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Sample records for mm ho ca

  1. HoCaMA: Home Care Hybrid Multiagent Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile, Juan A.; Bajo, Javier; Abraham, Ajith; Corchado, Juan M.

    Home Care is one of the main objectives of Ambient Intelligence. Nowadays, the disabled and elderly population, which represents a significant part of our society, requires novel solutions for providing home care in an effective way. In this chapter, we present HoCaMA, a hybrid multiagent architecture that facilitates remote monitoring and care services for disabled patients at their homes. HoCaMA combines multiagent systems and Web services to facilitate the communication and integration with multiple health care systems. In addition, HoCaMA focuses on the design of reactive agents capable of interacting with different sensors present in the environment, and incorporates a system of alerts through SMS and MMS mobile technologies. Finally, it uses Radio Frequency IDentification and JavaCard technologies to provide advanced location and identification systems, as well as automatic access control facilities. HoCaMA has been implemented in a real environment and the results obtained are presented within this chapter.

  2. Cryogenic Ho:CaF2 laser pumped by Tm:fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínek, Michal; Kubeček, Václav; Ma, Weiwei; Zhao, Beibei; Jiang, Dapeng; Su, Liangbi

    2016-06-01

    The laser operation in the pulsed as well as continuous-wave regime of a modified-Bridgeman-grown 0.5 at.% Ho:CaF2 crystal at 83 K pumped by a Tm:fiber laser is reported. The maximum output power was 2.37 W at 2060 nm or 1.3 W at 2110 and 2130 nm. Continuous tuning range over 90 nm from 2030 to 2120 nm was achieved using a birefringent filter. The Ho:CaF2 fundamental spectroscopic properties as absorption and fluorescence spectra at 83 and 293 K are also presented.

  3. Visualiser of two-micron laser radiation based on Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Lyapin, A A; Ryabochkina, P A; Ushakov, S N; Fedorov, P P

    2014-06-30

    The anti-Stokes luminescence spectra of Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals corresponding to the {sup 5}G{sub 4} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}G{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 3} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 4}({sup 5}S{sub 2}) → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}S{sub 2} → {sup 5}I{sub 7}, {sup 5}I{sub 4} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}I{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 7}, {sup 5}F{sub 3} → {sup 5}I{sub 6}, {sup 5}I{sub 6} → {sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 6}, and {sup 5}I{sub 5} → {sup 5}I{sub 7} transitions upon excitation of the {sup 5}I{sub 7} level of Ho{sup 3+} ions are studied. A method for visualisation of IR radiation in the two-micron range using Ho:CaF{sub 2} crystals is proposed. The energy efficiency of conversion of two-micron laser radiation to radiation in the red spectral range 620 – 690 nm by a 1 mol % HoF{sub 3}:CaF{sub 2} crystal is estimated to be no higher than 0.02%. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. Contrasting Effects of Ca{sup 2+} and Ho{sup 3+} Substitutions on Superconductivity and Excess conductivity of (Ho{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x})(Ba{sub 2-y}Ho{sub y})Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}

    SciTech Connect

    Maulud, M. F.; Hamidi, Z. S.; Yusof, A. A.; Yusof, M. I. M.; Yahya, A. K.

    2010-07-07

    Effects of Ho{sup 3+} and Ca{sup 2+} substitutions in (Ho{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x})(Ba{sub 2-y}Ho{sub y})Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}}ceramics on normal and superconducting state behaviour were investigated. Electrical resistivity measurements showed increasing Ho{sup 3+} substitution at Ba{sup 2+} site (x = 0, 0.4, y = 0-0.4) caused normal state resistivity to change from metal-like to semimetal/semiconductor-like behaviour and suppressed T{sub c} from 89 K (y = 0) to 72 K (y = 0.4) while substitution of Ca{sup 2+} for Ho{sup 3+}((x = 0.2) 0.4, (y 0.4)) revives metallic behaviour of the normal state with increasing x. Excess conductivity analysis based on Asmalazov-Larkin theory showed 2D to 3D transition for all superconducting samples but with contrasting effects of the substitutions on AL{sub 2D} and AL{sub 3D} constants. The resistivity and excess conductivity results indicate effective hole filling Ho{sup 3+} and hole doping by by Ca{sup 2+} substitutions.

  5. Hydrides of CeNi/sub 5/, MmNi/sub 5/, Ca/sub 0/ /sub 2/(Ce/sub 0/ /sub 65/Mm/sub 0/ /sub 35/)/sub 0/ /sub 8/Ni/sub 5/, Ca/sub 0/ /sub 2/Ce/sub 0/ /sub 8/Ni/sub 5/, Ca/sub 0/ /sub 2/Mm/sub 0/ /sub 8/Ni/sub 5/, and mixed CeNi/sub 5//MmNi/sub 5/

    SciTech Connect

    Lakner, J.F.; Chow, T.S.

    1982-09-01

    Six intermetallic alloys (CeNi/sub 5/, MmNi/sub 5/, Ca/sub 0/ /sub 2/(Ce/sub 0/ /sub 65/Mm/sub 0/ /sub 35/)/sub 0/ /sub 8/Ni/sub 5/, Ca/sub 0/ /sub 2/Ce/sub 0/ /sub 8/Ni/sub 5/, Ca/sub 0/ /sub 2/Mm/sub 0/ /sub 8/Ni/sub 5/, and a mixed alloy, CeNi/sub 5//MmNi/sub 5/) were investigated with respect to their suitability to provide high hydrogen capacity and their potential for use in providing substantial hydrogen pressure at both low and high temperatures. A second phase of our investigation dealt with ball-milling and hydriding and dehydriding cycles to produce fine particles for use in hydride powder transfer studies. A summary of several Van't Hoff plots is also included for hydride-forming alloys.

  6. Enhancement of magnetic and ferroelectric behaviour in (Ca, Co) co-doped HoMnO3 multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, P. P.; Pradhan, S. K.; Das, S. K.; Samantaray, S.; Roul, B. K.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of sintering temperature on structural, electrical and magnetic behaviours of polycrystalline samples of Ho0.9Ca0.1Mn0.9Co0.1O3 prepared by the solid state reaction route sintered at three different temperature 1250 °C, 1350 °C, 1450 °C for 10 h are investigated. XRD, SEM, magnetization, dielectric and ferroelectric measurements were carried out. Experimental results showed the nucleation of orthorhombic phase as the sintering temperature increases from 1250 °C to 1450 °C. Ferroelectric (Tc) and antiferromagnetic transition temperature (TN) increases with increase in sintering temperature. Strong bifurcation of FC and ZFC curve in sample sintered at 1450 °C showed a clear onset of ferromagnetic state around 165 °K, which is confirmed from M to H graph at 165 °K. All the sample showed ferroelectric behaviour at room temperature which are leaky in nature. Sintering temperature along with Ca and Co doping in HoMnO3 ceramics plays an important role in phase transformation along with enhancement in multiferroic properties.

  7. Multicolour upconversion emission from Ho{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} codoped CaMoO{sub 4} phosphor

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Riya; Rai, Vineet Kumar

    2015-05-15

    The Ho{sup 3+}-Tm{sup 3+}-Yb{sup 3+} codoped CaMoO4 phosphor powder has been synthesized by chemical coprecipitation technique. For the structural investigation the X-ray diffraction analysis has been done. Multicolour upconversion (UC) emission in the visible region from the prepared material has been observed under the 980 nm near infrared (NIR) excitation. The UC emission bands ∼ 474 nm (blue), ∼ 541 nm (green) and ∼ 661 nm (red) region have been assigned as {sup 1}G{sub 4}→{sup 3}H{sub 6} (Tm{sup 3+}), {sup 5}F{sub 4}{sup 5}S{sub 2}→{sup 5}I{sub 8} (Ho{sup 3+}) and {sup 5}F{sub 5}→{sup 5}I{sub 8} (Ho{sup 3+}) transitions respectively.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of 2.02 {mu}m emission in Ho{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+} codoped transparent glass ceramic containing CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Q. J.; Zhang, W. J.; Qian, Q.; Yang, Z. M.; Zhang, Q. Y.

    2010-05-15

    Tm{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} codoped transparent glass ceramic (GC) containing CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals were fabricated by melt-quenching and subsequent thermal treatment. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis confirmed the precipitation of CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals among the glass matrix. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results evidenced the incorporation of Tm{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} into the CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals. Judd-Ofelt parameters were calculated based on the absorption spectra, the smaller {Omega}{sub 2} and larger {Omega}{sub 6} imply that Tm{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} ions has entered into a symmetrical ionic crystal field. 2.02 {mu}m emission spectral of the GC samples were recorded at room temperature with an excitation of 808 nm laser diode. The enhancement of the emission at 2.02 {mu}m in the GC samples could be attributed to more efficient cross relaxation process of Tm{sup 3+}:{sup 3}H{sub 4+}Tm{sup 3+}:{sup 3}H{sub 6}{yields}{sup 2}Tm{sup 3+}:{sup 3}H{sub 4}, and energy transfer from Tm{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+} benefited from the incorporation of rare earth ions into CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals.

  9. pH modulation of currents that contribute to the medium and slow afterhyperpolarizations in rat CA1 pyramidal neurones

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Tony; Church, John

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of changes in pHo and pHi on currents contributing to the medium and slow afterhyperpolarizations (mIAHP and sIAHP, respectively) in rat CA1 neurones. Reducing pHo from 7.4 to 6.7 inhibited mIAHP and sIAHP whereas increasing pHo to 7.7 augmented mIAHP and, to a greater extent, sIAHP. The ability of changes in pHo to modulate mIAHP reflected changes in the Ca2+-activated K+ current, IAHP, and a Co2+- and XE991-resistant component of mIAHP, but not the muscarine-sensitive current, IM. In the presence of 1 μm TTX and 5 mm TEA, low pHo-evoked reductions in sIAHP were associated with reductions in Ca2+-dependent depolarizing potentials; because neither effect was attenuated when internal H+ buffering power was raised by including 100 mm tricine in the patch pipette, the actions of reductions in pHo to inhibit sIAHP and, possibly, IAHP in large part appear to reflect a low pHo-dependent decrease in Ca2+ influx. In contrast, the effects of high pHo to augment mIAHP and sIAHP were associated with relatively small increases in Ca2+ potentials but were significantly attenuated by 100 mm internal tricine, indicating that a rise in pHi consequent upon the rise in pHo was largely responsible. The possibility that changes in pHi could act to modulate mIAHP and sIAHP, independently of changes in Ca2+ influx, was also suggested by experiments in which pHi was lowered at a constant pHo by the external application of propionate or by the withdrawal of HCO3− from the perfusing medium. Lowering pHi at a constant pHo had little effect on Ca2+ potentials but inhibited mIAHP and, to a greater extent, sIAHP, effects that were attenuated by 100 mm internal tricine. Together, the results indicate that changes in pHo and pHi modulate mIAHP and sIAHP in rat CA1 neurones and suggest that, depending on the direction of the pHo change, the sensitivities of the underlying currents to changes in Ca2+ influx and/or pHi may contribute to the effects of changes in pHo to

  10. Hybrid Laser-Arc Welding of 10-mm-Thick Cast Martensitic Stainless Steel CA6NM: As-Welded Microstructure and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirakhorli, Fatemeh; Cao, Xinjin; Pham, Xuan-Tan; Wanjara, Priti; Fihey, Jean-Luc

    2016-07-01

    Cast CA6NM martensitic stainless steel plates, 10 mm in thickness, were welded using hybrid laser-arc welding. The effect of different welding speeds on the as-welded joint integrity was characterized in terms of the weld bead geometry, defects, microstructure, hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and impact energy. Significant defects such as porosity, root humping, underfill, and excessive penetration were observed at a low welding speed (0.5 m/min). However, the underfill depth and excessive penetration in the joints manufactured at welding speeds above 0.75 m/min met the specifications of ISO 12932. Characterization of the as-welded microstructure revealed untempered martensite and residual delta ferrite dispersed at prior-austenite grain boundaries in the fusion zone. In addition, four different heat-affected zones in the weldments were differentiated through hardness mapping and inference from the Fe-Cr-Ni ternary phase diagram. The tensile fracture occurred in the base metal for all the samples and fractographic analysis showed that the crack path is within the martensite matrix, along primary delta ferrite-martensite interfaces and within the primary delta ferrite. Additionally, Charpy impact testing demonstrated slightly higher fracture energy values and deeper dimples on the fracture surface of the welds manufactured at higher welding speeds due to grain refinement and/or lower porosity.

  11. Preliminary Experiments and Determination of the Thermal Gradient in a 12.7 mm CaF2 Furnace Assembly, Humboldt State University Piston-Cylinder Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, B. E.

    2004-12-01

    A 12.7 mm piston-cylinder laboratory has been established at Humboldt State University. A series of double-thermocouple (DTC) experiments were performed to measure the thermal profile of the furnace assembly following the procedures of Pickering et al. (1998, Amer. Min.). Furnace assemblies consist of a 304 stainless base plug, CaF&_{2} sleeve, straight-walled graphite heater tube, crushable MgO inner parts, and lower graphite plug and ring which allow for extrusion of the graphite heater tube during shortening of the sleeve and MgO pieces. Careful measurement of pre- and post-run assembly parts indicate an average 30-35% shortening of the assembly. DTC results show a thermal peak that is displaced \\sim2.0 mm above the center of the effective furnace, defined as the length of inner MgO pieces post-run. This offset is in the same direction (upward, toward base plug), but slightly less than the offset described by Pickering et al. (1998). A secondary measure of the thermal profile using spinel growth via reaction between MgO and Al_{2}O_{3} assembly parts (e.g., Watson et al., 2002, CMP) is underway. A single partial melting experiment was performed at 1.0 GPa and 1330\\degC for 72 hours using intermediate peridotite starting material INT-A in a graphite-lined Pt capsule with vitreous carbon spheres as a melt sink. Phase compositions were determined by electron microprobe and mass balance calculations were made to determine melt fraction and mineral mode. Initial calculations yield glass:olivine:cpx:opx:spinel proportions of: 5.0:54.2:15.9:23.9:1.1. These preliminary results correspond well with previous work performed at the University of Oregon on the same starting material (Schwab and Johnston, 2001). The best match is with a 1315\\degC experiment (INT-A13) in terms of mode (6.9:53.7:13.4:25.0:1.0) and glass composition, indicating that the temperature of this initial experiment may be slightly cooler than the target temperature, however the results of this

  12. Large-scale QM/MM calculations of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II: Comparisons with EXAFS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Mitsuo; Isobe, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Takahito; Yamaguchi, Kizashi

    2016-08-01

    Large-scale QM/MM calculations including hydrogen-bonding networks in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of photosystem II (PSII) were performed to elucidate the geometric structures of the CaMn4O5 cluster in the key catalytic states (Si (i = 0-3)). The optimized Mn-Mn, Ca-Mn and Mn-O distances by the large-scale QM/MM starting from the high-resolution XRD structure were consistent with those of the EXAFS experiments in the dark stable S1 state by the Berkeley and Berlin groups. The optimized geometrical parameters for other Si (i = 0, 2, 3) states were also consistent with those of EXAFS, indicating the importance of the large-scale QM/MM calculations for the PSII-OEC.

  13. Luminescence Properties of Self-Activated Mm(VO4)2 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) Phosphors Synthesized by Solid-State Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Min, Xin; Huang, Zhaohui; Fang, Minghao; Liu, Yan'gai; Tang, Chao; Wu, Xiaowen

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, M3(VO4)2 (M = Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba) self-activated phosphors were prepared by a solid-state reaction method at 1,000 °C for 5 h. The phase formation and micrographs were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The Ca3(VO4)2 phosphor does not show any emission peaks under excitation with ultraviolet (UV) light. However, the M3(VO4)2 (M = Mg, Sr, and Ba) samples are effectively excited by UV light chips ranging from 200 nm to 400 nm and exhibit broad emission bands due to the charge transfer from the oxygen 2p orbital to the vacant 3d orbital of the vanadium in the VO4. The color of these phosphors changes from yellow to light blue via blue-green with increasing ionic radius from Mg to Sr to Ba. The luminescence lifetimes and quantum yield decrease with the increasing unit cell volume and V-V distance, in the order of Mg3(VO4)2 to Sr3(VO4)2 to Ba3(VO4)2. The emission intensity decreases with the increase of temperatures, but presents no color shift. This confirms that these self-activated M3(VO4)2 phosphors can be suggested as candidates of the single-phase phosphors for light using UV light emitting diodes (LEDs). PMID:27451689

  14. Anisotropy in the resistive superconducting transition under magnetic fields in single crystal Pb{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ho{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8}

    SciTech Connect

    Noji, Takashi; Koike, Yoji; Kato, Masatsune

    1996-02-01

    Anisotropic properties of the single crystal Pb{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ho{sub 0.5}Ca{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 8} have been investigated by measuring the electrical resistivity in the ab-plane {rho}{sub ab}(H, {theta}, T), which depends on the angle {theta} between the ab-plane and the magnetic-field direction, in various constant fields H perpendicular to the current direction. All the angle-dependent values of {rho}{sub ab}(H, {theta}, T) at a constant temperature are scaled to be on one curve as a function of reduced field. The anisotropic parameter {gamma} {triple_bond} (m{sub c}*/m{sub ab}*){sup 1/2} is estimated as 12-13, which is larger than that of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} and much smaller than that of Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}. It has been concluded that the anisotropy does not always depend on the thickness of the blocking layer but seems to depend on the overlap of the electronic wave functions along the c-axis. Anisotropy in the pinning potential has also been discussed from the resistive tail in the temperature dependence of {rho}{sub ab}(H, {theta}, T).

  15. Effects of extracellular pH on receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx in A7r5 rat smooth muscle cells: involvement of two different types of channel.

    PubMed Central

    Iwasawa, K; Nakajima, T; Hazama, H; Goto, A; Shin, W S; Toyo-oka, T; Omata, M

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of extracellular pH (pHo) on receptor (vasopressin or endothelin-1)-mediated Ca2- entry and Ca(2+)-permeable channels were investigated in aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) from rat embryonic thoracic aorta. Intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) was measured using fura-2 AM and whole-cell voltage clamp techniques were employed. 2. Vasopressin and endothelin-1 (100 nM) in the presence of nicardipine (10 microM) evoked a sustained rise in [Ca2+]i due to calcium entry. Extracellular acidosis decreased receptor (vasopressin or endothelin-1)-mediated Ca2+ entry, while extracellular alkalosis potentiated it. 3. Depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin (1 microM) also evoked Ca2+ entry activated by emptying of intracellular Ca2+ stores (capacitative Ca2+ entry). Extracellular acidosis decreased this capacitative Ca2+ entry, while extracellular alkalosis potentiated it. 4. Under voltage-clamp conditions with Ca+ internal solution, vasopressin and endothelin-1 activated non-selective cation currents (ICAT). Ba2+ or Ca2+ were also charge carriers of ICAT. Reducing the pHo inhibited ICAT, while increasing pHo potentiated it in a reversible manner. 5. Intracellular pH (pHi) changes did not cause the same marked effects as pHo changes, and a high concentration of Hepes (50 mM) in the patch pipette did not inhibit the effects of pHo on ICAT. 6. Similar results were obtained when ICAT was activated by GTP gamma S (1 mM) applied through the patch pipette, even in the absence of agonists, probably because of direct activation of GTP-binding proteins coupled to the receptors. 7. In cells treated with thapsigargin, addition of Ca2+ to the bath solution induced Ca(2+)-dependent K+ currents activated by capacitative Ca2+ entry. However, no measurable ionic currents activated by capacitative Ca2+ entry (ICRAC) were observed under conditions with Cs+ internal solution and EGTA (5 mM), although vasopressin still activated ICAT. 8. These results suggest that the

  16. Efficient, low threshold, cryogenic Ho:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Ganija, Miftar; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Haub, John; Veitch, Peter; Munch, Jesper

    2016-05-30

    We report the development of an efficient, liquid-nitrogen conduction cooled Ho:YAG slab laser with good beam quality. Detailed measurements resolving the structure of the 1900-1911 nm absorption band in Ho:YAG at 77 K are presented. Stress-free conduction cooled mounting of the Ho:YAG slab was demonstrated and the resulting laser operated with a large mode volume of 42 mm3, a slope efficiency of 75% and a threshold of 0.84 W. To our knowledge this corresponds to the lowest reported threshold intensity for a Ho:YAG laser. PMID:27410084

  17. mm-wave antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhs, H. P.

    1985-07-01

    The present low profile seeker front end's slotted waveguide antenna was primarily developed to investigate the feasibility of the application of standard manufacturing techniques to mm-wave hardware. A dual plane monopulse comparator was constructed to mate with the antenna via integrated packaging techniques. The comparator was fabricated by CAD/CAM milling operations.

  18. Controlled synthesis and luminescence properties of Ca0.5Y1-x(MoO4)2:xRE3+ (RE = Eu, Pr, Sm, Tb, Dy, Yb/Er, Yb/Tm, and Yb/Ho) phosphors by hydrothermal method versus pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalingam, Venkatakrishnan; Thirumalai, Jagannathan; Krishnan, Rajagopalan; Chandramohan, Rathinam

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report on rare-earth (RE) activated Ca0.5Y1-x(MoO4)2:xRE3+ (RE = Eu, Pr, Sm, Tb, Dy, Yb/Er, Yb/Ho, and Yb/Tm) phosphors synthesized using a surfactant-mediated hydrothermal route. Timedependent experiments were performed, and the morphological evolution of the phosphors was studied. From prepared powder samples of Ca0.5Y1-x(MoO4)2:xRE3+ (RE = Eu and Yb/Er), nano-sized thin phosphor films were grown using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The surface topography of the as-grown thin phosphor films was analyzed. The asprepared phosphors were characterized by structural and optical studies. The powder phosphor exhibited bi pyramid-like micro-architectures. Structural studies indicated that Ca0.5Y1-x(MoO4)2 possesses the scheelite tetragonal crystal structure. The down-conversion luminescence of Ca0.5Y1-x(MoO4)2:xRE3+ (RE = Eu, Pr, Sm, Tb, and Dy) as powder phosphors and Eu3+ doped Ca0.5Y1-x(MoO4)2 thin phosphor film were studied. Upon irradiation with a 980 nm laser, the Ca0.5Y1-x(MoO4)2: xRE3+ (RE = Yb/Er, Yb/Ho, and Yb/Tm) powder phosphors and Ca0.5Y1-x(MoO4)2:xRE3+ (RE = Yb/Er) thin phosphor film showed intense up-converted visible emissions in green, yellow, and blue regions. The fluorescence decay time and color co-ordinates were determined for all synthesized phosphors. From the obtained results, the prepared powder and thin film phosphors are suggested to be suitable candidates for display and electro-luminescence applications. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. High-spin yrast structure of {sup 159}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Ollier, J.; Simpson, J.; Riley, M. A.; Wang, X.; Aguilar, A.; Teal, C.; Paul, E. S.; Nolan, P. J.; Petri, M.; Rigby, S. V.; Thomson, J.; Unsworth, C.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Zhu, S.; Darby, I. G.; Hartley, D. J.; Kondev, F. G.

    2011-08-15

    An investigation of the yrast structure of the odd-Z {sup 159}Ho nucleus to high spin has been performed. The {sup 159}Ho nucleus was populated by the reaction {sup 116}Cd({sup 48}Ca,p4n{gamma}) at a beam energy of 215 MeV, and resulting {gamma} decays were detected by the Gammasphere spectrometer. The h{sub 11/2} yrast band has been significantly extended up to I{sup {pi}=}75/2{sup -} (tentatively 79/2{sup -}). A lower frequency limit for the second (h{sub 11/2}){sup 2} proton alignment was extracted consistent with the systematics of this alignment frequency, indicating an increased deformation with neutron number in the Ho isotopes. The energy-level splitting between the signature partners in the h{sub 11/2} structures of the Ho isotopes and the neighboring N=92 isotones is discussed.

  20. Minfong Ho: Politics in Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggins, Joy L.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author interviews Minfong Ho, an award-winning Thai writer of children's and young adult novels. Ho was born in Burma to Chinese parents in 1951, raised in Singapore and Thailand, educated in Bangkok, Taiwan, and at Cornell University in New York. Ho's first novel, "Sing to the Dawn," won first prize from the Council of…

  1. Quantification of the response of rat medullary raphe neurones to independent changes in pHo and PCO2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wengang; Bradley, Stefania Risso; Richerson, George B

    2002-01-01

    The medullary raphe nuclei contain putative central respiratory chemoreceptor neurones that are highly sensitive to acidosis. To define the primary stimulus for chemosensitivity in these neurones, the response to hypercapnic acidosis was quantified and compared with the response to independent changes in PCO2 and extracellular pH (pHo). Neurones from the ventromedial medulla of neonatal rats (P0-P2) were dissociated and maintained in tissue culture for long enough to develop a mature response (up to 70 days). Perforated patch clamp recordings were used to record membrane potential and firing rate while changes were made in pHo, PCO2 and/or [NaHCO3]o from baseline values of 7.4, 5 % and 26 mm, respectively. Hypercapnic acidosis (PCO2 9 %; pHo 7.17) induced an increase in firing rate to 285 % of control in one subset of neurones (‘stimulated neurones’) and induced a decrease in firing rate to 21 % of control in a different subset of neurones (‘inhibited neurones’). Isocapnic acidosis (pHo 7.16; [NaHCO3]o 15 mm) induced an increase in firing rate of stimulated neurones to 309 % of control, and a decrease in firing rate of inhibited neurones to 38 % of control. In a different group of neurones, isohydric hypercapnia (9 % PCO2; [NaHCO3]o 40 mm) induced an increase in firing rate of stimulated neurones by the same amount (to 384 % of control) as in response to hypercapnic acidosis (to 327 % of control). Inhibited neurones also responded to isohydric hypercapnia in the same way as they did to hypercapnic acidosis. In Hepes-buffered solution, both types of neurone responded to changes in pHo in the same way as they responded to changes in pHo in bicarbonate-buffered Ringer solution. It has previously been shown that all acidosis-stimulated neurones in the medullary raphe are immunoreactive for tryptophan hydroxylase (TpOH-ir). Here it was found that TpOH-ir neurones in the medullary raphe were immunoreactive for carbonic anhydrase type II and type IV (CA II and CA

  2. Building 1204, oblique view to east, 90 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 1204, oblique view to east, 90 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Squadron Operations & Readiness Crew Facility, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  3. Building 1204, oblique view to west, 135 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 1204, oblique view to west, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Squadron Operations & Readiness Crew Facility, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  4. Building 909, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 909, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. Building 908 at extreme right for context. - Travis Air Force Base, Handling Crew Building, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  5. Building 931, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 931, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Central Battery Charging Building, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  6. Building 904, oblique view to northwest, 135 mm lens ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 904, oblique view to northwest, 135 mm lens - Travis Air Force Base, Base Spares Warehouse No. 1, Dixon Avenue & W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  7. Building 931, oblique view to northwest, 210 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 931, oblique view to northwest, 210 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Central Battery Charging Building, North of W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  8. Building 904, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 904, oblique view to southeast, 135 mm lens. - Travis Air Force Base, Base Spares Warehouse No. 1, Dixon Avenue & W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  9. Building 904, oblique view to northeast, 210mm lens Travis ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 904, oblique view to northeast, 210mm lens - Travis Air Force Base, Base Spares Warehouse No. 1, Dixon Avenue & W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  10. Building 932, oblique view to northwest, 90 mm lens. Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 932, oblique view to northwest, 90 mm lens. Building 933-935 at extreme left. - Travis Air Force Base, Nuclear Weapons Assembly Plant 5, W Street, Armed Forces Special Weapons Project Q Area, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  11. Radical scavenging activity of antioxidants evaluated by means of electrogenerated HO radical.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Raquel; Geraldo, Dulce; Bento, Fátima

    2014-11-01

    A method is proposed and tested concerning the characterization of antioxidants by means of their reaction with electrogenerated HO radicals in galvanostatic assays with simultaneous O2 evolution, using a Pt anode fairly oxidized. The consumption of a set of species with antioxidant activity, ascorbic acid (AA), caffeic acid (CA), gallic acid (GA) and trolox (T), is described by a first order kinetics. The rate of the processes is limited by the kinetics of reaction with HO radicals and by the kinetics of charge transfer. Information regarding the scavenger activity of antioxidants is obtained by the relative value of the rate constant of the reaction between antioxidants and HO radicals, k(AO,HO)/k(O2). The number of HO radicals scavenged per molecule of antioxidant is also estimated and ranged from 260 (ascorbic acid) to 500 (gallic acid). The method is applied successfully in the characterization of the scavenger activity of ascorbic acid in a green-tea based beverage.

  12. Magnetic Order in HoF3 Studied via Ho Nuclear Spin Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchison, W. D.; Chaplin, D. H.; Bowden, G. J.

    2004-11-01

    It is shown that in-situ 166mHo ( I = 7) in a spherical single crystal of HoF3 can be used as sensitive internal thermometer to thermally detect NMR (NMR-TDNO) from the 100% abundant stable 165Ho ( I = 7/2) nuclei. In addition, new 166mHo NMRON results are reported. Both the 166mHo NMRON and 165Ho NMR-TDNO spectra show three distinct quadrupolar split sub-resonances, in zero applied field. The data is used to make estimates of the Ho magnetic moments and quadrupole parameters for the 166mHo and 166mHo sites.

  13. HO:LULF and HO:LULF Laser Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Morrison, Clyde A. (Inventor); Filer, Elizabeth D. (Inventor); Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Lockard, George E. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A laser host material LULF (LuLiF4) is doped with holmium (Ho) and thulium (Tm) to produce a new laser material that is capable of laser light production in the vicinity of 2 microns. The material provides an advantage in efficiency over conventional Ho lasers because the LULF host material allows for decreased threshold and upconversion over such hosts as YAG and YLF. The addition of Tm allows for pumping by commonly available GaAlAs laser diodes. For use with flashlamp pumping, erbium (Er) may be added as an additional dopant. For further upconversion reduction, the Tm can be eliminated and the Ho can be directly pumped.

  14. Primeval galaxies in the sub-mm and mm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, J. Richard; Myers, Steven T.

    1993-01-01

    Although the results of COBE's FIRAS experiment 1 constrain the deviation in energy from the CMB blackbody in the 500-5000 micron range to be delta E/E, sub cmb less than 0.005, primeval galaxies can still lead to a brilliant sub-mm sky of non-Gaussian sources that are detectable at 10 inch resolution from planned arrays such as SCUBA on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and, quite plausibly, at sub-arcsecond resolution in planned mm and sub-mm interferometers. Here, we apply our hierarchical peaks method to a CDM model to construct sub-mm and mm maps of bursting PG's appropriate for these instruments with minimum contours chosen to correspond to realistic observational parameters for them and which pass the FIRAS limits.

  15. Spectral and lasing characteristics of 1% Ho:YAG ceramics under intracavity pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Bagayev, S N; Vatnik, S M; Vedin, I A; Kurbatov, P F; Osipov, V V; Shitov, V A; Maksimov, R N; Luk'yashin, K E; Pavlyuk, A A

    2015-01-31

    High-transparency 1% Ho:YAG ceramics with the transmission coefficient of 82% in the IR range at the sample thickness of 1 mm are synthesised from a mixture of the Ho:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders obtained by the laser method. Results of investigations of spectral and lasing characteristics of 1 % Ho:YAG ceramics under intracavity pumping by radiation of a 5% Tm:KLuW disk element are presented. Based on spectral intensity analysis of generation in the 1.8 – 2.1 mm range and on cavity parameters, the estimated lasing slope efficiency for 1% Ho:YAG ceramics is about 40%. (lasers)

  16. {sup 163}Ho based experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, Loredana

    2015-07-15

    The analysis of the endpoint region of the calorimetrically measured {sup 163}Ho electron capture spectrum is a very promising way to determine the mass of the electron neutrino. The achievable sensitivity of {sup 163}Ho-based experiments and the experimental challenges will be presented. Three large collaborations aim at developing large scale experiments able to reach sub-eV sensitivity. Presently pilot experiments are performed to demonstrate the possibility to calorimetrically measure high precision and high statistics {sup 163}Ho spectra. The different approaches as well as the state of the art of the experimental efforts for the three collaborations will be discussed.

  17. OpenMM accelerated MMTK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Kevin P.; Constable, Steve; Faruk, Nabil F.; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we provide an interface developed to link the Molecular Modelling toolkit (MMTK) with OpenMM in order to take advantage of the fast evaluation techniques of OpenMM. This interface allows MMTK scripts using the Langevin dynamics integrator, for both classical and path integral simulations, to be executed on a variety of hardware including graphical processing units via OpenMM. The interface has been developed using Python and Cython to take advantage of the high level abstraction thanks to the MMTK and OpenMM software packages. We have tested the interface on a number of systems to observe which systems benefit most from the acceleration libraries of OpenMM.

  18. SSC 40 mm cable results and 50 mm design discussions

    SciTech Connect

    Christopherson, D.; Capone, D.; Hannaford, R.; Remsbottom, R.; Jayakumar, R.; Snitchler, G. ); Scanlan, R.; Royet, J. )

    1990-09-01

    A summary of the cable produced for the 1990 40 mm Dipole Program is presented. The cable design parameters for the 50 mm Dipole Program are discussed, as well as portions of the SSC specification draft. Considerations leading to the final cable configuration and the results of preliminary trials are included. The first iteration of a strand mapping program to automate cable strand maps is introduced. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  20. 5. East portal of Tunnel 26, view to southwest, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. East portal of Tunnel 26, view to southwest, 135mm lens. Tunnel 25 (HAER CA-201) is visible in the distance. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 26, Milepost 133.29, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  1. The GBT 4mm Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frayer, David T.; White, S.; Watts, G.; Stennes, M.; Maddalena, R. J.; Simon, R.; Pospieszalski, M.; Bryerton, E.

    2013-01-01

    The new 4mm receiver (67--93 GHz) for the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) was built to take advantage of the improved surface accuracy of the dish. The low frequency end of the 3mm atmospheric window is not available with ALMA (<84 GHz), and the sensitivity of the GBT is better than any other facility within this band. We discuss the design and performance of this new receiver for the GBT, and highlight the science opportunities available with the instrument. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  2. Apollo 12 photography 70 mm, 16 mm, and 35 mm frame index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    For each 70-mm frame, the index presents information on: (1) the focal length of the camera, (2) the photo scale at the principal point of the frame, (3) the selenographic coordinates at the principal point of the frame, (4) the percentage of forward overlap of the frame, (5) the sun angle (medium, low, high), (6) the quality of the photography, (7) the approximate tilt (minimum and maximum) of the camera, and (8) the direction of tilt. A brief description of each frame is also included. The index to the 16-mm sequence photography includes information concerning the approximate surface coverage of the photographic sequence and a brief description of the principal features shown. A column of remarks is included to indicate: (1) if the sequence is plotted on the photographic index map and (2) the quality of the photography. The pictures taken using the lunar surface closeup stereoscopic camera (35 mm) are also described in this same index format.

  3. Is the HO4- anion a key species in the aqueous-phase decomposition of ozone?

    PubMed

    Anglada, Josep M; Torrent-Sucarrat, Miquel; Ruiz-Lopez, Manuel F; Martins-Costa, Marilia

    2012-10-15

    The role of the HO(4)(-) anion in atmospheric chemistry and biology is a matter of debate, because it can be formed from, or be in equilibrium with, key species such as O(3) + HO(-) or HO(2) + O(2) (-). The determination of the stability of HO(4)(-) in water therefore has the greatest relevance for better understanding the mechanism associated with oxidative cascades in aqueous solution. However, experiments are difficult to perform because of the short-lived character of this species, and in this work we have employed DFT, CCSD(T) complete basis set (CBS), MRCI/aug-cc-pVTZ, and combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to investigate this topic. We show that the HO(4)(-) anion has a planar structure in the gas phase, with a very large HOO-OO bond length (1.823 Å). In contrast, HO(4)(-) adopts a nonplanar configuration in aqueous solution, with huge geometrical changes (up to 0.232 Å for the HOO-OO bond length) with a very small energy cost. The formation of the HO(4)(-) anion is predicted to be endergonic by 5.53±1.44 and 2.14±0.37 kcal mol(-1) with respect to the O(3) + HO(-) and HO(2) + O(2)(-) channels, respectively. Moreover, the combination of theoretical calculations with experimental free energies of solvation has allowed us to obtain accurate free energies for the main reactions involved in the aqueous decomposition of ozone. Thus, the oxygen transfer reaction (O(3) + OH(-) → HO(2) + O(2)(-)) is endergonic by 3.39±1.80 kcal mol(-1), the electron transfer process (O(3) + O(2)(-) → O(3)(-) + O(2)) is exergonic by 31.53±1.05 kcal mol(-1), supporting the chain-carrier role of the superoxide ion, and the reaction O(3) + HO(2)(-) → OH + O(2)(-) + O(2) is exergonic by 12.78±1.15 kcal mol(-1), which is consistent with the fact that the addition of small amounts of HO(2)(-) (through H(2)O(2)) accelerates ozone decomposition in water. The combination of our results with previously reported thermokinetic data provides some

  4. Exacerbated corneal inflammation and neovascularization in the HO-2 null mice is ameliorated by biliverdin

    PubMed Central

    Bellner, Lars; Vitto, Marco; Patil, Kiran A.; Dunn, Michael W.; Regan, Raymond; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO-1 and HO-2) represents an intrinsic cytoprotective and anti-inflammatory system based on its ability to modulate leukocyte migration and to inhibit expression of inflammatory cytokines and proteins. HO-2 deletion leads to unresolved corneal inflammation and chronic inflammatory complications including ulceration, perforation and neovascularization. We examined the consequences of HO-2 deletion on hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in the model of suture-induced inflammatory neovascularization. A 8.0 silk suture was placed at the corneal apex of wild type and HO-2 null mice. Neovascularization was assessed by vital microscopy and quantified by image analysis. Hemangiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis were determined by immunofluorescence staining using anti-CD31 and anti-LYVE-1 antibodies, respectively. Inflammation was quantified by histology and myeloperoxidase activity. The levels of HO-1 expression and inflammatory cytokines were determined by real time PCR and ELISA, respectively. Corneal sutures produced a consistent inflammatory response and a time-dependent neovascularization. The response in HO-2 null mice was associated with a greater increase compared to the wild type in the number of leukocytes (827600±129000 vs. 294500±57510; p<0.05), neovessels measured by vital microscopy (21.91±1.05 vs. 12.77±1.55 mm; p<0.001) 4 days after suture placement. Hemangiogenesis but not lymphangiogenesis was more pronounced in HO-2 null mice compared to wild type mice. Induction of HO-1 in sutured corneas was greatly attenuated in HO-2 null corneas and treatment with biliverdin diminished the exaggerated inflammatory and neovascular response in HO-2 null mice. The demonstration that the inflammatory responses, including expression of proinflammatory proteins, inflammatory cell influx and hemangiogenesis are exaggerated in HO-2 knockout mice strongly supports the notion that the HO system is critical for controlling the inflammatory and neovascular

  5. Topics in Ho Morphophonology and Morphosyntax

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucilowski, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Ho, an under-documented North Munda language of India, is known for its complex verb forms. This dissertation focuses on analysis of several features of those complex verbs, using data from original fieldwork undertaken by the author. By way of background, an analysis of the phonetics, phonology and morphophonology of Ho is first presented. Ho has…

  6. Investigation on the structure and upconversion fluorescence of Yb3+/Ho3+ co-doped fluorapatite crystals for potential biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiyu; Zhu, Jingxian; Man, Zhentao; Ao, Yingfang; Chen, Haifeng

    2014-01-01

    Rare-earth Yb3+ and Ho3+ co-doped fluorapatite (FA:Yb3+/Ho3+) crystals were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and their structure, upconversion properties, cell proliferation and imaging were investigated. The synthesized crystals, with a size of 16 by 286 nm, have a hexagonal crystal structure of classic FA and a Ca/Yb/Ho molar ratio of 100/16/2.1. Several reasonable Yb3+/Ho3+ -embedding lattice models along the fluorine channel of the FA crystal cell are proposed for the first time, such as models for (Ca7YbHo©)(PO4)6F2 and (Ca6YbHoNa2)(PO4)6F2. The activated FA:Yb3+/Ho3+ crystals were found to exhibit distinct upconversion fluorescence. The 543- and 654-nm signals in the emission spectra could be assigned, respectively, to the 5F4 (5S2) - 5I8 and 5F5 - 5I8 transitions of holmium via 980-nm near-infrared excitation and the energy transfer of ytterbium. After the surfaces were grafted with hydrophilic dextran, the crystals displayed clear fluorescent cell imaging. Thus, the prepared novel FA:Yb3+/Ho3+ upconversion fluorescent crystals have potential applications in the biomedical field. PMID:24658285

  7. Credit USAF, ca. 1943. Original housed in the Photograph Files, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit USAF, ca. 1943. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Historic view of finished swimming pool, with fence and lifeguard station. View looks west - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Swimming Pool, Second Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Photograph Files, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Early view of the Control Tower (designated T-65, Building 4500) fitted out with radio antennae. Structure at base of tower was T42 (later Building 4503), Flight Operations - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Radio & Control Tower T-65, Northeast of A Street, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. Modification of Caffeic Acid with Pyrrolidine Enhances Antioxidant Ability by Activating AKT/HO-1 Pathway in Heart

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Hui-Chun; Lee, Shih-Yi; Yang, Kai-Chien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Su, Ming-Jai

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of free radicals during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury leads to an interest in using antioxidant therapy. Activating an endogenous antioxidant signaling pathway is more important due to the fact that the free radical scavenging behavior in vitro does not always correlate with a cytoprotection effect in vivo. Caffeic acid (CA), an antioxidant, is a major phenolic constituent in nature. Pyrrolidinyl caffeamide (PLCA), a derivative of CA, was compared with CA for their antioxidant and cytoprotective effects. Our results indicate that CA and PLCA exert the same ability to scavenge DPPH in vitro. In response to myocardial I/R stress, PLCA was shown to attenuate lipid peroxydation and troponin release more than CA. These responses were accompanied with a prominent elevation in AKT and HO-1 expression and a preservation of mnSOD expression and catalase activity. PLCA also improved cell viability and alleviated the intracellular ROS level more than CA in cardiomyocytes exposed to H2O2. When inhibiting the AKT or HO-1 pathways, PLCA lost its ability to recover mnSOD expression and catalase activity to counteract with oxidative stress, suggesting AKT/HO-1 pathway activation by PLCA plays an important role. In addition, inhibition of AKT signaling further abolished HO-1 activity, while inhibition of HO-1 signaling attenuated AKT expression, indicating cross-talk between the AKT and HO-1 pathways. These protective effects may contribute to the cardiac function improvement by PLCA. These findings provide new insight into therapeutic approaches using a modified natural compound against oxidative stress from myocardial injuries. PMID:26845693

  10. Modification of Caffeic Acid with Pyrrolidine Enhances Antioxidant Ability by Activating AKT/HO-1 Pathway in Heart.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hui-Chun; Lee, Shih-Yi; Yang, Kai-Chien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Su, Ming-Jai

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of free radicals during ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury leads to an interest in using antioxidant therapy. Activating an endogenous antioxidant signaling pathway is more important due to the fact that the free radical scavenging behavior in vitro does not always correlate with a cytoprotection effect in vivo. Caffeic acid (CA), an antioxidant, is a major phenolic constituent in nature. Pyrrolidinyl caffeamide (PLCA), a derivative of CA, was compared with CA for their antioxidant and cytoprotective effects. Our results indicate that CA and PLCA exert the same ability to scavenge DPPH in vitro. In response to myocardial I/R stress, PLCA was shown to attenuate lipid peroxydation and troponin release more than CA. These responses were accompanied with a prominent elevation in AKT and HO-1 expression and a preservation of mnSOD expression and catalase activity. PLCA also improved cell viability and alleviated the intracellular ROS level more than CA in cardiomyocytes exposed to H2O2. When inhibiting the AKT or HO-1 pathways, PLCA lost its ability to recover mnSOD expression and catalase activity to counteract with oxidative stress, suggesting AKT/HO-1 pathway activation by PLCA plays an important role. In addition, inhibition of AKT signaling further abolished HO-1 activity, while inhibition of HO-1 signaling attenuated AKT expression, indicating cross-talk between the AKT and HO-1 pathways. These protective effects may contribute to the cardiac function improvement by PLCA. These findings provide new insight into therapeutic approaches using a modified natural compound against oxidative stress from myocardial injuries. PMID:26845693

  11. Shape coexistence in 153Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Dibyadyuti; Sarkar, S.; Saha Sarkar, M.; Bisoi, Abhijit; Ray, Sudatta; Dasgupta, Shinjinee; Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan, Kshetri, Ritesh; Ray, Indrani; Ganguly, S.; Pradhan, M. K.; Ray Basu, M.; Raut, R.; Ganguly, G.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Basu, S. K.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, P.; Goswami, A.

    2016-08-01

    The high-spin states in 153Ho have been studied by the La57(20Ne139,6 n ) reaction at a projectile energy of 139 MeV at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India, utilizing an earlier campaign of the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) setup. Data from γ -γ coincidence, directional correlation, and polarization measurements have been analyzed to assign and confirm the spins and parities of the levels. We have suggested a few additions and revisions of the reported level scheme of 153Ho. The RF-γ time difference spectra have been useful to confirm the half-life of an isomer in this nucleus. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical results, it is found that there are definite indications of shape coexistence in this nucleus. The experimental and calculated lifetimes of several isomers have been compared to follow the coexistence and evolution of shape with increasing spin.

  12. Tm:YLF Pumped Ho:YAG and Ho:LuAG Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J.; Walsh, Brian M.; Axenson, Theresa J.

    2004-01-01

    Room temperature Ho:YAG and Ho:LuAG lasers pumped by a Tm:YLF laser demonstrated a 3.4 mJ threshold and 0.41 slope efficiency, incident optical to laser output energy. Results for numerous rod lengths, Ho concentrations, and output mirror reflectivities are presented.

  13. Ferroelectricity and competing interactions in Ho-deficient non-stoichiometric orthorhombic HoMnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. X.; Yan, Z. B.; Xie, Y. L.; Zhou, X. H.; Liu, J.-M.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the consequences of the Ho-deficient non-stoichiometry in orthorhombic HoMnO{sub 3} in terms of microscopic mechanisms for ferroelectricity modulation. It is suggested that the Ho-deficiency (then Mn excess) results in Ho-vacancies and then Mn occupation of the Ho-site with increasing non-stoichiometry. The Ho-deficiency enhances the Mn-Mn symmetric exchange striction by suppressing the independent Ho-Ho interaction, and thus benefits to the induced Ho spin ordering against the independent Ho spin ordering. The symmetric Ho-Mn exchange striction is thus enhanced by this induced Ho spin ordering, leading to remarkably enhanced ferroelectric polarization as observed. This work presents an alternative scheme to modulate the multiferroicity in rare-earth manganites of strong 4f-3d coupling.

  14. In vitro investigation on Ho:YAG laser-assisted bone ablation underwater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Chen, Chuanguo; Chen, Faner; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Liquid-assisted hard tissue ablation by infrared lasers has extensive clinical application. However, detailed studies are still needed to explore the underlying mechanism. In the present study, the dynamic process of bubble evolution induced by Ho:YAG laser under water without and with bone tissue at different thickness layer were studied, as well as its effects on hard tissue ablation. The results showed that the Ho:YAG laser was capable of ablating hard bone tissue effectively in underwater conditions. The penetration of Ho:YAG laser can be significantly increased up to about 4 mm with the assistance of bubble. The hydrokinetic forces associated with the bubble not only contributed to reducing the thermal injury to peripheral tissue, but also enhanced the ablation efficiency and improve the ablation crater morphology. The data also presented some clues to optimal selection of irradiation parameters and provided additional knowledge of the bubble-assisted hard tissue ablation mechanism.

  15. Near infrared luminescence in Yb3+/Ho3+: co-doped germanate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanowicz, Marcin; Żmojda, Jacek; Miluski, Piotr; Ragin, Tomasz; Jeleń, Piotr; Sitarz, Maciej; Dorosz, Dominik

    2015-12-01

    The near-infrared emission of low phonon (805 cm-1) germanate glasses from GeO2-Ga2O3-BaO system co-doped with 0.7Yb2O3/(0.07-0.7)Ho2O3 ions has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7 → 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer and as a consequence luminescence intensity at 2mm. The highest value of the luminescence intensity was obtained in glass codoped with 0.7Yb2O3/0.15 Ho2O3.

  16. In vitro investigation on Ho:YAG laser-assisted bone ablation underwater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Chen, Chuanguo; Chen, Faner; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Liquid-assisted hard tissue ablation by infrared lasers has extensive clinical application. However, detailed studies are still needed to explore the underlying mechanism. In the present study, the dynamic process of bubble evolution induced by Ho:YAG laser under water without and with bone tissue at different thickness layer were studied, as well as its effects on hard tissue ablation. The results showed that the Ho:YAG laser was capable of ablating hard bone tissue effectively in underwater conditions. The penetration of Ho:YAG laser can be significantly increased up to about 4 mm with the assistance of bubble. The hydrokinetic forces associated with the bubble not only contributed to reducing the thermal injury to peripheral tissue, but also enhanced the ablation efficiency and improve the ablation crater morphology. The data also presented some clues to optimal selection of irradiation parameters and provided additional knowledge of the bubble-assisted hard tissue ablation mechanism. PMID:27056700

  17. Heterogeneous photochemistry of imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde: HO2 radical formation and aerosol growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Palacios, Laura; Corral Arroyo, Pablo; Aregahegn, Kifle Z.; Steimer, Sarah S.; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Nozière, Barbara; George, Christian; Ammann, Markus; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    The multiphase chemistry of glyoxal is a source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA), including its light-absorbing product imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde (IC). IC is a photosensitizer that can contribute to additional aerosol ageing and growth when its excited triplet state oxidizes hydrocarbons (reactive uptake) via H-transfer chemistry. We have conducted a series of photochemical coated-wall flow tube (CWFT) experiments using films of IC and citric acid (CA), an organic proxy and H donor in the condensed phase. The formation rate of gas-phase HO2 radicals (PHO2) was measured indirectly by converting gas-phase NO into NO2. We report on experiments that relied on measurements of NO2 formation, NO loss and HONO formation. PHO2 was found to be a linear function of (1) the [IC] × [CA] concentration product and (2) the photon actinic flux. Additionally, (3) a more complex function of relative humidity (25 % < RH < 63 %) and of (4) the O2 / N2 ratio (15 % < O2 / N2 < 56 %) was observed, most likely indicating competing effects of dilution, HO2 mobility and losses in the film. The maximum PHO2 was observed at 25-55 % RH and at ambient O2 / N2. The HO2 radicals form in the condensed phase when excited IC triplet states are reduced by H transfer from a donor, CA in our system, and subsequently react with O2 to regenerate IC, leading to a catalytic cycle. OH does not appear to be formed as a primary product but is produced from the reaction of NO with HO2 in the gas phase. Further, seed aerosols containing IC and ammonium sulfate were exposed to gas-phase limonene and NOx in aerosol flow tube experiments, confirming significant PHO2 from aerosol surfaces. Our results indicate a potentially relevant contribution of triplet state photochemistry for gas-phase HO2 production, aerosol growth and ageing in the atmosphere.

  18. Investigation of loss processes of Tm and Tm,Ho in YAG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armagan, G.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Bair, C. H.; Inge, A. T.; Hess, R. V.

    1991-01-01

    The loss of excitation from various manifolds of Tm and Tm,Ho in YAG as a function of temperature and concentration is studied. Two probable loss mechanisms - a Tm up-conversion and a Ho up-conversion - are identified. A 785-nm CW diode laser with 400-nW peak power was focused to a small spot on the sample. The emission from the sample observed at 90 deg was monitored through a monochromator with slits open to 3 mm. Intensity of emission was measured by varying the power of the excitation source using a set of neutral density filters. Power is reported as the percentage of the peak power, and the intensity curves were normalized below 20 percent of transmission. The fact that there is emission above the pump energy indicates an up-conversion from excited manifolds. Nonlinear changes in the intensity of the emission from the Tm 3F4 manifold with the pump power reveals a loss of excitation from this manifold. The linear dependence of the 5I7 manifold emission with pump power at low Tm and high Ho concentrations and the gain of energy in the 5I6 manifold of Ho indicate that the 5I7 manifold loss is due to the coupling of Tm and Ho ions.

  19. 7. Detail, east portal of Tunnel 34/Snowshed 33, 135mm lens. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail, east portal of Tunnel 34/Snowshed 33, 135mm lens. Tall signal mast necessary in order to be seen above winter snows. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 41, Milepost 193.3, Donner, Placer County, CA

  20. AN ELISA ASSAY FOR HEME OXYGENASE (HO-1)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An ELISA assay for heme oxygenase (HO-l )

    Abstract

    A double antibody capture ELISA for the HO-l protein has been developed to separately quantitate HO-I protein. The use of 2.5% NP40 detergent greatly assists in freeing HO-l protein from membranes and/or other cel...

  1. Thermochemistry of HO2 + HO2 → H2O4: Does HO2 Dimerization Affect Laboratory Studies?

    PubMed

    Sprague, Matthew K; Irikura, Karl K

    2015-07-01

    Self-reaction is an important sink for the hydroperoxy radical (HO2) in the atmosphere. It has been suggested (Denis, P. A.; Ornellas, F. R. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2009, 113 (2), 499-506) that the minor product hydrogen tetroxide (HO4H) may act as a reservoir of HO2. Here, we compute the thermochemistry of HO2 self-reactions to determine if either HO4H or the cyclic hydrogen-bound dimer (HO2)2 can act as reservoirs. We computed electronic energies using coupled-cluster calculations in the complete basis set limit, CCSD(T)/CBS[45]//CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ. Our model chemistry includes corrections for vibrational anharmonicity in the zero-point energy and vibrational partition functions, core-valence correlation, scalar relativistic effects, diagonal Born-Oppenheimer, spin-orbit splitting, and higher-order corrections. We compute the Gibbs energy of dimerization to be (-20.1 ± 1.6) kJ/mol at 298.15 K (2σ uncertainty), and (-32.3 ± 1.5) kJ/mol at 220 K. For atmospherically relevant [HO2] = 10(8) molecules per cm(3), our thermochemistry indicates that dimerization will be negligible, and thus H2O4 species are atmospherically unimportant. Under conditions used in laboratory experiments ([HO2] > 10(12) molecules per cm(3), 220 K), H2O4 formation may be significant. We compute two absorption spectra that could be used for laboratory detection of HO4H: the OH stretch overtone (near-IR) and electronic (UV) spectra. PMID:26066551

  2. Evaluation of Leuconostoc citreum HO12 and Weissella koreensis HO20 isolated from kimchi as a starter culture for whole wheat sourdough.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyejung; Kim, Yeo-Won; Hwang, Inyoung; Kim, Jeongho; Yoon, Sun

    2012-10-15

    Leuconostoc citreum HO12 and Weissella koreensis HO20 isolated from kimchi were evaluated as starter cultures in the making of whole wheat sourdough bread. After 24h of fermentation at 25 °C, both lactobacilli grew to the final cell numbers of ca. 10(9)cfu/g dough, and both doughs had similar pHs and total titratable acidities. In addition, the fermentation quotient of the dough with Lc. citreum HO12 was slightly lower than that of the dough with W. koreensis HO20 (1.6 versus 2.8). Sourdoughs and bread with 50% sourdough produced with the starter cultures exhibited consistent ability to retard the growth of bread spoilage fungi (Penicillium roqueforti and Aspergillus niger) and rope-forming bacterium (Bacillus subtilis). Sourdough breads underwent a significant reduction in bread firming during storage. It seems that both lactobacilli have the potential to improve the shelf-life of wheat bread. The results indicate that the selected lactobacilli have unique fermentation characteristics and produce sourdough breads with overall satisfactory quality.

  3. Evaluation of Leuconostoc citreum HO12 and Weissella koreensis HO20 isolated from kimchi as a starter culture for whole wheat sourdough.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyejung; Kim, Yeo-Won; Hwang, Inyoung; Kim, Jeongho; Yoon, Sun

    2012-10-15

    Leuconostoc citreum HO12 and Weissella koreensis HO20 isolated from kimchi were evaluated as starter cultures in the making of whole wheat sourdough bread. After 24h of fermentation at 25 °C, both lactobacilli grew to the final cell numbers of ca. 10(9)cfu/g dough, and both doughs had similar pHs and total titratable acidities. In addition, the fermentation quotient of the dough with Lc. citreum HO12 was slightly lower than that of the dough with W. koreensis HO20 (1.6 versus 2.8). Sourdoughs and bread with 50% sourdough produced with the starter cultures exhibited consistent ability to retard the growth of bread spoilage fungi (Penicillium roqueforti and Aspergillus niger) and rope-forming bacterium (Bacillus subtilis). Sourdough breads underwent a significant reduction in bread firming during storage. It seems that both lactobacilli have the potential to improve the shelf-life of wheat bread. The results indicate that the selected lactobacilli have unique fermentation characteristics and produce sourdough breads with overall satisfactory quality. PMID:23442676

  4. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mm of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Subpart MM 1 Table 1 to Subpart MM of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Combustion Sources at Kraft, Soda, Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemical Pulp Mills Pt. 63, Subpt. MM, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart MM of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM General...

  5. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mm of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Subpart MM 1 Table 1 to Subpart MM of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Combustion Sources at Kraft, Soda, Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemical Pulp Mills Pt. 63, Subpt. MM, Table 1 Table 1 to Subpart MM of Part 63—General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM General...

  6. 9. Credit USAF, ca. 1955. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Credit USAF, ca. 1955. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. View of Lockheed XVF-1 Pogo, an experimental vertical take-off and landing aircraft at North Base. Photograph was taken on the apron between buildings 4401 and 4402, looking north northeast towards back of Building 4402 and officers' quarters (T-15) beyond. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 5. Credit USAF, ca. 1942. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Credit USAF, ca. 1942. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. View of Bell Aircraft XP-59A Airacomet in flight. This was the United States military's first jet propelled aircraft which was extensively flight tested in secrecy at the Muroc Flight Test Base (North Base). - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  8. Reaction rate constant of HO2+O3 measured by detecting HO2 from photofragment fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzanares, E. R.; Suto, Masako; Lee, Long C.; Coffey, Dewitt, Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A room-temperature discharge-flow system investigation of the rate constant for the reaction 'HO2 + O3 yields OH + 2O2' has detected HO2 through the OH(A-X) fluorescence produced by photodissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. A reaction rate constant of 1.9 + or - 0.3 x 10 to the -15th cu cm/molecule per sec is obtained from first-order decay of HO2 in excess O3; this agrees well with published data.

  9. Local Measurement of Tropospheric HO(x)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, David R.

    1994-01-01

    In March of 1992 a workshop sponsored by NASA and NSF was held at SRI International to assess the current ability to measure atmospheric OH and HO2. The measurement techniques reviewed during the workshop for detection of OH included five laser-induced fluorescence schemes, five laser-based adsorption techniques, and four non-laser methods. Six instruments or instrument concepts for HO2 detection, including chemical amplification, conversion to OH with subsequent OH detection, or direct spectroscopic detection of the HO2 were also discussed. The conclusions from the workshop identify several measurement techniques for OH and HO2 that are ready for field tests. These have the ability to measure the radicals with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy to form meaningful comparison with atmospheric model predictions. The workshop conclusions also include recommendations for informal and formal intercomparison protocols.

  10. Impact of Ho(3+)-doping on (13)C dynamic nuclear polarization using trityl OX063 free radical.

    PubMed

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Martins, André; Fidelino, Leila; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Song, Likai; Sherry, A Dean; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-08-21

    We have investigated the effects of Ho-DOTA doping on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of [1-(13)C] sodium acetate using trityl OX063 free radical at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Our results indicate that addition of 2 mM Ho-DOTA on 3 M [1-(13)C] sodium acetate sample in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water with 15 mM trityl OX063 improves the DNP-enhanced (13)C solid-state nuclear polarization by a factor of around 2.7-fold. Similar to the Gd(3+) doping effect on (13)C DNP, the locations of the positive and negative (13)C maximum polarization peaks in the (13)C microwave DNP sweep are shifted towards each other with the addition of Ho-DOTA on the DNP sample. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have revealed that while the shape and linewidth of the trityl OX063 ESR spectrum was not affected by Ho(3+)-doping, the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of trityl OX063 was prominently reduced at cryogenic temperatures. The reduction of trityl OX063 electron T1 by Ho-doping is linked to the (13)C DNP improvement in light of the thermodynamic picture of DNP. Moreover, the presence of Ho-DOTA in the dissolution liquid at room temperature has negligible reduction effect on liquid-state (13)C T1, in contrast to Gd(3+)-doping which drastically reduces the (13)C T1. The results here suggest that Ho(3+)-doping is advantageous over Gd(3+) in terms of preservation of hyperpolarized state-an important aspect to consider for in vitro and in vivo NMR or imaging (MRI) experiments where a considerable preparation time is needed to administer the hyperpolarized (13)C liquid.

  11. Impact of Ho(3+)-doping on (13)C dynamic nuclear polarization using trityl OX063 free radical.

    PubMed

    Kiswandhi, Andhika; Niedbalski, Peter; Parish, Christopher; Kaur, Pavanjeet; Martins, André; Fidelino, Leila; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Song, Likai; Sherry, A Dean; Lumata, Lloyd

    2016-08-21

    We have investigated the effects of Ho-DOTA doping on the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of [1-(13)C] sodium acetate using trityl OX063 free radical at 3.35 T and 1.2 K. Our results indicate that addition of 2 mM Ho-DOTA on 3 M [1-(13)C] sodium acetate sample in 1 : 1 v/v glycerol : water with 15 mM trityl OX063 improves the DNP-enhanced (13)C solid-state nuclear polarization by a factor of around 2.7-fold. Similar to the Gd(3+) doping effect on (13)C DNP, the locations of the positive and negative (13)C maximum polarization peaks in the (13)C microwave DNP sweep are shifted towards each other with the addition of Ho-DOTA on the DNP sample. W-band electron spin resonance (ESR) studies have revealed that while the shape and linewidth of the trityl OX063 ESR spectrum was not affected by Ho(3+)-doping, the electron spin-lattice relaxation time T1 of trityl OX063 was prominently reduced at cryogenic temperatures. The reduction of trityl OX063 electron T1 by Ho-doping is linked to the (13)C DNP improvement in light of the thermodynamic picture of DNP. Moreover, the presence of Ho-DOTA in the dissolution liquid at room temperature has negligible reduction effect on liquid-state (13)C T1, in contrast to Gd(3+)-doping which drastically reduces the (13)C T1. The results here suggest that Ho(3+)-doping is advantageous over Gd(3+) in terms of preservation of hyperpolarized state-an important aspect to consider for in vitro and in vivo NMR or imaging (MRI) experiments where a considerable preparation time is needed to administer the hyperpolarized (13)C liquid. PMID:27424954

  12. Application of MM wave therapy in radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Avakian, R.S.; Gasparyan, L.V.

    1995-12-31

    The authors studied the effects of MM wave electromagnetic radiation influence on patients, affected by X-ray radiation during the reparation works after Chernobyl nuclear power plant exposure. They compared results of treatment of two groups of patients: (1) control group patients received only basis therapy; (2) testing group, 10 patients received basis therapy and MM wave influence. The authors used the wide band noise generator `Artsakh - 2` for local irradiation on the acupuncture points. Their data proved that low intensity MM waves have immunocorrective, antioxidant effects, and MM wave therapy is a perspective method for treatment of patients with radiological pathology.

  13. A Toddler's Treatment of "Mm" and "Mm Hm" in Talk with a Parent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipi, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The study to be reported in this paper examined the work accomplished by "mm" and "mm hm" in the interactions of a parent and his daughter aged 0;10-2;0. Using the findings of Gardner (2001) for adults, the analysis shows that "mm" accomplished a range of functions based on its sequential placement and prosodic features, whereas "mm hm" was much…

  14. Structure and kinematics of the clouds surrounding the Galactic mini-starburst W43 MM1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacq, T.; Braine, J.; Herpin, F.; van der Tak, F.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-10-01

    Massive stars have a major influence on their environment, yet their formation is difficult to study as they form quickly in highly obscured regions and are rare, hence more distant than lower mass stars. Westerhout 43 (W43) is a highly luminous galactic massive star-forming region at a distance of 5.5 kpc and the MM1 part hosts a particularly massive dense core (1000 M⊙ within 0.05 pc). We present new Herschel HIFI maps of the W43 MM1 region covering the main low-energy water lines at 557, 987, and 1113 GHz; their HO counterparts; and other lines such as 13CO (10-9) and C18O (9-8), which trace warm gas. These water lines are, with the exception of line wings, observed in absorption. Herschel SPIRE and JCMT 450 μm data have been used to make a model of the continuum emission at the HIFI wavelengths. Analysis of the maps, and in particular the optical depth maps of each line and feature, shows that a velocity gradient, possibly due to rotation, is present in both the envelope (r ≳ 0.5 pc) and the protostellar core (r ≲ 0.2 pc). Velocities increase in both components from SW to NE, following the general source orientation. While the H2O lines trace essentially the cool envelope, we show that the envelope cannot account for the HO absorption, which traces motions close to the protostar. The core has rapid infall, 2.9 km s-1, as manifested by the HO absorption features which are systematically redshifted with respect to the 13CO (10-9) emission line which also traces the inner material with the same angular resolution. Some HO absorption is detected outside the central core and thus outside the regions expected (from a spherical model) to be above 100 K; we attribute this to warm gas associated with the other massive dense cores in W43 MM1. Using the maps to identify absorption from cool gas on large scales, we subtract this component to model spectra for the inner envelope. Modeling the new, presumably corrected, spectra results in a lower water abundance

  15. Introduction to QM/MM simulations.

    PubMed

    Groenhof, Gerrit

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations have become a popular tool for investigating chemical reactions in condensed phases. In QM/MM methods, the region of the system in which the chemical process takes place is treated at an appropriate level of quantum chemistry theory, while the remainder is described by a molecular mechanics force field. Within this approach, chemical reactivity can be studied in large systems, such as enzymes. In the first part of this contribution, the basic methodology is briefly reviewed. The two most common approaches for partitioning the two subsystems are presented, followed by a discussion on the different ways of treating interactions between the subsystems. Special attention is given on how to deal with situations in which the boundary between the QM and MM subsystems runs through one or more chemical bonds. The second part of this contribution discusses what properties of larger system can be obtained within the QM/MM framework and how. Finally, as an example of a QM/MM application in practice, the third part presents an overview of recent QM/MM molecular dynamics simulations on photobiological systems. In addition to providing quantities that are experimentally accessible, such as structural intermediates, fluorescence lifetimes, quantum yields and spectra, the QM/MM simulations also provide information that is much more difficult to measure experimentally, such as reaction mechanisms and the influence of individual amino acid residues.

  16. Ho:YAG laser arthroscopy of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisto, Domenick J.; Blazina, Martin E.; Hirsh, Linda C.

    1994-09-01

    The HO:YAG laser is a near-contact laser with a capacity to ablate or cut tissues. The ablation function allows the surgeon to remove meniscal tissue, lyse and resect adhesions, melt loose bodies, and dissolve inflamed synovium. The cutting function of the laser is utilized to perform a lateral release or resect torn menisci. The laser can also be utilized to drill holes in Grade IV chondromalacic lesions to initiate a healing response. The laser has been embraced by orthopaedic surgeons because of its shape and versatility. The tip is only 2 mm wide and can be delivered into the tight posterior compartments of the knee with no damaging contact with the articular surfaces. The laser coagulates as it works and bleeding is minimized. The laser can function both as a cutting and ablating tool. The laser can also drill holes into subchondral bone to, hopefully, initiate a healing response.

  17. MM Algorithms for Geometric and Signomial Programming.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kenneth; Zhou, Hua

    2014-02-01

    This paper derives new algorithms for signomial programming, a generalization of geometric programming. The algorithms are based on a generic principle for optimization called the MM algorithm. In this setting, one can apply the geometric-arithmetic mean inequality and a supporting hyperplane inequality to create a surrogate function with parameters separated. Thus, unconstrained signomial programming reduces to a sequence of one-dimensional minimization problems. Simple examples demonstrate that the MM algorithm derived can converge to a boundary point or to one point of a continuum of minimum points. Conditions under which the minimum point is unique or occurs in the interior of parameter space are proved for geometric programming. Convergence to an interior point occurs at a linear rate. Finally, the MM framework easily accommodates equality and inequality constraints of signomial type. For the most important special case, constrained quadratic programming, the MM algorithm involves very simple updates.

  18. QM/MM Calculations on Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ryde, U

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, I discuss combined quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM; QM/MM) calculations for proteins. In QM/MM, a small but interesting part of the protein is treated by accurate QM methods, whereas the remainder is treated by faster MM methods. The prime problems with QM/MM calculations are bonds between the QM and MM systems, the selection of the QM system, and the local-minima problem. The two first problems can be solved by the big-QM approach, including in the QM calculation all groups within 4.5-6Å of the active site and all buried charges in the protein. The third problem can be solved by calculating free energies. It is important to study QM/MM energy components to ensure that the results are stable and reliable. They can also be used to understand the reaction and the effect of the surroundings, eg, by dividing the catalytic effect into bonded, van der Waals, electrostatic, and geometric components and to deduce which parts of the protein contribute most to the catalysis. It should be ensured that the QM calculations are reliable and converged by extending the basis set to quadruple-zeta quality, including a proper treatment of dispersion, as well as years experience and method development calculations with both pure and hybrid density functional theory methods. If the latter give differing results, calibration with high-level QM methods is needed. Reactions that change the net charge should be avoided. QM/MM calculations can be combined with experimental methods. PMID:27498637

  19. 8. Credit USAF, ca. 1952. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Credit USAF, ca. 1952. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Oblique low-level aerial view of North Base looking northeast. Based on positions and types of aircraft and automobiles, this photo taken same day as HAER photo CA-170-7. Most temporary structures in this view have been demolished with the exception of the hangars. The concrete foundations remain of many structures, while no trace was found of others. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. Dark filaments observed at 8.3mm and 3.1mm wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiel, E.; Ishiguro, M.; Kosugi, T.; Shibasaki, K.

    1986-01-01

    Mapping of the sun was made at 3.1mm (98 GHz) and 8.3mm (36 GHz) wavelengths with a 45m dish radio telescope at the Nobeyama Cosmic Radio Observatory. The depressions associated with large H alpha filaments are derived to be -0.2 at 8.3mm and -0.05 at 3.1mm, which are darker than the values inferred by Raoult et al. (1979)

  1. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy using 2-mm instruments.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Peng, Z; Kronberger, L; Pfeifer, J; Salehi, B

    1998-10-01

    Today, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the method of choice for treatment of symptomatic gallbladder disorders. It minimizes effects of the operation that are independent of the gallbladder, such as trauma to the abdominal wall and other soft tissue. The surgical wounds were even smaller when 2-mm trocars were used. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy using 2-mm instruments was performed in a consecutive series of 14 patients with symptomatic gallstones. The procedure was completed in 12 cases, with conversion to open surgery in two cases. Intraoperative cholangiography was always performed. The postoperative course was always uneventful. The cosmetic effect was highly satisfactory. The procedure using 2-mm instruments could be indicated in selected patients with uncomplicated gallstone disease. PMID:9820716

  2. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy using 2-mm instruments.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S; Peng, Z; Kronberger, L; Pfeifer, J; Salehi, B

    1998-10-01

    Today, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the method of choice for treatment of symptomatic gallbladder disorders. It minimizes effects of the operation that are independent of the gallbladder, such as trauma to the abdominal wall and other soft tissue. The surgical wounds were even smaller when 2-mm trocars were used. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy using 2-mm instruments was performed in a consecutive series of 14 patients with symptomatic gallstones. The procedure was completed in 12 cases, with conversion to open surgery in two cases. Intraoperative cholangiography was always performed. The postoperative course was always uneventful. The cosmetic effect was highly satisfactory. The procedure using 2-mm instruments could be indicated in selected patients with uncomplicated gallstone disease.

  3. Microeconomics of 300-mm process module control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monahan, Kevin M.; Chatterjee, Arun K.; Falessi, Georges; Levy, Ady; Stoller, Meryl D.

    2001-08-01

    Simple microeconomic models that directly link metrology, yield, and profitability are rare or non-existent. In this work, we validate and apply such a model. Using a small number of input parameters, we explain current yield management practices in 200 mm factories. The model is then used to extrapolate requirements for 300 mm factories, including the impact of simultaneous technology transitions to 130nm lithography and integrated metrology. To support our conclusions, we use examples relevant to factory-wide photo module control.

  4. Kinetics of the reaction HO2 + NO2 + M yields HO2NO2 + M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, S. P.; Peterson, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The flash photolysis/ultraviolet absorption technique was used to measure the rate constants for the reaction HO2 + NO2 + M yields HO2NO2 + M over the pressure range 50-700 torr and temperature range 229-362 K using He, O2, and N2 as diluent gases. The data were fit to the expression derived by Troe (1979) and co-workers for describing the pressure and temperature dependence of reactions in the falloff region. By combining these data with recent measurements of the rate constant for HO2NO2 thermal decomposition values of 73.8 + or - 2 eu for the standard entropy and -12.6 + or - kcal/mol for the standard enthalpy of formation of HO2NO2 were obtained. A significant enhancement in the rate constant was observed when water vapor was added to the system.

  5. Film Programmer's Guide to 16mm Rentals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artel, Linda J., Ed.; Weaver, Kathleen, Ed.

    The guide is geared to reflect the expanding interest in the history of cinema, in underground and experimental films, in social and political documentaries as well as more conventional Hollywood and foreign classics. It lists over 8,000 16mm films selected from 50 United States distributors. A title directory contains information concerning the…

  6. CCM3 to MM5 Data Conversion

    2007-03-02

    The accompanying script (which uses the NCAR Command Language) ready output from the Community Climate Model Code, version 3 (CCM3) and converts it to input format for the Mesoscale Model, version 5 (MM5) code. The script utilizes a Fortran binary write routine.

  7. Mm-wave power meter mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, D. L.; Oltmans, D. A.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1968-01-01

    E-band thermistor mount and a technique for adjusting a temperature compensating thermistor to provide an electrically balanced bridge are used for measuring RF power in the mm-wavelength. The mount is relatively insensitive to temperature effects that cause measurement errors in single ended circuits.

  8. Sticking of HO2 on fatty acids aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanega, Delphine; Briquez, Stéphane; Duflot, Denis; Monnerville, Maurice; Toubin, Céline

    2015-04-01

    Models of atmospheric chemistry are widely used to perform projections of future changes in the chemical composition of the global troposphere, including changes in climate related greenhouse gases and aerosol particles. However, large uncertainties are still associated with the chemistry implemented in these models, which in turn can lead to inaccurate long-term predictions. The proposed work seeks to improve our understanding of the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, which drives the lifetime of trace gases, and therefore atmospheric composition. Recent measurements [1] of free radicals made in forested environments characterized by low levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO and NO2) indicate that current models of atmospheric chemistry tend to overestimate the concentration of peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2). An overestimation of peroxy radicals is an important issue since these radicals are the main precursors of the hydroxyl radical (OH), the most important atmospheric oxidant during daytime. This issue could lead to a significant overestimation of the oxidative capacity of the global atmosphere since more than 86% of the Earth surface is covered by forests, oceans, and polar regions. An analysis of this dataset indicates that the missing sink could be due to an underestimation of the rates of RO2+HO2 reactions, and/or the uptake of peroxy radicals onto aerosol particles. A thorough evaluation of scientific studies published in the literature shows that there is a lack of kinetic and mechanistic data to correctly assess the contribution of these two loss pathways of peroxy radicals in low NOx environments. Classical molecular dynamics simulations, using the Gromacs package [2], are performed to study the interaction of HO2 with organic (carboxylic acid) aerosols. The effect of the presence of water molecules on the surface are also be investigated. These calculations provide theoretical values for observable quantities such as uptake and mass accommodation

  9. Highly efficient high power CW and Q-switched Ho:YLF laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, J.

    2015-06-01

    An efficient operation of a Ho:YLF laser pumped by a Tm-doped fibre laser is reported. The research in a continuous-wave (CW) operation was done for two crystals of the same 0.5 at.%Ho dopant concentration and with different lengths (3×3×30 mm3 and 3×3×50 mm3). For an output coupling transmission of 20% and a crystal length of 50 mm, the maximum CWoutput power of 38.9 W for 81.4 W of incident pump power, corresponding to the slope efficiency of 52.3% and optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 47.8% (determined with respect to the incident pump power) was achieved. The highest opti- cal-to-optical conversion efficiency of 70.2% with respect to the absorbed pump power was obtained. The influence of a heat-sink cooling water temperature on theCWlaser performance was studied. For a Q-switched operation the pulse repe- tition frequency (PRF) was changed from 2 to 10 kHz. The maximum average output power of 34.1 W at the PRF of 10 kHz was obtained for a 50 mm holmium crystal length. For 2 kHz PRF and 71.9 W of incident pump power, pulse energies of 13.7 mJ with a 21 ns FWHM pulse width corresponding to 652 kW peak power were recorded.

  10. New technique for prostatectomy using Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daidoh, Yuichiro; Arai, Tsunenori; Murai, Masaru; Nakajima, Akio; Tsuji, Akira; Odajima, Kunio; Nakajima, Fumio; Kikuchi, Makoto; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1994-05-01

    To develop a new transperineal laser prostatectomy through a biopsy needle, we determined the efficiency of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation for canine prostate. The Ho:YAG laser ((lambda) equals 2.1 micrometers ) may induced stress-wave to destroy the small vessels in prostate. After the exposure of the canine prostate, it was punctured by the needle. A quartz fiber of which core-diameter was 200 or 400 micrometers was inserted into the 18 G needle. The irradiation fluence was set to 150 - 600 J/cm2 and repetition rate was kept at 2 Hz. The cross-section of the irradiated portion of the prostate extracted immediately after the irradiation showed dark-colored hemorrhage layer around the ablation tract with 1 - 2 mm thickness. Some hemorrhage was histologically seen in stoma and gland in the irradiated prostate. In the case of 150 - 175 J/cm2 in the irradiation fluence, the irradiated portion of the prostate was found in the wedge-shaped area with brown color at one week after the irradiation. The lymphocytes infiltrating into the wedge-shaped zone were found. The wedge- shaped zone spread over the prostate and the change of urethral mucosa was minimum at one month after the irradiation. In the case of 500 - 600 J/cm2 irradiation, the paraurethral cavity was made at one month after the irradiation. The histological examination showed that the hemorrhage and subsequent histological changes may be caused by the laser induced stress-wave rather than thermal effect. Our results suggest that transperineal irradiation of pulsed Ho:YAG might offer an effective treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia with the minimal damage to the urethral mucosa.

  11. Terahertz/mm wave imaging simulation software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetterman, M. R.; Dougherty, J.; Kiser, W. L., Jr.

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a mm wave/terahertz imaging simulation package from COTS graphic software and custom MATLAB code. In this scheme, a commercial ray-tracing package was used to simulate the emission and reflections of radiation from scenes incorporating highly realistic imagery. Accurate material properties were assigned to objects in the scenes, with values obtained from the literature, and from our own terahertz spectroscopy measurements. The images were then post-processed with custom Matlab code to include the blur introduced by the imaging system and noise levels arising from system electronics and detector noise. The Matlab code was also used to simulate the effect of fog, an important aspect for mm wave imaging systems. Several types of image scenes were evaluated, including bar targets, contrast detail targets, a person in a portal screening situation, and a sailboat on the open ocean. The images produced by this simulation are currently being used as guidance for a 94 GHz passive mm wave imaging system, but have broad applicability for frequencies extending into the terahertz region.

  12. AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    Heme oxygenase (HO) occurs in biological tissues as two major isoforms HO-1 and HO-2. HO-1 is inducible by many treatments, particularly oxidative stress-related conditions such as depletion of gl...

  13. 10. Southeast end; view to northwest, 65mm lens. Note evidence ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Southeast end; view to northwest, 65mm lens. Note evidence of extreme building failure caused by adjacent railroad cut, which necessitated building demolition. (Vignetting due to extreme use of camera swing necessitated by lack of space to position camera otherwise.) - Benicia Arsenal, Powder Magazine No. 5, Junction of Interstate Highways 680 & 780, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  14. 3. West portal of Tunnel 18, view to northeast, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. West portal of Tunnel 18, view to northeast, 135mm lens. Note the use of concrete face and wingwalls, with dressed stone voussoirs, wingwall coping, parapet with stone belt course and coping, and coursed stone masonry slope protection flanking the portal. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel No. 17, Milepost 408, Dorris, Siskiyou County, CA

  15. 5. East portal of Tunnel 28, view to southsouthwest, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. East portal of Tunnel 28, view to south-southwest, 135mm lens. Shed above portal appears to have housed machinery connected with a counterweighted curtain mechanism used to help dissipate smoke from this 3,209-foot tunnel during the days of steam locomotive use - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 28, Milepost 134.75, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  16. 5. East portal of Tunnel 18, view to westsouthwest, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. East portal of Tunnel 18, view to west-southwest, 135mm lens. The train exiting the tunnel, though northbound toward Portland, is considered an eastbound train on the Southern Pacific (see explanation above). - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel No. 18, Milepost 410, Dorris, Siskiyou County, CA

  17. 2. West portal of Tunnel 1, view to northeast, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. West portal of Tunnel 1, view to northeast, 135mm lens. Like the new tunnels built during this period, Tunnel 1 received a new concrete portal face with granite masonry voussoirs and coping. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 1, Milepost 164.34, Blue Canyon, Placer County, CA

  18. 3. East portal of Tunnel 34, view to southsouthwest, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. East portal of Tunnel 34, view to south-southwest, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. Note the shift, in these later tunnels east of Colfax, to concrete portal faces with granite masonry voussoirs and coping. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 34, Milepost 145.4, Colfax, Placer County, CA

  19. 14. Main room; view no southwest, 65mm lens with electronic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Main room; view no southwest, 65mm lens with electronic flash illumination. The mountain visible through the windows was a landmark for the camp population. - Tule Lake Project Jail, Post Mile 44.85, State Route 139, Newell, Modoc County, CA

  20. 1. East portal of Tunnel 3, view to west, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. East portal of Tunnel 3, view to west, 135mm lens. This tunnel was photographed to provide context, because even though somewhat enlarged, it illustrates the nature of the unlined hard rock tunnels typical of the original Central Pacific construction in 1868. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 3, Milepost 180.65, Cisco, Placer County, CA

  1. Building 810, oblique view to eastsoutheast, 90mm lens. Note buttressed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Building 810, oblique view to east-southeast, 90mm lens. Note buttressed end wall extensions into which main doors nest. - Travis Air Force Base, B-36 Hangar, Between Woodskill Avenue & Ellis, adjacent to Taxiway V & W, Fairfield, Solano County, CA

  2. 2. West portal of Snowshed 29, view to east, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. West portal of Snowshed 29, view to east, 135mm lens. Note the heavy timber frame, with battered posts to carry the tremendous snow loads of winter. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 41, Milepost 193.3, Donner, Placer County, CA

  3. Genetic suppression of HO-1 exacerbates renal damage: reversed by an increase in the antiapoptotic signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Olszanecki, Rafal; Rezzani, Rita; Omura, Shinji; Stec, David E; Rodella, Luigi; Botros, Fady T; Goodman, Alvin I; Drummond, George; Abraham, Nader G

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis has been shown to contribute to the development of acute and chronic renal failure. The antiapoptotic action of the heme oxygenase (HO) system may represent an important protective mechanism in kidney pathology. We examined whether the lack of HO-1 would influence apoptosis in clipped kidneys of two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C) rats. Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were injected in the left ventricle with approximately 5 x 10(9) colony-forming units/ml of retrovirus containing rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS) or control retrovirus (LXSN). After 3 mo, a 0.25-mm U-shaped silver clip was placed around the left renal artery. Animals were killed 3 wk later. Clipping the renal artery in LSN-RHO-1-AS rats did not result in increased HO-1 expression. In contrast to LXSN animals, 2K1C LSN-RHO-1-AS rats showed increased expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and higher 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) content as well as increased expression of the proapoptotic protein Apaf-1 and caspase-3 activity. Clipping the renal artery in LXSN rats resulted in increased expression of the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, while clipping the renal artery in LSN-RHO-1-AS rats did not change Bcl-2 levels and decreased the levels of Bcl-xl. Treatment of LSN-RHO-1-AS rats with cobalt protoporphyrin resulted in induction of renal HO-1, which was accompanied by decreases in blood pressure, COX-2, 3-NT, and caspase-3 activity, and increased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules (Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, Akt and p-Akt) in the clipped kidneys. These findings underscore the prominent role of HO-1 in counteracting apoptosis in this 2K1C renovascular hypertension model. PMID:16940561

  4. 1 mm ultrafast superconducting stripline molecule detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, N.; Casaburi, A.; Shiki, S.; Suzuki, K.; Ejrnaes, M.; Cristiano, R.; Ohkubo, M.

    2009-10-01

    Superconducting stripline detectors (SSLDs) are promising for detecting keV molecules at nanosecond response times and with mass-independent detection efficiency. However, a fast response time is incompatible with practical centimeter detector size. A parallel configuration of striplines provides a means to address this problem. Experimental results and simulation for promisingly large 1-mm-square parallel niobium SSLDs show that nanosecond pulses are produced by superconducting-normal transition within only one of the parallel striplines instead of cascade switching of all the parallel striplines. Successful detection of a series of multimers of immunoglobulin G up to 584 kDa supports the mass-independent efficiency for mass spectrometry.

  5. Adenosine stimulates Ca2+ fluxes and increases cytosolic free Ca2+ in cultured rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Olivera, A; López-Rivas, A; López-Novoa, J M

    1992-01-01

    Adenosine has been associated with cellular Ca2+ metabolism in some cell types. Since adenosine is able to contract glomerular mesangial cells in culture, and since Ca2+ is the main messenger mediating contractile responses, we studied the effect of adenosine on 45Ca2+ movements into and out of mesangial cells and on the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). Adenosine at 0.1 mM increased 45Ca2+ uptake (basal, 9993 +/- 216; + adenosine, 14823 +/- 410 d.p.m./mg; P less than 0.01) through verapamil-sensitive Ca2+ channels. These channels seem to be of the A1-adenosine receptor subtype. Adenosine also stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux from 45Ca(2+)-loaded mesangial cells. This effect was accompanied by a net depletion of intracellular 45Ca2+ content under isotopic equilibrium conditions (basal, 24213 +/- 978; + adenosine, 18622 +/- 885 d.p.m./mg; P less than 0.05). The increase in 45Ca2+ efflux was inhibited by a Ca(2+)-free medium or in the presence of 10 microM-verapamil. However, the intracellular Ca(2+)-release blocker TMB-8 (10 microM) only partially inhibited the adenosine-stimulated 45Ca2+ efflux. In addition, adenosine induced an elevation in [Ca2+]i in mesangial cells with an initial transient peak within 15 s (basal, 113 +/- 7; adenosine, 345 +/- 46 nM), and a secondary increase which was slower (3-4 min) and of lower magnitude than the initial peak (250 +/- 21 nM). In summary, adenosine elevates [Ca2+]i and stimulates both Ca2+ uptake from the extracellular pool and Ca2+ efflux from intracellular pools in mesangial cells. The Ca2+ release from internal stores is produced by a combination of a TMB-8-inhibitable and a non-TMB-8-inhibitable mechanism, and seems to be dependent on Ca2+ influx. PMID:1554371

  6. High Energy Directly Pumped Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Ji-Rong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, Norman P.

    2000-01-01

    The most commonly used crystal architecture to produce 2 micrometer laser is co-doping Ho and Tm into a single host crystal. In this method, the stored energy transfer from the Tm (3)F4 to the Ho (5)I7 manifold is not fast enough to warrant high efficiency for short pulse applications. By separating the Ho and the Tm ions and doping the Tm in YALO3 and the Ho in YLF, we were able to directly pump the Ho (5)I7 manifold with 1.94 micrometers. The Ho:YLF laser has produced 33 mJ at 2.062 micrometers with a quantum efficiency of 0.88. The performance of each laser will be presented.

  7. Evolving Hořava cosmological horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Mohsen; Mohseni, Morteza

    2016-09-01

    Several sets of radially propagating null congruence generators are exploited in order to form 3-dimensional marginally trapped surfaces, referred to as black hole and cosmological apparent horizons in a Hořava universe. Based on this method, we deal with the characteristics of the 2-dimensional space-like spheres of symmetry and the peculiarities of having trapping horizons. Moreover, we apply this method in standard expanding and contracting FLRW cosmological models of a Hořava universe to investigate the conditions under which the extra parameters of the theory may lead to trapped/anti-trapped surfaces both in the future and in the past. We also include the cases of negative time, referred to as the finite past, and discuss the formation of anti-trapped surfaces inside the cosmological apparent horizons.

  8. Ho Doped BixSby Nanopolycrystalline Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, K. C.; Joshi, G.; Wang, Dezhi; Ren, Z. F.; Opeil, C. P.

    2011-03-01

    Department of Physics, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, 02467. Bismuth-Antimony alloys have been shown to have high ZT values below room temperature, especially for single crystals. For polycrystalline samples, impurity doping and magnetic field have proven to be powerful tools in the search for understanding and improving thermoelectric performance. Nanopolycrystalline BixSby doped with 1 and 3 % Ho were prepared by ball milling and dc hot pressing technique. Electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, carrier concentration, mobility, and magnetization are measured in a temperature range of 5-350 K and in magnetic fields up to 9 Tesla. The effects of Ho doping on the thermoelectric properties of BixSby in magnetic field will be discussed. D.O.E. Energy Frontier Research Center Grant (S3TEC), at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  9. Hořava-Lifshitz quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Zarro, Carlos A. D.

    2011-08-01

    In this work, a minisuperspace model for the projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity without the detailed-balance condition is investigated. The Wheeler-DeWitt equation is derived and its solutions are studied and discussed for some particular cases where, due to Hořava-Lifshitz gravity, there is a “potential barrier” nearby a=0. For a vanishing cosmological constant, a normalizable wave function of the Universe is found. When the cosmological constant is nonvanishing, the WKB method is used to obtain solutions for the wave function of the Universe. Using the Hamilton-Jacobi equation, one discusses how the transition from quantum to classical regime occurs and, for the case of a positive cosmological constant, the scale factor is shown to grow exponentially, hence recovering the general relativity behavior for the late Universe.

  10. Coordinated mm/sub-mm observations of Sagittarius A* in May 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunneriath, D.; Eckart, A.; Vogel, S.; Sjouwerman, L.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Schödel, R.; Baganoff, F. K.; Morris, M.; Bertram, T.; Dovciak, M.; Dowries, D.; Duschl, W. J.; Karas, V.; Konig, S.; Krichbaum, T.; Krips, M.; Lu, R.-S.; Markoff, S.; Mauerhan, J.; Meyer, L.; Moultaka, J.; Muzic, K.; Najarro, F.; Schuster, K.; Straubmeier, C.; Thum, C.; Witzel, G.; Zamaninasab, M.; Zensus, A.

    2008-10-01

    At the center of the Milky Way, with a distance of thicksim8 kpc, the compact source Sagittarius A* (SgrA*) can be associated with a super massive black hole of thicksim4x 106Modot. SgrA* shows strong variability from the radio to the X-ray wavelength domains. Here we report on simultaneous NIR/sub-millimeter/X-ray observations from May 2007 that involved the NACO adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope, the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), the US mm-array CARMA, the IRAM 30m mm-telescope, and other telescopes. We concentrate on the time series of mm/sub-mm data from CARMA, ATCA, and the MAMBO bolometer at the IRAM 30m telescope.

  11. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mm of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ....860. 63.1(b)(2) Title V operating permit—see 40 CFR part 70 Yes All major affected sources are... Combustion Sources at Kraft, Soda, Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemical Pulp Mills Pt. 63, Subpt. MM,...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mm of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ....860. 63.1(b)(2) Title V operating permit—see 40 CFR part 70 Yes All major affected sources are... Combustion Sources at Kraft, Soda, Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemical Pulp Mills Pt. 63, Subpt. MM,...

  13. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Mm of... - General Provisions Applicability to Subpart MM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ....860. 63.1(b)(2) Title V operating permit—see 40 CFR part 70 Yes All major affected sources are... Combustion Sources at Kraft, Soda, Sulfite, and Stand-Alone Semichemical Pulp Mills Pt. 63, Subpt. MM,...

  14. Spectroscopic and lasing properties of Ho:Tm:LuAG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Filer, Elizabeth D.; Naranjo, Felipe L.; Rodriguez, Waldo J.; Kokta, Milan R.

    1993-01-01

    Ho:Tm:LuAG has been grown, examined spectroscopically, and lased at 2.1 microns. Ho:Tm:LuAG was selected for this experimental investigation when quantum-mechanical modeling predicted that it would be a good laser material for Ho laser operation on one of the 5I7 to 5I8 transitions. Lasing was achieved at 2.100 microns, one of the three wavelengths predicted to be most probable for laser action.

  15. Thermal and nuclear hyperfine properties of Ho(OH)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, S.

    1985-05-01

    A reasonable explanation for the findings of Catanese and Meissner [Phys. Rev. B 8, 2071 (1973)] regarding the (hyperfine) heat capacity in the low-temperature region of Ho(OH)3 is given. The Schottky specific heat in the high-temperature region observed calorimetrically by Chirico et al. [J. Chem. Thermodyn. 13, 1092 (1981)] explained satisfactorily. Nuclear hyperfine constants for Ho3+ ions in Ho(OH)3 are determined.

  16. 6. Credit USAF, ca. 1947. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Credit USAF, ca. 1947. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Interior of Building 4401 (or possibly 4402) looking east at hangar doors with a North American Aviation XB-45 Tornado jet aircraft in the foreground. This view illustrates why the series of sliding doors and wide, high interior clearances were necessary to accommodate large aircraft. Note configuration of wooden trusses supporting the roof. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, Hangar No. 1, First & B Streets, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. 7. Credit USAF, ca. 1952. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Credit USAF, ca. 1952. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Oblique aerial view of North Base AFFTC (Air Force Flight Test Center) looking west northwest. The flight line at the edge of Rogers Dry Lake appears in the foreground, served by the facility's four hangars. Temporary structures beyond the hangars were demolished later in the 1950s. The fence that formerly surrounded the swimming pool in earlier photos has been taken down. In the distance lies the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Test Station, in its pre-1953 configuration. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. 4. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Credit USAF, ca. 1945. Original housed in the Photograph Files, AFFTC/HO, Edwards AFB, California. Low level oblique aerial view of Muroc Flight Test Base (North Base), looking southwest along flightline. HANG-P-A hangar (Building 4505) is in the right foreground. A Bell XP-59A Airacomet, the United States military's first jet propelled aircraft, is being towed on the apron toward the control tower. Other aircraft in the foreground include Douglas DC-3s, North American Aviation P-51 Mustangs, and Lockheed P-38 Lightnings. - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. Diode-end-pumped Tm, Ho:YVO4 microchip laser at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. Q.; Chen, F.; Wu, C. T.; Wang, Q.; Li, G.; Zhang, C. H.; Wang, Y. Z.; Ju, Y. L.

    2011-04-01

    Room temperature Tm, Ho:YVO4 microchip laser operated around 2 μm was demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. At a heat sink temperature of 283 K, a maximum output power of 47 mW was obtained by using a 0.25 mm length crystal at an absorbed pump power of 912 mW, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 9.1%. Increasing the temperature to 288 K, as much as 16.5 mW 2052.3 nm single-longitudinal-mode laser was achieved. The M 2 factor was measured to be 1.4.

  20. Diode-End-Pumped Tm:Ho:GdVO4 Microchip Laser at Room Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Bao-Quan; Chen, Fang; Wang, Qiang; Wu, Chun-Ting; Li, Gang; Zhang, Chao-Hui; Wang, Yue-Zhu; Ju, You-Lun

    2011-02-01

    Room-temperature Tm:Ho:GdVO4 microchip laser operated around 2 μm is demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge. At a heat sink temperature of 283 K, maximum output power of 29.7 mW is obtained by using a 0.25-mm-long crystal at an absorbed pump power of 912 mW, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 5.0%. At the temperature to 283 K, a single-longitudinal-mode laser as much as 8mW at 2048.5 nm is achieved. The M 2 factor is measured to be 1.4.

  1. Low noise, tunable Ho:fiber soliton oscillator for Ho:YLF amplifier seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng; Ruehl, Axel; Bransley, Colleen; Hartl, Ingmar

    2016-06-01

    We present a passively mode-locked, tunable soliton Ho:fiber ring oscillator, optimized for seeding of holmium-doped yttrium lithium flouride (Ho:YLF) amplifiers. The oscillator is independently tunable in central wavelength and spectral width from 2040 to 2070 nm and from 5 to 10 nm, respectively. At all settings the pulse energy within the soliton is around 800 pJ. The soliton oscillator was optimized to fully meet the spectral requirements for seeding Ho:YLF amplifiers. Its Kelly sidebands are located outside the amplifier gain spectrum, resulting in a train of about 1 ps long pedestal-free pulses with relative intensity noise of only 0.13% RMS when integrated from 1 Hz to Nyquist frequency.

  2. Prediction of Stereochemistry using Q2MM

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus The standard method of screening ligands for selectivity in asymmetric, transition metal-catalyzed reactions requires experimental testing of hundreds of ligands from ligand libraries. This “trial and error” process is costly in terms of time as well as resources and, in general, is scientifically and intellectually unsatisfying as it reveals little about the underlying mechanism behind the selectivity. The accurate computational prediction of stereoselectivity in enantioselective catalysis requires adequate conformational sampling of the selectivity-determining transition state but has to be fast enough to compete with experimental screening techniques to be useful for the synthetic chemist. Although electronic structure calculations are accurate and general, they are too slow to allow for sampling or fast screening of ligand libraries. The combined requirements can be fulfilled by using appropriately fitted transition state force fields (TSFFs) that represent the transition state as a minimum and allow fast conformational sampling using Monte Carlo. Quantum-guided molecular mechanics (Q2MM) is an automated force field parametrization method that generates accurate, reaction-specific TSFFs by fitting the functional form of an arbitrary force field using only electronic structure calculations by minimization of an objective function. A key feature that distinguishes the Q2MM method from many other automated parametrization procedures is the use of the Hessian matrix in addition to geometric parameters and relative energies. This alleviates the known problems of overfitting of TSFFs. After validation of the TSFF by comparison to electronic structure results for a test set and available experimental data, the stereoselectivity of a reaction can be calculated by summation over the Boltzman-averaged relative energies of the conformations leading to the different stereoisomers. The Q2MM method has been applied successfully to perform virtual ligand

  3. Prediction of Stereochemistry using Q2MM.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Eric; Rosales, Anthony R; Tutkowski, Brandon; Norrby, Per-Ola; Wiest, Olaf

    2016-05-17

    The standard method of screening ligands for selectivity in asymmetric, transition metal-catalyzed reactions requires experimental testing of hundreds of ligands from ligand libraries. This "trial and error" process is costly in terms of time as well as resources and, in general, is scientifically and intellectually unsatisfying as it reveals little about the underlying mechanism behind the selectivity. The accurate computational prediction of stereoselectivity in enantioselective catalysis requires adequate conformational sampling of the selectivity-determining transition state but has to be fast enough to compete with experimental screening techniques to be useful for the synthetic chemist. Although electronic structure calculations are accurate and general, they are too slow to allow for sampling or fast screening of ligand libraries. The combined requirements can be fulfilled by using appropriately fitted transition state force fields (TSFFs) that represent the transition state as a minimum and allow fast conformational sampling using Monte Carlo. Quantum-guided molecular mechanics (Q2MM) is an automated force field parametrization method that generates accurate, reaction-specific TSFFs by fitting the functional form of an arbitrary force field using only electronic structure calculations by minimization of an objective function. A key feature that distinguishes the Q2MM method from many other automated parametrization procedures is the use of the Hessian matrix in addition to geometric parameters and relative energies. This alleviates the known problems of overfitting of TSFFs. After validation of the TSFF by comparison to electronic structure results for a test set and available experimental data, the stereoselectivity of a reaction can be calculated by summation over the Boltzman-averaged relative energies of the conformations leading to the different stereoisomers. The Q2MM method has been applied successfully to perform virtual ligand screens on a range of

  4. Kinetics and stoichiometry of coupled Na efflux and Ca influx (Na/Ca exchange) in barnacle muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Coupled Na+ exit/Ca2+ entry (Na/Ca exchange operating in the Ca2+ influx mode) was studied in giant barnacle muscle cells by measuring 22Na+ efflux and 45Ca2+ influx in internally perfused, ATP-fueled cells in which the Na+ pump was poisoned by 0.1 mM ouabain. Internal free Ca2+, [Ca2+]i, was controlled with a Ca-EGTA buffering system containing 8 mM EGTA and varying amounts of Ca2+. Ca2+ sequestration in internal stores was inhibited with caffeine and a mitochondrial uncoupler (FCCP). To maximize conditions for Ca2+ influx mode Na/Ca exchange, and to eliminate tracer Na/Na exchange, all of the external Na+ in the standard Na+ sea water (NaSW) was replaced by Tris or Li+ (Tris-SW or LiSW, respectively). In both Na-free solutions an external Ca2+ (Cao)-dependent Na+ efflux was observed when [Ca2+]i was increased above 10(-8) M; this efflux was half-maximally activated by [Ca2+]i = 0.3 microM (LiSW) to 0.7 microM (Tris-SW). The Cao-dependent Na+ efflux was half-maximally activated by [Ca2+]o = 2.0 mM in LiSW and 7.2 mM in Tris-SW; at saturating [Ca2+]o, [Ca2+]i, and [Na+]i the maximal (calculated) Cao-dependent Na+ efflux was approximately 75 pmol#cm2.s. This efflux was inhibited by external Na+ and La3+ with IC50's of approximately 125 and 0.4 mM, respectively. A Nai-dependent Ca2+ influx was also observed in Tris-SW. This Ca2+ influx also required [Ca2+]i greater than 10(-8) M. Internal Ca2+ activated a Nai-independent Ca2+ influx from LiSW (tracer Ca/Ca exchange), but in Tris-SW virtually all of the Cai-activated Ca2+ influx was Nai-dependent (Na/Ca exchange). Half-maximal activation was observed with [Na+]i = 30 mM. The fact that internal Ca2+ activates both a Cao-dependent Na+ efflux and a Nai- dependent Ca2+ influx in Tris-SW implies that these two fluxes are coupled; the activating (intracellular) Ca2+ does not appear to be transported by the exchanger. The maximal (calculated) Nai-dependent Ca2+ influx was -25 pmol/cm2.s. At various [Na+]i between 6 and 106 mM

  5. From the nm to the Mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, I. M.

    2003-12-01

    Tectonic models for the evolution of an orogen start at the Mm scale, and use field work on smaller subunits at the km scale and rocks collected at the m scale. At the mm scale, minerals are identified, analyzed by mass spectrometry, their "cooling ages" assigned to a specific closure temperature, a cooling rate attributed to a particular tectonic regime, and a large body of self-referential literature is the product of an oiled machinery. Problems become apparent if one attempts to harmonize mm-scale science with the nasty little details at even smaller scales. Atoms are invisible to the naked eye (unlike the minerals mentioned above) and their actual behavior is, or was, only accessible to indirect argumentations and simplified calculations. Increased computing power now allows calculating the transport of atoms in a crystal from the Schr”dinger equation: results do not fit 19th century continuum physics for infinitely dilute solutions (Fick's and Arrhenius' "laws"). Moreover, improved nanochemical analyses allow characterizing the supposedly homogeneous mineral matrix. TEM images show how layers or chains in pristine minerals are substituted in a non-periodic way by alteration products. EMP analyses show the almost ubiquitous presence of razor-sharp boundaries rather than Erf profiles. Disequilibrium recrystallization textures thus prevail over diffusive reequilibration; diffusion sensu stricto is shown to be a much slower process than heterochemical replacement. Alterability sequences are well known to surface scientists: e.g. halite, olivine, biotite, muscovite, zircon. Such sequences are reflected in the isotopic retentivity. The link only becomes clear at the nm scale: isotopic exchange occurs during the replacement reactions that affect all rocks on their retrograde P-T evolution. This is sufficient to explain why zircons record higher isotopic ages than muscovites, which in turn undergo less isotope exchange than biotites etc. While there is a vague

  6. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced Ca2+ transients in single identified gonadotropes require both intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed Central

    Shangold, G A; Murphy, S N; Miller, R J

    1988-01-01

    We examined the effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) on the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in single rat anterior pituitary gonadotropes identified by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay. Concentrations of GnRH greater than 10 pM elicited increases in [Ca2+]i in identified cells but not in others. In contrast, depolarization induced by 50 mM K+ increased [Ca2+]i in all cells. Ca2+ transients induced by GnRH exhibited a complex time course. After an initial rapid rise, the [Ca2+]i fell to near basal levels only to be followed by a secondary extended rise and fall. Analysis of the Ca2+ transients on a rapid time base revealed that responses frequently consisted of several rapid oscillations in [Ca2+]i. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ or addition of the dihydropyridine Ca2+-channel blocker nitrendipine completely blocked the secondary rise in [Ca2+]i but had no effect whatsoever on the initial spike. Nitrendipine also blocked 50 mM K+-induced increases in [Ca2+]i in identified gonadotropes. The secondary rise induced by GnRH could be enhanced by a phorbol ester in a nitrendipine-sensitive fashion. Multiple spike responses to GnRH stimulation of the same cell could only be obtained if subsequent Ca2+ influx was permitted either by allowing a secondary rise to occur or by producing a Ca2+ transient by depolarizing the cells with 50 mM K+. It therefore appears that the response to GnRH consists of an initial phase of Ca2+ mobilization, probably mediated by inositol trisphosphate, and a subsequent phase of Ca2+ influx through nitrendipine-sensitive Ca2+ channels that may be activated by protein kinase C. The relative roles of these phases in the control of gonadotropin secretion are discussed. Images PMID:3045819

  7. Efficacy and safety of Ho:YAG Laser Lithotripsy for ureteroscopic removal of proximal and distal ureteral calculi

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Laser lithotripsy is an established endourological modality. Ho:YAG laser have broadened the indications for ureteroscopic stone managements to include larger stone sizes throughout the whole upper urinary tract. Aim of current work is to assess efficacy and safety of Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy during retrograde ureteroscopic management of ureteral calculi in different locations. Methods 88 patients were treated with ureteroscopic Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy in our institute. Study endpoint was the number of treatments until the patient was stone-free. Patients were classified according to the location of their stones as Group I (distal ureteric stones, 51 patients) and group II (proximal ureteral stones, 37). Group I patients have larger stones as Group II (10.70 mm vs. 8.24 mm, respectively, P = 0.020). Results Overall stone free rate for both groups was 95.8%. The mean number of procedures for proximal calculi was 1.1 ± 0.1 (1–3) and for distal calculi was 1.0 ± 0.0. The initial treatment was more successful in patients with distal ureteral calculi (100% vs. 82.40%, respectively, P = 0.008). No significant difference in the stone free rate was noticed after the second laser procedure for stones smaller versus larger than 10 mm (100% versus 94.1%, P = 0.13). Overall complication rate was 7.9% (Clavien II und IIIb). Overall and grade-adjusted complication rates were not dependant on the stone location. No laser induced complications were noticed. Conclusions The use of the Ho:YAG laser appears to be an adequate tool to disintegrate ureteral calculi independent of primary location. Combination of the semirigid and flexible ureteroscopes as well as the appropriate endourologic tools could likely improve the stone clearance rates for proximal calculi regardless of stone-size. PMID:25107528

  8. The MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to estimate ligand-binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Genheden, Samuel; Ryde, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The molecular mechanics energies combined with the Poisson–Boltzmann or generalized Born and surface area continuum solvation (MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA) methods are popular approaches to estimate the free energy of the binding of small ligands to biological macromolecules. They are typically based on molecular dynamics simulations of the receptor–ligand complex and are therefore intermediate in both accuracy and computational effort between empirical scoring and strict alchemical perturbation methods. They have been applied to a large number of systems with varying success. Areas covered: The authors review the use of MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to calculate ligand-binding affinities, with an emphasis on calibration, testing and validation, as well as attempts to improve the methods, rather than on specific applications. Expert opinion: MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA are attractive approaches owing to their modular nature and that they do not require calculations on a training set. They have been used successfully to reproduce and rationalize experimental findings and to improve the results of virtual screening and docking. However, they contain several crude and questionable approximations, for example, the lack of conformational entropy and information about the number and free energy of water molecules in the binding site. Moreover, there are many variants of the method and their performance varies strongly with the tested system. Likewise, most attempts to ameliorate the methods with more accurate approaches, for example, quantum-mechanical calculations, polarizable force fields or improved solvation have deteriorated the results. PMID:25835573

  9. A comparison of 9-inch, 70mm, and 35mm cameras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clegg, R. H.; Scherz, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Successful aerial photography depends on aerial cameras that provide acceptable photographs within the cost restrictions of the job. For topographic mapping where ultimate accuracy is required, only large-format mapping cameras will suffice. For mapping environmental patterns of vegetation, soils, or water pollution, 9-inch cameras often exceed accuracy and cost requirements, and small formats may be an overall better choice. In choosing the best camera for environmental mapping, relative capabilities and costs must be understood. This study compares resolution, photo interpretation potential, metric accuracy, and cost of 9-inch, 70 mm, and 35 mm cameras for obtaining simultaneous color and color-infrared photography for environmental mapping purposes.

  10. EGR-1 regulates Ho-1 expression induced by cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huaqun; Wang, Lijuan; Gong, Tao; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Chunhua; Li, Fen; Wang, Li; Li, Chaojun

    2010-05-28

    As an anti-oxidant molecule, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been implicated in the protection of lung injury by cigarette smoke (CS). The mechanisms regulating its expression have not been defined. In this report, the role of early growth response 1 (EGR-1) in the regulation of Ho-1 expression was investigated. In C57BL/6 mice with CS exposure, HO-1 was greatly increased in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar inflammatory cells. In primary cultured mouse lung fibroblasts and RAW264.7 cells exposed to cigarette smoke water extract (CSE), an increase in HO-1 protein level was detected. In addition, CSE induced HO-1 expression was decreased in Egr-1 deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (Egr-1{sup -/-} MEFs). Nuclear localization of EGR-1 was examined in mouse lung fibroblasts after exposure to CSE. Luciferase reporter activity assays showed that the enhancer region of the Ho-1 gene containing a proposed EGR-1 binding site was responsible for the induction of HO-1. A higher increase of alveolar mean linear intercept (Lm) was observed in lung tissues, and a larger increase in the number of total cells and monocytes/macrophages from bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was found in CS-exposed mice by loss of function of EGR-1 treatment. In summary, the present data demonstrate that EGR-1 plays a critical role in HO-1 production induced by CS.

  11. Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway Contributes to the Protective Effects of Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides in the Rodent Retina after Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-Fai; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Pu, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP), extracts from the wolfberries, are protective to retina after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). The antioxidant response element (ARE)–mediated antioxidant pathway plays an important role in maintaining the redox status of the retina. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), combined with potent AREs in its promoter, is a highly effective therapeutic target for the protection against neurodegenerative diseases, including I/R-induced retinal damage. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether the protective effect of LBP after I/R damage was mediated via activation of the Nrf2/HO-1-antioxidant pathway in the retina. Retinal I/R was induced by an increase in intraocular pressure to 130 mm Hg for 60 minutes. Prior to the induction of ischemia, rats were orally treated with either vehicle (PBS) or LBP (1 mg/kg) once a day for 1 week. For specific experiments, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, 20 mg/kg), an HO-1 inhibitor, was intraperitoneally administered at 24 h prior to ischemia. The protective effects of LBP were evaluated by quantifying ganglion cell and amacrine cell survival, and by measuring cell apoptosis in the retinal layers. In addition, HO-1 expression was examined using Western blotting and immunofluorescence analyses. Cytosolic and nuclear Nrf2 was measured using immunofluorescent staining. LBP treatment significantly increased Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and HO-1 expression in the retina after I/R injury. Increased apoptosis and a decrease in the number of viable cells were observed in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL) in the I/R retina, which were reversed by LBP treatment. The HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP, diminished the LBP treatment-induced protective effects in the retina after I/R. Taken together, these results suggested that LBP partially exerted its beneficial neuroprotective effects via the activation of Nrf2 and an increase in HO-1 protein expression. PMID:24400114

  12. Kinetic studies of Ca2+ binding and Ca2+ clearance in the cytosol of adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, T; Naraghi, M; Kang, H; Neher, E

    1997-01-01

    The Ca2+ binding kinetics of fura-2, DM-nitrophen, and the endogenous Ca2+ buffer, which determine the time course of Ca2+ changes after photolysis of DM-nitrophen, were studied in bovine chromaffin cells. The in vivo Ca2+ association rate constants of fura-2, DM-nitrophen, and the endogenous Ca2+ buffer were measured to be 5.17 x 10(8) M-1 s-1, 3.5 x 10(7) M-1 s-1, and 1.07 x 10(8) M-1 s-1, respectively. The endogenous Ca2+ buffer appeared to have a low affinity for Ca2+ with a dissociation constant around 100 microM. A fast Ca2+ uptake mechanism was also found to play a dominant role in the clearance of Ca2+ after flashes at high intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]), causing a fast [Ca2+]i decay within seconds. This Ca2+ clearance was identified as mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Its uptake kinetics were studied by analyzing the Ca2+ decay at high [Ca2+]i after flash photolysis of DM-nitrophen. The capacity of the mitochondrial uptake corresponds to a total cytosolic Ca2+ load of approximately 1 mM. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:9199815

  13. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Matthews, P. S.; Brooks, B.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, together known as HOx, play a vital role in atmospheric chemistry by controlling the oxidative capacity of the troposphere. The atmospheric lifetime and concentrations of many trace reactive species, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), are determined by HOx radical levels. Therefore, the ability to accurately predict atmospheric HOx concentrations from a detailed knowledge of their sources and sinks is a very useful diagnostic tool to assess our current understanding of atmospheric chemistry. Several recent field studies have observed significantly lower concentrations of HO2 radicals than predicted using box models, where HO2 loss onto aerosols was suggested as a possible missing sink [1, 2]. However, the mechanism on HO2 uptake onto aerosols and its impact on ambient HOx levels are currently not well understood. To improve our understanding of this process, we have conducted laboratory experiments to measure HO2 uptake coefficients onto submicron aerosol particles. The FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique, a highly sensitive laser induced fluorescence based detection method, was used to monitor HO2 uptake kinetics onto aerosol particles in an aerosol flow tube. The application of the FAGE technique allowed for kinetic experiments to be performed under low HO2 concentrations, i.e. [HO2] < 109 molecules cm-3. HO2 radicals were produced by the photolysis of water vapour in the presence of O2 and aerosol particles were produced either by atomizing dilute salt solutions or by homogeneous nucleation. HO2 uptake coefficients (γ) have been measured for single-component solid and aqueous inorganic salt and organic aerosol particles with a wide range of hygroscopicities. HO2 uptake coefficients on solid particles were below the detection limit (γ < 0.001), whereas on aqueous aerosols uptake coefficients were somewhat larger (γ = 0.001 - 0.008). HO2 uptake coefficients were highest on aerosols

  14. System performance advances of 18-mm and 16-mm subminiature image intensifier sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Nils I.

    2000-11-01

    Night vision system design has been centered aroudn the An/AVS-6 and AN/PVS-7 night vision goggle systems for the past 20 years. Goggle performance has improved during this time through increased performance of the image intensifier sensor, primarily the Omni IV sensor from ITT Industries Night Vision. Most of this improvement has been at the optimal light level (1E-3 fc scene illumination). Recent advances in image sensor performance from the filmless Generation (Gen) IV sensors has increased the low light level performance of night vision devices from 0.3 cy/mr to 0.7 cy/mr. In addition, sensor packaging design requirements have forced night vision sensor manufactures to design light weight, small volume sensors. ITT recently has designed such a sensor in a 16-mm format. This sensor if 50% lighter, up to 50% shorter, and has design features that simplify the objective lens design. New night vision goggles have been, and are being, designed which reduce the perceived head-supported weight. This paper presents signal-to-noise ratio, halo, and other film-less sensor data and similar 16-mm subminiature sensor data. The resulting system performance data will be described. Finally, the system design improvements and relationships with the subminiature 16-mm subminiature sensor will be given.

  15. Monitoring DNA recombination initiated by HO endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Neal; Haber, James E

    2012-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) have proven to be very potent initiators of recombination in yeast and other organisms. A single, site-specific DSB initiates homologous DNA repair events such as gene conversion, break-induced replication, and single-strand annealing, as well as nonhomologous end joining, microhomology-mediated end joining, and new telomere addition. When repair is either delayed or prevented, a single DSB can trigger checkpoint-mediated cell cycle arrest. In budding yeast, expressing the HO endonuclease under the control of a galactose-inducible promoter has been instrumental in the study of these processes by providing us a way to synchronously induce a DSB at a unique site in vivo. We describe how the HO endonuclease has been used to study the recombination events in mating-type (MAT) switching. Southern blots provide an overview of the process by allowing one to examine the formation of the DSB, DNA degradation at the break, and formation of the product. Denaturing gels and slot blots as well as PCR have provided important tools to follow the progression of resection in wild-type and mutant cells. PCR has also been important in allowing us to follow the kinetics of certain recombination intermediates such as the initiation of repair DNA synthesis or the removal of nonhomologous Y sequences during MAT switching. Finally chromatin immunoprecipitation has been used to follow the recruitment of key proteins to the DSB and in subsequent steps in DSB repair.

  16. Cytoprotective responses in HaCaT keratinocytes exposed to high doses of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Lundvig, Ditte M S; Pennings, Sebastiaan W C; Brouwer, Katrien M; Mtaya-Mlangwa, Matilda; Mugonzibwa, Emeria; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Wagener, Frank A D T G; Von den Hoff, Johannes W

    2015-08-15

    Wound healing is a complex process that involves the well-coordinated interactions of different cell types. Topical application of high doses of curcumin, a plant-derived polyphenol, enhances both normal and diabetic cutaneous wound healing in rodents. For optimal tissue repair interactions between epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts are essential. We previously demonstrated that curcumin increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and apoptosis in dermal fibroblasts, which could be prevented by pre-induction of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1. To better understand the effects of curcumin on wound repair, we now assessed the effects of high doses of curcumin on the survival of HaCaT keratinocytes and the role of the HO system. We exposed HaCaT keratinocytes to curcumin in the presence or absence of the HO-1 inducers heme (FePP) and cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP). We then assessed cell survival, ROS formation, and caspase activation. Curcumin induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HaCaT keratinocytes via a ROS-dependent mechanism. Both FePP and CoPP induced HO-1 expression, but only FePP protected against curcumin-induced ROS formation and caspase-mediated apoptosis. In the presence of curcumin, FePP but not CoPP induced the expression of the iron scavenger ferritin. Together, our data show that the induction of ferritin, but not HO, protects HaCaT keratinocytes against cytotoxic doses of curcumin. The differential response of fibroblasts and keratinocytes to high curcumin doses may provide the basis for improving curcumin-based wound healing therapies. PMID:26071936

  17. Diode-end-pumped continuously tunable single frequency Tm, Ho:LLF laser at 2.06 μm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinlu; Zhang, Su; Xiao, Nana; Cui, Jinhui; Zhao, Jiaqun; Li, Li

    2014-03-10

    We report on a laser diode-end-pumped continuously tunable single frequency Tm, Ho:LLF laser near room temperature. For transmission of 5%, the maximum single frequency output power of 221 mW at 2064.4 nm was obtained by using two uncoated etalons. The single frequency Tm, Ho:LLF laser operated on the fundamental transverse mode with an M2 factor of 1.13, and the output frequency could be tuned continuously near 1.5 GHz by angle tuning only of the 1 mm thick etalon. Furthermore, the influence of output coupler transmission on the laser performance was also investigated. The single frequency laser can be used as a seed laser for coherent Doppler lidar and differential absorption lidar systems.

  18. Towards Performance Portability with GungHo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Rupert; Glover, Matthew; Ham, David; Hobson, Mike; Maynard, Chris; Mitchell, Lawrence; Mullerworth, Steve; Pickles, Stephen; Rezny, Mike; Riley, Graham; Wood, Nigel; Ashworth, Mike

    2014-05-01

    The Met Office's numerical weather prediction and climate model code, the Unified Model (UM), is almost 25 years old. Up to the present day the UM has been able to be run efficiently on many of the worlds most powerful computers, helping to keep the Met Office at the forefront of climate prediction and weather forecasting. However, with performance increases from each new generation of computers now being primarily provided by an increase in the amount of parallelism rather than an increase in the clock-speed of the processors themselves, running higher resolutions of the UM now faces the double challenge of code scalability and numerical accuracy. The UM's atmospheric dynamical core makes use of a finite-difference scheme on a regular latitude-longitude grid. The regular latitude-longitude mesh results in an increasingly disparate grid resolution as the mesh resolution increases due to lines of longitude converging at the poles. For example, a 10km resolution at mid-latitudes would result in a 12m resolution at the poles. The difference in resolution leads to increased communication at the poles and load balance issues which are known to impair scalability; it also leads to issues with numerical accuracy and smaller time-steps due to the difference in scale. To address this problem the Met Office, NERC and STFC initiated the GungHo project. The primary aim of this project is to deliver a scalable, numerically accurate dynamical core. This dynamical core is scheduled to become operational around the year 2022. The project is currently investigating the use of quasi-uniform meshes, such as triangular, icosahedral and cubed-sphere meshes, using finite element methods. The associated GungHo software infrastructure is being developed to support multiple meshes and element types thus allowing for future model development. GungHo is also proposing a novel separation of concerns for the software implementation of the dynamical core. This approach distinguishes between

  19. 1. West portal of Tunnel 36, view to northeast, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of Tunnel 36, view to northeast, 135mm lens. Note the notched wingwalls that originally held timber posts of the original timber snowsheds, miles of which once enclosed and protected the railroad from the ravages of Sierra winters. Note also that these tunnels, built in the 1920s, have dispensed with any use of stone masonry, and instead have all-concrete portals. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 36, Milepost 176.92, Yuba Pass, Nevada County, CA

  20. Coupling Ratio for Ca(2+) Transport by Calcium Oxalate Precipitation.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Pankaj; Olesen, Claus; Møller, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    The SERCA isoform 1a is constructed to transport 2 Ca(2+) ions across the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane coupled to the hydrolysis of one molecule of MgATP. However, observed coupling ratios for Ca(2+) transported/ATP hydrolzyed are usually less than 2:1, since part of the Ca(2+) accumulated at high intravesicular concentrations by the active transport of Ca(2+) leaks out of the vesicles because of Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) exchange. However, in the presence of a high concentration of oxalate (5 mM) Ca(2+) will precipitate as Ca-oxalate inside the vesicles and thereby be prevented from leaking out and, in addition, this treatment will reduce the intravesicular free concentration of Ca(2+) to a level where optimal coupling ratios of 2:1 can be achieved.

  1. Detection of Ca(2+)-binding proteins by electrophoretic migration in the presence of Ca2+ combined with 45Ca2+ overlay of protein blots

    SciTech Connect

    Garrigos, M.; Deschamps, S.; Viel, A.; Lund, S.; Champeil, P.; Moller, J.V.; le Maire, M. , Gif-sur-Yvette )

    1991-04-01

    When high affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins like calmodulin, or proteins with a high Ca(2+)-binding capacity like calsequestrin, underwent sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis in Laemmli systems, their electrophoretic migration rates were much higher in gels containing 1 mM Ca2+ than in gels containing ethylene glycol bis(beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N{prime}-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). Replacement of EGTA by Ca2+ in the gel, combined with the blotting of electrophoretically separated proteins on polyvinylidene difluoride membranes and subsequent 45Ca2+ overlay, proved a very effective means of detecting Ca(2+)-binding proteins. This combined approach is important since artifacts occur in both techniques when used separately. We found that the usual procedure of adding Ca2+ to the sample before electrophoresis without including it in the gel itself permitted the detection of only very high affinity Ca(2+)-binding proteins.

  2. Ca/sup 2 +/-CaM-ATPase activity after corticosterone binding to synaptosomal plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Iqbal, Z.; Sze, P.Y.

    1986-03-01

    Studies conducted in the laboratory have demonstrated that corticosterone (CS) binds specifically to synaptosomal plasma membrane (SPM) and modify the cellular events in the synaptosomes. On an exposure of a rat brain synaptosomes to physiological concentrations (<1..mu..M) of CS, the uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ into synaptosomes was increased by 40-50%. Similarly the binding of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ to isolated SPM was also enhanced by 50% in the presence of CS. However when intact synaptosomes were pre-incubated with CS, the capacity of membranes to bind /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ was increased by 2-fold. After the incubation of intact synaptosomes with < ..mu..M CS, the activity of trifluoperazine sensitive and CaM dependent Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase at 1..mu..M Ca/sup 2 +/ was found to be stimulated by 20-30% whereas the activity of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase at 1mM Ca/sup 2 +/ remained unaffected. Exposure of synaptosomes to CS was also effective in protecting the reduction of ouabain-sensitive ATPase (Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase) activity caused by 0.5% ethanol used as a solvent medium for CS. These findings suggest that one of the physiological actions of CS in synaptosomes, after binding to synaptosomal plasma membranes, is an enhancement of Ca/sup 2 +/ transport and an increase of Ca/sup 2 +/-CaM-ATPase activity.

  3. Review of Tm and Ho Materials; Spectroscopy and Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    A review of Tm and Ho materials is presented, covering some fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics in both single and co-doped systems. Following an introduction to 2- m lasers, applications and historical development, the physics of quasi-four level lasers, energy transfer and modeling are discussed in some detail. Recent developments in using Tm lasers to pump Ho lasers are discussed, and seen to offer some advantages over conventional Tm:Ho lasers. This article is not intended as a complete review, but as a primer for introducing concepts and a resource for further study.

  4. IRRS, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and photoluminescence upconversion in Ho 3+-doped oxyfluorophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Basudeb

    2005-09-01

    Infrared reflection spectroscopic (IRRS), ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) absorption and photoluminescence upconversion properties with special emphasis on the spectrochemistry of the oxyfluorophosphate (oxide incorporated fluorophosphates) glasses of the Ba(PO 3) 2-AlF 3-CaF 2-SrF 2-MgF 2-Ho 2O 3 system have been studied with different concentrations (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 mol%) of Ho 2O 3. IRRS spectral band position and intensity of Ho 3+ ion doped oxyfluorophosphate glasses have been discussed in terms of reduced mass and force constant. UV-Vis-NIR absorption band position has been justified with quantitative calculation of nephelauxetic parameter and covalent bonding characteristics of the host. NIR to visible upconversion has been investigated by exciting at 892 nm at room temperature. Three upconverted bands originated from the 5F 3→ 5I 8, ( 5S 2, 5F 4)→ 5I 8 and 5F 5→ 5I 8 transitions have found to be centered at 491 nm (blue, medium), 543 nm (green, very strong) and 658 nm (red, weak), respectively. These bands have been justified from the evaluation of the absorption, normal (down conversion) fluorescence and excitation spectra. The upconversion processes have been explained by the excited state absorption (ESA), energy transfer (ET) and cross relaxation (CR) mechanisms involving population of the metastable (storage) energy levels by multiphonon deexcitation effect. It is evident from the IRRS study that the upconversion phenomena are expedited by the low multiphonon relaxation rate in oxyfluorophosphate glasses owing to their high intense low phonon energy (˜600 cm -1) which is very close to that of fluoride glasses (500-600 cm -1).

  5. The LLAMA 12 m mm/sub-mm radiotelescope in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepine, Jacques; Edemundo Arnal, Marcelo; de Graauw, Thijs; Abraham, Zulema; Gimenez de Castro, Guillermo; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Morras, Ricardo; Larrarte, Juan; Viramontes, José; Finger, Ricardo; Kooi, Jacob; Reeves, Rodrigo; Beaklini, Pedro

    2015-08-01

    LLAMA (Large Latin American Millimetric Array) is a joint Argentinean-Brazilian project of a 12m mm/sub-mm radio telescope similar to the APEX antenna, to be installed at a site at 4800 m altitude near San Antonio de Los Cobres in the Salta Province in Argentine, at 150 km from ALMA. The scientific cases for single dish and VLBI observations include black holes and accretion disks, the molecular evolution of interstellar clouds, the structure of the Galaxy, the formation of galaxies, and much more. The antenna was ordered to the company Vertex Antennentechnik in June 2014, and the construction is progressing quickly; it will be installed at the site in 2016. The radio telescope will be equipped with up to six receivers covering bands similar to those of ALMA. Cryostats with room for 3 cartridges, constructed by NAOJ (Tokyo,Japan), will be installed in each of the two Nasmyth cabins. Among the first receivers we will have an ALMA band 9 provided by NOVA (Groningen, Holland) and a band 5 from the Chalmers University (Sweden). Other receivers are still being discussed at the time of submission of this abstract,At high frequencies, VLBI observations at high frequencies could be made with ALMA, APEX and ASTE, and Northern radiotelescopes. In this way, LLAMA will be a seed for a Latin-American VLBI network.

  6. Teaching Evolutionary Mechanisms: Genetic Drift and M&M's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staub, Nancy L.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a classroom activity that teaches the mechanism of genetic drift to undergraduates. Illustrates a number of concepts that are critical in developing evolution literacy by sampling M&M milk chocolate candies. (MM)

  7. Uptake of HO2 Radicals Onto Dust Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2013-12-01

    OH and HO2 radicals play an important role in the troposphere by controlling its oxidative capacity and therefore the concentration of many trace species. Several field studies have observed significantly lower concentrations of HO2 radicals than predicted using box models (1,2). HO2 loss onto aerosols has been suggested as a possible sink. Mineral dust has an estimated annual flux of 2000 Tg year-1 (3). However, there has only been one study of HO2 uptake onto Arizona Test Dust (ATD) surfaces (4) and there are currently no published studies for dust aerosols. Therefore, the aim of this study was to measure the HO2 uptake coefficient onto ATD aerosols over a range of humidities and for different HO2 concentrations, as well as investigating the uptake as a function of the exposure time to the aerosol, for which a dependence had been observed for aqueous salt aerosols (5). Uptake coefficients were measured for ATD aerosols at atmospheric pressure and at 291 K using a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector combined with a flow tube. HO2 was formed from the photolysis of water vapour and was injected into the flow tube using a moveable injector, which was placed in six different positions along the flow tube. The non stable aerosol output was produced by stirring ATD in a bottle producing a dust cloud which was entrained into a flow. The aerosol number concentration was measured using a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) and was converted into a surface area using the average radius of one aerosol. The uptake coefficient was then able to be calculated by assuming first order kinetics. The HO2 uptake coefficient was measured at a relative humidity of between 6 and 75% and at initial HO2 concentrations of ~ 0.3 - 1 × 10^9 molecule cm-3. Average uptake coefficients of 0.018 × 0.006 and 0.031 × 0.008 were measured for the higher and lower HO2 concentrations respectively, and the impact investigated using a constrained box model. A time dependence was also

  8. Magnetic remanence in Yb14-xRExMnSb11 (RE=Tb, Dy, Ho) single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenkemper, Jason H.; Hu, Yufei; Abdusalyamova, M. N.; Makhmudov, F. A.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2016-06-01

    Single crystals of Yb14-xRExMnSb11 (x~0.1, 0.4; RE = Tb, Dy, Ho) have been prepared as a solid solution by Sn flux reactions of the elements. They crystallize in the Ca14AlSb11 structure type in the I41/acd space group. The RE3+preferentially substitutes on the Yb(1) site which is the smallest volume Yb containing polyhedron. In the case of Ho3+, a small amount of Ho3+ also substitutes on the Yb(4) site. The ferromagnetic ordering temperature of Yb14MnSb11 is reduced from 53 K to 41 K as x increases and dependent on the identity of the RE. This is attributed to the reduction in carriers and reduced screening of the Mn2+ local moment. The effective moments, μeff, agree well with the calculated moments assuming the RE substitutes as a trivalent cation. The largest coercive field is observed for RE = Dy (1000 Oe). For the maximum x of Yb14-xRExMnSb11 there are enough carriers for the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) mechanism of magnetic coupling via conduction electrons to still be valid in describing the ferromagnetic ordering.

  9. Flashlamp-pumped Ho:Tm:Cr:LuAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor); Barnes, Norman P. (Inventor); Murray, Keith E. (Inventor); Kokta, Milan R. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A room temperature solid-state laser is provided. A laser crystal is disposed in a laser cavity. The laser crystal has a LuAG host material doped with a concentration of about 0.35% Ho ions, about 5.57% Tm ions and at least about 1.01% Cr ions. A broadband energizing source such as a flashlamp is disposed transversely to the laser crystal to energize the Ho ions, Tm ions and Cr ions.

  10. Ca isotope cycling in a forested ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmden, Chris; Bélanger, Nicolas

    2010-02-01

    Reports of large Ca isotope fractionations between trees and soils prompted this study of a Boreal forest ecosystem near La Ronge, Saskatchewan, to improve understanding of this phenomenon. The results on five tree species (black spruce, trembling aspen, white spruce, jack pine, balsam poplar) confirm that nutrient Ca uptake by plants favors the light isotopes, thus driving residual Ca in plant available soil pools towards enrichment in the heavy isotopes. Substantial within-tree fraction occurs in tissues formed along the transpiration stream, with low δ 44Ca values in fine roots (2 mm), intermediate values in stemwood, and high values in foliage. Separation factors between different plant tissues are similar between species, but the initial fractionation step in the tips of the fine roots is species specific, and/or sensitive to the local soil environment. Soil water δ 44Ca values appear to increase with depth to at least 35 cm below the top of the forest floor, which is close to the deepest level of fine roots. The heavy plant fractionated signature of Ca in the finely rooted upper soils filters downward where it is retained on ion exchange sites, leached into groundwater, and discharged into surface waters. The relationship between Ca uptake by tree fine roots and the pattern of δ 44Ca enrichment with soil depth was modeled for two Ca pools: the forest floor (litter) and the underlying (upper B) mineral soil. Six study plots were investigated along two hillside toposequences trending upwards from a first order stream. We used allometric equations describing the Ca distribution in boreal tree species to calculate weighted average δ 44Ca values for the stands in each plot and estimate Ca uptake rates. The δ 44Ca value of precipitation was measured, and soil weathering signatures deduced, by acid leaching of lower B mineral soils. Steady state equations were used to derive a set of model Ca fluxes and fractionation factors for each plot. The model reproduces

  11. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease MM1+2C and MM1 are Identical in Transmission Properties.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Matsuura, Yuichi; Iwaki, Toru; Iwasaki, Yasushi; Yoshida, Mari; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Murayama, Shigeo; Takao, Masaki; Kato, Shinsuke; Yamada, Masahito; Mohri, Shirou; Kitamoto, Tetsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    The genotype (methionine, M or valine, V) at polymorphic codon 129 of the PRNP gene and the type (1 or 2) of abnormal prion protein in the brain are the major determinants of the clinicopathological features of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), thus providing molecular basis for classification of sporadic CJD, that is, MM1, MM2, MV1, MV2, VV1 or VV2. In addition to these "pure" cases, "mixed" cases presenting mixed neuropathological and biochemical features have also been recognized. The most frequently observed mixed form is the co-occurrence of MM1 and MM2, namely MM1+2. However, it has remained elusive whether MM1+2 could be a causative origin of dura mater graft-associated CJD (dCJD), one of the largest subgroups of iatrogenic CJD. To test this possibility, we performed transmission experiments of MM1+2 prions and a systematic neuropathological examination of dCJD patients in the present study. The transmission properties of the MM1+2 prions were identical to those of MM1 prions because MM2 prions lacked transmissibility. In addition, the neuropathological characteristics of MM2 were totally absent in dCJD patients examined. These results suggest that MM1+2 can be a causative origin of dCJD and causes neuropathological phenotype similar to that of MM1.

  12. FAGE Determination of Tropospheric HO and H02.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hard, T. M.; George, L. A.; O'Brien, R. J.

    1995-10-01

    FAGE (fluorescence assay with gas expansion) was developed as a sensitive technique for the detection of low-concentration free radicals in the atmosphere. The application of FAGE to tropospheric hydroxyl (H0) and hydroperoxyl (H02) radicals has yielded calibrated measurements of both species in both clean air and highly polluted urban air. For HO calibration, a continuously stirred tank reactor provides a uniform external HO concentration, which can be measured by gas chromatography of an HO-reactive hydrocarbon. The aerodynamics of the air-sampling process has been modeled computationally, with results that agree with empirical observations of the effects of nozzle diameter on HO loss during sampling. The authors have also modeled airborne fluid dynamics of a FAGE probe. They have recently obtained FAGE sensitivity as high as ± 1 × 106 cm3 for a 6-minute averaging period, during field studies in highly polluted Los Angeles air, yielding a 7:1 signal-to-noise ratio near midday. Multipass excitation can further improve this sensitivity. The authors summarize their recent field studies of HO and HO2, current work on improved calibration methods, other improvements, and future plans.

  13. Dentin ablation by Ho: YAG laser: correlation of energy versus volume using stereophotogrammetry.

    PubMed

    Stevens, B H; Trowbridge, H O; Harrison, G; Silverton, S F

    1994-05-01

    The future use of lasers in endodontics is dependent upon predictable and consistent ablation of dentin. In this pilot study we used an Ho:YAG laser fiberoptic delivery system to apply laser energy to prepared tooth sections in vitro. Longitudinally sectioned single-rooted human teeth were subjected to single-energy pulses varying from 25 to 1750 mJ at a focal length of 1 mm. At different energy levels we observed changes in the dentin surface ranging from minute surface pitting to the formation of large craters. Scanning electron microscopy and stereophotogrammetry were used to determine the relationship between the amount of energy applied to dentin and the extent of dentin ablation. Dentin crater formation was quantified by determining surface area, depth, and volume of craters produced. Increases in laser energy were compared with increases in surface area, depth, and volume of craters produced within the range of 150 to 1200 mJ. The Ho:YAG laser fiberoptic delivery system used in this study provides an effective means of ablating dentin. Three-dimensional stereophotogrammetry may prove to be a useful method for further studies on the effects of laser energy on mineralized tissues.

  14. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column...

  15. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column...

  16. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column...

  17. 40 CFR Table Mm-2 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Factors for Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass MM Table MM-2 to Subpart MM of Part 98 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Biomass-Based Fuels and Biomass Biomass-based fuel and biomass Column A:Density (metric tons/bbl) Column...

  18. 1.88 Micrometers InGaAsP Pumped, Room Temperature Ho: LuAG Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reichle, Donald J.; Busch, George; Leisher, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A room temperature, directly diode pumped Ho:LuAG laser oscillated for the first time. Direct pumping of the Ho upper laser manifold maximizes efficiency, minimizes heating, and eliminates Ho:Tm energy sharing. Design and performance are presented.

  19. Buffer-gas loaded MOTs for Ho, Yb,Tm, and Er

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Eunmi; Drayna, Garrett; Hemmerling, Boerge; Hutzler, Nick; Ravi, Aakash; Collopy, Alejandra; Hummon, Matthew; Stuhl, Benjamin; Yeo, Mark; Ye, Jun; Doyle, John

    2014-05-01

    We report on direct loading of lanthanide atoms into MOTs from a two-stage slow buffer-gas beam source, which has a peak forward velocity of ~ 30 - 60 m/s, considerably lower than other beam implementations. The low velocity combined with species generality makes this source useful for loading magneto-optical traps (MOTs), especially for species that are not well suited to the traditional approach of oven plus Zeeman slower. We report loading MOTs with Yb, Tm, Er, and Ho, without any additional slowing stages. Application of a single frequency slowing laser to the buffer-gas beam of Yb results in an unprecedentedly high loading rate of 2 . 0 (1 . 0) ×1010 Yb atoms/s and 1 . 3 (0 . 7) ×108 Yb atoms in the MOT. We plan to use this versatile source to load a MOT with CaF, following the same general approach to that used with YO and SrF.

  20. Formation of HO2/+/ by reaction of metastable O2/+/ ions with H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ajello, J. M.; Huntress, W. T.; Lane, A. L.; Lebreton, P. R.; Williamson, A. D.

    1974-01-01

    The photoionization efficiency curves of H2(+), O2(+), and HO2(+) have been studied in a mixture of hydrogen and oxygen over the wavelength range from 650 to 810 A. The HO2(+) ion appears at 804 A, the threshold for ionization of H2, by the reaction H2(+) + O2 yields HO2(+) + H. The relative photoionization efficiency curves of H2(+) and HO2(+) are the same from 804 to 764 A. Below 764 A production of the 4 Pi u metastable electronic state of O2(+) leads to the formation of HO2(+) by the reaction O2(+)(a 4 Pi u) + H2 yields HO2(+) + H.

  1. Reaction of HO2 with O3 and the effect of water vapor on HO2 kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of temperature and water vapor concentration on the ratio of the rate constant of the reaction HO2 + O3 yields OH + 2(O2) to the square root of the rate constant for the reaction HO2 + HO2 yields H2O2 + O2 are determined. Photolysis of H2-O2-O3 mixtures at 253.7 nm was carried out with H2O pressures in the range 0 to 15 torr at a temperature range of -42.5 to 61 C along with 184.9 nm photolysis of H2O-O2-O3 mixtures. It is shown that the rate of O3 photolysis is suppressed by the addition of water vapor and it is suggested that this effect is realized in the HO2 + HO2 yields H2O2 + O2 reaction. The calculated expression for the temperature dependence of the rate constant ratio is found to be in good agreement with that calculated from separate rate constants. Rate constants determined for the reaction OH + HO2 yields H2O + O2 are found to be higher than those previously determined, presumably due to increased pressure, indicating that atmospheric models should take into account the possible pressure dependences of the reactions considered.

  2. Luminal Ca2+ promoting spontaneous Ca2+ release from inositol trisphosphate-sensitive stores in rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Missiaen, L; Taylor, C W; Berridge, M J

    1992-01-01

    1. Spontaneous Ca2+ release from the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive stores in permeabilized hepatocytes was monitored using Fluo-3 to measure the free [Ca2+] of the medium bathing the cells. 2. Permeabilized cells rapidly sequestered Ca2+, reducing the [Ca2+] to 103 +/- 5 nM. Under conditions that depended critically upon cell density and the amount of Ca2+ in the medium, this was followed by a slow increase in [Ca2+] culminating in a substantial Ca2+ spike representing synchronous discharge from the InsP3-sensitive stores. 3. During the latency preceding the Ca2+ spike, the stores increased their sensitivity to InsP3. This sensitization seemed to be an all-or-none phenomenon. 4. Oxidized glutathione and thimerosal promoted the spontaneous release by sensitizing the InsP3 receptor. 5. An increase in the [Ca2+] within the stores was required for both the increased sensitivity to InsP3 and the subsequent spike. 6. Caffeine (6 mM) antagonized the effect of very low InsP3 concentrations and abolished the Ca2+ spike, without itself releasing Ca2+. 7. Our results suggesting that luminal Ca2+ may sensitive InsP3-sensitive stores leading to spontaneous Ca2+ mobilization will be discussed in the light of a modified version of the two-pool model for explaining cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations. PMID:1484365

  3. Role of Ca++ in Shoot Gravitropism. [avena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayle, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    A cornerstone in the argument that Ca(2+) levels may regulate growth is the finding the EGTA promotes straight growth. The usual explanation for these results is that Ca(2+) chelation from cell walls results in wall loosening and thus accelerated straight growth. The ability of frozen-thawed Avena coleoptile tissue (subjected to 15g tension) to extend in response to EGTA and Quin II was examined. The EGTA when applied in weakly buffered (i.e., 0.1mM) neutral solutions initiates rapid extension. When the buffer strength is increased, similar concentrations of EGTA produce no growth response. This implies when EGTA liberated protons are released upon Ca(2+) chelation they can either initiate acid growth (low buffer conditions) or if consumed (high buffer conditions) have no effect. Thus Ca(2+) chelation in itself apparently does not result in straight growth.

  4. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Submicron Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, P. S.; George, I. J.; Brooks, B.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    OH and HO2 (HOx) radicals are closely coupled and OH is responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere and controls the concentrations of many trace species. Therefore, it is important to be able to accurately predict HOx concentrations. However, some field measurement studies have reported significantly lower HO2 radical concentrations than calculated by constrained box models using detailed chemical mechanisms. Although the inclusion of halogen chemistry into the mechanisms can explain much of the differences in the marine boundary layer (MBL) (1,2), HO2 uptake by aerosols has been suggested as a possible sink in the MBL (2), the Arctic troposphere (3) and the upper troposphere (4). There have been very few laboratory studies (5,6) on HO2 uptake by aerosols and the rates and mechanism is still uncertain. The HO2 uptake coefficients were measured for a variety of atmospherically relevant inorganic and organic aerosols. The measurements were performed using an aerosol flow tube combined with a Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector. The sensitive FAGE cell allowed low HO2 concentrations (108-109 molecule cm-3) to be injected into the flow tube using a moveable injector. By moving the injector along the flow tube, position dependent HO2 decays were able to be recorded which when plotted against the total aerosol surface area allowed an uptake coefficient to be obtained. The aerosols were generated using an atomiser or by homogeneous nucleation and the total aerosol surface area was measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer. The HO2 uptake coefficient (γ) was measured at room temperature for dry inorganic salts and dry organics (γ< 0.004), wet inorganic salts and wet organics (γ= 0.002-0.005), wet copper doped ammonium sulfate aerosols (γ= 0.28± 0.05) and ammonium sulfate aerosols doped with different molar amounts of iron (γ= 0.003-0.06). The pH dependence of the HO2 uptake coefficient was investigated, however no

  5. A λ 3 mm and 1 mm line survey toward the yellow hypergiant IRC +10420⋆

    PubMed Central

    Quintana-Lacaci, G.; Agúndez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Bujarrabal, V.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Castro-Carrizo, A.; Alcolea, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Our knowledge of the chemical properties of the circumstellar ejecta of the most massive evolved stars is particularly poor. We aim to study the chemical characteristics of the prototypical yellow hypergiant star, IRC +10420. For this purpose, we obtained full line surveys at 1 and 3 mm atmospheric windows. Methods We have identified 106 molecular emission lines from 22 molecular species. Approximately half of the molecules detected are N-bearing species, in particular HCN, HNC, CN, NO, NS, PN, and N2H+. We used rotational diagrams to derive the density and rotational temperature of the different molecular species detected. We introduced an iterative method that allows us to take moderate line opacities into account. Results We have found that IRC +10420 presents high abundances of the N-bearing molecules compared with O-rich evolved stars. This result supports the presence of a N-rich chemistry, expected for massive stars. Our analysis also suggests a decrease of the 12C/13C ratio from ≳ 7 to ~ 3.7 in the last 3800 years, which can be directly related to the nitrogen enrichment observed. In addition, we found that SiO emission presents a significant intensity decrease for high-J lines when compared with older observations. Radiative transfer modeling shows that this variation can be explained by a decrease in the infrared (IR) flux of the dust. The origin of this decrease might be an expansion of the dust shell or a lower stellar temperature due to the pulsation of the star. PMID:27458319

  6. An efficient continuous-wave and Q-switched single-pass two-stage Ho:YLF MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Jacek; Jabczynski, Jan Karol; Zendzian, Waldemar

    2015-04-01

    We report on the efficient operation of an Ho:YLF laser single-pass in-band pumped by a Tm-doped fiber laser. The research in a continuous-wave (CW) operation in an oscillator scheme was done for a crystal of 0.5 at% Ho dopant concentration and the length of 30 mm for the output coupler transmittances of TOC=10%, 20%, 30% and 40%. At room temperature, for the output coupling transmission of 20%, the maximum CW output power of 24.5 W for 82.5 W of incident pump power, corresponding to the slope efficiency of 35.4% and optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 29.7% was achieved. The highest slope efficiency of 81.6% with respect to absorbed pump power was obtained. Carrying out the measurements of the laser spectrum, for the out-coupling transmittance of TOC=30%, we observed a very short time wavelength shift between 2051.5 and 2062.4 nm in an Ho:YLF laser operation. Trying to fully utilize the pump power unabsorbed by the active crystal in an oscillator stage, an amplifier system based on two additional Ho:YLF crystals was developed. For the output coupling transmission of 40% the slope efficiency increased from 31.5% in an oscillator scheme to 47.3% with respect to the incident pump power in a two-stage amplifier scheme with a beam quality parameter of M2 better than 1.1. For a Q-switched operation, for the maximum incident pump power and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 1 kHz, pulse energies of 18.5 mJ with a 22 ns FWHM pulse width corresponding to 841 kW peak power in the amplifier system were recorded.

  7. Is HO{sup 2 sub +} a detectable interstellar molecule?

    SciTech Connect

    Widicus Weaver, S. L.; Woon, D. E.; Ruscic, B.; McCall, B. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Illinois

    2009-05-20

    Although molecular oxygen, O{sub 2}, has long been thought to be present in interstellar environments, it has only been tentatively detected toward one molecular cloud. The fractional abundance of O{sub 2} determined from these observations is well below that predicted by astrochemical models. Given the difficulty of O{sub 2} observations from ground-based telescopes, identification of a molecule that could be used as a tracer of O{sub 2} in interstellar environments would be quite useful. To this end, we have undertaken a collaborative examination of HO{sub 2}{sup +} in an attempt to evaluate the feasibility of its detection in interstellar clouds. We have conducted high-level ab initio calculations of its structure to obtain its molecular parameters. The reaction responsible for the formation of HO{sub 2}{sup +} is nearly thermoneutral, and so a careful analysis of its thermochemistry was also required. Using the Active Thermochemical Tables approach, we have determined the most accurate values available to date for the proton affinities of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, and the enthalpy, Gibbs energy, and equilibrium constant for the reaction H{sub 3}{sup +} + O{sub 2} {yields} HO{sub 2}{sup +} + H{sub 2}. We find that while this reaction is endothermic by 50 {+-} 9 cm{sup -1} at 0 K, its equilibrium is shifted toward HO{sub 2}{sup +} at the higher temperatures of hot cores. We have examined the potential formation and destruction pathways for HO{sub 2}{sup +} in interstellar environments. Combining this information, we estimate the HO{sub 2}{sup +} column density in dense clouds to be {approx}10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, which corresponds to line brightness temperatures of {le} 0.2 mK. If our results prove correct, HO{sub 2}{sup +} is clearly not a detectable interstellar molecule.

  8. Ho:YAG laser sclerostomy in a long-term animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Snyder, Wendy J.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Fein, William; Fishbein, Michael C.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Dhondt, M. D.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-02-01

    The effects of the Ho:YAG (2.13 micrometers ) laser on rabbit scleral tissue ablation were determined. Over a period of 12 months the status of the drain hole was monitored. A 3 mm incision was made on 26 rabbits through the conjunctiva and the laser probe was advanced and applied under it. A fluence of 255 J/cm2 was used to perforate the sclera with a pulse duration of 300 microsecond(s) ec full width at half maximum. Results of this study show that this laser thermal sclerostomy procedure provided a patent hole in 6 of 8 (75%) eyes at 3 months, 11 of 15 (73%) eyes at 6 months, and 3 of 3 at 12 months. No postoperative inflammation, hypotony or subsequent scar formation was observed in any of the rabbits.

  9. Dual Effect of Phosphate Transport on Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, An-Chi; Liu, Ting; O'Rourke, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The large inner membrane electrochemical driving force and restricted volume of the matrix confer unique constraints on mitochondrial ion transport. Cation uptake along with anion and water movement induces swelling if not compensated by other processes. For mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, these include activation of countertransporters (Na+/Ca2+ exchanger and Na+/H+ exchanger) coupled to the proton gradient, ultimately maintained by the proton pumps of the respiratory chain, and Ca2+ binding to matrix buffers. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is known to affect both the Ca2+ uptake rate and the buffering reaction, but the role of anion transport in determining mitochondrial Ca2+ dynamics is poorly understood. Here we simultaneously monitor extra- and intra-mitochondrial Ca2+ and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) to examine the effects of anion transport on mitochondrial Ca2+ flux and buffering in Pi-depleted guinea pig cardiac mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake proceeded slowly in the absence of Pi but matrix free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]mito) still rose to ∼50 μm. Pi (0.001–1 mm) accelerated Ca2+ uptake but decreased [Ca2+]mito by almost 50% while restoring ΔΨm. Pi-dependent effects on Ca2+ were blocked by inhibiting the phosphate carrier. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake rate was also increased by vanadate (Vi), acetate, ATP, or a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog (AMP-PNP), with differential effects on matrix Ca2+ buffering and ΔΨm recovery. Interestingly, ATP or AMP-PNP prevented the effects of Pi on Ca2+ uptake. The results show that anion transport imposes an upper limit on mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and modifies the [Ca2+]mito response in a complex manner. PMID:25963147

  10. Dual Effect of Phosphate Transport on Mitochondrial Ca2+ Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wei, An-Chi; Liu, Ting; O'Rourke, Brian

    2015-06-26

    The large inner membrane electrochemical driving force and restricted volume of the matrix confer unique constraints on mitochondrial ion transport. Cation uptake along with anion and water movement induces swelling if not compensated by other processes. For mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, these include activation of countertransporters (Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger) coupled to the proton gradient, ultimately maintained by the proton pumps of the respiratory chain, and Ca(2+) binding to matrix buffers. Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is known to affect both the Ca(2+) uptake rate and the buffering reaction, but the role of anion transport in determining mitochondrial Ca(2+) dynamics is poorly understood. Here we simultaneously monitor extra- and intra-mitochondrial Ca(2+) and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) to examine the effects of anion transport on mitochondrial Ca(2+) flux and buffering in Pi-depleted guinea pig cardiac mitochondria. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake proceeded slowly in the absence of Pi but matrix free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]mito) still rose to ~50 μm. Pi (0.001-1 mm) accelerated Ca(2+) uptake but decreased [Ca(2+)]mito by almost 50% while restoring ΔΨm. Pi-dependent effects on Ca(2+) were blocked by inhibiting the phosphate carrier. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake rate was also increased by vanadate (Vi), acetate, ATP, or a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog (AMP-PNP), with differential effects on matrix Ca(2+) buffering and ΔΨm recovery. Interestingly, ATP or AMP-PNP prevented the effects of Pi on Ca(2+) uptake. The results show that anion transport imposes an upper limit on mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and modifies the [Ca(2+)]mito response in a complex manner. PMID:25963147

  11. Preconditioning with low concentration NO attenuates subsequent NO-induced apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells via HO-1-dependent mitochondrial death pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Kyoung-Mi; Lee, Seahyoung; Lim, Hyun-Joung; Go, Sang-Hee; Eom, Sang-Mi; Park, Hyun-Young . E-mail: hypark65@nih.go.kr

    2006-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathways are important in both the maintenance of vascular homeostasis and disease progression. Overproduction of NO has been associated with ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Growing evidences suggest that NO preconditioning has cytoprotective effects against I/R injury. However, the mechanism with which NO mediates these effects remains to be elucidated. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanism of how NO preconditioning inhibits subsequent NO-induced apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), specifically focusing on heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). According to our data, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) increased HO-1 expression in a concentration dependent manner. Preconditioning with low concentration SNP (0.3 mM) inhibited subsequent high concentration SNP (1.5 mM)-induced apoptosis, and this effect was reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor SnPP. Low concentration SNP-mediated protection involved p38 kinase inactivation and increased Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, mitochondrial membrane potential was concomitantly increased with decreased expressions of Bax, Apaf-1, and activity of caspase-3, which was reversed by SnPP treatment. Our results show that low concentration SNP preconditioning suppresses subsequent high concentration SNP-induced apoptosis by inhibiting p38 kinase and mitochondrial death pathway via HO-1-dependent mechanisms in VSMC.

  12. Materials Data on CaP4(HO6)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-10-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on K3CaP2HO8 (SG:12) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on CaZnAsHO5 (SG:19) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on CaP2(HO)4 (SG:15) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Ca3Al2(HO)12 (SG:230) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Ca(HO)2 (SG:164) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on NaCa2Si3HO9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ca2Al3Si3HO13 (SG:62) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Heterogeneous Uptake of HO2 Radicals onto Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I. J.; Brooks, B.; Goddard, A.; Whalley, L. K.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Heard, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    The hydroxyl (OH) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals, known collectively as HOx radicals, are the key reactants that control the oxidative capacity of the troposphere and the atmospheric lifetimes and concentrations of most trace reactive species, i.e. NOx, O3 and volatile organic compounds. Therefore, in order to gain an overall understanding of atmospheric chemistry and to predict the fate of atmospheric pollutants, a detailed knowledge of the sources and sinks of HOx species and their steady-state atmospheric concentrations is crucial. To this end, field measurements of atmospheric HOx concentrations have been recently compared to model predictions to gauge our level of understanding of atmospheric chemistry of trace reactive species. Box models incorporating known gas-phase chemistry have significantly overpredicted steady-state HO2 levels in comparison to field observations, suggesting heterogeneous uptake onto aerosols as a possible missing atmospheric sink for HO2 radicals [1-2]. However, relatively few laboratory studies have been performed to determine the kinetic parameters for HO2 loss onto aerosols, and thus the ability to assess the impact of this mechanism on HOx levels is limited. The goal of this laboratory study is to improve our understanding of the tropospheric HOx budget by measuring HO2 uptake kinetics onto aerosol particles. In this work, HO2 radicals were produced by the photolysis of water vapour and the FAGE (Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion) technique was used to monitor HO2 loss kinetics onto aerosol particles in an aerosol flow tube setup. FAGE is a highly sensitive laser-induced fluorescence based detection method for HOx radicals that has allowed for kinetic measurements to be performed under low HO2 concentrations minimizing gas-phase HO2 self reaction, i.e. for [HO2] < 109 molecules cm-3. The mass accommodation coefficient was determined by measuring HO2 uptake onto Cu(II)-doped ammonium sulfate aerosols. Reactive uptake coefficients

  1. Theoretical characterization of the potential energy surface for H + O2 yields HO2(asterisk) yields HO + O. II - The potential for H atom exchange in HO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael

    1989-01-01

    The results of CASSCF multireference contracted CI calculations with large ANO basis sets are presented for the exchange region of the HO2 potential-energy surface. The saddle point for H atom exchange is about 13 kcal/mol below the energy of H + O2; therefore, this region of the surface should be accessible during H + O2 recombination and methathesis reactions.

  2. Infrared spectra of products of the reaction of H atoms with O2 trapped in solid neon: HO2, HO2(+), HOHOH(-), and H2O(HO).

    PubMed

    Jacox, Marilyn E; Thompson, Warren E

    2013-10-01

    When a Ne/O2 mixture is codeposited at 4.3 K with a Ne/H2 mixture that has been passed through a microwave discharge, the infrared spectrum of the resulting deposit includes prominent absorptions of the three vibrational fundamentals of HO2 and seven relatively weak absorptions in the infrared and near-infrared, only one of them previously reported, that can be assigned to overtones and combination bands of that product. Similar assignments are made for DO2. A new, broad absorption at 702.9 cm(-1) appears close to the gas-phase absorption of HOHOH(-) at 697 cm(-1). Isotopic substitution experiments support that assignment. Evidence is also presented for the stabilization of HOHO(-). Absorptions near the vibrational fundamentals of H2O and an absorption at 3472.4 cm(-1) grow on exposure of the deposit to radiation of wavelength shorter than 345 nm. These absorptions are assigned to the H2O(HO) complex, in agreement with the results of an earlier argon-matrix study. In both studies, photodestruction of HO2 molecules that have H2O trapped in a nearby site results in formation of the complex. Because the discharge through Ne/H2 supports ion production, photodetachment of the resulting HOHOH(-) is an additional source of the complex. Other absorptions may be contributed by the bending fundamental of HO2(+) and by a cation complex with H2.

  3. Ho-doped fiber for high energy laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebele, E. Joseph; Askins, Charles G.; Peele, John R.; Wright, Barbara Marcheschi; Condon, Nicholas J.; O'Connor, Shawn; Brown, Christopher G.; Bowman, Steven R.

    2014-03-01

    Ho-doped fiber lasers are of interest for high energy laser applications because they operate in the eye safer wavelength range and in a window of high atmospheric transmission. Because they can be resonantly pumped for low quantum defect operation, thermal management issues are anticipated to be tractable. A key issue that must be addressed in order to achieve high efficiency and minimize thermal issues is parasitic absorption in the fiber itself. Hydroxyl contamination arising from the process for making the Ho-doped fiber core is the principal offender due to a combination band of Si-O and O-H vibrations that absorbs at 2.2 μm in the Ho3+ emission wavelength region. We report significant progress in lowering the OH content to 0.16 ppm, which we believe is a record level. Fiber experiments using a 1.94 μm thulium fiber laser to resonantly clad pump a triple clad Ho-doped core fiber have shown a slope efficiency of 62%, which we also believe is a record for a cladding-pumped laser. Although pump-power limited, the results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of power scaling Ho-doped fiber lasers well above the currently-reported 400-W level.1

  4. 2. West portal of Tunnel 37 view to eastsoutheast, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. West portal of Tunnel 37 view to east-southeast, 135mm lens. Note the notched wingwalls that would have originally held timber posts of the original timber snowsheds, miles of which once enclosed and protected the railroad from the ravages of Sierra winters. Note also that these tunnels, built in the 1920s, have dispensed with any use of stone masonry, and instead have all-concrete portals, though this tunnel retains the use of rubble granite slab slope protection flanking the portal. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 37, Milepost 177.79, Yuba Pass, Nevada County, CA

  5. 2. West portal of Tunnel 39, view to east, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. West portal of Tunnel 39, view to east, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. Note the notched wingwalls that support steel posts of entrance snowshed; these would have originally held timber posts of the original timber snowsheds, miles of which once enclosed and protected the railroad from the ravages of Sierra winters. Note also that these tunnels, built in the 1920s, have dispensed with any use of stone masonry, and instead have all-concrete portals. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 39, Milepost 180.95, Cisco, Placer County, CA

  6. 2. West portal of Tunnel 35, view to east, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. West portal of Tunnel 35, view to east, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. Note the notched wingwalls that support steel posts of entrance snowshed; these would have originally held timber posts of the original timber snowsheds, miles of which once enclosed and protected the railroad from the ravages of Sierra winters. Note also that these tunnels, built in the 1920s, have dispensed with any use of stone masonry, and instead have all-concrete portals. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 35, Milepost 176.62, Yuba Pass, Nevada County, CA

  7. 2. West portal of Tunnel 38, view to east, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. West portal of Tunnel 38, view to east, 135mm lens. Note the notched wingwalls that support steel posts of entrance snowshed; these would have originally held timber posts of the original timber snowsheds, miles of which once enclosed and protected the railroad from the ravages of Sierra winters. Note also that these tunnels, built in the 1920s, have dispensed with any use of stone masonry, and instead have all-concrete portals. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 38, Milepost 180.58, Cisco, Placer County, CA

  8. 3. West portal of Tunnel 23, view to north, 135mm ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. West portal of Tunnel 23, view to north, 135mm lens. Concrete foundation in right foreground was from 'telltale,' a simple post-and-beam frame that spanned the tracks with lengths of rope suspended from the beam. In the days when brakemen were required to be on, and walk along, the tops of freight cars to set brakes, the 'telltale' ropes would strike the unwary to warn of the tunnel ahead, allowing them to lie flat and avoid being struck by the tunnel portal. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 23, Milepost 132.69, Applegate, Placer County, CA

  9. Index to 8mm Motion Cartridges. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southern California, Los Angeles. National Information Center for Educational Media.

    Research at the National Information Center for Educational Media has shown that the 8mm motion cartridge with optical and magnetic sound seems to meet the basic tenets of a prime educational criterion for an educational medium--that it be available to the learner at his convenience. This is a bibliographical source for 8mm motion cartridges, and…

  10. Index to 8mm Motion Cartridges. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southern California, Los Angeles. National Information Center for Educational Media.

    Research at the National Information Center for Educational Media (NICEM) has shown that the 8mm motion cartridge with optical and magnetic sound seems to meet the basic tenets of a prime educational criterion for an educational medium--that it be available to the learner at his convenience. This is a bibliographical source for 8mm motion…

  11. Do Noncontingent Interviewer Mm-hmms Facilitate Interviewee Productivity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegman, Aron Wolfe

    1976-01-01

    Two studies investigated the hypothesis that noncontingent interviewer "mm-hmms" facilitate interviewee verbal productivity. Within- and between-subjects comparisons failed to support the hypothesis, although interviewees' ratings indicate that the mm-hmms were perceived as the social reinforcers they were intended to be. (Author)

  12. Is smaller better? Comparison of 3-mm and 5-mm leaf size for stereotactic radiosurgery: A dosimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Chern, Shyh-shi . E-mail: Richard.Chern@hci.utah.edu; Leavitt, Dennis D.; Jensen, Randy L.; Shrieve, Dennis C.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric comparison of a minimal 3-mm leaf width multileaf collimator (MLC) and a minimal 5-mm MLC in dynamic conformal arc stereotactic radiosurgery for treatment of intracranial lesions. Methods and Materials: The treatment plans of 23 patients previously treated for intracranial lesions in our institution were redone using the BrainSCAN, version 5.3, stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning system (BrainLAB). For each case, two dynamic conformal arc plans were generated: one using a minimal 3-mm micro-MLC (BrainLAB, Novalis) and one using a minimal 5-mm MLC (Varian Millennium). All arc parameters were the same in each of the two plans, except for the collimator angle settings. The collimator angle settings were optimized for each arc in each plan. A peritumoral rind structure (1 cm) was created to evaluate normal tissue sparing immediately adjacent to the target volume. Conformity indexes (CIs) were calculated for each plan. The dependence of normal tissue sparing and target conformity on target volume (TV) was determined. Results: The TV was 0.14-36.32 cm{sup 3} (median, 5.90). The CI was 1.22-2.60 (median, 1.51) for the 3-mm micro-MLC and 1.23-2.69 (median, 1.60) for the 5-mm MLC. Despite this small difference, it was a statistically significant increase (p < 0.0001) for the 5-mm MLC compared with the 3-mm micro-MLC. Improved normal tissue sparing was demonstrated using the 3-mm micro-MLC compared with the 5-mm MLC by examining the peritumoral rind volumes (PRVs) receiving 50% (PRV{sub 5}), 80% (PRV{sub 8}), and 90% (PRV{sub 9}) of the prescription dose. The reduction in the PRV{sub 5}, PRV{sub 8}, and PRV{sub 9} for the 3-mm micro-MLC compared with the 5-mm MLC was 13.5%, 12.9%, and 11.5%, respectively. The CI decreased with a larger TV, as did the difference in the CIs between the 3-mm micro-MLC and 5-mm MLC. A reduction in the PRV increased with larger TVs. Conclusion: The 3-mm micro-MLC provided better target conformity and

  13. Glucose-induced insulin secretion in uremia: role of 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Allegra, V; Luisetto, G; Mengozzi, G; Martimbianco, L; Vasile, A

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the role and mechanism of action of calcitriol on glucose-induced insulin secretion in uremia, 17 patients with severe chronic renal failure were studied. Glucose metabolism was investigated by the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) before and after treatment for 21 days with 0.5 microgram/day of calcitriol and 500 mg/day of calcium (C+Ca) (6 cases) or 0.5 microgram/day of calcitriol alone (C) (11 cases). After these evaluations the patients on C+Ca were shifted to C and 6 patients on C were shifted to C+Ca, and IVGTT was repeated 21 days after the shift. For each test plasma glucose (G), immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and C-peptide (C-p) were measured at -30, 0, 2, 5, 15, 30, 45, 60 min, and baseline plasma values of 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3, C-terminal parathyroid hormone (PTH-C), intact parathyroid hormone (PTH-I), calcitonin, and serum values of total and ionized calcium were dosed. Also, glucose constant decay (K-G), insulin response (IRI area), C-p production (C-p area), insulinogenic index (IGI) and insulin resistance index (RI) were calculated. A historical group of 21 healthy volunteers formed the normal controls. 1 alpha,25(HO)2-vitamin D3 plasma levels in uremic patients before treatment were significantly lower than normal range. As compared to controls, uremic patients showed significantly lower K-G, IRI area and IGI values and significantly higher RI values. After treatment with C or C+Ca, the insulin response improved significantly at 2 and 5 min and G decrement was more marked at 30, 45 and 60 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Progress towards a MOT for CaF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmerling, Boerge; Chae, Eunmi; Drayna, Garrett K.; Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Ravi, Aakash; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Collopy, Alejandra; Hummon, Matthew; Stuhl, Benjamin; Yeo, Mark; Ye, Jun; Doyle, John M.

    2014-05-01

    We report on progress toward a magneto-optical trap (MOT) of CaF molecules. While following the same essential approach as that used to laser cool SrF and YO, we are developing direct MOT loading from a 2-stage cryogenic buffer gas beam (CBGB) source. This source has a lower forward velocity compared to the hydrodynamic CBGB source that was employed with SrF and YO. We report the creation of the first CBGB loaded MOTs, without the use of a Zeeman slower, for Ho, Yb, Er, and Tm. The slower initial beam velocity of the two-stage CBGB should aid in MOT loading of molecules, which have inherently low MOT capture velocities (~ 10 m/s). We plan to implement an AC-MOT for CaF, and report on theoretical studies and experimental progress toward that goal.

  15. mm-wave radar - The new ECM-ECCM frontier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S. L.

    1984-05-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the relationship of mm-wave radar to electronic countermeasures (ECM)/electronic counter-countermeasures (ECCM). Electronic warfare support measures (ESM) are also considered, since employment of ECM against mm-wave radar places strong demands on ESM. The mm-waves are defined as wavelengths in the range from 1 to 10 mm corresponding to frequencies in the range from 300 to 30 GHz. Advantages of mm-waves over microwaves for radar applications are partly related to requirements for smaller antenna diameters, increased angular resolution/antenna diameter, increased bandwidth availability, increased range resolution, reduced vulnerability to unwanted detection by hostile forces, and smaller and lighter RF components.

  16. Ca channel gating during cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, M; DeFelice, L J

    1990-10-01

    How do Ca channels conduct Ca ions during the cardiac action potential? We attempt to answer this question by applying a two-microelectrode technique, previously used for Na and K currents, in which we record the patch current and the action potential at the same time (Mazzanti, M., and L. J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 12:95-100, and 1988. Biophys. J. 54:1139-1148; Wellis, D., L. J. DeFelice, and M. Mazzanti. 1990. Biophys. J. 57:41-48). In this paper, we also compare the action currents obtained by the technique with the step-protocol currents obtained during standard voltage-clamp experiments. Individual Ca channels were measured in 10 mM Ca/1 Ba and 10 mM Ba. To describe part of our results, we use the nomenclature introduced by Hess, P., J. B. Lansman, and R. W. Tsien (1984. Nature (Lond.). 311:538-544). With Ba as the charge carrier, Ca channel kinetics convert rapidly from long to short open times as the patch voltage changes from 20 to -20 mV. This voltage-dependent conversion occurs during action potentials and in step-protocol experiments. With Ca as the charge carrier, the currents are brief at all voltages, and it is difficult to define either the number of channels in the patch or the conductance of the individual channels. Occasionally, however, Ca-conducting channels spontaneously convert to long-open-time kinetics (in Hess et al., 1984, notation, mode 2). When this happens, which is about once in every 100beats, there usually appears to be only one channel in the patch. In this rare configuration, the channel is open long enough to measure its conductance in 10 Ca/ 1 Ba. The value is 8-10 pS, which is about half the conductance in Ba. Because the long openings occur so infrequently with Ca as the charge carrier, they contribute negligibly to the average Ca current at any particular time during an action potential. However, the total number of Ca ions entering during these long openings may be significant when compared to the number entering by the

  17. Ca channel gating during cardiac action potentials.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, M; DeFelice, L J

    1990-10-01

    How do Ca channels conduct Ca ions during the cardiac action potential? We attempt to answer this question by applying a two-microelectrode technique, previously used for Na and K currents, in which we record the patch current and the action potential at the same time (Mazzanti, M., and L. J. DeFelice. 1987. Biophys. J. 12:95-100, and 1988. Biophys. J. 54:1139-1148; Wellis, D., L. J. DeFelice, and M. Mazzanti. 1990. Biophys. J. 57:41-48). In this paper, we also compare the action currents obtained by the technique with the step-protocol currents obtained during standard voltage-clamp experiments. Individual Ca channels were measured in 10 mM Ca/1 Ba and 10 mM Ba. To describe part of our results, we use the nomenclature introduced by Hess, P., J. B. Lansman, and R. W. Tsien (1984. Nature (Lond.). 311:538-544). With Ba as the charge carrier, Ca channel kinetics convert rapidly from long to short open times as the patch voltage changes from 20 to -20 mV. This voltage-dependent conversion occurs during action potentials and in step-protocol experiments. With Ca as the charge carrier, the currents are brief at all voltages, and it is difficult to define either the number of channels in the patch or the conductance of the individual channels. Occasionally, however, Ca-conducting channels spontaneously convert to long-open-time kinetics (in Hess et al., 1984, notation, mode 2). When this happens, which is about once in every 100beats, there usually appears to be only one channel in the patch. In this rare configuration, the channel is open long enough to measure its conductance in 10 Ca/ 1 Ba. The value is 8-10 pS, which is about half the conductance in Ba. Because the long openings occur so infrequently with Ca as the charge carrier, they contribute negligibly to the average Ca current at any particular time during an action potential. However, the total number of Ca ions entering during these long openings may be significant when compared to the number entering by the

  18. Spectroscopy of {sup 144}Ho using recoil-isomer tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, P. J. R; Cullen, D. M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Puurunen, A.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sorri, J.; Saren, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Xu, F. R.

    2010-02-15

    Excited states in the proton-unbound odd-odd nucleus {sup 144}Ho have been populated using the {sup 92}Mo({sup 54}Fe,pn){sup 144}Ho reaction and studied using the recoil-isomer-tagging technique. The alignment properties and signature splitting of the rotational band above the I{sup p}i=(8{sup +}){sup 144m}Ho isomer have been analyzed and the isomer confirmed to have a pih{sub 11/2} x nuh{sub 11/2} two-quasiparticle configuration. The configuration-constrained blocking method has been used to calculate the shapes of the ground and isomeric states, which are both predicted to have triaxial nuclear shapes with |gamma|approx =24 deg.

  19. Relationship between RNA synthesis and the Ca2+-filled state of the nuclear envelope store.

    PubMed

    Benech, Juan Claudio; Escande, Carlos; Sotelo, José Roberto

    2005-08-01

    RNA synthesis and ATP-dependent (45)Ca(2+) uptake were measured simultaneously in isolated nuclear fraction of rat liver nuclei. Maximal level of RNA synthesis was obtained under ATP-dependent (45)Ca(2+)-uptake conditions (1 microM free [Ca(2+)] and 1 mM ATP in the bathing solution). This experimental condition was defined as "stimulated nuclei" condition. ATP-dependent (45)Ca(2+) uptake was inhibited using different strategies including: (a) eliminating Ca(2+) (1 mM EGTA); (b) lowering the ATP concentration; (c) modifying nuclear envelope membranes Ca(2+) permeability (Ca(2+) ionophores); or (d) inhibiting the nuclear Ca(2+) pump (thapsigargin and 3',3'',5',5''-tetraiodophenolsulfonephthalein). Under all the above conditions, RNA synthesis was lower than in "stimulated nuclei" condition. In the presence of ionomycin, RNA synthesis was significantly higher at 500 nM free [Ca(2+)], as compared with RNA synthesis in a Ca(2+)-free medium or at 1muM free [Ca(2+)]. However, even in such condition (500 nM free [Ca(2+)]), RNA synthesis was lower than RNA synthesis obtained in "stimulated nuclei" condition. We suggest two components for the effect of Ca(2+) on RNA synthesis: (A) a direct effect of nucleoplasmic [Ca(2+)]; and (B) an effect dependent on the accumulation of Ca(2+) in the nuclear envelope store mediated by the SERCA nuclear Ca(2+) pump.

  20. Amplitude modulation drive to rectangular-plate linear ultrasonic motors with vibrators dimensions 8 mm x 2.16 mm X 1 mm.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yang; Hanson, Ben; Levesley, Martin C; Walker, Peter G; Watterson, Kevin G

    2006-12-01

    In this paper, to exploit the contribution from not only the stators but also from other parts of miniature ultrasonic motors, an amplitude modulation drive is proposed to drive a miniature linear ultrasonic motor consisting of two rectangular piezoelectric ceramic plates. Using finite-element software, the first longitudinal and second lateral-bending frequencies of the vibrator are shown to be very close when its dimensions are 8 mm x 2.16 mm x 1 mm. So one single frequency power should be able to drive the motor. However, in practice the motor is found to be hard to move with a single frequency power because of its small vibration amplitudes and big frequency difference between its longitudinal and bending resonance, which is induced by the boundary condition variation. To drive the motor effectively, an amplitude modulation drive is used by superimposing two signals with nearly the same frequencies, around the resonant frequency of the vibrators of the linear motor. When the amplitude modulation frequency is close to the resonant frequency of the vibrator's surroundings, experimental results show that the linear motor can move back and forward with a maximum thrust force (over 0.016 N) and a maximum velocity (over 50 mm/s).

  1. Japanese Science Films; a Descriptive and Evaluative Catalog of: 16mm Motion Pictures, 8mm Cartridges, and Video Tapes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newren, Edward F., Ed.

    One hundred and eighty Japanese 16mm motion pictures, 8mm cartridges, and video tapes produced and judged appropriate for a variety of audience levels are listed in alphabetical order by title with descriptive and evaluative information. A subject heading list and a subject index to the film titles are included, as well as a sample of the…

  2. The assessment of the HO. scavenging action of therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Russell, J; Ness, J; Chopra, M; McMurray, J; Smith, W E

    1994-07-01

    A new method is reported for the assessment of the HO. scavenging action of therapeutic agents. It is based on the photolysis of zinc oxide and has a detection limit of 3.3%. The scavenging order of the compounds tested was penicillamine > rentiapril > ascorbic acid > cysteine > glutathione > thiomalic acid > N-acetylcysteine > myocrysin > methionine. None were as effective as DMSO. It is argued that these compounds can have an in vivo protective effect where HO. is produced from oxidant producing cells, thus limiting radical induced damage.

  3. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Hořava-Lifshitz holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishioka, Tatsuma

    2009-12-01

    We derive the detailed balance condition as a solution to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation in the Hořava-Lifshitz gravity. This result leads us to propose the existence of the d-dimensional quantum field theory on the future boundary of the (d + 1)-dimensional Hořava-Lifshitz gravity from the viewpoint of the holographic renormalization group. We also obtain a Ricci flow equation of the boundary theory as the holographic RG flow, which is the Hamilton equation in the bulk gravity, by tuning parameters in the theory.

  4. Atomic distribution, local structure and cation size effect in o-R1-xCaxMnO3 (R = Dy, Y, and Ho).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ning; Zhang, X; Yu, Yi

    2013-11-27

    We propose new interatomic potentials for the small rare-earth-based orthorhombic RMnO3 (R = Dy, Y, Ho), which accurately model the structural properties of these extreme cases of lanthanide manganate series. They are further employed to investigate the intrinsic defects in o-RMnO3 and the cation distribution and local structure in o-R1-xCaxMnO3 (R = Dy, Y, Ho). Schottky disorders are found to be the dominant structural defects, and the possibility of a small degree of anti-site disorder of R and Mn ions over A and B sites is found. The introduced Ca dopants tend to form chemically and structurally like CaMnO3 clusters in the lightly doped system, which can be regarded as representations of microscopic phase separation. The local structural disorder is reduced with increasing doping density. For o-R0.5Ca0.5MnO3 (R = Dy, Y, Ho), the charge ordering state is intrinsically favored, and the layer stripe model is shown to be energetically more favorable and structurally more reasonable. Moreover, the tendency to form charge ordered stripes increases with the decrease of R size. The local structure in the layer stripe pattern deviates largely from the average structure: RMnO3-like and CaMnO3-like layers are formed. The size of R ion has a significant influence on the doping effect on Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion and a manganate with a larger R will experience a larger reduction on the anisotropy of Mn-O bonds in Mn(3+)O6 octahedra. However, the change of octahedral tilting upon doping does not vary much with R radii.

  5. Tissue damage by laser radiation: an in vitro comparison between Tm:YAG and Ho:YAG laser on a porcine kidney model.

    PubMed

    Huusmann, Stephan; Wolters, Mathias; Kramer, Mario W; Bach, Thorsten; Teichmann, Heinrich-Otto; Eing, Andreas; Bardosi, Sebastian; Herrmann, Thomas R W

    2016-01-01

    :YAG) on the high power setting. Incision depth was 1214 ± 888 µm for Ho:YAG whereas Tm:YAG did not cut tissue at 5 W in saline solution. On the high power setting, the incision depth was 4050 ± 1058 µm for Tm:YAG and 4083 ± 520 µm for Ho:YAG. Both lasers create similar laser damage zones of <1 mm in ambient air and in saline solution. These in vitro experiments correspond well with in vivo experiments. Thereby, Tm:YAG offers a cutting performance, coagulation and safety profile similar to the standard Ho:YAG lasers in urological surgery. PMID:27006875

  6. Tissue damage by laser radiation: an in vitro comparison between Tm:YAG and Ho:YAG laser on a porcine kidney model.

    PubMed

    Huusmann, Stephan; Wolters, Mathias; Kramer, Mario W; Bach, Thorsten; Teichmann, Heinrich-Otto; Eing, Andreas; Bardosi, Sebastian; Herrmann, Thomas R W

    2016-01-01

    :YAG) on the high power setting. Incision depth was 1214 ± 888 µm for Ho:YAG whereas Tm:YAG did not cut tissue at 5 W in saline solution. On the high power setting, the incision depth was 4050 ± 1058 µm for Tm:YAG and 4083 ± 520 µm for Ho:YAG. Both lasers create similar laser damage zones of <1 mm in ambient air and in saline solution. These in vitro experiments correspond well with in vivo experiments. Thereby, Tm:YAG offers a cutting performance, coagulation and safety profile similar to the standard Ho:YAG lasers in urological surgery.

  7. Cycloid spirals and cycloid cone transition in the HoMn6-xCrxGe6 (T, x) magnetic phase diagramm by neutron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schobinger-Papamantellos, P.; Rodríguez-Carvajal, J.; Buschow, K. H. J.

    2016-06-01

    The structures and magnetic properties of the antiferromagnetic hexagonal pseudo ternary compounds HoMn6-xCrxGe6 (x=1, 1.5 and 2) are studied by neutron diffraction in the temperature range 1.5-300 K. The substitution of nonmagnetic Cr for Mn greatly affects the magnetic properties of HoMn6Ge6 by reducing the ordering temperature from 466 K to 278 K, 205 K and 130 K for (x=0, 1, 1.5 and 2) respectively, increasing the c/a ratio, suppressing the high temperature (HT) commensurate phase with q2=(0, 0, 1/2) and changing the high temperature (LT) q1=(0, 0, q1z) skew spiral rotation plane. HoMn5CrGe6 and HoMn4Cr2Ge6 display in the entire magnetically ordered regime cycloid spiral structures with the wave vector: q=(0, 0, qz), qz≈0.18(3) r.l.u. and Φs≈64.8° turn angle. The Ho and Mn/Cr (001) layers have ferromagnetic arrangements coupled antiferromagnetically. The Ho moments in the z=0 layer are oriented in a direction opposite to the line bisecting the angle 2φMn≈2×28° of the Mn layers at z=±∼0.25. This triple unit changes orientation collectively in the direction of q within the (b, c) plane containing the wave vector. Above 50 K, the wave vector length increases linearly from 0.24 to 0.28(1) r.l.u. below TN. The HT HoMn4.5Cr1.5Ge6 cycloid spiral, is stable in the range Tt

  8. 2.07-micron CW diode-laser-pumped Tm,Ho:YLiF4 room-temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid

    1989-01-01

    Continuous-wave action is obtained at 2.07 microns from a 2-mm-long Tm-sensitized Ho:YLiF4 crystal at room temperature when longitudinally pumped by a pair of diode-laser arrays. Laser output power at 300 K is 26 mW, with a 30-percent slope efficiency and a lasing threshold of 108 mW. A maximum output power of 187 mW is obtained from a 4-mm-long crystal at 77 K, with a 67 percent slope efficiency. A preliminary demonstration of cavity Q switching produced 165 microJ of pulse energy at a repetition rate of 100 Hz.

  9. Visualization of 2-μm radiation by BiF3:Ho3+ and BiF3:Ho3+/Yb3+ ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savikin, A. P.; Egorov, A. S.; Budruev, A. V.; Grishin, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    A series of ceramic samples of the compositions BiF3:1%Ho3+, BiF3:4%Ho3+, BiF3:1%Ho3+ + 1%Yb3+, and BiF3:1%Ho3+ + 3%Yb3+ is synthesized and the conversion of Tm:YLF laser radiation (λ = 1908 nm) is studied. The luminescence spectra exhibit bands in the regions of 490, 545, and 650 nm. The kinetic measurements of the afterglow of the green and red bands show that the population of the 5 S 2 and 5 F 4 states in the BiF3:1%Ho3+ samples occurs due to successive absorption of excitation photons, while the 5 F 5 level of Ho3+ is populated due to the ion-ion interaction. Codoping with Yb3+ leads to a decrease in the visualization threshold power density to 2 W/cm2.

  10. Sulforaphane Protects Rodent Retinas against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury through the Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruixing; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi; Pu, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    Retinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury induces oxidative stress, leukocyte infiltration, and neuronal cell death. Sulforaphane (SF), which can be obtained in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, exerts protective effects in response to oxidative stress in various tissues. These effects can be initiated through nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This investigation was designed to elucidate the neural protective mechanisms of SF in the retinal I/R rat model. Animals were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with SF (12.5 mg/kg) or vehicle (corn oil) once a day for 7 consecutive days. Then, retinal I/R was made by elevating the intraocular pressure (IOP) to 130 mmHg for 1 h. To determine if HO-1 was involved in the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway, rats were subjected to protoporphyrin IX zinc (II) (ZnPP, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) treatments at 24 h before retinal ischemia. The neuroprotective effects of SF were assessed by determining the morphology of the retina, counting the infiltrating inflammatory cells and the surviving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and amacrine cells, and measuring apoptosis in the retinal layers. The expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 was studied by immunofluorescence analysis and western blotting. I/R induced a marked increase of ROS generation, caused pronounced inflammation, increased the apoptosis of RGCs and amacrine cells and caused the thinning of the inner retinal layer (IRL), and these effects were diminished or abolished by SF pretreatment. Meanwhile, SF pretreatment significantly elevated the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the level of HO-1 expression in the I/R retinas; however, ZnPP reversed the protective effects of SF on I/R retinas. Together, we offer direct evidence that SF had protective effects on I/R retinas, which could be attributed, at least in part, to the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. PMID:25470382

  11. Electromagnetic launch of mm-size pellets to great velocities

    SciTech Connect

    Drobyshevski, E.M.; Zhukov, B.G.; Kurakin, R.O.; Sakharov, V.A.; Studenkov, A.M.

    1994-11-01

    Small body launching that uses gas or plasma faces the fundamental problem caused by excess energy loss that is due to the great wall surface/volume ratio of the barrel. For example, the efficiency of the plasma armature (PA) rail-gun acceleration is maximum for 8-10 mm-size bodies and drops as their size decreases. That is why in the case of nuclear fusion applications, where 1-2 mm-size pellets at 5-10 km/s velocity are desirable, electromagnetic launchers have not yet demonstrated an advantage over light-gas guns and one is now forced to search for a compromise between the pellet size (increasing it up to 3-4 mm) and its velocity (decreasing it down to {approx}3 km/s). As a whole, the probability of attaining 5-10 km/s velocity for 1-2 mm pellets seems to be rather remote at the present.

  12. Microscopic insight into the study of band spectra of 158Ho and 159,161,163Ho isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slathia, Barun; Devi, Rani; Khosa, S. K.

    2016-11-01

    The nuclear structure properties of the low-lying and excited states of Holmium isotopes have been studied within the framework of Projected Shell Model. The theoretical results are found to be in the reasonable agreement with the observed ones. The theoretical B (M 1) / B (E 2) estimates of 158Ho are seen to reproduce the same systematics as shown by the observed ones. However, for 159,161,163Ho, the B (E 2) transition probabilities for the ground state band have been predicted for transitions for which the experimental values are not available.

  13. Theoretical characterization of the minimum energy path for the reaction H + O2 to HO2(asterisk) to HO + O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Rohlfing, Celeste Mcmichael; Melius, Carl F.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The potential energy surface for the H + O2 to HO2(asterisk) to HO + O reaction has been investigated in the region of the minimum energy path using CASSCF/contracted CI (CCI) calculations with a large basis set. The results show no barrier for the addition of an H atom to O2, in agreement with previous studies. A crossing between the surface for electrostatic (OH dipole-O quadrupole) interaction and that for the formation of an O-O chemical bond, at r(infinity) of about 5.5 a(0), results in a small (about 0.5 kcal/mol) barrier.

  14. ALMA 1.3 mm observations of the Fomalhaut System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jacob; Boley, Aaron C.; Ford, Eric B.; Payne, Matthew John; Dent, William; Corder, Stuartt

    2016-10-01

    We present ALMA Band 6 (1.3 mm) observations of Fomalhaut and its debris disk. Since the system is relatively close at 7.7 pc, it has been the target of numerous studies at multiple wavelengths, and can serve as a testbed for debris disk evolution models and planet-disk interactions. Outstanding issues that need to be resolved to properly characterize the debris include tightening constraints on the spectral index in the submm/mm regime and determining whether there is indeed excess over the stellar emission, indicating the presence of an inner debris disk or ring.These ALMA 1.3 mm observations provide the highest resolution observations to date of the mm grains the outer ring. Tight constraints are placed on the geometry of the disk and on the mm-wavelength spectral index. We explore fitting the debris disk model in the image plane in addition to the standard method of fitting the visibilities. The results are compared and potential advantages/disadvantages of each approach are discussed.The central emission detected is indistinguishable from a point source, with 0.89 mJy being the best fit flux of the host star for Fomalhaut itself. This implies that any inner debris component must contribute little to the total central emission. Moreover, the stellar flux is less than 70% of that predicted by extrapolating a blackbody from the constrained photosphere temperature and just over 70% of the flux if extrapolating from the far infrared. This behavior is similar to that seen in the Sun for submm/mm wavelengths, but even more pronounced. Currently, insufficient data exists to properly constrain the degree to which stellar atmospheres affect the observed flux in the submm/mm regime. This result is part of an ongoing larger project focused on measuring the emission from stellar atmospheres at submm/mm wavelengths, which directly impacts inferred excesses for debris disk studies.

  15. [Degradation of oil derivatives by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus MM5].

    PubMed

    Marín, M M; Ortiz, M L; Laborda, F

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation of microorganisms from polluted heating oil. The growth of one of them has been studied (Acinetobacter calcoaceticus MM5) in several linear and branched hydrocarbons as well as the effect of its growth on commercial diesel oil. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus MM5 is not capable of using glucose as its only source of carbon, and it needs the presence of nitrogen and phosphorus sources to degrade any petroleum by-product.

  16. Fraxetin Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression by Activation of Akt/Nrf2 or AMP-activated Protein Kinase α/Nrf2 Pathway in HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Juthika; Chae, In Gyeong; Chun, Kyung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Fraxetin (7,8-dihydroxy-6-methoxy coumarin), a coumarin derivative, has been reported to possess antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects. A number of recent observations suggest that the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits inflammation and tumorigenesis. In the present study, we determined the effect of fraxetin on HO-1 expression in HaCaT human keratinocytes and investigated its underlying molecular mechanisms. Methods Reverse transcriptase-PCR and Western blot analysis were performed to detect HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Cell viability was measured by the MTS test. The induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fraxetin was evaluated by 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate staining. Results Fraxetin upregulated mRNA and protein expression of HO-1. Incubation with fraxetin induced the localization of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the nucleus and increased the antioxidant response element-reporter gene activity. Fraxetin also induced the phosphorylation of Akt and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)α and diminished the expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog, a negative regulator of Akt. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt and AMPKα abrogated fraxetin-induced expression of HO-1 and nuclear localization of Nrf2. Furthermore, fraxetin generated ROS in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusions Fraxetin induces HO-1 expression through activation of Akt/Nrf2 or AMPKα/Nrf2 pathway in HaCaT cells. PMID:27722139

  17. HO(x) Measurements in PEM Tropics B with the Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William H.

    2001-01-01

    The primary objective of PEM Tropics B was to study the processes responsible for the production and loss of tropospheric ozone over the tropical Pacific. This region of the globe contains very clean air as well as aged, polluted air that was advected from both the Asian and American continents. Understanding ozone requires understanding of HO(x) (HO(x) = OH + HO2) chemistry, since the reaction between H02 and NO leads to ozone production and the production of OH often requires ozone loss. In addition, OH is the atmosphere's primary oxidant. Since most atmospheric oxidation is thought to occur in the tropical lower troposphere, measurements during PEM Tropics B should provide an important test of the OH abundances and distributions. Thus, understanding and thoroughly testing HO(x) processes was an important objective of PEM Tropics B. Several issues need to be tested, One is HO, production rates and sources, since HO,, production directly affects ozone production and loss. Another is HO(x) behavior in and around clouds, since HO(x) is lost to cloud particles, but convection may bring HO(x) precursors from near the surface to the upper troposphere. A third is the rise and fall of HO(x) at sunrise and sunset, since these variations give strong indications of the important sources and sinks of HO(x). Making and interpreting high-quality OH and H02 measurements from the NASA DC-8 during PEM Tropics B is the objective of this research effort.

  18. Clopidogrel Protects Endothelium by Hindering TNFα-Induced VCAM-1 Expression through CaMKKβ/AMPK/Nrf2 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huabing; Zhao, Pengjun; Tian, Shiliu

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel (INN), an oral antiplatelet drug, has been revealed to have a number of biological properties, for instance, anti-inflammation and antioxidation. Oxidative stress plays an imperative role in inflammation, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, and cancer. In the present study, human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were employed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of INN. INN reduced TNFα-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and time-dependently prompted the expression and activity of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). Cellular glutathione (GSH) levels were augmented by INN. shHO-1 blocked the INN suppression of TNFα-induced HL-60 cell adhesion. The CaMKKβ/AMPK pathway and Nrf2 transcriptional factor were implicated in the induction of HO-1 by INN. Additionally, TNFα dramatically augmented VCAM-1 expression at protein and mRNA levels. INN treatment strikingly repressed TNFα-induced expression of VCAM-1 and HL-60 cell adhesion. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and shNrf2 abolished TNFα-induced expression of VCAM-1 and HL-60 cell adhesion. Our data suggest that INN diminishes TNFα-stimulated VCAM-1 expression at least in part via HO-1 induction, which is CaMKKβ/AMPK pathway-dependent. PMID:26824050

  19. Clopidogrel Protects Endothelium by Hindering TNFα-Induced VCAM-1 Expression through CaMKKβ/AMPK/Nrf2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huabing; Zhao, Pengjun; Tian, Shiliu

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel (INN), an oral antiplatelet drug, has been revealed to have a number of biological properties, for instance, anti-inflammation and antioxidation. Oxidative stress plays an imperative role in inflammation, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, and cancer. In the present study, human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were employed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of INN. INN reduced TNFα-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and time-dependently prompted the expression and activity of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). Cellular glutathione (GSH) levels were augmented by INN. shHO-1 blocked the INN suppression of TNFα-induced HL-60 cell adhesion. The CaMKKβ/AMPK pathway and Nrf2 transcriptional factor were implicated in the induction of HO-1 by INN. Additionally, TNFα dramatically augmented VCAM-1 expression at protein and mRNA levels. INN treatment strikingly repressed TNFα-induced expression of VCAM-1 and HL-60 cell adhesion. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and shNrf2 abolished TNFα-induced expression of VCAM-1 and HL-60 cell adhesion. Our data suggest that INN diminishes TNFα-stimulated VCAM-1 expression at least in part via HO-1 induction, which is CaMKKβ/AMPK pathway-dependent. PMID:26824050

  20. The prosecution of Taiwan sexuality researcher and activist Josephine Ho.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping

    2004-05-01

    In April 2003, following a newspaper report of a hyperlink to a website on bestiality on the Sexuality Databank website of the Center for the Study of Sexualities, National Central University, Taipei, Taiwan, 14 conservative NGOs filed charges against the Center's founder, Josephine Ho, for "propagating obscenities that corrupt traditional values." Ho has been researching sexuality and supporting freedom for marginalised sexual minorities for ten years. In a public statement in response to the charges, she said that the work of scholarly research must not be dictated by prejudice and that differences in sexual values should not be arbitrated by law and should be open for public discussion. As the legal process began in January 2004, Ho's supporters in Taiwan have called for the preservation of the Taiwan Constitutional decree on integrity and autonomy of academic research and freedom of expression on the internet, for the University to resist calls to dismiss Ho from her post, and for respect for freedom of speech and expression and the right to create spaces to educate people about non-normative sexualities.

  1. Programme Note: Realities and Opportunities in Ho Chi Minh City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchet, Chi Nguyen

    1996-01-01

    The current status of street children in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, is characterized by marginalization from society through street vending, begging, theft, and prostitution. Evaluation of a drop-in center serving children without family linkages indicates need for needs assessments, follow-up activities, measurement of individual child progress,…

  2. Conductively Cooled Ho:Tm:LuLiF Laser Amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Petros, M.; Petzar, Paul; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.

    2008-01-01

    A conductively-cooled Ho:Tm:LuLiF laser head can amplify 80mJ/340ns probe pulses into 400mJ when the pump pulse energy is close to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) threshold, 5.6J. For a small signal, the double-pass amplification exceeds 25.

  3. Paragonimiasis in Sin Ho District, Lai Chau Province, Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Vien, C V; Phue, N C; Ha, L D; Tuan, L M; Van, N T; Pao, T C; Hoa, L T; Phoung, C T

    1997-01-01

    Forty-four cases of pulmonary paragonimiasis, two also with evidence of cerebral infection, were found in Sin Ho District in Northern Viet Nam. There were 30 males and 14 females, 2-30 years of age. The diagnosis was made by sputum examination. Pet dogs and wild dogs in the area were also found infected and the people often eat roasted crabs.

  4. 75 FR 52534 - Su Van Ho: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Su Van Ho: Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug... Dade'' fish and 461 cartons of Pineapple Brand Betel Nut as ``Frozen Palmnut.'' On or about...

  5. Treatment of bladder cancer with Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hong-Min; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo; Zhang, Mei-Jue; Xu, Jian; Dai, Shen-guo; Wu, Jia-Jun; Jiang, Yu

    1998-11-01

    Among tumors of urinary system, the morbidity of bladder cancer is the first one. It is multiple, also has high risk of regeneration. The paper reports that 679 bladder tumors in 108 patients had treated for 284 times by pulsed HO:YAG laser from July 1994-June 1997.

  6. Production and characterization of 166Ho polylactic acid microspheres.

    PubMed

    Yavari, Kamal; Yeganeh, Ehsan; Abolghasemi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Microsphere and particle technology with selective transport of radiation represents a new generation of therapeutics. Poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) microspheres loaded with holmium-166 acetylacetonate ((166)Ho-PLLA-MS) are novel microdevices. In this research, (165)HoAcAc-PLLA microparticles were prepared by the solvent evaporation technique. Microspheres were irradiated at Tehran Research Reactor. The diameter and surface morphologies were characterized by particle sizer and scanning electron microscopy before and after irradiation. The complex stability, radiochemical purity, and in vivo biodistribiotion were checked in the final solution up to 3 days. In this study, (166)Ho-PLLA spherical particles with a smooth surface and diameter of 20-40 µm were obtained, which were stable in vitro and in vivo studies. Neutron irradiation did not damage the particles. The ease with which the PLLA spheres could be made in the optimal size range for later irradiation and their ability to retain the (166)Ho provided good evidence for their potential use in radioembolization.

  7. Low temperature magnetic transitions of single crystal HoBi

    SciTech Connect

    Fente, A.; Suderow, H.; Vieira, S.; Nemes, N. M.; Garcia-Hernandez, M.; Budko, Sergei L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2013-09-04

    We present resistivity, specific heat and magnetization measurements in high quality single crystals of HoBi, with a residual resistivity ratio of 126. We find, from the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization, an antiferromagnetic transition at 5.7 K, which evolves, under magnetic fields, into a series of up to five metamagnetic phases.

  8. Single-frequency lasing of monolithic Ho,Tm:YLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Deyst, John P.; Storm, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    Single-frequency lasing in monolithic crystals of holmium-thulium-doped YLF (Ho,Tm:YLF) is reported. A maximum single-frequency output power of 6 mW at a wavelength of 2.05 microns is demonstrated. Frequency tuning is also described.

  9. Performance of Ho:YAG as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Gettemy, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of two multiply doped Ho:YAG lasers has been characterized as a function of the laser rod temperature. From the experimental results, the dependence of the slope efficiency and threshold on temperature has been extracted. Threshold can be correlated with the occupation of the lower laser level. Implications on the optimum operating temperature are discussed.

  10. Temperature Dependence of the O + HO2 Rate Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis technique has been employed to investigate the kinetics of the radical-radical reaction O((sup 3)P) + HO2 OH + O2 over the temperature range 266-391 K in 80 Torr of N2 diluent gas. O((sup 3)P) was produced by 248.5-nm KrF laser photolysis of O3 followed by rapid quenching of O(1D) to O((sup 3)P) while HO2 was produced by simultaneous photolysis of H2O2 to create OH radicals which, in turn, reacted with H2O2 to yield HO2. The O((sup 3)P) temporal profile was monitored by using time-resolved resonance fluorescence spectroscopy. The HO2 concentration was calculated based on experimentally measured parameters. The following Arrhenius expression describes our experimental results: k(sub 1)(T) equals (2.91 +/- 0.70) x 10(exp -11) exp[(228 +/- 75)/T] where the errors are 2 sigma and represent precision only. The absolute uncertainty in k, at any temperature within the range 266-391 K is estimated to be +/- 22 percent. Our results are in excellent agreement with a discharge flow study of the temperature dependence of k(sub 1) in 1 Torr of He diluent reported by Keyser, and significantly reduce the uncertainty in the rate of this important stratospheric reaction at subambient temperatures.

  11. Living with ghosts in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanov, S.; Arroja, F.; Celoria, M.; Matarrese, S.; Pilo, L.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the branch of the projectable Hořava-Lifshitz model which exhibits ghost instabilities in the low energy limit. It turns out that, due to the Lorentz violating structure of the model and to the presence of a finite strong coupling scale, the vacuum decay rate into photons is tiny in a wide range of phenomenologically acceptable parameters. The strong coupling scale, understood as a cutoff on ghosts' spatial momenta, can be raised up to Λ ˜ 10 TeV. At lower momenta, the projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity is equivalent to General Relativity supplemented by a fluid with a small positive sound speed squared (10-42 ≲) c s 2 ≲ 10-20, that could be a promising candidate for the Dark Matter. Despite these advantages, the unavoidable presence of the strong coupling obscures the implementation of the original Hořava's proposal on quantum gravity. Apart from the Hořava-Lifshitz model, conclusions of the present work hold also for the mimetic matter scenario, where the analogue of the projectability condition is achieved by a non-invertible conformal transformation of the metric.

  12. 40 CFR Table Mm-1 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... case of products blended with some portion of biomass-based fuel, the carbon share in Table MM-1 of... biomass should not be reported, but products that were derived from both biomass and a petroleum...

  13. An Efficient Single Frequency Ho:YLF Laser for IPDA Lidar Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, J.; Bai, Y.; Wong, T.; Reithmeier, K.; Petros, M.

    2016-01-01

    A highly efficient, versatile, single frequency 2-micron pulsed laser can be used in a pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) / Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) instrument to make precise, high-resolution measurements to investigate sources and sinks of CO2. For a direct detection IPDA lidar, the desired 2 ?m Ho:YLF laser should generate 30-40 mJ pulses at the repetition rate of 100 to 200 Hz, with short pulse length (<100 ns) and better than 2% wall plug efficiency. A Tm fiber laser in-band pumped Ho:YLF laser has been developed to meet this technical challenge. This Ho:YLF laser is designed in a four mirror ring resonator with bow tie configuration, which helps to obtain high beam quality. It is end-pumped by a 40 W linearly polarized Tm fiber laser at 1.94µm. The resonator length is 1.10 meters with output coupler reflectivity at 45%. The laser crystal size is 3 x 3 x 60 mm (w, h, l) with a doping concentration of 0.5% Holmium. The laser beam and pump beam are mode-matched in the active medium. Thus, the pump and laser beams have the same confocal parameters. Mode-matching is also helpful for operating the laser in a single transverse mode. The laser beam waist is slightly less than 0.5 mm at the center of the laser crystal. Based on quasi-four level modeling, pump absorption and saturation depend on laser intensity. Laser amplification and saturation also depend on the pump intensity in the crystal. The laser is injection seeded to obtain the single frequency required by an IPDA lidar measurement. The seed beam is entered into the resonator through an output coupler. The laser is mounted on a water cooled optical bench for stable and reliable operation. The size of the optical bench is 22.16 x 9.20 x 1.25 inches. It is stiffened so that the laser can be operated in any orientation of the optical bench. This packaged Ho:YLF laser is designed for either mobile trailer or airborne platform operation. The engineering prototype Ho:YLF laser has

  14. Nuclear spectroscopy above isomers in {sub 67}{sup 148}Ho{sub 81} and {sub 67}{sup 149}Ho{sub 82} nuclei: Search for core-excited states in {sup 149}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Kownacki, J.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Zielinska, M.; Kordyasz, A.; Srebrny, J.; Droste, Ch.; Morek, T.; Grodner, E.; Ruchowska, E.; Korman, A.; Czarnacki, W.; Kisielinski, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; Hadynska-KlePk, K.; Mierzejewski, J.; Lieder, R. M.; Perkowski, J.; Andrzejewski, J.; Krol, A.

    2010-04-15

    The excited states of {sup 148}Ho and {sup 149}Ho isotopes are studied using gamma-ray and electron spectroscopy in off-beam and in-beam modes following {sup 112,114}Sn({sup 40}Ar,xnyp) reactions. Experiments include measurements of single gamma-rays and conversion electron spectra as well as gamma-gamma, electron-gamma, gamma-t, and gamma-gamma-t coincidences with the use of the OSIRIS-II 12-HPGe array and conversion electron spectrometer. Based on the present results, the level schemes of {sup 148}Ho and {sup 149}Ho are revised and significantly extended, up to about 4 and 5 MeV of excitation energy, respectively. Spin and parity of 5{sup -} are assigned to the 9.59-s isomer in {sup 148}Ho based on conversion electron results. Previously unobserved gamma rays feeding the 10{sup +} isomer in {sup 148}Ho and the 27/2{sup -} isomer in {sup 149}Ho nuclei are proposed. Shell-model calculations are performed. Possible core-excited states in {sup 149}Ho are discussed.

  15. The Ca(2+)/Calmodulin/CaMKK2 Axis: Nature's Metabolic CaMshaft.

    PubMed

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an essential ligand that binds its primary intracellular receptor calmodulin (CaM) to trigger a variety of downstream processes and pathways. Central to the actions of Ca(2+)/CaM is the activation of a highly conserved Ca(2+)/CaM kinase (CaMK) cascade that amplifies Ca(2+) signals through a series of subsequent phosphorylation events. Proper regulation of Ca(2+) flux is necessary for whole-body metabolism and disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis has been linked to various metabolic diseases. Here we provide a synthesis of recent advances that highlight the roles of the Ca(2+)/CaMK axis in key metabolic tissues. An appreciation of this information is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent signaling contributes to metabolic homeostasis and disease.

  16. Evidence for light-induced release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores in bee photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, A; Walz, B

    1990-03-26

    In the drone retina light elicits an increase in the extracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca]o). After withdrawal of extracellular Ca2+ and addition of 1 mM EGTA (ethyleneglycol-bis (beta-aminoethyl ether) N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid) a short light flash still caused an increase in [Ca]o as measured with Ca2(+)-sensitive microelectrodes. This increase vanished after a few flashes. When [Ca]o was reduced to 10(-5) M Ca2+ (no EGTA) the rise in Cao disappeared after several light flashes. Subsequent stimulation with a dim steady light produced a decrease in [Ca]o and caused a recovery of the increase in [Ca]o elicited by a test flash. The results show that bee photoreceptors have a light-depletable intracellular Ca2+ store which can be reloaded by dim continuous lights.

  17. CMOS mm-wave transceivers for Gbps wireless communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baoyong, Chi; Zheng, Song; Lixue, Kuang; Haikun, Jia; Xiangyu, Meng; Zhihua, Wang

    2016-07-01

    The challenges in the design of CMOS millimeter-wave (mm-wave) transceiver for Gbps wireless communication are discussed. To support the Gbps data rate, the link bandwidth of the receiver/transmitter must be wide enough, which puts a lot of pressure on the mm-wave front-end as well as on the baseband circuit. This paper discusses the effects of the limited link bandwidth on the transceiver system performance and overviews the bandwidth expansion techniques for mm-wave amplifiers and IF programmable gain amplifier. Furthermore, dual-mode power amplifier (PA) and self-healing technique are introduced to improve the PA's average efficiency and to deal with the process, voltage, and temperature variation issue, respectively. Several fully-integrated CMOS mm-wave transceivers are also presented to give a short overview on the state-of-the-art mm-wave transceivers. Project supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61331003).

  18. The same-source parallel MM{sub 5}.

    SciTech Connect

    Michalakes, J.

    1999-08-23

    The set of architectures available to users of the Penn State/NCAR MM5 has been expanded to included distributed-memory parallel computers, providing cost-effective scalable performance and memory capacity for large problem sizes. The same-source approach uses high-level parallel library and source-translation technology for adapting MM5, simplifying maintenance and allowing new physics modules to be incorporated without modification. The approach facilitates maintenance of the DM-parallel option to MM5 as an option within the official version, rather than as a separate stand-alone version. As a result, the DM-parallel option to MM5 (now at Version 3.1) has been a part of six subsequent model releases since MM5 Version 2.8 in March 1998. The same-source approach is applicable to other, similarly constructed codes when there is a need or desire to develop the code for distributed memory parallel machines without impacting the pre-existing source code. The approach is also compatible with pre-existing loop-level multithreading directives so that the code will run in distributed-memory/shared-memory mode on SMP clusters.

  19. Engineering Strong Interactions Between mm-wave and Optical Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Mark; Suleymanzade, Aziza; Estes, Jeremy; Eustice, Scott; Schuster, David; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We propose an atomic interface of Rydberg atoms as a means of engineering effective strong interactions between single mm-wave and optical photons. The atomic sample resides at the intersection of a high-finesse optical cavity and a superconducting mm-wave cavity, where it can coherently interact with photons of both regimes. The use of mm-wave (100 GHz) frequencies allows strong coupling at higher temperatures and with less sensitivity to stray electric fields. A hybrid cryogenic vacuum chamber at 4 Kelvin enables access to superconductivity as well as a UHV environment with optical access necessary for cold atom experiments. Strong interactions between these separate quantum degrees of freedom has important applications in quantum computing as well as simulation of many-body interacting systems.

  20. QM/MM X-ray Refinement of Zinc Metalloenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Hayik, Seth A.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Zinc metalloenzymes play an important role in biology. However, due to the limitation of molecular force field energy restraints used in X-ray refinement at medium or low resolutions, the precise geometry of the zinc coordination environment can be difficult to distinguish from ambiguous electron density maps. Due to the difficulties involved in defining accurate force fields for metal ions, the QM/MM (Quantum-Mechanical /Molecular-Mechanical) method provides an attractive and more general alternative for the study and refinement of metalloprotein active sites. Herein we present three examples that indicate that QM/MM based refinement yields a superior description of the crystal structure based on R and Rfree values and on the inspection of the zinc coordination environment. It is concluded that QM/MM refinement is a useful general tool for the improvement of the metal coordination sphere in metalloenzyme active sites. PMID:20116858

  1. New Methods for Exploring QM:MM Potential Energy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hratchian, Hrant P.

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, the applicability of quantum chemical methods for large system studies has been greatly enhanced by the development of hybrid QM:MM techniques. Despite these advancements, exploring the associated potential energy surfaces continues to present two key challenges. First, the QM energy and derivative evaluations may be too costly for simulations; and second, the system size for many QM:MM cases are too large to effectively store or use second-order information, an approach often used in QM studies to allow for larger integration steps and fewer QM evaluations of the potential energy surface. Our most recent work is focused on overcoming both computational bottlenecks. Using surface fitting models together with direct Hessian-vector and diagonalization algorithms, we are developing models that can accurately and efficiently explore QM:MM potential energy landscapes for very large systems. Our current development status and results from initial applications will be described.

  2. 450mm wafer patterning with jet and flash imprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ecron; Hellebrekers, Paul; Hofemann, Paul; LaBrake, Dwayne L.; Resnick, Douglas J.; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2013-09-01

    The next step in the evolution of wafer size is 450mm. Any transition in sizing is an enormous task that must account for fabrication space, environmental health and safety concerns, wafer standards, metrology capability, individual process module development and device integration. For 450mm, an aggressive goal of 2018 has been set, with pilot line operation as early as 2016. To address these goals, consortiums have been formed to establish the infrastructure necessary to the transition, with a focus on the development of both process and metrology tools. Central to any process module development, which includes deposition, etch and chemical mechanical polishing is the lithography tool. In order to address the need for early learning and advance process module development, Molecular Imprints Inc. has provided the industry with the first advanced lithography platform, the Imprio® 450, capable of patterning a full 450mm wafer. The Imprio 450 was accepted by Intel at the end of 2012 and is now being used to support the 450mm wafer process development demands as part of a multi-year wafer services contract to facilitate the semiconductor industry's transition to lower cost 450mm wafer production. The Imprio 450 uses a Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM) process that employs drop dispensing of UV curable resists to assist high resolution patterning for subsequent dry etch pattern transfer. The technology is actively being used to develop solutions for markets including NAND Flash memory, patterned media for hard disk drives and displays. This paper reviews the recent performance of the J-FIL technology (including overlay, throughput and defectivity), mask development improvements provided by Dai Nippon Printing, and the application of the technology to a 450mm lithography platform.

  3. Novel Processing of 81-mm Cu Shaped Charge Liners

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A; Korzekwa, D

    2002-01-16

    A seven-step procedure was developed for producing shaped charge liner blanks by back extrusion at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Starting with a 38.1-mm diameter, 101.6-mm long cylinder at 77K, three forging steps with a flat-top die are required to produce the solid cone while maintaining low temperature. The solid cone is forged in four individual back extrusions at 77K to produce the rough liner blank. This procedure is capable of being run in batch processes to improve the time efficiency.

  4. Full-mesh optical backplane with standard MM fiber ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, M.; Coviello, D.; Boffi, P.; Martinelli, M.; Basile, V.; Fassi, I.; Falcucci, M.; Renghini, C.; Scalmati, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    A new optical backplane solution is proposed for high-capacity ICT apparatus. A modular, scalable and full-mesh bandwidth-upgradable optical interconnection between optoelectronic boards is guaranteed thanks to an optimized layout of standard MM 12-fiber ribbons which divides the overall backplane into several independent optical sub-circuits. The novel automated assembly procedure of fiber ribbons inside sub-circuits with a robotic work-cell is described. System validation of the optical backplane performed with commercially available MM 12-fiber transceivers @10Gb/s proved the feasibility of the proposed solution for future optical interconnections with terabit overall capacity.

  5. Performance evaluation of 4.75-mm NMAS superpave mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Farhana

    A Superpave asphalt mixture with 4.75-mm nominal maximum aggregate size (NMAS) is a promising, low-cost pavement preservation treatment for agencies such as the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT). The objective of this research study is to develop an optimized 4.75-mm NMAS Superpave mixture in Kansas. In addition, the study evaluated the residual tack coat application rate for the 4.75-mm NMAS mix overlay. Two, hot-in-place recycling (HIPR) projects in Kansas, on US-160 and K-25, were overlaid with a 15- to 19-mm thick layer of 4.75-mm NMAS Superpave mixture in 2007. The field tack coat application rate was measured during construction. Cores were collected from each test section for Hamburg wheel tracking device (HWTD) and laboratory bond tests performed after construction and after one year in service. Test results showed no significant effect of the tack coat application rate on the rutting performance of rehabilitated pavements. The number of wheel passes to rutting failure observed during the HWTD test was dependent on the aggregate source as well as on in-place density of the cores. Laboratory pull-off tests showed that most cores were fully bonded at the interface of the 4.75-mm NMAS overlay and the HIPR layer, regardless of the tack application rate. The failure mode during pull-off tests at the HMA interface was highly dependent on the aggregate source and mix design of the existing layer material. This study also confirmed that overlay construction with a high tack coat application rate may result in bond failure at the HMA interface. Twelve different 4.75-mm NMAS mix designs were developed using materials from the aforementioned but two binder grades and three different percentages of natural (river) sand. Laboratory performance tests were conducted to assess mixture performance. Results show that rutting and moisture damage potential in the laboratory depend on aggregate type irrespective of binder grade. Anti-stripping agent affects moisture

  6. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan  W.; Barnhart, Todd  E.; Nickles, Robert  J.; Pollington, Anthony  D.; Kunde, Gerd  J.; Rabin, Michael  W.; Birnbaum, Eva  R.

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MSmore » to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.« less

  7. Origin of 48Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Donald D.; Krishnan, Tracy D.; Meyer, Bradley S.

    1997-02-01

    We stress conceptual understanding of why 48Ca survives low-entropy expansions but not high-entropy expansions. Type Ia supernovae are thereby demonstrated to be its source. The interdependence of the quasiequilibrium cluster (QSE) and the number of heavy nuclei is the key. By varying reaction rates, we show that nuclear cross sections are not a sensitive need for the problem of 48Ca nucleosynthesis.

  8. HO-1 expression increases mesenchymal stem cell-derived osteoblast but decreases adipocyte lineage

    PubMed Central

    Vanella, Luca; Kim, Dong Hyun; Asprinio, David; Peterson, Stephen J.; Barbagallo, Ignazio; Vanella, Angelo; Goldstein, Dove; Ikehara, Susumu; Abraham, Nader G.

    2009-01-01

    Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are pleitrophic cells that differentiate to either adipocytes or osteoblasts as a result of cross-talk by specific signaling pathways including heme oxygenase (HO)-1/-2 expression. We examined the effect of inducers of HO-1 expression and inhibitors of HO activity on MSC differentiation to the osteoblast and adipogenesis lineage. HO-1 expression is increased during osteoblast stem cell development, but remains elevated, at 25 days. The increase in HO-1 levels proceed an increase in alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity and an increase in BMP, osteonectin and RUNX-2 mRNA. Induction of HO-1 by osteogenic growth peptide (OGP) was associated with an increase in BMP-2 and osteonectin. Exposure of MSC to high glucose levels decreased osteocalcin and osteogenic protein expression, which was reversed by upregulation of the OGP-mediated increase in HO-1 expression. The glucose mediated decrease in HO-1 resulted in decreased levels of pAMPK, pAKT and the eNOS signaling pathway and was reversed by OGP. In contrast, MSC-derived adipocytes were increased by glucose. HO-1 siRNA decreased HO-1 expression but increased adipocyte stem cell differentiation and the adipogenesis marker, PPARγ. Thus, upregulation of HO-1 expression shifts the balance of MSC differentiation in favor of the osteoblast lineage. In contrast, a decrease in HO-1 or exposure to glucose drives the MSC towards adipogenesis. Thus targeting HO-1 expression is a portal to increased osteoblast stem cell differentiation and to the attenuation of osteoporosis by the promotion of bone formation. PMID:19853072

  9. Drastic facilitation by alpha-latrotoxin of bovine chromaffin cell exocytosis without measurable enhancement of Ca2+ entry or [Ca2+]i.

    PubMed Central

    Michelena, P; de la Fuente, M T; Vega, T; Lara, B; López, M G; Gandía, L; García, A G

    1997-01-01

    1. Latrotoxin (LTX, 1-3 nM) caused a gradual increase of the spontaneous catecholamine release rate in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells superfused with normal Krebs-Hepes solution containing 2.5 mM Ca2+. Ca2+ removal abolished this effect. LTX enhanced also the secretory responses to high K+ (35 or 70 mM) and to acetylcholine (ACh, 30 microM). 2. The application of Ca2+ pulses to cells previously superfused with a 0 Ca2+ solution (Krebs-Hepes deprived of CaCl2) induced secretory responses that gradually reached 400-800 nA of catecholamines, provided that LTX was present. The responses to ACh or 35 mM K+ pulses (in the presence of Ca2+) were also enhanced by LTX, from around 100-200 nA to over 1000 nA. Though such enhancement remained in the presence of Ca2+ channel blockers, it disappeared upon the lowering of [Na+]o or in electroporated cells. 3. Using protocols similar to those of secretion, LTX did not enhance basal 45Ca2+ uptake, whole-cell Ca2+ currents or basal [Ca2+]i. In fact, LTX attenuated the K(+)- or ACh-evoked increases in 45Ca2+ uptake and [Ca2+]i. 4. It is proposed that the secretory response to brief periods of Ca2+ reintroductions is triggered by local subplasmalemmal Ca2+i transients, produced by the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchanger of the plasma membrane working in the reverse mode. This situation might be physiologically reproduced during ACh stimulation of chromaffin cells, which is followed by the firing of Na(+)-dependent action potentials. Images Figure 12 PMID:9279802

  10. The plasma-membrane Ca2+-ATPase of Leishmania donovani is an extrusion pump for Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, D; Mukherjee, T; Sarkar, S; Majumdar, S; Bhaduri, A

    1997-01-01

    Controlled exposure of Leishmania donovani promastigotes to hypotonic shock results in the formation of deflagellated unsealed ghosts of original polarity that largely retain the pellicular microtubular structure associated with plasma membrane of the parasite. Gentle shearing followed by suspension of the purified membrane in appropriate isotonic buffer containing Mg2+ (4mM) results in the formation of sealed everted vesicles. The presence of Mg2+ (4 mM) appears to be essential for efficient sealing and also to prevent leakiness. ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation can be demonstrated in these vesicles Km values for Ca2+ and ATP were 125 nM and 0.8 mM respectively. The accumulated Ca2+ reaches a concentration of 1.1 mM. Ca2+ uptake is completely inhibited by vanadate (40 microM) and several thiol-modifying agents. Using 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) as the modifying agent, an excellent correlation between loss of enzyme activity and transport capability and their parallel regeneration in the presence of 2 mM dithiothreitol was demonstrated. Using 2'.7-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein as the fluorescent pH probe, it was observed that Ca2+ entry into the vesicles is accompanied by an outward movement of H+ from the vesicles. Taken together, this paper establishes that the high-affinity transmembrane Ca2+-ATPase [Ghosh, Ray, Sarkar and Bhaduri (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 11345-11351; Majumdar, Mukherjee, Ray and Bhaduri (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 18440-18446] is an extrusion pump for Ca2+ in this human pathogen. PMID:9078270

  11. Rapid Recycling of Ca2+ between IP3-Sensitive Stores and Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    López Sanjurjo, Cristina I.; Tovey, Stephen C.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2014-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) evokes release of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but the resulting Ca2+ signals are shaped by interactions with additional intracellular organelles. Bafilomycin A1, which prevents lysosomal Ca2+ uptake by inhibiting H+ pumping into lysosomes, increased the amplitude of the initial Ca2+ signals evoked by carbachol in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Carbachol alone and carbachol in combination with parathyroid hormone (PTH) evoke Ca2+ release from distinct IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores in HEK cells stably expressing human type 1 PTH receptors. Bafilomycin A1 similarly exaggerated the Ca2+ signals evoked by carbachol or carbachol with PTH, indicating that Ca2+ released from distinct IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores is sequestered by lysosomes. The Ca2+ signals resulting from store-operated Ca2+ entry, whether evoked by thapsigargin or carbachol, were unaffected by bafilomycin A1. Using Gd3+ (1 mM) to inhibit both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ extrusion, HEK cells were repetitively stimulated with carbachol to assess the effectiveness of Ca2+ recycling to the ER after IP3-evoked Ca2+ release. Blocking lysosomal Ca2+ uptake with bafilomycin A1 increased the amplitude of each carbachol-evoked Ca2+ signal without affecting the rate of Ca2+ recycling to the ER. This suggests that Ca2+ accumulated by lysosomes is rapidly returned to the ER. We conclude that lysosomes rapidly, reversibly and selectively accumulate the Ca2+ released by IP3 receptors residing within distinct Ca2+ stores, but not the Ca2+ entering cells via receptor-regulated, store-operated Ca2+ entry pathways. PMID:25337829

  12. A comparative study on diode-pumped continuous wave Tm:Ho:YVO4 and Tm:Ho:GdVO4 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. Q.; Chen, F.; Wu, C. T.; Wang, Q.; Li, G.; Zhang, C. H.; Wang, Y. Z.; Ju, Y. L.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we presented experimental results concerning on the laser characteristics of two microchip lasers emitting in the 2 μm range, Tm:Ho:YVO4 microchip laser and Tm:Ho:GdVO4 microchip laser. At a heat sink temperature of 283 K, the maximum output power of Tm:Ho:YVO4 laser and Tm:Ho:GdVO4 laser is 47 and 34 mW under absorbed pump power of 912 mW, respectively. High efficiency can be achieved for both lasers at room temperature. Nevertheless, compared with Tm:Ho:GdVO4 laser, Tm:Ho:YVO4 laser can operate on single frequency with high power easily. At the heat sink temperature of 288 K, as much as 16.5 mW of 2052.3 nm single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) laser was achieved for Tm:Ho:YVO4 laser. Under the same condition, only 8 mW of 2048.5 nm SLM laser was achieved for Tm:Ho:GdVO4 laser.

  13. Bell & Howell Introduces an 8mm Cartridge Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educ Screen Audiovisual Guide, 1970

    1970-01-01

    "Bell & Howell has developed a highly versatile cartidge projector system for cine and super 8mm formats. Because Bell & Howell believes that standardization is an important factor in the development of a cartridge system, it has built in a flexibility which will allow this standardization. (Author)

  14. 8mm Film in Education: Status and Prospects--1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forsdale, Louis

    An overwhelming deterrent to the use of film in the classroom has been the inaccessibility of the films and the complicated projectors required to show them. Eight-millimeter film has the potential to lower the cost of films, making them more accessible, and to make showing them vastly simpler. This paper traces the development of 8mm film use in…

  15. Public Library Subject Headings for 16MM Motion Pictures, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Library Association, Sacramento.

    A subject heading list for 16 millimeter motion pictures is proposed here that is designed to provide audiovisual librarians with a tool which will aid them in making subject indexes for their printed film catalogs and to establish an authority for professional catalogers who may be called upon to catalog 16 mm. motion pictures. In preparing the…

  16. IMPLEMENTATION OF AN URBAN CANOPY PARAMETERIZATION IN MM5

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) (Grell et al. 1994) has been modified to include an urban canopy parameterization (UCP) for fine-scale urban simulations (~1-km horizontal grid spacing). The UCP accounts for drag ...

  17. Advisory List of Instructional Media--16MM Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Educational Media.

    These two advisory lists include information on 16mm films appropriate for the K-12 instructional program. In both bibliographies films are listed in the following categories: communication skills; guidance; health, physical education, safety, and sports; science; and social studies. The list for the 1982-1983 school year also includes categories…

  18. Guide to Films (16 mm) About Negroes. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1970

    Over 740 films (16 mm.) concerning the lives, culture, history, and problems of Black people in the United States and in Africa are listed alphabetically by title in this guide. Each entry includes the running time, a synopsis of the film's content, and a source code and tells whether the film is in black-and-white or in color. The guide includes…

  19. RF and mm-Wave Photonics at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, G.A.; Sullivan, C.

    1999-07-08

    RF and mm-wave photonic devices and circuits have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories for applications ranging from RF optical data links to optical generation of mm-wave frequencies. This talk will explore recent high-speed photonics technology developments at Sandia including: (1) A monolithic optical integrated circuit for all-optical generation of mm-waves. Using integrated mode-locked diode lasers, amplifiers, and detectors, frequencies between 30 GHz and 90 GHz are generated by a single monolithic (Al,Ga)As optical circuit less than 2mm in its largest dimension. (2) Development of polarization-maintaining, low-insertion-loss, low v-pi, Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) modulators with DC-to-potentially-K-band modulation bandwidth. New low-loss polarization-maintaining waveguide designs using binary alloys have been shown to reduce polarization crosstalk in undoped (Al,Ga)As waveguides, yielding high extinction ratio (>40dB) and low on-chip loss (<6dB) in Mach-Zehnder interferometers. RF drive voltage is reduced through use of 45rnrn-active length devices with modulator sensitivity, v-pi, less than 3V.

  20. Guide to Films (16 mm) About Ecology, Adaptation and Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    Synopses of 350 films (16 mm.) on ecology, adaptation of plants and animals to their environment, and environmental pollution are listed alphabetically by title in this guide. It specifies whether the film is black-and-white or color, its running time, and its source. An abbreviated subject index and a directory of sources are also provided. The…

  1. Use of MM-Paths in constructive software development

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    Systems such as nuclear reactors, weapons systems, and real-time switching systems present a variety of problems for conventional software development. In addition to the sheer magnitude of these systems, high reliability requirements and deep complexities best characterized by Petri nets demand improvements in specification, design, and testing. Specification of such systems is considered: traditional functional decomposition is shown to be inadequate, as is the approach based on Finite State Machines. A rigorous form of process descriptions is developed here; these are demonstrated to have the same expressive power as Petri nets. Use of these process descriptions as a specification technique leads naturally to a truly intermediate level concept, the MM-path, which is the basis of the development methodology proposed here. This methodology is highly constructive in the sense that information needed in later phases is used to populate a database structured by the process description and MM-Path concepts. Sample queries are given to illustrate the use of the database in the software testing phases. Test coverage metrics are developed for the unit, integration, and system levels of software testing. Existing unit test coverage metrics are shown to be upper bounds to the unit test coverage metrics defined here. A lattice of four integration test coverage metrics is defined in terms of MM-Paths, and MM-Paths are used to extend the concepts of path analysis to system level testing.

  2. Metabolic Oscillations in Pancreatic Islets Depend on the Intracellular Ca2+ Level but Not Ca2+ Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Merrins, Matthew J.; Fendler, Bernard; Zhang, Min; Sherman, Arthur; Bertram, Richard; Satin, Leslie S.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Plasma insulin is pulsatile and reflects oscillatory insulin secretion from pancreatic islets. Although both islet Ca2+ and metabolism oscillate, there is disagreement over their interrelationship, and whether they can be dissociated. In some models of islet oscillations, Ca2+ must oscillate for metabolic oscillations to occur, whereas in others metabolic oscillations can occur without Ca2+ oscillations. We used NAD(P)H fluorescence to assay oscillatory metabolism in mouse islets stimulated by 11.1 mM glucose. After abolishing Ca2+ oscillations with 200 μM diazoxide, we observed that oscillations in NAD(P)H persisted in 34% of islets (n = 101). In the remainder of the islets (66%) both Ca2+ and NAD(P)H oscillations were eliminated by diazoxide. However, in most of these islets NAD(P)H oscillations could be restored and amplified by raising extracellular KCl, which elevated the intracellular Ca2+ level but did not restore Ca2+ oscillations. Comparatively, we examined islets from ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel-deficient SUR1−/− mice. Again NAD(P)H oscillations were evident even though Ca2+ and membrane potential oscillations were abolished. These observations are predicted by the dual oscillator model, in which intrinsic metabolic oscillations and Ca2+ feedback both contribute to the oscillatory islet behavior, but argue against other models that depend on Ca2+ oscillations for metabolic oscillations to occur. PMID:20655835

  3. EF-hand protein Ca2+ buffers regulate Ca2+ influx and exocytosis in sensory hair cells.

    PubMed

    Pangršič, Tina; Gabrielaitis, Mantas; Michanski, Susann; Schwaller, Beat; Wolf, Fred; Strenzke, Nicola; Moser, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding proteins are thought to shape the spatiotemporal properties of cellular Ca(2+) signaling and are prominently expressed in sensory hair cells in the ear. Here, we combined genetic disruption of parvalbumin-α, calbindin-D28k, and calretinin in mice with patch-clamp recording, in vivo physiology, and mathematical modeling to study their role in Ca(2+) signaling, exocytosis, and sound encoding at the synapses of inner hair cells (IHCs). IHCs lacking all three proteins showed excessive exocytosis during prolonged depolarizations, despite enhanced Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of their Ca(2+) current. Exocytosis of readily releasable vesicles remained unchanged, in accordance with the estimated tight spatial coupling of Ca(2+) channels and release sites (effective "coupling distance" of 17 nm). Substitution experiments with synthetic Ca(2+) chelators indicated the presence of endogenous Ca(2+) buffers equivalent to 1 mM synthetic Ca(2+)-binding sites, approximately half of them with kinetics as fast as 1,2-Bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). Synaptic sound encoding was largely unaltered, suggesting that excess exocytosis occurs extrasynaptically. We conclude that EF-hand Ca(2+) buffers regulate presynaptic IHC function for metabolically efficient sound coding. PMID:25691754

  4. Mineralogic Model (MM3.0) Analysis Model Report

    SciTech Connect

    C. Lum

    2002-02-12

    The purpose of this report is to document the Mineralogic Model (MM), Version 3.0 (MM3.0) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.0 and previous versions. A three-dimensional (3-D) Mineralogic Model was developed for Yucca Mountain to support the analyses of hydrologic properties, radionuclide transport, mineral health hazards, repository performance, and repository design. Version 3.0 of the MM was developed from mineralogic data obtained from borehole samples. It consists of matrix mineral abundances as a function of x (easting), y (northing), and z (elevation), referenced to the stratigraphic framework defined in Version 3.1 of the Geologic Framework Model (GFM). The MM was developed specifically for incorporation into the 3-D Integrated Site Model (ISM). The MM enables project personnel to obtain calculated mineral abundances at any position, within any region, or within any stratigraphic unit in the model area. The significance of the MM for key aspects of site characterization and performance assessment is explained in the following subsections. This work was conducted in accordance with the Development Plan for the MM (CRWMS M&O 2000). The planning document for this Rev. 00, ICN 02 of this AMR is Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The purpose of this ICN is to record changes in the classification of input status by the resolution of the use of TBV software and data in this report. Constraints and limitations of the MM are discussed in the appropriate sections that follow. The MM is one component of the ISM, which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1

  5. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2-sensitive Na+/Ca2+ exchanger activity in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jing; Almilaji, Ahmad; Schmid, Evi; Elvira, Bernat; Shimshek, Derya R; van der Putten, Herman; Wagner, Carsten A; Shumilina, Ekaterina; Lang, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Gene variants of the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are associated with susceptibility to Parkinson's disease (PD). Besides brain and periphery, LRRK2 is expressed in various immune cells including dendritic cells (DCs), antigen-presenting cells linking innate and adaptive immunity. However, the function of LRRK2 in the immune system is still incompletely understood. Here, Ca(2+)-signaling was analyzed in DCs isolated from gene-targeted mice lacking lrrk2 (Lrrk2(-/-)) and their wild-type littermates (Lrrk2(+/+)). According to Western blotting, Lrrk2 was expressed in Lrrk2(+/+) DCs but not in Lrrk2(-/-)DCs. Cytosolic Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i) were determined utilizing Fura-2 fluorescence and whole cell currents to decipher electrogenic transport. The increase of [Ca(2+)]i following inhibition of sarcoendoplasmatic Ca(2+)-ATPase with thapsigargin (1 µM) in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)-release) and the increase of [Ca(2+)]i following subsequent readdition of extracellular Ca(2+) (SOCE) were both significantly larger in Lrrk2(-/-) than in Lrrk2(+/+) DCs. The augmented increase of [Ca(2+)]i could have been due to impaired Ca(2+) extrusion by K(+)-independent (NCX) and/or K(+)-dependent (NCKX) Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchanger activity, which was thus determined from the increase of [Ca(2+)]i, (Δ[Ca(2+)]i), and current following abrupt replacement of Na(+) containing (130 mM) and Ca(2+) free (0 mM) extracellular perfusate by Na(+) free (0 mM) and Ca(2+) containing (2 mM) extracellular perfusate. As a result, both slope and peak of Δ[Ca(2+)]i as well as Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-induced current were significantly lower in Lrrk2(-/-) than in Lrrk2(+/+) DCs. A 6 or 24 hour treatment with the LRRK2 inhibitor GSK2578215A (1 µM) significantly decreased NCX1 and NCKX1 transcript levels, significantly blunted Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchanger activity, and significantly augmented the increase of [Ca(2+)]i following Ca(2+)-release and SOCE. In conclusion, the present observations

  6. Conjugate heat transfer analysis of 300-mm bake station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanan, Natarajan; Liang, Frank F.; Sims, James B.

    1999-06-01

    An exhaustive heat-transfer analysis of 200-mm and 300-mm bake equipment has been conducted to infer the temperature uniformity on the wafer from the time it is set on the plate until the end of the bake process. The objective of the analysis was to gain insight into the heat transport to the wafer and improve the thermal uniformity of the wafer. During the soft, hard and post-exposure bake processes, the temperatures to which the wafer is heated can range from 50 degrees to 250 degrees C. The influence of the variables that contribute to the temperature nonuniformity, namely the height of the proximity pins, wafer warp and bow, heater thickness, insulation of the bake plate, and lid material, have been analyzed. The analysis has been carried out using computational fluid dynamics packages, FLUENT/UNS and FIDAP. The accuracy of the numerical simulations has been verified through analytical solution is presented which provides a closed-form expression for the temperature of the wafer in terms of Biot number, a dimensionless parameter. The temperature rise of the wafer based on this simple expression compares very favorably with the detailed axisymmetric numerical solution that was carried out using variable material properties and the complex boundary conditions for the geometry of a 200-mm bake plate. The radial temperature variation on the wafer after 100 seconds on the bake plate also matches very well with the measurements. Based on the success of the modeling results with the 200-mm bake plates, a 300-mm bake plate analysis was conducted to determine if the temperature uniformity would be within specifications. The analysis revealed some key factors that caused temperature nonuniformity and the design was then altered to improve the temperature uniformity. Subsequent measurements confirmed the improvement of the temperature uniformity.

  7. Studies of Ca{sup 2+} binding in spinach photosytem II using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect

    Aedelroth, P.; Lindberg, K.; Andreasson, L.E.

    1995-07-18

    The Ca{sup 2+}-binding properties of photosystem II were investigated with radioactive {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}. PS II membranes, isolated from spinach grown on a medium containing {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+}, contained 1.5 Ca{sup 2+} per PS II unit. Approximately half of the incorporated radioactivity was lost after incubation for 30 h in nonradioactive buffer. About 1 Ca{sup 2+}/PS II bound slowly to Ca{sup 2+}-depleted membranes in the presence of the extrinsic 16- and 23-kDa polypeptides in parallel with restoration of oxygen-evolving activity. The binding was heterogeneous with dissociation constants of 60 {mu}M (0.7 Ca{sup 2+}/PS II) and 1.7 mM (0.3 Ca{sup 2+}/ PS II), respectively, which could reflect different affinities of the dark-stable S-states for Ca{sup 2+}. The reactivation of oxygen-evolving activity closely followed the binding of Ca{sup 2+}, showing that a single exchangeable Ca{sup 2+} per PS II is sufficient for the water-splitting reaction to function. In PS II, depleted of the 16- and 23-kDa polypeptides, about 0.7 exchangeable Ca{sup 2+}/PS II binds with a dissociation constant of 26 {mu}M, while 0.3 Ca{sup 2+} binds with a much weaker affinity (K{sub d} > 0.5 mM). The rate of binding of Ca{sup 2+} in the absence of the two extrinsic polypeptides was significantly higher than with the polypeptides bound. The rate of dissociation of bound Ca{sup 2+} in the dark, which had a half-time of about 80 h in intact PS H, increased in the absence of the 16-and 23-kDa polypeptides and showed a further increase after the additional removal of the 33-kDa protein and manganese. The rate of dissociation was also significantly faster in weak light than in the dark. Removal of the 33-kDa donor-side polypeptide together with the two lighter ones led to a reduction in the amount of bound Ca{sup 2+}, while practically no Ca{sup 2+} bound after treatments to dissociate also the manganese of the water-oxidizing site. 34 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. MM 55266 and MM 55268, glycopeptide antibiotics produced by a new strain of Amycolatopsis. Isolation, purification and structure determination.

    PubMed

    Box, S J; Coates, N J; Davis, C J; Gilpin, M L; Houge-Frydrych, C S; Milner, P H

    1991-08-01

    Two novel glycopeptide antibiotics MM 55266 and MM 55268 containing fatty acid acyl functions, and of molecular formula C86H89N8O35Cl5 and C87H91N8O35Cl5, respectively, have been isolated and identified from a complex produced by Amycolatopsis sp. NCIB 40089. Fermentation conditions for their production, and methods for their isolation are described. Structures have been deduced by use of COSY and NOE NMR techniques and supported by chemical degradation studies. Both glycopeptides possessed good antibacterial activity against Gram-positive organisms. PMID:1917694

  9. Ca Isotope Fractionation in the Hawaiian Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegand, B. A.; Chadwick, O. A.; Vitousek, P. M.; Wooden, J. L.

    2003-12-01

    Investigations of the nutrient budgets in Hawaiian soils show the sources of major cations to be weathering of volcanic rock, marine aerosols, and Asian dust inputs. Especially at deeply weathered sites older than 150 ka, soils show strong depletion of the macronutrient calcium. Most of the calcium supply in these soils is of atmospheric origin (marine aerosols and continental dust). In contrast, younger soils are mainly supplied by calcium from weathering of volcanic bedrock. Based on the results of previous studies using strontium isotopic signatures and Sr/Ca ratios (e.g. Kennedy et al. 1998, Chadwick et al. 1999, Whipkey et al. 2000, Stewart et al. 2001) we have conducted research focusing on the isotope composition of calcium as a new tool for the investigation of sources of calcium and biogeochemical processes effecting Ca isotope fractionation in the plant-soil system. The study combines δ 44Ca with 87Sr/86Sr and Sr/Ca data of soils (bulk compositions and extractable Ca and Sr from soil exchange sites) and different plant species including native Ohia trees (Metrosideros polymorpha) from a soil chronosequence along the Hawaiian Island chain. The study sites differ in age of the underlying substrate from 0.3 ka to 4,100 ka, but show similar recent climate (mean annual temperature of 16 ° C) and amount of precipitation (about 2,500 mm/y). 44Ca/40Ca ratios were measured on a MAT262 at Stanford University, using a 42Ca-48Ca double spike, and are reported as δ 44Ca values relative to seawater (δ 44Ca = 0 ‰ ). Results of the extractable, plant available calcium from six soil sites show δ 44Ca values in the range of +1.2 ‰ to -1.3 ‰ with generally more negative values related to younger soil sites where calcium is mainly derived from weathering of volcanic rocks. Bulk soil samples, however, show δ 44Ca values between -0.1 ‰ and -2.5 ‰ , indicating differences in composition as a result of contributions from volcanic minerals, continental dust, and

  10. Functional Coupling of Ca2+ Channels and Ryanodine Receptors in Cardiac Myocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sham, James S. K.; Cleemann, Lars; Morad, Martin

    1995-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dihydropyridine receptors are functionally coupled to ryanodine receptors of the sarcoplasmic reticulum in triadic or diadic junctional complexes. In cardiac muscle direct physical or functional couplings have not been demonstrated. We have tested the hypothesis of functional coupling of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in rat cardiac myocytes by comparing the efficacies of Ca2+ in triggering Ca2+ release when the ion enters the cell via the Ca2+ channels or the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger. Ca2+ transported through the Ca2+ channels was 20-160 times more effective than Ca2+ influx via the Na^+/Ca2+ exchanger in gating Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, suggesting privileged communication between Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors. In support of this hypothesis we found that Ca2+ channels were inactivated by Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, even though the myoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations were buffered with 10 mM EGTA. The data thus suggest privileged cross signaling between the dihydropyridine and ryanodine receptors such that Ca2+ flux through either the Ca2+ channel or the ryanodine receptor alters the gating kinetics of the other channel.

  11. Voltage-Induced Ca2+ Release in Postganglionic Sympathetic Neurons in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong-Li; Tsai, Wen-Chin; Li, Bai-Yan; Tao, Wen; Chen, Peng-Sheng; Rubart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that depolarization in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ can trigger Ca2+ release from internal stores in a variety of neuron subtypes. Here we examine whether postganglionic sympathetic neurons are able to mobilize Ca2+ from intracellular stores in response to depolarization, independent of Ca2+ influx. We measured changes in cytosolic ΔF/F0 in individual fluo-4 –loaded sympathetic ganglion neurons in response to maintained K+ depolarization in the presence (2 mM) and absence of extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e). Progressive elevations in extracellular [K+]e caused increasing membrane depolarizations that were of similar magnitude in 0 and 2 mM [Ca2+]e. Peak amplitude of ΔF/F0 transients in 2 mM [Ca2+]e increased in a linear fashion as the membrane become more depolarized. Peak elevations of ΔF/F0 in 0 mM [Ca2+]e were ~5–10% of those evoked at the same membrane potential in 2 mM [Ca2+]e and exhibited an inverse U-shaped dependence on voltage. Both the rise and decay of ΔF/F0 transients in 0 mM [Ca2+]e were slower than those of ΔF/F0 transients evoked in 2 mM [Ca2+]e. Rises in ΔF/F0 evoked by high [K+]e in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ were blocked by thapsigargin, an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase, or the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) receptor antagonists 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and xestospongin C, but not by extracellular Cd2+, the dihydropyridine antagonist nifedipine, or by ryanodine at concentrations that caused depletion of ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ stores. These results support the notion that postganglionic sympathetic neurons possess the ability to release Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive internal stores in response to membrane depolarization, independent of Ca2+ influx. PMID:26859144

  12. 40 CFR Table Mm-1 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... some portion of biomass-based fuel, the carbon share in Table MM-1 of this subpart represents only the petroleum-based components. 2 Products that are derived entirely from biomass should not be reported, but products that were derived from both biomass and a petroleum product (i.e., co-processed) should...

  13. MmTX1 and MmTX2 from coral snake venom potently modulate GABAA receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Jean-Pierre; Schwarz, Jürgen R; Diaz-Bustamante, Marcelo; Céard, Brigitte; Gutiérrez, José M; Kneussel, Matthias; Pongs, Olaf; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E

    2015-02-24

    GABAA receptors shape synaptic transmission by modulating Cl(-) conductance across the cell membrane. Remarkably, animal toxins that specifically target GABAA receptors have not been identified. Here, we report the discovery of micrurotoxin1 (MmTX1) and MmTX2, two toxins present in Costa Rican coral snake venom that tightly bind to GABAA receptors at subnanomolar concentrations. Studies with recombinant and synthetic toxin variants on hippocampal neurons and cells expressing common receptor compositions suggest that MmTX1 and MmTX2 allosterically increase GABAA receptor susceptibility to agonist, thereby potentiating receptor opening as well as desensitization, possibly by interacting with the α(+)/β(-) interface. Moreover, hippocampal neuron excitability measurements reveal toxin-induced transitory network inhibition, followed by an increase in spontaneous activity. In concert, toxin injections into mouse brain result in reduced basal activity between intense seizures. Altogether, we characterized two animal toxins that enhance GABAA receptor sensitivity to agonist, thereby establishing a previously unidentified class of tools to study this receptor family.

  14. MmTX1 and MmTX2 from coral snake venom potently modulate GABAA receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Jean-Pierre; Schwarz, Jürgen R.; Diaz-Bustamante, Marcelo; Céard, Brigitte; Gutiérrez, José M.; Kneussel, Matthias; Pongs, Olaf; Bosmans, Frank; Bougis, Pierre E.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors shape synaptic transmission by modulating Cl− conductance across the cell membrane. Remarkably, animal toxins that specifically target GABAA receptors have not been identified. Here, we report the discovery of micrurotoxin1 (MmTX1) and MmTX2, two toxins present in Costa Rican coral snake venom that tightly bind to GABAA receptors at subnanomolar concentrations. Studies with recombinant and synthetic toxin variants on hippocampal neurons and cells expressing common receptor compositions suggest that MmTX1 and MmTX2 allosterically increase GABAA receptor susceptibility to agonist, thereby potentiating receptor opening as well as desensitization, possibly by interacting with the α+/β− interface. Moreover, hippocampal neuron excitability measurements reveal toxin-induced transitory network inhibition, followed by an increase in spontaneous activity. In concert, toxin injections into mouse brain result in reduced basal activity between intense seizures. Altogether, we characterized two animal toxins that enhance GABAA receptor sensitivity to agonist, thereby establishing a previously unidentified class of tools to study this receptor family. PMID:25675485

  15. Effects of trimebutine on cytosolic Ca2+ and force transitions in intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Kobayashi, T; Tamaki, H

    1991-04-01

    The effects of trimebutine maleate on cytosolic free Ca2+ and force transitions in the guinea-pig taenia cecum were studied by fura-2 fluorometry and tension recording. The addition of 80 mM K+ induced a transient increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and tension, followed by a sustained increase. Trimebutine (10 microM) suppressed both [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development. The tonic responses were more potently inhibited than the phasic responses. Phasic components gradually increased as the added K+ increased (10-40 mM). The relationship between the peak increases in [Ca2+]i and tension was not affected by trimebutine (10 microM). This means that trimebutine does not affect the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile elements. In a high K+ and Ca(2+)-free medium, carbachol (10 microM) or caffeine (30 mM) caused transient [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development in the smooth muscle. Trimebutine (10 microM) decreased the amplitude of both responses. Trimebutine (10 microM) inhibited the spontaneous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and motility of taenia cecum in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.3 microM). These results suggest that trimebutine has two types of inhibitory actions on intestinal smooth muscle; one, the inhibition of Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels, and the other, the inhibition of Ca2+ release from intracellular storage sites. PMID:1868878

  16. The uptake of HO2 radicals to organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Pascale; Krapf, Manuel; Dommen, Josef; George, Ingrid; Whalley, Lisa; Ingham, Trevor; Baeza-Romero, Maria Teresa; Ammann, Markus; Heard, Dwayne

    2014-05-01

    HOx (OH + HO2) radicals are responsible for the majority of the oxidation in the troposphere and control the concentrations of many trace species in the atmosphere. There have been many field studies where the measured HO2 concentrations have been smaller than the concentration predicted by model calculations [1,2]. The difference has often been attributed to HO2 uptake by aerosols. Organics are a major component of aerosols accounting for 10 - 70 % of their mass [3]. However, there have been very few laboratory studies measuring HO2 uptake onto organic aerosols [4]. Uptake coefficients (γ) were measured for a range of aerosols using a Fluorescence Assay By Gas Expansion (FAGE) detector combined with an aerosol flow tube. HO2 was injected into the flow tube using a moveable injector which allowed first order HO2 decays to be measured along the flow tube both with and without aerosols. Laboratory generated aerosols were made using an atomiser or by homogeneous nucleation. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) were made using the Paul Scherrer Institute smog chamber and also by means of a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber. The total aerosol surface area was then measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Experiments were carried out on aerosols containing glutaric acid, glyoxal, malonic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid and squalene. The HO2 uptake coefficients for these species were measured in the range of γ < 0.004 to γ = 0.008 ± 0.004. Humic acid was also studied, however, much larger uptake coefficients (γ = 0.007 - 0.09) were measured, probably due to the fact that these aerosols contained elevated levels of transition metal ions. For humic acid the uptake coefficient was highly dependent on humidity and this may be explained by the liquid water content of the aerosols. Measurements were also performed on copper doped aerosols containing different organics. An uptake coefficient of 0.23 ± 0.07 was measured for copper doped ammonium sulphate

  17. Uninvited guest in mixed derivative Hořava gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coates, Andrew; Colombo, Mattia; Gümrükçüoǧlu, A. Emir; Sotiriou, Thomas P.

    2016-10-01

    We revisit the mixed-derivative extension of Hořava gravity which was designed to address the naturalness problems of the standard theory in the presence of matter couplings. We consider the minimal theory with mixed-derivative terms that contain two spatial and two temporal derivatives. Including all terms compatible with the (modified) scaling rules and the foliation-preserving diffeomorphisms, we calculate the dispersion relations of propagating modes. We find that the theory contains four propagating degrees of freedom, as opposed to three in the standard Hořava gravity. The new degree of freedom is another scalar graviton, and it is unstable at low energies. Our result brings tension to the Lorentz-violation suppression mechanism that relies on separation of scales.

  18. Itinerant and Localized Magnetization Dynamics in Antiferromagnetic Ho.

    PubMed

    Rettig, L; Dornes, C; Thielemann-Kühn, N; Pontius, N; Zabel, H; Schlagel, D L; Lograsso, T A; Chollet, M; Robert, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Glownia, J M; Schüßler-Langeheine, C; Johnson, S L; Staub, U

    2016-06-24

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L_{3} absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p→5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p→4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3-τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f-5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak. PMID:27391747

  19. Itinerant and Localized Magnetization Dynamics in Antiferromagnetic Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kühn, N.; Pontius, N.; Zabel, H.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chollet, M.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Glownia, J. M.; Schüßler-Langeheine, C.; Johnson, S. L.; Staub, U.

    2016-06-01

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E 1 , 2 p →5 d ) or quadrupole (E 2 , 2 p →4 f ) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5 d and localized 4 f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3 -τ ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4 f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flip process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4 f -5 d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.

  20. Chemistry, mineralogy and petrology of seven greater than 1 mm fragments from Mare Crisium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laul, J. C.; Vaniman, D. T.; Papike, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are summarized for a consortium study of the chemistry, mineralogy, and petrology of seven Luna 24 fragments greater than 1 mm in size and having a mass of about 2 mg each. The fragments include four samples of mare ferrobasalt composition, one vitrophyre with the composition of a Mg-rich VLT mare basalt, one agglutinate, and one plagioclase fragment. It is found that: (1) the ferrobasalt is a highly fractionated mare rock very low in alkalis and TiO2, is similar to the less fractionate Apollo 17 VLT basalts, and is quite low in large-ion lithophile trace-element content; (2) the rare-earth-element patterns of the ferrobasalts are typical of VLT basalt, but some ophitic basalts have positive Eu anomalies, while others have negative Eu anomalies typical of mare basalts; and (3) the agglutinate is feldspathic and similar in composition to soil fines in Fe, Cr, Ca, and Al.

  1. CW and AO Q-switched operation of a dual-crystal Tm, Ho:GdVO4 laser pumped by two diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. J.; Yao, B. Q.; Bai, Y. F.; Liu, Y. W.; He, Z. L.; Zhou, S.; Wang, J.; Xing, M. N.

    2013-02-01

    Continuous wave (CW) mode and acousto-optic (AO) Q-switched mode operation of a dual-crystal Tm, Ho:GdVO4 laser is reported. The dual-crystal Tm, Ho:GdVO4 laser with output wavelength of 2.05 μm was pumped by two laser diodes (LDs). The Tm, Ho:GdVO4 crystals were cooled by liquid nitrogen and pumped by two fiber-coupled LDs with a center output wavelength of 801.0 nm. A 20.5 W output power was obtained at a 255 mm physical cavity length in CW mode operation, and a 19.6 W average power was obtained at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 10 kHz with a 19 ns pulse duration. Also, the efficiency loss of the laser is not more than 4.4% from CW mode to Q-switch mode, and the M2 factor, which is measured by the traveling knife-edge method, does not exceed 1.2.

  2. Transcriptional upregulation centra of HO-1 by EGB via the MAPKs/Nrf2 pathway in mouse C2C12 myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Ying; Luo, Meiling; Wu, Qiong; Yu, Lijun; Chu, Haiying

    2015-03-01

    Long-term abuse of alcohol results in chronic alcoholic myopathy which is associated with increased oxidative stress. Ginkgo biloba extract (EGB) is widely used as a therapeutic agent to treat certain cardiovascular and neurological disorders. Although EGB is known to possess antioxidant functions and potent cytoprotective effects, its protective mechanism on alcohol-induced oxidative damage in C2C12 myoblasts remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the cytoprotective mechanisms of EGB against alcohol-derived oxidative stress in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Challenge with alcohol (100mM) caused an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species in mouse C2C12 myoblasts, which was not alleviated by treatment with EGB. These results indicate that EGB does not seem to act as an ROS scavenger in this experimental model. Additionally, EGB produced activation of ERK and JNK [two major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)], an increase in the nuclear level of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a stress-responsive protein with antioxidant function). Pretreatment with inhibitors of MAPKs PD98059 (a specific inhibitor of ERK), SP600125 (a specific inhibitor of JNK) abolished both EGB-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation and HO-1 up-regulation. We conclude that EGB confers cytoprotective effects from oxidative stress induced by alcohol in mouse C2C12 myoblasts depend on transcriptional upregulation of HO-1 by EGB via the MAPKs/Nrf2 pathway.

  3. Mechanism and stability of spectrally pure green up-conversion emission in Yb(3+)/Ho(3+) co-doped Ba5Gd8Zn4O21 phosphors.

    PubMed

    Suo, Hao; Guo, Chongfeng; Wang, Wenbin; Li, Ting; Duan, Changkui; Yin, Min

    2016-02-14

    A series of green-emitting up-conversion (UC) phosphors Ba5Gd8Zn4O21:Yb(3+),Ho(3+) were prepared by a modified sol-gel method, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were measured to characterize the crystal structure. The obtained UC samples emit dazzling green light and their spectra are composed of strong green emission peaking at 544 nm and negligible red emission peaking at 666 nm with the excitation of a 980 nm near-infrared (NIR) laser diode, assigned to (5)F4/(5)S2 → (5)I8 and (5)F5 → (5)I8 transitions of Ho(3+), respectively. The dependence of UC spectra on dopant contents, temperature and pumping power was employed to analyze UC emission color stability. The possible UC mechanisms and processes were proposed based on dependence of the UC emission intensity on pump power, and the lifetimes of green emission ((5)F4/(5)S2 → (5)I8) were also investigated to better comprehend the energy transfer (ET) process. The origin of spectrally pure green-emitting was discussed in detail by analyzing UC and down-conversion (DC) spectra in both the visible and NIR region by comparing that of the UC phosphor CaIn2O4:Yb(3+)/Ho(3+) with highly efficient green emission. Results suggest that Ba5Gd8Zn4O21:Yb(3+),Ho(3+) phosphors with intense green emission and high color purity have potential applications in displays and illuminating technology.

  4. Paragonimiasis in Sin Ho District, Lai Chau Province, Viet Nam.

    PubMed

    Vien, C V; Phue, N C; Ha, L D; Tuan, L M; Van, N T; Pao, T C; Hoa, L T; Phoung, C T

    1997-01-01

    Forty-four cases of pulmonary paragonimiasis, two also with evidence of cerebral infection, were found in Sin Ho District in Northern Viet Nam. There were 30 males and 14 females, 2-30 years of age. The diagnosis was made by sputum examination. Pet dogs and wild dogs in the area were also found infected and the people often eat roasted crabs. PMID:9656347

  5. Smart Ho:YAG laser lithotriptor using optical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaj, Jahja O.; Marafi, Mustafa A.; Makdisi, Yacob; Bhatia, Kuldip S.; Mathew, K. J.; Caka, Nebi; Hasani, Rexhep

    1998-03-01

    Ultra fast imaging and destruction of the gall bladder stone is performed using Ho:YAG laser. A laser guided approach for lithotropsy is proposed. The correlation output peak is introduced as a feedback signal for firing the laser pulse for stone destruction and 'discrimination' of the tissue image so that the risk of damaging and perforation of the tissue is reduced. A system constituted by correlation of ballistic images and fluorescent signals is proposed.

  6. Identical gamma-vibrational bands in {sup 165}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Janzen, V.P.

    1996-12-31

    The structure of {sup 165}Ho at moderate spins has been investigated by means of Coulomb excitation. Two {gamma}-vibrational bands (K{sup {pi}} = 11/2{sup {minus}} and K{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup {minus}}) are observed, with very nearly identical in-band {gamma}-ray energies. Gamma-ray branching ratios are analyzed to extract information on Coriolis mixing, and the role of the K quantum number in identical bands is discussed.

  7. A kinetic investigation of the effects of adrenaline on 45Ca2+ exchange in isolated hepatocytes at different Ca2+ concentrations, at 20 degrees C and in the presence of inhibitors of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, J C; Barritt, G J; Wadsworth, J C

    1983-01-01

    The effects of adrenaline on 45Ca2+-exchange curves for isolated hepatocytes incubated under various steady-state conditions were investigated. Kinetic analysis showed that the simplest compartment configuration consistent with each set of data was a series configuration of a three-compartment closed system comprising compartment 1 (C1), the extracellular medium, and two kinetically distinct compartments of cellular exchangeable Ca2+, C2 and C3 (C1 = C2 = C3). Subcellular fractionation of hepatocytes labelled with 45Ca2+ at 0.1 mM-Ca2+ indicated that C3 includes exchangeable Ca2+ in the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. The following results were obtained from experiments conducted at 37 degrees C at five different extracellular Ca2+ concentrations. For both untreated and adrenaline-treated cells, plots of the flux from C1 to C2 as a function of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration were best described by straight lines consistent with Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane being a diffusion process. Adrenaline increased the value of the permeability constant for Ca2+ influx by 40%. For untreated cells, plots of the flux between C2 and C3 as a function of the concentrations of Ca2+ in these compartments approached a plateau at high Ca2+ concentrations. Adrenaline caused a 3-fold increase in the concentration of Ca2+ that gives half-maximal rate of Ca2+ transport from C2 to C3. At 1.3 mM extracellular Ca2+, a decrease in incubation temperature from 37 degrees C to 20 degrees C decreased the quantity of Ca2+ in C3 and the flux and fractional transfer rates for the transport of Ca2+ between C2 and C3. At 20 degrees C adrenaline increased the quantity of Ca2+ in C3 and the fractional transfer rates for the transfer of Ca2+ from C1 to C2, and from C2 to C3. At 37 degrees C and 2.4 mM extracellular Ca2+, antimycin A plus oligomycin decreased the quantity of Ca2+ in C3 and increased the fractional transfer rate for the transport of Ca2+ from C3 to C2. In the presence

  8. Six-mm, plane-wave shock driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Alan M.; Chau, Henry H.

    1994-07-01

    A 6-mm-diameter, plane-wave shock generation system has been developed and characterized as a laboratory bench driver for small scale experiments. The driver is based on an exploding-foil-driven slapper used either directly or to initiate an HE pellet. The slapper is driven by a low-inductance fireset with burst currents on the order of 30 kA and burst times of about 250 ns, with time-to-burst jitter under 10 ns. Both the slapper impact and the detonation breakout of the pellet have been measured to be flat to within 10 ns over a 6-mm diameter. Fabry-Perot velocimetry of impacts with LiF crystals were used to characterize shock pressures and durations. Attenuator plates and flyers driven by the HE were also measured, which provided a variety of available pulse shapes and data for modeling efforts.

  9. Six-mm, plane-wave shock driver

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Chau, H.H.

    1993-06-14

    A 6-mm-diameter, plane-wave shock generation system has been developed and characterized as a laboratory bench driver for small scale experiments. The driver is based on an exploding-foil-driven slapper used either directly or to initiate an HE pellet. The slapper is driven by a low-inductance fireset with burst currents on the order of 30 kA and burst times of about 250ns, with a time-to-burst jitter under 10ns. Both the slapper impact and the detonation breakout of the pellet have been measured to be flat to within 10ns over a 6-mm diameter. Fabry-Perot velocimetry of impacts with LiF crystals were used to characterize shock pressures and durations. Attenuator plates and flyers driven by the HE were also measured, which provided a variety of available pulse shapes and data for modeling efforts.

  10. Six-mm, plane-wave shock driver

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A.M.; Chau, H.H. )

    1994-07-10

    A 6-mm-diameter, plane-wave shock generation system has been developed and characterized as a laboratory bench driver for small scale experiments. The driver is based on an exploding-foil-driven slapper used either directly or to initiate an HE pellet. The slapper is driven by a low-inductance fireset with burst currents on the order of 30 kA and burst times of about 250 ns, with time-to-burst jitter under 10 ns. Both the slapper impact and the detonation breakout of the pellet have been measured to be flat to within 10 ns over a 6-mm diameter. Fabry-Perot velocimetry of impacts with LiF crystals were used to characterize shock pressures and durations. Attenuator plates and flyers driven by the HE were also measured, which provided a variety of available pulse shapes and data for modeling efforts. [copyright]American Institute of Physics

  11. A 300-nm compact mm-wave linac FEL design

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.

    1995-12-31

    Microfabrication technology offers an alternative method for fabricating precision, miniature-size components suitable for use in accelerator physics and commercial applications. The original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf accelerating structure design, optical and x-ray masks production, deep x-ray lithography (LIGA exposures), and precision structural alignments. In this paper we will present a design study for a compact single pass mm-linac FEL to produce short wavelength radiation. This system will consists of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period. Initial experimental results on a scale model rf gun and microundulator will be presented.

  12. [Enforcement of type M 20 cal. 4 mm cartridges].

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jaworski, Ryszard; Kawecki, Jerzy; Semiczek, Wiesław; Trnka, Jakub

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to investigate and compare the speed and energy of a bullet from 4 mm cal. cartridges of central ignition type M20, both original and transformed by addition of different kinds of propellants. Original cartridges are characterized by an average speed of the bullet of 144 m/s and average energy of 4.8 J. After transformation by the addition of on an average 31.3 mg of smokeless powder from a cartridge type LR'22, a maximum bullet speed of 299 m/s (average) and maximum energy of 21.2 joule (average) were reached. Our test showed that shots using transformed ammunition type M 20 cal. 4 mm can be dangerous for both health and life. Multiple M20 shot wounds may be very similar to single shot wounds caused by a shotshell cartridge fired from a shotgun weapon.

  13. A 10-mm MR-Conditional Unidirectional Pneumatic Stepper Motor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Mershon, Christopher D.; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) conditional robotic devices facilitate accurate interventional procedures under MR imaging (MRI) guidance. For this purpose, a compact (10-mm diameter) MR-conditional stepper motor is presented. The device features seven key components, which contribute to a dense and easy to fabricate design. Alternating bursts of pressurized air and vacuum can drive the motor in 60° per step to achieve a maximum torque of 2.4 mNm. The relationship between torque and angular speed was investigated to demonstrate motor performance under different loading conditions. The stepper motor was tested in a GE 3T MRI scanner to verify its MR-compatibility. A maximum artifact width of 3 mm was measured in MRI images and a maximum signal-to-noise ratio reduction of 2.49% was recorded. PMID:25419104

  14. Cherenkov maser operation at lower-mm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Garate, E.; Cook, R.; Heim, P.; Layman, R.; Walsh, J.

    1985-07-15

    The basic operating principles of Cerenkov maser oscillations are briefly reviewed and the experimental performance of a 3-mm device is discussed. A power level of approximately 100kW was achieved at 88 GHz and voltage tuning from 84 to 128 GHz on the fundamental TM01 mode was observed. Operation on higher-order modes at frequencies up to 300-320 GHz was demonstrated, and a two-stage buncher-amplifier configuration was investigated.

  15. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  16. Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żmojda, Jacek; Dorosz, Dominik; Kochanowicz, Marcin; Miluski, Piotr; Dorosz, Jan

    2012-05-01

    The emission properties of Yb3+/Ho3+-codoped antimony-silicate optical fiber has been investigated. Luminescence at 2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7--> 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Yb3+ and Ho3+ ions. According to the Dexter-Miyakawa model, the parameters of energy migration CDD of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) <--> 2F5/2 (Yb3+) transition and direct energy transfer CDA of the 2F5/2 (Yb3+) --> 5I6 (Ho3+) transition was calculated. The optimization of the activator content and the concentration ratio were conducted with the purpose of maximizing the efficiency of energy transfer. It made possible to select best-suited glass which was used to manufacture double-clad optical fiber. Strong and narrow bands of spontaneous emission which formed as a result of energy transfer between ytterbium and holmium ions were observed in the fiber under exciting with radiation at 978 nm wavelength.

  17. High Rate Proton Irradiation of 15mm Muon Drifttubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zibell, A.; Biebel, O.; Hertenberger, R.; Ruschke, A.; Schmitt, Ch.; Kroha, H.; Bittner, B.; Schwegler, P.; Dubbert, J.; Ott, S.

    2012-08-01

    Future LHC luminosity upgrades will significantly increase the amount of background hits from photons, neutrons 11.11d protons in the detectors of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. At the proposed LHC peak luminosity of 5\\cdot 1034(1)/(cm2s), background hit rates of more than 10(kHz)/(cm2) are expected in the innermost forward region, leading to a loss of performance of the current tracking chambers. Based on the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tube chambers, a new high rate capable drift tube detecor using tubes with a reduced diameter of 15mm was developed. To test the response to highly ionizing particles, a prototype chamber of 46 15mm drift tubes was irradiated with a 20 MeV proton beam at the tandem accelerator at the Maier-Leibnitz Laboratory, Munich. Three tubes in a planar layer were irradiated while all other tubes were used for reconstruction of cosmic muon tracks through irradiated and nonirradiated parts of the chamber. To determine the rate capability of the 15mm drifttubes we investigated the effect of the proton hit rate on pulse height, efficiency and spatial resolution of the cosmic muon signals.

  18. Enhancing Paradynamics for QM/MM Sampling of Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lameira, Jerônimo; Kupchencko, Ilya; Warshel, Arieh

    2016-03-10

    Despite the enormous increase in computer power, it is still extremely challenging to obtain computationally converging sampling of ab initio QM/MM (QM(ai)/MM) free energy surfaces in condensed phases. The sampling problem can be significantly reduced by the use of the reference potential paradynamics (PD) approach, but even this approach still requires major computer time in studies of enzymatic reactions. To further reduce the sampling problem we developed here a new PD version where we use an empirical valence bond reference potential that has a minimum rather than a maximum at the transition state region of the target potential (this is accomplished conveniently by shifting the EVB of the product state). Hence, we can map the TS region in a more efficient way. Here, we introduce and validate the inverted EVB PD approach. The validation involves the study of the S(N)2 step of the reaction catalyzed by haloakene dehalogenase (DhlA) and the GTP hydrolysis in the RasGAP system. In addition, we have also studied the corresponding reaction in water for each of the systems described here and the reaction involving trimethylsulfonium and dimethylamine in solution. The results are encouraging and the new strategy appears to provide a powerful way of evaluating QM(ai)/MM activation free energies. PMID:26866994

  19. Feasibility studies of a compact mm-wave linac FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Nassiri, A.; Kustom, R.L.; Kang, Y.W.; Song, J.

    1995-12-31

    Short wavelength FELs impose stringent requirements on the quality of the electron beams. The key factor in obtaining a single-pass UV or x-ray FEL is the generation of small emittance electron beams with ultra-high brightness. The pioneering work at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the last decade has resulted in a dramatic improvement in the production of high electron beam brightness and small beam emittance using rf photocathode gun. The lower bound on the emittance of a 1-nC bunch without any emittance compensation is on the order of 3 {pi} mm-mrad. This is well within the emittance requirement being considered here. Although the original R&D work at Argonne, in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago and University of Wisconsin-Madison, has produced encouraging results in the area of rf structure design, x-ray mask fabrication, and LIGA processing (Lithography, Electroforming, and Molding), the goal to prove feasibility has not yet been achieved. In this paper, we will present feasibility studies for a compact single-pass mm-linac FEL based on LIGA technology. This system will consist of a photocathode rf gun operated at 30 GHz, a 50-MeV superconducting constant gradient structure operated at 60 GHz, and a microundulator with 1-mm period.

  20. The LLNL 150-mm equation-of-state gun system

    SciTech Connect

    Rienecker, F.; Honodel, C.; Waldron, R.; Moor, E.; Perfect, S.; Bast, R.

    1987-09-22

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently designing a large gun system for expanded studies of a wide range of materials, including samples of high explosives weighing up to 10 kg. In its initial configuration, the system will have a 150-mm bore, 20-m-long, single-stage gun that can fire a 10-kg projectile at velocities of 2.2 km/s. Future plans include conversion either to a two-stage gun, or to a single-stage 100-mm gun, and conversion to a ballistic range. The high-explosive samples will be contained in a stainless steel tank that is 3.8 m in diameter, 12.5-m long, and 89-mm thick. This paper emphasizes improvements in the gun design, including tube couplings that use large coupling nuts and elastic interference fits to achieve precise alignment, a rail support system that allows rapid changes of configuration without need for re-alignment, and a barrel venting experiment designed to reduce projectile tilt in free flight. In addition, the authors discuss a computer modeling experiment in which they examined the effects of stress and strain on one part of the gun, the breech. Results showed that peak stresses would cause the breech to deform, producing autofrettaged conditions.

  1. Kinetics of light-dependent Ca fluxes across the plasma membrane of rod outer segments. A dynamic model of the regulation of the cytoplasmic Ca concentration

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We measured simultaneously in single toad rods the membrane photocurrent and the Ca concentration in a small volume surrounding the outer segment. Illumination causes a rise in the extracellular Ca concentration. Photocurrents and Ca concentration changes occur over the same range of light intensities. Analysis of the time course of the Ca concentration changes suggests that these concentration changes arise from the difference in the transport rates of light-activated Ca influx and efflux across the outer segment plasma membrane. The Ca influx occurs through the light-sensitive channels of the outer segment membrane and the efflux through Na/Ca exchangers. In 0.1 mM external Ca, approximately 1-2% of the dark current is carried by Ca ions. The Ca efflux in the dark is identical to the influx, approximately 2 X 10(6) ions/s. Upon illumination, the Ca influx decreases with a time course and light sensitivity identical to those of the photocurrent. The Ca efflux, on the other hand, has very different kinetics from those of the photocurrent. Upon illumination, the Ca efflux decreases with a time course and light sensitivity determined by the change in membrane voltage and in the free cytoplasmic Ca concentration near the plasma membrane. In response to bright stimuli, which saturate the photocurrent for prolonged periods of time, the Ca efflux decays with an exponential time course from its value in darkness. The average time constant of this decay is 2.5 s. From the kinetics of the light- activated Ca fluxes, it is possible to predict that illumination causes a decrease in the cytoplasmic Ca concentration. We present a model of the regulation of the cytoplasmic Ca concentration by the dynamic balance of the Ca influx and efflux from the rod outer segment. The model accounts for our experimental observations and allows us to predict the time course and extent of the light-dependent decrease in the free cytoplasmic concentration. PMID:3116153

  2. Microstructure and electrical properties of Ho-doped BaTiO{sub 3}-sputtered films

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.H.; Chu, J.P.; Wang, S.F.

    2005-07-15

    The holmium-doped 200-nm-thick BaTiO{sub 3} (BT) thin films were prepared by rf magnetron sputtering. The effects of postannealing temperature and dopant concentration on microstructure and electrical properties were studied. Compositions of thin films studied are BT1 (Ba/Ti=0.8543), BT (Ba/Ti=0.9681), BT-0.05Ho, BT-1.1Ho, and BT-1.8Ho, and BT-2.9Ho where Ho content is in at %. For all films studied, the dielectric constant increases with increasing annealing temperature up to 700 deg. C due to better crystallinity and large grain sizes. The BT1 film annealed at 700 deg. C shows a high dielectric constant of 287 measured at 100 kHz and the Ho-doped film exhibited a dielectric constant of 135 for BT-1.1Ho annealed at 700 deg. C. A significant role of the Ho on the reduction of leakage current density is observed for the 700 deg. C annealed samples because of the smooth surface roughness. The BT-2.9Ho film shows the low leakage current density of 1.27x10{sup -8} A/cm{sup 2} at an electric field of 100 kV/cm.

  3. Measurements of HO2 chemical kinetics with a new detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Suto, M.

    1986-01-01

    Research for the period from December 1, 1985 to May 31, 1986 is discussed, i.e., the reaction rate constant of HO2+O3 has been measured with a discharge-flow-tube apparatus. The HO2 radical was detected by the OH(A-X) photofragment emission produced from photodissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. In the meantime, the optical emissions produced by the vacuum ultraviolet excitation of chemical species in the flow tube were investigated and used to examine the possibility for their interference with the HO2 detection. The research results are summarized below.

  4. [hHO-1 structure prediction and its mutant construct, expression, purification and activity analysis].

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhen Wei; Cui, Wen Jun; Zhou, Wen Pu; Zhang, Xue Hong; Shen, Qing Xiang; Li, Yun Zhu; Yu, Shan Chang

    2004-10-01

    Human Heme Oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism reaction of heme, which directly regulates the concentration of bilirubin in human body. The mutant structure was simulated by Swiss-pdbviewer procedure, which showed that the structure of active pocket was changed distinctly after Ala25 substituted for His25 in active domain, but the mutated enzyme still binded with heme. On the basis of the results, the expression vectors, pBHO-1 and pBHO-1(M), were constructed, induced by IPTG and expressed in E. coli DH5alpha strain. The expression products were purified with 30%-60% saturation (NH4)2SO4 and Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column chromatography. The concentration of hHO-1 in 30%-60% saturation (NH4)2SO4 components and in fractions through twice column chromatography was 3.6-fold and 30-fold higher than that in initial product, respectively. The activity of wild hHO-1 (whHO-1) and mutant hHO-1 (deltahHO-1) showed that the activity of deltahHO-1 was reduced 91.21% compared with that of whHO-1. The study shows that His25 is of importance for the mechanism of hHO-1, and provides the possibility for effectively regulating the activity to exert biological function.

  5. Measurement of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration in rabbit aorta using the photoprotein, aequorin. Effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on agonist-induced Ca2+ signal generation.

    PubMed Central

    Takuwa, Y; Rasmussen, H

    1987-01-01

    Addition of norepinephrine, angiotensin II, or histamine leads to a transient rise in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), as measured with aequorin, in rabbit aortic strips. Each induces a [Ca2+]i transient which peaks in 2 min and then falls either back to baseline (angiotensin II) or to a plateau (norepinephrine and histamine). The [Ca2+]i transient is due to the mobilization of Ca2+ from a caffeine-sensitive, intracellular pool. An elevation of [K+] to 35 mM leads to a monotonic sustained rise in [Ca2+]i which depends entirely on extracellular Ca2+, but an increase to 100 mM leads to a [Ca2+]i transient from the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Atrial natriuretic peptide does not alter basal [Ca2+]i nor inhibit the [Ca2+]i transient induced by either histamine or angiotensin II, but blocks that induced by norepinephrine, and blocks the plateau phase induced by either histamine or norepinephrine. The peptide inhibits the contractile response to all three agonists and to K+. PMID:2439545

  6. Comparisons between the 35 mm Quadrature Surface Resonator at 300 K and the 40 mm High-Temperature Superconducting Surface Resonator at 77 K in a 3T MRI Imager

    PubMed Central

    Song, Manli; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Chen, Ji; Lin, In-Tsang

    2015-01-01

    This study attempts to compare the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the 40 mm High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) surface resonator at 77 K and the 35 mm commercial quadrature (QD) surface resonator at 300 K in a 3 Tesla (T) MRI imager. To aquire images for the comparison, we implemented a phantom experiment using the 40 mm diameter Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3Ox (Bi-2223) HTS surface resonator, the 35 mm commercial QD surface resonator and the 40 mm professionally-made copper surface resonator. The HTS surface resonator at 77 K provided a 1.43-fold SNR gain over the QD surface resonator at 300 K and provided a 3.84-fold SNR gain over the professionally-made copper surface resonator at 300 K on phantom images. The results agree with the predictions, and the difference between the predicted SNR gains and measured SNR gains is 1%. Although the geometry of the HTS surface resonator is different from the QD surface resonator, its SNR is still higher. The results demonstrate that a higher image quality can be obtained with the HTS surface resonator at 77 K. With the HTS surface resonator, the SNR can be improved, suggesting that the HTS surface resonator is a potentially helpful diagnostic tool for MRI imaging in various applications. PMID:25812124

  7. Over-expression of HO-1 on mesenchymal stem cells promotes angiogenesis and improves myocardial function in infarcted myocardium

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible enzyme with diverse cytoprotective effects, and reported to have an important role in angiogenesis recently. Here we investigated whether HO-1 transduced by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can induce angiogenic effects in infarcted myocardium. HO-1 was transfected into cultured MSCs using an adenoviral vector. 1 × 106 Ad-HO-1-transfected MSCs (HO-1-MSCs) or Ad-Null-transfected MSCs (Null-MSCs) or PBS was respectively injected into rat hearts intramyocardially at 1 h post-myocardial infarction. The results showed that HO-1-MSCs were able to induce stable expression of HO-1 in vitro and in vivo. The capillary density and expression of angiogenic growth factors, VEGF and FGF2 were significantly enhanced in HO-1-MSCs-treated hearts compared with Null-MSCs-treated and PBS-treated hearts. However, the angiogenic effects of HO-1 were abolished by treating the animals with HO inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin. The myocardial apoptosis was marked reduced with significantly reduced fibrotic area in HO-1-MSCs-treated hearts; Furthermore, the cardiac function and remodeling were also significantly improved in HO-1-MSCs-treated hearts. Our current findings support the premise that HO-1 transduced by MSCs can induce angiogenic effects and improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:20925964

  8. Lambmeat colour values (HunterLab CIE and reflectance) are influenced by aperture size (5 mm v. 25 mm).

    PubMed

    Holman, Benjamin W B; Ponnampalam, Eric N; van de Ven, Remy J; Kerr, Matthew G; Hopkins, David L

    2015-02-01

    The effect of aperture size on the assessment of lamb meat colour values (L*, a*, b* and R630/580)was investigated. Two experiments using 2 HunterLab MiniScan colorimeters (large [25 mm] and small [5 mm] apertures) were conducted: 1) coloured tiles were measured and 2) unaged lamb (n = 65) m. longissimus lumborum (LL) and m. semimembranosus (SM) muscles were measured over 2.5 d under simulated retail display. For Experiment three, 2 different colorimeters were used on lamb (n = 36) LL aged for 6 weeks before measurement over 4 don simulated retail display. Coloured tile a* and b* values were unaffected by aperture size, but L* values and the R630/580 ratio were influenced by aperture size. The effect of aperture size on lamb meat colour measurements varied with display time and muscle type. The large aperture size generally provided the highest colorimetric values, and is recommended for measuring lamb meat colour.

  9. [Predictive factors of dengue shock syndrome at the children Hospital No. 1, Ho-chi-Minh City, Vietnam].

    PubMed

    Pham, T B; Nguyen, T H; Vu, T Q H; Nguyen, T L; Malvy, D

    2007-02-01

    The dengue shock syndrome (DSS) is primarily a complication of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) among children in South East Asia. A case-control study was carried out at the children hospital no 1 (Ho-Chi-Minh City, Vietnam) in May-July 2005, to identify the predictive factors of the DSS among 1-15 year patients with DHE Forty consecutive admitted cases and forty controls were studied. The associated features of DSS were the 7-12 year age group and the re-infection by the dengue virus. The vaccination against the Japanese encephalitis B was not associated statistically significantly with the shock syndrome. The clinical predictors of DSS gathered an abdominal tenderness, an hepatomegaly, a lethargy, a cold extremity presentation. DSS associated laboratory features were a value of hematocrit a 50 % and a platelet cell count < or = 75,000/mm3.

  10. Non-coding RNA derived from the region adjacent to the human HO-1 E2 enhancer selectively regulates HO-1 gene induction by modulating Pol II binding

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Atsushi; Mimura, Junsei; Itoh, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have disclosed the function of enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), which are long non-coding RNAs transcribed from gene enhancer regions, in transcriptional regulation. However, it remains unclear whether eRNAs are involved in the regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene (HO-1) induction. Here, we report that multiple nuclear-enriched eRNAs are transcribed from the regions adjacent to two human HO-1 enhancers (i.e. the distal E2 and proximal E1 enhancers), and some of these eRNAs are induced by the oxidative stress-causing reagent diethyl maleate (DEM). We demonstrated that the expression of one forward direction (5′ to 3′) eRNA transcribed from the human HO-1 E2 enhancer region (named human HO-1enhancer RNA E2-3; hereafter called eRNA E2-3) was induced by DEM in an NRF2-dependent manner in HeLa cells. Conversely, knockdown of BACH1, a repressor of HO-1 transcription, further increased DEM-inducible eRNA E2-3 transcription as well as HO-1 expression. In addition, we showed that knockdown of eRNA E2-3 selectively down-regulated DEM-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, eRNA E2-3 knockdown attenuated DEM-induced Pol II binding to the promoter and E2 enhancer regions of HO-1 without affecting NRF2 recruitment to the E2 enhancer. These findings indicate that eRNAE2-3 is functional and is required for HO-1 induction. PMID:25404134

  11. Ca2+ controls slow NAD(P)H oscillations in glucose-stimulated mouse pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Dan S; Misler, Stanley; Polonsky, Kenneth S

    2006-01-01

    Exposure of pancreatic islets of Langerhans to physiological concentrations of glucose leads to secretion of insulin in an oscillatory pattern. The oscillations in insulin secretion are associated with oscillations in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c). Evidence suggests that the oscillations in [Ca2+]c and secretion are driven by oscillations in metabolism, but it is unclear whether metabolic oscillations are intrinsic to metabolism or require Ca2+ feedback. To address this question we explored the interaction of Ca2+ concentration and islet metabolism using simultaneous recordings of NAD(P)H autofluorescence and [Ca2+]c, in parallel with measurements of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). All three parameters responded to 10 mm glucose with multiphasic dynamics culminating in slow oscillations with a period of ∼5 min. This was observed in ∼90% of islets examined from various mouse strains. NAD(P)H oscillations preceded those of [Ca2+]c, but their upstroke was often accelerated during the increase in [Ca2+]c, and Ca2+ influx was a prerequisite for their generation. Prolonged elevations of [Ca2+]c augmented NAD(P)H autofluorescence of islets in the presence of 3 mm glucose, but often lowered NAD(P)H autofluorescence of islets exposed to 10 mm glucose. Comparable rises in [Ca2+]c depolarized ΔΨm. The NAD(P)H lowering effect of an elevation of [Ca2+]c was reversed during inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport. These findings reveal the existence of slow oscillations in NAD(P)H autofluorescence in intact pancreatic islets, and suggest that they are shaped by Ca2+ concentration in a dynamic balance between activation of NADH-generating mitochondrial dehydrogenases and a Ca2+-induced decrease in NADH. We propose that a component of the latter reflects mitochondrial depolarization by Ca2+, which reduces respiratory control and consequently accelerates oxidation of NADH. PMID:16455690

  12. Cytoplasmic Na+-dependent modulation of mitochondrial Ca2+ via electrogenic mitochondrial Na+–Ca2+ exchange

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bongju; Matsuoka, Satoshi

    2008-01-01

    To clarify the role of mitochondrial Na+–Ca2+ exchange (NCXmito) in regulating mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca2+mito) concentration at intact and depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨmito), we measured Ca2+mito and ΔΨmito using fluorescence probes Rhod-2 and TMRE, respectively, in the permeabilized rat ventricular cells. Applying 300 nm cytoplasmic Ca2+ (Ca2+c) increased Ca2+mito and this increase was attenuated by cytoplasmic Na+ (Na+c) with an IC50 of 2.4 mm. To the contrary, when ΔΨmito was depolarized by FCCP, a mitochondrial uncoupler, Na+c enhanced the Ca2+c-induced increase in Ca2+mito with an EC50 of about 4 mm. This increase was not significantly affected by ruthenium red or cyclosporin A. The inhibition of NCXmito by CGP-37157 further increased Ca2+mito when ΔΨmito was intact, while it suppressed the Ca2+mito increase when ΔΨmito was depolarized, suggesting that ΔΨmito depolarization changed the exchange mode from forward to reverse. Furthermore, ΔΨmito depolarization significantly reduced the Ca2+mito decrease via forward mode, and augmented the Ca2+mito increase via reverse mode. When the respiratory chain was attenuated, the induction of the reverse mode of NCXmito hyperpolarized ΔΨmito, while ΔΨmito depolarized upon inducing the forward mode of NCXmito. Both changes in ΔΨmito were remarkably inhibited by CGP-37157. The above experimental data indicated that NCXmito is voltage dependent and electrogenic. This notion was supported theoretically by computer simulation studies with an NCXmito model constructed based on present and previous studies, presuming a consecutive and electrogenic Na+–Ca2+ exchange and a depolarization-induced increase in Na+ flux. It is concluded that Ca2+mito concentration is dynamically modulated by Na+c and ΔΨmito via electrogenic NCXmito. PMID:18218682

  13. Formation of asteroids from mm-cm sized grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, D.; Johansen, A.; Davies, M. B.

    2014-03-01

    Context. Asteroids and comets are intricately connected to life in the universe. Asteroids are the building blocks of terrestrial planets; water-rich asteroids and comets are likely to be the primary source of water for Earth's oceans and other volatiles (Morbidelli et al. 2000; Hartogh et al. 2011); and they may play role in mass extinctions. Yet, the formation of these objects is poorly understood. There is mounting evidence that the traditional picture of the formation of asteroids must be revised. The size distribution of asteroids is hard to reconcile with a traditional bottomup formation scenario. Instead, asteroids may form top-down, with large 100 - 1000 km sized objects forming first by the gravitational collapse of dense clumps of small particles. Experiments and simulations suggest that dust grains cannot grow to sizes larger than mm-cm in protoplanetary disks (Zsom et al. 2010). Also, primitive meteorites from the asteroid belt contain a large mass fraction in chondrules of sizes from 0.1 mm to a few mm. Hence, it is desirable to find a model for asteroid formation from mm-sized particles. Aims. In this work, we model the dynamics of mm-cm sized grains in dust-enriched inner regions of protoplanetary disks. We model the dust-gas interaction to determine whether dust grains of this size can form dense, self-gravitating clouds that can collapse to form asteroids. Methods. We perform shearing box simulations of the inner disk using the Pencil Code (Brandenburg & Dobler 2002). The simulations start with a Solar-type solids-to-gas ratio of 0.01 and we gradually increase the particle concentration. In a real protoplanetary disk, solid particles are expected to migrate from the outer regions and concentrate in the inner disk. Results. Our simulations show that mm-sized particles can form very dense clumps, driven by a run-away convergence in the radial-drift flow of these particles - this dynamic is known as the streaming instability (Youdin & Goodman 2005

  14. A Ca2+-induced Ca2+ Release Mechanism Involved in Asynchronous Exocytosis at Frog Motor Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Narita, K.; Akita, T.; Osanai, M.; Shirasaki, T.; Kijima, H.; Kuba, K.

    1998-01-01

    The extent to which Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) affects transmitter release is unknown. Continuous nerve stimulation (20–50 Hz) caused slow transient increases in miniature end-plate potential (MEPP) frequency (MEPP-hump) and intracellular free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in presynaptic terminals (Ca2+-hump) in frog skeletal muscles over a period of minutes in a low Ca2+, high Mg2+ solution. Mn2+ quenched Indo-1 and Fura-2 fluorescence, thus indicating that stimulation was accompanied by opening of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. MEPP-hump depended on extracellular Ca2+ (0.05–0.2 mM) and stimulation frequency. Both the Ca2+- and MEPP-humps were blocked by 8-(N,N-diethylamino)octyl3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate hydrochloride (TMB-8), ryanodine, and thapsigargin, but enhanced by CN−. Thus, Ca2+-hump is generated by the activation of CICR via ryanodine receptors by Ca2+ entry, producing MEPP-hump. A short interruption of tetanus (<1 min) during MEPP-hump quickly reduced MEPP frequency to a level attained under the effect of TMB-8 or thapsigargin, while resuming tetanus swiftly raised MEPP frequency to the previous or higher level. Thus, the steady/equilibrium condition balancing CICR and Ca2+ clearance occurs in nerve terminals with slow changes toward a greater activation of CICR (priming) during the rising phase of MEPP-hump and toward a smaller activation during the decay phase. A short pause applied after the end of MEPP- or Ca2+-hump affected little MEPP frequency or [Ca2+]i, but caused a quick increase (faster than MEPP- or Ca2+-hump) after the pause, whose magnitude increased with an increase in pause duration (<1 min), suggesting that Ca2+ entry-dependent inactivation, but not depriming process, explains the decay of the humps. The depriming process was seen by giving a much longer pause (>1 min). Thus, ryanodine receptors in frog motor nerve terminals are endowed with Ca2+ entry-dependent slow priming and fast inactivation mechanisms, as well as Ca2+ entry

  15. Numerical simulation on the solidification structure of Ø600mm continuous casting round bloom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Q.; Ni, H. W.; Wang, S. J.; Zang, H.

    2016-03-01

    A FE (Finite Element)—CA (Cellular Automation) coupling model was developed for the simulation of solidification structure formation during the Ø600mm round bloom continuous casting process of Q345E steel. The simulation result of the temperature field was consistent with the nail-shooting experimental result, and the simulated solidification structure of the bloom was in great agreement with corrosion testing under the same casting condition. The simulation results showed that the centre equiaxed crystal ratio increased slightly with the increase of secondary cooling water rate and decreased with the increase of casting temperature and casting speed. When the secondary cooling water rate was over 0.08L/kg, it had less effect on the solidification structure. As the casting temperature increased by 1°C or the casting speed increased by 0.01m/min, the centre equiaxed crystal ratio would decrease by 0.4%∼1.2% and 3%∼0.8% respectively. According to the simulation results, the optimized continuous casting process of Ø600mm round bloom should be the secondary cooling water rate of 0.08L/kg, the casting temperature of 1532°C∼1539°C and the casting speed of 0.20m/min∼0.22m/min. It was found that the solidification structure of Ø600mm Q345E steel round bloom was much improved after the optimized continuous casting process was adopted in practical production.

  16. Investigation of MM-PBSA rescoring of docking poses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David C; Humblet, Christine; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2008-05-01

    Target-based virtual screening is increasingly used to generate leads for targets for which high quality three-dimensional (3D) structures are available. To allow large molecular databases to be screened rapidly, a tiered scoring scheme is often employed whereby a simple scoring function is used as a fast filter of the entire database and a more rigorous and time-consuming scoring function is used to rescore the top hits to produce the final list of ranked compounds. Molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) approaches are currently thought to be quite effective at incorporating implicit solvation into the estimation of ligand binding free energies. In this paper, the ability of a high-throughput MM-PBSA rescoring function to discriminate between correct and incorrect docking poses is investigated in detail. Various initial scoring functions are used to generate docked poses for a subset of the CCDC/Astex test set and to dock one set of actives/inactives from the DUD data set. The effectiveness of each of these initial scoring functions is discussed. Overall, the ability of the MM-PBSA rescoring function to (i) regenerate the set of X-ray complexes when docking the bound conformation of the ligand, (ii) regenerate the X-ray complexes when docking conformationally expanded databases for each ligand which include "conformation decoys" of the ligand, and (iii) enrich known actives in a virtual screen for the mineralocorticoid receptor in the presence of "ligand decoys" is assessed. While a pharmacophore-based molecular docking approach, PhDock, is used to carry out the docking, the results are expected to be general to use with any docking method.

  17. Investigation of MM-PBSA rescoring of docking poses.

    PubMed

    Thompson, David C; Humblet, Christine; Joseph-McCarthy, Diane

    2008-05-01

    Target-based virtual screening is increasingly used to generate leads for targets for which high quality three-dimensional (3D) structures are available. To allow large molecular databases to be screened rapidly, a tiered scoring scheme is often employed whereby a simple scoring function is used as a fast filter of the entire database and a more rigorous and time-consuming scoring function is used to rescore the top hits to produce the final list of ranked compounds. Molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) approaches are currently thought to be quite effective at incorporating implicit solvation into the estimation of ligand binding free energies. In this paper, the ability of a high-throughput MM-PBSA rescoring function to discriminate between correct and incorrect docking poses is investigated in detail. Various initial scoring functions are used to generate docked poses for a subset of the CCDC/Astex test set and to dock one set of actives/inactives from the DUD data set. The effectiveness of each of these initial scoring functions is discussed. Overall, the ability of the MM-PBSA rescoring function to (i) regenerate the set of X-ray complexes when docking the bound conformation of the ligand, (ii) regenerate the X-ray complexes when docking conformationally expanded databases for each ligand which include "conformation decoys" of the ligand, and (iii) enrich known actives in a virtual screen for the mineralocorticoid receptor in the presence of "ligand decoys" is assessed. While a pharmacophore-based molecular docking approach, PhDock, is used to carry out the docking, the results are expected to be general to use with any docking method. PMID:18465849

  18. Living with Omniback and the 8mm drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.C.

    1990-01-01

    Apollo's OmniBack backup system provides a convenient and effective way of storing network backup information on 8mm tape. In addition it has a journaling facility to write extensive log files, recording the backup process in almost any degree of detail desired. The directory structure and file names used are logical and well-defined. Summary files announce the degree of success of the backup as specified in the work file. The system will run unattended under the UNIX cron command, allowing the backup to be performed during the night when user demands on the network are small and most user files are free.

  19. Planetary observations at a wavelength of 1. 32 mm

    SciTech Connect

    Ulich, B.L.; Dickel, J.R.; De Pater, I.

    1984-12-01

    Observations at a wavelength of 1.32 mm have been made of the Jovian planets, Ceres, the satellites Callisto and Ganymede, and the HII region DR 21. The observed brightness temperatures are presented. Those of the Jovian planets agree with the values expected from model atmosphere calculations, except that of Jupiter, which is lower than expected. Ceres and the satellites do not have atmospheres so their emission arised in their subsurface layers. The observed brightness temperatures are intermediate between those measured at infrared and centimeter wavelengths. 30 references.

  20. Synergies with ALMA and mm/submm facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, H.; McNamara, B.; Fabian, A.

    2016-06-01

    New sub-mm facilities, such as ALMA, have opened up exciting new areas of astrophysics. I will review some of ALMA's exciting discoveries from the first five years of science including observations of massive molecular gas flows at the centres of nearby galaxies. Feedback from a central active galactic nucleus is thought to regulate the growth of massive galaxies by suppressing gas cooling and star formation. I will also focus on the potential contribution that XMM-Newton observations could make to these fields over the next decade.

  1. Slow Slip Events on a 760 mm Long Granite Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mclaskey, G.; Yamashita, F.

    2015-12-01

    We describe slow slip events and dynamic rupture events generated on a newly constructed large-scale biaxial friction apparatus at Cornell University that provide insights into the mechanisms of aseismic and seismic slip. We find that, under nominally similar experimental conditions, the 760 mm long granite sample sometimes slips in dynamic stick-slip events and sometimes relieves accumulated shear stress through slow slip events. To provide insights into this curious behavior and the underlying mechanisms, fault slip and shear stress are each measured at 8 locations along the 760 mm long fault. This allows us to map slow slip fronts and the nucleation and propagation of dynamic fault rupture. The granite sample is also instrumented with an array of piezoelectric sensors that are the laboratory equivalent of a seismic network. When the sample is loaded relatively slowly, at 0.03 MPa/s, slow slip occurs on large sections of the fault and the slow slipping region soon expands to the sample boundary. In this case, stress is released in a slow slip event with peak slip velocities < 2 mm/s. Alternatively, when one end of the sample is loaded rapidly (4 MPa/s), or the sample is allowed to heal in stationary contact for a few minutes, slow slip initiates near the load point and accelerates to slip velocities exceeding 200 mm/s before the slow slipping region expands all the way to the sample boundary. This produces a dynamic slip event (stick-slip). The dynamic slip events radiate seismic waves equivalent to a M = -2.5 earthquake. In contrast, the laboratory-generated slow slip events are predominantly aseismic and produce only bursts of tiny and discrete seismic events (M = -6) reminiscent of swarms of microseismicity. The experiments illustrate how a single fault can slide slowly and aseismically or rapidly and dynamically depending on stress state and loading conditions. We compare the behavior observed on this Cornell apparatus to the behavior of other large

  2. Caffeine- and ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ stores in cultured guinea pig myenteric neurons.

    PubMed

    Kimball, B C; Yule, D I; Mulholland, M W

    1996-04-01

    In single fura 2-loaded myenteric neurons, caffeine caused concentration-dependent increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) that were quantal, saturable, and reversible. Inhibition of caffeine-induced Ca2+ release was demonstrated by ryanodine (1 microM), dantrolene (10 microM), and procaine (5 mM). Caffeine and cyclopiazonic acid (30 microM) released overlapping Ca2+ stores, whereas the caffeine-releasable pool was a subset of Ca2+ released by the Ca2+ ionophore ionomycin (4 microM). Both mild depolarization (7.5 mM KCl) and a submaximal concentration of caffeine (1 mM) produced neuronal [Ca2+]i oscillations in one-third of cells examined, which could be abolished by ryanodine (1 microM) or removal of extracellular Ca2+. Release of caffeine-sensitive Ca2+ stores induced influx of extracellular Ca2+. Immunolocalization using confocal microscopy revealed ryanodine receptor-like staining within the cytosol of cultured myenteric neurons.

  3. TRPV1 regulates activation and modulation of TRPA1 by Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mayur J.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) channel contributes to nociceptive signaling in certain pain models. It has been suggested that Ca2+, which activates and modulates TRPA1, could play a critical regulatory role in this process. Since TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are co-expressed and interact in neurons, we investigated whether activation and modulation of TRPA1 by Ca2+ is regulated by TRPV1. Cell-attached recordings showed that TRPA1 is activated by extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) in concentration-response fashion. This activation, especially by 2mM [Ca2+]e was substantially suppressed by co-expression with TRPV1. Inside-out recordings demonstrated that intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i)-triggered activation of TRPA1 was attenuated by the presence of TRPV1 only at 2 mM [Ca2+]e, but not in Ca2+-free conditions. Further, depletion of internal Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin generated TRPA1-mediated currents, which is affected by TRPV1 in both Chinee hamster ovary cells and sensory neurons. Since mustard oil current (IMO) is modulated by [Ca2+]e, we next examined whether alterations in the Ca2+-permeability of TRPV1 by mutating Y671 effect IMO properties. First it was demonstrated that the mutations in TRPV1 did not affect association of the TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels. However, these TRPV1 mutations, particularly Y671K, altered the following characteristics of TRPA1: magnitude of IMO in presence and absence of [Ca2+]e; the influence of [Ca2+]e on the voltage-dependency of IMO, and open probability of single-channel IMO. In summary, activation of TRPA1 by [Ca2+]e and [Ca2+]i is controlled by the TRPV1 channel, and characteristics of IMO depend on Ca2+ permeability of the TRPV1 channel. PMID:20884333

  4. BAY K 8644-induced enhancement of 45Ca uptake by rabbit aortic rings

    SciTech Connect

    Scriabine, A.; Anderson, C.L.; Janis, R.A.

    1986-07-01

    BAY K 8644, a Ca/sup 2 +/ channel activator, enhances uptake of /sup 45/Ca by rabbit aortic rings. This effect depends on the concentration of K/sup +/ in the medium: at 20 mM K/sup +/ the effect of BAY K 8644 was more pronounced than at 5 mM, whereas at 80 mM, no significant enhancement of /sup 45/Ca uptake by BAY K 8644 was found. In the medium containing 5 mM K/sup +/, BAY K 8644 was effective in experiments involving 10 or 30 (but not 3) min exposure of aortic rings to /sup 45/Ca. The dose-response curve for BAY K 8644 was established in 5 mM K/sup +/-containing medium and for 30 min exposure to /sup 45/Ca. BAY K 8644 was effective at 0.01 microM and higher concentrations. In the presence of norepinephrine (0.1 or 10 microM), BAY K 8644 had no greater effect on /sup 45/Ca uptake than in control 5 mM K/sup +/ medium. Our observation that the presence of norepinephrine in 5 mM K/sup +/ did not enhance BAY K 8644-induced /sup 45/Ca uptake suggests that activation of alpha-adrenergic receptor does not depolarize aortic membranes to the same extent as an increase in K+ concentration to 20 mM or that BAY K 8644 does not enhance Ca/sup 2 +/ entry through receptor-operated channels.

  5. Extratumoral Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expressing Macrophages Likely Promote Primary and Metastatic Prostate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Hanibal; Thysell, Elin; Jernberg, Emma; Stattin, Pär; Widmark, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive tumors induce tumor-supporting changes in the benign parts of the prostate. One factor that has increased expression outside prostate tumors is hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). To investigate HO-1 expression in more detail, we analyzed samples of tumor tissue and peritumoral normal prostate tissue from rats carrying cancers with different metastatic capacity, and human prostate cancer tissue samples from primary tumors and bone metastases. In rat prostate tumor samples, immunohistochemistry and quantitative RT-PCR showed that the main site of HO-1 synthesis was HO-1+ macrophages that accumulated in the tumor-bearing organ, and at the tumor-invasive front. Small metastatic tumors were considerably more effective in attracting HO-1+ macrophages than larger non-metastatic ones. In clinical samples, accumulation of HO-1+ macrophages was seen at the tumor invasive front, almost exclusively in high-grade tumors, and it correlated with the presence of bone metastases. HO-1+ macrophages, located at the tumor invasive front, were more abundant in bone metastases than in primary tumors. HO-1 expression in bone metastases was variable, and positively correlated with the expression of macrophage markers but negatively correlated with androgen receptor expression, suggesting that elevated HO-1 could be a marker for a subgroup of bone metastases. Together with another recent observation showing that selective knockout of HO-1 in macrophages reduced prostate tumor growth and metastatic capacity in animals, the results of this study suggest that extratumoral HO-1+ macrophages may have an important role in prostate cancer. PMID:27280718

  6. The reactions of HO2 with CO and NO and the reaction of O(1D) with H2O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonaitis, R.; Heicklen, J.

    1973-01-01

    HO2 radicals were generated by the photolysis of N2O at 2139 A in the presence of excess H2O or H2 and smaller amounts of CO and O2. The O(1D) atoms produced from the photolysis of N2O to give HO radicals or H2 to give HO + H. With H2O two HO radicals are produced for each O(1D) removed low pressures (i.e. approximately 20 torr H2O), but the HO yield drops as the pressure is raised. This drop is attributed to the insertion reaction: O(1D) + H2O + M yields H2O2 +M. The HO radicals generated can react with either CO or H2 to produce H atoms which then add to O2 to produce HO2. Two reactions are given for the reactions of the HO radicals, in the absence of NO.

  7. Using 70-mm aerial photography to identify rangeland sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everitt, J. H.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Alaniz, M. A.; Bowen, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    A south Texas rangeland area was used as a study site to test the use of microdensitometry on 70-mm color-infrared and black-and-white photographs (scale 1:19,000) for distinguishing among 11 range sites (two brushland, seven grassland, two barren land) during the winter (February), spring (May), and summer (August) of 1976. Color-infrared photographs were also taken at a scale of 1:42,000 for the summer date. Film optical density readings were made on one color-infrared film with white light only. The best separations among density readings for all range sites were obtained using white light exposed on color-infrared film in the summer when vegetation was at peak foliage development. Results from this study indicate that 70-mm aerial color-infrared photography at a scale of 1:19,000 or 1:42,000 has good potential for identifying range sites in large and inaccessible areas, and could be a useful tool for range management.

  8. QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Studies of Metal Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vidossich, Pietro; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM)) simulations have strongly contributed to providing insights into the understanding of several structural and mechanistic aspects of biological molecules. They played a particularly important role in metal binding proteins, where the electronic effects of transition metals have to be explicitly taken into account for the correct representation of the underlying biochemical process. In this review, after a brief description of the basic concepts of the QM/MM method, we provide an overview of its capabilities using selected examples taken from our work. Specifically, we will focus on heme peroxidases, metallo-β-lactamases, α-synuclein and ligase ribozymes to show how this approach is capable of describing the catalytic and/or structural role played by transition (Fe, Zn or Cu) and main group (Mg) metals. Applications will reveal how metal ions influence the formation and reduction of high redox intermediates in catalytic cycles and enhance drug metabolism, amyloidogenic aggregate formation and nucleic acid synthesis. In turn, it will become manifest that the protein frame directs and modulates the properties and reactivity of the metal ions. PMID:25006697

  9. Robotic QM/MM-driven maturation of antibody combining sites

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, Ivan V.; Golovin, Andrey V.; Chatziefthimiou, Spyros D.; Stepanova, Anastasiya V.; Peng, Yingjie; Zolotareva, Olga I.; Belogurov, Alexey A.; Kurkova, Inna N.; Ponomarenko, Natalie A.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Blackburn, G. Michael; Gabibov, Alexander G.; Lerner, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    In vitro selection of antibodies from large repertoires of immunoglobulin (Ig) combining sites using combinatorial libraries is a powerful tool, with great potential for generating in vivo scavengers for toxins. However, addition of a maturation function is necessary to enable these selected antibodies to more closely mimic the full mammalian immune response. We approached this goal using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations to achieve maturation in silico. We preselected A17, an Ig template, from a naïve library for its ability to disarm a toxic pesticide related to organophosphorus nerve agents. Virtual screening of 167,538 robotically generated mutants identified an optimum single point mutation, which experimentally boosted wild-type Ig scavenger performance by 170-fold. We validated the QM/MM predictions via kinetic analysis and crystal structures of mutant apo-A17 and covalently modified Ig, thereby identifying the displacement of one water molecule by an arginine as delivering this catalysis. PMID:27774510

  10. Resonant biaxial 7-mm MEMS mirror for omnidirectional scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, U.; Aikio, M.; Janes, J.; Senger, F.; Stenchly, V.; Weiss, M.; Quenzer, H.-J.; Wagner, B.; Benecke, W.

    2013-03-01

    Low-cost automotive laser scanners for environment perception are needed to enable the integration of advanced driver assistant systems (ADAS) into all automotive vehicle segments, a key to reducing the number of traffic accidents on roads. An omnidirectional 360 degree laser scanning concept has been developed based on combination of an omnidirectional lens and a biaxial large aperture MEMS mirror. This omnidirectional scanning concept is the core of a small sized low-cost time-of-flight based range sensor development. This paper describes concept, design, fabrication and first measurement results of a resonant biaxial 7mm gimbal-less MEMS mirror that is electrostatically actuated by stacked vertical comb drives. Identical frequencies of the two resonant axes are necessary to enable the required circle scanning capability. A tripod suspension was chosen since it allows minimizing the frequency splitting of the two resonant axes. Low mirror curvature is achieved by a thickness of the mirror of more than 500 μm. Hermetic wafer level vacuum packaging of such large mirrors based on multiple wafer bonding has been developed to enable to achieve a large mechanical tilt angle of +/- 6.5 degrees in each axis. The 7mm-MEMS mirror demonstrates large angle circular scanning at 1.5kHz.

  11. A novel role for carbon monoxide as a potent regulator of intracellular Ca2+ and nitric oxide in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Amira; Habara, Yoshiaki

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is known as an essential gaseous messenger that regulates a wide array of physiological and pathological processes, similar to nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the potential role of CO in Ca(2+) homeostasis and to explore the underlying mechanisms in pancreatic acinar cells. The exogenous application of a CO-releasing molecule dose-dependently increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i). A heme oxygenase (HO) inducer increased [Ca(2+)]i in a concentration-dependent manner, and the increase was diminished by an HO inhibitor. The CO-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase persisted in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), indicating that Ca(2+) release is the initial source for the increase. The inhibition of G protein, phospholipase C (PLC), and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor diminished the CO-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase. CO upregulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and stimulated NO production, and NOS inhibitor, calmodulin inhibitor, or the absence of extracellular Ca(2+) eliminated the latter response. Blocking the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) pathway abolished CO-induced NO production. Pretreatment with an NOS inhibitor, NO scavenger, or soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, did not affect the CO-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase, indicating that NO, soluble guanylate cyclase, and cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate are not involved in the CO-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase. CO inhibited the secretory responses to CCK-octapeptide or carbachol. We conclude that CO acts as a regulator not only for [Ca(2+)]i homeostasis via a PLC-IP3-IP3 receptor cascade but also for NO production via the calmodulin and PI3K-Akt/PKB pathway, and both CO and NO interact. Moreover, CO may provide potential therapy to ameliorate acute pancreatitis by inhibiting amylase secretion.

  12. Ferromagnetic and paramagnetic magnetization of implanted GaN:Ho,Tb,Sm,Tm films

    SciTech Connect

    Maryško, M. Hejtmánek, J.; Laguta, V.; Sofer, Z.; Sedmidubský, D.; Šimek, P.; Veselý, M.; Mikulics, M.; Buchal, C.; Macková, A.; Malínský, P.; Wilhelm, R. A.

    2015-05-07

    The SQUID magnetic measurements were performed on the GaN films prepared by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy and implanted by Tb{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, and Ho{sup 3+} ions. The sapphire substrate was checked by the electron paramagnetic resonance method which showed a content of Cr{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 3+} impurities. The samples 5 × 5 mm{sup 2} were positioned in the classical straws and within an estimated accuracy of 10{sup −6 }emu, no ferromagnetic moment was detected in the temperature region of 2–300 K. The paramagnetic magnetization was studied for parallel and perpendicular orientation. In the case of GaN:Tb sample, at T = 2 K, a pronounced anisotropy with the easy axis perpendicular to the film was observed which can be explained by the lowest quasi-doublet state of the non-Kramers Tb{sup 3+} ion. The Weiss temperature deduced from the susceptibility data using the Curie-Weiss (C-W) law was found to depend substantially on the magnetic field.

  13. Enhanced biohydrogen production from sugarcane bagasse by Clostridium thermocellum supplemented with CaCO3.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qing-Qing; Liang, Lei; Zhu, Ming-Jun

    2015-12-01

    Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 was used to degrade sugarcane bagasse (SCB) directly for hydrogen production, which was significantly enhanced by supplementing medium with CaCO3. The effect of CaCO3 concentration on the hydrogen production was investigated. The hydrogen production was significantly enhanced with the CaCO3 concentration increased from 10mM to 20mM. However, with the CaCO3 concentration further increased from 20mM to 100mM, the hydrogen production didn't increase further. Under the optimal CaCO3 concentration of 20mM, the hydrogen production reached 97.83±5.19mmol/L from 2% sodium hydroxide-pretreated SCB, a 116.72% increase over the control (45.14±1.03mmol/L), and the yield of hydrogen production reached 4.89mmol H2/g SCBadded. Additionally, CaCO3 promoted the biodegradation of SCB and the growth of C. thermocellum. The stimulatory effects of CaCO3 on biohydrogen production are mainly attributed to the buffering capacity of carbonate. The study provides a novel strategy to enhance biohydrogen production from lignocellulose.

  14. Organ specificity of a vacuolar Ca2+-binding protein RVCaB in radish and its expression under Ca2+-deficient conditions.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, K; Maeshima, M

    2001-11-01

    Radish vacuoles contain a new type of Ca2+-binding protein (RVCaB) with high capacity and low affinity for Ca2+. The protein is able to stimulate Ca2+ uptake into vacuoles, which is driven by Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ antiporter. In the present study, we found that the level of RVCaB mRNA is high in seedling hypocotyls and mature taproots but low in young roots and mature leaves. The RVCaB protein was abundant in hypocotyls and taproots but absent in leaves. The levels of the transcript and protein of RVCaB in taproots were gradually increased during maturation. The level of RVCaB mRNA in seedling hypocotyls doubled within a few hours when the growth medium was changed from 10 mM CaCl2 to water, although the level was strongly suppressed in 100 mM CaCl2. This response of the RVCaB gene was specific to Ca2+ and did not occur with other ions including K+ and Mg2+. RVCaB functioning as a Ca2+-sequestering protein in taproot vacuoles to provide for the Ca2+ deficiency is discussed. PMID:11725948

  15. HO-1-mediated macroautophagy: a mechanism for unregulated iron deposition in aging and degenerating neural tissues.

    PubMed

    Zukor, Hillel; Song, Wei; Liberman, Adrienne; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Fillebeen, Carine; Pantopoulos, Kostas; Wu, Ting-Di; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Schipper, Hyman M

    2009-05-01

    Oxidative stress, deposition of non-transferrin iron, and mitochondrial insufficiency occur in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). We previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is up-regulated in AD and PD brain and promotes the accumulation of non-transferrin iron in astroglial mitochondria. Herein, dynamic secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and other techniques were employed to ascertain (i) the impact of HO-1 over-expression on astroglial mitochondrial morphology in vitro, (ii) the topography of aberrant iron sequestration in astrocytes over-expressing HO-1, and (iii) the role of iron regulatory proteins (IRP) in HO-1-mediated iron deposition. Astroglial hHO-1 over-expression induced cytoplasmic vacuolation, mitochondrial membrane damage, and macroautophagy. HO-1 promoted trapping of redox-active iron and sulfur within many cytopathological profiles without impacting ferroportin, transferrin receptor, ferritin, and IRP2 protein levels or IRP1 activity. Thus, HO-1 activity promotes mitochondrial macroautophagy and sequestration of redox-active iron in astroglia independently of classical iron mobilization pathways. Glial HO-1 may be a rational therapeutic target in AD, PD, and other human CNS conditions characterized by the unregulated deposition of brain iron.

  16. Telegram from Ho Chi Minh to Harry S. Truman. Teaching with Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Lee Ann; Schamel, Wynell

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on a telegram sent from Hanoi, Vietnam, by Ho Chi Minh through the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) station in Kunming, China, to President Truman in which Ho asked for support of Vietnam's independence from France. Provides background information, a reproduction of the telegram, and ideas for teaching activities. (CMK)

  17. Paracrine action of HO-1-modified mesenchymal stem cells mediates cardiac protection and functional improvement.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Bin; Ren, Xiaofeng; Lin, Guosheng; Zhu, Chengang; Chen, Honglei; Yin, Jiechao; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Bo; Ding, Danhua

    2008-10-01

    The aim has been to determine whether the supernatants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfected with adenovirus carrying human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) gene protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. We have found that hHO-1 infected MSCs (hHO-1-MSCs) increased expression of hHO-1 protein. Apoptosis of cultured hHO-1-MSCs exposed to hypoxia was suppressed. Several cytokines, including HGF, bFGF, TGF-beta, VEGF and IL-1beta, were produced by hHO-1-MSCs, some being significantly enhanced under hypoxia stimulation. Meanwhile, those cytokines reduced caspase-3 level and activity in cultured adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (ARVCs) exposed to hypoxia. Supernatants obtained from hHO-1-MSCs improved left ventricular function, limited myocardial infarct size, increased microvessel density, and inhibited apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in rat myocardial infarction. It can be concluded hHO-1-modified MSCs prevent myocardial cell injury via secretion of paracrine-acting mediators.

  18. (Na) sub i modulates isoproterenol's effect on Ca permeability in cultured heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Smith, T.W. )

    1987-08-01

    Isoproterenol (ISO) augments the slow inward Ca current in cardiac muscle cells. The authors examined the role of intracellular Na (Na{sub i}) on ISO-mediated alterations in Ca uptake in cultured chick heart cells. In 140 mM Na medium, 1 {mu}M ISO did not measurably alter {sup 45}Ca uptake. When cells were first preincubated in Na-free medium for 5 min and then incubated in control medium with {sup 45}Ca, ISO increased {sup 45}Ca uptake by 30%. Nifedipine, verapamil, or dl-propranolol abolished the effect of ISO on {sup 45}Ca uptake. CGP 28392, a Ca channel agonist, increased Ca influx in a manner that was augmented by decreased Na{sub i}, similar to the ISO response. Neither ISO nor CGP 28392 altered {sup 45}Ca uptake when cells preincubated in Na-free medium were further incubated in Na-free medium containing {sup 45}Ca. Exposure of cells to Na-free medium or 25 mM K{sup +} medium caused depolarization of the resting membrane potential to approximately {minus}40 mV. In the absence of ISO, the {sup 45}Ca uptake in cells preincubated in Na-free or 25 mM extracellular K (K{sub o}) medium was significantly greater than in cells preincubated in control medium. This appeared to be due partly to increased {sup 45}Ca uptake via nifedipine-sensitive pathways. These findings support the hypothesis that reduction in Na{sub i} concentration ((Na){sub i}) enhances the ISO-induced augmentation of Ca uptake via nifedipine-sensitive pathways (presumably via slow Ca channels), probably by a direct effect on the channels.

  19. The role of Ca pathway in Cd uptake and translocation by the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingli; Tian, Shengke; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Xiaoe; Jiang, Hong

    2010-11-15

    Effect of Ca on plant growth, Cd uptake and translocation in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii was investigated, as to reveal the possible pathway of Cd entry into the plants system. High Ca increased plant growth under Cd stress after 7 d, and significantly affected the total Cd influx and translocation rate. Short-term kinetics of (109)Cd influx performed using radiotracers confirmed a significant inhibition of (109)Cd influx into the roots induced by high Ca. Under exposure of 5.0 mM Ca, K(m) of (109)Cd influx into roots was 2-fold higher in the hyperaccumulator, although the V(max) value remained at similar level, when compared with the treatments of 0.5 mM Ca. Calcium concentrations in xylem sap of the hyperaccumulator decreased with the increasing Cd levels and significant negative correlationship between the two elements was observed. However, increased xylem loading of Cd was observed in the hyperaccumulator in response to the increasing exogenous Ca level from 0.5 to 4.0 mM, but reverse effect was observed when higher Ca levels (8-32 mM) were presented in the solutions. These results suggest that Cd uptake and translocation in the hyperaccumulator S. alfredii plants is positively associated with Ca pathway. PMID:20674155

  20. Los Angeles, CA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    This rare cloud and smog free view of Los Angeles, CA (34.0N, 118.5W) is a result of strong Santa Ana winds blowing from the east. Both cultural and natural features are well displayed and all of the major streets, highways and freeways can be traced in their entirety throughout the city as well as the major business and commercial sections. On the eastern edge of the scene, the San Andreas fault cuts across from southeast to northwest.

  1. The Apollo 15 coarse fines (4-10 mm)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryder, Graham; Sherman, Sarah Bean

    1989-01-01

    A new catalog of the Apollo 15 coarse fines particles is presented. Powell's macroscopic descriptions, resulting from his 1972 particle by particle binocular examination of all of the Apollo 15 4 to 10 mm fines samples, are retained. His groupings are also retained, but petrographic, chemical, and other data from later analyses are incorporated into this catalog to better characterize individual particles and describe the groups. A large number of particles have no characterization beyond that done by Powell. Complete descriptions of the particles and all known references are provided. The catalog is intended for anyone interested in the rock types collected by Dave Scott and Jim Irwin in the Hadley-Appenine region, and particularly for researchers requiring sample allocations.

  2. Experimental investigation of a mm-wave planar antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakakis, Georgios D.

    1990-06-01

    This thesis investigates a new mm-wave Bilateral Slot Line (BSL) antenna and its relation to the Linearly Tapered Slot Antenna (LTSA). The BSL antenna consists of a tapered double-sided slotline and can be viewed as two identical LTSAs sandwiched back to back. Dielectric substrates with permittivities of 2.33 and 6.0 were used to construct these antennas. The theoretical background, the design, and the performance in the frequency range 5 to 9 GHz of the new microwave integrated circuit antenna is presented. The effects of several parameters such as dielectric constant, stripline and slotline characteristic impedance, antenna structure, and transition scheme on the radiation patterns and return loss were experimentally investigated. Some relationships between the width of stripline and slotline, their characteristic impedance and the dielectric constant are reported. Guidelines are laid to design the LTSA and BSL antennas.

  3. A densitometric analysis of commercial 35mm films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Ruffin, Christopher, III

    IIaO films have been subjected to various sensitometric tests. The have included thermal and aging effects and reciprocity failure studies. In order to compare the special IIaO film with popular brands of 35 mm films and their possible use in astrophotography, Agfa, Fuji and Kodak print and slide formats, as well as black and white and color formats, were subjected to sensitometric, as well as densitometric analysis. A scanning electron microscope was used to analyze grain structure size, and shape as a function of both speed and brand. Preliminary analysis of the grain structure using an ISI-SS40 scanning electron microscope indicates that the grain sizes for darker densities are much larger than the grain size for lighter densities. Researchers analyze the scanning electron microscope findings of the various grains versus densities as well as enhancement of the grains, using the IP-8500 Digital Image Processor.

  4. Calibration of a HTS Based LOX 400 mm Level Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunanithi, R.; Jacob, S.; Nadig, D. S.; Prasad, M. V. N.; Gour, Abhay S.; Pankaj, S.; Gowthaman, M.; Sudharshan, H.

    The measurement of the cryogen level in a cryostage of space crafts is crucial. At the same time the weight of the sensor should be small as it affects the payload fraction of the space craft. An attempt to develop a HTS based level sensor of 400 mm for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) measurement was made. In the initial phase of testing, loss of superconductivity of HTS wire in LOX inside a cryostat was noticed. Thus, a new four wall cryostat was designed to have a stable LOX level to provide thermal stability to the HTS based LOX sensor. The calibration of the developed sensor was carried out against capacitance level sensor which was pre calibrated using diode array to verify its linearity and performance for different current excitation levels. The calibrations were carried out without heater wires. The automatic data logging was accomplished using a program developed in LabVIEW 11.0.

  5. A densitometric analysis of commercial 35mm films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.; Ruffin, Christopher, III

    1989-01-01

    IIaO films have been subjected to various sensitometric tests. The have included thermal and aging effects and reciprocity failure studies. In order to compare the special IIaO film with popular brands of 35 mm films and their possible use in astrophotography, Agfa, Fuji and Kodak print and slide formats, as well as black and white and color formats, were subjected to sensitometric, as well as densitometric analysis. A scanning electron microscope was used to analyze grain structure size, and shape as a function of both speed and brand. Preliminary analysis of the grain structure using an ISI-SS40 scanning electron microscope indicates that the grain sizes for darker densities are much larger than the grain size for lighter densities. Researchers analyze the scanning electron microscope findings of the various grains versus densities as well as enhancement of the grains, using the IP-8500 Digital Image Processor.

  6. Coupling MM5 with ISOLSM: Development, testing, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W.J.; Cooley, H.S.; He, Y.; Torn, M.S.

    2003-06-10

    Surface water and energy fluxes are tightly coupled with CO2 exchanges between the ecosystem and atmosphere. Other surface-to-atmosphere trace-gas exchanges of interest in climate change research (e.g., N2O, CH4, C18OO, and H218O) are also strongly impacted by surface energy exchanges. Further, land-use change has large effects on the surface energy balance and therefore the exchanges of these trace gases. To investigate these issues at the regional scale we have coupled MM5 (Grell et al. 1995) with ISOLSM (Riley et al. 2002, Riley et al. 2003), a land-surface model based on LSM1 (Bonan 1995).

  7. Quantum Phase Slips in 6 mm Long Niobium Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weiwei; Liu, Xin; Chan, M H W

    2016-02-10

    Transport measurements were made to study the superconducting transition of four 6 mm long niobium nanowires with different cross-sectional dimensions. A low-temperature residual resistance tail measured with an excitation current of 5 nA is found in the thinnest wire down to 50 mK or 7.7% of Tc of Nb. The functional form of the residual resistance is consistent with quantum phase slip (QPS) processes. Resistance measured at high bias excitation current switches among many discrete values that are well below the normal state resistance. These discrete resistance values as a function of temperature fall into several parallel curves all showing QPS-like decay in the low temperature limit similar to that found at low current. The coexistence of QPS-like resistance tails and resistance jumps found in the same wire unifies results from previous experiments where these two distinct sets of evidence for QPS are exclusive of each other. PMID:26788964

  8. 120-mm supercondcting quadrupole for interaction regions of hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Zlobin, A.V.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; Novitski, I.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Magnetic and mechanical designs of a Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnet with 120-mm aperture suitable for interaction regions of hadron colliders are presented. The magnet is based on a two-layer shell-type coil and a cold iron yoke. Special spacers made of a low-Z material are implemented in the coil mid-planes to reduce the level of radiation heat deposition and radiation dose in the coil. The quadrupole mechanical structure is based on aluminum collars supported by an iron yoke and a stainless steel skin. Magnet parameters including maximum field gradient and field harmonics, Nb3Sn coil pre-stress and protection at the operating temperatures of 4.5 and 1.9 K are reported. The level and distribution of radiation heat deposition in the coil and other magnet components are discussed.

  9. Radio and mm-observations of active nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, P.

    Radio, mm-wave, and X ray observations of active galactic nuclei are reviewed, together with theoretical models for the phenomena. Formulas are defined for the power law energy distribution of relativistic electrons observed near the sources, the characteristic radio emission, the local emission coefficient, and electron energy loss. Consideration is also given to nonsynchrotron self-absorption and to international cooperation to coordinate radio telescopy on different continents to perform VLBI research. Most sources detected at low frequencies exhibit a steep spectrum halo, while flat spectrum sources at 5 GHz show little extended emission. The low frequency cut-offs encountered due to thermal absorption by H II regions are quantified. Injection and equilibrium spectra are examined, along with the synchrotron loss time scale, the inverse Compton limit, and evidence for repeated explosions in the nuclei. Finally, recent work at the Bonn radioastronomy facility is described.

  10. Sulfide capacities of CaO-CaF2-CaCl2 melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeonov, Simeon; Sakai, Toshihiko; Maeda, Masafumi

    1992-06-01

    The sulfide capacityC_{s^{2 - } } = ({text{pct S}}^{{text{2 - }}} )(p_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } /p_{{text{S}}_{text{2}} } )^{1/2} ) of CaO-CaF2-CaCl2 slag was determined at temperatures from 1000 °C to 1300 °C by equilibrating molten slag, molten silver, and CO-CO2-Ar gas mixture. The sulfide capacity increases with replacing CaCl2 by CaF2 in slags of constant CaO contents. The sulfide capacity also increases with increasing temperature as well as with increasing CaO content at a constant ratio of CaF2/CaCl2 of unity. A linear relationship between the sulfide capacity and carbonate capacity in literature was observed on a logarithmic scale.

  11. Superdeformation studies in {sup 150}Tb and {sup 153}Ho

    SciTech Connect

    Nisius, D.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Crowell, B.

    1995-08-01

    There are now over 40 superdeformed (SD) bands known in the A {approximately} 150 region and in most cases the properties of these bands are understood in terms of single-particle excitations in the absence of pairing. By continuing the search for new SD bands we hope to gain insight into (1) the ordering of the proton and neutron orbitals near the Fermi surface in the SD well, (2) the effects that the alignment of those orbitals has on the moments of inertia, and (3) the collective excitations in the SD well. For {sup 150}Tb, which is one proton and one neutron away from the SD doubly-magic nucleus {sup 152}Dy, it should be possible to study SD bands based on both proton and neutron hole excitations. By adding one proton to the {sup 152}Dy nucleus (i.e. {sup 153}Ho) proton excitations above the Z = 66 shell gap can be studied. These excitations are important as calculations suggested that the proton intruder orbital N = 7 might become occupied. Interactions between this orbital and a N = 5 level may result in softness towards octupole vibrations. High spin states in {sup 150}Th and {sup 153}Ho were populated using the {sup 124}Sn({sup 31}P,5n) and {sup 120}Sn({sup 37}Cl,4n) reactions, respectively. In both cases the early implementation phase of Gammasphere was used to detect the decay gamma rays and over 1 x 10{sup 9} triple and higher fold coincidence events were recorded. In {sup 150}Tb, the data analysis is complete and two new SD bands were identified. The fact that Im{sup (2)} moments of inertia are sensitive to the specific high-N intruder content of the SD bands was used to suggest configurations for the two new bands. A paper reporting these results is being prepared. For {sup 153}Ho, data analysis is still in its early stages.

  12. Comparison of less lethal 40 mm sponge projectile and the 37 mm projectile for injury assessment on human thorax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nsiampa, N.; Robbe, C.; Oukara, A.; Papy, A.

    2012-08-01

    Since there is an increasing interest in avoiding human body injury in diverse situations like crowd control or peacekeeping missions, less lethal ammunition are more and more used. In this study we focus only on kinetic energy non-lethal (KENLW) projectiles. Their desired effects on human body are the temporary incapacitation through blunt trauma. There are different types of KENLW projectiles ranging from rigid to deformable projectiles. Unfortunately, the effects of such projectiles are not really well known as it is difficult to measure the force transmitted to the human body or the related deformation. Because the potential of injury excludes human living tests, tests are performed on cadavers, animals or human tissue surrogates. Besides these tests, numerical simulations are more and more used to gain more understanding, to assess or to predict the effects of this kind of projectile on human body. In this paper a comparison based on the viscous criterion between the 37 mm rigid projectile and the 40 mm sponge projectile was made.

  13. Modelling and performance of Nb SIS mixers in the 1.3 mm and 0.8 mm bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpov, A.; Carter, M.; Lazareff, B.; Billon-Pierron, D.; Gundlach, K. H.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the modeling and subsequent improvements of SIS waveguide mixers for the 200-270 and 330-370 GHz bands (Blundell, Carter, and Gundlach 1988, Carter et al 1991). These mixers are constructed for use in receivers on IRAM radiotelescopes on Pico Veleta (Spain, Sierra Nevada) and Plateau de Bure (French Alps), and must meet specific requirements. The standard reduced height waveguide structure with suspended stripline is first analyzed and a model is validated through comparison with scale model and working scale measurements. In the first step, the intrinsic limitations of the standard mixer structure are identified, and the parameters are optimized bearing in mind the radioastronomical applications. In the second step, inductive tuning of the junctions is introduced and optimized for minimum noise and maximum bandwidth. In the 1.3 mm band, a DSB receiver temperature of less than 110 K (minimum 80 K) is measured from 180 through 260 GHz. In the 0.8 mm band, a DSB receiver temperature of less than 250 K (minimum 175 K) is obtained between 325 and 355 GHz. All these results are obtained with room-temperature optics and a 4 GHz IF chain having a 500 MHz bandwidth and a noise temperature of 14 K.

  14. 300mm pilot line DSA contact hole process stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argoud, M.; Servin, I.; Gharbi, A.; Pimenta Barros, P.; Jullian, K.; Sanche, M.; Chamiot-Maitral, G.; Barnola, S.; Tiron, R.; Navarro, C.; Chevalier, X.; Nicolet, C.; Fleury, G.; Hadziioannou, G.; Asai, M.; Pieczulewski, C.

    2014-03-01

    Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) is today a credible alternative lithographic technology for semiconductor industry [1]. In the coming years, DSA integration could be a standard complementary step with other lithographic techniques (193nm immersion, e-beam, extreme ultraviolet). Its main advantages are a high pattern resolution (down to 10nm), a capability to decrease an initial pattern edge roughness [2], an absorption of pattern guide size variation, no requirement of a high-resolution mask and can use standard fab-equipment (tracks and etch tools). The potential of DSA must next be confirmed viable for high volume manufacturing. Developments are necessary to transfer this technology on 300mm wafers in order to demonstrate semiconductor fab-compatibility [3-7]. The challenges concern especially the stability, both uniformity and defectivity, of the entire process, including tools and Blok Co-Polymer (BCP) materials. To investigate the DSA process stability, a 300mm pilot line with DSA dedicated track (SOKUDO DUO) is used at CEALeti. BCP morphologies with PMMA cylinders in a PS matrix are investigated (about 35nm natural period). BCP selfassembly in unpatterned surface and patterned surface (graphoepitaxy) configurations are considered in this study. Unpatterned configuration will initially be used for process optimization and fix a process of record. Secondly, this process of record will be monitored with a follow-up in order to validate its stability. Steps optimization will be applied to patterned surface configurations (graphoepitaxy) for contact hole patterning application. A process window of contact hole shrink process will be defined. Process stability (CD uniformity and defectivity related to BCP lithography) will be investigated.

  15. MALT-45: The Galactic plane in 7mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Christopher; Walsh, Andrew; Voronkov, Maxim; Ellingsen, Simon

    2013-07-01

    MALT-45: The Galactic plane in 7mm MALT-45 is an untargeted Galactic plane survey searching for tracers of high mass star formation (HMSF) at 7mm. With the recent upgrades to the Australia Telescope Compact Array, we have been able to push the limits on observational efficiency to obtain a very sensitive blind survey in a short amount of time. Specifically, MALT-45 uses a fast on-the-fly mapping with 6 seconds per pointing, which results in a quarter-square-degree region being mapped in approximately 14 hours. Each region is Nyquist sampled and collects data in 12 spectral lines. The primary spectral lines of MALT-45 include: CS (1-0) - a high density gas tracer, which contrasts well with NH3 (1,1) from the similar HOPS survey; 44 GHz Class I methanol masers - the brightest of the Class I lines, it is poorly understood, and MALT-45 is one of the first surveys to thoroughly search for these masers; SiO (1-0) v=1,2,3 - typically associated with evolved stars, there have been rare associations with HMSF, and MALT-45 offers the potential to detect more. Other lines include thermal SiO (1-0) v=0, thermal methanol, C34S, OCS, and radio recombination lines H51a and H53a. Perhaps the most significant and innovative aspect of MALT-45 is the usage of ATCA autocorrelations. Each antenna of the ATCA is similar to Mopra, and by using all 6 antennae simultaneously, have a 6 fold increase in sensitivity per unit observation time. The autocorrelation data was only recently made available by the ATCA upgrade with the Compact Array Broadband Backend, and tools have been developed to allow this data processing. We present the first 5 square-degrees (l = 330 - 335, b = -0.5 - +0.5) of the Galactic plane mapped by MALT-45.

  16. 7 mm continuum observations of ultra compact HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leto, P.; Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Buemi, C. S.; Dolei, S.; Manzitto, P.; Cerrigone, L.; Siringo, C.

    2009-12-01

    Aims: Ultra compact HII (UCHII) regions are indicators of high-mass star formation sites and are distributed mainly in the Galactic plane. They exhibit a broad band spectrum with significant emission between near-IR and radio wavelengths. We intend to investigate the possible contribution of the forthcoming ESA Planck mission to the science of UCHII regions by evaluating the possibility of detecting UCHIIs that are bright in the radio regime. Methods: We performed new 7 mm observations of a sample of UCHII regions. The observations were designed to acquire high-frequency radio spectra. For each source in our sample, the free-free radio spectrum has been modeled. Along with far-IR measurements, our spectra allow us to estimate the flux densities of the sources in the millimeter and sub-millimeter bands. We extrapolated and summed the ionized-gas (free-free radio emission) and dust (thermal emission) contributions in the afore mentioned wavelength ranges. The possibility of Planck detecting the selected sources can be assessed by comparing the estimated flux densities to the expected sensitivity in each Planck channel. To obtain a realistic estimation of the noise produced by the Galactic emission, the Planck sky model software package was used. Results: For each target source, from our new 7 mm data and other radio measurements from the literature, important physical parameters such as electron density and their spatial distribution, source geometry and emission measure were derived. We conclude that, in the case of the present sample, located close to the Galactic center, Planck will have a very low detection rate. In contrast, assuming that our sample is representative of the whole UCHII-region population, we derive a very high probability of detecting this kind of source with Planck if located instead close to the anticenter. From the analysis of the ionized-gas properties, we suggest that the selected sample could also be contaminated by other kinds of Galactic

  17. Measurement of CA1P and CA in leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.d.; Kobza, J.; Seemann, J.R. )

    1990-05-01

    Carboxyarabinitol-1-phosphate (CA1P) and carboxyarabinitol (CA) were assayed in leaves by isotope dilution. {sup 14}C-labeled standards were synthesized from (2-{sup 14}C) CABP using acid (CA1P) or alkaline (CA) phosphatase. Either was added to boiling 80% EtOH along with liquid N{sub 2}-killed leaves. Each was largely purified by anion exchange chromatography. CA1P samples were subjected to 2D-TLE/TLC. The specific activity of the {sup 14}C-containing spot was measured using alkaline phosphatase. CA samples were run on an HPLC and the specific activity was determined using a UV monitor and a flow-through radioisotope detector. In 3 of the tested species, light/dark amount of CA1P (nmol/mg Chl) were kidney bean, 0.7/67; sugar beet, 0.8/33; and Alocasia, 0/3.4. Light/dark CA levels (nmol/mg Chl) in these respective species were 897/653, 3.2/3.5, and 5.7/4.6. These results support the hypothesis that CA is a product of CA1P metabolism in vivo under high light, but also indicate that CA is not the only intermediate involved in CA1P synthesis under low light/dark conditions.

  18. Doping induced modification in polyhedral tilt in hexagonal Ho1-xYxMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, S. D.; Rayaprol, S.

    2012-06-01

    We have studied the effect of systematic doping of Y at Ho site on the crystal structure of hexagonal HoMnO3 We have carried out room temperature neutron diffraction (ND) study on Ho1-xYxMnO3 (x = 0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75), and by analyzing this ND data we have determined the cell parameters, Mn-O bond length, O-Mn-O bond angle. The variation in certain M-O bond length and O-Mn-O bond angles has been understood in terms of modifications in tilt of the MnO5 polyhedra due to Ho site Y doping in hexagonal HoMnO3.

  19. Theoretical study of reactions of HO{sub 2} in low-temperature oxidation of benzene

    SciTech Connect

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z.; Kennedy, Eric M.; Mackie, John C.

    2010-07-15

    We have generated a set of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the reactions involving HO{sub 2} in the very early stages of benzene oxidation at low temperatures using density functional theory (DFT). In particular, we report the rate constants for the reactions of HO{sub 2} with benzene and phenyl. The calculated reaction rate constant for the abstraction of H-C{sub 6}H{sub 5} by HO{sub 2} is found to be in good agreement with the limited experimental values. HO{sub 2} addition to benzene is found to be more important than direct abstraction. We show that the reactions of HO{sub 2} with the phenyl radical generate the propagating radical OH in a highly exoergic reaction. The results presented herein should be useful in modeling the oxidation of aromatic compounds at low temperatures. (author)

  20. Asymptotic freedom in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity.

    PubMed

    D'Odorico, Giulio; Saueressig, Frank; Schutten, Marrit

    2014-10-24

    We use the Wetterich equation for foliated spacetimes to study the renormalization group flow of projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity coupled to n Lifshitz scalars. Using novel results for anisotropic heat kernels, the matter-induced beta functions for the gravitational couplings are computed explicitly. The renormalization group flow exhibits an UV attractive anisotropic Gaussian fixed point where Newton's constant vanishes and the extra scalar mode decouples. This fixed point ensures that the theory is asymptotically free in the large-n expansion, indicating that projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity is perturbatively renormalizable. Notably, the fundamental fixed point action does not obey detailed balance.

  1. Detailed course of the O + HO2 reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, U. C.; Klein, F. S.; Kaufman, F.

    1985-01-01

    The elementary radical-radical reactions that are of such importance in laser, astrophysical, atmospheric, and combustion processes are increasingly open to direct rate measurement. Attention is presently given to the O + HO2 reaction, which has only one exothermic product channel: OH + O2. Isotopic product analysis was conducted spectroscopically using laser-induced fluorescence of OH. It is found that the simple atom-radical reaction takes place by way of the rapid formation and breakup of an unexpected radical intermediate, thereby raising questions as to the formation, thermochemistry, and decomposition of poorly known products in many other radical-radical reaction systems.

  2. Chaplygin gas Hořava-Lifshitz quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardehali, Hossein; Pedram, Pouria

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we study the Chaplygin gas Hořava-Lifshitz quantum cosmology. Using Schutz formalism and Arnowitt-Deser-Misner decomposition, we obtain the corresponding Schrödinger-Wheeler-DeWitt equation. We obtain exact classical and quantum mechanical solutions and construct wave packets to study the time evolution of the expectation value of the scale factor for two cases. We show that unlike classical solutions and upon choosing appropriate initial conditions, the expectation value of the scale factor never tends to the singular point which exhibits the singularity-free behavior of the solutions in the quantum domain.

  3. Asymptotic freedom in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity.

    PubMed

    D'Odorico, Giulio; Saueressig, Frank; Schutten, Marrit

    2014-10-24

    We use the Wetterich equation for foliated spacetimes to study the renormalization group flow of projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity coupled to n Lifshitz scalars. Using novel results for anisotropic heat kernels, the matter-induced beta functions for the gravitational couplings are computed explicitly. The renormalization group flow exhibits an UV attractive anisotropic Gaussian fixed point where Newton's constant vanishes and the extra scalar mode decouples. This fixed point ensures that the theory is asymptotically free in the large-n expansion, indicating that projectable Hořava-Lifshitz gravity is perturbatively renormalizable. Notably, the fundamental fixed point action does not obey detailed balance. PMID:25379908

  4. Lasing characteristics of Ho:YAG single crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Miller, Keith; Johnson, Eric G; Nie, Craig D; Bera, Subhabrata; Harrington, James A; Shori, Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Lasing was demonstrated for the first time at 2.09 μm in 0.5% Holmium (Ho) doped YAG single crystal fiber (SCF) fabricated using the Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) method. Output power of 23.5 W with 67.5% optical-to-optical slope efficiency is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest output power achieved at 2 µm from a SCF fabricated using LHPG. With continued improvement in the quality of the SCF and better thermal management, output power of few 100s W and higher, especially in the 2 µm spectral region, is realizable in the very near future.

  5. Ho:YLF Laser Pumped by TM:Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Itabe, Toshikazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by 1.94-micron Tm:fiber laser is described. A ring resonator of 3m length is adopted for the oscillator. The laser is a master oscillator and an amplifier system. It is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The laser outputs were about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser was developed to be used for wind and CO2 measurements.

  6. Lasing characteristics of Ho:YAG single crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Miller, Keith; Johnson, Eric G; Nie, Craig D; Bera, Subhabrata; Harrington, James A; Shori, Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Lasing was demonstrated for the first time at 2.09 μm in 0.5% Holmium (Ho) doped YAG single crystal fiber (SCF) fabricated using the Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) method. Output power of 23.5 W with 67.5% optical-to-optical slope efficiency is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest output power achieved at 2 µm from a SCF fabricated using LHPG. With continued improvement in the quality of the SCF and better thermal management, output power of few 100s W and higher, especially in the 2 µm spectral region, is realizable in the very near future. PMID:27137589

  7. Induction of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) does not enhance adiponectin production in human adipocytes: Evidence against a direct HO-1 - Adiponectin axis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengliu; Kimura, Masaki; Ng, Choaping; He, Jingjing; Keshvari, Sahar; Rose, Felicity J; Barclay, Johanna L; Whitehead, Jonathan P

    2015-09-15

    Adiponectin is a salutary adipokine and hypoadiponectinemia is implicated in the aetiology of obesity-related inflammation and cardiometabolic disease making therapeutic strategies to increase adiponectin attractive. Emerging evidence, predominantly from preclinical studies, suggests induction of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) increases adiponectin production and reduces inflammatory tone. Here, we aimed to test whether induction of HO-1 enhanced adiponectin production from mature adipocytes. Treatment of human adipocytes with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) or hemin for 24-48 h increased HO-1 expression and activity without affecting adiponectin expression and secretion. Treatment of adipocytes with TNFα reduced adiponectin secretion and increased expression and secretion of additional pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and MCP-1, as well as expression of sXBP-1, a marker of ER stress. HO-1 induction failed to reverse these effects. These results demonstrate that induction of HO-1 does not directly enhance adiponectin production or ameliorate the pro-inflammatory effects of TNFα and argue against a direct HO-1 - adiponectin axis.

  8. Electron microscope observations on Ca2+-ATPase microcrystals in detergent-solubilized sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K A; Mullner, N; Pikula, S; Dux, L; Peracchia, C; Varga, S; Martonosi, A

    1988-04-15

    Crystalline arrays of Ca2+-ATPase molecules develop in detergent-solubilized sarcoplasmic reticulum during incubation for several weeks at 2 degrees C under nitrogen in a medium of 0.1 M KCl, 10 mM K-3-(N-morpholino)propanesulfonate, pH 6.0, 3 mM MgCl2, 20 mM CaCl2, 20% glycerol, 3 mM NaN3, 5 mM dithiothreitol, 25 IU/ml Trasylol, 2 micrograms/ml 1,6-di-tert-butyl-p-cresol, 2 mg/ml protein, and 2-4 mg of detergent/mg of protein. Electron microscopy of sectioned, negatively stained, freeze-fractured, and frozen-hydrated Ca2+-ATPase crystals indicates that they consist of stacked lamellar arrays of Ca2+-ATPase molecules. Prominent periodicities of ATPase molecules within the lamellae arise from a centered rectangular lattice of dimensions 164 x 55.5 A. The association of lamellae into three-dimensional stacks is assumed to involve interactions between the exposed hydrophilic headgroups of ATPase molecules, that is promoted by glycerol and 20 mM Ca2+. Similar Ca2+-induced crystals were observed with purified or purified and delipidated Ca2+-ATPase preparations at lower detergent/protein ratios. Cross-linking of Ca2+-ATPase crystals with glutaraldehyde protects the structure against conditions such as low Ca2+, high pH, elevated temperature, SH group reagents, high concentration of detergents, and removal of phospholipids by extraction with organic solvents that disrupt unfixed preparations. PMID:2965700

  9. GDx-MM: An imaging Mueller matrix retinal polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twietmeyer, Karen Marie

    2007-12-01

    Retinal diseases are a major cause of blindness worldwide. Although widely studied, disease mechanisms are not completely understood, and diagnostic tests may not detect disease early enough for timely intervention. The goal of this research is to contribute to research for more sensitive diagnostic tests that might use the interaction of polarized light with retinal tissue to detect subtle changes in the microstructure. This dissertation describes the GDx-MM, a scanning laser polarimeter which measures a complete 16-element Mueller matrix image of the retina. This full polarization signature may provide new comparative information on the structure of healthy and diseased retinal tissue by highlighting depolarizing structures as well as structures with varying magnitudes and orientations of retardance and diattenuation. The three major components of this dissertation are: (1) Development of methods for polarimeter optimization and error analysis; (2) Design, optimization, assembly, calibration, and validation of the GDx-MM polarimeter; and (3) Analysis of data for several human subjects. Development involved modifications to a Laser Diagnostics GDx, a commercially available scanning laser ophthalmoscope with incomplete polarization capability. Modifications included installation of polarization components, development of a data acquisition system, and implementation of algorithms to convert raw data into polarization parameter images. Optimization involved visualization of polarimeter state trajectories on the Poincare sphere and a condition number analysis of the instrument matrix. Retinal images are collected non-invasively at 20 mum resolution over a 15° visual field in four seconds. Validation of the polarimeter demonstrates a polarimetric measurement accuracy of approximately +/- 5%. Retinal polarization data was collected on normal human subjects at the University of Arizona and at Indiana University School of Optometry. Calculated polarization parameter

  10. Ca(2+) Binding and Transport Studied with Ca(2+)/EGTA Buffers and (45)Ca(2+).

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Pankaj; Olesen, Claus; Møller, Jesper V

    2016-01-01

    The chapter describes procedures useful for determination of Ca(2+) binding by membranous Ca(2+)-ATPase based on the correction for the removal of Ca(2+) present in a non-bound state in the suspension medium. This is done by a filtration procedure that retains the membranous material on the Millipore filters. With suitable sucking devices it is possible to gently remove without dehydration nearly all medium from the Ca(2+) containing membranes, except that required for wetting of the filters on which they are deposited. Correction for this effect can be done with a double-filter where the radioactive content of the lower (protein-free) filter is subtracted from that present in the upper filter for calculation of Ca(2+) binding. This methodology can be used to study the effect of inhibitors on Ca(2+) binding and -transport, and with Ca(2+)/EGTA buffers to explore the Ca(2+) binding affinities and cooperative aspects of the two transport sites.

  11. Containment-enhanced Ho:YAG photofragmentation of soft tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christens-Barry, William A.; Guarnieri, Michael; Carson, Benjamin S.

    1998-01-01

    Laser surgery of soft tissue can exploit the power of brief, intense pulses of light to cause localized disruption of tissue with minimal effect upon surrounding tissue. In particular, studies of Ho:YAG laser surgery have shown that the effects of cavitation upon tissues and bone depend upon the physical composition of structures in the vicinity of the surgical site. For photofragmentation of occluding structures within catheters and other implant devices, it is possible to exploit the particular geometry of the catheter to amplify the effects of photofragmentation beyond those seen in bulk tissue. A Ho:YAG laser was used to photofragment occlusive material (tissue and tissue analogs) contained in glass capillary tubing and catheter tubing of the kind used in ventricular shunt implants for the management of hydrocephalus. Occluded catheters obtained from patient explants were also employed. Selection of operational parameters used in photoablation and photofragmentation of soft tissue must consider the physical composition and geometry of the treatment site. In the present case, containment of the soft tissue within relatively inelastic catheters dramatically alters the extent of photofragmentation relative to bulk (unconstrained) material. Our results indicate that the disruptive effect of cavitation bubbles is increased in catheters, due to the rapid displacement of material by cavitation bubbles comparable in size to the inner diameter of the catheter. The cylindrical geometry of the catheter lumen may additionally influence the propagation of acoustic shock waves that result from the collapse of the condensing cavitation bubbles.

  12. Strong coupling in Hořava gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charmousis, Christos; Niz, Gustavo; Padilla, Antonio; Saffin, Paul M.

    2009-08-01

    By studying perturbations about the vacuum, we show that Hořava gravity suffers from two different strong coupling problems, extending all the way into the deep infra-red. The first of these is associated with the principle of detailed balance and explains why solutions to General Relativity are typically not recovered in models that preserve this structure. The second of these occurs even without detailed balance and is associated with the breaking of diffeomorphism invariance, required for anisotropic scaling in the UV. Since there is a reduced symmetry group there are additional degrees of freedom, which need not decouple in the infra-red. Indeed, we use the Stuckelberg trick to show that one of these extra modes become strongly coupled as the parameters approach their desired infra-red fixed point. Whilst we can evade the first strong coupling problem by breaking detailed balance, we cannot avoid the second, whatever the form of the potential. Therefore the original Hořava model, and its "phenomenologically viable" extensions do not have a perturbative General Relativity limit at any scale. Experiments which confirm the perturbative gravitational wave prediction of General Relativity, such as the cumulative shift of the periastron time of binary pulsars, will presumably rule out the theory.

  13. Itinerant and localized magnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetic Ho

    DOE PAGES

    Rettig, L.; Dornes, C.; Thielemann-Kuhn, N.; Pontius, N.; Zabel, H.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T. A.; Chollet, M.; Robert, A.; Sikorski, M.; et al

    2016-06-21

    Using femtosecond time-resolved resonant magnetic x-ray diffraction at the Ho L3 absorption edge, we investigate the demagnetization dynamics in antiferromagnetically ordered metallic Ho after femtosecond optical excitation. Here, tuning the x-ray energy to the electric dipole (E1, 2p → 5d) or quadrupole (E2, 2p → 4f) transition allows us to selectively and independently study the spin dynamics of the itinerant 5d and localized 4f electronic subsystems via the suppression of the magnetic (2 1 3–τ) satellite peak. We find demagnetization time scales very similar to ferromagnetic 4f systems, suggesting that the loss of magnetic order occurs via a similar spin-flipmore » process in both cases. The simultaneous demagnetization of both subsystems demonstrates strong intra-atomic 4f–5d exchange coupling. In addition, an ultrafast lattice contraction due to the release of magneto-striction leads to a transient shift of the magnetic satellite peak.« less

  14. Measurement of atmospheric HO by a chemical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, R. Subramonia; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    1986-01-01

    The parameters for a chemical technique can be outlined from the following set of desirable goals: (1) sufficient conversion of tracer species A to product B that B can be measured quantitatively in the presence of A and a great excess of air; (2) specificity of reaction such that A is converted to B only by reaction with HO; and (3) sufficient sensitivity for detection that the ambient concentration of HO is not seriously perturbed by the presence of A and B. This proposed study involves finding a chemical reaction specific enough for OH, and a measurement of the product formed. What one wants is a rate constant of about 10 to the -10th power cu cm/s, so that 0.1 percent of the OH will be converted in 100 s. Laboratory studies are needed to find a reaction which will fill this bill, yielding a product in quantity sufficient for precise measurement. This is an extremely fast constant and the search may be difficult. Again there is a question of perturbing the local environment, while still providing a sensitive measurement. Also the temperature and pressure dependence of the reaction rate is a complicated function for many of these species (that is, one must use a RRKM or Troe-based picture), and must be taken into account.

  15. Minimally invasive scoliosis treatment with a Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, Christian G.; Lang, Robert D.; Goetz, Marcus H.

    2000-11-01

    Today most surgical treatment of spinal deformations is concentrated on invasive mechanical techniques with long operation times and major effects on the patient's mobility. The proposed minimally invasive technique using laser light for tissue ablation offers a possibility of gentle scoliosis treatment. It is thought that an early removal of the epiphysial growth zone on the convex side over several vertebrae results in a straightening of the spine. In a first evaluation, four different laser systems including argon ion, Nd:YAG (Q-switched), Nd:YAG (cw), and Ho:YAG laser were compared with respect to thermal damage to adjacent tissue, ablation rates, efficiency and laser handling. For in-vivo investigation, fresh lamb spine was used. Comparison showed that the Ho:YAG laser is the most appropriate laser for the given goal, providing efficient photoablation with moderate thermal effects on the adjacent tissue. In a second step the proposed minimally invasive operation technique was performed in in-vivo experiments on young foxhounds using 3D- thoracoscopic operation techniques. During these operations temperature mapping was done using fiber-optic fluorescent probes. After 12 months of normal growth the animals were sacrificed and x-ray as well as MRI was performed on the spine. First results show a positive effect of scoliotic growth in two cases. Being able to produce a scoliosis by hemiepiphysiodesis on the vertebra, It is thought that this technique is successful for a straightening of the spine on patients with scoliosis.

  16. Stochastic expression and epigenetic memory at the yeast HO promoter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yoon, Youngdae; Yu, Yaxin; Parnell, Emily J.; Garay, Juan Antonio Raygoza; Mwangi, Michael M.; Cross, Frederick R.; Stillman, David J.; Bai, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene regulation usually involves sequence-specific transcription factors and sequence-nonspecific cofactors. A large effort has been made to understand how these factors affect the average gene expression level among a population. However, little is known about how they regulate gene expression in individual cells. In this work, we address this question by mutating multiple factors in the regulatory pathway of the yeast HO promoter (HOpr) and probing the corresponding promoter activity in single cells using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. We show that the HOpr fires in an “on/off” fashion in WT cells as well as in different genetic backgrounds. Many chromatin-related cofactors that affect the average level of HO expression do not actually affect the firing amplitude of the HOpr; instead, they affect the firing frequency among individual cell cycles. With certain mutations, the bimodal expression exhibits short-term epigenetic memory across the mitotic boundary. This memory is propagated in “cis” and reflects enhanced activator binding after a previous “on” cycle. We present evidence that the memory results from slow turnover of the histone acetylation marks. PMID:23836672

  17. The LMT Galaxies' 3 mm Spectroscopic Survey: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa González, D.; Schloerb, P.; Vega, O.; Hunt, L.; Narayanan, G.; Calzetti, D.; Yun, M.; Terlevich, E.; Terlevich, R.; Mayya, Y. D.; Chávez, M.; Montaña, A.; Pérez García, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    The molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies offers fundamental insight for understanding star-formation processes and how stellar feedback affects the nuclear activity of certain galaxies. We present here Large Millimeter Telescope spectra obtained with the Redshift Search Receiver, a spectrograph that covers simultaneously the 3 mm band from 74 to 111 GHz with a spectral resolution of around 100 km/s. Our selected galaxies, have been detected previously in HCN, and have different degrees of nuclear activity — one normal galaxy (NGC 6946), the starburst prototype (M82) and two %ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs, IRAS 17208-0014 and Mrk 231). We plotted our data in the HCO+/HCN vs. HCN/13CO diagnostic diagram finding that NGC 6946 and M82 are located close to other normal galaxies; and that both IRAS 17208-0014 and Mrk 231 are close to the position of the well known ULIRG Arp 220 reported by Snell et al. (2011). We found that in Mrk 231 - a galaxy with a well known active galactic nucleus - the HCO+/HCN ratio is similar to the ratio observed in normal galaxies.

  18. Cleanroom compatible anodization cell for 150 mm Si wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardwell, Jennifer A.; LeBrun, Les; Evans, R. James; Curry, Donald G.; Abbott, Roger

    1996-06-01

    A cleanroom compatible anodization cell for use with 150 mm Si wafers has been constructed and tested. The material of construction is polyvinylidene fluoride, Kynar■, with Chemraz■ (elastomeric polytetrafluoroethylene) O-rings used for sealing. The back contact is made through a dilute HF solution, thus eliminating the possibility for metallic contamination which exists for other forms of back contact. Pt electrodes immersed in the back contact and front contact solutions are the primary electrical connection sites. Ellipsometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and dilute HF etch rate experiments were used to characterize the as-grown and annealed anodic oxides produced in this cell. Ellipsometric thickness mapping showed excellent lateral oxide uniformity over the entire anodized area; the standard deviations were <2 Å (for oxides ≤100 Å in thickness), <6 Å (for oxides ≤400 Å in thickness), and <10 Å (for oxides <500 Å in thickness). The properties of the oxides, as evaluated by FTIR spectroscopy are essentially identical to those grown on small-area samples using conventional anodization with a metallic back contact.

  19. Parallel implementation, validation, and performance of MM5

    SciTech Connect

    Michalakes, J.; Canfield, T.; Nanjundiah, R.; Hammond, S.; Grell, G.

    1994-12-31

    We describe a parallel implementation of the nonhydrostatic version of the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model, MM5, that includes nesting capabilities. This version of the model can run on many different massively Parallel computers (including a cluster of workstations). The model has been implemented and run on the IBM SP and Intel multiprocessors using a columnwise decomposition that supports irregularly shaped allocations of the problem to processors. This stategy will facilitate dynamic load balancing for improved parallel efficiency and promotes a modular design that simplifies the nesting problem AU data communication for finite differencing, inter-domain exchange of data, and I/O is encapsulated within a parallel library, RSL. Hence, there are no sends or receives in the parallel model itself. The library is Generalizable to other, similar finite difference approximation codes. The code is validated by comparing the rate of growth in error between the sequential and parallel models with the error growth rate when the sequential model input is perturbed to simulate floating point rounding error. Series of runs on increasing numbers of parallel processors demonstrate that the parallel implementation is efficient and scalable to large numbers of processors.

  20. rf breakdown tests of mm-wave metallic accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Dolgashev, Valery; Bowden, Gordon; Clarke, Christine; Hogan, Mark; McCormick, Doug; Novokhatski, Alexander; Spataro, Bruno; Weathersby, Stephen; Tantawi, Sami G.

    2016-01-01

    We are exploring the physics and frequency-scaling of vacuum rf breakdowns at sub-THz frequencies. We present the experimental results of rf tests performed in metallic mm-wave accelerating structures. These experiments were carried out at the facility for advanced accelerator experimental tests (FACET) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The rf fields were excited by the FACET ultrarelativistic electron beam. We compared the performances of metal structures made with copper and stainless steel. The rf frequency of the fundamental accelerating mode, propagating in the structures at the speed of light, varies from 115 to 140 GHz. The traveling wave structures are 0.1 m long and composed of 125 coupled cavities each. We determined the peak electric field and pulse length where the structures were not damaged by rf breakdowns. We calculated the electric and magnetic field correlated with the rf breakdowns using the FACET bunch parameters. The wakefields were calculated by a frequency domain method using periodic eigensolutions. Such a method takes into account wall losses and is applicable to a large variety of geometries. The maximum achieved accelerating gradient is 0.3 GV /m with a peak surface electric field of 1.5 GV /m and a pulse length of about 2.4 ns.

  1. Digital Frequency Domain Multiplexer for mm-Wavelength Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Spieler, Helmuth G; Dobbs, Matt; Bissonnette, Eric; Spieler, Helmuth G.

    2007-07-23

    An FPGA based digital signal processing (DSP) system for biasing and reading out multiplexed bolometric detectors for mm-wavelength telescopes is presented. This readout system is being deployed for balloon-borne and ground based cosmology experiments with the primary goal of measuring the signature of inflation with the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. The system consists of analog superconducting electronics running at 250 mK and 4 K, coupled to digital room temperature backend electronics described here. The digital electronics perform the real time functionality with DSP algorithms implemented in firmware. A soft embedded processor provides all of the slow housekeeping control and communications. Each board in the system synthesizes multi-frequency combs of 8 to 32 carriers in the MHz band to bias the detectors. After the carriers have been modulated with the sky-signal by the detectors, the same boards digitize the comb directly. The carriers are mixed down to base-band and low pass filtered. The signal bandwidth of 0.050Hz-100 Hz places extreme requirements on stability and requires powerful filtering techniques to recover the sky-signal from the MHz carriers.

  2. Mapping wetlands on beaver flowages with 35-mm photography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Beaver flowages and associated wetlands on the Chippewa National Forest, north-central Minnesota, were photographed from the ground and from the open side window of a small high-wing monoplane. The 35-mm High Speed Ektachrome transparencies obtained were used to map the cover-type associations visible on the aerial photographs. Nearly vertical aerial photos were rectified by projecting the slides onto a base map consisting ofcontrol points located by plane-table survey. Maps were prepared by tracing the recognizable stands of vegetation in the rectified projection at the desired map scale. Final map scales ranging from 1:260 to 1:571 permitted identification and mapping of 26 cover-type associations on 10 study flowages in 1971. This cover-mapping technique was economical and substituted for detailed ground surveys. Comparative data from 10 flowages were collected serially throughout the entire open-water season. Although developed for analysis of waterfowl habitat, the technique has application to other areas of wildlife management and ecological investigation.

  3. 100 mm dynamic stencils pattern sub-micrometre structures.

    PubMed

    Savu, Veronica; Xie, Shenqi; Brugger, Juergen

    2011-07-01

    Dynamic stencil lithography uses a moving shadow-mask to draw patterns by having directionally evaporated material deposited through the stencil apertures onto the substrate. Sub-micrometre, two-dimensional patterning is demonstrated at full 100 mm wafer scale, with two examples emphasizing this technique's unique features. Structures having a width-modulated height below a certain aperture size are fabricated by moving the stencil according to a two-dimensional trajectory. Variable-period gratings are obtained by translating a row of apertures at different orientations with respect to the row's axis. Despite the long deposition sequences one could envision for a stencil in dynamic mode, the apertures' active life-time in the sub-micrometre domain remains limited by the material's accretion on the membrane, resulting in the eventual clogging of the openings. A novel solution to this problem containing a micro-heater embedded in the membrane is described and its effectiveness in preventing material from clogging the apertures is demonstrated. PMID:21674118

  4. COSMOG: Cosmology Oriented Sub-mm Modeling of Galactic Foregrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Leisawitz, D.

    2004-01-01

    With upcoming missions in mid- and far-Infrared there is a need for software packages to reliably simulate the planned observations. This would help in both planning the observation and scanning strategy and in developing the concepts of the far-off missions. As this workshop demonstrated, many of the new missions are to be in the far-IR range of the electromagnetic spectrum and at the same time will map the sky with a sub-arcsec angular resolution. We present here a computer package for simulating foreground maps for the planned sub-mm and far-IR missions. such as SPECS. The package allows to study confusion limits and simulate cosmological observations for specified sky location interactively and in real time. Most of the emission at wavelengths long-ward of approximately 50 microns is dominated by Galactic cirrus and Zodiacal dust emission. Stellar emission at these wavelengths is weak and is for now neglected. Cosmological sources (distant and not-so-distant) galaxies for specified cosmologies will be added. Briefly, the steps that the algorithm goes through is described.

  5. Manufacturing and performance test of an 800-mm space optic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krödel, Matthias R.; Ozaki, Tsuyoshi; Kume, Masami; Furuya, Akira; Yui, Yukari Y.; Imai, Hiroko; Katayama, Haruyoshi; Tange, Yoshio; Nakagawa, Takao; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2008-07-01

    Next generation space telescopes, which are currently being developed in the US and Europe, require large-scale light-weight reflectors with high specific strength, high specific stiffness, low CTE, and high thermal conductivity. To meet budget constraints, they also require materials that produce surfaces suitable for polishing without expensive over-coatings. HB-Cesic - a European and Japanese trademark of ECM - is a Hybrid Carbon-Fiber Reinforced SiC composite developed jointly by ECM and MELCO to meet these challenges. The material's mechanical performance, such as stiffness, bending strength, and fracture toughness are significantly improved compared to the classic ECM Cesic material (type MF). Thermal expansion and thermal conductivity of HB-Cesic at cryogenic temperatures are now partly established; and excellent performance for large future space mirrors and structures are expected. This paper presents the design and manufacturing of an 800-mm mirror for space application, starting with the C/C raw material preparation to the finishing of the components, including the polishing of the mirror. The letters "HB" in HB-Cesic stand for "hybrid" to indicate that the C/C raw material is composed of a mixture of different types of chopped, short carbon-fibers.

  6. Kinetic Inductance Detectors development for mm-wave Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monfardini, A.; Swenson, L. J.; Benoit, A.; Bideau, A.; Bres, G.; Camus, P.; Garde, G.; Hoffmann, C.; Minet, J.; Rodenas, H.; Nika Collaboration

    Throughout the last decades, development of low-temperat- ure detectors focused mainly on the design of high-sensitivity, single-pixel devices. This includes such devices as semiconductor-based photodetectors and bolometers, Magnetic Metallic Calorimeters (MMC), Superconducting Tunnel Junctions (STJ), and Transition Edge Sensors (TES). However, these devices have had limited success in achieving the simultaneous large-scale array sizes and large-bandwidth operation necessary for high-speed, high-resolution detection. To overcome this performance limitation, it is advisable to focus on low-temperature detectors which are intrinsically adapted to giant-array multiplexing and ultra-fast readout. To adopt large scale frequency-domain multiplexing for low-temperature detectors, it is necessary to find detectors which"broadcast" at microwave frequencies. Superconducting microwave resonators naturally lend themselves to this task. One recent demonstration is an implementation known as Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs). This detection mechanism can be adopted for low-energy EM radiation (radio, mm, THz) in continuous mode, or in pulsed mode for higher energy radiation and particles. We present an ongoing development for a KIDs instrument dedicated to millimetric ground-based observations at the 30m IRAM telescope at Pico Veleta. The Neel IRAM KIDs Array (NIKA) project is coordinated in Grenoble and involves groups in Holland (SRON), UK (Cardiff) and Italy (Roma).

  7. Photoluminescence properties of Ho{sup 3+} ion in lithium-fluoroborate glass containing different modifier oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishna, A. Rajesh, D. Ratnakaram, Y. C.

    2014-04-24

    Trivalent holmium (0.5 mol%) doped lithium fluoro-borate glasses with the chemical compositions 49.5Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7−}20BaF{sub 2−}10NaF−20MO (where M=Mg, Ca, Cd and Pb), 49.5Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7−}20BaF{sub 2−}10NaF−10MgO−10CaO and 49.5Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7−}20BaF{sub 2−}10NaF−10CdO−10PbO were synthesized and investigated their photoluminescence properties. The variation in chemical composition by varying modifier oxides causes changes in the structural spectroscopic behavior of Ho{sup 3+} ions. These changes are examined by UV-VIS- NIR and luminescence spectroscopic techniques. The visible luminescence spectra were obtained by exciting samples at 409 nm radiation.

  8. Mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of newly developed biodegradable Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yunfei; Lin, Jixing; Wen, Cuie; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Yuncang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Mg-Zr-Sr alloys can be anticipated as excellent biodegradable implant materials for load-bearing applications. In general, rare earth elements (REEs) are widely used in magnesium (Mg) alloys with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties of Mg-based alloys. In this study, the REE holmium (Ho) was added to an Mg-1Zr-2Sr alloy at different concentrations of Mg1Zr2SrxHo alloys (x = 0, 1, 3, 5 wt. %) and the microstructure, mechanical properties, degradation behaviour and biocompatibility of the alloys were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Ho to Mg1Zr2Sr led to the formation of the intermetallic phases MgHo3, Mg2Ho and Mg17Sr2 which resulted in enhanced mechanical strength and decreased degradation rates of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. Furthermore, Ho addition (≤5 wt. %) to Mg-Zr-Sr alloys led to enhancement of cell adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast cells on the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. The in vitro biodegradation and the biocompatibility of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys were both influenced by the Ho concentration in the Mg alloys; Mg1Zr2Sr3Ho exhibited lower degradation rates than Mg1Zr2Sr and displayed the best biocompatibility compared with the other alloys. PMID:27553403

  9. Mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of newly developed biodegradable Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yunfei; Lin, Jixing; Wen, Cuie; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Yuncang

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Mg-Zr-Sr alloys can be anticipated as excellent biodegradable implant materials for load-bearing applications. In general, rare earth elements (REEs) are widely used in magnesium (Mg) alloys with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties of Mg-based alloys. In this study, the REE holmium (Ho) was added to an Mg-1Zr-2Sr alloy at different concentrations of Mg1Zr2SrxHo alloys (x = 0, 1, 3, 5 wt. %) and the microstructure, mechanical properties, degradation behaviour and biocompatibility of the alloys were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Ho to Mg1Zr2Sr led to the formation of the intermetallic phases MgHo3, Mg2Ho and Mg17Sr2 which resulted in enhanced mechanical strength and decreased degradation rates of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. Furthermore, Ho addition (≤5 wt. %) to Mg-Zr-Sr alloys led to enhancement of cell adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast cells on the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. The in vitro biodegradation and the biocompatibility of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys were both influenced by the Ho concentration in the Mg alloys; Mg1Zr2Sr3Ho exhibited lower degradation rates than Mg1Zr2Sr and displayed the best biocompatibility compared with the other alloys. PMID:27553403

  10. Mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion and biocompatibility of newly developed biodegradable Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yunfei; Lin, Jixing; Wen, Cuie; Zhang, Dongmei; Li, Yuncang

    2016-08-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that Mg-Zr-Sr alloys can be anticipated as excellent biodegradable implant materials for load-bearing applications. In general, rare earth elements (REEs) are widely used in magnesium (Mg) alloys with the aim of enhancing the mechanical properties of Mg-based alloys. In this study, the REE holmium (Ho) was added to an Mg-1Zr-2Sr alloy at different concentrations of Mg1Zr2SrxHo alloys (x = 0, 1, 3, 5 wt. %) and the microstructure, mechanical properties, degradation behaviour and biocompatibility of the alloys were systematically investigated. The results indicate that the addition of Ho to Mg1Zr2Sr led to the formation of the intermetallic phases MgHo3, Mg2Ho and Mg17Sr2 which resulted in enhanced mechanical strength and decreased degradation rates of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. Furthermore, Ho addition (≤5 wt. %) to Mg-Zr-Sr alloys led to enhancement of cell adhesion and proliferation of osteoblast cells on the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys. The in vitro biodegradation and the biocompatibility of the Mg-Zr-Sr-Ho alloys were both influenced by the Ho concentration in the Mg alloys; Mg1Zr2Sr3Ho exhibited lower degradation rates than Mg1Zr2Sr and displayed the best biocompatibility compared with the other alloys.

  11. IRRS, UV-Vis-NIR absorption and photoluminescence upconversion in Ho{sup 3+}-doped oxyfluorophosphate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Karmakar, Basudeb . E-mail: basudebk@cgcri.res.in

    2005-09-15

    Infrared reflection spectroscopic (IRRS), ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) absorption and photoluminescence upconversion properties with special emphasis on the spectrochemistry of the oxyfluorophosphate (oxide incorporated fluorophosphates) glasses of the Ba(PO{sub 3}){sub 2}-AlF{sub 3}-CaF{sub 2}-SrF{sub 2}-MgF{sub 2}-Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3} system have been studied with different concentrations (0.1, 0.3 and 1.0 mol%) of Ho{sub 2}O{sub 3}. IRRS spectral band position and intensity of Ho{sup 3+} ion doped oxyfluorophosphate glasses have been discussed in terms of reduced mass and force constant. UV-Vis-NIR absorption band position has been justified with quantitative calculation of nephelauxetic parameter and covalent bonding characteristics of the host. NIR to visible upconversion has been investigated by exciting at 892 nm at room temperature. Three upconverted bands originated from the {sup 5}F{sub 3}{yields}{sup 5}I{sub 8} ({sup 5}S{sub 2}, {sup 5}F{sub 4}){yields}{sup 5}I{sub 8} and {sup 5}F{sub 5}{yields}{sup 5}I{sub 8} transitions have found to be centered at 491 nm (blue, medium), 543 nm (green, very strong) and 658 nm (red, weak), respectively. These bands have been justified from the evaluation of the absorption, normal (down conversion) fluorescence and excitation spectra. The upconversion processes have been explained by the excited state absorption (ESA), energy transfer (ET) and cross relaxation (CR) mechanisms involving population of the metastable (storage) energy levels by multiphonon deexcitation effect. It is evident from the IRRS study that the upconversion phenomena are expedited by the low multiphonon relaxation rate in oxyfluorophosphate glasses owing to their high intense low phonon energy ({approx}600 cm{sup -1}) which is very close to that of fluoride glasses (500-600 cm{sup -1})

  12. HO-1 Upregulation Attenuates Adipocyte Dysfunction, Obesity, and Isoprostane Levels in Mice Fed High Fructose Diets

    PubMed Central

    Harsh, Mohit; Sodhi, Komal; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Abraham, Nader G.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Fructose metabolism is an unregulated metabolic pathway and excessive fructose consumption is known to activate ROS. HO-1 is a potent antioxidant gene that plays a key role in decreasing ROS and isoprostanes. We examined whether the fructose-mediated increase in adipocyte dysfunction involves an increase in isoprostanes and that pharmacological induction of HO-1 would decrease both isoprostane levels and adipogenesis. Methods and Results. We examined the effect of fructose, on adipogenesis in human MSCs in the presence and absence of CoPP, an inducer of HO-1. Fructose increased adipogenesis and the number of large lipid droplets while decreasing the number of small lipid droplets (P < 0.05). Levels of heme and isoprostane in fructose treated MSC-derived adipocytes were increased. CoPP reversed these effects and markedly increased HO-1 and the Wnt signaling pathway. The high fructose diet increased heme levels in adipose tissue and increased circulating isoprostane levels (P < 0.05 versus control). Fructose diets decreased HO-1 and adiponectin levels in adipose tissue. Induction of HO-1 by CoPP decreased isoprostane synthesis (P < 0.05 versus fructose). Conclusion. Fructose treatment resulted in increased isoprostane production and adipocyte dysfunction, which was reversed by the increased expression of HO-1. PMID:25295182

  13. The role of HO-1 in protection against lead-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyi; Ye, Fang; Li, Lili; Chang, Wei; Wu, Xiongwen; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Lead is a pervasive and persistent environmental pollutant that exerts deleterious effects on all living organisms and continues to threaten public health on a global scale. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-inducible enzyme that mediates antioxidative and cytoprotective effects to maintain cellular redox homeostasis and protect cells from oxidative stress. This study was designed to explore the role of HO-1 in protection against lead neurotoxicity and the signaling pathways involved. Lead acetate (PbAc) exposure resulted in increased HO-1 expression in primary rat hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells. PbAc-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) also increased, and cell viability decreased in SH-SY5Y cells. We further demonstrated that HO-1 could be induced by PbAc through the P38, ERK1/2, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in a ROS-dependent manner and through the JNK pathway in a ROS-independent manner. Further investigation revealed that HO-1 overexpression significantly restrained cell apoptosis and ROS production induced by PbAc in SH-SY5Y cells. Moreover, HO-1 knockdown aggravated PbAc-induced cell apoptosis and ROS production. Our results indicated that HO-1 was a novel protective factor that could efficiently inhibit PbAc-induced oxidative stress and cell death in the nervous system, thereby providing the potential therapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of lead-related diseases.

  14. Photocatalytic activity of Ho-doped anatase titanium dioxide coated magnetite.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhongliang; Xiang, Yongfang; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yao, Shuhua

    2011-01-01

    A composite photocatalyst (Ho/TiO(2)/Fe(3)O(4)) with Ho-doped anatase titanium dioxide (Ho/TiO(2)) shell and a magnetite core was prepared by coating photoactive Ho/TiO(2) onto a magnetic Fe(3)O(4) core through the hydrolysis of tetrabutyltitanate (Ti(OBu)(4), TBT) in water/oil (w/o) microemulsion with precursors of Ho(NO(3))(3) and TBT in the presence of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. The morphological, structural and optical properties of the prepared samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV-Vis diffusive reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS). The effect of Ho ion content on the photocatalytic activity was studied. The photodegradation behavior of the prepared photocatalyst under UV and visible light was investigated in aqueous solution using methyl orange (MO) as target pollutant. The results showed that the prepared photocatalyst was activated by visible light and used as effective catalyst in photo-oxidation reactions. In addition, the possibility of cyclic usage of the prepared photocatalyst was also confirmed. Moreover, Ho/TiO(2) was tightly bound to Fe(3)O(4) and could be easily recovered from the medium by a simple magnetic process. It can therefore be potentially applied for the treatment of water contaminated by organic pollutants. PMID:21208216

  15. The structure, magnetostriction, and hysteresis of (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.9)1-x(Tb0.15Ho0.85Fe1.9)x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bowen; Lv, Yan; Li, Guolu; Huang, Wenmei; Weng, Ling; Cui, Baozhi

    2015-05-01

    The (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.9)1-x(Tb0.15Ho0.85Fe1.9)x alloys were prepared in an arc furnace under high purity argon. The as-cast samples wrapped in Mo foil were sealed in a silica tube filled with high purity argon and were homogenized at 1000 °C for 1 day and at 950 °C for 5 days. Then, the homogenized specimens with 5 mm in diameter and 8 mm in length were annealed under the magnetic field of 320 kA/m. The static measurement of magnetostriction (λ//, λ⊥) was made by standard strain gauge, and the magnetization M was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that the main phase of annealed (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.9)1-x(Tb0.15Ho0.85Fe1.9)x alloys is the (Tb,Dy,Ho)Fe2 phase with the MgCu2-type structure. The magnetostriction λ// and magnetization M of (Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.9)1-x(Tb0.15Ho0.85Fe1.9)x alloys increases with increasing x from x = 0.1 to x = 0.3 when H < 240 kA/m. The hysteresis becomes small with increasing x when x ≤ 0.3. For magnetically annealed rod alloys, the magnetostriction markedly increases and reaches 1080 × 10-6 for x = 0.3 when H = 240 kA/m.

  16. Downregulation of Heme Oxygenase 1 (HO-1) Activity in Hematopoietic Cells Enhances Their Engraftment After Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, Mateusz; Moore, Joseph B; Zhao, John; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Grubczak, Kamil; Rzeszotek, Sylwia; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible stress-response enzyme that not only catalyzes the degradation of heme (e.g., released from erythrocytes) but also has an important function in various physiological and pathophysiological states associated with cellular stress, such as ischemic/reperfusion injury. HO-1 has a well-documented anti-inflammatory potential, and HO-1 has been reported to have a negative effect on adhesion and migration of neutrophils in acute inflammation in a model of peritonitis. This finding is supported by our recent observation that hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) from HO-1 KO mice are easy mobilizers, since they respond better to peripheral blood chemotactic gradients than wild-type littermates. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that transient inhibition of HO-1 by nontoxic small-molecule inhibitors would enhance migration of HSPCs in response to bone marrow chemoattractants and thereby facilitate their homing. To directly address this issue, we generated several human hematopoietic cell lines in which HO-1 was upregulated or downregulated. We also exposed murine and human BM-derived cells to small-molecule activators and inhibitors of HO-1. Our results indicate that HO-1 is an inhibitor of hematopoietic cell migration in response to crucial BM homing chemoattractants such as stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Most importantly, our in vitro and in vivo animal experiments demonstrate for the first time that transiently inhibiting HO-1 activity in HSPCs by small-molecule inhibitors improves HSPC engraftment. We propose that this simple and inexpensive strategy could be employed in the clinical setting to improve engraftment of HSPCs, particularly in those situations in which the number of HSPCs available for transplant is limited (e.g., when transplanting umbilical cord blood). PMID:27412411

  17. A Reevaluation of Airborne HO(x) Observations from NASA Field Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Jennifer; Crawford, James H.; Chen, Gao; Brune, William H.; Faloona, Ian C.; Tan, David; Harder, Hartwig; Martinez, Monica

    2006-01-01

    In-situ observations of tropospheric HO(x) (OH and HO2) obtained during four NASA airborne campaigns (SUCCESS, SONEX, PEM-Tropics B and TRACE-P) are reevaluated using the NASA Langley time-dependent photochemical box model. Special attention is given to previously diagnosed discrepancies between observed and predicted HO2 which increase with higher NO(x) levels and at high solar zenith angles. This analysis shows that much of the model discrepancy at high NO(x) during SUCCESS can be attributed to modeling observations at time-scales too long to capture the nonlinearity of HO(x) chemistry under highly variable conditions for NO(x). Discrepancies at high NO(x) during SONEX can be moderated to a large extent by complete use of all available precursor observations. Differences in kinetic rate coefficients and photolysis frequencies available for previous studies versus current recommendations also explain some of the disparity. Each of these causes is shown to exert greater influence with increasing NO(x) due to both the chemical nonlinearity between HO(x) and NO(x) and the increased sensitivity of HO(x) to changes in sources at high NO(x). In contrast, discrepancies at high solar zenith angles will persist until an adequate nighttime source of HO(x) can be identified. It is important to note that this analysis falls short of fully eliminating the issue of discrepancies between observed and predicted HO(x) for high NO(x) environments. These discrepancies are not resolved with the above causes in other data sets from ground-based field studies. Nevertheless, these results highlight important considerations in the application of box models to observationally based predictions of HO(x) radicals.

  18. Mechanical Stress Changes the Complex Interplay Between HO-1, Inflammation and Fibrosis, During Excisional Wound Repair.

    PubMed

    Cremers, Niels A J; Suttorp, Maarten; Gerritsen, Marlous M; Wong, Ronald J; van Run-van Breda, Coby; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Brouwer, Katrien M; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Carels, Carine E L; Lundvig, Ditte M S; Wagener, Frank A D T G

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress following surgery or injury can promote pathological wound healing and fibrosis, and lead to functional loss and esthetic problems. Splinted excisional wounds can be used as a model for inducing mechanical stress. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is thought to orchestrate the defense against inflammatory and oxidative insults that drive fibrosis. Here, we investigated the activation of the HO-1 system in a splinted and non-splinted full-thickness excisional wound model using HO-1-luc transgenic mice. Effects of splinting on wound closure, HO-1 promoter activity, and markers of inflammation and fibrosis were assessed. After seven days, splinted wounds were more than three times larger than non-splinted wounds, demonstrating a delay in wound closure. HO-1 promoter activity rapidly decreased following removal of the (epi)dermis, but was induced in both splinted and non-splinted wounds during skin repair. Splinting induced more HO-1 gene expression in 7-day wounds; however, HO-1 protein expression remained lower in the epidermis, likely due to lower numbers of keratinocytes in the re-epithelialization tissue. Higher numbers of F4/80-positive macrophages, αSMA-positive myofibroblasts, and increased levels of the inflammatory genes IL-1β, TNF-α, and COX-2 were present in 7-day splinted wounds. Surprisingly, mRNA expression of newly formed collagen (type III) was lower in 7-day wounds after splinting, whereas, VEGF and MMP-9 were increased. In summary, these data demonstrate that splinting delays cutaneous wound closure and HO-1 protein induction. The pro-inflammatory environment following splinting may facilitate higher myofibroblast numbers and increase the risk of fibrosis and scar formation. Therefore, inducing HO-1 activity against mechanical stress-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be an interesting strategy to prevent negative effects of surgery on growth and function in patients with orofacial clefts or in patients with

  19. Organics Substantially Reduce HO2 Uptake onto Aerosols Containing Transition Metal ions.

    PubMed

    Lakey, Pascale S J; George, Ingrid J; Baeza-Romero, Maria T; Whalley, Lisa K; Heard, Dwayne E

    2016-03-10

    A HO2 mass accommodation coefficient of α = 0.23 ± 0.07 was measured onto submicron copper(II)-doped ammonium sulfate aerosols at a relative humidity of 60 ± 3%, at 293 ± 2 K and at an initial HO2 concentration of ∼ 1 × 10(9) molecules cm(-3) by using an aerosol flow tube coupled to a sensitive fluorescence assay by gas expansion (FAGE) HO2 detection system. The effect upon the HO2 uptake coefficient γ of adding different organic species (malonic acid, citric acid, 1,2-diaminoethane, tartronic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and oxalic acid) into the copper(II)-doped aerosols was investigated. The HO2 uptake coefficient decreased steadily from the mass accommodation value to γ = 0.008 ± 0.009 when EDTA was added in a one-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II) ions, and to γ = 0.003 ± 0.004 when oxalic acid was added into the aerosol in a ten-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II). EDTA binds strongly to copper(II) ions, potentially making them unavailable for catalytic destruction of HO2, and could also be acting as a surfactant or changing the viscosity of the aerosol. The addition of oxalic acid to the aerosol potentially forms low-volatility copper-oxalate complexes that reduce the uptake of HO2 either by changing the viscosity of the aerosol or by causing precipitation out of the aerosol forming a coating. It is likely that there is a high enough oxalate to copper(II) ion ratio in many types of atmospheric aerosols to decrease the HO2 uptake coefficient. No observable change in the HO2 uptake coefficient was measured when the other organic species (malonic acid, citric acid, 1,2-diaminoethane, and tartronic acid) were added in a ten-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II) ions.

  20. Development of a Chemiluminescence Method for Gas-Phase HO2 Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Lloyd, J.; Springston, S.

    2003-12-01

    Hydroperoxyl Radical (HO2) is a highly reactive intermediate species that participates in photochemical processes in the troposphere. Accurate measurement of HO2 will facilitate the verification of the ozone production mechanism used by the atmospheric chemistry community. HO2 is also the major source of H2O2, which is responsible for the oxidation of SO2 in droplets. Here, we describe a new HO2 detection method based on flow injection analysis (FIA) with a chemiluminescence detector. Gas-phase HO2 is first scrubbed into a pH 9 borax buffer solution, then injected into a chemiluminescence detector, where HO2 and its conjugate base O2- react with MCLA, a synthetic analog of the luciferin from the crustacean Cypridina, to emit light at 465 nm. This technique shows high sensitivity (DL = 0.1 nM in liquid phase or 1 pptv in gas phase) and selectivity for the HO2 / O2- system. A unique feature of our technique is the calibration with a radiolytic method that uses a 60Co gamma ray source to quantitatively produce stable aqueous HO2 / O2- standards. This calibration method is highly reproducible, producing an instrument response that varies less than 5% from day to day. We tested our instrument in the meteorology field at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which is considered a clean remote rural site with background ozone levels about 30 ppbv. On July 17, 2003, a clear sunny day, with a steady NW wind, HO2 started to build up after sunrise and reached a maximum of 9 pptv at about 3 pm local time, approximately two hours after the maximum solar intensity. Our technique has the advantages of simplicity, low cost and ease of operation. It is especially suitable for field measurements, where space and energy resources are usually limited.

  1. Demonstration Report: ESTCP UXO Discrimination Study ESTCP PROJECT # MM-0838

    SciTech Connect

    Gasperikova, Erika

    2010-02-15

    second study in 2009 at the former Camp San Luis Obispo, CA, a site with more challenging topography and a wider mix of targets-of-interest (TOI). There were two primary objectives of this study: (1) Test and validate detection and discrimination capabilities of currently available and emerging technologies on real sites under operational conditions; and (2) Investigate in cooperation with regulators and program managers how discrimination technologies can be implemented in cleanup operations.

  2. Prostacyclin synthesis by vascular tissue. Effect of extracellular Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, G W; Chappell, C G; Frazer, C E; Ritter, J M

    1986-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) synthesis in vascular tissue is stimulated by free Ca2+. Concentrations in excess of 4 mM result in a sustained release of PGI2, but not other prostanoids, from rat aorta. This effect arises by increased synthesis of PGI2 and not through the inhibition of its metabolism. Physico-chemical examination of serum and plasma extract has indicated that much of the PGI2-stimulating activity reported for human serum derives from the presence of free Ca2+. PMID:3541921

  3. Parallel activation of Ca(2+)-induced survival and death pathways in cardiomyocytes by sorbitol-induced hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Chiong, M; Parra, V; Eisner, V; Ibarra, C; Maldonado, C; Criollo, A; Bravo, R; Quiroga, C; Contreras, A; Vicencio, J M; Cea, P; Bucarey, J L; Molgó, J; Jaimovich, E; Hidalgo, C; Kroemer, G; Lavandero, S

    2010-08-01

    Hyperosmotic stress promotes rapid and pronounced apoptosis in cultured cardiomyocytes. Here, we investigated if Ca(2+) signals contribute to this response. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to sorbitol [600 mosmol (kg water)(-1)] elicited large and oscillatory intracellular Ca(2+) concentration increases. These Ca(2+) signals were inhibited by nifedipine, Cd(2+), U73122, xestospongin C and ryanodine, suggesting contributions from both Ca(2+) influx through voltage dependent L-type Ca(2+) channels plus Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores mediated by IP(3) receptors and ryanodine receptors. Hyperosmotic stress also increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels, promoted mitochondrial depolarization, reduced intracellular ATP content, and activated the transcriptional factor cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), determined by increased CREB phosphorylation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Incubation with 1 mM EGTA to decrease extracellular [Ca(2+)] prevented cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by hyperosmotic stress, while overexpression of an adenoviral dominant negative form of CREB abolished the cardioprotection provided by 1 mM EGTA. These results suggest that hyperosmotic stress induced by sorbitol, by increasing Ca(2+) influx and raising intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, activates Ca(2+) release from stores and causes cell death through mitochondrial function collapse. In addition, the present results suggest that the Ca(2+) increase induced by hyperosmotic stress promotes cell survival by recruiting CREB-mediated signaling. Thus, the fate of cardiomyocytes under hyperosmotic stress will depend on the balance between Ca(2+)-induced survival and death pathways. PMID:20454859

  4. Voltage inactivation of Ca2+ entry and secretion associated with N- and P/Q-type but not L-type Ca2+ channels of bovine chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Villarroya, Mercedes; Olivares, Román; Ruíz, Ana; Cano-Abad, María F; de Pascual, Ricardo; Lomax, Richard B; López, Manuela G; Mayorgas, Inés; Gandía, Luis; García, Antonio G

    1999-01-01

    In this study we pose the question of why the bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cell needs various subtypes (L, N, P, Q) of the neuronal high-voltage activated Ca2+ channels to control a given physiological function, i.e. the exocytotic release of catecholamines. One plausible hypothesis is that Ca2+ channel subtypes undergo different patterns of inactivation during cell depolarization. The net Ca2+ uptake (measured using 45Ca2+) into hyperpolarized cells (bathed in a nominally Ca2+-free solution containing 1·2 mM K+) after application of a Ca2+ pulse (5 s exposure to 100 mM K+ and 2 mM Ca2+), amounted to 0·65 ± 0·02 fmol cell−1; in depolarized cells (bathed in nominally Ca2+-free solution containing 100 mM K+) the net Ca2+ uptake was 0·16 ± 0·01 fmol cell−1. This was paralleled by a dramatic reduction of the increase in the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, [Ca2+]i, caused by Ca2+ pulses applied to fura-2-loaded single cells, from 1181 ± 104 nM in hyperpolarized cells to 115 ± 9 nM in depolarized cells. A similar decrease was observed when studying catecholamine release. Secretion was decreased when K+ concentration was increased from 1·2 to 100 mM; the Ca2+ pulse caused, when comparing the extreme conditions, the secretion of 807 ± 35 nA of catecholamines in hyperpolarized cells and 220 ± 19 nA in depolarized cells. The inactivation by depolarization of Ca2+ entry and secretion occluded the blocking effects of combined ω-conotoxin GVIA (1 μM) and ω-agatoxin IVA (2 μM), thus suggesting that depolarization caused a selective inactivation of the N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels. This was strengthened by two additional findings: (i) nifedipine (3 μM), an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, suppressed the fraction of Ca2+ entry (24 %) and secretion (27 %) left unblocked by depolarization; (ii) FPL64176 (3 μM), an L-type Ca2+ channel ‘activator’, dramatically enhanced the entry of Ca2+ and the secretory response in depolarized cells. In voltage

  5. Measurements of HO2 chemical kinetics with a new detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Manzanares, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    In this research program, HO2 was detected by the OH(A-X) photofragment from dissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm. This detection method was applied to measure the reaction rate constant of HO2 + O3. This reaction rate constant is needed for the understanding of stratospheric chemistry. Since C12 was used in the flow system, photoexcitation of C12 may produce fluorescence to interfere with the measurements. Thus, the photoexcitation process of C12 in the vacuum ultraviolet region was also examined in this research period using synchrotron radiation as a light source. The research results are summarized.

  6. HoPaCI-DB: host-Pseudomonas and Coxiella interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Bleves, Sophie; Dunger, Irmtraud; Walter, Mathias C.; Frangoulidis, Dimitrios; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Voulhoux, Romé; Ruepp, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infectious diseases are the result of multifactorial processes affected by the interplay between virulence factors and host targets. The host-Pseudomonas and Coxiella interaction database (HoPaCI-DB) is a publicly available manually curated integrative database (http://mips.helmholtz-muenchen.de/HoPaCI/) of host–pathogen interaction data from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Coxiella burnetii. The resource provides structured information on 3585 experimentally validated interactions between molecules, bioprocesses and cellular structures extracted from the scientific literature. Systematic annotation and interactive graphical representation of disease networks make HoPaCI-DB a versatile knowledge base for biologists and network biology approaches. PMID:24137008

  7. DICOM to print, 35-mm slides, web, and video projector: tutorial using Adobe Photoshop.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Jud W

    2002-10-01

    Preparing images for publication has dealt with film and the photographic process. With picture archiving and communications systems, many departments will no longer produce film. This will change how images are produced for publication. DICOM, the file format for radiographic images, has to be converted and then prepared for traditional publication, 35-mm slides, the newest techniques of video projection, and the World Wide Web. Tagged image file format is the common format for traditional print publication, whereas joint photographic expert group is the current file format for the World Wide Web. Each medium has specific requirements that can be met with a common image-editing program such as Adobe Photoshop (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA). High-resolution images are required for print, a process that requires interpolation. However, the Internet requires images with a small file size for rapid transmission. The resolution of each output differs and the image resolution must be optimized to match the output of the publishing medium.

  8. Ca2+-SPECIFIC REMOVAL OF Z LINES FROM RABBIT SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Wayne A.; Stromer, M. H.; Goll, Darrel E.; Suzuki, A.

    1972-01-01

    Removal of rabbit psoas strips immediately after death and incubation in a saline solution containing 1 mM Ca2+ and 5 nM Mg2+ for 9 hr at 37°C and pH 7.1 causes complete Z-line removal but has no ultrastructurally detectable effect on other parts of the myofibril. Z lines remain ultrastructurally intact if 1 mM 1,2-bis-(2-dicarboxymethylaminoethoxy)-ethane (EGTA) is substituted for 1 mM Ca2+ and the other conditions remain unchanged. Z lines are broadened and amorphous but are still present after incubation for 9 hr at 37°C if 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) is substituted for 1 mM Ca2+ and 5 mM Mg2+ in the saline solution. A protein fraction that causes Z-line removal from myofibrils in the presence of Ca2+ at pH 7.0 can be isolated by extraction of ground muscle with 4 mM EDTA at pH 7.0–7.6 followed by isoelectric precipitation and fractionation between 0 and 40% ammonium sulfate saturation. Z-line removal by this protein fraction requires Ca2+ levels higher than 0.1 mM, but Z lines are removed without causing any other ultrastructurally detectable degradation of the myofibril. This is the first report of a protein endogenous to muscle that is able to catalyze degradation of the myofibril. The very low level of unbound Ca2+ in muscle cells in vivo may regulate activity of this protein fraction, or alternatively, this protein fraction may be localized in lysosomes. PMID:4621650

  9. Coachella Valley, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These band composites, acquired on June 4, 2000, cover a 11 by 13.5 km sub-scene in the Coachella Valley, CA. The area is shown by the yellow box on the full scene in the LOWER RIGHT corner, northwest of the Salton Sea. This is a major agricultural region of California, growing fruit and produce throughout the year. Different combinations of ASTER bands help identify the different crop types. UPPER LEFT: bands 3, 2, 1 as red, green, and blue (RGB); UPPER RIGHT: bands 4, 2, 1 as RGB; LOWER LEFT: bands 4, 3, 2 as RGB. The image is centered at 33.6 degrees north latitude, 116.1 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion solvation by flexible-boundary QM/MM: on-the-fly partial charge transfer between QM and MM subsystems.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Soroosh; Lin, Hai

    2014-09-15

    The flexible-boundary (FB) quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) scheme accounts for partial charge transfer between the QM and MM subsystems. Previous calculations have demonstrated excellent performance of FB-QM/MM in geometry optimizations. This article reports an implementation to extend FB-QM/MM to molecular dynamics simulations. To prevent atoms from getting unreasonably close, which can lead to polarization catastrophe, empirical correcting functions are introduced to provide additive penalty energies for the involved atom pairs and to improve the descriptions of the repulsive exchange forces in FB-QM/MM calculations. Test calculations are carried out for chloride, lithium, sodium, and ammonium ions solvated in water. Comparisons with conventional QM/MM calculations suggest that the FB treatment provides reasonably good results for the charge distributions of the atoms in the QM subsystems and for the solvation shell structural properties, albeit smaller QM subsystems have been used in the FB-QM/MM dynamics simulations.

  11. Variability of repeated coronary artery calcium measurements by 1.25-mm- and 2.5-mm-thickness images on prospective electrocardiograph-triggered 64-slice CT.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Jun; Matsuura, Noriaki; Yamamoto, Hideya; Hirai, Nobuhiko; Kiguchi, Masao; Fujioka, Chikako; Kitagawa, Toshiro; Kohno, Nobuoki; Ito, Katsuhide

    2008-02-01

    High reproducibility on coronary artery calcium scoring is a key requirement in monitoring the progression of coronary atherosclerosis. The purpose of this prospective study is to assess the reproducibility of 1.25-mm- and 2.5-mm-thickness images on prospective electrocardiograph-triggered 64-slice CT with respect to 2.5-mm-thickness images on spiral overlapping reconstruction. One hundred patients suspected of coronary artery disease were scanned twice repeatedly, both on prospective electrocardiograph-triggered step-and-shoot and retrospective electrocardiograph-gated spiral scans. Using 1.25-mm-thickness collimation, 1.25-mm- and 2.5-mm-thickness image sets on prospective scans and 2.5-mm-thickness image sets with 1.25-mm increment (overlapping) on retrospective scans were obtained. Coronary artery calcium scores, interscan variability and interobserver variability were evaluated. The mean interscan variability in coronary artery calcium measurement on 1.25-mm prospective/2.5-mm prospective/2.5-mm overlapping retrospective scans were Agatston: 10%/18%/12%, volume: 10%/12%/10% and mass: 8%/13%/11% for observer 1 and Agatston: 8%/14%/10%, volume: 7%/9%/10% and mass: 7%/10%/9% for observer 2, respectively. The mean interobserver variability was 5% to 14%. In conclusion, prospective electrocardiograph-triggered 64-slice CT using the 1.25-mm prospective scan shows the lowest variability. The 2.5-mm prospective scan on volume or mass scoring shows variability of around 10%, comparable to 2.5-mm-thickness spiral overlapping reconstruction images.

  12. Are models of catalytic removal of O3 by HO(x) accurate? Constraints from in situ measurements of the OH to HO2 ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, R. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Stimpfle, R. M.; Koplow, J.; Anderson, J. G.; Fahey, D. W.; Woodbridge, E. L.; Keim, E. R.; Gao, R.; Proffitt, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of the ratio OH/HO2, NO, O3, ClO, and BrO were obtained at altitudes from 15-20 km and latitudes from 15-60 deg N. A method is presented for interpreting the rates of chemical transformations that (1) are responsible for over half the ozone removal rate in the lower stratosphere via reactions of HO2; and (2) control the abundance of HO2 through coupling to nitrogen and halogen radicals. The results show our understanding of the chemical reactions controlling the partitioning of OH and HO2 is complete and accurate and that the potential effects of 'missing chemistry' are strickly constrained in the region of the atmosphere encompassed by the observations. The analysis demonstrates that the sensitivity of the ratio OH/HO2 to changes in NO is described to within 12% by current models. This reduces by more than a factor of 2 the effect of uncertainty in the coupling of hydrogen and nitrogen radicals on the analysis of the potential effects of perturbations to odd notrogen in the lower statosphere.

  13. Multiple effects of ryanodine on intracellular free Ca2+ in smooth muscle cells from bovine and porcine coronary artery: modulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum function.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner-Mann, C.; Hu, Q.; Sturek, M.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of ryanodine and caffeine on intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were studied by use of fura-2 microfluorometry in single smooth muscle cells freshly dispersed from bovine and porcine coronary artery. 2. Bovine and porcine cells demonstrated similar sensitivities to 10 min of exposure to ryanodine in physiological salt solution (PSS), as determined by comparable dose-dependent decreases in the subsequent [Ca2+]i transient induced by 5 mM caffeine. 3. Ryanodine (10 microM) caused a significant increase in [Ca2+]i to a plateau level 27 +/- 3% and 38 +/- 4% above baseline [Ca2+]i (baseline [Ca2+]i = [Ca2+]i at 0 min) in porcine and bovine cells, respectively, when bathed in PSS. In bovine cells the time required to reach 1/2 the plateau level was only 3 min versus 6 min for porcine cells. 4. The ryanodine-induced plateau increase in [Ca2+]i was 35 +/- 5% above baseline for bovine cells bathed in 0 Ca PSS (PSS including 10 microM EGTA with no added Ca2+), but only 7 +/- 3% above baseline in porcine cells during 10 min exposure to 10 microM ryanodine. In bovine cells [Ca2+]i showed proportional increases when extracellular Ca2+ was increased from the normal 2 mM Ca2+ PSS to 5 and 10 mM. 5. Cells pretreated with caffeine in 0 Ca PSS, which depleted the caffeine-sensitive sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ store, showed no increase in [Ca2+]i when challenged with 10 microM ryanodine. The ryanodine-associated increase in [Ca2+]i, which was sustained in 0 Ca PSS during the 10 min ryanodine exposure in cells not pretreated with caffeine, suggests that ryanodine releases Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, but also inhibits Ca2+ efflux.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 PMID:1504718

  14. Reaction of HO with CO: Tunneling Is Indeed Important.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Xue, Bert C; Weston, Ralph E; Barker, John R; Stanton, John F

    2012-06-01

    The potential energy surface and chemical kinetics for the reaction of HO with CO, which is an important process in both combustion and atmospheric chemistry, were computed using high-level ab initio quantum chemistry in conjunction with semiclassical transition state theory under the limiting cases of high and zero pressure. The reaction rate constants calculated from first principles agree extremely well with all available experimental data, which range in temperature over a domain that covers both combustion and terrestrial atmospheric chemistry. The role of quantum tunneling is confirmed to be extremely important, which supports recent work by Continetti and collaborators regarding the loss of hydrogen atoms from vibrationally excited states of HOCO. A sensitivity analysis has been carried out and serves as the basis for a plausible estimate of uncertainty in the calculations.

  15. Lung endothelial HO-1 targeting in vivo using lentiviral miRNA regulates apoptosis and autophagy during oxidant injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Ge; Sauler, Maor; Lee, Patty J.

    2013-01-01

    The lung endothelium is a major target for inflammatory and oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction is a crucial defense mechanism during oxidant challenges, such as hyperoxia. The role of lung endothelial HO-1during hyperoxia in vivo is not well defined. We engineered lentiviral vectors with microRNA (miRNA) sequences controlled by vascular endothelium cadherin (VE-cad) to study the specific role of lung endothelial HO-1. Wild-type (WT) murine lung endothelial cells (MLECs) or WT mice were treated with lentivirus and exposed to hyperoxia (95% oxygen). We detected HO-1 knockdown (∼55%) specifically in the lung endothelium. MLECs and lungs showed approximately a 2-fold increase in apoptosis and ROS generation after HO-1 silencing. We also demonstrate for the first time that silencing endothelial HO-1 has the same effect on lung injury and survival as silencing HO-1 in multiple lung cell types and that HO-1 regulates caspase 3 activation and autophagy in endothelium during hyperoxia. These studies demonstrate the utility of endothelial-targeted gene silencing in vivo using lentiviral miRNA constructs to assess gene function and that endothelial HO-1 is an important determinant of survival during hyperoxia.—Zhang, Y., Jiang, G., Sauler, M., Lee, P. J. Lung endothelial HO-1 targeting in vivo using lentiviral miRNA regulates apoptosis and autophagy during oxidant injury. PMID:23771928

  16. Isolation of 163Ho from dysprosium target material by HPLC for neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Veronika; Taylor, Wayne  A.; Nortier, Francois M.; Engle, Jonathan  W.; Barnhart, Todd  E.; Nickles, Robert  J.; Pollington, Anthony  D.; Kunde, Gerd  J.; Rabin, Michael  W.; Birnbaum, Eva  R.

    2015-04-29

    The rare earth isotope 163Ho is of interest for neutrino mass measurements. This report describes the isolation of 163Ho from a proton-irradiated dysprosium target and its purification. A Dy metal target was irradiated with 16 MeV protons for 10 h. After target dissolution, 163Ho was separated from the bulk Dy via cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography using 70 mmol dm–3 α-hydroxyisobutyric acid as the mobile phase. Subsequent purification of the collected Ho fraction was performed to remove the α-hydroxyisobutyrate chelating agent and to concentrate the Ho in a low ionic strength aqueous matrix. The final solution was characterized by MC-ICP-MS to determine the 163Ho/165Ho ratio, 163Ho and the residual Dy content. The HPLC purification process resulted in a decontamination factor 1.4E5 for Dy. As a result, the isolated Ho fraction contained 24.8 ±1.3 ng of 163Ho corresponding to holmium recovery of 72 ± 3%.

  17. First Evidence of Middle Atmospheric HO2 Response to UV variability during 27-day Solar Cycles From Satellite Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Zhang, Q.; Millan Valle, L. F.; Li, K. F.; Yung, Y. L.; Sander, S. P.; Livesey, N. J.; Santee, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    HO2 and OH, also known as odd oxygen HOx, play an important role in middle atmospheric chemistry, in particular O3 destruction through catalytic HOx reaction cycles. Due to their photochemical production and short chemical lifetimes, HOx species are expected to show rapid responses to solar irradiance changes, resulting in variability in the corresponding O3 chemistry. While the OH response to solar cycles has been investigated, HO2 studies have been limited by the lack of reliable observations. The recently developed "offline" HO2 data product from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) makes it possible, for the first time, to investigate HO2 variability and the behavior of OH/HO2 partitioning, which plays an important role in O3-destroying HOx cycles. Here we present the first evidence of global mean HO2 variability during solar 27-day cycles by investigating the new MLS HO2 data. We focus on the most recent data from 2012 - 2015, when solar irradiance variability is strong near the peak of Solar Cycle 24. The features of mesospheric HO2 variability are found to correlate well with those of solar Lyman-α variability. The strongest HO2 solar cycle signals occur in the pressure range 0.01 - 0.068 hPa. When continuous MLS OH observations are not available, the new HO2 data could be a promising alternative for investigating HOx variability and the corresponding impacts on O3 and the climate.

  18. Energy transfer in Tm,Ho:KYW crystal and diode-pumped microchip laser operation.

    PubMed

    Kurilchik, Sergey; Gusakova, Natali; Demesh, Maxim; Yasukevich, Anatol; Kisel, Viktor; Pavlyuk, Anatoly; Kuleshov, Nikolai

    2016-03-21

    An investigation of Tm-Ho energy transfer in Tm(5at.%),Ho(0.4at.%):KYW single crystal by two independent techiques was performed. Based on fluorescence dynamics measurements, energy transfer parameters P71 and P28 for direct (Tm→Ho) and back (Ho→Tm) transfers, respectively, as well as equilibrium constant Θ were evaluated. The obtained results were supported by calculation of microscopic interaction parameters according to the Förster-Dexter theory for a dipole-dipole interaction. Diode-pumped continuous-wave operation of Tm,Ho:KYW microchip laser was demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge. Maximum output power of 77 mW at 2070 nm was achieved at the fundamental TEM00 mode. PMID:27136836

  19. Low energy spin dynamics in the spin ice, Ho2Sn2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlers, Georg; Huq, Ashfia; Diallo, Souleymane Omar; Adriano, Cris; Rule, K; Cornelius, A. L.; Fouquet, Peter; Pagliuso, P G; Gardner, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The magnetic properties of Ho{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}O{sub 7} have been investigated and compared to other spin ice compounds. Although the lattice has expanded by 3% relative to the better studied Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} spin ice, no significant changes were observed in the high temperature properties, T {approx}> 20 K. As the temperature is lowered and correlations develop, Ho{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}O{sub 7} enters its quantum phase at a slightly higher temperature than Ho{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and is more antiferromagnetic in character. Below 80 K a weak inelastic mode associated with the holmium nuclear spin system has been measured. The hyperfine field at the holmium nucleus was found to be {approx}700 T.

  20. Observation of hydroperoxy radical HO2 in the upper atmosphere by SMILES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Yasuko; Lehmann, Ralph; Kuribayashi, Kouta; Sato, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    The HO_{2} radicals have an important role to control the oxidation capacity in the Earth and planetary atmosphere. We provide a first diurnal photo-chemical behavior of HO_{2} in the wide vertical range between stratosphere and lower thermosphere of the Earth by spectroscopic observation using a instrument optimized for the detection of minor atmospheric radical species, named Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES), from International Space Station (ISS). An unexpected behavior of HO_{2} was detected above mesopause (about 80 km) with a peak abundance after the sunset time, which was completely different from known diurnal behavior in the stratosphere and the mesosphere. We will report the photo-chemical behavior of HO_{2} in the upper atmosphere.

  1. Injection-seeded operation of a Q-switched Cr,Tm,Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Hale, Charley P.; Magee, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Single-frequency Tm,Ho:YAG lasers operating near 2 microns are attractive sources for several applications including eye-safe laser radar (lidar) and pumping of AgGaSe2 parametric oscillators for efficient generation of longer wavelengths. As part of a program to develop a coherent lidar system using Tm,Ho:YAG lasers, a diode laser-pumped tunable CW single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG laser and a flashlamp-pumped single-transverse-mode Q-switched Cr,Tm,Ho:YAG laser were developed. The CW laser was used to injection-seed the flashlamp-pumped laser, resulting in SLM Q-switched output. Operational characteristics of the CW and Q-switched lasers and injection-seeding results are reported.

  2. Enhancement of critical current density of MgB2 by doping Ho2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C.; Zhao, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Mg1-x(Ho2O3)xB2 alloys were prepared by in situ solid state reaction to study the effect of magnetic Ho2O3 dopant on flux pinning behavior of MgB2. Crystal structure, Tc, and Hc2 were not affected by Ho2O3 doping; however, Jc and Hirr were significantly enhanced. In 5T field, the best sample (x =3%) reached Jc of 1.0×103, 2.0×104, and 1.2×105A/cm2 at 20, 10, and 5K, respectively, much higher than those achieved by nonmagnetic impurity, such as Ti-, Zr-, and Y2O3-doped MgB2. The observed magnetic HoB4 nanoparticles were attributed to be the source for the enhanced flux pinning effects.

  3. New Magnetic confirguration in paramagnetic phase of HoCo2

    SciTech Connect

    Bonilla, C.M.; Calvo, I.; Herrero-Albillos, J.; Figueroa, A.I.; Castan-Guerrero, C.; Bertolome, J.; Rodriguez-Velamazan, J.A.; Schmitz, D.; Weschke, E.; Paudyal, Durga; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Gschneidner Jr, Karl; Bartolome, F.; Garcia, D.

    2012-02-23

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements on HoCo2 reveal the inversion of Co moment at temperatures higher than the critical temperature, Tc, showing that the net magnetization under a field of the Ho and Co sublattices remain antiparallel even above Tc. The Ho moment also changes its orientation to align antiparallel to the applied field at high temperature giving rise to a new magnetic configuration in the paramagnetic regime. Transverse susceptibility (TS) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements performed above Tc indicate the existence of sizable magnetic short-range correlated regions in HoCo2. First principles calculations based on spin polarized local-density approximation, LSDA+U havebeen performed to obtain insights on the origin of the short-range correlated volume.

  4. Prompt HO2 formation following the reaction of OH with aromatic compounds under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Nehr, Sascha; Bohn, Birger; Wahner, Andreas

    2012-06-21

    The secondary formation of HO(2) radicals following OH + aromatic hydrocarbon reactions in synthetic air under normal pressure and temperature was investigated in the absence of NO after pulsed production of OH radicals. OH and HO(x) (=OH + HO(2)) decay curves were recorded using laser-induced fluorescence after gas-expansion. The prompt HO(2) yields (HO(2) formed without preceding NO reactions) were determined by comparison to results obtained with CO as a reference compound. This approach was recently introduced and applied to the OH + benzene reaction and was extended here for a number of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The measured HO(2) formation yields are as follows: toluene, 0.42 ± 0.11; ethylbenzene, 0.53 ± 0.10; o-xylene, 0.41 ± 0.08; m-xylene, 0.27 ± 0.06; p-xylene, 0.40 ± 0.09; 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 0.31 ± 0.06; 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 0.37 ± 0.09; 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, 0.29 ± 0.08; hexamethylbenzene, 0.32 ± 0.08; phenol, 0.89 ± 0.29; o-cresol, 0.87 ± 0.29; 2,5-dimethylphenol, 0.72 ± 0.12; 2,4,6-trimethylphenol, 0.45 ± 0.13. For the alkylbenzenes HO(2) is the proposed coproduct of phenols, epoxides, and possibly oxepins formed in secondary reactions with O(2). In most product studies the only quantified coproducts were phenols whereas only a few studies reported yields of epoxides. Oxepins have not been observed so far. Together with the yields of phenols from other studies, the HO(2) yields determined in this work set an upper limit to the combined yields of epoxides and oxepins that was found to be significant (≤0.3) for all investigated alkylbenzenes except m-xylene. For the hydroxybenzenes the currently proposed HO(2) coproducts are dihydroxybenzenes. For phenol and o-cresol the determined HO(2) yields are matching the previously reported dihydroxybenzene yields, indicating that these are the only HO(2) forming reaction channels. For 2,5-dimethylphenol and 2,4,6-trimethylphenol no complementary product studies are available.

  5. Enhancement of sensitivity in photoreceptors of the honey been drone by light and by Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Walz, B

    1992-06-01

    Deeply dark adapted (1 h) photoreceptor cells of the honey bee drone show a light-induced enhancement of sensitivity (facilitation) as an aftereffect of illumination or in the presence of dim backgrounds. The Ca(2+)-dependency of this effect was studied: Reduction of extracellular Ca2+ to 0.1 mM decreases the sensitivity of a dark adapted cell, and the light-induced increase in sensitivity due to repetitive, dim, 20 ms test flashes is slower than in normal saline. After a sensitizing conditioning light, the sensitivity drops faster in low-calcium saline. The light-induced enhancement of sensitivity is mimicked by pressure injections of low amounts of Ca2+ (Ca2+/EGTA-buffers; 0.15 microM free Ca2+) into a dark adapted cell. Injection of EGTA alone decreases the sensitivity. Injection of a solution containing ca1 mM free Ca2+ sequentially decreases and later increases the sensitivity transiently. These results suggest a model in which a progressive increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration by light first increases (facilitates), and, at higher concentrations, decreases (light adapts) the sensitivity of the cells. One possible site of action for this positive and negative feedback control of cell sensitivity by Ca2+ is the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:1507158

  6. Enhancement of sensitivity in photoreceptors of the honey been drone by light and by Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Walz, B

    1992-06-01

    Deeply dark adapted (1 h) photoreceptor cells of the honey bee drone show a light-induced enhancement of sensitivity (facilitation) as an aftereffect of illumination or in the presence of dim backgrounds. The Ca(2+)-dependency of this effect was studied: Reduction of extracellular Ca2+ to 0.1 mM decreases the sensitivity of a dark adapted cell, and the light-induced increase in sensitivity due to repetitive, dim, 20 ms test flashes is slower than in normal saline. After a sensitizing conditioning light, the sensitivity drops faster in low-calcium saline. The light-induced enhancement of sensitivity is mimicked by pressure injections of low amounts of Ca2+ (Ca2+/EGTA-buffers; 0.15 microM free Ca2+) into a dark adapted cell. Injection of EGTA alone decreases the sensitivity. Injection of a solution containing ca1 mM free Ca2+ sequentially decreases and later increases the sensitivity transiently. These results suggest a model in which a progressive increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration by light first increases (facilitates), and, at higher concentrations, decreases (light adapts) the sensitivity of the cells. One possible site of action for this positive and negative feedback control of cell sensitivity by Ca2+ is the endoplasmic reticulum.

  7. CA II Emission surface fluxes in active chromosphere stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ca II emission-line surface fluxes are derived for 14 stars from 17 A/mm photographic spectra. Most of the stars observed are active chromosphere binaries; a few are known X-ray sources or have been observed by the IUE. The status of optical information on each of the objects is reviewed, and new information on v sin i and duplicity is presented.

  8. Assessing the performance of MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods. 3. The impact of force fields and ligand charge models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Sun, Huiyong; Li, Youyong; Wang, Junmei; Hou, Tingjun

    2013-07-18

    Here, we systematically investigated how the force fields and the partial charge models for ligands affect the ranking performance of the binding free energies predicted by the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) and Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area (MM/GBSA) approaches. A total of 46 small molecules targeted to five different protein receptors were employed to test the following issues: (1) the impact of five AMBER force fields (ff99, ff99SB, ff99SB-ILDN, ff03, and ff12SB) on the performance of MM/GBSA, (2) the influence of the time scale of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the performance of MM/GBSA with different force fields, (3) the impact of five AMBER force fields on the performance of MM/PBSA, and (4) the impact of four different charge models (RESP, ESP, AM1-BCC, and Gasteiger) for small molecules on the performance of MM/PBSA or MM/GBSA. Based on our simulation results, the following important conclusions can be obtained: (1) for short time-scale MD simulations (1 ns or less), the ff03 force field gives the best predictions by both MM/GBSA and MM/PBSA; (2) for middle time-scale MD simulations (2-4 ns), MM/GBSA based on the ff99 force field yields the best predictions, while MM/PBSA based on the ff99SB force field does the best; however, longer MD simulations, for example, 5 ns or more, may not be quite necessary; (3) for most cases, MM/PBSA with the Tan's parameters shows better ranking capability than MM/GBSA (GB(OBC1)); (4) the RESP charges show the best performance for both MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA, and the AM1-BCC and ESP charges can also give fairly satisfactory predictions. Our results provide useful guidance for the practical applications of the MM/GBSA and MM/PBSA approaches.

  9. Differential responses of the Mg/Ca Ratio in scleractinians to variations in Mg2+ and Ca2+ content of seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swart, P. K.; Giri, S.; Adkins, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    Although it is well known that the Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio of seawater has varied throughout the Phanerozoic, there is little information on whether the concentration of Ca2+ has changed in conjunction with Mg2+ or whether these two elements have changed independently. In addition while it has been documented that the Mg/Ca has varied within scleractinian corals during certain time periods, there have been no studies which have verified that changing Mg/Ca ratio in corals corresponds with a similar variation in seawater. Here we report studies using Modern corals which have been grown for an extended period of time (10 weeks) in elevated Ca2+and Mg2+ concentrations. While these studies show that the Mg2+/Ca2+ of the seawater is related to the same ratio in the coral skeleton, the slope of the relationship is dependent upon which of the two cations is altered. When the Ca2+ is increased, thereby decreasing the Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio in seawater, then the ratio within the skeleton decreases by ~0.7 mM/M for every 1 M/M decrease in the Mg2+ / Ca2+ ratio in the external seawater. However, when the Mg2+/Ca2+ ratio is altered by adding Mg2+, then there is an increase is ~2 mM/M for every 1 M/M increase in Mg2+/Ca2+. Assuming that such changes can be replicated by the reverse experiment, i.e. reducing the concentration of Ca2+ and Mg2+, then such a finding offers a solution to resolving whether the Mg/Ca ratio in ancient unaltered corals is responding to a change in Mg2+ or a change in Ca2+ in seawater. For example, the Mg/Ca ratios of unaltered corals from a defined time period might only be possible if the Ca2+ of seawater was altered rather than Mg2+. The reverse might be case for other time periods. Further supporting evidence for this hypothesis will be presented by other elements which exhibited unexpected behavior in response to changing Ca2+ and Mg2+.

  10. Materials Data on Ca6Al6Si3(HO12)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on BaCaP2(HO4)2 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on Ca2Ga2Si(HO4)2 (SG:1) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2014-07-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Ca2+ signaling in arterioles and small arteries of conscious, restrained, optical biosensor mice

    PubMed Central

    Fairfax, Seth T.; Mauban, Joseph R. H.; Hao, Scarlett; Rizzo, Mark A.; Zhang, Jin; Wier, W. Gil

    2014-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy and conscious, restrained optical biosensor mice were used to study smooth muscle Ca2+ signaling in ear arterioles. Conscious mice were used in order to preserve normal mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). ExMLCK mice, which express a genetically-encoded smooth muscle-specific FRET-based Ca2+ indicator, were equipped with blood pressure telemetry and immobilized for imaging. MAP was 101 ± 4 mmHg in conscious restrained mice, similar to the freely mobile state (107 ± 3 mmHg). Oscillatory vasomotion or irregular contractions were observed in most arterioles (71%), with the greatest oscillatory frequency observed at 0.25 s−1. In a typical arteriole with an average diameter of ~35 μm, oscillatory vasomotion of a 5–6 μm magnitude was accompanied by nearly uniform [Ca2+] oscillations from ~0.1 to 0.5 μM, with maximum [Ca2+] occurring immediately before the rapid decrease in diameter. Very rapid, spatially uniform “Ca2+ flashes” were also observed but not asynchronous propagating Ca2+ waves. In contrast, vasomotion and dynamic Ca2+ signals were rarely observed in ear arterioles of anesthetized exMLCK biosensor mice. Hexamethonium (30 μg/g BW, i.p.) caused a fall in MAP to 74 ± 4 mmHg, arteriolar vasodilation, and abolition of vasomotion and synchronous Ca2+ transients. Summary: MAP and heart rate (HR) were normal during high-resolution Ca2+ imaging of conscious, restrained mice. SNA induced continuous vasomotion and irregular vasoconstrictions via spatially uniform Ca2+ signaling within the arterial wall. FRET-based biosensor mice and two-photon imaging provided the first measurements of [Ca2+] in vascular smooth muscle cells in arterioles of conscious animals. PMID:25339912

  14. Raman and infrared study of 4f electron-phonon coupling in HoVO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberge, B.; Balli, M.; Jandl, S.; Fournier, P.; Palstra, T. T. M.; Nugroho, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    First-order Raman scattering and multiphonons are studied in RVO3 (R  =  Ho and Y) as a function of temperature in the orthorhombic and monoclinic phases. Raman spectra of HoVO3 and YVO3 unveil similar features since both compounds have nearly identical R-radii. However, the most important difference lies in the transition temperature involving the V3+ orbitals, the V3+ magnetic moments as well as the crystallographic structure. Particularly, the magnetic and orbital reorientations occur at T N2  =  40 K for HoVO3 instead T N2  =77 K in the case of YVO3. For both systems, anomalous phonon shifts which are related to spin-phonon coupling are observed below the V3+ magnetic ordering temperature (T N1  ≈  110 K) while additional phonon anomalies are exclusively observed in HoVO3 around T *  ≈  15 K. On the other hand, infrared (IR) transmittance measurements as a function of temperature reveal Ho3+5I8  →  5I7 excitations and additional excitations assigned as vibronics. These latter combined with drastic changes in Ho3+5I8  →  5I7 excitations at T N2, are indicative of a strong coupling between the Ho3+ ions and the ligand field. This could explain the large magnetocaloric capacity shown by HoVO3.

  15. The growth of Ho:YAG single crystals by Czochralski method and investigating the formed cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hasani Barbaran, J. Ghani Aragi, M. R.; Javaheri, I.; Baharvand, B.; Tabasi, M.; Layegh Ahan, R.; Jangjo, E.

    2015-12-15

    Ho:YAG single crystals were grown by Czochralski technique, and investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical methods. The crystals were cut and polished in order to observe and analyze their cores. It was found that the deviation of the cores formed in the Czochralski grown Ho:YAG single crystals are resulted from non-symmetrical status of thermal insulation around the Iridium crucible.

  16. Magnetic structures in RNi₄B (R=Nd, Tb, Ho, Er)

    SciTech Connect

    Alleno, E.; Mazumdar, C.

    2013-06-01

    Neutron diffraction has been performed on RNi₄B (R=Nd, Tb, Ho, Er) polycrystals. The orthorhombic structure for NdNi₄B and the CeCo₄B structure type (hexagonal) for TbNi₄B and HoNi₄B are confirmed. Our data also show that this last structure is currently the best approximant for ErNi₄B. The RNi₄B (R=Nd, Tb, Ho, Er) order ferromagnetically at respectively 11.0, 18.1, 6.2 and 10.0 K. The crystal electric field (CEF) interaction controls the magnetic anisotropy in this series leading to an easy axis ~30 deg above the basal plane in RNi₄B (R=Nd, Tb, Ho) and parallel to the c-axis in ErNi₄B at 1.6 K. The RNi₄B (R=Nd, Tb, Ho) display a spin re-orientation below Tc which arises from a competition between the second order term and the higher order terms of the CEF hamiltonian. - Graphical abstract: Simplified magnetic structure in NdNi₄B and full magnetic structure in RNi₄B (R=Tb, Ho). Variation with temperature of the easy magnetization axis direction (angle with c-axis) showing a spin re-orientation. Highlights: • RNi₄B (R=Nd, Tb, Ho, Er) polycrystals were inductively melted. • Neutron diffraction confirms they all order ferromagnetically. • The magnetization easy axis is parallel to the c-axis in ErNi₄B. • The RNi₄B (R=Nd, Tb, Ho) display a spin re-orientation below Tc. • Their easy axis tilts from the c-axis at Tc to ~30 deg above the basal plane at 1.5 K.

  17. First in situ detection of HO2 radical in a smog chamber by cw-CRDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djehiche, M.; Tarmoul, J.; Tomas, A.; Fittschen, C.; Coddeville, P.

    2009-04-01

    The hydroperoxyl radical HO2 belongs to these trace species of the atmosphere which play a crucial role in the tropospheric chemistry. In particular, it is responsible for the formation of OH radicals through the HO2 + NO reaction, the OH radical being the most important oxidant in the troposphere. The detection and quantification of the HO2 radical during laboratory experiments in environmental chambers have been a challenge for a long time due to its short lifetime and consequently weak concentrations. We have thus developed a new quartz photochemical reactor of 120 L which has been coupled to an in-situ cw-CRDS detector in the near IR. Preliminary tests on stable molecules like CO (~ 1570 nm) and CH2O (~ 1510 nm) allowed us to determine the absorption sensitivity of the spectrometer. An αmin of 1 × 10-9 cm-1 has been obtained, leading to an HO2 detection limit of about 2 × 1010 molecule cm-3at 6625 cm-1. We then investigated the photolysis of methyl nitrite CH3ONO at 365 nm: CH3ONO + hν → CH3O + NO CH3O + O2 → CH2O + HO2 HO2 + NO → OH + NO2 For the first time, the HO2 radical has been directly observed duringthe photolysis of CH3ONO. Experiments have been conducted at 50 Torr total pressure and absolute HO2 photostationary concentrations of (0.8 - 1.5) × 1011 molecules cm-3 have been determined, depending on the reaction conditions. The simultaneous measurements of the products (NO2 and CH2O) in the same wavelength region allow us to simulate the explicit chemical mechanism. The obtained results will be discussed and the perspectives in term of use of this new setup will be presented.

  18. Raman and infrared study of 4f electron-phonon coupling in HoVO3.

    PubMed

    Roberge, B; Balli, M; Jandl, S; Fournier, P; Palstra, T T M; Nugroho, A A

    2016-11-01

    First-order Raman scattering and multiphonons are studied in RVO3 (R  =  Ho and Y) as a function of temperature in the orthorhombic and monoclinic phases. Raman spectra of HoVO3 and YVO3 unveil similar features since both compounds have nearly identical R-radii. However, the most important difference lies in the transition temperature involving the V(3+) orbitals, the V(3+) magnetic moments as well as the crystallographic structure. Particularly, the magnetic and orbital reorientations occur at T N2  =  40 K for HoVO3 instead T N2  =77 K in the case of YVO3. For both systems, anomalous phonon shifts which are related to spin-phonon coupling are observed below the V(3+) magnetic ordering temperature (T N1  ≈  110 K) while additional phonon anomalies are exclusively observed in HoVO3 around T (*)  ≈  15 K. On the other hand, infrared (IR) transmittance measurements as a function of temperature reveal Ho(3+5)I8  →  (5)I7 excitations and additional excitations assigned as vibronics. These latter combined with drastic changes in Ho(3+5)I8  →  (5)I7 excitations at T N2, are indicative of a strong coupling between the Ho(3+) ions and the ligand field. This could explain the large magnetocaloric capacity shown by HoVO3. PMID:27603503

  19. Intravascular pressure augments cerebral arterial constriction by inducing voltage-insensitive Ca2+ waves.

    PubMed

    Mufti, Rania E; Brett, Suzanne E; Tran, Cam Ha T; Abd El-Rahman, Rasha; Anfinogenova, Yana; El-Yazbi, Ahmed; Cole, William C; Jones, Peter P; Chen, S R Wayne; Welsh, Donald G

    2010-10-15

    This study examined whether elevated intravascular pressure stimulates asynchronous Ca(2+) waves in cerebral arterial smooth muscle cells and if their generation contributes to myogenic tone development. The endothelium was removed from rat cerebral arteries, which were then mounted in an arteriograph, pressurized (20-100 mmHg) and examined under a variety of experimental conditions. Diameter and membrane potential (V(M)) were monitored using conventional techniques; Ca(2+) wave generation and myosin light chain (MLC(20))/MYPT1 (myosin phosphatase targeting subunit) phosphorylation were assessed by confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis, respectively. Elevating intravascular pressure increased the proportion of smooth muscle cells firing asynchronous Ca(2+) waves as well as event frequency. Ca(2+) wave augmentation occurred primarily at lower intravascular pressures (<60 mmHg) and ryanodine, a plant alkaloid that depletes the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of Ca(2+), eliminated these events. Ca(2+) wave generation was voltage insensitive as Ca(2+) channel blockade and perturbations in extracellular [K(+)] had little effect on measured parameters. Ryanodine-induced inhibition of Ca(2+) waves attenuated myogenic tone and MLC(20) phosphorylation without altering arterial V(M). Thapsigargin, an SR Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor also attenuated Ca(2+) waves, pressure-induced constriction and MLC(20) phosphorylation. The SR-driven component of the myogenic response was proportionally greater at lower intravascular pressures and subsequent MYPT1 phosphorylation measures revealed that SR Ca(2+) waves facilitated pressure-induced MLC(20) phosphorylation through mechanisms that include myosin light chain phosphatase inhibition. Cumulatively, our findings show that mechanical stimuli augment Ca(2+) wave generation in arterial smooth muscle and that these transient events facilitate tone development particularly at lower intravascular pressures by providing a proportion of the Ca

  20. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid stimulates hepatocellular exocytosis and mobilizes extracellular Ca++ mechanisms defective in cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Beuers, U; Nathanson, M H; Isales, C M; Boyer, J L

    1993-01-01

    To assess the effects of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) on bile excretory function, we examined whether TUDCA modulates vesicular exocytosis in the isolated perfused liver of normal rats in the presence of high (1.9 mM) or low (0.19 mM) extracellular Ca++ and in cholestatic rats 24 h after bile duct ligation. In addition, the effects of TUDCA on Ca++ homeostasis were compared in normal and in cholestatic hepatocytes. In the isolated perfused rat liver, TUDCA (25 microM) stimulated a sustained increase in the biliary excretion of horseradish peroxidase, a marker of the vesicular pathway, in the presence of high, but not low extracellular Ca++ or in the cholestatic liver. In contrast, TUDCA stimulated bile flow to the same extent regardless of the concentration of extracellular Ca++ or the presence of cholestasis. In indo-1-loaded hepatocytes, basal cytosolic free Ca++ ([Ca++]i) levels were not different between normal and cholestatic cells. However, in cholestatic cells [Ca++]i increases induced by TUDCA (10 microM) and its 7 alpha-OH epimer taurochenodeoxycholic acid (50 microM) were reduced to 22% and 26%, respectively, compared to normal cells. The impairment of TUDCA-induced [Ca++]i increase in cholestatic cells could be mimicked by exposing normal cells to low extracellular Ca++ (21%) or to the Ca++ channel blocker NiCl2 (23%). These data indicate that (a) dihydroxy bile acid-induced Ca++ entry may be of functional importance in the regulation of hepatocellular vesicular exocytosis, and (b) this Ca++ entry mechanism across the plasma membrane is impaired in cholestatic hepatocytes. We speculate that the beneficial effect of ursodeoxycholic acid in cholestatic liver diseases may be related to the Ca+(+)-dependent stimulation of vesicular exocytosis by its conjugate. PMID:8254052

  1. Simultaneous measurement of Ca2+ influx and reversal potentials in recombinant N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channels.

    PubMed Central

    Schneggenburger, R

    1996-01-01

    The Ca(2+) permeability of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) channels was studied in human embryonic kidney cells transfected with the NR1-NR2A subunit combination. To determine the fractional Ca(2+) current (P(f)), measurements of fura-2-based Ca(2+) influx and whole-cell currents were made in symmetrical monovalent ion concentrations at membrane potentials between -50 mV and the reversal potential. The ratios of Ca(2+) flux over net whole-cell charge at 2, 5, and 10 mM external Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca](o)) were identical at a membrane potential close to the reversal potential of the monovalent current component. Assuming unity of P(f) at this potential, the percentage of current carried by Ca(2+) was found to be 18.5 +/- 1.3% at 2 mM [Ca](o) and -50 mV. This value, which is higher than the ones reported previously, was confirmed in independent experiments in which a pure flux of Ca(2+) through NMDA-R channels was used to calibrate the Ca(2+) influx signals. The measured values of fractional Ca(2+) currents, which agree with the predictions of the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz equations, are also compatible with a two-barrier model for ion permeation, in which the differences between the energy barriers for Ca(2+) and monovalent ions are similar on the external and internal membrane sides. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:9172740

  2. The role of Ca(2+) and Na (+) membrane transport in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) spermatozoa motility.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Olga; Dzyuba, Borys; Cosson, Jacky; Rodina, Marek; Linhart, Otomar

    2014-10-01

    The role of environmental ion composition and osmolality in Ca(2+) signaled activation was assessed in spermatozoa of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis. Milt from ten mature males was obtained by abdominal massage. Spermatozoa motility was evaluated in 0, 100, and 300 mOsm/kg NaCl or sucrose solutions, buffered by 10 mM Tris-HCl pH 8.5. For investigation of spermatozoa reaction to external Ca(2+) concentration, 2 mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) was added to the activation media as a calcium ions chelator. For investigation of the effect of external Na(+) concentration in conditions of low external Ca(2+), 100 µM amiloride was added to the EGTA-containing solutions as a Na(+) transport blocker. Low motility was observed in sucrose (Na(+) free) solutions containing 2 mM EGTA but not in Na(+) solutions containing 2 mM EGTA. Addition of amiloride led to significantly increased motility (P < 0.05) compared with sucrose (Na(+) free) solutions containing 2 mM EGTA. We conclude that Na(+) transport in Ca(2+)-free solutions plays a regulatory role in brook trout spermatozoa activation. The influence of competitive Na(+) and Ca(2+) transport on the control of spermatozoa activation requires further study with respect to its application for improvement of artificial activation and storage media. PMID:24718964

  3. Effect of Ca2+ on programmed death of guard and epidermal cells of pea leaves.

    PubMed

    Kiselevsky, D B; Kuznetsova, Yu E; Vasil'ev, L A; Lobysheva, N V; Zinovkin, R A; Nesov, A V; Shestak, A A; Samuilov, V D

    2010-05-01

    The effect of Ca2+ on programmed death of guard cells (GC) and epidermal cells (EC) determined from destruction of the cell nucleus was investigated in epidermis of pea leaves. Ca2+ at concentrations of 1-100 microM increased and at a concentration of 1 mM prevented the CN(-)-induced destruction of the nucleus in GC, disrupting the permeability barrier of GC plasma membrane for propidium iodide (PI). Ca2+ at concentrations of 0.1-1 mM enhanced drastically the number of EC nuclei stained by PI in epidermis treated with chitosan, an inducer of programmed cell death. The internucleosomal DNA fragmentation caused by CN(-) was suppressed by 2 mM Ca2+ on 6 h incubation, but fragmentation was stimulated on more prolonged treatment (16 h). Presumably, the disruption of the permeability barrier of plasma membrane for PI is not a sign of necrosis in plant cells. Quinacrine and diphenylene iodonium at 50 microM concentration prevented GC death induced by CN(-) or CN(-) + 0.1 mM Ca2+ but had no influence on respiration and photosynthetic O2 evolution in pea leaf slices. The generation of reactive oxygen species determined from 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence was promoted by Ca2+ in epidermal peels from pea leaves.

  4. Ca2+ inhibition of inositol trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ release in single smooth muscle cells of guinea-pig small intestine.

    PubMed Central

    Zholos, A V; Komori, S; Ohashi, H; Bolton, T B

    1994-01-01

    1. Single smooth muscle cells from the longitudinal muscle layer of guinea-pig small intestine were voltage clamped using patch pipettes in the whole-cell mode. 2. When D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) was released at intervals, by photolysis of 'caged' InsP3 within the cell, increases in [Ca2+]i in many cells, as judged from Ca(2+)-activated K(+)-current, were all-or-none; release of InsP3 before a critical interval had elapsed, which was quite stable for an individual cell, resulted in no response. After Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release had been evoked by depolarization, the InsP3 response was inhibited. Oscillations in [Ca2+]i evoked by muscarinic receptor activation were unaffected by Ruthenium Red; during these oscillations exogenous InsP3 was not effective close to, or shortly after, peak [Ca2+]i but was effective at other times. 3. Reproducible release of Ca2+ and elevation of [Ca2+]i could be produced by brief (up to 0.5 s) pressure applications of 10 mM caffeine at intervals of 10 s or greater but caffeine itself rarely evoked oscillations in [Ca2+]i. Responses to flash release of InsP3 were reduced after caffeine-induced responses and recovery of caffeine-induced Ca2+ release was faster than recovery of InsP3-induced Ca2+ release. 4. The results support the idea that InsP3-induced Ca(2+)-store release can be inhibited by a certain level of [Ca2+]i at a time when Ca2+ stores have refilled and can be released by caffeine; they also support the suggestion that during oscillations of [Ca2+]i evoked by muscarinic receptor activation, Ca2+ inhibition of InsP3-induced Ca2+ release at some critical level of [Ca2+]i allows Ca2+ stores to refill and leads to a fall in [Ca2+]i so contributing to the oscillations which are observed. PMID:7531770

  5. Superiority of 10-mm-wide Balloon over 8-mm-wide Balloon in Papillary Dilation for Bile Duct Stones: A Matched Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Dai; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Tsujino, Takeshi; Umefune, Gyotane; Takahara, Naminatsu; Mohri, Dai; Kogure, Hirofumi; Matsubara, Saburo; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Sasahira, Naoki; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Endoscopic papillary balloon dilation (EPBD) is a possible alternative to endoscopic sphincterotomy (EST) for common bile duct (CBD) stones. To date, 10- and 8-mm EPBD have not been fully compared. Patients and Methods: Patients who underwent EPBD for CBD stones at two Japanese tertiary care centers between May 1994 and January 2014 were identified. Matched pairs with 10- and 8-mm EPBD were generated. Short- and long-term outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results: A total of 869 patients were identified (61 and 808 patients for 10- and 8-mm EPBD, respectively), and 61 well-balanced pairs were generated. The rate of complete stone removal within a single session was higher in the 10-mm EPBD group than in the 8-mm EPBD group (69% vs. 44%, P < 0.001), and use of lithotripsy was less frequent in the 10-mm EPBD group (23% vs. 56%, P < 0.001). The rates of post-ERCP pancreatitis were similar between the 10- and 8-mm EPBD groups (11% vs. 8%). Cumulative biliary complication-free rates were not statistically different between the two groups: 88% [95% confidence interval (CI): 79–97%] and 94% (95% CI: 88–100%) at 1 year and 69% (95% CI: 56–85%) and 80% (95% CI: 69–93%) at 2 years in the 10- and 8-mm EPBD groups, respectively. In the 10-mm EPBD group, ascending cholangitis was not observed, and pneumobilia was found in 5% of cases during the follow-up period. Conclusions: EPBD using a 10-mm balloon for CBD stones is safe and more effective than 8-mm EPBD. The sphincter function is highly preserved after 10-mm EPBD. PMID:26228364

  6. Comparison of urinary calculus fragmentation during Ho:YAG and Er:YAG lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Ho; Teichman, Joel H.; Welch, A. J.

    2005-04-01

    We compared urinary calculus fragmentation with long pulsed Ho:YAG (λ= 2.12 μm) versus Er:YAG (λ = 2.94 μm) lasers. We measured the ablation width, depth, volume and efficiency as a function of pulse energy from calculus threshold energy to clinical energy typically used for Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy. Ablation effects were evaluated for three types of urinary calculi (calcium oxalate monohydrate, cystine, and uric acid), for single and multiple pulses applied at various optical energy levels. By means of comparing laser-induced crater topography and ablation volume for each stone type, the feasibility of Er:YAG laser lithotripsy was appraised. The Er:YAG laser pulse energy generated deeper and narrower crater shapes with relatively smooth contours whereas the Ho:YAG laser produced shallower and wider craters with irregular shapes. In terms of multiple pulses ablation, the Er:YAG produced larger ablation volume than Ho:YAG. The deeper crater induced by the Er:YAG was attributed to the higher absorption coefficient of stones at the 2.94 μm wavelength, and widening of crater by Ho:YAG was perhaps caused by lateral expansion of ablated material. Comparing the ablation efficiency, Er:YAG was superior to Ho:YAG for both single and five-pulses.

  7. Correlation between magnon and magnetic symmetries of hexagonal RMnO3 (R = Er, Ho, Lu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thi Minh Hien; Nguyen, Thi Huyen; Chen, Xiang-Bai; Park, Yeonju; Jung, Young Mee; Lee, D.; Noh, T. W.; Cheong, Sang-Wook; Yang, In-Sang

    2016-11-01

    The correlation between the magnon scattering and the magnetic symmetries of hexagonal RMnO3 (R = Er, Ho) thin films and LuMnO3 single crystal was studied through the 2D Correlation Spectroscopy (2D COS) and Perturbation-Correlation Moving Window 2D (PCMW2D) Correlation Spectroscopy which were performed on the temperature-dependent Raman spectra of RMnO3 (R = Er, Ho, Lu). From the Raman spectra, we observed much stronger intensity and more asymmetrical magnon peak in LuMnO3 single crystal than in ErMnO3 and HoMnO3 thin films. While the ratio between magnon and phonon's linewidth of LuMnO3 and HoMnO3 display an anomalous behavior, that ratio of ErMnO3 is almost stable. The result from PCMW2D also supports these results. In addition, our 2D COS analysis showed that there are more overlap peaks in broad four-spin flipping magnon peak in LuMnO3 than that in ErMnO3 and HoMnO3. The differences of hexagonal RMnO3 (R = Er, Ho, Lu) in magnon scattering are very similar to the actual differences of the magnetic symmetries of these compounds. Therefore, we suggest that the magnon scattering of hexagonal RMnO3 is strongly correlated with the magnetic symmetries of these materials.

  8. First evidence of middle atmospheric HO2 response to 27 day solar cycles from satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuhui; Zhang, Qiong; Millán, Luis; Li, King-Fai; Yung, Yuk L.; Sander, Stanley P.; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Santee, Michelle L.

    2015-11-01

    HO2 and OH, also known as HOx, play an important role in controlling middle atmospheric O3. Due to their photochemical production and short chemical lifetimes, HOx are expected to respond rapidly to solar irradiance changes, resulting in O3 variability. While OH solar cycle signals have been investigated, HO2 studies have been limited by the lack of reliable observations. Here we present the first evidence of HO2 variability during solar 27 day cycles by investigating the recently developed HO2 data from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS). We focus on 2012-2015, when solar variability is strong near the peak of Solar Cycle 24. The features of HO2 variability, with the strongest signals at 0.01-0.068 hPa, correlate well with those of solar Lyman α. When continuous MLS OH observations are not available, the new HO2 data could be a promising alternative for investigating HOx variability and the corresponding impacts on O3 and the climate.

  9. BCL-B (BCL2L10) is overexpressed in patients suffering from multiple myeloma (MM) and drives an MM-like disease in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, Mohamed-Amine; Jacquel, Arnaud; Robert, Guillaume; Puissant, Alexandre; Richez, Valentine; Cassel, Romeo; Fenouille, Nina; Roulland, Sandrine; Gilleron, Jerome; Griessinger, Emmanuel; Dubois, Alix; Bailly-Maitre, Beatrice; Goncalves, Diogo; Mallavialle, Aude; Colosetti, Pascal; Marchetti, Sandrine; Amiot, Martine; Gomez-Bougie, Patricia; Rochet, Nathalie; Deckert, Marcel; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Hofman, Paul; Karsenti, Jean-Michel; Jeandel, Pierre-Yves; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine; Nadel, Bertrand; Cluzeau, Thomas; Anderson, Kenneth C; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Luciano, Frederic

    2016-08-22

    Multiple myeloma (MM) evolves from a premalignant condition known as monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). However, the factors underlying the malignant transformation of plasmocytes in MM are not fully characterized. We report here that Eµ-directed expression of the antiapoptotic Bcl-B protein in mice drives an MM phenotype that reproduces accurately the human disease. Indeed, with age, Eµ-bcl-b transgenic mice develop the characteristic features of human MM, including bone malignant plasma cell infiltration, a monoclonal immunoglobulin peak, immunoglobulin deposit in renal tubules, and highly characteristic bone lytic lesions. In addition, the tumors are serially transplantable in irradiated wild-type mice, underlying the tumoral origin of the disease. Eµ-bcl-b plasmocytes show increased expression of a panel of genes known to be dysregulated in human MM pathogenesis. Treatment of Eµ-bcl-b mice with drugs currently used to treat patients such as melphalan and VELCADE efficiently kills malignant plasmocytes in vivo. Finally, we find that Bcl-B is overexpressed in plasmocytes from MM patients but neither in MGUS patients nor in healthy individuals, suggesting that Bcl-B may drive MM. These findings suggest that Bcl-B could be an important factor in MM disease and pinpoint Eµ-bcl-b mice as a pertinent model to validate new therapies in MM. PMID:27455953

  10. The influence of metal-ion binding on the structure and surface composition of Sonic Hedgehog: a combined classical and hybrid QM/MM MD study.

    PubMed

    Hitzenberger, Manuel; Hofer, Thomas S

    2016-08-10

    In this work, the influence of the metal ions present in vertebrate Sonic Hedgehog was assessed by a series of molecular mechanics molecular dynamics simulations with differing ionic compositions. The obtained data suggest that Ca(ii) binding has a very distinct influence on the composition of the protein surface surrounding the binding site by shaping several ionic interactions with negatively charged sidechains that otherwise would be pointing towards the solvent, repelling potential ligands. Furthermore, the Ca(ii) ions play an important role in the stability of the loop regions where they are coordinated. In contrast, the removal of the Zn(ii) ion results in no noticeable destabilization of its chemical surrounding, however, it is shown that the destabilizing effect of removed Ca(ii) ions is amplified if Zn(ii) is absent as well. Furthermore, a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulation of Sonic Hedgehog with special focus on the Zn(ii) binding site has been conducted. The results indicate that QM/MM in contrast to pure MM accurately reproduces structural features also found by experimental studies and therefore is able to provide credible predictions not only of the dynamical properties of the studied system but also of protein-ligand interactions at the metal ion binding site. PMID:27452578

  11. Intrinsic Ca2+-dependent theta oscillations in apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Allan Kjeldsen; Nedergaard, Steen; Andreasen, Mogens

    2014-08-01

    Behavior-associated theta-frequency oscillation in the hippocampal network involves a patterned activation of place cells in the CA1, which can be accounted for by a somatic-dendritic interference model predicting the existence of an intrinsic dendritic oscillator. Here we describe an intrinsic oscillatory mechanism in apical dendrites of in vitro CA1 pyramidal cells, which is induced by suprathreshold depolarization and consists of rhythmic firing of slow spikes in the theta-frequency band. The incidence of slow spiking (29%) increased to 78% and 100% in the presence of the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (2 μM) or 4-aminopyridine (2 mM), respectively. Prior depolarization facilitated the induction of slow spiking. Applied electrical field polarization revealed a distal dendritic origin of slow spikes. The oscillations were largely insensitive to tetrodotoxin, but blocked by nimodipine (10 μM), indicating that they depend on activation of L-type Ca2+ channels. Antagonists of T-, R-, N-, and P/Q-type Ca2+ channels had no detectable effect. The slow spike dimension and frequency was sensitive to 4-aminopyridine (0.1-2 mM) and TEA (10 mM), suggesting the contribution from voltage-dependent K+ channels to the oscillation mechanism. α-Dendrotoxin (10 μM), stromatoxin (2 μM), iberiotoxin (0.2 μM), apamin (0.5 μM), linorpidine (30 μM), and ZD7288 (20 μM) were without effect. Oscillations induced by sine-wave current injection or theta-burst synaptic stimulation were voltage-dependently attenuated by nimodipine, indicating an amplifying function of L-type Ca2+ channels on imposed signals. These results show that the apical dendrites have intrinsic oscillatory properties capable of generating rhythmic voltage fluctuations in the theta-frequency band. PMID:25252335

  12. Use of a Genetically Enhanced, Pediocin-Producing Starter Culture, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MM217, To Control Listeria monocytogenes in Cheddar Cheese

    PubMed Central

    Buyong, Nurliza; Kok, Jan; Luchansky, John B.

    1998-01-01

    Cheddar cheese was prepared with Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MM217, a starter culture which contains pMC117 coding for pediocin PA-1. About 75 liters of pasteurized milk (containing ca. 3.6% fat) was inoculated with strain MM217 (ca. 106 CFU per ml) and a mixture of three Listeria monocytogenes strains (ca. 103 CFU per ml). The viability of the pathogen and the activity of pediocin in the cheese were monitored at appropriate intervals throughout the manufacturing process and during ripening at 8°C for 6 months. In control cheese made with the isogenic, non-pediocin-producing starter culture L. lactis subsp. lactis MM210, the counts of the pathogen increased to about 107 CFU per g after 2 weeks of ripening and then gradually decreased to about 103 CFU per g after 6 months. In the experimental cheese made with strain MM217, the counts of L. monocytogenes decreased to 102 CFU per g within 1 week of ripening and then decreased to about 10 CFU per g within 3 months. The average titer of pediocin in the experimental cheese decreased from approximately 64,000 arbitrary units (AU) per g after 1 day to 2,000 AU per g after 6 months. No pediocin activity (<200 AU per g) was detected in the control cheese. Also, the presence of pMC117 in strain MM217 did not alter the cheese-making quality of the starter culture, as the rates of acid production, the pH values, and the levels of moisture, NaCl, and fat of the control cheese and the experimental cheese were similar. Our data revealed that pediocin-producing starter cultures have significant potential for protecting natural cheese against L. monocytogenes. PMID:9835572

  13. Mechanical response with reversed electrical response to noradrenaline by Ca-deprived arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Keatinge, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    1. When sheep carotid arteries had become electrically active after 30 min in Ca-free saline, noradrenaline 0·1 mM caused almost as much contraction as it did with Ca 1·25 mM present; it also caused slight electrical depolarization, usually with increased spike frequency, followed by electrical quiescence. 2. In Ca-free saline with EDTA the arteries became profoundly depolarized, and their mechanical responses greatly reduced, within a few minutes. The mechanical responses to noradrenaline that remained were accompanied by electrical repolarization or, after longer periods in EDTA, by no electrical change. 3. This residual mechanical responsiveness to noradrenaline, always tested at 36° C, declined on average 26 times as rapidly during exposure to EDTA at 36° C as at 5° C and was not reduced by increasing the concentration of EDTA from 1·25 to 12·5 mM. This temperature-sensitivity was significantly too high to be explained by a diffusion-limited process. 4. The results suggest that most of the tissue Ca responsible for contractility in simple Ca-free saline was either free in the extracellular space or in cellular stores that were discharged within a few minutes when free extracellular Ca was removed. They also indicate a small resistant Ca store which did not communicate with the exterior by diffusion, and part of which noradrenaline could utilize for contraction by means not dependent on depolarization conducted from the cell membrane. PMID:4625124

  14. OH(A 2Sigma(+) - X 2Pi) emission from dissociative excitation of HO2 at 147 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suto, M.; Lee, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    The photodissociation processes of the HO2 radical have been studied using the Xe resonance line at 147 nm as a light source. HO2 radical was produced by the reaction H + O2 + He HO2 + He in a flow tube, and the HO2 concentration was measured by a titration method HO2 + NO - OH + NO2. An observed emission in the 310 + or -10 nm region was found to be due solely to photodissociation and is attributed to the OH(A 2Sigma(+) - X 2Pi) system. This emission was studied as a function of O2 and H2 pressure added to the flow tube. Other possible photoemission processes were considered, including photoexcitation of OH, photodissociative excitation of H2O2, emission from the reaction O(D-1) + H, and metastable O2 produced from photodissociation of HO2. It is concluded that the emission intensities produced from these processes is negligible.

  15. How Does the Ca(2+)-paradox Injury Induce Contracture in the Heart?-A Combined Study of the Intracellular Ca(2+) Dynamics and Cell Structures in Perfused Rat Hearts.

    PubMed

    Mani, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hideo; Adachi, Tetsuya; Ikegawa, Masaya; Dai, Ping; Fujita, Naohisa; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    The calcium (Ca(2+))-paradox injury of the heart, induced by restoration of extracellular Ca(2+) after its short-term depletion, is known to provoke cardiomyocyte contracture. However, undetermined is how the Ca(2+)-paradox provokes such a distinctive presentation of myocytes in the heart. To address this, we imaged sequential intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics and concomitant structures of the subepicardial ventricular myocytes in fluo3-loaded, Langendorff-perfused rat hearts produced by the Ca(2+) paradox. Under rapid-scanning confocal microscopy, repletion of Ca(2+) following its depletion produced high-frequency Ca(2+) waves in individual myocytes with asynchronous localized contractions, resulting in contracture within 10 min. Such alterations of myocytes were attenuated by 5-mM NiCl2, but not by verapamil, SEA0400, or combination of ryanodine and thapsigargin, indicating a contribution of non-specific transmembrane Ca(2+) influx in the injury. However, saponin-induced membrane permeabilization of Ca(2+) showed no apparent contracture despite the emergence of high-frequency Ca(2+) waves, indicating an essential role of myocyte-myocyte and myocyte-extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanical connections in the Ca(2+) paradox. In immunohistochemistry Ca(2+) depletion produced separation of the intercalated disc that expresses cadherin and dissipation of β-dystroglycan located along the sarcolemma. Taken together, along with the trans-sarcolemmal Ca(2+) influx, disruption of cell-cell and cell-ECM connections is essential for contracture in the Ca(2+)-paradox injury.

  16. Dynamic buffering of mitochondrial Ca2+ during Ca2+ uptake and Na+-induced Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Blomeyer, Christoph A.; Bazil, Jason N.; Stowe, David F.; Pradhan, Ranjan K.; Dash, Ranjan K.; Camara, Amadou K. S.

    2014-01-01

    In cardiac mitochondria, matrix free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]m) is primarily regulated by Ca2+ uptake and release via the Ca2+ uniporter (CU) and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCE) as well as by Ca2+ buffering. Although experimental and computational studies on the CU and NCE dynamics exist, it is not well understood how matrix Ca2+ buffering affects these dynamics under various Ca2+ uptake and release conditions, and whether this influences the stoichiometry of the NCE. To elucidate the role of matrix Ca2+ buffering on the uptake and release of Ca2+, we monitored Ca2+ dynamics in isolated mitochondria by measuring both the extra-matrix free [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]e) and [Ca2+]m. A detailed protocol was developed and freshly isolated mitochondria from guinea pig hearts were exposed to five different [CaCl2] followed by ruthenium red and six different [NaCl]. By using the fluorescent probe indo-1, [Ca2+] and [Ca2+e]m were spectrofluorometrically quantified, and the stoichiometry of the NCE was determined. In addition, we measured NADH, membrane potential, matrix volume and matrix pH to monitor Ca2+-induced changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Our [Ca2+]e and [Ca2+]m measurements demonstrate that Ca2+ uptake and release do not show reciprocal Ca2+ dynamics in the extra-matrix and matrix compartments. This salient finding is likely caused by a dynamic Ca2+ buffering system in the matrix compartment. The Na+ - induced Ca2+ release demonstrates an electrogenic exchange via the NCE by excluding an electroneutral exchange. Mitochondrial bioenergetics were only transiently affected by Ca2+ uptake in the presence of large amounts of CaCl2, but not by Na+- induced Ca2+ release. PMID:23225099

  17. Large electrostrain and high optical temperature sensitivity in BaTiO3-(Na0.5Ho0.5)TiO3 multifunctional ferroelectric ceramics.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Chai, Xiaona; Wang, Xusheng; Xu, Chao-Nan; Gu, Yihao; Zhao, Haifeng; Yao, Xi

    2016-08-01

    Ferroelectric (1 -x)BaTiO3-x(Na0.5Ho0.5)TiO3 ceramics with ferroelectric and up-conversion luminescent multifunctions were designed and fabricated by a solid state reaction process. Their structure, ferroelectric, piezoelectric, up-conversion photoluminescence and relative optical temperature sensing properties were investigated systematically. Crystal structure analysis and Rietveld refinements based on the powder X-ray diffraction data show that the ceramics crystallized in the tetragonal perovskite space group P4mm at room temperature. Enhanced electrical properties and strong green up-conversion luminescence with thermally coupled green emission bands centered at 523 and 553 nm were observed. For a typical sample x equals 0.05, a large electrostrain of 0.279% was obtained under a 70 kV cm(-1) electric field that is comparable to that of the PZT4. Meanwhile, the excellent optical temperature sensitivity (0.0063 K(-1) at 480 K) is higher than that of Er-doped BaTiO3 nanocrystal materials. The results suggest that the BaTiO3-(Na0.5Ho0.5)TiO3 material should be an attractive material for piezoelectric actuator and temperature sensing device applications. PMID:27244098

  18. Enhanced contractile responsiveness to cytosolic Ca(2+) by delta-2 opioid agonist deltorphin in intact guinea pig hearts.

    PubMed

    Fujita, S; Smart, S C; Stowe, D F

    2000-09-01

    Opioid receptor subtypes, delta and kappa, are found in cardiac tissue and may play a role in cardiac function. We explored if the synthetic opioid delta(2)[D-Ala(2)]-deltorphin (DTP) and mu peptide agonist [D-Ala(2)]-enkephalin (DAMGO) alter the left ventricular pressure (LVP) [Ca(2+)](i) relationship in isolated guinea pig hearts. LV phasic [Ca(2+)](i) was measured from dual fluorescence signals using indo 1. Ca(2+) transients were corrected and calibrated to nM [Ca(2+)](i). Diastolic (d), systolic (s) [Ca(2+)](i), and s-d[Ca(2+)](i) were plotted v LVP at 0.3 to 6.8 mM [CaCl(2)](e)to assess the association of contractility to Ca(2+). Also given were naltriben (NTB) and CTOP, delta(2) and mu antagonists, and nifedipine (NIF) and thapsigargin (THAP). From a control of 880+/-95 nM (SEM), DTP decreased s-d[Ca(2+)](max) to 525+/-82 nM after DTP and to 405+/-84 nM after NIF, whereas THAP increased s-d[Ca(2+)](max)to 1605+/-275 nM. NTB, 795+/-33 nM, NTB+DTP, 820+/-98 nM, DAMGO, 970+/-82 nM, and DAMGO+CTOP, 830+/-93 nM, gave values similar to controls. From a control value of 61+/-4 mm Hg, LVP(max)was increased by DTP to 73+/-3 mmHg and by THAP to 77+/-2 mmHg, was unchanged by DAMGO at 48+/-6 mmHg, and was decreased by NIF to 24+/-2 mmHg. Compared to the control value of 594+/-18 nM, less s-d[Ca(2+)](i) was required to attain 50% s-dLVP(max)(curve left shift) with increasing [CaCl(2)](e) for DTP, 407+/-17 nM, and more was required for THAP, 737+/-35 nM. DTP raised the slope max of s-dLVP(max)(100%) v. s-d[Ca(2+)](i)by 2.7-fold. This indicates DTP enhances cardiac performance by enhancing responsiveness to cytosolic Ca(2+)rather than by raising diastolic Ca(2+) and subsequently released Ca(2+), as does THAP.

  19. Revelation of non-statistical behavior in HO2 vibration by a new ab initio potential energy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi Ying; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua

    2006-09-01

    The hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) has long been considered as a prototype for statistical vibrational dynamics. In this work, however, it is shown that the bound state energy levels (up to the dissociation threshold) and low-lying resonances of the HO2 system (J=0) obtained on a new ab initio potential energy surface exhibit surprisingly large regularity. The implications of the non-statistical behavior of the HO2 system in unimolecular and bimolecular reactions are discussed.

  20. A Note on Friedmann Equation of FRW Universe in Deformed Hořava—Lifshitz Gravity from Entropic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao; Wang, Yong-Qiang

    2011-09-01

    With entropic interpretation of gravity proposed by Verlinde, we obtain the Friedmann equation of the Friedmann—Robertson—Walker universe for the deformed Hořava—Lifshitz gravity. It is shown that, when the parameter of Hořava—Lifshitz gravity ω → ∞, the modified Friedmann equation will go back to the one in Einstein gravity. This results may imply that the entropic interpretation of gravity is effective for the deformed Hořava—Lifshitz gravity.

  1. /sup 45/Ca distribution and transport in saponin skinned vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, M.A.; Diecke, F.P.

    1983-04-01

    /sup 45/Ca distribution and transport were studied in chemically skinned strips of caudal artery from Kyoto Wistar rats. Sarcolemmal membranes were made hyperpermeable by exposure for 60 min to solutions containing 0.1 mg/ml of saponin. Skinned helical strips responded with graded contractions to changes in ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid buffered free Ca solutions (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) and were sensitive to the Mg-ATP concentration. Tissues loaded in the presence of 10(-7) M Ca contracted in response to 10 mM caffeine. These experiments indicate the strips are skinned and possess a functional regulatory and contractile system and an intact Ca sequestering system. /sup 45/Ca distributes in three compartments in skinned caudal artery strips. The Ca contents of two components are linear functions of the Ca-ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid concentration and desaturate at rapid rates. They correspond to the extracellular and cytoplasmic spaces. A significantly smaller component releases Ca at comparatively slower rates. /sup 45/Ca uptake by the slow component consists of an ATP-dependent and an ATP-independent fraction. The /sup 45/Ca content of the ATP-dependent fraction is a function of the free Ca concentration and is independent of the Ca-ethylene glycol bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid concentration. Its content was enhanced by oxalate and was abolished by Triton X-100 skinning solutions. The ATP-independent component was not affected by Triton X-100 skinning and may represent Ca binding to cytoplasmic molecules and structures. The sequestered Ca was released with caffeine or Ca but not by epinephrine. The observations indicate that the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria of vascular smooth muscle strips skinned with saponin retain their functional integrity after saponin skinning.

  2. Characterization of the ER-Targeted Low Affinity Ca2+ Probe D4ER

    PubMed Central

    Greotti, Elisa; Wong, Andrea; Pozzan, Tullio; Pendin, Diana; Pizzo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca2+) is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger and changes in its concentration impact on nearly every aspect of cell life. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represents the major intracellular Ca2+ store and the free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]) within its lumen ([Ca2+]ER) can reach levels higher than 1 mM. Several genetically-encoded ER-targeted Ca2+ sensors have been developed over the last years. However, most of them are non-ratiometric and, thus, their signal is difficult to calibrate in live cells and is affected by shifts in the focal plane and artifactual movements of the sample. On the other hand, existing ratiometric Ca2+ probes are plagued by different drawbacks, such as a double dissociation constant (Kd) for Ca2+, low dynamic range, and an affinity for the cation that is too high for the levels of [Ca2+] in the ER lumen. Here, we report the characterization of a recently generated ER-targeted, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based, Cameleon probe, named D4ER, characterized by suitable Ca2+ affinity and dynamic range for monitoring [Ca2+] variations within the ER. As an example, resting [Ca2+]ER have been evaluated in a known paradigm of altered ER Ca2+ homeostasis, i.e., in cells expressing a mutated form of the familial Alzheimer’s Disease-linked protein Presenilin 2 (PS2). The lower Ca2+ affinity of the D4ER probe, compared to that of the previously generated D1ER, allowed the detection of a conspicuous, more clear-cut, reduction in ER Ca2+ content in cells expressing mutated PS2, compared to controls. PMID:27598166

  3. Characterization of the ER-Targeted Low Affinity Ca(2+) Probe D4ER.

    PubMed

    Greotti, Elisa; Wong, Andrea; Pozzan, Tullio; Pendin, Diana; Pizzo, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is a ubiquitous intracellular messenger and changes in its concentration impact on nearly every aspect of cell life. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represents the major intracellular Ca(2+) store and the free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]) within its lumen ([Ca(2+)]ER) can reach levels higher than 1 mM. Several genetically-encoded ER-targeted Ca(2+) sensors have been developed over the last years. However, most of them are non-ratiometric and, thus, their signal is difficult to calibrate in live cells and is affected by shifts in the focal plane and artifactual movements of the sample. On the other hand, existing ratiometric Ca(2+) probes are plagued by different drawbacks, such as a double dissociation constant (Kd) for Ca(2+), low dynamic range, and an affinity for the cation that is too high for the levels of [Ca(2+)] in the ER lumen. Here, we report the characterization of a recently generated ER-targeted, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based, Cameleon probe, named D4ER, characterized by suitable Ca(2+) affinity and dynamic range for monitoring [Ca(2+)] variations within the ER. As an example, resting [Ca(2+)]ER have been evaluated in a known paradigm of altered ER Ca(2+) homeostasis, i.e., in cells expressing a mutated form of the familial Alzheimer's Disease-linked protein Presenilin 2 (PS2). The lower Ca(2+) affinity of the D4ER probe, compared to that of the previously generated D1ER, allowed the detection of a conspicuous, more clear-cut, reduction in ER Ca(2+) content in cells expressing mutated PS2, compared to controls. PMID:27598166

  4. Physiologic rate of carrier-mediated Ca2+ entry matches active extrusion in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Desai, S A; Schlesinger, P H; Krogstad, D J

    1991-08-01

    The intracellular Ca2+ concentration of nearly all cells is kept at submicromolar levels. The magnitudes of transmembrane Ca2+ movement that maintain this steady state in the human red blood cell have long been debated. Although there is agreement that the physiologic extrusion of Ca2+ by the well-characterized Ca2+. ATPase amounts to 45 mumol/liter cells per h (1982. Nature (Lond.). 298:478-481), the reported passive entry rates in physiological saline (2-20 mumol/liter cells per h) are all substantially lower. This discrepancy could be due to incomplete inhibition of the pump in the previous measurements of Ca2+ entry. We therefore examined both rate and mechanism of entry after completely inactivating the pump. This required pretreatment with iodoacetamide (to lower the intracellular ATP concentration) and vanadate (to inhibit any residual Ca2+ pump activity). The rate of Ca2+ entry (53 mumol/liter cells per h) was now found to be comparable to the accepted extrusion rate. Entry closely obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Vmax = 321 +/- 17 nmol Ca/g dry wt per h, Km = 1.26 +/- 0.13 mM), was competitively inhibited by external Sr2+ (Ki = 10.8 +/- 1.2 mM), and was accelerated by intracellular Ca2+. 45Ca2+ efflux from these pump-inactivated cells was also accelerated by either external Ca2+ or Sr2+. These accelerating effects of divalent cations on the opposite (trans) face of the membrane rule out a simple channel. Substrate-gated channels are also ruled out: cells equilibrated with 45Ca2+ lost the isotope when unlabeled Ca2+ or Sr2+ was added externally. Thus, passive Ca2+ movements occur predominantly by a reversible carrier-mediated mechanism for which Sr2+ is an alternate substrate. The carrier's intrinsic affinity constants for Ca2+ and Sr2+, 1.46 and 0.37 mM-1, respectively, indicate that Ca2+ is the preferred substrate.

  5. Ho:YAG laser irradiation in blood vessel as a vasodilator: ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, E.; Iwasaki, T.; Kaneko, K.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.

    2007-02-01

    We studied Ho:YAG laser irradiation in blood vessel as a vasodilator ex vivo. We thought that the Ho:YAG laser-induced bubble expansion might be able to dilate the vessel because we found the vessel wall expansion after the Ho:YAG laser irradiation, that is steady deformation, in the vessel ex vivo. There have been many reports regarding to the Ho:YAG laser irradiation in the vessel. Most of studies concentrated on the interaction between Ho:YAG laser irradiation and vessel wall to investigate side effect on Ho:YAG laser angioplasty. We proposed to use the Ho:YAG laser-induced bubble expansion as a vasodilator. We studied vasodilation effect of the Ho:YAG laser-induced bubble ex vivo. The flash lamp excited Ho:YAG laser surgical unit (IH102, NIIC, Japan) (λ=2.1μm) was used. The laser energy was delivered by a silica glass fiber (outer diameter: 1000μm, core diameter: 600μm). The laser-induced bubble was generated in the extracted fresh porcine carotid artery with the warmed saline perfusion. The laser energy at the fiber tip was ranging from 170-1300mJ per pulse. Number of the laser irradiation was ranged from 20pulses to 100pulses. The outer diameter of the vessel was observed. To examine the change in mechanical properties of the vessel wall, the stress-strain curve of the laser-irradiated vessel was measured. Birefringence observation and microscopic observation of staining specimen were performed. When the laser energy was set to 1300mJ per pulse, the outer diameter of the vessel after the laser irradiation was expanded by 1.4 times comparing with that of before the laser irradiation and the dilatation effect was kept even at 10minutes after the irradiation. The elasticity modulus of the artery by collagen was changed by the laser irradiation. In the polarized microscopic observation, the brightness of the intimal side of the vessel is increased comparing with that of the normal. We think this brightness increasing may be attributed to birefringence change

  6. [166Dy]Dy/166Ho hydroxide macroaggregates: an in vivo generator system for radiation synovectomy.

    PubMed

    Ferro-Flores, G; Hernández-Oviedo, O; Arteaga de Murphy, C; Tendilla, J I; Monroy-Guzmán, F; Pedraza-López, M; Aldama-Alvarado, K

    2004-12-01

    Radiation synovectomy is an effective treatment in patients suffering from inflammatory-rheumatoid and degenerative joint diseases. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of preparing dysprosium-166 (166Dy)/holmium-166(166Ho) hydroxide macroaggregates ([166Dy]Dy/166Ho-HM) as an in vivo generator for radiation synovectomy evaluating whether the stability of 166Dy-HM and 166Ho-HM complexes is maintained when the daughter 166Ho is formed. The Monte Carlo (MCNP4B) theoretical depth dose profile for the in vivo [166Dy]Dy/166Ho generator system in a joint model was calculated and compared with that produced by 90Y, 153Sm and 166Ho. 166Dy was obtained by neutron irradiation of enriched 164Dy2O3 in a Triga Mark III reactor. Macroaggregates were prepared by reaction of [166Dy]DyCl3 with 0.5 M NaOH in an ultrasonic bath. [166Dy]Dy/166Ho-HM was obtained with radiochemical purity >99.5% and with the majority of particles in the 2-5 microm range. In vitro studies demonstrated that the radio-macroaggregates are stable in saline solution and human serum without a significant change in the particle size over 14 d, suggesting that no translocation of the daughter nucleus occurs subsequent to beta- decay of 166Dy. Biological studies in normal rats demonstrated high retention in the knee joint even 7 d after [166Dy]Dy/166Ho-HM administration. The Monte Carlo (MCNP4B) theoretical depth dose profiles in a joint model, showed that the in vivo [166Dy]Dy/166Ho generator system would produce 25% and 50% less radiation dose to the articular cartilage and bone surface, respectively, than that produced by 90Y or pure 166Ho in a treatment with the same therapeutic dose to the synovium surface. Despite that 153Sm showed the best depth dose profile sparing doses to healthy tissues, the use of 166Dy could provide the advantage of being applied in patients that cannot be reached within a few hours from a nuclear reactor and to produce less radiation exposure to the medical personnel

  7. L-type Ca2+ channel sparklets revealed by TIRF microscopy in mouse urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Sidaway, Peter; Teramoto, Noriyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger in urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM). In this study, small discrete elevations of intracellular Ca(2+), referred to as Ca(2+) sparklets have been detected in an intact detrusor smooth muscle electrical syncytium using a TIRF microscopy Ca(2+) imaging approach. Sparklets were virtually abolished by the removal of extracellular Ca(2+) (0.035 ± 0.01 vs. 0.23 ± 0.07 Hz/mm(2); P<0.05). Co-loading of smooth muscle strips with the slow Ca(2+) chelator EGTA-AM (10 mM) confirmed that Ca(2+) sparklets are restricted to the cell membrane. Ca(2+) sparklets were inhibited by the calcium channel inhibitors R-(+)-Bay K 8644 (1 μM) (0.034 ± 0.02 vs. 0.21 ± 0.08 Hz/mm(2); P<0.05), and diltiazem (10 μM) (0.097 ± 0.04 vs. 0.16 ± 0.06 Hz/mm(2); P<0.05). Ca(2+) sparklets were unaffected by inhibition of P2X1 receptors α,β-meATP (10 μM) whilst sparklet frequencies were significantly reduced by atropine (1 μM). Ca(2+) sparklet frequency was significantly reduced by PKC inhibition with Gö6976 (100 nM) (0.030 ± 0.01 vs. 0.30 ± 0.1 Hz/mm(2); P<0.05), demonstrating that Ca(2+) sparklets are PKC dependant. In the presence of CPA (10 μM), there was no apparent change in the overall frequency of Ca(2+) sparklets, although the sparklet frequencies of each UBSM became statistically independent of each other (Spearman's rank correlation 0.2, P>0.05), implying that Ca(2+) store mediated signals regulate Ca(2+) sparklets. Under control conditions, inhibition of store operated Ca(2+) entry using ML-9 (100 μM) had no significant effect. Amplitudes of Ca(2+) sparklets were unaffected by any agonists or antagonists, suggesting that these signals are quantal events arising from activation of a single channel, or complex of channels. The effects of CPA and ML-9 suggest that Ca(2+) sparklets regulate events in the cell membrane, and contribute to cytosolic and sarcoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations. PMID:24699670

  8. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Ca(2+)-S100B Reveal Two Protein Conformations.

    PubMed

    Cavalier, Michael C; Ansari, Mohd Imran; Pierce, Adam D; Wilder, Paul T; McKnight, Laura E; Raman, E Prabhu; Neau, David B; Bezawada, Padmavani; Alasady, Milad J; Charpentier, Thomas H; Varney, Kristen M; Toth, Eric A; MacKerell, Alexander D; Coop, Andrew; Weber, David J

    2016-01-28

    The drug pentamidine inhibits calcium-dependent complex formation with p53 ((Ca)S100B·p53) in malignant melanoma (MM) and restores p53 tumor suppressor activity in vivo. However, off-target effects associated with this drug were problematic in MM patients. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were therefore completed here with 23 pentamidine analogues, and X-ray structures of (Ca)S100B·inhibitor complexes revealed that the C-terminus of S100B adopts two different conformations, with location of Phe87 and Phe88 being the distinguishing feature and termed the "FF-gate". For symmetric pentamidine analogues ((Ca)S100B·5a, (Ca)S100B·6b) a channel between sites 1 and 2 on S100B was occluded by residue Phe88, but for an asymmetric pentamidine analogue ((Ca)S100B·17), this same channel was open. The (Ca)S100B·17 structure illustrates, for the first time, a pentamidine analog capable of binding the "open" form of the "FF-gate" and provides a means to block all three "hot spots" on (Ca)S100B, which will impact next generation (Ca)S100B·p53 inhibitor design. PMID:26727270

  9. Small Molecule Inhibitors of Ca2+-S100B Reveal Two Protein Conformations

    PubMed Central

    Cavalier, Michael C.; Ansari, Mohd. Imran; Pierce, Adam D.; Wilder, Paul T.; McKnight, Laura E.; Raman, E. Prabhu; Neau, David B.; Bezawada, Padmavani; Alasady, Milad J.; Charpentier, Thomas H.; Varney, Kristen M.; Toth, Eric A.; MacKerell, Alexander D.; Coop, Andrew; Weber, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The drug pentamidine inhibits calcium-dependent complex formation with p53 (CaS100B•p53) in malignant melanoma (MM), and restores p53 tumor suppressor activity in vivo. However, off-target effects associated with this drug were problematic in MM patients. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies were therefore completed here with 23 pentamidine analogues, and X-ray structures of CaS100B•inhibitor complexes revealed that the C-terminus of S100B adopts two different conformations, with location of Phe-87 and Phe-88 being the distinguishing feature and termed the “FF-Gate”. For symmetric pentamidine analogues (CaS100B•5a, CaS100B•6b) a channel between Sites 1 and 2 on S100B was occluded by residue Phe-88, but for an asymmetric pentamidine analogue (CaS100B•17), this same channel was open. The CaS100B•17 structure illustrates, for the first time, a pentamidine analog capable of binding the “open” form of the “FF-gate” and provides a means to block all three “hot spots” on CaS100B, which will impact next generation CaS100B•p53 inhibitor design. PMID:26727270

  10. Measurement of pernitric acid (HO2NO2) using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) with I-·H2O as the reagent ions: instrumentation and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, D.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D.; Ng, N. L.; Li, J.; Dibb, J. E.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) is formed by the association reaction of HO2 and NO2, which couples both the HOx (HO2+OH) and NOx (=NO2+NO) families. The thermal decomposition at higher temperatures is sufficiently fast that HO2NO2 is in steady state with HO2 and NO2. This allows HO2 levels to be inferred from HO2NO2 observations. In Polar Regions and higher altitudes, significant levels of HO2NO2 can build up and influences local HOx and NOx photochemistry. Here, we present an in situ measurement technique of HO2NO2 based on chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) using the reagent ion I- and its hydrated form I-·H2O, together with our calibration technique for HO2NO2 measurements. We will also present observations of HO2NO2: (1) in a polar boundary layer on top of the Greenland Ice Sheet during summer 2011, and (2) in an urban boundary layer in metropolitan Atlanta during winter 2014. The local chemistry of HO2NO2 at Summit will be evaluated. The local HO2 in Atlanta will be inferred and assessed with models.

  11. Single Longitudinal Mode, High Repetition Rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF Laser for Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petzar, Paul; Petros, M.; Chen, Songsheng; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Nyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    Ho:YLF/LuLiF lasers have specific applications for remote sensing such as wind-speed measurement and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement in the atmosphere because the operating wavelength (around 2 m) is located in the eye-safe range and can be tuned to the characteristic lines of CO2 absorption and there is strong backward scattering signal from aerosol (Mie scattering). Experimentally, a diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser has been successfully used as the transmitter of coherent differential absorption lidar for the measurement of with a repetition rate of 5 Hz and pulse energy of 75 mJ [1]. For highly precise CO2 measurements with coherent detection technique, a laser with high repetition rate is required to averaging out the speckle effect [2]. In addition, laser efficiency is critically important for the air/space borne lidar applications, because of the limited power supply. A diode pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser is difficult to efficiently operate in high repetition rate due to the large heat loading and up-conversion. However, a Tm:fiber laser pumped Ho:YLF laser with low heat loading can be operated at high repetition rates efficiently [3]. No matter whether wind-speed or carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration measurement is the goal, a Ho:YLF/LuLiF laser as the transmitter should operate in a single longitudinal mode. Injection seeding is a valid technique for a Q-switched laser to obtain single longitudinal mode operation. In this paper, we will report the new results for a single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate, Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. In order to avoid spectral hole burning and make injection seeding easier, a four mirror ring cavity is designed for single longitudinal mode, high repetition rate Q-switched Ho:YLF laser. The ramp-fire technique is chosen for injection seeding.

  12. HO-3867, a Safe STAT3 Inhibitor, Is Selectively Cytotoxic to Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Kellie S.; Naidu, Shan K.; Lata, Pushpa; Bid, Hemant K.; Rivera, Brian K.; McCann, Georgia A.; Tierney, Brent J.; ElNaggar, Adam C.; Bravo, Veronica; Leone, Gustavo; Houghton, Peter; Hideg, Kálmán; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Cohn, David E.; Selvendiran, Karuppaiyah

    2014-01-01

    STAT3 is well corroborated preclinically as a cancer therapeutic target, but tractable translational strategies for its blockade by small molecule inhibitors have remained elusive. In this study, we report the development of a novel class of bifunctional STAT3 inhibitors, based on conjugation of a diarylidenyl-piperidone (DAP) backbone to an N-hydroxypyrroline (−NOH) group, which exhibits minimal toxicity against normal cells and good oral bioavailability. Molecular modeling studies of this class suggested direct interaction with the STAT3 DNA binding domain. In particular, the DAP compound HO-3867 selectively inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation, transcription, and DNA binding without affecting the expression of other active STATs. HO-3867 exhibited minimal toxicity toward noncancerous cells and tissues but induced apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. Pharmacologic analysis revealed greater bioabsorption and bioavailability of the active (cytotoxic) metabolites in cancer cells compared with normal cells. The selective cytotoxicity of HO-3867 seemed to be multifaceted, eliciting differential activation of the Akt pathway in normal versus cancer cells. RNAi attenuation experiments confirmed the requirement of STAT3 for HO-3867–mediated apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. In vivo testing showed that HO-3867 could block xenograft tumor growth without toxic side effects. Furthermore, in primary human ovarian cancer cells isolated from patient ascites, HO-3867 inhibited cell migration/invasion and survival. Our results offer preclinical proof-of-concept for HO-3867 as a selective STAT3 inhibitor to treat ovarian cancer and other solid tumors where STAT3 is widely upregulated. PMID:24590057

  13. A new measurement of the half-life of (166m)Ho.

    PubMed

    Nedjadi, Y; Bailat, C; Caffari, Y; Froidevaux, P; Wastiel, C; Kivel, N; Guenther-Leopold, I; Triscone, G; Jaquenod, F; Bochud, F

    2012-09-01

    The work presented here is a new and precise measurement of the half-life of (166m)Ho by determining the activity concentration, using an ionisation chamber calibrated for this nuclide, and measuring the number of (166m)Ho atoms using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Since the isotope (166)Er interferes with the mass spectrometric measurement, Er has to be eliminated from the (166m)Ho radioactive solution. The elimination was achieved using ion-exchange chromatography with the cation exchange resin Dowex AG 50W-X8 and 2-Hydroxybutanoic acid as the mobile phase. After a first transit through the chromatographic column, the purified (166m)Ho eluate was spiked with natural Er to get a resulting Er isotopic composition close to that of natural Er at better than 99.5%, and then it underwent two further separations to eliminate the Er. The activity concentration of this Er-free radioactive (166m)Ho solution was measured in our reference ionisation chamber calibrated for this nuclide by means of the 4πβ(PC)-γ and 4πβ(PS)-4πγ coincidence techniques and integral counting with a well-type NaI(Tl) detector and Monte Carlo efficiencies. An aliquot of this standardized solution was sent to the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) for mass concentration determination using an isotope dilution MC-ICP-MS approach. The mass concentration of (166m)Ho in this solution was determined with 0.25% relative standard uncertainty. This value was corroborated by two other independent measurements. The new half-life of (166m)Ho, 1132.6(39) years (k=1), is compatible with the value determined in 1965, but is 5.6% shorter and about 43 times more precise. PMID:22421399

  14. HO-1 up-regulation: a key point in high-risk neuroblastoma resistance to bortezomib.

    PubMed

    Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Piras, Sabrina; Passalacqua, Mario; Domenicotti, Cinzia; Parodi, Alessia; Fenoglio, Daniela; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Moretta, Lorenzo; Traverso, Nicola; Nitti, Mariapaola

    2014-04-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by the development of chemoresistance, and bortezomib (BTZ), a selective inhibitor of proteasome, has been proposed in order to overcome drug resistance. Considering the involvement of the nuclear factor-erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the antioxidant and detoxifying ability of cancer cells, in this study we have investigated their role in differently aggressive NB cell lines treated with BTZ, focusing on the modulation of HO-1 to improve sensitivity to therapy. We have shown that MYCN amplified HTLA-230 cells were slightly sensitive to BTZ treatment, due to the activation of Nrf2 that led to an impressive up-regulation of HO-1. BTZ-treated HTLA-230 cells down-regulated p53 and up-regulated p21, favoring cell survival. The inhibition of HO-1 activity obtained by Zinc (II) protoprophyrin IX (ZnPPIX) was able to significantly increase the pro-apoptotic effect of BTZ in a p53- and p21-independent way. However, MYCN non-amplified SH-SY5Y cells showed a greater sensitivity to BTZ in relation to their inability to up-regulate HO-1. Therefore, we have shown that HO-1 inhibition improves the sensitivity of aggressive NB to proteasome inhibition-based therapy, suggesting that HO-1 up-regulation can be used as a marker of chemoresistance in NB. These results open up a new scenario in developing a combined therapy to overcome chemoresistance in high-risk neuroblastoma.

  15. HO-1 Protects against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunction in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dongling; Jin, Zhe; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Linlin; Chen, Kai; He, Xianghu; Song, Yinwei; Ke, Jianjuan; Wang, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial dysfunction would ultimately lead to myocardial cell apoptosis and death during ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Autophagy could ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction by autophagosome forming, which is a catabolic process to preserve the mitochondrial’s structural and functional integrity. HO-1 induction and expression are important protective mechanisms. This study in order to investigate the role of HO-1 during mitochondrial damage and its mechanism. Methods and Results The H9c2 cardiomyocyte cell line were incubated by hypoxic and then reoxygenated for the indicated time (2, 6, 12, 18, and 24 h). Cell viability was tested with CCK-8 kit. The expression of endogenous HO-1(RT-PCR and Western blot) increased with the duration of reoxygenation and reached maximum levels after 2 hours of H/R; thereafter, the expression gradually decreased to a stable level. Mitochondrial dysfunction (Flow cytometry quantified the ROS generation and JC-1 staining) and autophagy (The Confocal microscopy measured the autophagy. RFP-GFP-LC3 double-labeled adenovirus was used for testing.) were induced after 6 hours of H/R. Then, genetic engineering technology was employed to construct an Lv-HO1-H9c2 cell line. When HO-1 was overexpressed, the LC3II levels were significantly increased after reoxygenation, p62 protein expression was significantly decreased, the level of autophagy was unchanged, the mitochondrial membrane potential was significantly increased, and the mitochondrial ROS level was significantly decreased. Furthermore, when the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP was applied the level of autophagy after reoxygenation was significantly inhibited, and no significant improvement in mitochondrial dysfunction was observed. Conclusions During myocardial hypoxia-reoxygenation injury, HO-1 overexpression induces autophagy to protect the stability of the mitochondrial membrane and reduce the amount of mitochondrial oxidation products, thereby exerting a protective effect. PMID

  16. Glial HO-1 expression, iron deposition and oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Schipper, H M

    1999-09-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the pathological deposition of brain iron in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and other human neurodegenerative disorders remain poorly understood. In rat primary astrocyte cultures, we demonstrated that dopamine, cysteamine, H(2)O(2) and menadione rapidly induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression (mRNA and protein) followed by sequestration of non-transferrin-derived (55)Fe by the mitochondrial compartment. The effects of dopamine on HO-1 expression were inhibited by ascorbate implicating a free radical mechanism of action. Dopamine-induced mitochondrial iron trapping was abrogated by administration of the heme oxygenase inhibitors, tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) or dexamethasone (DEX) indicating that HO-1 upregulation is necessary for subsequent mitochondrial iron deposition in these cells. Overexpression of the human HO-1 gene in cultured rat astroglia by transient transfection also stimulated mitochondrial (55)Fe deposition, an effect that was again preventible by SnMP or DEX administration. We hypothesize that free ferrous iron and carbon monoxide generated by HO-1-mediated heme degradation promote mitochondrial membrane injury and the deposition of redox-active iron within this organelle. We have shown that the percentages of GFAP-positive astrocytes that co-express HO-1 in Parkinson-affected substantia nigra and Alzheimer-diseased hippocampus are significantly increased relative to age-matched controls. Stress-induced up-regulation of HO-1 in astroglia may be responsible for the abnormal patterns of brain iron deposition and mitochondrial insufficiency documented in various human neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:12835114

  17. HO(x) Measurements in SONEX with the Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor (ATHOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brune, William M.

    1997-01-01

    SONEX, which was delayed by aircraft inspection problems, began the second week of October and concluded in mid-November with 16 flights. These flights covered the Pacific Ocean off the western United States, transits across the United States, the western coast of Europe, and the North and Central Atlantic Ocean. Particular attention was paid to the North Atlantic Flight Corridor. ATHOS collected high-quality HO(x) data on 15 flights. Observations taken at 5 Hz were typically averaged into 20-second measurements. Each 20-second measurement has precision 1(sigma) of less than 0.01 pptv. OH measurements were generally made from the surface to flight altitudes. HO2 measurements, which require reagent NO flow, were made from flight altitudes to near the top of the planetary boundary layer. Measured OH and HO2 during SONEX was generally lower than the measured OH and HO2 during SUCCESS (April-May, 1996, central United States). Whereas during SUCCESS midday OH was 0.1-0.5 pptv and HO2 was 3-15 pptv, during SONEX midday OH was 0.02-0.2 pptv and HO2 was 0.5-8 pptv. Part of this difference results from the midday solar zenith angles, which were larger during SONEX than during SUCCESS due to both the season and the generally higher latitudes sampled during SONEX. However, some of the difference may be due to differences in HOx sources, since less air influenced by convection was sampled during SONEX. These possibilities await post-flight calibrations of ATHOS and analysis of observations of HO(x) and simultaneously measured meteorology and trace species.

  18. Sub-mm Jet Properties of the X-Ray Binary Swift J1745-26

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tetarenko, A. J.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Curran, P. A.; Russell, T. D.; Coulson, I. M.; Heinz, S.; Maitra, D.; Markoff, S. B.; Migliari, S.; Petitpas, G. R.; Rupen, M. P.; Rushton, A. P.; Russell, D. M.; Sarazin, C. L.

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of our observations of the early stages of the 2012-2013 outburst of the transient black hole X-ray binary (BHXRB), Swift J1745-26, with the Very Large Array, Submillimeter Array, and James Clerk Maxwell telescope (SCUBA-2). Our data mark the first multiple-band mm and sub-mm observations of a BHXRB. During our observations the system was in the hard accretion state producing a steady, compact jet. The unique combination of radio and mm/sub-mm data allows us to directly measure the spectral indices in and between the radio and mm/sub-mm regimes, including the first mm/sub-mm spectral index measured for a BHXRB. Spectral fitting revealed that both the mm (230 GHz) and sub-mm (350 GHz) measurements are consistent with extrapolations of an inverted power law from contemporaneous radio data (1-30 GHz). This indicates that, as standard jet models predict, a power law extending up to mm/sub-mm frequencies can adequately describe the spectrum, and suggests that the mechanism driving spectral inversion could be responsible for the high mm/sub-mm fluxes (compared to radio fluxes) observed in outbursting BHXRBs. While this power law is also consistent with contemporaneous optical data, the optical data could arise from either jet emission with a jet spectral break frequency of {{ν }break}≳ 1× {{10}14} Hz or the combination of jet emission with a lower jet spectral break frequency of {{ν }break}≳ 2× {{10}11} Hz and accretion disk emission. Our analysis solidifies the importance of the mm/sub-mm regime in bridging the crucial gap between radio and IR frequencies in the jet spectrum, and justifies the need to explore this regime further.

  19. CA V is present in rat kidney mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Dodgson, S.J.; Contino, L.C.

    1987-05-01

    Guinea pig liver mitochondria contain the unique carbonic anhydrase isozyme, CA V. Prior to sacrifice, 15 rats and 15 guinea pigs were either fed normal lab chow (group 1), starved 48 hours (group 2) or fed normal lab chow and given to drink only water with added HCl, pH 2.5 (group 3). Mitochondria were prepared from excised livers and kidneys. CA V activity of disrupted mitochondria was measured by /sup 18/O-mass spectrometric technique at pH 7.4, 37/sup 0/C, 25 mM NaHCO/sub 3/. Mass spectrometric CA assays with intact kidney mitochondria localize CA V activity to the matrix, as was found for liver mitochondria. It has been shown in hepatocytes prepared from starved guinea pigs and rats that inhibition of CA V results in decreased rate of gluconeogenesis from pyruvate. These present results are in line with the published observation that rat kidneys are much more gluconeogenic than guinea pig, and that this is increased by starvation and acidosis.

  20. A comparative study on Ca content and distribution in two Gesneriaceae species reveals distinctive mechanisms to cope with high rhizospheric soluble calcium.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenlong; Xu, Falun; Chen, Shixuan; Zhang, Zhennan; Zhao, Yan; Jin, Yukuan; Li, Meijing; Zhu, Yan; Liu, Yongxiu; Yang, Yi; Deng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Excessive Ca is toxic to plants thus significantly affects plant growth and species distribution in Ca-rich karst areas. To understand how plants survive high Ca soil, laboratory experiments were established to compare the physiological responses and internal Ca distribution in organ, tissue, cell, and intracellular levels under different Ca levels for Lysionotus pauciflorus and Boea hygrometrica, two karst habitant Gesneriaceae species in Southwest China. In the controlled condition, L. pauciflorus could survive as high as 200 mM rhizospheric soluble Ca, attributed to a series of physiological responses and preferential storage that limited Ca accumulation in chloroplasts of palisade cells. In contrast, B. hygrometrica could survive only 20 mM rhizospheric soluble Ca, but accumulated a high level of internal Ca in both palisade and spongy cells without disturbance on photosynthetic activity. By phenotype screening of transgenic plants expressing high Ca-inducible genes from B. hygrometrica, the expression of BhDNAJC2 in A. thaliana was found to enhance plant growth and photosynthesis under high soluble Ca stress. BhDNAJC2 encodes a recently reported heat shock protein (HSP) 40 family DnaJ-domain protein. The Ca-resistant phenotype of BhDNAJC2 highlights the important role of chaperone-mediated protein quality control in Ca tolerance in B. hygrometrica. Taken together, our results revealed that distinctive mechanisms were employed in the two Gesneriaceae karst habitants to cope with a high Ca environment.

  1. A comparative study on Ca content and distribution in two Gesneriaceae species reveals distinctive mechanisms to cope with high rhizospheric soluble calcium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenlong; Xu, Falun; Chen, Shixuan; Zhang, Zhennan; Zhao, Yan; Jin, Yukuan; Li, Meijing; Zhu, Yan; Liu, Yongxiu; Yang, Yi; Deng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Excessive Ca is toxic to plants thus significantly affects plant growth and species distribution in Ca-rich karst areas. To understand how plants survive high Ca soil, laboratory experiments were established to compare the physiological responses and internal Ca distribution in organ, tissue, cell, and intracellular levels under different Ca levels for Lysionotus pauciflorus and Boea hygrometrica, two karst habitant Gesneriaceae species in Southwest China. In the controlled condition, L. pauciflorus could survive as high as 200 mM rhizospheric soluble Ca, attributed to a series of physiological responses and preferential storage that limited Ca accumulation in chloroplasts of palisade cells. In contrast, B. hygrometrica could survive only 20 mM rhizospheric soluble Ca, but accumulated a high level of internal Ca in both palisade and spongy cells without disturbance on photosynthetic activity. By phenotype screening of transgenic plants expressing high Ca-inducible genes from B. hygrometrica, the expression of BhDNAJC2 in A. thaliana was found to enhance plant growth and photosynthesis under high soluble Ca stress. BhDNAJC2 encodes a recently reported heat shock protein (HSP) 40 family DnaJ-domain protein. The Ca-resistant phenotype of BhDNAJC2 highlights the important role of chaperone-mediated protein quality control in Ca tolerance in B. hygrometrica. Taken together, our results revealed that distinctive mechanisms were employed in the two Gesneriaceae karst habitants to cope with a high Ca environment. PMID:25477893

  2. Hořava-Lifshitz gravity: Detailed balance revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernieri, Daniele; Sotiriou, Thomas P.

    2012-03-01

    We attempt a critical reconsideration of “detailed balance” as a principle that can be used to restrict the proliferation of couplings in Hořava-Lifshitz gravity. We reexamine the shortcomings that have been usually associated with it in the literature and we argue that easy remedies can be found for all of them within the framework of detailed balance, and that the most persistent of them are actually related to projectability. We show that, once projectability is abandoned, detailed balance reduces the number of independent couplings by roughly an order of magnitude and imposes only one restriction that constitutes a phenomenological concern: the size of the (bare) cosmological constant is unacceptably large. Remarkably, this restriction (which is present in the projectable version as well) has been so far underappreciated in the literature. Optimists might prefer to interpret it as a potential blessing in disguise, as it allows one to entertain the idea of a miraculous cancellation between the bare cosmological constant and the (still poorly understood) vacuum energy contribution.

  3. The challenges of water governance in Ho Chi Minh City.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Cornelis J; Dan, Nguyen P; Dieperink, Carel

    2016-04-01

    Population growth, urbanization, pollution, and climate change pose urgent water challenges in cities. In this study, the sustainability of integrated water resources management in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) was evaluated using the City Blueprint approach. The City Blueprint is a set of 24 dedicated indicators divided over 8 categories (i.e., water security, water quality, drinking water, sanitation, infrastructure, climate robustness, biodiversity and attractiveness, and governance including public participation). The analysis showed that the rapid increase of water use for urban, industrial, and agricultural activities in HCMC has resulted in depletion of groundwater and severe pollution of both groundwater and surface water. Surface water quality, groundwater quality, biodiversity, and the sanitation of domestic and industrial wastewater are matters that need serious improvement. Current and future water supply in HCMC is at risk. HCMC can cope with it, but the 7 governance gaps as described by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) are major obstacles for HCMC. Rainwater harvesting, pollution reduction, as well as wastewater reuse are among the practical options. Wastewater reuse could lower the water stress index to 10%. The window to do this is narrow and rapidly closing as a result of the unprecedented urbanization and economic growth of this region. PMID:26009880

  4. Holographic energy density on Hořava-Lifshitz cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepe, Samuel; Peña, Francisco; Torres, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    In Hořava-Lifshitz cosmology we use the holographic Ricci-like cutoff for the energy density proposed by L. N. Granda and A. Oliveros and under this framework we study, through the cosmic evolution at late times, the sign change in the amount of nonconservation energy (Q ) present in this cosmology. We revise the early stage (curvature-dependent) of this cosmology, where a term reminiscent of stiff matter is the dominant, and in this stage we find a power-law solution for the cosmic scale factor although ω =-1 . Late and early phantom schemes are obtained without requiring ω <-1 . Nevertheless, these schemes are not feasible according to what is shown in this paper. We also show that ω =-1 alone does not imply a de Sitter phase in the present cosmology. Thermal aspects are revised by considering the energy interchange between the bulk and the spacetime boundary and we conclude that there is no thermal equilibrium between them. Finally, a ghost scalar graviton (extra degree of freedom in HL gravity) is required by the observational data.

  5. The challenges of water governance in Ho Chi Minh City.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Cornelis J; Dan, Nguyen P; Dieperink, Carel

    2016-04-01

    Population growth, urbanization, pollution, and climate change pose urgent water challenges in cities. In this study, the sustainability of integrated water resources management in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) was evaluated using the City Blueprint approach. The City Blueprint is a set of 24 dedicated indicators divided over 8 categories (i.e., water security, water quality, drinking water, sanitation, infrastructure, climate robustness, biodiversity and attractiveness, and governance including public participation). The analysis showed that the rapid increase of water use for urban, industrial, and agricultural activities in HCMC has resulted in depletion of groundwater and severe pollution of both groundwater and surface water. Surface water quality, groundwater quality, biodiversity, and the sanitation of domestic and industrial wastewater are matters that need serious improvement. Current and future water supply in HCMC is at risk. HCMC can cope with it, but the 7 governance gaps as described by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) are major obstacles for HCMC. Rainwater harvesting, pollution reduction, as well as wastewater reuse are among the practical options. Wastewater reuse could lower the water stress index to 10%. The window to do this is narrow and rapidly closing as a result of the unprecedented urbanization and economic growth of this region.

  6. Smog Chamber Studies of Toluene Photooxidation By Ho Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, A.; Bienenstock, Y.; Arias, M. C.; Collin, F.; Hastie, D. R.

    Two series of smog chamber experiments have been conducted to determine the par- ticulate yield from toluene photo oxidation and to investigate the dependence of the yield on experimental factors. Toluene was oxidized by HO radicals in the presence of NO by irradiating mixtures of toluene/isopropylnitrite/NO with UV light and experiments were done in the presence and absence of ammonium sulfate seed particles. Aerosol formation and growth was monitored using size distributions obtained from a Differential Mobility Analyzer and a Condensation Nucleus Counter. A Gas Chromatograph with an FID detector was used to monitor the toluene loss and a Chemiluminescence Analyzer measured the NO concentration. As expected the ozone concentration was found to be extremely low so the complicating ozone reactions are minimized. The experimental yields (the ratio between the organic aerosol mass formed and the mass of toluene reacted) were found to cluster around 10% but there were cases where the yields were as low as 1.7% and as high as 20%. The on-going work is focused on understanding the factors leading to the variability of experimental yields and on analyzing the data in the framework of the current gas/particle partitioning theory.

  7. Light sterile neutrino sensitivity of 163Ho experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastaldo, L.; Giunti, C.; Zavanin, E. M.

    2016-06-01

    We explore the sensitivity of 163Ho electron capture experiments to neutrino masses in the standard framework of three-neutrino mixing and in the framework of 3+1 neutrino mixing with a sterile neutrino which mixes with the three standard active neutrinos, as indicated by the anomalies found in short-baseline neutrino oscillations experiments. We calculate the sensitivity to neutrino masses and mixing for different values of the energy resolution of the detectors, of the unresolved pileup fraction and of the total statistics of events, considering the expected values of these parameters in the two planned stages of the ECHo project (ECHo-1k and ECHo-1M). We show that an extension of the ECHo-1M experiment with the possibility to collect 1016 events will be competitive with the KATRIN experiment. This statistics will allow to explore part of the 3+1 mixing parameter space indicated by the global analysis of short-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. In order to cover all the allowed region, a statistics of about 1017 events will be needed.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulations of ion solvation by flexible-boundary QM/MM: on-the-fly partial charge transfer between QM and MM subsystems.

    PubMed

    Pezeshki, Soroosh; Lin, Hai

    2014-09-15

    The flexible-boundary (FB) quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) scheme accounts for partial charge transfer between the QM and MM subsystems. Previous calculations have demonstrated excellent performance of FB-QM/MM in geometry optimizations. This article reports an implementation to extend FB-QM/MM to molecular dynamics simulations. To prevent atoms from getting unreasonably close, which can lead to polarization catastrophe, empirical correcting functions are introduced to provide additive penalty energies for the involved atom pairs and to improve the descriptions of the repulsive exchange forces in FB-QM/MM calculations. Test calculations are carried out for chloride, lithium, sodium, and ammonium ions solvated in water. Comparisons with conventional QM/MM calculations suggest that the FB treatment provides reasonably good results for the charge distributions of the atoms in the QM subsystems and for the solvation shell structural properties, albeit smaller QM subsystems have been used in the FB-QM/MM dynamics simulations. PMID:25056247

  9. CaPTC Biennial Meetings

    Cancer.gov

    CaPTC hosts the 'Biennial Science of Global Prostate Cancer Disparities in Black Men' conference to address the growing global public health problem of prostate cancer among Black men in industrialized and developing countries.

  10. Characteristics of Ca2+- and Mg2+-induced tension development in chemically skinned smooth muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Chemically skinned fibers from guinea pig taenia caecum were prepared by saponin treatment to study the smooth muscle contractile system in a state as close to the living state as posible. The skinned fibers showed tension development with an increase of Ca2+ in the solution, the threshold tension occurring as 5 X 10(-7) M Ca2+. The maximal tension induced with 10(-4) M Ca2+ was as large and rapid as the potassium-induced contracture in the intact fibers. The slope of the pCa tension curve was less steep than that of skeletal muscle fibers and shifted in the direction of lower pCa with an increase of MgATP. The presence of greater than 1 mM Mg2+ was required for Ca2+-induced contraction in the skinned fibers as well as for the activation of ATPase and superprecipitation in smooth muscle myosin B. Mg2+ above 2 mM caused a slow tension development by itself in the absence of Ca2+. Such a Mg2+-induced tension showed a linear relation to concentrations up to 8 mM in the presence of MgATP. Increase of MgATP concentration revealed a monophasic response without inhibition of Ca2+-induced tension development, unlike the biphasic response in striated muscle. When MgATP was removed from the relaxing solution, the tension developed slowly and slightly, even though the Mg2+ concentrations was fixed at 2 mM. These results suggest a substantial difference in the mode of actin-myosin interaction between smooth and skeletal muscle. PMID:151731

  11. Dietary calcium attenuates platelet aggregation and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otsuka, K.; Watanabe, M.; Yue, Q.; McCarron, D. A.; Hatton, D.

    1997-01-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are known to be blood pressure sensitive to dietary calcium. The effects of dietary calcium on platelet aggregation and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization were assessed by turbidimetric methods and fura-2 methods, respectively, in washed platelets of SHR. Ca2+ ATPase activity was examined in aortic membrane fractions. Six weeks of dietary calcium supplementation attenuated the increase of systolic blood pressure (SBP 199 +/- 16 v 170 +/- 9 mm Hg, P < .001) and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation (84.5 +/- 3.7 v 73.7 +/- 7.4%, P < .004) at 9 weeks of age. The ionomycin-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) peak in the absence of external Ca2+, which reflects [Ca2+]i storage size, and thrombin-evoked [Ca2+]i release from [Ca2+]i storage were decreased by 2.0% Ca diet (472 +/- 55 v 370 +/- 23 nmol/L, P < .001, 339 +/- 29 v 278 +/- 33 nmol/L, P < .002). In addition, SBP was positively correlated with platelet aggregation (r = 0.703, P = .0088), thrombin-evoked [Ca2+]i (r = 0.739, P = .0044), and ionomycin-induced [Ca2+]i (r = 0.591, P = .0415), respectively. However, there was no significant effect of dietary calcium on Ca2+-ATPase activity in aortic membranes. These results suggest that dietary calcium supplementation had a beneficial effect on platelets of SHR by attenuating [Ca2+]i mobilization from [Ca2+]i storage. The hypotensive effect of dietary calcium might be associated with attenuated [Ca2+]i mobilization in SHR.

  12. Isotope fractionation during Ca exchange on clay minerals in a marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ockert, C.; Gussone, N.; Kaufhold, S.; Teichert, B. M. A.

    2013-07-01

    In order to interpret marine porewater profiles it is mandatory to understand the behavior of calcium (Ca) and its isotopes during cation exchange in marine sediments. It has been proposed that the exchange of adsorbed Ca2+ for ammonium, which is a product of organic matter decomposition, results in the releases of light Ca from clay minerals into the porewater (Teichert et al., 2009). In order to investigate the effect of ammonium on Ca isotope fractionation, experiments with clay mineral separates (illites, montmorillonite, kaolinite) and natural marine sediments from the North Atlantic (Integrated Ocean Drilling Project Site U1306A) in artificial seawater were carried out at different temperatures (4, 14, 21 °C) and ammonium concentrations (100, 140, 180 mM). The results of the adsorption experiments, carried out in artificial seawater, show that during adsorption of Ca2+ the light Ca isotopes are favored over the heavier Ca isotopes. This effect is most prominent for the illite samples (1000lnα = -0.82 to -1.15) and kaolinite sample (1000lnα = -1.23 to -2.76), whereas montmorillonite and the natural marine sediments show smaller degrees of fractionation from the fluid in the range of -0.46 to +0.06‰. Determination of the desorbed Ca2+ is based on the adsorbed Ca2+ left on the exchanger and reveals that the desorbed Ca2+ has a significantly different isotopic signature from the surrounding fluid. In general, the degree of Ca isotope fractionation is dependent on the ammonium concentration, and does not show significant influence of temperature. Modeling the Ca2+ desorption induced by ammonium adsorption demonstrates, that according to the prevailing mineralogy and porewater:sediment ratio, desorbed Ca2+ has the potential to shift the porewater isotopy by up to -2.5‰ and needs to be considered when interpreting Ca isotope porewater profiles.

  13. CaMKII-dependent SR Ca leak contributes to doxorubicin-induced impaired Ca handling in isolated cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sag, Can M.; Köhler, Anne C.; Anderson, Mark E.; Backs, Johannes; Maier, Lars S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents, but cardiotoxicity limits DOX therapy. Although the mechanisms are not entirely understood, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear to be involved in DOX cardiotoxicity. Ca/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) can be activated by ROS through oxidation and is known to contribute to myocardial dysfunction through Ca leakage from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Rationale We hypothesized that CaMKII contributes to DOX-induced defects in intracellular Ca ([Ca]i) handling. Methods Cardiac myocytes were isolated from wild-type (WT) adult rat hearts and from mouse hearts lacking the predominant myocardial CaMKII isoform (CaMKIIδ−/−, KO) vs. WT. Isolated cardiomyocytes were investigated 30 min after DOX (10 µmol/L) superfusion, using epifluorescence and confocal microscopy. Intracellular ROS-generation ([ROS]i) and [Ca]i handling properties were assessed. In a subset of experiments, KN-93 or AIP (each 1 µmol/L) were used to inhibit CaMKII. Melatonin (Mel, 100 µmol/L) served as ROS-scavenger. Western blots were performed to determine the amount of CaMKII phosphorylation and oxidation. Results DOX increased [ROS]i and led to significant diastolic [Ca]i overload in rat myocytes. This was associated with reduced [Ca]i transients, a 5.8-fold increased diastolic SR Ca leak and diminished SR Ca content. ROS-scavenging partially rescued Ca handling. Western blots revealed increased CaMKII phosphorylation, but not CaMKII oxidation after DOX. Pharmacological CaMKII inhibition attenuated diastolic [Ca]i overload after DOX superfusion and led to partially restored [Ca]i transients and SR Ca content, presumably due to reduced Ca spark frequency. In line with this concept, isoform-specific CaMKIIδ-KO attenuated diastolic [Ca]i overload and Ca spark frequency. Conclusions DOX exposure induces CaMKII-dependent SR Ca leakage, which partially contributes to impaired cellular [Ca]i homeostasis

  14. Postsynaptic long-term enhancement (LTE) by dopamine may be mediated by Ca2+ and calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Mochida, S; Libet, B

    1990-04-01

    Long-term enhancement (LTE), of postsynaptic slow depolarizing responses to a muscarinic agonist (MCh), follows a brief exposure of the rabbit superior cervical ganglion to another transmitter, dopamine (DA). Either reduction of external Ca2+ (to 1.0 mM or 0.2 mM) or presence of a specific calmodulin antagonist (calmidazolium at 5 microM) blocked DA induction of this LTE. However, unlike LTP in hippocampus, induction of LTE is not mediated by depolarization-dependent influx of Ca2+.

  15. Continuous-wave and high repetition rate Q-switched operation of Ho:YLF laser in-band pumped by a linearly polarized Tm:fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Jacek; Zendzian, Waldemar; Jabczynski, Jan Karol; Swiderski, Jacek

    2014-11-01

    A study of Ho:YLF laser in continuous-wave (CW) and Q-switched operation, single-pass end-pumped by a Tm:fiber laser is presented. The research was made for two crystals of the same length and with different Ho dopant concentrations (0.5 at%, 3×3×30 mm3 and 1.0 at%, 5×5×30 mm3). The lasers operated on π-polarization. The lasers based on both crystals were examined under the same experimental circumstances. At room temperature, for an output coupling transmission of 40%, the maximum CW output powers of 11.5 W (0.5 at%) and 14.5 W (1.0 at%) were achieved, corresponding to slope efficiencies of 40.9% and 53.4% and optical-to-optical efficiencies of 35.4% and 44.6% with respect to the incident pump power, respectively. For a Q-switched operation, in a CW pumping regime, the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) was changed from 1 to 10 kHz. For this case, the maximum average output power of 14.2 W at the PRF of 10 kHz was obtained for a higher holmium-doping concentration crystal. For 1 kHz PRF, pulse energies of 5.7 mJ with a 11 ns FWHM pulse width corresponding to almost 520 kW peak power were recorded. The laser operated at the wavelength of 2050.08 nm with the FWHM line width of 0.86 nm delivering a near-diffraction-limited beam with M2 values of 1.05 and 1.09 in the horizontal and vertical directions, respectively.

  16. Assessing known pathways for HO2 loss in aqueous atmospheric aerosols: Regional and global impacts on tropospheric oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornton, Joel A.; Jaeglé, Lyatt; McNeill, V. Faye

    2008-03-01

    We present a study of the potential importance of known reaction pathways for HO2 loss in atmospheric aerosols. As a baseline case, we calculate the reaction probability for HO2 loss by its self-reaction in aqueous particles. Detailed calculations assessed the effects of aerosol pH, temperature, particle size, and aqueous phase diffusion limitations on the rate of HO2 loss by this process. An algebraic parameterization of the reaction probability, γHO2, due to self-reaction is valid for aerosol pH < 6 and the existence of a homogeneous gas-phase HOx source greater than 1 × 105 molec cm-3 s-1. In this formulation γHO2 depends strongly on particle phase, size, pH and temperature; the latter causing γHO2 > 0.1 in the upper troposphere and γHO2 < 0.01 in the extra-polar lower troposphere. We contrast the self-reaction pathway with catalytic oxidation by dissolved Cu ions. Using IMPROVE network data we assess the atmospheric importance and uncertainties associated with the Cu pathway. Simulations of tropospheric chemistry were performed using the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model with different parameterizations of γHO2. Relative to simulations where γHO2 = 0 for all aerosol types, assuming that only the aqueous-phase self-reaction proceeds on pollution and sea salt particles causes global annual mean differences in surface OH, HO2, and H2O2 of -1, -2, and +2%, respectively. These minor effects of heterogeneous loss are significantly different from a simulation assuming γHO2 = 0.2 on all particles, as is currently recommended, with implications for predictions of regional HOx levels, ozone production rates and their sensitivity to NOx.

  17. [CA 125--a tumor marker?].

    PubMed

    Pabst, T; Ludwig, C

    1995-06-17

    Tumor markers are useful tools in monitoring malignancies postoperatively or under hormone-/chemotherapy. In contrast, they usually lack diagnostic relevance and uncritical use may result in confusing situations. We describe three cases of diagnostic determinations of the tumor marker CA 125 resulting in subsequent partially invasive procedures. Based on these three cases, serum CA 125 levels were examined in 49 patients with abdominal diseases. We found CA 125 to be less a tumor product than an unspecific expression of stimulated mesothelial cells of the peritoneum. CA 125 was a marker for ascites (16 of 16 patients) and an indicator of infra-diaphragmatic involvement in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (11 of 12 patients). Furthermore, 5 of 6 patients with inflammatory abdominal diseases showed elevated CA 125 levels, as did 13 of 15 patients with solid abdominal tumors of different histology (all non-ovarian cancer, no ascites). In conclusion, CA 125 remains a good marker for follow-up of ovarian cancer, but should not be used for diagnosis of abdominal processes.

  18. Organics Substantially Reduce HO2 Uptake onto Aerosols Containing Transition Metal ions.

    PubMed

    Lakey, Pascale S J; George, Ingrid J; Baeza-Romero, Maria T; Whalley, Lisa K; Heard, Dwayne E

    2016-03-10

    A HO2 mass accommodation coefficient of α = 0.23 ± 0.07 was measured onto submicron copper(II)-doped ammonium sulfate aerosols at a relative humidity of 60 ± 3%, at 293 ± 2 K and at an initial HO2 concentration of ∼ 1 × 10(9) molecules cm(-3) by using an aerosol flow tube coupled to a sensitive fluorescence assay by gas expansion (FAGE) HO2 detection system. The effect upon the HO2 uptake coefficient γ of adding different organic species (malonic acid, citric acid, 1,2-diaminoethane, tartronic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and oxalic acid) into the copper(II)-doped aerosols was investigated. The HO2 uptake coefficient decreased steadily from the mass accommodation value to γ = 0.008 ± 0.009 when EDTA was added in a one-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II) ions, and to γ = 0.003 ± 0.004 when oxalic acid was added into the aerosol in a ten-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II). EDTA binds strongly to copper(II) ions, potentially making them unavailable for catalytic destruction of HO2, and could also be acting as a surfactant or changing the viscosity of the aerosol. The addition of oxalic acid to the aerosol potentially forms low-volatility copper-oxalate complexes that reduce the uptake of HO2 either by changing the viscosity of the aerosol or by causing precipitation out of the aerosol forming a coating. It is likely that there is a high enough oxalate to copper(II) ion ratio in many types of atmospheric aerosols to decrease the HO2 uptake coefficient. No observable change in the HO2 uptake coefficient was measured when the other organic species (malonic acid, citric acid, 1,2-diaminoethane, and tartronic acid) were added in a ten-to-one molar ratio with the copper(II) ions. PMID:26484935

  19. Development of a group contribution method to predict aqueous phase hydroxyl radical (HO*) reaction rate constants.

    PubMed

    Minakata, Daisuke; Li, Ke; Westerhoff, Paul; Crittenden, John

    2009-08-15

    The hydroxyl radical (HO*) is a strong oxidant that reacts with electron-rich sites of organic compounds and initiates complex chain mechanisms. In order to help understand the reaction mechanisms, a rule-based model was previously developed to predict the reaction pathways. For a kinetic model, there is a need to develop a rate constant estimator that predicts the rate constants for a variety of organic compounds. In this study, a group contribution method (GCM) is developed to predict the aqueous phase HO* rate constants for the following reaction mechanisms: (1) H-atom abstraction, (2) HO* addition to alkenes, (3) HO* addition to aromatic compounds, and (4) HO* interaction with sulfur (S)-, nitrogen (N)-, or phosphorus (P)-atom-containing compounds. The GCM hypothesizes that an observed experimental rate constant for a given organic compound is the combined rate of all elementary reactions involving HO*, which can be estimated using the Arrhenius activation energy, E(a), and temperature. Each E(a) for those elementary reactions can be comprised of two parts: (1) a base part that includes a reactive bond in each reaction mechanism and (2) contributions from its neighboring functional groups. The GCM includes 66 group rate constants and 80 group contribution factors, which characterize each HO* reaction mechanism with steric effects of the chemical structure groups and impacts of the neighboring functional groups, respectively. Literature-reported experimental HO* rate constants for 310 and 124 compounds were used for calibration and prediction, respectively. The genetic algorithms were used to determine the group rate constants and group contribution factors. The group contribution factors for H-atom abstraction and HO* addition to the aromatic compounds were found to linearly correlate with the Taft constants, sigma*, and electrophilic substituent parameters, sigma+, respectively. The best calibrations for 83% (257 rate constants) and predictions for 62% (77

  20. Determination of equilibrium constants for the reaction between acetone and HO2 using infrared kinetic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Grieman, Fred J; Noell, Aaron C; Davis-Van Atta, Casey; Okumura, Mitchio; Sander, Stanley P

    2011-09-29

    The reaction between the hydroperoxy radical, HO(2), and acetone may play an important role in acetone removal and the budget of HO(x) radicals in the upper troposphere. We measured the equilibrium constants of this reaction over the temperature range of 215-272 K at an overall pressure of 100 Torr using a flow tube apparatus and laser flash photolysis to produce HO(2). The HO(2) concentration was monitored as a function of time by near-IR diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy. The resulting [HO(2)] decay curves in the presence of acetone are characterized by an immediate decrease in initial [HO(2)] followed by subsequent decay. These curves are interpreted as a rapid (<100 μs) equilibrium reaction between acetone and the HO(2) radical that occurs on time scales faster than the time resolution of the apparatus, followed by subsequent reactions. This separation of time scales between the initial equilibrium and ensuing reactions enabled the determination of the equilibrium constant with values ranging from 4.0 × 10(-16) to 7.7 × 10(-18) cm(3) molecule(-1) for T = 215-272 K. Thermodynamic parameters for the reaction determined from a second-law fit of our van't Hoff plot were Δ(r)H°(245) = -35.4 ± 2.0 kJ mol(-1) and Δ(r)S°(245) = -88.2 ± 8.5 J mol(-1) K(-1). Recent ab initio calculations predict that the reaction proceeds through a prereactive hydrogen-bonded molecular complex (HO(2)-acetone) with subsequent isomerization to a hydroxy-peroxy radical, 2-hydroxyisopropylperoxy (2-HIPP). The calculations differ greatly in the energetics of the complex and the peroxy radical, as well as the transition state for isomerization, leading to significant differences in their predictions of the extent of this reaction at tropospheric temperatures. The current results are consistent with equilibrium formation of the hydrogen-bonded molecular complex on a short time scale (100 μs). Formation of the hydrogen-bonded complex will have a negligible impact on the