistics, Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney (return-to-play parameters, running, and ball drills), and Fisher exact tests (graft selection, bracing, continuous passive motion) were applied to the various data sets from the survey responses. Results: A 100% survey participation rate was achieved (22 team orthopaedic surgeons representing 19 MLS teams). A single-incision, arthroscopically assisted, single-bundle reconstruction was the most common technique (91%). Surgeons were split regarding femoral tunnel drilling (50% transtibial, 46% accessory medial). Autograft bone–patellar tendon–bone (BPTB) was the most common preferred graft choice (68%). The biggest concerns about BPTB autograft and hamstring autograft were anterior knee pain (76%) and hamstring weakness (46%), respectively. Most surgeons did not recommend postoperative continuous passive motion (64%) or functional bracing (68%). Most surgeons permitted return to sport without restrictions at 6 to 8 months following surgery (82%). Surgeons who routinely used functional bracing after ACL surgery more frequently used hamstring autograft than those who used BPTB autograft (P = .04

  3. Cadaveric feasibility study on the use of ultrasound contrast to assess spread of injectate in the serratus anterior muscle plane

    PubMed Central

    Daga, V; Narayanan, MK; Dedhia, JD; Gaur, P; Crick, H; Gaur, A

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Serratus anterior muscle plane (SAP) block has recently been described for the purpose of perioperative pain management following cases of trauma and breast surgery. It might prove a safer alternative to the other regional thoracic paravertebral and central neuraxial blockade techniques. There are no descriptive cadaveric studies in the pre-existing literature to delineate the anatomical plane for this novel technique. The main objectives for our study were to examine the location of the Serratus anterior muscle belly, assess the efficacy of achieving adequate delineation of the muscle plane utilising ultrasound imaging with agitated water as the contrast agent, and finally, to observe the extent of the cepahlo-caudal spread of the injectate in the SAP. Materials and Methods: Seven cadavers were studied. 20 mls of saline was injected into posterior axillary line (PAL) at the level of the 4-5th rib under ultrasound guidance. This was followed by injection of 10 mls of water with air (8 mls water and 2 mls of air). The presence of hyperechoic air bubbles in the fluid distended SAP (hypoechoic) area demonstrated the spread of water and air. Results: In 36% of cadavers, fully formed Serratus Anterior muscle belly was identified at the midaxillary line (MAL), 14% in PAL, and remaining 50% between PAL and MAL. The lower most limit of air-water spread was identified at the subcostal margin. Cephalad spread of contrast was noted in 2nd intercostal space ICS (7%), 3rd ICS (71%), and 4th ICS (22%). Conclusion: This study describes that the serratus anterior muscle is well-formed near the PAL and the injectate spread can be determined with the help of agitated water contrast on ultrasound. Furthermore, there was variability in the cephalad spread of the injectate. PMID:27051373

  4. Validation of the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder Temperature and Geopotential Height Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, M. J.; Lambert, A.; Manney, G. L.; Read, W. G.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; Ao, C. O.; Bernath, P. F.; Boone, C. D.; Cofield, R. E.; Daffer, W. H.; Drouin, B. J.; Fetzer, E. J.; Fuller, R. A.; Jarnot, R. F.; Jiang, J. H.; Jiang, Y. B.; Knosp, B. W.; Krueger, K.; Li, J.-L. F.; Mlynczak, M. G.; Pawson, S.; Russell, J. M., III; Santee, M. L.; Snyder, W. V.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the retrievals algorithm used to determine temperature and height from radiance measurements by the Microwave Limb Sounder on EOS Aura. MLS is a "limbscanning" instrument, meaning that it views the atmosphere along paths that do not intersect the surface - it actually looks forwards from the Aura satellite. This means that the temperature retrievals are for a "profile" of the atmosphere somewhat ahead of the satellite. Because of the need to view a finite sample of the atmosphere, the sample spans a box about 1.5km deep and several tens of kilometers in width; the optical characteristics of the atmosphere mean that the sample is representative of a tube about 200-300km long in the direction of view. The retrievals use temperature analyses from NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) data assimilation system as a priori states. The temperature retrievals are somewhat deperrdezt on these a priori states, especially in the lower stratosphere. An important part of the validation of any new dataset involves comparison with other, independent datasets. A large part of this study is concerned with such comparisons, using a number of independent space-based measurements obtained using different techniques, and with meteorological analyses. The MLS temperature data are shown to have biases that vary with height, but also depend on the validation dataset. MLS data are apparently biased slightly cold relative to correlative data in the upper troposphere and slightly warm in the middle stratosphere. A warm MLS bias in the upper stratosphere may be due to a cold bias in GEOS-5 temperatures.

  5. Evidence of localized strong enhancements in lower stratospheric CH3CN following intense forest fire activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livesey, N.

    2000-01-01

    On 24 August 1992, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite observed a significant enhancement in the abundance of lower stratospheric methyl cyanide at approximately 16-19 km in altitude in a small region off the coast of Florida. Concentrations of order 1400 parts per trillion by volume were observed, compared to a typical stratospheric background level of 30 pptv.

  6. Mitochondrial Localized Stat3 Promotes Breast Cancer Growth via Phosphorylation of Serine 727*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qifang; Raje, Vidisha; Yakovlev, Vasily A.; Yacoub, Adly; Szczepanek, Karol; Meier, Jeremy; Derecka, Marta; Chen, Qun; Hu, Ying; Sisler, Jennifer; Hamed, Hossein; Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Valerie, Kristoffer; Dent, Paul; Larner, Andrew C.

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) is a key mediator in the development of many cancers. For 20 years, it has been assumed that Stat3 mediates its biological activities as a nuclear localized transcription factor activated by many cytokines. However, recent studies from this laboratory and others indicate that Stat3 has an independent function in the mitochondria (mitoStat3) where it controls the activity of the electron transport chain (ETC) and mediates Ras-induced transformation of mouse embryo fibroblasts. The actions of mitoStat3 in controlling respiration and Ras transformation are mediated by the phosphorylation state of serine 727. To address the role of mitoStat3 in the pathogenesis of cells that are transformed, we used 4T1 breast cancer cells, which form tumors that metastasize in immunocompetent mice. Substitution of Ser-727 for an alanine or aspartate in Stat3 that has a mitochondrial localization sequence, MLS-Stat3, has profound effects on tumor growth, complex I activity of the ETC, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cells expressing MLS-Stat3(S727A) display slower tumor growth, decreased complex I activity of the ETC, and increased ROS accumulation under hypoxia compared with cells expressing MLS-Stat3. In contrast, cells expressing MLS-Stat3(S727D) show enhanced tumor growth and complex I activity and decreased production of ROS. These results highlight the importance of serine 727 of mitoStat3 in breast cancer and suggest a novel role for mitoStat3 in regulation of ROS concentrations through its action on the ETC. PMID:24019511

  7. The University of Bern Ion Model: Modeling the Mixed H+(H2O)m(CH_3CN)_n Clusters in the Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, E.; Kazil, J.; Arijs, E.; Livesey, N.

    2001-12-01

    Methyl cyanide (CH3CN) replaces water molecules in proton hydrates H+(H2O)n at high rates in the stratosphere. Our global 2D ion model uses the latest stratospheric UARS MLS CH3CN data together with neutral input from the NCAR SOCRATES model and computes mixed ion cluster H+(H2O)n(CH_3CN) densities. The results are compared with in situ measurements from different sources.

  8. (abstract) Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard

    1994-01-01

    A descope of the EOS program now requires that all EOS platforms after AM1 be launched on DELTA-class vehicles, which results in much smaller platforms (and payloads) than previously envisaged. A major part of the TES hardware design effort has therefore been redirected towards meeting this challenge. The development of the TES concept continues on a schedule to permit flight on the EOS CHEM platform in 2002, where it is planned to be accompanied by HIRDLS and MLS.

  9. The large-scale frozen-in anticyclone in the 2011 Arctic summer stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Douglas R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Strahan, Susan E.

    2013-03-01

    The 2011 Arctic stratospheric final warming was characterized by a large-scale frozen-in anticyclone (FrIAC) that rapidly displaced the winter polar vortex, establishing unusually strong polar easterlies. A comprehensive overview of the 2011 FrIAC is provided using meteorological analyses, Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) N2O observations, and N2O simulations from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) 3-D chemistry and transport model and the Van Leer Icosahedral Triangular Advection (VITA) 2-D (latitude × longitude) isentropic transport model. A vortex edge diagnostic is used to determine the FrIAC boundary, allowing quantification of several FrIAC properties. The 2011 FrIAC originated over North Africa in late March and traveled eastward and poleward over 2 weeks, forming a strong anticyclone that extended from ~580-2100 K potential temperature (~25-50 km). Low potential vorticity (PV) was transported to the pole with the FrIAC in early April; during May, most of the PV signature decayed due to diabatic processes. A small remnant negative PV anomaly persisted near the pole until mid-June. Tracer equivalent latitude was low initially and remained low throughout the summer. GMI, VITA, and MLS showed elevated N2O in the FrIAC, although the peak value was smaller in GMI due to a subtropical low bias. The high-resolution (~20 km) VITA filamentary structure quantitatively matched most of the features observed by MLS when smoothed to match the MLS resolution. The high-N2O anomaly persisted in the middle stratosphere over 4 months until late August, when it was destroyed by horizontal and vertical shearing, combined with photochemical processes.

  10. Hang in There: How to Get a Library Job against All Odds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Drasek, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    It is enough to make a resourceful media specialist wonder whether she will still have a job at the end of the school year or will need to find a new one. And it is not just experienced media specialists who are anxious. A teacher completing her MLS recently wrote on LM_NET that she was worried about getting a job after graduation. With all the…

  11. Characterization of Minnesota lunar simulant for plant growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, James P.; Lindsay, Willard L.; Sadeh, Willy Z.

    1993-01-01

    Processing of lunar regolith into a plant growth medium is crucial in the development of a regenerative life support system for a lunar base. Plants, which are the core of such a system, produce food and oxygen for humans and, at the same time, consume carbon dioxide. Because of the scarcity of lunar regolith, simulants must be used to infer its properties and to develop procedures for weathering and chemical analyses. The Minnesota Lunar Simulant (MLS) has been identified to date as the best available simulant for lunar regolith. Results of the dissolution studies reveal that appropriately fertilized MLS can be a suitable medium for plant growth. The techniques used in conducting these studies can be extended to investigate the suitability of actual lunar regolith as a plant growth medium. Dissolution experiments were conducted using the MLS to determine its nutritional and toxicity characteristics for plant growth and to develop weathering and chemical analysis techniques. Two weathering regimes, one with water and one with dilute organic acids simulating the root rhizosphere microenvironment, were investigated. Elemental concentrations were measured using inductively-coupled-plasma (ICP) emission spectrometry and ion chromatography (IC). The geochemical speciation model, MINTEQA2, was used to determine the major solution species and the minerals controlling them. Acidification was found to be a useful method for increasing cation concentrations to meaningful levels. Initial results indicate that MLS weathers to give neutral to slightly basic solutions which contain acceptable amounts of the essential elements required for plant nutrition (i.e., potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, zinc, sodium, silicon, manganese, copper, chlorine, boron, molybdenum, and cobalt). Elements that need to be supplemented include carbon, nitrogen, and perhaps phosphorus and iron. Trace metals in solution were present at nontoxic levels.

  12. Agriculture increases individual fitness.

    PubMed

    Kovaka, Karen; Santana, Carlos; Patel, Raj; Akçay, Erol; Weisberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We question the need to explain the onset of agriculture by appealing to the second type of multilevel selection (MLS2). Unlike eusocial insect colonies, human societies do not exhibit key features of evolutionary individuals. If we avoid the mistake of equating Darwinian fitness with health and quality of life, the adoption of agriculture is almost certainly explicable in terms of individual-level selection and individual rationality. PMID:27561384

  13. CuO/V2O5-Codoped Bi3/2ZnNb3/2O7 (BZN) Ceramic for Embedded Capacitor Layer in Integrated LTCC Modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoungho; Kang, Seungjin

    2016-06-01

    Sintering additives for Bi3/2ZnNb3/2O7 (BZN) ceramic have been studied to facilitate use of BZN as a material for embedded decoupling capacitors in high-density multilayered low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) modules for mobile communication systems and three-dimensional printing modules. Among the additives studied, a CuO/V2O5 mixture was the most promising for cofiring BZN ceramic with a commercial low-permittivity ( ɛ r) LTCC sheet (MLS-22; NEG Co., Japan) and Ag electrode. BZN codoped with 0.5 wt.% CuO/V2O5 was successfully densified at 860°C by reactive liquid-phase sintering, and the resulting dielectric properties were acceptable for use of the CuO/V2O5-codoped BZN for embedded capacitors in LTCC modules. The room-temperature permittivity ( ɛ r) of the CuO/V2O5-codoped BZN was 148 at 1 MHz, and the capacitance thermal stability was ±1.3% within the temperature range of -55°C to 125°C. The physical and chemical compatibilities of the CuO/V2O5-codoped BZN with heterogeneous layers (low- ɛ r LTCC layer and Ag electrode layer) in LTCC modules were also examined. A cofiring test of the doped BZN ceramic with MLS-22 LTCC sheet revealed that thickness control of the two heterogeneous layers was a key factor to avoid crack formation during cofiring. The optimum thickness ratio of doped BZN to MLS-22 layers was less than 0.25:1. A chemical compatibility test revealed no severe reaction between the doped BZN/MLS-22 and doped BZN/Ag layers.

  14. Barriers to creating a secure MPI

    SciTech Connect

    Brightwell, R.; Greenberg, D.S.; Matt, B.J.; Davida, G.I.

    1997-08-01

    This paper explores some of the many issues in developing security enhanced MPI for embedded real-time systems supporting the Department of Defense`s Multi-level Security policy (DoD MLS) are presented along with the preliminary design for such an MPI variant. In addition some of the many issues that need to be addressed in creating security enhanced versions of MPI for other domains are discussed. 19 refs.

  15. Macrocyclic Lactones Differ in Interaction with Recombinant P-Glycoprotein 9 of the Parasitic Nematode Cylicocylus elongatus and Ketoconazole in a Yeast Growth Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kaschny, Maximiliane; Demeler, Janina; Janssen, I. Jana I.; Kuzmina, Tetiana A.; Besognet, Bruno; Kanellos, Theo; Kerboeuf, Dominique; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Krücken, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Macrocyclic lactones (MLs) are widely used parasiticides against nematodes and arthropods, but resistance is frequently observed in parasitic nematodes of horses and livestock. Reports claiming resistance or decreased susceptibility in human nematodes are increasing. Since no target site directed ML resistance mechanisms have been identified, non-specific mechanisms were frequently implicated in ML resistance, including P-glycoproteins (Pgps, designated ABCB1 in vertebrates). Nematode genomes encode many different Pgps (e.g. 10 in the sheep parasite Haemonchus contortus). ML transport was shown for mammalian Pgps, Pgps on nematode egg shells, and very recently for Pgp-2 of H. contortus. Here, Pgp-9 from the equine parasite Cylicocyclus elongatus (Cyathostominae) was expressed in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain lacking seven endogenous efflux transporters. Pgp was detected on these yeasts by flow cytometry and chemiluminescence using the monoclonal antibody UIC2, which is specific for the active Pgp conformation. In a growth assay, Pgp-9 increased resistance to the fungicides ketoconazole, actinomycin D, valinomycin and daunorubicin, but not to the anthelmintic fungicide thiabendazole. Since no fungicidal activity has been described for MLs, their interaction with Pgp-9 was investigated in an assay involving two drugs: Yeasts were incubated with the highest ketoconazole concentration not affecting growth plus increasing concentrations of MLs to determine competition between or modulation of transport of both drugs. Already equimolar concentrations of ivermectin and eprinomectin inhibited growth, and at fourfold higher ML concentrations growth was virtually abolished. Selamectin and doramectin did not increase susceptibility to ketoconazole at all, although doramectin has been shown previously to strongly interact with human and canine Pgp. An intermediate interaction was observed for moxidectin. This was substantiated by increased binding of UIC2 antibodies in the

  16. Navigation systems for approach and landing of VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, S. F.; Mohr, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The formulation and implementation of navigation systems used for research investigations in the V/STOLAND avionics system are described. The navigation systems prove position and velocity in a cartestian reference frame aligned with the runway. They use filtering techniques to combine the raw position data from navaids (e.g., TACAN, MLS) with data from onboard inertial sensors. The filtering techniques which use both complementary and Kalman filters, are described. The software for the navigation systems is also described.

  17. Analytical evaluation of ILM sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. J.; Johnson, C. E.; Doty, D.

    1975-01-01

    Functional requirements and operating environment constraints for an Independent Landing Monitor for aircraft landings in Cat. 2/3 weather conditions are identified and translated into specific sensing requirements. State-of-the-art capabilities of radar, TV, FLIR, multilateration, microwave radiometry, interferometry, redundant MLS and nuclear sensing concepts are evaluated and compared to the requirements. Concepts showing the best ILM potential are identified elsewhere in this series. Three specific concepts are identified: bistatic radar, complex interferometry, and circular synthetic aperture.

  18. An automated method to register airborne and terrestrial laser scanning point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bisheng; Zang, Yufu; Dong, Zhen; Huang, Ronggang

    2015-11-01

    Laser scanning techniques have been widely used to capture three-dimensional (3D) point clouds of various scenes (e.g. urban scenes). In particular, airborne laser scanning (ALS) and mobile laser scanning (MLS), terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) are effective to capture point clouds from top or side view. Registering the complimentary point clouds captured by ALS and MLS/TLS provides an aligned data source for many purposes (e.g. 3D reconstruction). Among these MLS can be directly geo-referenced to ALS according to the equipped position systems. For small scanning areas or dense building areas, TLS is used instead of MLS. However, registering ALS and TLS datasets suffers from poor automation and robustness because of few overlapping areas and sparse corresponding geometric features. A robust method for the registration of TLS and ALS datasets is proposed, which has four key steps. (1) extracts building outlines from TLS and ALS data sets independently; (2) obtains the potential matching pairs of outlines according to the geometric constraints between building outlines; (3) constructs the Laplacian matrices of the extracted building outlines to model the topology between the geometric features; (4) calculates the correlation coefficients of the extracted geometric features by decomposing the Laplacian matrices into the spectral space, providing correspondences between the extracted features for coarse registration. Finally, the multi-line adjustment strategy is employed for the fine registration. The robustness and accuracy of the proposed method are verified using field data, demonstrating a reliable and stable solution to accurately register ALS and TLS datasets.

  19. An Improved Atmospheric Lifetime of Nitrous Oxide Based on Measurement and Constrained Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, N. M.; Prather, M. J.; Hsu, J. C.; Sovde, O. A.; Isaksen, I.; Jackman, C. H.; Fleming, E. L.; Douglass, A. R.; Strahan, S. E.; Steenrod, S. D.; Froidevaux, L.; Funke, B.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important part of our atmosphere's chemistry when considering both ozone depletion and the global climate. Long-lived atmospheric gasses like N2O have residence times of over a century, making anthropogenic perturbations in the present a lasting consequence. The study aims to calculate a best present-day atmospheric lifetime of N2O with uncertainty based on satellite observation and global chemistry transport models (CTMs). This revised lifetime needs to be considered in climate change assessments as it affects GWP values and projected N2O abundances. An observationally founded lifetime is first calculated using measurements from the NASA Aura satellite's Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument combined with two independent photochemical models including solar cycle effects. Four free-running CTMs are used to calculate both stratospheric N2O distributions and lifetimes. The MLS observations are compared to CTM tropical N2O distributions to identify model biases. Seasonal and interannual variations in N2O and NOy profiles that affect the N2O lifetime are assessed. The MLS data for N2O and O3 and the MIPAS satellite data for NOy are used as constraints to identify CTM biases that could influence their calculated lifetimes. This study finds that N2O lifetime fluctuates over a quasi-biennial cycle, and free-running CTMs can match this variability very well. The CTMs used here produce a wide range in lifetime, from 100 to more than 150 years, but the lifetime derived from the MLS data lies at the lower end, about 110 years.

  20. Unique Challenges Accompany Thick-Shell CdSe/nCdS (n > 10) Nanocrystal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y; Marchuk, K; Abraham, R; Sampat, S; Abraham, R.; Fang, N; Malko, AV; Vela, J

    2011-12-23

    Thick-shell CdSe/nCdS (n {ge} 10) nanocrystals were recently reported that show remarkably suppressed fluorescence intermittency or 'blinking' at the single-particle level as well as slow rates of Auger decay. Unfortunately, whereas CdSe/nCdS nanocrystal synthesis is well-developed up to n {le} 6 CdS monolayers (MLs), reproducible syntheses for n {ge} 10 MLs are less understood. Known procedures sometimes result in homogeneous CdS nucleation instead of heterogeneous, epitaxial CdS nucleation on CdSe, leading to broad and multimodal particle size distributions. Critically, obtained core/shell sizes are often below those desired. This article describes synthetic conditions specific to thick-shell growth (n {ge} 10 and n {ge} 20 MLs) on both small (sub2 nm) and large (>4.5 nm) CdSe cores. We find added secondary amine and low concentration of CdSe cores and molecular precursors give desired core/shell sizes. Amine-induced, partial etching of CdSe cores results in apparent shell-thicknesses slightly beyond those desired, especially for very-thick shells (n {ge} 20 MLs). Thermal ripening and fast precursor injection lead to undesired homogeneous CdS nucleation and incomplete shell growth. Core/shells derived from small CdSe (1.9 nm) have longer PL lifetimes and more pronounced blinking at single-particle level compared with those derived from large CdSe (4.7 nm). We expect our new synthetic approach will lead to a larger throughput of these materials, increasing their availability for fundamental studies and applications.

  1. A flight expert system for on-board fault monitoring and diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Moonis

    1990-01-01

    An architecture for a flight expert system (FLES) to assist pilots in monitoring, diagnosing, and recovering from inflight faults is described. A prototype was implemented and an attempt was made to automate the knowledge acquisition process by employing a learning by being told methodology. The scope of acquired knowledge ranges from domain knowledge, including the information about objects and their relationships, to the procedural knowledge associated with the functionality of the mechanisms. AKAS (automatic knowledge acquisition system) is the constructed prototype for demonstration proof of concept, in which the expert directly interfaces with the knowledge acquisition system to ultimately construct the knowledge base for the particular application. The expert talks directly to the system using a natural language restricted only by the extent of the definitions in an analyzer dictionary, i.e., the interface understands a subset of concepts related to a given domain. In this case, the domain is the electrical system of the Boeing 737. Efforts were made to define and employ heuristics as well as algorithmic rules to conceptualize data produced by normal and faulty jet engine behavior examples. These rules were employed in developing the machine learning system (MLS). The input to MLS is examples which contain data of normal and faulty engine behavior and which are obtained from an engine simulation program. MLS first transforms the data into discrete selectors. Partial descriptions formed by those selectors are then generalized or specialized to generate concept descriptions about faults. The concepts are represented in the form of characteristic and discriminant descriptions, which are stored in the knowledge base and are employed to diagnose faults. MLS was successfully tested on jet engine examples.

  2. Is There Evidence of Convectively Injected Water Vapor in the Lowermost Stratosphere Over Boulder, Colorado?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, D. F.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Davis, S. M.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Anderson et al. (2012) reported the frequent presence of convectively injected water vapor in the lowermost stratosphere over North America during summertime, based on aircraft measurements. They asserted that enhanced catalytic ozone destruction within these wet stratospheric air parcels presents a concern for UV dosages in populated areas, especially if the frequency of deep convective events increases. Schwartz et al.(2013) analyzed 8 years of more widespread Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) measurements of lower stratospheric water vapor over North America and concluded that anomalously wet (>8 ppm) air parcels were present only 2.5% of the time during July and August. However, given the 3-km vertical resolution of MLS water vapor retrievals in the lowermost stratosphere, thin wet layers deposited by overshooting convection may be present but not readily detectable by MLS. Since 1980 the balloon-borne NOAA frost point hygrometer (FPH) has produced nearly 400 high quality water vapor profiles over Boulder, Colorado, at 5-m vertical resolution from the surface to the middle stratosphere. The 34-year record of high-resolution FPH profiles obtained over Boulder during summer months is evaluated for evidence of convectively injected water vapor in the lowermost stratosphere. A number of approaches are used to assess the contributions of deep convection to the Boulder stratospheric water vapor record. The results are compared to those based on MLS profiles over Boulder and the differences are discussed. Anderson, J. G., D. M. Wilmouth, J. B. Smith, and D. S. Sayres (2012), UV dosage levels in summer: Increased risk of ozone loss from convectively injected water vapor, Science, 337(6096), 835-839, doi:10.1126/science.1222978. Schwartz, M. J., W. G. Read, M. L. Santee, N. J. Livesey, L. Froidevaux, A. Lambert, and G. L. Manney (2013), Convectively injected water vapor in the North American summer lowermost stratosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 40, 2316-2321, doi:10

  3. Characterization of Haemonchus contortus P-glycoprotein-16 and its interaction with the macrocyclic lactone anthelmintics.

    PubMed

    Godoy, P; Che, H; Beech, R N; Prichard, R K

    2015-11-01

    Anthelmintic resistance in veterinary nematodes, including Haemonchus contortus, has become a limitation to maintaining high standards of animal health. Resistance in this parasite, to all drug families including the macrocyclic lactones (MLs) is a serious issue worldwide. Mechanisms of resistance to the MLs appear to be complex and to include the elimination of these compounds by ABC transporter-like proteins present in nematodes. In order to investigate the potential involvement of ABC transporters in ML resistance in H. contortus, we have characterized the functionality of the ABC transporter H. contortus P-glycoprotein-16 (Hco-PGP-16) expressed in mammalian cells. This has included a study of its interaction with different MLs, including the avermectins, abamectin (ABA) and ivermectin (IVM), and the milbemycin, moxidectin (MOX). Hco-PGP-16 transport activity was studied using the fluorophore Rhodamine 123 (Rho 123). Transfected cells expressing Hco-PGP-16 accumulated less than 50% of Rho 123 than control cells, suggesting an active transport of this tracer dye by Hco-PGP-16. The influence of the MLs on the Rho123 transport by Hco-PGP-16 was then investigated. A marked inhibition of Rho123 transport by ABA and IVM was observed. In contrast, MOX showed less effect on inhibition of Rho123 transport by Hco-PGP-16, and the inhibition was not saturable. The difference in the interaction of the avermectins and MOX with Hco-PGP-16 may help explain the slower rate of development of resistance to MOX compared with the avermectins in H. contortus.

  4. Multilevel samplers as microcosms to assess microbial response to biostimulation.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, B R; Peacock, A D; Park, M; Ogles, D M; Istok, J D; McKinley, J P; Resch, C T; White, D C

    2008-01-01

    Passive multilevel samplers (MLS) containing a solid matrix for microbial colonization were used as in situ microcosms in conjunction with a push-pull biostimulation experiment designed to promote biological U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction. MLS were deployed at 24 elevations in the injection well and two downgradient wells to investigate the spatial variability in microbial community composition and growth prior to and following biostimulation. The microbial community was characterized by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) quantification of bacteria, NO(3)(-)-reducing bacteria (nirS and nirK), delta-proteobacteria, Geobacter sp., and methanogens (mcrA). Pretest cell densities were low overall but varied substantially with significantly greater bacterial populations detected at circumneutral pH (t-test, alpha= 0.05), suggesting carbon substrate and low pH limitations of microbial activity. Although pretest cell densities were low, denitrifying bacteria were dominant members of the microbial community. Biostimulation with an ethanol-amended ground water resulted in concurrent NO(3)(-) and Tc(VII) reduction, followed by U(VI) reduction. Q-PCR analysis of MLS revealed significant (1 to 2 orders of magnitude, Mann-Whitney U-test, alpha= 0.05) increases in cell densities of bacteria, denitrifiers, delta-proteobacteria, Geobacter sp., and methanogens in response to biostimulation. Traditionally, characterization of sediment samples has been used to investigate the microbial community response to biostimulation; however, collection of sediment samples is expensive and not conducive to deep aquifers or temporal studies. The results presented demonstrate that push-pull tests with passive MLS provide an inexpensive approach to determine the effect of biostimulation on contaminant concentrations, geochemical conditions, and the microbial community composition and function. PMID:18194316

  5. Airborne antenna polarization study for the microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilreath, M. C.

    1976-01-01

    The feasibility of the microwave landing system (MLS) airborne antenna pattern coverage requirements are investigated for a large commercial aircraft using a single omnidirectional antenna. Omnidirectional antennas having vertical and horizontal polarizations were evaluated at several different station locations on a one-eleventh scale model Boeing 737 aircraft. The results obtained during this experimental program are presented which include principal plane antenna patterns and complete volumetric coverage plots.

  6. Multilevel Samplers to Assess Microbial Community Response to Biostimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, B. R.; McKinley, J. P.; Peacock, A. D.; Park, M.; Ogles, D.; Istok, J. D.; Resch, C. T.; White, D. C.

    2006-05-01

    Passive multilevel samplers (MLS) containing a solid matrix for microbial colonization were used in conjunction with a push-pull biostimulation experiment designed to promote biological U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction. MLS were deployed at 24 elevations in the injection well and two down gradient wells to investigate the spatial variability in microbial community composition and growth prior to and following biostimulation. The microbial community was characterized by real-time PCR (Q-PCR) quantification of eubacteria, NO3- reducing bacteria (nirS and nirK), δ-proteobacteria, Geobacter sp., and methanogens (mcrA). Pretest cell densities were low overall but varied substantially with significantly greater eubacterial populations detected at circumneutral pH (T-test, α=0.05) suggesting carbon substrate and low pH limitation of microbial activity. Although pretest cell densities were low, denitrifying bacteria were dominant members of the microbial community. Biostimulation with an ethanol amended groundwater resulted in concurrent NO3- and Tc(VII) reduction followed by U(VI) reduction. Q-PCR analysis of MLS revealed significant (1-2 orders of magnitude, T-test, α=0.05) increases in cell densities of eubacteria, denitrifiers, δ- proteobacteria, Geobacter sp., and methanogens in response to biostimulation. Traditionally characterization of sediment samples has been used to investigate the microbial community response to biostimulation, however, collection of sediment samples is expensive and not conducive to deep aquifers or temporal studies. The results presented demonstrate that push-pull tests with passive MLS provide an inexpensive approach to determine the effect of biostimulation on contaminant concentrations, geochemical conditions, and the microbial community composition and function.

  7. The moving-least-squares-particle hydrodynamics method (MLSPH)

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, G.

    1997-12-31

    An enhancement of the smooth-particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method has been developed using the moving-least-squares (MLS) interpolants of Lancaster and Salkauskas which simultaneously relieves the method of several well-known undesirable behaviors, including spurious boundary effects, inaccurate strain and rotation rates, pressure spikes at impact boundaries, and the infamous tension instability. The classical SPH method is derived in a novel manner by means of a Galerkin approximation applied to the Lagrangian equations of motion for continua using as basis functions the SPH kernel function multiplied by the particle volume. This derivation is then modified by simply substituting the MLS interpolants for the SPH Galerkin basis, taking care to redefine the particle volume and mass appropriately. The familiar SPH kernel approximation is now equivalent to a colocation-Galerkin method. Both classical conservative and recent non-conservative formulations of SPH can be derived and emulated. The non-conservative forms can be made conservative by adding terms that are zero within the approximation at the expense of boundary-value considerations. The familiar Monaghan viscosity is used. Test calculations of uniformly expanding fluids, the Swegle example, spinning solid disks, impacting bars, and spherically symmetric flow illustrate the superiority of the technique over SPH. In all cases it is seen that the marvelous ability of the MLS interpolants to add up correctly everywhere civilizes the noisy, unpredictable nature of SPH. Being a relatively minor perturbation of the SPH method, it is easily retrofitted into existing SPH codes. On the down side, computational expense at this point is significant, the Monaghan viscosity undoes the contribution of the MLS interpolants, and one-point quadrature (colocation) is not accurate enough. Solutions to these difficulties are being pursued vigorously.

  8. In vivo breast sound-speed imaging with ultrasound tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie; Li, Cuiping; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We discuss a bent-ray ultrasound tomography algorithm with total-variation (TV) regularization. We have applied this algorithm to 61 in vivo breast datasets collected with our in-house clinical prototype for imaging sound-speed distributions in the breast. Our analysis showed that TV regularization could preserve sharper lesion edges than the classic Tikhonov regularization. Furthermore, the image quality of our TV bent-ray sound-speed tomograms was superior to that of the straight-ray counterparts for all types of breasts within BI-RADS density categories 1-4. For all four breast types from fatty to dense, the improvements for average sharpness (in the unit of (m{center_dot} s) {sup -1}) of lesion edges in our TV bent-ray tomograms are between 2.1 to 3.4 fold compared to the straight ray tomograms. Reconstructed sound-speed tomograms illustrated that our algorithm could successfully image fatty and glandular tissues within the breast. We calculated the mean sound-speed values for fatty tissue and breast parenchyma as 1422 {+-} 9 mls (mean{+-} SD) and1487 {+-} 21 mls, respectively. Based on 32 lesions in a cohort of 61 patients, we also found that the mean sound-speed for malignant breast lesions (1548{+-}17 mls) was higher, on average, than that of benign ones (1513{+-}27 mls) (one-sided p

  9. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Isolates From Newly Admitted Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Sun, Kangde; Dong, Danfeng; Luo, Qingqiong; Peng, Yibing; Chen, Fuxiang

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, or methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a significant pathogen in both nosocomial and community infections. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains tend to be multi-drug resistant and to invade hospital settings. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristicsof nasal S. aureus among newlyadmitted inpatients.In the present study, 66 S. aureus isolates, including 10 healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), 8 CA-MRSA, and 48 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains, were found in the nasal cavities of 62 patients by screening 292 newlyadmitted patients. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristics of these isolates, including spa-type, sequence type (ST) and SCCmec type, were investigated. All isolates were sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but high levels of resistance to penicillin and erythromycin were detected. According to D-test and erm gene detection results, the cMLS(B) and iMLS(B) phenotypes were detected in 24 and 16 isolates, respectively. All 10 HA-MRSA strains displayed the cMLS(B) phenotypemediated by ermA or ermA/ermC, while the cMLS(B) CA-MRSA and MSSA strains carried the ermB gene. Molecular characterization revealedall 10 HA-MRSA strains were derived from the ST239-SCCmec III clone, and four out of eight CA-MRSA strains were t437-ST59-SCCmec V. The results suggest that patients play an indispensable role in transmitting epidemic CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains.

  10. Multilevel samplers as microcosms to assess microbial response to biostimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, Brett R.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Park, Melora M.; Ogles, Dora; Istok, Jonathan D.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; White, David C.

    2008-03-01

    Passive multilevel samplers (MLS) containing a solid matrix for microbial colonization were used in conjunction with a push-pull biostimulation experiment designed to promote biological U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction. MLS were deployed at 24 elevations in the injection well and two down gradient wells to investigate the spatial variability in microbial community composition and growth prior to and following biostimulation. The microbial community was characterized by real-time PCR (Q-PCR) quantification of Bacteria, NO3- reducing bacteria (nirS and nirK), δ-proteobacteria, Geobacter sp., and methanogens (mcrA). Pretest cell densities were low overall but varied substantially with significantly greater Bacterial populations detected at circumneutral pH (T-test, α=0.05) suggesting carbon substrate and low pH limitations of microbial activity. Although pretest cell densities were low, denitrifying bacteria were dominant members of the microbial community. Biostimulation with an ethanol amended groundwater resulted in concurrent NO3- and Tc(VII) reduction followed by U(VI) reduction. Q-PCR analysis of MLS revealed significant (1-2 orders of magnitude, T-test, α=0.05) increases in cell densities of Bacteria, denitrifiers, δ-proteobacteria, Geobacter sp., and methanogens in response to biostimulation. Traditionally characterization of sediment samples has been used to investigate the microbial community response to biostimulation, however, collection of sediment samples is expensive and not conducive to deep aquifers or temporal studies. The results presented demonstrate that push-pull tests with passive MLS provide an inexpensive approach to determine the effect of biostimulation on contaminant concentrations, geochemical conditions, and the microbial community composition and function.

  11. Aiming low: A resident male's rank predicts takeover success by challenging males in Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Pingfen; Ren, Baoping; Garber, Paul A; Xia, Fan; Grueter, Cyril C; Li, Ming

    2016-09-01

    In many primate species that form one-male breeding units (OMUs), the threat of a takeover by a bachelor male represents a major challenge to group stability and individual reproductive success. In the case of snub-nosed monkeys, which live in large multilevel or modular societies (MLS) comprising several OMUs that travel, feed and rest together and as well as one or more all male units (AMUs), the process by which rival males challenge resident OMU males for access to females is poorly understood. From September 2012 to October 2013, we recorded 48 cases in which rival males visited an OMU in a MLS of Yunnan snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti) inhabiting the Baimaxueshan National Nature Reserve, Yunnan Province, China. In 40 cases, rival males engaged in mild agonistic interactions (approaching, staring, teeth-baring and chasing) but failed to take over the group; we counted these visits as failed takeovers, recognizing that they may nevertheless allow rival males to assess the competitive ability of residents. During eight successful takeovers, however, there was severe physical aggression between challenging and resident males, with serious injuries to participants. We found that neither the number of adult and subadult females in an OMU, the number of non-pregnant, non-lactating adult females in an OMU, nor the rank of a resident male relative to other resident males in the MLS predicted which OMU a challenging male targeted for takeover. However, a resident male's rank significantly predicted whether takeover attempts were successful. Specifically, challenging males were more successful in displacing a lower-ranking resident male than a higher-ranking male. Given that a Yunnan snub-nosed monkey MLS may contain as many as 40 resident and 36 bachelor males, continued research is required to determine the set of factors that enable resident males to maintain high social rank and successfully defend their harems. Am. J. Primatol. 78:974-982, 2016. © 2016

  12. Reducing the recruitment of sedimented algae and nutrient release into the overlying water using modified soil/sand flocculation-capping in eutrophic lakes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Gang; Dai, Lichun; Li, Liang; He, Linchen; Li, Hong; Bi, Lei; Gulati, Ramesh D

    2012-05-01

    The effect of simultaneously removing algal blooms from water and reducing the resuspension and nutrient release from the sediment was studied using modified local soil/sand flocculation-capping (MLS-capping) in simulated water-sediment systems. Twenty one sediment cores in situ with overlying water containing algal blooms were collected from Meiliang Bay of Lake Taihu (China) in July 2011. The algal cells in the water were flocculated and sunk to the sediment using chitosan modified local soils, and the algal flocs were capped with modified and nonmodified soil/sand and then incubated at 25 °C for 20 days. In the MLS-capping treated systems, the TP concentration was reduced from 2.56 mg P L(-1) to 0.06-0.14 mg P L(-1) and TN from 14.66 mg N L(-1) to 6.03-9.56 mg N L(-1) throughout the experiment, whereas the sediment to water fluxes of TP, TN, PO(4)-P, and NH(4)-N were greatly reduced or reversed and the redox potential remarkably increased compared to the control system. A capping layer of 1 cm chitosan-modified sand decreased the resuspension of the sediment by a factor of 5 compared to the clay/soil/sediment systems and the overlying water kept clear even under constant stirring conditions (200 rpm). The study suggested that by using MLS-capping technology it is possible to quickly reduce the nutrient and turbidity of water by flocculating and capping the algal cells into the sediment, where the resuspension of algal flocs is physically reduced and the diffusion of nutrients from sediment to the overlying water chemically blocked by the MLS capping layers.

  13. Newcastle Disease Virus: Potential Therapeutic Application for Human and Canine Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Diana; Pelayo, Rosana; Medina, Luis Alberto; Vadillo, Eduardo; Sánchez, Rogelio; Núñez, Luis; Cesarman-Maus, Gabriela; Sarmiento-Silva, Rosa Elena

    2015-01-01

    Research on oncolytic viruses has mostly been directed towards the treatment of solid tumors, which has yielded limited information regarding their activity in hematological cancer. It has also been directed towards the treatment of humans, yet veterinary medicine may also benefit. Several strains of the Newcastle disease virus (NDV) have been used as oncolytics in vitro and in a number of in vivo experiments. We studied the cytolytic effect of NDV-MLS, a low virulence attenuated lentogenic strain, on a human large B-cell lymphoma cell line (SU-DHL-4), as well as on primary canine-derived B-cell lymphoma cells, and compared them to healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both humans and dogs. NDV-MLS reduced cell survival in both human (42% ± 5%) and dog (34% ± 12%) lymphoma cells as compared to untreated controls. No significant effect on PBMC was seen. Cell death involved apoptosis as documented by flow-cytometry. NDV-MLS infections of malignant lymphoma tumors in vivo in dogs were confirmed by electron microscopy. Early (24 h) biodistribution of intravenous injection of 1 × 1012 TCID50 (tissue culture infective dose) in a dog with T-cell lymphoma showed viral localization only in the kidney, the salivary gland, the lung and the stomach by immunohistochemistry and/or endpoint PCR. We conclude that NDV-MLS may be a promising agent for the treatment of lymphomas. Future research is needed to elucidate the optimal therapeutic regimen and establish appropriate biosafety measures. PMID:26703717

  14. UARS Microwave Limb Sounder Observations of Upper Atmosphere Ozone and Chlorine Monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D.; Froidevaux, L.; Jarnot, R.; Read, W.; Waters, J.

    1994-01-01

    UARS MLS observations of stratospheric ozone and chlorine monoxide are described. Enhanced concentrations of ClO, the predominant form of reactive chlorine responsible for ozone depletion, are seen within both the northern and southern winter polar vortices. In the southern hemisphere, this leads directly to the development of the annual Antarctic ozone hole. While ozone depletion is also observed in the north, it is less severe and there is considerable interannual variability.

  15. Trace gas evolution in the lowermost stratosphere from Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santee, M. L.; Manney, G. L.; Livesey, N. J.; Froidevaux, L.; Schwartz, M. J.; Read, W. G.

    2011-09-01

    Daily global measurements from NASA's Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) allow comprehensive investigation of interhemispheric and interannual variations in chemical and transport processes throughout the lowermost stratosphere (LMS). We analyze nearly seven years of MLS O3, HNO3, HCl and ClO measurements along with meteorological analyses to place chemical processing in and dispersal of processed air from the winter polar lowermost vortex and subvortex in a global context. The MLS data, the first simultaneous observations of HCl and ClO covering much of the LMS, reveal that chlorine activation is widespread in the Antarctic subvortex and can occur to a significant degree in the Arctic subvortex. Unusually low temperatures and strong, prolonged chlorine activation in the lowermost vortex and subvortex promoted large ozone losses there in the 2006 (and 2008) Antarctic and 2004/2005 Arctic winters, consistent with reported record low column ozone. Processed air dispersing from the decaying vortex in spring induces rapid changes in extravortex trace gas abundances. After vortex breakdown, the subtropical jet/tropopause becomes the major transport barrier in the LMS. Quasi-isentropic transport of tropical tropospheric air into the LMS, associated with the summer monsoon circulations, leads to decreases in extratropical O3, HNO3, and HCl in both hemispheres. Strong mixing in the summertime LMS homogenizes extratropical trace gas fields. MLS measurements in the tropics show signatures of monsoon-related cross-equatorial stratosphere-to-troposphere transport. Observed seasonal and interannual variations in trace gas abundances in the LMS are consistent with variations in the strength of transport barriers diagnosed from meteorological analyses.

  16. Hitting the Goalpost: Calculating the Fine Line Between Winning and Losing a Penalty Shootout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widenhorn, Ralf

    2016-10-01

    The Portland Timbers won their first Major League Soccer (MLS) Cup Championship in December 2015. However, if it had not been for a kind double goalpost miss during a penalty shootout a few weeks earlier, the Timbers would never have been in the finals. On Oct. 30th, after what has been called "the greatest penalty kick shootout in MLS history," featuring a combined 22 penalties that included penalties by both goalkeepers, the Timbers won their first-round playoff against Sporting Kansas City. During the thrilling shootout, which can be watched, for example, for example on the MLS website, Sporting had two potentially game-winning penalties miss by the smallest of margins. One penalty bounced off the goalpost back into the field and another was an improbable double post miss. For a physicist, this prompts an interesting research question. Could we find an estimate by what distance the double post penalty shown in Fig. 1 failed to be the game winning shot?

  17. Identification of macrolide-resistant clones of Streptococcus pyogenes in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Silva-Costa, C; Ramirez, M; Melo-Cristino, J

    2006-06-01

    Although the overall level of macrolide resistance (27%) has remained stable in Portugal, a rapid inversion in the dominant phenotypes has been noted, with a sharp decrease in the MLS(B) phenotype paralleled by an increase in the M phenotype. To gain further insight into these changes, 325 macrolide-resistant isolates were characterised using a combination of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The use of Cfr9I, an isoschizomer of SmaI, to digest M phenotype isolates that were refractory to SmaI digestion allowed direct comparison of MLS(B) and M isolates. The results from PFGE and MLST were highly concordant and identified eight major clones, accounting for 92% of the isolates, each of which was associated exclusively with a single macrolide resistance phenotype. Two major clones were found among MLS(B) isolates, characterised by sequence types (ST) 46 (T12/emm22) and ST52 (T28/emm28), whereas clones characterised by ST39 (T4/emm4) and ST28 (T1/emm1) dominated among M isolates. The clone defined by ST52 corresponded to a bacitracin-resistant clone circulating in Europe, and a novel variant expressing other surface antigens (T12/emm22) was detected. The presence of the four major clones has been reported previously in other European countries, suggesting Europe-wide dissemination of a few macrolide-resistant lineages. PMID:16700698

  18. Brain activation to negative stimuli mediates a relationship between adolescent marijuana use and later emotional functioning.

    PubMed

    Heitzeg, Mary M; Cope, Lora M; Martz, Meghan E; Hardee, Jillian E; Zucker, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    This work investigated the impact of heavy marijuana use during adolescence on emotional functioning, as well as the brain functional mediators of this effect. Participants (n=40) were recruited from the Michigan Longitudinal Study (MLS). Data on marijuana use were collected prospectively beginning in childhood as part of the MLS. Participants were classified as heavy marijuana users (n=20) or controls with minimal marijuana use. Two facets of emotional functioning-negative emotionality and resiliency (a self-regulatory mechanism)-were assessed as part of the MLS at three time points: mean age 13.4, mean age 19.6, and mean age 23.1. Functional neuroimaging data during an emotion-arousal word task were collected at mean age 20.2. Negative emotionality decreased and resiliency increased across the three time points in controls but not heavy marijuana users. Compared with controls, heavy marijuana users had less activation to negative words in temporal, prefrontal, and occipital cortices, insula, and amygdala. Activation of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex to negative words mediated an association between marijuana group and later negative emotionality. Activation of the cuneus/lingual gyrus mediated an association between marijuana group and later resiliency. Results support growing evidence that heavy marijuana use during adolescence affects later emotional outcomes. PMID:26403581

  19. A modular injection system, multilevel sampler, and manifold for tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Brian J; Fuller, Mark E; Rose, George F; Onstott, Tullis C; DeFlaun, Mary F; Alvarez, Enrique; Hemingway, Chris; Hallet, R Bruce; Phelps, Tommy J; Griffin, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Ground water injection and sampling systems were developed for bacterial transport experiments in both homogenous and heterogeneous unconsolidated, surficial aquifers. Two types of injection systems, a large single tank and a dynamic mixing tank, were designed to deliver more than 800 L of amended ground water to the aquifer over 12 hours, without altering the ground water temperature, pH, Eh, or dissolved gas composition. Two types of multilevel samplers (MLSs) were designed and installed. Permanent MLSs performed well for the homogenous surficial aquifer, but their installation procedure promoted vertical mixing, which could obfuscate experimental data obtained from vertically stratified, heterogeneous aquifers. A novel, removable MLS was designed to fit in 2- and 4-inch wells. Expandable O-rings between each sampling port hydraulically isolated each port for sample collection when a nut was tightened at the land surface. A low-cost vacuum manifold system designed to work with both MLS designs used 50 mL centrifuge tubes to efficiently sample 12 MLS ports with one peristaltic pump head. The integrated system was developed and used during four field campaigns over a period of three years. During each campaign, more than 3000 ground water samples were collected in less than one week. This system should prove particularly useful for ground water tracer, injection, and push-pull experiments that require high-frequency and/or high-density sampling. PMID:14649864

  20. The effect of landing system coverage and path geometry on lateral position errors at the runway threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    The results of an analytical study performed to determine the effect of the azimuth coverage of a Microwave Landing System (MLS) on the ability of an airplane, with an initial navigation position estimate error, to navigate to the runway threshold are presented. The test path chosen for this study consists of an initial straight segment leading into a 130 deg turn with a 2286 m radius and ending in a straight-in final approach segment. The test path configuration was varied by changing the MLS azimuth coverage angle and the final approach length. The aircraft was positioned with an inital offset to the left or right of the desired path along the line of intersection with the MLS azimuth coverage. A fast time computer simulation program, using a simplistic point mass model of the airplane, was used for this study. The data from this study indicates that the lateral position errors at the runway are primarily a function of the final approach length. The effect of the azimuth coverage on the lateral position errors was restricted by the turn characteristics of the horizontal steering control laws.

  1. An investigation of asymmetric flow features in a scaled-up driven model of the human vocal folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2010-07-01

    Flow through a driven, 7.5 times life-size vocal fold model was investigated at corresponding life-size flow rates of Q mean = 89.1 ml/s, 159.4 ml/s, and 253.0 ml/s. The flow was scaled to match physiological values for Reynolds, Strouhal, and Euler numbers. The models were driven at a life-size frequency of 94 Hz. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) data were acquired in the anterior-posterior midplane of the glottis, and the unsteady transglottal pressure drop across the vocal folds was simultaneously measured. Flow and pressure data were obtained at four discrete instances during the closing phases of the phonatory cycle for which t/T open = 0.60, 0.70, 0.80, and 0.90. The glottal jet trajectory exhibited a bimodal distribution of flow attachment between the two medial surfaces of the glottis. Vortex shedding at the trailing edge separation point generated instabilities in the shear layer, which caused large oscillations in the glottal jet orientation downstream of the glottal exit. The development of the Coanda effect during the glottal cycle was found to have minimal impact on the transglottal pressure drop, suggesting that flow orientation does not directly influence the dipole sound source. The change in transglottal pressure drop as a result of jet trajectory was less than 2% for all three investigated flow rates.

  2. The Effect of 17-4 PH Stainless Steel on the Lifetime of a Pennzane(Trademark) Lubricated Microwave Limb Sounder Antenna Actuator Assembly Ball Screw for the AURA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Lam, Jonathan; Balzer, Mark; Anderson, Mark; Lo, John; Schepis, Joseph P.

    2005-01-01

    During ground based life testing of a Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Antenna Actuator Assembly (AAA) ball-screw assembly, lubricant darkening and loss were noted when approximately 10 percent of required lifetime was completed. The MLS-AAA ball screw and nut are made from 17-4 PH steel, the nut has 440C stainless steel balls, and the assembly is lubricated with a Pennzane formulation containing a three weight percent lead naphthenate additive. Life tests were done in dry nitrogen at 50 C. To investigate the MLS-AAA life test anomaly, Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) accelerated tests were performed. SOT results indicated greatly reduced relative lifetimes of Pennzane formulations in contact with 17-4 PH steel compared to 440C stainless steel. Also, dry nitrogen tests yielded longer relative lifetimes than comparable ultrahigh vacuum tests. Generally, oxidized Pennzane formulations yielded shorter lifetimes than non-oxidized lubricant. This study emphasizes surface chemistry effects on the lubricated lifetime of moving mechanical assemblies.

  3. The 2015-2016 Arctic winter: Perspectives on extremes in polar processing and meteorological variability from the 12-year record of Aura Microwave Limb Sounder measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santee, Michelle; Manney, Gloria; Lambert, Alyn; Livesey, Nathaniel; Lawrence, Zachary

    2016-04-01

    In the last decade, the Arctic lower stratosphere has seen some of the most dynamically disturbed winters, with stratospheric sudden warmings that curtailed polar processing early in the season and limited chemical ozone loss, as well as several winters marked by exceptionally cold conditions and severe chemical ozone loss. The occurrence in recent winters of different combinations of extreme meteorological conditions, and their impact on polar chemical processes, has underscored the Arctic stratosphere's sensitivity to a spectrum of dynamical variability. Launched as part of NASA's Aura satellite in July 2004, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) provides an extensive suite of measurements enabling quantification of polar processing and chemical ozone loss. Here we use MLS observations in conjunction with meteorological analyses in a comprehensive analysis of the Arctic winter of 2015-2016. An unusually large volume of low temperatures in the early winter led to strong depletion in gas-phase HNO3 and H2O associated with polar stratospheric cloud formation. As a consequence of this early-winter processing and an elongated vortex with significant portions exposed to sunlight, substantial chlorine activation (enhanced abundances of ClO, depressed abundances of HCl) was evident far earlier than is typical in Arctic winter. The degree of polar processing and chemical ozone loss in this winter will be placed in the context of the previous 11 Arctic winters observed by Aura MLS.

  4. The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite: From Coffee Table Art to Quantitative Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne R.

    1999-01-01

    The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) has provided an unprecedented set of observations of constituents of the stratosphere. When used in combination with data from other sources and appropriate modeling tools, these observations are useful for quantitative evaluation of stratospheric photochemical processes. This is illustrated by comparing ozone observations from airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL), from the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM), from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), and from the Halogen occultation Experiment (HALOE) with ozone fields generated with a three dimensional model. For 1995-96, at polar latitudes, observations from DIAL flights on December 9 and January 30, and POAM and MLS between late December and late January are compared with ozone fields from the GSFC 3D chemistry and transport model. Data from the three platforms consistently show that the observed ozone has a negative trend relative to the modeled ozone, and that the trend is uniform in time between early and mid winter, with no obvious dependence on proximity to the vortex edge. The importance of chlorine catalyzed photochemistry to this ozone loss is explored by comparing observations from MLS and HALOE with simulations for other northern winters, particularly 1997-98.

  5. Vibration transfer mobility measurements using maximum length sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Herbert L.

    2005-09-01

    Vibration transfer mobility measurements are required under Federal Transit Administration guidelines when developing detailed predictions of ground-borne vibration for rail transit systems. These measurements typically use a large instrumented hammer to generate impulses in the soil. These impulses are measured by an array of accelerometers to characterize the transfer mobility of the ground in a localized area. While effective, these measurements often make use of heavy, custom-engineered equipment to produce the impulse signal. To obtain satisfactory signal-to-noise ratios, it is necessary to generate multiple impulses to generate an average value, but this process involves considerable physical labor in the field. To address these shortcomings, a transfer mobility measurement system utilizing a tactile transducer and maximum length sequences (MLS) was developed. This system uses lightweight off-the-shelf components to significantly reduce the weight and cost of the system. The use of MLS allows for adequate signal-to-noise ratio from the tactile transducer, while minimizing the length of the measurement. Tests of the MLS system show good agreement with the impulse-based method. The combination of the cost savings and reduced weight of this new system facilitates transfer mobility measurements that are less physically demanding, and more economical when compared with current methods.

  6. A Potential Biochemical Mechanism Underlying the Influence of Sterol Deprivation Stress on Caenorhabditis elegans Longevity*

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Mi Cheong; Na, Keun; Kim, Heekyeong; Jeong, Seul-Ki; Joo, Hyoe-Jin; Chitwood, David J.; Paik, Young-Ki

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the biochemical mechanism underlying the effect of sterol deprivation on longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans, we treated parent worms (P0) with 25-azacoprostane (Aza), which inhibits sitosterol-to-cholesterol conversion, and measured mean lifespan (MLS) in F2 worms. At 25 μm (∼EC50), Aza reduced total body sterol by 82.5%, confirming sterol depletion. Aza (25 μm) treatment of wild-type (N2) C. elegans grown in sitosterol (5 μg/ml) reduced MLS by 35%. Similar results were obtained for the stress-related mutants daf-16(mu86) and gas-1(fc21). Unexpectedly, Aza had essentially no effect on MLS in the stress-resistant daf-2(e1370) or mitochondrial complex II mutant mev-1(kn1) strains, indicating that Aza may target both insulin/IGF-1 signaling (IIS) and mitochondrial complex II. Aza increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels 2.7-fold in N2 worms, but did not affect ROS production by mev-1(kn1), suggesting a direct link between Aza treatment and mitochondrial ROS production. Moreover, expression of the stress-response transcription factor SKN-1 was decreased in amphid neurons by Aza and that of DAF-28 was increased when DAF-6 was involved, contributing to lifespan reduction. PMID:21186286

  7. Interface study and performance of large layer pair ultra-short period W/B{sub 4}C X-ray multilayer

    SciTech Connect

    Pradhan, P. C. Nayak, M.; Mondal, P.; Lodha, G. S.

    2015-06-24

    The nature of interfaces in ultra short period W/B{sub 4}C multilayers (MLs) is studied using hard x-ray reflectivity and cross sectional transmission electron microscope. W/B{sub 4}C MLs are fabricated using magnetron sputtering system with systematic varying thickness of both W and B{sub 4}C layers from ∼5 to 30 Å keeping number of layer pairs fixed at 10. It is observed that in low period W/B{sub 4}C ML, as the layer thickness decreases, the interdiffusion plays a significant role because of the discontinuous nature of film. This gives variation of density and roughness of the layer as well as generates thickness errors in the ML structure due to volume changes which is originated by interdifusion process. Finally, W/B{sub 4}C MLs with large number of layer pairs (300) are fabricated with periodicity d= 20 Å which gives ∼54 % of reflectivity at energy 8.047 keV.

  8. Hight Determination Techniques for the Next National Height System of Finland- A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saari, T.; Saaranen, V.; Kaartinen, H.; Poutanen, M.; Kukko, A.; Nyberg, S.

    2014-11-01

    Precise levelling is known for its accuracy and reliability in height determination, but the process itself is slow, laborious and expensive. FGI has started a project to develop methods for height determination that could decrease the creation time of national height systems without losing the required accuracy. In this pilot project, we studied precise levelling and alternative techniques: MLS (Mobile Laser Scanning) and GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) levelling, which included static GPS (Global Positioning System) and VRS (Virtual Reference Station) measurements. We compared the techniques in a field test, where the height difference of two known benchmarks were measured. All of the height differences were within 16 mm from each other, where the results from the precise levelling and the GPS levelling differed from 0.5-1.0 mm. Results from the MLS measurements were more than 5.0 mm off from the others and the average of the VRS measurements was 10.0 mm off. The uncertainties are compatible with the results, since the largest RMS values were calculated from the MLS and the VRS measurements. This research highlighted the differences of the techniques, but none of them is yet to be abandoned. The study should be expanded into a larger scale to better evaluate strengths and weaknesses of the techniques.

  9. Electrostatic charging of lunar dust

    SciTech Connect

    Walch, Bob; Horanyi, Mihaly; Robertson, Scott

    1998-10-21

    Transient dust clouds suspended above the lunar surface were indicated by the horizon glow observed by the Surveyor spacecrafts and the Lunar Ejecta and Meteorite Experiment (Apollo 17), for example. The theoretical models cannot fully explain these observations, but they all suggest that electrostatic charging of the lunar surface due to exposure to the solar wind plasma and UV radiation could result in levitation, transport and ejection of small grains. We report on our experimental studies of the electrostatic charging properties of an Apollo-17 soil sample and two lunar simulants MLS-1 and JSC-1. We have measured their charge after exposing individual grains to a beam of fast electrons with energies in the range of 20{<=}E{<=}90 eV. Our measurements indicate that the secondary electron emission yield of the Apollo-17 sample is intermediate between MLS-1 and JSC-1, closer to that of MLS-1. We will also discuss our plans to develop a laboratory lunar surface model, where time dependent illumination and plasma bombardment will closely emulate the conditions on the surface of the Moon.

  10. Reverberation time measurement using integrated impulse response and sweep sine excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabuco, Marco; Brando, Paulo

    2002-11-01

    As the capacity and speed of digital processing systems becomes much higher, the integrated impulsive response for reverberation time measurements by the indirect method also becomes more feasible and faster. The MLS technique to obtain the impulse response for LTI has been developed during the last several years and it is very well reported by the bibliography. Some frequency analyzers available in the market are capable to generate and process MLS to get the impulse responses very easily. Sometimes, when the room to be tested is very reverberant, sequences of higher order and a certain number of average are necessary to assure acceptable signal-to-noise ratio. The sweep sine technique or the deconvolution method to obtain impulsive responses presents many new advantages, most of them still reported in various technical documents. This paper presents the results of application of this technique to measure the reverberation time in two different reverberation rooms. Comparisons with MLS, ensemble, and reverberation time averages are presented. The sweep sine technique repeatability was verified in a reverberation chamber for a polyurethane foam sample and showed smaller standard deviations when compared with other techniques. (To be presented in Portuguese.)

  11. Adaptive control based on fast online algebraic identification and GPI control for magnetic levitation systems with time-varying input gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, R.; Sira-Ramírez, H.; Feliu, V.

    2014-08-01

    This paper considers the position tracking problem of a voltage-controlled magnetic levitation system (MLS) in the presence of modelling errors caused by uncertainties in the system's physical parameters. An adaptive control based on fast online algebraic parameter estimation and generalised proportional integral (GPI) output feedback control is considered as a control scheme candidate. The GPI controller guarantees an asymptotically exponentially stable behaviour of the controlled ball position and the possibilities of carrying out rest-to-rest trajectory tracking tasks. The nature of the control input gain in an MLS is that of a state-dependent time-varying gain, reflecting the nonlinear character of the magnetic force with regard to the distance and the properties of the metallic ball. The system gain has therefore been locally approximated using a periodically updated time polynomial function (of second degree), where the coefficients of the polynomial are estimated during a very short period of time. This estimation is achieved using the recently introduced algebraic online parameter estimation approach. The stability of the closed-loop system is demonstrated under the assumption that no external factors cause changes in the parameter during the time interval in which the stability is analysed. Finally, experimental results are presented for the controlled MLS demonstrating the excellent stabilisation and position tracking performance of the control system designed in the presence of significant nonlinearities and uncertainties of the underlying system.

  12. NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knosp, B.; Neely, S.; Zimdars, P.; Mills, B.; Vance, N.

    2007-12-01

    The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Science Computing Facility (SCF) stores over 50 terabytes of data, has over 240 computer processing hosts, and 64 users from around the world. These resources are spread over three primary geographical locations - the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Raytheon RIS, and New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMT). A need for a grid network system was identified and defined to solve the problem of users competing for finite, and increasingly scarce, MLS SCF computing resources. Using Sun's Grid Engine software, a grid network was successfully created in a development environment that connected the JPL and Raytheon sites, established master and slave hosts, and demonstrated that transfer queues for jobs can work among multiple clusters in the same grid network. This poster will first describe MLS SCF resources and the lessons that were learned in the design and development phase of this project. It will then go on to discuss the test environment and plans for deployment by highlighting benchmarks and user experiences.

  13. NASA/FAA flight-test investigation of helicopter microwave landing system approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peach, I. L., Jr.; Bull, J. S.; Anderson, D. J.; Dugan, D. C.; Ross, V. L.; Hunting, A. W.; Pate, D. P.; Savage, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The helicopter Microwave Landing System flight-test investigations, conducted by a joint NASA/FAA effort in order to gather statistical data for establishing terminal instrument procedures criteria, and to provide a performance data base for developing advanced MLS guidance concepts, are presented. The specific flight-test objectives were to: (1) develop acceptable angle-only MLS approach profiles; (2) determine tracking errors; (3) determine altitude loss during missed approach; (4) evaluate guidance display sensitivities; and (5) evaluate pilot acceptability. Fourteen pilots flew 140 manual (without stability augmentation) dual-pilot simulated instrument approaches in a UH-1H helicopter. The flight profiles flown included 3-, 6-, and 9-degree glideslope, centerline approaches to decision heights of 50, 100, and 150 ft, respectively. The angular guidance display sensitivities and the data acquisition system are also described. Eight major conclusions are made, and include the following: (1) the use of pitch attitude to control airspeed and collective to control glideslope was the preferred pilot technique for the steep glideslope approaches, and (2) angular guidance deviation indicator sensitivity requirements for helicopter MLS approaches to STOLports and heliports have been found to be significantly different from standard ILS sensitivities.

  14. Transgenic Zebrafish Expressing mCherry in the Mitochondria of Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Noble, Sandra; Godoy, Rafael; Affaticati, Pierre; Ekker, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Genetic mutations and environmental toxins are known to affect mitochondrial health and have been implicated in the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. To visualize mitochondria in dopaminergic neurons of live zebrafish, we used the regulatory elements of the dopamine transporter (dat) gene to target a reporter, mCherry, after fusion with the mitochondrial localizing signal (MLS) of Tom20. Immunoblot analysis of mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions from Tg(dat:tom20 MLS-mCherry) larvae shows that mCherry is efficiently targeted to the mitochondria. Confocal imaging of live fish was carried out from 1 day postfertilization (dpf) to 9 dpf. We also colocalized dat mRNA expression with the mCherry protein in the olfactory bulb (OB), subpallium (SP), pretectum (Pr), diencephalic clusters 2 and 3 (DC2/3), caudal hypothalamus (Hc), locus coeruleus (LC), anterior preoptic area (POa), retinal amacrine cells (RAC), caudal hypothalamus (Hc), and preoptic area (PO). Treating Tg(dat:tom20 MLS-mCherry) larvae with the dopaminergic neurotoxin MPTP (1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) at 2 or 3 dpf resulted in a decrease in mCherry fluorescence in the pretectum, olfactory bulb, subpallium, diencephalic clusters 2 and 3, and the caudal hypothalamus. Labeling of mitochondria in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons of zebrafish could allow their visualization in vivo following genetic or pharmacological manipulations.

  15. The evolution of the ozone collar in the Antarctic lower stratosphere during early August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Mariotti, A.; Mechoso, C.R.; Legras, B.; Daniel, V.

    2000-02-01

    The ozone evolution in the lower stratosphere of the Southern Hemisphere during the period 5--10 August 1994 is analyzed. The analysis focuses on the ozone collar (the band of maximum values in ozone mixing ratio around the Antarctic ozone hole at these altitudes) and the development of collar filaments. Ozone mixing ratios provided by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on board the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and by an ER-2 aircraft participating in the Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment/Measurements for Assessing the Effects of stratospheric Aircraft campaign are compared with values at corresponding locations in high-resolution isentropic maps obtained by using the numerical scheme of contour advection with surgery (CAS). The CAS reconstructed ozone maps provide a view of the way in which air masses are exported from the outskirts of the collar to form the tongues of higher mixing ratios observed at lower latitudes on MLS synoptic maps. There is an overall consistency between the datasets insofar as the collar location is concerned. This location seems to be primarily defined by the local properties of the flow. Nevertheless the CAS reconstructed collar tends to become weaker than that depicted by MLS data. By means of radioactive calculation estimates, it is argued that diabatic descent may be responsible for maintaining the ozone concentration approximately constant in the collar while filaments isentropically disperse collarlike mixing ratios from this region toward lower latitudes.

  16. Wind Retrievals under Rain for Passive Satellite Microwave Radiometers and its Applications to Hurricane Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meissner, Thomas; Wentz, Frank J.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm that retrieves wind speed under rain using C-hand and X-band channels of passive microwave satellite radiometers. The spectral difference of the brightness temperature signals due to wind or rain allows to find channel combinations that are sufficiently sensitive to wind speed but little or not sensitive to rain. We &ve trained a statistical algorithm that applies under hurricane conditions and is able to measure wind speeds in hurricanes to an estimated accuracy of about 2 m/s. We have also developed a global algorithm, that is less accurate but can be applied under all conditions. Its estimated accuracy is between 2 and 5 mls, depending on wind speed and rain rate. We also extend the wind speed region in our model for the wind induced sea surface emissivity from currently 20 m/s to 40 mls. The data indicate that the signal starts to saturate above 30 mls. Finally, we make an assessment of the performance of wind direction retrievals from polarimetric radiometers as function of wind speed and rain rate

  17. The effect of 17-4PH stainless steel on the lifetime of a Pennzane lubricated Microwave Limb Sounder Antenna Actuator Assembly ball screw for the AURA spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Jansen, Mark J.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Lam, Jonathan; Balzer, Mark; Lo, John; Anderson, Mark; Schepis, Joseph P.

    2005-07-01

    During ground based life testing of a Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) Antenna Actuator Assembly (AAA) ball-screw assembly, lubricant darkening and loss were noted when approximately 10% of required lifetime was completed. The MLS-AAA ball screw and nut are made from 17-4 PH steel, the nut has 440C stainless steel balls, and the assembly is lubricated with a Pennzane formulation containing a three weight percent lead naphthenate additive. Life tests were done in dry nitrogen at 50°C. To investigate the MLS-AAA life test anomaly, Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT) accelerated tests were performed. SOT results indicated greatly reduced relative lifetimes of Pennzane formulations in contact with 17-4 PH steel compared to 440C stainless steel. Also, dry nitrogen tests yielded longer relative lifetimes than comparable ultrahigh vacuum tests. Generally, oxidized Pennzane formulations yielded shorter lifetimes than non-oxidized lubricant. This study emphasizes surface chemistry effects on the lubricated lifetime of moving mechanical assemblies.

  18. Using performance tasks employing IOM patient safety competencies to introduce quality improvement processes in medical laboratory science education.

    PubMed

    Golemboski, Karen; Otto, Catherine N; Morris, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In order to contribute to improved healthcare quality through patient-centered care, laboratory professionals at all levels of practice must be able to recognize the connection between non-analytical factors and laboratory analysis, in the context of patient outcomes and quality improvement. These practices require qualities such as critical thinking (CT), teamwork skills, and familiarity with the quality improvement process, which will be essential for the development of evidence-based laboratory science practice. Performance tasks (PT) are an educational strategy which can be used to teach and assess CT and teamwork, while introducing Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) students at both baccalaureate and advanced-practice levels to the concepts of quality improvement processes and patient outcomes research. PT presents students with complex, realistic scenarios which require the incorporation of subject-specific knowledge with competencies such as effective team communication, patient-centered care, and successful use of information technology. A PT with assessment rubric was designed for use in a baccalaureate-level MLS program to teach and assess CT and teamwork competency. The results indicated that, even when students were able to integrate subject-specific knowledge in creative ways, their understanding of teamwork and quality improvement was limited. This indicates the need to intentionally teach skills such as collaboration and quality system design. PT represent one of many strategies that may be used in MLS education to develop essential professional competencies, encourage expert practice, and facilitate quality improvement.

  19. First Evidence of Middle Atmospheric HO2 Response to UV variability during 27-day Solar Cycles From Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Zhang, Q.; Millan Valle, L. F.; Li, K. F.; Yung, Y. L.; Sander, S. P.; Livesey, N. J.; Santee, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    HO2 and OH, also known as odd oxygen HOx, play an important role in middle atmospheric chemistry, in particular O3 destruction through catalytic HOx reaction cycles. Due to their photochemical production and short chemical lifetimes, HOx species are expected to show rapid responses to solar irradiance changes, resulting in variability in the corresponding O3 chemistry. While the OH response to solar cycles has been investigated, HO2 studies have been limited by the lack of reliable observations. The recently developed "offline" HO2 data product from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) makes it possible, for the first time, to investigate HO2 variability and the behavior of OH/HO2 partitioning, which plays an important role in O3-destroying HOx cycles. Here we present the first evidence of global mean HO2 variability during solar 27-day cycles by investigating the new MLS HO2 data. We focus on the most recent data from 2012 - 2015, when solar irradiance variability is strong near the peak of Solar Cycle 24. The features of mesospheric HO2 variability are found to correlate well with those of solar Lyman-α variability. The strongest HO2 solar cycle signals occur in the pressure range 0.01 - 0.068 hPa. When continuous MLS OH observations are not available, the new HO2 data could be a promising alternative for investigating HOx variability and the corresponding impacts on O3 and the climate.

  20. Microbiological analysis of multi-level borehole samples from a contaminated groundwater system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickup, R. W.; Rhodes, G.; Alamillo, M. L.; Mallinson, H. E. H.; Thornton, S. F.; Lerner, D. N.

    2001-12-01

    A range of bacteriological, geochemical process-related and molecular techniques have been used to assess the microbial biodegradative potential in groundwater contaminated with phenol and other tar acids. The contaminant plume has travelled 500 m from the pollutant source over several decades. Samples were obtained from the plume using a multi-level sampler (MLS) positioned in two boreholes (boreholes 59 and 60) which vertically transected two areas of the plume. Activity of the microbial community, as represented by phenol degradation potential and ability to utilise a range of substrates, was found to be influenced by the plume. Phenol degradation potential appeared to be influenced more by the concentration of the contaminants than the total bacterial cell numbers. However, in the areas of highest phenol concentration, the depression of cell numbers clearly had an effect. The types of bacteria present were assessed by culture and DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Bacterial groups or processes associated with major geochemical processes, such as methanogenesis, sulphate reduction and denitrification, that have the potential to drive contaminant degradation, were detected at various borehole levels. A comparative molecular analysis of the microbial community between samples obtained from the MLS revealed the microbial community was diverse. The examination of microbial activity complemented those results obtained through chemical analysis, and when combined with hydrological data, showed that MLS samples provided a realistic profile of plume effects and could be related to the potential for natural attenuation of the site.